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Sample records for resistance-associated protein family

  1. Investigating the Role of the Host Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein Transporter Family in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Pathogenicity Using a Caenorhabditis elegans Infection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Pietro; Visone, Marco; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Perrin, Elena; Maida, Isabel; Fani, Renato; Ballestriero, Francesco; Santos, Radleigh; Pinilla, Clemencia; Di Schiavi, Elia; Tegos, George; de Pascale, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between host efflux system of the non-vertebrate nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) strain virulence. This is the first comprehensive effort to profile host-transporters within the context of Bcc infection. With this aim, two different toxicity tests were performed: a slow killing assay that monitors mortality of the host by intestinal colonization and a fast killing assay that assesses production of toxins. A Virulence Ranking scheme was defined, that expressed the toxicity of the Bcc panel members, based on the percentage of surviving worms. According to this ranking the 18 Bcc strains were divided in 4 distinct groups. Only the Cystic Fibrosis isolated strains possessed profound nematode killing ability to accumulate in worms' intestines. For the transporter analysis a complete set of isogenic nematode single Multidrug Resistance associated Protein (MRP) efflux mutants and a number of efflux inhibitors were interrogated in the host toxicity assays. The Bcc pathogenicity profile of the 7 isogenic C. elegans MRP knock-out strains functionality was classified in two distinct groups. Disabling host transporters enhanced nematode mortality more than 50% in 5 out of 7 mutants when compared to wild type. In particular mrp-2 was the most susceptible phenotype with increased mortality for 13 out 18 Bcc strains, whereas mrp-3 and mrp-4 knock-outs had lower mortality rates, suggesting a different role in toxin-substrate recognition. The use of MRP efflux inhibitors in the assays resulted in substantially increased (>40% on average) mortality of wild-type worms.

  2. Structural elucidation of transmembrane domain zero (TMD0) of EcdL: A multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) family of ATP-binding cassette transporter protein revealed by atomistic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Krishnendu; Rani, Priyanka; Kishor, Gaurav; Agarwal, Shikha; Kumar, Antresh; Singh, Durg Vijay

    2017-09-20

    ATP-Binding cassette (ABC) transporters play an extensive role in the translocation of diverse sets of biologically important molecules across membrane. EchnocandinB (antifungal) and EcdL protein of Aspergillus rugulosus are encoded by the same cluster of genes. Co-expression of EcdL and echinocandinB reflects tightly linked biological functions. EcdL belongs to Multidrug Resistance associated Protein (MRP) subfamily of ABC transporters with an extra transmembrane domain zero (TMD0). Complete structure of MRP subfamily comprising of TMD0 domain, at atomic resolution is not known. We hypothesized that the transportation of echonocandinB is mediated via EcdL protein. Henceforth, it is pertinent to know the topological arrangement of TMD0, with other domains of protein and its possible role in transportation of echinocandinB. Absence of effective template for TMD0 domain lead us to model by I-TASSER, further structure has been refined by multiple template modelling using homologous templates of remaining domains (TMD1, NBD1, TMD2, NBD2). The modelled structure has been validated for packing, folding and stereochemical properties. MD simulation for 0.1 μs has been carried out in the biphasic environment for refinement of modelled protein. Non-redundant structures have been excavated by clustering of MD trajectory. The structural alignment of modelled structure has shown Z-score -37.9; 31.6, 31.5 with RMSD; 2.4, 4.2, 4.8 with ABC transporters; PDB ID 4F4C, 4M1 M, 4M2T, respectively, reflecting the correctness of structure. EchinocandinB has been docked to the modelled as well as to the clustered structures, which reveals interaction of echinocandinB with TMD0 and other TM helices in the translocation path build of TMDs.

  3. Drug resistance-associated markers P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, and lung resistance protein as prognostic factors in ovarian carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, H. J.; Katsaros, D.; de Vries, E. G.; Massobrio, M.; Genta, F.; Danese, S.; Arisio, R.; Scheper, R. J.; Kool, M.; Scheffer, G. L.; Willemse, P. H.; van der Zee, A. G.; Suurmeijer, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    Intrinsic and/or acquired resistance to chemotherapy is the major obstacle to overcome in the treatment of patients with ovarian carcinoma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of drug resistance-associated proteins P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug

  4. Natural Resistance Associated Macrophage Protein Is Involved in Immune Response of Blunt Snout Bream, Megalobrama amblycephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu-Hong; Mao, Ying; Lv, Yi-Na; Tang, Lei-Lei; Zhou, Yi; Zhong, Huan; Xiao, Jun; Yan, Jin-Peng

    2018-03-29

    The natural resistance-associated macrophage protein gene ( Nramp ), has been identified as one of the significant candidate genes responsible for modulating vertebrate natural resistance to intracellular pathogens. Here, we identified and characterized a new Nramp family member, named as maNramp , in the blunt snout bream. The full-length cDNA of maNramp consists of a 153 bp 5'UTR, a 1635 bp open reading frame encoding a protein with 544 amino acids, and a 1359 bp 3'UTR. The deduced protein (maNRAMP) possesses the typical structural features of NRAMP protein family, including 12 transmembrane domains, three N-linked glycosylation sites, and a conserved transport motif. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that maNRAMP shares the significant sequence consistency with other teleosts, and shows the higher sequence similarity to mammalian Nramp2 than Nramp1 . It was found that maNramp expressed ubiquitously in all normal tissues tested, with the highest abundance in the spleen, followed by the head kidney and intestine, and less abundance in the muscle, gill, and kidney. After lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, the mRNA level of maNramp was rapidly up-regulated, which reached a peak level at 6 h. Altogether, these results indicated that maNramp might be related to fish innate immunity and similar to mammalian Nramp1 in function.

  5. The human multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP is a plasma membrane drug-efflux pump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaman, G. J.; Flens, M. J.; van Leusden, M. R.; de Haas, M.; Mülder, H. S.; Lankelma, J.; Pinedo, H. M.; Scheper, R. J.; Baas, F.; Broxterman, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    The multidrug-resistance associated protein MRP is a 180- to 195-kDa membrane protein associated with resistance of human tumor cells to cytotoxic drugs. We have investigated how MRP confers drug resistance in SW-1573 human lung carcinoma cells by generating a subline stably transfected with an

  6. Expression of multidrug resistance-associated proteins predicts prognosis in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasschaert, SLA; de Bont, ESJM; Boezen, M; vander Kolk, DM; Daenen, SMJG; Faber, KN; Kamps, WA; de Vries, EGE; Vellenga, E

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are treated with a variety of chemotherapeutic drugs, which can be transported by six multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP). These MRPs have strongly overlapping functional activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the

  7. Molecular evidence and functional expression of multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) in rabbit corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karla, Pradeep K; Pal, Dananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2007-01-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) is a major family of efflux transporters involved in drug efflux leading to drug resistance. The objective of this study was to explore physical barriers for ocular drug absorption and to verify if the role of efflux transporters. MRP-2 is a major homologue of MRP family and found to express on the apical side of cell membrane. Cultured Rabbit Corneal Epithelial Cells (rCEC) were selected as an in vitro model for corneal epithelium. [14C]-erythromycin which is a proven substrate for MRP-2 was selected as a model drug for functional expression studies. MK-571, a known specific and potent inhibitor for MRP-2 was added to inhibit MRP mediated efflux. Membrane fraction of rCEC was used for western blot analysis. Polarized transport of [14C]-erythromycin was observed in rCEC and transport from B-->A was significantly high than from A-->B. Permeability's increased significantly from A-->B in the presence of MK-571 and ketoconozole. Uptake of [14C]-erythromycin in the presence of MK-571 was significantly higher than control in rCEC. RT-PCR analysis indicated a unique and distinct band at approximately 498 bp corresponding to MRP-2 in rCEC and MDCK11-MRP-2 cells. Immunoprecipitation followed by Western Blot analysis indicated a specific band at approximately 190 kDa in membrane fraction of rCEC and MDCK11-MRP-2 cells. For the first time we have demonstrated high expression of MRP-2 in rabbit corneal epithelium and its functional activity causing drug efflux. RT-PCR, immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis further confirms the result.

  8. Cytotoxicity of rhein, the active metabolite of sennoside laxatives, is reduced by multidrug resistance-associated protein 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorkom, BAP; Timmer-Bosscha, H; de Jong, S; Kleibeuker, JH; de Vries, EGE

    2002-01-01

    Anthranoid laxatives, belonging to the anthraquinones as do anthracyclines, possibly Increase colorectal cancer risk. Anthracyclines Interfere with topoisomerase II, Intercalate DNA and are substrates for P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein I. P-glycoprotein and multidrug

  9. Study of peripheral blood multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 expression of children intractable epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xuan; Liu, Xiaoming; Chen, Shengzhi; Li, Rui

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) expression of peripheral blood of children intractable epilepsy. Sixty children with epilepsy admitted to outpatient and inpatient services of Xuzhou Children's Hospital between November 2010 and October 2011 were divided into a refractory epilepsy group and a drug-controlled epilepsy group, with 30 cases each. Thirty healthy children who went to the hospital in the same year for health examination were enrolled as a control group. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot method were used to determine peripheral blood MRP1 level, mRNA, and protein content of the 3 groups. MRP1 expression in the refractory epilepsy group was significantly higher than those of the epilepsy group with good drug control and of the control group. All differences had statistical significance (P0.05). Peripheral blood MRP1 expression in patients with refractory epilepsy increases.

  10. IGSF9 Family Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Turtle and the vertebrate proteins immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), member 9 (IGSF9/Dasm1) and IGSF9B are members of an evolutionarily ancient protein family. A bioinformatics analysis of the protein family revealed that invertebrates contain only a single IGSF9 family gene......, whereas vertebrates contain two to four genes. In cnidarians, the gene appears to encode a secreted protein, but transmembrane isoforms of the protein have also evolved, and in many species, alternative splicing facilitates the expression of both transmembrane and secreted isoforms. In most species......, the longest isoforms of the proteins have the same general organization as the neural cell adhesion molecule family of cell adhesion molecule proteins, and like this family of proteins, IGSF9 family members are expressed in the nervous system. A review of the literature revealed that Drosophila Turtle...

  11. Inhibition of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) activity by rifampicin in human multidrug-resistant lung tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Courtois, A; Payen, L; Vernhet, L; de Vries, EGE; Guillouzo, A; Fardel, O

    1999-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) is a drug efflux membrane pump conferring multidrug resistance on tumor cells. In order to look for compounds that can lead to reversal of such a resistance, the antituberculosis compound rifampicin, belonging to the chemical class of rifamycins, was

  12. Nrf2 pathway regulates multidrug-resistance-associated protein 1 in small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Ji

    Full Text Available Although multidrug-resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1 is a major contributor to multi-drug resistance (MDR, the regulatory mechanism of Mrp1 still remains unclear. Nrf2 is a transcription factor that regulates cellular defense response through antioxidant response elements (AREs in normal tissues. Recently, Nrf2 has emerged as an important contributor to chemo-resistance in tumor tissues. In the present study, the role of Nrf2-ARE pathway on regulation of Mrp1 was investigated. Compared with H69 lung cancer cells, H69AR cells with MDR showed significantly higher Nrf2-ARE pathway activity and expression of Mrp1 as well. When Nrf2 was knocked down in H69AR cells, MRP1's expression decreased accordingly. Moreover, those H69AR cells with reduced Nrf2 level restored sensitivity to chemo-drugs. To explore how Nrf2-ARE pathway regulates Mrp1, the promoter of Mrp1 gene was searched, and two putative AREs--ARE1 and ARE2--were found. Using reporter gene and ChIP assay, both ARE1 and ARE2 showed response to and interaction with Nrf2. In 40 cases of cancer tissues, the expression of Nrf2 and MRP1 was measured by immunohistochemistry (IHC. As the quantitive data of IHC indicated, both Nrf2 and MRP1 showed significantly higher expression in tumor tissue than adjacent non-tumor tissue. And more important, the correlation analysis of the two genes proved that their expression was correlative. Taken together, theses data suggested that Nrf2-ARE pathway is required for the regulatory expression of Mrp1 and implicated Nrf2 as a new therapeutic target for MDR.

  13. Modulation of expression and activity of intestinal multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 by xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás; Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Arana, Maite Rocío; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Mottino, Aldo Domingo

    2016-07-15

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2/ABCC2) is a transporter that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. In the intestine, it is localized to the apical membrane of the enterocyte and plays a key role in limiting the absorption of xenobiotics incorporated orally. MRP2 may also play a role in systemic clearance of xenobiotics available from the serosal side of the intestine. MRP2 transports a wide range of substrates, mainly organic anions conjugated with glucuronic acid, glutathione and sulfate and its expression can be modulated by xenobiotics at transcriptional- and post-transcriptional levels. Transcriptional regulation is usually mediated by a group of nuclear receptors. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a major member of this group. Relevant drugs described to up-regulate intestinal MRP2 via PXR are rifampicin, spironolactone and carbamazepine, among others. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) was also reported to modulate MRP2 expression, phenobarbital being a typical activator. Dietary compounds, including micronutrients and other natural products, are also capable of regulating intestinal MRP2 expression transcriptionally. We have given them particular attention since the composition of the food ingested daily is not necessarily supervised and may result in interactions with therapeutic drugs. Post-transcriptional regulation of MRP2 activity by xenobiotics, e.g. as a consequence of inhibitory actions, is also described in this review. Unfortunately, only few studies report on drug-drug or nutrient-drug interactions as a consequence of modulation of intestinal MRP2 activity by xenobiotics. Future clinical studies are expected to identify additional interactions resulting in changes in efficacy or safety of therapeutic drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1 genetic variants, MRP1 protein levels and severity of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutgers Bea

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1 protects against oxidative stress and toxic compounds generated by cigarette smoking, which is the main risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. We have previously shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in MRP1 significantly associate with level of FEV1 in two independent population based cohorts. The aim of our study was to assess the associations of MRP1 SNPs with FEV1 level, MRP1 protein levels and inflammatory markers in bronchial biopsies and sputum of COPD patients. Methods Five SNPs (rs212093, rs4148382, rs504348, rs4781699, rs35621 in MRP1 were genotyped in 110 COPD patients. The effects of MRP1 SNPs were analyzed using linear regression models. Results One SNP, rs212093 was significantly associated with a higher FEV1 level and less airway wall inflammation. Another SNP, rs4148382 was significantly associated with a lower FEV1 level, higher number of inflammatory cells in induced sputum and with a higher MRP1 protein level in bronchial biopsies. Conclusions This is the first study linking MRP1 SNPs with lung function and inflammatory markers in COPD patients, suggesting a role of MRP1 SNPs in the severity of COPD in addition to their association with MRP1 protein level in bronchial biopsies.

  15. The expression and significance of P-glycoprotein, lung resistance protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To detect the expression of multidrug resistance molecules P-glycoprotein (P-gp, Lung resistnce protein (LRP and Multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP and analyze the relationship between them and the clinico-pathological features. Methods The expressions of P-gp, LRP and MRP in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 59 gastric cancer patients were determined by a labbelled Streptavidin-Peroxidase (SP immunohistochemical technique, and the results were analyzed in correlation with clinicopathological data. None of these patients received chemotherapy prior to surgery. Results The positive rates of P-gp, LRP, MRP were 86.4%, 84.7% and 27.1%, respectively. The difference between the positive rate of P-gp and MRP was significant statistically, as well as the difference between the expression of MRP and LRP. No significant difference was observed between P-gp and LRP, but the positively correlation between the expression of P-gp and LRP had been found. No significant correlation between the expression of P-gp, LRP, MRP and the grade of differentiation were observed. The expression of P-gp was correlated with clinical stages positively (r = 0.742, but the difference with the expression of P-gp in different stages was not significant. Conclusion The expressions of P-gp, LRP and MRP in patients with gastric cancer without prior chemotherapy are high, indicating that innate drug resistance may exist in gastric cancer.

  16. Isolation and Cloning of cDNA Fragment of Gene Encoding for Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein from M. affine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utut Widyastuti Suharsono

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Isolation and Cloning of cDNA Fragment of Gene Encoding for Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein from M. affine. M. affine can grow well in acid soil with high level of soluble aluminum. One of the important proteins in the detoxifying xenobiotic stress including acid and Al stresses is a multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP encoded by mrp gene. The objective of this research is to isolate and clone the cDNA fragment of MaMrp encoding MRP from M. affine. By reverse transcription, total cDNA had been synthesized from the total RNA as template. The fragment of cDNA MaMrp had been successfully isolated by PCR by using total cDNA as template and mrp primer designed from A. thaliana, yeast, and human. This fragment was successfully inserted into pGEM-T Easy and the recombinant plasmid was successfully introduced into E. coli DH5α. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the lenght of MaMrp fragment is 633 bp encoding 208 amino acids. Local alignment analysis based on nucleotide of mRNA showed that MaMrp fragment is 69% identical to AtMrp1 and 63% to AtMrp from A. thaliana. Based on deduced amino acid sequence, MaMRP is 84% identical to part of AtMRP13, 77% to AtMRP12, and 73% to AtMRP1 from A. thaliana respectively. Alignment analysis with AtMRP1 showed that MaMRP fragment is located in TM1 and NBF1 domains and has a specific amino acid sequence QCKAQLQNMEEE.

  17. Use of peptide antibodies to probe for the mitoxantrone resistance-associated protein MXR/BCRP/ABCP/ABCG2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Jensen, Ulla; Hansen, Alastair

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies have characterized the ABC half-transporter associated with mitoxantrone resistance in human cancer cell lines. Encoded by the ABCG2 gene, overexpression confers resistance to camptothecins, as well as to mitoxantrone. We developed four polyclonal antibodies against peptides...... corresponding to four different epitopes on the mitoxantrone resistance-associated protein, ABCG2. Three epitopes localized on the cytoplasmic region of ABCG2 gave rise to high-affinity antibodies, which were demonstrated to be specific for ABCG2. Western blot analysis of cells with high levels of ABCG2 showed...... membrane localization of ABCG2 in cell lines with high levels of expression. Plasma membrane staining was observed on the surface of the chorionic villi in placenta. These results support the hypothesis that ABCG2 is an ABC half-transporter that forms dimers in the plasma membrane, functioning as an ATP...

  18. THE ROLE OF MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ASSOCIATED PROTEIN (MRP) IN THE BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER AND OPIOID ANALGESIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wendy; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2013-01-01

    The blood brain barrier protects the brain from circulating compounds and drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is involved with the barrier, both preventing the influx of agent from the blood into the brain and facilitating the efflux of compounds from the brain into the blood, raising the possibility of a similar role for other transporters. Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP), a 190 kDa protein similar to Pgp is also ABC transport that has been implicated in the blood brain barrier. The current study explores its role in opioid action. Immunohistochemically, it is localized in the choroid plexus in ratsand can be selectively downregulated by antisense treatment at both the level of mRNA, as shown by RT-PCR, and protein, as demonstrated immunohistochemically. Behaviorally, downregulation of MRP significantly enhances the analgesic potency of systemic morphine in MRP knockout mice and in antisense-treated rats by lowering the blood brain barrier. Following intracerebroventricular administration, a number of compounds, including some opioids, are rapidly secreted from the brain into the blood where they contribute to the overall analgesic effects by activating peripheral systems. MRP plays a role in this efflux. Downregulating MRP expression leads to a corresponding decrease in the transport and a diminished analgesic response from opioids administered intracerebroventricularly. Thus, the transporter protein MRP plays a role in maintaining the blood-brain barrier and modulates the activity of opioids. PMID:23508590

  19. Colistin resistance associated with outer membrane protein change in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter asburiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kádár, Béla; Kocsis, Béla; Tóth, Ákos; Kristóf, Katalin; Felső, Péter; Kocsis, Béla; Böddi, Katalin; Szabó, Dóra

    2017-06-01

    In this study, outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of colistin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter asburiae were analyzed. One colistin-susceptible and three colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae sequence type 258 strains as well as one colistin-susceptible E. asburiae and its colistin-heteroresistant counterpart strain were involved in the study. OMP analysis of each strain was performed by microchip method. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight/mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) investigation was carried out after separation of OMPs by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and in-gel digestion. The MALDI-TOF/MS analysis of OMPs in the colistin-susceptible K. pneumoniae found 16 kDa proteins belonging to the LysM domain/BON superfamily, as well as DNA starvation proteins, whereas OmpX and OmpW were detected in the colistin-resistant counterpart strains. OmpC and OmpW were detected in the colistin-susceptible E. asburiae, whereas OmpA and OmpX were identified in the colistin-resistant counterpart. This study demonstrated that OMP differences were between colistin-susceptible and -resistant counterpart strains. The altered Gram-negative cell wall may contribute to acquired colistin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae.

  20. Mechanisms of multidrug resistance in HL60 cells. Analysis of resistance associated membrane proteins and levels of mdr gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, T; Latoud, C; Arnold, S T; Safa, A R; Felsted, R L; Center, M S

    1989-10-15

    HL60 cells isolated for resistance to Adriamycin do not contain P-glycoprotein, as determined with immunological probes. These cells, however, are multidrug resistant and defective in the cellular accumulation of drug. In view of these findings, we have examined in greater detail certain properties of the HL60/Adr cells and have compared these properties to an HL60 drug-resistant isolate (HL60/Vinc) which contains high levels of P-glycoprotein. The results of these studies demonstrated that verapamil induces a major increase in cellular drug accumulation in both HL60/Adr and HL60/Vinc isolates. An 125I-labeled photoaffinity analog of verapamil labeled P-glycoprotein contained in membranes of HL60/Vinc cells. In contrast, this agent did not label any protein selectively associated with drug resistance in membranes of the HL60/Adr isolate. The photoactive dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker [3H]azidopine and [125I]NASV, a photoaffinity analog of vinblastine, labelled P-glycoprotein in membranes from HL60/Vinc cells, whereas in experiments with the HL60/Adr isolate there was no detectable labeling of a drug resistance associated membrane protein. Additional studies have been carried out to analyze membrane proteins of HL60/Adr cells labeled with the photoaffinity agent 8-azido-alpha-[32P]ATP (AzATP32). The results demonstrate that this agent labeled a resistance associated membrane protein of 190 kilodaltons (P190). P190 is essentially absent in membranes of drug-sensitive cells. Labeling of P190 with AzATP32 in membranes of resistant cells was blocked completely when incubations were carried out in the presence of excess unlabeled ATP. Additional studies were carried out to analyze mdr gene amplification and expression in sensitive and resistant cells. Experiments carried out with human 5',mdr1 (1.1 kb) and mdr3 (1.0 kb) cDNAs demonstrate that both of these sequences were highly amplified in the HL60/Vinc isolate. Only the mrd1 gene sequence however, was

  1. The netrin protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekharan, Sathyanath; Kennedy, Timothy E

    2009-01-01

    The name netrin is derived from the Sanskrit Netr, meaning 'guide'. Netrins are a family of extracellular proteins that direct cell and axon migration during embryogenesis. Three secreted netrins (netrins 1, 3 and 4), and two glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane proteins, netrins G1 and G2, have been identified in mammals. The secreted netrins are bifunctional, acting as attractants for some cell types and repellents for others. Receptors for the secreted netrins include the Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) family, the Down's syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM), and the UNC-5 homolog family: Unc5A, B, C and D in mammals. Netrin Gs do not appear to interact with these receptors, but regulate synaptic interactions between neurons by binding to the transmembrane netrin G ligands NGL1 and 2. The chemotropic function of secreted netrins has been best characterized with regard to axon guidance during the development of the nervous system. Extending axons are tipped by a flattened, membranous structure called the growth cone. Multiple extracellular guidance cues direct axonal growth cones to their ultimate targets where synapses form. Such cues can be locally derived (short-range), or can be secreted diffusible cues that allow target cells to signal axons from a distance (long-range). The secreted netrins function as short-range and long-range guidance cues in different circumstances. In addition to directing cell migration, functional roles for netrins have been identified in the regulation of cell adhesion, the maturation of cell morphology, cell survival and tumorigenesis.

  2. 9-Deazapurines as Broad-Spectrum Inhibitors of the ABC Transport Proteins P-Glycoprotein, Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1, and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Katja; Schmitt, Sven Marcel; Wiese, Michael

    2017-11-09

    P-Glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) are the three major ABC transport proteins conferring resistance to many structurally diverse anticancer agents, leading to the phenomenon called multidrug resistance (MDR). Much effort has been put into the development of clinically useful compounds to reverse MDR. Broad-spectrum inhibitors of ABC transport proteins can be of great use in cancers that simultaneously coexpress two or three transporters. In this work, we continued our effort to generate new, potent, nontoxic, and multiply effective inhibitors of the three major ABC transporters. The best compound was active in a very low micromolar concentration range against all three transporters and restored sensitivity toward daunorubicin (P-gp and MRP1) and SN-38 (BCRP) in A2780/ADR (P-gp), H69AR (MRP1), and MDCK II BCRP (BCRP) cells. Additionally, the compound is a noncompetitive inhibitor of daunorubicin (MRP1), calcein AM (P-gp), and pheophorbide A (BCRP) transport.

  3. Bypassing Iron Storage in Endodermal Vacuoles Rescues the Iron Mobilization Defect in the natural resistance associated-macrophage protein3natural resistance associated-macrophage protein4 Double Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, Viviane; Schnell Ramos, Magali; Gillet, Cynthia; Socha, Amanda L; Giraudat, Jérôme; Agorio, Astrid; Merlot, Sylvain; Clairet, Colin; Kim, Sun A; Punshon, Tracy; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Thomine, Sébastien

    2015-09-01

    To improve seed iron (Fe) content and bioavailability, it is crucial to decipher the mechanisms that control Fe storage during seed development. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds, most Fe is concentrated in insoluble precipitates, with phytate in the vacuoles of cells surrounding the vasculature of the embryo. NATURAL RESISTANCE ASSOCIATED-MACROPHAGE PROTEIN3 (AtNRAMP3) and AtNRAMP4 function redundantly in Fe retrieval from vacuoles during germination. When germinated under Fe-deficient conditions, development of the nramp3nramp4 double mutant is arrested as a consequence of impaired Fe mobilization. To identify novel genes involved in seed Fe homeostasis, we screened an ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized population of nramp3nramp4 seedlings for mutations suppressing their phenotypes on low Fe. Here, we report that, among the suppressors, two independent mutations in the VACUOLAR IRON TRANSPORTER1 (AtVIT1) gene caused the suppressor phenotype. The AtVIT1 transporter is involved in Fe influx into vacuoles of endodermal and bundle sheath cells. This result establishes a functional link between Fe loading in vacuoles by AtVIT1 and its remobilization by AtNRAMP3 and AtNRAMP4. Moreover, analysis of subcellular Fe localization indicates that simultaneous disruption of AtVIT1, AtNRAMP3, and AtNRAMP4 limits Fe accumulation in vacuolar globoids. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Nrf2 Regulates the Sensitivity of Mouse Keratinocytes to Nitrogen Mustard via Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1 (Mrp1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udasin, Ronald G.; Wen, Xia; Bircsak, Kristin M.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Shakarjian, Michael P.; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur mustard and nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine, HN2) are potent vesicants developed as chemical warfare agents. These electrophilic, bifunctional alkylating agents cause skin injury, including inflammation, edema, and blistering. HN2 covalently modifies macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins or is scavenged by glutathione, forming adducts that can contribute to toxicity. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (Mrp1/MRP1) is a transmembrane ATPase known to efflux glutathione-conjugated electrophiles. In the present studies, we examined the effects of modulating Mrp1-mediated transport activity on the sensitivity of primary and PAM212 mouse keratinocytes to HN2. Primary keratinocytes, and to a lesser extent, PAM212 cells, express Mrp1 mRNA and protein and possess Mrp1 functional activity, as measured by calcein efflux. Sulforaphane, an activator of Nrf2, increased Mrp1 mRNA, protein, and functional activity in primary keratinocytes and PAM212 cells and decreased their sensitivity to HN2-induced growth inhibition (IC50 = 1.4 and 4.8 µM in primary keratinocytes and 1 and 13 µM in PAM212 cells, in the absence and presence of sulforaphane, respectively). The Mrp1 inhibitor, MK-571, reversed the effects of sulforaphane on HN2-induced growth inhibition in both primary keratinocytes and PAM212 cells. In primary keratinocytes from Nrf2−/− mice, sulforaphane had no impact on Mrp1 expression or activity, or on sensitivity to HN2, demonstrating that its effects depend on Nrf2. These data suggest that Mrp1-mediated efflux is important in regulating HN2-induced keratinocyte growth inhibition. Enhancing HN2 efflux from keratinocytes may represent a novel strategy for mitigating vesicant-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:26454883

  5. Intraabdominal sepsis down-regulates transcription of sodium taurocholate cotransporter and multidrug resistance-associated protein in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, P K; Chen, J; Andrejko, K M; Deutschman, C S

    2000-08-01

    Hepatic dysfunction in sepsis is characterized by hyperbilirubinemia and intrahepatic cholestasis. We hypothesize that sepsis causes decreased hepatic transcription of the bile acid transporter sodium taurocholate cotransporter (Ntcp) and the organic anion transporter multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp2) and that interleukin (IL)-6 is important in the down-regulation of Ntcp and Mrp2 expression. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent induction of mild, nonlethal sepsis by cecal ligation and single puncture (CLP) or fulminant sepsis by cecal ligation and double puncture (2CLP). Hepatic transcription of Ntcp and Mrp2 rapidly decreased after CLP or 2CLP. Seventy-two hours later, transcription was 60% of baseline in CLP and 14% of baseline in 2CLP. Serum bilirubin was elevated from 24 h onward and cholestasis was observed on fixed liver specimens at 24, 48, and 72 h after 2CLP but not after CLP. Steady-state Ntcp and Mrp2 mRNA was decreased in IL-6-treated cultured hepatocytes and in normal rats given 1 mg/kg intravenous IL-6. We conclude that 1) Ntcp and Mrp2 transcription is down-regulated transiently after CLP and persistently after 2CLP; 2) 2CLP results in hyperbilirubinemia and cholestasis, in part due to persistently decreased transcription of Ntcp and Mrp2; and 3) altered Ntcp and Mrp2 transcription is mediated in part by IL-6.

  6. Excretion of fluorescent substrates of mammalian multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) in the Schistosoma mansoni excretory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H; Kusel, J R; Thornhill, J

    2004-01-01

    The protonephridium of platyhelminths including Schistosoma mansoni plays a pivotal role in their survival by excretion of metabolic wastes as well as xenobiotics, and can be revealed in the living adult parasite by certain fluorescent compounds which are concentrated in excretory tubules and collecting ducts. To determine the presence of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) as a possible transporter in protonephridial epithelium, adult schistosomes were exposed to a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, fluo-3 acetyloxymethyl ester, which is a potential substrate of mammalian MRP. Specific fluorescence related to fluo-3/Ca2+ chelate delineated the whole length of the protonephridial system. Simultaneously, a fluorescent substance was accumulated in the posterior part of collecting ducts and the excretory bladder. Similarly, when other fluorogenic substrates for mammalian MRP such as monoclorobimane, fluorescein diacetate, and 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate were applied to adult schistosomes, these fluorescent markers were observed in the excretory tubules through to the excretory bladder. The excretory system of mechanically-transformed schistosomula was not labelled with any of these 4 fluorescent markers. These findings suggest that the protonephridial epithelium of adult schistosomes, but not schistosomula, might express the homologue of the mammalian MRP transporting organic anionic conjugates with glutathione, glucuronate or sulphate as well as unconjugated amphiphilic organic anions.

  7. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 (MRP2) Mediated Transport of Oxaliplatin-Derived Platinum in Membrane Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Khine; Li, Yan; Paxton, James; McKeage, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The platinum-based anticancer drug oxaliplatin is important clinically in cancer treatment. However, the role of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) in controlling oxaliplatin membrane transport, in vivo handling, toxicity and therapeutic responses is unclear. In the current study, preparations of MRP2-expressing and control membrane vesicles, containing inside-out orientated vesicles, were used to directly characterise the membrane transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Oxaliplatin inhibited the ATP-dependent accumulation of the model MRP2 fluorescent probe, 5(6)-carboxy-2,'7'-dichlorofluorescein, in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles. MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles accumulated up to 19-fold more platinum during their incubation with oxaliplatin and ATP as compared to control membrane vesicles and in the absence of ATP. The rate of ATP-dependent MRP2-mediated active transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum increased non-linearly with increasing oxaliplatin exposure concentration, approaching a plateau value (Vmax) of 2680 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes (95%CI, 2010 to 3360 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes), with the half-maximal platinum accumulation rate (Km) at an oxaliplatin exposure concentration of 301 μM (95% CI, 163 to 438 μM), in accordance with Michaelis-Menten kinetics (r2 = 0.954). MRP2 inhibitors (myricetin and MK571) reduced the ATP-dependent accumulation of oxaliplatin-derived platinum in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles in a concentration-dependent manner. To identify whether oxaliplatin, or perhaps a degradation product, was the likely substrate for this active transport, HPLC studies were undertaken showing that oxaliplatin degraded slowly in membrane vesicle incubation buffer containing chloride ions and glutathione, with approximately 95% remaining intact after a 10 minute incubation time and a degradation half-life of 2.24 hours (95%CI, 2.08 to 2.43 hours). In

  8. Expression of multidrug resistance associated protein 5 (MRP5) on cornea and its role in drug efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karla, Pradeep K; Quinn, Tim L; Herndon, Betty L; Thomas, Priscilla; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to investigate the presence of nucleoside/nucleotide efflux transporter in cornea and to evaluate the role in ocular drug efflux. RT-PCR, immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis and immunostaining were employed to establish molecular presence of multidrug resistance associated protein 5 (MRP5) on cornea. Corneal efflux by MRP5 was studied with bis(POM)-PMEA and acyclovir using rabbit and human corneal epithelial cells along with MRP5 over expressing cells (MDCKII-MRP5). Ex vivo studies using excised rabbit cornea and in vivo ocular microdialysis in male New Zealand white rabbits were used to further evaluate the role of MRP5 in conferring ocular drug resistance. RT-PCR confirms the expression of MRP5 in both rabbit and human corneal epithelial cells along with MDCKII-MRP5 cells. Immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis using a rat (M511-54) monoclonal antibody that reacts with human epitope confirms the expression of MRP5 protein in human corneal epithelial cells and MDCKII-MRP5 cells. Immunostaining performed on human cornea indicates the localization of this efflux pump on both epithelium and endothelium. Efflux studies reveal that depletion of ATP decreased PMEA efflux significantly. MRP5 inhibitors also diminished PMEA and acyclovir efflux. However, depletion of glutathione did not alter efflux. MDR1 and MRP2 did not contribute to PMEA efflux. However, MRP2 is involved in acyclovir efflux while MDR1 do not participate in this process. TLC/autoradiography suggested the conversion of bis(POM)-PMEA to PMEA in rabbit and human corneal epithelial cells. Two well known antiglaucoma drugs, bimatoprost and latanoprost were rapidly effluxed by MRP5. Ex vivo study on intact rabbit corneas demonstrated accumulation of PMEA in cornea in the presence of ATP-depleting medium. In vivo ocular pharmacokinetics also revealed a significant increase in maximum aqueous humor concentration (C(max)) and area under the

  9. Coupling of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and multidrug resistance-associated proteins is responsible for the intestinal disposition and poor bioavailability of emodin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wei; Feng, Qian; Li, Ye; Ye, Ling; Hu, Ming; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2012-01-01

    Emodin is a poorly bioavailable but promising plant-derived anticancer drug candidate. The low oral bioavailability of emodin is due to its extensive glucuronidation in the intestine and liver. Caco-2 cell culture model was used to investigate the interplay between UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) and efflux transporters in the intestinal disposition of emodin. Bidirectional transport assays of emodin at different concentrations were performed in the Caco-2 monolayers with or without multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) efflux transporter chemical inhibitors. The bidirectional permeability of emodin and its glucuronide in the Caco-2 monolayers was determined. Emodin was rapidly metabolized to emodin glucuronide in Caco-2 cells. LTC4, a potent inhibitor of MRP2, decreased the efflux of emodin glucuronide and also substantially increased the intracellular glucuronide level in the basolateral-to-apical (B–A) direction. MK-571, chemical inhibitor of MRP2, MRP3, and MRP4, significantly reduced the efflux of glucuronide in the apical-to-basolateral (A–B) and B–A directions in a dose-dependent manner. However, dipyridamole, a BCRP chemical inhibitor demonstrated no effect on formation and efflux of emodin glucuronide in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, UGT is a main metabolic pathway for emodin in the intestine, and the MRP family is composed of major efflux transporters responsible for the excretion of emodin glucuronide in the intestine. The coupling of UGTs and MRP efflux transporters causes the extensive metabolism, excretion, and low bioavailability of emodin. -- Highlights: ► Glucuronidation is the main reason for the poor oral bioavailability of emodin. ► Efflux transporters are involved in the excretion of emodin glucuronide. ► The intestine is the main organ for metabolism of emodin.

  10. Coupling of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and multidrug resistance-associated proteins is responsible for the intestinal disposition and poor bioavailability of emodin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei; Feng, Qian; Li, Ye; Ye, Ling [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Hu, Ming, E-mail: mhu@uh.edu [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston, 1441 Moursund Street, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Liu, Zhongqiu, E-mail: liuzq@smu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2012-12-15

    Emodin is a poorly bioavailable but promising plant-derived anticancer drug candidate. The low oral bioavailability of emodin is due to its extensive glucuronidation in the intestine and liver. Caco-2 cell culture model was used to investigate the interplay between UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) and efflux transporters in the intestinal disposition of emodin. Bidirectional transport assays of emodin at different concentrations were performed in the Caco-2 monolayers with or without multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) efflux transporter chemical inhibitors. The bidirectional permeability of emodin and its glucuronide in the Caco-2 monolayers was determined. Emodin was rapidly metabolized to emodin glucuronide in Caco-2 cells. LTC4, a potent inhibitor of MRP2, decreased the efflux of emodin glucuronide and also substantially increased the intracellular glucuronide level in the basolateral-to-apical (B–A) direction. MK-571, chemical inhibitor of MRP2, MRP3, and MRP4, significantly reduced the efflux of glucuronide in the apical-to-basolateral (A–B) and B–A directions in a dose-dependent manner. However, dipyridamole, a BCRP chemical inhibitor demonstrated no effect on formation and efflux of emodin glucuronide in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, UGT is a main metabolic pathway for emodin in the intestine, and the MRP family is composed of major efflux transporters responsible for the excretion of emodin glucuronide in the intestine. The coupling of UGTs and MRP efflux transporters causes the extensive metabolism, excretion, and low bioavailability of emodin. -- Highlights: ► Glucuronidation is the main reason for the poor oral bioavailability of emodin. ► Efflux transporters are involved in the excretion of emodin glucuronide. ► The intestine is the main organ for metabolism of emodin.

  11. Spontaneous T-cell responses against peptides derived from the Taxol resistance-associated gene-3 (TRAG-3) protein in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Anders; Hadrup, Sine Reker; Svane, Inge Marie

    2005-01-01

    Expression of the cancer-testis antigen Taxol resistance - associated gene-3 (TRAG-3) protein is associated with acquired paclitaxel ( Taxol) resistance, and is expressed in various cancer types; e. g., breast cancer, leukemia, and melanoma. Thus, TRAG-3 represents an attractive target....... The identified HLA-A* 02.01 - restricted TRAG-3-derived epitopes are targets for spontaneous immune responses in breast cancer, hematopoietic cancer, and melanoma patients. Hence, these epitopes represent potential target structures for future therapeutic vaccinations against cancer, possibly appropriate...... for strategies that combine vaccination and chemotherapy; i.e., paclitaxel treatment....

  12. The family of retinoblastoma proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiegler, P; Giordano, A

    2001-01-01

    Our understanding of how the retinoblastoma family members, pRB/p105, pRB2/p130, and pRBL1/p107, regulate cellular properties has progressed significantly. Mechanisms have been described regarding how these proteins utilize properties of additional factors, such as histone deacetylases, to negatively regulate transcription. More importantly, the retinoblastoma proteins have been integrated within multiple cellular pathways, and a complex view has emerged on how the individual members respond to various external and internal stimuli. pRB/p105 is best described in its biochemical properties as well as in the resulting cellular functions. Less is known about pRB2/p130 and pRBL1/p107, but an improved map of their individual as well as redundant functions has been drawn over the last years. In this review we describe general aspects of the properties and functions of the three retinoblastoma family members and their protein-binding partners in cellular growth control.

  13. Involvement of miR-326 in chemotherapy resistance of breast cancer through modulating expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhongxing; Wu, Hui; Xia, James; Li, Yuhua; Zhang, Yawei; Huang, Ke; Wagar, Nicholas; Yoon, Younghyoun; Cho, Heidi T; Scala, Stefania; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2010-03-15

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP-1/ABCC1) transports a wide range of therapeutic agents and may play a critical role in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells. However, the regulation of MRP-1 remains controversial. To explore whether miRNAs are involved in the regulation of MRP-1 expression and modulate the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents, we analyzed miRNA expression levels in VP-16-resistant MDR cell line, MCF-7/VP, in comparison with its parent cell line, MCF-7, using a miRNA microarray. MCF-7/VP overexpressed MRP-1 mRNA and protein not MDR-1 and BCRP. miR-326 was downregulated in MCF-7/VP compared to MCF-7. Additionally, miR-326 was downregulated in a panel of advanced breast cancer tissues and consistent reversely with expression levels of MRP-1. Furthermore, the elevated levels of miR-326 in the mimics-transfected VP-16-resistant cell line, MCF-7/VP, downregulated MRP-1 expression and sensitized these cells to VP-16 and doxorubicin. These findings demonstrate for the first time the involvement of miRNAs in multidrug resistance mediated by MRP-1 and suggest that miR-326 may be an efficient agent for preventing and reversing MDR in tumor cells. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression of P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein, glutathione-S-transferase pi and p53 in canine transmissible venereal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G. Gerardi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The overexpression of proteins P-glycoprotein (P-gp, multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP1, mutant p53, and the enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GSTpi are related to resistance to chemotherapy in neoplasms. This study evaluated the expression of these markers by immunohistochemistry in two groups of canine TVT, without history of prior chemotherapy (TVT1, n=9 and in TVTs presented unsatisfactory clinical response to vincristine sulfate (TVT2, n=5. The percentage of specimens positively stained for P-gp, MRP1, GSTpi and p53 were, respectively 88.8%, 0%, 44.5% and 22.2% in TVT1 and 80%, 0%, 80% and 0% in TVT2. In TVT1, one specimen presented positive expression for three markers and four specimens for two markers. In TVT2, three specimens expressed P-gp and GSTpi. In conclusion, the canine TVTs studied expressed the four markers evaluated, but just P-gp and GSTpi were significantly expressed, mainly at cytoplasm and cytoplasm and nuclei, respectively, either before chemotherapy as after vincristine sulfate exposure. Future studies are needed to demonstrate the function of these two markers in conferring multidrug resistance (MDR or predict the response to chemotherapy in canine TVT.

  15. Transport of N-acetyl-S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine, a metabolite of trichloroethylene, by mouse multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (Mrp2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Koag, Myong-Chul; Newman, Debra; Scholz, Karoline; Bondar, Galyna; Zhu Quansheng; Avliyakulov, Nuraly K.; Dekant, Wolfgang; Faull, Kym; Kurtz, Ira; Pushkin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    N-acetyl-S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (Ac-DCVC) and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC) are the glutathione conjugation pathway metabolites of a common industrial contaminant and potent nephrotoxicant trichloroethylene (TCE). Ac-DCVC and DCVC are accumulated in the renal proximal tubule where they may be secreted into the urine by an unknown apical transporter(s). In this study, we explored the hypothesis that the apical transport of Ac-DCVC and/or DCVC may be mediated by the multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (Mrp2, ABCC2), which is known to mediate proximal tubular apical ATP-dependent transport of glutathione and numerous xenobiotics and endogenous substances conjugated with glutathione. Transport experiments using membrane vesicles prepared from mouse proximal tubule derived cells expressing mouse Mrp2 utilizing ATPase assay and direct measurements of Ac-DCVC/DCVC using liquid chromatography/tandem mass-spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) demonstrated that mouse Mrp2 mediates ATP-dependent transport of Ac-DCVC. Expression of mouse Mrp2 antisense mRNA significantly inhibited the vectorial basolateral to apical transport of Ac-DCVC but not DCVC in mouse proximal tubule derived cells endogenously expressing mouse Mrp2. The results suggest that Mrp2 may be involved in the renal secretion of Ac-DCVC.

  16. Analysis of expression of cMOAT (MRP2), MRP3, MRP4, and MRP5, homologues of the multidrug resistance-associated protein gene (MRP1), in human cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, M.; de Haas, M.; Scheffer, G. L.; Scheper, R. J.; van Eijk, M. J.; Juijn, J. A.; Baas, F.; Borst, P.

    1997-01-01

    By screening databases of human expressed sequence tags, we have identified three new homologues of MRP1, the gene encoding the multidrug resistance-associated protein, and cMOAT (or MRP2), the canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter gene. We call these new genes MRP3, MRP4, and MRP5.

  17. Lack of Contribution of Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein and Organic Anion-transporting Polypeptide to Pharmacokinetics of Regorafenib, a Novel Multi-Kinase Inhibitor, in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kazuo; Ueyama, Jun; Tatsumi, Yasuaki; Tsukiyama, Ikuto; Sugiura, Yuka; Saito, Hiroko; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Hasegawa, Takaaki

    2015-09-01

    We investigated whether hepatic multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (ABCC2) is involved in the hepatobiliary excretion of regorafenib, a novel multi-kinase inhibitor, using Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and Eisai hyperbilirubinemic rats (EHBR) lacking the efflux transporter ABCC2. The involvement of organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1 (OATP1; OATP in humans) and OATP2 in the hepatic uptake of regorafenib and their protein levels in the liver were also investigated in the two rat groups. When regorafenib (5 mg/kg) was administered intravenously, the plasma concentrations of regorafenib were higher in EHBR than those in SD rats. However, the slope of the plasma concentration-time curves was the same for the two groups. Although the apparent biliary clearance of regorafenib in EHBR was lower than that of SD rats, no significant difference in the biliary excretion rate was observed between them, suggesting that regorafenib is not a substrate for ABCC2 and is not excreted into bile by ABCC2. It was also found that the contribution of biliary excretion to the systemic elimination of regorafenib is small. The protein-binding profiles of regorafenib were found to be linear in both rat groups. The binding potency, which was very high in both rat groups (>99.5%), was significantly higher in EHBR than that in SD rats. No significant differences in the plasma concentrations of unbound regorafenib were observed between the two rat groups, suggesting that the differences observed in the pharmacokinetic behaviors of regorafenib between the two rat groups were due to differences in protein-binding. When the protein levels of hepatic OATP1 and OATP2 were measured by immunoblot analysis, the expression of both transporters in EHBR was less than 40% of that in SD rats. The present results suggest that regorafenib is not a substrate for OATP1 and OATP2. These findings suggest the possibility that ABCC2-mediated hepatobiliary excretion and OATP1/OATP2-mediated hepatic uptake do

  18. Integral UBL domain proteins: a family of proteasome interacting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs) comprises a conserved group of proteins involved in a multitude of different cellular activities. However, recent studies on UBL-domain proteins indicate that these proteins appear to share a common property in their ability to interact wi...

  19. Drug resistance in cortical and hippocampal slices from resected tissue of epilepsy patients: no significant impact of P-glycoprotein and Multidrug resistance associated proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora eSandow

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistant patients undergoing epilepsy surgery have a good chance to become sensitive to anticonvulsant medication, suggesting that the resected brain tissue is responsible for drug resistance. Here, we address the question whether P-glycoprotein (Pgp and multidrug resistance associated proteins (MRPs expressed in the resected tissue contribute to drug resistance in vitro. Effects of anti-epileptic drugs (carbamazepine, sodium valproate, phenytoin and two unspecific inhibitors of Pgp and MRPs (verapamil and probenecid on seizure-like events induced in slices from 35 hippocampal and 35 temporal cortex specimens of altogether 51 patients (161 slices were studied. Although in slice preparations the blood brain barrier is not functional, we found that seizure-like events predominantly persisted in the presence of anticonvulsant drugs (90% and also in the presence of verapamil and probenecid (86%. Following subsequent co-administration of antiepileptic drugs and drug transport inhibitors, seizure-like events continued in 63% of 143 slices. Drug sensitivity in slices was recognized either as transition to recurrent epileptiform transients (30% or as suppression (7%, particularly by perfusion with carbamazepine in probenecid containing solutions (43%, 9%. Summarizing responses to co-administration from more than one slice per patient revealed that suppression of seizure-like activity in all slices was only observed in 7 % of patients. Patients whose tissue was completely or partially sensitive (65 % presented with higher seizure frequencies than those with resistant tissue (35 %. However, corresponding subgroups of patients don’t differ with respect to expression rates of drug transporters. Our results imply that parenchymal MRPs and Pgp are not responsible for drug resistance in resected tissue.

  20. Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein-1 (MRP-1)-dependent Glutathione Disulfide (GSSG) Efflux as a Critical Survival Factor for Oxidant-enriched Tumorigenic Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Gayle M; Biswas, Ayan; Khanna, Savita; Spieldenner, James M; Pan, Xueliang; Sen, Chandan K

    2016-05-06

    Endothelial cell tumors are the most common soft tissue tumors in infants. Tumor-forming endothelial (EOMA) cells are able to escape cell death fate despite excessive nuclear oxidant burden. Our previous work recognized perinuclear Nox-4 as a key contributor to EOMA growth. The objective of this work was to characterize the mechanisms by which EOMA cells evade oxidant toxicity and thrive. In EOMA cells, compared with in the cytosol, the nuclear GSSG/GSH ratio was 5-fold higher. Compared to the ratio observed in healthy murine aortic endothelial (MAE) cells, GSSG/GSH was over twice as high in EOMA cells. Multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP-1), an active GSSG efflux mechanism, showed 2-fold increased activity in EOMA compared with MAE cells. Hyperactive YB-1 and Ape/Ref-1 were responsible for high MRP-1 expression in EOMA. Proximity ligand assay demonstrated MRP-1 and YB-1 binding. Such binding enabled the nuclear targeting of MRP-1 in EOMA in a leptomycin-B-sensitive manner. MRP-1 inhibition as well as knockdown trapped nuclear GSSG, causing cell death of EOMA. Disulfide loading of cells by inhibition of GSSG reductase (bischoloronitrosourea) or thioredoxin reductase (auranofin) was effective in causing EOMA death as well. In sum, EOMA cells survive a heavy oxidant burden by rapid efflux of GSSG, which is lethal if trapped within the cell. A hyperactive MRP-1 system for GSSG efflux acts as a critical survival factor for these cells, making it a potential target for EOMA therapeutics. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein-1 (MRP-1)-dependent Glutathione Disulfide (GSSG) Efflux as a Critical Survival Factor for Oxidant-enriched Tumorigenic Endothelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Gayle M.; Biswas, Ayan; Khanna, Savita; Spieldenner, James M.; Pan, Xueliang; Sen, Chandan K.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell tumors are the most common soft tissue tumors in infants. Tumor-forming endothelial (EOMA) cells are able to escape cell death fate despite excessive nuclear oxidant burden. Our previous work recognized perinuclear Nox-4 as a key contributor to EOMA growth. The objective of this work was to characterize the mechanisms by which EOMA cells evade oxidant toxicity and thrive. In EOMA cells, compared with in the cytosol, the nuclear GSSG/GSH ratio was 5-fold higher. Compared to the ratio observed in healthy murine aortic endothelial (MAE) cells, GSSG/GSH was over twice as high in EOMA cells. Multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP-1), an active GSSG efflux mechanism, showed 2-fold increased activity in EOMA compared with MAE cells. Hyperactive YB-1 and Ape/Ref-1 were responsible for high MRP-1 expression in EOMA. Proximity ligand assay demonstrated MRP-1 and YB-1 binding. Such binding enabled the nuclear targeting of MRP-1 in EOMA in a leptomycin-B-sensitive manner. MRP-1 inhibition as well as knockdown trapped nuclear GSSG, causing cell death of EOMA. Disulfide loading of cells by inhibition of GSSG reductase (bischoloronitrosourea) or thioredoxin reductase (auranofin) was effective in causing EOMA death as well. In sum, EOMA cells survive a heavy oxidant burden by rapid efflux of GSSG, which is lethal if trapped within the cell. A hyperactive MRP-1 system for GSSG efflux acts as a critical survival factor for these cells, making it a potential target for EOMA therapeutics. PMID:26961872

  2. Contribution of aquaporin 9 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 to differential sensitivity to arsenite between primary cultured chorion and amnion cells prepared from human fetal membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Yuta; Yuan, Bo; Kaise, Toshikazu; Takeichi, Makoto; Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko; Kroetz, Deanna L.; Toyoda, Hiroo

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As III ) has shown a remarkable clinical efficacy, whereas its side effects are still a serious concern. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effects of As III on human-derived normal cells for revealing the mechanisms underlying these side effects. We examined the effects of As III on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells prepared from human fetal membranes. A significant dose-dependent As III -mediated cytotoxicity was observed in the C-cells accompanied with an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Higher concentrations of As III were required for the A-cells to show cytotoxicity and LDH release, suggesting that the C-cells were more sensitive to As III than the A-cells. The expression levels of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were approximately 2 times higher in the C-cells than those in the A-cells. Both intracellular arsenic accumulation and its cytotoxicity in the C-cells were significantly abrogated by sorbitol, a competitive AQP9 inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. The protein expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 were downregulated by As III in the C-cells, but not in the A-cells. No significant differences in the expression levels of MRP1 were observed between C- and A-cells. The protein expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was hardly detected in both cells, although a detectable amount of its mRNA was observed. Cyclosporine A, a broad-spectrum inhibitor for ABC transporters, and MK571, a MRP inhibitor, but not PGP-4008, a P-gp specific inhibitor, potently sensitized both cells to As III -mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest that AQP9 and MRP2 are involved in controlling arsenic accumulation in these normal cells, which then contribute to differential sensitivity to As III cytotoxicity between these cells. -- Highlights: ► Examination of effect of As III on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells. ► Dose-dependent As III -mediated cytotoxicity in C

  3. Contribution of aquaporin 9 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 to differential sensitivity to arsenite between primary cultured chorion and amnion cells prepared from human fetal membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Yuta [Department of Clinical Molecular Genetics, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Yuan, Bo, E-mail: yuanbo@toyaku.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Molecular Genetics, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California San Francisco, 1550 4th St, RH584E Box 2911 San Francisco, CA 94158-2911 (United States); Kaise, Toshikazu [Laboratory of Environmental Chemodynamics, School of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Takeichi, Makoto [Yoneyama Maternity Hospital, 2-12 Shin-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0065 (Japan); Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Kroetz, Deanna L. [Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California San Francisco, 1550 4th St, RH584E Box 2911 San Francisco, CA 94158-2911 (United States); Toyoda, Hiroo [Department of Clinical Molecular Genetics, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As{sup III}) has shown a remarkable clinical efficacy, whereas its side effects are still a serious concern. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effects of As{sup III} on human-derived normal cells for revealing the mechanisms underlying these side effects. We examined the effects of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells prepared from human fetal membranes. A significant dose-dependent As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity was observed in the C-cells accompanied with an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Higher concentrations of As{sup III} were required for the A-cells to show cytotoxicity and LDH release, suggesting that the C-cells were more sensitive to As{sup III} than the A-cells. The expression levels of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were approximately 2 times higher in the C-cells than those in the A-cells. Both intracellular arsenic accumulation and its cytotoxicity in the C-cells were significantly abrogated by sorbitol, a competitive AQP9 inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. The protein expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 were downregulated by As{sup III} in the C-cells, but not in the A-cells. No significant differences in the expression levels of MRP1 were observed between C- and A-cells. The protein expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was hardly detected in both cells, although a detectable amount of its mRNA was observed. Cyclosporine A, a broad-spectrum inhibitor for ABC transporters, and MK571, a MRP inhibitor, but not PGP-4008, a P-gp specific inhibitor, potently sensitized both cells to As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest that AQP9 and MRP2 are involved in controlling arsenic accumulation in these normal cells, which then contribute to differential sensitivity to As{sup III} cytotoxicity between these cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examination of effect of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion

  4. The human protein disulfide isomerase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galligan James J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enzyme-mediated disulfide bond formation is a highly conserved process affecting over one-third of all eukaryotic proteins. The enzymes primarily responsible for facilitating thiol-disulfide exchange are members of an expanding family of proteins known as protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs. These proteins are part of a larger superfamily of proteins known as the thioredoxin protein family (TRX. As members of the PDI family of proteins, all proteins contain a TRX-like structural domain and are predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Subcellular localization and the presence of a TRX domain, however, comprise the short list of distinguishing features required for gene family classification. To date, the PDI gene family contains 21 members, varying in domain composition, molecular weight, tissue expression, and cellular processing. Given their vital role in protein-folding, loss of PDI activity has been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous disease states, most commonly related to the unfolded protein response (UPR. Over the past decade, UPR has become a very attractive therapeutic target for multiple pathologies including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease, and type-2 diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms of protein-folding, specifically thiol-disulfide exchange, may lead to development of a novel class of therapeutics that would help alleviate a wide range of diseases by targeting the UPR.

  5. Thyroxine (T4 Transfer from Blood to Cerebrospinal Fluid in Sheep Isolated Perfused Choroid Plexus: Role of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins and Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Zibara

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Thyroxine (T4 enters the brain either directly across the blood–brain barrier (BBB or indirectly via the choroid plexus (CP, which forms the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier (B-CSF-B. In this study, using isolated perfused CP of the sheep by single-circulation paired tracer and steady-state techniques, T4 transport mechanisms from blood into lateral ventricle CP has been characterized as the first step in the transfer across the B-CSF-B. After removal of sheep brain, the CPs were perfused with 125I-T4 and 14C-mannitol. Unlabeled T4 was applied during single tracer technique to assess the mode of maximum uptake (Umax and the net uptake (Unet on the blood side of the CP. On the other hand, in order to characterize T4 protein transporters, steady-state extraction of 125I-T4 was measured in presence of different inhibitors such as probenecid, verapamil, BCH, or indomethacin. Increasing the concentration of unlabeled-T4 resulted in a significant reduction in Umax%, which was reflected by a complete inhibition of T4 uptake into CP. In fact, the obtained Unet% decreased as the concentration of unlabeled-T4 increased. The addition of probenecid caused a significant inhibition of T4 transport, in comparison to control, reflecting the presence of a carrier mediated process at the basolateral side of the CP and the involvement of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs: MRP1 and MRP4 and organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatp1, Oatp2, and Oatp14. Moreover, verapamil, the P-glycoprotein (P-gp substrate, resulted in ~34% decrease in the net extraction of T4, indicating that MDR1 contributes to T4 entry into CSF. Finally, inhibition in the net extraction of T4 caused by BCH or indomethacin suggests, respectively, a role for amino acid “L” system and MRP1/Oatp1 in mediating T4 transfer. The presence of a carrier-mediated transport mechanism for cellular uptake on the basolateral membrane of the CP, mainly P-gp and Oatp2, would account

  6. Integral UBL domain proteins: a family of proteasome interacting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs) comprises a conserved group of proteins involved in a multitude of different cellular activities. However, recent studies on UBL-domain proteins indicate that these proteins appear to share a common property in their ability to interact......-domain proteins catalyse the formation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, whereas others appear to target ubiquitinated proteins for degradation and interact with chaperones. Hence, by binding to the 26S proteasome the UBL-domain proteins seem to tailor and direct the basic proteolytic functions of the particle...

  7. Comparative uptake of Tc-99m sestamibi and Tc-99m tetrofosmin in cancer cells and tissue expressing P-Glycoprotein or multidrug resistance associated protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jung Ah; Lee, Jae Tae; Yoo, Jung Ah

    2005-01-01

    99m Tc-sestamibi(MIBI) and 99m Tc-tetrofosmin have been used as substrates for P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP), which are closely associated with multidrug resistance of the tumors. To understand different handling of radiotracers in cancer cell lines expressing Pgp and MRP, we compared cellular uptakes of 99m Tc-MIBI and 99m Tc-tetrofosmin. The effects of cyclosporin A (CsA), well-known multidrug resistant reversing agent, on the uptake of both tracers were also compared. HCT15/CL02 human colorectal cancer cells for Pgp expressing cells, and human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells for MRP expressing cells, were used for in vitro and in vivo studies. RT-PCR, western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were used for detection of Pgp and MRP. MDR-reversal effect with CsA was evaluated at different drug concentrations after incubation with MIBI or tetrofosmin. Radioactivities of supernatant and pellet were measured with gamma well counter. Tumoral uptake of the tracers were measured from tumor bearing nude mice treated with or without CsA. RT-PCR, western blot analysis of the cells and immunochemical staining revealed selective expression of Pgp and MRP for HCT15/CL02 and A549 cells, respectively. There were no significant difference in cellular uptakes of both tracers in HCT15/CL02 cells, but MIBI uptake was slightly higher than that of tetrofosmin in A549 cells. Co-incubation with CsA resulted in a increase in cellular uptakes of MIBI and tetrofosmin. Uptake of MIBI or tetrofosmin in HCT15/CL02 cells was increased by 10-and 2.4-fold, and by 7.5 and 6.3-fold in A549 cells, respectively. Percentage increase of MIBI was higher than that of tetrofosmin with CsA for both cells (ρ < 0.05). In vivo biodistribution study showed that MIBI (114% at 10 min, 257% at 60 min, 396% at 24C min) and tetrofosmin uptake (110% at 10 min, 205% at 60 min, 410% at 240 min) were progressively increased by the time, up to 240 min with CsA. But

  8. Comparative uptake of Tc-99m sestamibi and Tc-99m tetrofosmin in cancer cells and tissue expressing P-Glycoprotein or multidrug resistance associated protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jung Ah; Lee, Jae Tae; Yoo, Jung Ah [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2005-02-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi(MIBI) and {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin have been used as substrates for P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP), which are closely associated with multidrug resistance of the tumors. To understand different handling of radiotracers in cancer cell lines expressing Pgp and MRP, we compared cellular uptakes of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI and {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin. The effects of cyclosporin A (CsA), well-known multidrug resistant reversing agent, on the uptake of both tracers were also compared. HCT15/CL02 human colorectal cancer cells for Pgp expressing cells, and human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells for MRP expressing cells, were used for in vitro and in vivo studies. RT-PCR, western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were used for detection of Pgp and MRP. MDR-reversal effect with CsA was evaluated at different drug concentrations after incubation with MIBI or tetrofosmin. Radioactivities of supernatant and pellet were measured with gamma well counter. Tumoral uptake of the tracers were measured from tumor bearing nude mice treated with or without CsA. RT-PCR, western blot analysis of the cells and immunochemical staining revealed selective expression of Pgp and MRP for HCT15/CL02 and A549 cells, respectively. There were no significant difference in cellular uptakes of both tracers in HCT15/CL02 cells, but MIBI uptake was slightly higher than that of tetrofosmin in A549 cells. Co-incubation with CsA resulted in a increase in cellular uptakes of MIBI and tetrofosmin. Uptake of MIBI or tetrofosmin in HCT15/CL02 cells was increased by 10-and 2.4-fold, and by 7.5 and 6.3-fold in A549 cells, respectively. Percentage increase of MIBI was higher than that of tetrofosmin with CsA for both cells ({rho} < 0.05). In vivo biodistribution study showed that MIBI (114% at 10 min, 257% at 60 min, 396% at 24C min) and tetrofosmin uptake (110% at 10 min, 205% at 60 min, 410% at 240 min) were progressively increased by the time, up to

  9. Characterization of paralogous protein families in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Wei

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High gene numbers in plant genomes reflect polyploidy and major gene duplication events. Oryza sativa, cultivated rice, is a diploid monocotyledonous species with a ~390 Mb genome that has undergone segmental duplication of a substantial portion of its genome. This, coupled with other genetic events such as tandem duplications, has resulted in a substantial number of its genes, and resulting proteins, occurring in paralogous families. Results Using a computational pipeline that utilizes Pfam and novel protein domains, we characterized paralogous families in rice and compared these with paralogous families in the model dicotyledonous diploid species, Arabidopsis thaliana. Arabidopsis, which has undergone genome duplication as well, has a substantially smaller genome (~120 Mb and gene complement compared to rice. Overall, 53% and 68% of the non-transposable element-related rice and Arabidopsis proteins could be classified into paralogous protein families, respectively. Singleton and paralogous family genes differed substantially in their likelihood of encoding a protein of known or putative function; 26% and 66% of singleton genes compared to 73% and 96% of the paralogous family genes encode a known or putative protein in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. Furthermore, a major skew in the distribution of specific gene function was observed; a total of 17 Gene Ontology categories in both rice and Arabidopsis were statistically significant in their differential distribution between paralogous family and singleton proteins. In contrast to mammalian organisms, we found that duplicated genes in rice and Arabidopsis tend to have more alternative splice forms. Using data from Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing, we show that a significant portion of the duplicated genes in rice show divergent expression although a correlation between sequence divergence and correlation of expression could be seen in very young genes. Conclusion

  10. Characterization of paralogous protein families in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haining; Ouyang, Shu; Egan, Amy; Nobuta, Kan; Haas, Brian J; Zhu, Wei; Gu, Xun; Silva, Joana C; Meyers, Blake C; Buell, C Robin

    2008-02-19

    High gene numbers in plant genomes reflect polyploidy and major gene duplication events. Oryza sativa, cultivated rice, is a diploid monocotyledonous species with a ~390 Mb genome that has undergone segmental duplication of a substantial portion of its genome. This, coupled with other genetic events such as tandem duplications, has resulted in a substantial number of its genes, and resulting proteins, occurring in paralogous families. Using a computational pipeline that utilizes Pfam and novel protein domains, we characterized paralogous families in rice and compared these with paralogous families in the model dicotyledonous diploid species, Arabidopsis thaliana. Arabidopsis, which has undergone genome duplication as well, has a substantially smaller genome (~120 Mb) and gene complement compared to rice. Overall, 53% and 68% of the non-transposable element-related rice and Arabidopsis proteins could be classified into paralogous protein families, respectively. Singleton and paralogous family genes differed substantially in their likelihood of encoding a protein of known or putative function; 26% and 66% of singleton genes compared to 73% and 96% of the paralogous family genes encode a known or putative protein in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. Furthermore, a major skew in the distribution of specific gene function was observed; a total of 17 Gene Ontology categories in both rice and Arabidopsis were statistically significant in their differential distribution between paralogous family and singleton proteins. In contrast to mammalian organisms, we found that duplicated genes in rice and Arabidopsis tend to have more alternative splice forms. Using data from Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing, we show that a significant portion of the duplicated genes in rice show divergent expression although a correlation between sequence divergence and correlation of expression could be seen in very young genes. Collectively, these data suggest that while co

  11. Monophyletic clustering and characterization of protein families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jian

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A protein family contains sequences that are evolutionarily related. Generally, this is reflected by sequence similarity. There have been many attempts to organize the set of protein families into evolutionarily homogenous clusters using certain clustering methods. How do we characterize these clusters? How can we cluster protein families using these characterizations? In this work, these questions were addressed by use of a concept called group-wide co-evolution, and was exemplified by some real and simulated protein family data. The results have shown that the trend of a group of monophyletic proteins might be characterized by a normal distribution, while the strength and variability of this trend can be described by the sample mean and variance of the observed correlation coefficients after a suitable transformation. To exploit this property, we have developed a monophyletic clustering method called monophyletic k−medoids clustering. A software package written in R has been made available at http://www.kent.ac.uk/ims/personal/jz .

