WorldWideScience

Sample records for resistant dr rats

  1. Depletion of RT6.1+ T lymphocytes induces diabetes in resistant biobreeding/Worcester (BB/W) rats

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the role of RT6+ T cells in the pathogenesis of diabetes in BB/W rats, we treated animals from the diabetes-resistant (DR) subline with anti-RT6.1 lymphocytotoxic mAb. This depleted greater than 95% of peripheral RT6+ T cells but did not substantially reduce levels of circulating T cells or the in vitro response of spleen cells to mitogen. Treatment of 30-d-old DR BB/W rats in this way: induced insulitis and diabetes, rendered nondiabetic RT6-depleted DR rats susceptible to the...

  2. GenoType HelicoDR test in the determination of antimicrobial resistance of Helicobacter pylori in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Won; Kim, Nayoung; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Park, Ji Hyun; Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Jung Mogg; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2014-09-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of Helicobacter pylori is most important factor in eradication success. GenoType HelicoDR test has been developed for rapid detection of antimicrobial resistance. The present study evaluated the clinical usefulness of GenoType HelicoDR test in Korea. To detect 23S rRNA for clarithromycin resistance and gyrA mutations for fluoroquinolone resistance, both DNA sequencing after minimal inhibitory test (MIC) and GenoType HelicoDR test were performed in H. pylori isolates from the gastric mucosa of 101 patients. The eradication results of clarithromycin and moxifloxacin-containing triple therapy were evaluated by the 23S rRNA and gyrA mutations. For 42 isolates with A2143G mutation by GenoType HelicoDR, 83.3% (35/42) of concordance rate was estimated with DNA sequencing method and 85.7% (36/42) for MIC test. For 43 isolates with N87K mutation by GenoType HelicoDR, 71.1% (31/43) of concordance rate was estimated with DNA sequencing and 88.4% (38/43) for MIC test. The sensitivity and specificity of GenoType HelicoDR test in determination of 23S rRNA mutation were 94.9% and 87.1%, and those of gyrA 98.2% and 80.0%. The sensitivity and specificity of GenoType HelicoDR test in determination of clarithromycin resistance based on MIC test were 55.0% and 80.0%, for fluoroquinolone 74.4% and 70.0%. GenoType HelicoDR test is useful to determine mutations responsible for clarithromycin or fluoroquinolone-containing eradication failure but has a limitation for the clinical applicability in determination of resistance.

  3. Dr. Haakon Sæthre: a Norwegian neuroscientist and his resistance against Nazi Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidman, Lawrence A

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Haakon Sæthre was a leader of Norwegian neurology and psychiatry. He was resourceful, compassionate and had immense pride in his independent homeland. He described Sæthre-Chotzen syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly type III). When Nazi Germany occupied Norway during World War II, Sæthre fearlessly and actively resisted, from revoking his medical association membership, to hiding persecuted Jews as patients in his psychiatric ward and aiding in their escape to Sweden, to managing the largest "illegal" food warehouse in Oslo with Danish humanitarian aid. As a prominent and noticeable citizen, he was arrested and executed by the Nazis in reprisal for the resistance's assassination of a hated Norwegian Nazi. His legacy lives on in Norway, where he was honored by a scholarship fund, a portrait and multiple plaques at Ullevål Hospital, and a street and memorial statue in his hometown. He was a hero and should be remembered by all who practice neurology.

  4. Long-term characterization of the diet-induced obese and diet-resistant rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas Nygaard; Hansen, Gitte; Paulsen, Sarah Juel

    2010-01-01

    The availability of useful animal models reflecting the human obesity syndrome is crucial in the search for novel compounds for the pharmacological treatment of obesity. In the current study, we have performed an extensive characterization of the obesity syndrome in a polygenetic animal model......, namely the selectively bred diet-induced obese (DIO) and diet-resistant (DR) rat strains. We show that they constitute useful models of the human obesity syndrome. DIO and DR rats were fed either a high-energy (HE) or a standard chow (Chow) diet from weaning to 9 months of age. Metabolic characterization...... including blood biochemistry and glucose homeostasis was examined at 2, 3, 6, and 9 months of age. Furthermore, in 6-month-old HE-fed DIO rats, the anti-obesity effects of liraglutide and sibutramine were examined in a 28-day study. Only HE-fed DIO rats developed visceral obesity, hyperleptinemia...

  5. Dr. Lewis Kitchener Dahl, the Dahl Rats and the ‘Inconvenient truth’ abou the Genetics of Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Bina

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Lewis K. Dahl is regarded as an iconic figure in the field of hypertension research. During the 1960s and 1970s he published several seminal articles in the field that shed light on the relationship between salt and hypertension. Further, the Dahl rat models of hypertension that he developed by a selective breeding strategy are among the most widely used models for hypertension research. To this day, genetic studies using this model are ongoing in our laboratory. While Dr. Dahl is known for his contributions to the field of hypertension, very little, if any, of his personal history is documented. This article details a short biography of Dr. Lewis Dahl, the history behind the development of the Dahl rats and presents an overview of the results obtained through the genetic analysis of the Dahl rat as an experimental model to study the inheritance of hypertension. PMID:25646295

  6. Incidence of multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant and pan-drug-resistant bacteria in children hospitalized at Dr. Hasan Sadikin general hospital Bandung Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrizain, R.; Suryaningrat, F.; Alam, A.; Setiabudi, D.

    2018-03-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become a global issue, with 700,000 deaths attributable to multidrug-resistance (MDR) occurring each year. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show rapidly increasing rates of infection due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The aim of the study isto describe the incidence of MDR, extensively drug-resistant (XDR) and pan drug-resistant (PDR) in Enterococcus spp., Staphylococcus aureus, K. pneumonia, Acinetobacter baumanii, P. aeruginosin, and Enterobacter spp. (ESKAPE) pathogens in children admitted to Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital. All pediatric patients having blood culture drawn from January 2015 to December 2016 were retrospectively studied. Data include the number of drawn blood culture, number of positive results, type of bacteria, sensitivity pattern. International standard definitions for acquired resistance by ECDC and CDC was used as definitions for MDR, XDR and PDR bacteria. From January 2015 to December 2016, 299 from 2.542 (11.7%) blood culture was positive, with Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp., respectively 5, 6, 24, 5, 20 with total 60 (20%). The MDR and XDR pathogen found were 47 and 13 patients, respectively.

  7. Chronic hyperinsulinemia contributes to insulin resistance under dietary restriction in association with altered lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Ippei; Tanimoto, Keiichi; Akiyama, Nobuteru; Naya, Noriyuki; Fujieda, Kumiko; Iwasaki, Takanori; Yukioka, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    Hyperinsulinemia is widely thought to be a compensatory response to insulin resistance, whereas its potentially causal role in the progression of insulin resistance remains to be established. Here, we aimed to examine whether hyperinsulinemia could affect the progression of insulin resistance in Zucker fatty diabetic (ZDF) rats. Male ZDF rats at 8 wk of age were fed a diet ad libitum (AL) or dietary restriction (DR) of either 15 or 30% from AL feeding over 6 wk. Insulin sensitivity was determined by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. ZDF rats in the AL group progressively developed hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia by 10 wk of age, and then plasma insulin rapidly declined to nearly normal levels by 12 wk of age. Compared with AL group, DR groups showed delayed onset of hyperglycemia and persistent hyperinsulinemia, leading to weight gain and raised plasma triglycerides and free fatty acids by 14 wk of age. Notably, insulin sensitivity was significantly reduced in the DR group rather than the AL group and inversely correlated with plasma levels of insulin and triglyceride but not glucose. Moreover, enhanced lipid deposition and upregulation of genes involved in lipogenesis were detected in liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissues of the DR group rather than the AL group. Alternatively, continuous hyperinsulinemia induced by insulin pellet implantation produced a decrease in insulin sensitivity in ZDF rats. These results suggest that chronic hyperinsulinemia may lead to the progression of insulin resistance under DR conditions in association with altered lipid metabolism in peripheral tissues in ZDF rats. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Evaluation of a New Test, GenoType HelicoDR, for Molecular Detection of Antibiotic Resistance in Helicobacter pylori▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambau, Emmanuelle; Allerheiligen, Vera; Coulon, Céline; Corbel, Céline; Lascols, Christine; Deforges, Lionel; Soussy, Claude-James; Delchier, Jean-Charles; Megraud, Francis

    2009-01-01

    The eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori by standard therapy is decreasing due to antibiotic resistance, mainly to clarithromycin. Our aim was to provide a new molecular test to guide the treatment of new and relapsed cases. We first studied 126 H. pylori strains for phenotypic (MIC) and genotypic resistance to clarithromycin (rrl mutation) and levofloxacin (gyrA mutation) and then developed a DNA strip genotyping test on the basis of the correlation results and literature data. Clinical strains (n = 92) and gastric biopsy specimens containing H. pylori (n = 105) were tested blindly with the new molecular test GenoType HelicoDR. The presence of mutations or the absence of hybridization with wild-type sequences was predictive, in rrl for clarithromycin resistance in 91 cases (mostly the A2147G mutation) and in gyrA for levofloxacin resistance in 58 cases (mutations at codon 87 or 91). Genotyping revealed a mix of genotypes in 33% of the cases, reflecting a coinfection or selection for resistant mutants. The sensitivity and specificity of detecting resistance were 94% and 99% for clarithromycin and 87% and 98.5% for levofloxacin, respectively. The concordance scores were 0.96 for clarithromycin and 0.94 for levofloxacin. With global resistance rates of 46% for clarithromycin and 25% for levofloxacin, which were observed for consecutive positive biopsy specimens from 2007 and 2008, the positive and negative predictive values for detecting resistance were 99% and 94% for clarithromycin and 96% and 96% for fluoroquinolone. GenoType HelicoDR is efficient at detecting mutations predictive of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori when applied to strains or directly to gastric biopsy specimens. PMID:19759218

  9. Evaluation of a new test, genotype HelicoDR, for molecular detection of antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambau, Emmanuelle; Allerheiligen, Vera; Coulon, Céline; Corbel, Céline; Lascols, Christine; Deforges, Lionel; Soussy, Claude-James; Delchier, Jean-Charles; Megraud, Francis

    2009-11-01

    The eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori by standard therapy is decreasing due to antibiotic resistance, mainly to clarithromycin. Our aim was to provide a new molecular test to guide the treatment of new and relapsed cases. We first studied 126 H. pylori strains for phenotypic (MIC) and genotypic resistance to clarithromycin (rrl mutation) and levofloxacin (gyrA mutation) and then developed a DNA strip genotyping test on the basis of the correlation results and literature data. Clinical strains (n = 92) and gastric biopsy specimens containing H. pylori (n = 105) were tested blindly with the new molecular test GenoType HelicoDR. The presence of mutations or the absence of hybridization with wild-type sequences was predictive, in rrl for clarithromycin resistance in 91 cases (mostly the A2147G mutation) and in gyrA for levofloxacin resistance in 58 cases (mutations at codon 87 or 91). Genotyping revealed a mix of genotypes in 33% of the cases, reflecting a coinfection or selection for resistant mutants. The sensitivity and specificity of detecting resistance were 94% and 99% for clarithromycin and 87% and 98.5% for levofloxacin, respectively. The concordance scores were 0.96 for clarithromycin and 0.94 for levofloxacin. With global resistance rates of 46% for clarithromycin and 25% for levofloxacin, which were observed for consecutive positive biopsy specimens from 2007 and 2008, the positive and negative predictive values for detecting resistance were 99% and 94% for clarithromycin and 96% and 96% for fluoroquinolone. GenoType HelicoDR is efficient at detecting mutations predictive of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori when applied to strains or directly to gastric biopsy specimens.

  10. DR_SEQAN: a PC/Windows-based software to evaluate drug resistance using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menéndez-Arias Luis

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genotypic assays based on DNA sequencing of part or the whole reverse transcriptase (RT- and protease (PR-coding regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 genome have become part of the routine clinical management of HIV-infected individuals. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to complex interactions between mutations found in viral genes. Results DR_SEQAN is a tool to analyze RT and PR sequences. The program output includes a list containing all of the amino acid changes found in the query sequence in comparison with the sequence of a wild-type HIV-1 strain. Translation of codons containing nucleotide mixtures can result in potential ambiguities or heterogeneities in the amino acid sequence. The program identifies all possible combinations of 2 or 3 amino acids that derive from translation of triplets containing nucleotide mixtures. In addition, when ambiguities affect codons relevant for drug resistance, DR_SEQAN allows the user to select the appropriate mutation to be considered by the program's drug resistance interpretation algorithm. Resistance is predicted using a rule-based algorithm, whose efficiency and accuracy has been tested with a large set of drug susceptibility data. Drug resistance predictions given by DR_SEQAN were consistent with phenotypic data and coherent with predictions provided by other publicly available algorithms. In addition, the program output provides two tables showing published drug susceptibility data and references for mutations and combinations of mutations found in the analyzed sequence. These data are retrieved from an integrated relational database, implemented in Microsoft Access, which includes two sets of non-redundant core tables (one for combinations of mutations in the PR and the other for combinations in the RT. Conclusion DR_SEQAN is an easy to use off-line application that provides expert advice on HIV genotypic resistance interpretation. It is

  11. WTC rat has unique characteristics such as resistant to streptozotocin

    OpenAIRE

    Nagaki, Yoshiaki; Ito, Koichi; Kuwahara, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Because we found that WTC rats might be resistant to streptozotocin (STZ), we have elucidated the mechanisms of resistant to the diabetogenic effects of STZ in the WTC rats. Dose response to STZ was evaluated with glucose levels. No significant changes in glucose level to STZ administration were observed in WTC rats. Insulin secretion by suppling glucose was preserved in WTC rats even after STZ administration. Although there was no significant difference in gene expression of both GLUT2 and K...

  12. Previously undescribed plasmids recovered from activated sludge confer tetracycline resistance and phenotypic changes to Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyerim; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Choi, In-Geol; Park, Woojun

    2014-02-01

    We used culture-dependent and culture-independent methods to extract previously undescribed plasmids harboring tetracycline (TC) resistance genes from activated sludge. The extracted plasmids were transformed into naturally competent Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 to recover a non-Escherichia coli-based plasmid. The transformed cells showed 80-100-fold higher TC resistance than the wild-type strain. Restriction length polymorphism performed using 30 transformed cells showed four different types of plasmids. Illumina-based whole sequencing of the four plasmids identified three previously unreported plasmids and one previously reported plasmid. All plasmids carried TC resistance-related genes (tetL, tetH), tetracycline transcriptional regulators (tetR), and mobilization-related genes. As per expression analysis, TC resistance genes were functional in the presence of TC. The recovered plasmids showed mosaic gene acquisition through horizontal gene transfer. Membrane fluidity, hydrophobicity, biofilm formation, motility, growth rate, sensitivity to stresses, and quorum sensing signals of the transformed cells were different from those of the wild-type cells. Plasmid-bearing cells seemed to have an energy burden for maintaining and expressing plasmid genes. Our data showed that acquisition of TC resistance through plasmid uptake is related to loss of biological fitness. Thus, cells acquiring antibiotic resistance plasmids can survive in the presence of antibiotics, but must pay ecological costs.

  13. Maternal Western diet increases adiposity even in male offspring of obesity-resistant rat dams: early endocrine risk markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frihauf, Jennifer B; Fekete, Éva M; Nagy, Tim R; Levin, Barry E; Zorrilla, Eric P

    2016-12-01

    Maternal overnutrition or associated complications putatively mediate the obesogenic effects of perinatal high-fat diet on developing offspring. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a Western diet developmental environment increases adiposity not only in male offspring from obesity-prone (DIO) mothers, but also in those from obesity-resistant (DR) dams, implicating a deleterious role for the Western diet per se. Selectively bred DIO and DR female rats were fed chow (17% kcal fat) or Western diet (32%) for 54 days before mating and, thereafter, through weaning. As intended, despite chow-like caloric intake, Western diet increased prepregnancy weight gain and circulating leptin levels in DIO, but not DR, dams. Yet, in both genotypes, maternal Western diet increased the weight and adiposity of preweanlings, as early as in DR offspring, and increased plasma leptin, insulin, and adiponectin of weanlings. Although body weight normalized with chow feeding during adolescence, young adult Western diet offspring subsequently showed decreased energy expenditure and, in DR offspring, decreased lipid utilization as a fuel substrate. By mid-adulthood, maternal Western diet DR offspring ate more chow, weighed more, and were fatter than controls. Thus, maternal Western diet covertly programmed increased adiposity in childhood and adulthood, disrupted relations of energy regulatory hormones with body fat, and decreased energy expenditure in offspring of lean, genetically obesity-resistant mothers. Maternal Western diet exposure alone, without maternal obesity or overnutrition, can promote offspring weight gain. Copyright © 2016 Frihauf et al.

  14. Use of the D-R model to define trends in the emergence of Ceftazidime-resistant Escherichia coli in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of the D-R model for defining trends in the appearance of Ceftazidime-resistant Escherichia coli. Methods: Actual data related to the manifestation of Ceftazidime-resistant E.coli spanning years 1996-2009 were collected from the China National Knowledge Internet (CN...

  15. Vitamin K requirement in Danish anticoagulant-resistant Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette D.; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Nielsen, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement......Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement...

  16. WTC rat has unique characteristics such as resistant to streptozotocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaki, Yoshiaki; Ito, Koichi; Kuwahara, Masayoshi

    2016-12-01

    Because we found that WTC rats might be resistant to streptozotocin (STZ), we have elucidated the mechanisms of resistant to the diabetogenic effects of STZ in the WTC rats. Dose response to STZ was evaluated with glucose levels. No significant changes in glucose level to STZ administration were observed in WTC rats. Insulin secretion by suppling glucose was preserved in WTC rats even after STZ administration. Although there was no significant difference in gene expression of both GLUT2 and Kir6.2, which were involved in STZ resistance, between WTC rats and Wistar rats, the expression of metallothionein 2a in pancreas and liver to STZ administration of WTC rats was significantly higher than that of Wistar rats. Moreover, alloxan did not induce diabetes in WTC rats as same as STZ. These results suggest that WTC rats might have powerful antioxidant property to protect β cells in pancreas. Because the STZ-resistant property is very close characteristics to human beings, WTC rats will become a useful animal model in diabetic researches.

  17. August rats are more resistant to arrhythmogenic effect of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion than Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, L M; Kirillina, T N; Pshennikova, M G; Arkhipenko, Yu V

    2002-06-01

    As differentiated from Wistar rats, myocardial ischemia and reperfusion produce no ventricular fibrillation in August rats. Pretreatment with nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nw-nitro-L-arginine increased mortality rate in August rats with acute myocardial infarction from 20 to 40%. Under these conditions mortality rate in Wistar rats increased from 50 to 71%. Interstrain differences in the resistance of these animals to the arrhythmogenic effect of ischemia are probably associated with higher activity of the nitric oxide system in August rats compared to Wistar rats.

  18. Genetically determined differences in the resistance to myocardial infarction in Wistar and August rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, L M; Saltykova, V A; Pshennikova, M G

    2001-06-01

    In intact August rats, the cardiac contractile function at rest was by 76% higher than in Wistar rats, while their hearts, both intact and after acute myocardial infarction, were more resistant to isometric load than the hearts of Wistar rats. Postinfarction mortality in August rats was 18% vs. 70% in Wistar rats. Adrenoreactivity of the myocardium in August rats was decreased compared to that in Wistar rats. These peculiarities can determine high resistance of August rats to myocardial infarction.

  19. Dynamic resistance training decreases sympathetic tone in hypertensive ovariectomized rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimojo, G.L.; Palma, R.K.; Brito, J.O.; Sanches, I.C. [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Programa de Ciências da Reabilitação, Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Irigoyen, M.C. [Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); De Angelis, K. [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Programa de Ciências da Reabilitação, Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-27

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise training on hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic control in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (SC), sedentary hypertensive (SH), sedentary hypertensive ovariectomized (SHO), and resistance-trained hypertensive ovariectomized (RTHO). Resistance exercise training was performed on a vertical ladder (5 days/week, 8 weeks) at 40-60% maximal load. Direct arterial pressure was recorded. Vagal and sympathetic tones were measured by heart rate (HR) responses to methylatropine (3 mg/kg, iv) and propranolol (4 mg/kg, iv). Ovariectomy resulted in additional increases in blood pressure in hypertensive rats and was associated with decreased vagal tone. Resistance exercise trained rats had lower mean arterial pressure than untrained rats (RTHO: 159±2.2 vs SHO: 177±3.4 mmHg), as well as resting bradycardia (RTHO: 332±9.0 vs SHO: 356±5 bpm). Sympathetic tone was also lower in the trained group. Moreover, sympathetic tone was positively correlated with resting HR (r=0.7, P<0.05). The additional arterial pressure increase in hypertensive rats caused by ovarian hormone deprivation was attenuated by moderate-intensity dynamic resistance training. This benefit may be associated with resting bradycardia and reduced cardiac sympathetic tone after training, which suggests potential benefits of resistance exercise for the management of hypertension after ovarian hormone deprivation.

  20. Dynamic resistance training decreases sympathetic tone in hypertensive ovariectomized rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimojo, G.L.; Palma, R.K.; Brito, J.O.; Sanches, I.C.; Irigoyen, M.C.; De Angelis, K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise training on hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic control in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (SC), sedentary hypertensive (SH), sedentary hypertensive ovariectomized (SHO), and resistance-trained hypertensive ovariectomized (RTHO). Resistance exercise training was performed on a vertical ladder (5 days/week, 8 weeks) at 40-60% maximal load. Direct arterial pressure was recorded. Vagal and sympathetic tones were measured by heart rate (HR) responses to methylatropine (3 mg/kg, iv) and propranolol (4 mg/kg, iv). Ovariectomy resulted in additional increases in blood pressure in hypertensive rats and was associated with decreased vagal tone. Resistance exercise trained rats had lower mean arterial pressure than untrained rats (RTHO: 159±2.2 vs SHO: 177±3.4 mmHg), as well as resting bradycardia (RTHO: 332±9.0 vs SHO: 356±5 bpm). Sympathetic tone was also lower in the trained group. Moreover, sympathetic tone was positively correlated with resting HR (r=0.7, P<0.05). The additional arterial pressure increase in hypertensive rats caused by ovarian hormone deprivation was attenuated by moderate-intensity dynamic resistance training. This benefit may be associated with resting bradycardia and reduced cardiac sympathetic tone after training, which suggests potential benefits of resistance exercise for the management of hypertension after ovarian hormone deprivation

  1. Use of the D-R model to define trends in the emergence of Ceftazidime-resistant Escherichia coli in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Ding

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of the D-R model for defining trends in the appearance of Ceftazidime-resistant Escherichia coli. METHODS: Actual data related to the manifestation of Ceftazidime-resistant E. coli spanning years 1996-2009 were collected from the China National Knowledge Internet. These data originated from 430 publications encompassing 1004 citations of resistance. The GM(1,1 and the novel D-R models were used to fit current data and from this, predict trends in the appearance of the drug-resistant phenotype. The results were evaluated by Relative Standard Error (RSE, Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD and Mean Absolute Error (MAE. RESULTS: Results from the D-R model showed a rapid increase in the appearance of Ceftazidime-resistant E. coli in this region of the world. These results were considered accurate based upon the minor values calculated for RSE, MAD and MAE, and were equivalent to or better than those generated by the GM(1,1 model. CONCLUSION: The D-R model which was originally created to define trends in the transmission of swine viral diseases can be adapted to evaluating trends in the appearance of Ceftazidime-resistant E. coli. Using only a limited amount of data to initiate the study, our predictions closely mirrored the changes in drug resistance rates which showed a steady increase through 2005, a decrease between 2005 and 2008, and a dramatic inflection point and abrupt increase beginning in 2008. This is consistent with a resistance profile where changes in drug intervention temporarily delayed the upward trend in the appearance of the resistant phenotype; however, resistance quickly resumed its upward momentum in 2008 and this change was better predicted using the D-R model. Additional work is needed to determine if this pattern of "increase-control-increase" is indicative of Ceftazidime-resistant E. coli or can be generally ascribed to bacteria acquiring resistance to drugs in the absence of alternative

  2. Development of TRAIL Resistance by Radiation-Induced Hypermethylation of DR4 CpG Island in Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Cheol [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Research Center, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won Hyeok [Department of Biomedical Research Center, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Min, Young Joo [Department of Biomedical Research Center, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Internal Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Hee Jeong [Department of Pathology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Myung Woul [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyo Won [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun-A [Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung-Ho [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Who, E-mail: swhokim@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon, E-mail: sykim3715@gmail.com [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: There are limited therapeutic options for patients with recurrent head and neck cancer after radiation therapy failure. To assess the use of tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) as a salvage chemotherapeutic agent for recurrent cancer after radiation failure, we investigated the effect of clinically relevant cumulative irradiation on TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Methods and Materials: Using a previously established HN3 cell line from a laryngeal carcinoma patient, we generated a chronically irradiated HN3R isogenic cell line. Viability and apoptosis in HN3 and HN3R cells treated with TRAIL were analyzed with MTS and PI/annexin V-FITC assays. Western blotting and flow cytometry were used to determine the underlying mechanism of TRAIL resistance. DR4 expression was semiquantitatively scored in a tissue microarray with 107 laryngeal cancer specimens. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and bisulfite sequencing for DR4 were performed for genomic DNA isolated from each cell line. Results: HN3R cells were more resistant than HN3 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis because of significantly reduced levels of the DR4 receptor. The DR4 staining score in 37 salvage surgical specimens after radiation failure was lower in 70 surgical specimens without radiation treatment (3.03 ± 2.75 vs 5.46 ± 3.30, respectively; P<.001). HN3R cells had a methylated DR4 CpG island that was partially demethylated by the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Conclusion: Epigenetic silencing of the TRAIL receptor by hypermethylation of a DR4 CpG island might be an underlying mechanism for TRAIL resistance in recurrent laryngeal carcinoma treated with radiation.

  3. Hypoandrogenism related to early skin wound healing resistance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroianu, A; Veloso, D F M; Alberti, L R; Figueiredo, J A; Rodrigues, F H O Carmo; Carneiro, B G M Carvalho E

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the effect of testosterone depletion on healing of surgical skin wounds at different ages and post-operative periods. Forty-four Wistar male rats were divided into four groups: Group 1Y (n = 11) - young control, sham-operated rats (30-day old); Group 1A (n = 10) - adult control, sham-operated rats (3 to 4-month old); Group 2Y (n = 10) - young rats after bilateral orchiectomy; and Group 2A (n = 11) - adult rats after bilateral orchiectomy. After 6 months, a linear incision was performed on the dorsal region of the animals. The resistance of the wound healing was measured in a skin fragment using a tensiometer, on the 7th and 21st post-operative days. The wound healing resistance was higher in Group 1Y than in Group 2Y after 7 days (P Wound healing resistance at 21 days was higher than at 7 days in all groups (P wound healing resistance was not different between young and adult rats. It is concluded that bilateral orchiectomy diminished the wound healing resistance only in young animals at the 7th post-operative day.

  4. Pulmonary arterial dysfunction in insulin resistant obese Zucker rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cogolludo Angel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin resistance and obesity are strongly associated with systemic cardiovascular diseases. Recent reports have also suggested a link between insulin resistance with pulmonary arterial hypertension. The aim of this study was to analyze pulmonary vascular function in the insulin resistant obese Zucker rat. Methods Large and small pulmonary arteries from obese Zucker rat and their lean counterparts were mounted for isometric tension recording. mRNA and protein expression was measured by RT-PCR or Western blot, respectively. KV currents were recorded in isolated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells using the patch clamp technique. Results Right ventricular wall thickness was similar in obese and lean Zucker rats. Lung BMPR2, KV1.5 and 5-HT2A receptor mRNA and protein expression and KV current density were also similar in the two rat strains. In conductance and resistance pulmonary arteries, the similar relaxant responses to acetylcholine and nitroprusside and unchanged lung eNOS expression revealed a preserved endothelial function. However, in resistance (but not in conductance pulmonary arteries from obese rats a reduced response to several vasoconstrictor agents (hypoxia, phenylephrine and 5-HT was observed. The hyporesponsiveness to vasoconstrictors was reversed by L-NAME and prevented by the iNOS inhibitor 1400W. Conclusions In contrast to rat models of type 1 diabetes or other mice models of insulin resistance, the obese Zucker rats did not show any of the characteristic features of pulmonary hypertension but rather a reduced vasoconstrictor response which could be prevented by inhibition of iNOS.

  5. Centrally administered urocortin 2 decreases gorging on high-fat diet in in both diet induced obesity-prone and -resistant rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottone, Pietro; Sabino, Valentina; Nagy, Tim R.; Coscina, Donald V.; Levin, Barry E.; Zorrilla, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Obesity is a costly, deadly public health problem for which new treatments are needed. Individual differences in meal pattern have been proposed to play a role in obesity risk. The present study tested the hypothesis that i) the microstructure of chronic high-fat diet intake differs between genetically selected Diet-Induced Obesity (DIO) and Diet Resistant (DR) rats, and ii) central administration of urocortin 2 (Ucn 2), a corticotropin-releasing factor type 2 (CRF2) agonist, decreases high-fat diet intake not only in lean DR rats, but also in obese DIO rats. Design Male, selectively bred DIO and DR rats (n=10/genotype) were chronically fed a high-fat diet. Food and water intake as well as ingestion microstructure were then compared under baseline conditions and following third intracerebroventricular injection of Ucn 2 (0, 0.1, 0.3, 1, 3 µg). Results Irrespective of genotype, Ucn 2 reduced nocturnal food intake with a minimum effective dose of 0.3 µg, suppressing high-fat diet intake by ~40% at the 3 µg dose. Ucn 2 also made rats of both genotypes eat smaller and briefer meals, including at doses that did not reduce drinking. Obese DIO rats ate fewer but larger meals than DR rats, which they ate more quickly and consumed with 2/3rd less water. Conclusions Unlike leptin and insulin, Ucn 2 retains its full central anorectic efficacy to reduce high-fat diet intake even in obese, genetically-prone DIO rats, which otherwise show a “gorging” meal pattern. These results open new opportunities of investigation towards treating some forms of diet-induced obesity. PMID:23478425

  6. A política comercial da administração Bush: o CAFTA-DR e a resistência interior

    OpenAIRE

    Lima,Thiago

    2009-01-01

    Argumenta-se que a política comercial da administração Bush é uma importante modificação na tradição norte-americana ao aderir à proliferação de acordos bilaterais. Contudo, a análise do CAFTA-DR demonstra que ela pode encontrar forte resistência doméstica.

  7. Spirulina protects against rosiglitazone induced osteoporosis in insulin resistance rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sumeet; Hrishikeshvan, H J; Sehajpal, Prabodh K

    2010-01-01

    The study was undertaken to assess the protective effect of Spirulina fusiformis extract against Rosiglitazone induced osteoporosis and pharmacodynamic effects of Rosiglitazone with Spirulina in treating hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia of insulin resistance rat. For this aim, 30 Wistar albino rats were equally divided into five groups as control (C), diabetes mellitus (DM), diabetes mellitus+Rosiglitazone (DM+R), diabetes mellitus+Spirulina (DM+S), and diabetes mellitus+Rosiglitazone+Spirulina (DM+R+S). Serum glucose, triglyceride, HDL, LDL and insulin concentrations were estimated by routine standard methods in blood samples collected on 21th day. Integrity of the bone surface was examined by scanning electronic microscopy, and bone strength was measured by micro-hardness test on 45th day. A significant decrease in total bone mineral density was observed in group DM+R rats (pSpirulina administration. The intactness and integrity of the bone surface as well as the bone strength improved due to the high content of calcium and phosphorous in Spirulina. Besides, chromium and gamma-linoleic acid in Spirulina helped to decrease the fasting serum glucose, HDL, LDL and triglycerides levels in insulin resistance rats. These findings suggest that combination therapy of Rosiglitazone with Spirulina reduced the risk of osteoporosis in insulin resistance rats. Additionally, Spirulina complemented the antihyperglycemic and antilipidemic activity of Rosiglitazone. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-resistant HLA-DR "superdimer" bands are in some cases class II heterodimers bound to antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hitzel, C.; Grüneberg, U.; van Ham, M.; Trowsdale, J.; Koch, N.

    1999-01-01

    The detection of dimers of dimers in MHC class II crystals has excited speculation about their possible functions in T cell Ag recognition. Biochemical evidence for the existence of DR superdimers falls short of proof and is controversial. To monitor B lymphoma cells for high m.w. complexes of

  9. Women's resistance, femicide, and 'dead without dying' in Palestine: an interview with Dr. Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, A.

    2014-01-01

    Dr Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian is a feminist, Palestinian professor at the Hebrew University in East Jerusalem. Drawing on her practises as a social worker for vulnerable Palestinian women, she passionately advocates that critical scholarship should attentively listen to the personal stories of women

  10. Pharmacodynamic/Pharmacogenomic Modeling of Insulin Resistance Genes in Rat Muscle After Methylprednisolone Treatment: Exploring Regulatory Signaling Cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenling Yao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroids (CS effects on insulin resistance related genes in rat skeletal muscle were studied. In our acute study, adrenalectomized (ADX rats were given single doses of 50 mg/kg methylprednisolone (MPL intravenously. In our chronic study, ADX rats were implanted with Alzet mini-pumps giving zero-order release rates of 0.3 mg/kg/h MPL and sacrificed at various times up to 7 days. Total RNA was extracted from gastrocnemius muscles and hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChips. Data mining and literature searches identified 6 insulin resistance related genes which exhibited complex regulatory pathways. Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1, uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoenzyme 4 (PDK4, fatty acid translocase (FAT and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT dynamic profiles were modeled with mutual effects by calculated nuclear drug-receptor complex (DR(N and transcription factors. The oscillatory feature of endothelin-1 (ET-1 expression was depicted by a negative feedback loop. These integrated models provide test- able quantitative hypotheses for these regulatory cascades.

  11. Xylitol prevents NEFA-induced insulin resistance in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, P.; Kehlenbrink, S.; Hu, M.; Zhang, K.; Gutierrez-Juarez, R.; Koppaka, S.; El-Maghrabi, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Increased NEFA levels, characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus, contribute to skeletal muscle insulin resistance. While NEFA-induced insulin resistance was formerly attributed to decreased glycolysis, it is likely that glucose transport is the rate-limiting defect. Recently, the plant-derived sugar alcohol xylitol has been shown to have favourable metabolic effects in various animal models. Furthermore, its derivative xylulose 5-phosphate may prevent NEFA-induced suppression of glycolysis. We therefore examined whether and how xylitol might prevent NEFA-induced insulin resistance. Methods We examined the ability of xylitol to prevent NEFA-induced insulin resistance. Sustained ~1.5-fold elevations in NEFA levels were induced with Intralipid/heparin infusions during 5 h euglycaemic–hyperinsulinaemic clamp studies in 24 conscious non-diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats, with or without infusion of xylitol. Results Intralipid infusion reduced peripheral glucose uptake by ~25%, predominantly through suppression of glycogen synthesis. Co-infusion of xylitol prevented the NEFA-induced decreases in both glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. Although glycolysis was increased by xylitol infusion alone, there was minimal NEFA-induced suppression of glycolysis, which was not affected by co-infusion of xylitol. Conclusions/interpretation We conclude that xylitol prevented NEFA-induced insulin resistance, with favourable effects on glycogen synthesis accompanying the improved insulin-mediated glucose uptake. This suggests that this pentose sweetener has beneficial insulin-sensitising effects. PMID:22460760

  12. Comparison of the effects of aerobic and resistance training on cardiac autonomic adaptations in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Larissa C R; Tezini, Geisa C S V; Schujmann, Débora S; Porto, Jaqueline M; Rossi, Bruno R O; Souza, Hugo C D

    2011-07-05

    We have compared the effects of two types of physical training on the cardiac autonomic control in ovariectomized and sham-operated rats according to different approaches: double autonomic blockade (DAB) with methylatropine and propranolol; baroreflex sensibility (BRS) and spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). Wistar female rats (±250g) were divided into two groups: sham-operated and ovariectomized. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups: sedentary rats, rats submitted to aerobic trained and rats submitted to resistance training. Ovariectomy did not change arterial pressure, basal heart rate (HR), DAB and BRS responses, but interfered with HRV by reducing the low-frequency oscillations (LF=0.20-0.75Hz) in relation to sedentary sham-operated rats. The DAB showed that both types of training promoted an increase in the predominance of vagal tonus in sham-operated rats, but HR variations due to methylatropine were decreased in the resistance trained rats compared to sedentary rats. Evaluation of BRS showed that resistance training for sham-operated and ovariectomized rats reduced the tachycardic responses in relation to aerobic training. Evaluation of HRV in trained rats showed that aerobic training reduced LF oscillations in sham-operated rats, whereas resistance training had a contrary effect. In the ovariectomized rats, aerobic training increased high frequency oscillations (HF=0.75-2.5Hz), whereas resistance training produced no effect. In sham-operated rats, both types of training increased the vagal autonomic tonus, but resistance training reduced HF oscillations and BRS as well. In turn, both types of training had similar results in ovariectomized rats, except for HRV, as aerobic training promoted an increase in HF oscillations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Resistance to anticoagulants in rats (Rattus norvegicus) in sewers in an urban area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodal, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Control of rats in sewers is, though of varying intensity, common practice in a majority of Danish municipalities and bromadiolone is the most preferred active ingredient. The results of sewer rat control is very difficult to register and very little is known about resistance among sewer rats. Th...

  14. Anticoagulant resistance: a relevant issue in sewer rat (Rattus norvegicus) control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    the resistant rats, had resistance-related mutations in the VKORC1 gene. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that the genetic background of anticoagulant resistance may have to be redefined in respect of resistance-related changes in the VKORC1 gene. Copyright © 2009 Society of Chemical Industry......BACKGROUND: The majority of rat problems in cities are thought to be related to defective sewers, and the use of anticoagulant rodenticides in such places is often implemented as part of regular urban rodent control. Knowledge pertaining to the resistance status of sewer rat populations is non......-existent, which may be leading to control problems in cities. It has become crucial to provide knowledge on the prevalence of resistance and how different control strategies have affected its prevalence among sewer rat populations. The prevalence of resistance was investigated in six sewer locations in Copenhagen...

  15. Helicobacter pylori from Peptic Ulcer Patients in Uganda Is Highly Resistant to Clarithromycin and Fluoroquinolones: Results of the GenoType HelicoDR Test Directly Applied on Stool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denish Calmax Angol

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Around 70–90% of peptic ulcer disease (PUD is due to Helicobacter pylori and requires treatment with antimicrobials to which these bacteria are susceptible. Common H. pylori diagnostic tests do not provide drug susceptibility data. Using the GenoType HelicoDR PCR test designed for gastric biopsies for simultaneous detection of H. pylori and its resistance to clarithromycin (CLA/fluoroquinolones (FLQ, we present evidence for stool as an optional test specimen and also provide data on prevalence of H. pylori resistance to CLA and FLQ in Uganda. Methods. Stool from 142 symptomatic PUD patients at three hospitals in Kampala was screened for H. pylori using a rapid antigen test. The GenoType HelicoDR test was run on all H. pylori antigen positives to determine PCR positivity and resistance to CLA/FLQ. Results. Thirty-one samples (22% were H. pylori antigen positive, and 21 (68% of these were H. pylori PCR positive. Six of the 21 (29% were resistant to CLA and eight to FLQ (42%, while two gave invalid FLQ resistance results. Conclusion. Stool is a possible specimen for the GenoType HelicoDR test for rapid detection of H. pylori and drug resistance. In Uganda, Helicobacter pylori is highly resistant to CLA and FLQ.

  16. ENO1 promotes tumor proliferation and cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xinghua; Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Li, Chunsun; Guo, Yan; Liu, Yushan; Chen, Yali; Lu, Xiaoyun [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, 30 North Tongyang Road, Pingchao, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Yuchan, E-mail: wangyuchannt@126.com [Department of Pathogen and Immunology, Medical College, Nantong University, 19 Qixiu Road, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); He, Song, E-mail: hesongnt@126.com [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, 30 North Tongyang Road, Pingchao, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-07-15

    Enolases are glycolytic enzymes responsible for the ATP-generated conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate. In addition to the glycolytic function, Enolase 1 (ENO1) has been reported up-regulation in several tumor tissues. In this study, we investigated the expression and biologic function of ENO1 in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas (NHLs). Clinically, by western blot analysis we observed that ENO1 expression was apparently higher in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma than in the reactive lymphoid tissues. Subsequently, immunohistochemical staining of 144 NHLs suggested that the expression of ENO1 was significantly lower in the indolent lymphomas compared with the progressive lymphomas. Further, we identified ENO1 as an independent prognostic factor, and it was significantly correlated with overall survival of NHL patients. In addition, we found that ENO1 could promote cell proliferation, regulate cell cycle associated gene and PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in NHLs. Finally, we verified that ENO1 participated in the process of lymphoma cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). Adhesion to FN or HS5 cells significantly protected OCI-Ly8 and Daudi cells from cytotoxicity compared with those cultured in suspension, and these effects were attenuated when transfected with ENO1-siRNA. Based on the study, we propose that inhibition of ENO1 expression may be a novel strategy for therapy for NHLs patients, and it may be a target for drug resistance. - Highlights: • ENO1 expression is reversely correlated with clinical outcomes of patients with NHLs. • ENO1 promotes the proliferation of NHL cells. • ENO1 regulates cell adhesion mediated drug resistance.

  17. Involvement of hepatic xenobiotic related genes in bromadiolone resistance in wild Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus (Berk.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Alsbo, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    To examine the role of xenobiotic relevant genes in bromadiolone resistance in wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) we compared the constitutive liver gene expression and expression upon bromadiolone administration in bromadiolone resistant and anticoagulant susceptible female rats using a LNA...... expressed in resistant than susceptible rats upon bromadiolone exposure. To establish how bromadiolone affected xenobiotic gene expression in the two strains we compared bromadiolone expression profiles to saline profiles of both strains. Bromadiolone mediated significant up-regulation of Cyp2e1 and Cyp3a3...... expression in the resistant rats whereas the rodenticide conferred down-regulation of Cyp2e1, Cyp3a3 and Gpox1 and induction of Cyp2c12 expression in susceptible rats. Cyp2c13 and Cyp3a2 expression were markedly suppressed in both strains upon treatment. This suggests that xenobiotic relevant enzymes play...

  18. Resistance exercise reduces memory impairment induced by monosodium glutamate in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Paulo Cesar Oliveira; Quines, Caroline Brandão; Jardim, Natália Silva; Leite, Marlon Regis; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2017-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Monosodium glutamate causes cognitive impairment. Does resistance exercise improve the performance of rats treated with monosodium glutamate? What is the main finding and its importance? Resistance exercise is effective against monosodium glutamate-induced memory impairment in male and female rats. Monosodium glutamate (MSG), a flavour enhancer in diets, causes cognitive impairment in rodents. Exercise has been reported to protect against impairment of memory in humans. In this study, we investigated whether resistance exercise improves the performance of male and female rats treated with MSG in tests of memory and motor co-ordination. Wistar rats received MSG [4 g (kg body weight) -1  day -1 , s.c.] from postnatal day 1 to 10. At postnatal day 60, the animals started a resistance exercise protocol in an 80 deg inclined vertical ladder apparatus and performed it during 7 weeks. Rats performed object recognition and location memory tests. Resistance exercise reduced impairment in motor co-ordination of male and female rats treated with MSG. Resistance exercise was effective against the decrease in exploratory preference in the long-term recognition memory for novel objects of male rats treated with MSG. In MSG-treated female rats, resistance exercise was effective against the decrease in exploratory preference in the novel object location test. The exploratory preference of female rats in the long-term recognition memory test was similar in all groups. The short-term memory was not altered by MSG or resistance exercise in male and female rats. This study demonstrates that MSG affected the memory of male and female rats in different ways. Resistance exercise was effective against the decrease in recognition for male rats and in location memory for female rats treated with MSG. This report demonstrates the beneficial effects of resistance exercise against the prejudice of motor condition and impairment of memory induced

  19. Obesity-resistant S5B rats showed great cocaine conditioned place preference than the obesity-prone OM rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K..; Kim, R.; Cho, J.; Michaelides, M.; Anderson, B.J.; Primeaux, S.D.; Bray, G.A.; Wang, G.-J.; Robinson, J.K.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-12-01

    Dopamine (DA) and the DA D2 receptor (D2R) are involved in the rewarding and conditioned responses to food and drug rewards. Osborne-Mendel (OM) rats are genetically prone and S5B/P rats are genetically resistant to obesity when fed a high-fat diet. We hypothesized that the differential sensitivity of these two rat strains to natural rewards may also be reflected in sensitivity to drugs of abuse. Therefore, we tested whether OM and S5B/P rats showed a differential preference to cocaine using conditioned place preference (CPP). To also evaluate whether there is specific involvement of the D2R in this differential conditioning sensitivity, we then tested whether the D2R agonist bromocriptine (BC) would differentially affect the effects of cocaine in the two strains. OM and S5B/P rats were conditioned with cocaine (5 or 10 mg/kg) in one chamber and saline in another for 8 days. Rats were then tested for cocaine preference. The effects of BC (0.5, 1, 5, 10, 20 mg/kg) on cocaine preference were then assessed in subsequent test sessions. OM rats did not show a significant preference for the cocaine-paired chamber on test day. Only the S5B/P rats showed cocaine CPP. Later treatment with only the highest dose of BC resulted in reduced cocaine CPP in S5B/P rats when treated with 5 mg/kg cocaine and in OM rats treated with 10 mg/kg cocaine. Our results indicated that obesity-resistant S5B rats showed greater cocaine CPP than the obesity-prone OM rats. These findings do not support a theory of common vulnerability for reinforcer preferences (food and cocaine). However, they show that BC reduced cocaine conditioning effects supporting at least a partial regulatory role of D2R in conditioned responses to drugs.

  20. Heterogeneity in induced thermal resistance of rat tumor cell clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasovic, S.P.; Rosenblatt, P.L.; Heitzman, D.

    1983-01-01

    Four 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma clones were examined for their survival response to heating under conditions that induced transient thermal resistance (thermotolerance). Clones MTC and MTF7 were isolated from the subcutaneous locally growing tumor, whereas clones MTLn2 and MTLn3 were derived from spontaneous lung metastases. There was heterogeneity among these clones in thermotolerance induced by either fractionated 45 0 C or continuous 42 0 C heating, but the order of sensitivity was not necessarily the same. The clones developed thermal resistance at different rates and to different degrees within the same time intervals. There was heterogeneity between clones isolated from within either the primary site or metastatic lesions. However, clones derived from metastatic foci did not intrinsically acquire more or less thermotolerance to fractionated 45 0 C or continuous 42 0 C heating than did clones from the primary tumor. Further, there was no apparent relationship between any phenotypic properties that conferred more or less thermotolerance in vitro and any phenotypic properties that conferred enhanced metastatic success of these same clones by spontaneous (subcutaneous) or experimental (intravenous) routes in vivo. These tumor clones also differ in their karyotype, metastatic potential, cell surface features, sensitivity to x-irradiation and drugs, and ability to repair sublethal radiation damage. These results provide further credence to the concept that inherent heterogeneity within tumors may be as important in therapeutic success as other known modifiers of outcome such as site and treatment heterogeneity

  1. Risk factors related to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection among inpatients at Prof. dr. R. D. Kandou general hospital Manado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utomo, H. T.; Nugroho, A.; Harijanto, P. N.

    2018-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) presents nosocomial infection problemsin hospitals. Identification of risk factors related to MRSA infection is a concern among healthcare provider. A retrospective case-control study was conducted to identify MRSA infection proportion among isolates, also to identify risk factors amonginpatients at Prof. dr.R. D. Kandou General Hospital, Manado. Data were from themedical record, from patient’s culture isolateswith positive Staphylococcus aureus infection from January-December 2015. Case subject isolated cultures of MRSA and control subject isolated cultures of non-MRSA. Bivariate analysis were performed in 10 independent variables (age, length of stay, prior use of antibiotics before cultures, history of HIV infection, prior use of corticosteroid, history of malignancy, history of chronic disease, prior use of medical tools (catheter, ventilator, etc), history of invasive medical procedure, history of hospitalization before). All variables with a p-value<0.05 were into multivariate analysis with forwarding stepwise logistic regression. Mean subjects age were 48.13 ± 2.05 years old and length of stay were 8.65 ± 0.25 days, and only prior antibiotic use-variable were considered statistically significant (p = 0.017; OR 1.889; 95%CI 1.595 – 2.238).

  2. PPARγ agonists diminish serum VEGF elevation in diet-induced insulin resistant SD rats and ZDF rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Baichun; Lin Peiyuan; Carrick, Kevin M.; McNulty, Judi A.; Clifton, Lisa G.; Winegar, Deborah A.; Strum, Jay C.; Stimpson, Stephen A.; Pahel, Greg L.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists on serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in diet-induced insulin resistant SD rats and ZDF rats. SD rats fed a high fat/sucrose diet showed increases in serum insulin and VEGF (both p < 0.01). Treatment with a PPARγ agonist GI262570 normalized the diet-elevated insulin and VEGF (both p < 0.01). There was a positive correlation between serum insulin and VEGF (p < 0.05) in SD rats. ZDF rats had higher serum glucose, insulin, and VEGF than Zucker lean rats (all p < 0.01). Treatment of ZDF rats with PPARγ agonist pioglitazone decreased serum glucose and VEGF (both p < 0.01). There was a positive correlation between glucose and VEGF in ZDF rats (p < 0.05). In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, GI262570 did not affect insulin-stimulated VEGF secretion. These studies demonstrated that hyperinsulinemia in SD rats and hyperglycemia in ZDF rats were associated with increased serum VEGF; PPARγ agonists normalized serum insulin, glucose, and VEGF, but did not affect VEGF secretion in vitro

  3. Distribution of rodenticide resistance and zoonotic pathogens in Norway rats in Lower Saxony and Hamburg, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Martin; von Keyserlingk, Michael; Braune, Silke; Becker, Detlef; Plenge-Bönig, Anita; Freise, Jona F; Pelz, Hans-Joachim; Esther, Alexandra

    2013-03-01

    Genetically based resistance to anticoagulants has led to increasing difficulties in the control of rodents over recent decades. The possible impact of rodenticide-resistant rats on the infection risk of humans and livestock by zoonotic pathogens is generally unknown. Hence, in a monitoring programme in the German federal states of Lower Saxony and Hamburg, more than 500 Norway rats were analysed for both Tyr139Cys polymorphisms within the VKORC1 gene and zoonotic agents. Evidence of resistance was almost completely restricted to the known resistance area in southern Lower Saxony. Homozygous mutations were only found in urban areas sampled owing to the occurrence of rat control problems and were missing in bycatches of rats by muskrat trappers in rural areas. In more than 25% of the rats, zoonotic bacteria (Leptospira, Salmonella, Yersinia and Coxiella) were detected. There was no obvious correlation between the occurrence of rats carrying zoonotic pathogens and anticoagulant resistance. Zoonotic agents and genetically based resistance conferred by the Tyr139Cys polymorphism are both unevenly distributed in Lower Saxony. The study provides the basis for further studies focusing on districts with high levels of pathogens and resistance to assess the potential health risk of their combined occurrence. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Resistance Training in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with Severe Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vanerson Passos Neves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Resistance training (RT has been recommended as a non-pharmacological treatment for moderate hypertension. In spite of the important role of exercise intensity on training prescription, there is still no data regarding the effects of RT intensity on severe hypertension (SH. Objective: This study examined the effects of two RT protocols (vertical ladder climbing, performed at different overloads of maximal weight carried (MWC, on blood pressure (BP and muscle strength of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR with SH. Methods: Fifteen male SHR ENT#091;206 ± 10 mmHg of systolic BP (SBPENT#093; and five Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY; 119 ± 10 mmHg of SBP were divided into 4 groups: sedentary (SED-WKY and SHR (SED-SHR; RT1-SHR training relative to body weight (~40% of MWC; and RT2-SHR training relative to MWC test (~70% of MWC. Systolic BP and heart rate (HR were measured weekly using the tail-cuff method. The progression of muscle strength was determined once every fifteen days. The RT consisted of 3 weekly sessions on non-consecutive days for 12-weeks. Results: Both RT protocols prevented the increase in SBP (delta - 5 and -7 mmHg, respectively; p > 0.05, whereas SBP of the SED-SHR group increased by 19 mmHg (p 0.05. Conclusions: Our data indicated that both RT protocols were effective in preventing chronic elevation of SBP in SH. Additionally, a higher RT overload induced a greater increase in muscle strength.

  5. Rat amylin-(8-37) enhances insulin action and alters lipid metabolism in normal and insulin-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettiarachchi, M; Chalkley, S; Furler, S M; Choong, Y S; Heller, M; Cooper, G J; Kraegen, E W

    1997-11-01

    To clarify roles of amylin, we investigated metabolic responses to rat amylin-(8-37), a specific amylin antagonist, in normal and insulin-resistant, human growth hormone (hGH)-infused rats. Fasting conscious rats were infused with saline or hGH, each with and without amylin-(8-37) (0.125 mumol/h), over 5.75 h. At 3.75 h, a hyperinsulinemic (100 mU/l) clamp with bolus 2-deoxy-D-[3H]glucose and [14C]glucose was started. hGH infusion led to prompt (2- to 3-fold) basal hyperamylinemia (P hGH-infused rats. Amylin-(8-37) corrected hGH-induced liver insulin resistance, increased basal plasma triglycerides and lowered plasma nonesterified fatty acids in both groups, and reduced muscle triglyceride and total long-chain acyl-CoA content in saline-treated rats (P hGH infusion; 2) amylin-(8-37) increases whole body and muscle insulin sensitivity and consistently reduces basal insulin levels in normal and hGH-induced insulin resistant rats; and 3) amylin-(8-37) elicits a significant alteration of in vivo lipid metabolism. These findings support a role of amylin in modulating insulin action and suggest that this could be mediated by effects on lipid metabolism.

  6. Bromadiolone resistance does not respond to absence of anticoagulants in experimental populations of Norway rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, A.C.; Leirs, H.; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) is documented to be associated with pleiotropic effects, notably with an increased dietary vitamin K requirement. The aim of this study was to quantify these effects in small populations of Norway rat in Denmark and to se...

  7. Comparison of the effects of endurance, resistance and concurrent training on insulin resistance and adiponectin-leptin ratio in diabetic rat

    OpenAIRE

    A. Saremi

    2017-01-01

    Background: The obesity-related hormones leptin and adiponectin are independently and oppositely associated with insulin resistance. Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of endurance, resistance and concurrent training on insulin resistance and adiponectin-leptin ratio in diabetic rats. Methods: Ten out of 50 male Wistar rats were separated as healthy subjects. Then diabetes was induced in the remaining rats by the injection of streptozotocin. Diabetic r...

  8. Vasodilatation with pinacidil. Mode of action in rat resistance vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videbaek, L.M.; Aalkjaer, C.; Mulvany, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    Pinacidil is a newly developed antihypertensive vasodilator, proposed to belong to the new group of smooth muscle relaxants, the K+ channel openers. The in vitro effects of pinacidil on induced tone, smooth muscle membrane potential and 86 Rb and 42 K efflux from rat resistance vessels (internal diameter about 200 microns) were studied. Tone induced with noradrenaline was concentration-dependently inhibited by pinacidil. Responses to electrical field stimulation were also inhibited. However, tone induced with high K+ depolarization, noradrenaline in the presence of high K+, caffeine-induced contractions and noradrenaline contractions in the presence of felodipine were little affected by pinacidil. Pinacidil caused concentration-dependent hyperpolarisation of the resting smooth muscle. Pinacidil caused only a small and transient increase of the 86 Rb efflux rate constant, while the same concentrations of pinacidil produced a significant increase in the 42 K efflux rate constant. Our results seem to indicate that the relaxant effect of pinacidil is the result of an increase in K+ permeability, thus causing hyperpolarisation and relaxation. The opened K+ channels appear to be selective for K+ over Rb+

  9. Obesity does not aggravate osteoporosis or osteoblastic insulin resistance in orchiectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potikanond, Saranyapin; Rattanachote, Pinyada; Pintana, Hiranya; Suntornsaratoon, Panan; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that testosterone deprivation impairs osteoblastic insulin signaling, decreases osteoblast survival, reduces bone density, and that obesity aggravates those deleterious effects in testosterone-deprived rats. Twenty four male Wistar rats underwent either a bilateral orchiectomy (O, n=12) or a sham operation (S, n=12). Then the rats in each group were further divided into two subgroups fed with either a normal diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HF) for 12 weeks. At the end of the protocol, blood samples were collected to determine metabolic parameters and osteocalcin ratios. The tibiae were collected to determine bone mass using microcomputed tomography and for osteoblast isolation. The results showed that rats fed with HF (sham-operated HF-fed rats (HFS) and ORX HF-fed rats (HFO)) developed peripheral insulin resistance and had decreased trabecular bone density. In ND-fed rats, only the ORX ND-fed rats (NDO) group had decreased trabecular bone density. In addition, osteoblastic insulin resistance, as indicated by a decrease in tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and Akt, were observed in all groups except the sham-operated ND-fed rats (NDS) rats. Those groups, again with the exception of the NDS rats, also had decreased osteoblastic survival. No differences in the levels of osteoblastic insulin resistance and osteoblastic survival were found among the NDO, HFS, and HFO groups. These findings suggest that either testosterone deprivation or obesity alone can impair osteoblastic insulin signaling and decrease osteoblastic survival leading to the development of osteoporosis. However, obesity does not aggravate those deleterious effects in the bone of testosterone-deprived rats. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  10. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiliccot, Sila [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  11. High molecular weight hyaluronan mediates the cancer resistance of the naked mole-rat

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Xiao; Azpurua, Jorge; Hine, Christopher; Vaidya, Amita; Myakishev-Rempel, Max; Ablaeva, Julia; Mao, Zhiyong; Nevo, Eviatar; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    The naked mole-rat displays exceptional longevity, with a maximum lifespan exceeding 30 years 1–3 . This is the longest reported lifespan for a rodent species and is especially striking considering the small body mass of the naked mole-rat. In comparison, a similarly sized house mouse has a maximum lifespan of 4 years 4,5 . In addition to their longevity, naked mole-rats show an unusual resistance to cancer. Multi-year observations of large naked mole-rat colonies did not detect a single inci...

  12. Sodium salicylate reduced insulin resistance in the retina of a type 2 diabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Youde; Thakran, Shalini; Bheemreddy, Rajini; Coppess, William; Walker, Robert J; Steinle, Jena J

    2015-01-01

    Sodium salicylate has been reported to reduce markers of diabetic retinopathy in a type 1 rat model. Because rates of type 2 diabetes are on the rise, we wanted to determine whether salicylate could improve insulin resistance in a type 2 rat model, as well as improve retinal function. We treated lean and obese BBZDR/Wor type 2 diabetic rats with salicylate in their chow for 2 months. Prior to salicylate treatment, rats underwent an electroretinogram to measure retinal function. After 2 months of treatment, rats underwent an additional electroretinogram prior to sacrifice. In addition to the animal model, we also treated retinal endothelial cells (REC) and rat Müller cells with salicylate and performed the same analyses as done for the rat retinal lysates. To investigate the role of salicylate in insulin signaling, we measured TNFα and caspase 3 levels by ELISA, as well as performed Western blotting for insulin receptor substrate 1, insulin receptor, SOCS3, and pro- and anti-apoptotic markers. Data demonstrated that salicylate significantly improved retinal function, as well as reduced TNFα and SOCS3-induced insulin resistance in all samples. Overall, results suggest that salicylate is effective in reducing insulin resistance in the retina of type 2 diabetic rat models.

  13. Sodium Salicylate Reduced Insulin Resistance in the Retina of a Type 2 Diabetic Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Youde; Thakran, Shalini; Bheemreddy, Rajini; Coppess, William; Walker, Robert J.; Steinle, Jena J.

    2015-01-01

    Sodium salicylate has been reported to reduce markers of diabetic retinopathy in a type 1 rat model. Because rates of type 2 diabetes are on the rise, we wanted to determine whether salicylate could improve insulin resistance in a type 2 rat model, as well as improve retinal function. We treated lean and obese BBZDR/Wor type 2 diabetic rats with salicylate in their chow for 2 months. Prior to salicylate treatment, rats underwent an electroretinogram to measure retinal function. After 2 months of treatment, rats underwent an additional electroretinogram prior to sacrifice. In addition to the animal model, we also treated retinal endothelial cells (REC) and rat Müller cells with salicylate and performed the same analyses as done for the rat retinal lysates. To investigate the role of salicylate in insulin signaling, we measured TNFα and caspase 3 levels by ELISA, as well as performed Western blotting for insulin receptor substrate 1, insulin receptor, SOCS3, and pro- and anti-apoptotic markers. Data demonstrated that salicylate significantly improved retinal function, as well as reduced TNFα and SOCS3-induced insulin resistance in all samples. Overall, results suggest that salicylate is effective in reducing insulin resistance in the retina of type 2 diabetic rat models. PMID:25874611

  14. Estrogen has opposing effects on vascular reactivity in obese, insulin-resistant male Zucker rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks-Asplund, Esther M.; Shoukas, Artin A.; Kim, Soon-Yul; Burke, Sean A.; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2002-01-01

    We hypothesized that estradiol treatment would improve vascular dysfunction commonly associated with obesity, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance. A sham operation or 17beta-estradiol pellet implantation was performed in male lean and obese Zucker rats. Maximal vasoconstriction (VC) to phenylephrine (PE) and potassium chloride was exaggerated in control obese rats compared with lean rats, but estradiol significantly attenuated VC in the obese rats. Estradiol reduced the PE EC50 in all groups. This effect was cyclooxygenase independent, because preincubation with indomethacin reduced VC response to PE similarly in a subset of control and estrogen-treated lean rats. Endothelium-independent vasodilation (VD) to sodium nitroprusside was similar among groups, but endothelium-dependent VD to ACh was significantly impaired in obese compared with lean rats. Estradiol improved VD in lean and obese rats by decreasing EC50 but impaired function by decreasing maximal VD. The shift in EC50 corresponded to an upregulation in nitric oxide synthase III protein expression in the aorta of the estrogen-treated obese rats. In summary, estrogen treatment improves vascular function in male insulin-resistant, obese rats, partially via an upregulation of nitric oxide synthase III protein expression. These effects are counteracted by adverse factors, such as hyperlipidemia and, potentially, a release of an endothelium-derived contractile agent.

