WorldWideScience

Sample records for resistance training programme

  1. The effects of a 12-week resistance training programme on the body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coloured women had a greater decrease in body mass (r = 0.25), FM (r = 0.28) and increase in RMR (r = 0.28) than the Caucasians. Both groups showed a decrease in body mass, FM, percentage body fat, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI) and an increase in FFM and RMR after the intervention programme.

  2. (ARV) treatment training programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A successful ARV programme requires that all components of a functional management system be put in place for effective and efficient functioning. This would include logistics, human resources, financial planning, and monitoring and evaluation systems, as well as sustainable institutional capacities. The Nigerian national ...

  3. (ARV) treatment training programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    successful ARV programme requires that all components of a functional management system be put in place for ... It examines knowledge and skills gained, ... Oluwole Odutolu is a public health physician and consultant monitoring and evaluation specialist to the World Bank/UNAIDS Global HIV/AIDS Monitoring and.

  4. The change in motivating factors influencing commencement, adherence and retention to a supervised resistance training programme in previously sedentary post-menopausal women: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, Janet Erica; Christie, Candice Jo-Anne

    2015-03-12

    Understanding motivators for exercise participation in post-menopausal women may impact retention to exercise programmes and inform intervention trial designs. The purpose of this investigation was to assess self-reported motivational factors influencing adherence and retention to a 24-week progressive resistance training programme. Post-menopausal females (n = 34) were passively recruited to undertake a 24-week progressive resistance training protocol, in small-group sessions, on three non-consecutive days of the week. Attendance was recorded by the researcher. Qualitative reports were sourced from the sample for four phases of the study: pre-study (prior to week 1), recruitment (week 1), during study (weeks 2 - 24), and post-intervention (beyond week 24). Responses were categorised according to ten descriptors: specific health index improvement, education, flexibility of time, social contact, conscience (loyalty to the researcher), wellness, weight management, organisation parameters (pertaining to the study programme) and enjoyment of the exercises. Of the initial sample, 76.5% (n = 26) met the specified ≥80% attendance criterion. The primary findings were that motivation to volunteer for the study was driven by a perceived need for a structured exercise programme (50% of respondents). A commitment to the researcher was the primary motivator for continued adherence to the study for 50% of participants. Social contact with other participants was cited by 60% of the sample as the primary reason for adherence for the full duration of 24 weeks. A desire to maintain the "wellness" derived from the programme was cited by 60% as a reason for continuing an exercise routine post-study. This study identified that routine and supervision initially attract women to exercise programmes, while social cohesion of the group setting contributes to retention over time. Understanding the changing nature of motivating factors may contribute to better overall adherence

  5. (ARV) treatment training programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    should be offered ART; strategies for HAART; comprehensive care .... There has been an increase in knowledge and improved clinical skills.The staff have a more positive attitude and better acceptance of HIV patients.They are also more enthusiastic ... provision of the training manual, a background reading document to ...

  6. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  7. 2001 - 2002 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    1ST TERM 1ST OCTOBER - 23 NOVEMBER 2001 LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS The Autumn term of the Academic Training Programme is about to start. As usual, the first term includes lectures primarily dedicated to Post-graduate students. These are meant to help students complement the courses available from their home Universities with lectures on topics close to CERN activities. The lectures are nevertheless open to all CERN staff, and in particular to young Fellows. This year's series include courses on Accelerator Physics, on Field Theory, and on Symmetry Breaking Phenomena in Physics. The course on Accelerators by Dr. Wilson has been a regular feature on the Academic Training programme for many previous editions. This year, the course will be updated to include new sections on Colliders and on future facilities such as the Neutrino Factory. A good introduction to this very successful course can be found in the previous version of these lectures, available from the Web Lecture Archive Project: http://w...

  8. Evaluation of Training Programme in Organizations. | Patwardhan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The training programme was developed on the basis of the assessment of training needs. The programme was executed for 125 operators in seven batches during nine months. They completed schooling and a technical course. Effect of the training on participants' job performance and in the factory at large also is checked ...

  9. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form a...

  10. Academic Training: 2003 - 2004 Academic Training Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch 3rd Term - 5 April to 2nd July 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 April Complex Systems, Chaos and Measurements by P. Collet / Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France 26, 27, 28, 29 April The Theory of Heavy Ion Collisions by U. Wiedemann / CERN-PH/TH 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 May Particle Identification at the LHC by D. Fournier / LAL, Orsay, France 1, 2, 3, 4 June Neural Systems, Genetic Algorithms by V. Robles Forcada and M. Perez Hernandez / Univ. Politecnica de Madrid E. 7, 8, 9, June Real Time Process Control by T. Riesco / CERN-TS 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 June The Cosmic Microwave Background by M. Zaldarriaga / Harvard University, USA 21, 22, 23, June Fixed Target Physics at CERN : Results and Prospects by J. Engelen / CERN-DG 28, 29, 30 June, 1, 2, July Search for Dark Matter by B. Sadoulet / Univ. of California, Berkeley, USA The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstrac...

  11. Evaluating a training programme for executive coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolyne Beets

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The evaluation of training programmes provides methodological and logistical challenges to evaluators and human resource (HR managers. The training of executive coaches is no exception in this regard. Research purpose: The study aimed to investigate one particular aspect of the results of an executive coach training programme, and the extent to which knowledge, skills and attitudes acquired during the programme were applied in practical settings. Motivation for the study: Too little is known in South Africa about the effectiveness of training programmes, including executive coach training programmes. There is a need to demonstrate methodological approaches that would provide valid and reliable data. Research design, approach and method: The success case method (SCM was used to guide the study, consisting first of a survey of 80 participants in the training programme, followed by eight interviews to compare successful with less successful cases of skills transfer. Main findings: All six successful coaches were applying the proximal outcomes from the training with good results, with several valuable consequences resulting from the training. Barriers to successful implementation included personal circumstances and unfulfilled expectations of the programme content. Practical/managerial implications: Aspects of the training programme that could be improved included: the buddy selection system, more individualised feedback about self-development, closer supervision, and more support from programme managers. Contribution/value-add: This evaluation contributes to the evaluation literature by providing a documented exploration of a systematic application of the SCM. It also contributes to the coach training literature by providing a systematic evaluation of a coach training intervention in South Africa.

  12. Large strengthening effect of a hip-flexor training programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Zebis, Mette

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect on hip-flexion strength of a 6-week hip-flexor training programme using elastic bands as resistance. We hypothesized that the training group, compared to a control group, would increase their hip-flexion strength more. METHODS: Thirty-three healthy subjects (45...... by 17 %, (p mean change of 0.34 (95 % CI 0.......17-0.52) Nm/kg, in favour of the strength training group (p external loading, for only 6 weeks, substantially improves hip-flexor muscle strength. This simple exercise programme seems promising for future prevention and treatment...

  13. 2006-2007 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    Please help the Academic Training Committee to plan the 2006-07 programme of lectures by filling in the 2006-07 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire, which can be found at: http://academia.web.cern.ch/academia/questionnaire/ If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training'form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received.

  14. Radiation protection training programmes Spanish approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arboli, M. Marco; Suarez, M. Rodriguez; Cabrera, S. Falcon

    2002-01-01

    Radiation Protection Programmes are being considered the best way to promote safety culture and to spread and propagate European basic safety standards. It is widely accepted that training is an important tool to upgrade competence for radiation exposed workers. The Spanish Radiation Protection Education and Training Programmes provide a solid and integrated educational model, which takes into account the variety of applied fields, the different levels of responsibilities, the technological and methodological advances, as well as the international tendencies. The needs for a specialised training on Radiation Protection (RP) for exposed workers appears into the Spanish regulation in 1964. National initial training programmes are well established since 1972. Individual certifications, based on personal licences are required for exposed workers. The Spanish regulation also includes continuous and on the job RP training. The educational programmes are being continuously updating and improving. CIEMAT plays an important role in RP Spanish training, improving and modifying the previous RP courses and developing new programmes in order to complete the RP training levels. To achieve Radiation Protection objectives, new technological media for educational methods and material are taking into account. Nevertheless, Spanish RP education and training model has to be improved in some aspects. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the situation and the future needs to be considered in order to complete the RP training processes

  15. Benchmarking Danish Vocational Education and Training Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Wittrup, Jesper

    This study paper discusses methods whereby Danish vocational education and training colleges can be benchmarked, and presents results from a number of models. It is conceptually complicated to benchmark vocational colleges, as the various colleges in Denmark offer a wide range of course programmes...... attempt to summarise the various effects that the colleges have in two relevant figures, namely retention rates of students and employment rates among students who have completed training programmes....

  16. 2005-06 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    Please help the Academic Training Committee to plan the 2005-06 programme of lectures by filling in the 2005-06 Academic Training Programme Questionnaire which can be found at: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  17. Assessment of job training programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faber, H.; Desmares, E.

    1996-01-01

    In this document we describe the model which was used as a basis for assessing the training process. This process covers all the conventional aspects such as training courses, classes etc. as well as all other means of acquiring and imparting skills such as on-the-job training, shadow training, informal talks etc. The information results from the implementation of this assessment method. 1 ref., 3 figs

  18. Training in radiological protection for nuclear programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Many Member States are developing or already have developed their own national training programmes. The IAEA is actively involved in promoting training in radiological protection for nuclear programmes. The various types of training are fully discussed, with suggested curricula. An earlier report was published as Technical Reports Series No.31 in 1964. In 1973, new and additional information was received from Member States which is reflected in the present report. Training programmes are classified, according to those requiring training: specialists; persons whose work is closely related to radiological protection (administrators, public health officers and industrial health personnel, safety inspectors and engineers in nuclear installations, public service personnel); persons working with radiation; and the general public. Forms, scope and duration of training are discussed. Different types of training programmes are currently required for training of medical doctors (those providing medical surveillance for radiation workers and others dealing with public health aspects of radiation hazards), for technical supervisors, radiologists, and qualified workers in nuclear medicine, technological staff, administrators, persons working with radiation, and public service personnel. Standard curricula and desirable experiments and exercises are discussed. The organization of training together with the facilities, equipment and teaching staff required are considered, as is follow-up training. Annexes 1 to 4 give examples of training curricula and training courses available in various countries, a suggested syllabus for training of technical supervisors, and a bibliography consisting of 210 references dealing with general topics, nuclear radiation physics, radiochemistry and radiation chemistry, radiation biology and biophysics, dosimetry and health physics and radiation protection, medical aspects and toxicology, and environmental aspects

  19. Effects of the addition of a resistance training programme to a caloric restriction weight loss intervention on psychosocial factors in overweight and obese post-menopausal women: a Montreal Ottawa New Emerging Team study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Virginie; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Doucet, Eric; Brochu, Martin; Lavoie, Jean-Marc; Karelis, Antony; Prud'homme, Denis; Strychar, Irene

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the addition of a resistance training programme to a caloric restriction weight loss intervention on psychosocial profile. The study sample consisted of 137 overweight and obese post-menopausal women. Participants were randomized to a caloric restriction group and caloric restriction + resistance training group. Psychosocial, anthropometric, and metabolic variables were measured before and after the 6-month weight loss intervention. Both groups presented similar weight loss and there were no significant differences between the caloric restriction group and caloric restriction + resistance training group for changes in psychosocial profile. Thereafter, all participants were classified into quintiles based on the amount of weight loss. In all quintiles, women markedly improved body esteem and self-esteem, and decreased hunger and perceived risk for diabetes mellitus (P or =2.4 % body weight loss), decreases in disinhibition in quintiles 3-5 (> or =4.9 %), increases in self-efficacy in quintiles 3-5 (> or =4.9 %), and increases in health perceptions in quintile 5 (> or =11.1%). The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that the addition of a resistance training programme to a caloric restriction weight loss intervention has additional benefits on psychosocial profile. Overall, the significant improvements in the psychosocial profile observed were mostly accounted for by the degree of weight loss.

  20. Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Regular Lecture Programme 9 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Inner Tracking Detectors by Pippa Wells (CERN) 10 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Calorimeters (2/5) by Philippe Bloch (CERN) 11 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Muon systems (3/5) by Kerstin Hoepfner (RWTH Aachen) 12 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Particle Identification and Forward Detectors by Peter Krizan (University of Ljubljana and J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia) 13 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Trigger and Data Acquisition (5/5) by Dr. Brian Petersen (CERN) from 11:00 to 12:00 at CERN ( Bldg. 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant )

  1. 2002 - 2003 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    1st TERM : November - December 2002   LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS 18, 19, 20, 21, 22 November 2002 Telling the Truth with Statistics by R. Barlow / Univ. of Manchester, UK 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500     REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 2, 3, 4, 5 December 2002 Introduction to String Theory by W. Lerche / CERN-TH 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg. 500 The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the CERN bulletin, the WWW, and by Notices before each term and for each series of lectures. Françoise Benz Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  2. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures.

  3. Nuclear power training programmes in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanarro, A.; Izquierdo, L.

    1977-01-01

    The introduction of nuclear power in Spain is developing very rapidly. At present 1.1GW(e) are installed in Spain and this is expected to increase to 8GW(e) in 1980 and to 28GW(e) in 1990. Spanish industry and technology are also rapidly increasing their participation in building nuclear stations, in manufacturing the necessary components and in the activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle. All of this requires properly trained personnel, which is estimated to become approximately 1200 high-level technicians, 1100 medium-level technicians and 1500 technical assistants by 1980. This personnel is trained: (a) in engineering schools; (b) in the Nuclear Studies Institute; (c) in the electric companies with nuclear programmes. The majority of the high-level engineering schools in the country include physics and basic nuclear technology courses in their programmes. Some of them have an experimental low-power nuclear reactor. The Nuclear Studies Institute is an official organism dependent on the Nuclear Energy Commission and responsible, among other subjects, for training personnel for the peaceful use and development of nuclear energy in the country. The electric companies also participate in training personnel for future nuclear stations and they plan to have advanced simulators of PWR and BWR type stations for operator training. The report deals with the personnel requirement forecasts and describes the training programmes. (author)

  4. 2007 2008 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 6 & 8 May 2008 11:00 -12:00 – Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1 Energy isn’t Everything: CERN’s Fixed Target Niche Prof. John DAINTON / Cockcroft Institute & Liverpool University, UK Fixed target physics at CERN remains an essential part of the Laboratory’s scientific programme and horizon. In recent years fixed target and decay physics using CERN’s unique accelerator and beam facilities has continued to enable unique experiments to be undertaken. An overview is presented of the status of this physics and, wherever appropriate, of its future. LECTURE SERIES 7 May 2008 11:00 -12:00 – TH Auditorium – Bldg. 4-3-006 A rich revenue from the use of radioactive beams and radioactive targets: recent highlights from the nTOF and ISOLDE facilities 9 May 2008 11:00 -12:00 – Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1 The fifth decade of ISOLDE: HIE-ISOLDE Professor Mark HUYSE, Leuven University, BE The On-Line Isotope Mass Separator ISOLDE is a facility dedicated to the production of a...

  5. 2006 - 2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    1st Term: 02.10. 2006 - 15.12.2006 LECTURE SERIES Practical statistics for particle physicists by L. Lyons, Univ. Oxford, GB 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 October 11:00 -12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg 500 Gravitational waves by M. Landry, LIGO Hanford Observatory, Richland, USA 16, 17, 18 October 11:00-12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg 500 Neutrino physics, past and future by B. Kayser, FERMILAB, Batavia, USA 27, 28, 29, 30 November, 1 December 11:00-12:00 - TH Auditorium, Bldg 4, 3rd Floor QCD: are we ready for the LHC by S. Frixione, INFN, Genoa, It 4, 5, 6, 7 December 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, Bldg 500 The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc.) will be published in the CERN bulletin, the WWW, and by Notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  6. resistance training and changes to plasma lipoproteins in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to resistance training, HDL-cholesterol was reduced in women aged 54 - 71 years over 12 weeks. 12 ... the effect of a 24-week progressive resistance training programme on the blood lipid profiles of a sample ..... cise training on cardiovascular risk factors of sedentary, overweight, pre- menopausal and postmenopausal ...

  7. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (7 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (2 places disponibles) Core Development Pac...

  8. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (12 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (4 places disponibles) Core Development Pa...

  9. 2007 2008 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 13 May 2008 11:00 -12:00 – Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1 LHC Hardware Commissioning - Why LHC Hardware commissioning? Specificity and complexity of the LHC Roberto SABAN, CERN, Geneva The operation of the Large Hadron Collider relies many systems with technologies often beyond the start of the art and in particular on hundreds of superconducting magnets operating in superfluid He at 1.9K powered by more than 1700 power converters. A sophisticated magnet protection system is crucial to detect a quench and safely extract the energy stored in the circuits (about 1GJ only in one of the dipole circuits of each sector) after a resistive transition. In order to ensure safe operation, these systems depend on each other and on the infrastructure systems (controls, electricity distribution, water cooling, ventilation, communication systems, etc.). The commissioning of the technical systems together with the associated infrastructures is therefore mandatory. The complexity of operating this machine s...

  10. A multi disciplinary obstetric emergency training programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whelan, Mary

    2012-09-01

    The Rotunda Hospital (Dublin) obstetric emergency training programme (RHOET) was designed, in 2008, to meet the ongoing education and training needs of the local multidisciplinary team. Prior to its implementation, senior midwives attended the advanced life support in obstetrics (ALSO) course, and many of the obstetricians attended the Management of obstetric emergencies and trauma (MOET) and\\/or ALSO courses. Attendance at these off site courses meant that the only opportunity for team training was the informal and ad hoc \\'drills and skills\\' that took place in the birthing suite. This paper documents our journey since RHOET was implemented.

  11. Transformational leadership training programme for charge nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duygulu, Sergul; Kublay, Gulumser

    2011-03-01

    This paper is a report of an evaluation of the effects of a transformational leadership training programme on Unit Charge Nurses' leadership practices. Current healthcare regulations in the European Union and accreditation efforts of hospitals for their services mandate transformation in healthcare services in Turkey. Therefore, the transformational leadership role of nurse managers is vital in determining and achieving long-term goals in this process. The sample consisted of 30 Unit Charge Nurses with a baccalaureate degree and 151 observers at two university hospitals in Turkey. Data were collected using the Leadership Practices Inventory-Self and Observer (applied four times during a 14-month study process from December 2005 to January 2007). The transformational leadership training programme had theoretical (14 hours) and individual study (14 hours) in five sections. Means, standard deviations and percentages, repeated measure tests and two-way factor analysis were used for analysis. According the Leadership Practices Inventory-Self and Observer ratings, leadership practices increased statistically significantly with the implementation of the programme. There were no significant differences between groups in age, length of time in current job and current position. The Unit Charge Nurses Leadership Practices Inventory self-ratings were significantly higher than those of the observers. There is a need to develop similar programmes to improve the leadership skills of Unit Charge Nurses, and to make it mandatory for nurses assigned to positions of Unit Charge Nurse to attend this kind of leadership programme. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. 2007 2008 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 27, 28 & 29 May 2008 11:00 -12:00 – Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1 The biological effects of ionizing radiation M. STREIT-BIANCHI, CERN, Geneva, CH Since the discovery of X-rays the practical use of ionizing radiation and its damaging effects have been a source of concern for occupational health and radiation protection. This led to the introduction of dose limits and strict controls associated with the use of radiation for civil uses. This Academic Training lecture series will discuss the effects of radiation on humans with special emphasis on the health effects of low doses. Radiation risks as assessed from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Chernobyl as well as others accidental and occupational exposures will be presented and discussed. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 June 2008 11:00 -12:00 – Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1 Technology and applications of high field accelerator magnets Dr. G. AMBROSIO, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, USA Superconducting magnets are an enabling technology for high ene...

  13. 2007 2008 Academic Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 27, 28 & 29 May 2008 11:00 -12:00 – Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1 The biological effects of ionizing radiation M. STREIT-BIANCHI, CERN, Geneva, CH Since the discovery of X-rays the practical use of ionizing radiation and its damaging effects have been a source of concern for occupational health and radiation protection. This led to the introduction of dose limits and strict controls associated with the use of radiation for civil uses. This Academic Training lecture series will discuss the effects of radiation on humans with special emphasis on the health effects of low doses. Radiation risks as assessed from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Chernobyl as well as others accidental and occupational exposures will be presented and discussed. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 June 2008 11:00 -12:00 – Main Auditorium, bldg. 500-1 Technology and applications of high field accelerator magnets Dr. G. AMBROSIO, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, USA Superconducting magnets are an enabling technology for high ene...

  14. Resistance training during preadolescence. Issues and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blimkie, C J

    1993-06-01

    High intensity resistance training appears to be effective in increasing strength in preadolescents. Children make similar relative (percentage improvement), but smaller absolute, strength gains compared with adolescents and young adults in response to similar resistance training programmes. Resistance training appears to have little if any effect on muscle size, and strength gains during training have been associated with increases in levels of neuromuscular activation and changes in intrinsic contractile characteristics of muscle. Although unsubstantiated, improved motor coordination probably also contributes to the increase in strength, especially for more complex strength manoeuvres. On the basis of limited information, training-induced strength gains are lost during detraining, and the decay in strength has been associated with a reduction in neuromuscular activation. Short term resistance training appears to have no effect on somatic growth (height or weight) and body composition, and no proven positive influence on sports performance, injury rate or recovery from injury during preadolescence. Weightlifting has proved injurious to some children, especially when unsupervised and without instruction in proper weightlifting technique and load selection. In contrast, the risk of injury from prudently prescribed and closely supervised resistance training appears to be low during preadolescence. Lastly, short term resistance training appears to have no detrimental effect during preadolescence on either cardiorespiratory fitness or resting blood pressure.

  15. Launch of technical training courses for programmers

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This autumn, two new technical training courses have been launched for scientists and engineers at CERN who undertake programming tasks, particularly in C and C++. Both courses are taught by Andrzej Nowak, an expert in next-generation and cutting-edge computing technology research.   The training courses are organised in cooperation with CERN openlab and are sponsored by the CERN IT department – there is only a nominal registration fee of 50 CHF. This is an opportunity not to be missed! Computer architecture and hardware-software interaction (2 days, 26-27 October) The architecture course offers a comprehensive overview of current topics in computer architecture and their consequences for the programmer, from the basic Von Neumann schema to its modern-day expansions. Understanding hardware-software interaction allows the programmer to make better use of all features of available computer hardware and compilers. Specific architectural ...

  16. IEA Energy Training Capacity-building Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The IEA has carried out training activities in energy-related areas from its origins as an agency, with the Emergency Response Exercises (ERE), designed to prepare member countries for oil supply disruption through a set of specially prepared drills simulating crisis conditions. The globalisation of world energy markets in recent years and the wider engagement of the IEA beyond its members have expanded this role, as demand for training instruction has increased. In response, the IEA has created the Energy Training and Capacity-Building Programme, which, through seminars and workshops, secondments and internships, will offer training in the methods and standards that make IEA work in a wide range of energy-related areas, including statistics, the international standard for objective policy recommendations.