  12. On the Entropy of Protein Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, John P.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Cocco, Simona; Jacquin, Hugo; Monasson, Rémi

    2016-03-01

    Proteins are essential components of living systems, capable of performing a huge variety of tasks at the molecular level, such as recognition, signalling, copy, transport, ... The protein sequences realizing a given function may largely vary across organisms, giving rise to a protein family. Here, we estimate the entropy of those families based on different approaches, including Hidden Markov Models used for protein databases and inferred statistical models reproducing the low-order (1- and 2-point) statistics of multi-sequence alignments. We also compute the entropic cost, that is, the loss in entropy resulting from a constraint acting on the protein, such as the mutation of one particular amino-acid on a specific site, and relate this notion to the escape probability of the HIV virus. The case of lattice proteins, for which the entropy can be computed exactly, allows us to provide another illustration of the concept of cost, due to the competition of different folds. The relevance of the entropy in relation to directed evolution experiments is stressed.

  13. SUMOylation of Myc-family proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Sabò

    Full Text Available Myc-family proteins are key controllers of the metabolic and proliferative status of the cell, and are subjected to a complex network of regulatory events that guarantee their efficient and fast modulation by extracellular stimuli. Hence, unbalances in regulatory mechanisms leading to altered Myc levels or activities are often reported in cancer cells. Here we show that c- and N-Myc are conjugated to SUMO proteins at conserved lysines in their C-terminal domain. No obvious effects of SUMOylation were detected on bulk N-Myc stability or activities, including the regulation of transcription, proliferation or apoptosis. N-Myc SUMOylation could be induced by cellular stresses, such as heat shock and proteasome inhibition, and in all instances concerned a small fraction of the N-Myc protein. We surmise that, as shown for other substrates, SUMOylation may be part of a quality-control mechanism acting on misfolded Myc proteins.

  14. Targeting functional motifs of a protein family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadola, Pradeep; Deo, Nivedita

    2016-10-01

    The structural organization of a protein family is investigated by devising a method based on the random matrix theory (RMT), which uses the physiochemical properties of the amino acid with multiple sequence alignment. A graphical method to represent protein sequences using physiochemical properties is devised that gives a fast, easy, and informative way of comparing the evolutionary distances between protein sequences. A correlation matrix associated with each property is calculated, where the noise reduction and information filtering is done using RMT involving an ensemble of Wishart matrices. The analysis of the eigenvalue statistics of the correlation matrix for the β -lactamase family shows the universal features as observed in the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE). The property-based approach captures the short- as well as the long-range correlation (approximately following GOE) between the eigenvalues, whereas the previous approach (treating amino acids as characters) gives the usual short-range correlations, while the long-range correlations are the same as that of an uncorrelated series. The distribution of the eigenvector components for the eigenvalues outside the bulk (RMT bound) deviates significantly from RMT observations and contains important information about the system. The information content of each eigenvector of the correlation matrix is quantified by introducing an entropic estimate, which shows that for the β -lactamase family the smallest eigenvectors (low eigenmodes) are highly localized as well as informative. These small eigenvectors when processed gives clusters involving positions that have well-defined biological and structural importance matching with experiments. The approach is crucial for the recognition of structural motifs as shown in β -lactamase (and other families) and selectively identifies the important positions for targets to deactivate (activate) the enzymatic actions.

  15. Clustering evolving proteins into homologous families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Mahbob, Maisarah; Ragan, Mark A

    2013-04-08

    Clustering sequences into groups of putative homologs (families) is a critical first step in many areas of comparative biology and bioinformatics. The performance of clustering approaches in delineating biologically meaningful families depends strongly on characteristics of the data, including content bias and degree of divergence. New, highly scalable methods have recently been introduced to cluster the very large datasets being generated by next-generation sequencing technologies. However, there has been little systematic investigation of how characteristics of the data impact the performance of these approaches. Using clusters from a manually curated dataset as reference, we examined the performance of a widely used graph-based Markov clustering algorithm (MCL) and a greedy heuristic approach (UCLUST) in delineating protein families coded by three sets of bacterial genomes of different G+C content. Both MCL and UCLUST generated clusters that are comparable to the reference sets at specific parameter settings, although UCLUST tends to under-cluster compositionally biased sequences (G+C content 33% and 66%). Using simulated data, we sought to assess the individual effects of sequence divergence, rate heterogeneity, and underlying G+C content. Performance decreased with increasing sequence divergence, decreasing among-site rate variation, and increasing G+C bias. Two MCL-based methods recovered the simulated families more accurately than did UCLUST. MCL using local alignment distances is more robust across the investigated range of sequence features than are greedy heuristics using distances based on global alignment. Our results demonstrate that sequence divergence, rate heterogeneity and content bias can individually and in combination affect the accuracy with which MCL and UCLUST can recover homologous protein families. For application to data that are more divergent, and exhibit higher among-site rate variation and/or content bias, MCL may often be the better

  16. Low frequency of the scrapile resistance-associated allele and presence of lysine-171 allele of the prion protein gene in Italian Biellese ovine breed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acutis, P.L.; Sbaiz, L.; Verburg, F.J.; Riina, M.V.; Ru, G.; Moda, G.; Caramelli, M.; Bossers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Frequencies of polymorphisms at codons 136, 154 and 171 of the prion protein (PrP) gene were studied in 1207 pure-bred and cross-bred Italian Biellese rams, a small ovine breed of about 65 000 head in Italy. Aside from the five most common alleles (VRQ, ARQ, ARR, AHQ and ARH), the rare ARK allele

  17. Learning generative models for protein fold families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Sivaraman; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Carbonell, Jaime G; Lee, Su-In; Langmead, Christopher James

    2011-04-01

    We introduce a new approach to learning statistical models from multiple sequence alignments (MSA) of proteins. Our method, called GREMLIN (Generative REgularized ModeLs of proteINs), learns an undirected probabilistic graphical model of the amino acid composition within the MSA. The resulting model encodes both the position-specific conservation statistics and the correlated mutation statistics between sequential and long-range pairs of residues. Existing techniques for learning graphical models from MSA either make strong, and often inappropriate assumptions about the conditional independencies within the MSA (e.g., Hidden Markov Models), or else use suboptimal algorithms to learn the parameters of the model. In contrast, GREMLIN makes no a priori assumptions about the conditional independencies within the MSA. We formulate and solve a convex optimization problem, thus guaranteeing that we find a globally optimal model at convergence. The resulting model is also generative, allowing for the design of new protein sequences that have the same statistical properties as those in the MSA. We perform a detailed analysis of covariation statistics on the extensively studied WW and PDZ domains and show that our method out-performs an existing algorithm for learning undirected probabilistic graphical models from MSA. We then apply our approach to 71 additional families from the PFAM database and demonstrate that the resulting models significantly out-perform Hidden Markov Models in terms of predictive accuracy. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Cellular transport of microcystin-LR in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) across the intestinal wall: possible involvement of multidrug resistance-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieczynski, Flavia; De Anna, Julieta S; Pirez, Macarena; Brena, Beatríz M; Villanueva, Silvina S M; Luquet, Carlos M

    2014-09-01

    We studied Abcc mediated-transport in middle and posterior intestine of the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. Luminal and serosal transport were evaluated in everted and non-everted intestinal sacs, respectively, incubated with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB; 200 μM). CDNB enters the cells and is conjugated with glutathione via glutathione S-transferase (GST) to form 2,4-dinitrophenyl-S-glutathione (DNP-SG), a known Abcc substrate. DNP-SG concentration in the bath was recorded every 10 min, in order to calculate the mass-specific transport rate. For evaluating the possible involvement of Abcc proteins in microcystin-LR (MCLR) transport, 1.135 μM MCLR was added to the bath or inside the sacs, in everted or non-everted preparations, respectively. Both luminal and serosal DNP-SG efflux were significantly inhibited by MCLR. A concentration-response curve obtained using strips from middle intestine yielded an IC50 value of 1.33 μM MCLR. The Abcc inhibitor, MK571 produced concentration-dependent inhibition of DNP-SG similar to that produced by MCLR. Since competition of MCLR and CDNB as GST substrates could bias the DNP-SG transport results, we evaluated the effects of MCLR on calcein efflux, which does not depend on GST activity. We applied the non-fluorescent, cell-permeant compound calcein-AM (0.25 μM) to middle intestinal strips and recorded the efflux of its hydrolysis product, the fluorescent Abcc substrate calcein. 2.27 μM MCLR and 3 μM MK571 inhibited calcein efflux (17.39 and 20.2%, respectively). Finally, MCLR interaction with Abcc transporters was evaluated by measuring its toxic intracellular effects. Middle intestinal segments were incubated in saline solution with 1.135 μM MCLR (MC1), 2.27 μM MCLR (MC2), 3 μM MK571 (MK) or 1.135 μM MCLR+3 μM MK571 (MC1/MK). After 1h, GSH concentration, protein phosphatase 1 and 2A (PP1, PP2A) and GST activities were measured in each segment. MC1did not produce significant effect while MC1/MK and MC2

  19. Efflux Transport Characterization of Resveratrol Glucuronides in UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 Transfected HeLa Cells: Application of a Cellular Pharmacokinetic Model to Decipher the Contribution of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Li, Feng; Quan, Enxi; Dong, Dong; Wu, Baojian

    2016-04-01

    Resveratrol undergoes extensive metabolism to form biologically active glucuronides in humans. However, the transport mechanisms for resveratrol glucuronides are not fully established. Here, we aimed to characterize the efflux transport of resveratrol glucuronides using UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells (HeLa1A1 cells), and to determine the contribution of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 4 to cellular excretion of the glucuronides. Two glucuronide isomers [i.e., resveratrol 3-O-glucuronide (R3G) and resveratrol 4'-O-glucuronide (R4'G)] were excreted into the extracellular compartment after incubation of resveratrol (1-100 μM) with HeLa1A1 cells. The excretion rate was linearly related to the level of intracellular glucuronide, indicating that glucuronide efflux was a nonsaturable process. MK-571 (a dual inhibitor of UGT1A1 and MRPs) significantly decreased the excretion rates of R3G and R4'G while increasing their intracellular levels. Likewise, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated silencing of MRP4 caused a significant reduction in glucuronide excretion but an elevation in glucuronide accumulation. Furthermore, β-glucuronidase expressed in the cells catalyzed the hydrolysis of the glucuronides back to the parent compound. A cellular pharmacokinetic model integrating resveratrol transport/metabolism with glucuronide hydrolysis/excretion was well fitted to the experimental data, allowing derivation of the efflux rate constant values in the absence or presence of shRNA targeting MRP4. It was found that a large percentage of glucuronide excretion (43%-46%) was attributed to MRP4. In conclusion, MRP4 participated in cellular excretion of R3G and R4'G. Integration of mechanistic pharmacokinetic modeling with transporter knockdown was a useful method to derive the contribution percentage of an exporter to overall glucuronide excretion. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Multiple efflux pumps are involved in the transepithelial transport of colchicine: combined effect of p-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 leads to decreased intestinal absorption throughout the entire small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Sabit, Hairat; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to thoroughly characterize the efflux transporters involved in the intestinal permeability of the oral microtubule polymerization inhibitor colchicine and to evaluate the role of these transporters in limiting its oral absorption. The effects of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) inhibitors on colchicine bidirectional permeability were studied across Caco-2 cell monolayers, inhibiting one versus multiple transporters simultaneously. Colchicine permeability was then investigated in different regions of the rat small intestine by in situ single-pass perfusion. Correlation with the P-gp/MRP2 expression level throughout different intestinal segments was investigated by immunoblotting. P-gp inhibitors [N-(4-[2-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6,7-dimethoxy-2-isoquinolinyl)ethyl]-phenyl)-9,10-dihydro-5-methoxy-9-oxo-4-acridine carboxamide (GF120918), verapamil, and quinidine], and MRP2 inhibitors [3-[[3-[2-(7-chloroquinolin-2-yl)vinyl]phenyl]-(2-dimethylcarbamoylethylsulfanyl)methylsulfanyl] propionic acid (MK571), indomethacin, and p-aminohippuric acid (p-AH)] significantly increased apical (AP)-basolateral (BL) and decreased BL-AP Caco-2 transport in a concentration-dependent manner. No effect was obtained by the BCRP inhibitors fumitremorgin C (FTC) and pantoprazole. P-gp/MRP2 inhibitors combinations greatly reduced colchicine mucosal secretion, including complete abolishment of efflux (GF120918/MK571). Colchicine displayed low (versus metoprolol) and constant permeability along the rat small-intestine. GF120918 significantly increased colchicine permeability in the ileum with no effect in the jejunum, whereas MK571 augmented jejunal permeability without changing the ileal transport. The GF120918/MK571 combination caused an effect similar to that of MK571 alone in the jejunum and to that of GF120918 alone in the ileum. P-gp expression followed a gradient increasing from

  1. HIPPI: highly accurate protein family classification with ensembles of HMMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-phuong Nguyen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given a new biological sequence, detecting membership in a known family is a basic step in many bioinformatics analyses, with applications to protein structure and function prediction and metagenomic taxon identification and abundance profiling, among others. Yet family identification of sequences that are distantly related to sequences in public databases or that are fragmentary remains one of the more difficult analytical problems in bioinformatics. Results We present a new technique for family identification called HIPPI (Hierarchical Profile Hidden Markov Models for Protein family Identification. HIPPI uses a novel technique to represent a multiple sequence alignment for a given protein family or superfamily by an ensemble of profile hidden Markov models computed using HMMER. An evaluation of HIPPI on the Pfam database shows that HIPPI has better overall precision and recall than blastp, HMMER, and pipelines based on HHsearch, and maintains good accuracy even for fragmentary query sequences and for protein families with low average pairwise sequence identity, both conditions where other methods degrade in accuracy. Conclusion HIPPI provides accurate protein family identification and is robust to difficult model conditions. Our results, combined with observations from previous studies, show that ensembles of profile Hidden Markov models can better represent multiple sequence alignments than a single profile Hidden Markov model, and thus can improve downstream analyses for various bioinformatic tasks. Further research is needed to determine the best practices for building the ensemble of profile Hidden Markov models. HIPPI is available on GitHub at https://github.com/smirarab/sepp .

  2. Orm family proteins mediate sphingolipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breslow, David K; Collins, Sean R; Bodenmiller, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    or mutations to their phosphorylation sites cause dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolism. Our work identifies the Orm proteins as critical mediators of sphingolipid homeostasis and raises the possibility that sphingolipid misregulation contributes to the development of childhood asthma....

  3. The Protein 4.1 family: hub proteins in animals for organizing membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Anthony J; Lu, Hui-Chun; Bennett, Pauline M

    2014-02-01

    Proteins of the 4.1 family are characteristic of eumetazoan organisms. Invertebrates contain single 4.1 genes and the Drosophila model suggests that 4.1 is essential for animal life. Vertebrates have four paralogues, known as 4.1R, 4.1N, 4.1G and 4.1B, which are additionally duplicated in the ray-finned fish. Protein 4.1R was the first to be discovered: it is a major mammalian erythrocyte cytoskeletal protein, essential to the mechanochemical properties of red cell membranes because it promotes the interaction between spectrin and actin in the membrane cytoskeleton. 4.1R also binds certain phospholipids and is required for the stable cell surface accumulation of a number of erythrocyte transmembrane proteins that span multiple functional classes; these include cell adhesion molecules, transporters and a chemokine receptor. The vertebrate 4.1 proteins are expressed in most tissues, and they are required for the correct cell surface accumulation of a very wide variety of membrane proteins including G-Protein coupled receptors, voltage-gated and ligand-gated channels, as well as the classes identified in erythrocytes. Indeed, such large numbers of protein interactions have been mapped for mammalian 4.1 proteins, most especially 4.1R, that it appears that they can act as hubs for membrane protein organization. The range of critical interactions of 4.1 proteins is reflected in disease relationships that include hereditary anaemias, tumour suppression, control of heartbeat and nervous system function. The 4.1 proteins are defined by their domain structure: apart from the spectrin/actin-binding domain they have FERM and FERM-adjacent domains and a unique C-terminal domain. Both the FERM and C-terminal domains can bind transmembrane proteins, thus they have the potential to be cross-linkers for membrane proteins. The activity of the FERM domain is subject to multiple modes of regulation via binding of regulatory ligands, phosphorylation of the FERM associated domain and

  4. The small heat shock proteins family : The long forgotten chaperones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrido, C.; Paul, C.; Seigneuric, R.; Kampinga, H. H.

    2012-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins are a rather heterogeneous family of ATP-independent chaperones, some of which have been proven to block protein aggregation and help the cells to survive stressful conditions. Although much less studied than high molecular weight HSPs like HSP70/HSPA or HSP90/HSPC, their

  5. The SNARE protein family of Leishmania major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mottram Jeremy C

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmania major is a protozoan parasite with a highly polarised cell shape that depends upon endocytosis and exocytosis from a single area of the plasma membrane, the flagellar pocket. SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor adaptor proteins receptors are key components of the intracellular vesicle-mediated transports that take place in all eukaryotic cells. They are membrane-bound proteins that facilitate the docking and fusion of vesicles with organelles. The recent availability of the genome sequence of L. major has allowed us to assess the complement of SNAREs in the parasite and to investigate their location in comparison with metazoans. Results Bioinformatic searches of the L. major genome revealed a total of 27 SNARE domain-containing proteins that could be classified in structural groups by phylogenetic analysis. 25 of these possessed the expected features of functional SNAREs, whereas the other two could represent kinetoplastid-specific proteins that might act as regulators of the SNARE complexes. Other differences of Leishmania SNAREs were the absence of double SNARE domain-containing and of the brevin classes of these proteins. Members of the Qa group of Leishmania SNAREs showed differential expressions profiles in the two main parasite forms whereas their GFP-tagging and in vivo expression revealed localisations in the Golgi, late endosome/lysosome and near the flagellar pocket. Conclusion The early-branching eukaryote L. major apparently possess a SNARE repertoire that equals in number the one of metazoans such as Drosophila, showing that the machinery for vesicle fusion is well conserved throughout the eukaryotes. However, the analysis revealed the absence of certain types of SNAREs found in metazoans and yeast, while suggesting the presence of original SNAREs as well as others with unusual localisation. This study also presented the intracellular localisation of the L. major SNAREs from the Qa group

  6. Computing a new family of shape descriptors for protein structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter; Sinclair, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The large-scale 3D structure of a protein can be represented by the polygonal curve through the carbon a atoms of the protein backbone. We introduce an algorithm for computing the average number of times that a given configuration of crossings on such polygonal curves is seen, the average being...... taken over all directions in space. Hereby, we introduce a new family of global geometric measures of protein structures, which we compare with the so-called generalized Gauss integrals....

  7. The BPI-like/PLUNC family proteins in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Thomas T; Haigh, Brendan J; Broadhurst, Marita K; Hood, Kylie A; Maqbool, Nauman J

    2011-08-01

    Members of the protein family having similarity to BPI (bactericidal/permeability increasing protein) (the BPI-like proteins), also known as the PLUNC (palate, lung and nasal epithelium clone) family, have been found in a range of mammals; however, those in species other than human or mouse have been relatively little characterized. Analysis of the BPI-like proteins in cattle presents unique opportunities to investigate the function of these proteins, as well as address their evolution and contribution to the distinct physiology of ruminants. The present review summarizes the current understanding of the nature of the BPI-like locus in cattle, including the duplications giving rise to the multiple BSP30 (bovine salivary protein 30 kDa) genes from an ancestral gene in common with the single PSP (parotid secretory protein) gene found in monogastric species. Current knowledge of the expression of the BPI-like proteins in cattle is also presented, including their pattern of expression among tissues, which illustrate their independent regulation at sites of high pathogen exposure, and the abundance of the BSP30 proteins in saliva and salivary tissues. Finally, investigations of the function of the BSP30 proteins are presented, including their antimicrobial, lipopolysaccharide-binding and bacterial aggregation activities. These results are discussed in relation to hypotheses regarding the physiological role of the BPI-like proteins in cattle, including the role they may play in host defence and the unique aspects of digestion in ruminants.

  8. Systems Proteomics View of the Endogenous Human Claudin Protein Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Koval, Michael; Ranganathan, Shoba; Fanayan, Susan; Hancock, William S; Lundberg, Emma K; Beavis, Ronald C; Lane, Lydie; Duek, Paula; McQuade, Leon; Kelleher, Neil L; Baker, Mark S

    2016-02-05

    Claudins are the major transmembrane protein components of tight junctions in human endothelia and epithelia. Tissue-specific expression of claudin members suggests that this protein family is not only essential for sustaining the role of tight junctions in cell permeability control but also vital in organizing cell contact signaling by protein-protein interactions. How this protein family is collectively processed and regulated is key to understanding the role of junctional proteins in preserving cell identity and tissue integrity. The focus of this review is to first provide a brief overview of the functional context, on the basis of the extensive body of claudin biology research that has been thoroughly reviewed, for endogenous human claudin members and then ascertain existing and future proteomics techniques that may be applicable to systematically characterizing the chemical forms and interacting protein partners of this protein family in human. The ability to elucidate claudin-based signaling networks may provide new insight into cell development and differentiation programs that are crucial to tissue stability and manipulation.

  9. Disorder and function: a review of the dehydrin protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen P Graether

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dehydration proteins (dehydrins are group 2 members of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA protein family. The protein architecture of dehydrins can be described by the presence of three types of conserved sequence motifs that have been named the K-, Y- and S-segments. By definition, a dehydrin must contain at least one copy of the lysine-rich K-segment. Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, and salinity cause the upregulation of dehydrin mRNA and protein levels. Despite the large body of genetic and protein evidence of the importance of these proteins in stress response, the in vivo protective mechanism is not fully known. In vitro experimental evidence from biochemical assays and localization experiments suggest multiple roles for dehydrins, including membrane protection, cryoprotection of enzymes, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Membrane binding by dehydrins is likely to be as a peripheral membrane protein, since the protein sequences are highly hydrophilic and contain many charged amino acids. Because of this, dehydrins in solution are intrinsically disordered proteins, that is, they have no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure. Despite their disorder, dehydrins have been shown to gain structure when bound to ligands such as membranes, and to possibly change their oligomeric state when bound to ions. We review what is currently known about dehydrin sequences and their structures, and examine the various ligands that have been shown to bind to this family of proteins.

  10. Systems Proteomics View of the Endogenous Human Claudin Protein Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Koval, Michael; Ranganathan, Shoba; Fanayan, Susan; Hancock, William S.; Lundberg, Emma K.; Beavis, Ronald C.; Lane, Lydie; Duek, Paula; McQuade, Leon; Kelleher, Neil L.; Baker, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Claudins are the major transmembrane protein components of tight junctions in human endothelia and epithelia. Tissue-specific expression of claudin members suggests that this protein family is not only essential for sustaining the role of tight junctions in cell permeability control but also vital in organizing cell contact signaling by protein–protein interactions. How this protein family is collectively processed and regulated is key to understanding the role of junctional proteins in preserving cell identity and tissue integrity. The focus of this review is to first provide a brief overview of the functional context, on the basis of the extensive body of claudin biology research that has been thoroughly reviewed, for endogenous human claudin members and then ascertain existing and future proteomics techniques that may be applicable to systematically characterizing the chemical forms and interacting protein partners of this protein family in human. The ability to elucidate claudin-based signaling networks may provide new insight into cell development and differentiation programs that are crucial to tissue stability and manipulation. PMID:26680015

  11. Practical analysis of specificity-determining residues in protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagoyen, Mónica; García-Martín, Juan A; Pazos, Florencio

    2016-03-01

    Determining the residues that are important for the molecular activity of a protein is a topic of broad interest in biomedicine and biotechnology. This knowledge can help understanding the protein's molecular mechanism as well as to fine-tune its natural function eventually with biotechnological or therapeutic implications. Some of the protein residues are essential for the function common to all members of a family of proteins, while others explain the particular specificities of certain subfamilies (like binding on different substrates or cofactors and distinct binding affinities). Owing to the difficulty in experimentally determining them, a number of computational methods were developed to detect these functional residues, generally known as 'specificity-determining positions' (or SDPs), from a collection of homologous protein sequences. These methods are mature enough for being routinely used by molecular biologists in directing experiments aimed at getting insight into the functional specificity of a family of proteins and eventually modifying it. In this review, we summarize some of the recent discoveries achieved through SDP computational identification in a number of relevant protein families, as well as the main approaches and software tools available to perform this type of analysis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family proteins: New ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extensive efforts have been employed by the scientific communities worldwide, to identify and develop potential inhibitors of BET family BDs to regulate protein expression by inhibiting acetylated histone (H3/H4) interactions. Several small molecule inhibitors have been reported, which not only have high affinity, but also ...

  13. Adducin family proteins possess different nuclear export potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chia-Mei; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Lin, Wan-Yi; Chen, Hong-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Background The adducin (ADD) family proteins, namely ADD1, ADD2, and ADD3, are actin-binding proteins that play important roles in the stabilization of membrane cytoskeleton and cell-cell junctions. All the ADD proteins contain a highly conserved bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) at the carboxyl termini, but only ADD1 can localize to the nucleus. The reason for this discrepancy is not clear. Methods To avoid the potential effect of cell-cell junctions on the distribution of ADD prot...

  14. Chitinase family GH18: evolutionary insights from the genomic history of a diverse protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aronson Nathan N

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chitinases (EC.3.2.1.14 hydrolyze the β-1,4-linkages in chitin, an abundant N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine polysaccharide that is a structural component of protective biological matrices such as insect exoskeletons and fungal cell walls. The glycoside hydrolase 18 (GH18 family of chitinases is an ancient gene family widely expressed in archea, prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Mammals are not known to synthesize chitin or metabolize it as a nutrient, yet the human genome encodes eight GH18 family members. Some GH18 proteins lack an essential catalytic glutamic acid and are likely to act as lectins rather than as enzymes. This study used comparative genomic analysis to address the evolutionary history of the GH18 multiprotein family, from early eukaryotes to mammals, in an effort to understand the forces that shaped the human genome content of chitinase related proteins. Results Gene duplication and loss according to a birth-and-death model of evolution is a feature of the evolutionary history of the GH18 family. The current human family likely originated from ancient genes present at the time of the bilaterian expansion (approx. 550 mya. The family expanded in the chitinous protostomes C. elegans and D. melanogaster, declined in early deuterostomes as chitin synthesis disappeared, and expanded again in late deuterostomes with a significant increase in gene number after the avian/mammalian split. Conclusion This comprehensive genomic study of animal GH18 proteins reveals three major phylogenetic groups in the family: chitobiases, chitinases/chitolectins, and stabilin-1 interacting chitolectins. Only the chitinase/chitolectin group is associated with expansion in late deuterostomes. Finding that the human GH18 gene family is closely linked to the human major histocompatibility complex paralogon on chromosome 1, together with the recent association of GH18 chitinase activity with Th2 cell inflammation, suggests that its late expansion

  15. A novel family of small proteins that affect plant development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Charles Walker

    2011-04-29

    The DVL genes represent a new group of plant proteins that influence plant growth and development. Overexpression of DVL1, and other members of the DVL family, causes striking phenotypic changes. The DVL proteins share sequence homology in their C-terminal half. Point mutations in the C-terminal domain show it is necessary and deletion studies demonstrate the C-terminal domain is sufficient to confer the overexpression phenotypes. The phenotypes observed, and the conservation of the protein sequence in the plant kingdom, does suggest the DVL proteins have a role in modulating plant growth and development. Our working hypothesis is the DVL proteins function as regulators of cellular signaling pathways that control growth and development.

  16. Phosducin-like proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum : implications for the phosducin family of proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, M; Knol, JC; Kortholt, A; Roelofs, J; Ruchira, [No Value; Postma, Marten; Visser, AJWG; Van Haastert, PJM; Knol, Jaco C.; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.

    2003-01-01

    Retinal phosducin is known to sequester transducin Gbetagamma, thereby modulating transducin activity. Phos ducin is a member of a family of phosducin-like proteins (PhLP) found in eukaryotes. Phylogeny of 33 phosducin-like proteins from metazoa, plants and lower eukaryotes identified three distinct

  17. Target Molecular Simulations of RecA Family Protein Filaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeng-Tseng Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of the RadA family mechanism is crucial to understanding the DNA SOS repair process. In a 2007 report, the archaeal RadA proteins function as rotary motors (linker region: I71-K88 such as shown in Figure 1. Molecular simulations approaches help to shed further light onto this phenomenon. We find 11 rotary residues (R72, T75-K81, M84, V86 and K87 and five zero rotary residues (I71, K74, E82, R83 and K88 in the simulations. Inclusion of our simulations may help to understand the RadA family mechanism.

  18. The PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein family of auxin transporters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křeček, Pavel; Skůpa, Petr; Libus, Jiří; Naramoto, S.; Tejos, R.; Friml, J.; Zažímalová, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 12 (2009), s. 249.1-249.11 ISSN 1474-760X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06034; GA AV ČR KJB600380904; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA601630703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : PIN protein family * auxin efflux carriers * auxin transport Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.626, year: 2009

  19. The PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein family of auxin transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krecek, Pavel; Skupa, Petr; Libus, Jirí; Naramoto, Satoshi; Tejos, Ricardo; Friml, Jirí; Zazímalová, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are secondary transporters acting in the efflux of the plant signal molecule auxin from cells. They are asymmetrically localized within cells and their polarity determines the directionality of intercellular auxin flow. PIN genes are found exclusively in the genomes of multicellular plants and play an important role in regulating asymmetric auxin distribution in multiple developmental processes, including embryogenesis, organogenesis, tissue differentiation and tropic responses. All PIN proteins have a similar structure with amino- and carboxy-terminal hydrophobic, membrane-spanning domains separated by a central hydrophilic domain. The structure of the hydrophobic domains is well conserved. The hydrophilic domain is more divergent and it determines eight groups within the protein family. The activity of PIN proteins is regulated at multiple levels, including transcription, protein stability, subcellular localization and transport activity. Different endogenous and environmental signals can modulate PIN activity and thus modulate auxin-distribution-dependent development. A large group of PIN proteins, including the most ancient members known from mosses, localize to the endoplasmic reticulum and they regulate the subcellular compartmentalization of auxin and thus auxin metabolism. Further work is needed to establish the physiological importance of this unexpected mode of auxin homeostasis regulation. Furthermore, the evolution of PIN-based transport, PIN protein structure and more detailed biochemical characterization of the transport function are important topics for further studies.

  20. Analysis of substructural variation in families of enzymatic proteins with applications to protein function prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fofanov Viacheslav Y

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural variations caused by a wide range of physico-chemical and biological sources directly influence the function of a protein. For enzymatic proteins, the structure and chemistry of the catalytic binding site residues can be loosely defined as a substructure of the protein. Comparative analysis of drug-receptor substructures across and within species has been used for lead evaluation. Substructure-level similarity between the binding sites of functionally similar proteins has also been used to identify instances of convergent evolution among proteins. In functionally homologous protein families, shared chemistry and geometry at catalytic sites provide a common, local point of comparison among proteins that may differ significantly at the sequence, fold, or domain topology levels. Results This paper describes two key results that can be used separately or in combination for protein function analysis. The Family-wise Analysis of SubStructural Templates (FASST method uses all-against-all substructure comparison to determine Substructural Clusters (SCs. SCs characterize the binding site substructural variation within a protein family. In this paper we focus on examples of automatically determined SCs that can be linked to phylogenetic distance between family members, segregation by conformation, and organization by homology among convergent protein lineages. The Motif Ensemble Statistical Hypothesis (MESH framework constructs a representative motif for each protein cluster among the SCs determined by FASST to build motif ensembles that are shown through a series of function prediction experiments to improve the function prediction power of existing motifs. Conclusions FASST contributes a critical feedback and assessment step to existing binding site substructure identification methods and can be used for the thorough investigation of structure-function relationships. The application of MESH allows for an automated

  1. The importance of ADAM family proteins in malignant tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Walkiewicz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of reports about the role of adamalysins (ADAM in malignant tumors are being published. To date, more than 30 representatives of this group, out of which about 20 occur in humans, have been described. The ADAM family is a homogeneous group of proteins which regulate, from the stage of embryogenesis, a series of processes such as cell migration, adhesion, and cell fusion. Half of them have proteolytic activity and are involved in the degradation of the extracellular matrix and the disintegration of certain protein complexes, thereby regulating the bioavailability of various growth factors. Many of these functions have a direct role in the processes of carcinogenesis and promoting the growth of tumor, which affect some signaling pathways, including those related to insulin-like growth factors (IGF1, IGF2, vascular growth factor (VEGF, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα and the EGFR/HER pathway. Another branch of studies is the evaluation of the possibility of using members of ADAM family proteins in the diagnosis, especially in breast, colon and non- small cell lung cancer. The detection of concentrations of adamalysin in serum, urine and pleural aspirates might contribute to the development of methods of early diagnosis of cancer and monitoring the therapy. However, both the role of adamalysins in the development and progression of tumors and their importance as a diagnostic and predictive further research still need to be checked on large groups of patients.

  2. [The importance of ADAM family proteins in malignant tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkiewicz, Katarzyna; Gętek, Monika; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata; Kokot, Teresa; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa

    2016-02-11

    Increasing numbers of reports about the role of adamalysins (ADAM) in malignant tumors are being published. To date, more than 30 representatives of this group, out of which about 20 occur in humans, have been described. The ADAM family is a homogeneous group of proteins which regulate, from the stage of embryogenesis, a series of processes such as cell migration, adhesion, and cell fusion. Half of them have proteolytic activity and are involved in the degradation of the extracellular matrix and the disintegration of certain protein complexes, thereby regulating the bioavailability of various growth factors. Many of these functions have a direct role in the processes of carcinogenesis and promoting the growth of tumor, which affect some signaling pathways, including those related to insulin-like growth factors (IGF1, IGF2), vascular growth factor (VEGF), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and the EGFR/HER pathway. Another branch of studies is the evaluation of the possibility of using members of ADAM family proteins in the diagnosis, especially in breast, colon and non- small cell lung cancer. The detection of concentrations of adamalysin in serum, urine and pleural aspirates might contribute to the development of methods of early diagnosis of cancer and monitoring the therapy. However, both the role of adamalysins in the development and progression of tumors and their importance as a diagnostic and predictive further research still need to be checked on large groups of patients.

  3. Guanylate kinase domains of the MAGUK family scaffold proteins as specific phospho-protein-binding modules

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jinwei; Shang, Yuan; Xia, Caihao; Wang, Wenning; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUK) family proteins contain an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain, whose function has been elusive. Here, this domain is revealed as a new type of phospho-peptide-binding module, in which the GMP-binding site has evolved to accommodate phospho-serines or -threonines.

  4. A protein relational database and protein family knowledge bases to facilitate structure-based design analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobilio, Dominick; Walker, Gary; Brooijmans, Natasja; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Denny, R Aldrin; Dejoannis, Jason; Feyfant, Eric; Kowticwar, Rupesh K; Mankala, Jyoti; Palli, Satish; Punyamantula, Sairam; Tatipally, Maneesh; John, Reji K; Humblet, Christine

    2010-08-01

    The Protein Data Bank is the most comprehensive source of experimental macromolecular structures. It can, however, be difficult at times to locate relevant structures with the Protein Data Bank search interface. This is particularly true when searching for complexes containing specific interactions between protein and ligand atoms. Moreover, searching within a family of proteins can be tedious. For example, one cannot search for some conserved residue as residue numbers vary across structures. We describe herein three databases, Protein Relational Database, Kinase Knowledge Base, and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, containing protein structures from the Protein Data Bank. In Protein Relational Database, atom-atom distances between protein and ligand have been precalculated allowing for millisecond retrieval based on atom identity and distance constraints. Ring centroids, centroid-centroid and centroid-atom distances and angles have also been included permitting queries for pi-stacking interactions and other structural motifs involving rings. Other geometric features can be searched through the inclusion of residue pair and triplet distances. In Kinase Knowledge Base and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, the catalytic domains have been aligned into common residue numbering schemes. Thus, by searching across Protein Relational Database and Kinase Knowledge Base, one can easily retrieve structures wherein, for example, a ligand of interest is making contact with the gatekeeper residue.

  5. The NOX Family of Proteins Is Also Present in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjar, Christine; Cherrier, Mickaël V; Dias Mirandela, Gaëtan; Petit-Hartlein, Isabelle; Stasia, Marie José; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Fieschi, Franck; Dupuy, Jérôme

    2017-11-07

    Transmembrane NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzymes have been so far only characterized in eukaryotes. In most of these organisms, they reduce molecular oxygen to superoxide and, depending on the presence of additional domains, are called NOX or dual oxidases (DUOX). Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide, have been traditionally considered accidental toxic by-products of aerobic metabolism. However, during the last decade it has become evident that both O 2 •- and H 2 O 2 are key players in complex signaling networks and defense. A well-studied example is the production of O 2 •- during the bactericidal respiratory burst of phagocytes; this production is catalyzed by NOX2. Here, we devised and applied a novel algorithm to search for additional NOX genes in genomic databases. This procedure allowed us to discover approximately 23% new sequences from bacteria (in relation to the number of NOX-related sequences identified by the authors) that we have added to the existing eukaryotic NOX family and have used to build an expanded phylogenetic tree. We cloned and overexpressed the identified nox gene from Streptococcus pneumoniae and confirmed that it codes for an NADPH oxidase. The membrane of the S. pneumoniae NOX protein (SpNOX) shares many properties with its eukaryotic counterparts, such as affinity for NADPH and flavin adenine dinucleotide, superoxide dismutase and diphenylene iodonium inhibition, cyanide resistance, oxygen consumption, and superoxide production. Traditionally, NOX enzymes in eukaryotes are related to functions linked to multicellularity. Thus, the discovery of a large family of NOX-related enzymes in the bacterial world brings up fascinating questions regarding their role in this new biological context. IMPORTANCE NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzymes have not yet been reported in bacteria. Here, we carried out computational and experimental studies to provide the first characterization of a prokaryotic NOX. Out of 996 prokaryotic proteins showing

  6. Docking Validation Resources: Protein Family and Ligand Flexibility Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sudipto; Balius, Trent E.; Rizzo, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    A database consisting of 780 ligand-receptor complexes, termed SB2010, has been derived from the Protein Databank to evaluate the accuracy of docking protocols for regenerating bound ligand conformations. The goal is to provide easily accessible community resources for development of improved procedures to aid virtual screening for ligands with a wide range of flexibilities. Three core experiments using the program DOCK, which employ rigid (RGD), fixed anchor (FAD), and flexible (FLX) protocols, were used to gauge performance by several different metrics: (1) global results, (2) ligand flexibility, (3) protein family, and (4) crossdocking. Global spectrum plots of successes and failures vs rmsd reveal well-defined inflection regions, which suggest the commonly used 2 Å criteria is a reasonable choice for defining success. Across all 780 systems, success tracks with the relative difficulty of the calculations: RGD (82.3%) > FAD (78.1%) > FLX (63.8%). In general, failures due to scoring strongly outweigh those due to sampling. Subsets of SB2010 grouped by ligand flexibility (7-or-less, 8-to-15, and 15-plus rotatable bonds) reveal success degrades linearly for FAD and FLX protocols, in contrast to RGD which remains constant. Despite the challenges associated with FLX anchor orientation and on-the-fly flexible growth, success rates for the 7-or-less (74.5%), and in particular the 8-to-15 (55.2%) subset, are encouraging. Poorer results for the very flexible 15-plus set (39.3%) indicate substantial room for improvement. Family-based success appears largely independent of ligand flexibility suggesting a strong dependence on the binding site environment. For example, zinc-containing proteins are generally problematic despite moderately flexible ligands. Finally, representative crossdocking examples, for carbonic anhydrase, thermolysin, and neuraminidase families, show the utility of family-based analysis for rapid identification of particularly good or bad docking trends

  7. A Deg-protease family protein in marine Synechococcus is involved in outer membrane protein organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhona Kayra Stuart

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Deg-family proteases are a periplasm-associated group of proteins that are known to be involved in envelope stress responses and are found in most microorganisms. Orthologous genes SYNW2176 (in strain WH8102 and sync_2523 (strain CC9311 are predicted members of the Deg-protease family and are among the few genes induced by copper stress in both open ocean and coastal marine Synechococcus strains. In contrast to the lack of a phenotype in a similar knockout in Synechocystis PCC6803, a SYNW2176 knockout mutant in strain WH8102 was much more resistant to copper than the wild-type. The mutant also exhibited a significantly altered outer membrane protein composition which may contribute to copper resistance, longer lag phase after transfer, low-level consistent alkaline phosphatase activity, and an inability to induce high alkaline phosphatase activity in response to phosphate stress. This phenotype suggests a protein-quality-control role for SYNW2176, the absence of which leads to a constitutively activated stress response. Deg-protease family proteins in this ecologically important cyanobacterial group thus help to determine outer membrane responses to both nutrients and toxins.

  8. The IAP Protein Family, SMAC Mimetics and Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philchenkov, Alex; Miura, Koh

    2016-01-01

    Since the acquired resistance of cells to apoptosis is one of the major hallmarks of cancer, the endogenous inhibitors of apoptosis can be regarded as promising targets in the design of anticancer therapeutics. In addition to their antiapoptotic activity, inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are able to regulate numerous other cell functions, including proliferation, differentiation, and migration, as well as proinflammatory and immune responses. Study of the IAP family as target molecules in targeted therapies has recently focused on SMAC mimetics as synthetic IAP antagonists that have been under development as promising therapeutics. To overview the background of IAP proteins and to focus on the development of SMAC mimetics, the present review first looks at the mechanisms of IAP proteins' antiapoptotic activities and those for controlling those activities; then the SMAC mimetics, including birinapant, LCL161, and DEBIO1143/AT-406, and their clinical trials are introduced. To further clarify the processes to exert the efficacies of SMAC mimetics, it is necessary to determine therapeutic biomarkers that predict and assess them, which may include caspases and factors in the TNFα pathway.

  9. The cryptochrome-photolyase protein family in diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Sarah; Juhas, Matthias; Jäger, Stefanie; Kottke, Tilman; Büchel, Claudia

    2017-10-01

    The cryptochrome - photolyase family (CPF) consists of homologous flavoproteins having completely different functions involving DNA repair, circadian rhythm and/or photoreception. From the original photolyases, working either as (6-4) or cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyases, the animal- and plant-type cryptochromes, respectively, evolved and also the more intermediate DASH cryptochromes. Whereas animal cryptochromes work mostly in clock-related functions, plant cryptochromes are also directly involved in developmental processes such as hypocotyl elongation or flower induction. In diatoms, all types of cryptochromes and photolyases were predicted from genome sequences. However, up to now only two proteins have been characterised in more detail, CPF1 and CryP. CPF1 is related to animal-type cryptochromes, but works as a (6-4) photolyase in addition to having photoreceptor functions. It was shown to interact with the CLOCK:Bmal1 heterodimer in a heterologous system, and thus is probably involved in clock-related processes. Moreover, CPF1 directly influences transcription. The latter was also true for CryP, which is a cryptochrome distantly related to plant-type cryptochromes. In addition, CryP influences light-harvesting protein accumulation. For all diatom cryptochromes, down-stream signalling has to proceed via interaction partners different from the classical proteins involved in cryptochrome signalling in higher plants, because these candidates are missing in diatoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Folding dynamics of a family of beta-sheet proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2008-03-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) consist of ten anti-parallel beta strands and two small alpha helices. The beta strands are arranged into two nearly orthogonal five-strand beta sheets that surround the interior cavity, which binds unsaturated long-chain fatty acids. In the brain isoform (BFABP), these are very important for the development of the central nervous system and neuron differentiation. Furthermore, BFABP is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases including cancer and neuronal degenerative disorders. In this work, site-directed spin labeling combined with EPR techniques have been used to study the folding mechanism of BFABP. In the first series of studies, we labeled the two Cys residues at position 5 and 80 in the wild type protein with an EPR spin marker; in addition, two singly labeled mutants at positions 5 and 80 in the C80A and C5A mutants, respectively, were also produced and used as controls. The changes in the distances between the two residues were examined by a pulsed EPR method, DEER (Double Electron Electron Resonance), as a function of guanidinium hydrochloride concentration. The results were compared with those from CW EPR, circular dichroism and fluorescence measurements, which provide the information regarding sidechain mobility, secondary structure and tertiary structure, respectively. The results will be discussed in the context of the folding mechanism of the family of fatty acid binding proteins.

  11. Identification and analysis of YELLOW protein family genes in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yong-Zhu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major royal jelly proteins/yellow (MRJP/YELLOW family possesses several physiological and chemical functions in the development of Apis mellifera and Drosophila melanogaster. Each protein of the family has a conserved domain named MRJP. However, there is no report of MRJP/YELLOW family proteins in the Lepidoptera. Results Using the YELLOW protein sequence in Drosophila melanogaster to BLAST silkworm EST database, we found a gene family composed of seven members with a conserved MRJP domain each and named it YELLOW protein family of Bombyx mori. We completed the cDNA sequences with RACE method. The protein of each member possesses a MRJP domain and a putative cleavable signal peptide consisting of a hydrophobic sequence. In view of genetic evolution, the whole Bm YELLOW protein family composes a monophyletic group, which is distinctly separate from Drosophila melanogaster and Apis mellifera. We then showed the tissue expression profiles of Bm YELLOW protein family genes by RT-PCR. Conclusion A Bombyx mori YELLOW protein family is found to be composed of at least seven members. The low homogeneity and unique pattern of gene expression by each member among the family ensure us to prophesy that the members of Bm YELLOW protein family would play some important physiological functions in silkworm development.

  12. PATtyFams: Protein families for the microbial genomes in the PATRIC database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Davis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to build accurate protein families is a fundamental operation in bioinformatics that influences comparative analyses, genome annotation and metabolic modeling. For several years we have been maintaining protein families for all microbial genomes in the PATRIC database (Pathosystems Resource Integration Center, patricbrc.org in order to drive many of the comparative analysis tools that are available through the PATRIC website. However, due to the burgeoning number of genomes, traditional approaches for generating protein families are becoming prohibitive. In this report, we describe a new approach for generating protein families, which we call PATtyFams. This method uses the k-mer-based function assignments available through RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology to rapidly guide family formation, and then differentiates the function-based groups into families using a Markov Cluster algorithm (MCL. This new approach for generating protein families is rapid, scalable and has properties that are consistent with alignment-based methods.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of reduced glutathione transport: role of the MRP/CFTR/ABCC and OATP/SLC21A families of membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballatori, Nazzareno; Hammond, Christine L.; Cunningham, Jennifer B.; Krance, Suzanne M.; Marchan, Rosemarie

    2005-01-01

    The initial step in reduced glutathione (GSH) turnover in all mammalian cells is its transport across the plasma membrane into the extracellular space; however, the mechanisms of GSH transport are not clearly defined. GSH export is required for the delivery of its constituent amino acids to other tissues, detoxification of drugs, metals, and other reactive compounds of both endogenous and exogenous origin, protection against oxidant stress, and secretion of hepatic bile. Recent studies indicate that some members of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP/CFTR or ABCC) family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, as well as some members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP or SLC21A) family of transporters contribute to this process. In particular, five of the 12 members of the MRP/CFTR family appear to mediate GSH export from cells namely, MRP1, MRP2, MRP4, MRP5, and CFTR. Additionally, two members of the OATP family, rat Oatp1 and Oatp2, have been identified as GSH transporters. For the Oatp1 transporter, efflux of GSH may provide the driving force for the uptake of extracellular substrates. In humans, OATP-B and OATP8 do not appear to transport GSH; however, other members of this family have yet to be characterized in regards to GSH transport. In yeast, the ABC proteins Ycf1p and Bpt1p transport GSH from the cytosol into the vacuole, whereas Hgt1p mediates GSH uptake across the plasma membrane. Because transport is a key step in GSH homeostasis and is intimately linked to its biological functions, GSH export proteins are likely to modulate essential cellular functions

  14. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  15. The NOX Family of Proteins Is Also Present in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Hajjar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Transmembrane NADPH oxidase (NOX enzymes have been so far only characterized in eukaryotes. In most of these organisms, they reduce molecular oxygen to superoxide and, depending on the presence of additional domains, are called NOX or dual oxidases (DUOX. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, including superoxide, have been traditionally considered accidental toxic by-products of aerobic metabolism. However, during the last decade it has become evident that both O2•− and H2O2 are key players in complex signaling networks and defense. A well-studied example is the production of O2•− during the bactericidal respiratory burst of phagocytes; this production is catalyzed by NOX2. Here, we devised and applied a novel algorithm to search for additional NOX genes in genomic databases. This procedure allowed us to discover approximately 23% new sequences from bacteria (in relation to the number of NOX-related sequences identified by the authors that we have added to the existing eukaryotic NOX family and have used to build an expanded phylogenetic tree. We cloned and overexpressed the identified nox gene from Streptococcus pneumoniae and confirmed that it codes for an NADPH oxidase. The membrane of the S. pneumoniae NOX protein (SpNOX shares many properties with its eukaryotic counterparts, such as affinity for NADPH and flavin adenine dinucleotide, superoxide dismutase and diphenylene iodonium inhibition, cyanide resistance, oxygen consumption, and superoxide production. Traditionally, NOX enzymes in eukaryotes are related to functions linked to multicellularity. Thus, the discovery of a large family of NOX-related enzymes in the bacterial world brings up fascinating questions regarding their role in this new biological context.

  16. Distribution of protein kinase Mzeta and the complete protein kinase C isoform family in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, M U; Benedikz, Eirikur; Hernandez, I

    2000-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a multigene family of at least ten isoforms, nine of which are expressed in brain (alpha, betaI, betaII, gamma, delta, straightepsilon, eta, zeta, iota/lambda). Our previous studies have shown that many of these PKCs participate in synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region...... Mzeta (PKMzeta). In this study, we used immunoblot and immunocytochemical techniques with isoform-specific antisera to examine the distribution of the complete family of PKC isozymes and PKMzeta in rat brain. Each form of PKC showed a widespread distribution in the brain with a distinct regional pattern...... of high and low levels of expression. PKMzeta, the predominant form of PKM in brain, had high levels in hippocampus, frontal and occipital cortex, striatum, and hypothalamus. In the hippocampus, each isoform was expressed in a characteristic pattern, with zeta prominent in the CA1 stratum radiatum...

  17. ErpC, a member of the complement regulator-acquiring family of surface proteins from Borrelia burgdorferi, possesses an architecture previously unseen in this protein family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caesar, Joseph J. E.; Johnson, Steven; Kraiczy, Peter; Lea, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of ErpC, a member of the complement regulator-acquiring surface protein family from B. burgdorferi, has been solved, providing insights into the strategies of complement evasion by this zoonotic bacterium and suggesting a common architecture for other members of this protein family. Borrelia burgdorferi is a spirochete responsible for Lyme disease, the most commonly occurring vector-borne disease in Europe and North America. The bacterium utilizes a set of proteins, termed complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs), to aid evasion of the human complement system by recruiting and presenting complement regulator factor H on its surface in a manner that mimics host cells. Presented here is the atomic resolution structure of a member of this protein family, ErpC. The structure provides new insights into the mechanism of recruitment of factor H and other factor H-related proteins by acting as a molecular mimic of host glycosaminoglycans. It also describes the architecture of other CRASP proteins belonging to the OspE/F-related paralogous protein family and suggests that they have evolved to bind specific complement proteins, aiding survival of the bacterium in different hosts

  18. Monoubiquitination of Tob/BTG family proteins competes with degradation-targeting polyubiquitination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Toru; Kim, Minsoo; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Watanabe, Masato; Oyama, Masaaki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Tob/BTG family proteins are monoubiquitinated in the absence of E3s in vitro. → Monoubiquitination sites of Tob are identified by mass spectrometry. → The monoubiquitination event correlates with lower levels of polyubiquitination. -- Abstract: Tob belongs to the anti-proliferative Tob/BTG protein family. The expression level of Tob family proteins is strictly regulated both transcriptionally and through post-translational modification. Ubiquitin (Ub)/proteosome-dependent degradation of Tob family proteins is critical in controlling cell cycle progression and DNA damage responses. Various Ub ligases (E3s) are responsible for degradation of Tob protein. Here, we show that Tob family proteins undergo monoubiquitination even in the absence of E3s in vitro. Determination of the ubiquitination site(s) in Tob by mass spectrometric analysis revealed that two lysine residues (Lys48 and Lys63) located in Tob/BTG homology domain are ubiquitinated. A mutant Tob, in which both Lys48 and Lys63 are substituted with alanine, is more strongly polyubiquitinated than wild-type Tob in vivo. These data suggest that monoubiquitination of Tob family proteins confers resistance against polyubiquitination, which targets proteins for degradation. The strategy for regulating the stability of Tob family proteins suggests a novel role for monoubiquitination.

  19. Monoubiquitination of Tob/BTG family proteins competes with degradation-targeting polyubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toru, E-mail: toru@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Kim, Minsoo [Division of Bacterial Infection, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko [Medical Proteomics Laboratory, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Watanabe, Masato [Department of Medical Genome Science, School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8562 (Japan); Oyama, Masaaki [Medical Proteomics Laboratory, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Tsumoto, Kouhei [Medical Proteomics Laboratory, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Medical Genome Science, School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8562 (Japan); Yamamoto, Tadashi, E-mail: tyamamot@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Cell Signal Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, 1919-1 Onna-son, Kunigami, Okinawa 904-0412 (Japan)

    2011-05-27

    Highlights: {yields} Tob/BTG family proteins are monoubiquitinated in the absence of E3s in vitro. {yields} Monoubiquitination sites of Tob are identified by mass spectrometry. {yields} The monoubiquitination event correlates with lower levels of polyubiquitination. -- Abstract: Tob belongs to the anti-proliferative Tob/BTG protein family. The expression level of Tob family proteins is strictly regulated both transcriptionally and through post-translational modification. Ubiquitin (Ub)/proteosome-dependent degradation of Tob family proteins is critical in controlling cell cycle progression and DNA damage responses. Various Ub ligases (E3s) are responsible for degradation of Tob protein. Here, we show that Tob family proteins undergo monoubiquitination even in the absence of E3s in vitro. Determination of the ubiquitination site(s) in Tob by mass spectrometric analysis revealed that two lysine residues (Lys48 and Lys63) located in Tob/BTG homology domain are ubiquitinated. A mutant Tob, in which both Lys48 and Lys63 are substituted with alanine, is more strongly polyubiquitinated than wild-type Tob in vivo. These data suggest that monoubiquitination of Tob family proteins confers resistance against polyubiquitination, which targets proteins for degradation. The strategy for regulating the stability of Tob family proteins suggests a novel role for monoubiquitination.

  20. A Review on Structures and Functions of Bcl-2 Family Proteins from Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Dakshinamurthy; Sivaraman, Thirunavukkarasu

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells evade apoptosis, which is regulated by proteins of Bcl-2 family in the intrinsic pathways. Numerous experimental three-dimensional (3D) structures of the apoptotic proteins and the proteins bound with small chemical molecules/peptides/proteins have been reported in the literature. In this review article, the 3D structures of the Bcl-2 family proteins from Homo sapiens and as well complex structures of the anti-apoptotic proteins bound with small molecular inhibitors reported in the literature to date have been comprehensively listed out and described in detail. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms by which the Bcl-2 family proteins modulate the apoptotic processes and strategies for designing antagonists to anti-apoptotic proteins have been concisely discussed.

  1. TIS11 Family Proteins and Their Roles in Posttranscriptional Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Baou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression of mRNAs containing adenine-uridine rich elements (AREs in their 3 untranslated regions is mediated by a number of different proteins that interact with these elements to either stabilise or destabilise them. The present review concerns the TPA-inducible sequence 11 (TIS11 protein family, a small family of proteins, that appears to interact with ARE-containing mRNAs and promote their degradation. This family of proteins has been extensively studied in the past decade. Studies have focussed on determining their biochemical functions, identifying their target mRNAs, and determining their roles in cell functions and diseases.

  2. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Klaus B; Kedström, Linda Maria Haugaard; Wilbek, Theis S

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the ......PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95...... linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic...

  3. Sub-grouping and sub-functionalization of the RIFIN multi-copy protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnhammer Erik L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic protozoans possess many multicopy gene families which have central roles in parasite survival and virulence. The number and variability of members of these gene families often make it difficult to predict possible functions of the encoded proteins. The families of extra-cellular proteins that are exposed to a host immune response have been driven via immune selection to become antigenically variant, and thereby avoid immune recognition while maintaining protein function to establish a chronic infection. Results We have combined phylogenetic and function shift analyses to study the evolution of the RIFIN proteins, which are antigenically variant and are encoded by the largest multicopy gene family in Plasmodium falciparum. We show that this family can be subdivided into two major groups that we named A- and B-RIFIN proteins. This suggested sub-grouping is supported by a recently published study that showed that, despite the presence of the Plasmodium export (PEXEL motif in all RIFIN variants, proteins from each group have different cellular localizations during the intraerythrocytic life cycle of the parasite. In the present study we show that function shift analysis, a novel technique to predict functional divergence between sub-groups of a protein family, indicates that RIFINs have undergone neo- or sub-functionalization. Conclusion These results question the general trend of clustering large antigenically variant protein groups into homogenous families. Assigning functions to protein families requires their subdivision into meaningful groups such as we have shown for the RIFIN protein family. Using phylogenetic and function shift analysis methods, we identify new directions for the investigation of this broad and complex group of proteins.

  4. Two novel heat-soluble protein families abundantly expressed in an anhydrobiotic tardigrade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayami Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals.

  5. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding theUniverse of Protein Families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B.; Halpern,Aaron L.; Williamson, Shannon J.; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S.; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A.; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael,Benjamin J.; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E.; Godzik,Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E.; Taylor, Susan S.; Strausberg,Robert L.; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J.Craig

    2006-03-23

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  6. Regulation of dynamin family proteins by post-translational ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dynamin superfamily proteins comprising classical dynamins and related proteins are membrane remodelling agentsinvolved in several biological processes such as endocytosis, maintenance of organelle morphology and viralresistance. These large GTPases couple GTP hydrolysis with membrane alterations such as ...

  7. Comparative and functional analysis of the widely occurring family of Nep1-like proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oome, Stan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325800847; van den Ackerveken, Guido|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113853254

    2014-01-01

    Nep1-like proteins (NLP) are best known for their cytotoxic activity in dicot plants. NLP are taxonomically widespread among microbes with very different lifestyles. To learn more about this enigmatic protein family, we analyzed more than 500 available NLP protein sequences from fungi, oomycetes,

  8. The human PNMA family: novel neuronal proteins implicated in paraneoplastic neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüller, Martina; Jenne, Dieter; Voltz, Raymond

    2005-12-01

    Using sera from patients with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, several novel neuronal autoantigens such as the paraneoplastic Ma antigens (PNMA) have been identified. Here, we report the correction and completion of the previously published prototype member PNMA1, the brain and testis restricted expression of a third member (PNMA3) and the sequences for further partially uncharacterized members of this novel neuronal protein family. Murine and rat orthologs exist for this protein family. By analogy to the pro-apoptotic MOAP1, similar functional interactions may exist between members of the PNMA family and the bcl-2 family.

  9. Guanylate kinase domains of the MAGUK family scaffold proteins as specific phospho-protein-binding modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinwei; Shang, Yuan; Xia, Caihao; Wang, Wenning; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie

    2011-11-25

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) are a large family of scaffold proteins that play essential roles in tissue developments, cell-cell communications, cell polarity control, and cellular signal transductions. Despite extensive studies over the past two decades, the functions of the signature guanylate kinase domain (GK) of MAGUKs are poorly understood. Here we show that the GK domain of DLG1/SAP97 binds to asymmetric cell division regulatory protein LGN in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The structure of the DLG1 SH3-GK tandem in complex with a phospho-LGN peptide reveals that the GMP-binding site of GK has evolved into a specific pSer/pThr-binding pocket. Residues both N- and C-terminal to the pSer are also critical for the specific binding of the phospho-LGN peptide to GK. We further demonstrate that the previously reported GK domain-mediated interactions of DLGs with other targets, such as GKAP/DLGAP1/SAPAP1 and SPAR, are also phosphorylation dependent. Finally, we provide evidence that other MAGUK GKs also function as phospho-peptide-binding modules. The discovery of the phosphorylation-dependent MAGUK GK/target interactions indicates that MAGUK scaffold-mediated signalling complex organizations are dynamically regulated.

  10. Identification and characterization of GmPDIL7, a soybean ER membrane-bound protein disulfide isomerase family protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Aya; Matsusaki, Motonori; Masuda, Taro; Urade, Reiko

    2017-02-01

    Most proteins synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) possess intramolecular and intermolecular disulfide bonds, which play an important role in the conformational stability and function of proteins. Hence, eukaryotic cells contain protein disulfide bond formation pathways such as the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-ER oxidoreductin 1 (Ero1) system in the ER lumen. In this study, we identified soybean PDIL7 (GmPDIL7), a novel soybean ER membrane-bound PDI family protein, and determined its enzymatic properties. GmPDIL7 has a putative N-terminal signal sequence, a thioredoxin domain with an active center motif (CGHC), and a putative C-terminal transmembrane region. Likewise, we demonstrated that GmPDIL7 is ubiquitously expressed in soybean tissues and is localized in the ER membrane. Furthermore, GmPDIL7 associated with other soybean PDI family proteins in vivo and GmPDIL7 mRNA was slightly upregulated under ER stress. The redox potential of recombinant GmPDIL7 expressed in Escherichia coli was -187 mV, indicating that GmPDIL7 could oxidize unfolded proteins. GmPDIL7 exhibited a dithiol oxidase activity level that was similar to other soybean PDI family proteins. However, the oxidative refolding activity of GmPDIL7 was lower than other soybean PDI family proteins. GmPDIL7 was well oxidized by GmERO1. Taken together, our results indicated that GmPDIL7 primarily plays a role as a supplier of disulfide bonds in nascent proteins for oxidative folding on the ER membrane. The nucleotide sequence data for the GmPDIL7 cDNA are available in the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) databases under the accession numbers LC158001. Protein disulfide isomerase: EC 5.3.4.1. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Impacts of a new transcription factor family: mammalian GCM proteins in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemolhosseini, Said; Wegner, Michael

    2004-09-13

    GCM proteins constitute a small transcription factor family with a DNA-binding domain exhibiting a novel fold composed of two subdomains rigidly held together by coordination of one of two structural zinc cations. In all known cases, GCM proteins exert the role of master regulators: the prototypical family member determines gliogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster, whereas mammalian GCM proteins orchestrate divergent aspects of development and physiology in placenta, kidney, thymus, and parathyroid gland. Recent data point to an involvement of GCM proteins in different pathological contexts, such as preeclampsia, hyper- or hypoparathyroidism, and parathyroid gland tumors.

  12. Regulation of dynamin family proteins by post-translational ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-04-22

    Apr 22, 2017 ... Dynamin superfamily proteins comprising classical dynamins and related proteins are membrane remodelling agents involved in several biological processes such as endocytosis, maintenance of organelle morphology and viral resistance. These large GTPases couple GTP hydrolysis with membrane ...

  13. Computing a new family of shape descriptors for protein structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter; Sinclair, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The large-scale 3D structure of a protein can be represented by the polygonal curve through the carbon a atoms of the protein backbone. We introduce an algorithm for computing the average number of times that a given configuration of crossings on such polygonal curves is seen, the average being...