  15. Berberine improves insulin resistance induced by high fat diet in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Libin; Yang Ying; Shang Wenbin; Li Fengying; Tang Jinfeng; Wang Xiao; Liu Shangquan; Yuan Guoyue; Chen Mingdao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of berberine on insulin resistance induced by high fat diet in rats. Methods: Normal male SD rats (8 weeks old) were divided into two groups taking either normal chow (NC, n=9) or high fat diet (HF, n=20). After fourteen weeks, HF rats were divided into two groups. Ten rats continued to take high fat diet. Another ten rats took additional berberine gavage (HF+B, 150mg/kg weight once a day). Six weeks later, oral glucose tolerance test and insulin tolerance test were performed for estimating insulin sensitivity. Results: The body weight, liver weight and epididyaml fat pads weight of HF group were significantly higher than those of HF+B group and NC group (all P<0.01). Fasting plasma glucose, insulin and plasma glucose, insulin 2h after taking glucose in HF+B rats were significantly lower than those in HF rats (all P<0.01). Plasma glucose and insulin levels at all time points in HF rats were significantly higher than those in NC rats. Homa-IR of HF group was markedly higher than that of HF+B group (P<0.01). The glucose-lowering effects after the administration of insuin (0.5u/kg intrapenitoneally) at all time points in HF+B rats were stronger than those in HF rats with 23% and 7% reduction at 15min respectively. Conclusion: Long term high fat diet resulted in insulin resistance. Berberine was able to reverse insulin resistance through promoting peripheral tissue up taking of glucose and decreasing insulin, which would be quite ideal for the intervention of IGT. (authors)

  16. High-molecular-mass hyaluronan mediates the cancer resistance of the naked mole rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiao; Azpurua, Jorge; Hine, Christopher; Vaidya, Amita; Myakishev-Rempel, Max; Ablaeva, Julia; Mao, Zhiyong; Nevo, Eviatar; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2013-07-18

    The naked mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber) displays exceptional longevity, with a maximum lifespan exceeding 30 years. This is the longest reported lifespan for a rodent species and is especially striking considering the small body mass of the naked mole rat. In comparison, a similarly sized house mouse has a maximum lifespan of 4 years. In addition to their longevity, naked mole rats show an unusual resistance to cancer. Multi-year observations of large naked mole-rat colonies did not detect a single incidence of cancer. Here we identify a mechanism responsible for the naked mole rat's cancer resistance. We found that naked mole-rat fibroblasts secrete extremely high-molecular-mass hyaluronan (HA), which is over five times larger than human or mouse HA. This high-molecular-mass HA accumulates abundantly in naked mole-rat tissues owing to the decreased activity of HA-degrading enzymes and a unique sequence of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2). Furthermore, the naked mole-rat cells are more sensitive to HA signalling, as they have a higher affinity to HA compared with mouse or human cells. Perturbation of the signalling pathways sufficient for malignant transformation of mouse fibroblasts fails to transform naked mole-rat cells. However, once high-molecular-mass HA is removed by either knocking down HAS2 or overexpressing the HA-degrading enzyme, HYAL2, naked mole-rat cells become susceptible to malignant transformation and readily form tumours in mice. We speculate that naked mole rats have evolved a higher concentration of HA in the skin to provide skin elasticity needed for life in underground tunnels. This trait may have then been co-opted to provide cancer resistance and longevity to this species.

  17. High molecular weight hyaluronan mediates the cancer resistance of the naked mole-rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiao; Azpurua, Jorge; Hine, Christopher; Vaidya, Amita; Myakishev-Rempel, Max; Ablaeva, Julia; Mao, Zhiyong; Nevo, Eviatar; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    The naked mole-rat displays exceptional longevity, with a maximum lifespan exceeding 30 years1–3. This is the longest reported lifespan for a rodent species and is especially striking considering the small body mass of the naked mole-rat. In comparison, a similarly sized house mouse has a maximum lifespan of 4 years4,5. In addition to their longevity, naked mole-rats show an unusual resistance to cancer. Multi-year observations of large naked mole-rat colonies did not detect a single incidence of cancer2,6. Here we identify a mechanism responsible for the naked mole-rat’s cancer resistance. We found that naked mole-rat fibroblasts secrete extremely high molecular weight hyaluronan (HA), which is over five times larger than human or mouse HA. This high molecular weight HA accumulates abundantly in naked mole rat tissues due to the decreased activity of HA-degrading enzymes and a unique sequence of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2). Furthermore, the naked mole-rat cells are more sensitive to HA signaling, as the naked mole rat cells have a higher affinity to HA than the mouse or human cells. Perturbation of the signaling pathways sufficient for malignant transformation of mouse fibroblasts fails to transform naked mole-rat cells. However, once high molecular weight HA is removed by either knocking down HAS2 or overexpressing the HA-degrading enzyme, Hyal2, naked mole-rat cells become susceptible to malignant transformation and readily form tumors in mice. We speculate that naked mole-rats have evolved a higher concentration of HA in the skin to provide skin elasticity needed for life in underground tunnels. This trait may have then been co-opted to provide cancer resistance and longevity to this species. PMID:23783513

  18. Rat Strain Differences in Susceptibility to Alcohol-Induced Chronic Liver Injury and Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. DeNucci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The finding of more severe steatohepatitis in alcohol fed Long Evans (LE compared with Sprague Dawley (SD and Fisher 344 (FS rats prompted us to determine whether host factors related to alcohol metabolism, inflammation, and insulin/IGF signaling predict proneness to alcohol-mediated liver injury. Adult FS, SD, and LE rats were fed liquid diets containing 0% or 37% (calories ethanol for 8 weeks. Among controls, LE rats had significantly higher ALT and reduced GAPDH relative to SD and FS rats. Among ethanol-fed rats, despite similar blood alcohol levels, LE rats had more pronounced steatohepatitis and fibrosis, higher levels of ALT, DNA damage, pro-inflammatory cytokines, ADH, ALDH, catalase, GFAP, desmin, and collagen expression, and reduced insulin receptor binding relative to FS rats. Ethanol-exposed SD rats had intermediate degrees of steatohepatitis, increased ALT, ADH and profibrogenesis gene expression, and suppressed insulin receptor binding and GAPDH expression, while pro-inflammatory cytokines were similarly increased as in LE rats. Ethanol feeding in FS rats only reduced IL-6, ALDH1–3, CYP2E1, and GAPDH expression in liver. In conclusion, susceptibility to chronic steatohepatitis may be driven by factors related to efficiency of ethanol metabolism and degree to which ethanol exposure causes hepatic insulin resistance and cytokine activation.

  19. Lack of Contribution of Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein and Organic Anion-transporting Polypeptide to Pharmacokinetics of Regorafenib, a Novel Multi-Kinase Inhibitor, in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kazuo; Ueyama, Jun; Tatsumi, Yasuaki; Tsukiyama, Ikuto; Sugiura, Yuka; Saito, Hiroko; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Hasegawa, Takaaki

    2015-09-01

    We investigated whether hepatic multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (ABCC2) is involved in the hepatobiliary excretion of regorafenib, a novel multi-kinase inhibitor, using Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and Eisai hyperbilirubinemic rats (EHBR) lacking the efflux transporter ABCC2. The involvement of organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1 (OATP1; OATP in humans) and OATP2 in the hepatic uptake of regorafenib and their protein levels in the liver were also investigated in the two rat groups. When regorafenib (5 mg/kg) was administered intravenously, the plasma concentrations of regorafenib were higher in EHBR than those in SD rats. However, the slope of the plasma concentration-time curves was the same for the two groups. Although the apparent biliary clearance of regorafenib in EHBR was lower than that of SD rats, no significant difference in the biliary excretion rate was observed between them, suggesting that regorafenib is not a substrate for ABCC2 and is not excreted into bile by ABCC2. It was also found that the contribution of biliary excretion to the systemic elimination of regorafenib is small. The protein-binding profiles of regorafenib were found to be linear in both rat groups. The binding potency, which was very high in both rat groups (>99.5%), was significantly higher in EHBR than that in SD rats. No significant differences in the plasma concentrations of unbound regorafenib were observed between the two rat groups, suggesting that the differences observed in the pharmacokinetic behaviors of regorafenib between the two rat groups were due to differences in protein-binding. When the protein levels of hepatic OATP1 and OATP2 were measured by immunoblot analysis, the expression of both transporters in EHBR was less than 40% of that in SD rats. The present results suggest that regorafenib is not a substrate for OATP1 and OATP2. These findings suggest the possibility that ABCC2-mediated hepatobiliary excretion and OATP1/OATP2-mediated hepatic uptake do

  20. Lifespan extension in the spontaneous dwarf rat and enhanced resistance to hyperoxia-induced mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Toru; Tahara, Shoichi; Shinkai, Tadashi; Kuramoto, Kazunao; Matsumoto, Shigenobu; Yanabe, Makoto; Takagi, Shohei; Kondo, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Takao

    2013-05-01

    Lifespan extension has been demonstrated in dwarfism mouse models relative to their wild-type. The spontaneous dwarf rat (SDR) was isolated from a closed colony of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Growth hormone deficiencies have been indicated to be responsible for dwarfism in SDR. Survival time, the markers of oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymes, and resistance to hyperoxia were compared between SDR and SD rats, to investigate whether SDR, a dwarfism rat model, also extends lifespan and has an enhanced resistance to oxidative stress. SDRs lived 38% longer than SD rats on average. This is the first report to show that dwarf rats exhibit lifespan extensions similar to Ames and Snell mice. Decreased 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) content, a marker of oxidative DNA damage, indicated suppressed oxidative stress in the liver, kidney, and lung of SDRs. Increased glutathione peroxidase enzyme activity was consistent with decreased 8-oxodG content in the same tissues. The heart and brain showed a similar tendency, but this was not significant. However, the catalase and superoxide dismutase enzyme activities of SDRs were not different from those of SD rats in any tissue. This was not what the original null hypothesis predicted. SDRs had potent resistance to the toxicity associated with high O2 (85%) exposure. The mean survival time in SDRs was more than 147% that of SD rats with 168h O2 exposure. These results suggest that the enhanced resistance to oxidative stress of SDRs associated with enhanced hydrogen peroxide elimination may support its potential role in lifespan extension. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of glutamine on the effect of resistance exercise on cardiac ANP in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeu Rodrigues de Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Various nutritional supplements (herbs, vitamins, and micronutrients improve responses and adaptations to resistance exercise. ANP is a heart hormone that contributes to fluid, electrolyte and blood pressure homeostasis through its natriuretic and vasodilative actions. In the present study, the adaptation of ANP in response to resistance exercise was investigated in rats supplemented with glutamine for five weeks. The results showed that supplementation with glutamine did not influence the number of ANP granules per atrial cardiocyte in sedentary animals. In exercised-trained rats, the number and diameter of the granules was significantly higher in comparison with the control group and in exercised animals supplemented with glutamine there was significant increase in the number and diameter of ANP granules compared with controls. Altogether, these data indicated that in resistance exercise rats, glutamine significantly enhances cardiac ANP thus implicating the beneficial effects of glutamine supplementation to the ANP system.

  2. Non-p-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in detransformed rat cells selected for resistance to methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J M; Sircar, S; Horvath, J; Dion, P

    1989-11-01

    Three independent variants (G2, G4, G5), resistant to methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), an anticancer drug, have been isolated by single step selection from an adenovirus-transformed rat brain cell line (1). These variants display selective cross-resistance to several natural product drugs of dissimilar structure and action. Multidrug resistance has recently been shown to be caused by overexpression of the membrane-associated p-glycoprotein, most often caused by amplification of the mdr gene. Several types of experiments were conducted to determine whether the observed drug resistance in our cell lines could be due to changes at the mdr locus. The following results were obtained: (a) the mdr locus was not amplified; (b) transcription of the mdr gene and p-glycoprotein synthesis were not increased; (c) multidrug resistance cell lines, which carry an amplified mdr locus, were not cross-resistant to methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone); (d) verapamil did not reverse the resistance of G cells or mdr cells to methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), nor that of G cells to vincristine; and (e) methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) resistance was recessive and depended on a block to drug uptake, as opposed to mdr cells which are dominant and express increased drug efflux. The results obtained suggest that the drug resistance in the G2, G4, and G5 cells was atypical and may be due to a mechanism distinct from that mediated by the mdr locus.

  3. Participation of endogenous opioids in the antinociception induced by resistance exercise in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S. Galdino

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Exercise is a low-cost intervention that promotes health and contributes to the maintenance of the quality of life. The present study was designed to investigate the influence of different resistance exercise protocols on the nociceptive threshold of rats. Female Wistar rats were used to perform exercises in a weight-lifting exercise model. The following groups were examined (N = 6 per group: untrained rats (control group; an acute protocol group consisting of rats submitted to 15 sets of 15 repetitions of resistance exercise (acute group; rats exercised with 3 sets of 10 repetitions, three times per week for 12 weeks (trained group, and a group consisting of trained rats that were further submitted to the acute protocol (trained-acute group. The nociceptive threshold was measured by the paw-withdrawal test, in which the withdrawal threshold (escape reaction was measured by an apparatus applying force to the plantar surface of the animal paw. The opioid antagonist naloxone (2 mg/kg was administered subcutaneously 10 min before the exercise protocols. The trained group demonstrated antinociception only up to day 45 of the 12-week training period. A significant increase (37%, P < 0.05 in the nociceptive threshold was produced immediately after exercise, decreasing to 15% after 15 min, when the acute exercise protocol was used. Naloxone reversed this effect. These data show that the acute resistance exercise protocol was effective in producing antinociception for 15 min. This antinociceptive effect is mediated by the activation of opioid receptors.

  4. [Sodium restriction prevents cardiovascular remodeling associated with insulin-resistance in the rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugale, C; Oudot, C; Desmetz, C; Guzman, C; Lajoix, A; Jover, B

    2013-06-01

    In the present work, the objective was to evaluate the influence of a dietary sodium restriction on cardiovascular morphology changes associated with insulin-resistance. At 8 weeks of age, rats were fed for 12 weeks a 60%-fructose diet containing a regular sodium content (0.64%) or totally lacking in sodium chloride (resistance in fructose-fed rats. Concomitantly, an increase in cardiac mass and in cardiac collagen (Sirius red staining) was detected without obvious change in arterial pressure or cardiac aldosterone synthase mRNA expression. In addition, cross-sectional area of the carotid artery was higher in fructose-fed rats. Production of superoxide anion, equated with dihydroethidium (DHE) staining, was enhanced in cardiac tissue of rats with insulin-resistance. Withdrawal of sodium from the fructose diet prevented all the cardiovascular effects of fructose consumption, including DHE staining. These results are in favor of the participation of oxidative stress normalization in the beneficial influence of dietary sodium deprivation on cardiovascular remodeling in this model of insulin-resistance in rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. CCR5 polymorphism and plague resistance in natural populations of the black rat in Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Tollenaere, C.; Rahalison, L.; Ranjalahy, M.; Rahelinirina, S.; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Brouat, Carine

    2008-01-01

    Madagascar remains one of the world's largest plague foci. The black rat, Rattus rattus, is the main reservoir of plague in rural areas. This species is highly susceptible to plague in plague-free areas (low-altitude regions), whereas rats from the plague focus areas (central highlands) have evolved a disease-resistance polymorphism. We used the candidate gene CCR5 to investigate the genetic basis of plague resistance in R. rattus. We found a unique non-synonymous substitution (H184R) in a fu...

  6. Effect of thiazolidinedione treatment on resistin levels in insulin resistant sprague dawley rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousaf, I.; Hameed, W.; Rajput, T.A.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is manifested by decreased effect of fixed quantity of insulin on glucose metabolism leading to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Visceral obesity has been positively correlated with insulin resistance but its mechanism is not fully defined. Insulin resistance may be the consequence of adipocytokines including visfatin and resistin. This study was designed to see the effect of thiazolidinediones on levels of resistin in insulin resistant rats. Methods: Ninety Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups. Group I served as control. Rats in Group II and III were made insulin resistant diabetics. Group III was treated with rosiglitazone after development of diabetes. Plasma glucose, serum triglycerides, HDL, TG:HDL ratio and serum resistin levels were analysed. Results: Body weight and plasma glucose were significantly increased (p<0.05) along with TG:HDL ratio (p<0.05) in group II and group III at the end of 4th week. Serum resistin levels also increased significantly (p<0.05) in group II and III at the end of 4th week. Treatment of group III with rosiglitazone led to improvement in insulin resistance with decrease in serum resistin levels (p<0.05). Conclusion: Increased serum resistin level indicates insulin resistance and impending hyperglycaemia. Thiazolidinediones augment sensitivity of insulin to restore normoglycaemia by decreasing serum resistin level. (author)

  7. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra, E-mail: jmartyn@partners.org [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  8. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [ 3 H]glucose and 2-deoxy[ 14 C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats

  9. CCR5 polymorphism and plague resistance in natural populations of the black rat in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollenaere, C; Rahalison, L; Ranjalahy, M; Rahelinirina, S; Duplantier, J-M; Brouat, C

    2008-12-01

    Madagascar remains one of the world's largest plague foci. The black rat, Rattus rattus, is the main reservoir of plague in rural areas. This species is highly susceptible to plague in plague-free areas (low-altitude regions), whereas rats from the plague focus areas (central highlands) have evolved a disease-resistance polymorphism. We used the candidate gene CCR5 to investigate the genetic basis of plague resistance in R. rattus. We found a unique non-synonymous substitution (H184R) in a functionally important region of the gene. We then compared (i) CCR5 genotypes of dying and surviving plague-challenged rats and (ii) CCR5 allelic frequencies in plague focus and plague-free populations. Our results suggested a higher prevalence of the substitution in resistant animals compared to susceptible individuals, and a tendency for higher frequencies in plague focus areas compared to plague-free areas. Therefore, the CCR5 polymorphism may be involved in Malagasy black rat plague resistance. CCR5 and other undetermined plague resistance markers may provide useful biological information about host evolution and disease dynamics.

  10. Ginsenoside Re rapidly reverses insulin resistance in muscles of high-fat diet fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong-Ho; Kim, Sang Hyun; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Jung, Su-Ryun; Polonsky, Kenneth S; Klein, Samuel; Holloszy, John O

    2012-11-01

    In a previous study, it was found that a ginseng berry extract with a high content of the ginsenoside Re normalized blood glucose in ob/ob mice. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the ginsenoside Re on insulin resistance of glucose transport in muscles of rats made insulin resistant with a high-fat diet. Rats were fed either rat chow or a high-fat diet for 5 weeks. The rats were then euthanized, and insulin stimulated glucose transport activity was measured in epitrochlearis and soleus muscle strips in vitro. Treatment of muscles with Re alone had no effect on glucose transport. The high-fat diet resulted in ~50% decreases in insulin responsiveness of GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface and glucose transport in epitrochlearis and soleus muscles. Treatment of muscles with Re in vitro for 90 min completely reversed the high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance of glucose transport and GLUT4 translocation. This effect of Re is specific for insulin stimulated glucose transport, as Re treatment did not reverse the high-fat diet-induced resistance of skeletal muscle glucose transport to stimulation by contractions or hypoxia. Our results show that the ginsenoside Re induces a remarkably rapid reversal of high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance of muscle glucose transport by reversing the impairment of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of cytochrome P450 differentiated expression related to developmental stages in bromadiolone resistance in rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    over-express the Cyp2a1 gene. TGhe altered gene expression has been suggested to be involved in the bromadiolone resistance by facilitating enhanced anticoagulant metabolism. To investigate the gene expression of these cytochrome P450 genes in rats of different developmental stages we compared...... expression profiles, from 8-, 12- and 20-week-old resistant rats of the Danish strain to profiles of anticoagulant-susceptible rats of same ages. The three age-groups were selected to represent a group of pre-pubertal, pubertal and adult rats. We found expression profiles of the pre-pubertal and pubertal...... resistant rats to concur with profiles of the adults suggesting that cytochrome P450 enzymes are involved in the Danish bromadiolone resistance regardless of developmental stage. We also investigated the relative importance of the six cytochrome P450s in the different development stages of the resistant...

  12. Fine-mapping diabetes-related traits, including insulin resistance, in heterogeneous stock rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg Woods, Leah C; Holl, Katie L; Oreper, Daniel; Xie, Yuying; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Valdar, William

    2012-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a disease of relative insulin deficiency resulting from both insulin resistance and beta cell failure. We have previously used heterogeneous stock (HS) rats to fine-map a locus for glucose tolerance. We show here that glucose intolerance in the founder strains of the HS colony is mediated by different mechanisms: insulin resistance in WKY and an insulin secretion defect in ACI, and we demonstrate a high degree of variability for measures of insulin resistance and insulin secretion in HS rats. As such, our goal was to use HS rats to fine-map several diabetes-related traits within a region on rat chromosome 1. We measured blood glucose and plasma insulin levels after a glucose tolerance test in 782 male HS rats. Using 97 SSLP markers, we genotyped a 68 Mb region on rat chromosome 1 previously implicated in glucose and insulin regulation. We used linkage disequilibrium mapping by mixed model regression with inferred descent to identify a region from 198.85 to 205.9 that contains one or more quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fasting insulin and a measure of insulin resistance, the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index. This region also encompasses loci identified for fasting glucose and Insulin_AUC (area under the curve). A separate <3 Mb QTL was identified for body weight. Using a novel penalized regression method we then estimated effects of alternative haplotype pairings under each locus. These studies highlight the utility of HS rats for fine-mapping genetic loci involved in the underlying causes of T2D.

  13. Hypersensitivity to contact inhibition provides a clue to cancer resistance of naked mole-rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seluanov, Andrei; Hine, Christopher; Azpurua, Jorge; Feigenson, Marina; Bozzella, Michael; Mao, Zhiyong; Catania, Kenneth C; Gorbunova, Vera

    2009-11-17

    The naked mole-rat is the longest living rodent with a maximum lifespan exceeding 28 years. In addition to its longevity, naked mole-rats have an extraordinary resistance to cancer as tumors have never been observed in these rodents. Furthermore, we show that a combination of activated Ras and SV40 LT fails to induce robust anchorage-independent growth in naked mole-rat cells, while it readily transforms mouse fibroblasts. The mechanisms responsible for the cancer resistance of naked mole-rats were unknown. Here we show that naked mole-rat fibroblasts display hypersensitivity to contact inhibition, a phenomenon we termed "early contact inhibition." Contact inhibition is a key anticancer mechanism that arrests cell division when cells reach a high density. In cell culture, naked mole-rat fibroblasts arrest at a much lower density than those from a mouse. We demonstrate that early contact inhibition requires the activity of p53 and pRb tumor suppressor pathways. Inactivation of both p53 and pRb attenuates early contact inhibition. Contact inhibition in human and mouse is triggered by the induction of p27(Kip1). In contrast, early contact inhibition in naked mole-rat is associated with the induction of p16(Ink4a). Furthermore, we show that the roles of p16(Ink4a) and p27(Kip1) in the control of contact inhibition became temporally separated in this species: the early contact inhibition is controlled by p16(Ink4a), and regular contact inhibition is controlled by p27(Kip1). We propose that the additional layer of protection conferred by two-tiered contact inhibition contributes to the remarkable tumor resistance of the naked mole-rat.

  14. Ovariectomized High Fit Rats Are Protected against Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Min; Kanaley, Jill A.; Zidon, Terese M.; Welly, Rebecca J.; Scroggins, Rebecca J.; Britton, Steven L.; Koch, Lauren G.; Thyfault, John P.; Booth, Frank W.; Padilla, Jaume; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the absence of exercise training, rats selectively bred for high intrinsic aerobic capacity (HCR) are protected against ovariectomy (OVX)-induced insulin resistance and obesity compared to those bred for low intrinsic aerobic capacity (LCR). Purpose This study determined whether OVX HCR rats remain protected with exposure to high fat diet (HFD) compared to OVX LCR rats. Methods Female HCR and LCR rats (n=36; age 27-33 weeks) underwent OVX and were randomized to a standard chow diet (NC; 5% kcal fat) or HFD (45% kcal fat), ad libitum for 11 weeks. Total energy expenditure (TEE), resting energy expenditure (REE), spontaneous physical activity (SPA), and glucose tolerance were assessed midway, while fasting circulating metabolic markers, body composition, adipose tissue distribution, and skeletal muscle AMPK and mitochondrial markers were assessed at sacrifice. Results Both HCR and LCR experienced HFD-induced increases in total and visceral adiposity following OVX. Despite similar gains in adiposity, HCR rats were protected from HFD-induced insulin resistance and reduced TEE observed in LCR rats (P<0.05). This metabolic protection was likely attributed to a compensatory increase in SPA and associated preservation of skeletal muscle AMPK activity in HCR; whereas, HFD significantly reduced SPA and AMPK activity in LCR (P<0.05). In both lines, HFD reduced citrate synthase activity, gene expression of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis (tFAM, NRF1, and PGC-1α), and protein levels of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complexes I, II, IV, and V in skeletal muscle (all P<0.05). Conclusion Following OVX, HCR and LCR rats differentially respond to HFD such that HCR increase while LCR decrease SPA. This “physical activity compensation” likely confers protection from HFD-induced insulin resistance and reduced energy expenditure in HCR rats. PMID:26885638

  15. Comparison of the effects of endurance, resistance and concurrent training on insulin resistance and adiponectin-leptin ratio in diabetic rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Saremi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The obesity-related hormones leptin and adiponectin are independently and oppositely associated with insulin resistance. Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of endurance, resistance and concurrent training on insulin resistance and adiponectin-leptin ratio in diabetic rats. Methods: Ten out of 50 male Wistar rats were separated as healthy subjects. Then diabetes was induced in the remaining rats by the injection of streptozotocin. Diabetic rats divided into 4 groups: Control, resistance training (5 sessions/week, 4 reps/3 sets, endurance training (5 sets per week of treadmill running and concurrent training. The resistance training protocol consisted of ten weeks climbing up the ladder, while endurance training performed on treadmill for ten weeks. Concurrent training group completed a combination of both resistances and endurance treadmill training. Blood samples were taken to assess leptin, adiponectin and insulin resistance. Findings: Endurance, resistance and concurrent training significantly decreased insulin resistance and glucose (P0.05. On the one hand, adiponctin level and adiponctin-leptin ratio significantly increased in all of training groups (P<0.05. Conclusion: Exercise training, as defined in this study, leads to improvements in adiponectin-leptin ratio and concurrent training has more impact on insulin resistance index in diabetic rats.

  16. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grans, Camilla Figueiredo; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Abssamra, Marcos Elias Vergilino; Rocha, Leandro Yanase; Carrozzi, Nicolle Martins [Laboratório do Movimento Humano, Universidade São Judas Tadeu (USJT), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mostarda, Cristiano [Departamento de Educação Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão (UFMA), São Luís, MA (Brazil); Figueroa, Diego Mendrot [Laboratório de Hipertensão Experimental, Instituto do Coração (InCor), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Angelis, Kátia De [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Universidade Nove de Julho (Uninove), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia [Laboratório de Hipertensão Experimental, Instituto do Coração (InCor), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rodrigues, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.rodrigues@incor.usp.br [Laboratório do Movimento Humano, Universidade São Judas Tadeu (USJT), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats.

  17. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Figueiredo Grans

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. Objective: To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week. At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. Results: The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32% and trained infarcted (+46% in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%, myocardial performance index (-39% and systolic blood pressure (+6% improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%, as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46% in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Conclusion: Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats.

  18. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grans, Camilla Figueiredo; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Abssamra, Marcos Elias Vergilino; Rocha, Leandro Yanase; Carrozzi, Nicolle Martins; Mostarda, Cristiano; Figueroa, Diego Mendrot; Angelis, Kátia De; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Background Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. Objective To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. Results The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Conclusion Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats. PMID:25014059

  19. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grans, Camilla Figueiredo; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Abssamra, Marcos Elias Vergilino; Rocha, Leandro Yanase; Carrozzi, Nicolle Martins; Mostarda, Cristiano; Figueroa, Diego Mendrot; Angelis, Kátia De; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats

  20. Resistance training after myocardial infarction in rats: its role on cardiac and autonomic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grans, Camilla Figueiredo; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Abssamra, Marcos Elias Vergilino; Rocha, Leandro Yanase; Carrozzi, Nicolle Martins; Mostarda, Cristiano; Figueroa, Diego Mendrot; Angelis, Kátia De; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2014-07-01

    Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats.

  1. Ovariectomized Highly Fit Rats Are Protected against Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Min; Kanaley, Jill A; Zidon, Terese M; Welly, Rebecca J; Scroggins, Rebecca J; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Thyfault, John P; Booth, Frank W; Padilla, Jaume; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J

    2016-07-01

    In the absence of exercise training, rats selectively bred for high intrinsic aerobic capacity (high-capacity running (HCR)) are protected against ovariectomy (OVX)-induced insulin resistance (IR) and obesity compared with those bred for low intrinsic aerobic capacity (low-capacity running (LCR)). This study determined whether OVX HCR rats remain protected with exposure to high-fat diet (HFD) compared with OVX LCR rats. Female HCR and LCR rats (n = 36; age, 27-33 wk) underwent OVX and were randomized to a standard chow diet (NC, 5% kcal fat) or HFD (45% kcal fat) ad libitum for 11 wk. Total energy expenditure, resting energy expenditure, spontaneous physical activity (SPA), and glucose tolerance were assessed midway, whereas fasting circulating metabolic markers, body composition, adipose tissue distribution, and skeletal muscle adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and mitochondrial markers were assessed at sacrifice. Both HCR and LCR rats experienced HFD-induced increases in total and visceral adiposity after OVX. Despite similar gains in adiposity, HCR rats were protected from HFD-induced IR and reduced total energy expenditure observed in LCR rats (P activity in HCR; however, HFD significantly reduced SPA and AMPK activity in LCR (P activity, gene expression of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis (tFAM, NRF1, and PGC-1α), and protein levels of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complexes I, II, IV, and V in skeletal muscle (all P physical activity compensation" likely confers protection from HFD-induced IR and reduced energy expenditure in HCR rats.

  2. [Variability of hemodynamic parameters and resistance to stress damage in rats of different strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, L M; Popkova, E V; Lakomkin, V L; Kirillina, T N; Zhukova, A G; Sazontova, T G; Usacheva, M A; Kapel'ko, V I

    2006-02-01

    Total power of heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity were significantly smaller in the August rats than in the Wistar rats, but adrenal and plasma catecholamine contents were considerably higher in the former ones. 1 hour after stress (30 min in cold water), plasma catecholamine was increased 2-fold in Wistar rats, while in August rats the adrenaline concentration increased only by 58% and the were no changes in noradrenaline content. At the same time, activation of catecholamine metabolism in the adrenal glands was similar in both groups. The oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide depressed the contractile function of isolated heart in the August rats to a smaller extent as compared to Wistar rats, control ones and after the cold-water stress. This effect correlated with more pronounced stability ofantioxidant enzymes in the August rats. It seems that the greater resistance to stress damage in the August rats is mediated by enhanced power of defense mechanisms both at systemic and cellular levels.

  3. Drømmejobbet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrebye, Silas

    2012-01-01

    Medarbejdere vil i fremtiden også kunne arbejde, mens de sover. Virksomheder tilbyder snart deres ansatte interne kurser i ‘lucid dreaming’. Disse giver mulighed for, at man i sine drømme bliver bevidst om, at man drømmer og således kan manipulere dem. Det skal nu udnyttes. Management...

  4. Dr. Dampe - Doctor Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, John

    2009-01-01

    On Dr.phil. J.J.Dampe's fight for democracy in the first part of the 19th century in Denmark and his dramatic writings......On Dr.phil. J.J.Dampe's fight for democracy in the first part of the 19th century in Denmark and his dramatic writings...

  5. Low warfarin resistance frequency in Norway rats in two cities in China after 30 years usage of anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Ning; Liu, Lan; Tian, Lin; Luo, Chan; Cong, Lin; Feng, Zhiyong; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Song, Ying

    2018-04-17

    Anticoagulant rodenticides have been widely used in rodent control in China for over 30 years and resistant Norway rats have been reported. Mutations in the vitamin K epoxide reductase complex, subunit 1 (Vkorc1) gene can cause anticoagulant resistance in rodents. In this study, we analyzed the Vkorc1 polymorphisms of 681 Norway rats collected in Zhanjiang and Harbin City in China from 2008 to 2015 and evaluated the warfarin resistance frequency. Analysis revealed 4 mutations including 3 not previously reported. Two new synonymous mutations His68His and Leu105Leu are not associated with warfarin resistance. One new nonsynonymous mutation Ala140Thr was found in Zhanjiang rat samples collected in 3 years with low frequencies (3.3%-4.0%) and is likely associated with warfarin resistance. Laboratory resistance tests suggested low warfarin resistance frequencies in rats from Zhanjiang (4.9%-17.1%) and Harbin City (0-2.5%). Both genetic analysis and laboratory resistance tests suggested low warfarin resistance frequencies in rats from Zhanjiang and Harbin City. The alternative usage of FGARs and SGARs might represent an effective strategy against the development of warfarin resistance in Norway rats in China. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. A possible mechanism of resistance to cadmium toxicity in male Long-Evans rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamure, Yasutaka; Shimada, Hideaki; Kiyozumi, Morio; Yasutake, Akira; Imamura, Yorishige

    2006-05-01

    The susceptibility to cadmium (Cd)-induced toxicity in male Long-Evans (LE) rats was compared with that in male Fischer 344 (Fischer) and Wistar-Imamichi (WI) rats, which are sensitive and resistant, respectively, to Cd toxicity. All rats of the LE and WI strains survived for 7 days after the treatment with a toxic dose of Cd (6.5mg/kg b.w.). However, all rats of the Fischer strain died by the following day. The strong resistance to Cd toxicity in the LE strain was confirmed to be independent of metallothionein synthesis induced by Cd. The hepatic and renal Cd contents after its administration were significantly lower in the LE strain than in the Fischer strain. Furthermore, the hepatic and renal zinc (Zn) contents after its administration were significantly lower in the LE strain than in the Fischer strain. These limited data suggest that the strong resistance to Cd toxicity in male LE rats results from, at least in part, the lower accumulation of the metal in the liver and kidney, in a similar mechanism as the lower Zn accumulation.

  7. Partial sleep deprivation by environmental noise increases food intake and body weight in obesity resistant rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavanji, Vijayakumar; Teske, Jennifer A.; Billington, Charles J.; Kotz, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Sleep-restriction in humans increases risk for obesity, but previous rodent studies show weight loss following sleep deprivation, possibly due to stressful-methods used to prevent sleep. Obesity-resistant (OR) rats exhibit consolidated-sleep and resistance to weight-gain. We hypothesized that sleep disruption by a less-stressful method would increase body weight, and examined effect of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) on body weight in OR and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Design and Methods OR and SD rats (n=12/group) were implanted with transmitters to record sleep/wake. After baseline recording, six SD and six OR rats underwent 8 h PSD during light-phase for 9 d. Sleep was reduced using recordings of random noise. Sleep/wake states were scored as wakefulness (W), slow-wave-sleep (SWS) and rapid-eye-movement-sleep (REMS). Total number of transitions between stages, SWS-delta-power, food intake and body weight were documented. Results Exposure to noise decreased SWS and REMS time, while increasing W time. Sleep-deprivation increased number of transitions between stages and SWS-delta-power. Further, PSD during the rest phase increased recovery-sleep during active phase. The PSD SD and OR rats had greater food intake and body weight compared to controls Conclusions PSD by less-stressful means increases body weight in rats. Also, PSD during rest phase increases active period sleep. PMID:23666828

  8. Adolescent rats are resistant to forming ethanol seeking habits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Serlin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Early age of onset alcohol drinking is significantly more likely to lead to alcohol use disorders (AUDs than alcohol drinking that begins after the age of 18. Unfortunately, the majority of people in the United States begin drinking in adolescence. Therefore, it is important to understand how early alcohol drinking leads to increased risk for AUDs so that better treatments and prevention strategies can be developed. Adolescents perceive greater rewarding properties of alcohol, and adolescents may be more likely to form alcohol-seeking habits that promote continued use throughout the lifetime. Therefore, we compared the development of alcohol seeking habits in adolescent and adult male, Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were trained to lever press to receive 10% ethanol + 0.1% saccharin on a schedule that promotes habit formation. Rats were tested using a contingency degradation procedure at different points in training. Adult rats formed ethanol-seeking habits with only moderate training, while adolescents remained goal-directed even with extended training. Nevertheless, adolescents consumed more ethanol than adults throughout the experiment and continued to consume more ethanol than adults when they reached adulthood. Therefore, early onset alcohol use may promote AUD formation through establishment of high levels of drinking that becomes habitual in adulthood.

  9. Remarkable features of ovarian morphology and reproductive hormones in insulin-resistant Zucker fatty (fa/fa rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manase Kengo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zucker fatty (fa/fa rats are a well-understood model of obesity and hyperinsulinemia. It is now thought that obesity/hyperinsulinemia is an important cause of endocrinological abnormality, but to date there have been no reports on the changes in ovarian morphology or the ovarian androgen profile in rat models of obesity and insulin resistance. Methods In this study we investigated the effects of obesity and hyperinsulinemia on ovarian morphology and the hormone profile in insulin-resistant Zucker fatty rats (5, 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age, n = 6-7. Results Ovaries from 5-week-old fatty rats had significantly greater total and atretic follicle numbers, and higher atretic-to-total follicle ratios than those from lean rats. Ovaries from 12- and 16-week-old fatty rats showed interstitial cell hyperplasia and numerous cysts with features of advanced follicular atresia. In addition, serum testosterone and androstenedione levels significantly declined in fatty rats from age 8 to 16 weeks, so that fatty rats showed significantly lower levels of serum testosterone (12 and 16 weeks and androstenedione (all weeks than lean rats. This may reflect a reduction of androgen synthesis during follicular atresia. Serum adiponectin levels were high in immature fatty rats, and although the levels declined significantly as they matured, it remained significantly higher in fatty rats than in lean rats. On the other hand, levels of ovarian adiponectin and its receptors were significantly lower in mature fatty rats than in lean mature rats or immature fatty rats. Conclusions Our findings indicate that ovarian morphology and hormone profiles are significantly altered by the continuous insulin resistance in Zucker fatty rats. Simultaneously, abrupt reductions in serum and ovarian adiponectin also likely contribute to the infertility seen in fatty rats.

  10. Effects of One Resistance Exercise Session on Vascular Smooth Muscle of Hypertensive Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da; Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a public health problem and increases the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. To evaluate the effects of a resistance exercise session on the contractile and relaxing mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle in mesenteric arteries of N G -nitro L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-induced hypertensive rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (C), hypertensive (H), and exercised hypertensive (EH). Hypertension was induced by administration of 20 mg/kg of L-NAME for 7 days prior to experimental protocols. The resistance exercise protocol consisted of 10 sets of 10 repetitions and intensity of 40% of one repetition maximum. The reactivity of vascular smooth muscle was evaluated by concentration‑response curves to phenylephrine (PHEN), potassium chloride (KCl) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Rats treated with L-NAME showed an increase (p < 0.001) in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) compared to the initial period of induction. No difference in PHEN sensitivity was observed between groups H and EH. Acute resistance exercise reduced (p < 0.001) the contractile response induced by KCl at concentrations of 40 and 60 mM in group EH. Greater (p < 0.01) smooth muscle sensitivity to NPS was observed in group EH as compared to group H. One resistance exercise session reduces the contractile response induced by KCl in addition to increasing the sensitivity of smooth muscle to NO in mesenteric arteries of hypertensive rats

  11. Effects of One Resistance Exercise Session on Vascular Smooth Muscle of Hypertensive Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da; Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana, E-mail: marciorvsantos@bol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    Hypertension is a public health problem and increases the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. To evaluate the effects of a resistance exercise session on the contractile and relaxing mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle in mesenteric arteries of N{sup G}-nitro L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-induced hypertensive rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (C), hypertensive (H), and exercised hypertensive (EH). Hypertension was induced by administration of 20 mg/kg of L-NAME for 7 days prior to experimental protocols. The resistance exercise protocol consisted of 10 sets of 10 repetitions and intensity of 40% of one repetition maximum. The reactivity of vascular smooth muscle was evaluated by concentration‑response curves to phenylephrine (PHEN), potassium chloride (KCl) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Rats treated with L-NAME showed an increase (p < 0.001) in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) compared to the initial period of induction. No difference in PHEN sensitivity was observed between groups H and EH. Acute resistance exercise reduced (p < 0.001) the contractile response induced by KCl at concentrations of 40 and 60 mM in group EH. Greater (p < 0.01) smooth muscle sensitivity to NPS was observed in group EH as compared to group H. One resistance exercise session reduces the contractile response induced by KCl in addition to increasing the sensitivity of smooth muscle to NO in mesenteric arteries of hypertensive rats.

  12. Dietary fructo-oligosaccharides and inulin decrease resistance of rats to salmonelle: protective role of calcium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggencate, ten S.J.M.; Bovee-Oudenhoven, I.M.J.; Lettink-Wissink, M.L.G.; Katan, M.B.; Meer, van der R.

    2004-01-01

    Background: We have shown recently that rapid fermentable fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) decreased resistance of rats towards salmonella. It is not known whether inulin ( which is fermented more gradually) has similar effects or whether buffering nutrients can counteract the adverse effects of rapid

  13. Genetic, physiological and comparative genomic studies of hypertension and insulin resistance in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coan, P. M.; Hummel, O.; Diaz, A. G.; Barrier, M.; Alfazema, N.; Norsworthy, P. J.; Pravenec, Michal; Petretto, E.; Hübner, N.; Aitman, T. J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2017), s. 297-306 ISSN 1754-8403 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/12/0696 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : rat * congenic * genomic * hypertension * insulin resistance Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Endocrinology and metabolism (including diabetes, hormones) Impact factor: 4.691, year: 2016

  14. Effects of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the pharmacology of rat conduit and resistance intrapulmonary arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howarth Frank C

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor control of blood glucose in diabetes is known to promote vascular dysfunction and hypertension. Diabetes was recently shown to be linked to an increased prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine how the pharmacological reactivity of intrapulmonary arteries is altered in a rat model of diabetes. Methods Diabetes was induced in rats by the β-cell toxin, streptozotocin (STZ, 60 mg/kg, and isolated conduit and resistance intrapulmonary arteries studied 3–4 months later. Isometric tension responses to the vasoconstrictors phenylephrine, serotonin and PGF2α, and the vasodilators carbachol and glyceryl trinitrate, were compared in STZ-treated rats and age-matched controls. Results STZ-induced diabetes significantly blunted the maximum response of conduit, but not resistance pulmonary arteries to phenylephrine and serotonin, without a change in pEC50. Agonist responses were differentially reduced, with serotonin (46% smaller affected more than phenylephrine (32% smaller and responses to PGF2α unaltered. Vasoconstriction caused by K+-induced depolarisation remained normal in diabetic rats. Endothelium-dependent dilation to carbachol and endothelium-independent dilation to glyceryl trinitrate were also unaffected. Conclusion The small resistance pulmonary arteries are relatively resistant to STZ-induced diabetes. The impaired constrictor responsiveness of conduit vessels was agonist dependent, suggesting possible loss of receptor expression or function. The observed effects cannot account for pulmonary hypertension in diabetes, rather the impaired reactivity to vasoconstrictors would counteract the development of pulmonary hypertensive disease.

  15. Silymarin induces insulin resistance through an increase of phosphatase and tensin homolog in Wistar rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Chun Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN is a phosphoinositide phosphatase that regulates crucial cellular functions, including insulin signaling, lipid and glucose metabolism, as well as survival and apoptosis. Silymarin is the active ingredient in milk thistle and exerts numerous effects through the activation of PTEN. However, the effect of silymarin on the development of insulin resistance remains unknown. METHODS: Wistar rats fed fructose-rich chow or normal chow were administered oral silymarin to identify the development of insulin resistance using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemic- euglycemic clamping. Changes in PTEN expression in skeletal muscle and liver were compared using western blotting analysis. Further investigation was performed in L6 cells to check the expression of PTEN and insulin-related signals. PTEN deletion in L6 cells was achieved by small interfering ribonucleic acid transfection. RESULTS: Oral administration of silymarin at a dose of 200 mg/kg once daily induced insulin resistance in normal rats and enhanced insulin resistance in fructose-rich chow-fed rats. An increase of PTEN expression was observed in the skeletal muscle and liver of rats with insulin resistance. A decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt in L6 myotube cells, which was maintained in a high-glucose condition, was also observed. Treatment with silymarin aggravated high-glucose-induced insulin resistance. Deletion of PTEN in L6 cells reversed silymarin-induced impaired insulin signaling and glucose uptake. CONCLUSIONS: Silymarin has the ability to disrupt insulin signaling through increased PTEN expression. Therefore, silymarin should be used carefully in type-2 diabetic patients.

  16. Hippocampal neurogenesis of Wistar Kyoto rats is congenitally impaired and correlated with stress resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kin, Kyohei; Yasuhara, Takao; Kameda, Masahiro; Agari, Takashi; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Morimoto, Jun; Okazaki, Mihoko; Umakoshi, Michiari; Kuwahara, Ken; Kin, Ittetsu; Tajiri, Naoki; Date, Isao

    2017-06-30

    The hippocampus is thought to be an important region for depression. However, the relationship between hippocampal neurogenesis and depression is still controversial. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats are frequently used as a depression model. WKY rats are known to show physiologically abnormal features, and these features resemble abnormalities seen in depressed patients. However, the neurogenesis of WKY rats is still unknown. In this study, we first evaluated the neurogenesis of WKY rats and compared it to that of Wistar (WIS) rats. No strain effect was observed in the number of cells positive for 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and BrdU/Doublecortin (Dcx) in the subventricular zone (SVZ). However, the number of BrdU- and BrdU/Dcx-positive cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus was significantly lower in WKY rats than in WIS rats. Next, we evaluated the correlation between neurogenesis and behavior tests. Behavior tests did not affect neurogenesis in either strain. Hippocampal neurogenesis correlated negatively with the results of a forced swim test (FST) on day 2 in each strain. That is, rats with a lower level of native neurogenesis in the DG showed a higher level of learned helplessness induced by the inescapable stress of the FST on day 1. Our findings indicate that hippocampal neurogenesis in WKY rats is congenitally impaired in contrast to that in WIS rats. Native cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the DG are correlated with stress resistance. These findings may be useful for developing new targets for depression treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by wild urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea G Himsworth

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is an important cause of multi-drug-resistant infections in people, particularly indigent populations. MRSA can be transmitted between people and domestic animals, but the potential for transmission between people and commensal pests, particularly rodents, had not been investigated. The objective of this study was to identify the presence and characterize the ecology of MRSA in rats (Rattus spp. from in an impoverished, inner-city neighborhood. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from rats trapped in 33 city blocks and one location within the adjacent port. Bacterial culture was performed and MRSA isolates were characterized using a variety of methods, including whole-genome sequencing (WGS. The ecology of MRSA in rats was described using phylogenetic analysis, geospatial analysis, and generalized linear mixed models. MRSA was identified 22 of 637 (3.5% rats tested, although prevalence varied from 0 - 50% among blocks. Isolates belonged to 4 clusters according to WGS, with the largest cluster (n = 10 containing isolates that were genetically indistinguishable from community-acquired USA300 MRSA strains isolated from people within the study area. MRSA strains demonstrated both geographic clustering and dispersion. The odds of an individual rat carrying MRSA increased with increased body fat (OR = 2.53, 95% CI = 1.33-4.82, and in the winter (OR = 5.29, 95% CI = 1.04-26.85 and spring (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.10-27.58 compared to the fall. The results show that urban rats carried the same MRSA lineages occurring in local human and/or animal populations, supporting recent transmission from external sources. MRSA carriage was influenced by season, most likely as a result of temporal variation in rat behavior and rat-human interactions.

  18. Low intensity resistance training improves systolic function and cardiovascular autonomic control in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostarda, Cristiano T; Rodrigues, Bruno; de Moraes, Oscar Albuquerque; Moraes-Silva, Ivana C; Arruda, Paula Barros Olinto; Cardoso, Ruymar; Scapini, Katia Bilhar; Dos Santos, Fernando; De Angelis, Kátia; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of low intensity resistance training (RT) on left ventricular (LV) function, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and cardiovascular autonomic control of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into (n=8 each group): sedentary control (SC), trained control (TC), sedentary diabetic (SD), and trained diabetic (TD). Trained groups underwent low intensity RT (40%-50% 1 repetition maximum) for 10 weeks. Echocardiographic evaluation, arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), BRS, and autonomic measurements were performed. Diabetes induced an increase in glycemia and a reduction in body weight in diabetics when compared with control animals. Diabetic rats displayed cardiac dysfunction, reduced systolic AP and HR, impaired BRS and autonomic derangement when compared to control rats. RT improved ejection fraction (SD: 68%±1.3% vs. TD: 75%±3.0%) and velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (SD: 0.32±0.02 vs. TD: 0.40±0.01 circ/seg.10(-4)). Trained diabetic rats presented increased AP (+10.2%), HR (+10.4%), and BRS after RT protocol. Low intensity RT induced an increase in systolic function in diabetic rats. This may be due to positive LV remodeling and BRS improvement, which may have played an important role in the attenuation of hemodynamic impairment and cardiac autonomic neuropathy in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cancer resistance in the blind mole rat is mediated by concerted necrotic cell death mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vera; Hine, Christopher; Tian, Xiao; Ablaeva, Julia; Gudkov, Andrei V.; Nevo, Eviatar; Seluanov, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Blind mole rats Spalax (BMR) are small subterranean rodents common in the Middle East. BMR is distinguished by its adaptations to life underground, remarkable longevity (with a maximum documented lifespan of 21 y), and resistance to cancer. Spontaneous tumors have never been observed in spalacids. To understand the mechanisms responsible for this resistance, we examined the growth of BMR fibroblasts in vitro of the species Spalax judaei and Spalax golani. BMR cells proliferated actively for 7–20 population doublings, after which the cells began secreting IFN-β, and the cultures underwent massive necrotic cell death within 3 d. The necrotic cell death phenomenon was independent of culture conditions or telomere shortening. Interestingly, this cell behavior was distinct from that observed in another long-lived and cancer-resistant African mole rat, Heterocephalus glaber, the naked mole rat in which cells display hypersensitivity to contact inhibition. Sequestration of p53 and Rb proteins using SV40 large T antigen completely rescued necrotic cell death. Our results suggest that cancer resistance of BMR is conferred by massive necrotic response to overproliferation mediated by p53 and Rb pathways, and triggered by the release of IFN-β. Thus, we have identified a unique mechanism that contributes to cancer resistance of this subterranean mammal extremely adapted to life underground. PMID:23129611

  20. Effect of Long Term Regular Resistance Exercise on Heart Function and Oxidative Stress in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rahbar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Numerous studies have been conducted to assess the effects of acute resistance exercises on the structure and the function of heart, but little works done on effects of chronic resistance exercises. So, the objective of current study was to investigate the long term effect of regular exercises on cardiac function and oxidative stress.   Methods: Forty male Wistar rats in the weight range of 250- 300 g were used in this study. They were divided in 2 following groups: The 3 months exercises test group and control group which remained without exercises. Regular resistive exercise was carried out according to the model proposed by Tamaki et al. Test group rats exercised for three months. Finally the hearts of 10 rats in each group were taken for homogenization, oxidative stress measurement and the other ten were examined for heart function. Malondialdhyde as an index of oxidative stress and superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxides and catalase as an indicator of antioxidant capacity with special kits were specifically measured.   Results: Regular resistive exercise didn't significantly affect the rats' weight, but heart weight in exercise group showed a significant increase (p<0.05. There was a significant decrease in heart rate in exercise group (p<0.05. Left ventricle contraction strength and coronary flow had a significant increase in exercise group in comparison with control group (p<0.05. There was not any significant difference in Malondialdhyde and antioxidant enzymes activity.   Conclusion: This study showed that, heart efficiency had a significant improvement under effect of regular resistive exercise. Meanwhile, regular resistive exercise didn’t have any significant effect on oxidative stress and heart antioxidant defense capacity.

  1. Pyridostigmine Improves the Effects of Resistance Exercise Training after Myocardial Infarction in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriani, Daniele J.; Coelho-Júnior, Hélio J.; de Oliveira, Juliana C. M. F.; Delbin, Maria A.; Mostarda, Cristiano T.; Dourado, Paulo M. M.; Caperuto, Érico C.; Irigoyen, Maria C. C.; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Exercise training and pharmacological treatments are important strategies to minimize the deleterious effects of MI. However, little is known about the effects of resistance training combined with pyridostigmine bromide (PYR) treatment on cardiac and autonomic function, as well as on the inflammatory profile after MI. Thus, in the present study, male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into: control (Cont); sedentary infarcted (Inf); PYR – treated sedentary infarcted rats (Inf+P); infarcted rats undergoing resistance exercise training (Inf+RT); and infarcted rats undergoing PYR treatment plus resistance training (Inf+RT+P). After 12 weeks of resistance training (15–20 climbs per session, with a 1-min rest between each climb, at a low to moderate intensity, 5 days a week) and/or PYR treatment (0.14 mg/mL of drink water), hemodynamic function, autonomic modulation, and cytokine expressions were evaluated. We observed that 3 months of PYR treatment, either alone or in combination with exercise, can improve the deleterious effects of MI on left ventricle dimensions and function, baroreflex sensitivity, and autonomic parameters, as well as systemic and tissue inflammatory profile. Furthermore, additional benefits in a maximal load test and anti-inflammatory state of skeletal muscle were found when resistance training was combined with PYR treatment. Thus, our findings suggest that the combination of resistance training and PYR may be a good therapeutic strategy since they promote additional benefits on skeletal muscle anti-inflammatory profile after MI. PMID:29483876

  2. Pyridostigmine Improves the Effects of Resistance Exercise Training after Myocardial Infarction in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele J. Feriani

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction (MI remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Exercise training and pharmacological treatments are important strategies to minimize the deleterious effects of MI. However, little is known about the effects of resistance training combined with pyridostigmine bromide (PYR treatment on cardiac and autonomic function, as well as on the inflammatory profile after MI. Thus, in the present study, male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into: control (Cont; sedentary infarcted (Inf; PYR – treated sedentary infarcted rats (Inf+P; infarcted rats undergoing resistance exercise training (Inf+RT; and infarcted rats undergoing PYR treatment plus resistance training (Inf+RT+P. After 12 weeks of resistance training (15–20 climbs per session, with a 1-min rest between each climb, at a low to moderate intensity, 5 days a week and/or PYR treatment (0.14 mg/mL of drink water, hemodynamic function, autonomic modulation, and cytokine expressions were evaluated. We observed that 3 months of PYR treatment, either alone or in combination with exercise, can improve the deleterious effects of MI on left ventricle dimensions and function, baroreflex sensitivity, and autonomic parameters, as well as systemic and tissue inflammatory profile. Furthermore, additional benefits in a maximal load test and anti-inflammatory state of skeletal muscle were found when resistance training was combined with PYR treatment. Thus, our findings suggest that the combination of resistance training and PYR may be a good therapeutic strategy since they promote additional benefits on skeletal muscle anti-inflammatory profile after MI.

  3. Pyridostigmine Improves the Effects of Resistance Exercise Training after Myocardial Infarction in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriani, Daniele J; Coelho-Júnior, Hélio J; de Oliveira, Juliana C M F; Delbin, Maria A; Mostarda, Cristiano T; Dourado, Paulo M M; Caperuto, Érico C; Irigoyen, Maria C C; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Exercise training and pharmacological treatments are important strategies to minimize the deleterious effects of MI. However, little is known about the effects of resistance training combined with pyridostigmine bromide (PYR) treatment on cardiac and autonomic function, as well as on the inflammatory profile after MI. Thus, in the present study, male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into: control (Cont); sedentary infarcted (Inf); PYR - treated sedentary infarcted rats (Inf+P); infarcted rats undergoing resistance exercise training (Inf+RT); and infarcted rats undergoing PYR treatment plus resistance training (Inf+RT+P). After 12 weeks of resistance training (15-20 climbs per session, with a 1-min rest between each climb, at a low to moderate intensity, 5 days a week) and/or PYR treatment (0.14 mg/mL of drink water), hemodynamic function, autonomic modulation, and cytokine expressions were evaluated. We observed that 3 months of PYR treatment, either alone or in combination with exercise, can improve the deleterious effects of MI on left ventricle dimensions and function, baroreflex sensitivity, and autonomic parameters, as well as systemic and tissue inflammatory profile. Furthermore, additional benefits in a maximal load test and anti-inflammatory state of skeletal muscle were found when resistance training was combined with PYR treatment. Thus, our findings suggest that the combination of resistance training and PYR may be a good therapeutic strategy since they promote additional benefits on skeletal muscle anti-inflammatory profile after MI.

  4. Hibiscus sabdariffa calyx palliates insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and oxidative rout in fructose-induced metabolic syndrome rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiboye, Taofeek O; Raji, Hikmat O; Adeleye, Abdulwasiu O; Adigun, Nurudeen S; Giwa, Oluwayemisi B; Ojewuyi, Oluwayemisi B; Oladiji, Adenike T

    2016-03-30

    The effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyx extract was evaluated in high-fructose-induced metabolic syndrome rats. Insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and oxidative rout were induced in rats using high-fructose diet. High-fructose diet-fed rats were administered 100 and 200 mg kg(-1) body weight of H. sabdariffa extract for 3 weeks, starting from week 7 of high-fructose diet treatment. High-fructose diet significantly (P Hibiscus extract. Overall, aqueous extract of H. sabdariffa palliates insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and oxidative rout in high-fructose-induced metabolic syndrome rats. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Patwardhan, Dr Vilas Shridhar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1995 Section: Engineering & Technology. Patwardhan, Dr Vilas Shridhar Ph.D. (Purdue), FNAE. Date of birth: 13 October 1947. Specialization: Computer Simulation, Mathematical Modelling, Multiphase Reactions and Software Development and Spreadsheet Programming Address: 3, Vibha Heights, Sanewadi, ...

  6. Thiagarajan, Dr Pazhamaneri Subramaniam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1995 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Thiagarajan, Dr Pazhamaneri Subramaniam Ph.D. (Rice), FNASc. Date of birth: 9 November 1948. Specialization: Distributed Probabilistic Systems, Hybrid Systems and Computational Systems Biology Address: Laboratory of System Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, ...

  7. Nadkarni, Dr Vikas Madhusudan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nadkarni, Dr Vikas Madhusudan Ph.D. (Delaware). Date of birth: 6 December 1947. Specialization: Polymer Science & Engineering, Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Address: Managing Director, Techcellence Consultancy Services, Pvt. Ltd., 5, Pushkaraj, Pushpak Park, Aundh, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra

  8. Galande, Dr Sanjeev

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , Gene Regulation, Genomics and Proteomics Address: Centre for Excellence in Epigenetics, Indian Institute of Science Education, & Research, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2590 8060

  9. Davis, Dr Trupapur Antony

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1979 Section: Plant Sciences. Davis, Dr Trupapur Antony Ph.D. (ISI). Date of birth: 9 February 1923. Date of death: 10 November 1989. Specialization: Plant Physiology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  10. Deshpande, Dr A A

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Period: 1989–1993. Deshpande, Dr A A . Date of birth: 23 January 1958. Specialization: Observational Radio Astronomy Address during Associateship: Raman Research Institute, C.V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar P.O, Bangalore 560 080.

  11. Mohan, Dr Viswanathan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madras), FNASc, FNA, FRCP (London, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Ireland), FTWAS. Date of birth: 10 April 1954. Specialization: Diabetes and its Complications, Epidemiology, Genomic Studies Address: Dr Mohan's Diabetes Specialities Centre, No.

  12. Mistry, Dr Kekshushroo Bamanshaw

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. (Delhi). Date of birth: 13 January 1936. Specialization: Soil Science, Fertilizers and Agrochemicals Address: 52, Sunshine, Dr Rajaballi Patel Lane, Mumbai 400 026, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (022) 2351 7387, (022) 2351 0564

  13. Mishra, Dr A C

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2009 Section: Medicine. Mishra, Dr A C . Ph.D. (Pune), FNA. Date of birth: 1 July 1950. Specialization: Human Viral Infection & Zoonotic Diseases, Public Health Address: Director, Interactive Research School of Health Affairs, Bharati Vidyapeeth University, ...

  14. Agarwal, Dr Uday S

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , Dr Uday S. Date of birth: 15 June 1962. Specialization: Chemical Engineering Address during Associateship: Chemical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110 016. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  15. Balasubramanian, Dr Kalpattu Kuppusamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Balasubramanian, Dr Kalpattu Kuppusamy Ph.D. (Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 5 September 1939. Specialization: Molecular Rearrangements, Carbohydrate Chemistry, Organic Electrophotochemistry, Synthetic Organic Chemistry and Heterocyclic Chemistry Address: No. 47 (old 24), Padmanabhanagar, 5th Street, Adayar, ...

  16. Jayaraman, Dr Narayanaswamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2011 Section: Chemistry. Jayaraman, Dr Narayanaswamy Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur). Date of birth: 25 May 1964. Specialization: Carbohydrate Chemistry, Dendrimer Chemistry, Synthetic Organic Chemistry Address: Department of Organic Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact:

  17. Hazarika, Dr Nabajit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hazarika, Dr Nabajit Ph.D. (Tezpur). Date of birth: 17 January 1986. Specialization: Remote Sensing, GIS Applications, Fluvial Geomorphology, Landuse Landcover Studies Address: Dept. of Environmental Science, Nagaland University, Lumami 798 627, Nagaland Contact: Residence: 94354 81256, 97066 71256

  18. Gopinath, Dr Chinnakonda Subramanian

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gopinath, Dr Chinnakonda Subramanian Ph.D. (IIT, Madras). Date of birth: 4 June 1964. Specialization: Water Splitting, Materials Science, Surface Science, Heterogeneous Catalysis, Spectroscopy Address: Senior Principal Scientist, Catalysis Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact:

  19. Vijayamohanan, Dr Kunjukrishna Pillai

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2008 Section: Chemistry. Vijayamohanan, Dr Kunjukrishna Pillai Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 28 May 1960. Specialization: Electrochemical Power Sources, Functional Materials, Electrochemistry, Nanotechnology and Materials Chemistry Address: Director, Central Electrochemical Research Institute, ...

  20. Effects of marine collagen peptides on glucose metabolism and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, CuiFeng; Zhang, Wei; Mu, Bo; Zhang, Fan; Lai, NanNan; Zhou, JianXin; Xu, AiMin; Liu, JianGuo; Li, Yong

    2017-07-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of marine collagen peptides (MCPs) on glucose metabolism and insulin resistance using a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Forty T2DM obese Wistar rats were randomly assigned to receive varying doses of MCPs or a vehicle control for 4 weeks. Blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as oxidative stress and inflammation were measured. The expression of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) in skeletal muscles and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) in livers of T2DM rats was also measured. It was found that in the group of 9.0 g/kg/day MCPs significantly improved glucose, insulin, and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance, and increased the insulin sensitivity index (ISI). In addition, the groups of 4.5 and 2.25 g/kg/day MCPs significantly improved liver steatosis. It was also found that MCPs decreased expression of oxidative stress biomarkers and inflammatory cytokines and adipocytokines in T2DM rats. In conclusion, medium and high doses of MCPs (≥4.5 g/kg/day) improved glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in T2DM rats. These beneficial effects of MCPs may be mediated by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation and by up-regulating GLUT4, and PPAR-α activity.