  17. Muscle Damage Indicators after Land and Aquatic Plyometric Training Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatka Wertheimer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Plyometric training is an important part of athletic conditioning with many significant benefits, including improved motor abilities and performance, but it can also increase the serum indices of muscle damage, collagen breakdown, muscle swelling, and soreness. Due to the physical characteristics of water, plyometric training in water presents less eccentric contraction, facilitates faster transition from the eccentric to concentric phase of a jump and offers greater resistance during concentric contraction with acute lower indices of muscle damage. To advance our understanding of the long-term effects of an eight-week plyometric training programme on land and in water on muscle damage indicators (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, creatine kinase (CK and serum urea (SU, two experimental groups of physically active men (a group on land (EG1 and a group in water (EG2 were tested before and after the first and the last plyometric training to monitor muscle damage indicators and adaptations. The results showed changes in CK activity after both plyometric trainings for EG1 and only after the first training for EG2. Moreover, after the eight-week programme, significant difference was observed in CK activity in comparison with EG2. There were no observed changes in LDH activity while SU showed greater changes for the group on land. The plyometric training programme in water resulted in smaller levels of muscle damage indicators. Although both experimental groups conducted the same plyometric training with the same jump volume, the eccentric and concentric loads were not the same, so it can be concluded that adaptations in muscle damage processes are faster with smaller eccentric loads.

  18. Evaluation of a PICC care training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purran, Ashutosh; Weller, Gordon; Kerr, Catherine

    2016-01-13

    An integrated care organisation requires a flexible workforce with a variable skill mix in all care settings. Organisations should ensure that education and training are maintained to support safe, high quality care that provides value for money, promotes flexibility, and increases workforce participation in achieving organisation objectives and the expansion of services. Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) care was identified as a challenging area for the nursing workforce in acute care and community services, following the integration and service enlargement of the Whittington Health NHS Trust. This article describes the evaluation of a new PICC care training programme that was developed and implemented to increase knowledge and awareness. The evaluation provides the clinical education team with information to help identify additional training needs to facilitate the integration of care.

  19. THE EXPERIENCE OF NETWORKING POSTGRADUATE TRAINING PROGRAMMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Teplyashina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Present scientific and innovative education programmes focus on the development of applied research in priority areas of industry, cross-industry and regional development. Implementation of such programs is most effective along with the network organization of the process of training. In accordance with the Federal Law on Education in the Russian Federation, this model of networking as «educational institution – educational organization» is a very convenient form of academic mobility realisation.The aim of the present paper is to analyse the model of interaction of the networking postgraduate training programmes at Krasnoyarsk State Medical University named after Prof. V. F. Voino-Yasenetsky and Medical School of Niigata University (Japan.Methodology and research methods involve theoretical analysis of the scientific outcomes of implementing a networking postgraduate training programme, comparative-teaching method, generalization, and pedagogical modeling.Results. The mechanisms of developing the partnership between universities of different countries are detailed. The experience of network international education in a postgraduate study is presented. The presented experience allowed the authors to develop an integrated strategy of cooperation with foreign colleagues in this direction. The advantages and problems of use of a network form of training of academic and teaching staff in a postgraduate school are revealed. The proposals and recommendations on optimization and harmonization of the purposes, tasks and programs of network interaction of the educational organizations are formulated.Practical significance. The proposed materials of the publication can form the base for creation and designing of an effective system of postgraduate education and competitiveness growth of the Russian universities. 

  20. Implementation of a formal in-training assessment programme in anaesthesiology and preliminary results of acceptability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, C; Østergaard, D; van der Vleuten, C P M

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A new reform on postgraduate education in Denmark requires a formal in-training assessment in all specialties. The aim of this study was to survey the implementation and acceptability of the first example of a nation-wide in-training assessment programme for first-year trainees...... been enrolled in the programme. Thirteen departments reported in total on 27 trainees who had completed their first year of training and these departments had applied a median 21 (range 17-21) of the 21 tests included in the entire programme. Time constraints and resistance among senior clinicians were...... the most frequently cited barriers to implementation. Evaluations from trainees showed a generally positive attitude towards most of the programme. They especially praised the programme's effect on structuring training and having a positive effect on learning. CONCLUSION: The in-training assessment...

  1. Inr training programme in nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cretu, I.; Ionila, M.; Gyongyosi, E.; Dragan, E.; Petra, M.

    2013-01-01

    The field of scientific research goes through rapid changes to which organizations must dinamically and efficiently adapt, which leads to the need to develop a continuous learning process that should be the basis for a long-term operational performance. Thus, human resource management systems and continuous learning should be perfectly correlated/alligned with the organizational strategy and knowledge. The research institutes through the nature of their activity are constantly undergoing a transformation process by exploring new research areas which presumes ensuring competent human resources who have to continuously learn and improve. The «learning organization » concept represents a metaphor rooted in the search of a strategy for promoting the personal development of the individual within an organization through a continuous transformation. Learning is associated with the idea of continuous transformation based on the individual and organizational development. Within « learning organizations » the human development strategy occupies a central role in management strategies. It was learned that organizations which perform excellently depend on the employees committment, especially in the budget constraints environment. For this, the human resources have to be used at maximum capacity but this is possible only with an increased committment of the employee towards the organization. The purpose of this paper is to present the basic training programme for the new employees which is part of the training strategy which carry out activities in the nuclear field of SCN Pitesti. With the majority of the research personnel aged between 45 and 60 years old there is the risk of loosing the knowledge gained in this domain. The expertise gained by experienced experts in the institute nationally and internationally can be exploited through the knowledge transfer to the new employees by organizing training programmes. The knowledge transfer between generations is one of the

  2. Integrating tuberculosis and antimicrobial resistance control programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Rumina; Shakoor, Sadia; Hanefeld, Johanna; Khan, Mishal

    2018-03-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries facing high levels of antimicrobial resistance, and the associated morbidity from ineffective treatment, also have a high burden of tuberculosis. Over recent decades many countries have developed effective laboratory and information systems for tuberculosis control. In this paper we describe how existing tuberculosis laboratory systems can be expanded to accommodate antimicrobial resistance functions. We show how such expansion in services may benefit tuberculosis case-finding and laboratory capacity through integration of laboratory services. We further summarize the synergies between high-level strategies on tuberculosis and antimicrobial resistance control. These provide a potential platform for the integration of programmes and illustrate how integration at the health-service delivery level for diagnostic services could occur in practice in a low- and middle-income setting. Many potential mutual benefits of integration exist, in terms of accelerated scale-up of diagnostic testing towards rational use of antimicrobial drugs as well as optimal use of resources and sharing of experience. Integration of vertical disease programmes with separate funding streams is not without challenges, however, and we also discuss barriers to integration and identify opportunities and incentives to overcome these.

  3. Assessment of Non-Professional Staff Training programme In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study identified training and development for non-professional staff in Nigerian University Libraries, the categories of staff that are enjoying the training programme, the relevance of the course contents, and the effect of the training programme for non-professional and job performance. The method adopted for the study ...

  4. Effects of a psychological skills training programme for underserved ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of a psychological skills training programme for underserved rugby union players. ... The programme's effectiveness was further validated by the experimental group's feedback. Recommendations are made for future research, as well as practical application within existing rugby development programmes in South ...

  5. Evaluation of a mental skills training programme for high school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to develop, implement and evaluate a mental skills training programme for male, high school rugby players. The hypotheses were that the mental skills training programme would improve an experimental groups' mental skills and sporting performance perceptions in comparison to a control ...

  6. Evaluating a Special Education Training Programme in Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delkamiller, Julie; Swain, Kristine D.; Ritzman, Mitzi J.; Leader-Janssen, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined a two-year special education and inclusive practices in-service training programme with a university in Nicaragua. Participants included 14 teachers from nine schools in Nicaragua. Participants' knowledge of special education concepts were evaluated as part of assessing the training modules. In addition, programme evaluation…

  7. IAEA education and training programme in nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, J.L.F.; Lederman, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the IAEA education and training (E and T) programme in nuclear safety. A strategic planning for the programme implementation is described in terms of objectives, outputs and activities. A framework based on areas of competency and the level of depth of the training is presented as well as the main achievements to date. (author)

  8. Short-term performance effects of three different low-volume strength-training programmes in college male soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brito, João; Vasconcellos, Fabrício; Oliveira, José

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse the short-term performance effects of three in-season low-volume strength-training programmes in college male soccer players. Fifty-seven male college soccer players (age: 20.31.6 years) were randomly assigned to a resistance-training group (n=12), plyometric training...... with the control group (pplyometric training group (p

  9. Heavy resistance training and lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloomquist, Kira; Karlsmark, Tonny; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2014-01-01

    , and identify associations between progressive resistance training with heavy loads, and the development of BCRL. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a descriptive study. POPULATION: Women treated for breast cancer (n = 149), who had participated in the 'Body and Cancer' exercise intervention between 1 January 2010......BACKGROUND: There is limited knowledge regarding progressive resistance training during adjuvant chemotherapy and the risk of developing breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Furthermore, no studies have investigated the safety of resistance training with heavy loads (> 80% 1 repetition maximum......) in this population. 'Body and Cancer' is a six-week, nine-hour weekly, supervised, multimodal exercise intervention utilizing progressive resistance training with heavy loads for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of BCRL in former participants...

  10. Comparison of gravity-resisted and gym-based core training on core ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using a gravity-resisted core training intervention is likely to produce beneficial gains in core endurance for resistance trained males to a greater extent than a programme of similar exercises conducted conventionally in a gym. Keywords: Gravity-resisted core training; Exercise; Rehabilitation; Core endurance ...

  11. Virtual vitreoretinal surgery: validation of a training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-02-01

    To test the validity of the eyesi surgical simulator as an assessment tool in a virtual reality vitreoretinal training programme. In collaboration with an experienced vitreoretinal surgeon, a virtual vitreoretinal training programme was composed on the eyesi surgical simulator, software version 2.9.2 (VRmagic GmbH, Manheim, Germany). It was completed twice by three groups: 20 medical students, ten residents of ophthalmology and five trained vitreoretinal surgeons. The programme contained six training modules: navigation level 2 (Nav2), forceps training level 5 (ForT5), bimanual training level 3 (BimT3), laser coagulation level 3 (LasC3), posterior hyaloid level 3 (PostH3) and internal limiting membrane peeling level 3 (ILMP3). The scores in each module were assessed from two to five different factors (tissue treatment, efficiency, target achievement, instrument handling and microscope handling), and it was possible to achieve 100 points in each module. At the final training session, the highest overall median score was found for the vitreoretinal surgeons (vitreoretinal surgeons: 434 points, residents: 394.5 points, medical students: 272.5 points, p training programme with validity for the eyesi surgical simulator as an assessment tool for overall score and for four of six vitreoretinal modules. These findings could potentially make the programme a useful tool in the training of future vitreoretinal surgeons. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. the mccord-christian medical fellowship vocational training programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    interns to qualified specialists and even a retired academic. PROGRAMME CONTENT. The programme was offered over a period ... Formative evaluation was carried out through audits. 2 = Good knowledge but no experience ... 10 trainees who have completed the full2-year training. Tuberculosis control in the community.

  13. Evaluating IMU communication skills training programme: assessment tool development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, R; Beevi, Z; Lukman, H

    2008-08-01

    This article describes the development of four assessment tools designed to evaluate the communication skills training (CST) programme at the International Medical University (IMU). The tools measure pre-clinical students' 1) perceived competency in basic interpersonal skills, 2) attitude towards patient-centred communication, 3) conceptual knowledge on doctor-patient communication, and 4) acceptance of the CST programme.

  14. An international partnership interdisciplinary training programme on public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrioti, Despena; Charalambous, George; Skitsou, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Targeted training programmes are more efficient towards skills development. Literature on assessing training needs in order to formulate programmes through international partnerships is very limited. This study intended to identify perceived training needs in public health with an aim...... at providing the respective training in cooperation with the World Health Organization, European Office. Method and Material: We distributed a questionnaire to Greek professionals such as doctors, nurses, administrative personnel and social scientists, employed in the public sector all over the country. We...... health (61%) as the highest priorities echoed current population needs. Conclusions: This international partnership training programme was the first of this type provided to a member state by WHO/EURO. It combined academic expertise in curriculum development and teaching technologies with practical...

  15. Evaluation and impact of cardiotocography training programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pehrson, C; Sørensen, Jette Led; Amer-Wåhlin, I

    2011-01-01

    The interpretation and management of cardiotocography (CTG) tracings are often criticised in obstetric malpractice cases. As a consequence, regular CTG training has been recommended, even though little is known about the effect of CTG training....

  16. Designing Training Programmes for EIU and ESD: A Trainer's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    UNESCO Bangkok, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The training guide is based on a TOT (Training of Trainer) workshop conducted in September 2005 in Chiangmai, Thailand jointly by Asia Pacific Centre of Education for International Understanding (APCEIU) and UNESCO's Asia Pacific Programme of Educational Innovation for Development (APEID). The publication provides a comprehensive guide to trainers…

  17. Do Computerised Training Programmes Designed to Improve Working Memory Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apter, Brian J. B.

    2012-01-01

    A critical review of working memory training research during the last 10 years is provided. Particular attention is given to research that has attempted to investigate the efficacy of commercially marketed computerised training programmes such as "Cogmed" and "Jungle Memory". Claimed benefits are questioned on the basis that research methodologies…

  18. Comparative Effects of Circuit Training Programme on Speed and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stratified random sampling technique was used to select 40 pre-menarceal and 40 postmenarcheal girls who were later randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. At the end of the training programme, 40 subjects completed the post training measurements, so there were 10 subjects in each of the four study ...

  19. Effect of Training Programme on Secondary Schools Teachers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Training Programme on Secondary Schools Teachers' Knowledge and Attitude towards Reproductive Health Education in Rural Schools IIe-Ife, ... in percentage of those who were favourably disposed to the teaching of RHE/SE in Nigeria Schools at post-training assessment [from 17.9% to 45.2%, p=0.0011].

  20. Developing Your Own Transactional Analysis Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Training Officer, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The New York Telephone Company recently improved its customer relations through the development of a transactional analysis training program for its employees. The program's four phases are described. (Author/BP)

  1. Development of operator training programmes for Sizewell B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnie, S.

    1988-01-01

    In accordance with existing practice, it is the Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB's) intention that the station manager of Sizewell B and future pressurized water reactor (PWR) stations will be responsible for ensuring that his staff perform their designated duties competently. To assist the station managers in fulfilling these responsibilities, the CEGB ensures that all nuclear training needs are identified, effective training strategies are developed and training programmes provided. The management, operation and development of the CEGB Nuclear Power Training Centre is integrated with nuclear power training activities conducted on site and at other locations. A systematic approach to training must be used so that the training is effective, i.e. that the staff can operate the plant safely and economically. To aid in the systematic production of PWR training programmes in general, but in particular for shift operations engineers, a PWR section was established in 1983 at the CEGB Nuclear Power Training Centre. A condition in the site licence for Sizewell B states that a suitable simulator must be available for training operations staff at least one year before fuel loading commences. The work of this section in operations engineer training is summarized. (author)

  2. Could Slackline Training Complement the FIFA 11+ Programme Regarding Training of Neuromuscular Control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Tobias; Kiefer, Julian; Werner, Inge; Federolf, Peter A

    2017-09-01

    The current study compared changes in neuromuscular control between slackline training and the stabilization training elements of the FIFA 11+ programme. Twenty-five students in 2 groups performed a 12-unit training programme. The slackline training group (n = 13) exclusively trained with a slackline. The stabilization training group (n = 12) practised exercises as described in the second part of the FIFA 11+ programme. Improvements in balance were assessed using three tests for dynamic, quasi-static, and perturbed postural control: the star excursion balance test (SEBT), the closed-eye single-leg stance, and the MFT S3-Check. Both groups significantly improved the stability and sensorimotor index of the MFT S3-Check (p slackline training group showing a larger training effect than the stabilization training group. The results of the present study suggest that slackline training offers similar - or better - improvements in neuromuscular control as the FIFA 11+ warm-up programme. If compliance with the FIFA 11+ programme is declining, then slacklining might offer an alternative approach to reach the training goals of improved sensorimotor control.

  3. Evolution of radiation protection training programmes in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monica, Rodriguez Suarez; Elvira, Hernando Velasco; Javier, Menarguez; Javier, Fernandez; Susana, Falcon; Mirian, Bravo

    2006-01-01

    Education and training are an important tool to promote safety culture and to upgrade competence. In this sense, Radiation Protection (R.P.) training programmes are a major challenge in order to achieve occupational, public and environmental radiation protection in all applied fields of ionising radiation.The Spanish R.P. Education and Training system provides a solid and integrated educational model. The needs for a specialized training on R.P. for exposed workers appears into the Spanish regulation in 1964. Since then, a wide variety of R.P. initial, continuous and on the job training courses has been carried out, taking into account the diverse applied fields, the different levels of responsibilities, the technological and methodological advances, as well as the international trends. C.I.E.M.A.T., through the R.P. training Unit, has been organizing and developing most of the R.P. training in Spain since 1964, becoming a reference centre. The educational programmes are being continuously updating and improving in order to complete and adapt all R.P. training levels. Initial training, long-life training, updating or upgrading training, as well as other innovative courses related with R.P. are being offered by C.I.E.M.A.T. each year. Another important aspect of R.P. is the information and training to stake holders. C.I.E.M.A. T. is also working in this sense. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the evolution of R.P. training processes since 1964 in Spain, in order to conclude which are the future trends and the changes required to adapt the Spanish R.P. Education and Training system to the current needs and upcoming scene. (authors)

  4. Evolution of radiation protection training programmes in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monica, Rodriguez Suarez; Elvira, Hernando Velasco; Javier, Menarguez; Javier, Fernandez; Susana, Falcon; Mirian, Bravo [CIEMAT - Radiation Protection Training Unit ( IEE), Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Education and training are an important tool to promote safety culture and to upgrade competence. In this sense, Radiation Protection (R.P.) training programmes are a major challenge in order to achieve occupational, public and environmental radiation protection in all applied fields of ionising radiation.The Spanish R.P. Education and Training system provides a solid and integrated educational model. The needs for a specialized training on R.P. for exposed workers appears into the Spanish regulation in 1964. Since then, a wide variety of R.P. initial, continuous and on the job training courses has been carried out, taking into account the diverse applied fields, the different levels of responsibilities, the technological and methodological advances, as well as the international trends. C.I.E.M.A.T., through the R.P. training Unit, has been organizing and developing most of the R.P. training in Spain since 1964, becoming a reference centre. The educational programmes are being continuously updating and improving in order to complete and adapt all R.P. training levels. Initial training, long-life training, updating or upgrading training, as well as other innovative courses related with R.P. are being offered by C.I.E.M.A.T. each year. Another important aspect of R.P. is the information and training to stake holders. C.I.E.M.A. T. is also working in this sense. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the evolution of R.P. training processes since 1964 in Spain, in order to conclude which are the future trends and the changes required to adapt the Spanish R.P. Education and Training system to the current needs and upcoming scene. (authors)

  5. CERN High School Teachers Training Programme meets DG

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2014-01-01

    CERN's DG Rolf Heuer met with the participants of the High School Teachers Training Programme on 23 July 2014 for a Q&A Session. Following the interaction, he met with the HST Working Group collaborating on a lesson plan for teaching SESAME in high schools.

  6. Drop-out from parenting training programmes: a retrospective study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective:Parent training programmes are a well-established treatment approach for children and adolescents with disruptive behaviour disorders. However, dropout from treatment is a common problem that confounds research on the efficacy of this approach, and wastes important mental health resources. This study ...

  7. Therapeutic role of continuous exercise training programme on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The continuous (n=112; 58.63 ± 7.22 years) group involved in an 8 weeks continuous training (60-79% HR max reserve) programme of between 45 minutes to 60 minutes, while age-matched controls hypertensive (n=105; 58.27± 6.24 years) group remain sedentary during this period. Cardiovascular parameters [Systolic ...

  8. Locomotor training as part of a rehabilitation programme for patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Locomotor training as part of a rehabilitation programme for patients with spinal cord injury - a case study. BM Parr, R Gamieldien, SEH Davies. Abstract. No Abstract South African Journal of Sports Medicine Vol. 20 (3) 2008: pp. 91-92. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  9. The Czech Republic programme and experiences on training and qualification for NPPs personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, P.

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear power programme in Czech Republic is based on commercial use of WWER-type reactors. This document discusses future scope of nuclear programme in Czech Republic and status of training programme for NPP personnel

  10. CERN Technical Training Programme: Learning for the LHC!

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In collaboration with AS and AC divisions, the Technical Training Programme is launching EVM Hands-on Tutorials specifically designed for those people involved in the current EVM for LHC exercise. The goal of the EVM Hands-on Training Sessions is to provide insight in Earned Value Management as implemented at CERN. Following this course will enable you to understand the EVM methodology, the tools used at CERN, the procedures used for the data-collection and data-reporting and assist you in analysing cost & schedule variances. The course is an intensive 2-hour 'hands-on' training session. If you are interested in this course, please discuss with your supervisor or your DTO. More information and online registration by EDH are available from the Technical Training web pages: http://www.cern.ch/TechnicalTraining/

  11. CERN Technical Training Programme: Learning for the LHC !

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In collaboration with AS and AC divisions, the Technical Training Programme is launching EVM Hands-on Tutorials specifically designed for those people involved in the current EVM for LHC exercise. The goal of the EVM Hands-on Training Sessions is to provide insight in Earned Value Management as implemented at CERN. Following this course will enable you to understand the EVM methodology, the tools used at CERN, the procedures used for the data-collection and data-reporting and assist you in analysing cost & schedule variances. The course is an intensive 2-hour 'hands-on' training session. If you are interested in this course, please discuss with your supervisor or your DTO. More information and online registration by EDH are available from the Technical Training web pages: http://www.cern.ch/TechnicalTraining/

  12. [Implementation of a national training assessment programme in anaesthesiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjelsager, K.; Malling, B.; Bested, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2004, outcome-based education and in-training assessment was introduced by a reform of postgraduate medical education in Denmark. An assessment programme covering the introductory year of anaesthesiology was constructed. The purpose of this study was to explore to which degree...... this programme was implemented in daily practice in the clinical departments and whether the recommended assessment protocol was followed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to 26 departments and 38 trainees. RESULTS: The response rate for both groups exceeded 90%. Individual learning plans...... were prepared by (2/3) of the trainees according to both trainees and departments. The various methods in the assessment programme were implemented to a high degree. The use of structured clinical observations was reported by more than 70% of both groups. Global assessments were applied in more than 70...

  13. ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME 2002/03: TIME TO VOTE!

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Each year at this time the Academic Training Committee makes a selection of possible topics for inclusion in next year's programme. But before a final decision is taken, everyone is given the opportunity to provide their input by selecting the subjects that are particularly relevant for them by filling in a questionnaire. As usual the questionnaire is divided into three sections: high energy physics, postgraduate lectures, applied physics and other topics. There is also space for making suggestions for subjects not listed and for giving comments and feedback on the programme in general. This year's questionnaire is available on the web. Please take the time to study it and choose the sets of lectures that will meet your academic training requirements from September 2002 through June 2003. THE DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION IS APRIL 26. The committee relies on you to make your carefully considered selection and to help it sustain a long standing CERN tradition of providing a high quality Academic Training Programme c...