  14. An estimated 5% of new protein structures solved today represent a new Pfam family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mistry, Jaina; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Punta, Marco

    2013-01-01

    This study uses the Pfam database to show that the sequence redundancy of protein structures deposited in the PDB is increasing. The possible reasons behind this trend are discussed. High-resolution structural knowledge is key to understanding how proteins function at the molecular level. The number of entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the repository of all publicly available protein structures, continues to increase, with more than 8000 structures released in 2012 alone. The authors of this article have studied how structural coverage of the protein-sequence space has changed over time by monitoring the number of Pfam families that acquired their first representative structure each year from 1976 to 2012. Twenty years ago, for every 100 new PDB entries released, an estimated 20 Pfam families acquired their first structure. By 2012, this decreased to only about five families per 100 structures. The reasons behind the slower pace at which previously uncharacterized families are being structurally covered were investigated. It was found that although more than 50% of current Pfam families are still without a structural representative, this set is enriched in families that are small, functionally uncharacterized or rich in problem features such as intrinsically disordered and transmembrane regions. While these are important constraints, the reasons why it may not yet be time to give up the pursuit of a targeted but more comprehensive structural coverage of the protein-sequence space are discussed

  15. Using amino acid correlation and community detection algorithms to identify functional determinants in protein families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Bleicher

    Full Text Available Correlated mutation analysis has a long history of interesting applications, mostly in the detection of contact pairs in protein structures. Based on previous observations that, if properly assessed, amino acid correlation data can also provide insights about functional sub-classes in a protein family, we provide a complete framework devoted to this purpose. An amino acid specific correlation measure is proposed, which can be used to build networks summarizing all correlation and anti-correlation patterns in a protein family. These networks can be submitted to community structure detection algorithms, resulting in subsets of correlated amino acids which can be further assessed by specific parameters and procedures that provide insight into the relationship between different communities, the individual importance of community members and the adherence of a given amino acid sequence to a given community. By applying this framework to three protein families with contrasting characteristics (the Fe/Mn-superoxide dismutases, the peroxidase-catalase family and the C-type lysozyme/α-lactalbumin family, we show how our method and the proposed parameters and procedures are related to biological characteristics observed in these protein families, highlighting their potential use in protein characterization and gene annotation.

  16. Structural insights and ab initio sequencing within the DING proteins family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.elias@weizmann.ac.il [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Liebschner, Dorothee [CRM2, Nancy Université (France); Gotthard, Guillaume; Chabriere, Eric [AFMB, Université Aix-Marseille II (France)

    2011-01-01

    DING proteins constitute a recently discovered protein family that is ubiquitous in eukaryotes. The structural insights and the physiological involvements of these intriguing proteins are hereby deciphered. DING proteins constitute an intriguing family of phosphate-binding proteins that was identified in a wide range of organisms, from prokaryotes and archae to eukaryotes. Despite their seemingly ubiquitous occurrence in eukaryotes, their encoding genes are missing from sequenced genomes. Such a lack has considerably hampered functional studies. In humans, these proteins have been related to several diseases, like atherosclerosis, kidney stones, inflammation processes and HIV inhibition. The human phosphate binding protein is a human representative of the DING family that was serendipitously discovered from human plasma. An original approach was developed to determine ab initio the complete and exact sequence of this 38 kDa protein by utilizing mass spectrometry and X-ray data in tandem. Taking advantage of this first complete eukaryotic DING sequence, a immunohistochemistry study was undertaken to check the presence of DING proteins in various mice tissues, revealing that these proteins are widely expressed. Finally, the structure of a bacterial representative from Pseudomonas fluorescens was solved at sub-angstrom resolution, allowing the molecular mechanism of the phosphate binding in these high-affinity proteins to be elucidated.

  17. Structural insights and ab initio sequencing within the DING proteins family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, Mikael; Liebschner, Dorothee; Gotthard, Guillaume; Chabriere, Eric

    2011-01-01

    DING proteins constitute a recently discovered protein family that is ubiquitous in eukaryotes. The structural insights and the physiological involvements of these intriguing proteins are hereby deciphered. DING proteins constitute an intriguing family of phosphate-binding proteins that was identified in a wide range of organisms, from prokaryotes and archae to eukaryotes. Despite their seemingly ubiquitous occurrence in eukaryotes, their encoding genes are missing from sequenced genomes. Such a lack has considerably hampered functional studies. In humans, these proteins have been related to several diseases, like atherosclerosis, kidney stones, inflammation processes and HIV inhibition. The human phosphate binding protein is a human representative of the DING family that was serendipitously discovered from human plasma. An original approach was developed to determine ab initio the complete and exact sequence of this 38 kDa protein by utilizing mass spectrometry and X-ray data in tandem. Taking advantage of this first complete eukaryotic DING sequence, a immunohistochemistry study was undertaken to check the presence of DING proteins in various mice tissues, revealing that these proteins are widely expressed. Finally, the structure of a bacterial representative from Pseudomonas fluorescens was solved at sub-angstrom resolution, allowing the molecular mechanism of the phosphate binding in these high-affinity proteins to be elucidated

  18. TMC and EVER genes belong to a larger novel family, the TMC gene family encoding transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutai Hideki

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the transmembrane cochlear expressed gene 1 (TMC1 cause deafness in human and mouse. Mutations in two homologous genes, EVER1 and EVER2 increase the susceptibility to infection with certain human papillomaviruses resulting in high risk of skin carcinoma. Here we report that TMC1, EVER1 and EVER2 (now TMC6 and TMC8 belong to a larger novel gene family, which is named TMC for trans membrane channel-like gene family. Results Using a combination of iterative database searches and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR experiments we assembled contigs for cDNA encoding human, murine, puffer fish, and invertebrate TMC proteins. TMC proteins of individual species can be grouped into three subfamilies A, B, and C. Vertebrates have eight TMC genes. The majority of murine TMC transcripts are expressed in most organs; some transcripts, however, in particular the three subfamily A members are rare and more restrictively expressed. Conclusion The eight vertebrate TMC genes are evolutionary conserved and encode proteins that form three subfamilies. Invertebrate TMC proteins can also be categorized into these three subfamilies. All TMC genes encode transmembrane proteins with intracellular amino- and carboxyl-termini and at least eight membrane-spanning domains. We speculate that the TMC proteins constitute a novel group of ion channels, transporters, or modifiers of such.

  19. A family of related proteins is encoded by the major Drosophila heat shock gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadsworth, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    At least four proteins of 70,000 to 75,000 molecular weight (70-75K) were synthesized from mRNA which hybridized with a cloned heat shock gene previously shown to be localized to the 87A and 87C heat shock puff sites. These in vitro-synthesized proteins were indistinguishable from in vivo-synthesized heat shock-induced proteins when analyzed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. A comparison of the pattern of this group of proteins synthesized in vivo during a 5-min pulse or during continuous labeling indicates that the 72-75K proteins are probably not kinetic precursors to the major 70K heat shock protein. Partial digestion products generated with V8 protease indicated that the 70-75K heat shock proteins are closely related, but that there are clear differences between them. The partial digestion patterns obtained from heat shock proteins from the Kc cell line and from the Oregon R strain of Drosophila melanogaster are very similar. Genetic analysis of the patterns of 70-75K heat shock protein synthesis indicated that the genes encoding at least two of the three 72-75K heat shock proteins are located outside of the major 87A and 87C puff sites

  20. Enhancing the prediction of protein pairings between interacting families using orthology information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pazos Florencio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has repeatedly been shown that interacting protein families tend to have similar phylogenetic trees. These similarities can be used to predicting the mapping between two families of interacting proteins (i.e. which proteins from one family interact with which members of the other. The correct mapping will be that which maximizes the similarity between the trees. The two families may eventually comprise orthologs and paralogs, if members of the two families are present in more than one organism. This fact can be exploited to restrict the possible mappings, simply by impeding links between proteins of different organisms. We present here an algorithm to predict the mapping between families of interacting proteins which is able to incorporate information regarding orthologues, or any other assignment of proteins to "classes" that may restrict possible mappings. Results For the first time in methods for predicting mappings, we have tested this new approach on a large number of interacting protein domains in order to statistically assess its performance. The method accurately predicts around 80% in the most favourable cases. We also analysed in detail the results of the method for a well defined case of interacting families, the sensor and kinase components of the Ntr-type two-component system, for which up to 98% of the pairings predicted by the method were correct. Conclusion Based on the well established relationship between tree similarity and interactions we developed a method for predicting the mapping between two interacting families using genomic information alone. The program is available through a web interface.

  1. Rapid expansion of the protein disulfide isomerase gene family facilitates the folding of venom peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safavi-Hemami, Helena; Li, Qing; Jackson, Ronneshia L.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of correct disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum is a crucial step for folding proteins destined for secretion. Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs) play a central role in this process. We report a previously unidentified, hypervariable family of PDIs that represents the most...... diverse gene family of oxidoreductases described in a single genus to date. These enzymes are highly expressed specifically in the venom glands of predatory cone snails, animals that synthesize a remarkably diverse set of cysteine-rich peptide toxins (conotoxins). Enzymes in this PDI family, termed...

  2. Peroxisomal Proteostasis Involves a Lon Family Protein That Functions as Protease and Chaperone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartoszewska, Magdalena; Williams, Chris; Kikhney, Alexey; Opaliński, Łukasz; van Roermund, Carlo W. T.; de Boer, Rinse; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are subject to continuous quality control for optimal proteostasis. The knowledge of peroxisome quality control systems is still in its infancy. Here we show that peroxisomes contain a member of the Lon family of proteases (Pln). We show that Pln is a heptameric protein and acts as an

  3. The alpha-kinase family: an exceptional branch on the protein kinase tree.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelbeek, J.A.J.; Clark, K.; Venselaar, H.; Huynen, M.A.; Leeuwen, F.N. van

    2010-01-01

    The alpha-kinase family represents a class of atypical protein kinases that display little sequence similarity to conventional protein kinases. Early studies on myosin heavy chain kinases in Dictyostelium discoideum revealed their unusual propensity to phosphorylate serine and threonine residues in

  4. Cell cycle regulation by the retinoblastoma family of growth inhibitory proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Beijersbergen, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    The retinoblastoma family of growth-inhibitory proteins act by binding and inhibiting several proteins with growth-stimulatory activity, the most prominent of which is the cellular transcription factor E2F. In higher organisms, progression through the cell division cycle is accompanied by the

  5. Characterization of a DUF820 family protein Alr3200 of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-14

    Oct 14, 2016 ... The hypothetical protein 'Alr3200' of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 is highly conserved among cyanobacterial species. It is a member of the DUF820 (Domain of Unknown Function) protein family, and is predicted to have a. DNase domain. Biochemical analysis revealed a Mg(II)-dependent DNase activity ...

  6. Characterization of a DUF820 family protein Alr3200 of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The hypothetical protein 'Alr3200' of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 is highly conserved among cyanobacterialspecies. It is a member of the DUF820 (Domain of Unknown Function) protein family, and is predicted to have aDNase domain. Biochemical analysis revealed a Mg(II)-dependent DNase activity for Alr3200 with a ...

  7. Indispensable roles of mammalian Cbl family proteins as negative regulators of protein tyrosine kinase signaling: Insights from in vivo models

    OpenAIRE

    Naramura, Mayumi; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2011-01-01

    All higher eukaryotes utilize protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) as molecular switches to control a variety of cellular signals. Notably, many PTKs have been identified as proto-oncogenes whose aberrant expression, mutations or co-option by pathogens can lead to human malignancies. Thus, it is obvious that PTK functions must be precisely regulated in order to maintain homeostasis of an organism. Investigations over the past fifteen years have revealed that members of the Cbl family proteins can ...

  8. Defining Sequence Space and Reaction Products within the Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase (AtzD)/Barbiturase Protein Family

    OpenAIRE

    Seffernick, Jennifer L.; Erickson, Jasmine S.; Cameron, Stephan M.; Cho, Seunghee; Dodge, Anthony G.; Richman, Jack E.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2012-01-01

    Cyanuric acid hydrolases (AtzD) and barbiturases are homologous, found almost exclusively in bacteria, and comprise a rare protein family with no discernible linkage to other protein families or an X-ray structural class. There has been confusion in the literature and in genome projects regarding the reaction products, the assignment of individual sequences as either cyanuric acid hydrolases or barbiturases, and spurious connection of this family to another protein family. The present study h...

  9. P1 peptidase–a mysterious protein of family Potyviridae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The coding region for P1 peptidase is located at the very beginning of the viral genome of the family Potyviridae. Until recently P1 was thought of as serine peptidase with ... Jana Rohožková1 Milan Navrátil1. Faculty of Science, Palacký University in Olomouc, Šlechtitelů 11, 783 71, Olomouc-Holice, Czech Republic ...

  10. The DNABII family of proteins is comprised of the only nucleoid associated proteins required for nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilm structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Aishwarya; Buzzo, John; Rocco, Christopher J; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Goodman, Steven D

    2017-12-12

    Biofilms play a central role in the pathobiology of otitis media (OM), bronchitis, sinusitis, conjunctivitis, and pneumonia caused by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI). Our previous studies show that extracellular DNA (eDNA) and DNABII proteins are essential components of biofilms formed by NTHI. The DNABII protein family includes integration host factor (IHF) and the histone-like protein HU and plays a central role in NTHI biofilm structural integrity. We demonstrated that immunological targeting of these proteins during NTHI-induced experimental OM in a chinchilla model caused rapid clearance of biofilms from the middle ear. Given the essential role of DNABII proteins in maintaining the structure of an NTHI biofilm, we investigated whether any of the other nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs) expressed by NTHI might play a similar role, thereby serving as additional target(s) for intervention. We demonstrated that although several NAPs including H-NS, CbpA, HfQ and Dps are present within the biofilm extracellular matrix, only the DNABII family of proteins is critical for the structural integrity of the biofilms formed by NTHI. We have also demonstrated that IHF and HU are located at distinct regions within the extracellular matrix of NTHI biofilms formed in vitro, indicative of independent functions of these two proteins. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The PEF family proteins sorcin and grancalcin interact in vivo and in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian; Tarabykina, Svetlana; la Cour, Jonas Marstrand

    2003-01-01

    The penta-EF hand (PEF) family of calcium binding proteins includes grancalcin, peflin, sorcin, calpain large and small subunits as well as ALG-2. Systematic testing of the heterodimerization abilities of the PEF proteins using the yeast two-hybrid and glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays...... be a way to regulate and fine tune processes mediated by calcium binding proteins of the penta-EF hand type....

  12. Arabidopsis PPP family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases: many targets but few engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrig, R Glen; Labandera, Anne-Marie; Moorhead, Greg B

    2013-09-01

    The major plant serine/threonine protein phosphatases belong to the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family. Over the past few years the complement of Arabidopsis thaliana PPP family of catalytic subunits has been cataloged and many regulatory subunits identified. Specific roles for PPPs have been characterized, including roles in auxin and brassinosteroid signaling, in phototropism, in regulating the target of rapamycin pathway, and in cell stress responses. In this review, we provide a framework for understanding the PPP family by exploring the fundamental role of the phosphatase regulatory subunits that drive catalytic engine specificity. Although there are fewer plant protein phosphatases compared with their protein kinase partners, their function is now recognized to be as dynamic and as regulated as that of protein kinases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. On the Power and Limits of Sequence Similarity Based Clustering of Proteins Into Families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiwie, Christian; Röttger, Richard

    2017-01-01

    important to also unravel the proteomic repertoire of an organism. A classical computational approach for detecting protein families is a sequence-based similarity calculation coupled with a subsequent cluster analysis. In this work we have intensively analyzed various clustering tools on a large scale. We...... used the data to investigate the behavior of the tools' parameters underlining the diversity of the protein families. Furthermore, we trained regression models for predicting the expected performance of a clustering tool for an unknown data set and aimed to also suggest optimal parameters...... in an automated fashion. Our analysis demonstrates the benefits and limitations of the clustering of proteins with low sequence similarity indicating that each protein family requires its own distinct set of tools and parameters. All results, a tool prediction service, and additional supporting material is also...

  14. The Role of BCL2 Family of Apoptosis Regulator Proteins in Acute and Chronic Leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Tzifi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The disturbance of apoptosis molecular signaling pathways is involved in carcinogenesis. BCL2 family of proteins is the hallmark of apoptosis regulation. In the last decade, new members of BCL2 gene family were discovered and cloned and were found to be differentially expressed in many types of cancer. BCL2 protein family, through its role in regulation of apoptotic pathways, is possibly related to cancer pathophysiology and resistance to conventional chemotherapy. It is well known that leukemias are haematopoietic malignancies characterized by biological diversity, varied cytogenetics, different immunophenotype profiles, and diverse outcome. Current research focuses on the prognostic impact and specific role of these proteins in the pathogenesis of leukemias. The understanding of the molecular pathways that participate in the biology of leukemias may lead to the design of new therapies which may improve patients' survival. In the present paper, we describe current knowledge on the role of BCL2 apoptosis regulator proteins in acute and chronic leukemias.

  15. Selecting protein families for environmental features based on manifold regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xingpeng; Xu, Weiwei; Park, E K; Li, Guangrong

    2014-06-01

    Recently, statistics and machine learning have been developed to identify functional or taxonomic features of environmental features or physiological status. Important proteins (or other functional and taxonomic entities) to environmental features can be potentially used as biosensors. A major challenge is how the distribution of protein and gene functions embodies the adaption of microbial communities across environments and host habitats. In this paper, we propose a novel regularization method for linear regression to adapt the challenge. The approach is inspired by local linear embedding (LLE) and we call it a manifold-constrained regularization for linear regression (McRe). The novel regularization procedure also has potential to be used in solving other linear systems. We demonstrate the efficiency and the performance of the approach in both simulation and real data.

  16. Evolutionary gradient of predicted nuclear localization signals (NLS)-bearing proteins in genomes of family Planctomycetaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Yang, Ruifu; Huang, Chen; Liao, Qiwen; Fan, Guangyi; Sun, Chenghang; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen

    2017-04-04

    The nuclear envelope is considered a key classification marker that distinguishes prokaryotes from eukaryotes. However, this marker does not apply to the family Planctomycetaceae, which has intracellular spaces divided by lipidic intracytoplasmic membranes (ICMs). Nuclear localization signal (NLS), a short stretch of amino acid sequence, destines to transport proteins from cytoplasm into nucleus, and is also associated with the development of nuclear envelope. We attempted to investigate the NLS motifs in Planctomycetaceae genomes to demonstrate the potential molecular transition in the development of intracellular membrane system. In this study, we identified NLS-like motifs that have the same amino acid compositions as experimentally identified NLSs in genomes of 11 representative species of family Planctomycetaceae. A total of 15 NLS types and 170 NLS-bearing proteins were detected in the 11 strains. To determine the molecular transformation, we compared NLS-bearing protein abundances in the 11 representative Planctomycetaceae genomes with them in genomes of 16 taxonomically varied microorganisms: nine bacteria, two archaea and five fungi. In the 27 strains, 29 NLS types and 1101 NLS-bearing proteins were identified, principal component analysis showed a significant transitional gradient from bacteria to Planctomycetaceae to fungi on their NLS-bearing protein abundance profiles. Then, we clustered the 993 non-redundant NLS-bearing proteins into 181 families and annotated their involved metabolic pathways. Afterwards, we aligned the ten types of NLS motifs from the 13 families containing NLS-bearing proteins among bacteria, Planctomycetaceae or fungi, considering their diversity, length and origin. A transition towards increased complexity from non-planctomycete bacteria to Planctomycetaceae to archaea and fungi was detected based on the complexity of the 10 types of NLS-like motifs in the 13 NLS-bearing proteins families. The results of this study reveal that

  17. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  18. The multi-protein family of sulfotransferases in plants: composition, occurrence, substrate specificity, and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Felix; Krause, Florian; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    All members of the sulfotransferase (SOT, EC 2.8.2.-) protein family transfer a sulfuryl group from the donor 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) to an appropriate hydroxyl group of several classes of substrates. The primary structure of these enzymes is characterized by a histidine residue in the active site, defined PAPS binding sites and a longer SOT domain. Proteins with this SOT domain occur in all organisms from all three domains, usually as a multi-protein family. Arabidopsis thaliana SOTs, the best characterized SOT multi-protein family, contains 21 members. The substrates for several plant enzymes have already been identified, such as glucosinolates, brassinosteroids, jasmonates, flavonoids, and salicylic acid. Much information has been gathered on desulfo-glucosinolate (dsGl) SOTs in A. thaliana. The three cytosolic dsGl SOTs show slightly different expression patterns. The recombinant proteins reveal differences in their affinity to indolic and aliphatic dsGls. Also the respective recombinant dsGl SOTs from different A. thaliana ecotypes differ in their kinetic properties. However, determinants of substrate specificity and the exact reaction mechanism still need to be clarified. Probably, the three-dimensional structures of more plant proteins need to be solved to analyze the mode of action and the responsible amino acids for substrate binding. In addition to A. thaliana, more plant species from several families need to be investigated to fully elucidate the diversity of sulfated molecules and the way of biosynthesis catalyzed by SOT enzymes.

  19. A new heterogeneous family of telomerically encoded Cryptosporidium proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Maha; Hunter, Paul R; McDonald, Vincent; Elwin, Kristin; Chalmers, Rachel M; Tyler, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is predominantly caused by two closely related species of protozoan parasites the zoonotic Cryptosporidium parvum and anthroponotic Cryptosporidium hominis which diverge phenotypically in respect to host range and virulence. Using comparative genomics we identified two genes displaying overt heterogeneity between species. Although initial work suggested both were species specific, Cops-1 for C. parvum and Chos-1 for C. hominis, subsequent study identified an abridged ortholog of Cops-1 in C. hominis. Cops-1 and Chos-1 showed limited, but significant, similarity to each other and share common features: (i) telomeric location: Cops-1 is the last gene on chromosome 2, whilst Chos-1 is the first gene on chromosome 5, (ii) encode circa 50-kDa secreted proteins with isoelectric points above 10, (iii) are serine rich, and (iv) contain internal nucleotide repeats. Importantly, Cops-1 sequence contains specific SNPs with good discriminatory power useful epidemiologically. C. parvum-infected patient sera recognized a 50-kDa protein in antigen preparations of C. parvum but not C. hominis, consistent with Cops-1 being antigenic for patients. Interestingly, anti-Cops-1 monoclonal antibody (9E1) stained oocyst content and sporozoite surface of C. parvum only. This study provides a new example of protozoan telomeres as rapidly evolving contingency loci encoding putative virulence factors. PMID:23467513

  20. Three members of the 6-cys protein family of Plasmodium play a role in gamete fertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa R van Dijk

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The process of fertilization is critically dependent on the mutual recognition of gametes and in Plasmodium, the male gamete surface protein P48/45 is vital to this process. This protein belongs to a family of 10 structurally related proteins, the so called 6-cys family. To identify the role of additional members of this family in Plasmodium fertilisation, we performed genetic and functional analysis on the five members of the 6-cys family that are transcribed during the gametocyte stage of P. berghei. This analysis revealed that in addition to P48/45, two members (P230 and P47 also play an essential role in the process of parasite fertilization. Mating studies between parasites lacking P230, P48/45 or P47 demonstrate that P230, like P48/45, is a male fertility factor, consistent with the previous demonstration of a protein complex containing both P48/45 and P230. In contrast, disruption of P47 results in a strong reduction of female fertility, while males remain unaffected. Further analysis revealed that gametes of mutants lacking expression of p48/45 or p230 or p47 are unable to either recognise or attach to each other. Disruption of the paralog of p230, p230p, also specifically expressed in gametocytes, had no observable effect on fertilization. These results indicate that the P. berghei 6-cys family contains a number of proteins that are either male or female specific ligands that play an important role in gamete recognition and/or attachment. The implications of low levels of fertilisation that exist even in the absence of these proteins, indicating alternative pathways of fertilisation, as well as positive selection acting on these proteins, are discussed in the context of targeting these proteins as transmission blocking vaccine candidates.

  1. WCS120 protein family and proteins soluble upon boiling in cold-acclimated winter wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitamvas, P.; Saalbach, Gerhard; Prasil, I.T.

    2007-01-01

    analysis of total sample of proteins soluble upon boiling showed seven COR proteins in the CA samples and only three COR proteins in the NA samples of cultivar Mironovskaya 808 (MIR). In conclusion, the Level of the accumulation of WCS120, WCS66 and WCS40 distinguished our two frost-tolerant winter wheat...

  2. Crystal Structure of a Plant Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion Family Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiki; Iwaki, Shigehiro; Tsukazaki, Tomoya

    2017-09-05

    The multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family of proteins consists of transporters responsible for multidrug resistance in prokaryotes. In plants, a number of MATE proteins were identified by recent genomic and functional studies, which imply that the proteins have substrate-specific transport functions instead of multidrug extrusion. The three-dimensional structure of eukaryotic MATE proteins, including those of plants, has not been reported, preventing a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of these proteins. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a MATE protein from the plant Camelina sativa at 2.9 Å resolution. Two sets of six transmembrane α helices, assembled pseudo-symmetrically, possess a negatively charged internal pocket with an outward-facing shape. The crystal structure provides insight into the diversity of plant MATE proteins and their substrate recognition and transport through the membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Architecture and regulation of HtrA-family proteins involved in protein quality control and stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Guido; Hilgenfeld, Rolf

    2013-03-01

    Protein quality control is vital for all living cells and sophisticated molecular mechanisms have evolved to prevent the excessive accumulation of unfolded proteins. High-temperature requirement A (HtrA) proteases have been identified as important ATP-independent quality-control factors in most species. HtrA proteins harbor a serine-protease domain and at least one peptide-binding PDZ domain to ensure efficient removal of misfolded or damaged proteins. One distinctive property of HtrAs is their ability to assemble into complex oligomers. Whereas all examined HtrAs are capable of forming pyramidal 3-mers, higher-order complexes consisting of up to 24 molecules have been reported. Tight control of chaperone and protease function is of pivotal importance in preventing deleterious HtrA-protease activity. In recent years, structural biology provided detailed insights into the molecular basis of the regulatory mechanisms, which include unique intramolecular allosteric signaling cascades and the dynamic switching of oligomeric states of HtrA proteins. Based on these results, functional models for many family members have been developed. The HtrA protein family represents a remarkable example of how structural and functional diversity is attained from the assembly of simple molecular building blocks.

  4. The Rh protein family: gene evolution, membrane biology, and disease association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Han; Ye, Mao

    2010-04-01

    The Rh (Rhesus) genes encode a family of conserved proteins that share a structural fold of 12 transmembrane helices with members of the major facilitator superfamily. Interest in this family has arisen from the discovery of Rh factor's involvement in hemolytic disease in the fetus and newborn, and of its homologs widely expressed in epithelial tissues. The Rh factor and Rh-associated glycoprotein (RhAG), with epithelial cousins RhBG and RhCG, form four subgroups conferring upon vertebrates a genealogical commonality. The past decade has heralded significant advances in understanding the phylogenetics, allelic diversity, crystal structure, and biological function of Rh proteins. This review describes recent progress on this family and the molecular insights gleaned from its gene evolution, membrane biology, and disease association. The focus is on its long evolutionary history and surprising structural conservation from prokaryotes to humans, pointing to the importance of its functional role, related to but distinct from ammonium transport proteins.

  5. Sifting through genomes with iterative-sequence clustering produces a large, phylogenetically diverse protein-family resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpton, Thomas J; Jospin, Guillaume; Wu, Dongying; Langille, Morgan G I; Pollard, Katherine S; Eisen, Jonathan A

    2012-10-13

    New computational resources are needed to manage the increasing volume of biological data from genome sequencing projects. One fundamental challenge is the ability to maintain a complete and current catalog of protein diversity. We developed a new approach for the identification of protein families that focuses on the rapid discovery of homologous protein sequences. We implemented fully automated and high-throughput procedures to de novo cluster proteins into families based upon global alignment similarity. Our approach employs an iterative clustering strategy in which homologs of known families are sifted out of the search for new families. The resulting reduction in computational complexity enables us to rapidly identify novel protein families found in new genomes and to perform efficient, automated updates that keep pace with genome sequencing. We refer to protein families identified through this approach as "Sifting Families," or SFams. Our analysis of ~10.5 million protein sequences from 2,928 genomes identified 436,360 SFams, many of which are not represented in other protein family databases. We validated the quality of SFam clustering through statistical as well as network topology-based analyses. We describe the rapid identification of SFams and demonstrate how they can be used to annotate genomes and metagenomes. The SFam database catalogs protein-family quality metrics, multiple sequence alignments, hidden Markov models, and phylogenetic trees. Our source code and database are publicly available and will be subject to frequent updates (http://edhar.genomecenter.ucdavis.edu/sifting_families/).

  6. Endeavour to simplify the frustrated concept of protein-ammonium family ionic liquid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Indrani; Venkatesu, Pannuru

    2015-08-28

    The large amount of attention earned by ionic liquids (ILs) in the various physical and chemical sciences has been attributed to their unique, designer nature. In the past few years, the role of ILs in protein folding/unfolding has been rapidly growing. In light of the increasing importance of ILs, it is desirable to systematize the ion effects on protein properties such as structure stability, activity and enantioselectivity. Various studies available in the literature show ILs as a potential solvent medium for many enzymatic reactions, as well as in various protein folding/unfolding studies. Various reviews by many researchers focus on the synthesis, application and general properties of the ILs, however a review focussing on the effect of various ILs on the activity, structure and stability of proteins is still missing. Also, according to the best of our knowledge there is no single review available throughout the literature that focuses on the effect of the same family of ILs on different proteins. Therefore, it is a priority to obtain complete knowledge of the biomolecules, particularly amino acids (AAs) and proteins in a particular IL family. The focus of the present perspective is to investigate the performance of a list of proteins and protein model compounds in the presence of ammonium-based ILs. This perspective presents a survey of all the key developments from the available reports and also our past and present experience related to proteins and ammonium-based ILs. Additionally, we have tried to put the available information in chronological order in most of the cases. The use of ammonium family ILs as a co-solvent for various proteins model compounds and proteins has been outlined. This perspective can act as a barometer for reckoning the various advancements made in this field and can also galvanize further investigation of various untouched aspects of this research area.

  7. Cartilage acidic protein 1, a new member of the beta-propeller protein family with amyloid propensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Liliana; Morgado, Isabel; Guerreiro, Marta; Cardoso, João C R; Melo, Eduardo P; Power, Deborah M

    2017-02-01

    Cartilage acidic protein1 (CRTAC1) is an extracellular matrix protein of chondrogenic tissue in humans and its presence in bacteria indicate it is of ancient origin. Structural modeling of piscine CRTAC1 reveals it belongs to the large family of beta-propeller proteins that in mammals have been associated with diseases, including amyloid diseases such as Alzheimer's. In order to characterize the structure/function evolution of this new member of the beta-propeller family we exploited the unique characteristics of piscine duplicate genes Crtac1a and Crtac1b and compared their structural and biochemical modifications with human recombinant CRTAC1. We demonstrate that CRTAC1 has a beta-propeller structure that has been conserved during evolution and easily forms high molecular weight thermo-stable aggregates. We reveal for the first time the propensity of CRTAC1 to form amyloid-like structures, and hypothesize that the aggregating property of CRTAC1 may be related to its disease-association. We further contribute to the general understating of CRTAC1's and beta-propeller family evolution and function. Proteins 2017; 85:242-255. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Identification of novel restriction endonuclease-like fold families among hypothetical proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinch, Lisa N; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Rychlewski, Leszek; Grishin, Nick V

    2005-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases and other nucleic acid cleaving enzymes form a large and extremely diverse superfamily that display little sequence similarity despite retaining a common core fold responsible for cleavage. The lack of significant sequence similarity between protein families makes homology inference a challenging task and hinders new family identification with traditional sequence-based approaches. Using the consensus fold recognition method Meta-BASIC that combines sequence profiles with predicted protein secondary structure, we identify nine new restriction endonuclease-like fold families among previously uncharacterized proteins and predict these proteins to cleave nucleic acid substrates. Application of transitive searches combined with gene neighborhood analysis allow us to confidently link these unknown families to a number of known restriction endonuclease-like structures and thus assign folds to the uncharacterized proteins. Finally, our method identifies a novel restriction endonuclease-like domain in the C-terminus of RecC that is not detected with structure-based searches of the existing PDB database.

  9. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Tom G.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Rivas, Manuel A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit. Methods Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1%) together in three different ways 1) variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2) variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3) all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families). A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Results We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed. Conclusion We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals. PMID:27128313

  10. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom G Richardson

    Full Text Available It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit.Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1% together in three different ways 1 variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2 variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3 all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families. A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT.We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed.We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals.

  11. Carcinoembryonic antigen family receptor recognition by gonococcal Opa proteins requires distinct combinations of hypervariable Opa protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Martine P; Kao, David; Hogan, Daniel M; Grant, Christopher C R; Belland, Robert J

    2002-04-01

    Neisserial Opa proteins function as a family of adhesins that bind heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) or carcinoembryonic antigen family (CEACAM) receptors on human host cells. In order to define the CEACAM binding domain on Opa proteins, we tested the binding properties of a series of gonococcal (strain MS11) recombinants producing mutant and chimeric Opa proteins with alterations in one or more of the four surface-exposed loops. Mutagenesis demonstrated that the semivariable domain, present in the first loop, was completely dispensable for CEACAM binding. In contrast, the two hypervariable (HV) regions present in the second and third loops were essential for binding; deletion of either domain resulted in loss of receptor recognition. Deletion of the fourth loop resulted in a severe decrease in Opa expression at the cell surface and could therefore not be tested for CEACAM binding. Chimeric Opa variants, containing combinations of HV regions derived from different CEACAM binding Opa proteins, lost most of their receptor binding activity. Some chimeric variants gained HSPG binding activity. Together, our results indicate that full recognition of CEACAM receptors by Opa proteins requires a highly coordinate interplay between both HV regions. Furthermore, shuffling of HV regions may result in novel HSPG receptor binding activity.

  12. FAM20: an evolutionarily conserved family of secreted proteins expressed in hematopoietic cells

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    Cobos Everardo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hematopoiesis is a complex developmental process controlled by a large number of factors that regulate stem cell renewal, lineage commitment and differentiation. Secreted proteins, including the hematopoietic growth factors, play critical roles in these processes and have important biological and clinical significance. We have employed representational difference analysis to identify genes that are differentially expressed during experimentally induced myeloid differentiation in the murine EML hematopoietic stem cell line. Results One identified clone encoded a previously unidentified protein of 541 amino acids that contains an amino terminal signal sequence but no other characterized domains. This protein is a member of family of related proteins that has been named family with sequence similarity 20 (FAM20 with three members (FAM20A, FAM20B and FAM20C in mammals. Evolutionary comparisons revealed the existence of a single FAM20 gene in the simple vertebrate Ciona intestinalis and the invertebrate worm Caenorhabditis elegans and two genes in two insect species, Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae. Six FAM20 family members were identified in the genome of the pufferfish, Fugu rubripes and five members in the zebrafish, Danio rerio. The mouse Fam20a protein was ectopically expressed in a mammalian cell line and found to be a bona fide secreted protein and efficient secretion was dependent on the integrity of the signal sequence. Expression analysis revealed that the Fam20a gene was indeed differentially expressed during hematopoietic differentiation and that the other two family members (Fam20b and Fam20c were also expressed during hematcpoiesis but that their mRNA levels did not vary significantly. Likewise FAM20A was expressed in more limited set of human tissues than the other two family members. Conclusions The FAM20 family represents a new family of secreted proteins with potential functions in regulating

  13. Nature of protein family signatures: insights from singular value analysis of position-specific scoring matrices.

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    Akira R Kinjo

    Full Text Available Position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs are useful for detecting weak homology in protein sequence analysis, and they are thought to contain some essential signatures of the protein families. In order to elucidate what kind of ingredients constitute such family-specific signatures, we apply singular value decomposition to a set of PSSMs and examine the properties of dominant right and left singular vectors. The first right singular vectors were correlated with various amino acid indices including relative mutability, amino acid composition in protein interior, hydropathy, or turn propensity, depending on proteins. A significant correlation between the first left singular vector and a measure of site conservation was observed. It is shown that the contribution of the first singular component to the PSSMs act to disfavor potentially but falsely functionally important residues at conserved sites. The second right singular vectors were highly correlated with hydrophobicity scales, and the corresponding left singular vectors with contact numbers of protein structures. It is suggested that sequence alignment with a PSSM is essentially equivalent to threading supplemented with functional information. In addition, singular vectors may be useful for analyzing and annotating the characteristics of conserved sites in protein families.

  14. The SSX Family of Cancer-Testis Antigens as Target Proteins for Tumor Therapy

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    Heath A. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer-testis antigens (CTAs represent an expanding class of tumor-associated proteins defined on the basis of their tissue-restricted expression to testis or ovary germline cells and frequent ectopic expression in tumor tissue. The expression of CTA in MHC class I-deficient germline cells makes these proteins particularly attractive as immunotherapeutic targets because they serve as essentially tumor-specific antigens for MHC class I-restricted CD8+ T cells. Moreover, because CTAs are expressed in many types of cancer, any therapeutic developed to target these antigens might have efficacy for multiple cancer types. Of particular interest among CTAs is the synovial sarcoma X chromosome breakpoint (SSX family of proteins, which includes ten highly homologous family members. Expression of SSX proteins in tumor tissues has been associated with advanced stages of disease and worse patient prognosis. Additionally, both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to SSX proteins have been demonstrated in patients with tumors of varying histological origin, which indicates that natural immune responses can be spontaneously generated to these antigens in cancer patients. The current review will describe the history and identification of this family of proteins, as well as what is known of their function, expression in normal and malignant tissues, and immunogenicity.

  15. Comparative Proteomics of Mouse Tears and Saliva: Evidence from Large Protein Families for Functional Adaptation

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    Robert C. Karn

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We produced a tear proteome of the genome mouse, C57BL/6, that contained 139 different protein identifications: 110 from a two-dimensional (2D gel with subsequent trypsin digestion, 19 from a one-dimensional (1D gel with subsequent trypsin digestion and ten from a 1D gel with subsequent Asp-N digestion. We compared this tear proteome with a C57BL/6 mouse saliva proteome produced previously. Sixteen of the 139 tear proteins are shared between the two proteomes, including six proteins that combat microbial growth. Among the 123 other tear proteins, were members of four large protein families that have no counterparts in humans: Androgen-binding proteins (ABPs with different members expressed in the two proteomes, Exocrine secreted peptides (ESPs expressed exclusively in the tear proteome, major urinary proteins (MUPs expressed in one or both proteomes and the mouse-specific Kallikreins (subfamily b KLKs expressed exclusively in the saliva proteome. All four families have members with suggested roles in mouse communication, which may influence some aspect of reproductive behavior. We discuss this in the context of functional adaptation involving tear and saliva proteins in the secretions of mouse lacrimal and salivary glands, respectively.

  16. Marked variability in the extent of protein disorder within and between viral families.

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    Ravindra Pushker

    Full Text Available Intrinsically disordered regions in eukaryotic proteomes contain key signaling and regulatory modules and mediate interactions with many proteins. Many viral proteomes encode disordered proteins and modulate host factors through the use of short linear motifs (SLiMs embedded within disordered regions. However, the degree of viral protein disorder across different viruses is not well understood, so we set out to establish the constraints acting on viruses, in terms of their use of disordered protein regions. We surveyed predicted disorder across 2,278 available viral genomes in 41 families, and correlated the extent of disorder with genome size and other factors. Protein disorder varies strikingly between viral families (from 2.9% to 23.1% of residues, and also within families. However, this substantial variation did not follow the established trend among their hosts, with increasing disorder seen across eubacterial, archaebacterial, protists, and multicellular eukaryotes. For example, among large mammalian viruses, poxviruses and herpesviruses showed markedly differing disorder (5.6% and 17.9%, respectively. Viral families with smaller genome sizes have more disorder within each of five main viral types (ssDNA, dsDNA, ssRNA+, dsRNA, retroviruses, except for negative single-stranded RNA viruses, where disorder increased with genome size. However, surveying over all viruses, which compares tiny and enormous viruses over a much bigger range of genome sizes, there is no strong association of genome size with protein disorder. We conclude that there is extensive variation in the disorder content of viral proteomes. While a proportion of this may relate to base composition, to extent of gene overlap, and to genome size within viral types, there remain important additional family and virus-specific effects. Differing disorder strategies are likely to impact on how different viruses modulate host factors, and on how rapidly viruses can evolve novel

  17. Marked Variability in the Extent of Protein Disorder within and between Viral Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushker, Ravindra; Mooney, Catherine; Davey, Norman E.; Jacqué, Jean-Marc; Shields, Denis C.

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered regions in eukaryotic proteomes contain key signaling and regulatory modules and mediate interactions with many proteins. Many viral proteomes encode disordered proteins and modulate host factors through the use of short linear motifs (SLiMs) embedded within disordered regions. However, the degree of viral protein disorder across different viruses is not well understood, so we set out to establish the constraints acting on viruses, in terms of their use of disordered protein regions. We surveyed predicted disorder across 2,278 available viral genomes in 41 families, and correlated the extent of disorder with genome size and other factors. Protein disorder varies strikingly between viral families (from 2.9% to 23.1% of residues), and also within families. However, this substantial variation did not follow the established trend among their hosts, with increasing disorder seen across eubacterial, archaebacterial, protists, and multicellular eukaryotes. For example, among large mammalian viruses, poxviruses and herpesviruses showed markedly differing disorder (5.6% and 17.9%, respectively). Viral families with smaller genome sizes have more disorder within each of five main viral types (ssDNA, dsDNA, ssRNA+, dsRNA, retroviruses), except for negative single-stranded RNA viruses, where disorder increased with genome size. However, surveying over all viruses, which compares tiny and enormous viruses over a much bigger range of genome sizes, there is no strong association of genome size with protein disorder. We conclude that there is extensive variation in the disorder content of viral proteomes. While a proportion of this may relate to base composition, to extent of gene overlap, and to genome size within viral types, there remain important additional family and virus-specific effects. Differing disorder strategies are likely to impact on how different viruses modulate host factors, and on how rapidly viruses can evolve novel instances of SLi

  18. Phylogenetic analysis reveals dynamic evolution of the poly(A)-binding protein gene family in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallie, Daniel R; Liu, Renyi

    2014-11-25

    The poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) binds the poly(A) tail of eukaryotic mRNAs and functions to maintain the integrity of the mRNA while promoting protein synthesis through its interaction with eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4G and eIF4B. PABP is encoded by a single gene in yeast and marine algae but during plant evolution the PABP gene family expanded substantially, underwent sequence divergence into three subclasses, and acquired tissue-specificity in gene family member expression. Although such changes suggest functional specialization, the size of the family and its sequence divergence have complicated an understanding of which gene family members may be foundational and which may represent more recent expansions of the family to meet the specific needs of speciation. Here, we examine the evolution of the plant PABP gene family to provide insight into these aspects of the family that may yield clues into the function of individual family members. The PABP gene family had expanded to two members by the appearance of fresh water algae and four members in non-vascular plants. In lycophytes, the first sequence divergence yielding a specific class member occurs. The earliest members of the gene family share greatest similarity to those modern members whose expression is confined to reproductive tissues, suggesting that supporting reproductive-associated gene expression is the most conserved function of this family. A family member sharing similarity to modern vegetative-associated members first appears in gymnosperms. Further elaboration of the reproductive-associated and vegetative-associated members occurred during the evolution of flowering plants. Expansion of the plant PABP gene family began prior to the colonization of land. By the evolution of lycophytes, the first class member whose expression is confined to reproductive tissues in higher plants had appeared. A second class member whose expression is vegetative-associated appeared in

  19. Potential molecular mimicry between the human endogenous retrovirus W family envelope proteins and myelin proteins in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Ranjan; Joseph, Blessy; Whittall, Trevor

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease caused by the destruction of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system. The major target molecules for the immune response are the myelin basic protein, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein and proteolipid protein but the aetiology of the disease is as yet poorly understood. The HLA Class II allele DRB1*1501 in particular as well as DRB5*0101 and the expression of human endogenous retroviral envelope proteins have been linked to multiple sclerosis but the molecular mechanisms relating these remain to be elucidated. We hypothesised that cross-reactive peptide epitopes in retroviral envelope proteins and myelin proteins that can be presented by the two Class II DR molecules may play a role in initiating multiple sclerosis. Sequence homologies between retroviral envelope and myelin proteins and in silico predictions of peptides derived from them that are able to bind to the two Class II alleles were examined to test the hypothesis. The results support the hypothesis that molecular mimicry in peptide epitopes from envelope proteins of the HERV-W family of endogenous retroviruses and myelin proteins is possible and could potentially trigger multiple sclerosis. Mimicry between syncytin-1, a HERV-W envelope protein that is expressed during placentation, and myelin proteins may also explain the higher prevalence of multiple sclerosis in women. Experiments to test the ability of the identified peptide epitopes to activate T H cells are required to confirm the present findings. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fast and simple protein-alignment-guided assembly of orthologous gene families from microbiome sequencing reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huson, Daniel H; Tappu, Rewati; Bazinet, Adam L; Xie, Chao; Cummings, Michael P; Nieselt, Kay; Williams, Rohan

    2017-01-25

    Microbiome sequencing projects typically collect tens of millions of short reads per sample. Depending on the goals of the project, the short reads can either be subjected to direct sequence analysis or be assembled into longer contigs. The assembly of whole genomes from metagenomic sequencing reads is a very difficult problem. However, for some questions, only specific genes of interest need to be assembled. This is then a gene-centric assembly where the goal is to assemble reads into contigs for a family of orthologous genes. We present a new method for performing gene-centric assembly, called protein-alignment-guided assembly, and provide an implementation in our metagenome analysis tool MEGAN. Genes are assembled on the fly, based on the alignment of all reads against a protein reference database such as NCBI-nr. Specifically, the user selects a gene family based on a classification such as KEGG and all reads binned to that gene family are assembled. Using published synthetic community metagenome sequencing reads and a set of 41 gene families, we show that the performance of this approach compares favorably with that of full-featured assemblers and that of a recently published HMM-based gene-centric assembler, both in terms of the number of reference genes detected and of the percentage of reference sequence covered. Protein-alignment-guided assembly of orthologous gene families complements whole-metagenome assembly in a new and very useful way.

  1. Genome-wide identification and analysis of FK506-binding protein family gene family in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xiangpeng; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Mizhen; Sun, Xin; Li, Yu; Mu, Qian; Zhu, Xudong; Li, Pengyu; Fang, Jinggui

    2014-01-25

    The FK506 binding proteins (FKBPs) are abundant and ubiquitous proteins belonging to the large peptidyl-prolylcis-trans isomerase superfamily. FKBPs are known to be involved in many biological processes including hormone signaling, plant growth, and stress responses through a chaperone or an isomerization of proline residues during protein folding. The availability of complete strawberry genome sequences allowed the identification of 23 FKBP genes by HMMER and blast analysis. Chromosome scaffold locations of these FKBP genes in the strawberry genome were determined and the protein domain and motif organization of FaFKBPs analyzed. The phylogenetic relationships between strawberry FKBPs were also assessed. The expression profiles of FaFKBPs genes results revealed that most FaFKBPs were expressed in all tissues, while a few FaFKBPs were specifically expressed in some of the tissues. These data not only contribute to some better understanding of the complex regulation of the strawberry FKBP gene family, but also provide valuable information for further research in strawberry functional genomics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Family C of human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is constituted by eight metabotropic glutamate receptors, two gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA(B1-2)) subunits forming the heterodimeric GABA(B) receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor, three taste1 receptors (T1R1-3), a promiscuous L-alpha;-amino......-2) and T1R2-3 receptor, all receptors are either activated or positively modulated by amino acids. In this review, we outline mutational, biophysical and structural studies which have elucidated the interaction of the amino acids with the Venus flytrap domains, molecular mechanisms of receptor selectivity...... acid receptor G-protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) and seven orphan receptors. Aside from the orphan receptors, the family C GPCRs are dimeric receptors characterized by a large extracellular Venus flytrap domain which bind the endogenous agonists. Except from the GABA(B1...

  3. Variability and action mechanism of a family of anticomplement proteins in Ixodes ricinus.

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    Bernard Couvreur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ticks are blood feeding arachnids that characteristically take a long blood meal. They must therefore counteract host defence mechanisms such as hemostasis, inflammation and the immune response. This is achieved by expressing batteries of salivary proteins coded by multigene families. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the in-depth analysis of a tick multigene family and describe five new anticomplement proteins in Ixodes ricinus. Compared to previously described Ixodes anticomplement proteins, these segregated into a new phylogenetic group or subfamily. These proteins have a novel action mechanism as they specifically bind to properdin, leading to the inhibition of C3 convertase and the alternative complement pathway. An excess of non-synonymous over synonymous changes indicated that coding sequences had undergone diversifying selection. Diversification was not associated with structural, biochemical or functional diversity, adaptation to host species or stage specificity but rather to differences in antigenicity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Anticomplement proteins from I. ricinus are the first inhibitors that specifically target a positive regulator of complement, properdin. They may provide new tools for the investigation of role of properdin in physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. They may also be useful in disorders affecting the alternative complement pathway. Looking for and detecting the different selection pressures involved will help in understanding the evolution of multigene families and hematophagy in arthropods.

  4. Protein topology determines cysteine oxidation fate: the case of sulfenyl amide formation among protein families.

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    Defelipe, Lucas A; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A; Turjanski, Adrián G

    2015-03-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function.

  5. Trends in genome dynamics among major orders of insects revealed through variations in protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappoport, Nadav; Linial, Michal

    2015-08-07

    Insects belong to a class that accounts for the majority of animals on earth. With over one million identified species, insects display a huge diversity and occupy extreme environments. At present, there are dozens of fully sequenced insect genomes that cover a range of habitats, social behavior and morphologies. In view of such diverse collection of genomes, revealing evolutionary trends and charting functional relationships of proteins remain challenging. We analyzed the relatedness of 17 complete proteomes representative of proteomes from insects including louse, bee, beetle, ants, flies and mosquitoes, as well as an out-group from the crustaceans. The analyzed proteomes mostly represented the orders of Hymenoptera and Diptera. The 287,405 protein sequences from the 18 proteomes were automatically clustered into 20,933 families, including 799 singletons. A comprehensive analysis based on statistical considerations identified the families that were significantly expanded or reduced in any of the studied organisms. Among all the tested species, ants are characterized by an exceptionally high rate of family gain and loss. By assigning annotations to hundreds of species-specific families, the functional diversity among species and between the major clades (Diptera and Hymenoptera) is revealed. We found that many species-specific families are associated with receptor signaling, stress-related functions and proteases. The highest variability among insects associates with the function of transposition and nucleic acids processes (collectively coined TNAP). Specifically, the wasp and ants have an order of magnitude more TNAP families and proteins relative to species that belong to Diptera (mosquitoes and flies). An unsupervised clustering methodology combined with a comparative functional analysis unveiled proteomic signatures in the major clades of winged insects. We propose that the expansion of TNAP families in Hymenoptera potentially contributes to the accelerated

  6. Bridging the molecular and biological functions of the oxysterol-binding protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrangelo, Antonietta; Ridgway, Neale D

    2018-03-13

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and OSBP-related proteins (ORPs) constitute a large eukaryotic gene family that transports and regulates the metabolism of sterols and phospholipids. The original classification of the family based on oxysterol-binding activity belies the complex dual lipid-binding specificity of the conserved OSBP homology domain (OHD). Additional protein- and membrane-interacting modules mediate the targeting of select OSBP/ORPs to membrane contact sites between organelles, thus positioning the OHD between opposing membranes for lipid transfer and metabolic regulation. This unique subcellular location, coupled with diverse ligand preferences and tissue distribution, has identified OSBP/ORPs as key arbiters of membrane composition and function. Here, we will review how molecular models of OSBP/ORP-mediated intracellular lipid transport and regulation at membrane contact sites relate to their emerging roles in cellular and organismal functions.

  7. The concept of the CCN protein family revisited: a centralized coordination network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perbal, Bernard

    2018-03-01

    The wide array of biological properties attributed to the CCN family of proteins (Perbal in Lancet 363(9402):62-64, 2004) led me to reconsider the possible relationship and roles that these proteins may play as a team, instead of acting on their own as individual regulators in various signaling pathways. The dynamic model which I present in this review stems from the contribution of the biological properties that we established for CCN3, one of the three founding members of the CCN family, which was identified by our group as the first CCN protein showing growth inhibitory properties (1992), expressed mainly in quiescent cells (1996), and showing anti-tumor activities in several cellular models both ex vivo and in vivo. At the present time CCN3 is the only member of the family that has been reported to negatively act on the progression of the cell cycle. The unique dual localisation of CCN3 in the nucleus and outside cells, either at the membrane or in the extracellular matrix, that I first established in 1999, and that now appears to be shared by several other CCN proteins, is a unique essential feature which can no longer be ignored. Based on the structural and functional properties of CCN3, shared by most of the CCN family members, I propose an « all in one » concept in which CCN proteins are team members with specific functions that are aimed at the same goal. This model accounts both for the functional specificity of the various CCN proteins, their sequential and opposite or complementary effects in various biological context, and for the biological consequences of their physical interaction and biological cross-regulation.

  8. A comprehensive software suite for protein family construction and functional site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Renfrew Haft

    Full Text Available In functionally diverse protein families, conservation in short signature regions may outperform full-length sequence comparisons for identifying proteins that belong to a subgroup within which one specific aspect of their function is conserved. The SIMBAL workflow (Sites Inferred by Metabolic Background Assertion Labeling is a data-mining procedure for finding such signature regions. It begins by using clues from genomic context, such as co-occurrence or conserved gene neighborhoods, to build a useful training set from a large number of uncharacterized but mutually homologous proteins. When training set construction is successful, the YES partition is enriched in proteins that share function with the user's query sequence, while the NO partition is depleted. A selected query sequence is then mined for short signature regions whose closest matches overwhelmingly favor proteins from the YES partition. High-scoring signature regions typically contain key residues critical to functional specificity, so proteins with the highest sequence similarity across these regions tend to share the same function. The SIMBAL algorithm was described previously, but significant manual effort, expertise, and a supporting software infrastructure were required to prepare the requisite training sets. Here, we describe a new, distributable software suite that speeds up and simplifies the process for using SIMBAL, most notably by providing tools that automate training set construction. These tools have broad utility for comparative genomics, allowing for flexible collection of proteins or protein domains based on genomic context as well as homology, a capability that can greatly assist in protein family construction. Armed with this new software suite, SIMBAL can serve as a fast and powerful in silico alternative to direct experimentation for characterizing proteins and their functional interactions.

  9. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments.

  10. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments. (topical review)

  11. Conservation and divergence of C-terminal domain structure in the retinoblastoma protein family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liban, Tyler J.; Medina, Edgar M.; Tripathi, Sarvind; Sengupta, Satyaki; Henry, R. William; Buchler, Nicolas E.; Rubin, Seth M. (UCSC); (Duke); (MSU)

    2017-04-24

    The retinoblastoma protein (Rb) and the homologous pocket proteins p107 and p130 negatively regulate cell proliferation by binding and inhibiting members of the E2F transcription factor family. The structural features that distinguish Rb from other pocket proteins have been unclear but are critical for understanding their functional diversity and determining why Rb has unique tumor suppressor activities. We describe here important differences in how the Rb and p107 C-terminal domains (CTDs) associate with the coiled-coil and marked-box domains (CMs) of E2Fs. We find that although CTD–CM binding is conserved across protein families, Rb and p107 CTDs show clear preferences for different E2Fs. A crystal structure of the p107 CTD bound to E2F5 and its dimer partner DP1 reveals the molecular basis for pocket protein–E2F binding specificity and how cyclin-dependent kinases differentially regulate pocket proteins through CTD phosphorylation. Our structural and biochemical data together with phylogenetic analyses of Rb and E2F proteins support the conclusion that Rb evolved specific structural motifs that confer its unique capacity to bind with high affinity those E2Fs that are the most potent activators of the cell cycle.

  12. Slipins: ancient origin, duplication and diversification of the stomatin protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young J Peter W

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stomatin is a membrane protein that was first isolated from human red blood cells. Since then, a number of stomatin-like proteins have been identified in all three domains of life. The conservation among these proteins is remarkable, with bacterial and human homologs sharing 50 % identity. Despite being associated with a variety of diseases such as cancer, kidney failure and anaemia, precise functions of these proteins remain unclear. Results We have constructed a comprehensive phylogeny of all 'stomatin-like' sequences that share a 150 amino acid domain. We show these proteins comprise an ancient family that arose early in prokaryotic evolution, and we propose a new nomenclature that reflects their phylogeny, based on the name "slipin" (stomatin-like protein. Within prokaryotes there are two distinct subfamilies that account for the two different origins of the eight eukaryotic stomatin subfamilies, one of which gave rise to eukaryotic SLP-2, renamed here "paraslipin". This was apparently acquired through the mitochondrial endosymbiosis and is widely distributed amongst the major kingdoms. The other prokaryotic subfamily gave rise to the ancestor of the remaining seven eukaryotic subfamilies. The highly diverged "alloslipin" subfamily is represented only by fungal, viral and ciliate sequences. The remaining six subfamilies, collectively termed "slipins", are confined to metazoa. Protostome stomatin, as well as a newly reported arthropod subfamily slipin-4, are restricted to invertebrate groups, whilst slipin-1 (previously SLP-1 is present in nematodes and higher metazoa. In vertebrates, the stomatin family expanded considerably, with at least two duplication events giving rise to podocin and slipin-3 subfamilies (previously SLP-3, with the retained ancestral sequence giving rise to vertebrate stomatin. Conclusion Stomatin-like proteins have their origin in an ancient duplication event that occurred early on in the evolution

  13. Involvement of Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG)-family proteins in the neuroprotection by rasagiline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ji-Feng; He, Shuang; Kang, Ji-Feng; Xu, Qian; Hu, Ya-Cen; Zhang, Hai-Nan; Wang, Chun-Yu; Yan, Xin-Xiang; Tang, Bei-Sha

    2015-01-01

    Rasagiline, a novel monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitor, has a mild to moderate effect in relieving Parkinson's disease (PD) symptoms as well as unique neuroprotective effects. Previous studies demonstrated rasagiline protect neurons by regulating Bcl-2 family proteins. Our study aimed to study whether Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG)-family proteins, which were reported closely associated with neurodegenerative disease, were involved in the neuroprotective effect of rasagiline. We found that after the administration of 1-methy1-4-phenvl-1,2,3,6-tetrahvdropvridine (MPTP), BAG2 and BAG5 proteins were up-regulated in the substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons of PD mouse model. A further increase of BAG2 and BAG5 was detected after intragastric administration of rasagiline to post-MPTP lesioned mice. Thus, the current study proved the association of BAG family proteins with PD, and suggested the involvement and a positive role of BAG2, BAG5 in the neuroprotection of rasagiline. These preliminary results implicate a novel pathway for further study on neuroprotection of rasagiline.

  14. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of a Fusion Protein Tuberculosis Vaccine Combining Five Esx Family Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zhi-Hao; Sun, Rui-Feng; Lin, Chen; Chen, Fu-Zeng; Mai, Jun-Tao; Liu, Yu-Xiao; Xu, Zi-Yan; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    One strategy to develop the next generation of tuberculosis vaccines is to construct subunit vaccines based on T cell antigens. In this study, we have evaluated the vaccine potential of a fusion protein combining EsxB, EsxD, EsxG, EsxU, and EsxM of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( M. tb ). This recombinant protein, named BM, was expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli . Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with purified BM protein formulated in Freund's incomplete adjuvant induced the production of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-2) and multifunctional CD4 + T cells. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with BM protein followed by intravenous challenge with Mycobacterium bovis BCG resulted in better levels of protection than the two leading antigens, Ag85A and PPE18. Taken together, these results indicate that BM is a protective antigen. Future studies to combine BM with other antigens and evaluate its effectiveness as a booster of BCG or as a therapeutic vaccine are warranted.

  15. Golgi coiled-coil proteins contain multiple binding sites for Rab family G proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinka, Rita; Gillingham, Alison K.; Kondylis, Vangelis; Munro, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Vesicles and other carriers destined for the Golgi apparatus must be guided to the correct cisternae. Golgins, long coiled-coil proteins that localize to particular Golgi subdomains via their C termini, are candidate regulators of vesicle sorting. In this study, we report that the GRIP domain

  16. Stealth proteins: in silico identification of a novel protein family rendering bacterial pathogens invisible to host immune defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sperisen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a variety of bacterial defense strategies to survive in a hostile environment. Generation of extracellular polysaccharides has proved to be a simple but effective strategy against the host's innate immune system. A comparative genomics approach led us to identify a new protein family termed Stealth, most likely involved in the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides. This protein family is characterized by a series of domains conserved across phylogeny from bacteria to eukaryotes. In bacteria, Stealth (previously characterized as SacB, XcbA, or WefC is encoded by subsets of strains mainly colonizing multicellular organisms, with evidence for a protective effect against the host innate immune defense. More specifically, integrating all the available information about Stealth proteins in bacteria, we propose that Stealth is a D-hexose-1-phosphoryl transferase involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides. In the animal kingdom, Stealth is strongly conserved across evolution from social amoebas to simple and complex multicellular organisms, such as Dictyostelium discoideum, hydra, and human. Based on the occurrence of Stealth in most Eukaryotes and a subset of Prokaryotes together with its potential role in extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, we propose that metazoan Stealth functions to regulate the innate immune system. Moreover, there is good reason to speculate that the acquisition and spread of Stealth could be responsible for future epidemic outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by a large variety of eubacterial pathogens. Our in silico identification of a homologous protein in the human host will help to elucidate the causes of Stealth-dependent virulence. At a more basic level, the characterization of the molecular and cellular function of Stealth proteins may shed light on fundamental mechanisms of innate immune defense against microbial invasion.

  17. Stealth Proteins: In Silico Identification of a Novel Protein Family Rendering Bacterial Pathogens Invisible to Host Immune Defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a variety of bacterial defense strategies to survive in a hostile environment. Generation of extracellular polysaccharides has proved to be a simple but effective strategy against the host's innate immune system. A comparative genomics approach led us to identify a new protein family termed Stealth, most likely involved in the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides. This protein family is characterized by a series of domains conserved across phylogeny from bacteria to eukaryotes. In bacteria, Stealth (previously characterized as SacB, XcbA, or WefC is encoded by subsets of strains mainly colonizing multicellular organisms, with evidence for a protective effect against the host innate immune defense. More specifically, integrating all the available information about Stealth proteins in bacteria, we propose that Stealth is a D-hexose-1-phosphoryl transferase involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides. In the animal kingdom, Stealth is strongly conserved across evolution from social amoebas to simple and complex multicellular organisms, such as Dictyostelium discoideum, hydra, and human. Based on the occurrence of Stealth in most Eukaryotes and a subset of Prokaryotes together with its potential role in extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, we propose that metazoan Stealth functions to regulate the innate immune system. Moreover, there is good reason to speculate that the acquisition and spread of Stealth could be responsible for future epidemic outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by a large variety of eubacterial pathogens. Our in silico identification of a homologous protein in the human host will help to elucidate the causes of Stealth-dependent virulence. At a more basic level, the characterization of the molecular and cellular function of Stealth proteins may shed light on fundamental mechanisms of innate immune defense against microbial invasion.

  18. Pu-Erh Tea Extract Induces the Degradation of FET Family Proteins Involved in the Pathogenesis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available FET family proteins consist of fused in sarcoma/translocated in liposarcoma (FUS/TLS, Ewing's sarcoma (EWS, and TATA-binding protein-associated factor 15 (TAF15. Mutations in the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1, TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43, and FET family proteins are associated with the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, a fatal neurodegenerative disease. There is currently no cure for this disease and few effective treatments are available. Epidemiological studies indicate that the consumption of tea is associated with a reduced risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. The results of this study revealed that components of a pu-erh tea extract (PTE interacted with FET family proteins but not with TDP-43 or SOD1. PTE induced the degradation of FET family proteins but had no effects on TDP-43 or SOD1. The most frequently occurring ALS-linked FUS/TLS mutant protein, R521C FUS/TLS, was also degraded in the presence of PTE. Furthermore, ammonium chloride, a lysosome inhibitor, but not lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, reduced the degradation of FUS/TLS protein by PTE. PTE significantly reduced the incorporation of R521C FUS/TLS into stress granules under stress conditions. These findings suggest that PTE may have beneficial health effects, including preventing the onset of FET family protein-associated neurodegenerative diseases and delaying the progression of ALS by inhibiting the cytoplasmic aggregation of FET family proteins.