  1. Changes of plasma angiogenic factors during chronic resistance exercise in type 1 diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esfahani, S.P.; Gharakhanlou, R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Exercise has several beneficial effects on cardiovascular system. However, the exact mechanism is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic resistance exercise on some plasma angiogenic factors in type 1 diabetic rats. Methodology: Thirty male Wistar rats were divided into three groups of control, diabetic and diabetic trained (n = 10 each). Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (55 mg/kg). The rats in the trained group undertook one training session per day, 3 days/week, for 4 weeks. Blood samples were taken and the concentrations of plasma glucose, lipid profile, nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and soluble form of VEGF receptor-1 (sFlt-1) were determined. Results: We found a significant reduction in plasma NO concentrations in diabetic rats compared to the controls (p 0.05). There were no significant differences in plasma VEGF and sFlt-1 concentrations between diabetic sedentary and trained groups (p > 0.05). Moreover, VEGF/sFlt-1 ratios in diabetic animals were lower than the control group and resistance exercise could not increase this ratio in diabetic animals (p > 0.05) Conclusion: Resistance exercise could not change plasma VEGF, sFlt-1 and VEGF/sFlt-1 ratio. However, it increased plasma NO concentrations in diabetic animals. More studies are needed to determine the effects of this type of exercise on the angiogenesis process. (author)

  2. Effects of Resistance Training on Ventricular Function and Hypertrophy in a Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barauna, Valério Garrone; Rosa, Kaleizu Teodoro; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; de Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to follow the ventricular function and cardiac hypertrophy in rats undergoing a resistance-training program for a period of 3 months. Design: Forty animals were divided into two major groups: control (n=16) and resistance trained (n=24). From the resistance-trained group, 12 animals were resistance trained for 1 month and another 12 for 3 months. The resistance-training protocol was performed with 4 sets of 12 repetitions using 65% to 75% of one repetition maximum (maximum lifted weight with the exercise apparatus). Methods: Echocardiographic analysis was performed at the beginning of the resistance-training period and at the end of each month. The repetition maximum was measured every 2 weeks. Cardiac hypertrophy was determined by echocardiography, by the absolute weight of the cardiac chambers and by histology of the left ventricle. Results: Before resistance training, both groups had similar repetition maximums, ranging from 1.8-fold to 2-fold the body weight; however, at the end of the resistance-training period, the repetition maximum of the resistance-trained group was 6-fold greater than the body weight. The left ventricular mass as assessed by echocardiography was 8%, 12% and 16% larger in the resistance-trained group than in the control group in the first, second and third months, respectively. This hypertrophy showed a similar increase in the interventricular septum and in the free posterior wall mass. There was no reduction in the end-diastolic left ventricular internal diameter during the 3-month resistance-training period. Systolic function did not differ between the groups throughout the resistance-training period. Conclusion: Resistance training induces the development of concentric cardiac hypertrophy without ventricular dysfunction or cavity reduction. Although diastolic function was not completely investigated, we cannot exclude the possibility that resistance training results in diastolic dysfunction. PMID

  3. Quercetin Decreases Insulin Resistance in a Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Rat Model by Improving Inflammatory Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenzhi; Zhai, Dongxia; Zhang, Danying; Bai, Lingling; Yao, Ruipin; Yu, Jin; Cheng, Wen; Yu, Chaoqin

    2017-05-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a clinical feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Quercetin, derived from Chinese medicinal herbs such as hawthorn, has been proven practical in the management of IR in diabetes. However, whether quercetin could decrease IR in PCOS is unknown. This study aims to observe the therapeutic effect of quercetin on IR in a PCOS rat model and explore the underlying mechanism. An IR PCOS rat model was established by subcutaneous injection with dehydroepiandrosterone. The body weight, estrous cycle, and ovary morphology of the quercetin-treated rats were observed. Serum inflammatory cytokines were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In ovarian tissues, the expression of key genes involved in the inflammatory signaling pathway was detected through Western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, or immunohistochemistry. The nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) was also observed by immunofluorescence. The estrous cycle recovery rate of the insulin-resistant PCOS model after quercetin treatment was 58.33%. Quercetin significantly reduced the levels of blood insulin, interleukin 1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α. Quercetin also significantly decreased the granulosa cell nuclear translocation of NF-κB in the insulin-resistant PCOS rat model. The treatment inhibited the expression of inflammation-related genes, including the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunit p22phox, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and Toll-like receptor 4, in ovarian tissue. Quercetin improved IR and demonstrated a favorable therapeutic effect on the PCOS rats. The underlying mechanism of quercetin potentially involves the inhibition of the Toll-like receptor/NF-κB signaling pathway and the improvement in the inflammatory microenvironment of the ovarian tissue of the PCOS rat model.

  4. Effects of compound K on hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuang; Ren, Dayong; Li, Jianrui; Yuan, Guangxin; Li, Hongyu; Xu, Guangyu; Han, Xiao; Du, Peige; An, Liping

    2014-06-01

    Compound K (CK) is a final metabolite of panaxadiol ginsenosides from Panax ginseng. Although anti-diabetic activity of CK has been reported in recent years, the molecular mechanism of CK in the treatment of diabetes mellitus remains unclear. In the present investigation, we established a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with insulin resistance using high-fat diet (HFD) and streptozotocin (STZ), and attempted to verify more details and exact mechanisms in the treatment of T2DM. CK was administered orally at three doses [300, 100 and 30 mg/kg bodyweight (b.w.)] to the diabetic rats. Bodyweight, food-intake, fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting serum insulin (FINS), insulin sensitivity (ISI), total glycerin (TG), total cholesterol (TC), as well as oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were evaluated in normal and diabetic rats. According to our results, CK could improve bodyweight and food-intake of diabetic rats. CK exhibited dose-dependent reduction of FBG, TG and TC of diabetic rats. CK treatment also enhanced FINS and ISI. Meanwhile, the glucose tolerance observed in the present study was improved significantly by CK. It is concluded from the results that CK may have improving effects on hyperglycemia and insulin resistance of diabetic rats. Furthermore, research showed that CK could promote the expression of InsR, IRS1, PI3Kp85, pAkt and Glut4 in skeletal muscle tissue of diabetic rats. These results indicate that the hypoglycemic activity of CK is mediated by improvement of insulin sensitivity, which is closely related to PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of sodium aescinate treatment on PCOS rat model with insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Hu, L M; Wang, Y F; Yang, H Y; Huang, X Y; Zhou, W; Sun, H X

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies indicated that insulin resistance may contribute to the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS); however, the specific mechanism is still unclear. To investigate the effect of sodium aescinate (SA) on PCOS-IR rat models. Sixty rats were randomly divided into the five groups: un-treated rats (n = 12), PCOS-IR group (n = 12), PCOS-IR group plus 50 mg/kg SA (n = 12), PCOS-IR group plus 10 mg/kg SA (n = 12), PCOS-IR group plus 150 mg/kg metformin (n = 12). On day 21, rats were sacrificed, and H(and)E staining was performed for histopathologic examination of the ovaries; moreover, the serum level of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), testosterone, and luteotropic hormone (LH) were measured, and the expression as well as phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt and Gsk-3β were examined using western blot assay. High dosage of SA treatment improved the morphological features of the ovaries in PCOS rats, and also induced significant decrease in serum expression of testosterone and LH/FSH ratio and significant decrease in the expression of p-PI3K, p-Akt and p-Gsk-3β. Our results demonstrated that SA treatment could alleviate the symptom of PCOS in rat model through regulating the PI3K/Akt/GSK3-β pathway (Fig. 4, Ref. 22).

  6. The effect of N-stearoylethanolamine on plasma lipid composition in rats with experimental insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Onopchenko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A model of insulin resistance (IR, induced by prolonged high fat diet with high content of saturated fats was used to investigate the effect of N-stearoylethanolamine (NSE on the composition of free fatty acids (FFA, plasma lipoprotein spectrum and content of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα in rats. The results of this work showed a rise in the content of monounsaturated fatty acids (18:1 n-9 and a reduction in the level of polyunsaturated fatty acids (20:4 n-6 in plasma of rats with experimental IR. These findings are accompanied by the increased TNFα production and significant changes in plasma lipoprotein profile of rats with the fat overload. Particularly, a decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol level and increased low-density (LDL and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL cholesterol level were detected. The NSE administration to obese rats with IR restored the content of mono- and polyunsaturated FFA, increased HDL cholesterol content and reduced LDL cholesterol level. In addition, the IR rats treated with NSE showed normalization in the serum TNFα level. Our results showed the restoration of plasma lipid profile under NSE administration in rats with obesity-induced IR. Considering the fact that plasma lipid composition displays the lipid metabolism in general, the NSE actions may play a significant role in the prevention of IR-associated complications.

  7. Antidepressant effects of Kai-Xin-San in fluoxetine-resistant depression rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.Z. Dong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the antidepressant effect and the mechanism of action of Kai-Xin-San (KXS in fluoxetine-resistant depressive (FRD rats. Two hundred male Wistar rats weighing 200±10 g were exposed to chronic and unpredictable mild stresses (CUMS for 4 weeks and given fluoxetine treatment simultaneously. The rats that did not show significant improvement in behavioral indexes were chosen as the FRD model rats. These rats were randomly divided into four groups: FRD model control; oral fluoxetine and aspirin; oral KXS at a dose of 338 mg·kg–1·day–1; and oral KXS at a dose of 676 mg·kg–1·day–1. Rats continued to be exposed to CUMS and underwent treatment once a day for 3 weeks, then cytokine (COX-2, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β, and TNF-α levels in the hippocampus and serum, and organ coefficients were measured. Both doses of KXS improved the crossing and rearing frequencies, sucrose-preference index, and body weight in FRD rats. KXS at a dose of 338 mg·kg–1·day–1reduced COX-2, IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α levels, increased IL-10 level in the hippocampus, and reduced IL-2 and TNF-α levels in serum. KXS at a dose of 676 mg·kg–1·day–1reduced TNF-α level in the hippocampus, reduced IL-2 and TNF-α levels in serum, and increased IFN-γ and IL-10 levels in the hippocampus and serum. There were no significant differences in organ-coefficients of the spleen among and between groups. The results suggested that oral administration of KXS in FRD rats was effective in improving behavior disorders by influencing various inflammatory pathways.

  8. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1) does not reduce the diabetes incidence in diabetes-prone BB rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, J I; Mørch, L; Markholst, H

    1994-01-01

    ) BB rats (75%) when compared to pair-fed, vehicle treated controls (55%, p = 0.18), or to unhandled DP BB rats (80%, p = 0.71). However, IL-1 induced significantly higher blood glucose concentrations in the prediabetic period (p ... episodes of blood glucose concentrations > 11 mmol/l in the prediabetic period in 11/20 DP BB rats compared to 4/27 diabetes-resistant (DR) BB rats and 4/28 Wistar Furth (WF) rats (both p .... The reduced pyrogenic and endocrine effect of rhIL-1 in the DR BB and WF rats compared to the DP BB rats could be explained by the impaired ability of the DP BB rats to produce anti-rhIL-1-antibodies. In conclusion, administration of rhIL-1 modulated the prediabetic period, and produced higher blood glucose...

  9. Effects of early excision and grafting on cytokines and insulin resistance in burned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin-Long; Xia, Zhao-Fan; Ben, Dao-Feng; Duo, Wei

    2010-11-01

    Burn wound excision and grafting is a common clinical practice that decreases patient morbidity and mortality. It is not known, however, if the salutary effects of this procedure are related to effects on interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-) α, and to reducing insulin resistance after burn. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, burn, burn ± excision groups. Rats in burn group were given a third-degree scald burn covering 30% total body surface area (TBSA) and no wound excision. Rats in burn ± excision group were subjected to a 30% third-degree burn followed by complete excision and allografting of the injury site within 15 min after burn. The rats in control group were treated in the same manner as the burn group, except that they were immersed in a room-temperature water. Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were observed at 3 days after burn, euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic glucose clamps were performed at 4 days after burn and interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-) α were determined after euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic glucose clamps. The levels of IL-6 and TNF-α increased after burn. Significant differences in GTT were observed between control and burn groups, and the rate of glucose infused measured in burned rats was significantly decreased compared with that in control at 4 days after burn. Early excision and grafting significantly decreased levels of IL-6 and TNF-α, and further reduced insulin resistance following thermal injury compared with burn group. Early excision and grafting appeared to have an effect on inflammatory mediators and further reduced insulin resistance induced by major burns. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF POTASSIUM DICHROMATE Cr (VI ADMINISTRATION DURATION ON GLOBULAR RESISTANCE IN FEMALE RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LETIŢIA STANA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The „in vivo” experiment has had as aim the study of different Cr(VI doses administration on globular resistance in female rats related to administration duration. Study was carried out on 56 female rats divided in 8 groups, 6 experimental and 2 control that received potassium dichromate in drinking water in doses of 25 ppm, 50 ppm and 75ppm Cr(VI, for 3 months, respectively, 6 months. Decrease of globular resistance (in terms of haemolysis degree in hypotonic solutions at increasing dose (up to 0.8% NaCl at 75 ppm dose in all experimental groups, in direct relation with the duration of administration was registered. Control groups were in physiological limits. The results of the present study revealed the affecting of erythrocyte membrane in function of administration duration and chromium intake level, because of oxidative lesions produced by it.

  11. Stress Resistance in the Naked Mole-Rat: The Bare Essentials – A Mini-Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kaitlyn N.; Mele, James; Hornsby, Peter J.; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies comparing similar-sized species with disparate longevity may elucidate novel mechanisms that abrogate aging and prolong good health. We focus on the longest living rodent, the naked mole-rat. This mouse-sized mammal lives ∼8 times longer than do mice and, despite high levels of oxidative damage evident at a young age, it is not only very resistant to spontaneous neoplasia but also shows minimal decline in age-associated physiological traits. Objectives We assess the current status of stress resistance and longevity, focusing in particular on the molecular and cellular responses to cytotoxins and other stressors between the short-lived laboratory mouse and the naked mole-rat. Results Like other experimental animal models of lifespan extension, naked mole-rat fibroblasts are extremely tolerant of a broad spectrum of cytotoxins including heat, heavy metals, DNA-damaging agents and xenobiotics, showing LD50 values between 2- and 20-fold greater than those of fibroblasts of shorter-lived mice. Our new data reveal that naked mole-rat fibroblasts stop proliferating even at low doses of toxin whereas those mouse fibroblasts that survive treatment rapidly re-enter the cell cycle and may proliferate with DNA damage. Naked mole-rat fibroblasts also show significantly higher constitutive levels of both p53 and Nrf2 protein levels and activity, and this increases even further in response to toxins. Conclusion Enhanced cell signaling via p53 and Nrf2 protects cells against proliferating with damage, augments clearance of damaged proteins and organelles and facilitates the maintenance of both genomic and protein integrity. These pathways collectively regulate a myriad of mechanisms which may contribute to the attenuated aging profile and sustained healthspan of the naked mole-rat. Understanding how these are regulated may be also integral to sustaining positive human healthspan well into old age and may elucidate novel therapeutics for delaying the onset and

  12. Stress resistance in the naked mole-rat: the bare essentials - a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kaitlyn N; Mele, James; Hornsby, Peter J; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2012-01-01

    Studies comparing similar-sized species with disparate longevity may elucidate novel mechanisms that abrogate aging and prolong good health. We focus on the longest living rodent, the naked mole-rat. This mouse-sized mammal lives ~8 times longer than do mice and, despite high levels of oxidative damage evident at a young age, it is not only very resistant to spontaneous neoplasia but also shows minimal decline in age-associated physiological traits. We assess the current status of stress resistance and longevity, focusing in particular on the molecular and cellular responses to cytotoxins and other stressors between the short-lived laboratory mouse and the naked mole-rat. Like other experimental animal models of lifespan extension, naked mole-rat fibroblasts are extremely tolerant of a broad spectrum of cytotoxins including heat, heavy metals, DNA-damaging agents and xenobiotics, showing LD(50) values between 2- and 20-fold greater than those of fibroblasts of shorter-lived mice. Our new data reveal that naked mole-rat fibroblasts stop proliferating even at low doses of toxin whereas those mouse fibroblasts that survive treatment rapidly re-enter the cell cycle and may proliferate with DNA damage. Naked mole-rat fibroblasts also show significantly higher constitutive levels of both p53 and Nrf2 protein levels and activity, and this increases even further in response to toxins. Enhanced cell signaling via p53 and Nrf2 protects cells against proliferating with damage, augments clearance of damaged proteins and organelles and facilitates the maintenance of both genomic and protein integrity. These pathways collectively regulate a myriad of mechanisms which may contribute to the attenuated aging profile and sustained healthspan of the naked mole-rat. Understanding how these are regulated may be also integral to sustaining positive human healthspan well into old age and may elucidate novel therapeutics for delaying the onset and progression of physiological declines

  13. Insulin Resistance Induced by a High Fructose Diet in Rats Due to Hepatic Disturbance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heibashy, M.I.A.; Mazen, G.M.A.; Kelada, N.A.H.

    2013-01-01

    High consumption of dietary fructose is accused of being responsible for the development of the insulin resistance (IR) syndrome. Concern has arisen because of the realization that fructose, at elevated concentrations, can promote metabolic changes that are potentially deleterious. Among these changes is IR which manifests as a decreased biological response to normal levels of plasma insulin. Therefore, this experiment was designed to evaluate the role of high fructose diet on metabolic syndrome in rats. The experimental animals were divided into two batches. The control batch received a control diet; the second batch was given a high-fructose diet as the sole source of carbohydrate. The rats were continued on the dietary regimen for 1, 2 and 3 months. After the experimental periods, fructose fed rats groups showed significant elevations in the levels of glucose, insulin sensitivity, liver function tests, nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α when compared to their corresponding values in the rats fed normal diet. Moreover, liver lipid peroxidation [thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) and lipid hydroperoxide concentrations were remarkably increased in high-fructose-fed rats according to the time of administration (1, 2 and 3 months). On the other hand, the activities of enzymatic antioxidants (glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase) and glyoxalase I and II were significantly declined in this group. In conclusion, high fructose feeding raises liver dysfunction and causes the features of metabolic syndrome (insulin resistance) in rats dependent on the time of administration due to different mechanisms which were discussed in this work according to available recent researches

  14. HLA-DR and HLA-DQ alleles in patients from the south of Brazil: markers for leprosy susceptibility and resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peixoto Paulo R

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many epidemiological studies have shown that the genetic factors of the host play a role in the variability of clinical response to infection caused by M. leprae. With the purpose of identifying genes of susceptibility, the present study investigated the possible role of HLA-DRB1 and DQA1/DQB1 alleles in susceptibility to leprosy, and whether they account for the heterogeneity in immune responses observed following infection in a Southern Brazilian population. Methods One hundred and sixty-nine leprosy patients and 217 healthy controls were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and reverse hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes and sequence-specific primers(One Lambda®, CA, USA. Results There was a positive association of HLA-DRB1*16 (*1601 and *1602 with leprosy per se (7.3% vs. 3.2%, P = 0.01, OR = 2.52, CI = 1.26–5.01, in accord with previous serological studies, which showed DR2 as a marker of leprosy. Although, HLA-DQA1*05 frequency (29.8% vs. 20.9%, P = 0.0424, OR = 1.61, CI = 1.09–2.39 was higher in patients, and HLA-DQA1*02 (3.0% vs. 7.5%, P = 0.0392, OR = 0.39, CI = 0.16 – 0.95 and HLA-DQA1*04 (4.0% vs. 9.1%, P = 0.0314, OR = 0.42, CI = 0.19 – 0.93 frequencies lower, P-values were not significant after the Bonferroni's correction. Furthermore, HLA-DRB1*1601 (9.0% vs. 1.8%; P = 0.0016; OR = 5.81; CI = 2.05–16.46 was associated with susceptibility to borderline leprosy compared to control group, and while HLA-DRB1*08 (11.2% vs. 1.2%; P = 0.0037; OR = 12.00; CI = 1.51 – 95.12 was associated with susceptibility to lepromatous leprosy, when compared to tuberculoid leprosy, DRB1*04 was associated to protection. Conclusion These data confirm the positive association of HLA-DR2 (DRB1*16 with leprosy per se, and the protector effect of DRB1*04 against lepromatous leprosy in Brazilian patients.

  15. Regulation of glucose dynamics by noninvasive peripheral electrical stimulation in normal and insulin-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalogna, Merav; Fishman, Sigal; Halpern, Zamir; Ben-Shlomo, Shani; Nevo, Uri; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2016-06-01

    The epidemic nature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), along with the downsides of current treatments, has raised the need for therapeutic alternatives. We studied normo-glycemic and high-fat diet (HFD), induced insulin-resistant Wistar Han rats for 2 to 3weeks. Rats received peripheral electrical stimulation (PES) treatment (2Hz/16Hz bursts, 10mA) in their hind limbs for 3min, 3 times per week. Glucose tolerance was evaluated by using a glucose tolerance test at the beginning and again at the end of the study. The effect of an acute PES treatment on metabolic rates of glucose appearance and turnover was measured by using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (HEGC) test. Repeated PES treatment significantly inhibited the progression of glucose intolerance in normal and insulin-resistant rats and prevented HFD-induced gains in body weight and fat mass. Acute treatment induced a prolonged effect on glucose turnover, as evaluated by the HEGC test. Increased hepatic glucose output was observed during the basal state (Pinsulin (41.1%, Pinsulin sensitivity in rats. Repeated PES treatment may have a beneficial effect on HFD-induced adiposity and control of body weight. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Resistance Exercise Restores Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Barreto, André Sales; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos; Oliveira, Antônio Cesar Cabral de; Wichi, Rogério Brandão; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana

    2014-01-01

    Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent. The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8); sedentary diabetic (n = 8); and trained diabetic (n = 8). Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings. A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg) as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group. Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats

  17. Effects of One Resistance Exercise Session on Vascular Smooth Muscle of Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Hypertension is a public health problem and increases the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Objective: To evaluate the effects of a resistance exercise session on the contractile and relaxing mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle in mesenteric arteries of NG-nitro L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME-induced hypertensive rats. Methods: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (C, hypertensive (H, and exercised hypertensive (EH. Hypertension was induced by administration of 20 mg/kg of L-NAME for 7 days prior to experimental protocols. The resistance exercise protocol consisted of 10 sets of 10 repetitions and intensity of 40% of one repetition maximum. The reactivity of vascular smooth muscle was evaluated by concentration‑response curves to phenylephrine (PHEN, potassium chloride (KCl and sodium nitroprusside (SNP. Results: Rats treated with L-NAME showed an increase (p < 0.001 in systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP and mean arterial pressure (MAP compared to the initial period of induction. No difference in PHEN sensitivity was observed between groups H and EH. Acute resistance exercise reduced (p < 0.001 the contractile response induced by KCl at concentrations of 40 and 60 mM in group EH. Greater (p < 0.01 smooth muscle sensitivity to NPS was observed in group EH as compared to group H. Conclusion: One resistance exercise session reduces the contractile response induced by KCl in addition to increasing the sensitivity of smooth muscle to NO in mesenteric arteries of hypertensive rats.

  18. Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B contributes to LPS-induced leptin resistance in male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Beatriz de Carvalho; Rorato, Rodrigo C.; Uchoa, Ernane Torres; Marangon, Paula B.; Elias, Carol F.; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Leptin resistance is induced by the feedback inhibitors tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) and decreased Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) signaling. To investigate the participation of PTP1B and SHP-2 in LPS-induced leptin resistance, we injected repeated (6-LPS) intraperitoneal LPS doses (100 μg/kg ip) for comparison with a single (1-LPS) treatment and evaluated the expression of SHP-2, PTP1B, p-ERK1/2, and p-STAT3 in the hypothalamus of male Wistar rats. The single LPS treatment increased the expression of p-STAT3 and PTP1B but not SHP-2. The repeated LPS treatment reduced SHP-2, increased PTP1B, and did not change p-STAT3. We observed that the PTP1B expression induced by the endotoxin was highly colocalized with leptin receptor cells in the hypothalamus of LepRb-IRES-Cre-tdTomato reporter mice. The single, but not the repeated, LPS treatment decreased the food intake and body weight. Leptin had no stimulatory effect on the hypophagia, body weight loss, or pSTAT3 expression in 6-LPS rats, indicating leptin unresponsiveness. Notably, the PTP1B inhibitor (3.0 nmol/rat in 5 μl icv) restored the LPS-induced hypophagia in 6-LPS rats and restored the ability of leptin to reduce food intake and body weight as well as to phosphorylate STAT3 in the arcuate, paraventricular, and ventromedial nuclei of the hypothalamus. The present data suggest that an increased PTP1B expression in the hypothalamus underlies the development of leptin resistance during repeated exposure to LPS. Our findings contribute to understanding the mechanisms involved in leptin resistance during low-grade inflammation as seen in obesity. PMID:25352433

  19. Resistance Exercise Restores Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Mendonça Mota

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent. Objectives: The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats. Methods: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8; sedentary diabetic (n = 8; and trained diabetic (n = 8. Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings. Results: A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2% and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3% without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05 in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05 in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg as compared to the sedentary diabetic group. Conclusions: Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

  20. Resistance Exercise Restores Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Barreto, André Sales; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos [Departamento de Fisiologia - Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Oliveira, Antônio Cesar Cabral de; Wichi, Rogério Brandão [Departamento de Educação Física - UFS, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana, E-mail: marciorvsantos@bol.com.br [Departamento de Fisiologia - Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent. The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8); sedentary diabetic (n = 8); and trained diabetic (n = 8). Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings. A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg) as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group. Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

  1. Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B contributes to LPS-induced leptin resistance in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Beatriz de Carvalho; Rorato, Rodrigo C; Uchoa, Ernane Torres; Marangon, Paula B; Elias, Carol F; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose; Elias, Lucila L K

    2015-01-01

    Leptin resistance is induced by the feedback inhibitors tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) and decreased Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) signaling. To investigate the participation of PTP1B and SHP-2 in LPS-induced leptin resistance, we injected repeated (6-LPS) intraperitoneal LPS doses (100 μg/kg ip) for comparison with a single (1-LPS) treatment and evaluated the expression of SHP-2, PTP1B, p-ERK1/2, and p-STAT3 in the hypothalamus of male Wistar rats. The single LPS treatment increased the expression of p-STAT3 and PTP1B but not SHP-2. The repeated LPS treatment reduced SHP-2, increased PTP1B, and did not change p-STAT3. We observed that the PTP1B expression induced by the endotoxin was highly colocalized with leptin receptor cells in the hypothalamus of LepRb-IRES-Cre-tdTomato reporter mice. The single, but not the repeated, LPS treatment decreased the food intake and body weight. Leptin had no stimulatory effect on the hypophagia, body weight loss, or pSTAT3 expression in 6-LPS rats, indicating leptin unresponsiveness. Notably, the PTP1B inhibitor (3.0 nmol/rat in 5 μl icv) restored the LPS-induced hypophagia in 6-LPS rats and restored the ability of leptin to reduce food intake and body weight as well as to phosphorylate STAT3 in the arcuate, paraventricular, and ventromedial nuclei of the hypothalamus. The present data suggest that an increased PTP1B expression in the hypothalamus underlies the development of leptin resistance during repeated exposure to LPS. Our findings contribute to understanding the mechanisms involved in leptin resistance during low-grade inflammation as seen in obesity. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Genetic, physiological and comparative genomic studies of hypertension and insulin resistance in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M. Coan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously mapped hypertension-related insulin resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs to rat chromosomes 4, 12 and 16 using adipocytes from F2 crosses between spontaneously hypertensive (SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY rats, and subsequently identified Cd36 as the gene underlying the chromosome 4 locus. The identity of the chromosome 12 and 16 genes remains unknown. To identify whole-body phenotypes associated with the chromosome 12 and 16 linkage regions, we generated and characterised new congenic strains, with WKY donor segments introgressed onto an SHR genetic background, for the chromosome 12 and 16 linkage regions. We found a >50% increase in insulin sensitivity in both the chromosome 12 and 16 strains. Blood pressure and left ventricular mass were reduced in the two congenic strains consistent with the congenic segments harbouring SHR genes for insulin resistance, hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Integrated genomic analysis, using physiological and whole-genome sequence data across 42 rat strains, identified variants within the congenic regions in Upk3bl, RGD1565131 and AABR06087018.1 that were associated with blood pressure, cardiac mass and insulin sensitivity. Quantitative trait transcript analysis across 29 recombinant inbred strains showed correlation between expression of Hspb1, Zkscan5 and Pdgfrl with adipocyte volume, systolic blood pressure and cardiac mass, respectively. Comparative genome analysis showed a marked enrichment of orthologues for human GWAS-associated genes for insulin resistance within the syntenic regions of both the chromosome 12 and 16 congenic intervals. Our study defines whole-body phenotypes associated with the SHR chromosome 12 and 16 insulin-resistance QTLs, identifies candidate genes for these SHR QTLs and finds human orthologues of rat genes in these regions that associate with related human traits. Further study of these genes in the congenic strains will lead to robust identification of the

  3. Identifying novel phenotypes of vulnerability and resistance to activity-based anorexia in adolescent female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarich-Marsteller, Nicole C; Underwood, Mark D; Foltin, Richard W; Myers, Michael M; Walsh, B Timothy; Barrett, Jeffrey S; Marsteller, Douglas A

    2013-11-01

    Activity-based anorexia is a translational rodent model that results in severe weight loss, hyperactivity, and voluntary self-starvation. The goal of our investigation was to identify vulnerable and resistant phenotypes of activity-based anorexia in adolescent female rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained under conditions of restricted access to food (N = 64; or unlimited access, N = 16) until experimental exit, predefined as a target weight loss of 30-35% or meeting predefined criteria for animal health. Nonlinear mixed effects statistical modeling was used to describe wheel running behavior, time to event analysis was used to assess experimental exit, and a regressive partitioning algorithm was used to classify phenotypes. Objective criteria were identified for distinguishing novel phenotypes of activity-based anorexia, including a vulnerable phenotype that conferred maximal hyperactivity, minimal food intake, and the shortest time to experimental exit, and a resistant phenotype that conferred minimal activity and the longest time to experimental exit. The identification of objective criteria for defining vulnerable and resistant phenotypes of activity-based anorexia in adolescent female rats provides an important framework for studying the neural mechanisms that promote vulnerability to or protection against the development of self-starvation and hyperactivity during adolescence. Ultimately, future studies using these novel phenotypes may provide important translational insights into the mechanisms that promote these maladaptive behaviors characteristic of anorexia nervosa. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Flow and volume dependence of rat airway resistance during constant flow inflation and deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Alessandro; Carniel, Emanuele Luigi; Parmagnani, Andrea; Natali, Arturo Nicola

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the flow and volume dependence of both the ohmic and the viscoelastic pressure dissipations of the normal rat respiratory system separately during inflation and deflation. The study was conducted in the Respiratory Physiology Laboratory in our institution. Measurements were obtained for Seven albino Wistar rats of both sexes by using the flow interruption method during constant flow inflations and deflations. Measurements included anesthesia induction, tracheostomy and positioning of a tracheal cannula, positive pressure ventilation, constant flow respiratory system inflations and deflations at two different volumes and flows. The ohmic resistance exhibited volume and flow dependence, decreasing with lung volume and increasing with flow rate, during both inflation and deflation. The stress relaxation-related viscoelastic resistance also exhibited volume and flow dependence. It decreased with the flow rate at a constant lung volume during both inflation and deflation, but exhibited a different behavior with the lung volume at a constant flow rate (i.e., increased during inflations and decreased during deflations). Thus, stress relaxation in the rat lungs exhibited a hysteretic behavior. The observed flow and volume dependence of respiratory system resistance may be predicted by an equation derived from a model of the respiratory system that consists of two distinct compartments. The equation agrees well with the experimental data and indicates that the loading time is the critical parameter on which stress relaxation depends, during both lung inflation and deflation.

  5. Effect of pinacidil on norepinephrine- and potassium-induced contractions and membrane potential in rat and human resistance vessels and in rat aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videbaek, L.M.; Aalkjaer, C.; Mulvany, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of pinacidil on contractile responses to norepinephrine, potassium, and membrane potential was examined in rat and human resistance vessels. In some experiments rat aorta was also used. Pinacidil (0.1-30 microM) caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of norepinephrine-induced contractions in all vessels studied. In the same concentration range, pinacidil had only little effect on potassium (125 mM) activated rat mesenteric and femoral resistance vessels. In denervated rat mesenteric resistance vessels, a depolarization with potassium (125 mM) before superimposing a norepinephrine tone markedly diminished the effect of pinacidil. In resting rat mesenteric resistance vessels, pinacidil (1-10 microM) caused a hyperpolarization of 10-15 mV. In rat aorta, pinacidil (10 microM) caused a significant (p less than 0.001) increase in 86 Rb+ efflux rate constant whereas 1 microM had no effect. The results of these experiments indicate that the vasodilating effect may be caused by a hyperpolarization of the vascular smooth muscle cell membrane

  6. Acute Hepatic Insulin Resistance Contributes to Hyperglycemia in Rats Following Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiali; Liu, Baoshan; Han, Hui; Yuan, Qiuhuan; Xue, Mengyang; Xu, Feng; Chen, Yuguo

    2015-02-23

    Although hyperglycemia is common in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Insulin signaling plays a key role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. In this study, we test the hypothesis that rapid alteration of insulin signaling pathways could be a potential contributor to acute hyperglycemia after MI. Male rats were used to produce MI by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were significantly higher in MI rats than those in controls. Insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) was reduced significantly in the liver tissue of MI rats compared with controls, followed by decreased attachment of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) p85 subunit with IRS1 and Akt phosphorylation. However, insulin-stimulated signaling was not altered significantly in skeletal muscle after MI. The relative mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and G6Pase were slightly higher in the liver tissue of MI rats than those in controls. Rosiglitazone (ROSI) markedly restored hepatic insulin signaling, inhibited gluconeogenesis and reduced plasma glucose levels in MI rats. Insulin resistance develops rapidly in liver but not skeletal muscle after MI, which contributes to acute hyperglycemia. Therapy aimed at potentiating hepatic insulin signaling may be beneficial for MI-induced hyperglycemia.

  7. [Mechanism study on leptin resistance in lung cancer cachexia rats treated by Xiaoyan Decoction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun-Chao; Jia, Ying-Jie; Yang, Pei-Ying; Zhang, Xing; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Jin-Li; Sun, Yi-Yu; Chen, Jun; Duan, Hao-Guo; Guo, Hua; Li, Chao

    2014-12-01

    To study the leptin resistance mechanism of Xiaoyan Decoction (XD) in lung cancer cachexia (LCC) rats. An LCC rat model was established. Totally 40 rats were randomly divided into the normal control group, the LCC model group, the XD group, and the positive control group, 10 in each group. After LCC model was set up, rats in the LCC model group were administered with normal saline, 2 mL each time. Rats in the XD group were administered with XD at the daily dose of 2 mL. Those in the positive control group were administered with Medroxyprogesterone Acetate suspension (20 mg/kg) by gastrogavage at the daily dose of 2 mL. All medication lasted for 14 days. The general condition and tumor growth were observed. Serum levels of leptin and leptin receptor in the hypothalamus were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Contents of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and anorexia for genomic POMC were detected using real-time PCR technique. Serum leptin levels were lower in the LCC model group than in the normal control group with statistical significance (P hypothalamus increased significantly in the LCC model group (P 0.05). There was statistical difference in POMC between the normal control group and the LCC model group (P hypothalamus. LCC could be improved by elevating NPY contents in the hypothalamus and reducing POMC contents, promoting the appetite, and increasing food intake from the periphery pathway and the central pathway.

  8. Morphology and Molecular Mechanisms of Hepatic Injury in Rats under Simulated Weightlessness and the Protective Effects of Resistance Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Du

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of long-term simulated weightlessness on liver morphology, enzymes, glycogen, and apoptosis related proteins by using two-month rat-tail suspension model (TS, and liver injury improvement by rat-tail suspension with resistance training model (TS&RT. Microscopically the livers of TS rats showed massive granular degeneration, chronic inflammation, and portal fibrosis. Mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum swelling and loss of membrane integrity were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The similar, but milder, morphological changes were observed in the livers of TS&RT rats. Serum biochemistry analysis revealed that the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST were significantly higher (p<0.05 in TS rats than in controls. The levels of ALT and AST in TS&RT rats were slightly lower than in RT rats, but they were insignificantly higher than in controls. However, both TS and TS&RT rats had significantly lower levels (p<0.05 of serum glucose and hepatic glycogen than in controls. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, and active caspase-3 were higher in TS rats than in TS&RT and control rats. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR showed that TS rats had higher mRNA levels (P < 0.05 of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78 and caspase-12 transcription than in control rats; whereas mRNA expressions of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK were slightly higher in TS rats. TS&RT rats showed no significant differences of above 4 mRNAs compared with the control group. Our results demonstrated that long-term weightlessness caused hepatic injury, and may trigger hepatic apoptosis. Resistance training slightly improved hepatic damage.

  9. A vascular mechanism for high-sodium-induced insulin resistance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premilovac, Dino; Richards, Stephen M; Rattigan, Stephen; Keske, Michelle A

    2014-12-01

    High sodium (HS) effects on hypertension are well established. Recent evidence implicates a relationship between HS intake and insulin resistance, even in the absence of hypertension. The aim of the current study was to determine whether loss of the vascular actions of insulin may be the driving factor linking HS intake to insulin resistance. Sprague Dawley rats were fed a control (0.31% wt/wt NaCl) or HS (8.00% wt/wt NaCl) diet for 4 weeks and subjected to euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp (10 mU min(-1) kg(-1)) or constant-flow pump-perfused hindlimb studies following an overnight fast. A separate group of HS rats was given quinapril during the dietary intervention and subjected to euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp as above. HS intake had no effect on body weight or fat mass or on fasting glucose, insulin, endothelin-1 or NEFA concentrations. However, HS impaired whole body and skeletal muscle glucose uptake, in addition to a loss of insulin-stimulated microvascular recruitment. These effects were present despite enhanced insulin signalling (Akt) in both liver and skeletal muscle. Constant-flow pump-perfused hindlimb experiments revealed normal insulin-stimulated myocyte glucose uptake in HS-fed rats. Quinapril treatment restored insulin-mediated microvascular recruitment and muscle glucose uptake in vivo. HS-induced insulin resistance is driven by impaired microvascular responsiveness to insulin, and is not due to metabolic or signalling defects within myocytes or liver. These results imply that reducing sodium intake may be important not only for management of hypertension but also for insulin resistance, and highlight the vasculature as a potential therapeutic target in the prevention of insulin resistance.

  10. Enhancing TB case detection: experience in offering upfront Xpert MTB/RIF testing to pediatric presumptive TB and DR TB cases for early rapid diagnosis of drug sensitive and drug resistant TB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Raizada

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB in children is challenging due to difficulties in obtaining good quality sputum specimens as well as the paucibacillary nature of disease. Globally a large proportion of pediatric tuberculosis (TB cases are diagnosed based only on clinical findings. Xpert MTB/RIF, a highly sensitive and specific rapid tool, offers a promising solution in addressing these challenges. This study presents the results from pediatric groups taking part in a large demonstration study wherein Xpert MTB/RIF testing replaced smear microscopy for all presumptive PTB cases in public health facilities across India.The study covered a population of 8.8 million across 18 programmatic sub-district level tuberculosis units (TU, with one Xpert MTB/RIF platform established at each study TU. Pediatric presumptive PTB cases (both TB and Drug Resistant TB (DR-TB accessing any public health facilities in study area were prospectively enrolled and tested on Xpert MTB/RIF following a standardized diagnostic algorithm.4,600 pediatric presumptive pulmonary TB cases were enrolled. 590 (12.8%, CI 11.8-13.8 pediatric PTB were diagnosed. Overall 10.4% (CI 9.5-11.2 of presumptive PTB cases had positive results by Xpert MTB/RIF, compared with 4.8% (CI 4.2-5.4 who had smear-positive results. Upfront Xpert MTB/RIF testing of presumptive PTB and presumptive DR-TB cases resulted in diagnosis of 79 and 12 rifampicin resistance cases, respectively. Positive predictive value (PPV for rifampicin resistance detection was high (98%, CI 90.1-99.9, with no statistically significant variation with respect to past history of treatment.Upfront access to Xpert MTB/RIF testing in pediatric presumptive PTB cases was associated with a two-fold increase in bacteriologically-confirmed PTB, and increased detection of rifampicin-resistant TB cases under routine operational conditions across India. These results suggest that routine Xpert MTB/RIF testing is a promising

  11. David, Dr Joy Caesarina

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1982 Section: Medicine. David, Dr Joy Caesarina M.B.B.S., M.S. (Madras). Date of birth: 3 May 1927. Date of death: 20 April 2004. Specialization: Neuropharmacology Last known address: 292, 4th Main, 1st Block, Koramangala, Bengaluru 560 034. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  12. Sastry, Dr Garikapati Narahari

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sastry, Dr Garikapati Narahari Ph.D. (Hyderabad), FNASc. Date of birth: 17 January 1966. Specialization: Computational Chemistry, Theoretical Chemistry, Computer-aided Drug Design Address: Head, Centre for Molecular Modelling, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500 007, A.P.. Contact:

  13. Rao, Dr Ramachandra Raghavendra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rao, Dr Ramachandra Raghavendra Ph.D. (Mysore), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 22 September 1945. Specialization: Plant Taxonomy, Ethnobotany, Phytogeography and Biodiversity & Conservation Address: No. C-303, Sharada Nivas, 15th Cross, 6th Main, Indiranagar II Stage, Bengaluru 560 038, Karnataka Contact:

  14. Abrol, Dr Yash Pal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abrol, Dr Yash Pal Ph.D. (Chicago), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS. Date of birth: 23 December 1935. Specialization: Agriculture: Crop Physiology, Environmental Sciences Address: Chief Patron, Society for Conservation of Nature, Room No. F4, A Block, NASC Complex, Dev Prakash Shastry Marg, P.O. Pusa, New Delhi 110 012, ...

  15. Ali, Dr Nahid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2013 Section: Animal Sciences. Ali, Dr Nahid Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc, FNA, FTWAS. Date of birth: 1 August 1956. Specialization: Immunology, Parasitology Address: Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, 4, Raja SC Mullick Road, Kolkata 700 032, W.B.. Contact: Office: (033) 2499 5757. Residence: (033) 2328 0176

  16. Mishra, Dr Gyan Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2005 Section: General Biology. Mishra, Dr Gyan Chandra Ph.D. (Udaipur), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 15 August 1947. Specialization: Immunology and Cell Biology Address: NASI Senior Scientist, National Centre for Cell Science, NCCS Complex, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra Contact:

  17. Narayanamurti, Dr Venkatesh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narayanamurti, Dr Venkatesh Ph.D. (Cornell). Date of birth: 9 September 1939. Specialization: Solid State, Nanoscience, Electronic Materials, Science Policy Address: Benjamin Peirce Professor of Technology & Public Policy, Harvard University, 107D, Pierce Hall, 29, Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA Contact:

  18. Shankar, Dr Pattamadai Narasimhan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1992 Section: Engineering & Technology. Shankar, Dr Pattamadai Narasimhan Ph.D. (Caltech). Date of birth: 13 August 1944. Specialization: Engineering Science and Fluid Dynamics Address: 33/1, Kasturba Road Cross, Bengaluru 560 001, Karnataka Contact: Residence: (080) 2221 7404

  19. Gurjar, Dr Mukund Keshao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gurjar, Dr Mukund Keshao Ph.D. (Nagpur and London), FNASc. Date of birth: 28 August 1952. Specialization: Carbohydrate Chemistry and Synthetic Organic Chemistry Address: Director, R&D, Emcure Pharmaceuticals Limited, P2, ITBT Park Phase II, Hinjwadi, Pune 411 057, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 3982 1350, ...

  20. Valluri, Dr Sitaram Rao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1971 Section: Engineering & Technology. Valluri, Dr Sitaram Rao Ph.D. (Caltech). Date of birth: 25 June 1924. Specialization: Metal Fatigue Address: 'Prashanthi', 659, 100 Feet Road, Indiranagar, Bengaluru 560 038, Karnataka Contact: Residence: (080) 2525 8294. YouTube ...

  1. Kannan, Dr Kazhiur Kothandapani

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kannan, Dr Kazhiur Kothandapani Ph.D. (IISc), FNA. Date of birth: 30 September 1939. Specialization: X-ray & Macromolecular Crystallography and Macromolecular Computer Graphics Address: F-206, Redwood, Reheja Residency, III Block, Koramangala, Bengaluru 560 034, Karnataka Contact: Residence: (080) 2550 ...

  2. Choudary, Dr Boyapati Manoranjan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1992 Section: Chemistry. Choudary, Dr Boyapati Manoranjan Ph.D. (Gujarat), FNA. Date of birth: 10 August 1946. Specialization: Homogeneous & Heterogeneous Catalysis, Flow Reactions, Nanotechnology, Nanomedicine Address: Flat No. 312, New MLA & MP Colony, Road No.

  3. Jameel, Dr Shahid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jameel, Dr Shahid Ph.D. (Washington State Univ.), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 8 August 1957. Specialization: Molecular Biology and Molecular Virology Address: Chief Executive Officer, The Wellcome Trust/DBT India Alliance, 8-2-684/3/K/19, Kaushik Society, Road NO. 12, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 034, A.P.. Contact:

  4. Chopra, Dr Ishwar Chander

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1962 Section: Medicine. Chopra, Dr Ishwar Chander M.R.C.S.. Date of birth: 8 January 1911. Date of death: 18 October 1996. Specialization: Pharmacology, Toxicology and Indian Medicinal Plants Last known address: C-116, Defence Colony, New Delhi 110 024. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  5. Authikesavalu, Dr Munisamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1948 Section: Medicine. Authikesavalu, Dr Munisamy MBBS (Madras), MS (Minneapolis), FRCS. Date of birth: 16 August 1906. Date of death: 22 September 1973. Specialization: Experimental Surgery, Ophthalmology, Otolaryngology Address: 5-C, Lavelle Cross Road, Bengaluru ...

  6. Nandicoori, Dr Vinay Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2018 Section: General Biology. Nandicoori, Dr Vinay Kumar Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc. Date of birth: 1 March 1969. Specialization: Molecular & Cellular Biology, Cell Signalling, Cell Biology Address: National Institute of Immunology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, U.T.; Contact ...

  7. Mukhopadhyay, Dr Amitabha

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2010 Section: General Biology. Mukhopadhyay, Dr Amitabha Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 5 February 1959. Specialization: Cell Biology, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Drug Delivery Address: Staff Scientist VII, National Institute of Immunology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, ...

  8. Gangal, Dr Sharad Vishwanath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gangal, Dr Sharad Vishwanath Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNASc. Date of birth: 2 May 1937. Specialization: Allergy, Immunology and Biochemistry Address: Lakshmi Niwas, Opp. Santoshi Mata Temple (B Cabin), Sane Guruji Path, Naupada, Thane 400 602, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (022) 2537 6961. Mobile: 93249 24307

  9. Gangal, Dr Sudha Gajanan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gangal, Dr Sudha Gajanan Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA Council Service: 1995-97. Date of birth: 25 August 1934. Specialization: Cancer & Basic Immunology, Cell Biology and Genetic Diseases Address: 4, Mahavishnu Apartments, Dahanukar Colony A, Kothrud, Pune 411 029, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (020) 2538 4382, ...

  10. Shivanna, Dr Kundaranahalli Ramalingaiah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1985 Section: Plant Sciences. Shivanna, Dr Kundaranahalli Ramalingaiah Ph.D. (Delhi), FNA, FNAAS, FNASc. Date of birth: 30 June 1940. Specialization: Pollen Biology, Reproductive Ecology and Conservation Biology Address: Odekar Farms, Nandihalli, via Thovinakere, Tumkur 572 138, Karnataka Contact:

  11. Bhandari, Dr Nita

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2015 Section: Medicine. Bhandari, Dr Nita Ph.D. (JNU), FAMS. Date of birth: 9 November 1955. Specialization: Nutrition-Infection Interaction, Child Health, Nutritional Interventions, Clinical Evaluation of Vaccine Address: President & Director, Centre for Health R&D Society for Applied Studies, 45, Kalu Sarai, New ...

  12. Obituary: Dr Dimitri Tassiopoulos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-22

    Jun 22, 2017 ... the Tourism and Events Educators Chamber of South Africa. (TEECSA), an association representing higher education travel, tourism and events related programme providers. Dr Tassiopoulos successfully supervised post-graduate mini- theses/theses/dissertations and served as an external examiner.

  13. Yusuf, Dr Seikh Mohammad

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2017 Section: Physics. Yusuf, Dr Seikh Mohammad Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNASc. Date of birth: 3 March 1965. Specialization: Magnetism, Advanced Magnetic Materials, Neutron Scattering, Condensed Matter Physics Address: Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085, ...

  14. Mukhopadhyay, Dr Sangita

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2013 Section: Medicine. Mukhopadhyay, Dr Sangita Ph.D. (Utkal), FNASc. Date of birth: 1 January 1966. Specialization: Immunology, Cell Signalling, Communicable Diseases Address: Group Leader, Molecular Cell Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting & Diagnostics, Nampally, Hyderabad 500 001, A.P.. Contact ...

  15. Shaha, Dr Chandrima

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2005 Section: General Biology. Shaha, Dr Chandrima Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc, FNA Council Service: 2013-15. Date of birth: 14 October 1952. Specialization: Cell Biology and Biochemistry Address: Professor of Eminence, National Institute of Immunology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, U.T.. Contact:

  16. Chakraborty, Dr Tushar Kanti

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2003 Section: Chemistry. Chakraborty, Dr Tushar Kanti Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 10 April 1957. Specialization: Peptides & Peptidomimetics, Organic Synthesis Address: Department of Organic Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2293 ...

  17. Budhani, Dr Ramesh Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Budhani, Dr Ramesh Chandra Ph.D. (IIT, Delhi), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 3 February 1955. Specialization: Renewable Energy, Nanoscale Systems, Experimental Condensed Matter Physics, Superconductivity and Magnetism Address: Department of Physics, Lasers & Photonics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 ...

  18. Chatterjee, Dr Ambar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship; Associateship. Associate Profile. Period: 1986–1989. Chatterjee, Dr Ambar. Date of birth: 25 October 1952. Specialization: Physics of Nuclear Reactions Address during Associateship: Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  19. Sahni, Dr Girish

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sahni, Dr Girish Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 2 March 1956. Specialization: Protein Engineering, Molecular Biology, Biotechnology and Enzymology Address: Director General, Council of Scientific & Industrial Research, Anusandhan Bhavan, 2, Rafi Marg, New Delhi 110 001, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 2371 0472 ...

  20. Shastry, Dr B Sriram

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shastry, Dr B Sriram Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS. Date of birth: 26 November 1950. Specialization: Strongly-Correlated Fermi Systems, Quantum Integrable Systems Address: Distinguished Professor, Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA Contact: Office: (+1-831) 459 5849

  1. Dr Satish R. Shetye

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1992 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Shetye, Dr Satish Ramnath Ph.D. (Washington), FNA, FNASc. Council Service: 1998-2003. Date of birth: 25 October 1950. Specialization: Physical Oceanography Address: Vice Chancellor, Goa University, Taleigao Plateau 403 206, Goa Contact: Office: (0832) 651 9001

  2. Khush, Dr Gurdev Singh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1991 Section: Plant Sciences. Khush, Dr Gurdev Singh Ph.D. (UC, Davis), FNA, FRS, FNASc. Date of birth: 22 August 1935. Specialization: Plant Genetics & Breeding and Biotechnology Address: 39399, Black Hawk Place, Davis, CA 95616-7008, USA Contact: Office: (+1 530) 750 ...

  3. Galande, Dr Sanjeev

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Epigenetics, Chromatin Biology, Gene Regulation, Genomics and Proteomics Address: Centre for Excellence in Epigenetics, Indian Institute of Science Education, & Research, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2590 8060. Mobile: 99233 63737. Fax: (020) 2025 1566

  4. Watve, Dr Milind Gajanan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 12 December 1957. Specialization: Wildlife Ecology & Animal Cognition, Evolutionary Biology, Computational Biology and Microbial Diversity Address: Professor, Biology, Indian Institute of Science Education & Research, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2590 ...

  5. Chattopadhyay, Dr Dhrubajyoti

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2004 Section: General Biology. Chattopadhyay, Dr Dhrubajyoti Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc. Date of birth: 11 May 1954. Specialization: Enzyme Biotechnology, Transcription, Molecular Virology and Oxidative Stress Response Address: Vice Chancellor, Amity University, New Town, Kolkata 700 135, W.B.

  6. Ramachandran, Dr Sundaresan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Ramachandran, Dr Sundaresan D.Sc. (MIT). Date of birth: 17 August 1930. Specialization: Alloy & Stainless Steel Making and Process Metallurgical Design & Development Address: 'Vidya Theertha Kripa', No. 1, Siva Sundar Avenue, Thiruvanmiyur, Chennai 600 041, T.N.

  7. Santhanam, Dr Vaidyanathaswamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Plant Sciences. Santhanam, Dr Vaidyanathaswamy Ph.D. (Madras). Date of birth: 31 July 1925. Specialization: Plant Breeding & Genetics, Research Management and Cotton Development Address: 'Shri Abhirami', 107, Venkataswamy Road West, R S Puram Post, Coimbatore 641 002, T.N.. Contact:

  8. Sharma, Dr Ram Swaroop

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1989 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Sharma, Dr Ram Swaroop Ph.D. (Basel), FNA. Date of birth: 10 July 1937. Specialization: Metamorphic Petrology, Mineralogy and Precambrian Geology Address: 70/36, Pratapnagar, Sector 7, Sanganer (RHB), Jaipur 302 033, Rajasthan

  9. Shetye, Dr Satish Ramnath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1992 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Shetye, Dr Satish Ramnath Ph.D. (Washington), FNA, FNASc. Council Service: 1998-2003. Date of birth: 25 October 1950. Specialization: Physical Oceanography Address: Yashoda, C-14/162, Tonca, Caranzalem, Panaji 403 002, Goa

  10. Ramadas, Dr Trivandrum Ramakrishnan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1998 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Ramadas, Dr Trivandrum Ramakrishnan Ph.D. (Mumbai). Date of birth: 30 March 1955. Specialization: Geometry and Mathematical Physics Address: Professor, Chennai Mathematical Institute, H-1, SIPCOT IT Park, Siruseri, Kelambakkam, Chennai 603 103

  11. Sengupta, Dr Sagar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sengupta, Dr Sagar Ph.D. (IISc), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 23 June 1968. Specialization: Cancer Biology, Cell Signalling, Mytochondrial Biology Address: National Institute of Immunology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 2670 3786. Residence: (0124) 422 7107. Mobile: 93131 05470

  12. Arunachalam, Dr Vallampadugai Srinivasaraghavan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1979 Section: Engineering & Technology. Arunachalam, Dr Vallampadugai Srinivasaraghavan Ph.D. (Wales), F.R.Engg. (UK), FNA, FNASc, FNAE, D.Engg. (h.c.), D.Litt. (h.c.) Council Service: 1983-85. Date of birth: 10 November 1935. Specialization: Materials Science & Engineering, Energy Technologies, ...

  13. Nayak, Dr Shailesh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2014 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Nayak, Dr Shailesh Ph.D. (Baroda). Date of birth: 21 August 1953. Specialization: Remote Sensing, Coastal & Ocean Processes, Oceanography Address: Distinguished Scientist, Ministry of Earth Sciences, Prithvi Bhavan, Lodi Road, New Delhi 110 003, U.T.

  14. Ranganathan, Dr Darshan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1991 Section: Chemistry. Ranganathan, Dr Darshan Ph.D. (Delhi), FNA. Date of birth: 4 June 1941. Date of death: 4 June 2001. Specialization: Organic Chemistry, Bio-Organic Chemistry and Supramolecular Chemistry Last known address: Scientist, Indian Institue of Chemical, Technology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad ...

  15. Amarjit Singh, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amarjit Singh, Dr Ph.D. (Harvard). Date of birth: 19 November 1924. Specialization: Millimeter Wave Tubes, Microwave Tubes and Microwave Electronics Address: 12, Auburn Court, Vernon Hills, IL 60061, USA Contact: Residence: (+1-847) 247 9260. Email: amarjitsingh@ieee.org. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  16. Brahmayya Sastry, Dr Podila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1978 Section: Medicine. Brahmayya Sastry, Dr Podila Ph.D. (McGill). Date of birth: 24 May 1913. Date of death: 28 May 1993. Specialization: Physiology, Neurophysiology and Placental Physiology Last known address: Sitaramanilayam, Plot No. 9, Doctors Co-Operative Housing Colony, Waltair, Visakhapatnam ...

  17. Thakur, Dr Vikram Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1991 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Thakur, Dr Vikram Chandra Ph.D. (London). Date of birth: 15 January 1940. Specialization: Structural Geology, Tectonics of Himalayan Geology and Active Tectonics Address: 9/12 (Lane 9), Ashirwad Eclave, Dehra Dun 248 001, Uttarakhand Contact:

  18. Bapat, Dr Sharmila Avadhut

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2015 Section: Medicine. Bapat, Dr Sharmila Avadhut Ph.D. (Pune), FNASc. Date of birth: 20 November 1965. Specialization: Cancer Biology & Stem Cells Address: National Centre for Cell Science, NCCS Complex, University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2570 8089

  19. Chandrasekaran, Dr Chidambara

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1945 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Chandrasekaran, Dr Chidambara Ph.D. (London) 1962-64. Date of birth: 30 October 1911. Date of death: 4 January 2000. Specialization: Statistics, Public Health and Demography Last known address: 'Sri Kripa', 79/3, Benson Cross Road, Bengaluru 560 046. YouTube ...

  20. Mandal, Dr Asit Baran

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mandal, Dr Asit Baran Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FRSC. Date of birth: 13 January 1952. Specialization: Electrochemistry, Thermodynamics, Ionic Liquids, Biophysical Chemistry, Organised Self-Assemblies and Nanomaterials Address: Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja SC Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 ...

  1. Das, Dr Amitava

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: Chemistry. Das, Dr Amitava Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 24 December 1959. Specialization: Molecular Reactions, Supramolecular Chemistry, Assembly Photo-included Processes Address: Director, Central Salt & Marine Chemicals Research Institute, GB Marg, Bhavnagar 364 002, ...

  2. Agrewala, Dr Javed Naim

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Agrewala, Dr Javed Naim Ph.D. (Agra), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 14 May 1961. Specialization: Immunology, Vaccine, Drug Discovery Address: Chief Scientist, Immunology Laboratory, Institute of Microbial Technology, Sector 39A, Chandigarh 160 036, U.T.. Contact: Office: (0172) 666 5261. Residence: (0172) 666 5514

  3. Dube, Dr Anuradha

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dube, Dr Anuradha Ph.D. (Kanpur), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 27 November 1955. Specialization: Parasite (Leishmania), Immunobiology, Drug Vaccine Development Address: INSA Senior Scientist, Central Drug Research Institute, P.B. No. 173, New Campus, Sector 10, Sitapur Road, Janakipuram Vistar, Lucknow 226 ...

  4. Chakraborty, Dr Subhra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chakraborty, Dr Subhra Ph.D. (JNU). Date of birth: 25 September 1964. Specialization: Nutritional & Stress Genomics, Plant proteomics, Molecular Biology, Biotechnology Address: Staff Scientist VII, National Institute of Plant Genome Research, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 2673 5186

  5. Anil, Dr Arga Chandrashekar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2015 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Anil, Dr Arga Chandrashekar Ph.D. (Karnatak). Date of birth: 23 January 1959. Specialization: Biological Oceanography, Marine Ecology, Marine Biology Address: Chief Scientist, National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula 403 004, ...

  6. Mukherjee, Dr Sunil Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukherjee, Dr Sunil Kumar Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 5 January 1950. Specialization: Molecular Biology, Extra Chromosomal DNA Replication and Viral Pathogenesis & RNAi. Address: NASI Senior Scientist, Department of Genetics, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110 ...

  7. Sethunathan, Dr Nambrattil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1986 Section: Plant Sciences. Sethunathan, Dr Nambrattil Ph.D. (Madras), FNA, FNAAS, FNASc. Date of birth: 2 June 1937. Specialization: Environmental Microbiology Address: Flat No. 103, Ushodaya Apartments, Sri Venkateswara Officers' Colony, Ramakrishnapuram, Secunderabad 500 056, A.P.

  8. Gore, Dr Anil Purushottam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1997 Section: Animal Sciences. Gore, Dr Anil Purushottam Ph.D. (Kentucky). Date of birth: 10 August 1947. Specialization: Analysis of Clinical Trials, Non-parametric Inference and Statistical Ecology Address: Bakul, 40, Empress Garden Society, Sopan Baug, Pune 411 001, Maharashtra Contact:

  9. Amritkar, Dr Ravindra Eknath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amritkar, Dr Ravindra Eknath Ph.D. (Bangalore), FNASc. Date of birth: 19 August 1951. Specialization: Nonlinear Phenomena, Chaos and Statistical Physics Address: Visiting Professor, Institute of Infrastructure, Technology, Research, and Management (IITRAM), Near Khokhara Circle, Ahmedabad 380 026, Gujarat Contact ...

  10. Bal, Dr Dattatreya Vaman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1943 Section: Animal Sciences. Bal, Dr Dattatreya Vaman Ph.D. (Liverpool). Date of birth: 25 August 1905. Date of death: 1 April 1999. Specialization: Marine Zoology, Oceanography. Fisheries and Aquaculture Last known address: 104, Swaroop Complex, Karve Road, Pune 411 ...

  11. Chandrashekar, Dr Tavarekere Kalliah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2000 Section: Chemistry. Chandrashekar, Dr Tavarekere Kalliah Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA, FTWAS Council Service: 2013-15. Date of birth: 1 January 1956. Specialization: Bio-inorganic Chemistry, Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis Address: Senior Professor, School of Chemical Sciences, ...

  12. Kulkarni, Dr Mohan Gopalkrishna

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1996 Section: Engineering & Technology. Kulkarni, Dr Mohan Gopalkrishna Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNAE. Date of birth: 14 November 1950. Specialization: Polymer Science & Engineering, Intellectual Property Address: Emeritus Scientist, Unit for R&D of Information Products, Tapovan, NCL Campus, Pashan Road, Pune ...

  13. Sharma, Dr Surinder Mohan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sharma, Dr Surinder Mohan Ph.D. (Bombay), FNASc. Date of birth: 15 April 1952. Specialization: Condensed Matter Physics under High Pressures, Synchrotron Beamlines, Molecular Dynamics and First Principles Calculations Address: Distinguished Scientist, DAE, Head, High Pressure Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic ...

  14. Sharma, Dr Ram Prakash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1987 Section: Chemistry. Sharma, Dr Ram Prakash Ph.D. (Aligarh and London). Date of birth: 5 January 1939. Specialization: Natural Products Chemistry and New Synthetic Methods Address: E-45, DGS Housing Society, Sector 22, Plot No. 6, Dwaraka, New Delhi 110 045, U.T.

  15. Krishnan, Dr Raghavan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Monsoon & Climate Dynamics, Atmosphere-Ocean-Land System, Monsoon Hydrological Cycle Address: Acting Director, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2590 4301. Residence: (020) 2589 8886. Mobile: 98817 37976

  16. Gahalaut, Dr Vineet Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2018 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Gahalaut, Dr Vineet Kumar Ph.D. (Roorkee). Date of birth: 26 September 1966. Specialization: Seismology, Tectonic Geodesy, Geodynamics Address: National Centre for Seismology, Ministry of Earth Sciences, IMD Complex, Lodi Road, New Delhi 110 003, U.T.. Contact:

  17. Bhawalkar, Dr Dilip Devidas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1986 Section: Physics. Bhawalkar, Dr Dilip Devidas Ph.D. (Southampton), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 16 October 1940. Specialization: Lasers and laser Instrumentation Address: 26, Paramanu Nagar, Indore 452 013, M.P.. Contact: Office: (0731) 232 2707. Residence: (0731) 232 0031. Mobile: 93032 ...

  18. Babu, Dr Cherukuri Raghavendra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1990 Section: Plant Sciences. Babu, Dr Cherukuri Raghavendra D.Phil. (Calcutta). Date of birth: 30 June 1940. Specialization: Biosystematics, Ecology and Population Genetics Address: Professor Emeritus, CEMDE, School of Environmental Studies, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, U.T.. Contact:

  19. Brahm Prakash, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1972 Section: Engineering & Technology. Brahm Prakash, Dr Ph.D. (Panjab), FNA 1974-76. Date of birth: 21 August 1912. Date of death: 3 January 1984. Specialization: Metallurgy. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  20. Yadav, Dr Ram Ratan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yadav, Dr Ram Ratan Ph.D. (Lucknow), FNASc. Date of birth: 5 January 1956. Specialization: Palaeoclimatology, Tree Ring Analysis, Climate Change, Biodiversity Address: CSIR Emeritus Scientist, Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, 33, Gen. Mahadev Singh Road, Dehra Dun 248 001, Uttrakhand Contact: Residence: ...

  1. Ram Sagar, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ram Sagar, Dr Ph.D. (Gorakhpur), FNASc. Date of birth: 1 July 1952. Specialization: Astronomy & Astrophysics and High Energy Physics Address: NASI Senior Scientist, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Sarjapur Road, Koramangala, Bengaluru 560 034, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2254 1221. Residence: (080) 2571 ...

  2. Ganguly, Dr Chaitanyamoy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1994 Section: Engineering & Technology. Ganguly, Dr Chaitanyamoy Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNA, FNAE, FNASc. Date of birth: 31 December 1946. Specialization: Fuel Cycle, Advanced Ceramics, Powder Metallurgy and Uranium, Thorium & Plutonium Fuels Address: Caladia 703, The Botanika, Kondapur, ...