  14. EQUIP training the trainers: an evaluation of a training programme for service users and carers involved in training mental health professionals in user-involved care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, C; Grundy, A; Meade, O; Callaghan, P; Lovell, K

    2017-08-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: UK NHS policy highlights the importance of user and carer involvement in health professional training. We know little about service user and carer motivations and experiences of accessing training courses for delivering training to health professionals and how well such courses prepare them for delivering training to healthcare professionals. 'Involvement' in training has often been tokenistic and too narrowly focused on preregistration courses. There is limited data on how best to prepare and support potential service user and carer trainers. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study adds to the international literature by highlighting service user and carer motivations for accessing a training course for delivering training to health professionals. Service users and carers wanted to gain new skills and confidence in presentation/facilitation as well as to make a difference to healthcare practice. We also learned that service users desired different levels of involvement in training facilitation - some wanted to take a more active role than others. A one-size-fits-all approach is not always appropriate. Encountering resistance from staff in training was a previously unidentified challenge to service user and carers' experience of delivering training in practice and is a key challenge for trainers to address in future. Professional training involvement can be enhanced via specialist training such as the EQUIP training the trainers programme evaluated here. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: When training service users and carers to deliver training to mental health professionals, it is important that service users are equipped to deal with resistance from staff. It is important that service user and carer roles are negotiated and agreed prior to delivering training to healthcare professionals to accommodate individual preferences and allay anxieties. Training for service users and carers must be offered

  15. Does Resistance Training Stimulate Cardiac Muscle Hypertrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomer, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the left ventricular structural adaptations induced by resistance/strength exercise, focusing on human work, particularly well-trained strength athletes engaged in regular, moderate- to high-intensity resistance training (RT). The article discusses both genders and examines the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids in…

  16. RESISTANCE TRAINING FOR YOUTH: MYTHS AND FACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Radovanović

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Using resistance training with the aim of developing muscle strength among youth is still a matter of debate and often receives severe criticism. Previous research, which has not noted an increase in muscle strength, led to the conclusion that resistance training is ineffective among youth. However, the results of numerous more recent studies which have closely followed the published statements and recommendations obtained by leading global professional and health organizations, indicate that if carried out properly, resistance training among youth can have very positive results. In addition to its positive influence on muscle strength and endurance, as well as the potential increase in the success rate of motor performance, regular resistance training can result in the improvement of body composition, increased bone mineral density, an improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness, as well as its influence on one’s psychological well-being. The most commonly used types of load for resistance training include free weights and weight machines, which can have standard dimensions, but are also specially designed for younger people. It is also often the case that these training programs consist of body weight exercises, exercises with a medicine ball, expanders and elastic bands. Current findings from well-organized and monitored studies involving samples of youth indicated a very small possibility of injury during resistance training, provided that all the training recommendations for the given age group are adhered to.

  17. Resistance training among young athletes: safety, efficacy and injury prevention effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, A D; Myer, G D

    2010-01-01

    A literature review was employed to evaluate the current epidemiology of injury related to the safety and efficacy of youth resistance training. Several case study reports and retrospective questionnaires regarding resistance exercise and the competitive sports of weightlifting and powerlifting reveal that injuries have occurred in young lifters, although a majority can be classified as accidental. Lack of qualified instruction that underlies poor exercise technique and inappropriate training loads could explain, at least partly, some of the reported injuries. Current research indicates that resistance training can be a safe, effective and worthwhile activity for children and adolescents provided that qualified professionals supervise all training sessions and provide age-appropriate instruction on proper lifting procedures and safe training guidelines. Regular participation in a multifaceted resistance training programme that begins during the preseason and includes instruction on movement biomechanics may reduce the risk of sports-related injuries in young athletes. Strategies for enhancing the safety of youth resistance training are discussed.

  18. Resistance Training for Pediatric Female Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracciolini, Andrea; Hanson, Emily; Kiefer, Adam W; Myer, Gregory D; Faigenbaum, Avery D

    2016-01-01

    Resistance training often is not an inherent component of current dance training for pediatric female dancers. Reasons for this include concerns surrounding injury to the immature skeleton and diminishing dancer aesthetic appearance, as well as questions related to the effectiveness of such training for increasing dancer strength and muscle endurance. Many forms of dance demand sufficient muscle strength and endurance for prolonged periods of high intensity dance, power generation during leaps and jumps, as well as stabilization of the lower extremity to prevent injury. The benefits of resistance training for the pediatric female dancer are multiple, including improved muscle strength and bone health and decreased risk for stress related injuries to the actively growing skeleton. Understanding the biomechanical changes that occur during growth that may predispose the female dancer to injury is important, as well as initiating individualized resistance training protocols early in training that may serve to improve performance and prevent future injury.

  19. A Report on Education and Training in the International Council on Archives' Africa Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, James

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, the International Council on Archives launched its Africa Programme (2015-2020) in order to coordinate its support for African archives and archivists. The Programme is focused on two strategic priorities: advocacy and education and training. This article examines the education and training component of the Programme. It begins by…

  20. Development of programmable multi-channel earth resistivity system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hyun Ki; Choi, Jong Ho; Park, In Wha [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Maximum 256 channel digital-stacking automatic electrical earth resistivity meter is upgrade-developed and field-tested with two commercially available systems (OYO McOHM and ABEM Terrameter) for Schlumberger vertical sounding and dipole-dipole arrays. The results of three systems are very well coincident for several dummy resistors and Schlumberger array in field site. The developed system K-Ohm shows even more reasonable quality data in sensitive dipole-dipole array measurements in comparison with the electrical survey instruments of digital stacking type manufactured by other countries. New Important features of upgraded programmable K-Ohm system are as follows ; 1) Auto-electrode-switching control by Notebook printer port, 2) receiving signal measurement by Notebook serial port, 3) interactive automatic dipole-dipole measurement software with two apparent resistivity sections compared in one Notebook display to minimize noisy data in field, 4) auto-saved field memo at any time appending to acquired data, 5) max 500 V{sub p-p} 500 mA transmitter (measuring cycle S/W programmable), 6) low-drift sigma - delta 24 bit A/D 0.0015 % linearity error with zero-offset and full - scale gain autocalibration, 7) DC 12 v operated and TX-RX 7,000 V optical-isolated, 8) electrodes grounding auto-tested, user-oriented any array sequential programmable control software. Further study will be focused on higher power TX and stand alone TX-RX system, and micro-resistivity system for in-borehole resistivity imaging. (author). 8 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Influence of operation incidents on the french training programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernes, A.

    1987-04-01

    The French Electricity Producer (EDF) and the Safety Authorities have developed, each of his own, a procedure for analysing the operating incidents. One of the major lessons of their analysis was the importance of incidents due to human error and, among them, to deficiences in the training of the operators. It is, in consequence, particularly important to improve the quality of these programmes and one of the major concerns is how to take into account the lessons of operation experience. Our purpose is aimed at describing how this is now done

  2. Resistance training is medicine: effects of strength training on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Wayne L

    2012-01-01

    Inactive adults experience a 3% to 8% loss of muscle mass per decade, accompanied by resting metabolic rate reduction and fat accumulation. Ten weeks of resistance training may increase lean weight by 1.4 kg, increase resting metabolic rate by 7%, and reduce fat weight by 1.8 kg. Benefits of resistance training include improved physical performance, movement control, walking speed, functional independence, cognitive abilities, and self-esteem. Resistance training may assist prevention and management of type 2 diabetes by decreasing visceral fat, reducing HbA1c, increasing the density of glucose transporter type 4, and improving insulin sensitivity. Resistance training may enhance cardiovascular health, by reducing resting blood pressure, decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, and increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Resistance training may promote bone development, with studies showing 1% to 3% increase in bone mineral density. Resistance training may be effective for reducing low back pain and easing discomfort associated with arthritis and fibromyalgia and has been shown to reverse specific aging factors in skeletal muscle.

  3. The scientific basis for high-intensity interval training: optimising training programmes and maximising performance in highly trained endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Paul B; Jenkins, David G

    2002-01-01

    While the physiological adaptations that occur following endurance training in previously sedentary and recreationally active individuals are relatively well understood, the adaptations to training in already highly trained endurance athletes remain unclear. While significant improvements in endurance performance and corresponding physiological markers are evident following submaximal endurance training in sedentary and recreationally active groups, an additional increase in submaximal training (i.e. volume) in highly trained individuals does not appear to further enhance either endurance performance or associated physiological variables [e.g. peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), oxidative enzyme activity]. It seems that, for athletes who are already trained, improvements in endurance performance can be achieved only through high-intensity interval training (HIT). The limited research which has examined changes in muscle enzyme activity in highly trained athletes, following HIT, has revealed no change in oxidative or glycolytic enzyme activity, despite significant improvements in endurance performance (p sprinting may be equally effective as more traditional HIT programmes for eliciting improvements in endurance performance. Further examination of the biochemical and physiological adaptations which accompany different HIT programmes, as well as investigation into the optimal HIT programme for eliciting performance enhancements in highly trained athletes is required.

  4. H-CARE PROJECT - AN INNOVATIVE EUROPEAN TRAINING PROGRAMME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela CIOBANU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An innovative European training programme for salespersons of medical devices, assistivetechnologies and food supplements was launched in 2014 with 6 partners from 5 European Union countries (Turkey, Bulgaria, Romania, Austria and Belgium. The project, called “Launching of Sector Skills Alliance for Training and Apprenticeship of Health Care and Food Supplements Salespersons” (H-CARE, contributes to the Europe 2020 growth strategy in particular to the European Union’s employment rate target of 75% by 2020, by helping people learn new skills and adapt to changes in the labor market. By development of a new occupational job profile in Health Care Sales the project will encourage the employment in this sector. The project offers exactly new skills for new jobs Agenda, providing opportunities for the inclusion of unemployed or low paid people in the European Union job market.

  5. The Impact of Resistance Training on Swimming Performance: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Emmet; Harrison, Andrew J; Lyons, Mark

    2017-11-01

    The majority of propulsive forces in swimming are produced from the upper body, with strong correlations between upper body strength and sprint performance. There are significant gaps in the literature relating to the impact of resistance training on swimming performance, specifically the transfer to swimming performance. The aims of this systematic literature review are to (1) explore the transfer of resistance-training modalities to swimming performance, and (2) examine the effects of resistance training on technical aspects of swimming. Four online databases were searched with the following inclusion criteria: (1) journal articles with outcome measures related to swimming performance, and (2) competitive swimmers participating in a structured resistance-training programme. Exclusion criteria were (1) participants with a mean age force resistance-training programmes are optimal. Stroke length is best achieved through resistance training with low repetitions at a high velocity/force. Resisted swims are the most appropriate training modality for improving stroke rate. Future research is needed with respect to the effects of long-term resistance-training interventions on both technical parameters of swimming and overall swimming performance. The results of such work will be highly informative for the scientific community, coaches and athletes.

  6. Organization of Specialist Adjustment Training Based on Existing Educational Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E V. Zelentsova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with matters related to the adjustment training of the specialist who has specified competences in order to solve the specific staffing problems of enterprises, provide scheduled staff re-training, suggest additional specializations to graduates of educational institutions, etc. Defines a structure and content of the management system elements for training and adjustment training of specialists, including a shift from activity-related competence to desirable areas of knowledge, and therefrom to the curricula and programmes.A concept of the knowledge subject is defined. It allows perceiving a specific subject area. A concept of the aspects of the certain knowledge subject is proposed, and in this case it is assumed that the knowledge subject can be represented as a finite set of aspects of the given subject of knowledge. A concept of the knowledge section is defined as a body of knowledge, reflecting some aspect of the particular subject of knowledge. Thus, the entire body of knowledge to be offered by the particular Department may be represented by a variety of specific sections of knowledge. For each section of knowledge is introduced a concept of the training level, which corresponds to the level of detail and quality of the educational material delivered. To assess the level of training it is possible to use the method of expert’s estimates.The paper suggests a scheme that allows realization of the relevant order for target training of specialists. Requirements for training specialists are represented as a competency model of the specialist; an implemented study programme is characterized by the competences, obtained as the learning outcomes.The content of knowledge, corresponding to some competence, is represented as a total of all the sections of knowledge related to the aspects generated by the competence. Then the competence can be revealed through the body of knowledge. As a result, both an order for adjustment training

  7. Relationship between resistance training and selfreported habitual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Similar to the non-exercising control group, resistance training resulted in no significant (p > 0.05) changes in the habitual intake of daily intake of total ... as a mode of training may not be an effective mode of exercise to promote overall physical activity in an attempt to modify the patterns of macronutrient and energy intake.

  8. Measuring Learning Resistance to Workplace Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jonathan E.; Lounsbury, John

    2016-01-01

    Training Transfer has been a topic bearing considerable mention over the past several decades. This article focuses on the connection between training transfer and learning resistance and presents research findings describing the design, creation, and testing of the Learning Efficiency Inventory (LEI). The LEI was designed to measure learning…

  9. Differences and similarities in rheumatology specialty training programmes across European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sivera, Francisca; Ramiro, Sofia; Cikes, Nada; Dougados, Maxime; Gossec, Laure; Kvien, Tore K.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Mandl, Peter; Moorthy, Arumugam; Panchal, Sonia; Da Silva, José A. P.; Bijlsma, Johannes W.; Collaku, Ledio; Aroyan, Armine; Radner, Helga; Tushina, Anastasyia; de Langhe, Ellen; Sokolovic, Sekib; Shumnalieva, Russka; Baresic, Marko; Senolt, Ladislav; Holland-Fischer, Mette; Kull, Mart; Puolitaival, Antti; Letsveridze, Khatuna; Hueber, Axel; Fanouriakis, Antonis; MacMullan, Paul; Rimar, Doron; Bugatti, Serena; Zepa, Julija; Menasssa, Jeanine; Karpec, Diana; Misevska-Percinkova, Snezana; Cassar, Karen; Deseatnicova, Elena; Tas, Sander; Haavardsholm, Espen; Sznajd, Jan; Berghea, Florian; Trifonova, Elena; Jeremic, Ivica; Mlynarikova, Vanda; Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Chatzidionysiou, Aikaterina; Dumusc, Alexandre; Hatemi, Gulen; Ozdemirel, Erhan; Biliavska, Iuliia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To analyse the similarities and discrepancies between the official rheumatology specialty training programmes across Europe. Methods A steering committee defined the main aspects of training to be assessed. In 2013, the rheumatology official training programmes were reviewed for each of

  10. Evaluation of a simulation training programme for geriatric medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braude, Philip; Reedy, Gabriel; Dasgupta, Deblina; Dimmock, Valerie; Jaye, Peter; Birns, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    geriatrics encompasses diverse medical, social and ethical challenges requiring a multidimensional, interdisciplinary approach. Recent reports have highlighted failings in the care of older people. It is therefore vital that trainees in geriatrics are afforded opportunities to develop skills in managing this complex population. Simulation has been adopted as a teaching tool in medicine; however, evidence for its use in geriatrics has been limited to small, single-site studies primarily involving role-play or discrete clinical skills training. a standardised, two centre, multimodal, interprofessional, geriatrics simulation training programme was developed using curriculum-mapped scenarios in which the patient perspective was central. Simulation techniques used included high-fidelity patient manikins, actors with integrated clinical skills using part-task trainers and role-play exercises. A mixed-methods evaluation was used to analyse data from participants before and after training. eighty-nine candidates attended 12 similar courses over 2 years. Thematic analysis of candidate feedback was supportive of simulation as a useful tool, with benefits for both technical and non-technical skills. Candidates commented that simulation was a valuable training modality addressing curriculum areas rarely taught formally including continence assessment, end-of-life decisions and multidisciplinary situations. Quantitative analysis of pre- and post-course questionnaires revealed a significant improvement of self-reported confidence in managing geriatric scenarios (mean improvement 11.5%; P geriatrics. Simulation training affords situational learning without compromising patient safety and is an exciting and novel method of delivering teaching for geriatrics that could be integrated into national training curricula. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Global health training in US obstetrics and gynaecology residency programmes: perspectives of students, residents and programme directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Lisa M; Banks, Erika H; Conroy, Erin M; McGinn, Aileen P; Ghartey, Jeny P; Wagner, Sarah A; Merkatz, Irwin R

    2015-12-01

    Benefits of exposure to global health training during medical education are well documented and residents' demand for this training is increasing. Despite this, it is offered by few US obstetrics and gynaecology (OBGYN) residency training programmes. To evaluate interest, perceived importance, predictors of global health interest and barriers to offering global health training among prospective OBGYN residents, current OBGYN residents and US OGBYN residency directors. We designed two questionnaires using Likert scale questions to assess perceived importance of global health training. The first was distributed to current and prospective OBGYN residents interviewing at a US residency programme during 2012-2013. The second questionnaire distributed to US OBGYN programme directors assessed for existing global health programmes and global health training barriers. A composite Global Health Interest/Importance score was tabulated from the Likert scores. Multivariable linear regression was performed to assess for predictors of Global Health Interest/Importance. A total of 159 trainees (77%; 129 prospective OBGYN residents and 30 residents) and 69 (28%) programme directors completed the questionnaires. Median Global Health Interest/Importance score was 7 (IQR 4-9). Prior volunteer experience was predictive of a 5-point increase in Global Health Interest/Importance score (95% CI -0.19 to 9.85; p=0.02). The most commonly cited barriers were cost and time. Interest and perceived importance of global health training in US OBGYN residency programmes is evident among trainees and programme directors; however, significant financial and time barriers prevent many programmes from offering opportunities to their trainees. Prior volunteer experience predicts global health interest. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. The Anatomy of a Successful Caribbean Substance Abuse Training Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SD Reid

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This paper describes the components of the Caribbean Institute on Alcoholism and Other Drug Problems (CARIAD, a long-standing substance abuse training programme. It seeks to explain how certain strategies and pedagogic techniques may be contributing to its success. Methods: Authors deconstruct the core elements of CARIAD to demonstrate how the programme effectively meets the characteristics of a community of practice. The processes used to develop the learning community and the specific pedagogic strategies and techniques that foster collaborative knowledge construction and sharing are described. Results: Caribbean Institute on Alcoholism and Other Drug Problems brings together a multi-disciplinary, multi-national group of individuals with interest in substance abuse. The programme provides a range of formal and informal learning activities which focus on sharing best practices and creating new sociocultural relevant knowledge to advance the domain of professional practice in substance abuse. The components of CARIAD promote interactivity, rapid bonding and a sense of identity. Caribbean Institute on Alcoholism and Other Drug Problems provides a unique platform for cultural sharing that gives participants an opportunity to reveal insights into local and regional expressions of substance abuse challenges. Participants, however, recognize the absence of structured continuity and the diminution of what could be accomplished by graduates over time. Conclusion: The success of CARIAD as a regional learning platform may be related to its success as a Caribbean community of practice for substance abuse. Caribbean Institute on Alcoholism and Other Drug Problems would do well to sustain the community of practice, generating and maintaining ongoing participation and collaboration among graduates. This can potentially serve to create new strategies for advancing the region in the area of substance abuse.

  13. Embracing the new paradigm of assessment in residency training: an assessment programme for first-year residency training in anaesthesiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, C; Østergaard, D; Scherpbier, A

    2003-01-01

    is to specify the evaluation situations and develop appropriate methods. This paper describes the intrinsic rational validation process in outlining an assessment programme for first-year anaesthesiology residency training according to the new paradigm. The applicability to other residency programmes and higher......-level training in anaesthesiology is discussed. Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Jan...

  14. Focused training programmes for solving growth problems of very small businesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Perks

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and objectives: The purpose of the study is to investigate the various types of focused training programmes that should be designed for eliminating or preventing small business growth problems. To help achieve this main objective, the following secondary goals are identified : • To highlight the role and nature of entrepreneurial training. • To identify possible focused training programmes for solving very small business problems. • To determine how training programmes should be structured to target very small business growth problems. • To explore which other method(s, besides training programmes could be uitilised for solving very small black business entrepreneurs' growth problems. • To provide trainers with guidelines in designing focused training programmes for solving very small business problems. Problem investigated: South African entrepreneurs have a poor skills record, which inhibits small business growth. The needs of a business changes as the business grows, resulting in growing pains for the very small business entrepreneur. Successful entrepreneurs are not necessarily academically inclined and often learn in a more dynamic, non-linear environment, therefore various specific focused training programmes need to be designed that can assist very small business entrepreneurs in eliminating or preventing small business growth problems. Methodology: A qualitative study was done, in which an empirical survey was conducted by means of a series of in-depth interviews with ten very small black business entrepreneurs. Findings: The empirical results identified seven types of training programmes focusing on financial management computer training, operations management, people management, marketing management, management and investment management. Other training programmes indicated were stress management, time management and security management. Within each of these types of training programmes specific focus areas were

  15. Why do seniors leave resistance training programs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton E

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Elissa Burton,1 Anne-Marie Hill,1 Simone Pettigrew,2 Gill Lewin,3 Liz Bainbridge,1 Kaela Farrier,1 Phil Airey,4 Keith D Hill1 1School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, 2School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, 3School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, Curtin University, 4Council on the Ageing, Perth, WA, Australia Purpose: The proportion of the population, that is older, is growing at a faster rate than other age groups. Physical activity is important for older people because it assists in living independently. Participating in resistance training on a regular basis (twice weekly is recommended for older people; yet, fewer than 15% of people over 60 years achieve this level. The aim of this article was to investigate the factors contributing to older people’s decisions to stop participation in a resistance training program.Participants and methods: Participants were older people who had chosen to participate in a structured resistance training program specifically designed for seniors and then after a period of time discontinued. This population received a questionnaire in the mail focused on factors contributing to their cessation of resistance training exercise. Qualitative results were analyzed using inductive content analysis.Results: Fifty-six survey responses were received (average age 71.5 years, SD =9.0; 79% females. Injury, illness, and holidaying were the main reasons for ceasing participation. A small but important number of responses (11% reported that they considered they were not provided with sufficient support during the resistance training programs.Conclusions: To attract and retain their senior clients, the results indicate that program organizers need to provide tailored support to return to resistance training after injury and offer flexible and individualized services that accommodate older people’s life choices in retirement. Keywords: older people, strength training, gymnasium, retention, aging

  16. Newborn Resuscitation Training Programmes Reduce Early Neonatal Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pammi, Mohan; Dempsey, Eugene M; Ryan, C Anthony; Barrington, Keith J

    2016-01-01

    Substantial health care resources are expended on standardised formal neonatal resuscitation training (SFNRT) programmes, but their effectiveness has not been proven. To determine whether SFNRT programmes reduce neonatal mortality and morbidity, improve acquisition and retention of knowledge and skills, or change teamwork and resuscitation behaviour. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, PREMEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science and the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, ongoing trials and conference proceedings in April 2015, and included randomised or quasi-randomised trials that reported at least one of our specified outcomes. SFNRT in low- and middle-income countries decreased early neonatal mortality [risk ratio (RR) 0.85 (95% CI 0.75-0.96)]; the number needed to treat for benefit [227 (95% CI 122-1,667; 3 studies, 66,162 participants, moderate-quality evidence)], and 28-day mortality [RR 0.55 (95% CI 0.33-0.91); 1 study, 3,355 participants, low-quality evidence]. Decreasing trends were noted for late neonatal mortality [RR 0.47 (95% CI 0.20-1.11)] and perinatal mortality [RR 0.94 (95% CI 0.87-1.00)], but there were no differences in fresh stillbirths [RR 1.05 (95% CI 0.93-1.20)]. Teamwork training with simulation increased the frequency of teamwork behaviour [mean difference (MD) 2.41 (95% CI 1.72-3.11)] and decreased resuscitation duration [MD -149.54 (95% CI -214.73 to -84.34); low-quality evidence, 2 studies, 130 participants]. SFNRT in low- and middle-income countries reduces early neonatal mortality, but its effects on birth asphyxia and neurodevelopmental outcomes remain uncertain. Follow-up studies suggest normal neurodevelopment in resuscitation survivors. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Is inertial flywheel resistance training superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in improving muscle strength?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicens-Bordas, J; Esteve, E; Fort-Vanmeerhaeghe, A

    2018-01-01

    -dependent resistance training in improving other muscular adaptations. DESIGN: A systematic review with meta-analyses of randomised and non-randomised controlled trials. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials with no publication date......OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of this systematic review was to determine if inertial flywheel resistance training is superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in improving muscle strength. The secondary aim was to determine whether inertial flywheel resistance training is superior to gravity...... restrictions until November 2016. We performed meta-analyses on randomised and non-randomised controlled trials to determine the standardized mean difference between the effects of inertial flywheel and gravity-dependent resistance training on muscle strength. A total of 76 and 71 participants were included...