  19. Identification and functionality prediction of pathogenesis-related protein 1 from legume family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellis, Meenakshi; Mathur, Monika; Gurjar, Gayatri; Kadoo, Narendra; Gupta, Vidya

    2017-11-01

    The production and accumulation of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins in plants is one of the important responses to biotic and abiotic stress. Large number of identified PR proteins has been categorized into 17 functional families based on their structure, phylogenetics, and biological activities. However, they are not widely studied in legume crops. Using 29 PR1 proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana, as query, here we have predicted 92 candidate PR1 proteins through the PSI-BLAST and HMMER programs. These candidate proteins were comprehensively analyzed with, multiple sequence alignment, domain architecture studies, signal peptide, and motif extraction followed by phylogenetic analysis. Further, response of two candidate PR1 proteins from chickpea against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp.ciceri attack was validated using qRT-PCR followed by their 3D structure prediction. To decipher mode of action for PR1s, docking of pathogen extracellular matrix components along with fungal elicitors was performed with two chickpea PR1 proteins. Based on these findings, we propose carbohydrate to be the unique pathogen-recognition feature for PR1 proteins and β-glucanase activity via β-glucan binding or modification. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Pentraxin family of proteins interact specifically with phosphorylcholine and/or phosphorylethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, R A; Dahlbäck, B; Coe, J E; Nelsestuen, G L

    1992-05-26

    Pentraxins are a family of serum proteins characterized by five identical subunits that are noncovalently linked. The two major types of pentraxins are C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid P component (SAP). CRP proteins are identified by their calcium-dependent interaction with phosphorylcholine. This study showed that SAP also bound to phosphorylated compounds but had a high specificity for phosphorylethanolamine. Thus, human CRP and SAP show high specificity that is complementary for the related compounds, phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine, respectively. This relationship suggests a complementary and/or related function for the pentraxins. Pentraxins from other species were also examined. Mouse SAP showed binding interactions and specificity similar to human SAP. Female protein (FP) from hamster and rat CRP showed a hybrid specificity and bound to both phosphorylethanolamine and phosphorylcholine. All of the proteins that bound phosphorylethanolamine also associated with human C4b-binding protein (C4BP). With the exception of human and rat CRP, all the proteins also bound to vesicles containing acidic phospholipids. All of these binding interactions were calcium-dependent and mutually exclusive, suggesting that they involved the same site on the protein. These findings suggest possible ways to examine the function of the pentraxins.

  1. Complement factor H family proteins in their non-canonical role as modulators of cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józsi, Mihály; Schneider, Andrea E; Kárpáti, Éva; Sándor, Noémi

    2018-01-04

    Complement factor H is a major regulator of the alternative pathway of the complement system. The factor H-related proteins are less characterized, but recent data indicate that they rather promote complement activation. These proteins have some common ligands with factor H and have both overlapping and distinct functions depending on domain composition and the degree of conservation of amino acid sequence. Factor H and some of the factor H-related proteins also appear in a non-canonical function that is beyond their role in the modulation of complement activation. This review covers our current understanding on this emerging role of factor H family proteins in modulating the activation and function of various cells by binding to receptors or receptor ligands. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ixodes ticks belonging to the Ixodes ricinus complex encode a family of anticomplement proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daix, V; Schroeder, H; Praet, N; Georgin, J-P; Chiappino, I; Gillet, L; de Fays, K; Decrem, Y; Leboulle, G; Godfroid, E; Bollen, A; Pastoret, P-P; Gern, L; Sharp, P M; Vanderplasschen, A

    2007-04-01

    The alternative pathway of complement is an important innate defence against pathogens including ticks. This component of the immune system has selected for pathogens that have evolved countermeasures. Recently, a salivary protein able to inhibit the alternative pathway was cloned from the American tick Ixodes scapularis (Valenzuela et al., 2000; J. Biol. Chem. 275, 18717-18723). Here, we isolated two different sequences, similar to Isac, from the transcriptome of I. ricinus salivary glands. Expression of these sequences revealed that they both encode secreted proteins able to inhibit the complement alternative pathway. These proteins, called I. ricinus anticomplement (IRAC) protein I and II, are coexpressed constitutively in I. ricinus salivary glands and are upregulated during blood feeding. Also, we demonstrated that they are the products of different genes and not of alleles of the same locus. Finally, phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that ticks belonging to the Ixodes ricinus complex encode a family of relatively small anticomplement molecules undergoing diversification by positive Darwinian selection.

  3. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culhane, Kelly J; Liu, Yuting; Cai, Yingying; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2015-01-01

    Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  4. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Culhane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  5. WCS120 protein family and proteins soluble upon boiling in cold-acclimated winter wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vítámvás, P.; Saalbach, G.; Prášil, I.T.; Čapková, Věra; Opatrná, J.; Ahmed, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 164, č. 9 (2007), s. 1197-1207 ISSN 0176-1617 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD206/03/H137 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : Cold acclimation * COR proteins * Frost tolerance Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.239, year: 2007

  6. A combinatorial approach to detect coevolved amino acid networks in protein families of variable divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Baussand

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Communication between distant sites often defines the biological role of a protein: amino acid long-range interactions are as important in binding specificity, allosteric regulation and conformational change as residues directly contacting the substrate. The maintaining of functional and structural coupling of long-range interacting residues requires coevolution of these residues. Networks of interaction between coevolved residues can be reconstructed, and from the networks, one can possibly derive insights into functional mechanisms for the protein family. We propose a combinatorial method for mapping conserved networks of amino acid interactions in a protein which is based on the analysis of a set of aligned sequences, the associated distance tree and the combinatorics of its subtrees. The degree of coevolution of all pairs of coevolved residues is identified numerically, and networks are reconstructed with a dedicated clustering algorithm. The method drops the constraints on high sequence divergence limiting the range of applicability of the statistical approaches previously proposed. We apply the method to four protein families where we show an accurate detection of functional networks and the possibility to treat sets of protein sequences of variable divergence.

  7. InterPro: an integrated documentation resource for protein families, domains and functional sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Nicola J; Apweiler, Rolf; Attwood, Terri K; Bairoch, Amos; Bateman, Alex; Binns, David; Biswas, Margaret; Bradley, Paul; Bork, Peer; Bucher, Phillip; Copley, Richard; Courcelle, Emmanuel; Durbin, Richard; Falquet, Laurent; Fleischmann, Wolfgang; Gouzy, Jerome; Griffith-Jones, Sam; Haft, Daniel; Hermjakob, Henning; Hulo, Nicolas; Kahn, Daniel; Kanapin, Alexander; Krestyaninova, Maria; Lopez, Rodrigo; Letunic, Ivica; Orchard, Sandra; Pagni, Marco; Peyruc, David; Ponting, Chris P; Servant, Florence; Sigrist, Christian J A

    2002-09-01

    The exponential increase in the submission of nucleotide sequences to the nucleotide sequence database by genome sequencing centres has resulted in a need for rapid, automatic methods for classification of the resulting protein sequences. There are several signature and sequence cluster-based methods for protein classification, each resource having distinct areas of optimum application owing to the differences in the underlying analysis methods. In recognition of this, InterPro was developed as an integrated documentation resource for protein families, domains and functional sites, to rationalise the complementary efforts of the individual protein signature database projects. The member databases - PRINTS, PROSITE, Pfam, ProDom, SMART and TIGRFAMs - form the InterPro core. Related signatures from each member database are unified into single InterPro entries. Each InterPro entry includes a unique accession number, functional descriptions and literature references, and links are made back to the relevant member database(s). Release 4.0 of InterPro (November 2001) contains 4,691 entries, representing 3,532 families, 1,068 domains, 74 repeats and 15 sites of post-translational modification (PTMs) encoded by different regular expressions, profiles, fingerprints and hidden Markov models (HMMs). Each InterPro entry lists all the matches against SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL (2,141,621 InterPro hits from 586,124 SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL protein sequences). The database is freely accessible for text- and sequence-based searches.

  8. The retinoblastoma protein binds to a family of E2F transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lees, J A; Saito, M; Vidal, M

    1993-01-01

    for E2F-2 and E2F-3 were mapped to 1p36 and 6q22, respectfully, confirming their independence from E2F-1. However, the E2F-2 and E2F-3 proteins are closely related to E2F-1. Both E2F-2 and E2F-3 bound to wild-type but not mutant E2F recognition sites, and they bound specifically to the retinoblastoma...... of a family of proteins....

  9. iPfam: a database of protein family and domain interactions found in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Robert D; Miller, Benjamin L; Clements, Jody; Bateman, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The database iPfam, available at http://ipfam.org, catalogues Pfam domain interactions based on known 3D structures that are found in the Protein Data Bank, providing interaction data at the molecular level. Previously, the iPfam domain-domain interaction data was integrated within the Pfam database and website, but it has now been migrated to a separate database. This allows for independent development, improving data access and giving clearer separation between the protein family and interactions datasets. In addition to domain-domain interactions, iPfam has been expanded to include interaction data for domain bound small molecule ligands. Functional annotations are provided from source databases, supplemented by the incorporation of Wikipedia articles where available. iPfam (version 1.0) contains >9500 domain-domain and 15 500 domain-ligand interactions. The new website provides access to this data in a variety of ways, including interactive visualizations of the interaction data.

  10. Sifting through genomes with iterative-sequence clustering produces a large, phylogenetically diverse protein-family resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpton Thomas J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New computational resources are needed to manage the increasing volume of biological data from genome sequencing projects. One fundamental challenge is the ability to maintain a complete and current catalog of protein diversity. We developed a new approach for the identification of protein families that focuses on the rapid discovery of homologous protein sequences. Results We implemented fully automated and high-throughput procedures to de novo cluster proteins into families based upon global alignment similarity. Our approach employs an iterative clustering strategy in which homologs of known families are sifted out of the search for new families. The resulting reduction in computational complexity enables us to rapidly identify novel protein families found in new genomes and to perform efficient, automated updates that keep pace with genome sequencing. We refer to protein families identified through this approach as “Sifting Families,” or SFams. Our analysis of ~10.5 million protein sequences from 2,928 genomes identified 436,360 SFams, many of which are not represented in other protein family databases. We validated the quality of SFam clustering through statistical as well as network topology–based analyses. Conclusions We describe the rapid identification of SFams and demonstrate how they can be used to annotate genomes and metagenomes. The SFam database catalogs protein-family quality metrics, multiple sequence alignments, hidden Markov models, and phylogenetic trees. Our source code and database are publicly available and will be subject to frequent updates (http://edhar.genomecenter.ucdavis.edu/sifting_families/.

  11. Sifting through genomes with iterative-sequence clustering produces a large, phylogenetically diverse protein-family resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background New computational resources are needed to manage the increasing volume of biological data from genome sequencing projects. One fundamental challenge is the ability to maintain a complete and current catalog of protein diversity. We developed a new approach for the identification of protein families that focuses on the rapid discovery of homologous protein sequences. Results We implemented fully automated and high-throughput procedures to de novo cluster proteins into families based upon global alignment similarity. Our approach employs an iterative clustering strategy in which homologs of known families are sifted out of the search for new families. The resulting reduction in computational complexity enables us to rapidly identify novel protein families found in new genomes and to perform efficient, automated updates that keep pace with genome sequencing. We refer to protein families identified through this approach as “Sifting Families,” or SFams. Our analysis of ~10.5 million protein sequences from 2,928 genomes identified 436,360 SFams, many of which are not represented in other protein family databases. We validated the quality of SFam clustering through statistical as well as network topology–based analyses. Conclusions We describe the rapid identification of SFams and demonstrate how they can be used to annotate genomes and metagenomes. The SFam database catalogs protein-family quality metrics, multiple sequence alignments, hidden Markov models, and phylogenetic trees. Our source code and database are publicly available and will be subject to frequent updates (http://edhar.genomecenter.ucdavis.edu/sifting_families/). PMID:23061897

  12. Characterization of the deleted in autism 1 protein family: implications for studying cognitive disorders.

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    Azhari Aziz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are a group of commonly occurring, highly-heritable developmental disabilities. Human genes c3orf58 or Deleted In Autism-1 (DIA1 and cXorf36 or Deleted in Autism-1 Related (DIA1R are implicated in ASD and mental retardation. Both gene products encode signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. As evolutionary medicine has emerged as a key tool for understanding increasing numbers of human diseases, we have used an evolutionary approach to study DIA1 and DIA1R. We found DIA1 conserved from cnidarians to humans, indicating DIA1 evolution coincided with the development of the first primitive synapses. Nematodes lack a DIA1 homologue, indicating Caenorhabditis elegans is not suitable for studying all aspects of ASD etiology, while zebrafish encode two DIA1 paralogues. By contrast to DIA1, DIA1R was found exclusively in vertebrates, with an origin coinciding with the whole-genome duplication events occurring early in the vertebrate lineage, and the evolution of the more complex vertebrate nervous system. Strikingly, DIA1R was present in schooling fish but absent in fish that have adopted a more solitary lifestyle. An additional DIA1-related gene we named DIA1-Like (DIA1L, lacks a signal peptide and is restricted to the genomes of the echinoderm Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and cephalochordate Branchiostoma floridae. Evidence for remarkable DIA1L gene expansion was found in B. floridae. Amino acid alignments of DIA1 family gene products revealed a potential Golgi-retention motif and a number of conserved motifs with unknown function. Furthermore, a glycine and three cysteine residues were absolutely conserved in all DIA1-family proteins, indicating a critical role in protein structure and/or function. We have therefore identified a new metazoan protein family, the DIA1-family, and understanding the biological roles of DIA1-family members will have implications for our understanding of autism and mental

  13. Characterization of the deleted in autism 1 protein family: implications for studying cognitive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Azhari; Harrop, Sean P; Bishop, Naomi E

    2011-01-19

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of commonly occurring, highly-heritable developmental disabilities. Human genes c3orf58 or Deleted In Autism-1 (DIA1) and cXorf36 or Deleted in Autism-1 Related (DIA1R) are implicated in ASD and mental retardation. Both gene products encode signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. As evolutionary medicine has emerged as a key tool for understanding increasing numbers of human diseases, we have used an evolutionary approach to study DIA1 and DIA1R. We found DIA1 conserved from cnidarians to humans, indicating DIA1 evolution coincided with the development of the first primitive synapses. Nematodes lack a DIA1 homologue, indicating Caenorhabditis elegans is not suitable for studying all aspects of ASD etiology, while zebrafish encode two DIA1 paralogues. By contrast to DIA1, DIA1R was found exclusively in vertebrates, with an origin coinciding with the whole-genome duplication events occurring early in the vertebrate lineage, and the evolution of the more complex vertebrate nervous system. Strikingly, DIA1R was present in schooling fish but absent in fish that have adopted a more solitary lifestyle. An additional DIA1-related gene we named DIA1-Like (DIA1L), lacks a signal peptide and is restricted to the genomes of the echinoderm Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and cephalochordate Branchiostoma floridae. Evidence for remarkable DIA1L gene expansion was found in B. floridae. Amino acid alignments of DIA1 family gene products revealed a potential Golgi-retention motif and a number of conserved motifs with unknown function. Furthermore, a glycine and three cysteine residues were absolutely conserved in all DIA1-family proteins, indicating a critical role in protein structure and/or function. We have therefore identified a new metazoan protein family, the DIA1-family, and understanding the biological roles of DIA1-family members will have implications for our understanding of autism and mental retardation.

  14. Assignment of protein sequences to existing domain and family classification systems: Pfam and the PDB

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Qifang; Dunbrack, Roland L.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Automating the assignment of existing domain and protein family classifications to new sets of sequences is an important task. Current methods often miss assignments because remote relationships fail to achieve statistical significance. Some assignments are not as long as the actual domain definitions because local alignment methods often cut alignments short. Long insertions in query sequences often erroneously result in two copies of the domain assigned to the query. Divergent r...

  15. Molecular properties of Zic4 and Zic5 proteins: functional diversity within Zic family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Akira; Inoue, Takashi; Mikoshiba, Katuhiko; Aruga, Jun

    2004-01-01

    The Zic-family proteins control various developmental processes. Previous studies have shown that Zic1, Zic2, and Zic3 can act as transcriptional regulators, and that their functions are repressed by I-mfa, which has been identified as a repressor for basic helix-loop-helix-type transcriptional factors. Here, we investigated the molecular properties of the Zic4 and Zic5 proteins. Zic4/Zic5 showed DNA-binding activity to the Gli-binding sequence, similar to Zic1/Zic2/Zic3 proteins. However, Zic4/Zic5 did not exhibit any significant transcriptional activation ability nor they bind to I-mfa differently from Zic1/Zic2/Zic3. The nuclear localization of Zic4/Zic5 was not affected by the presence of the I-mfa protein, whereas the Zic1/Zic2/Zic3 proteins were translocated to the cytoplasmic compartment in the presence of I-mfa. The difference may be attributable to the dissimilarity of the N-terminal region between the Zic1/Zic2/Zic3 and Zic4/Zic5 proteins, since the binding of the Zic1/Zic2/Zic3 proteins to I-mfa occurs through their N-terminal regions

  16. Bioinformatic Characterization of the Trimeric Intracellular Cation-Specific Channel Protein Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverio, Abe L. F.

    2014-01-01

    Trimeric intracellular cation-specific (TRIC) channels are integral to muscle excitation–contraction coupling. TRIC channels provide counter-ionic flux when calcium is rapidly transported from intracellular stores to the cell cytoplasm. Until recently, knowledge of the presence of these proteins was limited to animals. We analyzed the TRIC family and identified a profusion of prokaryotic family members with topologies and motifs similar to those of their eukaryotic counterparts. Prokaryotic members far outnumber eukaryotic members, and although none has been functionally characterized, the evidence suggests that they function as secondary carriers. The presence of fused N- or C-terminal domains of known biochemical functions as well as genomic context analyses provide clues about the functions of these prokaryotic homologs. They are proposed to function in metabolite (e.g., amino acid/ nucleotide) efflux. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that TRIC channel homologs diverged relatively early during evolutionary history and that horizontal gene transfer was frequent in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. Topological analyses of TRIC channels revealed that these proteins possess seven putative transmembrane segments (TMSs), which arose by intragenic duplication of a three-TMS polypeptide-encoding genetic element followed by addition of a seventh TMS at the C terminus to give the precursor of all current TRIC family homologs. We propose that this family arose in prokaryotes. PMID:21519847

  17. GH32 family activity: a topological approach through protein contact networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Sara; Di Paola, Luisa; Giuliani, Alessandro; Ridolfi, Alessandra; De Gara, Laura

    2016-11-01

    The application of Protein Contact Networks methodology allowed to highlight a novel response of border region between the two domains to substrate binding. Glycoside hydrolases (GH) are enzymes that mainly hydrolyze the glycosidic bond between two carbohydrates or a carbohydrate and a non-carbohydrate moiety. These enzymes are involved in many fundamental and diverse biological processes in plants. We have focused on the GH32 family, including enzymes very similar in both sequence and structure, each having however clear specificities of substrate preferences and kinetic properties. Structural and topological differences among proteins of the GH32 family have been here identified by means of an emerging approach (Protein Contact network, PCN) based on the formalization of 3D structures as contact networks among amino-acid residues. The PCN approach proved successful in both reconstructing the already known functional domains and in identifying the structural counterpart of the properties of GH32 enzymes, which remain uncertain, like their allosteric character. The main outcome of the study was the discovery of the activation upon binding of the border (cleft) region between the two domains. This reveals the allosteric nature of the enzymatic activity for all the analyzed forms in the GH32 family, a character yet to be highlighted in biochemical studies. Furthermore, we have been able to recognize a topological signature (graph energy) of the different affinity of the enzymes towards small and large substrates.

  18. PHOG-BLAST – a new generation tool for fast similarity search of protein families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mironov Andrey A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The need to compare protein profiles frequently arises in various protein research areas: comparison of protein families, domain searches, resolution of orthology and paralogy. The existing fast algorithms can only compare a protein sequence with a protein sequence and a profile with a sequence. Algorithms to compare profiles use dynamic programming and complex scoring functions. Results We developed a new algorithm called PHOG-BLAST for fast similarity search of profiles. This algorithm uses profile discretization to convert a profile to a finite alphabet and utilizes hashing for fast search. To determine the optimal alphabet, we analyzed columns in reliable multiple alignments and obtained column clusters in the 20-dimensional profile space by applying a special clustering procedure. We show that the clustering procedure works best if its parameters are chosen so that 20 profile clusters are obtained which can be interpreted as ancestral amino acid residues. With these clusters, only less than 2% of columns in multiple alignments are out of clusters. We tested the performance of PHOG-BLAST vs. PSI-BLAST on three well-known databases of multiple alignments: COG, PFAM and BALIBASE. On the COG database both algorithms showed the same performance, on PFAM and BALIBASE PHOG-BLAST was much superior to PSI-BLAST. PHOG-BLAST required 10–20 times less computer memory and computation time than PSI-BLAST. Conclusion Since PHOG-BLAST can compare multiple alignments of protein families, it can be used in different areas of comparative proteomics and protein evolution. For example, PHOG-BLAST helped to build the PHOG database of phylogenetic orthologous groups. An essential step in building this database was comparing protein complements of different species and orthologous groups of different taxons on a personal computer in reasonable time. When it is applied to detect weak similarity between protein families, PHOG-BLAST is less

  19. Using hierarchical clustering of secreted protein families to classify and rank candidate effectors of rust fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Diane G O; Win, Joe; Cano, Liliana M; Szabo, Les J; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Rust fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that cause considerable damage on crop plants. Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stem rust, and Melampsora larici-populina, the poplar leaf rust pathogen, have strong deleterious impacts on wheat and poplar wood production, respectively. Filamentous pathogens such as rust fungi secrete molecules called disease effectors that act as modulators of host cell physiology and can suppress or trigger host immunity. Current knowledge on effectors from other filamentous plant pathogens can be exploited for the characterisation of effectors in the genome of recently sequenced rust fungi. We designed a comprehensive in silico analysis pipeline to identify the putative effector repertoire from the genome of two plant pathogenic rust fungi. The pipeline is based on the observation that known effector proteins from filamentous pathogens have at least one of the following properties: (i) contain a secretion signal, (ii) are encoded by in planta induced genes, (iii) have similarity to haustorial proteins, (iv) are small and cysteine rich, (v) contain a known effector motif or a nuclear localization signal, (vi) are encoded by genes with long intergenic regions, (vii) contain internal repeats, and (viii) do not contain PFAM domains, except those associated with pathogenicity. We used Markov clustering and hierarchical clustering to classify protein families of rust pathogens and rank them according to their likelihood of being effectors. Using this approach, we identified eight families of candidate effectors that we consider of high value for functional characterization. This study revealed a diverse set of candidate effectors, including families of haustorial expressed secreted proteins and small cysteine-rich proteins. This comprehensive classification of candidate effectors from these devastating rust pathogens is an initial step towards probing plant germplasm for novel resistance components.

  20. Using hierarchical clustering of secreted protein families to classify and rank candidate effectors of rust fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane G O Saunders

    Full Text Available Rust fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that cause considerable damage on crop plants. Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stem rust, and Melampsora larici-populina, the poplar leaf rust pathogen, have strong deleterious impacts on wheat and poplar wood production, respectively. Filamentous pathogens such as rust fungi secrete molecules called disease effectors that act as modulators of host cell physiology and can suppress or trigger host immunity. Current knowledge on effectors from other filamentous plant pathogens can be exploited for the characterisation of effectors in the genome of recently sequenced rust fungi. We designed a comprehensive in silico analysis pipeline to identify the putative effector repertoire from the genome of two plant pathogenic rust fungi. The pipeline is based on the observation that known effector proteins from filamentous pathogens have at least one of the following properties: (i contain a secretion signal, (ii are encoded by in planta induced genes, (iii have similarity to haustorial proteins, (iv are small and cysteine rich, (v contain a known effector motif or a nuclear localization signal, (vi are encoded by genes with long intergenic regions, (vii contain internal repeats, and (viii do not contain PFAM domains, except those associated with pathogenicity. We used Markov clustering and hierarchical clustering to classify protein families of rust pathogens and rank them according to their likelihood of being effectors. Using this approach, we identified eight families of candidate effectors that we consider of high value for functional characterization. This study revealed a diverse set of candidate effectors, including families of haustorial expressed secreted proteins and small cysteine-rich proteins. This comprehensive classification of candidate effectors from these devastating rust pathogens is an initial step towards probing plant germplasm for novel resistance components.

  1. TGF-β mimic proteins form an extended gene family in the murine parasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Danielle J; Harcus, Yvonne; White, Madeleine P J; Gregory, William F; Nahler, Janina; Stephens, Ian; Toke-Bjolgerud, Edward; Hewitson, James P; Ivens, Alasdair; McSorley, Henry J; Maizels, Rick M

    2018-03-03

    We recently reported the discovery of a new parasite-derived protein that functionally mimics the immunosuppressive cytokine transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. The Heligmosomoides polygyrus TGF-β Mimic (Hp-TGM) shares no homology to any TGF-β family member, however it binds the mammalian TGF-β receptor and induces expression of Foxp3, the canonical transcription factor of both mouse and human regulatory T cells. Hp-TGM consists of five atypical Complement Control Protein (CCP, Pfam 00084) domains, each lacking certain conserved residues and 12-15 amino acids longer than the 60-70 amino acids consensus domain, but with a recognizable 3-cysteine, tryptophan, cysteine motif. We now report on the identification of a family of nine related Hp-TGM homologues represented in the secreted proteome and transcriptome of H. polygyrus. Recombinant proteins from five of the nine new TGM members were tested for TGF-β activity, but only two were functionally active in an MFB-F11 reporter assay, and by the induction of T cell Foxp3 expression. Sequence comparisons reveal that proteins with functional activity are similar or identical to Hp-TGM across the first three CCP domains, but more variable in domains 4 and 5. Inactive proteins diverged in all domains, or lacked some domains entirely. Testing truncated versions of Hp-TGM confirmed that domains 1-3 are essential for full activity in vitro, while domains 4 and 5 are not required. Further studies will elucidate whether these latter domains fulfill other functions in promoting host immune regulation during infection and if the more divergent family members play other roles in immunomodulation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Using Hierarchical Clustering of Secreted Protein Families to Classify and Rank Candidate Effectors of Rust Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Diane G. O.; Win, Joe; Cano, Liliana M.; Szabo, Les J.; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Rust fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that cause considerable damage on crop plants. Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stem rust, and Melampsora larici-populina, the poplar leaf rust pathogen, have strong deleterious impacts on wheat and poplar wood production, respectively. Filamentous pathogens such as rust fungi secrete molecules called disease effectors that act as modulators of host cell physiology and can suppress or trigger host immunity. Current knowledge on effectors from other filamentous plant pathogens can be exploited for the characterisation of effectors in the genome of recently sequenced rust fungi. We designed a comprehensive in silico analysis pipeline to identify the putative effector repertoire from the genome of two plant pathogenic rust fungi. The pipeline is based on the observation that known effector proteins from filamentous pathogens have at least one of the following properties: (i) contain a secretion signal, (ii) are encoded by in planta induced genes, (iii) have similarity to haustorial proteins, (iv) are small and cysteine rich, (v) contain a known effector motif or a nuclear localization signal, (vi) are encoded by genes with long intergenic regions, (vii) contain internal repeats, and (viii) do not contain PFAM domains, except those associated with pathogenicity. We used Markov clustering and hierarchical clustering to classify protein families of rust pathogens and rank them according to their likelihood of being effectors. Using this approach, we identified eight families of candidate effectors that we consider of high value for functional characterization. This study revealed a diverse set of candidate effectors, including families of haustorial expressed secreted proteins and small cysteine-rich proteins. This comprehensive classification of candidate effectors from these devastating rust pathogens is an initial step towards probing plant germplasm for novel resistance components. PMID:22238666

  3. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori-Amamiyamachi 1-1, Aoka-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Matsumori, Haruka [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Kalendova, Alzbeta; Hozak, Pavel [Department of Biology of the Cell Nucleus, Institute of Molecular Genetics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Goldberg, Ilya G. [Image Informatics and Computational Biology Unit, Laboratory of Genetics, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 251 Bayview Boulevard, Suite 100, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Nakao, Mitsuyoshi [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan); Saitoh, Noriko [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Harata, Masahiko, E-mail: mharata@biochem.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori-Amamiyamachi 1-1, Aoka-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan)

    2015-08-21

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis. - Highlights: • ARP6, an actin related protein, is important for nucleolar function and structure. • A population of ARP6 is localized in the center of nucleolus. • Depletion of ARP6 resulted in aberrant shape of the nucleolus. • ARP6 maintains the active rDNA transcription under high glucose. • ARP6 is required for the repression of rDNA transcription under starvation.

  4. Evolution of the Yellow/Major Royal Jelly Protein family and the emergence of social behavior in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapeau, Mark David; Albert, Stefan; Kucharski, Robert; Prusko, Carsten; Maleszka, Ryszard

    2006-11-01

    The genomic architecture underlying the evolution of insect social behavior is largely a mystery. Eusociality, defined by overlapping generations, parental brood care, and reproductive division of labor, has most commonly evolved in the Hymenopteran insects, including the honey bee Apis mellifera. In this species, the Major Royal Jelly Protein (MRJP) family is required for all major aspects of eusocial behavior. Here, using data obtained from the A. mellifera genome sequencing project, we demonstrate that the MRJP family is encoded by nine genes arranged in an approximately 60-kb tandem array. Furthermore, the MRJP protein family appears to have evolved from a single progenitor gene that encodes a member of the ancient Yellow protein family. Five genes encoding Yellow-family proteins flank the genomic region containing the genes encoding MRJPs. We describe the molecular evolution of these protein families. We then characterize developmental-stage-specific, sex-specific, and caste-specific expression patterns of the mrjp and yellow genes in the honey bee. We review empirical evidence concerning the functions of Yellow proteins in fruit flies and social ants, in order to shed light on the roles of both Yellow and MRJP proteins in A. mellifera. In total, the available evidence suggests that Yellows and MRJPs are multifunctional proteins with diverse, context-dependent physiological and developmental roles. However, many members of the Yellow/MRJP family act as facilitators of reproductive maturation. Finally, it appears that MRJP protein subfamily evolution from the Yellow protein family may have coincided with the evolution of honey bee eusociality.

  5. Génolevures: protein families and synteny among complete hemiascomycetous yeast proteomes and genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, David J.; Martin, Tiphaine; Nikolski, Macha; Cayla, Cyril; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Durrens, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    The Génolevures online database (http://cbi.labri.fr/Genolevures/ and http://genolevures.org/) provides exploratory tools and curated data sets relative to nine complete and seven partial genome sequences determined and manually annotated by the Génolevures Consortium, to facilitate comparative genomic studies of Hemiascomycete yeasts. The 2008 update to the Génolevures database provides four new genomes in complete (subtelomere to subtelomere) chromosome sequences, 50 000 protein-coding and tRNA genes, and in silico analyses for each gene element. A key element is a novel classification of conserved multi-species protein families and their use in detecting synteny, gene fusions and other aspects of genome remodeling in evolution. Our purpose is to release high-quality curated data from complete genomes, with a focus on the relations between genes, genomes and proteins. PMID:19015150

  6. Identification of an evolutionary conserved SURF-6 domain in a family of nucleolar proteins extending from human to yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polzikov, Mikhail; Zatsepina, Olga; Magoulas, Charalambos

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian SURF-6 protein is localized in the nucleolus, yet its function remains elusive in the recently characterized nucleolar proteome. We discovered by searching the Protein families database that a unique evolutionary conserved SURF-6 domain is present in the carboxy-terminal of a novel family of eukaryotic proteins extending from human to yeast. By using the enhanced green fluorescent protein as a fusion protein marker in mammalian cells, we show that proteins from distantly related taxonomic groups containing the SURF-6 domain are localized in the nucleolus. Deletion sequence analysis shows that multiple regions of the SURF-6 protein are capable of nucleolar targeting independently of the evolutionary conserved domain. We identified that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae member of the SURF-6 family, named rrp14 or ykl082c, has been categorized in yeast databases to interact with proteins involved in ribosomal biogenesis and cell polarity. These results classify SURF-6 as a new family of nucleolar proteins in the eukaryotic kingdom and point out that SURF-6 has a distinct domain within the known nucleolar proteome that may mediate complex protein-protein interactions for analogous processes between yeast and mammalian cells

  7. A new family of giardial cysteine-rich non-VSP protein genes and a novel cyst protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara J Davids

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the Giardia lamblia cyst wall is necessary for survival in the environment and host infection, we tested the hypothesis that it contains proteins other than the three known cyst wall proteins. Serial analysis of gene expression during growth and encystation revealed a gene, "HCNCp" (High Cysteine Non-variant Cyst protein, that was upregulated late in encystation, and that resembled the classic Giardia variable surface proteins (VSPs that cover the trophozoite plasmalemma. HCNCp is 13.9% cysteine, with many "CxxC" tetrapeptide motifs and a transmembrane sequence near the C-terminus. However, HCNCp has multiple "CxC" motifs rarely found in VSPs, and does not localize to the trophozoite plasmalemma. Moreover, the HCNCp C-terminus differed from the canonical VSP signature. Full-length epitope-tagged HCNCp expressed under its own promoter was upregulated during encystation with highest expression in cysts, including 42 and 21 kDa C-terminal fragments. Tagged HCNCp targeted to the nuclear envelope in trophozoites, and co-localized with cyst proteins to encystation-specific secretory vesicles during encystation. HCNCp defined a novel trafficking pathway as it localized to the wall and body of cysts, while the cyst proteins were exclusively in the wall. Unlike VSPs, HCNCp is expressed in at least five giardial strains and four WB subclones expressing different VSPs. Bioinformatics identified 60 additional large high cysteine membrane proteins (HCMp containing > or = 20 CxxC/CxC's lacking the VSP-specific C-terminal CRGKA. HCMp were absent or rare in other model or parasite genomes, except for Tetrahymena thermophila with 30. MEME analysis classified the 61 gHCMp genes into nine groups with similar internal motifs. Our data suggest that HCNCp is a novel invariant cyst protein belonging to a new HCMp family that is abundant in the Giardia genome. HCNCp and the other HCMp provide a rich source for developing parasite-specific diagnostic reagents

  8. Expanding the Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase Protein Family to the Fungal Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Anthony G.; Preiner, Chelsea S.

    2013-01-01

    The known enzymes that open the s-triazine ring, the cyanuric acid hydrolases, have been confined almost exclusively to the kingdom Bacteria and are all homologous members of the rare cyanuric acid hydrolase/barbiturase protein family. In the present study, a filamentous fungus, Sarocladium sp. strain CA, was isolated from soil by enrichment culturing using cyanuric acid as the sole source of nitrogen. A reverse-genetic approach identified a fungal cyanuric acid hydrolase gene composed of two exons and one intron. The translated spliced sequence was 39 to 53% identical to previously characterized bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases. The sequence was used to generate a gene optimized for expression in Escherichia coli and encoding an N-terminally histidine-tagged protein. The protein was purified by nickel affinity and anion-exchange chromatography. The purified protein was shown by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) to produce carboxybiuret as the product, which spontaneously decarboxylated to yield biuret and carbon dioxide. The protein was very narrow in substrate specificity, showing activity only with cyanuric acid and N-methyl cyanuric acid. Barbituric acid was an inhibitor of enzyme activity. Sequence analysis identified genes with introns in other fungi from the Ascomycota that, if spliced, are predicted to encode proteins with cyanuric acid hydrolase activity. The Ascomycota cyanuric acid hydrolase homologs are most closely related to cyanuric acid hydrolases from Actinobacteria. PMID:24039269

  9. Phylogenetic distribution and membrane topology of the LytR-CpsA-Psr protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger-Bächi Brigitte

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial cell wall is the target of many antibiotics and cell envelope constituents are critical to host-pathogen interactions. To combat resistance development and virulence, a detailed knowledge of the individual factors involved is essential. Members of the LytR-CpsA-Psr family of cell envelope-associated attenuators are relevant for β-lactam resistance, biofilm formation, and stress tolerance, and they are suggested to play a role in cell wall maintenance. However, their precise function is still unknown. This study addresses the occurrence as well as sequence-based characteristics of the LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins. Results A comprehensive list of LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins was established, and their phylogenetic distribution and clustering into subgroups was determined. LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins were present in all Gram-positive organisms, except for the cell wall-deficient Mollicutes and one strain of the Clostridiales. In contrast, the majority of Gram-negatives did not contain LytR-CpsA-Psr family members. Despite high sequence divergence, the LytR-CpsA-Psr domains of different subclusters shared a highly similar, predicted mixed a/β-structure, and conserved charged residues. PhoA fusion experiments, using MsrR of Staphylococcus aureus, confirmed membrane topology predictions and extracellular location of its LytR-CpsA-Psr domain. Conclusion The LytR-CpsA-Psr domain is unique to bacteria. The presence of diverse subgroups within the LytR-CpsA-Psr family might indicate functional differences, and could explain variations in phenotypes of respective mutants reported. The identified conserved structural elements and amino acids are likely to be important for the function of the domain and will help to guide future studies of the LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins.

  10. Assignment of protein sequences to existing domain and family classification systems: Pfam and the PDB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qifang; Dunbrack, Roland L

    2012-11-01

    Automating the assignment of existing domain and protein family classifications to new sets of sequences is an important task. Current methods often miss assignments because remote relationships fail to achieve statistical significance. Some assignments are not as long as the actual domain definitions because local alignment methods often cut alignments short. Long insertions in query sequences often erroneously result in two copies of the domain assigned to the query. Divergent repeat sequences in proteins are often missed. We have developed a multilevel procedure to produce nearly complete assignments of protein families of an existing classification system to a large set of sequences. We apply this to the task of assigning Pfam domains to sequences and structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We found that HHsearch alignments frequently scored more remotely related Pfams in Pfam clans higher than closely related Pfams, thus, leading to erroneous assignment at the Pfam family level. A greedy algorithm allowing for partial overlaps was, thus, applied first to sequence/HMM alignments, then HMM-HMM alignments and then structure alignments, taking care to join partial alignments split by large insertions into single-domain assignments. Additional assignment of repeat Pfams with weaker E-values was allowed after stronger assignments of the repeat HMM. Our database of assignments, presented in a database called PDBfam, contains Pfams for 99.4% of chains >50 residues. The Pfam assignment data in PDBfam are available at http://dunbrack2.fccc.edu/ProtCid/PDBfam, which can be searched by PDB codes and Pfam identifiers. They will be updated regularly.

  11. Defining sequence space and reaction products within the cyanuric acid hydrolase (AtzD)/barbiturase protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seffernick, Jennifer L; Erickson, Jasmine S; Cameron, Stephan M; Cho, Seunghee; Dodge, Anthony G; Richman, Jack E; Sadowsky, Michael J; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2012-09-01

    Cyanuric acid hydrolases (AtzD) and barbiturases are homologous, found almost exclusively in bacteria, and comprise a rare protein family with no discernible linkage to other protein families or an X-ray structural class. There has been confusion in the literature and in genome projects regarding the reaction products, the assignment of individual sequences as either cyanuric acid hydrolases or barbiturases, and spurious connection of this family to another protein family. The present study has addressed those issues. First, the published enzyme reaction products of cyanuric acid hydrolase are incorrectly identified as biuret and carbon dioxide. The current study employed (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to show that cyanuric acid hydrolase releases carboxybiuret, which spontaneously decarboxylates to biuret. This is significant because it revealed that homologous cyanuric acid hydrolases and barbiturases catalyze completely analogous reactions. Second, enzymes that had been annotated incorrectly in genome projects have been reassigned here by bioinformatics, gene cloning, and protein characterization studies. Third, the AtzD/barbiturase family has previously been suggested to consist of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily, a large class of metallohydrolases. Bioinformatics and the lack of bound metals both argue against a connection to the amidohydrolase superfamily. Lastly, steady-state kinetic measurements and observations of protein stability suggested that the AtzD/barbiturase family might be an undistinguished protein family that has undergone some resurgence with the recent introduction of industrial s-triazine compounds such as atrazine and melamine into the environment.

  12. PfEMP1 – A Parasite Protein Family of Key Importance in Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Immunity and Pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars; Jensen, Anja T R

    2015-01-01

    to be a central element in the pathogenesis of the disease. It is mediated by the interaction of parasite ligands on the erythrocyte surface and a range of host receptor molecules in many organs and tissues. Among several proteins and protein families implicated in this process, the P. falciparum erythrocyte...... membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family of high-molecular weight and highly variable antigens appears to be the most prominent. In this chapter, we aim to provide a systematic overview of the current knowledge about these proteins, their structure, their function, how they are presented on the erythrocyte...

  13. The CREC family, a novel family of multiple EF-hand, low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding proteins localised to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Vorum, H

    2000-01-01

    The CREC family consists of a number of recently discovered multiple (up to seven) EF-hand proteins that localise to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells. At present, the family includes reticulocalbin, ERC-55/TCBP-49/E6BP, Cab45, calumenin and crocalbin/CBP-50. Similar proteins are found...... in quite diverse invertebrate organisms such as DCB-45 and SCF in Drosophila melanogaster, SCF in Bombyx mori, CCB-39 in Caenorhabditis elegans and Pfs40/PfERC in Plasmodium falciparum. The Ca(2+) affinity is rather low with dissociation constants around 10(-4)-10(-3) M. The proteins may participate in Ca......(2+)-regulated activities. Recent evidence has been obtained that some CREC family members are involved in pathological activities such as malignant cell transformation, mediation of the toxic effects of snake venom toxins and putative participation in amyloid formation. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Jan-21...

  14. TIR-X and TIR-NBS proteins: two new families related to disease resistance TIR-NBS-LRR proteins encoded in Arabidopsis and other plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Blake C; Morgante, Michele; Michelmore, Richard W

    2002-10-01

    The Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain is found in one of the two large families of homologues of plant disease resistance proteins (R proteins) in Arabidopsis and other dicotyledonous plants. In addition to these TIR-NBS-LRR (TNL) R proteins, we identified two families of TIR-containing proteins encoded in the Arabidopsis Col-0 genome. The TIR-X (TX) family of proteins lacks both the nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and the leucine rich repeats (LRRs) that are characteristic of the R proteins, while the TIR-NBS (TN) proteins contain much of the NBS, but lack the LRR. In Col-0, the TX family is encoded by 27 genes and three pseudogenes; the TN family is encoded by 20 genes and one pseudogene. Using massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS), expression was detected at low levels for approximately 85% of the TN-encoding genes. Expression was detected for only approximately 40% of the TX-encoding genes, again at low levels. Physical map data and phylogenetic analysis indicated that multiple genomic duplication events have increased the numbers of TX and TN genes in Arabidopsis. Genes encoding TX, TN and TNL proteins were demonstrated in conifers; TX and TN genes are present in very low numbers in grass genomes. The expression, prevalence, and diversity of TX and TN genes suggests that these genes encode functional proteins rather than resulting from degradation or deletions of TNL genes. These TX and TN proteins could be plant analogues of small TIR-adapter proteins that function in mammalian innate immune responses such as MyD88 and Mal.

  15. Biochemical characterization of Sf9 Sp-family-like protein factors reveals interesting features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheedi, S; Ramachandran, A; Ehtesham, N Z; Hasnain, S E

    2007-01-01

    We earlier documented the involvement of novel Sp-family-like protein factors in transcription from the Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcNPV) polyhedrin (polh) gene promoter [Ramachandran et al. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276: 23440-23449]. These zinc-dependent Sp-like factors bind to two putative Sp-factor-binding motifs, present within the AcSp sequence upstream of the polh promoter, with very high affinity (K(d) = 2.1 x 10(-12) M). Like other polh-promoter-associated host transcription factors, these Sp-like factors display tolerance to high ion concentrations up to even 3 M NaCl. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated a probable cross-talk between the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) Sp-family-like proteins and the TFIID complex. In complementary experiments, specific replacements of the Sp-factor-binding motifs with TATA-like elements resulted in expression of a luciferase reporter gene to almost the same level as that obtained with a wild-type native construct. Our results point to the possibility of the involvement of TFIID and Sf9 Sp protein interaction in transcription from the baculovirus polyhedrin promoter.

  16. Xanthorrhizol induced DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells involving Bcl-2 family proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tee, Thiam-Tsui; Cheah, Yew-Hoong; Meenakshii, Nallappan; Mohd Sharom, Mohd Yusof; Azimahtol Hawariah, Lope Pihie

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We isolated xanthorrhizol, a sesquiterpenoid compound from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. ► Xanthorrhizol induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells as observed using SEM. ► Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells involved Bcl-2 family proteins. ► DNA fragmentation was observed in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells. ► DNA fragmentation maybe due to cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins. -- Abstract: Xanthorrhizol is a plant-derived pharmacologically active sesquiterpenoid compound isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Previously, we have reported that xanthorrhizol inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 human hepatoma cells by inducing apoptotic cell death via caspase activation. Here, we attempt to further elucidate the mode of action of xanthorrhizol. Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells as observed by scanning electron microscopy was accompanied by truncation of BID; reduction of both anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-X L expression; cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins and DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these results suggest xanthorrhizol as a potent antiproliferative agent on HepG2 cells by inducing apoptosis via Bcl-2 family members. Hence we proposed that xanthorrhizol could be used as an anti-liver cancer drug for future studies.

  17. Xanthorrhizol induced DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells involving Bcl-2 family proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tee, Thiam-Tsui, E-mail: thiamtsu@yahoo.com [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Cheah, Yew-Hoong [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Bioassay Unit, Herbal Medicine Research Center, Institute for Medical Research, Jalan Pahang, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Meenakshii, Nallappan [Biology Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohd Sharom, Mohd Yusof; Azimahtol Hawariah, Lope Pihie [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated xanthorrhizol, a sesquiterpenoid compound from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xanthorrhizol induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells as observed using SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells involved Bcl-2 family proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation was observed in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation maybe due to cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins. -- Abstract: Xanthorrhizol is a plant-derived pharmacologically active sesquiterpenoid compound isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Previously, we have reported that xanthorrhizol inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 human hepatoma cells by inducing apoptotic cell death via caspase activation. Here, we attempt to further elucidate the mode of action of xanthorrhizol. Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells as observed by scanning electron microscopy was accompanied by truncation of BID; reduction of both anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-X{sub L} expression; cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins and DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these results suggest xanthorrhizol as a potent antiproliferative agent on HepG2 cells by inducing apoptosis via Bcl-2 family members. Hence we proposed that xanthorrhizol could be used as an anti-liver cancer drug for future studies.

  18. Transcriptional activation capacity of the novel PLAG family of zinc finger proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, K; Voz, M L; Hensen, K; Meyen, E; Van de Ven, W J

    1998-09-04

    We have isolated and characterized two novel cDNAs encoding C2H2 zinc finger proteins showing high sequence homology to PLAG1, a protein ectopically activated by promoter swapping or promoter substitution in pleomorphic adenomas with chromosomal abnormalities at chromosome 8q12. PLAG1 and the two new PLAG1 family members (PLAGL1 and PLAGL2) constitute a novel subfamily of zinc finger proteins that recognize DNA and/or RNA. To examine the potential of the three human proteins to modulate transcription, we constructed several PLAG/GAL4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins and measured their ability to activate transcription of a reporter gene construct in different mammalian cell lines and in yeast. Although the carboxyl-terminal part of PLAGL1 shows strong overall transcriptional activity in mesenchymal (COS-1) and epithelial cells (293), both PLAG1 and PLAGL2 transactivate in mesenchymal cells only if depleted from a repressing region. This effect is less profound in epithelial cells. These data suggest that the activation in pleomorphic adenomas of PLAG1 most likely results in uncontrolled activation of downstream target genes.

  19. BIS2Analyzer: a server for co-evolution analysis of conserved protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteri, Francesco; Nadalin, Francesca; Champeimont, Raphaël; Carbone, Alessandra

    2017-07-03

    Along protein sequences, co-evolution analysis identifies residue pairs demonstrating either a specific co-adaptation, where changes in one of the residues are compensated by changes in the other during evolution or a less specific external force that affects the evolutionary rates of both residues in a similar magnitude. In both cases, independently of the underlying cause, co-evolutionary signatures within or between proteins serve as markers of physical interactions and/or functional relationships. Depending on the type of protein under study, the set of available homologous sequences may greatly differ in size and amino acid variability. BIS2Analyzer, openly accessible at http://www.lcqb.upmc.fr/BIS2Analyzer/, is a web server providing the online analysis of co-evolving amino-acid pairs in protein alignments, especially designed for vertebrate and viral protein families, which typically display a small number of highly similar sequences. It is based on BIS2, a re-implemented fast version of the co-evolution analysis tool Blocks in Sequences (BIS). BIS2Analyzer provides a rich and interactive graphical interface to ease biological interpretation of the results. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Backbone 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR assignments for the Cyanothece 51142 protein cce_0567: a protein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchko, Garry W; Sofia, Heidi J

    2008-06-01

    Cyanothece 51142 contains a 78-residue protein, cce_0567, that falls into the DUF683 family of proteins associated with nitrogen fixation. Here we report the assignment of most of the main chain and 13C(beta) side chain resonances of the approximately 40 kDa homo-tetramer.

  1. Structural basis for antagonizing a host restriction factor by C7 family of poxvirus host-range proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Krumm, Brian; Li, Yongchao; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Productive viral replication requires overcoming many barriers posed by the host innate immune system. Human sterile alpha motif domain-containing 9 (SAMD9) is a newly identified antiviral factor that is specifically targeted by poxvirus proteins belonging to the C7 family of host-range factors. Here we provide the first, to our knowledge, atomic view of two functionally divergent proteins from the C7 family and determine the molecular basis that dictates whether they can target SAMD9 effecti...

  2. Receptor oligomerization in family B1 of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Sarah Norklit; Ørgaard, Anne; Jørgensen, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    , investigation of family B1 receptor oligomerization and especially its pharmacological importance is still at an early stage. Even though GPCR oligomerization is a well-established phenomenon, there is a need for more investigations providing a direct link between these interactions and receptor functionality......The superfamily of the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) is the largest family of membrane-associated receptors. GPCRs are involved in the pathophysiology of numerous human diseases, and they constitute an estimated 30-40% of all drug targets. During the last two decades......, GPCR oligomerization has been extensively studied using methods like bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and today, receptor-receptor interactions within the GPCR superfamily is a well-established phenomenon. Evidence of the impact of GPCR oligomerization on, e.g., ligand binding, receptor...

  3. Comparative genome analysis reveals a conserved family of actin-like proteins in apicomplexan parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibley L David

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phylum Apicomplexa is an early-branching eukaryotic lineage that contains a number of important human and animal pathogens. Their complex life cycles and unique cytoskeletal features distinguish them from other model eukaryotes. Apicomplexans rely on actin-based motility for cell invasion, yet the regulation of this system remains largely unknown. Consequently, we focused our efforts on identifying actin-related proteins in the recently completed genomes of Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium spp., Cryptosporidium spp., and Theileria spp. Results Comparative genomic and phylogenetic studies of apicomplexan genomes reveals that most contain only a single conventional actin and yet they each have 8–10 additional actin-related proteins. Among these are a highly conserved Arp1 protein (likely part of a conserved dynactin complex, and Arp4 and Arp6 homologues (subunits of the chromatin-remodeling machinery. In contrast, apicomplexans lack canonical Arp2 or Arp3 proteins, suggesting they lost the Arp2/3 actin polymerization complex on their evolutionary path towards intracellular parasitism. Seven of these actin-like proteins (ALPs are novel to apicomplexans. They show no phylogenetic associations to the known Arp groups and likely serve functions specific to this important group of intracellular parasites. Conclusion The large diversity of actin-like proteins in apicomplexans suggests that the actin protein family has diverged to fulfill various roles in the unique biology of intracellular parasites. Conserved Arps likely participate in vesicular transport and gene expression, while apicomplexan-specific ALPs may control unique biological traits such as actin-based gliding motility.

  4. Spider Glue Proteins Have Distinct Architectures Compared with Traditional Spidroin Family Members*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthavada, Keshav; Hu, Xiaoyi; Tuton-Blasingame, Tiffany; Hsia, Yang; Sampath, Sujatha; Pacheco, Ryan; Freeark, Jordan; Falick, Arnold M.; Tang, Simon; Fong, Justine; Kohler, Kristin; La Mattina-Hawkins, Coby; Vierra, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive spider glues are required to perform a variety of tasks, including web construction, prey capture, and locomotion. To date, little is known regarding the molecular and structural features of spider glue proteins, in particular bioadhesives that interconnect dragline or scaffolding silks during three-dimensional web construction. Here we use biochemical and structural approaches to identify and characterize two aggregate gland specific gene products, AgSF1 and AgSF2, and demonstrate that these proteins co-localize to the connection joints of both webs and wrapping silks spun from the black widow spider, Latrodectus hesperus. Protein architectures are markedly divergent between AgSF1 and AgSF2, as well as traditional spider silk fibroin family members, suggesting connection joints consist of a complex proteinaceous network. AgSF2 represents a nonglycosylated 40-kDa protein that has novel internal amino acid block repeats with the consensus sequence NVNVN embedded in a glycine-rich matrix. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of AgSF1 reveals pentameric QPGSG iterations that are similar to conserved modular elements within mammalian elastin, a rubber-like elastomeric protein that interfaces with collagen. Wet-spinning methodology using purified recombinant proteins show AgSF1 has the potential to self-assemble into fibers. X-ray fiber diffraction studies performed on these synthetic fibers reveal the presence of noncrystalline domains that resemble classical rubber networks. Collectively, these data support that the aggregate gland serves to extrude a protein mixture that contains substances that allow for the self-assembly of fiber-like structures that interface with dragline silks to mediate prey capture. PMID:22927444

  5. Phylogenomic analysis reveals dynamic evolutionary history of the Drosophila heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1 gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia T Levine

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin is the gene-poor, satellite-rich eukaryotic genome compartment that supports many essential cellular processes. The functional diversity of proteins that bind and often epigenetically define heterochromatic DNA sequence reflects the diverse functions supported by this enigmatic genome compartment. Moreover, heterogeneous signatures of selection at chromosomal proteins often mirror the heterogeneity of evolutionary forces that act on heterochromatic DNA. To identify new such surrogates for dissecting heterochromatin function and evolution, we conducted a comprehensive phylogenomic analysis of the Heterochromatin Protein 1 gene family across 40 million years of Drosophila evolution. Our study expands this gene family from 5 genes to at least 26 genes, including several uncharacterized genes in Drosophila melanogaster. The 21 newly defined HP1s introduce unprecedented structural diversity, lineage-restriction, and germline-biased expression patterns into the HP1 family. We find little evidence of positive selection at these HP1 genes in both population genetic and molecular evolution analyses. Instead, we find that dynamic evolution occurs via prolific gene gains and losses. Despite this dynamic gene turnover, the number of HP1 genes is relatively constant across species. We propose that karyotype evolution drives at least some HP1 gene turnover. For example, the loss of the male germline-restricted HP1E in the obscura group coincides with one episode of dramatic karyotypic evolution, including the gain of a neo-Y in this lineage. This expanded compendium of ovary- and testis-restricted HP1 genes revealed by our study, together with correlated gain/loss dynamics and chromosome fission/fusion events, will guide functional analyses of novel roles supported by germline chromatin.

  6. Novel cyclic di-GMP effectors of the YajQ protein family control bacterial virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-qi An

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bis-(3',5' cyclic di-guanylate (cyclic di-GMP is a key bacterial second messenger that is implicated in the regulation of many critical processes that include motility, biofilm formation and virulence. Cyclic di-GMP influences diverse functions through interaction with a range of effectors. Our knowledge of these effectors and their different regulatory actions is far from complete, however. Here we have used an affinity pull-down assay using cyclic di-GMP-coupled magnetic beads to identify cyclic di-GMP binding proteins in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc. This analysis identified XC_3703, a protein of the YajQ family, as a potential cyclic di-GMP receptor. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that the purified XC_3703 protein bound cyclic di-GMP with a high affinity (K(d∼2 µM. Mutation of XC_3703 led to reduced virulence of Xcc to plants and alteration in biofilm formation. Yeast two-hybrid and far-western analyses showed that XC_3703 was able to interact with XC_2801, a transcription factor of the LysR family. Mutation of XC_2801 and XC_3703 had partially overlapping effects on the transcriptome of Xcc, and both affected virulence. Electromobility shift assays showed that XC_3703 positively affected the binding of XC_2801 to the promoters of target virulence genes, an effect that was reversed by cyclic di-GMP. Genetic and functional analysis of YajQ family members from the human pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia showed that they also specifically bound cyclic di-GMP and contributed to virulence in model systems. The findings thus identify a new class of cyclic di-GMP effector that regulates bacterial virulence.

  7. Hydrogen bond networks determine emergent mechanical and thermodynamic properties across a protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallakyan Sargis

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gram-negative bacteria use periplasmic-binding proteins (bPBP to transport nutrients through the periplasm. Despite immense diversity within the recognized substrates, all members of the family share a common fold that includes two domains that are separated by a conserved hinge. The hinge allows the protein to cycle between open (apo and closed (ligated conformations. Conformational changes within the proteins depend on a complex interplay of mechanical and thermodynamic response, which is manifested as an increase in thermal stability and decrease of flexibility upon ligand binding. Results We use a distance constraint model (DCM to quantify the give and take between thermodynamic stability and mechanical flexibility across the bPBP family. Quantitative stability/flexibility relationships (QSFR are readily evaluated because the DCM links mechanical and thermodynamic properties. We have previously demonstrated that QSFR is moderately conserved across a mesophilic/thermophilic RNase H pair, whereas the observed variance indicated that different enthalpy-entropy mechanisms allow similar mechanical response at their respective melting temperatures. Our predictions of heat capacity and free energy show marked diversity across the bPBP family. While backbone flexibility metrics are mostly conserved, cooperativity correlation (long-range couplings also demonstrate considerable amount of variation. Upon ligand removal, heat capacity, melting point, and mechanical rigidity are, as expected, lowered. Nevertheless, significant differences are found in molecular cooperativity correlations that can be explained by the detailed nature of the hydrogen bond network. Conclusion Non-trivial mechanical and thermodynamic variation across the family is explained by differences within the underlying H-bond networks. The mechanism is simple; variation within the H-bond networks result in altered mechanical linkage properties that directly affect

  8. Recognition of DNA modified with antitumor cisplatin by p53-family proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pivoňková, Hana; Fojta, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, č. 1 (2009), s. 265-266 ISSN 1742-464X. [34th FEBS Congress. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Prague] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040701; GA ČR(CZ) GP204/07/P476; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : p53-family proteins * interaction * DNA modification Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  9. Studying the co-evolution of protein families with the Mirrortree web server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, David; Pazos, Florencio

    2010-05-15

    The Mirrortree server allows to graphically and interactively study the co-evolution of two protein families, and investigate their possible interactions and functional relationships in a taxonomic context. The server includes the possibility of starting from single sequences and hence it can be used by non-expert users. The web server is freely available at http://csbg.cnb.csic.es/mtserver. It was tested in the main web browsers. Adobe Flash Player is required at the client side to perform the interactive assessment of co-evolution. pazos@cnb.csic.es Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. Enzyme promiscuity in the hormone-sensitive lipase family of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseppe, Manco; Luigia, Merone; Elena, Porzio; Yan, Feng; Luigi, Mandrich

    2012-02-01

    The number of enzymes endowed with the capacity to catalyse other reactions than the main, physiological one, a feature that has been called promiscuity, is increasing at a fast pace. Promiscuity is a highly pervasive phenomenon that is present at each level of life complexity. For enzymes, promiscuity encompasses interesting aspects related to their physiological role, evolution and biotechnological applications. Herein, at first we will describe some general aspects of enzyme promiscuity and then we will report some examples from the α/β hydrolase superfamily of proteins, with particular emphasis to the hormone-sensitive lipase family.

  11. ProtoNet 6.0: organizing 10 million protein sequences in a compact hierarchical family tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappoport, Nadav; Karsenty, Solange; Stern, Amos; Linial, Nathan; Linial, Michal

    2012-01-01

    ProtoNet 6.0 (http://www.protonet.cs.huji.ac.il) is a data structure of protein families that cover the protein sequence space. These families are generated through an unsupervised bottom-up clustering algorithm. This algorithm organizes large sets of proteins in a hierarchical tree that yields high-quality protein families. The 2012 ProtoNet (Version 6.0) tree includes over 9 million proteins of which 5.5% come from UniProtKB/SwissProt and the rest from UniProtKB/TrEMBL. The hierarchical tree structure is based on an all-against-all comparison of 2.5 million representatives of UniRef50. Rigorous annotation-based quality tests prune the tree to most informative 162,088 clusters. Every high-quality cluster is assigned a ProtoName that reflects the most significant annotations of its proteins. These annotations are dominated by GO terms, UniProt/Swiss-Prot keywords and InterPro. ProtoNet 6.0 operates in a default mode. When used in the advanced mode, this data structure offers the user a view of the family tree at any desired level of resolution. Systematic comparisons with previous versions of ProtoNet are carried out. They show how our view of protein families evolves, as larger parts of the sequence space become known. ProtoNet 6.0 provides numerous tools to navigate the hierarchy of clusters.

  12. Xanthurenic acid translocates proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins into mitochondria and impairs mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hess Otto M

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xanthurenic acid is an endogenous molecule produced by tryptophan degradation, produced in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Its accumulation can be observed in aging-related diseases, e.g. senile cataract and infectious disease. We previously reported that xanthurenic acid provokes apoptosis, and now present a study of the response of mitochondria to xanthurenic acid. Results Xanthurenic acid at 10 or 20 μM in culture media of human aortic smooth muscle cells induces translocation of the proteins Bax, Bak, Bclxs, and Bad into mitochondria. In 20 μM xanthurenic acid, Bax is also translocated to the nucleus. In isolated mitochondria xanthurenic acid leads to Bax and Bclxs oligomerization, accumulation of Ca2+, and increased oxygen consumption. Conclusion Xanthurenic acid interacts directly with Bcl-2 family proteins, inducing mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis and impairing mitochondrial functions.

  13. T cell inactivation by poxviral B22 family proteins increases viral virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Alzhanova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Infections with monkeypox, cowpox and weaponized variola virus remain a threat to the increasingly unvaccinated human population, but little is known about their mechanisms of virulence and immune evasion. We now demonstrate that B22 proteins, encoded by the largest genes of these viruses, render human T cells unresponsive to stimulation of the T cell receptor by MHC-dependent antigen presentation or by MHC-independent stimulation. In contrast, stimuli that bypass TCR-signaling are not inhibited. In a non-human primate model of monkeypox, virus lacking the B22R homologue (MPXVΔ197 caused only mild disease with lower viremia and cutaneous pox lesions compared to wild type MPXV which caused high viremia, morbidity and mortality. Since MPXVΔ197-infected animals displayed accelerated T cell responses and less T cell dysregulation than MPXV US2003, we conclude that B22 family proteins cause viral virulence by suppressing T cell control of viral dissemination.

  14. The Aspergillus fumigatus Damage Resistance Protein Family Coordinately Regulates Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Azole Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Song

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ergosterol is a major and specific component of the fungal plasma membrane, and thus, the cytochrome P450 enzymes (Erg proteins that catalyze ergosterol synthesis have been selected as valuable targets of azole antifungals. However, the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus has developed worldwide resistance to azoles largely through mutations in the cytochrome P450 enzyme Cyp51 (Erg11. In this study, we demonstrate that a cytochrome b5-like heme-binding damage resistance protein (Dap family, comprised of DapA, DapB, and DapC, coordinately regulates the functionality of cytochrome P450 enzymes Erg5 and Erg11 and oppositely affects susceptibility to azoles. The expression of all three genes is induced in an azole concentration-dependent way, and the decreased susceptibility to azoles requires DapA stabilization of cytochrome P450 protein activity. In contrast, overexpression of DapB and DapC causes dysfunction of Erg5 and Erg11, resulting in abnormal accumulation of sterol intermediates and further accentuating the sensitivity of ΔdapA strains to azoles. The results of exogenous-hemin rescue and heme-binding-site mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that the heme binding of DapA contributes the decreased azole susceptibility, while DapB and -C are capable of reducing the activities of Erg5 and Erg11 through depletion of heme. In vivo data demonstrate that inactivated DapA combined with activated DapB yields an A. fumigatus mutant that is easily treatable with azoles in an immunocompromised mouse model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Compared to the single Dap proteins found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we suggest that this complex Dap family regulatory system emerged during the evolution of fungi as an adaptive means to regulate ergosterol synthesis in response to environmental stimuli.

  15. The RNPP family of quorum-sensing proteins in Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Estrada, Jorge; Aceves-Diez, Angel E; Guarneros, Gabriel; de la Torre, Mayra

    2010-07-01

    Quorum sensing is one of several mechanisms that bacterial cells use to interact with each other and coordinate certain physiological processes in response to cell density. This mechanism is mediated by extracellular signaling molecules; once a critical threshold concentration has been reached, a target sensor kinase or response regulator is activated (or repressed), facilitating the expression of quorum sensing-dependent genes. Gram-positive bacteria mostly use oligo-peptides as signaling molecules. These cells have a special kind of quorum-sensing systems in which the receptor protein interacts directly with its cognate signaling peptide. The receptors are either Rap phosphatases or transcriptional regulators and integrate the protein family RNPP, from Rap, Npr, PlcR, and PrgX. These quorum-sensing systems control several microbial processes, like sporulation, virulence, biofilm formation, conjugation, and production of extracellular enzymes. Insights of the mechanism of protein-signaling peptide binding as well as the molecular interaction among receptor protein, signaling peptide, and target DNA have changed some earlier perceptions. In spite of the increased knowledge and the potential biotechnological applications of these quorum-sensing systems, few examples on engineering for biotechnological applications have been published. Real applications will arise only when researchers working in applied microbiology and biotechnology are aware of the importance of quorum-sensing systems for health and bioprocess applications.