  3. Asundi, Dr Moodalagiri Kushalrao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asundi, Dr Moodalagiri Kushalrao Ph.D. (London). Date of birth: 1 May 1930. Date of death: 1 December 2003. Specialization: Physical Metallurgy and Structural & Mechanical Properties of Materials Last known address: Consulting Metallurgist, No. 44, 'VIBHA', Ramakrishna Paramahamsa Marg, Bandra East, Mumbai 400 ...

  4. Mishra, Dr Rakesh K

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mishra, Dr Rakesh K Ph.D. (Allahabad), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 14 April 1961. Specialization: Genomics, Chromatin, Epigenetics Address: Director, Centre for Cellular & Molecular Biology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500 007, A.P.. Contact: Office: (040) 2719 2600. Residence: (040) 2720 6400. Mobile: 94419 02188

  5. Mahalakshmi, Dr Radhakrishnan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahalakshmi, Dr Radhakrishnan Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 8 April 1980. Specialization: Membrane Protein Biophysics, Protein Folding, Spectroscopy Address during Associateship: MBL, Dept. of Biological Sci., Indian Institute of Science Edn. &, Research, Bhauri, Bhopal 462 066, M.P.. Contact: Office: (0755) 669 2562

  6. Ram Sagar, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2001 Section: Physics. Ram Sagar, Dr Ph.D. (Gorakhpur), FNASc. Date of birth: 1 July 1952. Specialization: Astronomy & Astrophysics and High Energy Physics Address: NASI Senior Scientist, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Sarjapur Road, Koramangala, Bengaluru 560 034, Karnataka Contact:

  7. Ghosh, Dr Balaram

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ghosh, Dr Balaram Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 23 November 1955. Specialization: Immunology, Genomics, Gene Regulation Address: Distinguished Professor, Institute of Genomics & Integrative Biology, Mall Road, Delhi 110 007, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 2766 2580. Residence: (011) 2786 0108

  8. Pradhan, Dr Trilochan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pradhan, Dr Trilochan Ph.D. (Chicago). Date of birth: 3 January 1929. Specialization: Elementary Particles & High Energy Physics, Plasma Physics and Atomic Physics Address: Emeritus Professor, Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005, Orissa Contact: Office: (0674) 230 1058. Residence: (0674) ...

  9. Dastidar, Dr Pranab Rebatiranjan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Engineering & Technology. Dastidar, Dr Pranab Rebatiranjan B.E., Ph.D. (Manchester). Date of birth: 10 July 1933. Specialization: Electronics, Controls and Nuclear Power Address: F-3, Rajkunj Co-op. Housing Society, Wadhavli, Chembur, Mumbai 400 074., Maharashtra Contact:

  10. Khanna, Dr Navin Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2017 Section: Medicine. Khanna, Dr Navin Chandra Ph.D. (AIIMS), FNASc. Date of birth: 1 April 1956. Specialization: Dengue Subunit Vaccine, Dengue Botanical Drug, Recombinant Proteins of Medical Use Address: International Centre for Genetic Engineering, and Biotechnology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi ...

  11. Chandy, Dr Jacob

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1961 Section: Medicine. Chandy, Dr Jacob MBBS (Madras), FRCS (c) Council Service: 1962-70. Date of birth: 23 January 1910. Date of death: 23 June 2007. Specialization: Neurology, Neurosurgery and Medical Education Last known address: Paarra, Matteethra, Kottayam 686 ...

  12. Nageswara Rao, Dr Gullapalli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nageswara Rao, Dr Gullapalli M.D. (Opthal.) (AIIMS), FAMS, FACS, FRCS, FNASc. Date of birth: 1 September 1945. Specialization: Cornea, Community Eye Health and Eye Care Policy & Planning Address: Distinguished Chair of Eye Health, LV Prasad Eye Institute, LV Prasad Marg, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 034, A.P.

  13. Bhagwat, Dr Wasudeo Vithal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 10 October 1906. Date of death: 28 January 2000. Specialization: Physical Chemistry Last known address: c/o Dr V W Bhagwat, F 2/17 University Campus, Vikram University,, Kothi Road, Ujjain 456 010. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  14. Majumdar, Dr Subeer Suhash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2014 Section: Animal Sciences. Majumdar, Dr Subeer Suhash Ph.D. (nagpur), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 21 May 1961. Specialization: Animal Biotechnology, Transgenic Animals, Endocrinology Address: Director, National Institute of Animal Biotechnology, Gopan Pally, Hyderabad 500 046, A.P.

  15. Pal, Dr Gaya Prasad

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1994 Section: Medicine. Pal, Dr Gaya Prasad M.B.B.S. and M.S. (Indore), D.Sc. (S. Gujarat), FNASc, FAMS. Date of birth: 7 June 1950. Specialization: Human Anatomy, Clinical Anatomy and Biomechanics of Spine Address: FASI Director, Modern Institute of Medical Sciences, Kanadia, Near Bypass ...

  16. Sirsat, Dr Satyavati Motiram

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sirsat, Dr Satyavati Motiram Ph.D. (Mumbai). Date of birth: 7 October 1925. Date of death: 10 July 2010. Specialization: Medical Research (Cancer) & Ultrastructural Pathology and Hospice Care of the Dying Last known address: Bhagirathi Sadan, 17th Road, Khar, Mumbai 400 052. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  17. Chandrasekharan, Dr Komaravolu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chandrasekharan, Dr Komaravolu Ph.D. (Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 21 November 1920. Date of death: 13 April 2017. Specialization: Analysis and Theory of Numbers Last known address: Professor Emertius, Eidg. Technische Hochschule, Mathematik, ETH Zentrum, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  18. Chandy, Dr Jacob

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1961 Section: Medicine. Chandy, Dr Jacob MBBS (Madras), FRCS (c) Council Service: 1962-70. Date of birth: 23 January 1910. Date of death: 23 June 2007. Specialization: Neurology, Neurosurgery and Medical Education Last known address: Paarra, Matteethra, Kottayam 686 004. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  19. Chitnis, Dr Chetan Eknath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2009 Section: Medicine. Chitnis, Dr Chetan Eknath Ph.D. (UC, Berkeley), FNA. Date of birth: 3 April 1961. Specialization: Molecular Parasitology, Vaccine Development for Malaria and Molecular & Cell Biology Address: Head, Malaria Parasite Biology & Vaccine, Institut Pasteur, 28, ...

  20. Gupta, Dr Chhitar Mal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gupta, Dr Chhitar Mal Ph.D. (Agra), FNA, FNASc, FAMS, FTWAS Council Service: 1998-2000. Date of birth: 1 September 1944. Specialization: Membrane Biology, Bio-organic Chemistry and Molecular Biophysics Address: Distinguished Professor and Infosys Chair, Institute of Bioinformatics & Applied Biotechnology, Room ...

  1. Mohanty, Dr Debasisa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2012 Section: General Biology. Mohanty, Dr Debasisa Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 30 November 1966. Specialization: Bioinformatics, Computational & Structural Biology, Biophysics Address: National Institute of Immunology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, ...

  2. Amarjit Singh, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Amarjit Singh, Dr Ph.D. (Harvard). Date of birth: 19 November 1924. Specialization: Millimeter Wave Tubes, Microwave Tubes and Microwave Electronics Address: 12, Auburn Court, Vernon Hills, IL 60061, USA Contact: Residence: (+1-847) 247 9260

  3. Prakash, Dr Vishweshwaraiah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash, Dr Vishweshwaraiah Ph.D. (Mysore), FNASc, FNAE, FRSC,FNAAS. Date of birth: 23 November 1951. Specialization: S&T Policy, Physical Biochemistry, Chemistry of Macromolecules, Biophysics of Proteins, Enzymes & Thermodynamics, Food Chemistry, Nutrition, Food Biotechnology and Food Science Address: ...

  4. Gupta, Dr Pradeep Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2007 Section: Physics. Gupta, Dr Pradeep Kumar Ph.D. (Heriot Watt University), FNASc. Date of birth: 16 August 1954. Specialization: Lasers, Biomedical Applications of Lasers, Nonlinear Optics, Laser Materials Address: Visiting Professor, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110 016, ...

  5. Choudary, Dr Boyapati Manoranjan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1992 Section: Chemistry. Choudary, Dr Boyapati Manoranjan Ph.D. (Gujarat), FNA. Date of birth: 10 August 1946. Specialization: Homogeneous & Heterogeneous Catalysis, Flow Reactions, Nanotechnology, Nanomedicine Address: Flat No. 312, New MLA & MP Colony, Road No. 10C, Jubilee Hills ...

  6. Nagaraj, Dr Ramakrishnan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1992 Section: General Biology. Nagaraj, Dr Ramakrishnan Ph.D. (IISc), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 10 February 1953. Specialization: Peptide Conformation; Membrane Biochemistry, Host-Defence Peptides, Protein Nanostructures Address: NASI Senior Scientist, Centre for Cellular and Molecular ...

  7. Bhaduri, Dr Sumit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1989 Section: Chemistry. Bhaduri, Dr Sumit Ph.D. (Cambridge), FNA. Date of birth: 22 October 1948. Specialization: Organometallic Chemistry and Catalysis Address: 562, Adenwala Road, Rustom Mansion, Mumbai 400 019, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (022) 2415 0255

  8. Rai, Dr Shyam Sundar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 16 March 1954. Specialization: Geophysics, Data Analysis & Modelling Deep Earth Exploration Address: Chair, Earth & Climate Science, Indian Institute of Science Education & Research, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411 008, Maharasdhtra Contact: Office: (020) 2590 8255. Mobile: 98903 22705

  9. Nair, Dr Gopinath Balakrish

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nair, Dr Gopinath Balakrish Ph.D. (Annamalai), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS. Date of birth: 5 January 1954. Specialization: Clinical Microbiology, Molecular Epidemiology, Diarrhoeal Diseases Address: Ag. Regional Adviser, World Health Organisation, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Indraprastha Estate, New Delhi 110 002, U.T.. Contact:

  10. Kinger, Dr Asha K

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship; Associateship. Associate Profile. Period: 1993–1997. Kinger, Dr Asha K. Date of birth: 30 April 1962. Specialization: Biotechnology Address during Associateship: Department of Biotechnology, All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110 029. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  11. Dey, Dr Gautam Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dey, Dr Gautam Kumar Ph.D. (BHU), FNAE. Date of birth: 8 June 1957. Specialization: Phase Transformations in Metals & Alloys, Electron Microscopy and Metallic Glasses & Nanocrystalline Materials Address: Head, Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085, Maharashtra

  12. Brahm Prakash, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1972 Section: Engineering & Technology. Brahm Prakash, Dr Ph.D. (Panjab), FNA 1974-76. Date of birth: 21 August 1912. Date of death: 3 January 1984. Specialization: Metallurgy.

  13. Brahmachari, Dr Samir Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1991 Section: General Biology. Brahmachari, Dr Samir Kumar Ph.D. (IISc), FNA, FNASc, FNAE, FTWAS. Date of birth: 1 January 1952. Specialization: Functional Genetics and Genome Informatics Address: Institute of Genomics & Integrative Biology, Mathura Road, New Delhi 110 020, U.T.. Contact:

  14. Panda, Dr Subrat Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Panda, Dr Subrat Kumar M.B.B.S. (Utkal), M.D. (Path.) (AIIMS), FNA. Date of birth: 18 November 1954. Specialization: Liver Pathology, Viral Hepatitis and Molecular Biology/Virology Address: Professor, Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110 029, U.T.. Contact:

  15. Sharma, Dr Surendra Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: Medicine. Sharma, Dr Surendra Kumar Ph.D. (AIIMS), MD (PGIMER, Chandigarh), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 22 February 1951. Specialization: Environmental Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Internal Medicine, Pulmonary & Critical Care and Sleep Medicine Address: B-5/3, B Block, Sector 13, RK ...

  16. Parnaik, Dr Veena Krishnaji

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2008 Section: Animal Sciences. Parnaik, Dr Veena Krishnaji Ph.D. (Ohio State), FNA. Date of birth: 22 August 1953. Specialization: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Lamins and Nuclear Organisation Address: INSA Senior Scientist, Centre for Cellular & Molecular Biology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500 007, A.P.

  17. Sengupta, Dr Sagar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2017 Section: General Biology. Sengupta, Dr Sagar Ph.D. (IISc), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 23 June 1968. Specialization: Cancer Biology, Cell Signalling, Mytochondrial Biology Address: National Institute of Immunology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 2670 3786

  18. Salunke, Dr Dinakar Mashnu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2001 Section: General Biology. Salunke, Dr Dinakar Mashnu Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA, FTWAS. Date of birth: 1 July 1955. Specialization: Structural Biology, Macromolecular Crystallography and Immunology Address: Director, International Centre for Genetic Engineering, & Biotechnology, Aruna Asaf ...

  19. Basu, Dr Sandip Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1992 Section: General Biology. Basu, Dr Sandip Kumar Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc, FNA, FTWAS Council Service: 1995-97. Date of birth: 1 January 1944. Specialization: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology and Microbial Genetics Address: FD-426, Sector 3, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 106, W.B.. Contact:

  20. Adhya, Dr Samit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1999 Section: General Biology. Adhya, Dr Samit Ph.D. (New York), FNA. Date of birth: 29 September 1953. Specialization: Mitochondrial Biology, Molecular Genetics of Parasites, Intracellular RNA Trafficking and DNA Diagnostics Address: CSIR Emeritus Scientist, Indian Inst. of Chemical Biology, 4, Raja S.C. ...

  1. Mandal, Dr Chitra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mandal, Dr Chitra Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA, FTWAS, FAMS. Date of birth: 15 September 1951. Specialization: Glycobiology, Immunobiology and Glycoimmunology Address: Distinguished Biotechnology Research Professor, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, 4, Raja SC Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032, W.B.

  2. Apte, Dr Shree Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2008 Section: General Biology. Apte, Dr Shree Kumar Ph.D. (Gujarat), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS. Date of birth: 18 October 1952. Specialization: Molecular Biology & Biotechnology, Physiology and Stress Biology of Bacteria & Plants Address: Emeritus Professor, Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushakti Nagar, ...

  3. Barua, Dr Asok Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1987 Section: Physics. Barua, Dr Asok Kumar Ph.D. (Calcutta). Date of birth: 1 July 1936. Specialization: Solid State Materials, Thin Film Technology and Thin Film Solar Cells Address: Honorary Emeritus Professor, Indian Institute of Engineering Science & Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711 103, W.B.. Contact:

  4. Jena, Dr Prafulla Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jena, Dr Prafulla Kumar Ph.D. (Utkal). Date of birth: 27 December 1931. Specialization: Extractive Metallurgy, Mineral Processing, Environmental Engineering and Materials Processing Address: Chairman, Institute of Advance Technology and Environmental Studies, 80A-831A Lewis Road, Bhubaneswar 751 002, Orissa

  5. Ghosh, Dr Pushpito Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2010 Section: Chemistry. Ghosh, Dr Pushpito Kumar Ph.D. (Princeton). Date of birth: 29 May 1954. Specialization: Processes Research, Water Purification, Renewable Energy, R&D Management Address: A-604, Punit Park, Plot No. 182/C, Sector 17, Merol, Navi Mumbai 400 706, ...

  6. Chandrasekaran, Dr Chidambara

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1945 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Chandrasekaran, Dr Chidambara Ph.D. (London) 1962-64. Date of birth: 30 October 1911. Date of death: 4 January 2000. Specialization: Statistics, Public Health and Demography Last known address: 'Sri Kripa', 79/3, Benson Cross Road, Bengaluru 560 046.

  7. Mukerji, Dr Mitali

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2014 Section: Medicine. Mukerji, Dr Mitali Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 13 November 1967. Specialization: Functional Genomics, Population Genomics, Ayurgenomics Address: Sr Principal Scientist, Genomics & Molecualr Medicine, Institute of Genomics & Integrative Biology, Sukhdev Vihar, Mathura Road, New Delhi ...

  8. Correlation of gut microbiota composition with resistance to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Stanisavljevic

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS. It is widely accepted that autoimmune response against the antigens of the CNS is the essential pathogenic force in the disease. It has recently become increasingly appreciated that activated encephalitogenic cells tend to migrate towards gut associated lymphoid tissues (GALT and that interrupted balance between regulatory and inflammatory immunity within the GALT might have decisive role in the initiation and propagation of the CNS autoimmunity. Gut microbiota composition and function has the major impact on the balance in the GALT. Thus, our aim was to perform analyses of gut microbiota in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Albino Oxford (AO rats that are highly resistant to EAE induction and Dark Agouti (DA rats that develop EAE after mild immunization were compared for gut microbiota composition in different phases after EAE induction. Microbial analyses of the genus Lactobacillus and related lactic acid bacteria showed higher diversity of Lactobacillus spp. in EAE-resistant AO rats, while some members of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria (Undibacterium oligocarboniphilum were detected only in faeces of DA rats at the peak of the disease (between 13 and 16 days after induction. Interestingly, Turicibacter sp. that was found exclusively in non-immunized AO, but not in DA rats in our previous study was detected in DA rats that remained healthy 16 days after induction. Similar observation was obtained for the members of Lachnospiraceae. As dominant presence of the members of Lachnospiraceae family in gut microbial community has been linked with mild symptoms of various diseases, it is tempting to assume that Turicibacter sp. and Lachnospiraceae contribute to the prevention of EAE development and the alleviation of the disease symptoms. Further, production of a typical regulatory cytokine interleukin-10 was

  9. Resistance to Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease Associated Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Sandra; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Belo, Luís; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Reis, Flávio

    2015-12-25

    This study aimed to elucidate the mechanisms explaining the persistence of anemia and resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anemia with formation of anti-rHuEPO antibodies. The remnant kidney rat model of CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy was used to test a long-term (nine weeks) high dose of rHuEPO (200 UI/kg bw/week) treatment. Hematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated as well as serum and tissue (kidney, liver and/or duodenum) protein and/or gene expression of mediators of erythropoiesis, iron metabolism and tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and fibrosis. Long-term treatment with a high rHuEPO dose is associated with development of resistance to therapy as a result of antibodies formation. In this condition, serum EPO levels are not deficient and iron availability is recovered by increased duodenal absorption. However, erythropoiesis is not stimulated, and the resistance to endogenous EPO effect and to rHuEPO therapy results from the development of a hypoxic, inflammatory and fibrotic milieu in the kidney tissue. This study provides new insights that could be important to ameliorate the current therapeutic strategies used to treat patients with CKD-associated anemia, in particular those that become resistant to rHuEPO therapy.

  10. Fish oil and olive oil can modify insulin resistance and plasma desacyl-ghrelin in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atoosa Saidpour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence exists for reciprocal effects of insulin and desacyl-ghrelin (DAG concentration, but the association between different fatty acid saturation in high fat diet (HFD and these hormones remain to be established. To evaluate the impact of different sources of dietary fat and the level of fatty acid saturation on plasma insulin and DAG levels and also the association of DAG with insulin action this study was carried out. Methods: Male weaning Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups of HFDs, high fat butter (HF-B, high fat soy (HF-S, high fat olive (HF-O, high fat fish (HF-F, and a group of standard diet (SD. Blood samples were collected after 8 weeks and after they were fasted for 24 h. Body weight, food intake, plasma glucose, insulin, DAG and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR were measured. Results: Plasma insulin levels at fed and fasted status, were significantly higher in rats on HF-B compared to those on SD, HF-F and HF-O diets (P<0.05. Insulin concentration in rats on HF-S was also higher than those on SD, HF-F and HF-O diets (P<0.05, in the feeding status. Insulin resistance was significantly higher in rats on HF-B, compared to those on SD, HF-F and HF-O (P<0.05. Rats that were fed with HF-B diet had lower fasting plasma DAG levels than the SD, HF-F and HF-O groups (P<0.05; furthermore, the HF-F group had significantly higher DAG level than the HF-S groups (P<0.05. Conclusions: Fish and olive oils may hence contribute to lower insulin level and HOMA-IR by increasing DAG concentration and may have more health benefits than other fat sources in diets.

  11. Expression profiling of the VKORC1 and Calumenin gene in a Danish strain of bromadiolone-resistant Norway rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) has been associated with two genes, VKORC1 and Calumenin, which encodes proteins essential to the vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylation system. Mutations in the VKORC1 gene are considered the genetic basis for anticoagulant resistance...

  12. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 genes between bromadiolone-resistant and anticoagulant-susceptible Norway rats:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) has been suggested to be due to mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding the target protein of anticoagulant rodenticides such as warfarin and bromadiolone. Other factors, e.g. pharmacokinetics, may however also contribute to resistance. We...

  13. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 genes between bromadiolone-resistant and anticoagulant-susceptible Norway rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude Kjær; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    Background: Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus (Berk.), has been suggested to be conferred by mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding the target protein of anticoagulant rodenticides. Other factors, e.g. pharmacokinetics, may also contribute to resistance, however. To examine...

  14. Acute insulin resistance mediated by advanced glycation endproducts in severely burned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Xu, Jie; Cai, Xiaoqing; Ji, Lele; Li, Jia; Cao, Bing; Li, Jun; Hu, Dahai; Li, Yan; Wang, Haichang; Xiong, Lize; Xiao, Ruiping; Gao, Feng

    2014-06-01

    Hyperglycemia often occurs in severe burns; however, the underlying mechanisms and importance of managing postburn hyperglycemia are not well recognized. This study was designed to investigate the dynamic changes of postburn hyperglycemia and the underlying mechanisms and to evaluate whether early glycemic control is beneficial in severe burns. Prospective, randomized experimental study. Animal research laboratory. Sprague-Dawley rats. Anesthetized rats were subjected to a full-thickness burn injury comprising 40% of the total body surface area and were randomized to receive vehicle, insulin, and a soluble form of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts treatments. An in vitro study was performed on cultured H9C2 cells subjected to vehicle or carboxymethyllysine treatment. We found that blood glucose change presented a distinct pattern with two occurrences of hyperglycemia at 0.5- and 3-hour postburn, respectively. Acute insulin resistance evidenced by impaired insulin signaling and glucose uptake occurred at 3-hour postburn, which was associated with the second hyperglycemia and positively correlated with mortality. Mechanistically, we found that serum carboxymethyllysine, a dominant species of advanced glycation endproducts, increased within 1-hour postburn, preceding the occurrence of insulin resistance. More importantly, treatment of animals with soluble form of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts, blockade of advanced glycation endproducts signaling, alleviated severe burn-induced insulin resistance. In addition, early hyperglycemic control with insulin not only reduced serum carboxymethyllysine but also blunted postburn insulin resistance and reduced mortality. These findings suggest that severe burn-induced insulin resistance is partly at least mediated by serum advanced glycation endproducts and positively correlated with mortality. Early glycemic control with insulin or inhibition of advanced glycation endproducts with soluble form of receptor

  15. H-1, C-13, and N-15 NMR assignments of the hypothetical Nudix protein DR0079 from the extremely radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Ni, Shuisong; Holbrook, Stephen R.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2003-02-05

    Letter to the Editor. Biological context Deinococcus radiodurans is a bacterium that is extremely resistant to the lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet radiation, and other physical and chemical DNA-damaging agents (Battista, 1997). It has been suggested that this resistance is due to unusually efficient DNA repair mechanisms (Minton, 1994). Analysis of the complete genome sequence of D. radiodurans reveals a full suite of genes with potential DNA repair activities (White et al, 1999), essentially all of which have functional homologues in other procaryotes. These hypothetical DNA repair genes display a high amount of redundancy and include 21 genes that have sequence homology with the Nudix family of polyphosphate pyrophosphohydrolases (Bessman et al., 1996). Nudix proteins are identified by the consensus sequence GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where U= I, L, or V and X= any amino acid) that forms part of the catalytic site for diphosphate hydrolysis (Bessman et al., 1996). Consequently, a nucleoside diphosphate linkage is a feature common in Nudix substrates that include NADH, nucleotide sugars, dinucleotide polyphosphates, and (deoxy)ribonucleoside triphosphates (NTPs). The general biochemical function of the Nudix family of proteins is believed to be sanitizing the cell (Bessman et al., 1996). For example, MutT preferably hydrolyzes the promutagenic NTP 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine triphosphate to nucleotide monophosphate and inorganic phosphate. Despite the identification of over 450 putative Nudix proteins in genomes on the basis of the Nudix consensus sequence (Gabelli et al., 2001), few Nudix protein structures have been determined (Holbrook et al., 2002). To better understand the relevance, function, and mechanism of the Nudix family of proteins, and to better understand the roles played by the hypothetical D. radiodurans Nudix proteins in radiation-resistance, we have crystallized the hypothetical D.

  16. The Effect of Physical Resistance Training on Baroreflex Sensitivity of Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Felipe Pereira Gomes

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Baroreceptors act as regulators of blood pressure (BP; however, its sensitivity is impaired in hypertensive patients. Among the recommendations for BP reduction, exercise training has become an important adjuvant therapy in this population. However, there are many doubts about the effects of resistance exercise training in this population. Objective: To evaluate the effect of resistance exercise training on BP and baroreceptor sensitivity in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. Method: Rats SHR (n = 16 and Wistar (n = 16 at 8 weeks of age, at the beginning of the experiment, were randomly divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (CS, n = 8; trained control (CT, n = 8; sedentary SHR (HS, n = 8 and trained SHR (HT, n = 8. Resistance exercise training was performed in a stairmaster-type equipment (1.1 × 0.18 m, 2 cm between the steps, 80° incline with weights attached to their tails, (5 days/week, 8 weeks. Baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate (HR was tested by loading/unloading of baroreceptors with phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. Results: Resistance exercise training increased the soleus muscle mass in SHR when compared to HS (HS 0.027 ± 0.002 g/mm and HT 0.056 ± 0.003 g/mm. Resistance exercise training did not alter BP. On the other hand, in relation to baroreflex sensitivity, bradycardic response was improved in the TH group when compared to HS (HS -1.3 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg and HT -2.6 ± 0.2 bpm/mmHg although tachycardia response was not altered by resistance exercise (CS -3.3 ± 0.2 bpm/mmHg, CT -3.3 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg, HS -1.47 ± 0.06 bpm/mmHg and HT -1.6 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg. Conclusion: Resistance exercise training was able to promote improvements on baroreflex sensitivity of SHR rats, through the improvement of bradycardic response, despite not having reduced BP.

  17. Stress-enhanced fear learning in rats is resistant to the effects of immediate massed extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Virginia A; Fanselow, Michael S

    2012-11-01

    Enhanced fear learning occurs subsequent to traumatic or stressful events and is a persistent challenge to the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Facilitation of learning produced by prior stress can elicit an exaggerated fear response to a minimally aversive event or stimulus. Stress-enhanced fear learning (SEFL) is a rat model of PTSD; rats previously exposed to the SEFL 15 electrical shocks procedure exhibit several behavioral responses similar to those seen in patients with PTSD. However, past reports found that SEFL is not mitigated by extinction (a model of exposure therapy) when the spaced extinction began 24 h after stress. Recent studies found that extinction from 10 min to 1 h subsequent to fear conditioning "erased" learning, whereas later extinction, occurring from 24 to 72 h after conditioning did not. Other studies indicate that massed extinction is more effective than spaced procedures. Therefore, we examined the time-dependent nature of extinction on the stress-induced enhancement of fear learning using a massed trial's procedure. Experimental rats received 15 foot shocks and were given either no extinction or massed extinction 10 min or 72 h later. Our present data indicate that SEFL, following traumatic stress, is resistant to immediate massed extinction. Experimental rats showed exaggerated new fear learning regardless of when extinction training occurred. Thus, post-traumatic reactivity such as SEFL does not seem responsive to extinction treatments.

  18. Stress-enhanced fear learning in rats is resistant to the effects of immediate massed extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Virginia A.; Fanselow, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced fear learning occurs subsequent to traumatic or stressful events and is a persistent challenge to the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Facilitation of learning produced by prior stress can elicit an exaggerated fear response to a minimally aversive event or stimulus. Stress-enhanced fear learning (SEFL) is a rat model of PTSD; rats previously exposed to the SEFL 15 electrical shocks procedure exhibit several behavioral responses similar to those seen in patients with PTSD. However, past reports found that SEFL is not mitigated by extinction (a model of exposure therapy) when the spaced extinction began 24 h after stress. Recent studies found that extinction from 10 min to 1 h subsequent to fear conditioning “erased” learning, whereas later extinction, occurring from 24 to 72 h after conditioning did not. Other studies indicate that massed extinction is more effective than spaced procedures. Therefore, we examined the time-dependent nature of extinction on the stress-induced enhancement of fear learning using a massed trial’s procedure. Experimental rats received 15 foot shocks and were given either no extinction or massed extinction 10 min or 72 h later. Our present data indicate that SEFL, following traumatic stress, is resistant to immediate massed extinction. Experimental rats showed exaggerated new fear learning regardless of when extinction training occurred. Thus, post-traumatic reactivity such as SEFL does not seem responsive to extinction treatments. PMID:22176467

  19. Grain yields and disease resistance as selection criteria for introduction of new varieties of small grain cereal in Lubumbashi, D.R. Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukobo, M R P; Ngongo, L M; Haesaert, G

    2014-01-01

    Wheat production in African countries is a major challenge for their development, considering their increasing consumption of wheat flour products. In the Democratic Republic of Congo, wheat and wheat-based products are the important imported food products although there is a potential for the cultivation of small grain cereals such as durum wheat, wheat and triticale. Trials done in Lubumbashi in the Katanga Province have shown that Septoria Leaf Blotch, Septoria Glume Blotch and Fusarium head blight are the main constraints to the efficient development of these cultures. Some varieties of Elite Spring Wheat, High Rainfall Wheat, Triticale and Durum Wheat from CIMMYT were followed during 4 growing seasons and agronomic characteristics and their levels of disease resistance were recorded. Correlations of agronomic characteristics with yields showed that in most cases, thousand kernel weight is the parameter that has the most influence on the yield level (p < 0.0001). The analysis of variance for all diseases showed that there were significant effects related to the year, the species and the interaction years x species. Triticale varieties seem to have a better resistance against the two forms of Septoria compared to wheat varieties but, they seem to be more sensitive to Fusarium Head Blight than wheat varieties. However, the Fusarium Head Blight has a rather low incidence in Lubumbashi.

  20. Reproductive success of bromadiolone-resistant rats in absence of anticoagulant pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Leirs, Herwig; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2006-01-01

    that, for both males and females, surprisingly few individuals contributed to the next generation with numerous offspring, and most breeders contributed with none or a single offspring. The expected higher reproductive success and consequent increase in proportional numbers of sensitive rats...... experimental populations of wild brown rats, an investigation was carried out to establish whether tolerance to anticoagulant exposure changed over a period of 2 years. In the same populations, DNA microsatellite markers were used to infer parentage, and this made it possible to estimate reproductive success...... results in sex differential selection; in highly resistant males the selection presumably takes place at the immature stage, whereas in females the vitamin K requirement becomes crucial at the reproductive stage, as vitamin K is not only essential for the blood clotting process but also for bone formation...

  1. Tacrolimus reversibly reduces insulin secretion, induces insulin resistance, and causes islet cell damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chun; Niu, Yu-Jian; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Teng, Ya-Qin; Li, Chun-Feng; Wang, Hong-Yu; Yin, Jun-Ping; Wang, Le-Tian; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the diabetogenic effects of the immunosuppressive agent tacrolimus, the reversibility of these effects upon treatment discontinuation, and the underlying mechanisms in a rat model. 60 healthy male rats were randomly divided into three groups for intragastric administration of tacrolimus either at 4 mg/kg/d or 2 mg/kg/d or an equal volume of normal saline (control). The treatment was administered for 5 months, followed by a 5-month period of no intervention. Fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels were used to calculate the homeostasis model assessment of ß-cell function (HOMA-ß) and insulin sensitivity index (ISI). Tacrolimus treatment significantly increased blood glucose concentrations (p insulin secretion pathway, local and/or systemic insulin resistance, and islet cell damage.

  2. Differential mesocorticolimbic responses to palatable food in binge eating prone and binge eating resistant female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Elaine B; Culbert, Kristen M; Gradl, Dana R; Richardson, Kimberlei A; Klump, Kelly L; Sisk, Cheryl L

    2015-12-01

    Binge eating is a key symptom of many eating disorders (e.g. binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa binge/purge type), yet the neurobiological underpinnings of binge eating are poorly understood. The mesocorticolimbic reward circuit, including the nucleus accumbens and the medial prefrontal cortex, is likely involved because this circuit mediates the hedonic value and incentive salience of palatable foods (PF). Here we tested the hypothesis that higher propensity for binge eating is associated with a heightened response (i.e., Fos induction) of the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex to PF, using an animal model that identifies binge eating prone (BEP) and binge eating resistant (BER) rats. Forty adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were given intermittent access to PF (high fat pellets) 3×/week for 3 weeks. Based on a pattern of either consistently high or consistently low PF consumption across these feeding tests, 8 rats met criteria for categorization as BEP, and 11 rats met criteria for categorization as BER. One week after the final feeding test, BEP and BER rats were either exposed to PF in their home cages or were given no PF in their home cages for 1h prior to perfusion, leading to three experimental groups for the Fos analysis: BEPs given PF, BERs given PF, and a No PF control group. The total number of Fos-immunoreactive (Fos-ir) cells in the nucleus accumbens core and shell, and the cingulate, prelimbic, and infralimbic regions of the medial prefrontal cortex was estimated by stereological analysis. PF induced higher Fos expression in the nucleus accumbens shell and core and in the prelimbic and infralimbic cortex of BEP rats compared to No PF controls. Throughout the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex, PF induced higher Fos expression in BEP than in BER rats, even after adjusting for differences in PF intake. Differences in the neural activation pattern between BEP and BER rats were more robust in prefrontal cortex

  3. The effects of angiotensin II receptor antagonist (candesartan on rat renal vascular resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supatraviwat, J

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the action of angiotensin II (AII on renal perfusion pressure and renal vascular resistance using noncompetitive AT1-receptor antagonist (candesartan or CV 11974. Experiments were performed in isolated kidney of adult male Wistar rats. Kreb's Henseleit solution was perfused into the renal artery at the rate of 3.5 ml/min. This flow rate was designed in order to maintain renal perfusion pressure between 80-120 mm Hg. Dose-response relationship between perfusion flow rate and AII concentration were studied. Renal perfusion pressure in response to 1, 10 and 100 nM AII were increased from basal perfusion pressure of 94±8 mm Hg to 127±6, 157±12 and 190±16 mm Hg, respectively. Administration of perfusate containing 11.4 μM candesartan for 30 min had no effect on the basal perfusion pressure. However, this significantly reduced renal perfusion pressure in the presence of AII (1, 10 and 100 nM by 39%, 47% and 61%, (n=7, P<0.05 respectively. At the basal perfusion pressure, calculated renal vascular resistance was 27±2 mm Hg · min · ml-1. However, the vascular resistance were found to be 41±1, 45±2 and 47±2 mm Hg · min · ml-1 when 1, 10 and 100 nM AII were added. Moreover, this dose of candesartan also showed a significant decrease in renal vascular resistance at the corresponding doses of AII by 38%, 48% and 43%, (n=7, P<0.05 respectively. The higher dose of candesartan (22.7 μM completely inhibited the action of 1, 10 and 100 nM AII on renal vasoconstriction. These results may indicate that the action of AII on renal vascular resistance is via AT1-receptor, at least in rat isolated perfusion kidney.

  4. Improvements of insulin resistance in ovariectomized rats by a novel phytoestrogen from Curcuma comosa Roxb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasannarong, Mujalin; Saengsirisuwan, Vitoon; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Suksamrarn, Apichart

    2012-03-30

    Curcuma comosa Roxb. (C. comosa) is an indigenous medicinal herb that has been used in Thailand as a dietary supplement to relieve postmenopausal symptoms. Recently, a novel phytoestrogen, (3R)-1,7-diphenyl-(4E,6E)-4,6-heptadien-3-ol or compound 049, has been isolated and no study thus far has investigated the role of C. comosa in preventing metabolic alterations occurring in estrogen-deprived state. The present study investigated the long-term effects (12 weeks) of C. comosa hexane extract and compound 049 on insulin resistance in prolonged estrogen-deprived rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized (OVX) and treated with C. comosa hexane extract (125 mg, 250 mg, or 500 mg/kg body weight (BW)) and compound 049 (50 mg/kg BW) intraperitoneally three times per week for 12 weeks. Body weight, food intake, visceral fat weight, uterine weight, serum lipid profile, glucose tolerance, insulin action on skeletal muscle glucose transport activity, and GLUT-4 protein expression were determined. Prolonged ovariectomy resulted in dyslipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose transport, as compared to SHAM. Treatment with C. comosa hexane extract and compound 049, three times per week for 12 weeks, markedly reduced serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein levels, improved insulin sensitivity and partially restored uterine weights in ovariectomized rats. In addition, compound 049 or high doses of C. comosa hexane extract enhanced insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and increased muscle GLUT-4 protein levels. Treatment with C. comosa and its diarylheptanoid derivative improved glucose and lipid metabolism in estrogen-deprived rats, supporting the traditional use of this natural phytoestrogen as a strategy for relieving insulin resistance and its related metabolic defects in postmenopausal women.

  5. Improvements of insulin resistance in ovariectomized rats by a novel phytoestrogen from Curcuma comosa Roxb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasannarong Mujalin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcuma comosa Roxb. (C. comosa is an indigenous medicinal herb that has been used in Thailand as a dietary supplement to relieve postmenopausal symptoms. Recently, a novel phytoestrogen, (3R-1,7-diphenyl-(4E,6E-4,6-heptadien-3-ol or compound 049, has been isolated and no study thus far has investigated the role of C. comosa in preventing metabolic alterations occurring in estrogen-deprived state. The present study investigated the long-term effects (12 weeks of C. comosa hexane extract and compound 049 on insulin resistance in prolonged estrogen-deprived rats. Methods Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized (OVX and treated with C. comosa hexane extract (125 mg, 250 mg, or 500 mg/kg body weight (BW and compound 049 (50 mg/kg BW intraperitoneally three times per week for 12 weeks. Body weight, food intake, visceral fat weight, uterine weight, serum lipid profile, glucose tolerance, insulin action on skeletal muscle glucose transport activity, and GLUT-4 protein expression were determined. Results Prolonged ovariectomy resulted in dyslipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose transport, as compared to SHAM. Treatment with C. comosa hexane extract and compound 049, three times per week for 12 weeks, markedly reduced serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein levels, improved insulin sensitivity and partially restored uterine weights in ovariectomized rats. In addition, compound 049 or high doses of C. comosa hexane extract enhanced insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and increased muscle GLUT-4 protein levels. Conclusions Treatment with C. comosa and its diarylheptanoid derivative improved glucose and lipid metabolism in estrogen-deprived rats, supporting the traditional use of this natural phytoestrogen as a strategy for relieving insulin resistance and its related metabolic defects in postmenopausal women.

  6. [Probiotics improve obesity-associated dyslipidemia and insulin resistance in high-fat diet-fed rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ren-Qiang; Yuan, Jin-Ling; Ma, Lu-Yi; Qin, Qing-Xu; Wu, Xiao-You

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of probiotics (bifidobacterium breve and lactobacillus acidophilus) on serum lipid, serum insulin and insulin resistance in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese rats. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to a control (n=10) and a high fat diet groups (n=40) and were fed with standard diet and HFD respectively. Four weeks later, thirty-six HFD-induced obese rats were randomly administered with normal saline (NS), bifidobacterium breve and lactobacillus acidophilus daily (n=12 each). Four weeks later, body lengths, body weights and abdomen circumference of rats were measured, blood lipid, glucose and insulin levels were measured, and Lee's index and insulin resistance index were calculated. Body weight, abdomen circumference, Lee's index, fasting glucose, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL) in the NS-treated HFD group were significantly higher than the control group (Pfasting glucose, TC, TG and LDL than the NS-treated HFD group (Pfasting insulin, insulin resistance index and insulin secretion index between the bifidobacterium breve and lactobacillus acidophilus groups (P<0.05). Lactobacillus acidophilus and bifidobacterium breve can decrease serum levels of lipid and glucose and improve insulin resistance in obese rats. Bifidobacterium breve seems to be more effective on attenuating insulin resistance than lactobacillus acidophilus.

  7. The Effect of Different Doses of Vitamin D Supplementation on Insulin Resistance in ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastegar Hoseini

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and vitamin D deficiency are both too common during menopause. Since the effect of different doses of vitamin D supplements on blood sugar, insulin concentration  and insulin resistance are unknown, the present study aimed at investigating the effects of different doses of the vitamin D supplements on visceral fat, blood sugar, insulin concentration,  and insulin resistance in ovariectomized rats. Materials and Methods: In this randomized experimental study, 32 female Wistar rats were divided into 4 equal groups  as follows: three groups . that received vitamin D supplements (high, moderate, and low dose and one control group. After 8 weeks of different doses of vitamin D supplementation plasma concentration of glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR were measured  in the three groups. The obtained data  was statistically analyzed by means of dependent t-test and ANOVA . at the significance level of P<0.05. Results: After a period of eight-week  intervention, body weight, BMI, waist circumference, visceral fat, insulin, blood glucose and HOMA-IR at high, moderate, and low doses of vitamin D supplementation were significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.05. High dose of vitamin D compared with moderate and low doses significantly caused reduction in insulin, blood glucose, and HOMA-IR (P<0.001 for all three variables. Conclusion: The findings of the current study showed that a high dose of vitamin D causes significant improvements in FPG, insulin, and insulin resistance  evaluated by HOMA-IR. It was also found that adding vitamin D supplements can improve glucose control in menopause model of rats.

  8. Anti-TNF-α antibody alleviates insulin resistance in rats with sepsis-induced stress hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, W; Han, C; Li, M; Zhang, J; Jiang, Z

    2017-10-13

    To explore the effects and mechanisms of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) antibody on insulin resistance (IR) in rats with sepsis-induced stress hyperglycemia. The sepsis-induced stress hyperglycemic rat model was constructed by cecal ligation and puncture combined with the intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide. The rats were randomly divided into six groups: normal control (NC) group, surgical rats (Cntl) group, high-dose anti-TNF-α antibody therapy (TNF, 6 mg/kg) group, low-dose anti-TNF-α antibody therapy (Tnf, 3 mg/kg) group, insulin therapy (INS) group, and INS + Tnf group. The blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations were detected, followed by analysis of intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Finally, the expression levels of phospho-Akt (p-Akt), Akt, p-mTOR, mTOR, nuclear factor-κB (NFκB), I kappa beta kinase (IKKβ), and suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS-3) were detected by western blotting. There was no significant difference in blood glucose concentrations among these groups, while the serum insulin concentration in TNF and Tnf groups was lower than that in the Cntl group at postoperative 6 h (P TNF group than that in the Cntl group (P Tnf and TNF groups (P TNF-α antibody could reduce IR by inhibiting AKt/mTOR signaling pathway and the expression levels of NFκB, IKKβ, and SOCS-3 in rats with sepsis-induced stress hyperglycemia.

  9. Ontogeny, aging, and gender-related changes in hepatic multidrug resistant protein genes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qiong-Ni; Hou, Wei-Yu; Xu, Shang-Fu; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Liu, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (Mrps) are efflux transporters playing important roles in endogenous substances and xenobiotics transport out of the liver. Children, elderly, gender and physio-pathological conditions could influence their expression and result in changes in drug disposition. This study was aimed to examine the development-, aging-, and sex-dependent changes in Mrp1-4 and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (Abcg2) gene expressions in livers of rats. The livers from male and female SD rats at development (-2, 1,7,14,21,28,35, and 60d) and aging (28, 60, 180 and 540d) were collected and total RNA was isolated, purified and subjected to real-time RT-PCR analysis. Results showed that expression of Mrp1 was low, while Abcg2 and Mrp2 were the high in the liver. Mrp1 expression decreased with maturity but remained constant to 540d, while Mrp3 and 4 increased with liver development, reached the peak with maturity at 35-60days of age, and slightly reduced with aging. Mrp2 and Abcg2 were high at 7days of age and maintained at relative high levels till maturity, while Abcg2 was reduced during aging. Females had higher Mrp3 and Abcg2 mRNA expression than male rats, while male rats had higher Mrp2 and Mrp4 mRNA expression. The expression of hepatic Mrp1-4 and Abcg2 mRNA during development, aging in male and female rats was characterized, which could be fundamental to our understanding of age- and sex-associated variations in drug disposition in children, elderly, and women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gaia DR1 documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, F.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Arenou, F.; Comoretto, G.; Eyer, L.; Farras Casas, M.; Hambly, N.; Hobbs, D.; Salgado, J.; Utrilla Molina, E.; Vogt, S.; van Leeuwen, M.; Abreu, A.; Altmann, M.; Andrei, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Brown, A. G. A.; Busonero, D.; Busso, G.; Butkevich, A.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castañeda, J.; Charnas, J.; Cheek, N.; Clementini, G.; Crowley, C.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Angeli, F.; De Ridder, J.; Evans, D.; Fabricius, C.; Findeisen, K.; Fleitas, J. M.; Gracia, G.; Guerra, R.; Guy, L.; Helmi, A.; Hernandez, J.; Holl, B.; Hutton, A.; Klioner, S.; Lammers, U.; Lecoeur-Taïbi, I.; Lindegren, L.; Luri, X.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Messineo, R.; Michalik, D.; Mignard, F.; Montegriffo, P.; Mora, A.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Pancino, E.; Panem, C.; Portell, J.; Rimoldini, L.; Riva, A.; Robin, A.; Siddiqui, H.; Smart, R.; Sordo, R.; Soria, S.; Turon, C.; Vallenari, A.; Voss, H.

    2017-12-01

    We present the first Gaia data release, Gaia DR1, consisting of astrometry and photometry for over 1 billion sources brighter than magnitude 20.7 in the white-light photometric band G of Gaia. The Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) processed the raw measurements collected with the Gaia instruments during the first 14 months of the mission, and turned these into an astrometric and photometric catalogue. Gaia DR1 consists of three parts: an astrometric data set which contains the positions, parallaxes, and mean proper motions for about 2 million of the brightest stars in common with the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues (the primary astrometric data set) and the positions for an additional 1.1 billion sources (the secondary astrometric data set). The primary set forms the realisation of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). The second part of Gaia DR1 is the photometric data set, which contains the mean G-band magnitudes for all sources. The third part consists of the G-band light curves and the characteristics of 3000 Cepheid and RR Lyrae stars observed at high cadence around the south ecliptic pole. The positions and proper motions in the astrometric data set are given in a reference frame that is aligned with the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to better than 0.1 mas at epoch J2015.0, and non-rotating with respect to the ICRF to within 0.03 mas yr^-1. For the primary astrometric data set, the typical standard error for the positions and parallaxes is about 0.3 mas, while for the proper motions the typical standard error is about 1 mas yr^-1. Whereas it has been suggested in Gaia Collaboration et al. (2016a) that a systematic component of ∼0.3 mas should be 'added' (in quadrature) to the parallax uncertainties, Brown (2017) clarifies that reported parallax standard errors already include local systematics as a result of the calibration of the TGAS parallax uncertainties by comparison to Hipparcos parallaxes. For the subset of

  11. Hyperbilirubinemia modulates myocardial function, aortic ejection, and ischemic stress resistance in the Gunn rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakrania, Bhavisha; Du Toit, Eugene F; Ashton, Kevin J; Kiessling, Can J; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Headrick, John P; Bulmer, Andrew C

    2014-10-15

    Mildly elevated circulating unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) is associated with protection against hypertension and ischemic heart disease. We assessed whether endogenously elevated bilirubin in Gunn rats modifies cardiovascular function and resistance to ischemic insult. Hearts were assessed ex vivo (Langendorff perfusion) and in vivo (Millar catheterization and echocardiography), and left ventricular myocardial gene expression was measured via quantitative real-time PCR. Ex vivo analysis revealed reduced intrinsic contractility in the Gunn myocardium (+dP/dt: 1,976 ± 622 vs. 2,907 ± 334 mmHg/s, P hearts exhibited improved ventricular function after 35 min of ischemia and 90 min of reperfusion (63 ± 14 vs. 35 ± 12%, P stress resistance in association with beneficial transcriptional changes. These effects may contribute to protection from cardiovascular disease with elevated bilirubin. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. GLOBULAR RESISTANCE MODIFICATION ON RATS CONSECUTIVELY TO Al2(SO43 ADDITION FOR TWO GENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LOREDANA GABRIELA STANA

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Some of the major modifications on membranes produced by the oxygen reactivespecies are membranal structure and functions modifications, lipids peroxydation,membranal protein alterations and transportation disturbances thru membranes. Aseries of xenobotics like oxidant pollutants, lead, aluminium and others directly orindirectly are producing thru metabolization free radicals which interact with cellscomponents and alterate their functions. The purpose of this paper was to relieve theimpact of aluminium cumulative addition onto globular resistance on rats. Has beenadministrated three levels of aluminium (200ppb, 400 ppb şi 1000 ppb as Al2(SO43ad libidum in water. Was followed their toxicity impact on the globular resistancefor two generations. The results indicate a decrease of globular resistance directlycorrelated with the aluminium addition.

  13. Curcuma oil ameliorates insulin resistance & associated thrombotic complications in hamster & rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vishal; Jain, Manish; Misra, Ankita; Khanna, Vivek; Prakash, Prem; Malasoni, Richa; Dwivedi, Anil Kumar; Dikshit, Madhu; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Curcuma oil (C. oil) isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) has been shown to have neuro-protective, anti-cancer, antioxidant and anti-hyperlipidaemic effects in experimental animal models. However, its effect in insulin resistant animals remains unclear. The present study was carried out to investigate the disease modifying potential and underlying mechanisms of the C. oil in animal models of diet induced insulin resistance and associated thrombotic complications. Male Golden Syrian hamsters on high fructose diet (HFr) for 12 wk were treated orally with vehicle, fenofibrate (30 mg/kg) or C. oil (300 mg/kg) in the last four weeks. Wistar rats fed HFr for 12 wk were treated orally with C. oil (300 mg/kg) in the last two weeks. To examine the protective effect of C. oil, blood glucose, serum insulin, platelet aggregation, thrombosis and inflammatory markers were assessed in these animals. Animals fed with HFr diet for 12 wk demonstrated hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, alteration in insulin sensitivity indices, increased lipid peroxidation, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet free radical generation, tyrosine phosphorylation, aggregation, adhesion and intravascular thrombosis. Curcuma oil treatment for the last four weeks in hamsters ameliorated HFr-induced hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet activation, and thrombosis. In HFr fed hamsters, the effect of C. oil at 300 mg/kg [ ] was comparable with the standard drug fenofibrate. Curcuma oil treatment in the last two weeks in rats ameliorated HFr-induced hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia by modulating hepatic expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator 1 (PGC-1)α and PGC-1β genes known to be involved in lipid and glucose metabolism. High fructose feeding to rats and hamsters led to the development of insulin

  14. Curcuma oil ameliorates insulin resistance & associated thrombotic complications in hamster & rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Curcuma oil (C. oil isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa L. has been shown to have neuro-protective, anti-cancer, antioxidant and anti-hyperlipidaemic effects in experimental animal models. However, its effect in insulin resistant animals remains unclear. The present study was carried out to investigate the disease modifying potential and underlying mechanisms of the C. oil in animal models of diet induced insulin resistance and associated thrombotic complications. Methods: Male Golden Syrian hamsters on high fructose diet (HFr for 12 wk were treated orally with vehicle, fenofibrate (30 mg/kg or C. oil (300 mg/kg in the last four weeks. Wistar rats fed HFr for 12 wk were treated orally with C. oil (300 mg/kg in the last two weeks. To examine the protective effect of C. oil, blood glucose, serum insulin, platelet aggregation, thrombosis and inflammatory markers were assessed in these animals. Results: Animals fed with HFr diet for 12 wk demonstrated hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, alteration in insulin sensitivity indices, increased lipid peroxidation, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet free radical generation, tyrosine phosphorylation, aggregation, adhesion and intravascular thrombosis. Curcuma oil treatment for the last four weeks in hamsters ameliorated HFr-induced hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet activation, and thrombosis. In HFr fed hamsters, the effect of C. oil at 300 mg/kg [ ] was comparable with the standard drug fenofibrate. Curcuma oil treatment in the last two weeks in rats ameliorated HFr-induced hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia by modulating hepatic expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator 1 (PGC-1α and PGC-1β genes known to be involved in lipid and glucose metabolism. Interpretation

  15. Can an aversive, extinction-resistant memory trigger impairments in walking adaptability? An experimental study using adult rats

    OpenAIRE

    Medeiros, FM; Myskiw, J; Baptista, P; Neves, L; Martins, LA; Izquierdo, I; Furini, C; Xavier, L; Hollands, KL; Mestriner, RG

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive demands can influence the adaptation of walking, a crucial skill to maintain body stability and prevent falls. Whilst previous research has shown emotional load tunes goal-directed movements, little attention has been given to this finding. This study sought to assess the effects of suffering an extinction-resistant memory on skilled walking performance in adult rats, as an indicator of walking adaptability. Thus, 36 Wistar rats were divided in a two-part experiment. In the first pa...

  16. Effect of adrenomedullin gene delivery on insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Y. Henein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is one of the common metabolic disorders that ultimately afflicts large number of individuals. Adrenomedullin (AM is a potent vasodilator peptide; previous studies reported development of insulin resistance in aged AM deficient mice. In this study, we employed a gene delivery approach to explore its potential role in insulin resistance. Four groups were included: control, diabetic, non-diabetic injected with the AM gene and diabetic injected with the AM gene. One week following gene delivery, serum glucose, insulin, triglycerides, leptin, adiponectin and corticosterone were measured as well as the insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR. Soleus muscle glucose uptake and RT-PCR of both AM and glucose transporter-4 (GLUT 4 gene expressions were assessed. A single tail vein injection of adrenomedullin gene in type 2 diabetic rats improved skeletal muscle insulin responsiveness with significant improvement of soleus muscle glucose uptake, HOMA-IR, serum glucose, insulin and triglycerides and significant increase in muscle GLUT 4 gene expression (P < 0.05 compared with the non-injected diabetic rats. The beneficial effects of AM gene delivery were accompanied by a significant increase in the serum level of adiponectin (2.95 ± 0.09 versus 2.33 ± 0.17 μg/ml in the non-injected diabetic group as well as a significant decrease in leptin and corticosterone levels (7.51 ± 0.51 and 262.88 ± 10.34 versus 10.63 ± 1.4 and 275.86 ± 11.19 ng/ml respectively in the non-injected diabetic group. The conclusion of the study is that AM gene delivery can improve insulin resistance and may have significant therapeutic applications in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  17. The exenatide analogue AC3174 attenuates hypertension, insulin resistance, and renal dysfunction in Dahl salt-sensitive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Rayne

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptors improves insulin sensitivity and induces vasodilatation and diuresis. AC3174 is a peptide analogue with pharmacologic properties similar to the GLP-1 receptor agonist, exenatide. Hypothetically, chronic AC3174 treatment could attenuate salt-induced hypertension, cardiac morbidity, insulin resistance, and renal dysfunction in Dahl salt-sensitive (DSS rats. Methods DSS rats were fed low salt (LS, 0.3% NaCl or high salt (HS, 8% NaCl diets. HS rats were treated with vehicle, AC3174 (1.7 pmol/kg/min, or GLP-1 (25 pmol/kg/min for 4 weeks via subcutaneous infusion. Other HS rats received captopril (150 mg/kg/day or AC3174 plus captopril. Results HS rat survival was improved by all treatments except GLP-1. Systolic blood pressure (SBP was lower in LS rats and in GLP-1, AC3174, captopril, or AC3174 plus captopril HS rats than in vehicle HS rats (p Conclusions Thus, AC3174 had antihypertensive, cardioprotective, insulin-sensitizing, and renoprotective effects in the DSS hypertensive rat model. Furthermore, AC3174 improved animal survival, an effect not observed with GLP-1.

  18. Resistance exercise decreases heroin self-administration and alters gene expression in the nucleus accumbens of heroin-exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark A; Fronk, Gaylen E; Abel, Jean M; Lacy, Ryan T; Bills, Sarah E; Lynch, Wendy J

    2018-02-02

    Preclinical studies consistently report that aerobic exercise decreases drug self-administration and other forms of drug-seeking behavior; however, relatively few studies have examined other types of physical activity. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of resistance exercise (i.e., strength training) on heroin self-administration and mRNA expression of genes known to mediate opioid reinforcement and addictive behavior in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of heroin-exposed rats. Female rats were obtained during late adolescence and divided into two groups. Resistance exercise rats were trained to climb a vertical ladder wearing a weighted vest; sedentary control rats were placed repeatedly on the ladder oriented horizontally on its side. All rats were implanted with intravenous catheters and trained to self-administer heroin on a fixed ratio (FR1) schedule of reinforcement. mRNA expression in the NAc core and shell was examined following behavioral testing. Resistance exercise significantly decreased heroin self-administration, resulting in a downward shift in the dose-effect curve. Resistance exercise also reduced mRNA expression for mu opioid receptors and dopamine D1, D2, and D3 receptors in the NAc core. Resistance exercise increased mRNA expression of dopamine D5 receptors in the NAc shell and increased mRNA expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (exons I, IIB, IIC, IV, VI, IX) in the NAc core. These data indicate that resistance exercise decreases the positive reinforcing effects of heroin and produces changes in opioid and dopamine systems in the NAc of heroin-exposed rats.

  19. Subchronic Immunotoxicity Assessment of Genetically Modified Virus-Resistant Papaya in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Tang; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wu, Jhaol-Huei; Yen, Gow-Chin; Yeh, Shyi-Dong; Cheng, Ying-Huey; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Liao, Jiunn-Wang

    2016-07-27

    Papaya is an important fruit that provides a variety of vitamins with nutritional value and also holds some pharmacological properties, including immunomodulation. Genetically modified (GM) papaya plants resistant to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) infection have been generated by cloning the coat protein gene of the PRSV which can be used as a valuable strategy to fight PRSV infection and to increase papaya production. In order to assess the safety of GM papaya as a food, this subchronic study was conducted to assess the immunomodulatory responses of the GM papaya line 823-2210, when compared with its parent plant of non-GM papaya, Tainung-2 (TN-2), in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Both non-GM and GM 823-2210 papaya fruits at low (1 g/kg bw) and high (2 g/kg bw) dosages were administered via daily oral gavage to male and female rats consecutively for 90 days. Immunophenotyping, mitogen-induced splenic cell proliferation, antigen-specific antibody response, and histopathology of the spleen and thymus were evaluated at the end of the experiment. Results of immunotoxicity assays revealed no consistent difference between rats fed for 90 days with GM 823-2210 papaya fruits, as opposed to those fed non-GM TN-2 papaya fruits, suggesting that with regard to immunomodulatory responses, GM 823-2210 papaya fruits maintain substantial equivalence to fruits of their non-GM TN-2 parent.

  20. Acute resistance exercise induces antinociception by activation of the endocannabinoid system in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdino, Giovane; Romero, Thiago; Silva, José Felippe Pinho da; Aguiar, Daniele; Paula, Ana Maria de; Cruz, Jader; Parrella, Cosimo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Duarte, Igor; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Perez, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Resistance exercise (RE) is also known as strength training, and it is performed to increase the strength and mass of muscles, bone strength, and metabolism. RE has been increasingly prescribed for pain relief. However, the endogenous mechanisms underlying this antinociceptive effect are still largely unexplored. Thus, we investigated the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in RE-induced antinociception. Male Wistar rats were submitted to acute RE in a weight-lifting model. The nociceptive threshold was measured by a mechanical nociceptive test (paw pressure) before and after exercise. To investigate the involvement of cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoids in RE-induced antinociception, cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists, endocannabinoid metabolizing enzyme inhibitors, and an anandamide reuptake inhibitor were injected before RE. After RE, CB1 cannabinoid receptors were quantified in rat brain tissue by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In addition, endocannabinoid plasma levels were measured by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. RE-induced antinociception was prevented by preinjection with CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists. By contrast, preadministration of metabolizing enzyme inhibitors and the anandamide reuptake inhibitor prolonged and enhanced this effect. RE also produced an increase in the expression and activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in rat brain tissue and in the dorsolateral and ventrolateral periaqueductal regions and an increase in endocannabinoid plasma levels. The present study suggests that a single session of RE activates the endocannabinoid system to induce antinociception.

  1. Analysis of Resistant Starches in Rat Cecal Contents Using Fourier Transform Infrared Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Timothy J. [Ames Laboratory; Ai, Yongfeng [Iowa State University; Jones, Roger W. [Ames Laboratory; Houk, Robert S. [Ames Laboratory; Jane, Jay-lin [Iowa State University; Zhao, Yinsheng [Iowa State University; Birt, Diane F. [Iowa State University; McClelland, John F. [Ames Laboratory

    2013-01-29

    Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) qualitatively and quantitatively measured resistant starch (RS) in rat cecal contents. Fisher 344 rats were fed diets of 55% (w/w, dry basis) starch for 8 weeks. Cecal contents were collected from sacrificed rats. A corn starch control was compared against three RS diets. The RS diets were high-amylose corn starch (HA7), HA7 chemically modified with octenyl succinic anhydride, and stearic-acid-complexed HA7 starch. To calibrate the FTIR-PAS analysis, samples from each diet were analyzed using an enzymatic assay. A partial least-squares cross-validation plot generated from the enzymatic assay and FTIR-PAS spectral results for starch fit the ideal curve with a R2 of 0.997. A principal component analysis plot of components 1 and 2 showed that spectra from diets clustered significantly from each other. This study clearly showed that FTIR-PAS can accurately quantify starch content and identify the form of starch in complex matrices.

  2. Consumption of resistant starch decreases postprandial lipogenesis in white adipose tissue of the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Marc A

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic consumption of diets high in resistant starch (RS leads to reduced fat cell size compared to diets high in digestible starch (DS in rats and increases total and meal fat oxidation in humans. The aim of the present study was to examine the rate of lipogenesis in key lipogenic organs following a high RS or DS meal. Following an overnight fast, male Wistar rats ingested a meal with an RS content of 2% or 30% of total carbohydrate and were then administered an i.p bolus of 50 μCi 3H2O either immediately or 1 hour post-meal. One hour following tracer administration, rats were sacrificed, a blood sample collected, and the liver, white adipose tissue (WAT, and gastrocnemius muscle excised and frozen until assayed for total 3H-lipid and 3H-glycogen content. Plasma triglyceride and NEFA concentrations and 3H-glycogen content did not differ between groups. In all tissues, except the liver, there was a trend for the rate of lipogenesis to be higher in the DS group than the RS group which reached significance only in WAT at 1 h (p

  3. Insulin resistance in uremia: Insulin receptor kinase activity in liver and muscle from chronic uremic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchin, F.; Ittoop, O.; Sinha, M.K.; Caro, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have studied the structure and function of the partially purified insulin receptors from liver and skeletal muscle in a rat model of severe chronic uremia. 125 I-insulin binding was higher in the liver from uremic rats when compared with ad libitum- and pair-fed controls. Furthermore, the ability of insulin to stimulate the autophosphorylation of the β-subunit and insulin receptor kinase activity using Glu 80 , Tyr 20 as exogenous phosphoacceptor was increased in the liver of the uremic animals. The structural characteristics of the receptors, as determined by electrophoretic mobilities of affinity labeled α-subunit and the phosphorylated β-subunit, were normal in uremia. 125 I-insulin binding and insulin receptor kinase activity were similar in the skeletal muscle from uremic and pair- and ad libitum-fed animals. Thus the data are supportive of the hypothesis that in liver and muscle of chronic uremic rats, insulin resistance is due to a defect(s) distal to the insulin receptor kinase

  4. Electrophysiological characterization of texture information slip-resistance dependent in the rat vibrissal nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albarracín Ana L

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in tactile discrimination agree that rats are able to learn a rough-smooth discrimination task by actively touching (whisking objects with their vibrissae. In particular, we focus on recent evidence of how neurons at different levels of the sensory pathway carry information about tactile stimuli. Here, we analyzed the multifiber afferent discharge of one vibrissal nerve during active whisking. Vibrissae movements were induced by electrical stimulation of motor branches of the facial nerve. We used sandpapers of different grain size as roughness discrimination surfaces and we also consider the change of vibrissal slip-resistance as a way to improve tactile information acquisition. The amplitude of afferent activity was analyzed according to its Root Mean Square value (RMS. The comparisons among experimental situation were quantified by using the information theory. Results We found that the change of the vibrissal slip-resistance is a way to improve the roughness discrimination of surfaces. As roughness increased, the RMS values also increased in almost all cases. In addition, we observed a better discrimination performance in the retraction phase (maximum amount of information. Conclusions The evidence of amplitude changes due to roughness surfaces and slip-resistance levels allows to speculate that texture information is slip-resistance dependent at peripheral level.