  18. [General conditions concerning the implementation of an outpatient education programme--characteristics and distinctions from an inpatient training programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, I; Wunderlich, B; Niehues, C

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the EVA study was to develop an outpatient education programme for women with endometriosis with a view to permanent transfer into routine care. Implementation of the programme generated several problems and obstacles that are not, or not to this extent, present in the inpatient setting of a rehabilitation clinic. The patient education programme was developed in line with an existing inpatient programme, taking into account the criteria for evaluating such training programmes. Several adjustments to process, structure and content level had to be made to achieve the conditions of the outpatient setting. Since May 2008, 17 training courses took place in various outpatient and acute inpatient settings, and a total of 156 women with diagnosed endometriosis participated. The problems and obstacles that emerged affected similarly the process, structure and content of the training programme. On the structural level, especially problems with availability of rooms, technical equipment and trainers occurred, leading to significant time pressures. The main problem on the procedural level was the recruitment of participants, since--in contrast to the inpatient setting and to disease management programmes--no assignment by physicians or insurers takes place. Furthermore, gainful activity of the participants and the resulting shift of the training beyond the usual working and opening hours are important barriers for implementation. The unavailability of trainers in these settings requires creative solutions. Regarding the contents of the training it has to be taken into consideration that--unlike the inpatient setting--no aftercare intervention and no individual psychological consultation are possible. The training programme has to be designed in such a way that all problems that have occurred could be dealt with appropriately. In summary, the permanent implementation of an outpatient training programme is possible but is more time-consuming than inpatient trainings

  19. Manual Resistance versus Conventional Resistance Training: Impact on Strength and Muscular Endurance in Recreationally Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulvi-Medrano, Iván; Rial, Tamara; Cortell-Tormo, Juan M; Alakhdar, Yasser; La Scala Teixeira, Caue V; Masiá-Tortosa, Laura; Dorgo, Sandor

    2017-09-01

    Manual resistance training (MRT) has been widely used in the field of physical therapy. It has also been used as a strength training method due to the accommodating resistance nature of this modality. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of an 8-week MRT program on maximum strength and muscular endurance in comparison to conventional resistance training in recreationally trained men. Twenty healthy recreationally trained male subjects were recruited and divided into a MRT training group and a conventional training (CT) group. CT group performed bench press and lat pull-down exercises, and the MRT group performed similar movements with resistance provided by a personal trainer. Both groups completed similar training protocol and training load: 2 training sessions weekly for 3 sets of 8 repetitions at an intensity of 8 to 10 on the perceived exertion scale of 0-10. Initial maximum strength differences were not significant between the groups. Neither group showed significant changes in muscular strength or endurance. Despite the statistically non-significant pre- to post differences, a trend for improvement was observed and effect size (ES) calculations indicated greater magnitude of effects for strength and endurance changes in the MRT group in lat pulldown (g=0.84) compared to CT group. Effectiveness of MRT is similar to CT for improving muscular strength and endurance. MRT can be used as a supplemental or alternative strength training modality for recreationally trained subjects, or be considered by personal trainers especially in low equipped facility conditions.

  20. Evaluation of maths training programme for children with learning difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Ehlert

    2013-06-01

    The study at hand focuses on the question of whether educationally impaired children with large deficits in mathematics can be supported successfully by means of a highly adaptive support measure (MARKO-T, and whether the effects of this support can be maintained over a certain period. For this, 32 educationally impaired third-graders with math deficits were supported individually with MARKO-T twice a week, over a period of ten weeks. As control group, 32 similarly impaired third-graders were paralleled according to the mathematical and cognitive achievements of the training group. Two further control groups, each with 32 unimpaired first-graders, were paralleled according to their mathematical and cognitive achievements, respectively. The results showed that the very poor mathematical performance of the educationally impaired children could be significantly improved with this support programme. Four months after the end of the training, significant support effects could still be established when compared to the educationally impaired control group. The comparison with the two control groups demonstrated that the developmental curve of the children with learning difficulties increased in a way that was comparable to that of the unimpaired first-graders.

  1. Integration of MOOCs in Advanced Mining Training Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveleva, Irina; Greenwald, Oksana; Kolomiets, Svetlana; Medvedeva, Elena

    2017-11-01

    The paper covers the concept of innovative approaches in education based on incorporating MOOCs options into traditional classroom. It takes a look at the ways higher education instructors working with the mining engineers enrolled in advanced training programmes can brighten, upgrade and facilitate the learning process. The shift of higher education from in-class to online format has changed the learning environment and the methods of teaching including professional retraining courses. In addition, the need of mining companies for managers of a new kind obligates high school retraining centres rapidly move towards the 21st century skill framework. One of widely recognized innovations in the sphere of e-learning is MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) that can be used as an effective teaching tool for organizing professional training of managing staff of mining companies within the walls of a university. The authors share their instructional experience and show the benefits of introducing MOOCs options at the courses designed for retraining mining engineers and senior managers of coal enterprises. Though in recent researches the pedagogical value of MOOCs is highly questioned and even negated this invention of the 21st century can become an essential and truly helpful instrument in the hands of educators.

  2. Qualification and training of personnel for nuclear equipment programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montagnier, S.

    1980-01-01

    The Equipment Department of Electricite de France has the task of designing, co-ordinating the construction of and commissioning the power stations required to feed the grid as part of the country's energy policity. The French nuclear programme may seem ambitious - 35.000 to 40.000 MW in service by 1985 - but it should be remembered that the first nuclear power plant construction in France goes back more than 20 years and that, as a result of this, the Equipment Department already has qualified staff at its disposal. Hence the proposed training activities take into account the educational background of such personnel and the number of persons concerned. These activities can be divided into (1) the professional orientation phase, intended for recently recruited staff members and consisting of discussion and instruction seminars aimed at facilitating the induction of the young recruit into EDF's departments, and (2) the training and retraining phase, intended for all staff in accordance with each person's particular job and made up, as the case may be, of courses in new theoretical knowledge, updating of previous knowledge, often accompanied by extensive practical work in the field, discussion of working methods, study of new operational techniques, and so forth. The teaching methods adopted naturally take into account the professional level of the trainees and are therefore usually 'active' or 'semi-active', entailing groups of the order of 12 persons, with effective participation by their supervisors. (author)

  3. The effects of high resistance-few repetitions and low resistance-high repetitions resistance training on climbing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Espen; Andersen, Vidar; Saeterbakken, Atle Hole

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of different strength training intensities on climbing performance, climbing-specific tests and a general strength test. Thirty lower grade and intermediate-level climbers participated in a 10-week training programme. The participants were randomized into three groups: high resistance-few repetitions training groups (HR-FR), low resistance-high repetitions training groups (LR-HR) and a control group (CON) which continued climbing/training as usual. Post-testing results demonstrated statistical tendencies for climbing performance improvements in the HR-FR and LR-HR (p = 0.088-0.090, effect size = 0.55-0.73), but no differences were observed between the groups (p = 0.950). For the climbing-specific tests, no differences were observed between the groups (p = 0.507-1.000), but the HR-FR and LR-HR improved their time in both Dead-hang (p = 0.004-0.026) and Bent-arm hang (p training groups reduced their climbing sessions during the intervention compared to the CON group (p = 0.057-0.074). In conclusion, HR-FR and LR-HR training programmes demonstrated an 11% and 12% non-significant improvement in climbing performance despite a 50% reduction in climbing sessions, but improved the results in strength and climbing-specific tests. None of the training intensities was superior compared to the others.

  4. Microsurgery simulation training system and set up: An essential system to complement every training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masud, Dhalia; Haram, Nadine; Moustaki, Margarita; Chow, Whitney; Saour, Samer; Mohanna, Pari Naz

    2017-07-01

    Microsurgical techniques are essential in plastic surgery; however, inconsistent training practices, acquiring these skills can be difficult. To address this, we designed a standardised laboratory-based microsurgical training programme, which allows trainees to develop their dexterity, visuospatial ability, operative flow and judgement as separate components. Thirty trainees completed an initial microsurgical anastomosis on a chicken femoral artery, assessed using the structured assessment of microsurgical skills (SAMS) method. The study group (n = 18) then completed a 3-month training programme, while the control group (n = 19) did not. A final anastomosis was completed by all trainees (n = 30). The study group had a significant improvement in the microsurgical technique, assessed using the SAMS score, when the initial and final scores were compared (Mean: 24 SAMS initial versus 49 SAMS final) (p group had a significantly lower rate of improvement (Mean: 23 SAMS initial versus 25 SAMS final). There was a significant difference between the final SAMS score of the study group and that of senior surgeons (Mean: 49 study final SAMS versus 58 senior SAMS). This validated programme is a safe, cost-effective and flexible method of allowing trainees to develop microsurgical skills in a non-pressurized environment. In addition, the objectified skills allow trainers to assess the trainees' level of proficiency before operating on patients. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The post-activation potentiation effect on sprint performance after combined resistance/sprint training in junior basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimachidis, Constantinos; Patikas, Dimitrios; Galazoulas, Christos; Bassa, Eleni; Kotzamanidis, Christos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a 10-week combined resistance/sprint training programme in the post-activation potentiation of sprint performance before, between and after resistance training sets. Twenty-six junior basketball players were randomly divided into a control and a combined training group. The combined training group performed a combined training programme consisting of 5 sets at 5-8 RM (Repetition Maximum) half-squats with sprints performed between each set. Post-activation potentiation was considered as the increase in sprint velocity in trials executed between and after the resistance sets compared with the sprint trial performed before the resistance sets of the respective first and last training session. For sprint evaluation the running distances 0-10 and 0-30 m were selected. The intervention increased both strength and sprint performance. No post-activation potentiation effect was observed during the first training session in either group. Post-activation potentiation appeared in the combined training group during the last training session of the intervention in both 0-10 and 0-30 m sprint. This study illustrates that post-activation potentiation effect on sprint performance in junior basketball players, who did not previously follow systematic resistance training, emerges after a 10-week resistance/sprint combined training programme.

  6. UNESCO's global renewable energy education and training programme (GREET Programme)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benchikh, O. [UNESCO, Paris (France). Div. of Basic and Engineering Sciences

    2004-09-01

    In every development process, there is a pressing need to increase the availability of qualified human resources. Developing countries tend to experience a crucial lack in precisely this area. They are confronted with many difficulties in developing scientific education. It is costly to teach in these countries and there is a lack of equipment and laboratory materials. Moreover, they often lack capacity for local production. Science and technology help forming a world view, including values, which stimulates creative capabilities, open mindedness, and a perception of nature and the environment that provide people with indispensable tools to cope with a globalizing world. The rational use of scientific and technological progress can contribute powerfully to solving development problems, particularly those of hunger and disease. Increasingly, science is becoming a direct productive force that underpins economic growth and social progress. The role of training in the scientific field is apparent at three levels: for upper echelon staff and researchers, for mid-level technicians and for qualified workers. In recent years, important achievements have been accomplished in this regard, particularly in developing countries. Much work has been done in order to ensure a higher priority for the scientific teaching process, both to improve its quality and to direct it more towards solving problems related to everyday life. A diversified training programme is needed to meet increasing demands for qualified personnel in the developing countries. This training should consider the latest developments in science and technology. It must strengthen competence and technical polyvalence, in such a way as to produce a technical staff of high quality in judgement and decision making. Both of these qualities are necessary for project planning and management, and for being able to identify the most appropriate application and utilisation for local conditions. (orig.)

  7. A novel method of assessing quality of postgraduate psychiatry training: experiences from a large training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizrah, Mukhtar; Iacoponi, Eduardo; Parker, Elizabeth; Rymer, Janice; Iversen, Amy; Wessely, Simon

    2013-06-14

    Most assessments of the quality of postgraduate training are based on anonymised questionnaires of trainees. We report a comprehensive assessment of the quality of training at a large postgraduate psychiatry training institute using non-anonymised face-to-face interviews with trainees and their trainers. Two consultant psychiatrists interviewed 99 trainees and 109 trainers. Scoring of interview responses was determined by using a pre-defined criteria. Additional comments were recorded as free text. Interviews covered 13 domains, including: Clinical, teaching, research and management opportunities, clinical environment, clinical supervision, adequacy of job description, absence of bullying and job satisfaction. Multiple interview domain scores were combined, generating a 'Combined' score for each post. The interview response rate was 97% for trainers 88% for trainees. There was a significant correlation between trainee and trainer scores for the same interview domains (Pearson's r = 0.968, pJob satisfaction scores of year 1 to year 3 core trainees showed a significant increase with increasing seniority (Linear regression coefficient = 0.273, 95% CI: 0.033 to 0.513, ANOVA p= 0.026). This in-depth examination of the quality of training on a large psychiatry training programme successfully elicited strengths and weakness of our programme. Such an interview scheme could be easily implemented in smaller schemes and may well provide important information to allow for targeted improvement of training. Additionally, trends in quality of training and job satisfaction amongst various psychiatric specialities were identified; specifically speciality posts and liaison posts in psychiatry were revealed to be the most popular with trainees.

  8. A novel method of assessing quality of postgraduate psychiatry training: experiences from a large training programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Most assessments of the quality of postgraduate training are based on anonymised questionnaires of trainees. We report a comprehensive assessment of the quality of training at a large postgraduate psychiatry training institute using non-anonymised face-to-face interviews with trainees and their trainers. Methods Two consultant psychiatrists interviewed 99 trainees and 109 trainers. Scoring of interview responses was determined by using a pre-defined criteria. Additional comments were recorded as free text. Interviews covered 13 domains, including: Clinical, teaching, research and management opportunities, clinical environment, clinical supervision, adequacy of job description, absence of bullying and job satisfaction. Multiple interview domain scores were combined, generating a ‘Combined’ score for each post. Results The interview response rate was 97% for trainers 88% for trainees. There was a significant correlation between trainee and trainer scores for the same interview domains (Pearson’s r = 0.968, ppsychiatry posts as compared to general adult psychiatry posts (Two tailed t-test, p psychiatry as compared to other specialist psychiatry posts (t-test: p = 0.038, 95% CI: -0.3901, -0.0118). Job satisfaction scores of year 1 to year 3 core trainees showed a significant increase with increasing seniority (Linear regression coefficient = 0.273, 95% CI: 0.033 to 0.513, ANOVA p= 0.026). Conclusions This in-depth examination of the quality of training on a large psychiatry training programme successfully elicited strengths and weakness of our programme. Such an interview scheme could be easily implemented in smaller schemes and may well provide important information to allow for targeted improvement of training. Additionally, trends in quality of training and job satisfaction amongst various psychiatric specialities were identified; specifically speciality posts and liaison posts in psychiatry were revealed to be the most popular with trainees. PMID

  9. Formative evaluation of a teledentistry training programme for oral health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, K K; Nayar, P; Chandak, A; Gupta, N

    2017-03-15

    The objective of this study was to conduct a formative evaluation of a teledentistry (TD) programme that was developed for a predominantly rural state in the Midwestern United States. Formative evaluation data were collected on programme activities from the TD programme records. In addition, the effectiveness of the TD training programme was evaluated using a self-administered paper-based survey administered to the participants, immediately following completion of the training activity. Ninety-three dental students, oral health and other health professionals participated in the TD training programme. Overall, the trainees rated the TD training programme highly, with regard to the content, format and skills improvement. The evaluation also demonstrated a positive change in all trainees' attitudes following the training sessions, with most trainees acknowledging a positive impact of the training on their knowledge and competency. We identified challenges in the development of the TD programme and in expanding access to oral health care for rural communities. Challenges included reimbursement and a limited interest amongst established dental offices. Dental schools can play an important role in preparing both dental health professionals and other health professionals in the use of TD by providing training and oral health expertise. The use of TD by non-dental providers for consultation, referral and disease management has the potential to improve oral health outcomes, particularly for rural and underserved populations. Evaluation data provide critical feedback to programme planners and administrators. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Do they practice what we teach? Follow-up evaluation of a Schema Therapy training programme

    OpenAIRE

    Kingston, Deborah; Moghaddam, Nima; Beckley, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated a three-day Schema Therapy training programme for trainee clinical psychologists. The training used an experiential model of learning, which was intended to encourage the transfer of knowledge and techniques from the learning environment into clinical practice. Using a mixed-methods approach, the training programme was evaluated in terms of: (1) self-reported changes in knowledge, confidence and willingness to use Schema Therapy-informed techniques; (2) whether the tra...

  11. Special evaluation review of the Agency's training course programme 1986-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    During discussions at the 1994 Policy Review Seminar, Member States supported the principle that socio-economic impact and cost-benefit be considered important factors in the approval of technical co-operation programmes. In line with this principle, it was considered timely to conduct an evaluation of the Agency's Training Course Programme, to assist the Department of Technical Co-operation in focusing this programme on relevant subjects, consistent with the objectives and trends of, and complementary to, the entire Technical Co-operation Programme. The main purpose of the evaluation was to (a) assess the continued relevance, effectiveness and impact of the Training Course Programme in its present form as a means of technology transfer to developing Member States; and (b) propose possible alternatives for handling the demand by Member States for training through regional and interregional training courses. 10 tab

  12. Timing of postexercise protein intake is important for muscle hypertrophy with resistance training in elderly humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esmarck, B.; Andersen, J.L.; Olsen, S.

    2001-01-01

    1. Age-associated loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength can partly be counteracted by resistance training, causing a net synthesis of muscular proteins. Protein synthesis is influenced synergistically by postexercise amino acid supplementation, but the importance of the timing of protein intake...... ± S.E.M.)) completed a 12 week resistance training programme (3 times per week) receiving oral protein in liquid form (10 g protein, 7 g carbohydrate, 3 g fat) immediately after (P0) or 2 h after (P2) each training session. Muscle hypertrophy was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and from...

  13. Effects of resistance training on cardiovascular health in non-obese active adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Clare Chung-Wah; McManus, Alison Mary; So, Hung-Kwan; Chook, Ping; Au, Chun-Ting; Li, Albert Martin; Kam, Jack Tat-Chi; So, Raymond Chi-Hung; Lam, Christopher Wai-Kei; Chan, Iris Hiu-Shuen; Sung, Rita Yn-Tz

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the benefits of a 10-wk resistance training programme on cardiovascular health in non-obese and active adolescents. METHODS This is a pragmatic randomised controlled intervention. The study was carried out in a Hong Kong Government secondary school. Thirty-eight lean and active boys and girls were randomised to either the resistance training group or the control group. Students in the resistance training group received in-school 10-wk supervised resistance training twice per week, with each session lasting 70 min. Main outcome measures taken before and after training included brachial endothelial dependent flow-mediated dilation, body composition, fasting serum lipids, fasting glucose and insulin, high sensitive C-reactive protein, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure and aerobic fitness. RESULTS The only training related change was in endothelial dependent flow-mediated dilation which increased from 8.5% to 9.8%. A main effect of time and an interaction (P < 0.005) indicated that this improvement was a result of the 10-wk resistance training. Main effects for time (P < 0.05) in a number of anthropometric, metabolic and vascular variables were noted; however, there were no significant interactions indicating the change was more likely an outcome of normal growth and development as opposed to a training effect. CONCLUSION Ten weeks of resistance training in school appears to have some vascular benefit in active, lean children PMID:27610345

  14. [Establishment of a Neonatal ECMO Programme on the Basis of a Special Training Programme--A 6-year Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, K M; Herber-Jonat, S; Huebener, C; Hasbargen, U; Schmitz, C; Schramm, R; Lehner, M; Stehr, M; Schulze, A; Flemmer, A W

    2015-12-01

    Internationally the need for neonatal ECMO is decreasing and the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) recommends that centres providing neonatal ECMO should treat at least 6 children per year. After a one-year training programme and preparation of the clinical application, neonatal ECMO was established and subsequently 41 infants [median age 1 day (1-172 days), median weight 3.25 kg (1.27-5.79 kg)] with severe respiratory failure have been treated within a 6-year period (fall 2008-fall 2014). For rescue therapy we provide inhaled nitric oxide, high-frequency oscillation and other differentiated ventilator strategies. Parallel to the clinical use of ECMO all employees have been trained in a special programme at 3-monthly intervals. By establishing an elaborate training programme and concentrating the treatment of critically ill newborns in one centre, the expertise of both running and preventing of neonatal ECMO due to pulmonary failure can be achieved. The diagnoses correlate to those of other centres which perform neonatal ECMO. 13 infants needed ECMO. The resulting overall survival rate was 11/12 (91.7%) infants treated with ECMO with a curative approach. All patients could be weaned from ECMO. In the context of a specialised university hospital with all treatment options for critically ill newborns and with the establishment of a specialised training programme, neonatal ECMO for pulmonary failure can achieve equally good results in comparison to those of national and international ECMO centres. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. The Structured Operational Research and Training Initiative for public health programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, A; Harries, A D; Zachariah, R; Bissell, K; Hinderaker, S G; Edginton, M; Enarson, D A; Satyanarayana, S; Kumar, A M V; Hoa, N B; Tweya, H; Reid, A J; Van den Bergh, R; Tayler-Smith, K; Manzi, M; Khogali, M; Kizito, W; Ali, E; Delaunois, P; Reeder, J C

    2014-06-21

    In 2009, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) and Médecins sans Frontières Brussels-Luxembourg (MSF) began developing an outcome-oriented model for operational research training. In January 2013, The Union and MSF joined with the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) at the World Health Organization (WHO) to form an initiative called the Structured Operational Research and Training Initiative (SORT IT). This integrates the training of public health programme staff with the conduct of operational research prioritised by their programme. SORT IT programmes consist of three one-week workshops over 9 months, with clearly-defined milestones and expected output. This paper describes the vision, objectives and structure of SORT IT programmes, including selection criteria for applicants, the research projects that can be undertaken within the time frame, the programme structure and milestones, mentorship, the monitoring and evaluation of the programmes and what happens beyond the programme in terms of further research, publications and the setting up of additional training programmes. There is a growing national and international need for operational research and related capacity building in public health. SORT IT aims to meet this need by advocating for the output-based model of operational research training for public health programme staff described here. It also aims to secure sustainable funding to expand training at a global and national level. Finally, it could act as an observatory to monitor and evaluate operational research in public health. Criteria for prospective partners wishing to join SORT IT have been drawn up.