  16. The XMAP215-family protein DdCP224 is required for cortical interactions of microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hestermann Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions of peripheral microtubule tips with the cell cortex are of crucial importance for nuclear migration, spindle orientation, centrosome positioning and directional cell movement. Microtubule plus end binding proteins are thought to mediate interactions of microtubule tips with cortical actin and membrane proteins in a dynein-dependent manner. XMAP215-family proteins are main regulators of microtubule plus end dynamics but so far they have not been implicated in the interactions of microtubule tips with the cell cortex. Results Here we show that overexpression of an N-terminal fragment of DdCP224, the Dictyostelium XMAP215 homologue, caused a collapse of the radial microtubule cytoskeleton, whereby microtubules lost contact with the cell cortex and were dragged behind like a comet tail of an unusually motile centrosome. This phenotype was indistinguishable from mutants overexpressing fragments of the dynein heavy chain or intermediate chain. Moreover, it was accompanied by dispersal of the Golgi apparatus and reduced cortical localization of the dynein heavy chain indicating a disrupted dynein/dynactin interaction. The interference of DdCP224 with cortical dynein function is strongly supported by the observations that DdCP224 and its N-terminal fragment colocalize with dynein and coimmunoprecipitate with dynein and dynactin. Conclusions Our data show that XMAP215-like proteins are required for the interaction of microtubule plus ends with the cell cortex in interphase cells and strongly suggest that this function is mediated by dynein.

  17. Trichinella spiralis: genome database searches for the presence and immunolocalization of protein disulphide isomerase family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, C P; Clemente, I; Mendes, T; Novo, C

    2016-01-01

    The formation of nurse cells in host muscle cells during Trichinella spiralis infection is a key step in the infective mechanism. Collagen trimerization is set up via disulphide bond formation, catalysed by protein disulphide isomerase (PDI). In T. spiralis, some PDI family members have been identified but no localization is described and no antibodies specific for T. spiralis PDIs are available. In this work, computational approaches were used to search for non-described PDIs in the T. spiralis genome database and to check the cross-reactivity of commercial anti-human antibodies with T. spiralis orthologues. In addition to a previously described PDI (PDIA2), endoplasmic reticulum protein (ERp57/PDIA3), ERp72/PDIA4, and the molecular chaperones calreticulin (CRT), calnexin (CNX) and immunoglobulin-binding protein/glucose-regulated protein (BIP/GRP78), we identified orthologues of the human thioredoxin-related-transmembrane proteins (TMX1, TMX2 and TMX3) in the genome protein database, as well as ERp44 (PDIA10) and endoplasmic reticulum disulphide reductase (ERdj5/PDIA19). Immunocytochemical staining of paraffin sections of muscle infected by T. spiralis enabled us to localize some orthologues of the human PDIs (PDIA3 and TMX1) and the chaperone GRP78. A theoretical three-dimensional model for T. spiralis PDIA3 was constructed. The localization and characteristics of the predicted linear B-cell epitopes and amino acid sequence of the immunogens used for commercial production of anti-human PDIA3 antibodies validated the use of these antibodies for the immunolocalization of T. spiralis PDIA3 orthologues. These results suggest that further study of the role of the PDIs and chaperones during nurse cell formation is desirable.

  18. Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque 1818, Tetraspanin Membrane Protein Family: Characterization and Expression Analysis of CD81 cDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    CD81, also known as the target of an antiproliferative antibody 1 (TAPA-1), is a member of tetraspanin integral membrane protein family. This protein plays many important roles in immune functions. In this report, we characterized and analyzed expression of the channel catfish CD81 transcript. T...

  19. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Bcl-2 Family Proteins for Pancreatic Cancer Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masood, Ashiq; Azmi, Asfar S.; Mohammad, Ramzi M.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has a complex etiology and displays a wide range of cellular escape pathways that allow it to resist different treatment modalities. Crucial signaling molecules that function downstream of the survival pathways, particularly at points where several of these pathways crosstalk, provide valuable targets for the development of novel anti-cancer drugs. Bcl-2 family member proteins are anti-apoptotic molecules that are known to be overexpressed in most cancers including PC. The anti-apoptotic machinery has been linked to the observed resistance developed to chemotherapy and radiation and therefore is important from the targeted drug development point of view. Over the past ten years, our group has extensively studied a series of small molecule inhibitors of Bcl-2 against PC and provide solid preclinical platform for testing such novel drugs in the clinic. This review examines the efficacy, potency, and function of several small molecule inhibitor drugs targeted to the Bcl-2 family of proteins and their preclinical progress against PC. This article further focuses on compounds that have been studied the most and also discusses the anti-cancer potential of newer class of Bcl-2 drugs

  20. ADAM and ADAMTS Family Proteins and Snake Venom Metalloproteinases: A Structural Overview

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    Soichi Takeda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM family proteins constitute a major class of membrane-anchored multidomain proteinases that are responsible for the shedding of cell-surface protein ectodomains, including the latent forms of growth factors, cytokines, receptors and other molecules. Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs are major components in most viper venoms. SVMPs are primarily responsible for hemorrhagic activity and may also interfere with the hemostatic system in envenomed animals. SVMPs are phylogenetically most closely related to ADAMs and, together with ADAMs and related ADAM with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS family proteinases, constitute adamalysins/reprolysins or the M12B clan (MEROPS database of metalloproteinases. Although the catalytic domain structure is topologically similar to that of other metalloproteinases such as matrix metalloproteinases, the M12B proteinases have a modular structure with multiple non-catalytic ancillary domains that are not found in other proteinases. Notably, crystallographic studies revealed that, in addition to the conserved metalloproteinase domain, M12B members share a hallmark cysteine-rich domain designated as the “ADAM_CR” domain. Despite their name, ADAMTSs lack disintegrin-like structures and instead comprise two ADAM_CR domains. This review highlights the current state of our knowledge on the three-dimensional structures of M12B proteinases, focusing on their unique domains that may collaboratively participate in directing these proteinases to specific substrates.

  1. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha activates Src-family kinases and controls integrin-mediated responses in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Muranjan, M; Sap, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fyn and c-Src are two of the most widely expressed Src-family kinases. Both are strongly implicated in the control of cytoskeletal organization and in the generation of integrin-dependent signalling responses in fibroblasts. These proteins are representative of a large family of tyros......BACKGROUND: Fyn and c-Src are two of the most widely expressed Src-family kinases. Both are strongly implicated in the control of cytoskeletal organization and in the generation of integrin-dependent signalling responses in fibroblasts. These proteins are representative of a large family...... established, no corresponding phosphatases have been identified that, under physiological conditions, function as positive regulators of c-Src and Fyn in fibroblasts. RESULTS: Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) was inactivated by homologous recombination. Fibroblasts derived from...

  2. A conserved function in phosphatidylinositol metabolism for mammalian Vps13 family proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Sook Park

    Full Text Available The Vps13 protein family is highly conserved in eukaryotic cells. In humans, mutations in the gene encoding the family member VPS13A lead to the neurodegenerative disorder chorea-acanthocytosis. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, there is just a single version of VPS13, thereby simplifying the task of unraveling its molecular function(s. While VPS13 was originally identified in yeast by its role in vacuolar sorting, recent studies have revealed a completely different function for VPS13 in sporulation, where VPS13 regulates phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PtdIns(4P levels in the prospore membrane. This discovery raises the possibility that the disease phenotype associated with vps13A mutants in humans is due to misregulation of PtdIns(4P in membranes. To determine whether VPS13A affects PtdIns(4P in membranes from mammalian neuronal cells, phosphatidylinositol phosphate pools were compared in PC12 tissue culture cells in the absence or presence of VPS13A. Consistent with the yeast results, the localization of PtdIns(4P is specifically altered in VPS13A knockdown cells while other phosphatidylinositol phosphates appear unaffected. In addition, VPS13A is necessary to prevent the premature degeneration of neurites that develop in response to Nerve Growth Factor. The regulation of PtdIns(4P is therefore a conserved function of the Vps13 family and may play a role in the maintenance of neuronal processes in mammals.

  3. Plastid gene expression and plant development require a plastidic protein of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor family.

    OpenAIRE

    Babiychuk, Elena; Vandepoele, Klaas; Wissing, Josef; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; De Rycke, Riet; Akbari, Hana; Joubès, Jérôme; Beeckman, Tom; Jänsch, Lothar; Frentzen, Margrit; Van Montagu, Marc C E; Kushnir, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Plastids are DNA-containing organelles unique to plant cells. In Arabidopsis, one-third of the genes required for embryo development encode plastid-localized proteins. To help understand the role of plastids in embryogenesis and postembryonic development, we characterized proteins of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) family, which in animal models, comprises DNA-binding regulators of mitochondrial transcription. Of 35 Arabidopsis mTERF proteins, 11 are plastid-localiz...

  4. Primary structure of a multimeric protein, homologous to the PEP-utilizing enzyme family and isolated from a hyperthermophilic archaebacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicicopol, C; Peters, J; Kellermann, J; Baumeister, W

    1994-12-19

    A large protein complex (approx. 2000 kDa) was found in the cytosol of the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Staphylothermus marinus. The purified protein was shown to be a homomultimer of 93 kDa subunits, the primary structure of which was determined by nucleotide sequence analysis. The protein belongs to the family of phosphoenolpyruvate-utilizing enzymes and represents the first member characterized in archaebacteria. Its homomultimeric organisation differs from the typically dimeric structure of its eubacterial and eukaryotic counterparts.

  5. Expression of activator protein-1 (AP-1) family members in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharman-Biz, Amirhossein; Gao, Hui; Ghiasvand, Reza; Zhao, Chunyan; Zendehdel, Kazem; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor is believed to be important in tumorigenesis and altered AP-1 activity was associated with cell transformation. We aimed to assess the potential role of AP-1 family members as novel biomarkers in breast cancer. We studied the expression of AP-1 members at the mRNA level in 72 primary breast tumors and 37 adjacent non-tumor tissues and evaluated its correlation with clinicopathological parameters including estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2/neu status. Expression levels of Ubiquitin C (UBC) were used for normalization. Protein expression of AP-1 members was assessed using Western blot analysis in a subset of tumors. We used student’s t-test, one-way ANOVA, logistic regression and Pearson’s correlation coefficient for statistical analyses. We found significant differences in the expression of AP-1 family members between tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues for all AP-1 family members except Fos B. Fra-1, Fra-2, Jun-B and Jun-D mRNA levels were significantly higher in tumors compared to adjacent non-tumor tissues (p < 0.001), whilst c-Fos and c-Jun mRNA levels were significantly lower in tumors compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues (p < 0.001). In addition, Jun-B overexpression had outstanding discrimination ability to differentiate tumor tissues from adjacent non-tumor tissues as determined by ROC curve analysis. Moreover, Fra-1 was significantly overexpressed in the tumors biochemically classified as ERα negative (p = 0.012) and PR negative (p = 0.037). Interestingly, Fra-1 expression was significantly higher in triple-negative tumors compared with luminal carcinomas (p = 0.01). Expression levels of Fra-1 and Jun-B might be possible biomarkers for prognosis of breast cancer

  6. The C1q family of proteins: insights into the emerging non-traditional functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhane eGhebrehiwet

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Research conducted over the past 20 years have helped us unravel not only the hidden structural and functional subtleties of human C1q, but also has catapulted the molecule from a mere recognition unit of the classical pathway to a well-recognized molecular sensor of damage modified self or non-self antigens. Thus, C1q is involved in a rapidly expanding list of pathological disorders—including autoimmunity, trophoblast migration, preeclampsia and cancer. The results of two recent reports are provided to underscore the critical role C1q plays in health and disease. First is the observation by Singh and colleagues showing that pregnant C1q-/- mice recapitulate the key features of human preeclampsia that correlate with increased fetal death. Treatment of the C1q-/- mice with pravastatin restored trophoblast invasiveness, placental blood flow, and angiogenic balance and, thus, prevented the onset of preeclampsia. Second is the report by Hong et al., which showed that C1q can induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating the tumor suppressor molecule WW-domain containing oxydoreductase (WWOX or WOX1 and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q on the other hand enhanced prostate hyperplasia and cancer formation due to failure of WOX1 activation. Recent evidence also shows that C1q belongs to a family of structurally and functionally related TNFα-like family of proteins that may have arisen from a common ancestral gene. Therefore C1q not only shares the diverse functions with the TNF family of proteins, but also explains why C1q has retained some of its ancestral cytokine-like activities. This review is intended to highlight some of the structural and functional aspects of C1q by underscoring the growing list of its non-traditional functions.

  7. Crystal structures of catrocollastatin/VAP2B reveal a dynamic, modular architecture of ADAM/adamalysin/reprolysin family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Tomoko; Araki, Satohiko; Mori, Hidezo; Takeda, Soichi

    2007-05-29

    Catrocollastatin/vascular apoptosis-inducing protein (VAP)2B is a metalloproteinase from Crotalus atrox venom, possessing metalloproteinase/disintegrin/cysteine-rich (MDC) domains that bear the typical domain architecture of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)/adamalysin/reprolysin family proteins. Here we describe crystal structures of catrocollastatin/VAP2B in three different crystal forms, representing the first reported crystal structures of a member of the monomeric class of this family of proteins. The overall structures show good agreement with both monomers of atypical homodimeric VAP1. Comparison of the six catrocollastatin/VAP2B monomer structures and the structures of VAP1 reveals a dynamic, modular architecture that may be important for the functions of ADAM/adamalysin/reprolysin family proteins.

  8. Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein (MBD) Family: Epigenomic Read-Outs Functions and Roles in Tumorigenesis and Psychiatric Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Smith, Marilia Arruda Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics is the study of the heritable changes on gene expression that are responsible for the regulation of development and that have an impact on several diseases. However, it is of equal importance to understand how epigenetic machinery works. DNA methylation is the most studied epigenetic mark and is generally associated with the regulation of gene expression through the repression of promoter activity and by affecting genome stability. Therefore, the ability of the cell to interpret correct methylation marks and/or the correct interpretation of methylation plays a role in many diseases. The major family of proteins that bind methylated DNA is the methyl-CpG binding domain proteins, or the MBDs. Here, we discuss the structure that makes these proteins a family, the main functions and interactions of all protein family members and their role in human disease such as psychiatric disorders and cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Identification of Heat Shock Protein families and J-protein types by incorporating Dipeptide Composition into Chou's general PseAAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saeed; Kabir, Muhammad; Hayat, Maqsood

    2015-11-01

    Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) are the substantial ingredients for cell growth and viability, which are found in all living organisms. HSPs manage the process of folding and unfolding of proteins, the quality of newly synthesized proteins and protecting cellular homeostatic processes from environmental stress. On the basis of functionality, HSPs are categorized into six major families namely: (i) HSP20 or sHSP (ii) HSP40 or J-proteins types (iii) HSP60 or GroEL/ES (iv) HSP70 (v) HSP90 and (vi) HSP100. Identification of HSPs family and sub-family through conventional approaches is expensive and laborious. It is therefore, highly desired to establish an automatic, robust and accurate computational method for prediction of HSPs quickly and reliably. Regard, a computational model is developed for the prediction of HSPs family. In this model, protein sequences are formulated using three discrete methods namely: Split Amino Acid Composition, Pseudo Amino Acid Composition, and Dipeptide Composition. Several learning algorithms are utilized to choice the best one for high throughput computational model. Leave one out test is applied to assess the performance of the proposed model. The empirical results showed that support vector machine achieved quite promising results using Dipeptide Composition feature space. The predicted outcomes of proposed model are 90.7% accuracy for HSPs dataset and 97.04% accuracy for J-protein types, which are higher than existing methods in the literature so far. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Coat Protein and NIa Protease of Two Potyviridae Family Members Independently Confer Superinfection Exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; French, Roy

    2016-12-01

    Superinfection exclusion (SIE) is an antagonistic virus-virus interaction whereby initial infection by one virus prevents subsequent infection by closely related viruses. Although SIE has been described in diverse viruses infecting plants, humans, and animals, its mechanisms, including involvement of specific viral determinants, are just beginning to be elucidated. In this study, SIE determinants encoded by two economically important wheat viruses, Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV; genus Tritimovirus, family Potyviridae) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV; genus Poacevirus, family Potyviridae), were identified in gain-of-function experiments that used heterologous viruses to express individual virus-encoded proteins in wheat. Wheat plants infected with TriMV expressing WSMV P1, HC-Pro, P3, 6K1, CI, 6K2, NIa-VPg, or NIb cistrons permitted efficient superinfection by WSMV expressing green fluorescent protein (WSMV-GFP). In contrast, wheat infected with TriMV expressing WSMV NIa-Pro or coat protein (CP) substantially excluded superinfection by WSMV-GFP, suggesting that both of these cistrons are SIE effectors encoded by WSMV. Importantly, SIE is due to functional WSMV NIa-Pro or CP rather than their encoding RNAs, as altering the coded protein products by minimally changing RNA sequences led to abolishment of SIE. Deletion mutagenesis further revealed that elicitation of SIE by NIa-Pro requires the entire protein while CP requires only a 200-amino-acid (aa) middle fragment (aa 101 to 300) of the 349 aa. Strikingly, reciprocal experiments with WSMV-mediated expression of TriMV proteins showed that TriMV CP, and TriMV NIa-Pro to a lesser extent, likewise excluded superinfection by TriMV-GFP. Collectively, these data demonstrate that WSMV- and TriMV-encoded CP and NIa-Pro proteins are effectors of SIE and that these two proteins trigger SIE independently of each other. Superinfection exclusion (SIE) is an antagonistic virus-virus interaction that prevents secondary

  11. Improved detection of remote homologues using cascade PSI-BLAST: influence of neighbouring protein families on sequence coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Swati; Mutt, Eshita; Chellappan, Ajithavalli; Sankaran, Sandhya; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2013-01-01

    Development of sensitive sequence search procedures for the detection of distant relationships between proteins at superfamily/fold level is still a big challenge. The intermediate sequence search approach is the most frequently employed manner of identifying remote homologues effectively. In this study, examination of serine proteases of prolyl oligopeptidase, rhomboid and subtilisin protein families were carried out using plant serine proteases as queries from two genomes including A. thaliana and O. sativa and 13 other families of unrelated folds to identify the distant homologues which could not be obtained using PSI-BLAST. We have proposed to start with multiple queries of classical serine protease members to identify remote homologues in families, using a rigorous approach like Cascade PSI-BLAST. We found that classical sequence based approaches, like PSI-BLAST, showed very low sequence coverage in identifying plant serine proteases. The algorithm was applied on enriched sequence database of homologous domains and we obtained overall average coverage of 88% at family, 77% at superfamily or fold level along with specificity of ~100% and Mathew's correlation coefficient of 0.91. Similar approach was also implemented on 13 other protein families representing every structural class in SCOP database. Further investigation with statistical tests, like jackknifing, helped us to better understand the influence of neighbouring protein families. Our study suggests that employment of multiple queries of a family for the Cascade PSI-BLAST searches is useful for predicting distant relationships effectively even at superfamily level. We have proposed a generalized strategy to cover all the distant members of a particular family using multiple query sequences. Our findings reveal that prior selection of sequences as query and the presence of neighbouring families can be important for covering the search space effectively in minimal computational time. This study also

  12. Improved detection of remote homologues using cascade PSI-BLAST: influence of neighbouring protein families on sequence coverage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Kaushik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of sensitive sequence search procedures for the detection of distant relationships between proteins at superfamily/fold level is still a big challenge. The intermediate sequence search approach is the most frequently employed manner of identifying remote homologues effectively. In this study, examination of serine proteases of prolyl oligopeptidase, rhomboid and subtilisin protein families were carried out using plant serine proteases as queries from two genomes including A. thaliana and O. sativa and 13 other families of unrelated folds to identify the distant homologues which could not be obtained using PSI-BLAST. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have proposed to start with multiple queries of classical serine protease members to identify remote homologues in families, using a rigorous approach like Cascade PSI-BLAST. We found that classical sequence based approaches, like PSI-BLAST, showed very low sequence coverage in identifying plant serine proteases. The algorithm was applied on enriched sequence database of homologous domains and we obtained overall average coverage of 88% at family, 77% at superfamily or fold level along with specificity of ~100% and Mathew's correlation coefficient of 0.91. Similar approach was also implemented on 13 other protein families representing every structural class in SCOP database. Further investigation with statistical tests, like jackknifing, helped us to better understand the influence of neighbouring protein families. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study suggests that employment of multiple queries of a family for the Cascade PSI-BLAST searches is useful for predicting distant relationships effectively even at superfamily level. We have proposed a generalized strategy to cover all the distant members of a particular family using multiple query sequences. Our findings reveal that prior selection of sequences as query and the presence of neighbouring families can be important for

  13. The Drosophila DOCK family protein Sponge is required for development of the air sac primordium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, Kazushge; Anh Suong, Dang Ngoc; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu, E-mail: myamaguc@kit.ac.jp

    2017-05-15

    Dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) family genes are known as DOCK1-DOCK11 in mammals. DOCK family proteins mainly regulate actin filament polymerization and/or depolymerization and are GEF proteins, which contribute to cellular signaling events by activating small G proteins. Sponge (Spg) is a Drosophila counterpart to mammalian DOCK3/DOCK4, and plays a role in embryonic central nervous system development, R7 photoreceptor cell differentiation, and adult thorax development. In order to conduct further functional analyses on Spg in vivo, we examined its localization in third instar larval wing imaginal discs. Immunostaining with purified anti-Spg IgG revealed that Spg mainly localized in the air sac primordium (ASP) in wing imaginal discs. Spg is therefore predicted to play an important role in the ASP. The specific knockdown of Spg by the breathless-GAL4 driver in tracheal cells induced lethality accompanied with a defect in ASP development and the induction of apoptosis. The monitoring of ERK signaling activity in wing imaginal discs by immunostaining with anti-diphospho-ERK IgG revealed reductions in the ERK signal cascade in Spg knockdown clones. Furthermore, the overexpression of D-raf suppressed defects in survival and the proliferation of cells in the ASP induced by the knockdown of Spg. Collectively, these results indicate that Spg plays a critical role in ASP development and tracheal cell viability that is mediated by the ERK signaling pathway. - Highlights: • Spg mainly localizes in the air sac primordium in wing imaginal discs. • Spg plays a critical role in air sac primordium development. • Spg positively regulates the ERK signal cascade.

  14. Modeling of folds and folding pathways for some protein families of (α + β)- and (α/β)-classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, Alexey B; Efimov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, updated structural trees for α/β-proteins containing five- and seven-segment (α/β)-motifs are represented. Novel structural motifs occurring in some families of (α + β)- and (α/β)-proteins are also characterized. Databases of these proteins have been compiled from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) and the corresponding structural trees have been constructed. The classification of these proteins has been developed and organized as an extension of the PCBOST database, which is available at http://strees.protres.ru . In total, the updated Protein Classification Based on Structural Trees database contains 11 structural trees, 106 levels, 635 folds, 4911 proteins and domains, and 14,202 PDB entries.

  15. Insight into the evolution of the histidine triad protein (HTP) family in Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhu-Qing; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Pan, Xiu-Zhen; Wang, Bin; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2013-01-01

    The Histidine Triad Proteins (HTPs), also known as Pht proteins in Streptococcus pneumoniae, constitute a family of surface-exposed proteins that exist in many pathogenic streptococcal species. Although many studies have revealed the importance of HTPs in streptococcal physiology and pathogenicity, little is known about their origin and evolution. In this study, after identifying all htp homologs from 105 streptococcal genomes representing 38 different species/subspecies, we analyzed their domain structures, positions in genome, and most importantly, their evolutionary histories. By further projecting this information onto the streptococcal phylogeny, we made several major findings. First, htp genes originated earlier than the Streptococcus genus and gene-loss events have occurred among three streptococcal groups, resulting in the absence of the htp gene in the Bovis, Mutans and Salivarius groups. Second, the copy number of htp genes in other groups of Streptococcus is variable, ranging from one to four functional copies. Third, both phylogenetic evidence and domain structure analyses support the division of two htp subfamilies, designated as htp I and htp II. Although present mainly in the pyogenic group and in Streptococcus suis, htp II members are distinct from htp I due to the presence of an additional leucine-rich-repeat domain at the C-terminus. Finally, htp genes exhibit a faster nucleotide substitution rate than do housekeeping genes. Specifically, the regions outside the HTP domains are under strong positive selection. This distinct evolutionary pattern likely helped Streptococcus to easily escape from recognition by host immunity.

  16. Insight into the evolution of the histidine triad protein (HTP family in Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu-Qing Shao

    Full Text Available The Histidine Triad Proteins (HTPs, also known as Pht proteins in Streptococcus pneumoniae, constitute a family of surface-exposed proteins that exist in many pathogenic streptococcal species. Although many studies have revealed the importance of HTPs in streptococcal physiology and pathogenicity, little is known about their origin and evolution. In this study, after identifying all htp homologs from 105 streptococcal genomes representing 38 different species/subspecies, we analyzed their domain structures, positions in genome, and most importantly, their evolutionary histories. By further projecting this information onto the streptococcal phylogeny, we made several major findings. First, htp genes originated earlier than the Streptococcus genus and gene-loss events have occurred among three streptococcal groups, resulting in the absence of the htp gene in the Bovis, Mutans and Salivarius groups. Second, the copy number of htp genes in other groups of Streptococcus is variable, ranging from one to four functional copies. Third, both phylogenetic evidence and domain structure analyses support the division of two htp subfamilies, designated as htp I and htp II. Although present mainly in the pyogenic group and in Streptococcus suis, htp II members are distinct from htp I due to the presence of an additional leucine-rich-repeat domain at the C-terminus. Finally, htp genes exhibit a faster nucleotide substitution rate than do housekeeping genes. Specifically, the regions outside the HTP domains are under strong positive selection. This distinct evolutionary pattern likely helped Streptococcus to easily escape from recognition by host immunity.

  17. CGRP Receptor Family and Accessory Protein Localization: Implications for Predicted Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.R. Oliver

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, adrenomedullin, amylin, and calcitonin are functionally related neuropeptides. Certain of these peptides mediate their action through receptors which have common components, such as the receptor activity modifying proteins (RAMPs and CGRP-receptor component protein, as well as possibly through other distinct receptors. Specifically, the molecular pharmacology of CGRP and adrenomedullin is determined by coexpression of one of three receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs with calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR. Additionally, through formation of another hetero-oligomer, RAMPs also govern the pharmacology of the calcitonin receptor, which in association with RAMP1 or RAMP3, binds amylin with high affinity. We have used multiple approaches to discern the regional and cellular expression of these various receptor components and binding sites for the above neuropeptides in multiple species and in different tissues. Techniques applied include in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and radioligand autoradiography. These data allow further understanding of both the complexity of receptor-receptor component and receptor-ligand interactions in vivo. Interestingly, these localization data suggest that RAMPs may interact with receptors additional to those already identified for the CGRP family and may be involved in binding innate neuropeptides or other neurotransmitters which are not members of the calcitonin gene-related peptide fam

  18. Distinct roles of the RasGAP family proteins in C. elegans associative learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyurkó, M Dávid; Csermely, Péter; Sőti, Csaba; Steták, Attila

    2015-10-15

    The Ras GTPase activating proteins (RasGAPs) are regulators of the conserved Ras/MAPK pathway. Various roles of some of the RasGAPs in learning and memory have been reported in different model systems, yet, there is no comprehensive study to characterize all gap genes in any organism. Here, using reverse genetics and neurobehavioural tests, we studied the role of all known genes of the rasgap family in C. elegans in associative learning and memory. We demonstrated that their proteins are implicated in different parts of the learning and memory processes. We show that gap-1 contribute redundantly with gap-3 to the chemosensation of volatile compounds, gap-1 plays a major role in associative learning, while gap-2 and gap-3 are predominantly required for short- and long-term associative memory. Our results also suggest that the C. elegans Ras orthologue let-60 is involved in multiple processes during learning and memory. Thus, we show that the different classes of RasGAP proteins are all involved in cognitive function and their complex interplay ensures the proper formation and storage of novel information in C. elegans.

  19. An IgaA/UmoB Family Protein from Serratia marcescens Regulates Motility, Capsular Polysaccharide Biosynthesis, and Secondary Metabolite Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Nicholas A; Brothers, Kimberly M; Callaghan, Jake D; Passerini, Angelina M; Sigindere, Cihad; Hill, Preston J; Liu, Xinyu; Wozniak, Daniel J; Shanks, Robert M Q

    2018-03-15

    Secondary metabolites are an important source of pharmaceuticals and key modulators of microbe-microbe interactions. The bacterium Serratia marcescens is part of the Enterobacteriaceae family of eubacteria and produces a number of biologically active secondary metabolites. In this study, we screened for novel regulators of secondary metabolites synthesized by a clinical isolate of S. marcescens and found mutations in a gene for an uncharacterized UmoB/IgaA family member here named gumB Mutation of gumB conferred a severe loss of the secondary metabolites prodigiosin and serratamolide. The gumB mutation conferred pleiotropic phenotypes, including altered biofilm formation, highly increased capsular polysaccharide production, and loss of swimming and swarming motility. These phenotypes corresponded to transcriptional changes in fimA , wecA , and flhD Unlike other UmoB/IgaA family members, gumB was found to be not essential for growth in S. marcescens , yet igaA from Salmonella enterica , yrfF from Escherichia coli , and an uncharacterized predicted ortholog from Klebsiella pneumoniae complemented the gumB mutant secondary metabolite defects, suggesting highly conserved function. These data support the idea that UmoB/IgaA family proteins are functionally conserved and extend the known regulatory influence of UmoB/IgaA family proteins to the control of competition-associated secondary metabolites and biofilm formation. IMPORTANCE IgaA/UmoB family proteins are found in members of the Enterobacteriaceae family of bacteria, which are of environmental and public health importance. IgaA/UmoB family proteins are thought to be inner membrane proteins that report extracellular stresses to intracellular signaling pathways that respond to environmental challenge. This study introduces a new member of the IgaA/UmoB family and demonstrates a high degree of functional similarity between IgaA/UmoB family proteins. Moreover, this study extends the phenomena controlled by Iga

  20. Comparative genomics of the family Vibrionaceae reveals the wide distribution of genes encoding virulence-associated proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Hong

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species of the family Vibrionaceae are ubiquitous in marine environments. Several of these species are important pathogens of humans and marine species. Evidence indicates that genetic exchange plays an important role in the emergence of new pathogenic strains within this family. Data from the sequenced genomes of strains in this family could show how the genes encoded by all these strains, known as the pangenome, are distributed. Information about the core, accessory and panproteome of this family can show how, for example, genes encoding virulence-associated proteins are distributed and help us understand how virulence emerges. Results We deduced the complete set of orthologs for eleven strains from this family. The core proteome consists of 1,882 orthologous groups, which is 28% of the 6,629 orthologous groups in this family. There were 4,411 accessory orthologous groups (i.e., proteins that occurred in from 2 to 10 proteomes and 5,584 unique proteins (encoded once on only one of the eleven genomes. Proteins that have been associated with virulence in V. cholerae were widely distributed across the eleven genomes, but the majority was found only on the genomes of the two V. cholerae strains examined. Conclusions The proteomes are reflective of the differing evolutionary trajectories followed by different strains to similar phenotypes. The composition of the proteomes supports the notion that genetic exchange among species of the Vibrionaceae is widespread and that this exchange aids these species in adapting to their environments.

  1. The MRJP/YELLOW protein family of Apis mellifera: identification of new members in the EST library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Stefan; Klaudiny, Jaroslav

    2004-01-01

    Major royal jelly proteins (named MRJP1-5) of honeybee (Apis mellifera), yellow proteins of Drosophila, together with putative proteins found in several bacteria, form a protein family termed the MRJP/yellow family. Members of the family exert diverse physiological functions and amongst eukaryotes appear to be restricted to the order Insecta. MRJPs constitute about 90% of total protein of royal jelly, which is secreted by nurse bees to feed the queen and growing larvae. We looked for mrjp and yellow homologues in a honeybee brain expressed sequence tags (EST) library. In addition to the five mrjp cDNAs previously characterized, we found three additional cDNAs encoding novel MRJPs and importantly, two cDNAs coding for orthologues of Drosophila yellow proteins. One yellow cDNA and all three cDNAs coding for the novel MRJPs were assembled completely, the sequence of the other yellow homologue was partially assembled. The data we present here supports the view that repeated duplications and functional divergence occurred during the evolution of MRJPs in honeybees, with even closely related MRJPs appearing to perform diverse physiological functions. Conversely, yellow protein orthologues appear to be conserved and thus candidates for maintaining the former function(s) of yellow proteins.

  2. Transcriptomic and biochemical analyses identify a family of chlorhexidine efflux proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Karl A.; Jackson, Scott M.; Penesyan, Anahit; Patching, Simon G.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Brown, Melissa H.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Paulsen, Ian. T.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorhexidine is widely used as an antiseptic or disinfectant in both hospital and community settings. A number of bacterial species display resistance to this membrane-active biocide. We examined the transcriptomic response of a representative nosocomial human pathogen, Acinetobacter baumannii, to chlorhexidine to identify the primary chlorhexidine resistance elements. The most highly up-regulated genes encoded components of a major multidrug efflux system, AdeAB. The next most highly overexpressed gene under chlorhexidine stress was annotated as encoding a hypothetical protein, named here as AceI. Orthologs of the aceI gene are conserved within the genomes of a broad range of proteobacterial species. Expression of aceI or its orthologs from several other γ- or β-proteobacterial species in Escherichia coli resulted in significant increases in resistance to chlorhexidine. Additionally, disruption of the aceI ortholog in Acinetobacter baylyi rendered it more susceptible to chlorhexidine. The AceI protein was localized to the membrane after overexpression in E. coli. This protein was purified, and binding assays demonstrated direct and specific interactions between AceI and chlorhexidine. Transport assays using [14C]-chlorhexidine determined that AceI was able to mediate the energy-dependent efflux of chlorhexidine. An E15Q AceI mutant with a mutation in a conserved acidic residue, although unable to mediate chlorhexidine resistance and transport, was still able to bind chlorhexidine. Taken together, these data are consistent with AceI being an active chlorhexidine efflux protein and the founding member of a family of bacterial drug efflux transporters. PMID:24277845

  3. A mosquito hemolymph odorant-binding protein family member specifically binds juvenile hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Hwan; Pham, Van; Jablonka, Willy; Goodman, Walter G.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2017-07-27

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of insect development and reproduction. In adult mosquitoes, it is essential for maturation of the ovary and normal male reproductive behavior, but how JH distribution and activity is regulated after secretion is unclear. Here, we report a new type of specific JH-binding protein, given the name mosquito juvenile hormone-binding protein (mJHBP), which circulates in the hemolymph of pupal and adult Aedes aegypti males and females. mJHBP is a member of the odorant-binding protein (OBP) family, and orthologs are present in the genomes of Aedes, Culex, and Anopheles mosquito species. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that mJHBP specifically binds JH II and JH III but not eicosanoids or JH derivatives. mJHBP was crystallized in the presence of JH III and found to have a double OBP domain structure reminiscent of salivary “long” D7 proteins of mosquitoes. We observed that a single JH III molecule is contained in the N-terminal domain binding pocket that is closed in an apparent conformational change by a C-terminal domain-derived α-helix. The electron density for the ligand indicated a high occupancy of the natural 10R enantiomer of JH III. Of note, mJHBP is structurally unrelated to hemolymph JHBP from lepidopteran insects. A low level of expression of mJHBP in Ae. aegypti larvae suggests that it is primarily active during the adult stage where it could potentially influence the effects of JH on egg development, mating behavior, feeding, or other processes.

  4. Structural basis for antagonizing a host restriction factor by C7 family of poxvirus host-range proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Krumm, Brian; Li, Yongchao; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Human sterile alpha motif domain-containing 9 (SAMD9) protein is a host restriction factor for poxviruses, but it can be overcome by some poxvirus host-range proteins that share homology with vaccinia virus C7 protein. To understand the mechanism of action for this important family of host-range factors, we determined the crystal structures of C7 and myxoma virus M64, a C7 family member that is unable to antagonize SAMD9. Despite their different functions and only 23% sequence identity, the two proteins have very similar overall structures, displaying a previously unidentified fold comprised of a compact 12-stranded antiparallel β-sandwich wrapped in two short α helices. Extensive structure-guided mutagenesis of C7 identified three loops clustered on one edge of the β sandwich as critical for viral replication and binding with SAMD9. The loops are characterized with functionally important negatively charged, positively charged, and hydrophobic residues, respectively, together forming a unique "three-fingered molecular claw." The key residues of the claw are not conserved in two C7 family members that do not antagonize SAMD9 but are conserved in distantly related C7 family members from four poxvirus genera that infect diverse mammalian species. Indeed, we found that all in the latter group of proteins bind SAMD9. Taken together, our data indicate that diverse mammalian poxviruses use a conserved molecular claw in a C7-like protein to target SAMD9 and overcome host restriction.

  5. The Atg8 Family of Proteins-Modulating Shape and Functionality of Autophagic Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahzadeh, Iman; Schwarten, Melanie; Gensch, Thomas; Willbold, Dieter; Weiergräber, Oliver H

    2017-01-01

    Aging is a multifactorial process involving an accumulation of alterations on various organizational levels, which finally compromises viability and limits the lifespan of organisms. It is now well-established that many aspects of aging can be positively affected by (macro)autophagy, a mechanism of self-digestion found in virtually all eukaryotic cells. A comprehensive understanding of autophagy is thus expected to not only deepen our insight into the mechanisms of aging but to also open up new avenues toward increasing the healthy lifespan in humans. In this review, we focus on the Atg8 family of ubiquitin-like proteins, which play a crucial role in the autophagy process by virtue of their unique mode of reversible membrane association.

  6. Comparative evaluation of low-molecular-mass proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies members of the ESAT-6 family as immunodominant T-cell antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt, R L; Oettinger, T; Rosenkrands, I

    2000-01-01

    ), and the well-described ESAT-6 antigen. Genetic analyses demonstrated that TB10.4 as well as CFP10 belongs to the ESAT-6 family of low-mass proteins, whereas TB7.3 is a low-molecular-mass protein outside this family. The proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their immunogenicity was tested...

  7. LowMACA: exploiting protein family analysis for the identification of rare driver mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melloni, Giorgio E M; de Pretis, Stefano; Riva, Laura; Pelizzola, Mattia; Céol, Arnaud; Costanza, Jole; Müller, Heiko; Zammataro, Luca

    2016-02-09

    The increasing availability of resequencing data has led to a better understanding of the most important genes in cancer development. Nevertheless, the mutational landscape of many tumor types is heterogeneous and encompasses a long tail of potential driver genes that are systematically excluded by currently available methods due to the low frequency of their mutations. We developed LowMACA (Low frequency Mutations Analysis via Consensus Alignment), a method that combines the mutations of various proteins sharing the same functional domains to identify conserved residues that harbor clustered mutations in multiple sequence alignments. LowMACA is designed to visualize and statistically assess potential driver genes through the identification of their mutational hotspots. We analyzed the Ras superfamily exploiting the known driver mutations of the trio K-N-HRAS, identifying new putative driver mutations and genes belonging to less known members of the Rho, Rab and Rheb subfamilies. Furthermore, we applied the same concept to a list of known and candidate driver genes, and observed that low confidence genes show similar patterns of mutation compared to high confidence genes of the same protein family. LowMACA is a software for the identification of gain-of-function mutations in putative oncogenic families, increasing the amount of information on functional domains and their possible role in cancer. In this context LowMACA emphasizes the role of genes mutated at low frequency otherwise undetectable by classical single gene analysis. LowMACA is an R package available at http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/LowMACA.html. It is also available as a GUI standalone downloadable at: https://cgsb.genomics.iit.it/wiki/projects/LowMACA.

  8. F-BAR family proteins, emerging regulators for cell membrane dynamic changes-from structure to human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Suxuan; Xiong, Xinyu; Zhao, Xianxian; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Hong

    2015-05-09

    Eukaryotic cell membrane dynamics change in curvature during physiological and pathological processes. In the past ten years, a novel protein family, Fes/CIP4 homology-Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (F-BAR) domain proteins, has been identified to be the most important coordinators in membrane curvature regulation. The F-BAR domain family is a member of the Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain superfamily that is associated with dynamic changes in cell membrane. However, the molecular basis in membrane structure regulation and the biological functions of F-BAR protein are unclear. The pathophysiological role of F-BAR protein is unknown. This review summarizes the current understanding of structure and function in the BAR domain superfamily, classifies F-BAR family proteins into nine subfamilies based on domain structure, and characterizes F-BAR protein structure, domain interaction, and functional relevance. In general, F-BAR protein binds to cell membrane via F-BAR domain association with membrane phospholipids and initiates membrane curvature and scission via Src homology-3 (SH3) domain interaction with its partner proteins. This process causes membrane dynamic changes and leads to seven important cellular biological functions, which include endocytosis, phagocytosis, filopodium, lamellipodium, cytokinesis, adhesion, and podosome formation, via distinct signaling pathways determined by specific domain-binding partners. These cellular functions play important roles in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. We further summarize F-BAR protein expression and mutation changes observed in various diseases and developmental disorders. Considering the structure feature and functional implication of F-BAR proteins, we anticipate that F-BAR proteins modulate physiological and pathophysiological processes via transferring extracellular materials, regulating cell trafficking and mobility, presenting antigens, mediating extracellular matrix degradation, and transmitting

  9. A member of the CPW-WPC protein family is expressed in and localized to the surface of developing ookinetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangwanrangsan, Niwat; Tachibana, Mayumi; Jenwithisuk, Rachaneeporn; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Riengrojpitak, Suda; Torii, Motomi; Ishino, Tomoko

    2013-04-15

    Despite the development of malaria control programs, billions of people are still at risk for this infectious disease. Recently, the idea of the transmission-blocking vaccine, which works by interrupting the infection of mosquitoes by parasites, has gained attention as a promising strategy for malaria control and eradication. To date, a limited number of surface proteins have been identified in mosquito-stage parasites and investigated as potential targets for transmission-blocking vaccines. Therefore, for the development of effective transmission-blocking strategies in epidemic areas, it is necessary to identify novel zygote/ookinete surface proteins as candidate antigens. Since the expression of many zygote/ookinete proteins is regulated post-transcriptionally, proteins that are regulated by well-known translational mediators were focused. Through in silico screening, CPW-WPC family proteins were selected as potential zygote/ookinete surface proteins. All experiments were performed in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium yoelii XNL. mRNA and protein expression profiles were examined by RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively, over the course of the life cycle of the malaria parasite. Protein function was also investigated by the generation of gene-disrupted transgenic parasites. The CPW-WPC protein family, named after the unique WxC repeat domains, is highly conserved among Plasmodium species. It is revealed that CPW-WPC mRNA transcripts are transcribed in gametocytes, while CPW-WPC proteins are expressed in zygote/ookinete-stage parasites. Localization analysis reveals that one of the CPW-WPC family members, designated as PyCPW-WPC-1, is a novel zygote/ookinete stage-specific surface protein. Targeted disruption of the pycpw-wpc-1 gene caused no obvious defects during ookinete and oocyst formation, suggesting that PyCPW-WPC-1 is not essential for mosquito-stage parasite development. It is demonstrated that PyCPW-WPC-1 can be classified as a novel, post

  10. Clan CD of cysteine peptidases as an example of evolutionary divergences in related protein families across plant clades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Ines; Garcia, Francisco J; Martinez, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses are powerful tools that can be used to analyze the presence, conservation, and evolution of protein families and to elucidate issues concerning their function. To deal with these questions, we have chosen the clan CD of cysteine peptidases, which is formed by different protein families that play key roles in plants. An evolutionary comparative analysis of clan CD cysteine peptidases in representative species of different taxonomic groups that appeared during the evolution of the Viridiplantae was performed. The results obtained indicates: i) C13 GPI:protein transamidases, C14 metacaspases I, and C50 separases are present in all taxonomic groups; ii) C13 legumains and C14 metacaspases II are absent in some basal algae groups; iii) C11 clostripains have only been found in the two Chlorophyceae species; iv) C25 gingipains and C80 RTX toxins have not been found in plants. Moreover, gene duplication events could have been associated in some families to the increasing complexities acquired in land plants. These findings have demonstrated that comparative genomics is useful to provide valuable insights on the differential evolution of the related peptidase families belonging to clan CD in plant clades. The low number of protein members suggests a restricted physiological role for these peptidase families, mainly in algae species.

  11. Identification of an AP2-family protein that is critical for malaria liver stage development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiroh Iwanaga

    Full Text Available Liver-stage malaria parasites are a promising target for drugs and vaccines against malaria infection. However, little is currently known about gene regulation in this stage. In this study, we used the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei and showed that an AP2-family transcription factor, designated AP2-L, plays a critical role in the liver-stage development of the parasite. AP2-L-depleted parasites proliferated normally in blood and in mosquitoes. However, the ability of these parasites to infect the liver was approximately 10,000 times lower than that of wild-type parasites. In vitro assays showed that the sporozoites of these parasites invaded hepatocytes normally but that their development stopped in the middle of the liver schizont stage. Expression profiling using transgenic P. berghei showed that fluorescent protein-tagged AP2-L increased rapidly during the liver schizont stage but suddenly disappeared with the formation of the mature liver schizont. DNA microarray analysis showed that the expression of several genes, including those of parasitophorous vacuole membrane proteins, was significantly decreased in the early liver stage of AP2-L-depleted parasites. Investigation of the targets of this transcription factor should greatly promote the exploration of liver-stage antigens and the elucidation of the mechanisms of hepatocyte infection by malaria parasites.

  12. Molecular cloning and expression of the transformation sensitive epithelial marker stratifin. A member of a protein family that has been involved in the protein kinase C signalling pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leffers, H; Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H

    1993-01-01

    tissues showed that polypeptides comigrating with proteins 9124, 9125 and 9126 are ubiquitous and highly expressed in the brain. Stratifin, however, was present only in cultured epithelial cells and was most abundant in fetal and adult human tissues enriched in stratified squamous keratinising epithelium......We have identified a family of abundant acidic human keratinocyte proteins with apparent molecular masses ranging between 30,000 and 31,100 (isoelectric focussing sample spot proteins 9109 (epithelial marker stratifin), 9124, 9125, 9126 and 9231 in the master two-dimensional gel database of human...

  13. Automatic discovery of cross-family sequence features associated with protein function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krings Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methods for predicting protein function directly from amino acid sequences are useful tools in the study of uncharacterised protein families and in comparative genomics. Until now, this problem has been approached using machine learning techniques that attempt to predict membership, or otherwise, to predefined functional categories or subcellular locations. A potential drawback of this approach is that the human-designated functional classes may not accurately reflect the underlying biology, and consequently important sequence-to-function relationships may be missed. Results We show that a self-supervised data mining approach is able to find relationships between sequence features and functional annotations. No preconceived ideas about functional categories are required, and the training data is simply a set of protein sequences and their UniProt/Swiss-Prot annotations. The main technical aspect of the approach is the co-evolution of amino acid-based regular expressions and keyword-based logical expressions with genetic programming. Our experiments on a strictly non-redundant set of eukaryotic proteins reveal that the strongest and most easily detected sequence-to-function relationships are concerned with targeting to various cellular compartments, which is an area already well studied both experimentally and computationally. Of more interest are a number of broad functional roles which can also be correlated with sequence features. These include inhibition, biosynthesis, transcription and defence against bacteria. Despite substantial overlaps between these functions and their corresponding cellular compartments, we find clear differences in the sequence motifs used to predict some of these functions. For example, the presence of polyglutamine repeats appears to be linked more strongly to the "transcription" function than to the general "nuclear" function/location. Conclusion We have developed a novel and useful approach for

  14. The effect of phosphorylation on the salt-tolerance-related functions of the soybean protein PM18, a member of the group-3 LEA protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Yang, Meiyan; Cheng, Hua; Sun, Nan; Liu, Simu; Li, Shuiming; Wang, Yong; Zheng, Yizhi; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2017-11-01

    Enzymatically driven post-translated modifications (PTMs) usually happen within the intrinsically disordered regions of a target protein and can modulate variety of protein functions. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a family of the plant intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Despite their important roles in plant stress response, there is currently limited knowledge on the presence and functional and structural effects of phosphorylation on LEA proteins. In this study, we identified three phosphorylation sites (Ser 90 , Tyr 136 , and Thr 266 ) in the soybean PM18 protein that belongs to the group-3 LEA proteins. In yeast expression system, PM18 protein increased the salt tolerance of yeast, and the phosphorylation of this protein further enhanced its protective function. Further analysis revealed that Ser 90 and Tyr 136 are more important than Thr 266 , and these two sites might work cooperatively in regulating the salt resistance function of PM18. The circular dichroism analysis showed that PM18 protein was disordered in aqueous media, and phosphorylation did not affect the disordered status of this protein. However, phosphorylation promoted formation of more helical structure in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or trifluoroethanol (TFE). Furthermore, in dedicated in vitro experiments, phosphorylated PM18 protein was able to better protect lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the inactivation induced by the freeze-thaw cycles than its un- or dephosphorylated forms. All these data indicate that phosphorylation may have regulatory effects on the stress-tolerance-related function of LEA proteins. Therefore, further studies are needed to shed more light on functional and structural roles of phosphorylation in LEA proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Differential regulation of plasma proteins between members of a family with homozygous HbE and HbEβ-thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchismita Halder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this report we’ve compared the plasma protein profiles of 4 individuals in a family. Father and the younger son both are hemoglobin (Hb Eβ-thalassemic {Cod 26 (G-A/IVS 1- 5 (G-C}, but the father never requires transfusion, whereas the younger son requires monthly blood transfusion. Mother and the elder son are HbEE {Cod 26 (G-A/Cod 26 (GA} without any history of transfusion. Proteomic study was done on the plasma fraction of the blood following ammonium sulphate precipitation. Proteins were separated by 2D-gel electrophoresis, expression of proteins compared by densitometry and proteins identified by tandem MALDI mass spectrometry. Proteins responsible in hemolysis, hypercoagulation and hemoglobin scavenging have shown differential regulation, establishing the relation between the differences in the levels of plasma proteins with the progression of the disease phenotype, manifested in the extent of transfusion dependence of the patient.

  16. Two ancient bacterial-like PPP family phosphatases from Arabidopsis are highly conserved plant proteins that possess unique properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2011-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases, is a cornerstone of cellular signaling and regulation. Since their discovery, protein phosphatases have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with specificity that rivals their counteracting kinase partners. However, despite years of focused characterization in mammalian and yeast systems, many protein phosphatases in plants remain poorly or incompletely characterized. Here, we describe a bioinformatic, biochemical, and cellular examination of an ancient, Bacterial-like subclass of the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family designated the Shewanella-like protein phosphatases (SLP phosphatases). The SLP phosphatase subcluster is highly conserved in all plants, mosses, and green algae, with members also found in select fungi, protists, and bacteria. As in other plant species, the nucleus-encoded Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SLP phosphatases (AtSLP1 and AtSLP2) lack genetic redundancy and phylogenetically cluster into two distinct groups that maintain different subcellular localizations, with SLP1 being chloroplastic and SLP2 being cytosolic. Using heterologously expressed and purified protein, the enzymatic properties of both AtSLP1 and AtSLP2 were examined, revealing unique metal cation preferences in addition to a complete insensitivity to the classic serine/threonine PPP protein phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin. The unique properties and high conservation of the plant SLP phosphatases, coupled to their exclusion from animals, red algae, cyanobacteria, archaea, and most bacteria, render understanding the function(s) of this new subclass of PPP family protein phosphatases of particular interest.

  17. TcTASV: a novel protein family in trypanosoma cruzi identified from a subtractive trypomastigote cDNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Elizabeth A; Ziliani, María; Agüero, Fernán; Bernabó, Guillermo; Sánchez, Daniel O; Tekiel, Valeria

    2010-10-05

    The identification and characterization of antigens expressed in Trypanosoma cruzi stages that parasitize mammals are essential steps for the development of new vaccines and diagnostics. Genes that are preferentially expressed in trypomastigotes may be involved in key processes that define the biology of trypomastigotes, like cell invasion and immune system evasion. With the initial aim of identifying trypomastigote-specific expressed tags, we constructed and sequenced an epimastigote-subtracted trypomastigote cDNA library (library TcT-E). More than 45% of the sequenced clones of the library could not be mapped to previously annotated mRNAs or proteins. We validated the presence of these transcripts by reverse northern blot and northern blot experiments, therefore providing novel information about the mRNA expression of these genes in trypomastigotes. A 280-bp consensus element (TcT-E element, TcT-Eelem) located at the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of many different open reading frames (ORFs) was identified after clustering the TcT-E dataset. Using an RT-PCR approach, we were able to amplify different mature mRNAs containing the same TcT-Eelem in the 3' UTR. The proteins encoded by these ORFs are members of a novel surface protein family in T. cruzi, (which we named TcTASV for T. cruzi Trypomastigote, Alanine, Serine and Valine rich proteins). All members of the TcTASV family have conserved coding amino- and carboxy-termini, and a central variable core that allows partitioning of TcTASV proteins into three subfamilies. Analysis of the T. cruzi genome database resulted in the identification of 38 genes/ORFs for the whole TcTASV family in the reference CL-Brener strain (lineage II). Because this protein family was not found in other trypanosomatids, we also looked for the presence of TcTASV genes in other evolutionary lineages of T. cruzi, sequencing 48 and 28 TcTASVs members from the RA (lineage II) and Dm28 (lineage I) T. cruzi strains respectively. Detailed

  18. TcTASV: a novel protein family in trypanosoma cruzi identified from a subtractive trypomastigote cDNA library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A García

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification and characterization of antigens expressed in Trypanosoma cruzi stages that parasitize mammals are essential steps for the development of new vaccines and diagnostics. Genes that are preferentially expressed in trypomastigotes may be involved in key processes that define the biology of trypomastigotes, like cell invasion and immune system evasion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With the initial aim of identifying trypomastigote-specific expressed tags, we constructed and sequenced an epimastigote-subtracted trypomastigote cDNA library (library TcT-E. More than 45% of the sequenced clones of the library could not be mapped to previously annotated mRNAs or proteins. We validated the presence of these transcripts by reverse northern blot and northern blot experiments, therefore providing novel information about the mRNA expression of these genes in trypomastigotes. A 280-bp consensus element (TcT-E element, TcT-Eelem located at the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR of many different open reading frames (ORFs was identified after clustering the TcT-E dataset. Using an RT-PCR approach, we were able to amplify different mature mRNAs containing the same TcT-Eelem in the 3' UTR. The proteins encoded by these ORFs are members of a novel surface protein family in T. cruzi, (which we named TcTASV for T. cruzi Trypomastigote, Alanine, Serine and Valine rich proteins. All members of the TcTASV family have conserved coding amino- and carboxy-termini, and a central variable core that allows partitioning of TcTASV proteins into three subfamilies. Analysis of the T. cruzi genome database resulted in the identification of 38 genes/ORFs for the whole TcTASV family in the reference CL-Brener strain (lineage II. Because this protein family was not found in other trypanosomatids, we also looked for the presence of TcTASV genes in other evolutionary lineages of T. cruzi, sequencing 48 and 28 TcTASVs members from the RA (lineage II and Dm28

  19. A guild of 45 CRISPR-associated (Cas protein families and multiple CRISPR/Cas subtypes exist in prokaryotic genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Haft

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs are a family of DNA direct repeats found in many prokaryotic genomes. Repeats of 21-37 bp typically show weak dyad symmetry and are separated by regularly sized, nonrepetitive spacer sequences. Four CRISPR-associated (Cas protein families, designated Cas1 to Cas4, are strictly associated with CRISPR elements and always occur near a repeat cluster. Some spacers originate from mobile genetic elements and are thought to confer "immunity" against the elements that harbor these sequences. In the present study, we have systematically investigated uncharacterized proteins encoded in the vicinity of these CRISPRs and found many additional protein families that are strictly associated with CRISPR loci across multiple prokaryotic species. Multiple sequence alignments and hidden Markov models have been built for 45 Cas protein families. These models identify family members with high sensitivity and selectivity and classify key regulators of development, DevR and DevS, in Myxococcus xanthus as Cas proteins. These identifications show that CRISPR/cas gene regions can be quite large, with up to 20 different, tandem-arranged cas genes next to a repeat cluster or filling the region between two repeat clusters. Distinctive subsets of the collection of Cas proteins recur in phylogenetically distant species and correlate with characteristic repeat periodicity. The analyses presented here support initial proposals of mobility of these units, along with the likelihood that loci of different subtypes interact with one another as well as with host cell defensive, replicative, and regulatory systems. It is evident from this analysis that CRISPR/cas loci are larger, more complex, and more heterogeneous than previously appreciated.

  20. Functional studies of ssDNA binding ability of MarR family protein TcaR from Staphylococcus epidermidis.

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    Yu-Ming Chang

    Full Text Available The negative transcription regulator of the ica locus, TcaR, regulates proteins involved in the biosynthesis of poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG. Absence of TcaR increases PNAG production and promotes biofilm formation in Staphylococci. Previously, the 3D structure of TcaR in its apo form and its complex structure with several antibiotics have been analyzed. However, the detailed mechanism of multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR family proteins such as TcaR is unclear and only restricted on the binding ability of double-strand DNA (dsDNA. Here we show by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, electron microscopy (EM, circular dichroism (CD, and Biacore analysis that TcaR can interact strongly with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA, thereby identifying a new role in MarR family proteins. Moreover, we show that TcaR preferentially binds 33-mer ssDNA over double-stranded DNA and inhibits viral ssDNA replication. In contrast, such ssDNA binding properties were not observed for other MarR family protein and TetR family protein, suggesting that the results from our studies are not an artifact due to simple charge interactions between TcaR and ssDNA. Overall, these results suggest a novel role for TcaR in regulation of DNA replication. We anticipate that the results of this work will extend our understanding of MarR family protein and broaden the development of new therapeutic strategies for Staphylococci.

  1. Evaluation of the Selectivity and Cysteine Dependence of Inhibitors across the Regulator of G Protein-Signaling Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Michael P; Bodle, Christopher R; Roman, David L

    2018-01-01

    Since their discovery more than 20 years ago, regulators of G protein-signaling (RGS) proteins have received considerable attention as potential drug targets because of their ability to modulate G α activity. Efforts to identify small molecules capable of inhibiting the protein-protein interactions between activated G α subunits and RGS proteins have yielded a substantial number of inhibitors, especially toward the well studied RGS4. These efforts also determined that many of these small molecules inhibit the protein-protein interactions through covalent modification of cysteine residues within the RGS domain that are located distal to the G α -binding interface. As some of these cysteine residues are highly conserved within the RGS family, many of these inhibitors display activity toward multiple RGS family members. In this work, we sought to determine the selectivity of these small-molecule inhibitors against 12 RGS proteins, as well as against the cysteine-null mutants for 10 of these proteins. Using both biochemical and cell-based methods to assess G α -RGS complex formation and G α enzymatic activity, we found that several previously identified RGS4 inhibitors were active against other RGS members, such as RGS14, with comparable or greater potency. Additionally, for every compound tested, activity was dependent on the presence of cysteine residues. This work defines the selectivity of commercially available RGS inhibitors and provides insight into the RGS family members for which drug discovery efforts may be most likely to succeed. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. Putative midkine family protein up-regulation in Patella caerulea (Mollusca, Gastropoda) exposed to sublethal concentrations of cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanucci, Silvana; Minerdi, Daniela; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Mengoni, Alessio; Bazzicalupo, Marco

    2005-01-01

    A cDNA sequence of a putative midkine (MK) family protein was identified and characterised in the mollusc Patella caerulea. The midkine family consists of two members, midkine and pleiotrophin (PTN), and it is one of the recently discovered cytokines. Our results show that this putative midkine protein is up-regulated in specimens of P. caerulea exposed to sublethal cadmium concentrations (i.e. 0.5 and 1 mg l -1 Cd) over a 10-day exposure period. Semiquantitative RT-PCR and quantitative Real time RT-PCR estimations indicate elevated expression of midkine mRNA in exposed specimens compared to controls. Moreover, RT-PCR Real time values were higher in the viscera (here defined as the part of the soft tissue including digestive gland plus gills) than in the foot (i.e. foot plus head plus heart) of the limpets. At present, information on the functional signalling significance of the midkine family proteins suggests that the up-regulation of P. caerulea putative midkine family protein is a distress signal likely with informative value on health status of the organism and with potential prognostic capability

  3. A family of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding proteins represses translation in late development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J; Christiansen, J; Lykke-Andersen, J

    1999-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a major fetal growth factor. The IGF-II gene generates multiple mRNAs with different 5' untranslated regions (5' UTRs) that are translated in a differential manner during development. We have identified a human family of three IGF-II mRNA-binding proteins...

  4. The Crystal Structure of Rv0813c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals a New Family of Fatty Acid-Binding Protein-Like Proteins in Bacteria▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, William; Haouz, Ahmed; Graña, Martin; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Betton, Jean-Michel; Cole, Stewart T.; Alzari, Pedro M.

    2007-01-01

    The gene Rv0813c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which codes for a hypothetical protein of unknown function, is conserved within the order Actinomycetales but absent elsewhere. The crystal structure of Rv0813c reveals a new family of proteins that resemble the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) found in eukaryotes. Rv0813c adopts the 10-stranded β-barrel fold typical of FABPs but lacks the double-helix insert that covers the entry to the binding site in the eukaryotic proteins. The barrel encloses a deep cavity, at the bottom of which a small cyclic ligand was found to bind to the hydroxyl group of Tyr192. This residue is part of a conserved Arg-X-Tyr motif much like the triad that binds the carboxylate group of fatty acids in FABPs. Most of the residues forming the internal surface of the cavity are conserved in homologous protein sequences found in CG-rich prokaryotes, strongly suggesting that Rv0813c is a member of a new family of bacterial FABP-like proteins that may have roles in the recognition, transport, and/or storage of small molecules in the bacterial cytosol. PMID:17172346

  5. Characterization of the BTB-MATH protein family in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Henriette

    2011-01-01

    The BTB proteins are defined by a highly conserved protein-protein-interaction motif BTB/POZ (Bric-a-Brac/Tramtrack/Broad complex/POX Virus and Zink finger), often combined with a secondary protein- or DNA-binding domain. In plants and animals the association of BTB proteins with Cullin3 proteins was demonstrated. As subunits of multimeric Ubiquitin-ligases CUL3-BTB complexes mediate ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of substrate proteins, and by this regulating diverse biological pro...

  6. A first-principles model of early evolution: emergence of gene families, species, and preferred protein folds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin B Zeldovich

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we develop a microscopic physical model of early evolution where phenotype--organism life expectancy--is directly related to genotype--the stability of its proteins in their native conformations-which can be determined exactly in the model. Simulating the model on a computer, we consistently observe the "Big Bang" scenario whereby exponential population growth ensues as soon as favorable sequence-structure combinations (precursors of stable proteins are discovered. Upon that, random diversity of the structural space abruptly collapses into a small set of preferred proteins. We observe that protein folds remain stable and abundant in the population at timescales much greater than mutation or organism lifetime, and the distribution of the lifetimes of dominant folds in a population approximately follows a power law. The separation of evolutionary timescales between discovery of new folds and generation of new sequences gives rise to emergence of protein families and superfamilies whose sizes are power-law distributed, closely matching the same distributions for real proteins. On the population level we observe emergence of species--subpopulations that carry similar genomes. Further, we present a simple theory that relates stability of evolving proteins to the sizes of emerging genomes. Together, these results provide a microscopic first-principles picture of how first-gene families developed in the course of early evolution.

  7. A direct role for the Sec1/Munc18-family protein Vps33 as a template for SNARE assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard W; Jeffrey, Philip D; Zick, Michael; Phillips, Ben P; Wickner, William T; Hughson, Frederick M

    2015-09-04

    Fusion of intracellular transport vesicles requires soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and Sec1/Munc18-family (SM) proteins. Membrane-bridging SNARE complexes are critical for fusion, but their spontaneous assembly is inefficient and may require SM proteins in vivo. We report x-ray structures of Vps33, the SM subunit of the yeast homotypic fusion and vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS) complex, bound to two individual SNAREs. The two SNAREs, one from each membrane, are held in the correct orientation and register for subsequent complex assembly. Vps33 and potentially other SM proteins could thus act as templates for generating partially zipped SNARE assembly intermediates. HOPS was essential to mediate SNARE complex assembly at physiological SNARE concentrations. Thus, Vps33 appears to catalyze SNARE complex assembly through specific SNARE motif recognition. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Direct Involvement of Retinoblastoma Family Proteins in DNA Repair by Non-homologous End-Joining

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    Rebecca Cook

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in DNA double-strand break (DSB repair lead to genetic instability, a recognized cause of cancer initiation and evolution. We report that the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB1 is required for DNA DSB repair by canonical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ. Support of cNHEJ involves a mechanism independent of RB1’s cell-cycle function and depends on its amino terminal domain with which it binds to NHEJ components XRCC5 and XRCC6. Cells with engineered loss of RB family function as well as cancer-derived cells with mutational RB1 loss show substantially reduced levels of cNHEJ. RB1 variants disabled for the interaction with XRCC5 and XRCC6, including a cancer-associated variant, are unable to support cNHEJ despite being able to confer cell-cycle control. Our data identify RB1 loss as a candidate driver of structural genomic instability and a causative factor for cancer somatic heterogeneity and evolution.