  5. Effects of Resistance Training on Serum Level of Reproductive Hormones and Sperm Parameters in Type 2 Diabetes Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Parastesh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in fertility indices. Resistance training, on the other hand, through reducing the adverse effects of diabetes, exerts a positive impact on diabetic individuals. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of ten weeks of resistance training on serum levels of reproductive hormones and sperm parameters in Wistar rats with diabetes mellitus type 2. Materials and Methods:In this experimental study, 36 Wistar rats with mean weight of 200±50 were ran-domly assigned to healthy control, diabetic control and diabetic training groups. The diabetic resistance training group received ten weeks of resistance training (climbing up the ladder following the induction of diabetes. Twenty-four hours after the last training session, left epididymis of the rats was examined for studying sperm parameters and blood serum samples were examined for evaluating reproductive hormones. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Turkey’s Post Hoc test at 0.05%. Results: Ten weeks of resistance training induced significant increases in serum testosterone and FSH levels in the resistance training group in comparison to the diabetic group (p<0.007.Resistance training did not have any significant effects on serum LH levels in the resistance training group compared to the diabetic control group. In ad-dition, sperm parameters (sperm count, survival rate and motility presented significant improvements compared to the diabetic group(p<0.05. Conclusion: Resistance training can improve sperm parameters, including sperm count, survival rate and motility, through increasing serum testosterone, LH and FSH levels (reproductive hormones in rats with diabetes mellitus type 2.

  6. Delayed myelination and neurodevelopment in male seizure-prone versus seizure-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pragati; Powell, Kim L; Wlodek, Mary E; O'Brien, Terence J; Gilby, Krista L

    2018-01-28

    Aberrant myelination and developmental delay have been reported in epilepsy. However, it is unclear whether these are linked to intrinsic mechanisms that support a predisposition toward seizures and the development of epilepsy. Thus, we compared rates of myelination and neurodevelopment in male rats selectively bred for enhanced susceptibility to kindling epileptogenesis (FAST) with male rats bred for resistance (SLOW). Myelin-specific gene expression was compared in the brainstem, cerebellum, and cerebral hemisphere of FAST and SLOW rats on postnatal days (PNDs) 5, 11, 17, 23, and 90 to determine strain-specific myelination rates. Myelin protein levels were also compared at PNDs 5 and 23 in the brainstem. Relative rates of neurodevelopment were evaluated between PNDs 5 and 21 using physical growth landmarks and neuromotor tests including righting reflex, cliff avoidance, negative geotaxis, and locomotor activity. Myelin-specific mRNA expression was significantly down-regulated in FAST rats on PNDs 5 and 11 in all 3 brain structures, indicating relatively delayed myelination. Likewise, corresponding protein levels were significantly lower in FAST brainstem on PND 5. Developmental delay was evident in the FAST strain such that only 9% of FAST pups, compared to 81% of SLOW, had open eyes by PND 13, locomotor activity was significantly reduced between PNDs 12 and 16, and neuromotor task acquisition was delayed between PNDs 5 and 10. Relative delays in myelination and neurodevelopment co-occurred in the seizure-prone FAST strain in the absence of seizures. These findings suggest these symptoms are not seizure-induced and may be mechanistically linked to an underlying pathophysiology supporting a predisposition toward developing epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Acute resistance exercise reduces increased gene expression in muscle atrophy of ovariectomised arthritic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Furlanetto Jr

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We studied the effect of resistance exercise (RE on mRNA levels of atrogin-1, MuRF-1, and myostatin in the gastrocnemius muscle of arthritic rats after loss of ovarian function (LOF. Material and methods : Thirty female Wistar rats (nine weeks old, 195.3 ±17.4 grams were randomly allocated into five groups: control group (CT-Sham; n = 6; group with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 6; group with rheumatoid arthritis subjected to RE (RAEX; n = 6; ovariectomy group with rheumatoid arthritis (RAOV; n = 6; and an ovariectomy group with rheumatoid arthritis subjected to RE (RAOVEX; n = 6. After 15 days of intra-articular injections with Met-BSA the animals were subjected to RE and six hours after workout were euthanised. Results : The rheumatoid arthritis provoked reduction in the cross-sectional area (CSA of muscle fibres, but the CSA was lower in the RAOV when compared to the RA groups. Skeletal muscle atrogin-1 mRNA level was increased in arthritic rats (RA and RAOV, but the atrogin-1 level was higher in RAOV group when compared to other arthritic groups. The Muscle MuRF-1 mRNA level was also increased in the RAOV group. The increased atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 mRNA levels were lower in the RAOVEX group than in the RAOV group. The myostatin mRNA level was similar in all groups, except for the RAOVEX group, in which it was lower than the other groups. Conclusions : LOF results in increased loss of skeletal muscle-related ubiquitin ligases (atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. However, the RE reduces the atrogin-1, MuRF-1, and myostatin mRNA levels in muscle of arthritic rats affected by LOF.

  8. The efficacy of Prosopis glandulosa as antidiabetic treatment in rat models of diabetes and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, C; Lochner, A; Huisamen, B

    2011-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is rampantly increasing and the need for therapeutics is crucial. In recognition of this, untested antidiabetic agents are flooding the market. Diavite™ which is a product consisting solely of the dried and ground pods of Prosopis glandulosa (Torr.) [Fabaceae] is currently marketed as a food supplement with glucose stabilizing properties. However, these are anecdotal claims lacking scientific evidence. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of Prosopis glandulosa as an antidiabetic agent. Male Wistar rats were rendered (a) type 1 diabetic after an intraperitoneal injection of STZ (40 mg/kg) and (b) insulin resistant after a 16-week high caloric diet (DIO). Zucker fa/fa ZDF rats were used in a pilot study. Half of each group of animals was placed on Prosopis glandulosa treatment (100mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks and the remaining animals served as age-matched controls. At the time of sacrifice, blood was collected for glucose and insulin level determination, the pancreata of the STZ rats were harvested for histological analysis and cardiomyocytes prepared from the DIO and Zucker fa/fa hearts for determination of insulin sensitivity. Type 1 diabetic model: Prosopis glandulosa treatment resulted in significant increased insulin levels (pProsopis glandulosa treatment resulted in increased small β-cells (pProsopis glandulosa treatment partially preventing this. Zucker fa/fa rats: Prosopis glandulosa treatment significantly reduced fasting glucose levels (pProsopis glandulosa treatment resulted in an increased basal (pProsopis glandulosa treatment moderately lowers glucose levels in different animal models of diabetes, stimulates insulin secretion, leads to the formation of small β-cells and improves insulin sensitivity of isolated cardiomyocytes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tributyltin chloride increases phenylephrine-induced contraction and vascular stiffness in mesenteric resistance arteries from female rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro Júnior, Rogério Faustino; Marques, Vinicius Bermond; Nunes, Dieli Oliveira; Ronconi, Karoline de Sousa; Araújo, Julia F.P. de; Rodrigues, Paula Lopes; Padilha, Alessandra Simão; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Graceli, Jones B.; Stefanon, Ivanita

    2016-01-01

    Tributyltin chloride (TBT) is an organotin compound that reduces estrogen levels in female rats. We aimed to investigate the effects of TBT exposure on vascular tonus and vascular remodelling in the resistance arteries of female rats. Rats were treated daily with TBT (500 ng/kg) for 15 days. TBT did not change arterial blood pressure but did modify some morpho-physiological parameters of third-order mesenteric resistance arteries in the following ways: (1) decreased lumen and external diameters; (2) increased wall/lm ratio and wall thickness; (3) decreased distensibility and increased stiffness; (4) increased collagen deposition; and (5) increased pulse wave velocity. TBT exposure increased the phenylephrine-induced contractile response in mesenteric resistance arteries. However, vasodilatation responses induced by acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were not modified by TBT. It is suggested that TBT exposure reduces vascular nitric oxide (NO) production, because:(1) L-NAME incubation did not cause a leftward shift in the concentration–response curve for phenylephrine; (2) both eNOS protein expression; (3) in situ NO production were reduced. Incubation with L-NAME; and (4) SOD shifted the phenylephrine response curve to the left in TBT rats. Tiron, catalase, ML-171 and VAS2870 decreased vascular reactivity to phenylephrine only in TBT rats. Moreover, increased superoxide anion production was observed in the mesenteric resistance arteries of TBT rats accompanied by an increase in gp91phox, catalase, AT 1 receptor and total ERK1/2 protein expression. In conclusion, these findings show that TBT induced alterations are most likely due to a reduction of NO production combined with increased O 2 − production derived from NADPH oxidase and ERK1/2 activation. These findings offer further evidence that TBT is an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: • Tributyltin chloride reduces estrogen levels in female rats. • Treatment with TBT

  10. Population genetics, community of parasites, and resistance to rodenticides in an urban brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvars-Larrive, Amélie; Pascal, Michel; Gasqui, Patrick; Cosson, Jean-François; Benoît, Etienne; Lattard, Virginie; Crespin, Laurent; Lorvelec, Olivier; Pisanu, Benoît; Teynié, Alexandre; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Bonnet, Sarah; Marianneau, Philippe; Lacôte, Sandra; Bourhy, Pascale; Berny, Philippe; Pavio, Nicole; Le Poder, Sophie; Gilot-Fromont, Emmanuelle; Jourdain, Elsa; Hammed, Abdessalem; Fourel, Isabelle; Chikh, Farid; Vourc'h, Gwenaël

    2017-01-01

    Brown rats are one of the most widespread urban species worldwide. Despite the nuisances they induce and their potential role as a zoonotic reservoir, knowledge on urban rat populations remains scarce. The main purpose of this study was to characterize an urban brown rat population from Chanteraines park (Hauts-de-Seine, France), with regards to haematology, population genetics, immunogenic diversity, resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides, and community of parasites. Haematological parameters were measured. Population genetics was investigated using 13 unlinked microsatellite loci. Immunogenic diversity was assessed for Mhc-Drb. Frequency of the Y139F mutation (conferring resistance to rodenticides) and two linked microsatellites were studied, concurrently with the presence of anticoagulant residues in the liver. Combination of microscopy and molecular methods were used to investigate the occurrence of 25 parasites. Statistical approaches were used to explore multiple parasite relationships and model parasite occurrence. Eighty-six rats were caught. The first haematological data for a wild urban R. norvegicus population was reported. Genetic results suggested high genetic diversity and connectivity between Chanteraines rats and surrounding population(s). We found a high prevalence (55.8%) of the mutation Y139F and presence of rodenticide residues in 47.7% of the sampled individuals. The parasite species richness was high (16). Seven potential zoonotic pathogens were identified, together with a surprisingly high diversity of Leptospira species (4). Chanteraines rat population is not closed, allowing gene flow and making eradication programs challenging, particularly because rodenticide resistance is highly prevalent. Parasitological results showed that co-infection is more a rule than an exception. Furthermore, the presence of several potential zoonotic pathogens, of which four Leptospira species, in this urban rat population raised its role in the maintenance

  11. Pioglitazone attenuates prostatic enlargement in diet-induced insulin-resistant rats by altering lipid distribution and hyperinsulinaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, Ajit; Jena, Gopabandhu; Ramarao, Poduri

    2010-12-01

    Increased incidence of benign prostatic hyperplasia among insulin-resistant individuals suggests a role for hyperinsulinaemia in prostatic enlargement. We have already reported increased cell proliferation and enlargement of prostate gland in insulin-resistant rats. The present study aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the reversal of prostatic enlargement in insulin-resistant rats by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist pioglitazone. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a normal pellet or a high-fat diet for 12 weeks with or without pioglitazone (20 mg·kg(-1)). Subgroups of animals fed different diets were castrated. Effects of dietary manipulation and pioglitazone were measured on insulin sensitivity, lipid distribution, cell proliferation and apoptosis. A high-fat diet led to the accumulation of fat in non-adipose tissues, insulin resistance, compensatory hyperinsulinaemia and prostatic enlargement in rats. Pioglitazone treatment altered fat distribution, improved insulin sensitivity and normalized lipid and insulin level in rats on the high-fat diet. The improved metabolic parameters led to decreased cellular proliferation and increased apoptosis in the prostate gland. High-fat diet feeding and pioglitazone treatment did not change plasma testosterone levels. However, significant prostatic atrophy was observed in castrated rats irrespective of dietary intervention. Our results show a previously unexplored therapeutic potential of pioglitazone for prostatic enlargement under insulin-resistant condition and further suggest that targeting distribution of lipid from non-adipose tissue to adipose tissue and insulin signalling could be new strategies for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Drømmebilleder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2014-01-01

    Bogen beskriver i en række intense analyser forbindelsen mellem ydre og indre billeder: altså mellem de moderne mediers billedverden og drømmens og erindringens indre billeder. I fokus for undersøgelsen er desuden kønnet, altså hvordan billeder viser, omformer eller skjuler kønnet, 'det andet', s...... about understanding the images that seek us from within (in dreams and memories) - and a book that sharpens sight of the interaction between external and internal images, and why we are looking at the first and is visited by the last....... and internal images of dreams and memories. The focus of the study is also gender, i.e. how the pictures show converter or conceal the sex, 'the other', which is requested and considered and displaced. It is a book of becoming conscious of what we see - for example in the media. However, it is also a book...

  13. Leucine supplementation improves acquired growth hormone resistance in rats with protein-energy malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Wang, Xinying; Zhao, Jie; Wan, Xiao; Zhang, Li; Wu, Chao; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) can lead to growth hormone (GH) resistance. Leucine supplementation diets have been shown to increase protein synthesis in muscles. Our study aimed at investigating if long-term leucine supplementation could modulate GH-insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 system function and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-related signal transduction in skeletal muscles in a rat model of severe malnutrition. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 50; weight, 302 ± 5 g) were divided into 5 treatment groups, including 2 control groups (a normal control group that was fed chow and ad libitum water [CON, n = 10] and a malnourished control group [MC, n = 10] that was fed a 50% chow diet). After undergoing a weight loss stage for 4 weeks, rats received either the chow diet (MC-CON, n = 10), the chow diet supplemented with low-dose leucine (MC-L, n = 10), or the chow diet supplemented with high-dose leucine (MC-H, n = 10) for 2 weeks. The muscle masses of the gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus were significantly reduced in the MC group. Re-feeding increased muscle mass, especially in the MC-L and MC-H groups. In the MC group, serum IGF-1, IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3, and hepatic growth hormone receptor (GHR) levels were significantly decreased and phosphorylation of the downstream anabolic signaling effectors protein kinase B (Akt), mTOR, and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) were significantly lower than in other groups. However, serum IGF-1 and IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-3 concentrations and hepatic growth hormone receptor (GHR) levels were significantly higher in the MC-L and MC-H groups than in the MC-CON group, and serum IGFBP-1 levels was significantly reduced in the MC-L and MC-H groups. These changes were consistent with those observed for hepatic mRNA expression levels. Phosphorylation of the downstream anabolic signaling effectors Akt, mTOR, and S6K1 were also significantly higher in the MC-L and MC-H groups than in the MC

  14. Self-administered nicotine differentially impacts body weight gain in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprecht, Laura E; Smith, Tracy T; Donny, Eric C; Sved, Alan F

    2017-07-01

    Obesity and tobacco smoking represent the largest challenges to public health, but the causal relationship between nicotine and obesity is poorly understood. Nicotine suppresses body weight gain, a factor impacting smoking initiation and the failure to quit, particularly among obese smokers. The impact of nicotine on body weight regulation in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant populations consuming densely caloric diets is unknown. In the current experiment, body weight gain of adult male rats maintained on a high energy diet (31.8% kcal from fat) distributed into obesity-prone (OP), obesity-resistant (OR) and an intermediate group, which was placed on standard rodent chow (Chow). These rats were surgically implanted with intravenous catheters and allowed to self-administer nicotine (0 or 60μg/kg/infusion, a standard self-administration dose) in 1-h sessions for 20 consecutive days. Self-administered nicotine significantly suppressed body weight gain but not food intake in OP and Chow rats. Self-administered nicotine had no effect on body weight gain in OR rats. These data suggest that: 1) OR rats are also resistant to nicotine-induced suppression of body weight gain; and 2) nicotine may reduce levels of obesity in a subset of smokers prone to obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transfection of rat embryo cells with mutant p53 increases the intrinsic radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, F.S.; Su, M.; Gerweck, L.; Schmidt, E.V.; Borek, C.; Preffer, F.; Dombkowski, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dominant oncogenic sequences have been shown to modulate the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of cells of both human and murine tumor cell lines. Whether transfection with candidate tumor-suppressor genes can modulate intrinsic radiation sensitivity is unknown. The data presented here demonstrate that transfection of rat embryo cells with a mutant p53 allele can increase the intrinsic radiation resistance of cells in vitro. First, transfection with mutant p53 resulted in transformed cellular morphology. Second, the transfected clone and the corresponding pooled population of transfected clones were more resistant to ionizing radiation in vitro. Last, analyses of the parameters of cell kinetics suggested that the radiobiological effects were unlikely to be due to altered parameters of cell kinetics at the time of irradiation, suggesting that mutant p53 altered the intrinsic radiation resistance of transfected cells by a more direct mechanism. Further experimentation will be necessary to develop a mechanistic approach for the study of these alterations. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Naked Mole Rat Cells Have a Stable Epigenome that Resists iPSC Reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Naked mole rat (NMR is a valuable model for aging and cancer research due to its exceptional longevity and cancer resistance. We observed that the reprogramming efficiency of NMR fibroblasts in response to OSKM was drastically lower than that of mouse fibroblasts. Expression of SV40 LargeT antigen (LT dramatically improved reprogramming of NMR fibroblasts. Inactivation of Rb alone, but not p53, was sufficient to improve reprogramming efficiency, suggesting that NMR chromatin may be refractory to reprogramming. Analysis of the global histone landscape revealed that NMR had higher levels of repressive H3K27 methylation marks and lower levels of activating H3K27 acetylation marks than mouse. ATAC-seq revealed that in NMR, promoters of reprogramming genes were more closed than mouse promoters, while expression of LT led to massive opening of the NMR promoters. These results suggest that NMR displays a more stable epigenome that resists de-differentiation, contributing to the cancer resistance and longevity of this species.

  17. Cafeteria diet intake for fourteen weeks can cause obesity and insulin resistance in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Antônio Corrêa Pinto Júnior

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Obesity is a strong predictor of some kinds of diseases. High intake of high-fat foods contributes significantly to the growth of the obese population globally. The aim of this study was to verify if consumption of a cafeteria diet for fourteen weeks could increase white fat mass, body weight and skeletal muscle mass and promote insulin resistance in male Wistar rats. METHODS: Twenty animals were divided into two groups: control and obese. Both were fed standard chow and water ad libitum. Additionally, a cafeteria diet consisting of bacon, bologna sausage, sandwich cookies and soft drink was given to the obese group. RESULTS: The obese group was significantly heavier (p<0.0001 than controls from the second week until the end of the cafeteria-diet intervention. Absolute and relative fat mass, liver weight and Lee Index increased significantly (p<0.05 in the obese group. Furthermore, the obese group had lower (p<0.05 insulin sensitivity than the control group. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, fourteen weeks of cafeteria diet promoted a progressive increase of fat mass and insulin resistance. Therefore, this is a great and inexpensive diet-induced insulin resistance model.

  18. Profiling of gender-specific rat plasma proteins associated with susceptibility or resistance to diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Won; Liu, Hao; Choi, Duk Kwon; Oh, Tae Seok; Mukherjee, Rajib; Yun, Jong Won

    2012-02-02

    Obesity-prone (OP) and obesity-resistant (OR) rats with different responses to development of obesity in spite of the same genetic background are useful animal models for searching for markers during the development of obesity. Here, we investigated whether plasma proteins of OP and OR rats may behave in a different way in males and females. We performed a comparative proteomic analysis using 2-DE combined with MALDI-TOF/MS on proteins from OP and OR male and female rats to discover gender-specific rat plasma proteins associated with susceptibility or resistance to diet-induced obesity. A total of 29 proteins showing differential expression between the groups were identified by MALDI-TOF/MS and database searches. These proteins were classified into 4 groups according to their regulation patterns in response to diet and gender. 22 proteins showed significant differences between OP and OR rats in males and/or females (Group I, II, and III) and 7 proteins exhibited only a high fat diet (HFD)-responsive difference in male or female rats (Group IV). In conclusion, the proteins negatively (ITIH3, FGG, TUBB5, and ZAG) or positively (Hp, ITIH4, and RBP) correlated with obesity found in this study could be used for selection of new targets for gender specific-medical treatment of obesity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Protective Effects of Withania somnifera Root on Inflammatory Markers and Insulin Resistance in Fructose-Fed Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Samadi Noshahr

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: We investigated the effects of Withania somnifera root (WS on insulin resistance, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, and interleukin-6 (IL-6 in fructose-fed rats. Methods: Forty-eight Wistar-Albino male rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=12; Group I as control, Group II as sham-treated with WS by 62.5mg/g per diet, Group III fructose-fed rats received 10%W/V fructose, and Group IV fructose- and WS-fed rats. After eight weeks blood samples were collected to measure glucose, insulin, IL-6, and TNF-α levels in sera. Results: Blood glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-R, IL-6, and TNF-α levels were all significantly greater in the fructose-fed rats than in the controls. Treatment with WS significantly (P < 0.05 inhibited the fructose-induced increases in glucose, insulin, HOMA-R, IL-6, and TNF-α. Conclusion: Our data suggest that WS normalizes hyperglycemia in fructose-fed rats by reducing inflammatory markers and improving insulin sensitivity.

  20. Partial sleep deprivation by environmental noise increases food intake and body weight in obesity-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavanji, Vijayakumar; Teske, Jennifer A; Billington, Charles J; Kotz, Catherine M

    2013-07-01

    Sleep restriction in humans increases risk for obesity, but previous rodent studies show weight loss following sleep deprivation, possibly due to stressful methods used to prevent sleep. Obesity-resistant (OR) rats exhibit consolidated-sleep and resistance to weight gain. It was hypothesized that sleep disruption by a less-stressful method would increase body weight, and the effect of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) on body weight in OR and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was examined. OR and SD rats (n = 12/group) were implanted with transmitters to record sleep/wake. After baseline recording, six SD and six OR rats underwent 8 h PSD during light phase for 9 days. Sleep was reduced using recordings of random noise. Sleep/wake states were scored as wakefulness (W), slow-wave-sleep (SWS), and rapid-eye-movement-sleep (REMS). Total number of transitions between stages, SWS-delta-power, food intake, and body weight were documented. Exposure to noise decreased SWS and REMS time, while increasing W time. Sleep-deprivation increased the number of transitions between stages and SWS-delta-power. Further, PSD during the rest phase increased recovery sleep during the active phase. The PSD SD and OR rats had greater food intake and body weight compared to controls PSD by less-stressful means increases body weight in rats. Also, PSD during the rest phase increases active period sleep. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  1. Role of cytochrome P-450 4A in oxygen sensing and NO production in rat cremaster resistance arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, C. J.; Bakker, E. N.; Sipkema, P.

    1999-01-01

    The role of arachidonic acid metabolism and nitric oxide (NO) in hypoxia-induced changes of vascular tone was investigated in first-order cannulated rat cremaster muscle resistance arteries. Spontaneous tone reduced arterial diameter from 179 +/- 2 micrometer (fully dilated) to 98 +/- 3 micrometer

  2. Increased salt intake during early ontogenesis lead to development of arterial hypertension in salt-resistant Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitok, Pavel; Molcan, Lubos; Vesela, Anna; Kruzliak, Peter; Moravcik, Roman; Zeman, Michal

    2015-01-01

    A direct relationship exists between salt consumption and hypertension. Increased sodium intake does not automatically lead to a rise in blood pressure (BP) because of marked intra-individual variability in salt sensitivity. Wistar rats are a salt-resistant strain and increased salt intake in adults does not induce hypertension. Mechanisms regulating BP develop during early ontogenesis and increased sodium consumption by pregnant females leads to an increase in BP of their offspring, but early postnatal stages have not been sufficiently analyzed in salt-resistant strains of rats. The aim of this work was to study the effects of increased salt during early ontogeny on cardiovascular characteristics of Wistar rats. We used 16 control (C; 8 males + 8 females) rats fed with a standard diet (0.2% sodium) and 16 experimental (S; 8 males + 8 females) rats fed with a diet containing 0.8% sodium. BP was measured weekly and plasma renin activity, aldosterone and testosterone concentrations were assayed by radioimmunoassay after the experiment in 16-week-old animals. In the kidney, AT1 receptors were determined by the western blot. BP was higher in the S as compared with the C rats and did not differ between males and females. The relative left ventricle mass was increased in S as compared with C males and no differences were recorded in females. No significant differences between groups were found in hormonal parameters and AT1 receptors. Results indicate that moderately increased salt intake during postnatal ontogeny results in a BP rise even in salt-resistant rats.

  3. Tributyltin chloride increases phenylephrine-induced contraction and vascular stiffness in mesenteric resistance arteries from female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro Júnior, Rogério Faustino; Marques, Vinicius Bermond; Nunes, Dieli Oliveira; Ronconi, Karoline de Sousa; de Araújo, Julia F P; Rodrigues, Paula Lopes; Padilha, Alessandra Simão; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Graceli, Jones B; Stefanon, Ivanita

    2016-03-15

    Tributyltin chloride (TBT) is an organotin compound that reduces estrogen levels in female rats. We aimed to investigate the effects of TBT exposure on vascular tonus and vascular remodelling in the resistance arteries of female rats. Rats were treated daily with TBT (500 ng/kg) for 15 days. TBT did not change arterial blood pressure but did modify some morpho-physiological parameters of third-order mesenteric resistance arteries in the following ways: (1) decreased lumen and external diameters; (2) increased wall/lm ratio and wall thickness; (3) decreased distensibility and increased stiffness; (4) increased collagen deposition; and (5) increased pulse wave velocity. TBT exposure increased the phenylephrine-induced contractile response in mesenteric resistance arteries. However, vasodilatation responses induced by acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were not modified by TBT. It is suggested that TBT exposure reduces vascular nitric oxide (NO) production, because:(1) L-NAME incubation did not cause a leftward shift in the concentration-response curve for phenylephrine; (2) both eNOS protein expression; (3) in situ NO production were reduced. Incubation with L-NAME; and (4) SOD shifted the phenylephrine response curve to the left in TBT rats. Tiron, catalase, ML-171 and VAS2870 decreased vascular reactivity to phenylephrine only in TBT rats. Moreover, increased superoxide anion production was observed in the mesenteric resistance arteries of TBT rats accompanied by an increase in gp91phox, catalase, AT1 receptor and total ERK1/2 protein expression. In conclusion, these findings show that TBT induced alterations are most likely due to a reduction of NO production combined with increased O2(-) production derived from NADPH oxidase and ERK1/2 activation. These findings offer further evidence that TBT is an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Blueberry Supplementation Influences the Gut Microbiota, Inflammation, and Insulin Resistance in High-Fat-Diet-Fed Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunhye; Keirsey, Katherine I; Kirkland, Rebecca; Grunewald, Zachary I; Fischer, Joan G; de La Serre, Claire B

    2018-02-01

    Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been linked to obesity-associated chronic inflammation. Microbiota manipulation may therefore affect obesity-related comorbidities. Blueberries are rich in anthocyanins, which have anti-inflammatory properties and may alter the gut microbiota. We hypothesized that blueberry supplementation would alter the gut microbiota, reduce systemic inflammation, and improve insulin resistance in high-fat (HF)-diet-fed rats. Twenty-four male Wistar rats (260-270 g; n = 8/group) were fed low-fat (LF; 10% fat), HF (45% fat), or HF with 10% by weight blueberry powder (HF_BB) diets for 8 wk. LF rats were fed ad libitum, whereas HF and HF_BB rats were pair-fed with diets matched for fiber and sugar contents. Glucose tolerance, microbiota composition (16S ribosomal RNA sequencing), intestinal integrity [villus height, gene expression of mucin 2 (Muc2) and β-defensin 2 (Defb2)], and inflammation (gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines) were assessed. Blueberry altered microbiota composition with an increase in Gammaproteobacteria abundance (P gene expression of Muc2 was ∼150% higher in HF_BB rats compared with HF rats (P expression in the LF group not being different from that in either the HF or HF_BB groups. Tumor necrosis factor α (Tnfa) and interleukin 1β (Il1b) gene expression in visceral fat was increased by HF feeding when compared with the LF group (by 300% and 500%, respectively; P < 0.05) and normalized by blueberry supplementation. Finally, blueberry improved markers of insulin sensitivity. Hepatic insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) phosphorylation at serine 307:IRS1 ratio was ∼35% higher in HF rats compared with LF rats (P < 0.05) and HF_BB rats. In HF-diet-fed male rats, blueberry supplementation led to compositional changes in the gut microbiota associated with improvements in systemic inflammation and insulin signaling.

  5. The mitochondrial function of the cerebral vasculature in insulin-resistant Zucker obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdzo, Ivan; Rutkai, Ibolya; Tokes, Tunde; Sure, Venkata N L R; Katakam, Prasad V G; Busija, David W

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about mitochondrial functioning in the cerebral vasculature during insulin resistance (IR). We examined mitochondrial respiration in isolated cerebral arteries of male Zucker obese (ZO) rats and phenotypically normal Zucker lean (ZL) rats using the Seahorse XFe24 analyzer. We investigated mitochondrial morphology in cerebral blood vessels as well as mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial protein expression levels in cerebral arteries and microvessels. We also measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in cerebral microvessels. Under basal conditions, the mitochondrial respiration components (nonmitochondrial respiration, basal respiration, ATP production, proton leak, and spare respiratory capacity) showed similar levels among the ZL and ZO groups with the exception of maximal respiration, which was higher in the ZO group. We examined the role of nitric oxide by measuring mitochondrial respiration following inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and mitochondrial activation after administration of diazoxide (DZ). Both ZL and ZO groups showed similar responses to these stimuli with minor variations.l-NAME significantly increased the proton leak, and DZ decreased nonmitochondrial respiration in the ZL group. Other components were not affected. Mitochondrial morphology and distribution within vascular smooth muscle and endothelium as well as mitochondrial protein levels were similar in the arteries and microvessels of both groups. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and ROS levels were increased in cerebral microvessels of the ZO. Our study suggests that mitochondrial function is not significantly altered in the cerebral vasculature of young ZO rats, but increased ROS production might be due to increased eNOS in the cerebral microcirculation during IR. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Silymarin ameliorates fructose induced insulin resistance syndrome by reducing de novo hepatic lipogenesis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Prem; Singh, Vishal; Jain, Manish; Rana, Minakshi; Khanna, Vivek; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar; Dikshit, Madhu

    2014-03-15

    High dietary fructose causes insulin resistance syndrome (IRS), primarily due to simultaneous induction of genes involved in glucose, lipid and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. The present study evaluates effect of a hepatoprotective agent, silymarin (SYM) on fructose-induced metabolic abnormalities in the rat and also assessed the associated thrombotic complications. Wistar rats were kept on high fructose (HFr) diet throughout the 12-week study duration (9 weeks of HFr feeding and subsequently 3 weeks of HFr plus SYM oral administration [once daily]). SYM treatment significantly reduced the HFr diet-induced increase expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)-1α/β, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1), sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1c, liver X receptor (LXR)-β, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and PPARγ genes in rat liver. SYM also reduced HFr diet mediated increase in plasma triglycerides (TG), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), uric acid, malondialdehyde (MDA), total nitrite and pro-inflammatory cytokines (C-reactive protein [CRP], interleukin-6 [IL-6], interferon-gamma [IFN-γ] and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]) levels. Moreover, SYM ameliorated HFr diet induced reduction in glucose utilization and endothelial dysfunction. Additionally, SYM significantly reduced platelet activation (adhesion and aggregation), prolonged ferric chloride-induced blood vessel occlusion time and protected against exacerbated myocardial ischemia reperfusion (MI-RP) injury. SYM treatment prevented HFr induced mRNA expression of hepatic PGC-1α/β and also its target transcription factors which was accompanied with recovery in insulin sensitivity and reduced propensity towards thrombotic complications and aggravated MI-RP injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Aging diminishes the resistance of AO rats to EAE: putative role of enhanced generation of GM-CSF Expressing CD4+ T cells in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Pilipović, Ivan; Vujnović, Ivana; Blagojević, Veljko; Kosec, Duško; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Aging influences immune response and susceptibility to EAE in a strain specific manner. The study was designed to examine influence of aging on EAE induction in Albino Oxford (AO) rats. Differently from 3-month-old (young) rats, which were resistant to EAE induction, the majority of aged (24-26-month-old) rats developed mild chronic form of EAE. On 16(th) day post-immunization, when in aged rats the neurological deficit reached plateau, more mononuclear cells, including CD4+ T lymphocytes was retrieved from spinal cord of aged than young rats. The frequencies of IL-17+ and GM-CSF+ cells within spinal cord infiltrating CD4+ lymphocytes were greater in aged rats. To their increased frequency contributed the expansion of GM-CSF + IL-17 + IFN-γ+ cells, which are highly pathogenic in mice. The expression of the cytokines (IL-1β and IL-23/p19) driving GM-CSF + IL-17 + IFN-γ + cell differentiation in mice was also augmented in aged rat spinal cord mononuclear cells. Additionally, in aged rat spinal cord the expansion of GM-CSF + IL-17-IFN-γ- CD4+ T lymphocytes was found. Consistently, the expression of mRNAs for IL-3, the cytokine exhibiting the same expression pattern as GM-CSF, and IL-7, the cytokine driving differentiation of GM-CSF + IL-17-IFN-γ- CD4 + lymphocytes in mice, was upregulated in aged rat spinal cord mononuclear cells, and the tissue, respectively. This was in accordance with the enhanced generation of the brain antigen-specific GM-CSF+ CD4+ lymphocytes in aged rat draining lymph nodes, as suggested by (i) the higher frequency of GM-CSF+ cells (reflecting the expansion of IL-17-IFN-γ- cells) within their CD4+ lymphocytes and (ii) the upregulated GM-CSF and IL-3 mRNA expression in fresh CD4+ lymphocytes and MBP-stimulated draining lymph node cells and IL-7 mRNA in lymph node tissue from aged rats. In agreement with the upregulated GM-CSF expression in aged rats, strikingly more CD11b + CD45(int) (activated microglia

  8. Effects of Glutamine and Alanine Supplementation on Central Fatigue Markers in Rats Submitted to Resistance Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Yule Coqueiro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that increased brain serotonin synthesis impairs performance in high-intensity intermittent exercise and specific amino acids may modulate this condition, delaying fatigue. This study investigated the effects of glutamine and alanine supplementation on central fatigue markers in rats submitted to resistance training (RT. Wistar rats were distributed in: sedentary (SED, trained (CON, trained and supplemented with alanine (ALA, glutamine and alanine in their free form (G + A, or as dipeptide (DIP. Trained groups underwent a ladder-climbing exercise for eight weeks, with progressive loads. In the last 21 days, supplementations were offered in water with a 4% concentration. Albeit without statistically significance difference, RT decreased liver glycogen, and enhanced the concentrations of plasma glucose, free fatty acids (FFA, hypothalamic serotonin, and ammonia in muscle and the liver. Amino acids affected fatigue parameters depending on the supplementation form. G + A prevented the muscle ammonia increase by RT, whereas ALA and DIP augmented ammonia and glycogen concentrations in muscle. DIP also increased liver ammonia. ALA and G + A reduced plasma FFA, whereas DIP increased this parameter, free tryptophan/total tryptophan ratio, hypothalamic serotonin, and the serotonin/dopamine ratio. The supplementations did not affect physical performance. In conclusion, glutamine and alanine may improve or impair central fatigue markers depending on their supplementation form.

  9. Photobiomodulation Leads to Reduced Oxidative Stress in Rats Submitted to High-Intensity Resistive Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helenita Antonia de Oliveira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether oxidative stress markers are influenced by low-intensity laser therapy (LLLT in rats subjected to a high-intensity resistive exercise session (RE. Female Wistar rats divided into three experimental groups (Ctr: control, 4J: LLLT, and RE and subdivided based on the sampling times (instantly or 24 h postexercise underwent irradiation with LLLT using three-point transcutaneous method on the hind legs, which was applied to the gastrocnemius muscle at the distal, medial, and proximal points. Laser (4J or placebo (device off were carried out 60 sec prior to RE that consisted of four climbs bearing the maximum load with a 2 min time interval between each climb. Lipoperoxidation levels and antioxidant capacity were obtained in muscle. Lipoperoxidation levels were increased (4-HNE and CL markers instantly post-RE. LLLT prior to RE avoided the increase of the lipid peroxidation levels. Similar results were also notified for oxidation protein assays. The GPx and FRAP activities did not reduce instantly or 24 h after RE. SOD increased 24 h after RE, while CAT activity did not change with RE or LLLT. In conclusion, LLLT prior to RE reduced the oxidative stress markers, as well as, avoided reduction, and still increased the antioxidant capacity.

  10. Fish oil and olive oil can modify insulin resistance and plasma desacyl-ghrelin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidpour, Atoosa; Zahediasl, Saleh; Kimiagar, Masoud; Vafa, Mohamadreza; Ghasemi, Asghar; Abadi, Alireza; Daneshpour, Maryam Sadat; Zarkesh, Maryam

    2011-07-01

    Evidence exists for reciprocal effects of insulin and desacyl-ghrelin (DAG) concentration, but the association between different fatty acid saturation in high fat diet (HFD) and these hormones remain to be established. To evaluate the impact of different sources of dietary fat and the level of fatty acid saturation on plasma insulin and DAG levels and also the association of DAG with insulin action this study was carried out. Male weaning Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups of HFDs, high fat butter (HF-B), high fat soy (HF-S), high fat olive (HF-O), high fat fish (HF-F), and a group of standard diet (SD). Blood samples were collected after 8 weeks and after they were fasted for 24 h. Body weight, food intake, plasma glucose, insulin, DAG and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were measured. Plasma insulin levels at fed and fasted status, were significantly higher in rats on HF-B compared to those on SD, HF-F and HF-O diets (Polive oils may hence contribute to lower insulin level and HOMA-IR by increasing DAG concentration and may have more health benefits than other fat sources in diets.

  11. Effect of apple polyphenol concentrate on lipid metabolism in rats under experimental insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagayko, Andriy L; Kravchenko, Ganna B; Fylymonenko, Viktoriia P; Krasilnikova, Oksana A

    Obesity is strongly associated with an increased risk of developing insulin resistance as the metabolic indicator of prediabetes and a major risk factor in diabetes mellitus type 2 pathogenesis. Medicinal products obtained from apples can be used as potent prophylactic and therapeutic remedies in treatment of diabetes mellitus. Experiment was designed to study the effect of total apple polyphenol food concentrate on lipid metabolism under experimental IR. Male Wistar rats weighting 180-210 g were used in the experiment. IR was induced by high-calorie diet enriched with fructose. The effect of total apple polyphenol food concentrate was compared with the action of epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin. To estimate the alterations in lipid metabolism in liver homogenate were measured triacylglycerols, free fatty acids, total phospholipids, TBA-reactive substance and conjugated dienes contents. In blood serum were measured total lipids, triacylglycerols, cholesterol, total phospholipids and reduced glutathione levels. The obtained results indicated that feeding rats with high-calorie diet enriched with fructose caused the dyslipidemia and oxidative stress development. The administration of quercetin, epigallocatechin gallate and total apple polyphenol food concentrate improved disorders of lipid metabolism and pro-oxidant-antioxidant homeostasis. Total apple polyphenol food concentrate had a more pronounced effect on studied indices that is probably due to synergism and additive effect of extract numerous components.

  12. Effects of Glutamine and Alanine Supplementation on Central Fatigue Markers in Rats Submitted to Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coqueiro, Audrey Yule; Raizel, Raquel; Bonvini, Andrea; Hypólito, Thaís; Godois, Allan da Mata; Pereira, Jéssica Ramos Rocha; Garcia, Amanda Beatriz de Oliveira; Lara, Rafael de Souza Bittencourt; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Tirapegui, Julio

    2018-01-25

    Recent evidence suggests that increased brain serotonin synthesis impairs performance in high-intensity intermittent exercise and specific amino acids may modulate this condition, delaying fatigue. This study investigated the effects of glutamine and alanine supplementation on central fatigue markers in rats submitted to resistance training (RT). Wistar rats were distributed in: sedentary (SED), trained (CON), trained and supplemented with alanine (ALA), glutamine and alanine in their free form (G + A), or as dipeptide (DIP). Trained groups underwent a ladder-climbing exercise for eight weeks, with progressive loads. In the last 21 days, supplementations were offered in water with a 4% concentration. Albeit without statistically significance difference, RT decreased liver glycogen, and enhanced the concentrations of plasma glucose, free fatty acids (FFA), hypothalamic serotonin, and ammonia in muscle and the liver. Amino acids affected fatigue parameters depending on the supplementation form. G + A prevented the muscle ammonia increase by RT, whereas ALA and DIP augmented ammonia and glycogen concentrations in muscle. DIP also increased liver ammonia. ALA and G + A reduced plasma FFA, whereas DIP increased this parameter, free tryptophan/total tryptophan ratio, hypothalamic serotonin, and the serotonin/dopamine ratio. The supplementations did not affect physical performance. In conclusion, glutamine and alanine may improve or impair central fatigue markers depending on their supplementation form.

  13. Effect of an avocado oil-enhanced diet (Persea americana on sucrose-induced insulin resistance in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Del Toro-Equihua

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have been conducted to evaluate the effects of vegetable oils with varying percentages of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids on insulin resistance. However, there is no report on the effect of avocado oil on this pathologic condition. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of avocado oil on sucrose-induced insulin resistance in Wistar rats. An experimental study was carried out on Wistar rats that were randomly assigned into six groups. Each group received a different diet over an 8-week period (n = 11 in each group: the control group was given a standard diet, and the other five groups were given the standard feed plus sucrose with the addition of avocado oil at 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, and 30%, respectively. Variables were compared using Student t test and analysis of variance. Statistically significant difference was considered when p < 0.05. Rats that were given diets with 10% and 20% avocado oil showed lower insulin resistance (p = 0.022 and p = 0.024, respectively. Similar insulin resistance responses were observed in the control and 30% avocado oil addition groups (p = 0.85. Addition of 5–30% avocado oil lowered high sucrose diet-induced body weight gain in Wistar rats. It was thus concluded that glucose tolerance and insulin resistance induced by high sucrose diet in Wistar rats can be reduced by the dietary addition of 5–20% avocado oil.

  14. Tinospora crispa Ameliorates Insulin Resistance Induced by High Fat Diet in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nazri Abu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The antidiabetic properties of Tinospora crispa, a local herb that has been used in traditional Malay medicine and rich in antioxidant, were explored based on obesity-linked insulin resistance condition. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups, namely, the normal control (NC which received standard rodent diet, the high fat diet (HFD which received high fat diet only, the high fat diet treated with T. crispa (HFDTC, and the high fat diet treated with orlistat (HFDO. After sixteen weeks of treatment, blood and organs were harvested for analyses. Results showed that T. crispa significantly (p < 0.05 reduced the body weight (41.14 ± 1.40%, adiposity index serum levels (4.910 ± 0.80%, aspartate aminotransferase (AST: 161 ± 4.71 U/L, alanine aminotransferase (ALT: 100.95 ± 3.10 U/L, total cholesterol (TC: 18.55 ± 0.26 mmol/L, triglycerides (TG: 3.70 ± 0.11 mmol/L, blood glucose (8.50 ± 0.30 mmo/L, resistin (0.74 ± 0.20 ng/mL, and leptin (17.428 ± 1.50 ng/mL hormones in HFDTC group. The insulin (1.65 ± 0.07 pg/mL and C-peptide (136.48 pmol/L hormones were slightly decreased but within normal range. The histological results showed unharmed and intact liver tissues in HFDTC group. As a conclusion, T. crispa ameliorates insulin resistance-associated with obesity in Wistar rats fed with high fat diet.

  15. Supplemental arginine above the requirement during suckling causes obesity and insulin resistance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Lila; Mori, Tomomi; Koyama, Ayaka; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Kato, Hisanori

    2016-06-01

    Nutrition in early life is important in determining susceptibility to adult obesity, and arginine may promote growth acceleration in infants. We hypothesized that maternal arginine supplementation may promote growth in their pups and contribute to obesity and alteration of the metabolic system in later life. Dams and pups of Wistar rats were given a normal diet (15% protein) as a control (CN) or a normal diet with 2% arginine (ARG). Altered profiles of free amino acids in breast milk were observed in that the concentrations of threonine and glycine were lower in the ARG dams compared with the CN dams. The offspring of the CN and ARG dams were further subdivided into normal-diet (CN-CN and ARG-CN) groups and a high fat-diet groups (CN-HF and ARG-HF). In response to the high fat-diet feeding, the visceral fat deposits were significantly increased in the ARG-HF group (although not compared with the CN-HF group); no difference was observed between the CN-CN and ARG-CN groups. The blood glucose and insulin levels after glucose loading were significantly higher in the ARG-HF group compared with the CN-HF group. The results suggest that the offspring of dams supplemented with arginine during lactation acquired increased susceptibility to a high-fat diet, resulting in visceral obesity and insulin resistance. The lower supply of threonine and glycine to pups may be one of the contributing causes to the programming of lifelong obesity risk in offspring. Our findings also indicated that maternal arginine supplementation during suckling causes obesity and insulin resistance in rats. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Shivaji, Dr Sisinthy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 17 June 1950. Specialization: Anti-Microbial Resistance, Gut Microbiome, Eye Disease, Conservation Biology, Mammalian Sperm Function, Bacterial Biodiversity of Cold Habitats, Cold Adaptation Address: Director, Prof. Brien Holdon Eye Research, LV Prasad Eye Institute, LV Prasad Marg, Banjara Hills, ...

  17. Shivaji, Dr Sisinthy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Anti-Microbial Resistance, Gut Microbiome, Eye Disease, Conservation Biology, Mammalian Sperm Function, Bacterial Biodiversity of Cold Habitats, Cold Adaptation Address: Director, Prof. Brien Holdon Eye Research, LV Prasad Eye Institute, LV Prasad Marg, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 034, A.P.

  18. Dietary Supplementation of Fructooligosaccharides Reduces Hepatic Steatosis Associated with Insulin Resistance in Obese Zucker Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha Devareddy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: One in five adults in the United States is obese as defined by a body mass index of 30 kg/m2. Obesity is associated with metabolic syndrome, a combination of medical conditions including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. These conditions present challenges to the medical care system and require a multifaceted approach through a variety of interventions. This study investigated the effects of fructooligosaccharides (FOS at the level of 5 % (w/w in alleviating the complications associated with metabolic syndrome.Methods: The study was carried out using thirty-six, three-month old female lean and obese Zucker rats housed in an environmentally controlled laboratory. The Zucker rats were divided into three groups (N=12: Lean (L-CTRL and obese controls (O-CTRL and obese-FOS (O-FOS. The controls received AIN-93M purified rodent diet and the animals in the O-FOS group were fed AIN-93M diet modified to contain 5.0% FOS (w/w. After 100 days of treatment, the rats were fasted for 12 hours and sacrificed. Tissue and organs of interest, and blood were collected for analysis. Serum concentrations of the following were determined: glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, triglycerides (TG, and insulin.Functional Foods in Heals and Disease 2011; 5:199-213Gravimetric quantification of liver lipids was performed and peroxisome proliferator-activatedreceptor- (PPAR- gene expression was determined in white adipose tissue by qRT-PCR.Results: No significant differences were observed in the serum lipids, fasting blood glucose,HbA1c and PPAR- gene expression in white adipose tissue of O-FOS group compared to OCTRLgroup. FOS supplementation significantly lowered the percent total liver lipids by 12%with a subsequent reduction in the liver weights compared to O-CTRL rats

  19. Postnatal development of resistance to short-term high-dose toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in TCDD-resistant and -semiresistant rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanainen, Ulla; Tuomisto, Jouni T.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Syrjaelae, Paula; Tuomisto, Jouko; Viluksela, Matti

    2004-01-01

    Despite great interspecies differences in adult 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) sensitivity, the toxic potency of TCDD is similar across species in fetal mortality. Han/Wistar (Kuopio; H/W) rats are exceptionally resistant to acute toxicity of TCDD, but show sensitivity to embryotoxicity and teratogenicity. The resistance of adult H/W rats to acute TCDD toxicity is based on a point mutation in the transactivation domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and to an unknown gene ''B''. This study investigated the time course of postnatal development of resistance to TCDD and the significance of genotypic variation in resistance development. H/W, line A (a new line with the H/W-type mutated AHR), and line B rats (a line with normal AHR but moderately resistant because of gene ''B'') were exposed to a single dose of TCDD 2-56 days after birth. H/W and line A rats received 1000 μg/kg; male and female B rats received 200 and 100 μg/kg, respectively. Survival was monitored for 42 days. Interestingly, although TCDD ceased growth and weight gain in all TCDD groups, the younger dosed animals did not seem to reach the body weight of the older dosed animals even in 100 days. The survival results after 42 days showed that line A rats are fairly resistant to TCDD immediately after birth, and their full TCDD resistance develops during the first week of life. The moderate resistance of line B rats develops approximately at the time of weaning. This difference in the time course of resistance development suggests that there are basic differences in pathways mediating resistance in lines A and B rats

  20. Simultaneous delivery of antibiotics neomycin and ampicillin in drinking water inhibits fermentation of resistant starch in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Aldaz, Diana G; Guice, Justin L; Page, Ryan C; Raggio, Anne M; Martin, Roy J; Husseneder, Claudia; Durham, Holiday A; Geaghan, James; Janes, Marlene; Gauthier, Ted; Coulon, Diana; Keenan, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    Antibiotics ampicillin 1 g/L and neomycin 0.5 g/L were added to drinking water before or during feeding of resistant starch (RS) to rats to inhibit fermentation. In a preliminary study, antibiotics and no RS were given prior to rats receiving a transplant of cecal contents via gavage from donor rats fed RS (without antibiotics) or a water gavage before feeding resistant starch to both groups. Antibiotics given prior to feeding RS did not prevent later fermentation of RS regardless of either type of gavage. In the second study, antibiotics were given simultaneously with feeding of RS. This resulted in inhibition of fermentation of RS with cecal contents pH >8 and low amounts of acetate and butyrate. Rats treated with antibiotics had reduced Bifidobacteria spp., but similar Bacteroides spp. to control groups to reduce acetate and butyrate and preserve the production of propionate. Despite reduced fermentation, rats given antibiotics had increased glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and cecum size, measures that are usually associated with fermentation. A simultaneous delivery of antibiotics inhibited fermentation of RS. However, increased GLP-1 and cecum size would be confounding effects in assessing the mechanism for beneficial effects of dietary RS by knocking out fermentation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Expression of connexin 37, 40 and 43 in rat mesenteric arterioles and resistance arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Mikkelsen, Hanne B; Arensbak, Birgitte

    2003-01-01

    Connexins are the protein constituents of gap junctions which mediate intercellular communication in most tissues. In arterioles gap junctions appear to be important for conduction of vasomotor responses along the vessel. Studies of the expression pattern of connexin isoforms in the microcirculat......Connexins are the protein constituents of gap junctions which mediate intercellular communication in most tissues. In arterioles gap junctions appear to be important for conduction of vasomotor responses along the vessel. Studies of the expression pattern of connexin isoforms...... in the microcirculation are sparse. We investigated the expression of the three major vascular connexins in mesenteric arterioles (diameter micro m) from male Sprague-Dawley rats, since conducted vasomotor responses have been described in these vessels. The findings were compared with those obtained from upstream...... small resistance arteries. Indirect immunofluorescence techniques were used on whole mounts of mesenteric arterioles and on frozen sections of resistance arteries (diameter approximately 300 micro m). Mesenteric arterioles expressed Cx40 and Cx43 in the endothelial layer, and Cx37 was found in most...

  2. Fatigue resistance of rat extraocular muscles does not depend on creatine kinase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayeß Katrin

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Creatine kinase (CK links phosphocreatine, an energy storage system, to cellular ATPases. CK activity serves as a temporal and spatial buffer for ATP content, particularly in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. The extraocular muscles are notoriously fast and active, suggesting the need for efficient ATP buffering. This study tested the hypotheses that (1 CK isoform expression and activity in rat extraocular muscles would be higher, and (2 the resistance of these muscles to fatigue would depend on CK activity. Results We found that mRNA and protein levels for cytosolic and mitochondrial CK isoforms were lower in the extraocular muscles than in extensor digitorum longus (EDL. Total CK activity was correspondingly decreased in the extraocular muscles. Moreover, cytoskeletal components of the sarcomeric M line, where a fraction of CK activity is found, were downregulated in the extraocular muscles as was shown by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. CK inhibition significantly accelerated the development of fatigue in EDL muscle bundles, but had no major effect on the extraocular muscles. Searching for alternative ATP buffers that could compensate for the relative lack of CK in extraocular muscles, we determined that mRNAs for two adenylate kinase (AK isoforms were expressed at higher levels in these muscles. Total AK activity was similar in EDL and extraocular muscles. Conclusion These data indicate that the characteristic fatigue resistance of the extraocular muscles does not depend on CK activity.

  3. Arginase inhibition prevents the development of hypertension and improves insulin resistance in obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyton, Kelly J; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Shebib, Ahmad R; Johnson, Fruzsina K; Johnson, Robert A; Durante, William

    2018-04-27

    This study investigated the temporal activation of arginase in obese Zucker rats (ZR) and determined if arginase inhibition prevents the development of hypertension and improves insulin resistance in these animals. Arginase activity, plasma arginine and nitric oxide (NO) concentration, blood pressure, and insulin resistance were measured in lean and obese animals. There was a chronological increase in vascular and plasma arginase activity in obese ZR beginning at 8 weeks of age. The increase in arginase activity in obese animals was associated with a decrease in insulin sensitivity and circulating levels of arginine and NO. The rise in arginase activity also preceded the increase in blood pressure in obese ZR detected at 12 weeks of age. Chronic treatment of 8-week-old obese animals with an arginase inhibitor or L-arginine for 4 weeks prevented the development of hypertension and improved plasma concentrations of arginine and NO. Arginase inhibition also improved insulin sensitivity in obese ZR while L-arginine supplementation had no effect. In conclusion, arginase inhibition prevents the development of hypertension and improves insulin sensitivity while L-arginine administration only mitigates hypertension in obese animals. Arginase represents a promising therapeutic target in ameliorating obesity-associated vascular and metabolic dysfunction.

  4. Insulin resistance and delayed clearance of peptide hormones in cirrhotic rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, T.P.; Drake, S.; Solomon, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    Clearance of porcine insulin, glucagon, and human growth hormone was measured in intact perfused cirrhotic and normal rat livers. Binding and degradation of 125 I-insulin by hepatocytes isolated from cirrhotic and normal livers were also studied. The half-lives (t/sub 1/2/) of immunoreactive insulin and glucagon were 14.0 +/- 3.1 and 9.6 +/- 2.1 min in normal livers and 26.0 +/- 6.1 and 25.0 +/- 7.1 min in cirrhotic livers. Insulin binding and degradation by hepatocytes from control and cirrhotic livers showed no significant differences. Intraportal insulin infusion in perfusion studies suppressed glucagon-stimulated increases in glucose output from control livers but failed to suppress glucose production by cirrhotic livers, suggesting the presence of hepatic insulin resistance in cirrhosis. Impaired clearance of insulin and glucagon by the intact cirrhotic liver and normal binding and degradation of insulin by isolated hepatocytes suggest that factors such as intrahepatic fibrosis and shunting and postbinding defects may be responsible for the impaired hormone clearance and hepatic insulin resistance

  5. Characterization of Bromadiolone Resistance in a Danish Strain of Norway Rats, Rattus norvegicus, by Hepatic Gene Expression Profiling of VKORC1 and Calumenin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2007-01-01

    indicate that bromadiolone resistance does not involve an over-expression of calumenin. We observed a low VKORC1 mRNA expression in resistant rats compared to susceptible rats, which may explain pleiotropic effects of resistance, such as a low VKOR activity and an enhanced need for vitamin K, observed......Anticoagulant agents, such as warfarin and bromadiolone, are used to control populations of Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus). The anticoagulants compromise the blood-coagulation process by inhibiting the vitamin K2,3 epoxide reductase enzyme complex (VKOR). Mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding...

  6. Heart resistance to oxidative stress in rats of different genetic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, L M; Lakomkin, V L; Zhukova, A G; Kirillina, T N; Saltykova, V A; Sazontova, T G; Kapel'ko, V I

    2004-09-01

    In August rats reperfusion after regional myocardial ischemia in situ or intracoronary administration of hydrogen peroxide less significantly suppressed contractile activity of the heart compared to Wistar rats. Activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase in the myocardium during reperfusion remained unchanged in August rats. In Wistar rats a profound inhibition of cardiac function was accompanied by a decrease in enzyme activity.

  7. Terbutaline increases the cervical resistance of the pregnant rat in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gáspár, Róbert; Kolarovszki-Sipiczki, Zoltán; Ducza, Eszter; Páldy, Eszter; Benyhe, Sándor; Borsodi, Anna; Falkay, George

    2005-01-01

    Cervical ripening is a crucial process leading to delivery. Early dilation of the pregnant cervix can contribute to premature labour. The maturity of the cervix can be characterized by its resistance to mechanical stretching. Although a number of compounds are considered to increase cervical resistance (e.g., progesterone, nitric oxide synthase inhibitors and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), none of them seem to be safe for clinical application. Other compounds, such as beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta(2)-AR) agonists, have been used for several decades to stop premature myometrium contractions, but their cervical action has never been investigated. The aim of this study was to detect the effects of the beta(2)-AR agonist terbutaline on nonpregnant and late-pregnant (day 18, 20, 21 or 22) cervices isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats. Cervical resistance was measured by means of a mechanical stretching test in vitro, the beta(2)-AR density was determined by Western blot analysis, the beta(2)-AR mRNA was determined by RT-PCR, while the G-protein activation following cervical beta(2)-AR stimulation with terbutaline was evaluated via a [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding assay. Terbutaline at 10(-6) M increased the cervical resistance of the late-pregnant samples in vitro from day 18 to day 22, but did not alter the resistance of the nonpregnant samples. This cervical resistance-increasing effect was concentration dependent and antagonized with propranolol on day 21. Terbutaline was ineffective on cervical samples when gradual stretching was omitted. RT-PCR and Western blot studies revealed increased beta(2)-AR mRNA and beta(2)-AR levels respectively on day 18 of pregnancy compared with the nonpregnant cervix, but no further changes were detected up to the end of pregnancy. The [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding assay demonstrated a decreased G-protein activation on the days of pregnancy investigated, but no activation was found in the nonpregnant samples. The degree of decrease in G

  8. Resistant starch but not enzymatic treated waxy maize delays development of diabetes in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedemann, Mette Skou; Hermansen, Kjeld; Pedersen, Sven

    2017-01-01

    of diabetes in male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Methods: Forty-eight male ZDF rats, aged 5 wk, were divided into 4 groups and fed experimental diets for 9 wk that contained 52.95% starch: gelatinized corn starch (S), glucidex (GLU), resistant starch (RS), or enzymatically modified starch (EMS). Blood......Background: The incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide, and nutritional management of circulating glucose may be a strategic tool in the prevention of T2D. Objective: We studied whether enzymatically modified waxy maize with an increased degree of branching delayed the onset...

  9. Dr Math at your service

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available investigating using AIMS French speaking tutors to assist in hurricane and earthquake devastated Haiti MXit: drmath.sa Google Chat: dr.math.rsa (at) gmail.com More Info: http://drmath.meraka.csir.co.za/drmath Photographs are descriptive not actual Dr... researching MXit ?lingo? PhD student in the USA investigating using AIMS French speaking tutors to assist in hurricane and earthquake devastated Haiti MXit: drmath.sa Google Chat: dr.math.rsa (at) gmail.com More Info: http...

  10. Whey protein increases muscle weight gain through inhibition of oxidative effects induced by resistance exercise in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Kely R; Silva, Marcelo E; de Lima, Wanderson G; Pedrosa, Maria L; Haraguchi, Fabiano K

    2016-10-01

    Whey protein (WP) is known for its nutritional value and antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the antioxidant properties of WP could contribute to muscle weight gain in response to resistance exercise (RE). We hypothesized that WP ingestion could increase muscle weight gain in rats subjected to an RE program, through inhibition of oxidative effects induced by high-intensity RE. Thirty-two male Fischer rats were randomly assigned to control sedentary, control exercised, WP sedentary, and WP exercised groups (n=8/group). The RE consisted of inducing the rats to perform sets of jumps for 8 weeks. Body and muscle weight gains, muscle glutathione content, histopathology, muscle antioxidant enzyme activities, and gene expression were evaluated. Body and muscle weight gains of exercised rats fed WP were higher than those of control exercised rats. Concomitantly, RE induced an increase in phagocyte infiltration, protein oxidation, and down-regulation of glutathione peroxidase and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase messenger RNA expression in gastrocnemius muscle (Pmuscle glutathione content was increased only by WP (P.05). These findings suggest that differences in body and muscle weight gain in exercised rats fed control or WP diets were mediated, in part, by the antioxidant properties of WP, and indicate that when associated with RE, WP represents a nutritional aid to support muscle growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine on plasma glucose, plasma insulin and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, M. K.; Hussain, M. M.; Khan, M. A.; Ahmad, T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of combined and individual supplementation of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine on plasma glucose, plasma insulin and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats. Methods: The randomised controlled trial was conducted at the Department of Physiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, between October 2010 and April 2011. It comprised 80 healthy Sprague Dawley rats who were divided into four groups (n = 20 each). Rats were fed high-fat diet for 2 weeks followed by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin to induce type 2 diabetes mellitus. Group I served as diabetic control; group II was given cholecalciferol; group III; levo carnitine; and group IV was administered cholecalciferol and levo carnitine together. After 6 days of supplementation, terminal intracardiac blood extraction was done and samples were analysed for fasting plasma glucose and plasma insulin. Insulin resistance was calculated by homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance. SPSS 17.0 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Fasting plasma glucose levels were significantly decreased (p <0.001) in the combined supplementation group compared to the diabetic control and individual supplementation groups. Combined supplementation showed a significant increase in fasting plasma insulin levels when compared with diabetic control and levo carnitine groups (p <0.001), and the effect of combined supplementation on ameliorating insulin resistance was significantly better (p <0.001) as compared to the individual supplementation of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine. Conclusions: The combined supplementation of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine for 6 days markedly improved the glycaemic control, insulin secretion and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats on high-fat diet. A prolonged supplementation by both the compounds along with caloric restriction may yield a more promising outcome. (author)

  12. Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland visiting the ATLAS magnet assembly hall, building 180. From l to r: Mr Carlo Lamprecht, State Councillor, Dr Stanislaw Huskowski and Dr Peter Jenni, ATLAS Spokesperson

  13. Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland visiting the ATLAS magnet assembly hall, building 180 with Mr Carlo Lamprecht, State Councillor, Dr Stanislaw Huskowski and Dr Peter Jenni, ATLAS Spokesperson

  14. The role of the substantia nigra pars reticulata in kindling resistance in rats with genetic absence epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Ozlem; Gulcebi, Medine I; Carcak, Nihan; Ketenci Ozatman, Sema; Eryigit, Tugba; Moshé, Solomon L; Galanopoulou, Aristea S; Onat, Filiz Yilmaz

    2015-11-01

    Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) show a resistance to secondary generalization of focal limbic seizures evoked by kindling. The substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNR) is involved in the propagation and modulation of seizures in kindling. We first examined the role of the SNRanterior and SNRposterior subregions in the resistance to the development of kindling in GAERS. Subsequently, to determine whether kindling resistance relates to differential sensitivity of γ-aminobutyric acid γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic or dopaminergic SNR neurons to kindling, we studied the effects of kindling-inducing stimulations on parvalbumin (PRV; GABAergic neuron marker) or tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; dopaminergic neuron marker) immunoreactivity (ir), respectively, in GAERS and in nonepileptic control (NEC) Wistar rats that lack kindling resistance. Adult male GAERS were implanted with a stimulation electrode in the amygdala, and bilateral injection cannulas for lidocaine or saline injection (30 min before each kindling stimulation until the animals reached three stage 5 seizures or the 22 stimulations) into the SNRanterior or SNRposterior . In another experiment, PRV-ir in SNRanterior and SNRposterior and TH-ir in SNRposterior only were densitometrically compared in GAERS-SHAM, NEC-SHAM GAERS-STIM, and NEC-STIM animals (6 kindling stimulations). Bilateral SNRposterior infusions of lidocaine eliminated the kindling resistance and resulted in stage 5 generalized motor seizures in all kindled rats. Bilateral lidocaine infusions in the SNRanterior failed to alter the kindling resistance in GAERS. PRV-ir in the SNRposterior was unaltered in GAERS-STIM but increased in NEC-STIM group. Cellular TH-ir in the SNRposterior significantly increased by kindling stimulations in both NEC-STIM and GAERS-STIM groups. The kindling resistance in GAERS is mediated by the SNRposterior in a lidocaine-sensitive manner. The insensitivity to kindling stimulation of PRV-ir in

  15. How Dr. Pierce Promoted Himself

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — This article is about Dr. Raymond V Pierce who owned St. Vincent Island before it became a refuge. The doctor painted advertisements for his famous “Woman’s Tonic”...