  16. Menopause: highlighting the effects of resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, R D; Prestes, J; Pereira, G B; Shiguemoto, G E; Perez, S E A

    2010-11-01

    The increase in lifespan and in the proportion of elderly women has increased the focus on menopause induced physiological alterations. These modifications are associated with the elevated risk of several pathologies such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, non-alcoholic fat liver disease, among others. Because of estrogen levels decline, many tissue and organs (muscular, bone, adipose tissue and liver) are affected. Additionally, body composition suffers important modifications. In this sense, there is a growing body of concern in understanding the physiological mechanisms involved and establishing strategies to prevent and reverse the effects of menopause. The hormone reposition therapy, diet and physical exercise have been recommended. Among the diverse exercise modalities, resistance training is not commonly used as a therapeutic intervention in the treatment of menopause. Thus, the aim of this review was to analyze the physiological alterations on several organs and systems induced by menopause and ovariectomy (experimental model to reproduce menopause), as well as, to study the effects of resistance training in preventing and reverting these modifications. In conclusion, resistance training promotes beneficial effects on several organs and systems, mainly, on muscular, bone and adipose tissue, allowing for a better quality of life in this population.

  17. The effect of two different interval-training programmes on physiological and performance indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindiani, Mahmood; Eliakim, Alon; Segev, Daria; Meckel, Yoav

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of an increasing-distance, interval-training programme and a decreasing-distance, interval-training programme, matched for total distance, on aerobic and anaerobic physiological indices. Forty physical education students were randomly assigned to either the increasing- or decreasing-distance, interval-training group (ITG and DTG), and completed two similar relevant sets of tests before and after six weeks of training. One training programme consisted of increasing-distance interval-training (100-200-300-400-500 m) and the other decreasing-distance interval training (500-400-300-200-100 m). While both training programmes led to a significant improvement in VO 2 max (ES = 0.83-1.25), the improvement in the DTG was significantly greater than in the ITG (14.5 ± 3.6 vs. 7.8 ± 3.2%, p training programmes led to a significant improvement in all anaerobic indices (ES = 0.83-1.63), the improvements in peak power (15.7 ± 7.8 vs. 8.9 ± 4.7), mean power (10.6 ± 5.4 vs. 6.8 ± 4.4), and fatigue index (18.2 ± 10.9 vs. 7.0 ± 14.2) were significantly greater in the DTG compared to the ITG (p training programmes on aerobic and anaerobic fitness, the DTG showed significant superiority over the ITG in improving aerobic and anaerobic performance capabilities. Coaches and athletes should therefore be aware that, in spite of identical total work, an interval-training programme might induce different physiological impacts if the order of intervals is not identical.

  18. TECHNICAL TRAINING: Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium 2ème niveau - French version only

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch CERN Technical Training 2003: Learning for the LHC ! Annonce de nouvelle formation - cours avancé Dans le cadre du programme de l'Enseignement Technique 2003, et en collaboration avec le GUAPI (Groupe des Utilisateurs d'Automates Programmables Industriels du CERN), une nouvelle formation a été organisée afin de perfectionner les connaissances sur l'outil PL7 de programmation des Automates PREMIUM de Schneider. Ce nouveau cours (niveau 2) s'adresse aux person...

  19. An evaluation of the 18- and 12-month basic postgraduate training programmes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Niels Kristian; Qvesel, Dorte; Kodal, Troels

    2010-01-01

    and new programmes evaluate their training, and it explores their attitudes towards the new postgraduate training programme. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We developed a questionnaire by which quantitative and qualitative data were collected. The questionnaire was sent to all physicians following basic...... equipped and less ready for continued specialisation than doctors of the 18-month programme and they requested a downward adjustment of the learning objectives associated with the educational positions which follow their basic training. Physicians do not expect the increased focus on learning...... and supervision to compensate for the six-month reduction of the training period. Internal medicine should be included in the basic postgraduate training of all physicians. Training in secondary as well as primary health care was requested. CONCLUSION: The young physicians were reluctant towards the new basic...

  20. Genital examination training: assessing the effectiveness of an integrated female and male teaching programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Lynn; Pullon, Susan; Garrett, Sue; Hoare, Kath

    2016-11-22

    Learning to undertake intimate female and male examinations is an important part of medical student training but opportunities to participate in practical, supervised learning in a safe environment can be limited. A collaborative, integrated training programme to provide such learning was developed by two university teaching departments and a specialist sexual health service, utilising teaching associates trained for intimate examinations in a simulated clinical educational setting. The objective of this research was to determine changes in senior medical students' self- reported experience and confidence in performing male and female genital examinations, before and after participating in a new clinical teaching programme. A quasi-experimental mixed methods design, using pre and post programme questionnaires and focus groups, was used to assess the effectiveness of the programme. The students reported greatly improved skill, confidence and comfort levels for both male and female genital examination following the teaching programme. Skill, confidence and comfort regarding male examinations were rated particularly low on the pre-teaching programme self- assessment, but post-programme was rated at similar levels to the female examination. This integrated female-male teaching programme (utilising trained teaching associates as simulated patients in a supervised clinical teaching environment) was successful in increasing senior medical students' skills and levels of confidence in performing genital examinations. There were differences between female and male medical students in their learning. Suggestions for improvement included providing more detailed instruction to some clinical supervisors about their facilitation role in the session.

  1. Why do medical trainees take time out of their specialty training programmes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, Steven J; Tack, Gurinder; Murphy, Philip; Holmes, Stuart; Hayden, Jacky

    2014-10-01

    Postgraduate medical trainees may take time out of programme for personal or professional reasons which can delay completion of training. This survey of out of programme trainees in England explores a phenomenon that impacts significantly upon medical careers and workforce planning.

  2. Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziakova, M.

    1998-01-01

    Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes is described for the following job positions: reactor operator; turbine operator; reactor maintenance worker; pump maintenance worker; chemistry foreman; health physics foreman; electric maintenance worker

  3. Effects of an eccentric training programme on hamstring strain injuries in women football players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Ama Espinosa Gurutze

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: to test the hypothesis that an eccentric training programme applied on women football players would reduce the hamstring injury rate by improving thigh muscle balance and, particularly, hamstring strength.

  4. Development of an education and training programme for radiation protection officers in facilities and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutwamezi, Tekla

    2015-02-01

    Education and training is a crucial matter in radiation protection and it is considered a regulatory requirement. For this reason, this project work focused on developing an education and training programme for Radiation Protection Officers whose overall function is to oversee radiation protection and safety at the work place. The developed education and training programme has adopted both the class room based and on the job training methods. Additionally, the programme is organized into 6 modules and focuses on fundamentals of radioactivity; biological effects; legislation; principles of radiation protection; assessment and protection against occupational exposure; medical exposure (only applicable to Radiation Protection Officers in the medical sector) and emergency preparedness and response. The purpose of the programme is to provide Radiation Protection Officers with the basic knowledge and skills to function effectively to meet radiation safety and regulatory requirements. (au)

  5. A training programme to improve hip strength in persons with lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Lee

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the effect of a 10-week training programme on persons with a lower limb amputation and to determine if this training is sufficient to enable running. Seven transtibial, 8 transfemoral and 1 bilateral amputee (all resulting from trauma, tumour or congenital) were randomly assigned to a training (n  =8) or control group (n = 8). Isokinetic hip flexor and extensor strength at 60 and 120º/s and oxygen consumption while walking at 1.0 m/s were tested pre- and post- a 10-week period. The training group followed a twice weekly hip strengthening programme, while the control group continued with their usual activities. Running ability was determined pre-testing, and attempted after post-testing for the training group only. The training group increased hip strength and decreased oxygen consumption. Six amputees who were previously unable to run were able to after training. The control group decreased intact limb hip extensor strength. The training programme is sufficient to improve hip strength and enable running in persons with a lower limb amputation. As hip strength was reduced in those not following the training programme, it is recommended that strength training be undertaken regularly in order to avoid losing limb strength following amputation.

  6. The evaluation of a frame-of-reference training programme for intern psychometrists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerdi Mulder

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The use of assessment centres (ACs has drastically increased over the past decade. However, ACs are constantly confronted with the lack of construct validity. One aspect of ACs that could improve the construct validity significantly is that of assessor training. Unfortunately untrained or poorly trained assessors are often used in AC processes. Research purpose: The purpose of this research was to evaluate a frame-of-reference (FOR programme to train intern psychometrists as assessors at an assessment centre. Motivation of study: The role of an assessor is important in an AC; therefore it is vital for an assessor to be able to evaluate and observe candidates’ behaviour adequately. Commencing with this training in a graduate psychometrist programme gives the added benefit of sending skilled psychometrists to the workplace. Research design, approach and method: A quantitative research approach was implemented, utilising a randomised pre-test-post-test comparison group design. Industrial Psychology postgraduate students (N = 22 at a South African university were used and divided into an experimental group (n = 11 and control group (n = 11. Three typical AC simulations were utilised as pre- and post-tests, and the ratings obtained from both groups were statistically analysed to determine the effect of the FOR training programme. Main findings: The data indicated that there was a significant increase in the familiarity of the participants with the one-on-one simulation and the group discussion simulation. Practical/managerial implications: Training intern psychometrists in a FOR programme could assist organisations in the appointment of more competent assessors. Contribution/value-add: To design an assessor training programme using FOR training for intern psychometrists in the South African context, specifically by incorporating this programme into the training programme for Honours students at universities.

  7. Resistance Training in Children and Young Adults: A Critical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Rami Shenouda; Mark Wilson; Scott Fletcher

    2017-01-01

    Resistance training is a method used by many athletes to increase their levels of performance. The benefits of this method are known to be increased strength, power and endurance. Resistance training in children has been a topic that has been long debated and there are some widely accepted beliefs and principles that guide clinicians involved in the discipline of sport and exercise medicine. While weight training is a form of resistance training that has proven beneficial effects on health an...

  8. Training in atomic science and techniques. Some results of the IAEA fellowship programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has regarded the creation of adequate facilities for training in nuclear science and technology as an essential step towards the development of the peaceful uses of atomic energy throughout the world. It has also been clear that this is one of the fields in which the Agency an give most fruitful assistance to its Member States: by awarding fellowships for training at advanced centres of study and research, by instituting visiting professorships to train scientific and technical personnel in their home countries, by organizing international and regional training courses or training centres. The Agency has made use of all these methods and more than 60 countries have benefited from its training programme. A part of the programme is financed out of voluntary contributions by Member States to the Agency's General Fund and some of it financed out of funds made available to the Agency under the UN Expanded Programme of Technical Assistance (EPTA). In addition, use is made of training facilities provided free by several Member States. In an attempt to assess some of the concrete results of the training programme, the Agency recently sent a special questionnaire to 151 former Agency fellows who had completed their training at least two years earlier. By the end of last year, replies had been received from 121 former fellows from 31 countries. They provide an encouraging picture, as can be seen from the numerical analysis

  9. Experiences of instructors delivering the Mental Health First Aid training programme: a descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, J

    2010-09-01

    Mental health literacy among the public is often poor, and although people frequently encounter others experiencing mental distress in their workplace, families and communities, they may be ill-equipped to provide appropriate support. 'Mental Health First Aid' (MHFA), a 12-h mental health promotion programme seeks to address this, training people in the knowledge and skills needed to engage with someone experiencing mental health problems. Research relating to the MHFA programme has centred on course attendees, with a paucity of research surrounding the delivery of basic mental health training programmes. Understanding experiences of instructors delivering such programmes is key to the success of future delivery. This study sought to identify the views and experiences of instructors delivering the MHFA programme in Wales. Fourteen MHFA instructors participated in semi-structured audio-recorded interviews, with the transcripts analysed to identify key themes. This paper explores two of the identified themes namely prerequisite skills and support required by instructors. The study highlighted that because of the ensuing emotional labour experienced by instructors, universal mental health training programmes must put in place a clear infrastructure to train, support and monitor those delivering them, for programme roll-out to be effective.

  10. A training programme for Taiwan nurses to improve child abuse reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Yu; Chou, Fan-Hao

    2017-08-01

    To design a training programme for nurses and evaluate the effectiveness of the training programme in improving the nurses' self-efficacy in reporting cases of child abuse and neglect. The problem of child abuse and neglect cases has become prevalent throughout numerous countries. Previous studies have found that more than 70% of Taiwanese nurses considered that they required child abuse and neglect training. Moreover, a training programme for child abuse and neglect reporting based on self-efficacy theory in clinical practice has been developed previously. A quasi-experimental research design was implemented. The study participants comprised 80 clinical nurses: 40 in an experimental group and 40 in a control group; the pretest, post-test and follow-up results were compared between the groups. Moreover, an analysis of covariance was applied to test the effectiveness of a nurse child abuse and neglect training programme after controlling for the effects of age, marital status and working years. The experimental and control groups were compared according to their scores on each self-efficacy subscale. The experimental and control groups differed significantly regarding the outcome measures of all six subscales of child abuse and neglect reporting self-efficacy between the pretest and post-test. Therefore, the results supported the hypothesis that nurse self-efficacy in reporting child abuse and neglect cases would improve after completing the Child Abuse and Neglect Training Program for Nurses. The Child Abuse and Neglect Training Program for Nurses is an appropriate training programme for improving nurse competence and confidence in reporting suspected child abuse and neglect cases. This study is relevant to clinical practice because it clarifies a relationship between nurses' self-efficacy and reporting behaviour. It also highlights the importance and effectiveness of the training programme Child Abuse and Neglect Training Program for Nurses in improving nurses

  11. Residency training programme in Nigeria- problems and prospects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postgraduate medical training is essential in the development of specialist manpower in health care delivery services. In this paper, postgraduate residency training in Nigeria was examined with highlights on the problems involved and the prospects. Keywords : Postgraduate, Residency, Medical, Nigeria, Training.

  12. Extension of general practice training from three to four years: experiences of a vocational training programme in Southern Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dowling, Stephanie

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the experiences of trainees taking part in an extended (four-year) general practice training programme introduced in the South Eastern region of the Republic of Ireland to replace the previous traditional (three-year) programme. In a qualitative design, eight homogeneous focus groups were held to determine the value of the additional year of training. The first cohort of trainees was interviewed towards the start and at the end of their fourth year. Trainees finishing the following year were also interviewed, as were graduates from the final three-year programme. GP trainers and the four members of the programme directing team comprised two further independent focus groups. Trainees reported that the integration of hospital posts and general practice attachments over the four years was particularly beneficial. The exposure to a variety of different general practices and the opportunity to take part in specialty clinics were considered extremely useful. The fourth year of training was felt to be less pressurised than previous years. Professional and personal development was enhanced; improved readiness to practise and confidence were noted. Perceived disadvantages of extended training included a lack of acknowledgment for doctors in their fourth year and excessive emphasis placed on research during the final year of training. The addition of an extra year of vocational training improves professional and personal development and changes the learning experience for doctors. Doctors felt more confident and ready to enter independent practice at the end of the fourth year of training.

  13. What do community football players think about different exercise-training programmes? Implications for the delivery of lower limb injury prevention programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Caroline F; Doyle, Tim LA; Dempsey, Alasdair R; Elliott, Bruce C; Twomey, Dara M; White, Peta E; Diamantopoulou, Kathy; Young, Warren; Lloyd, David G

    2014-01-01

    Background Players are the targeted end-users and beneficiaries of exercise-training programmes implemented during coach-led training sessions, and the success of programmes depends upon their active participation. Two variants of an exercise-training programme were incorporated into the regular training schedules of 40 community Australian Football teams, over two seasons. One variant replicated common training practices, while the second was an evidence-based programme to alter biomechanical and neuromuscular factors related to risk of knee injuries. This paper describes the structure of the implemented programmes and compares players’ end-of-season views about the programme variants. Methods This study was nested within a larger group-clustered randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of two exercise-training programmes (control and neuromuscular control (NMC)) for preventing knee injuries. A post-season self-report survey, derived from Health Belief Model constructs, included questions to obtain players’ views about the benefits and physical challenges of the programme in which they participated. Results Compared with control players, those who participated in the NMC programme found it to be less physically challenging but more enjoyable and potentially of more benefit. Suggestions from players about potential improvements to the training programme and its future implementation included reducing duration, increasing range of drills/exercises and promoting its injury prevention and other benefits to players. Conclusions Players provide valuable feedback about the content and focus of implemented exercise-training programmes, that will directly inform the delivery of similar, or more successful, programmes in the future. PMID:24047571

  14. Effect of resistance training on total, central and abdominal adiposity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resistance training had no impact on the measures of centrally located and abdominal adiposity. Body mass and BMI should be used with caution in risk calculations and measures of total adiposity in individuals engaging in resistance training due to this mode of training increasing lean mass (and thus body mass and BMI) ...

  15. The effect of an eight-week training programme on core stability in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A strong core musculature dynamically stabilises the pelvis during functional movements. Although it has been established that focused core training has a positive effect in numerous sports, little is known about the effect in gymnasts. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of an eight week core training programme on ...

  16. Perceptions of the impact of an advanced training programme on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health managers are selected based on their clinical skills rather than their leadership or management skills. Objective. To compare self-rated competencies in management and leadership before and after training of the participants; to assess participants' experience of the training programme; and to evaluate the ...

  17. Factors associated with participation in resistance training: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ryan E; Lubans, David R; Karunamuni, Nandini; Kennedy, Sarah; Plotnikoff, Ronald

    2017-10-01

    Regular participation in resistance training (RT) is critical to health and recommended in most international physical activity guidelines. Few people, however, participate in RT. The purpose of this review was to assess the demographic, behavioural, intrapersonal, interpersonal and environmental factors associated with participating in RT. Eligible studies were from English peer-reviewed published articles that examined correlates or determinants of RT in adult samples. Searches were performed from August 2015 to April 2016 in six databases. We identified 51 independent data sets, from nine countries, primarily of moderate to high quality, and 23 factors related to participating in RT. Education, perceived health status, quality of life, affective judgements, self-efficacy, intention, self-regulation behaviours, subjective norm and programme leadership were associated with RT. Low education levels and poor health status were associated with low participation rates in RT. Intrapersonal factors including affective judgements, self-efficacy, and self-regulation behaviours, and interpersonal factors including subjective norms and programme leadership may be important for promoting RT behaviours. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. The Safety Assessment Education and Training Programme (SAET). Education and Training in the Area of Safety Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger-Deroy, M.

    2014-01-01

    • The SAET Programme provides a systematic approach for training regulatory, operational and technical support staff in the skills needed for informed decision-making and technical review of NPP safety case documentation. • The objective of the Programme is to support the IAEA Member States in developing the knowledge and skills necessary for making the right decisions in NPP design, licensing and operation. (author)

  19. Resistance training among young athletes: safety, efficacy and injury prevention effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, A D; Myer, G D

    2012-01-01

    A literature review was employed to evaluate the current epidemiology of injury related to the safety and efficacy of youth resistance training. Several case study reports and retrospective questionnaires regarding resistance exercise and the competitive sports of weightlifting and power-lifting reveal that injuries have occurred in young lifters, although a majority can be classified as accidental. Lack of qualified instruction that underlies poor exercise technique and inappropriate training loads could explain, at least partly, some of the reported injuries. Current research indicates that resistance training can be a safe, effective and worthwhile activity for children and adolescents provided that qualified professionals supervise all training sessions and provide age-appropriate instruction on proper lifting procedures and safe training guidelines. Regular participation in a multifaceted resistance training programme that begins during the preseason and includes instruction on movement biomechanics may reduce the risk of sports-related injuries in young athletes. Strategies for enhancing the safety of youth resistance training are discussed. PMID:19945973

  20. Efficacy of a physical exercise training programme COPD in primary care: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastenau, Annemieke; Muris, Jean W M; de Bie, Rob A; Hendriks, Erik J M; Asijee, Guus M; Beekman, Emmylou; Gosselink, Rik; van Schayck, Onno C P

    2014-08-03

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is recognized as a systemic illness with significant extra-pulmonary features, such as exercise intolerance and muscle weakness. Pulmonary rehabilitation has been shown to be very effective in counteracting these consequences in patients with more advanced COPD. However, limited data is available on the efficacy of a physical exercise training programme in patients with mild to moderate COPD in primary care. Furthermore, it is unknown if improved exercise capacity translates into enhanced daily physical activities. The aim of this paper is to describe the design of a randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a physical exercise training programme in patients with mild to moderate COPD. In this randomized controlled trial situated in the primary care setting, 102 patients with mild to moderate airflow obstruction (FEV1 ≥ 50% of predicted), dyspnoea and a physically inactive lifestyle will be randomized to an intervention or control group. The intervention group receives a 4-month physical exercise training programme at a local physiotherapy practice, which includes exercise training, resistance training, breathing exercises and advises on how to increase the level of physical activity. The control group receives usual care, i.e. advises on how to increase the level of physical activity and a sham treatment at a local physiotherapy practice of which no physiological training stimulus can be expected. Primary outcome is functional exercise capacity at 4-months measured on the six-minute walk distance. Secondary outcomes include peripheral muscle strength, physical activity in daily life, health related quality of life, Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnoea score and patients' perceived effectiveness. Follow-up measurement will take place at 6 months after baseline. This will be one of the first studies to evaluate the efficacy of a physical exercise training programme in patients with mild to moderate COPD

  1. Lessons learnt from a three-year pilot field epidemiology training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Damian; Durand, A Mark; Hancock, Thane; Cash, Haley L; Hardie, Kate; Paterson, Beverley; Paulino, Yvette; White, Paul; Merritt, Tony; Fitzgibbons, Dawn; Gopalani, Sameer Vali; Flint, James; Edwin A Merilles, Onofre; Kashiwabara, Mina; Biaukula, Viema; Lepers, Christelle; Souares, Yvan; Nilles, Eric; Batikawai, Anaseini; Huseynova, Sevil; Patel, Mahomed; Saketa, Salanieta T; Durrheim, David; Henderson, Alden; Roth, Adam

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific region has widely dispersed populations, limited financial and human resources and a high burden of disease. There is an urgent need to improve the availability, reliability and timeliness of useable health data. The purpose of this paper is to share lessons learnt from a three-year pilot field epidemiology training programme that was designed to respond to these Pacific health challenges. The pilot programme built on and further developed an existing field epidemiology training programme for Pacific health staff. The programme was delivered in country by epidemiologists working for Pacific Public Health Surveillance Network partners. The programme consisted of five courses: four one-week classroom-based courses and one field epidemiology project. Sessions were structured so that theoretical understanding was achieved through interaction and reinforced through practical hands-on group activities, case studies and other interactive practical learning methods. As of September 2016, 258 students had commenced the programme. Twenty-six course workshops were delivered and one cohort of students had completed the full five-course programme. The programme proved popular and gained a high level of student engagement. Face-to-face delivery, a low student-to-facilitator ratio, substantial group work and practical exercises were identified as key factors that contributed to the students developing skills and confidence. Close engagement of leaders and the need to quickly evaluate and adapt the curriculum were important lessons, and the collaboration between external partners was considered important for promoting a harmonized approach to health needs in the Pacific.