  9. Characterization of a polymorphic family of integral membrane proteins in promastigotes of different Leishmania species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, F M; Murray, P J; Ji, H; Simpson, R J; Osborn, A H; Cappai, R; Handman, E

    1994-09-01

    Antibodies raised against a Leishmania major recombinant promastigote surface antigen 2 (PSA-2) fragment recognized three major polypeptides of approximate M(r) 96,000, 80,000 and 50,000 in promastigotes of three Israeli isolates of L. major including the cloned line LRC-L137-V121, but detected a different array of polypeptides in other L. major isolates. The pattern was different both in number of polypeptides detected and their molecular weight. The antibodies to L. major PSA-2 also recognized polypeptides in L. tropica, L. donovani and very weakly in L. mexicana promastigotes and in Crithidia lucilliae. The number and size of the polypeptides was different in each species. In addition to the membrane-bound PSA-2 polypeptides we identified water-soluble forms of PSA-2 released in promastigote culture supernatants. Peptide maps of the various L. major PSA-2 membrane polypeptides showed they were different from each other. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the three polypeptides expressed by L. major showed they are similar but distinct, consistent with being members of a polymorphic family. Because of the extensive sequence similarity between the PSA-2 genes it has been difficult to assign protein products to individual genes. As a first step towards solving this problem, we have transfected into L. mexicana a genomic clone of a L. major PSA-2 gene and shown that it produces a M(r) 35,000 polypeptide recognized by monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to L. major PSA-2.

  10. Hepatitis C virus drug resistance associated substitutions and their clinical relevance: Update 2018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbo, Maria C; Cento, Valeria; Di Maio, Velia C; Howe, Anita Y M; Garcia, Federico; Perno, Carlo F; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, due to the development of potent Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents (DAAs) that specifically target NS3, NS5A and NS5B viral proteins, several new and highly efficacious options to treat chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are available. The natural presence of resistance associated substitutions (RASs), as well as their rapid emergence during incomplete drug-pressure, are intrinsic characteristics of HCV that greatly affect treatment outcome and the chances to achieve a virolgical cure. To date, a high number of RASs in NS3, NS5A, and NS5B have been associated in vivo and/or in vitro with reduced susceptibility to DAAs, but no comprehensive RASs list is available. This review thus provides an updated, systematic overview of the role of RASs to currently approved DAAs or in phase II/III of clinical development against HCV-infection, discriminating their impact in different HCV-genotypes and DAAs, providing assistance for a fruitful use of HCV resistance testing in clinical practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression of S100 protein family members in normal skin and sweat gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Okano, Shinji; Takahara, Masakazu; Chiba, Takahito; Tu, Yating; Oda, Yoshinao; Furue, Masutaka

    2013-06-01

    Despite our growing knowledge regarding the biology of S100 family proteins in cancers and internal diseases, limited data are available with their distribution in normal skin and in sweat gland tumors. To study the expression and distribution pattern of multiple S100 proteins in normal skin and in the tumors of sweat glands. Immunohistological staining was performed using S100A2, S100A4, S100A6, S100A7, S100A8/9, S100A11, and S100P in 41 cases of various kinds of sweat gland tumors and in 13 cases of normal skin. In normal skin, S100A2, S100A6, S100A7, and S100P staining were observed in the sweat glands. S100A2 positively stained in the outer layer of the eccrine duct. S100A6 immunolabeling was observed in the secretory portion of the eccrine gland. Myoepithelial cells of the apocrine gland were positive for S100A2 and S100A6. S100A7 was positive in the acrosyringium, ductal, and secretory portions of the eccrine gland and in the inner layer of the apocrine gland. Intense S100P staining was detected in the inner layer of the acrosyringium and eccrine ducts. Langerhans cells and melanocytes showed strong immunoreactivity to S100A4. Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) expressed S100A7 and S100P with partial S100A6 and S1004 staining. Eccrine poroma expressed S100A2 and S100A7 with partial labeling with S100A6. Syringoma expressed S100A2, S1007, and S100P. Apocrine hidrocystoma expressed S100A2 with partial S100A6 and S100A7 immunoreactivity. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum expressed S100A2, S100A6, S100A7, and S100P. S100A2, S100A6, S100A7, and S100P proteins are specifically involved in structure-related distribution and are potentially useful for differential diagnoses of sweat gland tumors. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A lepidopteran-specific gene family encoding valine-rich midgut proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jothini Odman-Naresh

    Full Text Available Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM, an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps, which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran

  13. The claudin family of proteins in human malignancy: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding L

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lei Ding,1,2 Zhe Lu,2,4 Qun Lu,2,3 Yan-Hua Chen2,3 1Department of Oncology, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, 3Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA; 4Department of Basic Medicine, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China Abstract: Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, are the most apical component of the junctional complex and provide one form of cell–cell adhesion in epithelial and endothelial cells. Nearly 90% of malignant tumors are derived from the epithelium. Loss of cell–cell adhesion is one of the steps in the progression of cancer to metastasis. At least three main tight junction family proteins have been discovered: occludin, claudin, and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM. Claudins are the most important structural and functional components of tight junction integral membrane proteins, with at least 24 members in mammals. They are crucial for the paracellular flux of ions and small molecules. Overexpression or downregulation of claudins is frequently observed in epithelial-derived cancers. However, molecular mechanisms by which claudins affect tumorigenesis remain largely unknown. As the pivotal proteins in epithelial cells, altered expression and distribution of different claudins have been reported in a wide variety of human malignancies, including pancreatic, colonic, lung, ovarian, thyroid, prostate, esophageal, and breast cancers. In this review, we will give the readers an overall picture of the changes in claudin expression observed in various cancers and their mechanisms of regulation. Downregulation of claudins contributes to epithelial transformation by increasing the paracellular permeability of nutrients and growth factors to cancerous cells. In the cases of upregulation of claudin expression, the barrier function of the cancerous

  14. The IQD Family of Calmodulin-Binding Proteins Links Calcium Signaling to Microtubules, Membrane Subdomains, and the Nucleus1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plötner, Romina; Stamm, Gina; Hause, Gerd; Mitra, Dipannita; Abel, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton are essential processes for the coordination and control of plant cell shape and cell growth. Calmodulin (CaM) and closely related calmodulin-like (CML) polypeptides are principal sensors of Ca2+ signals. CaM/CMLs decode and relay information encrypted by the second messenger via differential interactions with a wide spectrum of targets to modulate their diverse biochemical activities. The plant-specific IQ67 DOMAIN (IQD) family emerged as possibly the largest class of CaM-interacting proteins with undefined molecular functions and biological roles. Here, we show that the 33 members of the IQD family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) differentially localize, using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins, to multiple and distinct subcellular sites, including microtubule (MT) arrays, plasma membrane subdomains, and nuclear compartments. Intriguingly, the various IQD-specific localization patterns coincide with the subcellular patterns of IQD-dependent recruitment of CaM, suggesting that the diverse IQD members sequester Ca2+-CaM signaling modules to specific subcellular sites for precise regulation of Ca2+-dependent processes. Because MT localization is a hallmark of most IQD family members, we quantitatively analyzed GFP-labeled MT arrays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells transiently expressing GFP-IQD fusions and observed IQD-specific MT patterns, which point to a role of IQDs in MT organization and dynamics. Indeed, stable overexpression of select IQD proteins in Arabidopsis altered cellular MT orientation, cell shape, and organ morphology. Because IQDs share biochemical properties with scaffold proteins, we propose that IQD families provide an assortment of platform proteins for integrating CaM-dependent Ca2+ signaling at multiple cellular sites to regulate cell function, shape, and growth. PMID:28115582

  15. The IQD Family of Calmodulin-Binding Proteins Links Calcium Signaling to Microtubules, Membrane Subdomains, and the Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürstenbinder, Katharina; Möller, Birgit; Plötner, Romina; Stamm, Gina; Hause, Gerd; Mitra, Dipannita; Abel, Steffen

    2017-03-01

    Calcium (Ca 2+ ) signaling and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton are essential processes for the coordination and control of plant cell shape and cell growth. Calmodulin (CaM) and closely related calmodulin-like (CML) polypeptides are principal sensors of Ca 2+ signals. CaM/CMLs decode and relay information encrypted by the second messenger via differential interactions with a wide spectrum of targets to modulate their diverse biochemical activities. The plant-specific IQ67 DOMAIN (IQD) family emerged as possibly the largest class of CaM-interacting proteins with undefined molecular functions and biological roles. Here, we show that the 33 members of the IQD family in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) differentially localize, using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins, to multiple and distinct subcellular sites, including microtubule (MT) arrays, plasma membrane subdomains, and nuclear compartments. Intriguingly, the various IQD-specific localization patterns coincide with the subcellular patterns of IQD-dependent recruitment of CaM, suggesting that the diverse IQD members sequester Ca 2+ -CaM signaling modules to specific subcellular sites for precise regulation of Ca 2+ -dependent processes. Because MT localization is a hallmark of most IQD family members, we quantitatively analyzed GFP-labeled MT arrays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells transiently expressing GFP-IQD fusions and observed IQD-specific MT patterns, which point to a role of IQDs in MT organization and dynamics. Indeed, stable overexpression of select IQD proteins in Arabidopsis altered cellular MT orientation, cell shape, and organ morphology. Because IQDs share biochemical properties with scaffold proteins, we propose that IQD families provide an assortment of platform proteins for integrating CaM-dependent Ca 2+ signaling at multiple cellular sites to regulate cell function, shape, and growth. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Candida albicans Agglutinin-Like Sequence (Als) Family Vignettes: A Review of Als Protein Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Lois L.; Cota, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Approximately two decades have passed since the description of the first gene in the Candida albicans ALS (agglutinin-like sequence) family. Since that time, much has been learned about the composition of the family and the function of its encoded cell-surface glycoproteins. Solution of the structure of the Als adhesive domain provides the opportunity to evaluate the molecular basis for protein function. This review article is formatted as a series of fundamental questions and explores the diversity of the Als proteins, as well as their role in ligand binding, aggregative effects, and attachment to abiotic surfaces. Interaction of Als proteins with each other, their functional equivalence, and the effects of protein abundance on phenotypic conclusions are also examined. Structural features of Als proteins that may facilitate invasive function are considered. Conclusions that are firmly supported by the literature are presented while highlighting areas that require additional investigation to reveal basic features of the Als proteins, their relatedness to each other, and their roles in C. albicans biology. PMID:27014205

  17. Eubacterial SpoVG homologs constitute a new family of site-specific DNA-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Jutras

    Full Text Available A site-specific DNA-binding protein was purified from Borrelia burgdorferi cytoplasmic extracts, and determined to be a member of the highly conserved SpoVG family. This is the first time a function has been attributed to any of these ubiquitous bacterial proteins. Further investigations into SpoVG orthologues indicated that the Staphylococcus aureus protein also binds DNA, but interacts preferentially with a distinct nucleic acid sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis and domain swapping between the S. aureus and B. burgdorferi proteins identified that a 6-residue stretch of the SpoVG α-helix contributes to DNA sequence specificity. Two additional, highly conserved amino acid residues on an adjacent β-sheet are essential for DNA-binding, apparently by contacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. Results of these studies thus identified a novel family of bacterial DNA-binding proteins, developed a model of SpoVG-DNA interactions, and provide direction for future functional studies on these wide-spread proteins.

  18. Bacillus cereus efflux protein BC3310 - a multidrug transporter of the unknown major facilitator family, UMF-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Jasmin K; Hassan, Karl; Vörös, Aniko; Simm, Roger; Saidijam, Massoud; Bettaney, Kim E; Bechthold, Andreas; Paulsen, Ian T; Henderson, Peter J F; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic classification divides the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) into 82 families, including 25 families that are comprised of transporters with no characterized functions. This study describes functional data for BC3310 from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579, a member of the "unknown major facilitator family-2" (UMF-2). BC3310 was shown to be a multidrug efflux pump conferring resistance to ethidium bromide, SDS and silver nitrate when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α ΔacrAB. A conserved aspartate residue (D105) in putative transmembrane helix 4 was identified, which was essential for the energy dependent ethidium bromide efflux by BC3310. Transport proteins of the MFS comprise specific sequence motifs. Sequence analysis of UMF-2 proteins revealed that they carry a variant of the MFS motif A, which may be used as a marker to distinguish easily between this family and other MFS proteins. Genes orthologous to bc3310 are highly conserved within the B. cereus group of organisms and thus belong to the core genome, suggesting an important conserved functional role in the normal physiology of these bacteria.

  19. Bacillus cereus efflux protein BC3310 - a multidrug transporter of the unknown major facilitator family, UMF-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin K Kroeger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic classification divides the major facilitator superfamily (MFS into 82 families, including 25 families that are comprised of transporters with no characterized functions. This study describes functional data for BC3310 from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579, a member of the unknown major facilitator family 2 (UMF 2. BC3310 was shown to be a multidrug efflux pump conferring resistance to ethidium bromide, SDS and silver nitrate when heterologously expressed in E. coli DH5α ΔacrAB. A conserved aspartate residue (D105 in putative transmembrane helix 4 was identified, which was essential for the energy dependent ethidium bromide efflux by BC3310. Transport proteins of the MFS comprise specific sequence motifs. Sequence analysis of UMF 2 proteins revealed that they carry a variant of the MFS motif A, which may be used as a marker to distinguish easily between this family and other MFS proteins. Genes orthologous to bc3310 are highly conserved within the B. cereus group of organisms and thus belong to the core genome, suggesting an important conserved functional role in the normal physiology of these bacteria.

  20. Bacillus cereus efflux protein BC3310 – a multidrug transporter of the unknown major facilitator family, UMF-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Jasmin K.; Hassan, Karl; Vörös, Aniko; Simm, Roger; Saidijam, Massoud; Bettaney, Kim E.; Bechthold, Andreas; Paulsen, Ian T.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic classification divides the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) into 82 families, including 25 families that are comprised of transporters with no characterized functions. This study describes functional data for BC3310 from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579, a member of the “unknown major facilitator family-2” (UMF-2). BC3310 was shown to be a multidrug efflux pump conferring resistance to ethidium bromide, SDS and silver nitrate when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α ΔacrAB. A conserved aspartate residue (D105) in putative transmembrane helix 4 was identified, which was essential for the energy dependent ethidium bromide efflux by BC3310. Transport proteins of the MFS comprise specific sequence motifs. Sequence analysis of UMF-2 proteins revealed that they carry a variant of the MFS motif A, which may be used as a marker to distinguish easily between this family and other MFS proteins. Genes orthologous to bc3310 are highly conserved within the B. cereus group of organisms and thus belong to the core genome, suggesting an important conserved functional role in the normal physiology of these bacteria. PMID:26528249

  1. Annotation and analysis of a large cuticular protein family with the R&R Consensus in Anopheles gambiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ningjia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most abundant family of insect cuticular proteins, the CPR family, is recognized by the R&R Consensus, a domain of about 64 amino acids that binds to chitin and is present throughout arthropods. Several species have now been shown to have more than 100 CPR genes, inviting speculation as to the functional importance of this large number and diversity. Results We have identified 156 genes in Anopheles gambiae that code for putative cuticular proteins in this CPR family, over 1% of the total number of predicted genes in this species. Annotation was verified using several criteria including identification of TATA boxes, INRs, and DPEs plus support from proteomic and gene expression analyses. Two previously recognized CPR classes, RR-1 and RR-2, form separate, well-supported clades with the exception of a small set of genes with long branches whose relationships are poorly resolved. Several of these outliers have clear orthologs in other species. Although both clades are under purifying selection, the RR-1 variant of the R&R Consensus is evolving at twice the rate of the RR-2 variant and is structurally more labile. In contrast, the regions flanking the R&R Consensus have diversified in amino-acid composition to a much greater extent in RR-2 genes compared with RR-1 genes. Many genes are found in compact tandem arrays that may include similar or dissimilar genes but always include just one of the two classes. Tandem arrays of RR-2 genes frequently contain subsets of genes coding for highly similar proteins (sequence clusters. Properties of the proteins indicated that each cluster may serve a distinct function in the cuticle. Conclusion The complete annotation of this large gene family provides insight on the mechanisms of gene family evolution and clues about the need for so many CPR genes. These data also should assist annotation of other Anopheles genes.

  2. A novel firmicute protein family related to the actinobacterial resuscitation-promoting factors by non-orthologous domain displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finan Christopher L

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Micrococcus luteus growth and resuscitation from starvation-induced dormancy is controlled by the production of a secreted growth factor. This autocrine resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf is the founder member of a family of proteins found throughout and confined to the actinobacteria (high G + C Gram-positive bacteria. The aim of this work was to search for and characterise a cognate gene family in the firmicutes (low G + C Gram-positive bacteria and obtain information about how they may control bacterial growth and resuscitation. Results In silico analysis of the accessory domains of the Rpf proteins permitted their classification into several subfamilies. The RpfB subfamily is related to a group of firmicute proteins of unknown function, represented by YabE of Bacillus subtilis. The actinobacterial RpfB and firmicute YabE proteins have very similar domain structures and genomic contexts, except that in YabE, the actinobacterial Rpf domain is replaced by another domain, which we have called Sps. Although totally unrelated in both sequence and secondary structure, the Rpf and Sps domains fulfil the same function. We propose that these proteins have undergone "non-orthologous domain displacement", a phenomenon akin to "non-orthologous gene displacement" that has been described previously. Proteins containing the Sps domain are widely distributed throughout the firmicutes and they too fall into a number of distinct subfamilies. Comparative analysis of the accessory domains in the Rpf and Sps proteins, together with their weak similarity to lytic transglycosylases, provide clear evidence that they are muralytic enzymes. Conclusions The results indicate that the firmicute Sps proteins and the actinobacterial Rpf proteins are cognate and that they control bacterial culturability via enzymatic modification of the bacterial cell envelope.

  3. Fast and accurate multivariate Gaussian modeling of protein families: predicting residue contacts and protein-interaction partners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Baldassi

    Full Text Available In the course of evolution, proteins show a remarkable conservation of their three-dimensional structure and their biological function, leading to strong evolutionary constraints on the sequence variability between homologous proteins. Our method aims at extracting such constraints from rapidly accumulating sequence data, and thereby at inferring protein structure and function from sequence information alone. Recently, global statistical inference methods (e.g. direct-coupling analysis, sparse inverse covariance estimation have achieved a breakthrough towards this aim, and their predictions have been successfully implemented into tertiary and quaternary protein structure prediction methods. However, due to the discrete nature of the underlying variable (amino-acids, exact inference requires exponential time in the protein length, and efficient approximations are needed for practical applicability. Here we propose a very efficient multivariate Gaussian modeling approach as a variant of direct-coupling analysis: the discrete amino-acid variables are replaced by continuous Gaussian random variables. The resulting statistical inference problem is efficiently and exactly solvable. We show that the quality of inference is comparable or superior to the one achieved by mean-field approximations to inference with discrete variables, as done by direct-coupling analysis. This is true for (i the prediction of residue-residue contacts in proteins, and (ii the identification of protein-protein interaction partner in bacterial signal transduction. An implementation of our multivariate Gaussian approach is available at the website http://areeweb.polito.it/ricerca/cmp/code.

  4. Fast and accurate multivariate Gaussian modeling of protein families: predicting residue contacts and protein-interaction partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassi, Carlo; Zamparo, Marco; Feinauer, Christoph; Procaccini, Andrea; Zecchina, Riccardo; Weigt, Martin; Pagnani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In the course of evolution, proteins show a remarkable conservation of their three-dimensional structure and their biological function, leading to strong evolutionary constraints on the sequence variability between homologous proteins. Our method aims at extracting such constraints from rapidly accumulating sequence data, and thereby at inferring protein structure and function from sequence information alone. Recently, global statistical inference methods (e.g. direct-coupling analysis, sparse inverse covariance estimation) have achieved a breakthrough towards this aim, and their predictions have been successfully implemented into tertiary and quaternary protein structure prediction methods. However, due to the discrete nature of the underlying variable (amino-acids), exact inference requires exponential time in the protein length, and efficient approximations are needed for practical applicability. Here we propose a very efficient multivariate Gaussian modeling approach as a variant of direct-coupling analysis: the discrete amino-acid variables are replaced by continuous Gaussian random variables. The resulting statistical inference problem is efficiently and exactly solvable. We show that the quality of inference is comparable or superior to the one achieved by mean-field approximations to inference with discrete variables, as done by direct-coupling analysis. This is true for (i) the prediction of residue-residue contacts in proteins, and (ii) the identification of protein-protein interaction partner in bacterial signal transduction. An implementation of our multivariate Gaussian approach is available at the website http://areeweb.polito.it/ricerca/cmp/code.

  5. Phylogenetic Reconstruction Shows Independent Evolutionary Origins of Mitochondrial Transcription Factors from an Ancient Family of RNA Methyltransferase Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aj Harris; Goldman, Aaron David

    2018-04-25

    Here, we generate a robust phylogenetic framework for the rRNA adenine N(6)-methyltransferase (RAMTase) protein family that shows a more ancient and complex evolutionary history within the family than previously reported. RAMTases occur universally by descent across the three domains of life, and typical orthologs within the family perform methylation of the small subunits of ribosomal RNA (rRNA). However, within the RAMTase family, two different groups of mitochondrial transcription factors, mtTFB1 and mtTFB2, have evolved in eukaryotes through neofunctionalization. Previous phylogenetic analyses have suggested that mtTFB1 and mtTFB2 comprise sister clades that arose via gene duplication, which occurred sometime following the endosymbiosis event that produced the mitochondrion. Through dense and taxonomically broad sampling of RAMTase family members especially within bacteria, we found that these eukaryotic mitochondrial transcription factors, mtTFB1 and mtTFB2, have independent origins in phylogenetically distant clades such that their divergence most likely predates the last universal common ancestor of life. The clade of mtTFB2s comprises orthologs in Opisthokonts and the clade of mtTFB1s includes orthologs in Amoebozoa and Metazoa. Thus, we clearly demonstrate that the neofunctionalization producing the transcription factor function evolved twice independently within the RAMTase family. These results are consistent with and help to elucidate outcomes from prior experimental studies, which found that some members of mtTFB1 still perform the ancestral rRNA methylation function, and the results have broader implications for understanding the evolution of new protein functions. Our phylogenetic reconstruction is also in agreement with prior studies showing two independent origins of plastid RAMTases in Viridiplantae and other photosynthetic autotrophs. We believe that this updated phylogeny of RAMTases should provide a robust evolutionary framework for ongoing

  6. A novel firefly luciferase biosensor enhances the detection of apoptosis induced by ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Junwei; Zhang, Huan; Fang, Liurong; Xi, Yongqiang; Zhou, Yanrong; Luo, Rui; Wang, Dang; Xiao, Shaobo; Chen, Huanchun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed a novel firefly luciferase based biosensor to detect apoptosis. • The novel biosensor 233-DnaE-DEVDG was reliable, sensitive and convenient. • 233-DnaE-DEVDG faithfully indicated ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced apoptosis. • EsxA, esxT and esxL in ESAT-6 family proteins induced apoptosis. • Activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. - Abstract: The activation of caspase-3 is a key surrogate marker for detecting apoptosis. To quantitate caspase-3 activity, we constructed a biosensor comprising a recombinant firefly luciferase containing a caspase-3 cleavage site. When apoptosis was induced, caspase-3 cleavage of the biosensor activated firefly luciferase by a factor greater than 25. The assay conveniently detected apoptosis in real time, indicating that it will facilitate drug discovery. We screened ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and found that esxA, esxT and esxL induced apoptosis. Further, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the NF-κB-regulated genes encoding tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. We conclude that this assay is useful for high-throughput screening to identify and characterize proteins and drugs that regulate apoptosis

  7. A novel firefly luciferase biosensor enhances the detection of apoptosis induced by ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Junwei; Zhang, Huan; Fang, Liurong; Xi, Yongqiang; Zhou, Yanrong; Luo, Rui; Wang, Dang, E-mail: wangdang511@126.com; Xiao, Shaobo; Chen, Huanchun

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • We developed a novel firefly luciferase based biosensor to detect apoptosis. • The novel biosensor 233-DnaE-DEVDG was reliable, sensitive and convenient. • 233-DnaE-DEVDG faithfully indicated ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced apoptosis. • EsxA, esxT and esxL in ESAT-6 family proteins induced apoptosis. • Activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. - Abstract: The activation of caspase-3 is a key surrogate marker for detecting apoptosis. To quantitate caspase-3 activity, we constructed a biosensor comprising a recombinant firefly luciferase containing a caspase-3 cleavage site. When apoptosis was induced, caspase-3 cleavage of the biosensor activated firefly luciferase by a factor greater than 25. The assay conveniently detected apoptosis in real time, indicating that it will facilitate drug discovery. We screened ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and found that esxA, esxT and esxL induced apoptosis. Further, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the NF-κB-regulated genes encoding tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. We conclude that this assay is useful for high-throughput screening to identify and characterize proteins and drugs that regulate apoptosis.

  8. A new Apicomplexa-specific protein kinase family : multiple members in Plasmodium falciparum, all with an export signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercereau-Puijalon Odile

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium spp. is a major health burden in tropical countries. The development of new control tools, including vaccines and drugs, is urgently needed. The availability of genome sequences from several malaria parasite species provides a basis on which to identify new potential intervention targets. Database mining for orthologs to the Plasmodium falciparum trophozoite protein R45, a vaccine candidate, led us identify a new gene family. Results Orthologs to the P. falciparum trophozoite protein R45 were detected exclusively in protozoan parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa, including several Plasmodium spp., Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. All family members are hybrid genes with a conserved C-terminal protein kinase domain of a novel type, recently called FIKK kinase, associated with a non conserved N-terminal region without any known functional signature. While a single copy gene was detected in most species, considerable gene expansion was observed in P. falciparum and its closest phylogenic relative P. reichenowi, with 20 and six copies, respectively, each with a distinct N-terminal domain. Based on full length protein sequence, pairs of orthologs were observed in closely related species, such as P. berghei and P.y. yoelii, P. vivax and P. knowlesi, or P. reichenowi and P. falciparum. All 20 P. falciparum paralogs possess a canonical Plasmodium export element downstream of a signal / anchor sequence required for exportation outside the parasitophorous vacuole. This is consistent with the reported association of the trophozoite protein R45, the only paralog characterised to date, with the infected red blood cell membrane. Interestingly, most genes are located in the subtelomeric region of chromosomes, in association with other multigene families contributing to the remodelling of the infected red blood cell membrane, in particular the ring erythrocyte surface

  9. Abnormal swelling of the peritrophic membrane in Eri silkworm gut caused by MLX56 family defense proteins with chitin-binding and extensin domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Kotaro; Shimura, Sachiko; Ueno, Chihiro; Arakawa, Toru; Nakamura, Masatoshi

    2018-03-01

    MLX56 family defense proteins, MLX56 and its close homolog LA-b, are chitin-binding defense proteins found in mulberry latex that show strong growth-inhibitions against caterpillars when fed at concentrations as low as 0.01%. MLX56 family proteins contain a unique structure with an extensin domain surrounded by two hevein-like chitin-binding domains, but their defensive modes of action remain unclear. Here, we analyzed the effects of MLX56 family proteins on the peritrophic membrane (PM), a thin and soft membrane consisting of chitin that lines the midgut lumen of insects. We observed an abnormally thick (>1/5 the diameter of midgut) hard gel-like membrane consisted of chitin and MLX56 family proteins, MLX56 and LA-b, in the midgut of the Eri silkworms, Samia ricini, fed a diet containing MLX56 family proteins, MLX56 and LA-b. When polyoxin AL, a chitin-synthesis-inhibitor, was added to the diet containing MLX56 family proteins, the toxicity of MLX56 family proteins disappeared and PM became thinner and fragmented. These results suggest that MLX56 family proteins, through their chitin-binding domains, bind to the chitin framework of PM, then through their extensin-domain (gum arabic-like structure), which functions as swelling agent, expands PM into an abnormally thick membrane that inhibits the growth of insects. This study shows that MLX56 family proteins are plant defense lectins with a totally unique mode of action, and reveals the functions of extensin domains and arabinogalactan proteins as swelling (gel-forming) agents of plants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [From dualism to multiplicity: seeing BCL-2 family proteins and cell death with new eyes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouacheria, Abdel

    2015-01-01

    The concept of cell death has many links to the concept of death itself, defined as the opposite of life. Achievements obtained through research on apoptosis have apparently allowed us to transcend this Manichean view. Death is no longer outside, but rather inside living systems, as a constitutive force at work within the living matter. Whereas the death of cells can be positive and breed "creation" (e.g. during morphogenesis), its dysregulation can also cause or contribute to fatal diseases including cancer. It is tempting to apply this biological discourse to illuminate the relations between life and death, taken in general terms, but does this generalization actually hold? Is this discourse not essentially a metaphor? If cell death is considered as a vital aspect of various biological processes, then are we not faced with some vitalistic conception of death? Are there one or more meanings to the word "death"? Does the power to self-destruct act in opposition to other key features of living entities, or rather in juxtaposition to them? In this article, we first describe how the field of cell death has been developed on the basis of perceived and built dichotomies, mirroring the original opposition between life and death. We detail the limitations of the current paradigm of apoptosis regulation by BCL-2 family proteins, which nicely illustrate the problem of binary thinking in biology. Last, we try to show a way out of this dualistic matrix, by drawing on the notions of multiplicity, complexity, diversity, evolution and contingency. © Société de Biologie, 2016.

  11. PSAP induces a unique Apaf-1 and Smac-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway independent of Bcl-2 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zeng, Linlin; Gao, Wei; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Fu, Xueqi; Xu, Xuemin

    2013-03-01

    Presenilin-associated protein (PSAP) has been identified as a mitochondrial proapoptotic protein. However, the mechanism by which PSAP induces apoptosis remains unknown. To this end, we have established an inducible expression system. Using this system, we have examined the roles of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins, cytochrome c, Smac (Smac/Diablo, second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases/direct IAP binding protein with low PI), and Apaf-1 (apoptotic protease-activating factor) in PSAP-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that knockdown of Apaf-1 abolished PSAP-induced caspase activation and poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, indicating that the apoptosome formation triggered by cytochrome c is crucial for PSAP-induced apoptosis. Our data also demonstrate that knockdown of Smac abolished PSAP-induced caspase activation and PARP cleavage, indicating that, in addition to Apaf-1 or apoptosome formation, Smac is also essential for PSAP-induced apoptosis. However, interestingly, our data demonstrate that overexpression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL did not protect cells from PSAP-induced apoptosis, and that knockdown of Bid, Bax, and Bak had no effect on PSAP-induced cytochrome c and Smac release, indicating that PSAP-induced apoptosis is not regulated by Bcl-2 family proteins. These results strongly suggest that PSAP evokes mitochondrial apoptotic cascades via a novel mechanism that is not regulated by Bcl-2 family proteins, but that both the formation of cytochrome c-Apaf-1 apoptosome and the presence of Smac are absolutely required for PSAP-induced apoptosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Solution NMR structures reveal a distinct architecture and provide first structures for protein domain family PF04536.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eletsky, Alexander; Acton, Thomas B; Xiao, Rong; Everett, John K; Montelione, Gaetano T; Szyperski, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    The protein family (Pfam) PF04536 is a broadly conserved domain family of unknown function (DUF477), with more than 1,350 members in prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins. High-quality NMR structures of the N-terminal domain comprising residues 41-180 of the 684-residue protein CG2496 from Corynebacterium glutamicum and the N-terminal domain comprising residues 35-182 of the 435-residue protein PG0361 from Porphyromonas gingivalis both exhibit an α/β fold comprised of a four-stranded β-sheet, three α-helices packed against one side of the sheet, and a fourth α-helix attached to the other side. In spite of low sequence similarity (18%) assessed by structure-based sequence alignment, the two structures are globally quite similar. However, moderate structural differences are observed for the relative orientation of two of the four helices. Comparison with known protein structures reveals that the α/β architecture of CG2496(41-180) and PG0361(35-182) has previously not been characterized. Moreover, calculation of surface charge potential and identification of surface clefts indicate that the two domains very likely have different functions.

  13. A novel family of Toxoplasma IMC proteins displays a hierarchical organization and functions in coordinating parasite division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh R Beck

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexans employ a peripheral membrane system called the inner membrane complex (IMC for critical processes such as host cell invasion and daughter cell formation. We have identified a family of proteins that define novel sub-compartments of the Toxoplasma gondii IMC. These IMC Sub-compartment Proteins, ISP1, 2 and 3, are conserved throughout the Apicomplexa, but do not appear to be present outside the phylum. ISP1 localizes to the apical cap portion of the IMC, while ISP2 localizes to a central IMC region and ISP3 localizes to a central plus basal region of the complex. Targeting of all three ISPs is dependent upon N-terminal residues predicted for coordinated myristoylation and palmitoylation. Surprisingly, we show that disruption of ISP1 results in a dramatic relocalization of ISP2 and ISP3 to the apical cap. Although the N-terminal region of ISP1 is necessary and sufficient for apical cap targeting, exclusion of other family members requires the remaining C-terminal region of the protein. This gate-keeping function of ISP1 reveals an unprecedented mechanism of interactive and hierarchical targeting of proteins to establish these unique sub-compartments in the Toxoplasma IMC. Finally, we show that loss of ISP2 results in severe defects in daughter cell formation during endodyogeny, indicating a role for the ISP proteins in coordinating this unique process of Toxoplasma replication.

  14. Ultra-High-Throughput Screening of Natural Product Extracts to Identify Proapoptotic Inhibitors of Bcl-2 Family Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassig, Christian A; Zeng, Fu-Yue; Kung, Paul; Kiankarimi, Mehrak; Kim, Sylvia; Diaz, Paul W; Zhai, Dayong; Welsh, Kate; Morshedian, Shana; Su, Ying; O'Keefe, Barry; Newman, David J; Rusman, Yudi; Kaur, Harneet; Salomon, Christine E; Brown, Susan G; Baire, Beeraiah; Michel, Andrew R; Hoye, Thomas R; Francis, Subhashree; Georg, Gunda I; Walters, Michael A; Divlianska, Daniela B; Roth, Gregory P; Wright, Amy E; Reed, John C

    2014-09-01

    Antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins are validated cancer targets composed of six related proteins. From a drug discovery perspective, these are challenging targets that exert their cellular functions through protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Although several isoform-selective inhibitors have been developed using structure-based design or high-throughput screening (HTS) of synthetic chemical libraries, no large-scale screen of natural product collections has been reported. A competitive displacement fluorescence polarization (FP) screen of nearly 150,000 natural product extracts was conducted against all six antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins using fluorochrome-conjugated peptide ligands that mimic functionally relevant PPIs. The screens were conducted in 1536-well format and displayed satisfactory overall HTS statistics, with Z'-factor values ranging from 0.72 to 0.83 and a hit confirmation rate between 16% and 64%. Confirmed active extracts were orthogonally tested in a luminescent assay for caspase-3/7 activation in tumor cells. Active extracts were resupplied, and effort toward the isolation of pure active components was initiated through iterative bioassay-guided fractionation. Several previously described altertoxins were isolated from a microbial source, and the pure compounds demonstrate activity in both Bcl-2 FP and caspase cellular assays. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of ultra-high-throughput screening using natural product sources and highlight some of the challenges associated with this approach. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  15. Identification and characterization of a novel Cut family cDNA that encodes human copper transporter protein CutC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jixi; Ji Chaoneng; Chen Jinzhong; Yang Zhenxing; Wang Yijing; Fei, Xiangwei; Zheng Mei; Gu Xing; Wen Ge; Xie Yi; Mao Yumin

    2005-01-01

    Copper is an essential heavy metal trace element that plays important roles in cell physiology. The Cut family was associated with the copper homeostasis and involved in several important metabolisms, such as uptake, storage, delivery, and efflux of copper. In this study, a novel Cut family cDNA was isolated from the human fetal brain library, which encodes a 273 amino acid protein with a molecular mass of about 29.3 kDa and a calculated pI of 8.17. It was named hCutC (human copper transporter protein CutC). The ORF of hCutC gene was cloned into pQE30 vector and expressed in Escherichia coli M15. The secreted hCutC protein was purified to a homogenicity of 95% by using the Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. RT-PCR analysis showed that the hCutC gene expressed extensively in human tissues. Subcellular location analysis of hCutC-EGFP fusion protein revealed that hCutC was distributed to cytoplasm of COS-7 cells, and both cytoplasm and nucleus of AD293 cells. The results suggest that hCutC may be one shuttle protein and play important roles in intracellular copper trafficking

  16. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha activates Src-family kinases and controls integrin-mediated responses in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Muranjan, M; Sap, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fyn and c-Src are two of the most widely expressed Src-family kinases. Both are strongly implicated in the control of cytoskeletal organization and in the generation of integrin-dependent signalling responses in fibroblasts. These proteins are representative of a large family...... of tyrosine kinases, the activity of which is tightly controlled by inhibitory phosphorylation of a carboxyterminal tyrosine residue (Tyr527 in chicken c-Src); this phosphorylation induces the kinases to form an inactive conformation. Whereas the identity of such inhibitory Tyr527 kinases has been well...... established, no corresponding phosphatases have been identified that, under physiological conditions, function as positive regulators of c-Src and Fyn in fibroblasts. RESULTS: Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) was inactivated by homologous recombination. Fibroblasts derived from...

  17. A 14-3-3 Family Protein from Wild Soybean (Glycine Soja) Regulates ABA Sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Sun, Mingzhe; Jia, Bowei; Chen, Chao; Qin, Zhiwei; Yang, Kejun; Shen, Yang; Meiping, Zhang; Mingyang, Cong; Zhu, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the 14-3-3 family proteins are key regulators of multiple stress signal transduction cascades. By conducting genome-wide analysis, researchers have identified the soybean 14-3-3 family proteins; however, until now, there is still no direct genetic evidence showing the involvement of soybean 14-3-3s in ABA responses. Hence, in this study, based on the latest Glycine max genome on Phytozome v10.3, we initially analyzed the evolutionary relationship, genome organization, gene structure and duplication, and three-dimensional structure of soybean 14-3-3 family proteins systematically. Our results suggested that soybean 14-3-3 family was highly evolutionary conserved and possessed segmental duplication in evolution. Then, based on our previous functional characterization of a Glycine soja 14-3-3 protein GsGF14o in drought stress responses, we further investigated the expression characteristics of GsGF14o in detail, and demonstrated its positive roles in ABA sensitivity. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses in Glycine soja seedlings and GUS activity assays in PGsGF14O:GUS transgenic Arabidopsis showed that GsGF14o expression was moderately and rapidly induced by ABA treatment. As expected, GsGF14o overexpression in Arabidopsis augmented the ABA inhibition of seed germination and seedling growth, promoted the ABA induced stomata closure, and up-regulated the expression levels of ABA induced genes. Moreover, through yeast two hybrid analyses, we further demonstrated that GsGF14o physically interacted with the AREB/ABF transcription factors in yeast cells. Taken together, results presented in this study strongly suggested that GsGF14o played an important role in regulation of ABA sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

  18. Characterization of a variant of gap junction protein α8 identified in a family with hereditary cataract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie S Kuo

    Full Text Available Congenital cataracts occur in isolation in about 70% of cases or are associated with other abnormalities such as anterior segment dysgenesis and microphthalmia. We identified a three-generation family in the University of California San Francisco glaucoma clinic comprising three individuals with congenital cataracts and aphakic glaucoma, one of whom also had microphthalmia. The purpose of this study was to identify a possible causative mutation in this family and to investigate its pathogenesis.We performed exome sequencing and identified a putative mutation in gap junction protein α8 (GJA8. We used PCR and DNA sequencing of GJA8 in affected and unaffected members of the pedigree to test segregation of the variant with the phenotype. We tested cellular distribution and function of the variant protein by immunofluorescence and intercellular transfer of Neurobiotin in transiently transfected HeLa cells.Exome sequencing revealed a variant in GJA8 (c.658A>G encoding connexin50 (Cx50 that resulted in a missense change (p.N220D in transmembrane domain 4. The variant was present in all three affected family members, but was also present in the proband's grandfather who was reported to be unaffected. The mutant protein localized to the plasma membrane and supported intercellular Neurobiotin transfer in HeLa cells.We identified a variant in transmembrane domain 4 of Cx50 in a family with autosomal dominant congenital cataracts. This variant has been previously identified in other cataract cohorts, but it is also present in unaffected individuals. Our study demonstrates that the mutant protein localized to the plasma membrane and formed functional intercellular channels. These data suggest that GJA8 c.658A>G is most likely a benign rare variant.

  19. The spatiotemporal expression pattern of the bone morphogenetic protein family in rat ovary cell types during the estrous cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Gregory F; Shimasaki, Shunichi

    2003-01-01

    Abstract In the mammalian ovary, great interest in the expression and function of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family has been recently generated from evidence of their critical role in determining folliculogenesis and female fertility. Despite extensive work, there is a need to understand the cellular sites of expression of these important regulatory molecules, and how their gene expression changes within the basic ovary cell types through the cycle. Here we have performed a detailed...

  20. Purification of family B G protein-coupled receptors using nanodiscs: Application to human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Cai

    Full Text Available Family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs play vital roles in hormone-regulated homeostasis. They are drug targets for metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis. Despite their importance, the signaling mechanisms for family B GPCRs at the molecular level remain largely unexplored due to the challenges in purification of functional receptors in sufficient amount for biophysical characterization. Here, we purified the family B GPCR human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor (GLP1R, whose agonists, e.g. exendin-4, are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The receptor was expressed in HEK293S GnTl- cells using our recently developed protocol. The protocol incorporates the receptor into the native-like lipid environment of reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL particles, also known as nanodiscs, immediately after the membrane solubilization step followed by chromatographic purification, minimizing detergent contact with the target receptor to reduce denaturation and prolonging stabilization of receptor in lipid bilayers without extra steps of reconstitution. This method yielded purified GLP1R in nanodiscs that could bind to GLP-1 and exendin-4 and activate Gs protein. This nanodisc purification method can potentially be a general strategy to routinely obtain purified family B GPCRs in the 10s of microgram amounts useful for spectroscopic analysis of receptor functions and activation mechanisms.

  1. Cloning and characterization of a human orphan family C G-protein coupled receptor GPRC5D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, H; Jensen, A A; Sheppard, P O

    2001-01-01

    Recently three orphan G-protein coupled receptors, RAIG1, GPRC5B and GPRC5C, with homology to members of family C (metabotropic glutamate receptor-like) have been identified. Using the protein sequences of these receptors as queries we identified overlapping expressed sequence tags which were....... The four human receptor subtypes, which we assign to group 5 of family C GPCRs, show 31-42% amino acid sequence identity to each other and 20-25% sequence identity to the transmembrane domains of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes 2 and 3 and other family C members. In contrast to the remaining...... family C members, the group 5 receptors have short amino terminal domains of some 30-50 amino acids. GPRC5D was shown to be clustered with RAIG1 on chromosome 12p13.3 and like RAIG1 and GPRC5B to consist of three exons, the first exon being the largest containing all seven transmembrane segments. GPRC5D...

  2. Structural and evolutionary aspects of two families of non-catalytic domains present in starch and glycogen binding proteins from microbes, plants and animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janeček, Štefan; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E. Ann

    2011-01-01

    glycoside hydrolase (GH) families GH13, GH14, GH15, GH31, GH57 and GH77, as well as in a number of regulatory enzymes, e.g., phosphoglucan, water dikinase-3, genethonin-1, laforin, starch-excess protein-4, the β-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase and its homologues from sucrose non-fermenting-1 protein...

  3. Dynamic Evolution of Nitric Oxide Detoxifying Flavohemoglobins, a Family of Single-Protein Metabolic Modules in Bacteria and Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisecaver, Jennifer H; Alexander, William G; King, Sean B; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Rokas, Antonis

    2016-08-01

    Due to their functional independence, proteins that comprise standalone metabolic units, which we name single-protein metabolic modules, may be particularly prone to gene duplication (GD) and horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Flavohemoglobins (flavoHbs) are prime examples of single-protein metabolic modules, detoxifying nitric oxide (NO), a ubiquitous toxin whose antimicrobial properties many life forms exploit, to nitrate, a common source of nitrogen for organisms. FlavoHbs appear widespread in bacteria and have been identified in a handful of microbial eukaryotes, but how the distribution of this ecologically and biomedically important protein family evolved remains unknown. Reconstruction of the evolutionary history of 3,318 flavoHb protein sequences covering the family's known diversity showed evidence of recurrent HGT at multiple evolutionary scales including intrabacterial HGT, as well as HGT from bacteria to eukaryotes. One of the most striking examples of HGT is the acquisition of a flavoHb by the dandruff- and eczema-causing fungus Malassezia from Corynebacterium Actinobacteria, a transfer that growth experiments show is capable of mediating NO resistance in fungi. Other flavoHbs arose via GD; for example, many filamentous fungi possess two flavoHbs that are differentially targeted to the cytosol and mitochondria, likely conferring protection against external and internal sources of NO, respectively. Because single-protein metabolic modules such as flavoHb function independently, readily undergo GD and HGT, and are frequently involved in organismal defense and competition, we suggest that they represent "plug-and-play" proteins for ecological arms races. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. A C-terminal Myb extension domain defines a novel family of double-strand telomeric DNA-binding proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamysheva, Zemfira N; Surovtseva, Yulia V; Vespa, Laurent; Shakirov, Eugene V; Shippen, Dorothy E

    2004-11-12

    Little is known about the protein composition of plant telomeres. We queried the Arabidopsis thaliana genome data base in search of genes with similarity to the human telomere proteins hTRF1 and hTRF2. hTRF1/hTRF2 are distinguished by the presence of a single Myb-like domain in their C terminus that is required for telomeric DNA binding in vitro. Twelve Arabidopsis genes fitting this criterion, dubbed TRF-like (TRFL), fell into two distinct gene families. Notably, TRFL family 1 possessed a highly conserved region C-terminal to the Myb domain called Myb-extension (Myb-ext) that is absent in TRFL family 2 and hTRF1/hTRF2. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that recombinant proteins from TRFL family 1, but not those from family 2, formed homodimers and heterodimers in vitro. DNA binding studies with isolated C-terminal fragments from TRFL family 1 proteins, but not family 2, showed specific binding to double-stranded plant telomeric DNA in vitro. Removal of the Myb-ext domain from TRFL1, a family 1 member, abolished DNA binding. However, when the Myb-ext domain was introduced into the corresponding region in TRFL3, a family 2 member, telomeric DNA binding was observed. Thus, Myb-ext is required for binding plant telomeric DNA and defines a novel class of proteins in Arabidopsis.

  5. Comparative Community Proteomics Demonstrates the Unexpected Importance of Actinobacterial Glycoside Hydrolase Family 12 Protein for Crystalline Cellulose Hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiras, Jennifer; Wu, Yu-Wei; Deng, Kai; Nicora, Carrie D.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Frey, Dario; Kolinko, Sebastian; Robinson, Errol W.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Adams, Paul D.; Northen, Trent R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Singer, Steven W.

    2016-08-23

    ABSTRACT

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHs) are key enzymes in the depolymerization of plant-derived cellulose, a process central to the global carbon cycle and the conversion of plant biomass to fuels and chemicals. A limited number of GH families hydrolyze crystalline cellulose, often by a processive mechanism along the cellulose chain. During cultivation of thermophilic cellulolytic microbial communities, substantial differences were observed in the crystalline cellulose saccharification activities of supernatants recovered from divergent lineages. Comparative community proteomics identified a set of cellulases from a population closely related to actinobacteriumThermobispora bisporathat were highly abundant in the most active consortium. Among the cellulases fromT. bispora, the abundance of a GH family 12 (GH12) protein correlated most closely with the changes in crystalline cellulose hydrolysis activity. This result was surprising since GH12 proteins have been predominantly characterized as enzymes active on soluble polysaccharide substrates. Heterologous expression and biochemical characterization of the suite ofT. bisporahydrolytic cellulases confirmed that the GH12 protein possessed the highest activity on multiple crystalline cellulose substrates and demonstrated that it hydrolyzes cellulose chains by a predominantly random mechanism. This work suggests that the role of GH12 proteins in crystalline cellulose hydrolysis by cellulolytic microbes should be reconsidered.

    IMPORTANCECellulose is the most abundant organic polymer on earth, and its enzymatic hydrolysis is a key reaction in the global carbon cycle and the conversion of plant biomass to biofuels. The glycoside hydrolases that depolymerize crystalline cellulose have been primarily characterized from isolates. In this study, we demonstrate that adapting microbial consortia from compost to grow on crystalline cellulose

  6. The KIM-family protein-tyrosine phosphatases use distinct reversible oxidation intermediates: Intramolecular or intermolecular disulfide bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Luciana E S F; Shen, Tun-Li; Page, Rebecca; Peti, Wolfgang

    2017-05-26

    The kinase interaction motif (KIM) family of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) includes hematopoietic protein-tyrosine phosphatase (HePTP), striatal-enriched protein-tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), and protein-tyrosine phosphatase receptor type R (PTPRR). KIM-PTPs bind and dephosphorylate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and thereby critically modulate cell proliferation and differentiation. PTP activity can readily be diminished by reactive oxygen species (ROS), e.g. H 2 O 2 , which oxidize the catalytically indispensable active-site cysteine. This initial oxidation generates an unstable sulfenic acid intermediate that is quickly converted into either a sulfinic/sulfonic acid (catalytically dead and irreversible inactivation) or a stable sulfenamide or disulfide bond intermediate (reversible inactivation). Critically, our understanding of ROS-mediated PTP oxidation is not yet sufficient to predict the molecular responses of PTPs to oxidative stress. However, identifying distinct responses will enable novel routes for PTP-selective drug design, important for managing diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we performed a detailed biochemical and molecular study of all KIM-PTP family members to determine their H 2 O 2 oxidation profiles and identify their reversible inactivation mechanism(s). We show that despite having nearly identical 3D structures and sequences, each KIM-PTP family member has a unique oxidation profile. Furthermore, we also show that whereas STEP and PTPRR stabilize their reversibly oxidized state by forming an intramolecular disulfide bond, HePTP uses an unexpected mechanism, namely, formation of a reversible intermolecular disulfide bond. In summary, despite being closely related, KIM-PTPs significantly differ in oxidation profiles. These findings highlight that oxidation protection is critical when analyzing PTPs, for example, in drug screening. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  7. Novel interactions between the HTLV antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2 and the NFAR protein family: Implications for the HTLV lifecycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Jane; Hall, William W. [Centre for Research in Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Ratner, Lee [Department of Medicine, Division of Molecular Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States of America (United States); Sheehy, Noreen [Centre for Research in Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2016-07-15

    The human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1/HTLV-2) antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2 play key roles in the HTLV lifecycles and persistence in the host. Nuclear Factors Associated with double-stranded RNA (NFAR) proteins NF90/110 function in the lifecycles of several viruses and participate in host innate immunity against infection and oncogenesis. Using GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate specific novel interactions between HBZ/APH-2 and NF90/110 and characterised the protein domains involved. Moreover we show that NF90/110 significantly enhance Tax mediated LTR activation, an effect that was abolished by HBZ but enhanced by APH-2. Additionally we found that HBZ and APH-2 modulate the promoter activity of survivin and are capable of antagonising NF110-mediated survivin activation. Thus interactions between HTLV antisense proteins and the NFAR protein family have an overall positive impact on HTLV infection. Hence NFARs may represent potential therapeutic targets in HTLV infected cells. - Highlights: • This study demonstrates for the first time interactions between NF90/110 and the HTLV antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2. • We show that NF90/110 significantly enhance LTR activation by the HTLV Tax protein, an effect that is abolished by HBZ but enhanced by APH-2. • The study shows that even though the HTLV antisense proteins activate survivin expression they antagonize the ability of NF90/110 to do so. • Overall we found that NF90/110 positively regulate HTLV infection and as such might represent a therapeutic target in infected cells.

  8. Novel interactions between the HTLV antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2 and the NFAR protein family: Implications for the HTLV lifecycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Jane; Hall, William W.; Ratner, Lee; Sheehy, Noreen

    2016-01-01

    The human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1/HTLV-2) antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2 play key roles in the HTLV lifecycles and persistence in the host. Nuclear Factors Associated with double-stranded RNA (NFAR) proteins NF90/110 function in the lifecycles of several viruses and participate in host innate immunity against infection and oncogenesis. Using GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate specific novel interactions between HBZ/APH-2 and NF90/110 and characterised the protein domains involved. Moreover we show that NF90/110 significantly enhance Tax mediated LTR activation, an effect that was abolished by HBZ but enhanced by APH-2. Additionally we found that HBZ and APH-2 modulate the promoter activity of survivin and are capable of antagonising NF110-mediated survivin activation. Thus interactions between HTLV antisense proteins and the NFAR protein family have an overall positive impact on HTLV infection. Hence NFARs may represent potential therapeutic targets in HTLV infected cells. - Highlights: • This study demonstrates for the first time interactions between NF90/110 and the HTLV antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2. • We show that NF90/110 significantly enhance LTR activation by the HTLV Tax protein, an effect that is abolished by HBZ but enhanced by APH-2. • The study shows that even though the HTLV antisense proteins activate survivin expression they antagonize the ability of NF90/110 to do so. • Overall we found that NF90/110 positively regulate HTLV infection and as such might represent a therapeutic target in infected cells.

  9. HAMAP: a database of completely sequenced microbial proteome sets and manually curated microbial protein families in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Tania; Auchincloss, Andrea H; Coudert, Elisabeth; Keller, Guillaume; Michoud, Karine; Rivoire, Catherine; Bulliard, Virginie; de Castro, Edouard; Lachaize, Corinne; Baratin, Delphine; Phan, Isabelle; Bougueleret, Lydie; Bairoch, Amos

    2009-01-01

    The growth in the number of completely sequenced microbial genomes (bacterial and archaeal) has generated a need for a procedure that provides UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot-quality annotation to as many protein sequences as possible. We have devised a semi-automated system, HAMAP (High-quality Automated and Manual Annotation of microbial Proteomes), that uses manually built annotation templates for protein families to propagate annotation to all members of manually defined protein families, using very strict criteria. The HAMAP system is composed of two databases, the proteome database and the family database, and of an automatic annotation pipeline. The proteome database comprises biological and sequence information for each completely sequenced microbial proteome, and it offers several tools for CDS searches, BLAST options and retrieval of specific sets of proteins. The family database currently comprises more than 1500 manually curated protein families and their annotation templates that are used to annotate proteins that belong to one of the HAMAP families. On the HAMAP website, individual sequences as well as whole genomes can be scanned against all HAMAP families. The system provides warnings for the absence of conserved amino acid residues, unusual sequence length, etc. Thanks to the implementation of HAMAP, more than 200,000 microbial proteins have been fully annotated in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot (HAMAP website: http://www.expasy.org/sprot/hamap).

  10. Wide diversity in structure and expression profiles among members of the Caenorhabditis elegans globin protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinogradov Serge

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of high throughput genome sequencing facilities and powerful high performance bioinformatic tools has highlighted hitherto unexpected wide occurrence of globins in the three kingdoms of life. In silico analysis of the genome of C. elegans identified 33 putative globin genes. It remains a mystery why this tiny animal might need so many globins. As an inroad to understanding this complexity we initiated a structural and functional analysis of the globin family in C. elegans. Results All 33 C. elegans putative globin genes are transcribed. The translated sequences have the essential signatures of single domain bona fide globins, or they contain a distinct globin domain that is part of a larger protein. All globin domains can be aligned so as to fit the globin fold, but internal interhelical and N- and C-terminal extensions and a variety of amino acid substitutions generate much structural diversity among the globins of C. elegans. Likewise, the encoding genes lack a conserved pattern of intron insertion positioning. We analyze the expression profiles of the globins during the progression of the life cycle, and we find that distinct subsets of globins are induced, or repressed, in wild-type dauers and in daf-2(e1370/insulin-receptor mutant adults, although these animals share several physiological features including resistance to elevated temperature, oxidative stress and hypoxic death. Several globin genes are upregulated following oxygen deprivation and we find that HIF-1 and DAF-2 each are required for this response. Our data indicate that the DAF-2 regulated transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO positively modulates hif-1 transcription under anoxia but opposes expression of the HIF-1 responsive globin genes itself. In contrast, the canonical globin of C. elegans, ZK637.13, is not responsive to anoxia. Reduced DAF-2 signaling leads to enhanced transcription of this globin and DAF-16 is required for this effect

  11. A Blumeria graminis gene family encoding proteins with a C-terminal variable region with homologues in pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grell, Morten N; Mouritzen, Peter; Giese, Henriette

    2003-06-05

    In a study aimed at characterising, at the molecular level, the obligate biotrophic fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh), we have identified a novel group of genes, the Egh16H genes, and shown that two of these are up-regulated during primary infection of barley leaves. The genes have partial homology to a previously characterised Bgh gene family, Egh16. Egh16 and Egh16H are subfamilies of a larger multigene family with presently about 15 members identified in Bgh. Egh16H has about ten members, and we show that five of these are expressed as highly conserved mRNAs that are predicted to encode proteins with a C-terminal variable region. Egh16H has high homology to sequences in Magnaporthe grisea and other plant pathogenic fungi, as well as sequences of both the insect pathogen Metarhizium anisopliae and the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. No close homologues of Egh16H were found in the non-pathogenic fungi Neurospora crassa and Aspergillus nidulans. We predict that Egh16H plays a general role in the interaction between pathogenic fungi and their hosts. At present, the large number of gene family members with C-terminal variation appears to be unique for Bgh, and the Egh16/Egh16H gene family is to our knowledge the largest gene family so far characterised in this fungus.

  12. The tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 family in immune homeostasis and inflammatory cancer diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Y Y; Yao, Y M; Sheng, Z Y

    2013-01-01

    Within the immune system homeostasis is maintained by a myriad of mechanisms that include the regulation of immune cell activation and programmed cell death. The breakdown of immune homeostasis may lead to fatal inflammatory diseases. We set out to identify genes of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8) family that has a functional role in the process of immune homeostasis. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8), which functions as an oncogenic molecule, is also associated with enhanced cell survival and inhibition of apoptosis. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2) governs immune homeostasis in both the innate and adaptive immune system and prevents hyper-responsiveness by negatively regulating signaling via T cell receptors and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). There also exist two highly homologous but uncharacterized proteins, TIPE1 and TIPE3. This review is an attempt to provide a summary of TNFAIP8 family associated with immune homeostasis and inflammatory cancer diseases.

  13. The maize INDETERMINATE1 flowering time regulator defines a highly conserved zinc finger protein family in higher plants

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    Colasanti Joseph

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maize INDETERMINATE1 gene, ID1, is a key regulator of the transition to flowering and the founding member of a transcription factor gene family that encodes a protein with a distinct arrangement of zinc finger motifs. The zinc fingers and surrounding sequence make up the signature ID domain (IDD, which appears to be found in all higher plant genomes. The presence of zinc finger domains and previous biochemical studies showing that ID1 binds to DNA suggests that members of this gene family are involved in transcriptional regulation. Results Comparison of IDD genes identified in Arabidopsis and rice genomes, and all IDD genes discovered in maize EST and genomic databases, suggest that ID1 is a unique member of this gene family. High levels of sequence similarity amongst all IDD genes from maize, rice and Arabidopsis suggest that they are derived from a common ancestor. Several unique features of ID1 suggest that it is a divergent member of the maize IDD family. Although no clear ID1 ortholog was identified in the Arabidopsis genome, highly similar genes that encode proteins with identity extending beyond the ID domain were isolated from rice and sorghum. Phylogenetic comparisons show that these putative orthologs, along with maize ID1, form a group separate from other IDD genes. In contrast to ID1 mRNA, which is detected exclusively in immature leaves, several maize IDD genes showed a broad range of expression in various tissues. Further, Western analysis with an antibody that cross-reacts with ID1 protein and potential orthologs from rice and sorghum shows that all three proteins are detected in immature leaves only. Conclusion Comparative genomic analysis shows that the IDD zinc finger family is highly conserved among both monocots and dicots. The leaf-specific ID1 expression pattern distinguishes it from other maize IDD genes examined. A similar leaf-specific localization pattern was observed for the putative ID1 protein

  14. Tubuliform silk protein: A protein with unique molecular characteristics and mechanical properties in the spider silk fibroin family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, M.; Lewis, R. V.

    2006-02-01

    Orb-web weavers can produce up to six different types of silk and a glue for various functions. Tubuliform silk is unique among them due to its distinct amino acid composition, specific time of production, and atypical mechanical properties. To study the protein composing this silk, tubuliform gland cDNA libraries were constructed from three orb-weaving spiders Argiope aurantia, Araneus gemmoides, and Nephila clavipes. Amino acid composition comparison between the predicted tubuliform silk protein sequence (TuSp1) and the corresponding gland protein confirms that TuSp1 is the major component in tubuliform gland in three spiders. Sequence analysis suggests that TuSp1 shares no significant similarity with its paralogues, while it has conserved sequence motifs with the most primitive spider, Euagrus chisoseus silk protein. The presence of large side-chain amino acids in TuSp1 sequence is consistent with the frustrated β-sheet crystalline structure of tubuliform silk observed in transmission electron microscopy. Repeat unit comparison within species as well as among three spiders exhibits high sequence conservation. Parsimony analysis based on carboxy terminal sequence shows that Argiope and Araneus are more closely related than either is to Nephila which is consistent with phylogenetic analysis based on morphological evidence.

  15. The repertoire of olfactory C family G protein-coupled receptors in zebrafish: candidate chemosensory receptors for amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngai John

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertebrate odorant receptors comprise at least three types of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs: the OR, V1R, and V2R/V2R-like receptors, the latter group belonging to the C family of GPCRs. These receptor families are thought to receive chemosensory information from a wide spectrum of odorant and pheromonal cues that influence critical animal behaviors such as feeding, reproduction and other social interactions. Results Using genome database mining and other informatics approaches, we identified and characterized the repertoire of 54 intact "V2R-like" olfactory C family GPCRs in the zebrafish. Phylogenetic analysis – which also included a set of 34 C family GPCRs from fugu – places the fish olfactory receptors in three major groups, which are related to but clearly distinct from other C family GPCRs, including the calcium sensing receptor, metabotropic glutamate receptors, GABA-B receptor, T1R taste receptors, and the major group of V2R vomeronasal receptor families. Interestingly, an analysis of sequence conservation and selective pressure in the zebrafish receptors revealed the retention of a conserved sequence motif previously shown to be required for ligand binding in other amino acid receptors. Conclusion Based on our findings, we propose that the repertoire of zebrafish olfactory C family GPCRs has evolved to allow the detection and discrimination of a spectrum of amino acid and/or amino acid-based compounds, which are potent olfactory cues in fish. Furthermore, as the major groups of fish receptors and mammalian V2R receptors appear to have diverged significantly from a common ancestral gene(s, these receptors likely mediate chemosensation of different classes of chemical structures by their respective organisms.

  16. A family portrait: structural comparison of the Whirly proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana and Solanum tuberosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappadocia, Laurent; Parent, Jean-Sébastien; Sygusch, Jurgen; Brisson, Normand

    2013-11-01

    DNA double-strand breaks are highly detrimental genomic lesions that routinely arise in genomes. To protect the integrity of their genetic information, all organisms have evolved specialized DNA-repair mechanisms. Whirly proteins modulate DNA repair in plant chloroplasts and mitochondria by binding single-stranded DNA in a non-sequence-specific manner. Although most of the results showing the involvement of the Whirly proteins in DNA repair have been obtained in Arabidopsis thaliana, only the crystal structures of the potato Whirly proteins WHY1 and WHY2 have been reported to date. The present report of the crystal structures of the three Whirly proteins from A. thaliana (WHY1, WHY2 and WHY3) reveals that these structurally similar proteins assemble into tetramers. Furthermore, structural alignment with a potato WHY2-DNA complex reveals that the residues in these proteins are properly oriented to bind single-stranded DNA in a non-sequence-specific manner.

  17. Structural and functional studies of a family of Dictyostelium discoideum developmentally regulated, prestalk genes coding for small proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Juan J; Galardi-Castilla, María; Escalante, Ricardo; Sastre, Leandro

    2008-01-03

    The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum executes a multicellular development program upon starvation. This morphogenetic process requires the differential regulation of a large number of genes and is coordinated by extracellular signals. The MADS-box transcription factor SrfA is required for several stages of development, including slug migration and spore terminal differentiation. Subtractive hybridization allowed the isolation of a gene, sigN (SrfA-induced gene N), that was dependent on the transcription factor SrfA for expression at the slug stage of development. Homology searches detected the existence of a large family of sigN-related genes in the Dictyostelium discoideum genome. The 13 most similar genes are grouped in two regions of chromosome 2 and have been named Group1 and Group2 sigN genes. The putative encoded proteins are 87-89 amino acids long. All these genes have a similar structure, composed of a first exon containing a 13 nucleotides long open reading frame and a second exon comprising the remaining of the putative coding region. The expression of these genes is induced at10 hours of development. Analyses of their promoter regions indicate that these genes are expressed in the prestalk region of developing structures. The addition of antibodies raised against SigN Group 2 proteins induced disintegration of multi-cellular structures at the mound stage of development. A large family of genes coding for small proteins has been identified in D. discoideum. Two groups of very similar genes from this family have been shown to be specifically expressed in prestalk cells during development. Functional studies using antibodies raised against Group 2 SigN proteins indicate that these genes could play a role during multicellular development.

  18. Structural and functional studies of a family of Dictyostelium discoideum developmentally regulated, prestalk genes coding for small proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escalante Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum executes a multicellular development program upon starvation. This morphogenetic process requires the differential regulation of a large number of genes and is coordinated by extracellular signals. The MADS-box transcription factor SrfA is required for several stages of development, including slug migration and spore terminal differentiation. Results Subtractive hybridization allowed the isolation of a gene, sigN (SrfA-induced gene N, that was dependent on the transcription factor SrfA for expression at the slug stage of development. Homology searches detected the existence of a large family of sigN-related genes in the Dictyostelium discoideum genome. The 13 most similar genes are grouped in two regions of chromosome 2 and have been named Group1 and Group2 sigN genes. The putative encoded proteins are 87–89 amino acids long. All these genes have a similar structure, composed of a first exon containing a 13 nucleotides long open reading frame and a second exon comprising the remaining of the putative coding region. The expression of these genes is induced at10 hours of development. Analyses of their promoter regions indicate that these genes are expressed in the prestalk region of developing structures. The addition of antibodies raised against SigN Group 2 proteins induced disintegration of multi-cellular structures at the mound stage of development. Conclusion A large family of genes coding for small proteins has been identified in D. discoideum. Two groups of very similar genes from this family have been shown to be specifically expressed in prestalk cells during development. Functional studies using antibodies raised against Group 2 SigN proteins indicate that these genes could play a role during multicellular development.