  16. Non-injurious neonatal hypoxia confers resistance to brain senescence in aged male rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Martin

    Full Text Available Whereas brief acute or intermittent episodes of hypoxia have been shown to exert a protective role in the central nervous system and to stimulate neurogenesis, other studies suggest that early hypoxia may constitute a risk factor that influences the future development of mental disorders. We therefore investigated the effects of a neonatal "conditioning-like" hypoxia (100% N₂, 5 min on the brain and the cognitive outcomes of rats until 720 days of age (physiologic senescence. We confirmed that such a short hypoxia led to brain neurogenesis within the ensuing weeks, along with reduced apoptosis in the hippocampus involving activation of Erk1/2 and repression of p38 and death-associated protein (DAP kinase. At 21 days of age, increased thicknesses and cell densities were recorded in various subregions, with strong synapsin activation. During aging, previous exposure to neonatal hypoxia was associated with enhanced memory retrieval scores specifically in males, better preservation of their brain integrity than controls, reduced age-related apoptosis, larger hippocampal cell layers, and higher expression of glutamatergic and GABAergic markers. These changes were accompanied with a marked expression of synapsin proteins, mainly of their phosphorylated active forms which constitute major players of synapse function and plasticity, and with increases of their key regulators, i.e. Erk1/2, the transcription factor EGR-1/Zif-268 and Src kinase. Moreover, the significantly higher interactions between PSD-95 scaffolding protein and NMDA receptors measured in the hippocampus of 720-day-old male animals strengthen the conclusion of increased synaptic functional activity and plasticity associated with neonatal hypoxia. Thus, early non-injurious hypoxia may trigger beneficial long term effects conferring higher resistance to senescence in aged male rats, with a better preservation of cognitive functions.

  17. Non-injurious neonatal hypoxia confers resistance to brain senescence in aged male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicolas; Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Koziel, Violette; Jazi, Rozat; Audonnet, Sandra; Vert, Paul; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Daval, Jean-Luc; Pourié, Grégory

    2012-01-01

    Whereas brief acute or intermittent episodes of hypoxia have been shown to exert a protective role in the central nervous system and to stimulate neurogenesis, other studies suggest that early hypoxia may constitute a risk factor that influences the future development of mental disorders. We therefore investigated the effects of a neonatal "conditioning-like" hypoxia (100% N₂, 5 min) on the brain and the cognitive outcomes of rats until 720 days of age (physiologic senescence). We confirmed that such a short hypoxia led to brain neurogenesis within the ensuing weeks, along with reduced apoptosis in the hippocampus involving activation of Erk1/2 and repression of p38 and death-associated protein (DAP) kinase. At 21 days of age, increased thicknesses and cell densities were recorded in various subregions, with strong synapsin activation. During aging, previous exposure to neonatal hypoxia was associated with enhanced memory retrieval scores specifically in males, better preservation of their brain integrity than controls, reduced age-related apoptosis, larger hippocampal cell layers, and higher expression of glutamatergic and GABAergic markers. These changes were accompanied with a marked expression of synapsin proteins, mainly of their phosphorylated active forms which constitute major players of synapse function and plasticity, and with increases of their key regulators, i.e. Erk1/2, the transcription factor EGR-1/Zif-268 and Src kinase. Moreover, the significantly higher interactions between PSD-95 scaffolding protein and NMDA receptors measured in the hippocampus of 720-day-old male animals strengthen the conclusion of increased synaptic functional activity and plasticity associated with neonatal hypoxia. Thus, early non-injurious hypoxia may trigger beneficial long term effects conferring higher resistance to senescence in aged male rats, with a better preservation of cognitive functions.

  18. Effects of Growth Hormone on Cardiac Remodeling During Resistance Training in Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junqueira, Adriana, E-mail: francispacagnelli@unoeste.br [Universidade do Oeste Paulista (UNOESTE), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil); Cicogna, Antônio Carlos [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Campus Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Engel, Letícia Estevam; Aldá, Maiara Almeida [Universidade do Oeste Paulista (UNOESTE), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil); Tomasi, Loreta Casquel de [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Campus Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Giuffrida, Rogério; Giometti, Inês Cristina [Universidade do Oeste Paulista (UNOESTE), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil); Freire, Ana Paula Coelho Figueira [Universidade do Oeste Paulista (UNOESTE), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil); Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Campus Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil); Aguiar, Andreo Fernando [Universidade do Norte do Paraná, UNOPAR, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes [Universidade do Oeste Paulista (UNOESTE), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil)

    2016-01-15

    Although the beneficial effects of resistance training (RT) on the cardiovascular system are well established, few studies have investigated the effects of the chronic growth hormone (GH) administration on cardiac remodeling during an RT program. To evaluate the effects of GH on the morphological features of cardiac remodeling and Ca2+ transport gene expression in rats submitted to RT. Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 7 per group): control (CT), GH, RT and RT with GH (RTGH). The dose of GH was 0.2 IU/kg every other day for 30 days. The RT model used was the vertical jump in water (4 sets of 10 jumps, 3 bouts/wk) for 30 consecutive days. After the experimental period, the following variables were analyzed: final body weight (FBW), left ventricular weight (LVW), LVW/FBW ratio, cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area (CSA), collagen fraction, creatine kinase muscle-brain fraction (CK-MB) and gene expressions of SERCA2a, phospholamban (PLB) and ryanodine (RyR). There was no significant (p > 0.05) difference among groups for FBW, LVW, LVW/FBW ratio, cardiomyocyte CSA, and SERCA2a, PLB and RyR gene expressions. The RT group showed a significant (p < 0.05) increase in collagen fraction compared to the other groups. Additionally, the trained groups (RT and RTGH) had greater CK-MB levels compared to the untrained groups (CT and GH). GH may attenuate the negative effects of RT on cardiac remodeling by counteracting the increased collagen synthesis, without affecting the gene expression that regulates cardiac Ca{sup 2+} transport.

  19. Effects of Growth Hormone on Cardiac Remodeling During Resistance Training in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junqueira, Adriana; Cicogna, Antônio Carlos; Engel, Letícia Estevam; Aldá, Maiara Almeida; Tomasi, Loreta Casquel de; Giuffrida, Rogério; Giometti, Inês Cristina; Freire, Ana Paula Coelho Figueira; Aguiar, Andreo Fernando; Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Although the beneficial effects of resistance training (RT) on the cardiovascular system are well established, few studies have investigated the effects of the chronic growth hormone (GH) administration on cardiac remodeling during an RT program. To evaluate the effects of GH on the morphological features of cardiac remodeling and Ca2+ transport gene expression in rats submitted to RT. Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 7 per group): control (CT), GH, RT and RT with GH (RTGH). The dose of GH was 0.2 IU/kg every other day for 30 days. The RT model used was the vertical jump in water (4 sets of 10 jumps, 3 bouts/wk) for 30 consecutive days. After the experimental period, the following variables were analyzed: final body weight (FBW), left ventricular weight (LVW), LVW/FBW ratio, cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area (CSA), collagen fraction, creatine kinase muscle-brain fraction (CK-MB) and gene expressions of SERCA2a, phospholamban (PLB) and ryanodine (RyR). There was no significant (p > 0.05) difference among groups for FBW, LVW, LVW/FBW ratio, cardiomyocyte CSA, and SERCA2a, PLB and RyR gene expressions. The RT group showed a significant (p < 0.05) increase in collagen fraction compared to the other groups. Additionally, the trained groups (RT and RTGH) had greater CK-MB levels compared to the untrained groups (CT and GH). GH may attenuate the negative effects of RT on cardiac remodeling by counteracting the increased collagen synthesis, without affecting the gene expression that regulates cardiac Ca 2+ transport

  20. Effects of endurance and resistance exercises on bone mineral density and mechanical strength of osteoporotic male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Banparvari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Osteoporosis is a complex disease characterized by  loss of bone mass, resulting in bone weakness and an increase in susceptibility to fractures. The aim of the current study was to determine skeletal changes induced by two progressive loading training programs on the bone properties of osteoporotic male rats. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was done on 30 Wistar male rats having mean weight of 180-200 g. They were divided into .5 equal groups. In the experimental group, osteoporosis was induced through intraperitoneal injection of 20% ethanol solution (3g/kg/day for four consecutive days for 3 weeks. The rest of the groups were  baseline group (pre test, resistance training, endurance training, and the control. The two training groups completed 12 five-day weeks of training program. according to resistance or endurance protocols. The other 6 rats were considered as the healthy group without any intervention . At the end of the intervention, the animals were killed and their bone mineral density (BMD of the femur and  L4, L5 were measured. Tensile max load of the left tibia and compression of the L5 vertebra were measured using mechanical tests. Results: The endurance (P= 0.035 and resistance (P= 0.001 groups femur BMD had significantly increased compared to that of the control . L4, L5 BMD in resistance training and control was significantly greater than that of endurance group (P= 0.001,P= 0.001. The tensile maximum load of the tibia and compression of the L5 in the resistance group was significantly greater than the control (P=0.01,P=0.03. Conclusion: Resistance training, compared to endurance training, can induce more effective favourable changes in bone mineral status and bone strength.

  1. Pioglitazone improves cognitive function via increasing insulin sensitivity and strengthening antioxidant defense system in fructose-drinking insulin resistance rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Qing Yin

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance (IR links Alzheimer's disease (AD with oxidative damage, cholinergic deficit, and cognitive impairment. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ agonist pioglitazone previously used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM has also been demonstrated to be effective in anti-inflammatory reaction and anti-oxidative stress in the animal models of AD and other neuroinflammatory diseases. Here, we investigated the effect of pioglitazone on learning and memory impairment and the molecular events that may cause it in fructose-drinking insulin resistance rats. We found that long-term fructose-drinking causes insulin resistance, oxidative stress, down-regulated activity of cholinergic system, and cognitive deficit, which could be ameliorated by pioglitazone administration. The results from the present study provide experimental evidence for using pioglitazone in the treatment of brain damage caused by insulin resistance.

  2. The Effect of Physical Resistance Training on Baroreflex Sensitivity of Hypertensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Moisés Felipe Pereira; Borges, Mariana Eiras; Rossi, Vitor de Almeida; Moura, Elizabeth de Orleans C de; Medeiros, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Baroreceptors act as regulators of blood pressure (BP); however, its sensitivity is impaired in hypertensive patients. Among the recommendations for BP reduction, exercise training has become an important adjuvant therapy in this population. However, there are many doubts about the effects of resistance exercise training in this population. To evaluate the effect of resistance exercise training on BP and baroreceptor sensitivity in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Rats SHR (n = 16) and Wistar (n = 16) at 8 weeks of age, at the beginning of the experiment, were randomly divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (CS, n = 8); trained control (CT, n = 8); sedentary SHR (HS, n = 8) and trained SHR (HT, n = 8). Resistance exercise training was performed in a stairmaster-type equipment (1.1 × 0.18 m, 2 cm between the steps, 80° incline) with weights attached to their tails, (5 days/week, 8 weeks). Baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate (HR) was tested by loading/unloading of baroreceptors with phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. Resistance exercise training increased the soleus muscle mass in SHR when compared to HS (HS 0.027 ± 0.002 g/mm and HT 0.056 ± 0.003 g/mm). Resistance exercise training did not alter BP. On the other hand, in relation to baroreflex sensitivity, bradycardic response was improved in the TH group when compared to HS (HS -1.3 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg and HT -2.6 ± 0.2 bpm/mmHg) although tachycardia response was not altered by resistance exercise (CS -3.3 ± 0.2 bpm/mmHg, CT -3.3 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg, HS -1.47 ± 0.06 bpm/mmHg and HT -1.6 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg). Resistance exercise training was able to promote improvements on baroreflex sensitivity of SHR rats, through the improvement of bradycardic response, despite not having reduced BP. Os barorreceptores atuam como reguladores da pressão arterial (PA); no entanto, sua sensibilidade encontra-se prejudicada em pacientes hipertensos. Dentre as recomendações para a redução da PA, o treinamento f

  3. Preventive effect of curcumin on inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin resistance in high-fat fed obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maithilikarpagaselvi, Nachimuthu; Sridhar, Magadi Gopalakrishna; Swaminathan, Rathinam Palamalai; Sripradha, Ramalingam

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigated the beneficial effects of curcumin on inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin resistance in high-fat fed male Wistar rats. Five-month-old male Wistar rats (n=20) were divided into two groups (10 rats in each group). Among the two groups, one group received 30 % high-fat diet (HFD) and another group received 30 % HFD with curcumin (200 mg/kg body weight). Food intake, body weight and biochemical parameters were measured at the beginning and at the end of the study. After 10 weeks, oxidative stress parameters in skeletal muscle and hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG) content were estimated. Histological examinations of the liver samples were performed at the end of the experiment. High-fat feeding caused increase in body weight, liver and adipose tissue mass. Rats fed with HFD showed increased levels of fasting plasma glucose, insulin, Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), total cholesterol (TC), TAG, very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-c) and decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c). There was also increase in the plasma inflammatory markers [tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), C-reactive protein (CRP)] and skeletal muscle oxidative stress parameters [malondialdehyde (MDA), total oxidant status (TOS)] in these rats. In addition, high-fat feeding increased liver TAG content and caused fat accumulation in the liver. Treatment with curcumin significantly reduced body weight, relative organ weights (liver, adipose tissue), glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR. Curcumin supplementation decreased plasma levels of TC, TAG, VLDL-c, TNF-α and increased HDL-c. Administration of curcumin also reduced MDA, TOS in skeletal muscle, hepatic TAG content and liver fat deposition. Curcumin supplementation improved HFD-induced dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation and insulin resistance.

  4. Periodontitis contributes to adipose tissue inflammation through the NF-B, JNK and ERK pathways to promote insulin resistance in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanli; Zeng, Jin; Chen, Guoqing; Xie, Xudong; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the mechanism by which periodontitis affects the inflammatory response and systemic insulin resistance in the white adipose and liver tissues in an obese rat model. The obese model was generated by feeding rats a high fat diet. The periodontitis model was induced by ligatures and injection of "red complex", which consisted of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia, for two weeks. When compared with rats without periodontitis, fasting glucose levels and homeostasis model assessment index were significantly increased in rats with periodontitis, suggesting that periodontitis promotes the development of insulin resistance in obese rats. Gene and protein expression analysis in white adipose and liver tissue revealed that experimental periodontitis stimulated the expression of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factors-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, toll-like receptor 2 and toll-like receptor 4. Signals associated with inflammation and insulin resistance, including nuclear factor- B, c-Jun amino-terminal kinase and extracellular-signal regulated kinase were significantly activated in the white adipose tissue from obese rats with periodontitis compared to obese rats without periodontitis. Taken together, these findings suggest that periodontitis plays an important role in aggravating the development of local white adipose inflammation and systemic insulin resistance in rat models. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Dr Luigi Orlando, Dr Sergio Ceccuzzi, Dr. Armando Sbrana, Europa Metalli, Italy, Dr Albert Scherger, Member of KM Europa Metal AG, Osnabr ck, Germany, Prof. Filippo Menzinger, Scientific Attaché, Permanent Mission of Italy in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr Lyn Evans and Dr Luigi Orlando Photo 04: L. to r.: Dr Lyn Evans, Dr Luigi Orlando, Prof. Luciano Maiani and Prof. Filippo Menzinger Photo 06: L. to r.: Prof. Philippo Menzinger, Dr Armando Sbrana, Prof. Luciano Maiani, Dr Albert Scherger, Dr Lyn Evans, Dr Luigi Orlando, Dr Sergio Ceccuzzi, visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall, SM18

  6. [Effects of linggui zhugan decoction combined calorie restriction on the insulin resistance of model rats and mechanisms research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-yuan; Jin, Ming-hua; Ke, Bin; Li, Su-hua; Shen, Yong-zhi; Zhai, Jia-yu; Chen, Chun-yu; Qin, Jian

    2013-03-01

    To explore the effects of Linggui Zhugan Decoction (LZD) combined calorie restriction on fasting plasma glucose (FPG), the insulin resistance (IR), and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-gamma) of IR model rats. Totally 48 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into the control group, the model group, the calorie restriction group, and the TCM + calorie restriction group, 12 in each group. Ordinary forage was given to those in the control group, and high fat diet was fed to those in the rest 3 groups for 12 weeks to establish the IR model. After successful modeling, rats in the control group and the model group were continually fed with the original farage for 4 days. The normal saline at the daily dose of 20 mL/kg was given to them by gastrogavage. The normal saline at the daily dose of 20 mL/kg was given to rats in the calorie restriction group by gastrogavage after 4-day calorie restriction. LZD at the daily dose of 20 mL/kg was given to rats in the TCM +calorie restriction group by gastrogavage after 4-day calorie restriction. The body weight, FPG, serum fasting insulin (FINS), insulin resistance index (IRI), and the protein expression of PPAR-y in the omental adipose tissue were compared. After 4-day calorie restriction, the body weight obviously decreased in the calorie restriction group and the TCM +calorie restriction group, when compared with the model group (P 0.05). The FINS and IRI obviously decreased in the calorie restriction group (P calorie restriction group (P calorie restriction group and the TCM + calorie restriction group (P calorie restriction group. LZD combined calorie restriction could reduce the body weight, FPG, and IRI of IR rats. Besides, it showed better effects than calorie restriction alone. Its effects in improving IR might be correlated with inhibiting the activities of PPAR-gamma. Meanwhile, it might play a role in inhibiting the differentiation of fat cells.

  7. Low-intensity aerobic exercise training attenuates airway inflammation and remodeling in a rat model of steroid-resistant asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qingwu; Chen, Xi; Feng, Juntao; Qin, Ling; Hu, Chengping

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic exercise can improve symptoms, reduce airway inflammation, and even ameliorate airway remodeling in asthmatic animals and patients. However, previous studies have focused mainly on the effect of aerobic exercise on steroid-sensitive asthma (SSA). The goals of this study were to determine the effect of low-intensity aerobic exercise training on airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in a rat model of steroid-resistant asthma (SRA) and to identify the potential mechanisms underlying these effects. Endotoxin-free ovalbumin with or without lipopolysaccharide were applied to establish rat models of SRA and SSA, respectively. Airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, remodeling, expression of interleukin (IL)-25, IL-33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), and IL-17 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and the role of dexamethasone (DXM) were compared between these two asthmatic rat models. The effect of low-intensity aerobic exercise training and anti-HMGB1 treatment on airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling in SRA rats also was evaluated. SRA rats developed neutrophil-dominated airway inflammation ((29.5±4.1)% of the total cell numbers in BALF), whereas SSA rats developed eosinophil-dominated airway inflammation ((24.0±6.1)% of the total cell numbers in BALF). Compared with SSA rats, SRA rats had more severe airway hyperresponsiveness, lower levels of IL-25 ((33.6±10.3) vs. (104.8±24.9) pg/ml), IL-33 ((87.5±25.0) vs. (226.6±40.7) pg/ml), and TSLP ((1 933.2±899.5) vs. (7 224.0±992.1) pg/ml), and higher levels of HMGB1 ((21.2±4.5) vs. (5.4±1.6) ng/ml) and IL-17 ((780.5±261.7) vs. (291.4±76.4) pg/ml) in BALF (all P exercise training decreased the expression of both HMGB1 ((14.1±2.9) vs. (21.2±4.5) ng/ml in control SRA rats) and IL-17 ((545.3±148.6) vs. (780.5±261.7) pg/ml in control SRA rats) in BALF (all P exercise training attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation

  8. Increased Muscular 5α-Dihydrotestosterone in Response to Resistance Training Relates to Skeletal Muscle Mass and Glucose Metabolism in Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Horii

    Full Text Available Regular resistance exercise induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy and improvement of glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients. Administration of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, a sex steroid hormone precursor, increases 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT synthesis and is associated with improvements in fasting blood glucose level and skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether increase in muscle DHT levels, induced by chronic resistance exercise, can contribute to skeletal muscle hypertrophy and concomitant improvement of muscular glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats. Male 20-week-old type 2 diabetic rats (OLETF were randomly divided into 3 groups: sedentary control, resistance training (3 times a week on alternate days for 8 weeks, or resistance training with continuous infusion of a 5α-reductase inhibitor (n = 8 each group. Age-matched, healthy nondiabetic Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO rats (n = 8 were used as controls. The results indicated that OLETF rats showed significant decrease in muscular DHEA, free testosterone, DHT levels, and protein expression of steroidogenic enzymes, with loss of skeletal muscle mass and hyperglycemia, compared to that of LETO rats. However, 8-week resistance training in OLETF rats significantly increased the levels of muscle sex steroid hormones and protein expression of steroidogenic enzymes with a concomitant increase in skeletal muscle mass, improved fasting glucose level, and insulin sensitivity index. Moreover, resistance training accelerated glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4 translocation and protein kinase B and C-ζ/λ phosphorylation. Administering the 5α-reductase inhibitor in resistance-trained OLETF rats resulted in suppression of the exercise-induced effects on skeletal muscle mass, fasting glucose level, insulin sensitivity index, and GLUT-4 signaling, with a decline in muscular DHT levels. These findings suggest that resistance training

  9. Lipasin/betatrophin is differentially expressed in liver and white adipose tissue without association with insulin resistance in Wistar and Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahová, M; Habart, D; Olejár, T; Berková, Z; Papáčková, Z; Daňková, H; Lodererova, A; Heczková, M; Saudek, F

    2017-05-04

    Lipasin is a recently identified lipokine expressed predominantly in liver and in adipose tissue. It was linked to insulin resistance in mice and to type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1D, T2D) in humans. No metabolic studies concerning lipasin were performed yet in rats. Therefore, we used rat model of T2D and insulin resistance, Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, to determine changes of lipasin expression in liver and in white adipose tissue (WAT) over 52 weeks in the relation to glucose tolerance, peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity and adiposity. GK rats were grossly glucose intolerant since the age of 6 weeks and developed peripheral insulin resistance at the age of 20 weeks. Expression of lipasin in the liver did not differ between GK and Wistar rats, declining with age, and it was not related to hepatic triacylglycerol content. In WAT, the lipasin expression was significantly higher in Wistar rats where it correlated positively with adiposity. No such correlation was found in GK rats. In conclusion, lipasin expression was associated neither with a mild age-related insulin resistance (Wistar), nor with severe genetically-based insulin resistance (GK).

  10. Guava leaf extracts promote glucose metabolism in SHRSP.Z-Leprfa/Izm rats by improving insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiangyu; Yoshitomi, Hisae; Gao, Ming; Qin, Lingling; Duan, Ying; Sun, Wen; Xu, Tunhai; Xie, Peifeng; Zhou, Jingxin; Huang, Liansha; Liu, Tonghua

    2013-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have been associated with insulin-resistance; however, the effective therapies in improving insulin sensitivity are limited. This study is aimed at investigating the effect of Guava Leaf (GL) extracts on glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in SHRSP.Z-Leprfa/Izm rats (SHRSP/ZF), a model of spontaneously metabolic syndrome. Male rats at 7 weeks of age were administered with vehicle water or treated by gavage with 2 g/kg GL extracts daily for six weeks, and their body weights, water and food consumption, glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance were measured. Compared with the controls, treatment with GL extracts did not modulate the amounts of water and food consumption, but significantly reduced the body weights at six weeks post treatment. Treatment with GL extracts did not alter the levels of fasting plasma glucose and insulin, but significantly reduced the levels of plasma glucose at 60 and 120 min post glucose challenge, also reduced the values of AUC and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) at 42 days post treatment. Furthermore, treatment with GL extracts promoted IRS-1, AKT, PI3Kp85 expression, then IRS-1, AMKP, and AKT308, but not AKT473, phosphorylation, accompanied by increasing the ratios of membrane to total Glut 4 expression and adiponectin receptor 1 transcription in the skeletal muscles. These data indicated that GL extracts improved glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in the skeletal muscles of rats by modulating the insulin-related signaling.

  11. In vivo non-thermal irreversible electroporation impact on rat liver galvanic apparent internal resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golberg, A; Laufer, S; Rabinowitch, H D; Rubinsky, B

    2011-01-01

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a biophysical phenomenon which involves application of electric field pulses to cells or tissues, causing certain rearrangements in the membrane structure leading to cell death. The treated tissue ac impedance changes induced by electroporation were shown to be the indicators for NTIRE efficiency. In a previous study we characterized in vitro tissue galvanic apparent internal resistance (GAIR) changes due to NTIRE. Here we describe an in vivo study in which we monitored the GAIR changes of a rat liver treated by NTIRE. Electrical pulses were delivered through the same Zn/Cu electrodes by which GAIR was measured. GAIR was measured before and for 3 h after the treatment at 15 min intervals. The results were compared to the established ac bioimpedance measurement method. A decrease of 33% was measured immediately after the NTIRE treatment and a 40% decrease was measured after 3 h in GAIR values; in the same time 40% and 47% decrease respectively were measured by ac bioimpedance analyses. The temperature increase due to the NTIRE was only 0.5 deg. C. The results open the way for an inexpensive, self-powered in vivo real-time NTIRE effectiveness measurement.

  12. Peculiarities of autonomic regulation assessed by variability of hemodynamic parameters in rats with different stress resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillina, T N; Usacheva, M A; Belkina, L M

    2006-10-01

    Analysis of contribution of sympathetic and parasympathetic systems into heart rate variability carried out using atenolol and atropine showed that August rats are characterized by enhanced tone of the sympathetic system and reduced tone of the parasympathetic system compared to Wistar rats. Reduced tone of the parasympathetic system is also confirmed by lower sensitivity of the baroreflex. Blockade of NO synthesis with Nw-nitro-L-arginine more markedly increased blood pressure variability in August rats compared to Wistar rats. The data attest to a certain rigidity of the autonomic cardiovascular regulation in August rats.

  13. The effects of Jiao-Tai-Wan on sleep, inflammation and insulin resistance in obesity-resistant rats with chronic partial sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xin; Huang, Wenya; Lu, Fuer; Fang, Ke; Wang, Dingkun; Zhao, Shuyong; Jia, Jiming; Xu, Lijun; Wang, Kaifu; Wang, Nan; Dong, Hui

    2017-03-23

    Jiao-Tai-Wan (JTW), composed of Rhizome Coptidis and Cortex Cinnamomi, is a classical traditional Chinese prescription for treating insomnia. Several in vivo studies have concluded that JTW could exert its therapeutical effect in insomnia rats. However, the specific mechanism is still unclear. The present study aimed to explore the effect of JTW on sleep in obesity-resistant (OR) rats with chronic partial sleep deprivation (PSD) and to clarify its possible mechanism. JTW was prepared and the main components contained in the granules were identified by 3D-High Performance Liquid Chromatography (3D-HPLC) assay. The Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats underwent 4 h PSD by environmental noise and the treatment with low and high doses of JTW orally for 4 weeks, respectively. Then sleep structure was analyzed by electroencephalographic (EEG). Inflammation markers including high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were examined in the rat plasma. Meanwhile, metabolic parameters as body weight increase rate, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting insulin (FINS) levels and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) were measured. The expressions of clock gene cryptochromes (Cry1 and Cry2) and inflammation gene nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in peripheral blood monocyte cells (PBMC) were also determined. The result showed that the administration of JTW significantly increased total sleep time and total slow wave sleep (SWS) time in OR rats with PSD. Furthermore, the treatment with JTW reversed the increase in the markers of systemic inflammation and insulin resistance caused by sleep loss. These changes were also associated with the up-regulation of Cry1 mRNA and Cry 2 mRNA and the down-regulation of NF-κB mRNA expression in PBMC. This study suggests that JTW has the beneficial effects of improving sleep, inflammation and insulin sensitivity. The mechanism appears to be related to the modulation of circadian clock and

  14. Tribute to Dr Jacques Rogge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourgois, Jan G; Dumortier, Jasmien; Callewaert, Margot

    2017-01-01

    'A tribute to Dr J. Rogge' aims to systematically review muscle activity and muscle fatigue during sustained submaximal quasi-isometric knee extension exercise (hiking) related to Olympic dinghy sailing as a tribute to Dr Rogge's merits in the world of sports. Dr Jacques Rogge is not only...... of invasive needle electromyography (EMG) during a specific sailing technique (hiking) on a self-constructed sailing ergometer. Hiking is a bilateral and multi-joint submaximal quasi-isometric movement which dinghy sailors use to optimize boat speed and to prevent the boat from capsizing. Large stresses...... are generated in the anterior muscles that cross the knee and hip joint, mainly employing the quadriceps at an intensity of 30-40% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), sometimes exceeding 100% MVC. Better sailing level is partially determined by a lower rate of neuromuscular fatigue during hiking and for ≈60...

  15. Low fish oil intake improves insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and muscle metabolism on insulin resistant MSG-obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Ricardo K; Brito, Gleisson A P; Coelho, Isabela; Pequitto, Danielle C T; Yamaguchi, Adriana A; Borghetti, Gina; Schiessel, Dalton Luiz; Kryczyk, Marcelo; Machado, Juliano; Rocha, Ricelli E R; Aikawa, Julia; Iagher, Fabiola; Naliwaiko, Katya; Tanhoffer, Ricardo A; Nunes, Everson A; Fernandes, Luiz Claudio

    2011-04-28

    Obesity is commonly associated with diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a lower dose of fish oil supplementation on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, and muscle metabolism in obese rats. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) (4 mg/g body weight) was injected in neonatal Wistar male rats. Three-month-old rats were divided in normal-weight control group (C), coconut fat-treated normal weight group (CO), fish oil-treated normal weight group (FO), obese control group (Ob), coconut fat-treated obese group (ObCO) and fish oil-treated obese group (ObFO). Obese insulin-resistant rats were supplemented with fish oil or coconut fat (1 g/kg/day) for 4 weeks. Insulin sensitivity, fasting blood biochemicals parameters, and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism were analyzed. Obese animals (Ob) presented higher Index Lee and 2.5 fold epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue than C. Insulin sensitivity test (Kitt) showed that fish oil supplementation was able to maintain insulin sensitivity of obese rats (ObFO) similar to C. There were no changes in glucose and HDL-cholesterol levels amongst groups. Yet, ObFO revealed lower levels of total cholesterol (TC; 30%) and triacylglycerol (TG; 33%) compared to Ob. Finally, since exposed to insulin, ObFO skeletal muscle revealed an increase of 10% in lactate production, 38% in glycogen synthesis and 39% in oxidation of glucose compared to Ob. Low dose of fish oil supplementation (1 g/kg/day) was able to reduce TC and TG levels, in addition to improved systemic and muscle insulin sensitivity. These results lend credence to the benefits of n-3 fatty acids upon the deleterious effects of insulin resistance mechanisms.

  16. Low fish oil intake improves insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and muscle metabolism on insulin resistant MSG-obese rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iagher Fabiola

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is commonly associated with diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a lower dose of fish oil supplementation on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, and muscle metabolism in obese rats. Methods Monosodium glutamate (MSG (4 mg/g body weight was injected in neonatal Wistar male rats. Three-month-old rats were divided in normal-weight control group (C, coconut fat-treated normal weight group (CO, fish oil-treated normal weight group (FO, obese control group (Ob, coconut fat-treated obese group (ObCO and fish oil-treated obese group (ObFO. Obese insulin-resistant rats were supplemented with fish oil or coconut fat (1 g/kg/day for 4 weeks. Insulin sensitivity, fasting blood biochemicals parameters, and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism were analyzed. Results Obese animals (Ob presented higher Index Lee and 2.5 fold epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue than C. Insulin sensitivity test (Kitt showed that fish oil supplementation was able to maintain insulin sensitivity of obese rats (ObFO similar to C. There were no changes in glucose and HDL-cholesterol levels amongst groups. Yet, ObFO revealed lower levels of total cholesterol (TC; 30% and triacylglycerol (TG; 33% compared to Ob. Finally, since exposed to insulin, ObFO skeletal muscle revealed an increase of 10% in lactate production, 38% in glycogen synthesis and 39% in oxidation of glucose compared to Ob. Conclusions Low dose of fish oil supplementation (1 g/kg/day was able to reduce TC and TG levels, in addition to improved systemic and muscle insulin sensitivity. These results lend credence to the benefits of n-3 fatty acids upon the deleterious effects of insulin resistance mechanisms.

  17. Effects of metformin on learning and memory behaviors and brain mitochondrial functions in high fat diet induced insulin resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintana, Hiranya; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2012-10-05

    Metformin is a first line drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Our previous study reported that high-fat diet (HFD) consumption caused not only peripheral and neuronal insulin resistance, but also induced brain mitochondrial dysfunction as well as learning impairment. However, the effects of metformin on learning behavior and brain mitochondrial functions in HFD-induced insulin resistant rats have never been investigated. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were divided into two groups to receive either a normal diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 12weeks. Then, rats in each group were divided into two treatment groups to receive either vehicle or metformin (15mg/kg BW twice daily) for 21days. All rats were tested for cognitive behaviors using the Morris water maze (MWM) test, and blood samples were collected for the determination of glucose, insulin, and malondialdehyde. At the end of the study, animals were euthanized and the brain was removed for studying brain mitochondrial function and brain oxidative stress. We found that in the HFD group, metformin significantly attenuated the insulin resistant condition by improving metabolic parameters, decreasing peripheral and brain oxidative stress levels, and improving learning behavior, compared to the vehicle-treated group. Furthermore, metformin completely prevented brain mitochondrial dysfunction caused by long-term HFD consumption. Our findings suggest that metformin effectively improves peripheral insulin sensitivity, prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction, and completely restores learning behavior, which were all impaired by long-term HFD consumption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Insufficient renal 1-alpha hydroxylase and bone homeostasis in aged rats with insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang-Quan, Huang; Bi-Rong, Dong; Ping, He; Zhen-Chan, Lu

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationship between insufficient renal 1-alpha hydroxylase (IRH) and bone homeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or insulin resistance (IR) and to investigate whether IR plays a major role in the pathogenesis of both IRH and bone loss in T2DM. The experimental animal models of T2DM, IR, IR treated with vitamin D (VD), IR treated with 1-alpha hydroxyvitamin D (1alpha(OH) D, the product of renal 1-alpha hydroxylase), T2DM treated with VD, and T2DM treated with 1alpha(OH) D were established on 18-month-old male Wistar rats. For rats in each animal model and normal control rats, IR was detected by euglycemic insulin clamp technique (EICT) and glucose infusion rate (GIR, an index of IR) was calculated. Levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and serum active vitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D) were determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA), and 1,25(OH)(2)D/25(OH)D ratio (1,25-25-R, an index of renal 1-alpha hydroxylase activity in vivo) was calculated; and bone mineral density (BMD) in femoral bone and lumbar vertebrae was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorption (DEXA). No significant difference was observed among the levels of 25(OH)D in all the rats. In IR rats, 1,25(OH)(2)D level, 1,25-25-R, and BMD level were significantly higher than those in T2DM rats and were lower than those in normal control rats. In the aged rats with T2DM or IR, administration of VD had no effect on 25(OH)D level, 1,25(OH)(2)D level, 1,25-25-R, and BMD level. Administration of 1alpha(OH) D had also no effect on 25(OH)D level but increased 1,25(OH)(2)D level, 1,25-25-R, and BMD level. For the aged rats with T2DM or IR, GIR positively correlated with both levels of 1,25(OH)(2)D and BMD, and 1,25-25-R positively and significantly correlated with levels of BMD. In T2DM or IR, IRH is a precipitating factor for bone loss. IR seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of both IRH and bone loss in T2DM.

  19. Can an aversive, extinction-resistant memory trigger impairments in walking adaptability? An experimental study using adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Filipe Mello; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Baptista, Pedro Porto Alegre; Neves, Laura Tartari; Martins, Lucas Athaydes; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; Izquierdo, Iván; Xavier, Léder Leal; Hollands, Kristen; Mestriner, Régis Gemerasca

    2018-02-05

    Cognitive demands can influence the adaptation of walking, a crucial skill to maintain body stability and prevent falls. Whilst previous research has shown emotional load tunes goal-directed movements, little attention has been given to this finding. This study sought to assess the effects of suffering an extinction-resistant memory on skilled walking performance in adult rats, as an indicator of walking adaptability. Thus, 36 Wistar rats were divided in a two-part experiment. In the first part (n=16), the aversive, extinction-resistance memory paradigm was established using a fear-conditioning chamber. In the second, rats (n=20) were assessed in a neutral room using the ladder rung walking test before and tree days after inducing an extinction-resistance memory. In addition, the elevated plus-maze test was used to control the influence of the anxiety-like status on gait adaptability. Our results revealed the shock group exhibited worse walking adaptability (lower skilled walking score), when compared to the sham group. Moreover, the immobility time in the ladder rung walking test was similar to the controls, suggesting that gait adaptability performance was not a consequence of the fear generalization. No anxiety-like behavior was observed in the plus maze test. Finally, correlation coefficients also showed the skilled walking performance score was positively correlated with the number of gait cycles and trial time in the ladder rung walking test and the total crossings in the plus maze. Overall, these preliminary findings provide evidence to hypothesize an aversive, extinction-resistant experience might change the emotional load, affecting the ability to adapt walking. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Differential effect of amylin on endothelial-dependent vasodilation in mesenteric arteries from control and insulin resistant rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam El Assar

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance (IR is frequently associated with endothelial dysfunction and has been proposed to play a major role in cardiovascular disease (CVD. On the other hand, amylin has long been related to IR. However the role of amylin in the vascular dysfunction associated to IR is not well addressed. Therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the effect of acute treatment with amylin on endothelium-dependent vasodilation of isolated mesenteric arteries from control (CR and insulin resistant (IRR rats and to evaluate the possible mechanisms involved. Five week-old male Wistar rats received 20% D-fructose dissolved in drinking water for 8 weeks and were compared with age-matched CR. Plasmatic levels of glucose, insulin and amylin were measured. Mesenteric microvessels were dissected and mounted in wire myographs to evaluate endothelium-dependent vasodilation to acetylcholine. IRR displayed a significant increase in plasmatic levels of glucose, insulin and amylin and reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation when compared to CR. Acute treatment of mesenteric arteries with r-amylin (40 pM deteriorated endothelium-dependent responses in CR. Amylin-induced reduction of endothelial responses was unaffected by the H2O2 scavenger, catalase, but was prevented by the extracellular superoxide scavenger, superoxide dismutase (SOD or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor (VAS2870. By opposite, amylin failed to further inhibit the impaired relaxation in mesenteric arteries of IRR. SOD, or VAS2870, but not catalase, ameliorated the impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation in IRR. At concentrations present in insulin resistance conditions, amylin impairs endothelium-dependent vasodilation in mircrovessels from rats with preserved vascular function and low levels of endogenous amylin. In IRR with established endothelial dysfunction and elevated levels of amylin, additional exposure to this peptide has no effect on endothelial vasodilation. Increased superoxide

  1. Bone mineral density and content during weight cycling in female rats: effects of dietary amylase-resistant starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagpal Sugeet

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although there is considerable evidence for a loss of bone mass with weight loss, the few human studies on the relationship between weight cycling and bone mass or density have differing results. Further, very few studies assessed the role of dietary composition on bone mass during weight cycling. The primary objective of this study was to determine if a diet high in amylase-resistant starch (RS2, which has been shown to increase absorption and balance of dietary minerals, can prevent or reduce loss of bone mass during weight cycling. Methods Female Sprague-Dawley (SD rats (n = 84, age = 20 weeks were randomly assigned to one of 6 treatment groups with 14 rats per group using a 2 × 3 experimental design with 2 diets and 3 weight cycling protocols. Rats were fed calcium-deficient diets without RS2 (controls or diets high in RS2 (18% by weight throughout the 21-week study. The weight cycling protocols were weight maintenance/gain with no weight cycling, 1 round of weight cycling, or 2 rounds of weight cycling. After the rats were euthanized bone mineral density (BMD and bone mineral content (BMC of femur were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and concentrations of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, and zinc in femur and lumbar vertebrae were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results Rats undergoing weight cycling had lower femur BMC (p 2 had higher femur BMD (p 2-fed rats also had higher femur calcium (p Conclusion Weight cycling reduces bone mass. A diet high in RS2 can minimize loss of bone mass during weight cycling and may increase bone mass in the absence of weight cycling.

  2. Lipid metabolism disturbances contribute to insulin resistance and decrease insulin sensitivity by malathion exposure in Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasram, Mohamed Montassar; Bouzid, Kahena; Douib, Ines Bini; Annabi, Alya; El Elj, Naziha; El Fazaa, Saloua; Abdelmoula, Jaouida; Gharbi, Najoua

    2015-04-01

    Several studies showed that organophosphorus pesticides disturb glucose homeostasis and can increase incidence of metabolic disorders and diabetes via insulin resistance. The current study investigates the influence of malathion on glucose metabolism regulation, in vivo, during subchronic exposure. Malathion was administered orally (200 mg/kg), once a day for 28 consecutive days. Plasma glucose, insulin and Glycated hemoglobin levels were significantly increased while hepatic glycogen content was decreased in intoxicated animals compared with the control group. Furthermore, there was a significant disturbance of lipid content in subchronic treated and post-treated rats deprived of malathion for one month. In addition, we used the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) to assess insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and pancreatic β-cell function (HOMA-β). Our results show that malathion increases insulin resistance biomarkers and decreases insulin sensitivity indices. Statistical analysis demonstrates that there was a positive and strong significant correlation between insulin level and insulin resistance indices, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β. Similarly, a negative and significant correlation was also found between insulin level and insulin sensitivity indices. For the first time, we demonstrate that malathion induces insulin resistance in vivo using homeostasis model assessment and these changes were detectable one month after the end of exposure. To explain insulin resistance induced by malathion we focus on lipid metabolism disturbances and their interaction with many proteins involved in insulin signaling pathways.

  3. Antidiabetic Effect of Hydroalcholic Urtica dioica Leaf Extract in Male Rats with Fructose-Induced Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Ahangarpour

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urtica dioica has been used as antihypertensive, antihyperlipidemic and antidiabetic herbal medicine. The purpose of this study was to study the effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Urtica dioica on fructose-induced insulin resistance rats. Methods: Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups including control, fructose, extract 50, extract 100 and extract 200. The control rat received vehicle, the fructose and extract groups received fructose 10% for eight weeks. The extract groups received single daily injection of vehicle, 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg/day for the two weeks. Blood glucose, insulin, last fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI, serum triglyceride (TG, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, alanin trasaminase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP, leptin and LDL/HDL ratio were determined.Results: Compared to control group, daily administration of fructose was associated with significant increase in FIRI, blood glucose and insulin, significant decrease in lepin, and no significant change in TG, HDL, LDL, LDL/HDL ratio, VLDL, ALT, and ALP. The extract significantly decreased serum glucose, insulin, LDL and leptin, and LDL/HDL ratio and FIRI. It also significantly increased serum TG, VLDL, and AST, but did not change serum ALP.Conclusion: We suggest that Urtica dioica extract, by decreasing serum glucose, and FIRI, may be useful to improve type 2 diabetes mellitus. Also, by positive effect on lipid profile and by decreasing effect on leptin, it may improve metabolic syndrome.

  4. Antidiabetic Effect of Hydroalcholic Urtica dioica Leaf Extract in Male Rats with Fructose-Induced Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Mohammadian, Maryam; Dianat, Mahin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Urtica dioica has been used as antihypertensive, antihyperlipidemic and antidiabetic herbal medicine. The purpose of this study was to study the effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Urtica dioica on fructose-induced insulin resistance rats. Methods: Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups including control, fructose, extract 50, extract 100 and extract 200. The control rat received vehicle, the fructose and extract groups received fructose 10% for eight weeks. The extract groups received single daily injection of vehicle, 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg/day for the two weeks. Blood glucose, insulin, last fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI), serum triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), alanin trasaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), leptin and LDL/HDL ratio were determined. Results: Compared to control group, daily administration of fructose was associated with significant increase in FIRI, blood glucose and insulin, significant decrease in lepin, and no significant change in TG, HDL, LDL, LDL/HDL ratio, VLDL, ALT, and ALP. The extract significantly decreased serum glucose, insulin, LDL and leptin, and LDL/HDL ratio and FIRI. It also significantly increased serum TG, VLDL, and AST, but did not change serum ALP. Conclusion: We suggest that Urtica dioica extract, by decreasing serum glucose, and FIRI, may be useful to improve type 2 diabetes mellitus. Also, by positive effect on lipid profile and by decreasing effect on leptin, it may improve metabolic syndrome. PMID:23115450

  5. Whey protein precludes lipid and protein oxidation and improves body weight gain in resistance-exercised rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Fabiano Kenji; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Neves, Leandro Xavier; dos Santos, Rinaldo Cardoso; Pedrosa, Maria Lúcia

    2011-08-01

    Resistance exercise such as weight-lifting (WL) increases oxidation products in plasma, but less is known regarding the effect of WL on oxidative damage to tissues. Dietary compounds are known to improve antioxidant defences. Whey protein (WP) is a source of protein in a variety of sport supplements and can enhance physical performance. To evaluate the effect of WL on biomarkers of lipid and protein oxidation, on liver antioxidants and on muscle growth in the absence or presence of WP in rats. Thirty-two male Fisher rats were randomly assigned to sedentary or exercise-trained groups and were fed with control or WP diets. The WL programme consisted of inducing the animals to perform sets of jumps with weights attached to the chest. After 8 weeks, arteriovenous blood samples, abdominal fat, liver and gastrocnemius muscle were collected for analysis. WP precludes WL-mediated increases in muscle protein carbonyl content and maintains low levels of TBARS in exercised and sedentary animals. WL reduced liver CAT activity, whereas WP increased hepatic glutathione content. In addition, WL plus WP generated higher body and muscle weight than exercise without WP. These data suggest that WP improves antioxidant defences, which contribute to the reduction of lipid and protein oxidation as well as body and muscle weight gain in resistance-exercised rats.

  6. Effect of L-arginine supplementation on insulin resistance and serum adiponectin concentration in rats with fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miczke, Anna; Suliburska, Joanna; Pupek-Musialik, Danuta; Ostrowska, Lucyna; Jabłecka, Anna; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Skrypnik, Damian; Bogdański, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether supplementation with L-arginine, a substrate used in the production of nitric oxide, had an effect on adiponectin concentration in rats fed a high-fat diet. The influence of L-arginine on insulin resistance was also evaluated. The experiment was performed using 36 Wistar rats divided into three groups: group 1 was fed a standard diet, group 2 a high-fat (HF) diet, group 3 a HF diet supplemented with L-arginine. After 42 days, serum levels of lipids, glucose, insulin, NO, and adiponectin were measured. Insulin resistance (IR) was estimated by the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA). Body mass was equal in all 3 groups, at the beginning as well as at the end of the study, however, in group 2 the amount of visceral fat was greater after 42 days. In group 3, there was a tendency for visceral fat to decrease. An increase in cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin and HOMA-IR, as well as a decrease in NO and adiponectin were seen in group 2, while in group 3, L-arginine supplementation ameliorated these disturbances. Our study shows that L-arginine supplementation in rats fed a HF diet is associated with an increase in insulin sensitivity. Our findings suggest that the underlying mechanism could be at least partially related to an increase in adiponectin concentration.

  7. Changes in tetrodotoxin-resistant C-fibre activity during fatiguing isometric contractions in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Kalezic

    Full Text Available It is by now well established that tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R afferent fibres from muscle in the rat exhibit a multisensitive profile, including nociception. TTX-R afferent fibres play an important role in motor control, via spinal and supraspinal loops, but their activation and function during muscle exercise and fatigue are still unknown. Therefore, the specific effect of isometric fatiguing muscle contraction on the responsiveness of TTX-R C-fibres has been investigated in this study. To quantify the TTX-R afferent input we recorded the cord dorsum potential (CDP, which is the result of the electrical fields set up within the spinal cord by the depolarisation of the interneurons located in the dorsal horn, activated by an incoming volley of TTX-R muscle afferents. The changes in TTX-R CDP size before, during and after fatiguing electrical stimulation of the gastrocnemius-soleus (GS muscle have been taken as a measure of TTX-R C-unit activation. At the end of the fatiguing protocol, following an exponential drop in force, TTX-R CDP area decreased in the majority of trials (9/14 to 0.75 ± 0.03% (mean ± SEM of the pre-fatigue value. Recovery to the control size of the TTX-R CDP was incomplete after 10 min. Furthermore, fatiguing trials could sensitise a fraction of the TTX-R C-fibres responding to muscle pinch. The results suggest a long-lasting activation of the TTX-R muscle afferents after fatiguing stimulation. The role of this behaviour in chronic muscle fatigue in connection with pain development is discussed. Accumulation of metabolites released into the interstitium during fatiguing stimulation might be one of the reasons underlying the C-fibres' long-lasting activation.

  8. Anand Kumar, Dr Trichnopoly Chelvaraj

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1981 Section: Animal Sciences. Anand Kumar, Dr Trichnopoly Chelvaraj Ph.D. (Rajasthan), D.Sc. (Mumbai). Date of birth: 18 June 1936. Date of death: 26 January 2010. Specialization: Human Reproduction Last known address: Chairman, Hope Infertility Clinic & Research Foundation, 33/1, Aga Abbas Ali Road, ...

  9. Dr. John Marburger visits DESY

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Dr. John Marburger, Director of the United States Office of Science and Technology Policy, visited the research center DESY in Hamburg. The American physicist wanted to inform himself about the status of the TESLA X-ray laser and the TESLA linear collider as well as the international collaboration at DESY (1/2 page).

  10. Beig, Dr Gufran-Ullah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2009 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Beig, Dr Gufran-Ullah Ph.D. Ahmedabad. Date of birth: 24 May 1961. Specialization: Atmospheric Sciences, Global Change & Atmospheric Environment, Urban Air Pollution & Chemical-Climate Change, 2-D & 3-D Atmospheric Chemical Transport Modelling

  11. Murty, Dr Thutupalli Gopala Krishna

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2002 Section: Engineering & Technology. Murty, Dr Thutupalli Gopala Krishna Ph.D. (Adelaide). Date of birth: 11 February 1944. Specialization: Optical Engineering, Thin Film Technology, Electro-Optical Instrumentation and Atmospheric Science Technologies Address: 848, 8th B Main, 17th Cross, ISRO Layout, ...

  12. Rao, Dr Kanury Venkata Subba

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rao, Dr Kanury Venkata Subba Ph.D. (Baroda), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 27 September 1958. Specialization: Synthetic Peptides, Cell Signalling, Biology of Tuberculosis Infection, Systems Biology Address: Head, DDRC, Translational Health Science & Technbology Institute, NCR Biotech, Science Cluster, Faridabad 121 ...

  13. Ali, Dr Moizuddin Abdul Salim

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Section: Animal Sciences. Ali, Dr Moizuddin Abdul Salim D.Sc. (Andhra), D.Sc. (h.c.), FNA. Date of birth: 12 November 1896. Date of death: 20 June 1987. Specialization: Ecology, Zoogeography, Nature Conservation, Ornithology Last known address: No. 46, Pali Hill, Bombay 400 050. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  14. Profile Interview: Dr. Sufia Dadabhai

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fanuel Bickton (FB), an. MMJ intern, speaks with Dr. Sufia Dadabhai (SD) on her personal and professional background, her position as the current Director of the. Johns Hopkins Research. Project (JHP) in Malawi, the cutting-edge HIV-related studies JHP is currently undertaking, and specifically how the Project is ...

  15. Raghava, Dr Gajendra Pal Singh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raghava, Dr Gajendra Pal Singh Ph.D. (Chandigarh), FNASc. Date of birth: 25 May 1963. Specialization: Bioinformatics, Cancer Genomics, Immunoinformatics, Drug Design, Subunit Vaccine Design Address: Head, Centre for Computational Biology, Indraprastha Institute of Information Technology, Okhla, Phase 3, New ...

  16. Repeated Dose 90-Day Feeding Study of Whole Fruits of Genetically Modified Papaya Resistant to Papaya Ringspot Virus in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Tang; Yen, Gow-Chin; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wu, Jhaol-Huei; Yeh, Shyi-Dong; Cheng, Ying-Huey; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Liao, Jiunn-Wang

    2015-02-04

    Genetically modified (GM) papaya plants resistant to infection by Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) have been successfully generated by cloning the coat protein (CP) gene of PRSV to increase fruit production. In this study, the GM papaya line 823-2210 was used to conduct a 90-day feeding toxicity study and compared to its parent plant of non-GM papaya, Tainung-2 (TN-2) based on the experimental guidance reported by the European Food Safety Authority.1 Ten male and 10 female Sprague-Dawley albino rats were gavaged at low (1 g/kg bw) and high (2 g/kg bw) doses of non-GM and GM lyophilized papaya fruits for 90 days. Hematology, coagulation, biochemistry, urinalysis, and pathology were examined in all animals. Although some differences were found in feed consumption, hematology, and serum chemistry examinations between non-GM and GM papaya, the results were within historical control values and not considered biologically significant in rats. In addition, there were no treatment-related gross or microscopic lesions in male or female rats attributable to the non-GM or GM papaya fruit. This 90-day feeding study of GM papaya fruit did not reveal adverse effects in rats and indicates that GM papaya fruits may be substantially equivalent to their non-GM parent plants.

  17. Four Cases of Spontaneous Neoplasia in the Naked Mole-Rat (Heterocephalus glaber), A Putative Cancer-Resistant Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kyle R; Milone, Nicholas A; Rodriguez, Carlos E

    2017-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is widely acclaimed to be cancer-resistant and of considerable research interest based on a paucity of reports of neoplasia in this species. We have, however, encountered four spontaneous cases of neoplasia and one presumptive case of neoplasia through routine necropsy and biopsy of individuals in a zoo collection of nonhybrid naked mole-rats bred from a single pair. One case each of metastasizing hepatocellular carcinoma, nephroblastoma (Wilms' tumor), and multicentric lymphosarcoma, as well as presumptive esophageal adenocarcinoma (Barrett's esophagus-like) was identified postmortem among 37 nonautolyzed necropsy submissions of naked mole-rats over 1-year-old that were submitted for necropsy between 1998 and August 2015. One incidental case of cutaneous hemangioma was also identified antemortem by skin biopsy from one naked mole-rat examined for trauma. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The effect of N-stearoylethanolamine on liver phospholipid composition of rats with insulin resistance caused by alimentary obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Onopchenko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We used alimentary obesity-induced insulin resistance (IR model in rats to investigate the influence of N-stearoylethanolamine on the content of phospholipids and their fatty acid composition. Our results show that prolonged high-fat diet triggers considerable aberrations in the composition of main phospholipids in the liver and can be one of the causes of IR in rats. In particular, the increase of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and significant decrease of other phospholipids: lysophosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and diphosphaglicerol were observed. The levels of monounsaturated (erucic, nervonic, oleic and polyunsaturated (eicosatrienoic, docosatrienoic, arachidonic fatty acids were increased; meanwhile the content of diunsaturated acids was decreased. The NSE administration (50 mg/kg of body weight caused restoration of the phospholipids content in the liver of rats with diet-induced IR that highly correlated with the decrease in plasma insulin level and the improvement of insulin sensitivity. Moreover, the effect of NSE was accompanied by the normalization of fatty acids composition of phospholipids that could be related to modulating influen­ce of NSE on the activity of the main fatty acid desaturases. It is known that the imbalance in phospholipid composition of the rat liver causes substantial metabolic alterations that are associated with the development of IR. Accordingly, the compensations of the imbalance by NSE can help to restore insulin sensitivity, inhibit the development of obesity, IR and type 2 diabetes.

  19. N-acetylcysteine Counteracts Adipose Tissue Macrophage Infiltration and Insulin Resistance Elicited by Advanced Glycated Albumin in Healthy Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolline S. da Silva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Advanced glycation endproducts elicit inflammation. However, their role in adipocyte macrophage infiltration and in the development of insulin resistance, especially in the absence of the deleterious biochemical pathways that coexist in diabetes mellitus, remains unknown. We investigated the effect of chronic administration of advanced glycated albumin (AGE-albumin in healthy rats, associated or not with N-acetylcysteine (NAC treatment, on insulin sensitivity, adipose tissue transcriptome and macrophage infiltration and polarization.Methods: Male Wistar rats were intraperitoneally injected with control (C or AGE-albumin alone, or, together with NAC in the drinking water. Biochemical parameters, lipid peroxidation, gene expression and protein contents were, respectively, determined by enzymatic techniques, reactive thiobarbituric acid substances, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry or immunoblot. Carboxymethyllysine (CML and pyrraline (PYR were determined by LC/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and ELISA.Results: CML and PYR were higher in AGE-albumin as compared to C. Food consumption, body weight, systolic blood pressure, plasma lipids, glucose, hepatic and renal function, adipose tissue relative weight and adipocyte number were similar among groups. In AGE-treated animals, insulin resistance, adipose macrophage infiltration and Col12a1 mRNA were increased with no changes in M1 and M2 phenotypes as compared to C-albumin-treated rats. Total GLUT4 content was reduced by AGE-albumin as compared to C-albumin. NAC improved insulin sensitivity, reduced urine TBARS, adipose macrophage number and Itgam and Mrc mRNA and increased Slc2a4 and Ppara. CD11b, CD206, Ager, Ddost, Cd36, Nfkb1, Il6, Tnf, Adipoq, Retn, Arg, and Il12 expressions were similar among groups.Conclusions: AGE-albumin sensitizes adipose tissue to inflammation due to macrophage infiltration and reduces GLUT4, contributing to insulin resistance in healthy rats. NAC antagonizes AGE

  20. Value of HLA-DR genotype in systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhili; Zhang, Pingan; Tong, Yongqing

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 allele polymorphisms have been reported to be associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility, but the results of these previous studies have been inconsistent. The purpose of the present study was to systematically summarize and explore whether specific HLA-DRB1 alleles confer susceptibility or resistance to SLE and lupus nephritis. This review was guided by the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) approach. A comprehensive search was made for articles from PubMed, Medline, Elsevier Science, Springer Link and Cochrane Library database. A total of 25 case-control studies on the relationship between gene polymorphism of HLA-DRB l and SLE were performed and data were analyzed and processed using Review Manager 5.2 and Stata 11.0. At the allelic level, HLA-DR4, DR11 and DR14 were identified as protective factors for SLE (0.79 [0.69,0.91], P  0.05). DR4 and 11 (OR, 0.55 [0.39, 0.79], P  0.05; 0.90 [0.64, 1.27], P > 0.05; 0.61 [0.36, 1.03], P > 0.05, respectively) were not statistically significant between the lupus nephritis and control groups. The HLA-DR4, DR11, DR14 alleles might be protective factors for SLE and HLA-DR3, DR9, DR15 were potent risk factors. In addition, HLA-DR4 and DR11 alleles might be protective factors for lupus nephritis and DR3 and DR15 suggest a risk role. These results proved that HLA-DR3, DR15, DR4 and DR11 might be identified as predictors for lupus nephritis and SLE. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Leptin receptor blockade reduces intrahepatic vascular resistance and portal pressure in an experimental model of rat liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, María Gabriela; Gracia-Sancho, Jordi; Marrone, Giusi; Rodríguez-Vilarrupla, Aina; Deulofeu, Ramon; Abraldes, Juan G; Bosch, Jaume; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos

    2013-10-01

    Increased hepatic vascular resistance mainly due to elevated vascular tone and to fibrosis is the primary factor in the development of portal hypertension in cirrhosis. Leptin, a hormone associated with reduction in nitric oxide bioavailability, vascular dysfunction, and liver fibrosis, is increased in patients with cirrhosis. We aimed at evaluating whether leptin influences the increased hepatic resistance in portal hypertension. CCl4-cirrhotic rats received the leptin receptor-blocker ObR antibody, or its vehicle, every other day for 1 wk. Hepatic and systemic hemodynamics were measured in both groups. Hepatic nitric oxide production and bioavailability, together with oxidative stress, nitrotyrosinated proteins, and liver fibrosis, were evaluated. In cirrhotic rats, leptin-receptor blockade significantly reduced portal pressure without modifying portal blood flow, suggesting a reduction in the intrahepatic resistance. Portal pressure reduction was associated with increased nitric oxide bioavailability and with decreased O2(-) levels and nitrotyrosinated proteins. No changes in systemic hemodynamics and liver fibrosis were observed. In conclusion, the present study shows that blockade of the leptin signaling pathway in cirrhosis significantly reduces portal pressure. This effect is probably due to a nitric oxide-mediated reduction in the hepatic vascular tone.

  2. Modulation of Steroidogenic Pathway in Rat Granulosa Cells with Subclinical Cd Exposure and Insulin Resistance: An Impact on Female Fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muskaan Belani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in lifestyle lead to insulin resistance (IR in females ultimately predisposing them towards infertility. In addition, cadmium (Cd, an environmental endocrine disruptor, is reported for detrimental effects on granulosa cells, thus leading to ovarian dysfunction. A combination of these factors, lifestyle and environment, seems to play a role in etiology of idiopathic infertility that accounts for 50% amongst the total infertility cases. To address this issue, we made an attempt to investigate the extent of Cd impact on insulin-resistant (IR granulosa cells. We exposed adult female Charles Foster rats to dexamethasone and confirmed IR condition by fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI. On treatment of IR rats with Cd, the preliminary studies demonstrated prolonged estrous cyclicity, decrease in serum estradiol concentrations, abnormal histology of ovary, and increased granulosa cell death. Further gene and protein expression studies of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD, and cytochrome P450 aromatase (CYP19A1 were performed. Protein expression studies demonstrated significant decrease in treated groups when compared with control. Study revealed that, in spite of the molecular parameters being affected at varied level, overall ovarian physiology is maximally affected in IR and Cd coexposed group, thus mimicking the condition similar to those prevailing in infertile females.