  2. Indian experience in the training of manpower for nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, P.K.; Damodaran, K.K.; Sarma, M.S.R.; Wagadarikar, V.K.

    1977-01-01

    In India manpower training for the nuclear power programme started several years before the introduction of nuclear power plants. Early efforts were concentrated on developing manpower in basic sciences related to nuclear power; for example, nuclear physics, chemistry, metallurgy of nuclear materials, aspects of chemical engineering etc. The setting up of the research centre viz. Atomic Energy Establishment Trombay, now named the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, was an important step in this direction. A programme of design and construction of research reactors and its utilization formed the backbone of manpower development. This enabled the first batch of engineers and scientists to be trained on the design and operation in the programmes connected with research reactors and use of isotopes in industry, agriculture and medicine. The next step was to establish a Training School in the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre in which fresh graduates from the Universities could be given courses both in their own disciplines and in other inter-connected disciplines of nuclear sciences. About 200 such graduates are being trained every year since 1957. An inter-disciplinary approach with teaching by working scientists and engineers and the attachment for short periods to the research laboratories is the framework of this training programme. At present about 3000 graduates from this Training School are involved in various capacities in India's nuclear power programme. With the commissioning of the first power reactors, it became necessary to conceive of training engineers, scientists and technicians, particularly for operation and maintenance of such systems on a larger scale. For this purpose, a separate training institute at Rajasthan Atomic Power Project near Rana Pratapsagar was set up. Models, simulators and courses, particularly emphasizing the heavy water system of reactors was introduced. In addition, a number of craftsmen for servicing equipment have also been trained as

  3. Comparative Effects of Circuit Training Programme on Speed and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    Circuit training is one of the training methods which are a given number of exercises arranged and numbered consecutively in a given area, it is based on sound anatomical, kinesiological and physiological principles designed to increase strength, power, flexibility, quickness and cardiovascular endurance. Howell and ...

  4. Evaluation of a safer male circumcision training programme for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A structured observations tool was administered by a trained research doctor during circumcisions and (wound) care of the initiates of the trained traditional surgeons. Results indicate that from the observations of 86 traditional male circumcisions a high number (37%) of adverse events were recorded (excessive bleeding, ...

  5. Evaluation Of A Safer Male Circumcision Training Programme For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    evaluation of the training consisted of a prospective assessment of knowledge and attitude immediately prior to and after training. Significant improvement in knowledge and/or attitudes was observed in legal aspects, STI, HIV and environmental aspects, attitudes in terms of improved collaboration with biomedical health ...

  6. Cognitive Training Programme in the Decrease of Stress of Daily ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The post-test outcome confirmed that cognitive training was effective in improving daily functioning of the retirees. Emanating from the research findings, the study proffered that persons of age sixty and above should be involved in periodical memory training which involves, teaching mnemonic strategies: organization, ...

  7. Resistance Training in Children and Young Adults: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Shenouda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance training is a method used by many athletes to increase their levels of performance. The benefits of this method are known to be increased strength, power and endurance. Resistance training in children has been a topic that has been long debated and there are some widely accepted beliefs and principles that guide clinicians involved in the discipline of sport and exercise medicine. While weight training is a form of resistance training that has proven beneficial effects on health and wellbeing, powerlifting and heavy weight training should be avoided, as lifting maximal weights through various ranges of motion as fast as possible can lead to serious limb injuries. In order to determine the risks and benefits of resistance training in children and adolescents, it is important to review the literature to find a clear consensus. Further prospective research should be completed to determine the long-term sequelae of resistance training in children in comparison to the general population.

  8. Training Programmes in Sustainable Forest Management in Austria, Croatia and Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvija Krajter Ostoić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: During the Erasmus+ project “Cooperation for Innovative Approach in Sustainable Forest Management Training (CIA2SFM” a study of the existing vocational education and training (VET and lifelong learning (LLL programmes in the field of sustainable forest management (SFM was conducted in Austria, Croatia and Slovenia. The aim of this paper is to get an overview of and analyse SFM-related VET and LLL programmes in the study area, with an emphasis on the identification of good practice examples and providing recommendations for improvement. Materials and Methods: A combined approach of literature review, Internet search and consultations with training providers was applied in order to collect data on training programmes conducted in the period 2006-2015 in Austria, Croatia and Slovenia. The programmes were analysed based on topics, types of methods used, existence of specified learning outcomes, programme evaluation by participants and how the programme was advertised. The analysis employed basic descriptive statistics. Topics were grouped into broader themes. Only training programmes targeting private forest owners, forestry professionals, and forestry entrepreneurs were analysed. Three examples of good practice in each country were selected based on collaboratively developed criteria. Results: In Austria, Croatia and Slovenia numerous training courses related to SFM were conducted in the analysed period, predominantly addressing target groups in forestry sector and covering a variety of topics. The relative importance of themes varied among countries. In order to facilitate the knowledge uptake by participants various methods were applied. Although indoor ex-cathedra approaches prevailed, it could be recognized that there is a growth in interest for foster demonstrations in the field, organizing field trips, emphasize on practical work and combining methods and approaches in most countries. Conclusions: Even if national

  9. Using an alumni survey to target improvements in an emergency medicine training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeta, Theodore; Mahalingam, Gowtham; Pyle, Matthew; Dam, Aaron; Visconti, Annette

    2018-03-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) is the governing body responsible for accrediting graduate medical training programme in the USA. The Emergency Medicine Milestones (EM-Milestones) were developed by the ACGME and American Board of Emergency Medicine as a guide and monitoring tool for the knowledge, skills, abilities and experiences to be acquired during training. Alumni surveys have been reported as a valuable resource for training programme to identify areas for improvement; however, there are few studies regarding programme improvement in emergency medicine. We aimed to use the EM-Milestones, adapted as an alumni self-assessment survey, to identify areas for training programme improvement. This study was conducted at an urban, academic affiliated, community hospital in New York city with an emergency medicine training programme consisting of 30 residents over 3 years. Alumni of our emergency medicine training programme were sent an EM-Milestones-based self-assessment survey. Participants evaluated their ability in each EM-Milestones subcompetency on a Likert scale. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Response rate was 74% (69/93). Alumni reported achieving the target performance in 5/6 general competencies, with Systems-Based Practice falling below the target performance. The survey further identified 6/23 subcompetencies (Pharmacotherapy, Ultrasound, Wound Management, Patient Safety, Systems-Based Management and Technology) falling below the target performance level. Alumni self-evaluation of competence using the EM-Milestones provides valuable information concerning confidence to practice independently; these data, coupled with regular milestone evaluation of existing trainees, can identify problem areas and provide a blueprint for targeted programme improvement. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted

  10. A structured competency based training programme for junior trainees in emergency medicine: the “Dundee Model”

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, R J; Pedley, D K; Thakore, S

    2006-01-01

    Recent changes in medical training prompted by Modernising Medical Careers and the New Deal requires a more structured, competency based training programme. This paper describes the development of such a programme in an emergency medicine department of a teaching hospital. It describes the process of design and the various aspects incorporated to develop a balanced system of training, appraisal, and assessment.

  11. Implementation of a formal in-training assessment programme in anaesthesiology and preliminary results of acceptability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, C; Østergaard, D; van der Vleuten, C P M

    2003-01-01

    in anaesthesiology developed by a working group under the Danish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. METHODS: A questionnaire about the implementation of the programme in practice and the characteristics of the trainees was sent to the educational responsible consultant (ERC) in each of the 26...... anaesthetic departments in the country with first-year trainees in anaesthesiology. Standard evaluations of the assessment programme were regularly collected from trainees. RESULTS: Twenty-five (96%) departments returned the questionnaire. In total the departments reported on 100 trainees and 83 of these had...... the most frequently cited barriers to implementation. Evaluations from trainees showed a generally positive attitude towards most of the programme. They especially praised the programme's effect on structuring training and having a positive effect on learning. CONCLUSION: The in-training assessment...

  12. Cardioprotective Properties of Aerobic and Resistance Training Against Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, C A; Souza, G I H; Oliveira, J C M F; Silva, L M; Mostarda, C T; Dourado, P M M; Oyama, L M; Lira, F S; Irigoyen, M C; Rodrigues, B

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the effects of aerobic and resistance exercise training on ventricular morphometry and function, physical capacity, autonomic function, as well as on ventricular inflammatory status in trained rats prior to myocardial infarction. Male Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: sedentary+Sham, sedentary+myocardial infarction, aerobic trained+myocardial infarction, and resistance trained+myocardial infarction. Sham and myocardial infarction were performed after training periods. In the days following the surgeries, evaluations were performed. Aerobic training prevents aerobic (to a greater extent) and resistance capacity impairments, ventricular dysfunction, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic disorders (vagal tonus decrease and sympathetic tonus increase) triggered by myocardial infarction. Resistance training was able to prevent negative changes to aerobic and resistance capacity (to a greater extent) but not to ventricular dysfunction, and it prevented cardiovascular sympathetic increments. Additionally, both types of training reduced left ventricle inflammatory cytokine concentration. Our results suggest that aerobic and, for the first time, dynamic resistance training were able to reduce sympathetic tonus to the heart and vessels, as well as preventing the increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations in the left ventricle of trained groups. These data emphasizes the positive effects of aerobic and dynamic resistance training on the prevention of the negative changes triggered by myocardial infarction. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Training programmes for family caregivers of people with dementia living at home: integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Lia; Sequeira, Carlos; Ferré-Grau, Carme; Neves, Pedro; Lleixà-Fortuño, Mar

    2016-10-01

    To establish primary features of training programmes designed to assist family caregivers of people with dementia living at home and to propose a model programme based on literature findings. Due to dementia's distinctive progression, there is a widely felt need to train family members who undertake the responsibility of caring for relatives diagnosed with this condition to provide positive care, particularly during the early and middle stages of the disease. Integrative review. Literature reviews were carried out in the Pubmed, CINAHL, Mediclatina and Medline databases, using the following describers: training programme, family caregivers, dementia and aged. Such searches encompassed publications between 2004-2014, together with eight articles for review due to their positive identification with the inclusion criteria. Relevant results were extracted, the subsequent analysis performed and the presentation carried out in a descriptive manner. The prevailing length of a training programme for a family caregiver of people with dementia is of six sessions over a six-week period, with one weekly session load, and an average duration of 100 minutes each. Methodologies most commonly used include discussion, problem-solving models as well as skills and strategies training. The themes discussed comprehend caring for the individual with dementia, information about the illness and the use of health and community resources. Regarding the assessment of the family caregiver, the most widely used instruments are demographic assessment questionnaires, self-efficiency and caregiver's burnout scales, as well as depression and quality of life measures. Three assessment instances of family caregivers' needs during the training programme are commonly encountered: initial, final and follow-up. This review has identified a set of features transversal to training programmes for family members who undertake the care for individuals with dementia living at home, which will bolster the

  14. FLOW RESTRICTED RESISTANCE TRAINING ATTENUATES MYOSTATIN GENE EXPRESSION IN A PATIENT WITH INCLUSION BODY MYOSITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Santos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion body myositis is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy that produces extreme muscle weakness. Blood flow restricted resistance training has been shown to improve muscle strength and muscle hypertrophy in inclusion body myositis. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a resistance training programme on the expression of genes related to myostatin (MSTN signalling in one inclusion body myositis patient. Methods: A 65-year-old man with inclusion body myositis underwent blood flow restricted resistance training for 12 weeks. The gene expression of MSTN, follistatin, follistatin-like 3, activin II B receptor, SMAD-7, MyoD, FOXO-3, and MURF-2 was quantified. Results: After 12 weeks of training, a decrease (25% in MSTN mRNA level was observed, whereas follistatin and follistatin-like 3 gene expression increased by 40% and 70%, respectively. SMAD-7 mRNA level was augmented (20%. FOXO-3 and MURF-2 gene expression increased by 40% and 20%, respectively. No change was observed in activin II B receptor or MyoD gene expression. Conclusions: Blood flow restricted resistance training attenuated MSTN gene expression and also increased expression of myostatin endogenous inhibitors. Blood flow restricted resistance training evoked changes in the expression of genes related to MSTN signalling pathway that could in part explain the muscle hypertrophy previously observed in a patient with inclusion body myositis.

  15. Malta’s specialist training programme in family medicine : a pre-implementation evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Sammut, Mario R.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: As a result of Malta’s EU accession in 2004, family medicine was accepted as a speciality and the Malta College of Family Doctors prepared a Specialist Training Programme in Family Medicine. To facilitate its launch, potential GP trainers and trainees participated in its preimplementation evaluation. Method: Participants’ views were gathered quantitatively through a questionnaire using scales to rate closed statements regarding the programme and its sections. Qualitative openend...

  16. The IAEA Assistance and Training Programme for Transport Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Mark B [ORNL; Eriksson, Ann-Margret [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Rawl, Richard [Transport Security and Safety, Oak Ridge; Anderson, Kimberly K [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security is working cooperatively with the U.S. Department of Energy's Global Threat Reduction Initiative, European Union and Australia to provide transport security assistance to countries throughout the world. Assistance is available to countries in reviewing and upgrading their transport security programs at all levels: (1) National level (regulatory and other government agencies); and (2) Operator level (shippers and carriers). Assistance is directed at implementing a consistent level of security throughout the life cycle of radioactive material (same level of security during transport as when in a fixed facility) Upgrade assistance can include: (1) Expert advisory missions to provide advice and guidance; (2) Training courses for regulatory, governmental and industry personnel; (3) Transport security awareness; (4) Detailed training on designing and implementing transport security programs; (5) Planning to identify and prioritize needs (developing security approaches and plans); (6) Developing model security plans and procedures; and (7) Equipment (vehicles, packages, command and control equipment, etc.). Country visits are now being scheduled to initiate transport security cooperative activities. A training course has been developed to assist countries in developing and implementing transport security programs. The training course has been given as a national training course (three times) and as a Regional training course (three times). The course addresses recommended security provisions for the transport of all radioactive material.

  17. The IAEA Assistance Training Programme for Transport Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Ann-Margret [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Rawl, Richard R [ORNL; Hawk, Mark B [ORNL; Anderson, Kimberly K [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security is working cooperatively with the U.S. Department of Energy's Global Threat Reduction Initiative, European Union and Australia to provide transport security assistance to countries throughout the world. Assistance is available to countries in reviewing and upgrading their transport security programs at all levels: (1) National level (regulatory and other government agencies); and (2) Operator level (shippers and carriers). Assistance is directed at implementing a consistent level of security throughout the life cycle of radioactive material (same level of security during transport as when in a fixed facility) Upgrade assistance can include: (1) Expert advisory missions to provide advice and guidance; (2) Training courses for regulatory, governmental and industry personnel; (3) Transport security awareness; (4) Detailed training on designing and implementing transport security programs; (5) Planning to identify and prioritize needs (developing security approaches and plans); (6) Developing model security plans and procedures; and (7) Equipment (vehicles, packages, command and control equipment, etc.). Country visits are now being scheduled to initiate transport security cooperative activities. A training course has been developed to assist countries in developing and implementing transport security programs. The training course has been given as a national training course (three times) and as a Regional training course (three times). The course addresses recommended security provisions for the transport of all radioactive material.

  18. Effect of a tele-training programme on radiographers in the interpretation of CT colonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Carsten; Lefere, Philippe; Gerke, Oke

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the performance of radiographers in CT colonography (CTC) after a tele-training programme, supervised by 2 experienced radiologists. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Five radiographers underwent training in CTC using a tele-training programme mainly based on the interpretation of 75...... training cases performed in the novice department. To evaluate the educational performance, each radiographer was tested on 20 test cases with 27 lesions >6mm (12: 6-9mm; 15: >10mm). Sensitivity, specificity and PPV for polyps ≥6mm and ≥10mm were calculated with point estimates and 95% confidence interval...... (95% CI). The results were compared by comparing 95% CI with a 5% significance level. RESULTS: In the training cases overall per-polyp sensitivity was 57% (95% CI 46.1-67.9) and 69.1% (95% CI 50.6-87.5) for lesions ≥6mm and ≥10mm, respectively. Overall per patient sensitivity, specificity and PPV were...

  19. OUTREACH PROGRAMMES FOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING: CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE INTERNATIONAL CARTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. E. Cartwright

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Organisations like the International Cartographic Association champion programmes that develop and deliver education and training to cartographers and geospatial scientists, globally. This can be in the form of traditional university and training college programmes, short courses for professional and technical members of mapping agencies and as outreach initiatives to transfer knowledge about the discipline and its contemporary practices. Through its international community, the ICA undertakes the transfer of knowledge about cartography and GI Science by publishing books and special editions of journals and running workshops. Colleagues from the ICA community conduct these workshops on a volunteer basis, generally with the support of the national member organisation of ICA or the national mapping body. For example, the ICA promotes the generation of extensive publications, generally through its Commissions and Working Groups. The publications include books, journals and the ICA Newsletter. Outreach activities are especially pertinent to up skill colleagues from developing countries. Specialist programmes can be offered for professional and 'everyday' map users (from adults to children. The ICA can assist with its current programmes, designed to embrace professional and non-professional cartographers alike. This paper will address how education and outreach programmes can be supported by international associations, by offering programmes independently, or in partnership with sister associations and national and regional organisations and societies. As well, the paper will address the need to deliver education and outreach programmes not to just the professional international community, but also to map users and citizen map publishers.

  20. Outreach Programmes for Education and Training: Contributions from the International Cartographic Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, W. E.; Fairbairn, D.

    2012-07-01

    Organisations like the International Cartographic Association champion programmes that develop and deliver education and training to cartographers and geospatial scientists, globally. This can be in the form of traditional university and training college programmes, short courses for professional and technical members of mapping agencies and as outreach initiatives to transfer knowledge about the discipline and its contemporary practices. Through its international community, the ICA undertakes the transfer of knowledge about cartography and GI Science by publishing books and special editions of journals and running workshops. Colleagues from the ICA community conduct these workshops on a volunteer basis, generally with the support of the national member organisation of ICA or the national mapping body. For example, the ICA promotes the generation of extensive publications, generally through its Commissions and Working Groups. The publications include books, journals and the ICA Newsletter. Outreach activities are especially pertinent to up skill colleagues from developing countries. Specialist programmes can be offered for professional and 'everyday' map users (from adults to children). The ICA can assist with its current programmes, designed to embrace professional and non-professional cartographers alike. This paper will address how education and outreach programmes can be supported by international associations, by offering programmes independently, or in partnership with sister associations and national and regional organisations and societies. As well, the paper will address the need to deliver education and outreach programmes not to just the professional international community, but also to map users and citizen map publishers.

  1. 2003 - 2004 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME 1st TERM

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2003-01-01

    1st TERM 29 September to 19 December 2003 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME (Renewable) Energy Policy in the EU Members States and the Accession States By D. Reiche, Free University of Berlin, D 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 October LECTURES SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Introduction to QCD By B. Webber, CERN-TH 20, 21, 22, 23, 24 October The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures.

  2. Effects of an Intensive Resistant Training Sessions and Green Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Esmaeil Afzalpour

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intensive and acute exercise trainings may induce oxidative stress, but antioxidant supplements may attenuate its degenerative consequences. The aim of this research was to examine the effect of green tea supplementation on the oxidative stress indices after an intensive resistance training session. Materials and Methods: 40 non-athletes (without regular physical activity women were randomly divided into 4 equal (n=10 groups including green tea supplementation, green tea supplementation plus resistance training, resistance training, and control groups. After supplementation period (600 mg/day, 14 days, resistance training and green tea supplementation plus resistance training groups performed an intensive resistance training session at 75-85 % of one repetition maximum. The malondialdehyde and total thiol were measured as oxidative stress indices. Data were analyzed by using of repeated measure ANOVA and LSD tests at p<0.056T. Results: Results showed that after 14 days of green tea consumption, malondialdehyde significantly decreased in green tea supplementation (p=0.03 and green tea supplementation plus resistance training (p=0.01 groups, while total thiol increased significantly (p=0.01 in two green tea supplementation groups. However, an intensive resistance training session increased malondialdehyde (p=0.01 without any significantly changes in total thiol (p=0.426T. Conclusion: It seems that green tea supplementation can inhibit exercise-induced protein and lipid oxidation in non-athletes women via enhancement of antioxidant defense system of the body6T.6T

  3. Effects of a contrast training programme on jumping, sprinting and agility performance of prepubertal basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre Román, Pedro Ángel; Villar Macias, Francisco Javier; García Pinillos, Felipe

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 10 week contrast training (CT) programme (isometric + plyometric) on jumping, sprinting abilities and agility performance in prepubertal basketball players. Fifty-eight children from a basketball academy (age: 8.72 ± 0.97 years; body mass index: 17.22 ± 2.48 kg/m 2 ) successfully completed the study. Participants were randomly assigned to experimental groups (EG, n = 30) and control groups (CG, n = 28). The CT programme was included in the experimental group's training sessions - twice a week - as part of their usual weekly training regime. This programme included 3 exercises: 1 isometric and 2 plyometric. Jumping, sprinting and agility performance were assessed before and after the training programme. Significant differences were found in posttest between EG and CG in sprint and T-test: EG showed better results than CG. Furthermore, there were significant differences in posttest-pretest between EG and CG in squat jump, countermovement jump, drop jump, sprint and T-test with the EG showing better results than CG. The CT programme led to increases in vertical jump, sprint and agility levels, so that the authors suggest that prepubertal children exhibit high muscular strength trainability.

  4. Assessment and evaluation of nurses training programme on radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessho, Y.; Kusama, T.