  19. C-terminal motif prediction in eukaryotic proteomes using comparative genomics and statistical over-representation across protein families

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    Cutler Sean R

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The carboxy termini of proteins are a frequent site of activity for a variety of biologically important functions, ranging from post-translational modification to protein targeting. Several short peptide motifs involved in protein sorting roles and dependent upon their proximity to the C-terminus for proper function have already been characterized. As a limited number of such motifs have been identified, the potential exists for genome-wide statistical analysis and comparative genomics to reveal novel peptide signatures functioning in a C-terminal dependent manner. We have applied a novel methodology to the prediction of C-terminal-anchored peptide motifs involving a simple z-statistic and several techniques for improving the signal-to-noise ratio. Results We examined the statistical over-representation of position-specific C-terminal tripeptides in 7 eukaryotic proteomes. Sequence randomization models and simple-sequence masking were applied to the successful reduction of background noise. Similarly, as C-terminal homology among members of large protein families may artificially inflate tripeptide counts in an irrelevant and obfuscating manner, gene-family clustering was performed prior to the analysis in order to assess tripeptide over-representation across protein families as opposed to across all proteins. Finally, comparative genomics was used to identify tripeptides significantly occurring in multiple species. This approach has been able to predict, to our knowledge, all C-terminally anchored targeting motifs present in the literature. These include the PTS1 peroxisomal targeting signal (SKL*, the ER-retention signal (K/HDEL*, the ER-retrieval signal for membrane bound proteins (KKxx*, the prenylation signal (CC* and the CaaX box prenylation motif. In addition to a high statistical over-representation of these known motifs, a collection of significant tripeptides with a high propensity for biological function exists

  20. Complexity of the Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1 cellulosome reflects an expansion of family-related protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israeli-Ruimy, Vered; Bule, Pedro; Jindou, Sadanari; Dassa, Bareket; Moraïs, Sarah; Borovok, Ilya; Barak, Yoav; Slutzki, Michal; Hamberg, Yuval; Cardoso, Vânia; Alves, Victor D; Najmudin, Shabir; White, Bryan A; Flint, Harry J; Gilbert, Harry J; Lamed, Raphael; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Bayer, Edward A

    2017-02-10

    Protein-protein interactions play a vital role in cellular processes as exemplified by assembly of the intricate multi-enzyme cellulosome complex. Cellulosomes are assembled by selective high-affinity binding of enzyme-borne dockerin modules to repeated cohesin modules of structural proteins termed scaffoldins. Recent sequencing of the fiber-degrading Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1 genome revealed a particularly elaborate cellulosome system. In total, 223 dockerin-bearing ORFs potentially involved in cellulosome assembly and a variety of multi-modular scaffoldins were identified, and the dockerins were classified into six major groups. Here, extensive screening employing three complementary medium- to high-throughput platforms was used to characterize the different cohesin-dockerin specificities. The platforms included (i) cellulose-coated microarray assay, (ii) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and (iii) in-vivo co-expression and screening in Escherichia coli. The data revealed a collection of unique cohesin-dockerin interactions and support the functional relevance of dockerin classification into groups. In contrast to observations reported previously, a dual-binding mode is involved in cellulosome cell-surface attachment, whereas single-binding interactions operate for cellulosome integration of enzymes. This sui generis cellulosome model enhances our understanding of the mechanisms governing the remarkable ability of R. flavefaciens to degrade carbohydrates in the bovine rumen and provides a basis for constructing efficient nano-machines applied to biological processes.

  1. The novel flightless-I gene brings together two gene families, actin-binding proteins related to gelsolin and leucine-rich-repeat proteins involved in Ras signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudianos, C; Campbell, H D

    1995-05-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster gene flightless-I, involved in gastrulation and muscle degeneration, has Caenorhabditis elegans and human homologues. In these highly conserved genes, two previously known gene families have been brought together, families encoding the actin-binding proteins related to gelsolin and the leucine-rich-repeat (LRR) group of proteins involved in protein-protein interactions. Both these gene families exhibit characteristics of molecular changes involving replication slippage and exon shuffling. Phylogenetic analyses of 19 amino acid sequences of 6 related protein types indicate that actin-associated proteins related to gelsolin are monophyletic to a common ancestor and include flightless proteins. Conversely, comparison of 24 amino acid sequences of LRR proteins including the flightless proteins indicates that flightless proteins are members of a structurally related subgroup. Included in the flightless cluster are human and mouse rsp-1 proteins involved in suppressing v-Ras transformation of cells and the membrane-associated yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisae) adenylate cyclase whose analogous LRRs are required for interaction with Ras proteins. There is a strong possibility that ligands for this group could be related and that flightless may have a similar role in Ras signal transduction. It is hypothesized that an ancestral monomeric gelsolin precursor protein has undergone at least four independent gene reorganization events to account for the structural diversity of the extant family of gelsolin-related proteins and that gene duplication and exon shuffling events occurred prior to or at the beginning of multicellular life, resulting in the evolution of some members of the family soon after the appearance of actin-type proteins.

  2. Localization of the ABCG2 mitoxantrone resistance-associated protein in normal tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fetsch, Patricia A; Abati, Andrea; Litman, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    was consistently found in alveolar pneumocytes, sebaceous glands, transitional epithelium of bladder, interstitial cells of testes, prostate epithelium, endocervical cells of uterus, squamous epithelium of cervix, small and large intestinal mucosa/epithelial cells, islet and acinar cells of pancreas, zona...... ABCG2 have a significant secretory function. These data suggest a dual function for ABCG2 in some tissues: the excretion of toxins and xenobiotics including anti-cancer agents and a potential, as-yet undefined role in the secretion of endogenous substrates....

  3. The UlaG protein family defines novel structural and functional motifs grafted on an ancient RNase fold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coll Miquel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial populations are highly successful at colonizing new habitats and adapting to changing environmental conditions, partly due to their capacity to evolve novel virulence and metabolic pathways in response to stress conditions and to shuffle them by horizontal gene transfer (HGT. A common theme in the evolution of new functions consists of gene duplication followed by functional divergence. UlaG, a unique manganese-dependent metallo-β-lactamase (MBL enzyme involved in L-ascorbate metabolism by commensal and symbiotic enterobacteria, provides a model for the study of the emergence of new catalytic activities from the modification of an ancient fold. Furthermore, UlaG is the founding member of the so-called UlaG-like (UlaGL protein family, a recently established and poorly characterized family comprising divalent (and perhaps trivalent metal-binding MBLs that catalyze transformations on phosphorylated sugars and nucleotides. Results Here we combined protein structure-guided and sequence-only molecular phylogenetic analyses to dissect the molecular evolution of UlaG and to study its phylogenomic distribution, its relatedness with present-day UlaGL protein sequences and functional conservation. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that UlaGL sequences are present in Bacteria and Archaea, with bona fide orthologs found mainly in mammalian and plant-associated Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The incongruence between the UlaGL tree and known species trees indicates exchange by HGT and suggests that the UlaGL-encoding genes provided a growth advantage under changing conditions. Our search for more distantly related protein sequences aided by structural homology has uncovered that UlaGL sequences have a common evolutionary origin with present-day RNA processing and metabolizing MBL enzymes widespread in Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. This observation suggests an ancient origin for the UlaGL family within the broader trunk

  4. SCPS: a fast implementation of a spectral method for detecting protein families on a genome-wide scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepusz, Tamás; Sasidharan, Rajkumar; Paccanaro, Alberto

    2010-03-09

    An important problem in genomics is the automatic inference of groups of homologous proteins from pairwise sequence similarities. Several approaches have been proposed for this task which are "local" in the sense that they assign a protein to a cluster based only on the distances between that protein and the other proteins in the set. It was shown recently that global methods such as spectral clustering have better performance on a wide variety of datasets. However, currently available implementations of spectral clustering methods mostly consist of a few loosely coupled Matlab scripts that assume a fair amount of familiarity with Matlab programming and hence they are inaccessible for large parts of the research community. SCPS (Spectral Clustering of Protein Sequences) is an efficient and user-friendly implementation of a spectral method for inferring protein families. The method uses only pairwise sequence similarities, and is therefore practical when only sequence information is available. SCPS was tested on difficult sets of proteins whose relationships were extracted from the SCOP database, and its results were extensively compared with those obtained using other popular protein clustering algorithms such as TribeMCL, hierarchical clustering and connected component analysis. We show that SCPS is able to identify many of the family/superfamily relationships correctly and that the quality of the obtained clusters as indicated by their F-scores is consistently better than all the other methods we compared it with. We also demonstrate the scalability of SCPS by clustering the entire SCOP database (14,183 sequences) and the complete genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (6,690 sequences). Besides the spectral method, SCPS also implements connected component analysis and hierarchical clustering, it integrates TribeMCL, it provides different cluster quality tools, it can extract human-readable protein descriptions using GI numbers from NCBI, it interfaces with

  5. SCPS: a fast implementation of a spectral method for detecting protein families on a genome-wide scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paccanaro Alberto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important problem in genomics is the automatic inference of groups of homologous proteins from pairwise sequence similarities. Several approaches have been proposed for this task which are "local" in the sense that they assign a protein to a cluster based only on the distances between that protein and the other proteins in the set. It was shown recently that global methods such as spectral clustering have better performance on a wide variety of datasets. However, currently available implementations of spectral clustering methods mostly consist of a few loosely coupled Matlab scripts that assume a fair amount of familiarity with Matlab programming and hence they are inaccessible for large parts of the research community. Results SCPS (Spectral Clustering of Protein Sequences is an efficient and user-friendly implementation of a spectral method for inferring protein families. The method uses only pairwise sequence similarities, and is therefore practical when only sequence information is available. SCPS was tested on difficult sets of proteins whose relationships were extracted from the SCOP database, and its results were extensively compared with those obtained using other popular protein clustering algorithms such as TribeMCL, hierarchical clustering and connected component analysis. We show that SCPS is able to identify many of the family/superfamily relationships correctly and that the quality of the obtained clusters as indicated by their F-scores is consistently better than all the other methods we compared it with. We also demonstrate the scalability of SCPS by clustering the entire SCOP database (14,183 sequences and the complete genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (6,690 sequences. Conclusions Besides the spectral method, SCPS also implements connected component analysis and hierarchical clustering, it integrates TribeMCL, it provides different cluster quality tools, it can extract human-readable protein

  6. Plant acyl-CoA-binding proteins: An emerging family involved in plant development and stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhi-Yan; Arias, Tatiana; Meng, Wei; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-07-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) was first identified in mammals as a neuropeptide, and was demonstrated to belong to an important house-keeping protein family that extends across eukaryotes and some prokaryotes. In plants, the Arabidopsis ACBP family consists of six AtACBPs (AtACBP1 to AtACBP6), and has been investigated using gene knock-out mutants and overexpression lines. Herein, recent findings on the AtACBPs are examined to provide an insight on their functions in various plant developmental processes, such as embryo and seed development, seed dormancy and germination, seedling development and cuticle formation, as well as their roles under various environmental stresses. The significance of the AtACBPs in acyl-CoA/lipid metabolism, with focus on their interaction with long to very-long-chain (VLC) acyl-CoA esters and their potential role in the formation of lipid droplets in seeds and vegetative tissues are discussed. In addition, recent findings on the rice ACBP family are presented. The similarities and differences between ACBPs from Arabidopsis and rice, that represent eudicot and monocot model plants, respectively, are analyzed and the evolution of plant ACBPs by phylogenetic analysis reviewed. Finally, we propose potential uses of plant ACBPs in phytoremediation and in agriculture related to the improvement of environmental stress tolerance and seed oil production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Shedding light on the expansion and diversification of the Cdc48 protein family during the rise of the eukaryotic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Nickias; Kloepper, Tobias H; Fasshauer, Dirk

    2016-10-18

    A defining feature of eukaryotic cells is the presence of various distinct membrane-bound compartments with different metabolic roles. Material exchange between most compartments occurs via a sophisticated vesicle trafficking system. This intricate cellular architecture of eukaryotes appears to have emerged suddenly, about 2 billion years ago, from much less complex ancestors. How the eukaryotic cell acquired its internal complexity is poorly understood, partly because no prokaryotic precursors have been found for many key factors involved in compartmentalization. One exception is the Cdc48 protein family, which consists of several distinct classical ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) proteins with two consecutive AAA domains. Here, we have classified the Cdc48 family through iterative use of hidden Markov models and tree building. We found only one type, Cdc48, in prokaryotes, although a set of eight diverged members that function at distinct subcellular compartments were retrieved from eukaryotes and were probably present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Pronounced changes in sequence and domain structure during the radiation into the LECA set are delineated. Moreover, our analysis brings to light lineage-specific losses and duplications that often reflect important biological changes. Remarkably, we also found evidence for internal duplications within the LECA set that probably occurred during the rise of the eukaryotic cell. Our analysis corroborates the idea that the diversification of the Cdc48 family is closely intertwined with the development of the compartments of the eukaryotic cell.

  8. Members of the heat-shock protein 70 family promote cancer cell growth by distinct mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Mikkel; Daugaard, Mads; Jensen, Mette Hartvig

    2005-01-01

    Whereas the stress-inducible heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) has gained plenty of attention as a putative target for tumor therapy, little is known about the role of other Hsp70 proteins in cancer. Here we present the first thorough analysis of the expression and function of the cytosolic Hsp70 pro...

  9. CATH FunFHMMer web server: protein functional annotations using functional family assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sayoni; Sillitoe, Ian; Lee, David; Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Ward, John; Orengo, Christine A

    2015-07-01

    The widening function annotation gap in protein databases and the increasing number and diversity of the proteins being sequenced presents new challenges to protein function prediction methods. Multidomain proteins complicate the protein sequence-structure-function relationship further as new combinations of domains can expand the functional repertoire, creating new proteins and functions. Here, we present the FunFHMMer web server, which provides Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for query protein sequences based on the functional classification of the domain-based CATH-Gene3D resource. Our server also provides valuable information for the prediction of functional sites. The predictive power of FunFHMMer has been validated on a set of 95 proteins where FunFHMMer performs better than BLAST, Pfam and CDD. Recent validation by an independent international competition ranks FunFHMMer as one of the top function prediction methods in predicting GO annotations for both the Biological Process and Molecular Function Ontology. The FunFHMMer web server is available at http://www.cathdb.info/search/by_funfhmmer. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Three Pseudomonas putida FNR Family Proteins with Different Sensitivities to O2*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Susan A.; Crack, Jason C.; Rolfe, Matthew D.; Acuña, José Manuel Borrero-de; Thomson, Andrew J.; Le Brun, Nick E.; Schobert, Max; Stapleton, Melanie R.; Green, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The Escherichia coli fumarate-nitrate reduction regulator (FNR) protein is the paradigm for bacterial O2-sensing transcription factors. However, unlike E. coli, some bacterial species possess multiple FNR proteins that presumably have evolved to fulfill distinct roles. Here, three FNR proteins (ANR, PP_3233, and PP_3287) from a single bacterial species, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, have been analyzed. Under anaerobic conditions, all three proteins had spectral properties resembling those of [4Fe-4S] proteins. The reactivity of the ANR [4Fe-4S] cluster with O2 was similar to that of E. coli FNR, and during conversion to the apo-protein, via a [2Fe-2S] intermediate, cluster sulfur was retained. Like ANR, reconstituted PP_3233 and PP_3287 were converted to [2Fe-2S] forms when exposed to O2, but their [4Fe-4S] clusters reacted more slowly. Transcription from an FNR-dependent promoter with a consensus FNR-binding site in P. putida and E. coli strains expressing only one FNR protein was consistent with the in vitro responses to O2. Taken together, the experimental results suggest that the local environments of the iron-sulfur clusters in the different P. putida FNR proteins influence their reactivity with O2, such that ANR resembles E. coli FNR and is highly responsive to low concentrations of O2, whereas PP_3233 and PP_3287 have evolved to be less sensitive to O2. PMID:25971977

  11. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  12. The Puf-family RNA-binding protein Puf2 controls sporozoite conversion to liver stages in the malaria parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Müller

    Full Text Available Malaria is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by unicellular, obligate intracellular parasites of the genus Plasmodium. During host switch the malaria parasite employs specialized latent stages that colonize the new host environment. Previous work has established that gametocytes, sexually differentiated stages that are taken up by the mosquito vector, control expression of genes required for mosquito colonization by translational repression. Sexual parasite development is controlled by a DEAD-box RNA helicase of the DDX6 family, termed DOZI. Latency of sporozoites, the transmission stage injected during an infectious blood meal, is controlled by the eIF2alpha kinase IK2, a general inhibitor of protein synthesis. Whether RNA-binding proteins participate in translational regulation in sporozoites remains to be studied. Here, we investigated the roles of two RNA-binding proteins of the Puf-family, Plasmodium Puf1 and Puf2, during sporozoite stage conversion. Our data reveal that, in the rodent malaria parasite P. berghei, Puf2 participates in the regulation of IK2 and inhibits premature sporozoite transformation. Inside mosquito salivary glands puf2⁻ sporozoites transform over time to round forms resembling early intra-hepatic stages. As a result, mutant parasites display strong defects in initiating a malaria infection. In contrast, Puf1 is dispensable in vivo throughout the entire Plasmodium life cycle. Our findings support the notion of a central role for Puf2 in parasite latency during switch between the insect and mammalian hosts.

  13. The Role of Bcl-2 Family Proteins in Therapy Responses of Malignant Astrocytic Gliomas: Bcl2L12 and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotini M. Kouri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is a highly aggressive and lethal brain cancer with a median survival of less than two years after diagnosis. Hallmarks of GBM tumors include soaring proliferative indices, high levels of angiogenesis, diffuse invasion into normal brain parenchyma, resistance toward therapy-induced apoptosis, and pseudopallisading necrosis. Despite the recent advances in neurosurgery, radiation therapy, and the development of targeted chemotherapeutic regimes, GBM remains one of the deadliest types of cancer. Particularly, the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ in combination with radiation therapy prolonged patient survival only marginally, and clinical studies assessing efficacies of targeted therapies, foremost ATP mimetics inhibiting the activity of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs, revealed only few initial responders; tumor recurrence is nearly universal, and salvage therapies to combat such progression remain ineffective. Consequently, myriad preclinical and clinical studies began to define the molecular mechanisms underlying therapy resistance of GBM tumors, and pointed to the Bcl-2 protein family, in particular the atypical member Bcl2-Like 12 (Bcl2L12, as important regulators of therapy-induced cell death. This review will discuss the multi-faceted modi operandi of Bcl-2 family proteins, describe their roles in therapy resistance of malignant glioma, and outline current and future drug development efforts to therapeutically target Bcl-2 proteins.

  14. Specific chlamydial inclusion membrane proteins associate with active Src family kinases in microdomains that interact with the host microtubule network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mital, Jeffrey; Miller, Natalie J; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Hackstadt, Ted

    2010-09-01

    Chlamydiae are Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria that cause diseases with significant medical and economic impact. Chlamydia trachomatis replicates within a vacuole termed an inclusion, which is extensively modified by the insertion of a number of bacterial effector proteins known as inclusion membrane proteins (Incs). Once modified, the inclusion is trafficked in a dynein-dependent manner to the microtubule-organizing centre (MTOC), where it associates with host centrosomes. Here we describe a novel structure on the inclusion membrane comprised of both host and bacterial proteins. Members of the Src family of kinases are recruited to the chlamydial inclusion in an active form. These kinases display a distinct, localized punctate microdomain-like staining pattern on the inclusion membrane that colocalizes with four chlamydial inclusion membrane proteins (Incs) and is enriched in cholesterol. Biochemical studies show that at least two of these Incs stably interact with one another. Furthermore, host centrosomes associate with these microdomain proteins in C. trachomatis-infected cells and in uninfected cells exogenously expressing one of the chlamydial effectors. Together, the data suggest that a specific structure on the C. trachomatis inclusion membrane may be responsible for the known interactions of chlamydiae with the microtubule network and resultant effects on centrosome stability.

  15. The intrinsically disordered structural platform of the plant defence hub protein RPM1-interacting protein 4 provides insights into its mode of action in the host-pathogen interface and evolution of the nitrate-induced domain protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolin; Greenwood, David R; Templeton, Matthew D; Libich, David S; McGhie, Tony K; Xue, Bin; Yoon, Minsoo; Cui, Wei; Kirk, Christopher A; Jones, William T; Uversky, Vladimir N; Rikkerink, Erik H A

    2014-09-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana (At) RPM1-interacting protein 4 (RIN4), targeted by many defence-suppressing bacterial type III effectors and monitored by several resistance proteins, regulates plant immune responses to pathogen-associated molecular patterns and type III effectors. Little is known about the overall protein structure of AtRIN4, especially in its unbound form, and the relevance of structure to its diverse biological functions. AtRIN4 contains two nitrate-induced (NOI) domains and is a member of the NOI family. Using experimental and bioinformatic approaches, we demonstrate that the unbound AtRIN4 is intrinsically disordered under physiological conditions. The intrinsically disordered polypeptide chain of AtRIN4 is interspersed with molecular recognition features (MoRFs) and anchor-identified long-binding regions, potentially allowing it to undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding to partner(s). A poly-l-proline II structure, often responsible for protein recognition, is also identified in AtRIN4. By performing bioinformatics analyses on RIN4 homologues from different plant species and the NOI proteins from Arabidopsis, we infer the conservation of intrinsic disorder, MoRFs and long-binding regions of AtRIN4 in other plant species and the NOI family. Intrinsic disorder and MoRFs could provide RIN4 proteins with the binding promiscuity and plasticity required to act as hubs in a pivotal position within plant defence signalling cascades. © 2014 FEBS.

  16. Prion protein gene analysis in three kindreds with fatal familial insomnia (FFI): Codon 178 mutation and codon 129 polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medori, R.; Tritschler, H.J. (Universita di Bologna (Italy))

    1993-10-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a disease linked to a GAC(Asp) [yields] AAC(Asn) mutation in codon 178 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. FFI is characterized clinically by untreatable progressive insomnia, dysautonomia, and motor dysfunctions and is characterized pathologically by selective thalamic atrophy. The authors confirmed the 178[sup Asn] mutation in the PrP gene of a third FFI family of French ancestry. Three family members who are under 40 years of age and who inherited the mutation showed only reduced perfusion in the basal ganglia on single photon emission computerized tomography. Some FFI features differ from the clinical and neuropathologic findings associated with 178[sup Asn] reported elsewhere. However, additional intragenic mutations accounting for the phenotypic differences were not observed in two affected individuals. In other sporadic and familial forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Straeussler syndrome, Met or Val homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129 is associated with a more severe phenotype, younger age at onset, and faster progression. In FFI, young and old individuals at disease onset had 129[sup Met/Val]. Moreover, of five 178[sup Asn] individuals who are above age-at-onset range and who are well, two have 129[sup Met] and three have 129[sup Met/Val], suggesting that polymorphic site 129 does not modulate FFI phenotypic expression. Genetic heterogeneity and environment may play an important role in inter- and intrafamilial variability of the 178[sup Asn] mutation. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Identification and gene expression analysis of a taxonomically restricted cysteine-rich protein family in reef-building corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Sunagawa

    Full Text Available The amount of genomic sequence information continues to grow at an exponential rate, while the identification and characterization of genes without known homologs remains a major challenge. For non-model organisms with limited resources for manipulative studies, high-throughput transcriptomic data combined with bioinformatics methods provide a powerful approach to obtain initial insights into the function of unknown genes. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of a novel family of putatively secreted, small, cysteine-rich proteins herein named Small Cysteine-Rich Proteins (SCRiPs. Their discovery in expressed sequence tag (EST libraries from the coral Montastraea faveolata required the performance of an iterative search strategy based on BLAST and Hidden-Markov-Model algorithms. While a discernible homolog could neither be identified in the genome of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, nor in a large EST dataset from the symbiotic sea anemone Aiptasia pallida, we identified SCRiP sequences in multiple scleractinian coral species. Therefore, we postulate that this gene family is an example of lineage-specific gene expansion in reef-building corals. Previously published gene expression microarray data suggest that a sub-group of SCRiPs is highly responsive to thermal stress. Furthermore, data from microarray experiments investigating developmental gene expression in the coral Acropora millepora suggest that different SCRiPs may play distinct roles in the development of corals. The function of these proteins remains to be elucidated, but our results from in silico, transcriptomic, and phylogenetic analyses provide initial insights into the evolution of SCRiPs, a novel, taxonomically restricted gene family that may be responsible for a lineage-specific trait in scleractinian corals.

  18. The involvement of Bcl-2 family proteins in AKT-regulated cell survival in cisplatin resistant epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yan; Jin, Shiguang; Li, Xueping; Wang, Daxin

    2017-01-03

    Many studies involving patients with cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer have shown that AKT activation leads to inhibition of apoptosis. The aim of this study was to examine the potential involvement of the Bcl-2 family proteins in AKT-regulated cell survival in response to cisplatin treatment. Cisplatin-sensitive (PEO1) and cisplatin-resistant (PEO4) cells were taken from ascites of patients with ovarian cancer before cisplatin treatment and after development of chemoresistance. It was found that cisplatin treatment activated the AKT signaling pathway and promoted cell proliferation in cisplatin-resistant EOC cells. When AKT was transfected into nucleus of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells, DNA-PK was phosphorylated at S473. The activated AKT (pAKT-S473) in these cells inhibited the death signal induced by cisplatin thereby inhibiting cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. Results from this study showed that the combination of cisplatin, DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441, and AKT inhibitor TCN can overcome drug resistance, increase apoptosis, and re-sensitize PEO4 cells to cisplatin treatment. A decrease in apoptotic activity was seen in PEO4 cells when Bad was downregulated by siRNA, which indicated that Bad promotes apoptosis in PEO4 cells. Use of the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-737 showed that ABT-737 binds to Bcl-2 but not Mcl-1 and releases Bax/Bak which leads to cell apoptosis. The combination of ABT-737 and cisplatin leads to a significant increase in the death of PEO1 and PEO4 cells. All together, these results indicate that Bcl-2 family proteins are regulators of drug resistance. The combination of cisplatin and Bcl-2 family protein inhibitor could be a strategy for the treatment of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer.

  19. Identification of family-specific residue packing motifs and their use for structure-based protein function prediction: I. Method development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Deepak; Huan, Jun; Prins, Jan; Snoeyink, Jack; Wang, Wei; Tropsha, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    Protein function prediction is one of the central problems in computational biology. We present a novel automated protein structure-based function prediction method using libraries of local residue packing patterns that are common to most proteins in a known functional family. Critical to this approach is the representation of a protein structure as a graph where residue vertices (residue name used as a vertex label) are connected by geometrical proximity edges. The approach employs two steps. First, it uses a fast subgraph mining algorithm to find all occurrences of family-specific labeled subgraphs for all well characterized protein structural and functional families. Second, it queries a new structure for occurrences of a set of motifs characteristic of a known family, using a graph index to speed up Ullman's subgraph isomorphism algorithm. The confidence of function inference from structure depends on the number of family-specific motifs found in the query structure compared with their distribution in a large non-redundant database of proteins. This method can assign a new structure to a specific functional family in cases where sequence alignments, sequence patterns, structural superposition and active site templates fail to provide accurate annotation.

  20. Limited cross-reactivity among domains of the Plasmodium falciparum clone 3D7 erythrocyte membrane protein 1 family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Louise; Turner, Louise; Magistrado, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    The var gene-encoded Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family is responsible for antigenic variation and sequestration of infected erythrocytes during malaria. We have previously grouped the 60 PfEMP1 variants of P. falciparum clone 3D7 into groups A and B/A (category A...... from clone 3D7 by using a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a pool of plasma from 63 malaria-exposed Tanzanian individuals. We conclude that naturally acquired antibodies are largely directed toward epitopes varying between different domains with a few, mainly category A, domains...

  1. The Shc Family Protein Adaptor, Rai, Negatively Regulates T Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling by Inhibiting ZAP-70 Recruitment and Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Ferro, Micol; Savino, Maria Teresa; Ortensi, Barbara; Finetti, Francesca; Genovese, Luca; Masi, Giulia; Ulivieri, Cristina; Benati, Daniela; Pelicci, Giuliana; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2011-01-01

    Rai/ShcC is a member of the Shc family of protein adaptors expressed with the highest abundance in the central nervous system, where it exerts a protective function by coupling neurotrophic receptors to the PI3K/Akt survival pathway. Rai is also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in other cell types, including T and B lymphocytes. We have previously reported that in these cells Rai attenuates antigen receptor signaling, thereby impairing not only cell proliferation but also, opposite to neuro...

  2. High Temperature During Rice Grain Filling Enhances Aspartate Metabolism in Grains and Results in Accumulation of Aspartate-Family Amino Acids and Protein Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-gang LIANG

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Global warming causes the exacerbation of rice growing environment, which seriously affects rice growth and reproduction, and finally results in the decrease of rice yield and quality. We investigated the activities of aspartate metabolism enzymes in grains, and the contents of Aspartate-family amino acids and protein components to further understand the effects of high temperature (HT on rice nutritional quality during rice grain filling. Under HT, the average activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AAT and aspartokinase (AK in grains significantly increased, the amino acid contents of aspartate (Asp, lysine (Lys, threonine (Thr, methionine (Met and isoleucine (Ile and the protein contents of albumin, globulin, prolamin and glutelin also significantly increased. The results indicated that HT enhanced Asp metabolism during rice grain filling and the enhancement of Asp metabolism might play an important role in the increase of Asp-family amino acids and protein components in grains. In case of the partial appraisal of the change of Asp-family amino acids and protein components under HT, we introduced eight indicators (amino acid or protein content, ratio of amino acid or protein, amino acid or protein content per grain and amino acid or protein content per panicle to estimate the effects of HT. It is suggested that HT during rice grain filling was benefit for the accumulation of Asp-family amino acids and protein components. Combined with the improvement of Asp-family amino acid ratio in grains under HT, it is suggested that HT during grain filling may improve the rice nutritional quality. However, the yields of parts of Asp-family amino acids and protein components were decreased under HT during rice grain filling.

  3. Cloning and characterization of a human orphan family C G-protein coupled receptor GPRC5D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, H; Jensen, A A; Sheppard, P O

    2001-01-01

    Recently three orphan G-protein coupled receptors, RAIG1, GPRC5B and GPRC5C, with homology to members of family C (metabotropic glutamate receptor-like) have been identified. Using the protein sequences of these receptors as queries we identified overlapping expressed sequence tags which were...... intestine, whereas other organs only express a subset of the genes. In an attempt to delineate the signal transduction pathway(s) of the orphan receptors, a series of chimeric receptors containing the amino terminal domain of the calcium sensing receptor or metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1...... predicted to encode an additional subtype. The full length coding regions of mouse mGprc5d and human GPRC5D were cloned and shown to contain predicted open reading frames of 300 and 345 amino acids, respectively. GPRC5D has seven putative transmembrane segments and is expressed in the cell membrane...

  4. Evolution, expression differentiation and interaction specificity of heterotrimeric G-protein subunit gene family in the mesohexaploid Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Gulab C; Kumar, Roshan; Bisht, Naveen C

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins, comprising of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are important signal transducers which regulate many aspects of fundamental growth and developmental processes in all eukaryotes. Initial studies in model plants Arabidopsis and rice suggest that the repertoire of plant G-protein is much simpler than that observed in metazoans. In order to assess the consequence of whole genome triplication events within Brassicaceae family, we investigated the multiplicity of G-protein subunit genes in mesohexaploid Brassica rapa, a globally important vegetable and oilseed crop. We identified one Gα (BraA.Gα1), three Gβ (BraA.Gβ1, BraA.Gβ2, and BraA.Gβ3), and five Gγ (BraA.Gγ1, BraA.Gγ2, BraA.Gγ3, BraA.Gγ4, and BraA.Gγ5) genes from B. rapa, with a possibility of 15 Gαβγ heterotrimer combinations. Our analysis suggested that the process of genome triplication coupled with gene-loss (gene-fractionation) phenomenon have shaped the quantitative and sequence diversity of G-protein subunit genes in the extant B. rapa genome. Detailed expression analysis using qRT-PCR assays revealed that the G-protein genes have retained ubiquitous but distinct expression profiles across plant development. The expression of multiple G-protein genes was differentially regulated during seed-maturation and germination stages, and in response to various phytohormone treatments and stress conditions. Yeast-based interaction analysis showed that G-protein subunits interacted in most of the possible combinations, with some degree of subunit-specific interaction specificity, to control the functional selectivity of G-protein heterotrimer in different cell and tissue-types or in response to different environmental conditions. Taken together, this research identifies a highly diverse G-protein signaling network known to date from B. rapa, and provides a clue about the possible complexity of G-protein signaling networks present across globally important Brassica species.

  5. Evolution, expression differentiation and interaction specificity of heterotrimeric G-protein subunit gene family in the mesohexaploid Brassica rapa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulab C Arya

    Full Text Available Heterotrimeric G-proteins, comprising of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are important signal transducers which regulate many aspects of fundamental growth and developmental processes in all eukaryotes. Initial studies in model plants Arabidopsis and rice suggest that the repertoire of plant G-protein is much simpler than that observed in metazoans. In order to assess the consequence of whole genome triplication events within Brassicaceae family, we investigated the multiplicity of G-protein subunit genes in mesohexaploid Brassica rapa, a globally important vegetable and oilseed crop. We identified one Gα (BraA.Gα1, three Gβ (BraA.Gβ1, BraA.Gβ2, and BraA.Gβ3, and five Gγ (BraA.Gγ1, BraA.Gγ2, BraA.Gγ3, BraA.Gγ4, and BraA.Gγ5 genes from B. rapa, with a possibility of 15 Gαβγ heterotrimer combinations. Our analysis suggested that the process of genome triplication coupled with gene-loss (gene-fractionation phenomenon have shaped the quantitative and sequence diversity of G-protein subunit genes in the extant B. rapa genome. Detailed expression analysis using qRT-PCR assays revealed that the G-protein genes have retained ubiquitous but distinct expression profiles across plant development. The expression of multiple G-protein genes was differentially regulated during seed-maturation and germination stages, and in response to various phytohormone treatments and stress conditions. Yeast-based interaction analysis showed that G-protein subunits interacted in most of the possible combinations, with some degree of subunit-specific interaction specificity, to control the functional selectivity of G-protein heterotrimer in different cell and tissue-types or in response to different environmental conditions. Taken together, this research identifies a highly diverse G-protein signaling network known to date from B. rapa, and provides a clue about the possible complexity of G-protein signaling networks present across globally important Brassica

  6. The RST and PARP-like domain containing SRO protein family: analysis of protein structure, function and conservation in land plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salojärvi Jarkko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SROs (SIMILAR TO RCD-ONE are a group of plant-specific proteins which have important functions in stress adaptation and development. They contain the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP domain and a C-terminal RST (RCD-SRO-TAF4 domain. In addition to these domains, several, but not all, SROs contain an N-terminal WWE domain. Results SROs are present in all analyzed land plants and sequence analysis differentiates between two structurally distinct groups; cryptogams and monocots possess only group I SROs whereas eudicots also contain group II. Group I SROs possess an N-terminal WWE domain (PS50918 but the WWE domain is lacking in group II SROs. Group I domain structure is widely represented in organisms as distant as humans (for example, HsPARP11. We propose a unified nomenclature for the SRO family. The SROs are able to interact with transcription factors through the C-terminal RST domain but themselves are generally not regulated at the transcriptional level. The most conserved feature of the SROs is the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PS51059 domain. However, bioinformatic analysis of the SRO PARP domain fold-structure and biochemical assays of AtRCD1 suggested that SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Conclusions The SROs are a highly conserved family of plant specific proteins. Sequence analysis of the RST domain implicates a highly preserved protein structure in that region. This might have implications for functional conservation. We suggest that, despite the presence of the catalytic core of the PARP domain, the SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Nevertheless, the function of SROs is critical for plants and might be related to transcription factor regulation and complex formation.

  7. Structural and functional insights into the interaction between the Cas family scaffolding protein p130Cas and the focal adhesion-associated protein paxillin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chi; Miller, Darcie J.; Guibao, Cristina D.; Donato, Dominique M.; Hanks, Steven K.; Zheng, Jie J.

    2017-08-31

    The Cas family scaffolding protein p130Cas is a Src substrate localized in focal adhesions (FAs) and functions in integrin signaling to promote cell motility, invasion, proliferation, and survival. p130Cas targeting to FAs is essential for its tyrosine phosphorylation and downstream signaling. Although the N-terminal SH3 domain is important for p130Cas localization, it has also been reported that the C-terminal region is involved in p130Cas FA targeting. The C-terminal region of p130Cas or Cas family homology domain (CCHD) has been reported to adopt a structure similar to that of the focal adhesion kinase C-terminal focal adhesion-targeting domain. The mechanism by which the CCHD promotes FA targeting of p130Cas, however, remains unclear. In this study, using a calorimetry approach, we identified the first LD motif (LD1) of the FA-associated protein paxillin as the binding partner of the p130Cas CCHD (in a 1:1 stoichiometry with a Kd ~4.2 μM) and elucidated the structure of the p130Cas CCHD in complex with the paxillin LD1 motif by X-ray crystallography. Of note, a comparison of the CCHD/LD1 complex with a previously solved structure of CCHD in complex with the SH2-containing protein NSP3 revealed that LD1 had almost identical positioning of key hydrophobic and acidic residues relative to NSP3. Because paxillin is one of the key scaffold molecules in FAs, we propose that the interaction between the p130Cas CCHD and the LD1 motif of paxillin plays an important role in p130Cas FA targeting.

  8. The Role of RUB (related to ubiquitin) Family of Proteins in the Hormone Response. Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callis, Judy [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology

    2013-03-22

    The Rub pathway is a conserved protein modification pathway. RUB (called Rubp1 in budding yeast, Nedd8 in animals and RUB in plants) is a ubiquitin-like 76-amino acid protein. It covalently attaches to protein using an enzymatic machinery analogous to the enzymes that attach ubiquitin to its substrate proteins. However, the nature of the complement of Rub-modified proteins in organisms was not clear. From bioinformatics analyses, one can identify a Rub activating enzymes and Rub conjugating enzymes. However, in many cases, their biochemical properties were not described. In DOE-funded work, we made major advances in our understanding of the Rub pathway in yeast and plants, work that is applicable to other organisms as well. There is a multi-subunit enzyme called SCF in all eukaryotes. The SCF consists of several subunits that serve as a scaffold (the cullin, SKP and RBX subunits) and one subunit that interacts with the substrate. This cullin protein (called Cdc53p in yeast and CULLIN 1 in plants and animals) was a known Rub target. In this work, we identified additional Rub targets in yeast as the other cullin-like proteins Cul3p and Rtt101p. Additionally we described the conservation of the Rub pathway because plant RUB1 can conjugated to yeast Cdc53p- in yeast. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, we characterized the Rub activating enzymes and showed that they are not biochemically equivalent. We also showed that the Rub pathway is essential in plants and characterized plants with reduced levels of rub proteins. These plants are affected in multiple developmental processes. We discovered that they over-produce ethylene as dark-grown seedlings. We characterized a mutant allele of CULLIN1 in Arabidopsis with impaired interaction with RBX and showed that it is unstable in vivo. We used our knowledge of monitoring protein degradation to map the degradation determinants in a plant transcription factor. Finally, we took a mass spectrometric approach to identify

  9. The 1.3-A resolution structure of Nitrosomonas europaea Rh50 and mechanistic implications for NH3 transport by Rhesus family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Domenico; Li, Xiao-Dan; Durand, Anne; Tomizaki, Takashi; Cherif-Zahar, Baya; Matassi, Giorgio; Merrick, Mike; Winkler, Fritz K

    2007-12-04

    The Rhesus (Rh) proteins are a family of integral membrane proteins found throughout the animal kingdom that also occur in a number of lower eukaryotes. The significance of Rh proteins derives from their presence in the human red blood cell membrane, where they constitute the second most important group of antigens used in transfusion medicine after the ABO group. Rh proteins are related to the ammonium transport (Amt) protein family and there is considerable evidence that, like Amt proteins, they function as ammonia channels. We have now solved the structure of a rare bacterial homologue (from Nitrosomonas europaea) of human Rh50 proteins at a resolution of 1.3 A. The protein is a trimer, and analysis of its subunit interface strongly argues that all Rh proteins are likely to be homotrimers and that the human erythrocyte proteins RhAG and RhCE/D are unlikely to form heterooligomers as previously proposed. When compared with structures of bacterial Amt proteins, NeRh50 shows several distinctive features of the substrate conduction pathway that support the concept that Rh proteins have much lower ammonium affinities than Amt proteins and might potentially function bidirectionally.

  10. Taxonomic distribution, repeats, and functions of the S1 domain-containing proteins as members of the OB-fold family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deryusheva, Evgeniia I; Machulin, Andrey V; Selivanova, Olga M; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2017-04-01

    Proteins of the nucleic acid-binding proteins superfamily perform such functions as processing, transport, storage, stretching, translation, and degradation of RNA. It is one of the 16 superfamilies containing the OB-fold in protein structures. Here, we have analyzed the superfamily of nucleic acid-binding proteins (the number of sequences exceeds 200,000) and obtained that this superfamily prevalently consists of proteins containing the cold shock DNA-binding domain (ca. 131,000 protein sequences). Proteins containing the S1 domain compose 57% from the cold shock DNA-binding domain family. Furthermore, we have found that the S1 domain was identified mainly in the bacterial proteins (ca. 83%) compared to the eukaryotic and archaeal proteins, which are available in the UniProt database. We have found that the number of multiple repeats of S1 domain in the S1 domain-containing proteins depends on the taxonomic affiliation. All archaeal proteins contain one copy of the S1 domain, while the number of repeats in the eukaryotic proteins varies between 1 and 15 and correlates with the protein size. In the bacterial proteins, the number of repeats is no more than 6, regardless of the protein size. The large variation of the repeat number of S1 domain as one of the structural variants of the OB-fold is a distinctive feature of S1 domain-containing proteins. Proteins from the other families and superfamilies have either one OB-fold or change slightly the repeat numbers. On the whole, it can be supposed that the repeat number is a vital for multifunctional activity of the S1 domain-containing proteins. Proteins 2017; 85:602-613. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Systematic functional analysis of the Ras GTPase family unveils a conserved network required for anterograde protein trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Marie-Elaine; Jenna, Sarah; Baillie, David L; Bossé, Roger; Simpson, Jeremy C; Chevet, Eric; Taouji, Saïd

    2017-01-01

    Phylogeny is often used to compare entire families of genes/proteins. We previously showed that classification of Caenorhabditis elegans Rho GTPases on the basis of their enzymatic properties was significantly different from sequence alignments. To further develop this concept, we have developed an integrated approach to classify C. elegans small GTPases based on functional data comprising affinity for GTP, sub-cellular localization, tissue distribution and silencing impact. This analysis led to establish a novel functional classification for small GTPases. To test the relevance of this classification in mammals, we focused our attention on the human orthologs of small GTPases from a specific group comprising arf-1.2, evl-20, arl-1, Y54E10BR.2, unc-108 and rab-7. We then tested their involvement in protein secretion and membrane traffic in mammalian systems. Using this approach we identify a novel network containing 18 GTPases, and 23 functionally interacting proteins, conserved between C. elegans and mammals, which is involved in membrane traffic and protein secretion. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Kernel based machine learning algorithm for the efficient prediction of type III polyketide synthase family of proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallika V

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Type III Polyketide synthases (PKS are family of proteins considered to have significant role in the biosynthesis of various polyketides in plants, fungi and bacteria. As these proteins show positive effects to human health, more researches are going on regarding this particular protein. Developing a tool to identify the probability of sequence, being a type III polyketide synthase will minimize the time consumption and manpower efforts. In this approach, we have designed and implemented PKSIIIpred, a high performance prediction server for type III PKS where the classifier is Support Vector Machine (SVM. Based on the limited training dataset, the tool efficiently predicts the type III PKS superfamily of proteins with high sensitivity and specificity. PKSIIIpred is available at http://type3pks.in/prediction/. We expect that this tool may serve as a useful resource for type III PKS researchers. Currently work is being progressed for further betterment of prediction accuracy by including more sequence features in the training dataset.

  13. Genomic Enzymology: Web Tools for Leveraging Protein Family Sequence-Function Space and Genome Context to Discover Novel Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlt, John A

    2017-08-22

    The exponentially increasing number of protein and nucleic acid sequences provides opportunities to discover novel enzymes, metabolic pathways, and metabolites/natural products, thereby adding to our knowledge of biochemistry and biology. The challenge has evolved from generating sequence information to mining the databases to integrating and leveraging the available information, i.e., the availability of "genomic enzymology" web tools. Web tools that allow identification of biosynthetic gene clusters are widely used by the natural products/synthetic biology community, thereby facilitating the discovery of novel natural products and the enzymes responsible for their biosynthesis. However, many novel enzymes with interesting mechanisms participate in uncharacterized small-molecule metabolic pathways; their discovery and functional characterization also can be accomplished by leveraging information in protein and nucleic acid databases. This Perspective focuses on two genomic enzymology web tools that assist the discovery novel metabolic pathways: (1) Enzyme Function Initiative-Enzyme Similarity Tool (EFI-EST) for generating sequence similarity networks to visualize and analyze sequence-function space in protein families and (2) Enzyme Function Initiative-Genome Neighborhood Tool (EFI-GNT) for generating genome neighborhood networks to visualize and analyze the genome context in microbial and fungal genomes. Both tools have been adapted to other applications to facilitate target selection for enzyme discovery and functional characterization. As the natural products community has demonstrated, the enzymology community needs to embrace the essential role of web tools that allow the protein and genome sequence databases to be leveraged for novel insights into enzymological problems.

  14. VHDL, a larval storage protein from the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, is a member of the vitellogenin gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sum, Herbert; Haunerland, Norbert H

    2007-10-01

    The hemolymph of last instar larvae of the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea contains a blue very high-density lipoprotein (VHDL) that is selectively taken up into fat body prior to pupation. Its amino-terminal sequence was determined by Edman degradation, and used to design a degenerate primer for PCR amplification. With 5' and 3' RACE techniques, the entire cDNA coding for VHDL was amplified and sequenced. Conceptual translation reveals a 173 kDa protein that contains a 15 amino acid signal sequence immediately before the experimentally determined N-terminus of the mature protein. The protein contains a typical lipoprotein N-terminal domain, and shows high sequence similarity to vitellogenins from Lepidoptera and other insect species. VHDL mRNA was not detectable in adult H. zea, and antibodies raised against VHDL did not react with adult hemolymph or yolk proteins. Therefore VHDL, although a member of the vitellogenin gene family, seems to be distinct from the vitellogenin expressed in adult females.

  15. In Entamoeba histolytica, a BspA family protein is required for chemotaxis toward tumour necrosis factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Silvestre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Entamoeba histolytica cell migration is essential for the development of human amoebiasis (an infectious disease characterized by tissue invasion and destruction. The tissue inflammation associated with tumour necrosis factor (TNF secretion by host cells is a well-documented feature of amoebiasis. Tumour necrosis factor is a chemoattractant for E. histolytica, and the parasite may have a TNF receptor at its cell surface. Methods: confocal microscopy, RNA Sequencing, bioinformatics, RNA antisense techniques and histological analysis of human colon explants were used to characterize the interplay between TNF and E. histolytica. Results: an antibody against human TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1 stained the E. histolytica trophozoite surface and (on immunoblots binds to a 150-kDa protein. Proteome screening with the TNFR1 sequence revealed a BspA family protein in E. histolytica that carries a TNFR signature domain and six leucine-rich repeats (named here as "cell surface protein", CSP, in view of its cellular location. Cell surface protein shares structural homologies with Toll-Like receptors, colocalizes with TNF and is internalized in TNF-containing vesicles. Reduction of cellular CSP levels abolished chemotaxis toward TNF and blocked parasite invasion of human colon. Conclusions: there is a clear link between TNF chemotaxis, CSP and pathogenesis.

  16. Identification of MarvelD3 as a tight junction-associated transmembrane protein of the occludin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balda Maria S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tight junctions are an intercellular adhesion complex of epithelial and endothelial cells, and form a paracellular barrier that restricts the diffusion of solutes on the basis of size and charge. Tight junctions are formed by multiprotein complexes containing cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. How these components work together to form functional tight junctions is still not well understood and will require a complete understanding of the molecular composition of the junction. Results Here we identify a new transmembrane component of tight junctions: MarvelD3, a four-span transmembrane protein. Its predicted transmembrane helices form a Marvel (MAL and related proteins for vesicle traffic and membrane link domain, a structural motif originally discovered in proteins involved in membrane apposition and fusion events, such as the tight junction proteins occludin and tricellulin. In mammals, MarvelD3 is expressed as two alternatively spliced isoforms. Both isoforms exhibit a broad tissue distribution and are expressed by different types of epithelial as well as endothelial cells. MarvelD3 co-localises with occludin at tight junctions in intestinal and corneal epithelial cells. RNA interference experiments in Caco-2 cells indicate that normal MarvelD3 expression is not required for the formation of functional tight junctions but depletion results in monolayers with increased transepithelial electrical resistance. Conclusions Our data indicate that MarvelD3 is a third member of the tight junction-associated occludin family of transmembrane proteins. Similar to occludin, normal expression of MarvelD3 is not essential for the formation of functional tight junctions. However, MarvelD3 functions as a determinant of epithelial paracellular permeability properties.

  17. Genome-wide screening of Oryza sativa ssp. japonica and indica reveals a complex family of proteins with ribosome-inactivating protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wytynck, Pieter; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J M

    2017-11-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are cytotoxic enzymes capable of halting protein synthesis by irreversible modification of ribosomes. Although RIPs are widespread they are not ubiquitous in the plant kingdom. The physiological importance of RIPs is not fully elucidated, but evidence suggests a role in the protection of the plant against biotic and abiotic stresses. Searches in the rice genome revealed a large and highly complex family of proteins with a RIP domain. A comparative analysis retrieved 38 RIP sequences from the genome sequence of Oryza sativa subspecies japonica and 34 sequences from the subspecies indica. The RIP sequences are scattered over different chromosomes but are mostly found on the third chromosome. The phylogenetic tree revealed the pairwise clustering of RIPs from japonica and indica. Molecular modeling and sequence analysis yielded information on the catalytic site of the enzyme, and suggested that a large part of RIP domains probably possess N-glycosidase activity. Several RIPs are differentially expressed in plant tissues and in response to specific abiotic stresses. This study provides an overview of RIP motifs in rice and will help to understand their biological role(s) and evolutionary relationships. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rhizobiales-like Phosphatase 2 from Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Novel Phospho-tyrosine-specific Phospho-protein Phosphatase (PPP) Family Protein Phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrig, R Glen; Labandera, Anne-Marie; Muhammad, Jamshed; Samuel, Marcus; Moorhead, Greg B

    2016-03-11

    Cellular signaling through protein tyrosine phosphorylation is well established in mammalian cells. Although lacking the classic tyrosine kinases present in humans, plants have a tyrosine phospho-proteome that rivals human cells. Here we report a novel plant tyrosine phosphatase from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtRLPH2) that, surprisingly, has the sequence hallmarks of a phospho-serine/threonine phosphatase belonging to the PPP family. Rhizobiales/Rhodobacterales/Rhodospirillaceae-like phosphatases (RLPHs) are conserved in plants and several other eukaryotes, but not in animals. We demonstrate that AtRLPH2 is localized to the plant cell cytosol, is resistant to the classic serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin, but is inhibited by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor orthovanadate and is particularly sensitive to inhibition by the adenylates, ATP and ADP. AtRLPH2 displays remarkable selectivity toward tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides versus serine/threonine phospho-peptides and readily dephosphorylates a classic tyrosine phosphatase protein substrate, suggesting that in vivo it is a tyrosine phosphatase. To date, only one other tyrosine phosphatase is known in plants; thus AtRLPH2 represents one of the missing pieces in the plant tyrosine phosphatase repertoire and supports the concept of protein tyrosine phosphorylation as a key regulatory event in plants. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Identification and characterization of a chitin-binding protein purified from coelomic fluid of the lugworm Arenicola marina defining a novel protein sequence family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitashenkova, Nina; Moeller, Jesper Bonnet; Leth-Larsen, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    We have isolated a novel type of lectin named Arenicola marina lectin-1 (AML-1) from the lugworm Arenicola marina. The lectin was purified from the coelomic fluid by affinity chromatography on a GlcNAc-derivatized column and eluted with GlcNAc. On SDS-PAGE, AML-1 showed an apparent molecular mass......, respectively, were isolated from a coelomocyte cDNA library. The two clones designated AML-1a and AML-1b were 92% identical at the protein level, and represent a novel type of protein sequence family. Purified AML-1 induced agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes, which could be inhibited by N......-acetylated saccharides. Recombinant AML-1b showed the same band pattern as the native protein, whereas recombinant AML-1a reduced lacked a 27-kDa band. AML-1b bound GlcNAc-derivatized columns and chitin, whereas AML-1a did not bind to these matrices. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed, that AML-1 is expressed...

  20. A family of E. coli expression vectors for laboratory scale and high throughput soluble protein production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bottomley Stephen P

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past few years, both automated and manual high-throughput protein expression and purification has become an accessible means to rapidly screen and produce soluble proteins for structural and functional studies. However, many of the commercial vectors encoding different solubility tags require different cloning and purification steps for each vector, considerably slowing down expression screening. We have developed a set of E. coli expression vectors with different solubility tags that allow for parallel cloning from a single PCR product and can be purified using the same protocol. Results The set of E. coli expression vectors, encode for either a hexa-histidine tag or the three most commonly used solubility tags (GST, MBP, NusA and all with an N-terminal hexa-histidine sequence. The result is two-fold: the His-tag facilitates purification by immobilised metal affinity chromatography, whilst the fusion domains act primarily as solubility aids during expression, in addition to providing an optional purification step. We have also incorporated a TEV recognition sequence following the solubility tag domain, which allows for highly specific cleavage (using TEV protease of the fusion protein to yield native protein. These vectors are also designed for ligation-independent cloning and they possess a high-level expressing T7 promoter, which is suitable for auto-induction. To validate our vector system, we have cloned four different genes and also one gene into all four vectors and used small-scale expression and purification techniques. We demonstrate that the vectors are capable of high levels of expression and that efficient screening of new proteins can be readily achieved at the laboratory level. Conclusion The result is a set of four rationally designed vectors, which can be used for streamlined cloning, expression and purification of target proteins in the laboratory and have the potential for being adaptable to a high

  1. Multiscale molecular dynamics simulations of membrane remodeling by Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs family proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Chan; Haohua, Wen; Lanyuan, Lu; Jun, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Membrane curvature is no longer thought of as a passive property of the membrane; rather, it is considered as an active, regulated state that serves various purposes in the cell such as between cells and organelle definition. While transport is usually mediated by tiny membrane bubbles known as vesicles or membrane tubules, such communication requires complex interplay between the lipid bilayers and cytosolic proteins such as members of the Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) superfamily of proteins. With rapid developments in novel experimental techniques, membrane remodeling has become a rapidly emerging new field in recent years. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are important tools for obtaining atomistic information regarding the structural and dynamic aspects of biological systems and for understanding the physics-related aspects. The availability of more sophisticated experimental data poses challenges to the theoretical community for developing novel theoretical and computational techniques that can be used to better interpret the experimental results to obtain further functional insights. In this review, we summarize the general mechanisms underlying membrane remodeling controlled or mediated by proteins. While studies combining experiments and molecular dynamics simulations recall existing mechanistic models, concurrently, they extend the role of different BAR domain proteins during membrane remodeling processes. We review these recent findings, focusing on how multiscale molecular dynamics simulations aid in understanding the physical basis of BAR domain proteins, as a representative of membrane-remodeling proteins. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21403182) and the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong, China (Grant No. CityU 21300014).

  2. Identification of family-specific residue packing motifs and their use for structure-based protein function prediction: II. Case studies and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Deepak; Huan, Jun; Prins, Jan; Snoeyink, Jack; Wang, Wei; Tropsha, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    This paper describes several case studies concerning protein function inference from its structure using our novel approach described in the accompanying paper. This approach employs family-specific motifs, i.e. three-dimensional amino acid packing patterns that are statistically prevalent within a protein family. For our case studies we have selected families from the SCOP and EC classifications and analyzed the discriminating power of the motifs in depth. We have devised several benchmarks to compare motifs mined from unweighted topological graph representations of protein structures with those from distance-labeled (weighted) representations, demonstrating the superiority of the latter for function inference in most families. We have tested the robustness of our motif library by inferring the function of new members added to SCOP families, and discriminating between several families that are structurally similar but functionally divergent. Furthermore we have applied our method to predict function for several proteins characterized in structural genomics projects, including orphan structures, and we discuss several selected predictions in depth. Some of our predictions have been corroborated by other computational methods, and some have been validated by independent experimental studies, validating our approach for protein function inference from structure.

  3. A testis-specific and testis developmentally regulated tumor protein D52 (TPD52)-like protein TPD52L3/hD55 interacts with TPD52 family proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qinhong; Chen Jie; Zhu Li; Liu Yun; Zhou Zuomin; Sha Jiahao; Wang Shui; Li Jianmin

    2006-01-01

    Tumor protein D52-like proteins (TPD52) are small coiled-coil motif bearing proteins that were first identified in breast cancer. TPD52 and related proteins have been implicated in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and vesicle trafficking. To date, three human TPD52 members had been identified, named hD52 (TPD52), hD53 (TPD52L1), and hD54 (TPD52L2). The most important characteristic of the protein family is a highly conserved coiled-coil motif that is required for homo- and heteromeric interaction with other TPD52-like proteins. Herein, we identified a novel TPD52-like sequence (TPD52L3, or hD55) in human testis using cDNA microarray. Sequence analysis of the deduced protein suggests that hD55 contains a coiled-coil motif and is highly conserved compared with other TPD52-like sequences. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down assays revealed that hD55 interacts with hD52, hD53, hD54, and itself. cDNA microarray detection found that hD55 was expressed at 5.6-fold higher levels in adult testis than in fetal testis. Additionally, the expression profile shows that hD55 is testis-specific, indicating a potential role for hD55 in testis development and spermatogenesis

  4. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the Alfin-like protein family in Arabidopsis lyrata, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Thellungiella halophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Song

    Full Text Available In previous studies, the Alfin1 gene, a transcription factor, enhanced salt tolerance in alfalfa, primarily through altering gene expression levels in the root. Here, we examined the molecular evolution of the Alfin-like (AL proteins in two Arabidopsis species (A. lyrata and A. thaliana and a salt-tolerant close relative Thellungiella halophila. These AL-like proteins could be divided into four groups and the two known DUF3594 and PHD-finger domains had co-evolved within each group of genes, irrespective of species, due to gene duplication events in the common ancestor of all three species while gene loss was observed only in T. halophila. To detect whether natural selection acted in the evolution of AL genes, we calculated synonymous substitution ratios (dn/ds and codon usage statistics, finding positive selection operated on four branches and significant differences in biased codon usage in the AL family between T. halophila and A. lyrata or A. thaliana. Distinctively, only the AL7 branch was under positive selection on the PHD-finger domain and the three members on the branch showed the smallest difference when codon bias was evaluated among the seven clusters. Functional analysis based on transgenic overexpression lines and T-DNA insertion mutants indicated that salt-stress-induced AtAL7 could play a negative role in salt tolerance of A. thaliana, suggesting that adaptive evolution occurred in the members of AL gene family.

  5. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the Alfin-like protein family in Arabidopsis lyrata, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Thellungiella halophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu; Gao, Jie; Yang, Fengxi; Kua, Chai-Shian; Liu, Jingxin; Cannon, Charles H

    2013-01-01

    In previous studies, the Alfin1 gene, a transcription factor, enhanced salt tolerance in alfalfa, primarily through altering gene expression levels in the root. Here, we examined the molecular evolution of the Alfin-like (AL) proteins in two Arabidopsis species (A. lyrata and A. thaliana) and a salt-tolerant close relative Thellungiella halophila. These AL-like proteins could be divided into four groups and the two known DUF3594 and PHD-finger domains had co-evolved within each group of genes, irrespective of species, due to gene duplication events in the common ancestor of all three species while gene loss was observed only in T. halophila. To detect whether natural selection acted in the evolution of AL genes, we calculated synonymous substitution ratios (dn/ds) and codon usage statistics, finding positive selection operated on four branches and significant differences in biased codon usage in the AL family between T. halophila and A. lyrata or A. thaliana. Distinctively, only the AL7 branch was under positive selection on the PHD-finger domain and the three members on the branch showed the smallest difference when codon bias was evaluated among the seven clusters. Functional analysis based on transgenic overexpression lines and T-DNA insertion mutants indicated that salt-stress-induced AtAL7 could play a negative role in salt tolerance of A. thaliana, suggesting that adaptive evolution occurred in the members of AL gene family.

  6. Proteomic identification of putative microRNA394 target genes in Arabidopsis thaliana identifies major latex protein family members critical for normal development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litholdo, Celso G; Parker, Benjamin; Eamens, Andrew L

    2016-01-01

    , the identification of proteins targeted by LCR F-box itself has proven problematic. Here, a proteomic analysis of shoot apices from plants with altered LCR levels identified a member of the Latex Protein (MLP) family gene as a potential LCR F-box target. Bioinformatic and molecular analyses also suggested that other...... MLP family members are likely to be targets for this post-translational regulation. Direct interaction between LCR F-Box and MLP423 was validated. Additional MLP members had reduction in protein accumulation, in varying degrees, mediated by LCR F-Box. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines, in which MLP28...... Taken together, the results demonstrate that MLPs are driven to degradation by LCR, and indicate that MLP gene family is target of miR394-LCR regulatory node, representing potential targets for directly post-translational regulation mediated by LCR F-Box. In addition, MLP28 family member is associated...

  7. Expression profile of the entire family of Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors in mouse and rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebendal Ted

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are membrane-bound receptors with long N termini. This family has 33 members in humans. Several Adhesion GPCRs are known to have important physiological functions in CNS development and immune system response mediated by large cell surface ligands. However, the majority of Adhesion GPCRs are still poorly studied orphans with unknown functions. Results In this study we performed the extensive tissue localization analysis of the entire Adhesion GPCR family in rat and mouse. By applying the quantitative real-time PCR technique we have produced comparable expression profile for each of the members in the Adhesion family. The results are compared with literature data and data from the Allen Brain Atlas project. Our results suggest that the majority of the Adhesion GPCRs are either expressed in the CNS or ubiquitously. In addition the Adhesion GPCRs from the same phylogenetic group have either predominant CNS or peripheral expression, although each of their expression profile is unique. Conclusion Our findings indicate that many of Adhesion GPCRs are expressed, and most probably, have function in CNS. The related Adhesion GPCRs are well conserved in their structure and interestingly have considerable overlap in their expression profiles, suggesting similarities among the physiological roles for members within many of the phylogenetically related clusters.

  8. Lipasin, thermoregulated in brown fat, is a novel but atypical member of the angiopoietin-like protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhiyao; Yao, Fayi; Abou-Samra, Abdul B; Zhang, Ren

    2013-01-18

    Hyperlipidemia is a major contributor to cardiovascular diseases. Members of the angiopoietin-like protein family (ANGPTLs) are important determinants of blood lipid levels. Lipasin, a newly identified gene that regulates serum triglycerides, is homologous to ANGPTL3's N-terminal domain, which is sufficient and necessary for blood lipid regulation. Brown fat is critical in mediating energy homeostasis. Thermogenesis is the primary function of brown fat, in which Lipasin and some ANGPTLs are abundant; it is unknown, however, whether these genes are thermoregulated. We therefore comprehensively examined the thermoregulation of Lipasin and ANGPTLs in brown fat. Here we show that Lipasin is a novel but atypical member of the ANGPTL family because it is within the same branch as ANGPTL3 and 4 by phylogenetic analysis. The mRNA levels of Lipasin are dramatically increased in the cold environment (4 °C for 4 h) whereas those of ANGPTL4 and ANGPTL2 are suppressed. Fasting dramatically suppresses Lipasin but increases ANGPTL4. High-fat diet treatment increases Lipasin, but reduces ANGPTL2. The distinct transcriptional regulations of Lipasin, ANGPTL2 and ANGPTL4 in brown fat in response to cold exposure and nutritional stimulation suggest distinct physiological roles for ANGPTL family members in mediating thermogenesis and energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fisheries productivity and its effects on the consumption of animal protein and food sharing of fishers' and non-fishers' families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Mikaelle Kaline Bezerra; de Melo, Clarissy Dinyz; Lopes, Priscila Fabiana Macedo

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the consumption of animal protein and food sharing among fishers' and non-fishers' families of the northeastern Brazilian coast. The diet of these families was registered through the 24-hour-recall method during 10 consecutive days in January (good fishing season) and June (bad fishing season) 2012. Fish consumption was not different between the fishers' and non-fishers' families, but varied according to fisheries productivity to both groups. Likewise, food sharing was not different between the two groups, but food was shared more often when fisheries were productive. Local availability of fish, more than a direct dependency on fisheries, determines local patterns of animal protein consumption, but a direct dependency on fisheries exposes families to a lower-quality diet in less-productive seasons. As such, fisheries could shape and affect the livelihoods of coastal villages, including fishers' and non-fishers' families.