  3. GLUT4 content decreases along with insulin resistance and high levels of inflammatory markers in rats with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leguisamo Natalia M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome is characterized by insulin resistance, which is closely related to GLUT4 content in insulin-sensitive tissues. Thus, we evaluated the GLUT4 expression, insulin resistance and inflammation, characteristics of the metabolic syndrome, in an experimental model. Methods Spontaneously hypertensive neonate rats (18/group were treated with monosodium glutamate (MetS during 9 days, and compared with Wistar-Kyoto (C and saline-treated SHR (H. Blood pressure (BP and lipid levels, C-reactive protein (CRP, interleukin 6 (IL-6, TNF-α and adiponectin were evaluated. GLUT4 protein was analysed in the heart, white adipose tissue and gastrocnemius. Studies were performed at 3 (3-mo, 6 (6-mo and 9 (9-mo months of age. Results MetS rats were more insulin resistant (pvs H, but adiponectin was lower in MetS at 9 months (MetS: 32 ± 2, H: 42 ± 2, C: 45 ± 2 pg/mL; p Conclusions MSG-treated SHR presented all metabolic syndrome characteristics, as well as reduced GLUT4 content, which must play a key role in the impaired glycemic homeostasis of the metabolic syndrome.

  4. Effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids high fat diet intervention on the synthesis of hepatic high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in obesity-insulin resistance rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianxing; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Shuang; Li, Wei; Ma, Lanzhi; Ding, Ming; Liu, Yuan

    2016-04-22

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have previously been demonstrated in association with a reduced risk of chronic diseases, including insulin resistance, cancer and cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of n-3 PUFA-rich perilla oil (PO) and fish oil (FO) high fat diet intervention against the synthesis of hepatic high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) in obesity-insulin resistance model rats. In the modeling period, the male SD rats were randomly divided into 2 groups. The rats in the high fat (HF) group were given a high fat pure diet containing 20.62% lard. In the intervention period, the model rats were intervened with purified high-fat diets rich in PO or FO, containing same energy content with high fat pure diet in HF. After the intervention, the protein and mRNA expressions status of the key genes involved in synthesis of hepatic HDL-c were measured for further analytic comparison. The obesity-insulin resistance model rats were characterized by surprisingly high levels of serum triglyceride (TG) and increased body weight (P intervention, there were no apparent changes in the serum HDL-c and total cholesterol (TCH). In addition, the FO could up-regulate the hepatic adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mRNA (P obesity-insulin resistance rats.

  5. Assessment of insulin resistance in fructose-fed rats with 125I-6-deoxy-6-iodo-D-glucose, a new tracer of glucose transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perret, Pascale; Slimani, Lotfi; Briat, Arnaud; Villemain, Daniele; Fagret, Daniel; Ghezzi, Catherine; Halimi, Serge; Demongeot, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Insulin resistance, characterised by an insulin-stimulated glucose transport defect, is an important feature of the pre-diabetic state that has been observed in numerous pathological disorders. The purpose of this study was to assess variations in glucose transport in rats using 125 I-6-deoxy-6-iodo-D-glucose (6DIG), a new tracer of glucose transport proposed as an imaging tool to assess insulin resistance in vivo. Two protocols were performed, a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp and a normoinsulinaemic-normoglycaemic protocol, in awake control and insulin-resistant fructose-fed rats. The tracer was injected at steady state, and activity in 11 tissues and the blood was assessed ex vivo at several time points. A multicompartmental mathematical model was developed to obtain fractional transfer coefficients of 6DIG from the blood to the organs. Insulin sensitivity of fructose-fed rats, estimated by the glucose infusion rate, was reduced by 40% compared with control rats. At steady state, 6DIG uptake was significantly stimulated by insulin in insulin-sensitive tissues of control rats (basal versus insulin: diaphragm, p < 0.01; muscle, p < 0.05; heart, p < 0.001), whereas insulin did not stimulate 6DIG uptake in insulin-resistant fructose-fed rats. Moreover, in these tissues, the fractional transfer coefficients of entrance were significantly increased with insulin in control rats (basal vs insulin: diaphragm, p < 0.001; muscle, p < 0.001; heart, p < 0.01) whereas no significant changes were observed in fructose-fed rats. This study sets the stage for the future use of 6DIG as a non-invasive means for the evaluation of insulin resistance by nuclear imaging. (orig.)

  6. Exploring a post-traumatic stress disorder paradigm in Flinders sensitive line rats to model treatment-resistant depression I: bio-behavioural validation and response to imipramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Sarel Jacobus; Harvey, Brian Herbert

    2017-08-01

    Co-morbid depression with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is often treatment resistant. In developing a preclinical model of treatment-resistant depression (TRD), we combined animal models of depression and PTSD to produce an animal with more severe as well as treatment-resistant depressive-like behaviours. Male Flinders sensitive line (FSL) rats, a genetic animal model of depression, were exposed to a stress re-stress model of PTSD [time-dependent sensitisation (TDS)] and compared with stress-naive controls. Seven days after TDS stress, depressive-like and coping behaviours as well as hippocampal and cortical noradrenaline (NA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) levels were analysed. Response to sub-chronic imipramine treatment (IMI; 10 mg/kg s.c.×7 days) was subsequently studied. FSL rats demonstrated bio-behavioural characteristics of depression. Exposure to TDS stress in FSL rats correlated negatively with weight gain, while demonstrating reduced swimming behaviour and increased immobility versus unstressed FSL rats. IMI significantly reversed depressive-like (immobility) behaviour and enhanced active coping behaviour (swimming and climbing) in FSL rats. The latter was significantly attenuated in FSL rats exposed to TDS versus unstressed FSL rats. IMI reversed reduced 5HIAA levels in unstressed FSL rats, whereas exposure to TDS negated this effect. Lowered NA levels in FSL rats were sustained after TDS with IMI significantly reversing this in the hippocampus. Combining a gene-X-environment model of depression with a PTSD paradigm produces exaggerated depressive-like symptoms that display an attenuated response to antidepressant treatment. This work confirms combining FSL rats with TDS exposure as a putative animal model of TRD.

  7. Antioxidant supplementation and obesity have independent effects on hepatic oxylipin profiles in insulin-resistant, obesity-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picklo, Matthew J; Newman, John W

    2015-12-01

    Obesity-induced changes in lipid metabolism are mechanistically associated with the development of insulin resistance and prediabetes. Recent studies have focused on the extent to which obesity-induced insulin resistance is mediated through oxylipins, derived from enzymatic and nonenzymatic lipid peroxidation. Vitamin E and vitamin C are widely used antioxidant supplements, but conflicting data exist as to whether supplementation with vitamins E and C reduces insulin resistance. The purpose of this work is (1) to test the hypothesis that supplementation with vitamin E and vitamin C prevents the development of insulin resistance and (2) to determine the extent to which antioxidant supplementation modifies obesity-induced changes in hepatic oxylipins. Using obesity-prone Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat, hypercaloric diet, we found that vitamin E and C supplementation did not block the development of insulin resistance, despite increased plasma levels of these antioxidants and decreased hepatic F2-isoprostane (F2-IsoP) concentrations. The obese phenotype was associated with increased hepatic concentrations of cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-dependent linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid-derived epoxides. Antioxidant supplementation, but not obesity, decreased levels of the lipoxygenase (LOX)-dependent, arachidonic acid-derived products lipoxin A4 (LXA4), 8,15-dihydroxtetraenoate (8,15-DiHETE), and 5,15-DiHETE. Our data demonstrate that antioxidant supplementation and obesity impact hepatic LOX- and CYP450-dependent oxylipin metabolism. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Psychobiology of experimental hypertension: evaluation of the Dahl rat lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, S.B. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY); Friedman, R.

    1981-01-01

    The Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) and salt-resistant (DR) rat lines were selectively bred to show opposite genetically determined blood pressure responses to excess sodium chloride ingestion. These animals have provided significant anatomical, physiological, and biochemical data concerning the pathological mechanisms of experimental hypertension. Research is also being conducted to determine the relevance of psychobiological and behavioral variables in these two lines. The rationale for the selection and maintenance of the Dahl model and the physiological, biochemical, and behavioral characteristics which distinguish DS and DR rats are presented. Although originally developed for the study of salt-induced hypertension, special attention is given to the application of this animal model in behavior genetic research, stressing its inherent advantages and limitations. The use of the Dahl model in psychobiological studies and the utility of the model for future behavioral, genetic, and psychophysiological research are also detailed.

  9. Bromocriptine increased operant responding for high fat food but decreased chow intake in both obesity-prone and resistant rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K.; Cho, J. Kim, R.; Michaelides, M.; Primeaux, S.; Bray, G.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-10-27

    Dopamine (DA) and DAD{sub 2} receptors (D2R) have been implicated in obesity and are thought to be involved in the rewarding properties of food. Osborne-Mendel (OM) rats are susceptible to diet induced obesity (DIO) while S5B/P (S5B) rats are resistant when given a high-fat diet. Here we hypothesized that the two strains would differ in high-fat food self-administration (FSA) and that the D2R agonist bromocriptine (BC) would differently affect their behavior. Ad-libitum fed OM and S5B/P rats were tested in a FSA operant chamber and were trained to lever press for high-fat food pellets under a fixed-ratio (FR1) and a progressive ratio (PR) schedule. After sixteen days of PR sessions, rats were treated with three different doses of BC (1, 10 and 20 mg/kg). No significant differences were found between the two strains in the number of active lever presses. BC treatment (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) increased the number of active lever presses (10 mg/kg having the strongest effect) whereas it decreased rat chow intake in the home cage with equivalent effects in both strains. These effects were not observed on the day of BC administration but on the day following its administration. Our results suggest that these two strains have similar motivation for procuring high fat food using this paradigm. BC increased operant responding for high-fat pellets but decreased chow intake in both strains, suggesting that D2R stimulation may have enhanced the motivational drive to procure the fatty food while correspondingly decreasing the intake of regular food. These findings suggest that susceptibility to dietary obesity (prior to the onset of obesity) may not affect operant motivation for a palatable high fat food and that differential susceptibility to obesity may be related to differential sensitivity to D2R stimulation.

  10. Resistant starch and exercise independently attenuate weight regain on a high fat diet in a rat model of obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Ginger C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term weight reduction remains elusive for many obese individuals. Resistant starch (RS and exercise may be useful for weight maintenance. The effects of RS, with or without exercise, on weight regain was examined during relapse to obesity on a high carbohydrate, high fat (HC/HF diet. Methods Obesity-prone rats were fed ad libitum for 16 weeks then weight reduced on a low fat diet to induce a 17% body weight loss (weight reduced rats. Weight reduced rats were maintained on an energy-restricted low fat diet for 18 weeks, with or without a daily bout of treadmill exercise. Rats were then allowed free access to HC/HF diet containing low (0.3% or high (5.9% levels of RS. Weight regain, energy balance, body composition, adipocyte cellularity, and fuel utilization were monitored as rats relapsed to obesity and surpassed their original, obese weight. Results Both RS and exercise independently attenuated weight regain by reducing the energy gap between the drive to eat and suppressed energy requirements. Exercise attenuated the deposition of lean mass during relapse, whereas its combination with RS sustained lean mass accrual as body weight returned. Early in relapse, RS lowered insulin levels and reduced the deposition of fat in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Exercise cessation at five weeks of relapse led to increased weight gain, body fat, subcutaneous adipocytes, and decreased lean mass; all detrimental consequences to overall metabolic health. Conclusions These data are the first to show the complimentary effects of dietary RS and regular exercise in countering the metabolic drive to regain weight following weight loss and suggest that exercise cessation, in the context of relapse on a HC/HF diet, may have dire metabolic consequences.

  11. Patterns of dioxin-altered mRNA expression in livers of dioxin-sensitive versus dioxin-resistant rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franc, Monique A. [University of Toronto, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Medical Sciences Building, Toronto, ON (Canada); Johnson and Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, Department of Pharmacogenomics, 1000 Route 202 South, P.O. Box 300, Raritan, NJ (United States); Moffat, Ivy D.; Boutros, Paul C.; Okey, Allan B. [University of Toronto, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Medical Sciences Building, Toronto, ON (Canada); Tuomisto, Jouni T.; Tuomisto, Jouko [National Public Health Institute, Department of Environmental Health, Centre for Environmental Health Risk Analysis, Kuopio (Finland); Pohjanvirta, Raimo [University of Helsinki, Department of Food and Environmental Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-11-15

    Dioxins exert their major toxicologic effects by binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and altering gene transcription. Numerous dioxin-responsive genes previously were identified both by conventional biochemical and molecular techniques and by recent mRNA expression microarray studies. However, of the large set of dioxin-responsive genes the specific genes whose dysregulation leads to death remain unknown. To identify specific genes that may be involved in dioxin lethality we compared changes in liver mRNA levels following exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in three strains/lines of dioxin-sensitive rats with changes in three dioxin-resistant rat strains/lines. The three dioxin-resistant strains/lines all harbor a large deletion in the transactivation domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). Despite this deletion, many genes exhibited a ''Type-I'' response - that is, their responses were similar in dioxin-sensitive and dioxin-resistant rats. Several genes that previously were well established as being dioxin-responsive or under AHR regulation emerged as Type-I responses (e.g. CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1 and Gsta3). In contrast, a relatively small number of genes exhibited a Type-II response - defined as a difference in responsiveness between dioxin-sensitive and dioxin-resistant rat strains. Type-II genes include: malic enzyme 1, ubiquitin C, cathepsin L, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and ferritin light chain 1. In silico searches revealed that AH response elements are conserved in the 5'-flanking regions of several genes that respond to TCDD in both the Type-I and Type-II categories. The vast majority of changes in mRNA levels in response to 100 {mu}g/kg TCDD were strain-specific; over 75% of the dioxin-responsive clones were affected in only one of the six strains/lines. Selected genes were assessed by quantitative RT-PCR in dose-response and time-course experiments and responses of some genes were

  12. Accumulation of ceramide in slow-twitch muscle contributes to the development of insulin resistance in the obese JCR:LA-cp rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, Natasha; Keung, Wendy; Kelly, Sandra E; Proctor, Spencer D; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Ussher, John R

    2015-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? The aim was to determine whether the accumulation of ceramide contributes to skeletal muscle insulin resistance in the JCR obese rat. What is the main finding and its importance? Our main new finding is that ceramides accumulate only in slow-twitch skeletal muscle in the JCR obese rat and that reducing ceramide content in this muscle type by inhibition of serine palmitoyl transferase-1 halts the progression of insulin resistance in this rat model predisposed to early development of type 2 diabetes. Our findings highlight the importance of assessing insulin signalling/sensitivity and lipid intermediate accumulation in different muscle fibre types. It has been postulated that insulin resistance results from the accumulation of cytosolic lipid metabolites (i.e. diacylglycerol/ceramide) that impede insulin signalling and impair glucose homeostasis. De novo ceramide synthesis is catalysed by serine palmitoyl transferase-1. Our aim was to determine whether de novo ceramide synthesis plays a role during development of insulin resistance in the JCR:LA-cp obese rat. Ten-week-old JCR:LA-cp obese rats were supplemented with either vehicle or the serine palmitoyl transferase-1 inhibitor l-cycloserine (360 mg l(-1) ) in their drinking water for a 2 week period, and glycaemia was assessed by meal tolerance testing. Treatment of JCR:LA-cp obese rats with l-cycloserine improved their plasma glucose and insulin levels during a meal tolerance test. Examination of muscle lipid metabolites and protein phosphorylation patterns revealed differential signatures in slow-twitch (soleus) versus fast-twitch muscle (gastrocnemius), in that ceramide levels were increased in soleus but not gastrocnemius muscles of JCR:LA-cp obese rats. Likewise, improved glycaemia in l-cycloserine-treated JCR:LA-cp obese rats was associated with enhanced Akt and pyruvate dehydrogenase signalling in soleus but not gastrocnemius muscles, probably as a result of l

  13. Aluminum exposure for one hour decreases vascular reactivity in conductance and resistance arteries in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Patrícia Medeiros; Escobar, Alyne Goulart; Torres, João Guilherme Dini; Martinez, Caroline Silveira; Rizzetti, Danize Aparecida; Kunz, Simone Noremberg; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Alonso, María Jesús; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Aluminum (Al) is an important environmental contaminant; however, there are not enough evidences of Al-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. We investigated the effects of acute exposure to aluminum chloride (AlCl 3 ) on blood pressure, vascular reactivity and oxidative stress. Methods and results: Male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: Untreated: vehicle (ultrapure water, ip) and AlCl 3 : single dose of AlCl 3 (100 mg/kg,ip). Concentration-response curves to phenylephrine in the absence and presence of endothelium, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, the potassium channel blocker tetraethylammonium, and the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin were performed in segments from aortic and mesenteric resistance arteries. NO released was assessed in aorta and reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde, non-protein thiol levels, antioxidant capacity and enzymatic antioxidant activities were investigated in plasma, aorta and/or mesenteric arteries. After one hour of AlCl 3 exposure serum Al levels attained 147.7 ± 25.0 μg/L. Al treatment: 1) did not affect blood pressure, heart rate and vasodilator responses induced by acetylcholine or sodium nitroprusside; 2) decreased phenylephrine-induced vasoconstrictor responses; 3) increased endothelial modulation of contractile responses, NO release and vascular ROS production from NADPH oxidase; 4) increased plasmatic, aortic and mesenteric malondialdehyde and ROS production, and 5) decreased antioxidant capacity and affected the antioxidant biomarkers non-protein thiol levels, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymatic activities. Conclusion: AlCl 3 -acute exposure reduces vascular reactivity. This effect is associated with increased NO production, probably acting on K + channels, which seems to occur as a compensatory mechanism against Al-induced oxidative stress. Our results suggest that Al exerts toxic effects to the vascular system. - Highlights:

  14. Insulin resistance induced by a high-fat diet is associated with the induction of genes related to leukocyte activation in rat peripheral leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Saki; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Shimada, Masaya; Hori, Tomoyo; Murayama, Yuki; Ohashi, Norio; Goda, Toshinao

    2010-12-18

    Insulin resistance caused by a high-fat diet induces type 2 diabetes and its complications. In this study, we investigated gene expression changes in peripheral leukocytes with insulin resistance by conducting microarray analyses in rats with high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance. After assessing insulin resistance in rats by an oral glucose tolerance test, we performed microarray analyses using peripheral leukocytes from normal rats and insulin-resistant rats after fasting. Real-time RT-PCR analyses were performed for several upregulated genes in the microarray data after fasting and at 3h after a single oral glucose load. Feeding rats a high-fat diet for 77days induced moderate insulin resistance. Microarray analysis showed that the high-fat diet enhances many genes related to leukocyte activation. These upregulated genes included genes related to host defense, and many genes related to G-protein-coupled receptor/tyrosine receptor signaling. Moreover, many genes, such as Anxa1, S100a8, Il22ra2, Gng10, Csf3r and Cd302, showed further upregulation of their expression after a single oral glucose load. Exposure to high glucose and/or tumor necrosis factor-α which is known to be a factor that induces insulin resistance, enhanced the mRNA levels of DUSP1, ANXA1, IL1B, S100A8, IL22RA2, S100A9 and IRF1 in human monocyte-like U937 cells. These results suggest that the expression of genes related to leukocyte activation in peripheral leukocytes is associated with the development of moderate insulin resistance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Glucose infusion causes insulin resistance in skeletal muscle of rats without changes in Akt and AS160 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Andrew J; Bruce, Clinton R; Cederberg, Anna; Turner, Nigel; James, David E; Cooney, Gregory J; Kraegen, Edward W

    2007-11-01

    Hyperglycemia is a defining feature of Type 1 and 2 diabetes. Hyperglycemia also causes insulin resistance, and our group (Kraegen EW, Saha AK, Preston E, Wilks D, Hoy AJ, Cooney GJ, Ruderman NB. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab Endocrinol Metab 290: E471-E479, 2006) has recently demonstrated that hyperglycemia generated by glucose infusion results in insulin resistance after 5 h but not after 3 h. The aim of this study was to investigate possible mechanism(s) by which glucose infusion causes insulin resistance in skeletal muscle and in particular to examine whether this was associated with changes in insulin signaling. Hyperglycemia (~10 mM) was produced in cannulated male Wistar rats for up to 5 h. The glucose infusion rate required to maintain this hyperglycemia progressively lessened over 5 h (by 25%, P < 0.0001 at 5 h) without any alteration in plasma insulin levels consistent with the development of insulin resistance. Muscle glucose uptake in vivo (44%; P < 0.05) and glycogen synthesis rate (52%; P < 0.001) were reduced after 5 h compared with after 3 h of infusion. Despite these changes, there was no decrease in the phosphorylation state of multiple insulin signaling intermediates [insulin receptor, Akt, AS160 (Akt substrate of 160 kDa), glycogen synthase kinase-3beta] over the same time course. In isolated soleus strips taken from control or 1- or 5-h glucose-infused animals, insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose transport was similar, but glycogen synthesis was significantly reduced in the 5-h muscle sample (68% vs. 1-h sample; P < 0.001). These results suggest that the reduced muscle glucose uptake in rats after 5 h of acute hyperglycemia is due more to the metabolic effects of excess glycogen storage than to a defect in insulin signaling or glucose transport.

  16. Valproic acid reduces insulin-resistance, fat deposition and FOXO1-mediated gluconeogenesis in type-2 diabetic rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sabbir; Kumar, Sandeep; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidences highlighted the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in insulin-resistance, gluconeogenesis and islet function. HDACs can modulate the expression of various genes, which directly or indirectly affect glucose metabolism. This study was aimed to evaluate the role of valproic acid (VPA) on fat deposition, insulin-resistance and gluconeogenesis in type-2 diabetic rat. Diabetes was developed in Sprague-Dawley rats by the combination of high-fat diet and low dose streptozotocin. VPA at the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg/day and metformin (positive control) 150 mg/kg twice daily for 10 weeks were administered by oral gavage. Insulin-resistance, dyslipidemia and glycemia were evaluated by biochemical estimations, while fat accumulation and structural alteration were assessed by histopathology. Protein expression and insulin signaling were evaluated by western blot and immunohistochemistry. VPA treatment significantly reduced the plasma glucose, HbA1c, insulin-resistance, fat deposition in brown adipose tissue, white adipose tissue and liver, which are comparable to metformin treatment. Further, VPA inhibited the gluconeogenesis and glucagon expression as well as restored the histopathological alterations in pancreas and liver. Our findings provide new insights on the anti-diabetic role of VPA in type-2 diabetes mellitus by the modulation of insulin signaling and forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1)-mediated gluconeogenesis. Since VPA is a well established clinical drug, the detailed molecular mechanisms of the present findings can be further investigated for possible clinical use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  17. In situ Ia expression on brain cells in the rat: autoimmune encephalomyelitis-resistant strain (BN) and susceptible strain (Lewis) compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Y; Kawai, K; Fujiwara, M

    1989-01-01

    In order to examine in situ Ia expression on brain cells of various strains of rat, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in both EAE-susceptible (LEW) and EAE-resistant (BN) strains. For induction of EAE in the resistant strain, two methods were applied: one was injection of guinea-pig myelin basic protein (GPBP) in complete Freund's adjuvant into LBNF1----BN chimeras; the other was transfer of GPBP-reactive T-line cells from BN rats into syngeneic rats. LBNF----BN chimeras developed clinical EAE, whereas BN rats that received T-line cells did not. However, histological EAE was apparent in both groups. Immunohistochemical examination using two different monoclonal antibodies (OX3 and OX6) against rat Ia antigens revealed that microglia of LEW, BN and chimera rats expressed Ia antigens in the central nervous system (CNS) with EAE. On the other hand, astrocytes were negative for Ia antigens in all the strains. Furthermore, quantitative analysis was undertaken in order to compare the density of Ia-positive microglia in the BN CNS with that in the LEW CNS. It was revealed that the density of Ia-positive microglia in the vicinity of perivascular inflammatory cell aggregates was essentially the same in both strains regardless of the difference in methods of EAE induction or histological severity of the disease. Ia-positive microglia remote from inflammatory cell aggregates were somewhat fewer in rats with mild histological EAE. However, no strain difference was noted in this analysis. Therefore, we concluded that in situ Ia-inducibility on the brain cells of EAE-resistant rats is not different from that of EAE-susceptible rats. Although Ia-positive microglia in both strains may be involved in the immune responses in the CNS, it is unlikely that the difference in Ia-inducibility on brain cells would contribute to strain-specific susceptibility to EAE. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2785488

  18. Fructose-driven glycolysis supports anoxia resistance in the naked mole-rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Thomas J; Reznick, Jane; Peterson, Bethany L; Blass, Gregory; Omerbašić, Damir; Bennett, Nigel C; Kuich, P Henning J L; Zasada, Christin; Browe, Brigitte M; Hamann, Wiebke; Applegate, Daniel T; Radke, Michael H; Kosten, Tetiana; Lutermann, Heike; Gavaghan, Victoria; Eigenbrod, Ole; Bégay, Valérie; Amoroso, Vince G; Govind, Vidya; Minshall, Richard D; Smith, Ewan St J; Larson, John; Gotthardt, Michael; Kempa, Stefan; Lewin, Gary R

    2017-04-21

    The African naked mole-rat's ( Heterocephalus glaber ) social and subterranean lifestyle generates a hypoxic niche. Under experimental conditions, naked mole-rats tolerate hours of extreme hypoxia and survive 18 minutes of total oxygen deprivation (anoxia) without apparent injury. During anoxia, the naked mole-rat switches to anaerobic metabolism fueled by fructose, which is actively accumulated and metabolized to lactate in the brain. Global expression of the GLUT5 fructose transporter and high levels of ketohexokinase were identified as molecular signatures of fructose metabolism. Fructose-driven glycolytic respiration in naked mole-rat tissues avoids feedback inhibition of glycolysis via phosphofructokinase, supporting viability. The metabolic rewiring of glycolysis can circumvent the normally lethal effects of oxygen deprivation, a mechanism that could be harnessed to minimize hypoxic damage in human disease. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Effects of ultraviolet-B exposure on the resistance to Listeria monocytogenes in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goettsch W; Garssen J; de Klerk A; Herremans MMPT; Dortant P; de Gruijl FR; van Loveren H; LPI; VIR; UU

    1996-01-01

    Een Listeria monocytogenes infectiemodel in de rat werd gebruikt om de immuunsuppressieve activiteit van ultraviolet-B straling (UVB) te onderzoeken. Ratten werden dagelijks blootgesteld aan suberythemale hoeveelheden UVB straling gedurende 5 of 7 opeenvolgende dagen. Twee verschillende UV bronnen

  20. Dr Jan Theodoor Henrard (with portrait)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goddijn, W.A.

    1946-01-01

    On October 16th 1946 Dr J. Th. Henrard will have reached the pensionable age of sixty five years. In accordance with the legal prescriptions he is due to take leave officially as keeper of the ”Rijksherbarium“. The present director, Prof. Dr H. J. Lam, invited me to write a short biography of Dr

  1. Resistance to the induction of EAE in AO rats: its prevention by the pre-treatment with cyclophosphamide or low dose of irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostarica-Stojkovic, M.; Petrovic, M.; Lukic, M.L. (Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia). Medicinski Fakultet; Inst. for Biological Research, Belgrade (Yu). Lab. for Cellular Immunology)

    1982-11-01

    Susceptibility to the induction of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) was compared in AO, DA and Lewis strain of rats. As evaluated by clinical and histological criteria, AO rats exhibited significantly lower susceptibility to EAE induced with guinea-pig spinal cord (GPSC) tissue and complete resistance to the encephalitogenic challenge with rat myelin basic protein (BP) irrespective of antigen dose and adjuvant used. AO rats pre-treated with BP + Freund's incomplete adjuvant became completely unresponsive to the induction of EAE with GPSC + Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) indicating that they do possess cells sensitive to some antigenic determinants of rat BP. In order to test whether the resistance to EAE is due to an active suppression, low dose of irradiation (300 rad) and cyclophosphamide (20 mg/kg) was applied prior to the induction of EAE. Selective depletion of radiosensitive cells facilitated the induction of EAE. Similarly cyclophosphamide given 2 days prior to BP + FCA completely abrogated the resistance to EAE induction. Thus, it appears that the inability of BP + FCA to produce EAE in AO rats is due to the disproportionate activation of suppressor cells.

  2. In utero Exposure to Germinated Brown Rice and Its GABA Extract Attenuates High-Fat-Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rat Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamu, Hadiza Altine; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Der-Jiun, Ooi; Ismail, Maznah

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported on the influence of diet on insulin resistance. Our study provides insight into the effect of germinated brown rice (GBR) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on early environment-driven programming and susceptibility to insulin resistance in rat offspring. Male rat offspring from female Sprague-Dawley rats fed with a high-fat diet (HFD) alone, HFD + GBR, or HFD + GABA extract throughout pregnancy and lactation were weaned 4 weeks after delivery and followed up for 8 weeks. A biochemical analysis and an assessment of the hepatic expression of insulin signaling genes were performed. The results showed that intrauterine exposure to HFD caused metabolic perturbations in rat offspring which gravitated towards insulin resistance even though the rat offspring did not consume an HFD. GBR and GABA attenuated the HFD-induced changes by underlying regulation of the insulin signaling genes. The results suggest that intake of GBR and GABA during pregnancy and lactation can influence the programming of genes in rat offspring, thereby enhancing insulin sensitivity. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Effects of Dietary Carbohydrate Replaced with Wild Rice (Zizania latifolia (Griseb Turcz on Insulin Resistance in Rats Fed with a High-Fat/Cholesterol Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengkai Zhai

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Wild rice (WR is a very nutritious grain that has been used to treat diabetes in Chinese medicinal practice. City diet (CD is based on the diet consumed by Asian area residents in modern society, which is rich in saturated fats, cholesterol and carbohydrates. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of replacing white rice and processed wheat starch of CD with WR as the chief source of dietary carbohydrates on insulin resistance in rats fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet. Except the rats of the low-fat (LF diet group, the rats of the other three groups, including to high-fat/cholesterol (HFC diet, CD and WR diet, were fed with high-fat/cholesterol diets for eight weeks. The rats fed with CD exhibited higher weight gain and lower insulin sensitivity compared to the rats consuming a HFC diet. However, WR suppressed high-fat/cholesterol diet-induced insulin resistance. WR decreased liver homogenate triglyceride and free fatty acids levels, raised serum adiponectin concentration and reduced serum lipocalin-2 and visfatin concentrations. In addition, the WR diet potently augmented the relative expressions of adiponectin receptor 2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, alpha and gamma, and abated relative expressions of leptin and lipocalin-2 in the tissues of interest. These findings indicate that WR is effective in ameliorating abnormal glucose metabolism and insulin resistance in rats, even when the diet consumed is high in fat and cholesterol.

  4. Melatonin supplementation plus exercise behavior ameliorate insulin resistance, hypertension and fatigue in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Kwon, Han-Sol; Kim, Myung-Jin; Go, Hyeon-Kyu; Oak, Min-Ho; Kim, Do-Hyung

    2017-08-01

    The objective was to investigate the effects of melatonin and exercise on insulin resistance (IR), hypertension and fatigue syndrome in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Rats were divided into 5 groups namely normal control (NC), T2DM control group (DC), diabetes plus exercise (DE), diabetes plus oral melatonin supplement (DM) and diabetes plus melatonin and exercise (DME) groups. Melatonin was administered orally 5mg/kg twice daily and 40min swimming/day 5days/week were regimented after diabetes induction. Blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, insulin, IR, serum leptin, lipid profiles, inflammatory cytokines, lipid peroxidation increased significantly (Pmelatonin ameliorated markedly hypertension, IR, biochemical alteration induced by diabetes and significantly increased exercise performance (PMelatonin supplementation in combination with exercise behavior may ameliorate IR, hypertension and exercise performance or fatigue possibly by improving antioxidative activities, hyperlipidemia, inflammatory cytokines via up-regulation of GLUT4, PGC-1 α and mitochondrial biogenesis in T2DM rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Renal Urotensin II System Plays Roles in the Regulation of Blood Pressure in Dahl Salt-Resistant Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Dahl salt-resistant (SR animal models are similar to peritoneal dialysis patients with fluid volumes overload with normal blood pressure in hemodynamic profiles. We will verify the roles of UII in the regulation of blood pressure in these animal models. Methodology. The Dahl salt-sensitive (SS and SR rats and UII receptor gene knocked out (KO mice were placed on a high-salt diet. Renal tissues were performed for the expression of UII in Dahl groups. Results. After high-salt diet for 6 weeks, the systolic blood pressure (SBP in SR group was significantly lower, accompanied with higher urinary UII levels, higher 24-hour urinary sodium excretion, and higher urinary creatinine clearance in the SR rats in comparison to SS group. The expressions of UII and UT were both upregulated in the kidney tissues of SR group in comparison to SS group (P<0.05. After high-salt diet for 8 weeks, the SBP of the KO group is significantly higher than that of the wild type group. Conclusion. We first demonstrate that renal UII system can play important roles in the regulation of blood pressure in Dahl SR rats which can be highly correlated to its effect on renal tubular sodium absorption.

  6. Swimming training alleviated insulin resistance through Wnt3a/β-catenin signaling in type 2 diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Increasing evidence suggests that regular physical exercise improves type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. However, the potential beneficial effects of swimming on insulin resistance and lipid disorder in T2DM, and its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Materials and Methods: Rats were fed with high fat diet and given a low dosage of Streptozotocin (STZ to induce T2DM model, and subsequently treated with or without swimming exercise. An 8-week swimming program (30, 60 or 120 min per day, 5 days per week decreased body weight, fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin. Results: Swimming ameliorated lipid disorder, improved muscular atrophy and revealed a reduced glycogen deposit in skeletal muscles of diabetic rats. Furthermore, swimming also inhibited the activation of Wnt3a/β-catenin signaling pathway, decreased Wnt3a mRNA and protein level, upregulated GSK3β phosphorylation activity and reduced the expression of β-catenin phosphorylation in diabetic rats. Conclusion: The trend of the result suggests that swimming exercise proved to be a potent ameliorator of insulin resistancein T2DM through the modulation of Wnt3a/β-catenin pathway and therefore, could present a promising therapeutic measure towards the treatment of diabetes and its relatives.

  7. Increases in energy intake, insulin resistance and stress in rats before Wenchuan earthquake far from the epicenter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu-Lu; Hu, Xiang; Zheng, Juan; Zhang, Hao-Hao; Kong, Wen; Yang, Wei-Hong; Zeng, Tian-Shu; Zhang, Jiao-Yue; Yue, Ling

    2010-10-01

    The study of pre-earthquake (PE) behavior in animals has always been shrouded by controversy. There is very little scientific evidence showing that animals can sense the coming of an earthquake and that their organisms undergo physiological changes during the PE period. On the day of the Wenchuan earthquake, prior to the time of its actual occurrence, we were coincidentally able to measure the insulin sensitivity and stress level in rats that were originally part of another study. We detected defects in insulin signaling and a decrease in glucose uptake in skeletal muscle (SkM) and adipose tissue (AT), indicating impaired insulin sensitivity. These changes were associated with significantly increased plasma corticosterone concentration and elevated HSD11B1 mRNA expression in SkM and AT. The increase in insulin resistance (IR) could be attributed to elevated local (SkM and AT) and systemic stress. Interestingly, we also noticed that the food intake in rats showed a sudden increase two days before the earthquake and reached a peak on the day of the earthquake itself. Our observations suggest the possibility that the rats underwent PE physiological changes consisting of an increase in the stress level and consequently leading to an increase in food intake and IR.

  8. Resistance or aerobic training decreases blood pressure and improves cardiovascular autonomic control and oxidative stress in hypertensive menopausal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Palma, Renata K; Moraes-Silva, Ivana C; da Silva Dias, Danielle; Shimojo, Guilherme L; Conti, Filipe F; Bernardes, Nathalia; Barboza, Catarina A; Sanches, Iris C; da Rosa Araújo, Alex Sander; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2016-10-01

    We investigated whether resistance training (RT) vs. aerobic training (AT) differentially impacts on arterial pressure and related mechanisms in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Female SHRs were ovariectomized and assigned to one of the following groups: sedentary, AT, or RT; sham sedentary SHR were used as control group. AT was performed on a treadmill, whereas RT was performed on a vertical ladder. Both exercise protocols were performed for 8 wk, 5 days/wk. Arterial pressure, baroreflex sensitivity, autonomic modulation, and cardiac oxidative stress parameters (lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, redox balance, NADPH oxidase, and antioxidant enzymes activities) were analyzed. Ovariectomy increased mean arterial pressure (∼9 mmHg), sympathetic modulation (∼40%), and oxidative stress in sedentary rats. Both RT and AT reduced mean arterial pressure (∼20 and ∼8 mmHg, respectively) and improved baroreflex sensitivity compared with sedentary ovariectomized rats. However, RT-induced arterial pressure decrease was significantly less pronounced than AT. Lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation were decreased while antioxidant enzymes were increased in both trained groups vs. sedentaries. The reduced gluthatione was higher after AT vs. other groups, whereas oxidized gluthatione was lower after RT vs. AT. Moreover, sympathetic and parasympathetic modulations were highly correlated with cardiac oxidative stress parameters. In conclusion, both RT and AT can decrease arterial pressure in a model of hypertension and menopause; although, at different magnitudes this decrease was related to attenuated autonomic dysfunction in association with cardiac oxidative stress improvement in both exercise protocols. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Saccharin Increases Fasting Blood Glucose but Not Liver Insulin Resistance in Comparison to a High Fructose-Fed Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avshalom Leibowitz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent data indicate that artificial sweeteners (AS may have deleterious effects on glucose metabolism. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of AS and the effects of a high fructose diet (HFrD on glucose metabolism and insulin resistance (IR in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. SD rats were fed either regular chow, chow with saccharin (Sac (0.1 mg/mL placed in their water, or HFrD for seven weeks. Glucose, insulin, and triglycerides (Tg levels were measured upon completion. A homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR index was used to determine insulin resistance. The liver was stained to detect signs of a fatty liver. Hepatic mRNA expression of glucose metabolism regulation genes, Srepb-1c (sterol regulatory element binding protein and ChREB (α & β (carbohydrate response element binding protein, as well as other glycolytic and lipogenic genes including glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pc, were considered IR markers. Both HFrD and Sac significantly increased fasting blood glucose levels compare to the control (140 ± 5 and 137 ± 6 vs. 118 ± 3 mg/dL, respectively, p < 0.05. However, only HFrD increased insulin secretion (0.99 ± 0.12 vs. 0.7 ± 0.1 and 0.6 ± 0.1 ug/L, Tg levels (420 ± 43 vs. 152 ± 20 and 127 ± 13 mg/dL, and the HOMA-IR index (3.4 ± 0.4 vs. 2.3 ± 0.36 and 2.13 ± 0.3 (HFrD vs. control and sac, p < 0.05. Fatty liver changes were only observed in HFrD fed rats. The expression of ChREB β, Srepb-1c, and G6pc mRNA were only significantly elevated (between 2–10 times folds, p < 0.05 in HFrD fed rats. Sac may increase fasting blood glucose but has no effect on liver insulin resistance.

  10. Validation of HOMA-IR in a model of insulin-resistance induced by a high-fat diet in Wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, Luciana C.; Elkfury, Jessica L.; Jornada, Manoela N.; Foletto, Kelly C.; Bertoluci, Marcello C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The present study aimed to validate homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in relation to the insulin tolerance test (ITT) in a model of insulin-resistance in Wistar rats induced by a 19-week high-fat diet. Materials and methods A total of 30 male Wistar rats weighing 200-300 g were allocated into a high-fat diet group (HFD) (55% fat-enriched chow, ad lib, n = 15) and a standard-diet group (CD) standard chow, ad lib, n = 15), for 19 weeks. ITT was ...

  11. Enriching the drinking water of rats with extracts of Salvia officinalis and Thymus vulgaris increases their resistance to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváthová, Eva; Srančíková, Annamária; Regendová-Sedláčková, Eva; Melušová, Martina; Meluš, Vladimír; Netriová, Jana; Krajčovičová, Zdenka; Slameňová, Darina; Pastorek, Michal; Kozics, Katarína

    2016-01-01

    Nature is an attractive source of therapeutic compounds. In comparison to the artificial drugs, natural compounds cause less adverse side effects and are suitable for current molecularly oriented approaches to drug development and their mutual combining. Medicinal plants represent one of the most available remedy against various diseases. Proper examples are Salvia officinalis L. and Thymus vulgaris L. which are known aromatic medicinal plants. They are very popular and frequently used in many countries. The molecular mechanism of their biological activity has not yet been fully understood. The aim of this study was to ascertain if liver cells of experimental animals drinking extracts of sage or thyme will manifest increased resistance against oxidative stress. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into seven groups. They drank sage or thyme extracts for 2 weeks. At the end of the drinking period, blood samples were collected for determination of liver biochemical parameters and hepatocytes were isolated to analyze (i) oxidatively generated DNA damage (conventional and modified comet assay), (ii) activities of antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)] and (iii) content of glutathione. Intake of sage and thyme had no effect either on the basal level of DNA damage or on the activity of SOD in rat hepatocytes and did not change the biochemical parameters of blood plasma. Simultaneously, the activity of GPx was significantly increased and the level of DNA damage induced by oxidants was decreased. Moreover, sage extract was able to start up the antioxidant protection expressed by increased content of glutathione. Our results indicate that the consumption of S.officinalis and T.vulgaris extracts positively affects resistency of rat liver cells against oxidative stress and may have hepatoprotective potential. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved

  12. Resistance to experimental tumorigenesis in cells of a long-lived mammal, the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Sitai; Mele, James; Wu, Yuehong; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Hornsby, Peter J

    2010-08-01

    The naked mole-rat (NMR, Heterocephalus glaber) is a long-lived mammal in which spontaneous cancer has not been observed. To investigate possible mechanisms for cancer resistance in this species, we studied the properties of skin fibroblasts from the NMR following transduction with oncogenes that cause cells of other mammalian species to form malignant tumors. Naked mole-rat fibroblasts were transduced with a retrovirus encoding SV40 large T antigen and oncogenic Ras(G12V). Following transplantation of transduced cells into immunodeficient mice, cells rapidly entered crisis, as evidenced by the presence of anaphase bridges, giant cells with enlarged nuclei, multinucleated cells, and cells with large number of chromosomes or abnormal chromatin material. In contrast, similarly transduced mouse and rat fibroblasts formed tumors that grew rapidly without crisis. Crisis was also observed after > 40 population doublings in SV40 TAg/Ras-expressing NMR cells in culture. Crisis in culture was prevented by additional infection of the cells with a retrovirus encoding hTERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase). SV40 TAg/Ras/hTERT-expressing NMR cells formed tumors that grew rapidly in immunodeficient mice without evidence of crisis. Crisis could also be induced in SV40 TAg/Ras-expressing NMR cells by loss of anchorage, but after hTERT transduction, cells were able to proliferate normally following loss of anchorage. Thus, rapid crisis is a response of oncogene-expressing NMR cells to growth in an in vivo environment, which requires anchorage independence, and hTERT permits cells to avoid crisis and to achieve malignant tumor growth. The unique reaction of NMR cells to oncogene expression may form part of the cancer resistance of this species.

  13. Tanshinone I alleviates insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus rats through IRS-1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ying; Gao, Jiaqi; Qin, Lingling; Xu, Yunling; Wang, Dongchao; Shi, Haoxia; Xu, Tunhai; Liu, Tonghua

    2017-09-01

    Tanshinone I from tanshen has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory diseases. Given the link between inflammation and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), we suspect that tanshinone I may have a beneficial effect on T2DM. This study was to investigate the potential effects of tanshinone I on T2DM and its underlying mechanism. T2DM was thus induced in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats using streptozotocin (STZ) and high-fat diet. It was observed that T2DM rats had higher levels of total cholesterol (TC), nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), total triglyceride (TG) and total low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) compared with normal, healthy SD rats. Treatment with tanshinone I decreased these levels and lowered blood glucose level in T2DM rats. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis showed that T2DM rats had elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, Western blot analysis revealed that T2DM rats had enhanced nuclear translocation of NF-κB as well as elevated phosphorylation of Ser307 in IRS-1(insulin receptor substrate 1). Treatment by tanshinone I lowered the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α, decreased nuclear translocation of NF-κB as well as phosphorylation of Ser307 in IRS-1. These results demonstrated that tanshinone I could alleviate T2DM syndrome in rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. S961, an insulin receptor antagonist causes hyperinsulinemia, insulin-resistance and depletion of energy stores in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikram, Ajit [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), SAS Nagar, Mohali, Punjab 160 062 (India); Jena, Gopabandhu, E-mail: gbjena@gmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), SAS Nagar, Mohali, Punjab 160 062 (India)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields}Insulin receptor antagonist S961 causes hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in rats. {yields}Peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma agonist pioglitazone improves S961 induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. {yields}Long term treatment with insulin receptor antagonist S961 results in the decreased adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. {yields}Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. -- Abstract: Impairment in the insulin receptor signaling and insulin mediated effects are the key features of type 2 diabetes. Here we report that S961, a peptide insulin receptor antagonist induces hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia ({approx}18-fold), glucose intolerance and impairment in the insulin mediated glucose disposal in the Sprague-Dawley rats. Further, long-term S961 treatment (15 day, 10 nM/kg/day) depletes energy storage as evident from decrease in the adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. However, peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonist pioglitazone significantly (P < 0.001) restored S961 induced hyperglycemia (196.73 {+-} 16.32 vs. 126.37 {+-} 27.07 mg/dl) and glucose intolerance ({approx}78%). Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. Further, results of the present study reconfirms and provide direct evidence to the crucial role of insulin receptor signaling in the glucose homeostasis and fuel metabolism.

  15. Herbal Formula HT048 Attenuates Diet-Induced Obesity by Improving Hepatic Lipid Metabolism and Insulin Resistance in Obese Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Hee Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that obesity causes a variety of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Despite the diligent scientific efforts to find effective ways to lower the level of obesity, the size of obese population grows continuously around the world. Here we present the results that show feeding diet containing HT048, a mixture of the extracts of Crataegus pinnatifida leaves and Citrus unshiu peel, two of the well-known traditional herbal medicines in Eastern Asia, decreases obesity in rats. We fed rats with five different diets for 10 weeks: chow diet (STD, high-fat diet (HFD, high-fat diet with 0.04% orlistat, a drug to treat obesity (HFD + Orlistat, high-fat diet with 0.2% HT048 (w/w; HFD + 0.2% HT048, and high-fat diet with 0.6% HT048 (w/w; HFD + 0.6% HT048. It was found that both body and total white adipose tissue weight of HT048 groups significantly decreased compared to those of the HFD group. Moreover, HT048 decreased serum insulin levels in HFD-fed obese rats. At the molecular level, HT048 supplementation downregulated genes involved in lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and adipogenesis, while the expression level of β-oxidation genes was increased. Supplementation-drug interactions are not likely as HFD and HT048-containing diet did not significantly induce genes encoding CYPs. Collectively, this study suggests that HT048 taken as dietary supplement helps to decrease obesity and insulin resistance in HFD-fed obese rats.

  16. S961, an insulin receptor antagonist causes hyperinsulinemia, insulin-resistance and depletion of energy stores in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, Ajit; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: →Insulin receptor antagonist S961 causes hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in rats. →Peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma agonist pioglitazone improves S961 induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. →Long term treatment with insulin receptor antagonist S961 results in the decreased adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. →Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. -- Abstract: Impairment in the insulin receptor signaling and insulin mediated effects are the key features of type 2 diabetes. Here we report that S961, a peptide insulin receptor antagonist induces hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia (∼18-fold), glucose intolerance and impairment in the insulin mediated glucose disposal in the Sprague-Dawley rats. Further, long-term S961 treatment (15 day, 10 nM/kg/day) depletes energy storage as evident from decrease in the adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. However, peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma (PPARγ) agonist pioglitazone significantly (P < 0.001) restored S961 induced hyperglycemia (196.73 ± 16.32 vs. 126.37 ± 27.07 mg/dl) and glucose intolerance (∼78%). Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. Further, results of the present study reconfirms and provide direct evidence to the crucial role of insulin receptor signaling in the glucose homeostasis and fuel metabolism.

  17. DPP4-inhibitor improves neuronal insulin receptor function, brain mitochondrial function and cognitive function in rats with insulin resistance induced by high-fat diet consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipatpiboon, Noppamas; Pintana, Hiranya; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2013-03-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) consumption has been demonstrated to cause peripheral and neuronal insulin resistance, and brain mitochondrial dysfunction in rats. Although the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin, is known to improve peripheral insulin sensitivity, its effects on neuronal insulin resistance and brain mitochondrial dysfunction caused by a HFD are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that vildagliptin prevents neuronal insulin resistance, brain mitochondrial dysfunction, learning and memory deficit caused by HFD. Male rats were divided into two groups to receive either a HFD or normal diet (ND) for 12 weeks, after which rats in each group were fed with either vildagliptin (3 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 21 days. The cognitive function was tested by the Morris Water Maze prior to brain removal for studying neuronal insulin receptor (IR) and brain mitochondrial function. In HFD rats, neuronal insulin resistance and brain mitochondrial dysfunction were demonstrated, with impaired learning and memory. Vildagliptin prevented neuronal insulin resistance by restoring insulin-induced long-term depression and neuronal IR phosphorylation, IRS-1 phosphorylation and Akt/PKB-ser phosphorylation. It also improved brain mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive function. Vildagliptin effectively restored neuronal IR function, increased glucagon-like-peptide 1 levels and prevented brain mitochondrial dysfunction, thus attenuating the impaired cognitive function caused by HFD. © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  19. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-09-01

    In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  20. Imprinting of female offspring with testosterone results in insulin resistance and changes in body fat distribution at adult age in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, C; Niklasson, M; Eriksson, E; Björntorp, P; Holmäng, A

    1998-01-01

    In women, a relative hyperandrogenicity is statistically associated with insulin resistance and centralization of body fat, which are predictors for the development of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of androgenization of newborn female rats on insulin sensitivity at adult age. To mimic the neonatal androgen peak normally observed in male rats, female pups were administered one high dose of testosterone (T) subcutaneously within 3 h after birth. They were then given back to their mothers and followed to adult age. At the end of the week 9, tail samples were taken, showing no differences in fasting plasma concentrations of glucose, lactate, insulin, or free fatty acids between T-treated rats and controls. Plasma concentrations of T and progesterone were significantly lower in the T-treated rats, whereas no differences were found in the levels of corticosterone, estradiol, insulin-like growth factor I, or ACTH. After 10 wk, insulin sensitivity was studied with hyperglycemic and euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (5 mU insulin/kg/min) clamp techniques. The T-treated rats showed insulin resistance with both techniques, which was overcome with time and increasing insulin concentrations during the clamp measurements. The T-treated rats were also heavier and had increased relative weights of skeletal muscles and the spleen. Parametrial, retroperitoneal, and inguinal adipose tissues decreased in weight while mesenteric adipose tissue tended to increase, resulting in an approximately 30-50% larger mesenteric than other adipose tissues. It is concluded that neonatal T imprinting of female rats is followed by insulin resistance, changes in adipose tissue distribution, and an enlarged lean mass, without elevation of circulating T. Similar changes are seen in adult female rats or women receiving T.

  1. Upregulation of ERK1/2-eNOS via AT2 receptors decreases the contractile response to angiotensin II in resistance mesenteric arteries from obese rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela N Hagihara

    Full Text Available It has been clearly established that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKS are important mediators of angiotensin II (Ang II signaling via AT1 receptors in the vasculature. However, evidence for a role of these kinases in changes of Ang II-induced vasoconstriction in obesity is still lacking. Here we sought to determine whether vascular MAPKs are differentially activated by Ang II in obese animals. The role of AT2 receptors was also evaluated. Male monosodium glutamate-induced obese (obese and non-obese Wistar rats (control were used. The circulating concentrations of Ang I and Ang II, determined by HPLC, were increased in obese rats. Ang II-induced isometric contraction was decreased in endothelium-intact resistance mesenteric arteries from obese compared with control rats and exhibited a retarded AT1 receptor antagonist response. Blocking of AT2 receptors and inhibition of either endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS or extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2 restored Ang II-induced contraction in obese rats. Western blot analysis revealed increased protein expression of AT2 receptors in arteries from obese rats. Basal and Ang II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was also increased in obese rats. Blockade of either AT1 or AT2 receptors corrected the increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in arteries from obese rats to levels observed in control preparations. Phosphorylation of eNOS was increased in obese rats. Incubation with the ERK1/2 inhibitor before Ang II stimulation did not affect eNOS phosphorylation in control rats; however, it corrected the increased phosphorylation of eNOS in obese rats. These results clearly demonstrate that enhanced AT2 receptor and ERK1/2-induced, NO-mediated vasodilation reduces Ang II-induced contraction in an endothelium-dependent manner in obese rats.

  2. Gastroduodenal resistance and neural mechanisms involved in saline flow decrease elicited by acute blood volume expansion in anesthetized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graça J.R.V.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that blood volume (BV expansion decreases saline flow through the gastroduodenal (GD segment in anesthetized rats (Xavier-Neto J, dos Santos AA & Rola FH (1990 Gut, 31: 1006-1010. The present study attempts to identify the site(s of resistance and neural mechanisms involved in this phenomenon. Male Wistar rats (N = 97, 200-300 g were surgically manipulated to create four gut circuits: GD, gastric, pyloric and duodenal. These circuits were perfused under barostatically controlled pressure (4 cmH2O. Steady-state changes in flow were taken to reflect modifications in circuit resistances during three periods of time: normovolemic control (20 min, expansion (10-15 min, and expanded (30 min. Perfusion flow rates did not change in normovolemic control animals over a period of 60 min. BV expansion (Ringer bicarbonate, 1 ml/min up to 5% body weight significantly (P<0.05 reduced perfusion flow in the GD (10.3 ± 0.5 to 7.6 ± 0.6 ml/min, pyloric (9.0 ± 0.6 to 5.6 ± 1.2 ml/min and duodenal (10.8 ± 0.4 to 9.0 ± 0.6 ml/min circuits, but not in the gastric circuit (11.9 ± 0.4 to 10.4 ± 0.6 ml/min. Prazosin (1 mg/kg and yohimbine (3 mg/kg prevented the expansion effect on the duodenal but not on the pyloric circuit. Bilateral cervical vagotomy prevented the expansion effect on the pylorus during the expansion but not during the expanded period and had no effect on the duodenum. Atropine (0.5 mg/kg, hexamethonium (10 mg/kg and propranolol (2 mg/kg were ineffective on both circuits. These results indicate that 1 BV expansion increases the GD resistance to liquid flow, 2 pylorus and duodenum are important sites of resistance, and 3 yohimbine and prazosin prevented the increase in duodenal resistance and vagotomy prevented it partially in the pylorus

  3. DETERMINATION OF THE SPECTRUM OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE GENES HAVE PHENOTYPIC RESISTANT STRAINS OF PARIETAL INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA IN RATS BY RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukina Y.V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The problem of formation of bacterial resistance to glycopeptides and beta-lactam antibiotics (cephalosporins and carbapenems are used worldwide for the treatment of severe community acquired and nosocomial infections, especially caused by polymicrobial flora has become global and is a major factor limiting the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. In this regard, the study of genetic microbial resistance determinants allows not only to carry out an effective antibiotic therapy, but also to identify two main processes leading to the development of epidemiologically significant events: the introduction of the agent in the risk population from the outside and in situ pathogen (spontaneous genetic drift targeted restructuring of the population. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the resistance genes to carbapenems, cephalosporins, glycopeptides have clinically important phenotype of resistant strains of microorganisms families Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Bacteroidaceae, Enterococcaceae, Peptostreptococcaceae. Materials and methods. As a material for PCR studies 712 phenotypically resistant strains of microorganisms isolated from 80 rats "Wistar" line in microbiological study microflora of the wall were used. During the investigation 474 isolates of bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae, 39 - Pseudomonadaceae, 71 - Bacteroidaceae, 96 - Enterococcaceae, 32 - Peptostreptococcaceae were studied. Isolation of DNA from bacteria in the study was performed using reagents "DNA-Express" ("Litekh", Russia. For the detection of resistance genes by PCR in real time (RT-PCR reagent kits "FLUOROPOL-RV" ("Litekh", Russia were used. During the experiment, the VIM genes, OXA-48, NDM, KPC, responsible for the resistance of microorganisms to carbapenems, CTX-M - resistance to cephalosporins, as well as genes Van A and van B, the development of resistance to glycopeptides (vancomycin and teicoplanin were determined. Analysis

  4. Kaempferol alleviates insulin resistance via hepatic IKK/NF-κB signal in type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cheng; Yang, Hui; Tang, Chengyong; Yao, Gaoqiong; Kong, Lingxi; He, Haixia; Zhou, Yuanda

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies show that inflammation underlies the metabolic disorders of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Since kaempferol, a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been described to have potent anti-inflammatory properties, we investigated whether kaempferol could ameliorate insulin resistance through inhibiting inflammatory responses. The model of diabetic rat was induced by 6-week high-fat diet plus streptozotocin. Animals were orally treated with kaempferol (50 or 150 mg/kg) and aspirin (100mg/kg) for 10 weeks. The results showed that kaempferol ameliorated blood lipids and insulin in an dose-dependent manner. Kaempferol effectively restored insulin resistance induced alteration of glucose disposal by using an insulin tolerance test and the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp method. Western blotting results showed that KPF inhibited the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), IkB kinase α (IKKα) and IkB kinase β (IKKβ). These effects were accompanied with reduction in nucleic and cytosol levels of nuclear factor kappa-β (NF-κB), and further tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels. Aspirin had similar effects. These results provide in vivo evidence that kaempferol-mediated down-regulation of IKK and subsequent inhibition of NF-κB pathway activation may be associated with the reduction of hepatic inflammatory lesions, which is contributing to the improvement of insulin signaling defect in diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Energy restriction does not prevent insulin resistance but does prevent liver steatosis in aging rats on a Western-style diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebelle, Marie; Roy, Maggie; St-Pierre, Valérie; Courchesne-Loyer, Alexandre; Fortier, Mélanie; Bouzier-Sore, Anne-Karine; Gallis, Jean-Louis; Beauvieux, Marie-Christine; Cunnane, Stephen C

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term energy restriction (ER) on plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle metabolite profiles in aging rats fed a Western-style diet. Three groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied. Group 1 consisted of 2 mo old rats fed ad libitum; group 2 were 19 mo old rats also fed ad libitum; and group 3 were 19 mo old rats subjected to 40% ER for the last 11.5 mo. To imitate a Western-style diet, all rats were given a high-sucrose, very low ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) diet. High-resolution magic angle spinning-(1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used for hepatic and skeletal muscle metabolite determination, and fatty acid profiles were measured by capillary gas chromatography on plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle. ER coupled with a Western-style diet did not prevent age-induced insulin resistance or the increase in triacylglycerol content in plasma and skeletal muscle associated with aging. However, in the liver, ER did prevent steatosis and increased the percent of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids relative to ω-6 and ω-3 PUFA. Although steatosis was reduced, the beneficial effects of ER on systemic insulin resistance and plasma and skeletal muscle metabolites observed elsewhere with a balanced diet seem to be compromised by high-sucrose and low ω-3 PUFA intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Plasma protein concentration and control of coronary vascular resistance in isolated rat heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avolio, A. P.; Spaan, J. A.; Laird, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Isolated externally paced (300 beats/min) rat hearts were perfused at constant pressure (70 mmHg) using a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution with (n = 52) and without (n = 15) washed bovine red cells. Albumin concentration varied from 1 to 10 g/dl. With increasing albumin concentration in

  7. Therapeutic effects of tender coconut water on oxidative stress in fructose fed insulin resistant hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagya, D; Prema, L; Rajamohan, T

    2012-04-01

    To investigate whether tender coconut water (TCW) mitigates oxidative stress in fructose fed hypertensive rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed with fructose rich diet and treated with TCW (4 mL/100 g of body weight) for 3 subsequent weeks. Systolic blood pressure was measured every three days using the indirect tail cuff method. At the end of the experimental period, plasma glucose and insulin, serum triglycerides and free fatty acids, lipid peroxidation markers (MDA, hydroperoxides and conjugated dienes) and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were analyzed in all the groups. Treatment with TCW significantly lowered the systolic blood pressure and reduced serum triglycerides and free fatty acids. Plasma glucose and insulin levels and lipid peroxidation markers such as MDA, hydroperoxides and conjugated dienes were significantly reduced in fructose fed rats treated with TCW. Activities of antioxidant enzymes are up regulated significantly in TCW treated rats. Histopathological analysis of liver showed that TCW treatment reduced the lipid accumulation and inflammatory infiltration without any significant hepatocellular damage. The overall results suggest that, TCW treatment could prevent and reverse high blood pressure induced by high fructose diet probably by inhibition of lipid peroxidation, upregulation of antioxidant status and improved insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of endurance, resistance, and concurrent exercise on learning and memory after morphine withdrawal in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrinkalam, Ebrahim; Heidarianpour, Ali; Salehi, Iraj; Ranjbar, Kamal; Komaki, Alireza

    2016-07-15

    Continuous morphine consumption contributes to the development of cognitive disorders. This work investigates the impacts of different types of exercise on learning and memory in morphine-dependent rats. Forty morphine-dependent rats were randomly divided into five groups: sedentary-dependent (Sed-D), endurance exercise-dependent (En-D), strength exercise-dependent (St-D), and combined (concurrent) exercise-dependent (Co-D). Healthy rats were used as controls (Con). After 10weeks of regular exercise (endurance, strength, and concurrent; each five days per week), spatial and aversive learning and memory were assessed using the Morris water maze and shuttle box tests. The results showed that morphine addiction contributes to deficits in spatial learning and memory. Furthermore, each form of exercise training restored spatial learning and memory performance in morphine-dependent rats to levels similar to those of healthy controls. Aversive learning and memory during the acquisition phase were not affected by morphine addiction or exercise, but were significantly decreased by morphine dependence. Only concurrent training returned the time spent in the dark compartment in the shuttle box test to control levels. These findings show that different types of exercise exert similar effects on spatial learning and memory, but show distinct effects on aversive learning and memory. Further, morphine dependence-induced deficits in cognitive function were blocked by exercise. Therefore, different exercise regimens may represent practical treatment methods for cognitive and behavioral impairments associated with morphine-related disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Effect of Rosiglitazone on Bone Quality in a Rat Model of Insulin Resistance and Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardone, Laura Donata

    Rosiglitazone (RSG) is an insulin-sensitizing drug used to treat Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). Clinical trials show that women taking RSG experience more limb fractures than patients taking other T2DM drugs. The purpose of this study is to understand how RSG (3mg/kg/day and 10mg/kg/day) and the bisphosphonate alendronate (0.7mg/kg/week) alter bone quality in the male, female and female ovariectomized (OVX) Zucker fatty rat model over a 12 week period. Bone quality was evaluated by mechanical testing of cortical and trabecular bone. Microarchitecture, bone mineral density (BMD), cortical bone porosity, bone formation/resorption and mineralization were also measured. Female OVX RSG10mg/kg rats had significantly lower vertebral BMD and compromised trabecular architecture versus OVX controls. Increased cortical porosity and decreased mechanical properties occurred in these rats. ALN treatment prevented these negative effects in the OVX RSG model. Evidence of reduced bone formation and excess bone resorption was detected in female RSG-treated rats.