    1996-01-01

    Many nurses in hospitals and clinics are concerned about the care of patients diagnosed or treated with radiation. Knowledge about radiation effects and radiological protection was in limited supply among nurses. Some nurses are anxious about the effects of occupational radiation, and they have not appropriately coped with their patients' questions about radiation effects of medical exposure. We investigated the level of knowledge about radiation among nurses and required knowledge for nurses in hospitals and clinics. Based on the results of the investigation, we designed an education and training program of lectures and practice for nurses in hospitals. After the education and training by our program was done, we evaluated the effects of the education and training with an interview and a questionnaire for each nurse. (author)

  5. 2003-2004 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME: H. QUACK

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch LECTURE SERIES 8 and 12 March, from 11.00-12.00 hrs Main Auditorium 9 March, from 11.00-12.00 hrs TH Auditorium* 11 March, from 10.00-12.00 hrs** Main Auditorium Introduction to Cryogenic Engineering H. QUACK, Technische Univ. Dresden, D • Properties of materials • History of cryogenics • Refrigeration processes and machines • Cooling methods • Applications of cryogenics * Please note unusual place. ** Please note unusual time.

  6. Going out-of-programme as a specialty trainee: procrastination or optimisation of training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Matthew; Azmy, Iman A F; Sanders, David S

    2011-12-01

    Out-of-programme (OOP) activities enable postgraduate trainees to undertake an experience outside of their individual subspecialty training programmes. Activities vary but may include a period of research, additional clinical experiences or time for a planned career break. Determining whether to go OOP is a common dilemma faced by many trainees as they progress through postgraduate training. This review assesses the options trainees have with regards to going OOP, evaluates the potential advantages and disadvantages and also provides advice for those considering an OOP activity.

  7. Communities in action: developing a dental ambassador training programme for adults with learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witton, R; Potterton, R; Smith, W

    2017-06-01

    Adults with learning disabilities may be at higher risk of poor oral health. The community outreach programme attached to Plymouth University Peninsula Dental School used established links with local agencies for this group to try out an intervention using service users as dental ambassadors. A programme was developed to meet the needs of the group and training in oral health key messages was provided along with support in presentation skills. Early evaluation shows promise in terms of feasibility, interest and improved self-care. Public health competencies being illustrated: Strategic leadership, communication, teaching and training, and collaborative working for health and oral health improvement. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  8. Family therapy training on a clinical psychology programme

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The report describes the intake interviewing exercise in a family therapy training unit developed for postgraduates in clinical psychology. The teaching method includes pre-class reading, video modelling, and simulated practice with live feedback. The academic material and other similar practice exercises are contained in the core textbook for this unit.

  9. Effect of interval training programme on pulse pressure in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... Abstract. Background: Pulse pressure (PP), might be a stronger determinants of cardiovascular risk. Objective: To investigate the effect of interval training program on PP in subjects with hypertension. Methods: Two hundred and forty five male patients with mild to moderate (Systolic Blood Pressure [SBP] ...

  10. Effect of interval training programme on pulse pressure in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pulse pressure (PP), might be a stronger determinants of cardiovascular risk. Objective: To investigate the effect of interval training program on PP in subjects with hypertension. Methods: Two hundred and forty five male patients with mild to moderate (Systolic Blood Pressure [SBP] between 140-179 & Diastolic ...

  11. Effects of Interval Training Programme on Resting Heart Rate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    4 and Department of Radiology,Federal Medical Center, Owerri, Nigeria. ABSTRACT. Background: Heart rate (HR) is a determinant of cardiovascular event risk in patient with hypertension. The primary purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of interval training program on HR in black African subjects with.

  12. Existing subtitler training programmes and challenges for South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article concludes that any South African course in subtitling should be rooted firmly in the domestic subtitling context, also in terms of the needs of the country. It also finds that a South African course will require a strong academic-theoretical foundation balanced by considerable emphasis on vocational training in order ...

  13. impact of clinical officer anaesthetist training programme at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-07

    Jul 7, 2013 ... Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Setting: Kenya Medical Training College, Nakuru. Subjects: ... who are competent and are able to provide anaesthetic, resuscitation and disaster management services ... three (10.3%) are employed full time by FBO. Figure 1. The work station distribution by county ...

  14. Evaluation of HeartMath Training Programme for Improving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of a HeartMath training apparatus on personal resilience and physiological coherence. A within group, pre-test and post-test, outcome evaluative design was employed to assess changes in dependent variables. A small convenience sample of 6 participants, 4 women and ...

  15. Strengthening medical training programmes by focusing on professional transitions: a national bridging programme to prepare medical school graduates for their role as medical interns in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Michael J; Luckett, Rebecca; Mantzor, Savara; Bedada, Alemayhu G; Saleeb, Paul; Haverkamp, Miriam; Mosepele, Mosepele; Haverkamp, Cecil; Maoto, Rosa; Prozesky, Detlef; Tapela, Neo; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Barak, Tomer

    2017-12-21

    The improvement of existing medical training programmes in resource-constrained settings is seen as key to addressing the challenge of retaining medical graduates trained at considerable cost both in-country and abroad. In Botswana, the establishment of the national Medical Internship Training Programme (MIT) in 2014 was a first step in efforts to promote retention through the expansion and standardization of internship training, but MIT faces a major challenge related to variability between incoming trainees due to factors such as their completion of undergraduate medical training in different settings. To address this challenge, in August 2016 we piloted a bridging programme for foreign and locally trained medical graduates that aimed to facilitate their transition into internship training. This study aimed to describe the programme and evaluate its impact on the participants' self-rated perceptions of their knowledge, experience, clinical skills, and familiarity with Botswana's healthcare system. We conducted a national, intensive, two-week programme designed to facilitate the transition from medical student to intern and to prepare all incoming interns for their work in Botswana's health system. Participants included all interns entering in August 2016. Formats included lectures, workshops, simulations, discussions, and reflection-oriented activities. The Kellogg Foundation Outcomes Logic Model was used to evaluate the programme, and participants self-rated their knowledge, skills, and attitudes across each of the programme objectives on paired questionnaires before and after participation. 48/54 participants (89%) provided paired data. Participants reported a high degree of satisfaction with the programme (mean 4.2/5). Self-rated preparedness improved after participation (mean 3.2 versus 3.7, p < 0.001), as did confidence across 18/19 knowledge/skill domains, suggesting that participants felt that the programme prepared them for their internship training

  16. The challenges and successes of implementing a sustainable antimicrobial resistance surveillance programme in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, Sarala; Dumre, Shyam Prakash; Shakya, Geeta; Kansakar, Palpasa; Rai, Bhupraj; Hossain, Anowar; Nair, Gopinath Balakrish; Albert, M John; Sack, David; Baker, Stephen; Rahman, Motiur

    2014-03-21

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major global public health concern and its surveillance is a fundamental tool for monitoring the development of AMR. In 1998, the Nepalese Ministry of Health (MOH) launched an Infectious Disease (ID) programme. The key components of the programme were to establish a surveillance programme for AMR and to develop awareness among physicians regarding AMR and rational drug usage in Nepal. An AMR surveillance programme was established and implemented by the Nepalese MOH in partnership with the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR, B) from 1998 to 2003. From 2004 to 2012, the programme was integrated and maintained as a core activity of the National Public Health Laboratory (NPHL) and resulted in an increased number of participating laboratories and pathogens brought under surveillance. The main strategies were to build national capacity on isolation, identification and AMR testing of bacterial pathogens, establish laboratory networking and an External Quality Assessment (EQA) programme, promote standardised recording and reporting of results, and to ensure timely analysis and dissemination of data for advocacy and national policy adaptations. The programme was initiated by nine participating laboratories performing AMR surveillance on Vibrio cholerae, Shigella spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The number of participating laboratories was ultimately increased to 13 and the number of pathogens under surveillance was increased to seven (Salmonella spp. was added to the surveillance programme in 2002 and extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli in 2011). From 1999 to 2012, data were available on 17,103 bacterial isolates. During the AMR programme, we observed changing trends in serovars/species for Salmonella spp., Shigella spp. and V. cholerae and changing AMR trend for all organisms. Notably, N. gonorrhoeae isolates demonstrated

  17. Effects of order and sequence of resistance and endurance training on body fat in elementary school-aged girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Ana R; Marta, Carlos C; Neiva, Henrique P; Izquierdo, Mikel; Marques, Mário C

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the effects of order and sequence of concurrent resistance and endurance training on body fat percentage (BFP) in a large sample of elementary school-aged girls. One hundred and twenty-six healthy girls, aged 10-11 years (10.95 ± 0.48 years), were randomly assigned to six groups to perform different training protocols per week for 8 weeks: Resistance-only (R), Endurance-only (E), Concurrent Distinct Endurance-Resistance (CDER), Concurrent Parallel Endurance-Resistance (CPER), Concurrent Parallel Resistance-Endurance (CPRE), and a Control group (C). In R and E, the subjects performed single sessions of resistance or endurance exercises, respectively (two days per week). In CDER, resistance-endurance training was performed on different days each week (four days per week). CPER and CPRE performed single-session combined endurance-resistance training or combined resistance-endurance training, respectively, each week (two days per week). After an 8-week training period, BFP decreased in all experimental groups (CPER: 13.3%, p0.05; R: 5.0%, p>0.05; and CDER: 5.6%, p>0.05). However, a significant difference was found in CPER and CPRE when compared to CDER, E, and R, indicating that training sequence may influence BFP. All programmes were effective, but CPER and CPRE obtained better results for BFP than CDER, E, or R. The effects of concurrent resistance and endurance training on body fat percentage can be mediated by order and sequence of exercise. These results provide insight into optimization of school-based fat loss exercise programmes in childhood.

  18. Effects of order and sequence of resistance and endurance training on body fat in elementary school-aged girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. Alves

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyse the effects of order and sequence of concurrent resistance and endurance training on body fat percentage (BFP in a large sample of elementary school-aged girls. One hundred and twenty-six healthy girls, aged 10-11 years (10.95 ± 0.48 years, were randomly assigned to six groups to perform different training protocols per week for 8 weeks: Resistance-only (R, Endurance-only (E, Concurrent Distinct Endurance-Resistance (CDER, Concurrent Parallel Endurance-Resistance (CPER, Concurrent Parallel Resistance-Endurance (CPRE, and a Control group (C. In R and E, the subjects performed single sessions of resistance or endurance exercises, respectively (two days per week. In CDER, resistance-endurance training was performed on different days each week (four days per week. CPER and CPRE performed single-session combined endurance-resistance training or combined resistance-endurance training, respectively, each week (two days per week. After an 8-week training period, BFP decreased in all experimental groups (CPER: 13.3%, p0.05; and CDER: 5.6%, p>0.05. However, a significant difference was found in CPER and CPRE when compared to CDER, E, and R, indicating that training sequence may influence BFP. All programmes were effective, but CPER and CPRE obtained better results for BFP than CDER, E, or R. The effects of concurrent resistance and endurance training on body fat percentage can be mediated by order and sequence of exercise. These results provide insight into optimization of school-based fat loss exercise programmes in childhood.

  19. The regulatory evaluation of radiation protection training programmes at Canadian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legare, M.; Tennant, D.

    1996-01-01

    The responsibility for providing the necessary assurance that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment is vested with the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). This responsibility has led the Operator Certification Division of the AECB to develop methods to obtain assurance that nuclear power plant operations personnel are well trained and adequately competent to perform their duties. The features of the AECB approach to evaluation of training programmes based on a systematic approach to training is described. An overview of the Canadian nuclear power plants' radiation protection qualification levels is given. The developing evaluation process is contributing to the improvement of licensee radiation protection training programmes. This is making possible the transfer of part of the responsibility for licensed personnel radiation protection qualification assessment to the licensees, thus enabling a reduction in the operator certification division formal qualification activities. (author)

  20. IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF KITCHEN GARDENING TRAINING UNDER WATERSHED PROGRAMME

    OpenAIRE

    Tabinda Qaiser; Hassnain Shah; Sajida Taj; Murad Ali

    2013-01-01

    Kitchen Gardening Project is the revolutionary step to increase vegetables production as well as provision of cheap vegetables to the consumers. The main focus of the study was to assess the impact of kitchen gardening training given by Water Resources Research Institute (WRRI) under watershed project in Arokas and Ghoragali. Capacity building of rural women in Kitchen Gardening was the focus and twenty trainees of kitchen gardening were selected randomly from each location to assess the impa...

  1. Evaluation of a Trauma-Focused CBT Training Programme for IAPT services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Hannah

    2017-09-01

    Therapists in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services are often expected to treat complex presentations of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), such as individuals with multiple, prolonged or early life trauma histories and significant co-morbidity, for which they have received minimal training. Although high recovery rates for PTSD have been demonstrated in randomized controlled trials, these are not always replicated in routine practice, suggesting that training interventions are required to fill the research-practice gap. This study investigated the outcomes of a therapist training programme on treating PTSD with trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy (TF-CBT). Twenty therapists from ten IAPT services participated in the training, which consisted of workshops, webinars and consultation sessions over a 6-month period. Feedback indicated that participants found the training highly acceptable. PTSD knowledge and self- and supervisor-rated competence on TF-CBT measures improved following the training and improvements were maintained a year later. Client outcomes on a PTSD measure improved following the training. Participants reported attempts to disseminate learning from the course back to their teams. The findings indicate that the training programme was successful in improving TF-CBT knowledge, skills and outcomes for IAPT therapists. Tentative support for training 'trauma experts' within IAPT services was found, although institutional constraints and staff turnover may limit the sustainability of the model.

  2. EFFECT OF THE CERVICAL ENDURANCE TRAINING PROGRAMME IN MECHANICAL NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjal Gogoi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mechanical neck pain commonly arises insidiously and is generally multifactorial in origin. Regardless of the primary source of pain, the prognosis for individual experiencing chronic neck pain is poor. Exercise interventions are important for effective management of patients with neck pain.the objective of the study is to compare the efficacy of cervical endurance training programme with cervical isometric exercise in alleviating symptoms of mechanical neck pain. Methods: 40 subjects were assessed and identified with Mechanical Neck Pain and recruited for the study and were randomly divided into two groups. In one group endurance training for cervical muscles and in another group resisted isometric had been given for 3 weeks. The post treatment scores regarding endurance, pain intensity, disability, Range of motion and muscle power were compared with the pre treatment scores. Results: Paired‘t’ test was done to compare the pretreatment scores with the post treatment scores .Unpaired ‘t’ test was done to compare the post treatment scores of both the groups. The pain intensity, disability were found to be significantly decreased in experimental group than the control group (p<0.001. While the endurance was found to be significantly increased in experimental group than the control group (p < 0.001. The muscle power was found to be slightly increased in the control group than the experimental group .The post treatment cervical range of motion does not have significant difference in between the groups (Flexion- p=0.35 and Extension-p=0.40. Conclusion: This study showed that the progressive endurance exercise is beneficial in alleviating mechanical neck pain and should be incorporated along with the conventional physiotherapy treatment for mechanical neck pain.

  3. Cognitive mechanisms underlying Armoni: a computer-assisted cognitive training programme for individuals with intellectual disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Peñaloza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although a number of cognitive deficits have been described in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID, few studies have examined the use of computer-assisted cognitive training programmes in this group of people. This study sought to determine the cognitive mechanisms underlying 16 activities included in Armoni, a computerized cognitive training programme for individuals with ID, in order to validate its use with this population. Fifty adults with ID from four residential care centres in Spain underwent neuropsychological testing tapping attention, verbal memory, visual memory, comprehension, visuoperception, visuoconstruction, naming ability, verbal fluency, verbal reasoning and motor function. In addition, they performed 16 activities included in the Armoni programme. The relationships between cognitive function and the computer-based activities were assessed using Spearman correlations. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were then used to explore how cognitive function predicted the performance of individuals with ID on the programme activities. Most programme activities correlated with visuoconstruction, comprehension and naming ability. Naming ability, visual memory, comprehension and visuoconstruction contributed the most to the predictive models regarding performance on the Armoni activities. Our findings support the validity of Armoni for cognitive training in individuals with ID.

  4. Say 'trouble's gone': chronic illness and employability in job training programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Emma K

    2013-01-01

    The concept of biographical disruption has unique relevance for socioeconomically disadvantaged groups who participate in entry-level job training programmes. In these programmes trainees often suffer from various forms of chronic illness and must arrange these illnesses into a picture of employability. In this article I use ethnographic data and narrative analysis to examine closely two trainees' illness-related experiences, expressions and talk, and find that their ability to present their illnesses in ways that are consistent with programmatic goals is strongly influenced by family support, responsibilities and roles, as well as particular aspects of illness, like the interpretability of symptoms. I also find that the concept of biographical disruption has a curious traction in the world of job training, particularly among job training programme staff who would like to see trainees mobilise a variety of resources to help manage their illness. However, for trainees, many of whom have lived with chronic illness for years, the concept of biographical disruption may be more limited as a tool for understanding the experiences of illness. A more meaningful disruptive force in the lives of trainees appears to be the programme itself and the strategies for dealing with illness that programme staff may extend. © 2012 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2012 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziakova, M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper deals with planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT based training programmes based on IAEA TC Project SLR/0/003 on upgrading NPP personnel training, with the aim of upgrading NPP safety and reliability of NPP operation and maintenance. The costs needed include both Slovak and IAEA sources. Five stages of the Project are defined: planning; organizing; motivating; implementation; control, review and accountability

  6. Work-based assessment within Malta’s specialist training programme in family medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Sammut, Mario R.; Abela, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    The Specialist Training Programme in Family Medicine (STPFM) – Malta was drawn up by the Malta College of Family Doctors in 2006, approved by Malta’s Specialist Accreditation Committee, and launched in 2007 by the Primary Health Care Department and the Malta College of Family Doctors. This article regarding the work-based assessment of specialist training in family medicine in Malta was prepared by consulting various local / international documents and publications tha...

  7. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Driscoll Jeremiah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: 1 Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT scores, 2 Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT reach distances, 3 ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and 4 ground reaction forces (GRFs during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors.

  8. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Driscoll, Jeremiah

    2011-06-09

    Abstract Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI) are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed\\/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: 1 Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) scores, 2 Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) reach distances, 3 ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and 4 ground reaction forces (GRFs) during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors.

  9. Changes of explosive strength in professional basketball players after a six week training cycle with plyometric training and resistance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lehnert

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Explosive strength of the lower extremities and agility are important parts of game performance in basketball. Although numerous studies have focused on the assessment of the training effect of plyometric training, studies focusing on elite players are missing. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to find out what changes in explosive strength of the lower extremities take place after a 6 week strength training with plyometric exercises and resistance exercises in elite basketball players. METHODS: Elite basketball players (n = 12; age 24.71 ± 1.5 years; height 197.0 ± 7.6 cm; weight 95.8 ± 8.1 kg performed during pre-season a 6 week training program with plyometric exercises and resistance exercises which were conducted biweekly during the pre-season. The changes in explosive strength were measured by the squat jump without arms, the counter movement jump without arms, the counter movement jump free arms and the 2 step run up jump. The players participated in two measurements. The 1st (pretesting was performed on the first day of pre-season and the 2nd (posttesting was completed two days after terminating the PT programme. The differences between the average values of the monitored parameters were determined by the Wilcoxon paired test. To calculate the effect size formula according to Fritz, Morris, and Richler (2012: R = Z/√N was used. RESULTS: Analysis of intra-group changes confirmed significant differences between the two measurements in tests of vertical jump squat (Z = 2.58, p = .01, r = .75, vertical jump from the point of the swing arm (Z = 2.49, p = .01, r = .72 and vertical jump from place without the swing arm (Z = 2.75, p = .01, r = .79. In case of the two step run up jump significant differences were not found (Z = 1.60, p = .11, r = .56. Analysis of intra-individual changes showed the significant interindividual differences in the changes of the explosive power of the lower limbs after a 6 week training. The

  10. Effects of a Ten Week Training Programme on Repeated Short Sprints among Football Referees of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniam Nathan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate whether a ten week training programme would improve repeated short sprints of football referees in Malaysia. Sixty national football referees were randomly assigned into 3 groups (n=20 namely the control group, experimental one and experimental two. Experimental one followed a 10 week training programme (duration of training 4 days in a week, each session=90 minutes and time 5 pm supervised by a physical education lecturer and his assistants. Experimental two reported for training at a different venue and trained on their own (duration, frequency and time as for experimental one. Pre-test and post-test results were used to determine whether there was an improvement. SPANOVA results rejected the null hypothesis [F (2, 57 =75.86 p<0.05].  Pillai’s Trace indicated there was a significant difference between pre-test and post-test results and significant interaction effect. Tukey Pair Wise Comparison indicated best performance by experimental one and the control group the poorest. The results indicated that the training programme was acceptable.

  11. Comparing the effects of two distinct eccentric modalities to traditional resistance training in resistance trained, higher functioning older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluchowski, Ashley; Dulson, Deborah; Merien, Fabrice; Plank, Lindsay; Harris, Nigel

    2017-11-01

    The effects of eccentric resistance exercise are of interest in the older adult cohort, but to our knowledge, there is no research on the relative effects of different eccentric modalities on a range of outcomes in higher functioning, resistance trained older adults. 33 resistance-trained older adults (aged 67±4.5years) were randomized into one of three supervised training groups: traditional (TRE), eccentric only (ERE) or eccentrically biased resistance exercise (EBRE) on a 45°, plate-loaded leg press machine. Participants trained twice per week with maximal strength, functional capacity, body composition and blood biomarkers measured before and after the eight-week intervention. Both eccentric and concentric strength, and important functional tasks for independent living significantly improved independent of group. Body composition and blood biomarkers were found to significantly improve in the EBRE group only however, no statistical differences were found between groups. Compared to traditional resistance training, the two eccentric modalities investigated here were equally effective for improvements in maximum muscular strength, functional capacity, body composition and metabolic biomarkers. When training the resistance trained older adult, very heavy isoinertial external loads (at least 70% of one repetition maximum) are effective irrespective of contraction mode. With heavy strength training, resistance trained older adults can continue to expect improvements in health and function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Wrist Resistance Training Improves Motor Control and Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Edward; Kim, You-Sin; Hill, Genevieve; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Kim, Chang Kook; Shim, Jae Kun

    2018-04-01

    Chu, E, Kim, Y-S, Hill, G, Kim, YH, Kim, CK, and Shim, JK. Wrist resistance training improves motor control and strength. J Strength Cond Res 32(4): 962-969, 2018-The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a 6-week direction-specific resistance training program on isometric torque control and isokinetic torque strength of the wrist joint. Nineteen subjects were randomly assigned to either the wrist training group (n = 9) or the control group (n = 10). The training group performed wrist exercises in 6 directions (flexion, extension, pronation, supination, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation), whereas the control group did not. Data were collected on the isometric torque control, 1-repetition maximum (1RM) strength, and isokinetic maximum torque (angular velocity of 60° per second wrist movements) before and after 6 weeks of resistance training and at 2-week intervals during training. The training group showed significant decreases in isometric torque control error in all 6 directions after 2 weeks of resistance training, whereas the control group did not show significant increase or decrease. After 4 weeks of training, the training group showed significant increases in maximum strength in all 6 directions as assessed by 1RM strength and isokinetic strength tests, whereas the control group did not show any statistically significant changes. This study shows that motor control significantly improves within the first 2 weeks of resistance training, whereas the wrist strength significantly improves within the first 4 weeks of resistance training. Based on the findings of this study, coaches and trainers should consider wrist resistance training to improve athletes' muscular strength and control of the wrist muscles.