  10. WrpA Is an Atypical Flavodoxin Family Protein under Regulatory Control of the Brucella abortus General Stress Response System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrou, Julien; Czyż, Daniel M; Willett, Jonathan W; Kim, Hye-Sook; Chhor, Gekleng; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Kim, Youngchang; Crosson, Sean

    2016-04-01

    The general stress response (GSR) system of the intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus controls the transcription of approximately 100 genes in response to a range of stress cues. The core genetic regulatory components of the GSR are required for B. abortus survival under nonoptimal growth conditions in vitro and for maintenance of chronic infection in an in vivo mouse model. The functions of the majority of the genes in the GSR transcriptional regulon remain undefined. bab1_1070 is among the most highly regulated genes in this regulon: its transcription is activated 20- to 30-fold by the GSR system under oxidative conditions in vitro. We have solved crystal structures of Bab1_1070 and demonstrate that it forms a homotetrameric complex that resembles those of WrbA-type NADH:quinone oxidoreductases, which are members of the flavodoxin protein family. However, B. abortus WrbA-related protein (WrpA) does not bind flavin cofactors with a high affinity and does not function as an NADH:quinone oxidoreductase in vitro. Soaking crystals with flavin mononucleotide (FMN) revealed a likely low-affinity binding site adjacent to the canonical WrbA flavin binding site. Deletion of wrpA (ΔwrpA) does not compromise cell survival under acute oxidative stress in vitro or attenuate infection in cell-based or mouse models. However, a ΔwrpA strain does elicit increased splenomegaly in a mouse model, suggesting that WrpA modulates B. abortus interaction with its mammalian host. Despite high structural homology with canonical WrbA proteins, we propose that B. abortus WrpA represents a functionally distinct member of the diverse flavodoxin family. Brucella abortus is an etiological agent of brucellosis, which is among the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. The general stress response (GSR) regulatory system of B. abortus controls the transcription of approximately 100 genes and is required for maintenance of chronic infection in a murine model; the majority of GSR-regulated genes

  11. A NAC domain protein family contributing to the regulation of wood formation in poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Misato; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Xu, Bo; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Goué, Nadia; Shi, Fusun; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Demura, Taku

    2011-08-01

    Wood harvested from trees is one of the most widely utilized natural materials on our planet. Recent environmental issues have prompted an increase in the demand for wood, especially as a cost-effective and renewable resource for industry and energy, so it is important to understand the process of wood formation. In the present study, we focused on poplar (Populus trichocarpa) NAC domain protein genes which are homologous to well-known Arabidopsis transcription factors regulating the differentiation of xylem vessels and fiber cells. From phylogenetic analysis, we isolated 16 poplar NAC domain protein genes, and named them PtVNS (VND-, NST/SND- and SMB-related proteins) genes. Expression analysis revealed that 12 PtVNS (also called PtrWND) genes including both VND and NST groups were expressed in developing xylem tissue and phloem fiber, whereas in primary xylem vessels, only PtVNS/PtrWND genes of the VND group were expressed. By using the post-translational induction system of Arabidopsis VND7, a master regulator of xylem vessel element differentiation, many poplar genes functioning in xylem vessel differentiation downstream from NAC domain protein genes were identified. Transient expression assays showed the variation in PtVNS/PtrWND transactivation activity toward downstream genes, even between duplicate gene pairs. Furthermore, overexpression of PtVNS/PtrWND genes induced ectopic secondary wall thickening in poplar leaves as well as in Arabidopsis seedlings with different levels of induction efficiency according to the gene. These results suggest that wood formation in poplar is regulated by cooperative functions of the NAC domain proteins. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Unification of Cas protein families and a simple scenario for the origin and evolution of CRISPR-Cas systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Yuri I

    2011-07-01

    comparison continue to reveal unexpected homologous relationship among Cas proteins. Unification of Cas protein families previously considered unrelated provides for improvement in the classification of CRISPR-Cas systems and a reconstruction of their evolution. Open peer review This article was reviewed by Malcolm White (nominated by Purficacion Lopez-Garcia, Frank Eisenhaber and Igor Zhulin. For the full reviews, see the Reviewers' Comments section.

  13. Alternative oxidase (AOX constitutes a small family of proteins in Citrus clementina and Citrus sinensis L. Osb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Araújo Castro

    Full Text Available The alternative oxidase (AOX protein is present in plants, fungi, protozoa and some invertebrates. It is involved in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, providing an alternative route for the transport of electrons, leading to the reduction of oxygen to form water. The present study aimed to characterize the family of AOX genes in mandarin (Citrus clementina and sweet orange (Citrus sinensis at nucleotide and protein levels, including promoter analysis, phylogenetic analysis and C. sinensis gene expression. This study also aimed to do the homology modeling of one AOX isoform (CcAOXd. Moreover, the molecular docking of the CcAOXd protein with the ubiquinone (UQ was performed. Four AOX genes were identified in each citrus species. These genes have an open reading frame (ORF ranging from 852 bp to 1150 bp and a number of exons ranging from 4 to 9. The 1500 bp-upstream region of each AOX gene contained regulatory cis-elements related to internal and external response factors. CsAOX genes showed a differential expression in citrus tissues. All AOX proteins were predicted to be located in mitochondria. They contained the conserved motifs LET, NERMHL, LEEEA and RADE-H as well as several putative post-translational modification sites. The CcAOXd protein was modeled by homology to the AOX of Trypanosona brucei (45% of identity. The 3-D structure of CcAOXd showed the presence of two hydrophobic helices that could be involved in the anchoring of the protein in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The active site of the protein is located in a hydrophobic environment deep inside the AOX structure and contains a diiron center. The molecular docking of CcAOXd with UQ showed that the binding site is a recessed pocket formed by the helices and submerged in the membrane. These data are important for future functional studies of citrus AOX genes and/or proteins, as well as for biotechnological approaches leading to AOX inhibition using UQ homologs.

  14. Arsenite induces apoptosis in human mesenchymal stem cells by altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by activating intrinsic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Santosh; Shi Yongli; Wang Feng; Wang He

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Environmental exposure to arsenic is an important public health issue. The effects of arsenic on different tissues and organs have been intensively studied. However, the effects of arsenic on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have not been reported. This study is designed to investigate the cell death process caused by arsenite and its related underlying mechanisms on MSCs. The rationale is that absorbed arsenic in the blood circulation can reach to the bone marrow and may affect the cell survival of MSCs. Methods: MSCs of passage 1 were purchased from Tulane University, grown till 70% confluency level and plated according to the experimental requirements followed by treatment with arsenite at various concentrations and time points. Arsenite (iAs III ) induced cytotoxic effects were confirmed by cell viability and cell cycle analysis. For the presence of canonic apoptosis markers; DNA damage, exposure of intramembrane phosphotidylserine, protein and m-RNA expression levels were analyzed. Results: iAs III induced growth inhibition, G2-M arrest and apoptotic cell death in MSCs, the apoptosis induced by iAs III in the cultured MSCs was, via altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by involving intrinsic pathway. Conclusion: iAs III can induce apoptosis in bone marrow-derived MSCs via Bcl-2 family proteins, regulating intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Due to the multipotency of MSC, acting as progenitor cells for a variety of connective tissues including bone, adipose, cartilage and muscle, these effects of arsenic may be important in assessing the health risk of the arsenic compounds and understanding the mechanisms of arsenic-induced harmful effects.

  15. Tandem Duplication Events in the Expansion of the Small Heat Shock Protein Gene Family in Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia J. Krsticevic

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In plants, fruit maturation and oxidative stress can induce small heat shock protein (sHSP synthesis to maintain cellular homeostasis. Although the tomato reference genome was published in 2012, the actual number and functionality of sHSP genes remain unknown. Using a transcriptomic (RNA-seq and evolutionary genomic approach, putative sHSP genes in the Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706 genome were investigated. A sHSP gene family of 33 members was established. Remarkably, roughly half of the members of this family can be explained by nine independent tandem duplication events that determined, evolutionarily, their functional fates. Within a mitochondrial class subfamily, only one duplicated member, Solyc08g078700, retained its ancestral chaperone function, while the others, Solyc08g078710 and Solyc08g078720, likely degenerated under neutrality and lack ancestral chaperone function. Functional conservation occurred within a cytosolic class I subfamily, whose four members, Solyc06g076570, Solyc06g076560, Solyc06g076540, and Solyc06g076520, support ∼57% of the total sHSP RNAm in the red ripe fruit. Subfunctionalization occurred within a new subfamily, whose two members, Solyc04g082720 and Solyc04g082740, show heterogeneous differential expression profiles during fruit ripening. These findings, involving the birth/death of some genes or the preferential/plastic expression of some others during fruit ripening, highlight the importance of tandem duplication events in the expansion of the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome. Despite its evolutionary diversity, the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome seems to be endowed with a core set of four homeostasis genes: Solyc05g014280, Solyc03g082420, Solyc11g020330, and Solyc06g076560, which appear to provide a baseline protection during both fruit ripening and heat shock stress in different tomato tissues.

  16. TBC1D24, an ARF6-interacting protein, is mutated in familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falace, Antonio; Filipello, Fabia; La Padula, Veronica; Vanni, Nicola; Madia, Francesca; De Pietri Tonelli, Davide; de Falco, Fabrizio A; Striano, Pasquale; Dagna Bricarelli, Franca; Minetti, Carlo; Benfenati, Fabio; Fassio, Anna; Zara, Federico

    2010-09-10

    Idiopathic epilepsies (IEs) are a group of disorders characterized by recurrent seizures in the absence of detectable brain lesions or metabolic abnormalities. IEs include common disorders with a complex mode of inheritance and rare Mendelian traits suggesting the occurrence of several alleles with variable penetrance. We previously described a large family with a recessive form of idiopathic epilepsy, named familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy (FIME), and mapped the disease locus on chromosome 16p13.3 by linkage analysis. In the present study, we found that two compound heterozygous missense mutations (D147H and A509V) in TBC1D24, a gene of unknown function, are responsible for FIME. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that Tbc1d24 is mainly expressed at the level of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. By coimmunoprecipitation assay we found that TBC1D24 binds ARF6, a Ras-related family of small GTPases regulating exo-endocytosis dynamics. The main recognized function of ARF6 in the nervous system is the regulation of dendritic branching, spine formation, and axonal extension. TBC1D24 overexpression resulted in a significant increase in neurite length and arborization and the FIME mutations significantly reverted this phenotype. In this study we identified a gene mutation involved in autosomal-recessive idiopathic epilepsy, unveiled the involvement of ARF6-dependent molecular pathway in brain hyperexcitability and seizures, and confirmed the emerging role of subtle cytoarchitectural alterations in the etiology of this group of common epileptic disorders. 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Studying p53 family proteins in yeast: Induction of autophagic cell death and modulation by interactors and small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leão, Mariana; Gomes, Sara; Bessa, Cláudia; Soares, Joana; Raimundo, Liliana [REQUIMTE, Laboratório de Microbiologia, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira n. 164, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Monti, Paola; Fronza, Gilberto [Mutagenesis Unit, Istituto di Ricerca e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino-IST-Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Pereira, Clara [REQUIMTE, Laboratório de Microbiologia, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira n. 164, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Saraiva, Lucília, E-mail: lucilia.saraiva@ff.up.pt [REQUIMTE, Laboratório de Microbiologia, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira n. 164, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal)

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to individually study human p53, p63 (full length and truncated forms) and p73. Using this cell system, the effect of these proteins on cell proliferation and death, and the influence of MDM2 and MDMX on their activities were analyzed. When expressed in yeast, wild-type p53, TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 induced growth inhibition associated with S-phase cell cycle arrest. This growth inhibition was accompanied by reactive oxygen species production and autophagic cell death. Furthermore, they stimulated rapamycin-induced autophagy. On the contrary, none of the tested p53 family members induced apoptosis either per se or after apoptotic stimuli. As previously reported for p53, also TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 increased actin expression levels and its depolarization, suggesting that ACT1 is also a p63 and p73 putative yeast target gene. Additionally, MDM2 and MDMX inhibited the activity of all tested p53 family members in yeast, although the effect was weaker on TAp63. Moreover, Nutlin-3a and SJ-172550 were identified as potential inhibitors of the p73 interaction with MDM2 and MDMX, respectively. Altogether, the yeast-based assays herein developed can be envisaged as a simplified cell system to study the involvement of p53 family members in autophagy, the modulation of their activities by specific interactors (MDM2 and MDMX), and the potential of new small molecules to modulate these interactions. - Highlights: • p53, p63 and p73 are individually studied in the yeast S. cerevisiae. • p53 family members induce ROS production, cell cycle arrest and autophagy in yeast. • p53 family members increase actin depolarization and expression levels in yeast. • MDM2 and MDMX inhibit the activity of p53 family members in yeast. • Yeast can be a useful tool to study the biology and drugability of p53, p63 and p73.

  18. Studying p53 family proteins in yeast: Induction of autophagic cell death and modulation by interactors and small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leão, Mariana; Gomes, Sara; Bessa, Cláudia; Soares, Joana; Raimundo, Liliana; Monti, Paola; Fronza, Gilberto; Pereira, Clara; Saraiva, Lucília

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to individually study human p53, p63 (full length and truncated forms) and p73. Using this cell system, the effect of these proteins on cell proliferation and death, and the influence of MDM2 and MDMX on their activities were analyzed. When expressed in yeast, wild-type p53, TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 induced growth inhibition associated with S-phase cell cycle arrest. This growth inhibition was accompanied by reactive oxygen species production and autophagic cell death. Furthermore, they stimulated rapamycin-induced autophagy. On the contrary, none of the tested p53 family members induced apoptosis either per se or after apoptotic stimuli. As previously reported for p53, also TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 increased actin expression levels and its depolarization, suggesting that ACT1 is also a p63 and p73 putative yeast target gene. Additionally, MDM2 and MDMX inhibited the activity of all tested p53 family members in yeast, although the effect was weaker on TAp63. Moreover, Nutlin-3a and SJ-172550 were identified as potential inhibitors of the p73 interaction with MDM2 and MDMX, respectively. Altogether, the yeast-based assays herein developed can be envisaged as a simplified cell system to study the involvement of p53 family members in autophagy, the modulation of their activities by specific interactors (MDM2 and MDMX), and the potential of new small molecules to modulate these interactions. - Highlights: • p53, p63 and p73 are individually studied in the yeast S. cerevisiae. • p53 family members induce ROS production, cell cycle arrest and autophagy in yeast. • p53 family members increase actin depolarization and expression levels in yeast. • MDM2 and MDMX inhibit the activity of p53 family members in yeast. • Yeast can be a useful tool to study the biology and drugability of p53, p63 and p73

  19. Structure of armadillo ACBP: a new member of the acyl-CoA-binding protein family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costabel, Marcelo D., E-mail: costabel@criba.edu.ar [Grupo de Biofísica, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Ermácora, Mario R. [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Bernal (Argentina); Santomé, José A. [Instituto de Química y Fisicoquímica Biológicas (IQUIFYB), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica (UBA-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alzari, Pedro M. [Unité de Biochimie Structurale, Institut Pasteur, Paris (France); Guérin, Diego M. A. [Unidad de Biofisica (CSIC-UPV/EHU), PO Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Grupo de Biofísica, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahía Blanca (Argentina)

    2006-10-01

    The X-ray structure of the tetragonal form of apo acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from the Harderian gland of the South American armadillo Chaetophractus villosus has been solved. The X-ray structure of the tetragonal form of apo acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from the Harderian gland of the South American armadillo Chaetophractus villosus has been solved. ACBP is a carrier for activated long-chain fatty acids and has been associated with many aspects of lipid metabolism. Its secondary structure is highly similar to that of the corresponding form of bovine ACBP and exhibits the unique flattened α-helical bundle (up–down–down–up) motif reported for animal, yeast and insect ACBPs. Conformational differences are located in loops and turns, although these structural differences do not suffice to account for features that could be related to the unusual biochemistry and lipid metabolism of the Harderian gland.

  20. The retinoblastoma protein binds to a family of E2F transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lees, J A; Saito, M; Vidal, M

    1993-01-01

    for E2F-2 and E2F-3 were mapped to 1p36 and 6q22, respectfully, confirming their independence from E2F-1. However, the E2F-2 and E2F-3 proteins are closely related to E2F-1. Both E2F-2 and E2F-3 bound to wild-type but not mutant E2F recognition sites, and they bound specifically to the retinoblastoma...

  1. Characterization of a DUF820 family protein Alr3200 of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-14

    Oct 14, 2016 ... PCC7120 displays high resistance to γ-radiation (LD50 of 6. kGy) (Singh et al. 2010), possibly because of an ... other bacterial proteins. 'Domains of Unknown Function' http://www.ias.ac.in/jbiosci ... the absence or presence of appropriate antibiotics [34 μg chloramphenicol mL. −1. (Cm34), 50 μg kanamycin ...

  2. hSSB1 phosphorylation is dynamically regulated by DNA-PK and PPP-family protein phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Nicholas W; Paquet, Nicolas; Shirran, Sally L; Bolderson, Emma; Kariawasam, Ruvini; Touma, Christine; Fallahbaghery, Azadeh; Gamsjaeger, Roland; Cubeddu, Liza; Botting, Catherine; Pollock, Pamela M; O'Byrne, Kenneth J; Richard, Derek J

    2017-06-01

    The maintenance of genomic stability is essential for cellular viability and the prevention of diseases such as cancer. Human single-stranded DNA-binding protein 1 (hSSB1) is a protein with roles in the stabilisation and restart of stalled DNA replication forks, as well as in the repair of oxidative DNA lesions and double-strand DNA breaks. In the latter process, phosphorylation of threonine 117 by the ATM kinase is required for hSSB1 stability and efficient DNA repair. The regulation of hSSB1 in other DNA repair pathways has however remained unclear. Here we report that hSSB1 is also directly phosphorylated by DNA-PK at serine residue 134. While this modification is largely suppressed in undamaged cells by PPP-family protein phosphatases, S134 phosphorylation is enhanced following the disruption of replication forks and promotes cellular survival. Together, these data thereby represent a novel mechanism for hSSB1 regulation following the inhibition of replication. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Plastid gene expression and plant development require a plastidic protein of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiychuk, Elena; Vandepoele, Klaas; Wissing, Josef; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; De Rycke, Riet; Akbari, Hana; Joubès, Jérôme; Beeckman, Tom; Jänsch, Lothar; Frentzen, Margrit; Van Montagu, Marc C. E.; Kushnir, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Plastids are DNA-containing organelles unique to plant cells. In Arabidopsis, one-third of the genes required for embryo development encode plastid-localized proteins. To help understand the role of plastids in embryogenesis and postembryonic development, we characterized proteins of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) family, which in animal models, comprises DNA-binding regulators of mitochondrial transcription. Of 35 Arabidopsis mTERF proteins, 11 are plastid-localized. Genetic complementation shows that at least one plastidic mTERF, BELAYA SMERT' (BSM), is required for embryogenesis. The main postembryonic phenotypes of genetic mosaics with the bsm mutation are severe abnormalities in leaf development. Mutant bsm cells are albino, are compromised in growth, and suffer defects in global plastidic gene expression. The bsm phenotype could be phenocopied by inhibition of plastid translation with spectinomycin. Plastid translation is essential for cell viability in dicotyledonous species such as tobacco but not in monocotyledonous maize. Here, genetic interactions between BSM and the gene encoding plastid homomeric acetyl-CoA carboxylase ACC2 suggest that there is a functional redundancy in malonyl-CoA biosynthesis that permits bsm cell survival in Arabidopsis. Overall, our results indicate that biosynthesis of malonyl-CoA and plastid-derived systemic growth-promoting compounds are the processes that link plant development and plastid gene expression. PMID:21464319

  4. Recent Progress in the Structure Determination of GPCRs, a Membrane Protein Family with High Potential as Pharmaceutical Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherezov, Vadim; Abola, Enrique; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2015-11-30

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a highly diverse and ubiquitous family of integral membrane proteins, transmitting signals inside the cells in response to an assortment of disparate extra-cellular stimuli. Their strategic location on the cell surface and their involvement in crucial cellular and physiological processes turn these receptors into highly important pharmaceutical targets. Recent technological developments aimed at stabilization and crystallization of these receptors have led to significant breakthroughs in GPCR structure determination efforts. One of the successful approaches involved receptor stabilization with the help of a fusion partner combined with crystallization in lipidic cubic phase (LCP). The success of using an LCP matrix for crystallization is generally attributed to the creation of a more native, membrane-like stabilizing environment for GPCRs just prior to nucleation and to the formation of type I crystal lattices, thus generating highly ordered and strongly diffracting crystals. Here they describe protocols for reconstituting purified GPCRs in LCP, performing pre-crystallization assays, setting up crystallization trials in manual mode, detecting crystallization hits, optimizing crystallization conditions, harvesting, and collecting crystallographic data. The protocols provide a sensible framework for approaching crystallization of stabilized GPCRs in LCP, however, as in any crystallization experiment, extensive screening and optimization of crystallization conditions as well as optimization of protein construct and purification steps are required. The process remains risky and these protocols do not necessarily guarantee success.

  5. Herpesviruses dUTPases: A New Family of Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP Proteins with Implications for Human Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall V. Williams

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The human herpesviruses are ubiquitous viruses and have a prevalence of over 90% in the adult population. Following a primary infection they establish latency and can be reactivated over a person’s lifetime. While it is well accepted that human herpesviruses are implicated in numerous diseases ranging from dermatological and autoimmune disease to cancer, the role of lytic proteins in the pathophysiology of herpesvirus-associated diseases remains largely understudies. Only recently have we begun to appreciate the importance of lytic proteins produced during reactivation of the virus, in particular the deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolases (dUTPase, as key modulators of the host innate and adaptive immune responses. In this review, we provide evidence from animal and human studies of the Epstein–Barr virus as a prototype, supporting the notion that herpesviruses dUTPases are a family of proteins with unique immunoregulatory functions that can alter the inflammatory microenvironment and thus exacerbate the immune pathology of herpesvirus-related diseases including myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, autoimmune diseases, and cancer.

  6. CYFIP family proteins between autism and intellectual disability: links with Fragile X syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eBardoni

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual disability (ID and autism spectrum disorders (ADS have in common alterations in some brain circuits and brain abnormalities, such as synaptic transmission and dendritic spines morphology. Recent studies have indicated a differential expression for specific categories of genes as a cause for both types of disease, while an increasing number of genes is recognized to produce both disorders. An example is the Fragile X Mental retardation gene, FMR1, whose silencing causes the Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of intellectual disability and autism, also characterized by physical hallmarks. FMRP, the protein encoded by FMR1, is an RNA-binding protein with an important role in translational control. Among the interactors of FMRP, CYFIP1/2 proteins are good candidates for intellectual disability and autism, on the bases of their genetic implication and functional properties, even if the precise functional significance of the CYFIP/FMRP interaction is not understood yet. CYFIP1 and CYFIP2 represent a link between Rac1, the Wave complex and FMRP, favoring the cross talk between actin polymerization and translational control

  7. Involvement of C4 protein of beet severe curly top virus (family Geminiviridae in virus movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunling Teng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV is a leafhopper transmitted geminivirus with a monopartite genome. C4 proteins encoded by geminivirus play an important role in virus/plant interaction. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To understand the function of C4 encoded by BSCTV, two BSCTV mutants were constructed by introducing termination codons in ORF C4 without affecting the amino acids encoded by overlapping ORF Rep. BSCTV mutants containing disrupted ORF C4 retained the ability to replicate in Arabidopsis protoplasts and in the agro-inoculated leaf discs of N. benthamiana, suggesting C4 is not required for virus DNA replication. However, both mutants did not accumulate viral DNA in newly emerged leaves of inoculated N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis, and the inoculated plants were asymptomatic. We also showed that C4 expression in plant could help C4 deficient BSCTV mutants to move systemically. C4 was localized in the cytosol and the nucleus in both Arabidopsis protoplasts and N. benthamiana leaves and the protein appeared to bind viral DNA and ds/ssDNA nonspecifically, displaying novel DNA binding properties. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that C4 protein in BSCTV is involved in symptom production and may facilitate virus movement instead of virus replication.

  8. Resuscitation promoting factors: a family of microbial proteins in survival and resuscitation of dormant mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi Kr; Srivastava, Ranjana

    2012-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), is an extraordinarily successful pathogen of humankind. It has been estimated that up to one-third of the world's population is infected with M. tuberculosis, and this population is an important reservoir for disease reactivation. Resuscitation promoting factor (Rpf) is a secretory protein, which was first reported in Micrococcus luteus. There are five functionally redundant Rpf-like proteins found in M. tuberculosis. Rpf promotes the resuscitation of dormant bacilli to yield normal, viable colony forming bacteria. All Rpfs share a conserved domain of about 70 amino acids and possess a lysozyme-like activity. The structural studies of the conserved domain suggest that Rpfs could be considered as a c-type lysozyme and lytic transglycosylases. Recently a novel class of nitrophenylthiocyanates (NPT) inhibitors of the muralytic activity of Rpf were reported which opens a new approach in the study of cell-wall hydrolyzing enzymes. This review describes molecular and structural studies conducted on Rpf proteins, their role in the resuscitation of dormant bacteria, in the reactivation of latent infection and identification of low molecular weight inhibitors of resuscitation promoting factors.

  9. A compendium of transcription factor and Transcriptionally active protein coding gene families in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Vikram A; Wang, Yu; Timko, Michael P

    2017-11-22

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) is the most important food and forage legume in the semi-arid tropics of sub-Saharan Africa where approximately 80% of worldwide production takes place primarily on low-input, subsistence farm sites. Among the major goals of cowpea breeding and improvement programs are the rapid manipulation of agronomic traits for seed size and quality and improved resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses to enhance productivity. Knowing the suite of transcription factors (TFs) and transcriptionally active proteins (TAPs) that control various critical plant cellular processes would contribute tremendously to these improvement aims. We used a computational approach that employed three different predictive pipelines to data mine the cowpea genome and identified over 4400 genes representing 136 different TF and TAP families. We compare the information content of cowpea to two evolutionarily close species common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), and soybean (Glycine max) to gauge the relative informational content. Our data indicate that correcting for genome size cowpea has fewer TF and TAP genes than common bean (4408 / 5291) and soybean (4408/ 11,065). Members of the GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR (GRF) and Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) gene families appear to be over-represented in the genome relative to common bean and soybean, whereas members of the MADS (Minichromosome maintenance deficient 1 (MCM1), AGAMOUS, DEFICIENS, and serum response factor (SRF)) and C2C2-YABBY appear to be under-represented. Analysis of the AP2-EREBP APETALA2-Ethylene Responsive Element Binding Protein (AP2-EREBP), NAC (NAM (no apical meristem), ATAF1, 2 (Arabidopsis transcription activation factor), CUC (cup-shaped cotyledon)), and WRKY families, known to be important in defense signaling, revealed changes and phylogenetic rearrangements relative to common bean and soybean that suggest these groups may have evolved different functions. The availability of detailed

  10. Phylogenetic analysis and protein structure modelling identifies distinct Ca(2+)/Cation antiporters and conservation of gene family structure within Arabidopsis and rice species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Jon K; Hirschi, Kendal D

    2016-12-01

    The Ca(2+)/Cation Antiporter (CaCA) superfamily is an ancient and widespread family of ion-coupled cation transporters found in nearly all kingdoms of life. In animals, K(+)-dependent and K(+)-indendent Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers (NCKX and NCX) are important CaCA members. Recently it was proposed that all rice and Arabidopsis CaCA proteins should be classified as NCX proteins. Here we performed phylogenetic analysis of CaCA genes and protein structure homology modelling to further characterise members of this transporter superfamily. Phylogenetic analysis of rice and Arabidopsis CaCAs in comparison with selected CaCA members from non-plant species demonstrated that these genes form clearly distinct families, with the H(+)/Cation exchanger (CAX) and cation/Ca(2+) exchanger (CCX) families dominant in higher plants but the NCKX and NCX families absent. NCX-related Mg(2+)/H(+) exchanger (MHX) and CAX-related Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-like (NCL) proteins are instead present. Analysis of genomes of ten closely-related rice species and four Arabidopsis-related species found that CaCA gene family structures are highly conserved within related plants, apart from minor variation. Protein structures were modelled for OsCAX1a and OsMHX1. Despite exhibiting broad structural conservation, there are clear structural differences observed between the different CaCA types. Members of the CaCA superfamily form clearly distinct families with different phylogenetic, structural and functional characteristics, and therefore should not be simply classified as NCX proteins, which should remain as a separate gene family.

  11. Comparative evaluation of low-molecular-mass proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies members of the ESAT-6 family as immunodominant T-cell antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt, Rikke L. V.; Oettinger, Thomas; Rosenkrands, Ida

    2000-01-01

    Culture filtrate from Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains protective antigens of relevance for the generation of a new antituberculosis vaccine. We have identified two previously uncharacterized M. tuberculosis proteins (TB7.3 and TB10.4) from the highly active low-mass fraction of culture filtrate....... The molecules were characterized, mapped in a two-dimensional electrophoresis reference map of short-term culture filtrate, and compared with another recently identified low-mass protein, CFP10 (F. X. Berthet, P, B. Rasmussen, I. Rosenkrands, P. Andersen, and B. Gicquel. Microbiology 144:3195-3203, 1998......), and the well-described ESAT-6 antigen. Genetic analyses demonstrated that TB10.4 as well as CFP10 belongs to the ESAT-6 family of low-mass proteins, whereas TB7.3 is a low-molecular-mass protein outside this family. The proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their immunogenicity was tested...

  12. Comparative evaluation of low-molecular-mass proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies members of the ESAT-6 family as immunodominant T-cell antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt, R L; Oettinger, T; Rosenkrands, I

    2000-01-01

    Culture filtrate from Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains protective antigens of relevance for the generation of a new antituberculosis vaccine. We have identified two previously uncharacterized M. tuberculosis proteins (TB7.3 and TB10.4) from the highly active low-mass fraction of culture filtrate....... The molecules were characterized, mapped in a two-dimensional electrophoresis reference map of short-term culture filtrate, and compared with another recently identified low-mass protein, CFP10 (F. X. Berthet, P. B. Rasmussen, I. Rosenkrands, P. Andersen, and B. Gicquel. Microbiology 144:3195-3203, 1998......), and the well-described ESAT-6 antigen. Genetic analyses demonstrated that TB10.4 as well as CFP10 belongs to the ESAT-6 family of low-mass proteins, whereas TB7.3 is a low-molecular-mass protein outside this family. The proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their immunogenicity was tested...

  13. Role of AtCDC48 & the AtCDC48 Regulatory Protein Family, PUX, in Plant Cell Morphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarek, Sebastian, Y.

    2009-11-08

    The long-term objective of this work is to understand the molecular events and mechanisms involved in secretory membrane trafficking and organelle biogenesis, which are crucial for normal plant growth and development. Our studies have suggested a vital role for the cytosolic chaperone Cdc48p/p97 during cytokinesis and cell expansion which are highly dependent upon secretory membrane trafficking. Localization studies have shown that the plant Cdc48p/p97, AtCDC48, and the Arabidopsis ortholog of the ER- and Golgi-associated SNARE, syntaxin 5, (referred to as SYP31) are targeted to the division plane during cytokinesis. In addition, AtCDC48 and SYP31 were shown to interact in vitro and in vivo. To characterize further the function of AtCDC48 and SYP31 we have utilized affinity chromatography and MALDI-MS to identify several plant-specific proteins that interact with SYP31 and/or modulate the activity of AtCDC48 including two UBX (i.e. ubiquitin-like) domain containing proteins, PUX1 and PUX2 (Proteins containing UBX domain). These proteins define a plant protein family consisting of 15 uncharacterized members that we postulate interact with AtCDC48. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that PUX2 is a novel membrane adapter for AtCDC48 that mediates AtCDC48/SYP31 interaction and is likely to control AtCDC48-dependent membrane fusion. In contrast, PUX1 negatively regulates AtCDC48 by inhibiting its ATPase activity and by promoting the disassembly of the active hexamer. These findings provide the first evidence that the assembly and disassembly of the CDC48/p97complex is actually a dynamic process. This new unexpected level of regulation for CDC48/p97 was demonstrated to be critical in vivo as pux1 loss-of-function mutants grow faster than wild-type plants. These studies suggest a role for AtCDC48 in plant cell cycle progression including cytokinesis and/or cell expansion. The proposed studies are designed to: 1) characterize further the localization and function of At

  14. BCL-2 family protein, BAD is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cekanova, Maria; Fernando, Romaine I.; Siriwardhana, Nalin; Sukhthankar, Mugdha; Parra, Columba de la; Woraratphoka, Jirayus; Malone, Christine; Ström, Anders; Baek, Seung J.; Wade, Paul A.; Saxton, Arnold M.; Donnell, Robert M.; Pestell, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic protein BAD is expressed in normal human breast tissue and shown that BAD inhibits expression of cyclin D1 to delay cell-cycle progression in breast cancer cells. Herein, expression of proteins in breast tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry and results were analyzed statistically to obtain semi-quantitative data. Biochemical and functional changes in BAD-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer cells were evaluated using PCR, reporter assays, western blotting, ELISA and extracellular matrix invasion assays. Compared to normal tissues, Grade II breast cancers expressed low total/phosphorylated forms of BAD in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. BAD overexpression decreased the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, and phosphorylation of STATs. BAD inhibited Ras/MEK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, without affecting the p38 signaling pathway. Expression of the metastasis-related proteins, MMP10, VEGF, SNAIL, CXCR4, E-cadherin and TlMP2 was regulated by BAD with concomitant inhibition of extracellular matrix invasion. Inhibition of BAD by siRNA increased invasion and Akt/p-Akt levels. Clinical data and the results herein suggest that in addition to the effect on apoptosis, BAD conveys anti-metastatic effects and is a valuable prognostic marker in breast cancer. - Highlights: • BAD and p-BAD expressions are decreased in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue. • BAD impedes breast cancer invasion and migration. • BAD inhibits the EMT and transcription factors that promote cancer cell migration. • Invasion and migration functions of BAD are distinct from the BAD's role in apoptosis

  15. BCL-2 family protein, BAD is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cekanova, Maria, E-mail: mcekanov@utk.edu [Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fernando, Romaine I. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Medical Center, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Siriwardhana, Nalin [Department of Animal Science, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sukhthankar, Mugdha [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Parra, Columba de la [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, PR (United States); Woraratphoka, Jirayus [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Medical Center, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Malone, Christine [Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ström, Anders [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Baek, Seung J. [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wade, Paul A. [Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Saxton, Arnold M. [Department of Animal Science, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Donnell, Robert M. [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Pestell, Richard G. [Department of Cancer Biology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); and others

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic protein BAD is expressed in normal human breast tissue and shown that BAD inhibits expression of cyclin D1 to delay cell-cycle progression in breast cancer cells. Herein, expression of proteins in breast tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry and results were analyzed statistically to obtain semi-quantitative data. Biochemical and functional changes in BAD-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer cells were evaluated using PCR, reporter assays, western blotting, ELISA and extracellular matrix invasion assays. Compared to normal tissues, Grade II breast cancers expressed low total/phosphorylated forms of BAD in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. BAD overexpression decreased the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, and phosphorylation of STATs. BAD inhibited Ras/MEK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, without affecting the p38 signaling pathway. Expression of the metastasis-related proteins, MMP10, VEGF, SNAIL, CXCR4, E-cadherin and TlMP2 was regulated by BAD with concomitant inhibition of extracellular matrix invasion. Inhibition of BAD by siRNA increased invasion and Akt/p-Akt levels. Clinical data and the results herein suggest that in addition to the effect on apoptosis, BAD conveys anti-metastatic effects and is a valuable prognostic marker in breast cancer. - Highlights: • BAD and p-BAD expressions are decreased in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue. • BAD impedes breast cancer invasion and migration. • BAD inhibits the EMT and transcription factors that promote cancer cell migration. • Invasion and migration functions of BAD are distinct from the BAD's role in apoptosis.

  16. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kitamura, H.; Matsumori, H.; Kalendová, Alžběta; Hozák, Pavel; Goldberg, I.G.; Nakao, M.; Saitoh, N.; Harata, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 464, č. 2 (2015), s. 554-560 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0050; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others: Human Frontier in Science programe(FR) RGP0017/2013 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Actin-related protein * ARP6 * Histone H2A.Z * Nucleolus * Wndchrm Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.371, year: 2015

  17. Inhibition of protein translation by the DISC1-Boymaw fusion gene from a Scottish family with major psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Baohu; Higa, Kerin K; Kim, Minjung; Zhou, Lynn; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A; Zhou, Xianjin

    2014-11-01

    The t(1; 11) translocation appears to be the causal genetic lesion with 70% penetrance for schizophrenia, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in a Scottish family. Molecular studies identified the disruption of the disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene by chromosome translocation at chromosome 1q42. Our previous studies, however, revealed that the translocation also disrupted another gene, Boymaw (also termed DISC1FP1), on chromosome 11. After translocation, two fusion genes [the DISC1-Boymaw (DB7) and the Boymaw-DISC1 (BD13)] are generated between the DISC1 and Boymaw genes. In the present study, we report that expression of the DB7 fusion gene inhibits both intracellular NADH oxidoreductase activities and protein translation. We generated humanized DISC1-Boymaw mice with gene targeting to examine the in vivo functions of the fusion genes. Consistent with the in vitro studies on the DB7 fusion gene, protein translation activity is decreased in the hippocampus and in cultured primary neurons from the brains of the humanized mice. Expression of Gad67, Nmdar1 and Psd95 proteins are also reduced. The humanized mice display prolonged and increased responses to the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, on various mouse genetic backgrounds. Abnormal information processing of acoustic startle and depressive-like behaviors are also observed. In addition, the humanized mice display abnormal erythropoiesis, which was reported to associate with depression in humans. Expression of the DB7 fusion gene may reduce protein translation to impair brain functions and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Yersinia outer protein YopE affects the actin cytoskeleton in Dictyostelium discoideum through targeting of multiple Rho family GTPases

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vlahou, Georgia

    2009-07-14

    Abstract Background All human pathogenic Yersinia species share a virulence-associated type III secretion system that translocates Yersinia effector proteins into host cells to counteract infection-induced signaling responses and prevent phagocytosis. Dictyostelium discoideum has been recently used to study the effects of bacterial virulence factors produced by internalized pathogens. In this study we explored the potential of Dictyostelium as model organism for analyzing the effects of ectopically expressed Yersinia outer proteins (Yops). Results The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis virulence factors YopE, YopH, YopM and YopJ were expressed de novo within Dictyostelium and their effects on growth in axenic medium and on bacterial lawns were analyzed. No severe effect was observed for YopH, YopJ and YopM, but expression of YopE, which is a GTPase activating protein for Rho GTPases, was found to be highly detrimental. GFP-tagged YopE expressing cells had less conspicuous cortical actin accumulation and decreased amounts of F-actin. The actin polymerization response upon cAMP stimulation was impaired, although chemotaxis was unaffected. YopE also caused reduced uptake of yeast particles. These alterations are probably due to impaired Rac1 activation. We also found that YopE predominantly associates with intracellular membranes including the Golgi apparatus and inhibits the function of moderately overexpressed RacH. Conclusion The phenotype elicited by YopE in Dictyostelium can be explained, at least in part, by inactivation of one or more Rho family GTPases. It further demonstrates that the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can be used as an efficient and easy-to-handle model organism in order to analyze the function of a translocated GAP protein of a human pathogen.

  19. A Gene Family Coding for Salivary Proteins (SHOT) of the Polyphagous Spider Mite Tetranychus urticae Exhibits Fast Host-Dependent Transcriptional Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, Wim; Dermauw, Wannes; Khalighi, Mousaalreza; Pavlidi, Nena; Reubens, Wim; Baggerman, Geert; Tirry, Luc; Menschaert, Gerben; Kant, Merijn R; Vanholme, Bartel; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The salivary protein repertoire released by the herbivorous pest Tetranychus urticae is assumed to hold keys to its success on diverse crops. We report on a spider mite-specific protein family that is expanded in T. urticae. The encoding genes have an expression pattern restricted to the anterior podocephalic glands, while peptide fragments were found in the T. urticae secretome, supporting the salivary nature of these proteins. As peptide fragments were identified in a host-dependent manner, we designated this family as the SHOT (secreted host-responsive protein of Tetranychidae) family. The proteins were divided in three groups based on sequence similarity. Unlike TuSHOT3 genes, TuSHOT1 and TuSHOT2 genes were highly expressed when feeding on a subset of family Fabaceae, while expression was depleted on other hosts. TuSHOT1 and TuSHOT2 expression was induced within 24 h after certain host transfers, pointing toward transcriptional plasticity rather than selection as the cause. Transfer from an 'inducer' to a 'noninducer' plant was associated with slow yet strong downregulation of TuSHOT1 and TuSHOT2, occurring over generations rather than hours. This asymmetric on and off regulation points toward host-specific effects of SHOT proteins, which is further supported by the diversity of SHOT genes identified in Tetranychidae with a distinct host repertoire.

  20. Characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins family and their role in drought stress tolerance in upland cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magwanga, Richard Odongo; Lu, Pu; Kirungu, Joy Nyangasi; Lu, Hejun; Wang, Xingxing; Cai, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Zhongli; Zhang, Zhenmei; Salih, Haron; Wang, Kunbo; Liu, Fang

    2018-01-15

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are large groups of hydrophilic proteins with major role in drought and other abiotic stresses tolerance in plants. In-depth study and characterization of LEA protein families have been carried out in other plants, but not in upland cotton. The main aim of this research work was to characterize the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein families and to carry out gene expression analysis to determine their potential role in drought stress tolerance in upland cotton. Increased cotton production in the face of declining precipitation and availability of fresh water for agriculture use is the focus for breeders, cotton being the backbone of textile industries and a cash crop for many countries globally. In this work, a total of 242, 136 and 142 LEA genes were identified in G. hirsutum, G. arboreum and G. raimondii respectively. The identified genes were classified into eight groups based on their conserved domain and phylogenetic tree analysis. LEA 2 were the most abundant, this could be attributed to their hydrophobic character. Upland cotton LEA genes have fewer introns and are distributed in all chromosomes. Majority of the duplicated LEA genes were segmental. Syntenic analysis showed that greater percentages of LEA genes are conserved. Segmental gene duplication played a key role in the expansion of LEA genes. Sixty three miRNAs were found to target 89 genes, such as miR164, ghr-miR394 among others. Gene ontology analysis revealed that LEA genes are involved in desiccation and defense responses. Almost all the LEA genes in their promoters contained ABRE, MBS, W-Box and TAC-elements, functionally known to be involved in drought stress and other stress responses. Majority of the LEA genes were involved in secretory pathways. Expression profile analysis indicated that most of the LEA genes were highly expressed in drought tolerant cultivars Gossypium tomentosum as opposed to drought susceptible, G. hirsutum. The tolerant

  1. Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) in plants: a complex gene family with major impacts on plant phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Kerrie L; Bhave, Mrinal

    2007-10-01

    The ubiquitous cell membrane proteins called aquaporins are now firmly established as channel proteins that control the specific transport of water molecules across cell membranes in all living organisms. The aquaporins are thus likely to be of fundamental significance to all facets of plant growth and development affected by plant-water relations. A majority of plant aquaporins have been found to share essential structural features with the human aquaporin and exhibit water-transporting ability in various functional assays, and some have been shown experimentally to be of critical importance to plant survival. Furthermore, substantial evidence is now available from a number of plant species that shows differential gene expression of aquaporins in response to abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, or cold and clearly establishes the aquaporins as major players in the response of plants to conditions that affect water availability. This review summarizes the function and regulation of these genes to develop a greater understanding of the response of plants to water insufficiency, and particularly, to identify tolerant genotypes of major crop species including wheat and rice and plants that are important in agroforestry.

  2. The role of TET family proteins and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Chen; Ling, Zhi-Qiang

    2014-08-01

    Tumorigenesis correlates with hypermethylation of tumor suppressors and hypomethylation of oncogenes. DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) catalyze DNA methylation, and mutations and aberrant expression in DNMT genes are found in multiple human tumors. The discovery of the DNA demethylation function of TET proteins has opened up new avenues for the study of DNA methylation regulation. TET proteins regulate the DNA demethylation pathway through oxidizing 5-mC into 5-hmC, 5-fC, and 5-aC. TET genes have been reported to be frequently mutated in hematopoietic malignancies and are associated with the malignant transformation of cells. Loss-of-function mutations in TET genes have not been reported in human solid tumors. However, 5-hmC has been found to be reduced in various solid tumors, indicating that TET genes may contribute to cellular transformation via regulation of DNA demethylation. As a new epigenetic modification, 5-hmC may be a useful biomarker for the diagnosis of cancers. To better understand the roles of TET and 5-hmC in tumors, the biological functions of TET and 5-hmC should be studied further.

  3. Cold Shock Proteins: a Minireview with Special Emphasis on Csp-family of Enteropathogenic Yersinia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riikka Keto-Timonen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria have evolved a number of mechanisms for coping with stress and adapting to changing environmental conditions. Many bacteria produce small cold shock proteins (Csp as a response to rapid temperature downshift (cold shock. During cold shock, the cell membrane fluidity and enzyme activity decrease, and the efficiency of transcription and translation is reduced due to stabilization of nucleic acid secondary structures. Moreover, protein folding is inefficient and ribosome function is hampered. Csps are thought to counteract these harmful effects by serving as nucleic acid chaperons that may prevent the formation of secondary structures in mRNA at low temperature and thus facilitate the initiation of translation. However, some Csps are non-cold inducible and they are reported to be involved in various cellular processes to promote normal growth and stress adaptation responses. Csps have been shown to contribute to osmotic, oxidative, starvation, pH and ethanol stress tolerance as well as to host cell invasion. Therefore, Csps seem to have a wider role in stress tolerance of bacteria than previously assumed. Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are enteropathogens that can spread through foodstuffs and cause an enteric infection called yersiniosis. Enteropathogenic Yersinia are psychrotrophs that are able to grow at temperatures close to 0ºC and thus they set great challenges for the modern food industry. To be able to efficiently control psychrotrophic Yersinia during food production and storage, it is essential to understand the functions and roles of Csps in stress response of enteropathogenic Yersinia.

  4. Comparative genomics of the odorant-binding and chemosensory protein gene families across the Arthropoda: origin and evolutionary history of the chemosensory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Filipe G; Rozas, Julio

    2011-01-01

    Chemoreception is a biological process essential for the survival of animals, as it allows the recognition of important volatile cues for the detection of food, egg-laying substrates, mates, or predators, among other purposes. Furthermore, its role in pheromone detection may contribute to evolutionary processes, such as reproductive isolation and speciation. This key role in several vital biological processes makes chemoreception a particularly interesting system for studying the role of natural selection in molecular adaptation. Two major gene families are involved in the perireceptor events of the chemosensory system: the odorant-binding protein (OBP) and chemosensory protein (CSP) families. Here, we have conducted an exhaustive comparative genomic analysis of these gene families in 20 Arthropoda species. We show that the evolution of the OBP and CSP gene families is highly dynamic, with a high number of gains and losses of genes, pseudogenes, and independent origins of subfamilies. Taken together, our data clearly support the birth-and-death model for the evolution of these gene families with an overall high gene turnover rate. Moreover, we show that the genome organization of the two families is significantly more clustered than expected by chance and, more important, that this pattern appears to be actively maintained across the Drosophila phylogeny. Finally, we suggest the homologous nature of the OBP and CSP gene families, dating back their most recent common ancestor after the terrestrialization of Arthropoda (380--450 Ma) and we propose a scenario for the origin and diversification of these families.

  5. Manganese activates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in rat astrocytes by modulating the expression of proteins of the Bcl-2 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Laura E; Juknat, A Ana; Venosa, Andrea J; Verrengia, Noemi; Kotler, Mónica L

    2008-12-01

    Manganese induces the central nervous system injury leading to manganism, by mechanisms not completely understood. Chronic exposure to manganese generates oxidative stress and induces the mitochondrial permeability transition. In the present study, we characterized apoptotic cell death mechanisms associated with manganese toxicity in rat cortical astrocytes and demonstrated that (i) Mn treatment targets the mitochondria and induces mitochondrial membrane depolarization followed by cytochrome c release to the cytoplasm, (ii) Mn induces both effector caspases 3/7 and 6 as well as PARP-1 cleavage and (iii) Mn shifts the balance of cell death/survival of Bcl-2 family proteins to favor the apoptotic demise of astrocytes. Our model system using cortical rat astrocytes treated with Mn would emerge as a good tool for investigations aimed to elucidate the role of apoptosis in manganism.

  6. A new member of the hsp90 family of molecular chaperones interacts with the retinoblastoma protein during mitosis and after heat shock.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, C F; Chen, Y; Dai, K; Chen, P L; Riley, D J; Lee, W H

    1996-01-01

    A gene encoding a new heat shock protein that may function as a molecular chaperone for the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) was characterized. The cDNA fragment was isolated by using the yeast two-hybrid system and Rb as bait. The open reading frame of the longest cDNA codes for a protein with substantial sequence homology to members of the hsp90 family. Antibodies prepared against fusions between glutathione S-transferase and portions of this new heat shock protein specifically recognized a 75-k...

  7. The complex becomes more complex: protein-protein interactions of SnRK1 with DUF581 family proteins provide a framework for cell- and stimulus type-specific SnRK1 signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nietzsche, Madlen; Schießl, Ingrid; Börnke, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    In plants, SNF1-related kinase (SnRK1) responds to the availability of carbohydrates as well as to environmental stresses by down-regulating ATP consuming biosynthetic processes, while stimulating energy-generating catabolic reactions through gene expression and post-transcriptional regulation. The functional SnRK1 complex is a heterotrimer where the catalytic α subunit associates with a regulatory β subunit and an activating γ subunit. Several different metabolites as well as the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) have been shown to modulate SnRK1 activity in a cell- and stimulus-type specific manner. It has been proposed that tissue- or stimulus-specific expression of adapter proteins mediating SnRK1 regulation can at least partly explain the differences observed in SnRK1 signaling. By using yeast two-hybrid and in planta bi-molecular fluorescence complementation assays we were able to demonstrate that proteins containing the domain of unknown function (DUF) 581 could interact with both isoforms of the SnRK1α subunit (AKIN10/11) of Arabidopsis. A structure/function analysis suggests that the DUF581 is a generic SnRK1 interaction module and co-expression with DUF581 proteins in plant cells leads to reallocation of the kinase to specific regions within the nucleus. Yeast two-hybrid analyses suggest that SnRK1 and DUF581 proteins share common interaction partners inside the nucleus. The analysis of available microarray data implies that expression of the 19 members of the DUF581 encoding gene family in Arabidopsis is differentially regulated by hormones and environmental cues, indicating specialized functions of individual family members. We hypothesize that DUF581 proteins could act as mediators conferring tissue- and stimulus-type specific differences in SnRK1 regulation.

  8. The complex becomes more complex: protein-protein interactions of SnRK1 with DUF581 family proteins provide a framework for cell- and stimulus type-specific SnRK1 signaling in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madlen eNietzsche

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In plants, SNF1-related kinase (SnRK1 responds to the availability of carbohydrates as well as to environmental stresses by down-regulating ATP consuming biosynthetic processes, while stimulating energy-generating catabolic reactions through gene expression and post-transcriptional regulation. The functional SnRK1 complex is a heterotrimer where the catalytic alpha subunit associates with a regulatory beta subunit and an activating gamma subunit. Several different metabolites as well as the hormone abscisic acid (ABA have been shown to modulate SnRK1 activity in a cell- and stimulus-type specific manner. It has been proposed that tissue- or stimulus-specific expression of adapter proteins mediating SnRK1 regulation can at least partly explain the differences observed in SnRK1 signaling. By using yeast two-hybrid and in planta bi-molecular fluorescence complementation assays we were able to demonstrate that proteins containing the domain of unknown function (DUF 581 could interact with both isoforms of the SnRK1 alpha subunit (AKIN10/11 of Arabidopsis. A structure/function analysis suggests that the DUF581 is a generic SnRK1 interaction module and co-expression with DUF581 proteins in plant cells leads to reallocation of the kinase to specific regions within the nucleus. Yeast two-hybrid analyses suggest that SnRK1 and DUF581 proteins can share common interaction partners inside the nucleus. The analysis of available microarray data implies that expression of the 19 members of the DUF581 encoding gene family in Arabidopsis is differentially regulated by hormones and environmental cues, indicating specialized functions of individual family members. We hypothesize that DUF581 proteins could act as mediators conferring tissue- and stimulus-type specific differences in SnRK1 regulation.

  9. Identification of calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK): A multi-functional gene family in Rafflesia cantleyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Safoora; Goh, Hoe-Han; Wan, Kiew-Lian

    2016-11-01

    Rafflesia, a parasitic plant that belongs to the Rafflesiaceae family, is notable for producing the largest flowers in the world. This study focused on identification of Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) due to their vital roles in plant growth and development, biotic and abiotic stress responses, and hormone signaling. RNA-seq data generated from three bud stages of Rafflesia cantleyi ie BS1, BS2, and BS3 and were assembled. Based on the BLAST searches of Rafflesia unique transcripts (UTs) to Arabidopsis TAIR database, a total of 14 unique transcripts (UTs) were identified as CDPK1 to CDPK5, CDPK7 to CDPK11, CDPK16, CDPK18, CDPK19, and CDPK28. These genes are expressed at all three bud stages of R. cantleyi with up-regulation pattern at BS1 vs. BS2 and BS2 vs. BS3. This result shows that the expression of CDPK gene family increases by developmental progress in Rafflesia in order to regulate biochemical and molecular changes at the cellular level in response to exposure to environmental changes. However, CDPKs functions in plants growth and defense process still need more experimental evidence to deeply understand their biological roles in R. cantleyi.

  10. Discovery, identification and comparative analysis of non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsLtp) family in Solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanfei; Huang, Dawei; Liu, Kan; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun; Gao, Gang; Song, Shuhui

    2010-12-01

    Plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLtps) have been reported to be involved in plant defense activity against bacterial and fungal pathogens. In this study, we identified 135 (122 putative and 13 previously identified) Solanaceae nsLtps, which are clustered into 8 different groups. By comparing with Boutrot's nsLtp classification, we classified these eight groups into five types (I, II, IV, IX and X). We compared Solanaceae nsLtps with Arabi-dopsis and Gramineae nsLtps and found that (1) Types I, II and IV are shared by Solanaceae, Gramineae and Arabidopsis; (2) Types III, V, VI and VIII are shared by Gramineae and Arabidopsis but not detected in Solanaceae so far; (3) Type VII is only found in Gramineae whereas type IX is present only in Arabidopsis and Solanaceae; (4) Type X is a new type that accounts for 52.59% Solanaceae nsLtps in our data, and has not been reported in any other plant so far. We further built and compared the three-dimensional structures of the eight groups, and found that the major functional diversification within the nsLtp family could be predated to the monocot/dicot divergence, and many gene duplications and sequence variations had happened in the nsLtp family after the monocot/dicot divergence, especially in Solanaceae. Copyright © 2010 Beijing Genomics Institute. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The spatiotemporal expression pattern of the bone morphogenetic protein family in rat ovary cell types during the estrous cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimasaki Shunichi

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the mammalian ovary, great interest in the expression and function of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP family has been recently generated from evidence of their critical role in determining folliculogenesis and female fertility. Despite extensive work, there is a need to understand the cellular sites of expression of these important regulatory molecules, and how their gene expression changes within the basic ovary cell types through the cycle. Here we have performed a detailed in situ hybridization analysis of the spatial and temporal expression patterns of the BMP ligands (BMP-2, -3, -3b, -4, -6, -7, -15, receptors (BMPR-IA, -IB, -II, and BMP antagonist, follistatin, in rat ovaries over the normal estrous cycle. We have found that: i all of the mRNAs are expressed in a cell-specific manner in the major classes of ovary cell types (oocyte, granulosa, theca interstitial, theca externa, corpora lutea, secondary interstitial, vascular and ovary surface epithelium; and ii most undergo dynamic changes during follicular and corpora luteal morphogenesis and histogenesis. The general principle to emerge from these studies is that the developmental programs of folliculogenesis (recruitment, selection, atresia, ovulation, and luteogenesis (luteinization, luteolysis are accompanied by rather dramatic spatial and temporal changes in the expression patterns of these BMP genes. These results lead us to hypothesize previously unanticipated roles for the BMP family in determining fundamental developmental events that ensure the proper timing and developmental events required for the generation of the estrous cycle.

  12. Respiratory proteins in Sipunculus nudus--implications for phylogeny and evolution of the hemerythrin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Achim; Lieb, Bernhard

    2010-02-01

    Three major classes of respiratory proteins are known, hemoglobin, molluscan and arthropod hemocyanin, and hemerythrin (Hr). Similar to hemoglobin, respiratory Hr is packed into erythrocytes floating in the coelomic fluid and is only known from sipunculids, brachiopods, and priapulids. Owing to this scattered distribution, the presence of Hr is generally assumed to be the plesiomorphic condition without phylogenetic importance. By sequencing 2000 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) from Sipunculus nudus, we found 75 Hr-coding ESTs assembled to 20 cDNA contigs classified as four distinct Hr isoforms: three polymeric Hrs (subunit A, A', and B) and the monomeric myo-hemerythrin (myoHr). Phylogenetic analyses revealed a clade of annelid and sipunculan monomeric Hrs, distinct from polymeric Hrs. Monomeric Hrs from annelids and sipunculids can be clustered together using Maximum Likelihood tree-building and network analyses, as well as applying Bayesian methods. Three distinct Hr clusters were found for S. nudus, suggesting a new monomeric Hr isoform.

  13. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for human regenerating familyprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Meng-Ru; Chen, Chinpan

    2012-10-01

    Human regenerating (Reg) genes belong to the C-type lectin superfamily and express secretory proteins in various tissues. Reg Iα, also named lithostathine, has multiple roles in numerous biological events such as cytokines, anti-apoptotic factors and the calcium carbonate crystals inhibitor. Under physiological pH, Reg Iα becomes largely insoluble after a self-proteolysis process, and the N-terminally truncated form readily polymerizes into fibrils, which leads to neurodegenerative diseases. Reg Iα may form protofibril via lateral hydrophobic interactions with a native-like conformation. The structural basis from the native to fibril form, as well as the carbohydrate binding sites on Reg Iα, remain unknown. Here we present the NMR backbone and side-chain assignments of Reg Iα for use in further NMR investigations.

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Thioredoxin Family Proteins for Medicare, Healthcare and Aging Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Yodoi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Human thioredoxin (TRX is a 12-kDa protein with redox-active dithiol in the active site -Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-, which is induced by biological stress due to oxidative damage, metabolic dysfunction, chemicals, infection/inflammation, irradiation, or hypoxia/ischemia-reperfusion. Our research has demonstrated that exogenous TRX is effective in a wide variety of inflammatory diseases, including viral pneumonia, acute lung injury, gastric injury, and dermatitis, as well as in the prevention and amelioration of food allergies. Preclinical and clinical studies using recombinant TRX (rhTRX are now underway. We have also identified substances that induce the expression of TRX in the body, in vegetables and other plant ingredients. Skincare products are being developed that take advantage of the anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic action of TRX. Furthermore, we are currently engaged in the highly efficient production of pure rhTRX in several plants, such as lettuce, grain and rice.

  15. Structural insights into substrate and coenzyme preference by SDR family protein Gox2253 from Gluconobater oxydans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bo; Cui, Dongbing; Zhang, Lujia; Jiang, Shuiqin; Machida, Satoru; Yuan, Y Adam; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-11-01

    Gox2253 from Gluconobacter oxydans belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases family, and catalyzes the reduction of heptanal, octanal, nonanal, and decanal with NADPH. To develop a robust working platform to engineer novel G. oxydans oxidoreductases with designed coenzyme preference, we adopted a structure based rational design strategy using computational predictions that considers the number of hydrogen bonds formed between enzyme and docked coenzyme. We report the crystal structure of Gox2253 at 2.6 Å resolution, ternary models of Gox2253 mutants in complex with NADH/short-chain aldehydes, and propose a structural mechanism of substrate selection. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that hydrogen bonds could form between 2'-hydroxyl group in the adenosine moiety of NADH and the side chain of Gox2253 mutant after arginine at position 42 is replaced with tyrosine or lysine. Consistent with the molecular dynamics prediction, Gox2253-R42Y/K mutants can use both NADH and NADPH as a coenzyme. Hence, the strategies here could provide a practical platform to engineer coenzyme selectivity for any given oxidoreductase and could serve as an additional consideration to engineer substrate-binding pockets. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. TET family proteins and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Miyake, Keisuke; Kosumi, Keisuke; Harada, Kazuto; Kurashige, Junji; Iwagami, Shiro; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Yuji; Yoshida, Naoya; Yamamoto, Manabu; Oda, Shinya; Watanabe, Masayuki; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Baba, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA is epigenetically marked by 5′-cytosine methylation (5-methylcytosine [5-mC]). The Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes (TET1, TET2, and TET3) are implicated in DNA demethylation, through dioxygenase activity that converts 5-mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC). Although decreased TET is reportedly associated with decreased 5-hmC levels in various cancers, functions of 5-hmC and TET expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) are unclear. We used ELISA and immunohistochemistry tests to analyze 5-hmC status in ESCC tissues, RT-qPCR to analyze TET family mRNA expression in normal and tumor tissues, and pyrosequencing to quantify LINE-1 (i.e., global DNA methylation) levels. ELISA and immunohistochemical testing showed 5-hmC levels were significantly lower in ESCC than in paired normal tissues (P hmC levels in ESCCs (P = 0.003, r = 0.33). 5-hmC levels were also significantly associated with LINE-1 methylation level (P = 0.0002, r = 0.39). Patients with low 5-hmC levels had shorter overall survival than those with higher levels, although not significantly so (P = 0.084). In conclusion, 5-hmC expression was decreased in ESCC tissues, and was associated with TET2 expression level. TET2 reduction and subsequent 5-hmC loss might affect ESCC development. PMID:26093090

  17. TET family proteins and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Asuka; Baba, Yoshifumi; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Miyake, Keisuke; Kosumi, Keisuke; Harada, Kazuto; Kurashige, Junji; Iwagami, Shiro; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Yuji; Yoshida, Naoya; Yamamoto, Manabu; Oda, Shinya; Watanabe, Masayuki; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Baba, Hideo

    2015-09-15

    Mammalian DNA is epigenetically marked by 5'-cytosine methylation (5-methylcytosine [5-mC]). The Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes (TET1, TET2, and TET3) are implicated in DNA demethylation, through dioxygenase activity that converts 5-mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC). Although decreased TET is reportedly associated with decreased 5-hmC levels in various cancers, functions of 5-hmC and TET expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) are unclear. We used ELISA and immunohistochemistry tests to analyze 5-hmC status in ESCC tissues, RT-qPCR to analyze TET family mRNA expression in normal and tumor tissues, and pyrosequencing to quantify LINE-1 (i.e., global DNA methylation) levels. ELISA and immunohistochemical testing showed 5-hmC levels were significantly lower in ESCC than in paired normal tissues (P associated with 5-hmC levels in ESCCs (P = 0.003, r = 0.33). 5-hmC levels were also significantly associated with LINE-1 methylation level (P = 0.0002, r = 0.39). Patients with low 5-hmC levels had shorter overall survival than those with higher levels, although not significantly so (P = 0.084). In conclusion, 5-hmC expression was decreased in ESCC tissues, and was associated with TET2 expression level. TET2 reduction and subsequent 5-hmC loss might affect ESCC development.

  18. UPF201 archaeal specific family members reveal structural similarity to RNA-binding proteins but low likelihood for RNA-binding function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy N Rao

    Full Text Available We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54 to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40% and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and five alpha-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  19. Application of a sensitive collection heuristic for very large protein families: Evolutionary relationship between adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL and classic mammalian lipases

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    Berezovsky Igor

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manually finding subtle yet statistically significant links to distantly related homologues becomes practically impossible for very populated protein families due to the sheer number of similarity searches to be invoked and analyzed. The unclear evolutionary relationship between classical mammalian lipases and the recently discovered human adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL; a patatin family member is an exemplary case for such a problem. Results We describe an unsupervised, sensitive sequence segment collection heuristic suitable for assembling very large protein families. It is based on fan-like expanding, iterative database searches. To prevent inclusion of unrelated hits, additional criteria are introduced: minimal alignment length and overlap with starting sequence segments, finding starting sequences in reciprocal searches, automated filtering for compositional bias and repetitive patterns. This heuristic was implemented as FAMILYSEARCHER in the ANNIE sequence analysis environment and applied to search for protein links between the classical lipase family and the patatin-like group. Conclusion The FAMILYSEARCHER is an efficient tool for tracing distant evolutionary relationships involving large protein families. Although classical lipases and ATGL have no obvious sequence similarity and differ with regard to fold and catalytic mechanism, homology links detected with FAMILYSEARCHER show that they are evolutionarily related. The conserved sequence parts can be narrowed down to an ancestral core module consisting of three β-strands, one α-helix and a turn containing the typical nucleophilic serine. Moreover, this ancestral module also appears in numerous enzymes with various substrate specificities, but that critically rely on nucleophilic attack mechanisms.