  10. Trigonella foenum-graecum water extract improves insulin sensitivity and stimulates PPAR and γ gene expression in high fructose-fed insulin-resistant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Mohammadi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrates the beneficial effects of trigonella foenum-graecum extract on insulin resistance in rats fed on a high-fructose diet. At least three mechanisms are involved, including direct insulin-like effect, increase in adiponectin levels, and PPARγ protein expression.

  11. [Effect of high-fat diet and food restriction on energy metabolism in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianmin; Wang, Junxia; Zheng, Long; Lian, Weiguang; Liu, Shufeng

    2015-09-01

    To explore the effect of high-fat diet and food restriction on energy metabolism in obesity-prone (OP) and obesity-resistant (OR) rats. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into OP, OR and control groups according to their body weight gain after fed with high-fat diet for 3 wk. OP and OR groups were fed with high-fat diet in the following 12 wk to promote the development of obesity. Then one-half of the rats of each group began to food restriction and were allowed access to 50% of their individual baseline mean daily food intake each day, while the other half were maintained on ad libitum food for 2 wk. Basal metabolic rate (BMR), resting metabolic rate (RMR) of each group were measured by indirect calorimetry during the high-fat diet feeding and food restriction conditions. After the rats were sacrificed, body fat content was measured. OR rats had significantly higher BMR and RMR than the other two groups during high-fat diet feeding condition. There was no significant difference between OP and control group. Food restriction led to a reduction in BMR and RMR in all groups. OR rats showed a significantly greater reduction. OP group showed a significant decrease in body fat weight and fat content during the food restriction period, while there was no significant differences in OR rats. There are significant differences between OP and OR rats in BMR and RMR either in high-fat diet feeding condition or food restricted state. OR rat has the ability to sense and respond to energy imbalance more accurately than OP rat.

  12. A cyclic GMP-dependent calcium-activated chloride current in smooth-muscle cells from rat mesenteric resistance arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Aalkjær, Christian; Nilsson, Holger

    2004-01-01

    M) in the pipette solution. The current was found to be a calcium-activated chloride current with an absolute requirement for cyclic GMP (EC50 6.4 microM). The current could be activated by the constitutively active subunit of PKG. Current activation was blocked by the protein kinase G antagonist Rp-8-Br......We have previously demonstrated the presence of a cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent calcium-activated inward current in vascular smooth-muscle cells, and suggested this to be of importance in synchronizing smooth-muscle contraction. Here we demonstrate the characteristics of this current. Using...... conventional patch-clamp technique, whole-cell currents were evoked in freshly isolated smooth-muscle cells from rat mesenteric resistance arteries by elevation of intracellular calcium with either 10 mM caffeine, 1 microM BAY K8644, 0.4 microM ionomycin, or by high calcium concentration (900 n...

  13. Effect of Arctium Lappa Root Extract on Glucose Levels and Insulin Resistance in Rats with High Sucrose Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ahangarpour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes Mellitus is a growing health problem in all over the world. Arctium Lappa has been used therapeutically in Europe, North America and Asia. Antioxidants and antidiabetic compounds have been found in the root of Arctium Lappa. This study intends to investigate the effects of Arctium Lappa root aqueous extract on glucose, insulin levels and Fasting Insulin Resistance Index in female rats with high sucrose diet. Methods: 40 female Wistar rats weighting 150-250(g were applied. After having a diet induced by sucrose 50% in drinking water for 5 weeks, the animals were randomly divided into two groups of control, sucrose induced, and three groups of sucrose induced along with Arctium Lappa root aqueous extract (50,100,200 mg/Kg (8 rats in each group. Treatment by extracts was used during 2 weeks (i.p. and 24 hours after the last treatment, heart blood samples were gathered. After Blood samples were centrifuged, fasting plasma glucose (12 h was determined by kit and fasting insulin concentration was assayed by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa methods. Result: Glucose levels, insulin and FIRI in sucrose group significantly increased in comparison with control group. Glucose levels in aqueous extract groups; 50 mg/kg (116.14±16.64mg/dl and 200 mg/kg (90.66±22.58 mg/dl in comparison with sucrose group (140.5±18.73 mg/dl significantly decreased. Insulin level and FIRI in all of aqueous extract groups were significantly decreased (P<0.001 in comparison with sucrose group. Conclusions: Arctium Lappa root aqueous extracts in animal model has revealed significant decrease in blood glucose and insulin levels.

  14. Overproduction of altered VLDL in an insulin-resistance rat model: Influence of SREBP-1c and PPAR-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Diego; Miksztowicz, Verónica; Macri, Vanesa; López, Gustavo H; Friedman, Silvia; Berg, Gabriela; Zago, Valeria; Schreier, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In insulin-resistance, VLDL presents alterations that increase its atherogenic potential. The mechanism by which insulin-resistance promotes the production of altered VLDL is still not completely understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c) and of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α), with the features of composition and size of VLDL in an insulin-resistance rat model induced by a sucrose rich diet (SRD). The study was conducted on 12 male Wistar rats (180g) receiving SRD (12 weeks) and 12 controls. Lipid profile, free fatty acids, glucose, and insulin were measured. Lipid content in liver and visceral fat were assessed. Isolated VLDL (d<1.006g/ml) was characterized by its chemical composition and size by HPLC. The respective hepatic expression of SREBP-1c and PPAR-α was determined (Western blot). As expected, SRD had elevated triglycerides (TG), free fatty acids and insulin levels, and decreased HDL-cholesterol (p<0.05), together with augmented hepatic and visceral fat (p<0.05). SRD showed higher VLDL total mass - with increased TG content - and predominance of large VLDL (p<0.05). SRD showed an increase in SREBP-1c (precursor and mature forms) and decreased PPAR-α expression (p<0.045). SREBP-1c forms were positively associated with VLDL total mass (p<0.04), VLDL-TG% (p<0.019), and large VLDL% (p<0.002). On the other hand, PPAR-α correlated negatively with VLDL total mass (p=0.05), VLDL-TG% (p=0.005), and large VLDL% (p=0.002). Insulin-resistance, by coordinated activation of SREBP-1c and reduction of PPAR-α, could promote the secretion of larger and TG over-enriched VLDL particles, with greater atherogenic capacity. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of creatine supplementation during resistance training on myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in rat skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Andreo F; Aguiar, Danilo H; Felisberto, Alan D S; Carani, Fernanda R; Milanezi, Rachel C; Padovani, Carlos R; Dal-Pai-Silva, Maeli

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize a rodent model to test the hypothesis that creatine (Cr) supplementation during resistance training would influence the pattern of slow-twitch muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms expression. Male Wistar rats (2-3 months old, 250-300 g) were divided into 4 groups: Nontrained without creatine supplementation (CO), nontrained with creatine supplementation (CR), trained without creatine supplementation (TR), and trained with creatine supplementation (TRCR). TR and TRCR groups were submitted to a resistance training program for 5 weeks (5 days/week) for morphological and biochemical analysis of the soleus muscle. Weightlifting exercise involved jump sessions into water, carrying progressive overload equivalent to percentage of body weight. CR and TRCR groups were given creatine at 0.5 g/kg(-1)/d(-1). Both Cr supplementation and resistance training alone or associated did not result in significant alterations (p > 0.05) in body weight gain, food intake, and muscle weight in the CR, TR and TRCR groups compared to the CO group. Also compared to the CO group, the CR group showed a significant (p training did not promote significant (p > 0.05) changes in MHC content of the TRCR group compared to the CO group. The data show that Cr supplementation provides a potential action to abolish the exercise-induced MHC isoform transitions from slow to fast in slow-twitch muscle. Thus, Cr supplementation might be a suitable strategy to maintaining a slow phenotype in slow muscle during resistance training, which may be favorable to maintenance of muscle oxidative capacity of endurance athletes.

  16. N-Acetylneuraminic Acid Supplementation Prevents High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats through Transcriptional and Nontranscriptional Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac is a biomarker of cardiometabolic diseases. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that dietary Neu5Ac may improve cardiometabolic indices. A high fat diet (HFD + Neu5Ac (50 or 400 mg/kg BW/day was fed to rats and compared with HFD + simvastatin (10 mg/kg BW/day or HFD alone for 12 weeks. Weights and serum biochemicals (lipid profile, oral glucose tolerance test, leptin, adiponectin, and insulin were measured, and mRNA levels of insulin signaling genes were determined. The results indicated that low and high doses of sialic acid (SA improved metabolic indices, although only the oral glucose tolerance test, serum triglycerides, leptin, and adiponectin were significantly better than those in the HFD and HFD + simvastatin groups (P<0.05. Furthermore, the results showed that only high-dose SA significantly affected the transcription of hepatic and adipose tissue insulin signaling genes. The data suggested that SA prevented HFD-induced insulin resistance in rats after 12 weeks of administration through nontranscriptionally mediated biochemical changes that may have differentially sialylated glycoprotein structures at a low dose. At higher doses, SA induced transcriptional regulation of insulin signaling genes. These effects suggest that low and high doses of SA may produce similar metabolic outcomes in relation to insulin sensitivity through multiple mechanisms. These findings are worth studying further.

  17. Intraabdominal sepsis down-regulates transcription of sodium taurocholate cotransporter and multidrug resistance-associated protein in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, P K; Chen, J; Andrejko, K M; Deutschman, C S

    2000-08-01

    Hepatic dysfunction in sepsis is characterized by hyperbilirubinemia and intrahepatic cholestasis. We hypothesize that sepsis causes decreased hepatic transcription of the bile acid transporter sodium taurocholate cotransporter (Ntcp) and the organic anion transporter multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp2) and that interleukin (IL)-6 is important in the down-regulation of Ntcp and Mrp2 expression. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent induction of mild, nonlethal sepsis by cecal ligation and single puncture (CLP) or fulminant sepsis by cecal ligation and double puncture (2CLP). Hepatic transcription of Ntcp and Mrp2 rapidly decreased after CLP or 2CLP. Seventy-two hours later, transcription was 60% of baseline in CLP and 14% of baseline in 2CLP. Serum bilirubin was elevated from 24 h onward and cholestasis was observed on fixed liver specimens at 24, 48, and 72 h after 2CLP but not after CLP. Steady-state Ntcp and Mrp2 mRNA was decreased in IL-6-treated cultured hepatocytes and in normal rats given 1 mg/kg intravenous IL-6. We conclude that 1) Ntcp and Mrp2 transcription is down-regulated transiently after CLP and persistently after 2CLP; 2) 2CLP results in hyperbilirubinemia and cholestasis, in part due to persistently decreased transcription of Ntcp and Mrp2; and 3) altered Ntcp and Mrp2 transcription is mediated in part by IL-6.

  18. Resistance to DNA Damaging Agents Produced Invasive Phenotype of Rat Glioma Cells—Characterization of a New in Vivo Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Stojković

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemoresistance and invasion properties are severe limitations to efficient glioma therapy. Therefore, development of glioma in vivo models that more accurately resemble the situation observed in patients emerges. Previously, we established RC6 rat glioma cell line resistant to DNA damaging agents including antiglioma approved therapies such as 3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU and temozolomide (TMZ. Herein, we evaluated the invasiveness of RC6 cells in vitro and in a new orthotopic animal model. For comparison, we used C6 cells from which RC6 cells originated. Differences in cell growth properties were assessed by real-time cell analyzer. Cells’ invasive potential in vitro was studied in fluorescently labeled gelatin and by formation of multicellular spheroids in hydrogel. For animal studies, fluorescently labeled cells were inoculated into adult male Wistar rat brains. Consecutive coronal and sagittal brain sections were analyzed 10 and 25 days post-inoculation, while rats’ behavior was recorded during three days in the open field test starting from 25th day post-inoculation. We demonstrated that development of chemoresistance induced invasive phenotype of RC6 cells with significant behavioral impediments implying usefulness of orthotopic RC6 glioma allograft in preclinical studies for the examination of new approaches to counteract both chemoresistance and invasion of glioma cells.

  19. Moderately Low Magnesium Intake Impairs Growth of Lean Body Mass in Obese-Prone and Obese-Resistant Rats Fed a High-Energy Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Bertinato

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The physical and biochemical changes resulting from moderately low magnesium (Mg intake are not fully understood. Obesity and associated co-morbidities affect Mg metabolism and may exacerbate Mg deficiency and physiological effects. Male rats selectively bred for diet-induced obesity (OP, obese-prone or resistance (OR, obese-resistant were fed a high-fat, high-energy diet containing moderately low (LMg, 0.116 ± 0.001 g/kg or normal (NMg, 0.516 ± 0.007 g/kg Mg for 13 weeks. The growth, body composition, mineral homeostasis, bone development, and glucose metabolism of the rats were examined. OP and OR rats showed differences (p < 0.05 in many physical and biochemical measures regardless of diet. OP and OR rats fed the LMg diet had decreased body weight, lean body mass, decreased femoral size (width, weight, and volume, and serum Mg and potassium concentrations compared to rats fed the NMg diet. The LMg diet increased serum calcium (Ca concentration in both rat strains with a concomitant decrease in serum parathyroid hormone concentration only in the OR strain. In the femur, Mg concentration was reduced, whereas concentrations of Ca and sodium were increased in both strains fed the LMg diet. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in an oral glucose tolerance test were similar in rats fed the LMg or NMg diets. These results show that a moderately low Mg diet impairs the growth of lean body mass and alters femoral geometry and mineral metabolism in OP and OR rats fed a high-energy diet.

  20. Passive transfer of resistance and the site of immune-dependent elimination of the challenge infection in rats vaccinated with highly irradiated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.J.; Bickle, Q.D.; Taylor, M.G.; Andrews, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    The immune-dependent elimination of a challenge infection in rats vaccinated with highly-irradiated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni was analysed by passive transfer of serum, recovery of the challenge from the lungs and livers and by transferring lung-stage schistosomula. Recipients of serum from rats immunized with either unirradiated, 20 or 40 krad.-irradiated cercariae, were equally resistant if the serum was injected on the day of infection or 5-7 days after infection. Vaccinated rat serum transferred to mice and vaccinated rabbit serum transferred to rats conferred comparable protection when injected on day 0 or 5 days after infection of the recipients. This apparent susceptibility of the lung schistosomula to immune attack was confirmed by challenging 20 or 40 krad.-irradiated cercariae vaccinated rats with lung-stage schistosomula derived from mice or rats. All the detectable attrition of a cercarial challenge in vaccinated rats occurred between 7 and 10 days post-challenge, before the parasites reached the liver. Since there was no evidence of damage or attrition in the skin or lungs before day 7 it was concluded that immune-dependent elimination occurred rapidly following a 'window of sensitivity' coinciding with the migration of the parasites from the lungs to the liver. (author)

  1. Effects of dihydropyridines on tension and calcium-45 influx in isolated mesenteric resistance vessels from spontaneously hypertensive and normotensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauvin, C.; Hwang, O.; Yamamoto, M.; van Breemen, C.

    1987-01-01

    Contractile tension responses to norepinephrine and depolarizing potassium (80 mM K+), as well as calcium-45 influx stimulated by these agents, were studied in isolated mesenteric resistance vessels (each 100 microM internal diameter) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and from normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKYs). Inhibitory effects of 2 dihydropyridine Ca++ antagonists, PN 200-110 (isradipine) and nisoldipine, on these parameters were also determined. Contractile responses to 80 mM K+ were inhibited by both Ca++ antagonists with the same potency and efficacy in SHR compared with WKY vessels (PN 200-110 IC50 = 2.8 +/- 1.3 X 10(-8) M in SHRs and 2.5 +/- 1.5 X 10(-8) M in WKYs; nisoldipine IC50 = 1.1 +/- 0.4 X 10(-8) M in SHRs and 1.2 +/- 0.9 X 10(-8) M in WKYs). However, contractile responses to norepinephrine (10(-4) M) were inhibited less potently by nisoldipine in SHR vessels (IC50 = 2.2 +/- 0.3 X 10(-9) M) compared with WKY vessels (IC50 = 1.6 +/- 0.6 X 10(-10) M). Similarly, PN 200-110 tended to be less (but not significantly less) potent in SHR vessels (IC50 = 3.3 +/- 1.8 X 10(-8) M) than in WKY vessels (IC50 = 3.4 +/- 0.9 X 10(-9) M); its efficacy was significantly depressed in the SHR vessels (by approximately 20%). When norepinephrine-stimulated calcium-45 influx was determined in the presence of these Ca++ antagonists, a similar profile emerged with respect to a comparison of SHR and WKY vessels. These results support a previously hypothesized alteration in receptor-activated Ca++ influx pathways in SHR mesenteric resistance vessels

  2. Effects of deoxycholylglycine, a conjugated secondary bile acid, on myogenic tone and agonist-induced contraction in rat resistance arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Khurana

    Full Text Available Bile acids (BAs regulate cardiovascular function via diverse mechanisms. Although in both health and disease serum glycine-conjugated BAs are more abundant than taurine-conjugated BAs, their effects on myogenic tone (MT, a key determinant of systemic vascular resistance (SVR, have not been examined.Fourth-order mesenteric arteries (170-250 µm isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats were pressurized at 70 mmHg and allowed to develop spontaneous constriction, i.e., MT. Deoxycholylglycine (DCG; 0.1-100 µM, a glycine-conjugated major secondary BA, induced reversible, concentration-dependent reduction of MT that was similar in endothelium-intact and -denuded arteries. DCG reduced the myogenic response to stepwise increase in pressure (20 to 100 mmHg. Neither atropine nor the combination of L-NAME (a NOS inhibitor plus indomethacin altered DCG-mediated reduction of MT. K(+ channel blockade with glibenclamide (K(ATP, 4-aminopyradine (K(V, BaCl(2 (K(IR or tetraethylammonium (TEA, K(Ca were also ineffective. In Fluo-2-loaded arteries, DCG markedly reduced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSM Ca(2+ fluorescence (∼50%. In arteries incubated with DCG, physiological salt solution (PSS with high Ca(2+ (4 mM restored myogenic response. DCG reduced vascular tone and VSM cytoplasmic Ca(2+ responses (∼50% of phenylephrine (PE- and Ang II-treated arteries, but did not affect KCl-induced vasoconstriction.In rat mesenteric resistance arteries DCG reduces pressure- and agonist-induced vasoconstriction and VSM cytoplasmic Ca(2+ responses, independent of muscarinic receptor, NO or K(+ channel activation. We conclude that BAs alter vasomotor responses, an effect favoring reduced SVR. These findings are likely pertinent to vascular dysfunction in cirrhosis and other conditions associated with elevated serum BAs.

  3. Dr. von Braun Briefing Walt Disney

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. von Braun began his association with Walt Disney in the 1950s when the rocket scientist appeared in three Disney television productions related to the exploration of space. Years later, Dr. von Braun invited Disney and his associates to tour the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This photograph is dated April 13, 1965. From left are R.J. Schwinghamer from the MSFC, Disney, B.J. Bernight, and Dr. von Braun.

  4. In Memoriam: Dr. Frank John Fenner

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-22

    This podcast reflects on one of the greatest pioneers in virology, Dr. Frank John Fenner. Dr. Frederick Murphy, a member of EID's editorial board and the Institute of Medicine, and professor of Pathology at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, shares professional and personal stories of Dr. Frank Fenner.  Created: 4/22/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/26/2011.

  5. BAY61-3606 potentiates the anti-tumor effects of TRAIL against colon cancer through up-regulating DR4 and down-regulating NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jipei; Wang, Yufang; Chen, Degao; Ji, Guangyu; Ma, Qizhao; Liao, Shiping; Zheng, Yanjiang; Zhang, Ji; Hou, Yiping

    2016-12-28

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is well known for its ability to preferentially induce apoptosis in malignant cells without causing damage to most normal cells. However, inherent and acquired resistance of tumor to TRAIL-induced apoptosis limits its therapeutic applicability. Here we show that the orally available tyrosine kinase inhibitor, BAY61-3606, enhances the sensitivity of human colon cancer cells, especially those harboring active mutations in Kirsten Rat Sarcoma Viral Oncogene Homolog (KRAS) gene, to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. The sensitization was achieved by up-regulating death receptor 4 (DR4) and the tumor suppressor p53. BAY61-3606-induced the up-regulation of DR4 is p53-dependent. Knockout of p53 decreased BAY61-3606-induced DR4 expression and inhibited the effect of BAY61-3606 on TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In addition, BAY61-3606 suppressed activity of NF-κB and regulated its gene products, which might also contribute to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our results showed that BAY61-3606 sensitizes colon cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via up-regulating DR4 expression in p53-dependent manner and inhibiting NF-κB activity, suggesting that the combination of TRAIL and BAY61-3606 may be a promising therapeutic approach in the treatment of colon cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of dietary protein quality on the resistance of rats to total body radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounous, G.; Pageau, R.

    1983-01-01

    Young rats have been fed four defined-formula diets before and after #betta#-irradiation (700 rd [7.0 Gy], 75 rd/min [750 mGy], 80 cm from the source, total body). Animals eating a diet containing lactalbumin hydrolyzate (20 g/100 g diet) exhibited less anorexia and weight loss following #betta#-rays than a corresponding group eating casein hydrolyzate (20 g/100 g diet). (orig.) [de

  7. Proteomic investigation of the ventral rat hippocampus links DRP-2 to escitalopram treatment resistance and SNAP to stress resilience in the chronic mild stress model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Christina; Jayatissa, Magdalena N; Enghild, Jan J

    2007-01-01

    of depression, by exposing rats to a series of mild stressors for 7 weeks, with antidepressant treatment during the last 4 weeks. In the CMS model, animals were split into six different groups at the end of treatment; unchallenged control escitalopram (n = 12), unchallenged control vehicle (n = 12), CMS vehicle...... (n = 12), CMS escitalopram responders (n = 11), CMS escitalopram non-responders (n = 13) and CMS resilient (stress resistant) (n = 12). Protein levels in the ventral rat hippocampus were compared between the groups to provide putative markers of anhedonia, escitalopram resistance, and stress...... resilience. Twenty-eight candidate protein spots were selected, of which 13 were successfully identified using tandem mass spectrometry. DRP-2 (dihydropyrimidinase-related protein-2) was a potential marker for escitalopram resistance, whereas alpha-SNAP and beta-SNAP were associated with stress resilience...

  8. Effects of supplementation with L-glutamine and L-alanine in the body composition of rats submitted to resistance exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Yule Coqueiro

    Full Text Available Abstract We investigated the effects of glutamine and alanine supplementation on body composition of rats submitted to resistance exercise. Wistar rats were submitted to eight-week of resistance exercise, which consisted of climbing a ladder with progressive loads (25–100% of body weight. In the last 21 days of training, animals were supplemented with L-glutamine and L-alanine, as a dipeptide or in their free form (DIP, GLN + ALA and ALA groups, or water (SED and CTRL groups. RE attenuated body weight gain and lipid contents of CTRL group (p < 0.05 vs. SED and DIP supplementation promoted an increase in tibialis muscle weight, as well as in protein content (p < 0.05 vs. CTRL. Taken together, our data indicated that resistance exercise improves body composition and dipeptide potentiated the muscle hypertrophic effect.

  9. Anticoagulant Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte

    Although sewer rat control is carried out in more than 80 % of all Danish municipalities, with usage of large amounts of anticoagulant rodenticides, knowledge on anticoagulant resistance among rats living in the sewers is limited. As rat problems in urban areas are believed to be related to sewer...... problems (70-90 % in UK and DK) unawareness of resistance amongst these populations of Brown rats may constitute a future control problem and knowledge on this issue has become crucial. Rats were captured in sewers from seven different locations in the suburban area of Copenhagen. Locations was chosen...... to represent different sewer rat management strategies i) no anticoagulants for approx. 20 years ii) no anticoagulants for the last 5 years and iii) continuous control for many years. Animals were tested for resistance to bromadiolone by Blood-Clotting Response test, as bromadiolone is the most frequently used...

  10. Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kondrashov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to perform a chemical analysis of both Alibernet red wine and an alcohol-free Alibernet red wine extract (AWE and to investigate the effects of AWE on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production as well as blood pressure development in normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs. Total antioxidant capacity together with total phenolic and selected mineral content was measured in wine and AWE. Young 6-week-old male WKY and SHR were treated with AWE (24,2 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. Total NOS and SOD activities, eNOS and SOD1 protein expressions, and superoxide production were determined in the tissues. Both antioxidant capacity and phenolic content were significantly higher in AWE compared to wine. The AWE increased NOS activity in the left ventricle, aorta, and kidney of SHR, while it did not change NOS activity in WKY rats. Similarly, increased SOD activity in the plasma and left ventricle was observed in SHR only. There were no changes in eNOS and SOD1 expressions. In conclusion, phenolics and minerals included in AWE may contribute directly to increased NOS and SOD activities of SHR. Nevertheless, 3 weeks of AWE treatment failed to affect blood pressure of SHR.

  11. Differential Development of Inflammation and Insulin Resistance in Different Adipose Tissue Depots Along Aging in Wistar Rats: Effects of Caloric Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra Rojas, Johanna X; García-San Frutos, Miriam; Horrillo, Daniel; Lauzurica, Nuria; Oliveros, Eva; Carrascosa, Jose María; Fernández-Agulló, Teresa; Ros, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes increases with aging and these disorders are associated with inflammation. Insulin resistance and inflammation do not develop at the same time in all tissues. Adipose tissue is one of the tissues where inflammation and insulin resistance are established earlier during aging. Nevertheless, the existence of different fat depots states the possibility of differential roles for these depots in the development of age-associated inflammation and insulin resistance. To explore this, we analyzed insulin signaling and inflammation in epididymal, perirenal, subcutaneous, and brown adipose tissues during aging in Wistar rats. Although all tissues showed signs of inflammation and insulin resistance with aging, epididymal fat was the first to develop signs of inflammation and insulin resistance along aging among white fat tissues. Subcutaneous adipose tissue presented the lowest degree of inflammation and insulin resistance that developed latter with age. Brown adipose tissue also presented latter insulin resistance and inflammation but with lower signs of macrophage infiltration. Caloric restriction ameliorated insulin resistance and inflammation in all tissues, being more effective in subcutaneous and brown adipose tissues. These data demonstrate differential susceptibility of the different adipose depots to the development of age-associated insulin resistance and inflammation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. D3.2 The DR. Congo review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    of the 2002 Peace Agreement in the country. A key challenge was that the sheer size of the DRC, the lack of infrastructure and the non-permissive environment made it a very difficult and complex undertaking. The Congolese partner has been resistant to reform, and the EU has found it difficult to undertake its......This IECEU project deliverable 3.5, The DR Congo Field Trip report, assesses the contributions of the EU CSDP missions Operation Artemis, EUFOR RDC, EUPOL and EUSEC to the overall security of the state of the DR Congo, in particular by taking into consideration the perspectives of mission personnel......, representatives of the Congolese authorities, NGOs and other IOs. EU involvement started with the deployment of Artemis in 2003, and the study ends with the closure of EUSEC in July 2016. All EU missions in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) have been part of EU support for the transition and implementation...

  13. Effect of N-Acetylcysteine on Antioxidant Defense, Oxidative Modification, and Salivary Gland Function in a Rat Model of Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Żukowski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the salivary gland dysfunction in insulin resistance (IR. It is not surprising that new substances are constantly being sought that will protect against the harmful effects of IR in the oral cavity environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC on oxidative stress and secretory function of salivary glands in a rat model of insulin resistance. Rats were divided into 4 groups: C—normal diet, C + NAC—normal diet + NAC, HFD—high-fat diet, and HFD + NAC. We have demonstrated that NAC elevated enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase and nonenzymatic antioxidants (reduced glutathione (GSH and total antioxidant capacity (TAS in the parotid glands of HFD + NAC rats, while in the submandibular glands increased only GSH and TAS levels. NAC protects against oxidative damage only in the parotid glands and increased stimulated salivary secretion; however, it does not increase the protein secretion in the both salivary glands. Summarizing, NAC supplementation prevents the decrease of stimulated saliva secretion, seen in the HFD rats affected. NAC improves the antioxidative capacity of the both glands and protects against oxidative damage to the parotid glands of IR rats.

  14. Synergetic Effects of Prenatal and Postnatal High Sucrose Intake on Glucose Tolerance and Hepatic Insulin Resistance in Rat Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengjie; Zhu, Di; Zhang, Yueming; Li, Lingjun; Chen, Xionghui; Zhang, Wenna; Shi, Ruixiu; Tao, Jianying; Han, Bing; Xu, Zhice

    2018-03-01

    High sucrose intake during pregnancy is linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus and altered insulin resistance. This study attempts to ascertain whether prenatal high sucrose intake (20% sucrose) alleviates the detrimental effects of high postnatal sugar consumption in the offspring, and the molecular mechanisms are investigated using a rat model. High prenatal sucrose exposure increases the body weight of the offspring at 1-3 weeks of age. Exposure to both prenatal and postnatal high sucrose increases glucose tolerance in the 4-month-old adult offspring compared with offspring receiving other treatments. Postnatal high sucrose exposure suppresses food intake but increases the total daily caloric and fluid intake. Both fasting blood glucose and plasma triglyceride levels are increased, but the fasting insulin level is unaffected. Prenatal high sucrose intake enlarges pancreatic islet area; however, prenatal-plus-postnatal high sucrose exposure induces smaller pancreatic islets. IRS-1(S612) protein phosphorylation is significantly increased, and the GSK-3β (S9) phosphorylation level is reduced. Both prenatal and prenatal-plus-postnatal high sucrose exposure substantially affect biological functions related to insulin homeostasis. IRS-1(S612) protein phosphorylation appears to be a part of the molecular mechanism underlying these effects. These results add to the understanding of how high sucrose intake contributes to insulin resistance and diabetes pathogenesis and how postnatal nutrition and lifestyle may mitigate detrimental prenatal exposures. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Adolescent female rats are more resistant than males to the effects of early stress on prefrontal cortex and impulsive behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Jaclyn M.; Shumake, Jason; Colorado, Rene A.; Conejo-Jimenez, Nelida; Gonzalez-Pardo, Hector; Gonzalez-Lima, F.

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that adolescent Sprague-Dawley females may be more resistant than males to display impulsive behavior and lower prefrontal cortex thickness after mother–infant separation (MS). Starting at postnatal day 2 (P2), the MS group was separated 6 hours/day and the early handled (EH) group 15 min/day for 10 days, and another group was standard facility reared (SFR). Subjects were examined for novel open-field activity (P28), light–dark apparatus (P29), familiar open-field (P30) and frontal cortical thickness. This protocol resulted in impulsive behavior in MS rats relative to EH and SFR, but this effect was less pronounced in females than males. MS affected the two sexes differently in terms of decreased prefrontal cortex dorsoventral thickness, with this effect being significant in males but not females. Neuroanatomical and behavioral documentation that adolescent females are more resistant than males to ADHD-like effects of maternal separation have not been previously reported. PMID:19125421

  16. GLOBULAR RESISTANCE MODIFICATION ON RATS CONSECUTIVELY TO Al2(SO43 ADDITION FOR TWO GENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STANA LOREDANA GABRIELA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Some of the major modifications on membranes produced by the oxygen reactivespecies are membranal structure and functions modifications, lipids peroxydation,membranal protein alterations and transportation disturbances thru membranes.A series of xenobotics like oxidant pollutants, lead, aluminium and others directlyor indirectly are producing thru metabolization free radicals which interact withcells components and alterate their functions. The purpose of this paper was torelieve the impact of aluminium cumulative addition onto globular resistance onrats. Has been administrated three levels of aluminium (200ppb, 400 ppb şi 1000ppb as Al2(SO43 ad libidum in water. Was followed their toxicity impact on theglobular resistance for two generations. The results indicate a decrease ofglobular resistance directly correlated with the aluminium addition.

  17. Trigonelline attenuates hepatic complications and molecular alterations in high-fat high-fructose diet-induced insulin resistance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Nehal A; Ramadan, Amer; Erian, Emad Y; Saleh, Dalia O; Sedik, Ahmed A; Badawi, Manal; El Hotaby, Walid

    2017-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trigonelline (TRG) on the hepatic complications associated with high-fat high-fructose (HFHF) diet-induced insulin resistance (IR) in rats. IR was induced by giving a saturated fat diet and 10% fructose in drinking water to rats for 8 weeks. Insulin-resistant rats were orally treated with TRG (50 and 100 mg/kg), sitagliptin (SIT; 5 mg/kg), or a combination of TRG (50 mg/kg) and SIT (5 mg/kg) for 14 days. Liver homogenates were used for assessment of hepatic lipids, oxidative stress biomarkers, and inflammatory cytokines. Histopathological and DNA cytometry examinations were carried out for hepatic and pancreatic tissues. Hepatic tissues were examined using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy for assessment of any molecular changes. Results of the present study revealed that oral treatment of insulin-resistant rats with TRG or TRG in combination with SIT significantly decreased homeostatic model assessment of IR, hepatic lipids, oxidative stress biomarkers, and the inflammatory cytokines. TRG or TRG in combination with SIT ameliorated the histopathological, DNA cytometry, and molecular alterations induced by a HFHF diet. Finally, it can be concluded that TRG has beneficial effects on the hepatic complications associated with IR due to its hypoglycemic effect and antioxidant potential.

  18. Red peppers with moderate and severe pungency prevent the memory deficit and hepatic insulin resistance in diabetic rats with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Min Jung; Kang, Suna; Moon, Na Rang; Daily, James W; Park, Sunmin

    2015-01-01

    Dementia induced by β-amyloid accumulation impairs peripheral glucose homeostasis, but red pepper extract improves glucose homeostasis. We therefore evaluated whether long-term oral consumption of different red pepper extracts improves cognitive dysfunction and glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetic rats with β-amyloid-induced dementia. Male diabetic rats received hippocampal CA1 infusions of β-amyloid (25-35) (AD) or β-amyloid (35-25, non-plaque forming), at a rate of 3.6 nmol/day for 14 days (Non-AD). AD rats were divided into four dietary groups receiving either 1% lyophilized 70% ethanol extracts of either low, moderate and severe pungency red peppers (AD-LP, AD-MP, and AD-SP) or 1% dextrin (AD-CON) in Western diets (43% energy as fat). The ascending order of control memory deficit measured by passive avoidance test and water maze test. Furthermore, the accumulation of β-amyloid induced glucose intolerance, although serum insulin levels were elevated during the late phase of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). All of the red pepper extracts prevented the glucose intolerance in AD rats. Consistent with OGTT results, during euglycemic hyperinulinemic clamp glucose infusion rates were lower in AD-CON than Non-AD-CON with no difference in whole body glucose uptake. Hepatic glucose output at the hyperinsulinemic state was increased in AD-CON. β-amyloid accumulation exacerbated hepatic insulin resistance, but all red pepper extract treatments reversed the insulin resistance in AD rats. The extracts of moderate and severe red peppers were found to prevent the memory deficit and exacerbation of insulin resistance by blocking tau phosphorylation and β-amyloid accumulation in diabetic rats with experimentally induced Alzheimer's-like dementia. These results suggest that red pepper consumption might be an effective intervention for preventing age-related memory deficit.

  19. Resistance exercise attenuates skeletal muscle oxidative stress, systemic pro-inflammatory state, and cachexia in Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilha, Camila Souza; Borges, Fernando Henrique; Costa Mendes da Silva, Lilian Eslaine; Frajacomo, Fernando Tadeu Trevisan; Jordao, Alceu Afonso; Duarte, José Alberto; Cecchini, Rubens; Guarnier, Flávia Alessandra; Deminice, Rafael

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise training (RET) on oxidative stress, systemic inflammatory markers, and muscle wasting in Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats. Male (Wistar) rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary controls (n = 9), tumor-bearing (n = 9), exercised (n = 9), and tumor-bearing exercised (n = 10). Exercised and tumor-bearing exercised rats were exposed to resistance exercise of climbing a ladder apparatus with weights tied to their tails for 6 weeks. The physical activity of control and tumor-bearing rats was confined to the space of the cage. After this period, tumor-bearing and tumor-bearing exercised animals were inoculated subcutaneously with Walker-256 tumor cells (11.0 × 10 7 cells in 0.5 mL of phosphate-buffered saline) while control and exercised rats were injected with vehicle. Following inoculation, rats maintained resistance exercise training (exercised and tumor-bearing exercised) or sedentary behavior (control and tumor-bearing) for 12 more days, after which they were euthanized. Results showed muscle wasting in the tumor-bearing group, with body weight loss, increased systemic leukocytes, and inflammatory interleukins as well as muscular oxidative stress and reduced mTOR signaling. In contrast, RET in the tumor-bearing exercised group was able to mitigate the reduced body weight and muscle wasting with the attenuation of muscle oxidative stress and systemic inflammatory markers. RET also prevented loss of muscle strength associated with tumor development. RET, however, did not prevent the muscle proteolysis signaling via FBXO32 gene messenger RNA expression in the tumor-bearing group. In conclusion, RET performed prior tumor implantation prevents cachexia development by attenuating tumor-induced systemic pro-inflammatory condition with muscle oxidative stress and muscle damage.

  20. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, a viscous soluble fiber, reduces insulin resistance and decreases fatty liver in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brockman David A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diets producing a high glycemic response result in exaggerated insulin secretion which induces hepatic lipogenesis, contributing to development of insulin resistance and fatty liver. Viscous dietary fibers blunt the postprandial rise in blood glucose, however their effect on type 2 diabetes and obesity are not entirely known. This study examined the effect of chronic consumption of the viscous, non-fermentable dietary fiber, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC, on glucose control, insulin resistance and liver lipids in an obese diabetic rat model. Methods Three groups of Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF rats were fed diets containing either 5% non-viscous cellulose (control, low viscosity HPMC (LV-HPMC or high viscosity HPMC (HV- HPMC for six weeks. Zucker lean littermates consuming cellulose served as a negative control. Markers of glucose control, including oral glucose tolerance test, glycated hemoglobin and urinary glucose, were measured as well as adiposity and the accumulation of liver lipids. Results The HPMC diets increased the viscosity of the small intestinal contents and reduced the postprandial rise in blood glucose. The food efficiency ratio was greater with HPMC feeding compared to the obese control and urinary excretion of glucose and ketone bodies was reduced. The two HPMC groups had lower glycated hemoglobin and kidney weights and a reduced area under the curve during a glucose tolerance test, indicating improved glucose control. Epididymal fat pad weight as percent of body weight was reduced in the HV-HPMC group compared to the obese control group. The HV-HPMC group also had lower concentrations of liver lipid and cholesterol and reduced liver weight. However, HV-HPMC feeding did not affect hepatic gene expression of SREBP-1c or FAS. Muscle concentration of acylcarnitines, a lipid intermediate in fatty acid β-oxidation, was not different between the HPMC groups and obese control, suggesting no change in muscle

  1. Dr. Francis Collins Is New NIH Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that, with Dr. Collins at the helm, the Human Genome Project met its milestones ahead of schedule and under budget. The project concluded successfully in April 2003 with the complete map of the human genome, the instruction book for peoples' DNA. Dr. Collins ...

  2. Dr Andrea Granelli, Vice President, Telecom Italia

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 06: Dr Andrea Granelli, Chief Executive Officer, Telecom Italia Lab (second from right) visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with (from left to right) M. Cecchi , F. Gagliardi and G. Cavallari. Photo 15: Dr Andrea Granelli, Chief Executive Officer, Telecom Italia Lab (left) visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with (from left to right) M. Cecchi and G. Cavallari.

  3. Angiotensin receptor blockade improves cardiac mitochondrial activity in response to an acute glucose load in obese insulin resistant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Thorwald

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia increases the risk of oxidant overproduction in the heart through activation of a multitude of pathways. Oxidation of mitochondrial enzymes may impair their function resulting in accumulation of intermediates and reverse electron transfer, contributing to mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS becomes inappropriately activated during metabolic syndrome, increasing oxidant production. To combat excess oxidant production, the transcription factor, nuclear factor erythriod-2- related factor 2 (Nrf2, induces expression of many antioxidant genes. We hypothesized that angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1 blockade improves mitochondrial function in response to an acute glucose load via upregulation of Nrf2. To address this hypothesis, an oral glucose challenge was performed in three groups prior to dissection (n = 5–8 animals/group/time point of adult male rats: 1 Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO; lean strain-control, 2 insulin resistant, obese Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF, and 3 OLETF + angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB; 10 mg olmesartan/kg/d × 6 weeks. Hearts were collected at T0, T60, and T120 minutes post-glucose infusion. ARB increased Nrf2 binding 32% compared to OLETF at T60. Total superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT activities were increased 45% and 66% respectively in ARB treated animals compared to OLETF. Mitochondrial enzyme activities of aconitase, complex I, and complex II increased by 135%, 33% and 66%, respectively in ARB compared to OLETF. These data demonstrate the protective effects of AT1 blockade on mitochondrial function during the manifestation of insulin resistance suggesting that the inappropriate activation of AT1 during insulin resistance may impair Nrf2 translocation and subsequent antioxidant activities and mitochondrial function. Keywords: Angiotensin II, Mitochondria, Cardiac, Antioxidant enzymes, TCA cycle

  4. Colesevelam improves insulin resistance in a diet-induced obesity (F-DIO) rat model by increasing the release of GLP-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shang, Quan; Saumoy, Monica; Holst, Jens Juul

    2009-01-01

    Bile acid sequestrants have been shown to lower glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. To investigate how colesevelam (CL) HCl improves hyperglycemia, studies were conducted in diet-induced obesity (F-DIO) rats, which develop insulin resistance when fed a high-energy (high fat....../high sucrose) diet (HE). The rats were fed HE; HE + 2% CL; HE + 0.02% SC-435 (SC), an apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter inhibitor; and regular chow (controls). After 4 wk of treatment, both in the HE group and the SC + HE group, plasma glucose and insulin levels remained elevated compared...

  5. Progressive resistance-loaded voluntary wheel running increases hypertrophy and differentially affects muscle protein synthesis, ribosome biogenesis, and proteolytic markers in rat muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, C B; Holland, A M; Kephart, W C; Mumford, P W; Lowery, R P; Kavazis, A N; Wilson, J M; Roberts, M D

    2018-02-01

    We examined if 6 weeks of progressive resistance-loaded voluntary wheel running in rats induced plantaris, soleus, and/or gastrocnemius hypertrophy and/or affected markers of translational efficiency, ribosome biogenesis, and markers of proteolysis. For 6 weeks, 8 male Sprague-Dawley rats (~9-10 weeks of age, ~300-325 g) rats were assigned to the progressive resistance-loaded voluntary wheel running model (EX), and ten rats were not trained (SED). For EX rats, the wheel-loading paradigm was as follows - days 1-7: free-wheel resistance, days 8-15: wheel resistance set to 20%-25% body mass, days 16-24: 40% body mass, days 25-32: 60% body mass, days 33-42: 40% body mass. Following the intervention, muscles were analysed for markers of translational efficiency, ribosome biogenesis, and muscle proteolysis. Raw gastrocnemius mass (+13%, p < .01), relative (body mass-corrected) gastrocnemius mass (+16%, p < .001), raw plantaris mass (+13%, p < .05), and relative plantaris mass (+15%, p < .01) were greater in EX vs. SED rats. In spite of gastrocnemius hypertrophy, EX animals presented a 54% decrease in basal muscle protein synthesis levels (p < .01), a 125% increase in pan 4EBP1 levels (p < .001) and a 31% decrease in pan eIF4E levels (p < .05). However, in relation to SED animals, EX animals presented a 70% increase in gastrocnemius c-Myc protein levels (p < .05). Most markers of translational efficiency and ribosome biogenesis were not altered in the plantaris or soleus muscles of EX vs. SED animals. Gastrocnemius F-box protein 32 and poly-ubiquinated protein levels were approximately 150% and 200% greater in SED vs. EX rats (p < .001). These data suggest that the employed resistance training model increases hind limb muscle hypertrophy, and this may be mainly facilitated through reductions in skeletal muscle proteolysis, rather than alterations in ribosome biogenesis or translational efficiency. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Effects of resistance training associated with whey protein supplementation on liver and kidney biomarkers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Ramiro; Silva, Priscila; Alves, Jadson; Stefani, Giuseppe; Petry, Marcelo; Rhoden, Cláudia; Dal Lago, Pedro; Schneider, Claudia Dornelles

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of whey protein (WP) supplementation and resistance training (RT) on liver and kidney biomarkers. The sedentary + WP group showed higher levels of plasma liver and kidney dysfunction markers compared with the other groups. In addition, WP supplementation associated with RT resulted in physiologic cardiac hypertrophy. WP supplementation without RT affected liver and kidney function.

  7. mRNA levels of related Abcb genes change opposite to each other upon histone deacetylase inhibition in drug-resistant rat hepatoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adám Sike

    Full Text Available The multidrug-resistant phenotype of tumor cells is acquired via an increased capability of drug efflux by ABC transporters and causes serious problems in cancer treatment. With the aim to uncover whether changes induced by epigenetic mechanisms in the expression level of drug transporter genes correlates with changes in the drug resistance phenotypes of resistant cells, we studied the expression of drug transporters in rat hepatoma cell lines. We found that of the three major rat ABC transporter genes Abcb1a, Abcb1b and Abcc1 the activity of only Abcb1b increased significantly in colchicine-selected, drug-resistant cells. Increased transporter expression in drug-resistant cells results primarily from transcriptional activation. A change in histone modification at the regulatory regions of the chromosomally adjacent Abcb1a and Abcb1b genes differentially affects the levels of corresponding mRNAs. Transcriptional up- and down-regulation accompany an increase in acetylation levels of histone H3 lysine 9 at the promoter regions of Abcb1b and Abcb1a, respectively. Drug efflux activity, however, does not follow tightly the transcriptional activity of drug transporter genes in hepatoma cells. Our results point out the need for careful analysis of cause-and-effect relationships between changes in histone modification, drug transporter expression and drug resistance phenotypes.

  8. Resistance training improves body composition and increases matrix metalloproteinase 2 activity in biceps and gastrocnemius muscles of diet-induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Markus Vinicius Campos; Leite, Richard Diego; Souza Lino, Anderson Diogo de; Marqueti, Rita de Cássia; Bernardes, Celene Fernandes; Araújo, Heloisa Sobreiro Selistre de; Bouskela, Eliete; Bouskella, Eliete; Shiguemoto, Gilberto Eiji; Andrade Perez, Sérgio Eduardo de; Kraemer-Aguiar, Luiz Guilherme

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the influence of resistance training on body composition and matrix metalloproteinase 2 activity in skeletal muscles of rats fed a high-fat diet. Thirty-two Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups (n = 8/each) according to diet and exercise status: Control (standard diet), Obese Control (high-fat diet), Resistance Training (standard diet) and Obese Resistance Training (high-fat diet) groups. Animals were fed a high-fat diet for 12 weeks to promote excessive weight gain. Resistance Training groups performed 12 weeks of training periods after this period in a vertical ladder three times/week. Fat percentage, fat-free mass and fat mass were assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 activity in biceps and gastrocnemius muscles was analyzed using zymography. Resistance training significantly reduced body and fat masses and fat percentages in both trained groups (pmuscles of both trained groups (pmuscle matrix metalloproteinase 2 activity promoted by excessive weight gain were positively modified by resistance training.

  9. Phloretin exerts hypoglycemic effect in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and improves insulin resistance in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen X

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Xin Shen,1,* Nan Zhou,1,* Le Mi,1 Zishuo Hu,2 Libin Wang,1 Xueying Liu,1 Shengyong Zhang1 1Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, 2Student Brigade, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The present study investigated the possible antiobesity and hypoglycemic effects of phloretin (Ph. In an attempt to discover the hypoglycemic effect and potential mechanism of Ph, we used the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and (L6 myotubes. Daily oral treatment with Ph for 4 weeks significantly (P<0.05 reduced postprandial blood glucose and improved islet injury and lipid metabolism. Glucose consumption and glucose tolerance were improved by Ph via GOD–POD method. Western blot results revealed that the expression of Akt, PI3K, IRS-1, and GLUT4 were upregulated in skeletal muscle of T2D rats and in L6 myotubes by Ph. The immunofluorescence studies confirmed that Ph improved the translocation of GLUT4 in L6 myotubes. Ph exerted hypoglycemic effects in vivo and in vitro, hence it may play an important role in the management of diabetes. Keywords: phloretin, diabetes, insulin sensitivity, blood glucose consumption, skeletal muscle

  10. Effects of Olea europea var. oleaster leaves in hypercholesterolemic insulin-resistant sand rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennani-Kabchi, N; Fdhil, H; Cherrah, Y; Kehel, L; el Bouayadi, F; Amarti, A; Saïdi, M; Marquié, G

    1999-01-01

    Sand rats fed a hypercaloric diet manifest obesity and diabetes. We have used this model to develop hypercholesterolaemia and describe the beneficial action of Olea europea var. oleaster leaves. Twenty-eight sand rats submitted to a high cholesterol diet for four months were assigned to control and treated groups. Plant decoction at 10 per cent was given orally for two months. Results showed that the control group exhibited hyperglycaemia, glucose intolerance, hypercholesterolaemia and moderate hyperinsulinaemia. Light microscopic study showed thickening of capillary walls in skin, pancreas and kidney. The treatment produced hypoglycaemic (43 per cent, p < 0.001), antihyperglycaemic (48 per cent, p < 0.001) and hypoinsulinaemic (39 per cent, p < 0.01) activities. In addition, the plant presented a hypocholesterolaemic effect (47 per cent, p < 0.001) accompanied by lowering of oxidized LDL (30 per cent, p < 0.01). Accordingly, capillary wall thickening was reduced in skin and pancreas and completely prevented in kidney. The data demonstrate that oleaster leaves possess at least two active compounds to treat hypercholesterolaemia and diabetes.

  11. SGLT2-inhibitor and DPP-4 inhibitor improve brain function via attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction, insulin resistance, inflammation, and apoptosis in HFD-induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa-Nguanmoo, Piangkwan; Tanajak, Pongpan; Kerdphoo, Sasiwan; Jaiwongkam, Thidarat; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2017-10-15

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (vildagliptin) has been shown to exert beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and neuroprotection in obese-insulin resistance. Recent studies demonstrated the neuroprotection of the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor (dapagliflozin) in diabetes. However, the comparative effects of both drugs and a combination of two drugs on metabolic dysfunction and brain dysfunction impaired by the obese-insulin resistance have never been investigated. Forty male Wistar rats were divided into two groups, and received either a normal-diet (ND, n=8) or a high-fat diet (HFD, n=32) for 16weeks. At week 13, the HFD-fed rats were divided into four subgroups (n=8/subgroup) to receive either a vehicle, vildagliptin (3mg/kg/day) dapagliflozin (1mg/kg/day) or combined drugs for four weeks. ND rats were given a vehicle for four weeks. Metabolic parameters and brain function were investigated. The results demonstrated that HFD rats developed obese-insulin resistance and cognitive decline. Dapagliflozin had greater efficacy on improved peripheral insulin sensitivity and reduced weight gain than vildagliptin. Single therapy resulted in equally improved brain mitochondrial function, insulin signaling, apoptosis and prevented cognitive decline. However, only dapagliflozin improved hippocampal synaptic plasticity. A combination of the drugs had greater efficacy in improving brain insulin sensitivity and reducing brain oxidative stress than the single drug therapy. These findings suggested that dapagliflozin and vildagliptin equally prevented cognitive decline in the obese-insulin resistance, possibly through some similar mechanisms. Dapagliflozin had greater efficacy than vildagliptin for preserving synaptic plasticity, thus combined drugs could be the best therapeutic approach for neuroprotection in the obese-insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of aerobic and resistance training of long duration on pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.S. Silva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine possible changes in serum concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines of eutrophic rats subjected to aerobic or resistance physical training. Methods: This study examined serum concentrations of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-1-β in rats that performed aerobic or resistance training for 16 weeks. Thirty-five Wistar rats (male adult were divided into three groups: Control Group (CG, Aerobic Group (AG and Resistance Group (RG. Rats were sacrificed 48 h after the final training session. Serum concentrations of cytokines were analysed by ELISA. Results: TNF-α levels were higher in the RG, followed by the AG and CG groups (p < 0.001. IFN-γ and IL-10 levels were not significantly different between groups (p = 0.097 and p = 0.17, respectively. The levels of IL6 and IL1-β were higher in AG compared to RG and CG (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.003, respectively. In general, our results indicate a higher pro-inflammatory profile in AG and probably RG animals. Conclusion: Further studies are required in order to better clarify the effects of aerobic and resistance exercise training on pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, future studies should address the metabolic and molecular pathways involved in these responses. Resumen: Objetivo: Determinar posibles cambios en las concentraciones séricas de citoquinas pro y antiinflamatorias de ratas eutróficas sometidas a entrenamiento físico aérobico y de resistencia. Método: Se examinaron las concentraciones séricas de TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-10 e IL-1-β en ratas sometidas a entrenamiento aeróbico o de resistencia de 16 semanas de duración. Treinta y cinco ratas Wistar (macho adulto fueron divididas en 3 grupos: Grupo Control (GC, Grupo Aeróbico (GA y Grupo Resistencia (GR. Las ratas se sacrificaron 48 horas después de la sesión de entrenamiento final. Las concentraciones s

  13. Study of histopathological and molecular changes of rat kidney under simulated weightlessness and resistance training protective effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Ding

    Full Text Available To explore the effects of long-term weightlessness on the renal tissue, we used the two months tail suspension model to simulate microgravity and investigated the simulated microgravity on the renal morphological damages and related molecular mechanisms. The microscopic examination of tissue structure and ultrastructure was carried out for histopathological changes of renal tissue morphology. The immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and Western blot were performed to explore the molecular mechanisms associated the observations. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE staining showed severe pathological kidney lesions including glomerular atrophy, degeneration and necrosis of renal tubular epithelial cells in two months tail-suspended rats. Ultrastructural studies of the renal tubular epithelial cells demonstrated that basal laminas of renal tubules were rough and incrassate with mitochondria swelling and vacuolation. Cell apoptosis in kidney monitored by the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 and caspase-3 accompanied these pathological damages caused by long-term microgravity. Analysis of the HSP70 protein expression illustrated that overexpression of HSP70 might play a crucial role in inducing those pathological damages. Glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78, one of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperones, was up-regulated significantly in the kidney of tail suspension rat, which implied that ER-stress was associated with apoptosis. Furthermore, CHOP and caspase-12 pathways were activated in ER-stress induced apoptosis. Resistance training not only reduced kidney cell apoptosis and expression of HSP70 protein, it also can attenuate the kidney impairment imposed by weightlessness. The appropriate optimization might be needed for the long term application for space exploration.

  14. Prolonged bed rest impairs rapid CPI-17 phosphorylation and contraction in rat mesenteric resistance arteries to cause orthostatic hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Toshio; Kitazawa, Kazuyo

    2017-12-01

    Prolonged bed rest (PBR) causes orthostatic hypotension (OH). Rapid constriction of splanchnic resistance arteries in response to a sudden increase in sympathetic tone contributes to the recovery of orthostatic arterial pressure upon standing. However, the molecular mechanism of PBR-induced dysfunction in arterial constriction is not fully understood. Previously, we showed that CPI-17, a regulatory protein for myosin phosphatase, mediates α 1A -adrenergic receptor-induced rapid contraction of small mesenteric arteries. Here, we tested whether PBR associated with OH affects the α 1 -adrenergic receptor-induced CPI-17 signaling pathway in mesenteric arteries using rats treated by head-down tail-suspension hindlimb unloading (HDU), an experimental OH model. In normal anesthetized rats, mean arterial pressure (MAP) rapidly reduced upon 90° head-up tilt from supine position and then immediately recovered without change in heart rate, suggesting a rapid arterial constriction. On the other hand, after a 4-week HDU treatment, the fast orthostatic MAP recovery failed for 1 min. Alpha1A subtype-specific antagonist suppressed the orthostatic MAP recovery with a small decrease in basal blood pressure, whereas non-specific α 1 -antagonist prazosin strongly reduced both basal MAP and orthostatic recovery. The HDU treatment resulted in 68% reduction in contraction in parallel with 83% reduction in CPI-17 phosphorylation in denuded mesenteric arteries 10 s after α 1 -agonist stimulation. The treatment with either Ca 2+ -release channel opener or PKC inhibitor mimicked the deficiency in HDU arteries. These results suggest that an impairment of the rapid PKC/CPI-17 signaling pathway downstream of α 1A -adrenoceptors in peripheral arterial constriction, as an end organ of orthostatic blood pressure reflex, is associated with OH in prolonged bed rest patients.

  15. Topical insulin accelerates cutaneous wound healing in insulin-resistant diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Tianyi; Gao, Min; Yang, Peilang; Pei, Qing; Liu, Dan; Wang, Di; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Insulin signaling defects could lead to insulin resistance in insulin target organs: typically, in the muscler, liver, and adipose tissue. We have observed that insulin accelerated diabetic wound healing in our previous works; to further elucidate the mechanism, we investigated the expression and activation of insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 signaling, compared insulin sensitivity in skin tissue with that in liver tissue, and also observed the regulation of insulin on inflammat...

  16. Intermittent fasting reduces body fat but exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in young rats regardless of high protein and fat diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunmin; Yoo, Kyung Min; Hyun, Joo Suk; Kang, Suna

    2017-02-01

    Intermittent fasting (IMF) is a relatively new dietary approach to weight management, although the efficacy and adverse effects have not been full elucidated and the optimal diets for IMF are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that a one-meal-per-day intermittent fasting with high fat (HF) or protein (HP) diets can modify energy, lipid, and glucose metabolism in normal young male Sprague-Dawley rats with diet-induced obesity or overweight. Male rats aged 5 weeks received either HF (40% fat) or HP (26% protein) diets ad libitum (AL) or for 3 h at the beginning of the dark cycle (IMF) for 5 weeks. Epidydimal fat pads and fat deposits in the leg and abdomen were lower with HP and IMF. Energy expenditure at the beginning of the dark cycle, especially from fat oxidation, was higher with IMF than AL, possibly due to greater activity levels. Brown fat content was higher with IMF. Serum ghrelin levels were higher in HP-IMF than other groups, and accordingly, cumulative food intake was also higher in HP-IMF than HF-IMF. HF-IMF exhibited higher area under the curve (AUC) of serum glucose at the first part (0-40 min) during oral glucose tolerance test, whereas AUC of serum insulin levels in both parts were higher in IMF and HF. During intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test, serum glucose levels were higher with IMF than AL. Consistently, hepatic insulin signaling (GLUT2, pAkt) was attenuated and PEPCK expression was higher with IMF and HF than other groups, and HOMA-IR revealed significantly impaired attenuated insulin sensitivity in the IMF groups. However, surprisingly, hepatic and skeletal muscle glycogen storage was higher in IMF groups than AL. The higher glycogen storage in the IMF groups was associated with the lower expression of glycogen phosphorylase than the AL groups. In conclusion, IMF especially with HF increased insulin resistance, possibly by attenuating hepatic insulin signaling, and lowered glycogen phosphorylase expression despite decreased fat mass in young

  17. Early Onset Inflammation in Pre-Insulin-Resistant Diet-Induced Obese Rats Does Not Affect the Vasoreactivity of Isolated Small Mesenteric Arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blædel, Martin; Raun, Kirsten; Boonen, Harrie C M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obesity is an increasing burden affecting developed and emerging societies since it is associated with an increased risk of diabetes and consequent cardiovascular complications. Increasing evidence points towards a pivotal role of inflammation in the etiology of vascular dysfunction....... Our study aimed to investigate signs of inflammation and their relation to vascular dysfunction in rats receiving a high fat diet. Methods: Diet-induced obese (DIO) rats were used as a model since these rats exhibit a human pre-diabetic pathology. Oral glucose and insulin tolerance tests were...... concomitant vascular dysfunction. The results show that inflammation and obesity are tightly associated, and that inflammation is manifested prior to significant insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction....

  18. Effect of 6 Weeks of Resistance Training and Boldenone Supplementation on 5-alpha Reductase and Aromatase Gene Expression in Testes Tissue of Male Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sadeghi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Using anabolic androgenic steroids by athletes has significant side effects on sex hormones and the reproductive system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 6 weeks of resistance exercise and Boldenone supplements on the expression of 5-alpha reductase and aromatase genes of the testis tissue in Wistar rats. Material & Methods: In this experimental study, thirty 12-week old male Wistar rats with the average weight of 195.00±7.94 grams were divided randomly into 5 groups; control, sham, Boldenone supplements (2mg per each kilogram of body weight, resistance exercise and Boldenone exercise. Resistance exercise program was 5 sessions of climbing the ladder each week (3 sets of 5 repeats for 6 weeks that was started by 50% of one maximum repetition and reached 100% at the end. The level of 5-alpha reductase and aromatase genes expression were measured after the anesthesia and the removal of the testes tissue in the samples. Data was analyzed by paired T, ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests by using SPSS 22 software. Findings: The average weight of all groups’ mice were significantly increased in week 6 comparing to the first week (p=0.0001. There was significant increasing in 5-alpha-reductase expression in Boldenone and Boldenone exercise than the control group and also in the Boldenone exercise than resistance exercise group after the intervention. There was significant increasing in aromatase gene expression in resistance exercise and Boldenone exercise groups than the control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Boldenone supplement along with 6 weeks of resistance exercise increases the levels of 5-alpha reductase and aromatase genes expression in testis tissue of Wistar rats.

  19. Cafeteria diet-induced insulin resistance is not associated with decreased insulin signaling or AMPK activity and is alleviated by physical training in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Nina; De Bock, Katrien; Richter, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Excess energy intake via a palatable low-fat diet (cafeteria diet) is known to induce obesity and glucose intolerance in rats. However, the molecular mechanisms behind this adaptation are not known, and it is also not known whether exercise training can reverse it. Male Wistar rats were assigned...... was counteracted by training. In the perfused hindlimb, insulin-stimulated glucose transport in red gastrocnemius muscle was completely abolished in CAF and rescued by exercise training. Apart from a tendency toward an approximately 20% reduction in both basal and insulin-stimulated Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation (P......) among the groups. In conclusion, surplus energy intake of a palatable but low-fat cafeteria diet resulted in obesity and insulin resistance that was rescued by exercise training. Interestingly, insulin resistance was not accompanied by major defects in the insulin-signaling cascade or in altered AMPK...

  20. Exploring a post-traumatic stress disorder paradigm in Flinders sensitive line rats to model treatment-resistant depression II: response to antidepressant augmentation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Sarel Jacobus; Harvey, Brian Herbert

    2017-08-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) displays high co-morbidity with major depression and treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Earlier work demonstrated exaggerated depressive-like symptoms in a gene×environment model of TRD and an abrogated response to imipramine. We extended the investigation by studying the behavioural and monoaminergic response to multiple antidepressants, viz. venlafaxine and ketamine with/without imipramine. Male Flinders sensitive line (FSL) rats, a genetic model of depression, were exposed to a time-dependent sensitisation (TDS) model of PTSD and compared with stress naive controls. 7 days after the TDS procedures, immobility and coping (swimming and climbing), behaviours in the forced swim test (FST) as well as hippocampal and cortical 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) and noradrenaline (NA) levels were analysed. Response to imipramine, venlafaxine and ketamine treatment (all 10 mg/kg×7 days) alone and in combination were subsequently studied. TDS exacerbated depressive-like behaviour of FSL rats in the FST. Imipramine, venlafaxine and ketamine were ineffective as monotherapy in TDS-exposed FSL rats. However, combining imipramine with either venlafaxine or ketamine resulted in significant anti-immobility effects and enhanced coping behaviours. Only ketamine+imipramine (frontal-cortical 5HIAA and NA), ketamine alone (frontal-cortical and hippocampal NA) and venlafaxine+imipramine (frontal-cortical NA) altered monoamine responses versus untreated TDS-exposed FSL rats. Exposure of FSL rats to TDS inhibits antidepressant response at behavioural and neurochemical levels. Congruent with TRD, imipramine plus venlafaxine or ketamine overcame treatment resistance in these animals. These data further support the hypothesis that exposure of FSL rats to a PTSD-like paradigm produces a valid animal model of TRD and warrants further investigation.