  13. programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aid for AIDS (AfA) is a disease management programme (DIVIPI available to beneficiaries and employees of contracted medical funds and ... the challenges alluded to in the first article, including late enrolment and the measurement of survival, especially in patients with ... I the HIV prevalence and incidence (new infections].

  14. Dealing with Learner Resistance to Technology-Delivered Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of student resistance to technology-delivered training focuses on strategies at the IRS (Internal Revenue Service) that overcame learner resistance by maintaining a personal relationship with each student and flexibly addressing each student's personal style and concerns. Considers reasons for student resistance and the continued need…

  15. Intermittent hypoxic resistance training: is metabolic stress the key moderator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brendan R; Slattery, Katie M; Dascombe, Ben J

    2015-02-01

    Traditionally, researchers and practitioners have manipulated acute resistance exercise variables to elicit the desired responses to training. However, recent research indicates that altering the muscular environment during resistance training, namely by implementing a hypoxic stimulus, can augment muscle hypertrophy and strength. Intermittent hypoxic resistance training (IHRT), whereby participants inspire hypoxic air during resistance training, has been previously demonstrated to increase muscle cross-sectional area and maximum strength by significantly greater amounts than the equivalent training in normoxia. However, some recent evidence has provided conflicting results, reporting that the use of systemic hypoxia during resistance training provided no added benefit. While the definitive mechanisms that may augment muscular responses to IHRT are not yet fully understood, an increased metabolic stress is thought to be important for moderating many downstream processes related to hypertrophy. It is likely that methodological differences between conflicting IHRT studies have resulted in different degrees of metabolic stress during training, particularly when considering the inter-set recovery intervals used. Given that the most fundamental physiological stresses resulting from hypoxia are disturbances to oxidative metabolism, it becomes apparent that resistance training may only benefit from additional hypoxia if the exercise is structured to elicit a strong metabolic response. We hypothesize that for IHRT to be more effective in producing muscular hypertrophy and increasing strength than the equivalent normoxic training, exercise should be performed with relatively brief inter-set recovery periods, with the aim of providing a potent metabolic stimulus to enhance anabolic responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sweden's International Training Programme in Education for Sustainable Development Enables Students to Change Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jim; Neeser, Marie

    2012-01-01

    The Swedish International Training Programme in Education for Sustainable Development, which has been run annually for the past 10 years, is a five-phase program that supports participants to develop and implement a change project in their work places. It requires a team of students from an institution and provides extensive follow up. The course…

  17. Development and feasibility of a patient feedback programme to improve consultation skills in general practice training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, M.E.; Blankenstein, A.H.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Schleypen, H.; Schoonheim, P.L.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To develop an attractive and effective patient feedback training programme for general practice trainees (GPTs). Methods: First, an exploratory study was conducted in which patients and GPTs were interviewed after they had worked with patient feedback. This contributed to the development

  18. An Evaluation of Participation in a Schools-Based Youth Mental Health Peer Education Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Aileen; Barry, James; Neary, Marie-Louise; Lane, Sabrina; O'Keeffe, Lynsey

    2016-01-01

    The use of peer education has been well documented within the discipline of health promotion, but not within the youth mental health domain. This paper describes an evaluation of an innovative schools-based peer education training programme that involved preparing young people to deliver a mental health workshop to their peers. Participants…

  19. Impact of in-service education and training programmes on teachers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Up to 80% of the teachers have participated in three or less INSET activities but only 10% of them said they engaged in activities that involved teaching reading methods in Social Studies. The paper therefore argues that in-service education and training programmes organized did little in exposing teachers to skills required ...

  20. Effects of a Teacher Training Programme on Symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froelich, Jan; Breuer, Dieter; Doepfner, Manfred; Amonn, Frauke

    2012-01-01

    A substantial lack of effective school based interventions especially in the natural setting exists in the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. We performed a 18-week teacher training programme in a public elementary school with 378 pupils in 16 classes. After completing a screening assessment for symptoms related to ADHD and to…

  1. Religion and Spirituality within Counselling/Clinical Psychology Training Programmes: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Simon

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing efforts to attend to religious and spiritual issues within clinical/counselling psychology. However, there is limited research demonstrating how successfully such content is integrated into existing training programmes. This investigation sought to review primary research literature related to training…

  2. Evaluation of the In-Service Education and Training Programme for Kuwait Army Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutawa, Najat; Al-Furaih, Suad

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates the In-Service Education and Training (INSET) programme organised for Kuwait Army instructors. The focus is on their perceptual gain in related topics and skills, as they attended 10 courses at the College of Education--Kuwait University. Pre- and post-assessments involved 20 trainees. The analysis indicates significant…

  3. Commitment to an Entrepreneurship Training Programme for Self-Employed Entrepreneurs, and Learning from Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Lenita; Hytti, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how self-employed entrepreneurs commit themselves to an entrepreneurship training programme and how such commitment relates to their perceptions of learning. Design/methodology/approach: The data were collected through qualitative, inductive methods by interviewing and observing six entrepreneurs…

  4. A suggested training programme for carotid artery stenting (CAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaines, Peter; Nicholson, Tony

    2006-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting as an alternative to traditional carotid endartrectomy is becoming increasingly important in the treatment of transient ischemic attack and stroke. Physicians from several different medical disciplines are interested in treating appropriate patients by this method. Patients are entitled to know what training and experience the surgeon or clinician has before giving consent. This should involve endovascular experience in all systems and experience and knowledge of cerebral angiography and intervention. A multidisciplinary approach and reporting of adverse events is vital for patient safety

  5. Lessons learnt from a three-year pilot field epidemiology training programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Hoy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Problem: The Pacific region has widely dispersed populations, limited financial and human resources and a high burden of disease. There is an urgent need to improve the availability, reliability and timeliness of useable health data. Context: The purpose of this paper is to share lessons learnt from a three-year pilot field epidemiology training programme that was designed to respond to these Pacific health challenges. The pilot programme built on and further developed an existing field epidemiology training programme for Pacific health staff. Action: The programme was delivered in country by epidemiologists working for Pacific Public Health Surveillance Network partners. The programme consisted of five courses: four one-week classroom-based courses and one field epidemiology project. Sessions were structured so that theoretical understanding was achieved through interaction and reinforced through practical hands-on group activities, case studies and other interactive practical learning methods. Outcome: As of September 2016, 258 students had commenced the programme. Twenty-six course workshops were delivered and one cohort of students had completed the full five-course programme. The programme proved popular and gained a high level of student engagement. Discussion: Face-to-face delivery, a low student-to-facilitator ratio, substantial group work and practical exercises were identified as key factors that contributed to the students developing skills and confidence. Close engagement of leaders and the need to quickly evaluate and adapt the curriculum were important lessons, and the collaboration between external partners was considered important for promoting a harmonized approach to health needs in the Pacific.

  6. 2003-2004 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME: Y. NIR

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch 22, 23, 24, 25 and 26 March LECTURE SERIES From 11:00 to 12:00 hrs Main Auditorium bldg. 500 on 22, 24, 25 and 26 March TH Auditorium bldg 4 on 23 March Neutrinos Y. NIR, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel The Standard Model predicts that the neutrinos are massless and do not mix. Generic extensions of the Standard Model predict that neutrinos are massive (but, very likely, much lighter than the charged fermions). Therefore, the search for neutrino masses and mixing tests the Standard Model and probes new physics. Measurements of various features of the fluxes of atmospheric, solar and, more recently, reactor neutrinos have provided evidence for neutrino oscillations and therefore for neutrino masses and mixing. These results have significant theoretical implications: new physics exists, and its scale can be estimated. There are interesting lessons for grand unified theories and for models of extra dimensions. T...

  7. Improving Problem Solving in Primary School Students: The Effect of a Training Programme Focusing on Metacognition and Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornoldi, Cesare; Carretti, Barbara; Drusi, Silvia; Tencati, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite doubts voiced on their efficacy, a series of studies has been carried out on the capacity of training programmes to improve academic and reasoning skills by focusing on underlying cognitive abilities and working memory in particular. No systematic efforts have been made, however, to test training programmes that involve both…

  8. Metacognitive training for patients with schizophrenia: preliminary evidence for a targeted, single-module programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzan, Ryan P; Delfabbro, Paul H; Galletly, Cherrie A; Woodward, Todd S

    2014-12-01

    Metacognitive training is an eight-module, group-based treatment programme for people with schizophrenia that targets the cognitive biases (i.e. problematic thinking styles) thought to contribute to the genesis and maintenance of delusions. The present article is an investigation into the efficacy of a shorter, more targeted, single-module metacognitive training programme, administered individually, which focuses specifically on improving cognitive biases that are thought to be driven by a 'hypersalience of evidence-hypothesis matches' mechanism (e.g. jumping to conclusions, belief inflexibility, reasoning heuristics, illusions of control). It was hypothesised that a more targeted metacognitive training module could still improve performance on these bias tasks and reduce delusional ideation, while improving insight and quality of life. A sample of 28 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and mild delusions either participated in the hour-long, single-session, targeted metacognitive training programme (n = 14), or continued treatment as usual (n = 14). All patients were assessed using clinical measures gauging overall positive symptomology, delusional ideation, quality of life and insight, and completed two cognitive bias tasks designed to elucidate the representativeness and illusion of control biases. After a 2-week, post-treatment interval, targeted metacognitive training patients exhibited significant decreases in delusional severity and conviction, significantly improved clinical insight, and significant improvements on the cognitive bias tasks, relative to the treatment-as-usual controls. Performance improvements on the cognitive bias tasks significantly correlated with the observed reductions in overall positive symptomology. Patients also evaluated the training positively. Although interpretations of these results are limited due to the lack of an optimally designed, randomised controlled trial and a small sample size, the results are promising and warrant

  9. Screening for depression: integrating training into the professional development programme for low vision rehabilitation staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Gwyneth; Holloway, Edith E; Craig, Graeme; Hepi, Niky; Coad, Samantha; Keeffe, Jill E; Lamoureux, Ecosse L

    2012-12-01

    To describe the integration of depression screening training into the professional development programme for low vision rehabilitation staff and report on staff evaluation of this training. Pre-post intervention study, in a single population of low vision rehabilitation staff. Three hundred and thirty-six staff from Australia's largest low vision rehabilitation organization, Vision Australia. Staff completed the depression screening and referral training as part of a wider professional development programme. A pre-post-training questionnaire was administered to all staff. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used to determine differences in self-reported knowledge, confidence, barriers to recognition and management of depression between baseline and post training. One hundred and seventy-two participants completed both questionnaires. Following training, participants reported an increased knowledge of depression, were more likely to respond to depression in their clients and reported to be more confident in managing depression (P training incorporating more active and 'hands-on' sessions are likely to be required. This training is a promising first step in integrating a depression screening tool into low vision rehabilitation practice. Further work is needed to determine the barriers and facilitators to implementation in practice and to assess clients' acceptability and outcomes. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2012 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  10. Resistance training and cardiac hypertrophy: unravelling the training effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haykowsky, Mark J; Dressendorfer, Rudolph; Taylor, Dylan; Mandic, Sandra; Humen, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    Resistance training (RT) is a popular method of conditioning to enhance sport performance as well as an effective form of exercise to attenuate the age-mediated decline in muscle strength and mass. Although the benefits of RT on skeletal muscle morphology and function are well established, its effect on left ventricular (LV) morphology remains equivocal. Some investigations have found that RT is associated with an obligatory increase in LV wall thickness and mass with minimal alteration in LV internal cavity dimension, an effect called concentric hypertrophy. However, others report that short- (18 years) RT does not alter LV morphology, arguing that concentric hypertrophy is not an obligatory adaptation secondary to this form of exertion. This disparity between studies on whether RT consistently results in cardiac hypertrophy could be caused by: (i) acute cardiopulmonary mechanisms that minimise the increase in transmural pressure (i.e. ventricular pressure minus intrathoracic pressure) and LV wall stress during exercise; (ii) the underlying use of anabolic steroids by the athletes; or (iii) the specific type of RT performed. We propose that when LV geometry is altered after RT, the pattern is usually concentric hypertrophy in Olympic weightlifters. However, the pattern of eccentric hypertrophy (increased LV mass secondary to an increase in diastolic internal cavity dimension and wall thickness) is not uncommon in bodybuilders. Of particular interest, nearly 40% of all RT athletes have normal LV geometry, and these athletes are typically powerlifters. RT athletes who use anabolic steroids have been shown to have significantly higher LV mass compared with drug-free sport-matched athletes. This brief review will sort out some of the factors that may affect the acute and chronic outcome of RT on LV morphology. In addition, a conceptual framework is offered to help explain why cardiac hypertrophy is not always found in RT athletes.

  11. Implications of Impaired Endurance Performance following Single Bouts of Resistance Training: An Alternate Concurrent Training Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doma, Kenji; Deakin, Glen B; Bentley, David J

    2017-11-01

    A single bout of resistance training induces residual fatigue, which may impair performance during subsequent endurance training if inadequate recovery is allowed. From a concurrent training standpoint, such carry-over effects of fatigue from a resistance training session may impair the quality of a subsequent endurance training session for several hours to days with inadequate recovery. The proposed mechanisms of this phenomenon include: (1) impaired neural recruitment patterns; (2) reduced movement efficiency due to alteration in kinematics during endurance exercise and increased energy expenditure; (3) increased muscle soreness; and (4) reduced muscle glycogen. If endurance training quality is consistently compromised during the course of a specific concurrent training program, optimal endurance development may be limited. Whilst the link between acute responses of training and subsequent training adaptation has not been fully established, there is some evidence suggesting that cumulative effects of fatigue may contribute to limiting optimal endurance development. Thus, the current review will (1) explore cross-sectional studies that have reported impaired endurance performance following a single, or multiple bouts, of resistance training; (2) identify the potential impact of fatigue on chronic endurance development; (3) describe the implications of fatigue on the quality of endurance training sessions during concurrent training, and (4) explain the mechanisms contributing to resistance training-induced attenuation on endurance performance from neurological, biomechanical and metabolic standpoints. Increasing the awareness of resistance training-induced fatigue may encourage coaches to consider modulating concurrent training variables (e.g., order of training mode, between-mode recovery period, training intensity, etc.) to limit the carry-over effects of fatigue from resistance to endurance training sessions.

  12. Establishing a generic training programme for future junior doctors: a role for neurosurgery within the framework of clinical neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadarajah, Ramesh; Amin, Amit; Aldlyami, Ehabb; Kang, Niel; Wong, James Min-Leong; Selway, Richard; Gullan, Richard

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To describe the opinion of junior doctors in neurosurgery in the UK and Eire about future reforms to training, and to relate this to the establishment of a generic neurosciences training programme. METHODS: A postal questionnaire survey of neurosurgery units in UK and Eire (36 units). All senior house officers (SHOs) taking part in a neurosurgery on-call rota during the 6 months between February and August 2003 (n=236); 190 respondents (response rate 81% overall, 90% neurosurgery SHOs and 55% neurology SHOs. The questionnaire covered most aspects of provision of training, working pattern and job satisfaction gained from the post. Also included were questions on future reforms for training. RESULTS: There is an overwhelming acceptance amongst SHOs for training to be centred on generic programmes. The audit also identified that there are many aspects of neurosurgical training which will be very suitable for trainees from other fields, thus supporting the establishment of a generic neurosciences training programme. CONCLUSIONS: The establishment of a generic training programme would encourage an improvement in training standards for the whole SHO grade. To ensure the success of this proposed generic training programme, support from junior doctors and all those involved in postgraduate education is required. Neurosciences teaching has the excellent potential to move towards the planning and formation of a generic neurosciences training programme in-line with the proposed reforms. PMID:16053687

  13. Region specific patella tendon hypertrophy in humans following resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M.; Reitelseder, S; Pedersen, T.G.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine if cross-sectional area (CSA) differs along the length of the human patellar tendon (PT), and if there is PT hypertrophy in response to resistance training. METHODS: Twelve healthy young men underwent baseline and post-training assessments. Maximal isometric knee extension strength......, subjects performed 12 weeks of heavy resistance knee extension training with one leg (Heavy-leg), and light resistance knee extension training with the other leg (Light-leg). RESULTS: The MVC increased for heavy-leg (15 +/- 4%, P .... CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this study is the first to report tendon hypertrophy following resistance training. Further, the data show that the human PT CSA varies along the length of the tendon....

  14. [Multiprofessional family-system training programme in psychiatry--effects on team cooperation and staff strain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwack, Julika; Schweitzer, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    How does the interdisciplinary cooperation of psychiatric staff members change after a multiprofessional family systems training programme? Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 49 staff members. Quantitative questionnaires were used to assess burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory, MBI) and team climate (Team-Klima-Inventar, TKI). The multiprofessional training intensifies interdisciplinary cooperation. It results in an increased appreciation of the nurses involved and in a redistribution of therapeutic tasks between nurses, psychologists and physicians. Staff burnout decreased during the research period, while task orientation and participative security within teams increased. The multiprofessional family systems training appears suitable to improve quality of patient care and interdisciplinary cooperation and to reduce staff burnout.

  15. An evaluation of the 18- and 12-month basic postgraduate training programmes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Niels Kristian; Qvesel, Dorte; Kodal, Troels

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It was decided that the Danish 18-month internship training should be replaced by a 12-month postgraduate training period including six months of employment at a hospital ward and six months at a general practice/hospital ward. This study examines how the physicians from the old...... equipped and less ready for continued specialisation than doctors of the 18-month programme and they requested a downward adjustment of the learning objectives associated with the educational positions which follow their basic training. Physicians do not expect the increased focus on learning...

  16. A regional training programme for radiotherapists and allied professionals for the West Africa health community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durosinmi-Etti, F.A.; Mouelle-Sone, A.

    1993-01-01

    With 47% of the population under 15 years of age and the control of infectious and other communicable diseases, cancer will likely constitute a major health problem in West Africa in future. Radiotherapy facilities and trained manpower to run them are very limited within the subregion. This paper quantifies the severity of the situation and discusses a practical approach aimed at coping with the situation through the organisation of a training programme for radiotherapists, medical physicists and radiation technologists as part of the strategies for cancer control in West Africa. A curriculum is proposed for the training of radiotherapists. (author) 2 tabs., 1 fig. 17 refs

  17. A report on the development and implementation of a preceptorship training programme for registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June D. Jeggels

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical supervision represents an important aspect in the development of nursing students’ clinical skills. At the School of Nursing (SoN the clinical supervisors employed by the University of the Western Cape (UWC have limited contact sessions with students in the clinical setting. However, with the increase in student numbers a need was identified to strengthen the support given to nursing students in the service setting.Objective: A preceptorship training programme for nurses was developed in 2009, aimed at improving the clinical teaching expertise of professional nurses. The planning phase, based on a preceptorship model, represents a collaborative undertaking by the higher education institution and the nursing directorate of the Provincial Government Western Cape. Method: A two-week, eight credit, short course was approved by the university structures and presented by staff members of the school. The teaching and learning strategies included interactive lectures, small group activities and preceptor-student encounters in simulated and real service settings. Some of the course outcomes were: applying the principles of clinical teaching and learning within the context of adult education, understanding the preceptor role and managing Results: To date, fifty-four participants have attended the course. Following an internal review of the pilot programme in 2010, relevant adjustments to the programme were made. Conclusion: It is recommended that all the stakeholders be involved in the development and implementation of a contextually relevant preceptorship training programme. It is further recommended that the school embarks on an extensive programme evaluation.

  18. Emotional and behavioural barriers to learning and development in the inclusive education classrooms in South Africa: Developing a training programme for teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter-Groot, Lucia; Visser, Maretha; Lubbe-de Beer, Carien

    2012-07-01

    The interaction between teachers, classroom strategies and learners experiencing emotional and behavioural barriers to learning and development in a system of inclusive education results in multiple dynamics on different levels. Many teachers in mainstream education lack training to deal with learners experiencing emotional and behavioural barriers. Resistance towards inclusive education is therefore evident. This paper describes the process of developing an in-service training programme for teachers who deal with learners with emotional and behavioural barriers in their classrooms. A process of action research was used to allow the researcher, in collaboration with 47 teachers from 2 primary schools, to develop a training programme to address the specific needs of teachers in dealing with learners experiencing emotional and behavioural barriers in their classes. Qualitative feedback from teachers and observations by the researcher and external observers were used to evaluate the appropriateness of the training. Teachers experienced that appropriate classroom management strategies made a significant difference in the behaviour of learners experiencing emotional and behavioural barriers. The training affected teachers' attitudes, teacher-learner interaction, learner behaviour and school organisation. In-service training for teachers can affect the effective implementation of inclusive education. This programme can be adapted to address the needs of teachers in other areas.

  19. Dementia training programmes for staff working in general hospital settings - a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Anthony; Innes, Anthea; Scerri, Charles

    2017-08-01

    Although literature describing and evaluating training programmes in hospital settings increased in recent years, there are no reviews that summarise these programmes. This review sought to address this, by collecting the current evidence on dementia training programmes directed to staff working in general hospitals. Literature from five databases were searched, based on a number of inclusion criteria. The selected studies were summarised and data was extracted and compared using narrative synthesis based on a set of pre-defined categories. Methodological quality was assessed. Fourteen peer-reviewed studies were identified with the majority being pre-test post-test investigations. No randomised controlled trials were found. Methodological quality was variable with selection bias being the major limitation. There was a great variability in the development and mode of delivery although, interdisciplinary ward based, tailor-made, short sessions using experiential and active learning were the most utilised. The majority of the studies mainly evaluated learning, with few studies evaluating changes in staff behaviour/practices and patients' outcomes. This review indicates that high quality studies are needed that especially evaluate staff behaviours and patient outcomes and their sustainability over time. It also highlights measures that could be used to develop and deliver training programmes in hospital settings.

  20. 'Leaders-to-be' complete first ENELA programme. Two more training programmes to be launched in 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, Jean-Claude

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the European Nuclear Energy Leadership Academy (ENELA) is to equip those working in and those working alongside the nuclear energy industry with the skills and expertise they will need to become future leaders and to ensure the further development of sustainable European nuclear energy solutions. The ENELA concept originates from an initiative within the framework of the European Nuclear Energy Forum. The stakeholders of ENELA include, among others, the nuclear industry, supporting suppliers, administrative bodies, national and regional authorities, policymakers, opinion formers and the media. ENELA was established in January 2010. The training and leadership centre and base of operations is near Munich city centre (Germany). In October 2011 20 participants from 8 countries completed the first ENELA programme. (orig.)

  1. Dynamic resistance training decreases sympathetic tone in hypertensive ovariectomized rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimojo, G.L.; Palma, R.K.; Brito, J.O.; Sanches, I.C. [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Programa de Ciências da Reabilitação, Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Irigoyen, M.C. [Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); De Angelis, K. [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Programa de Ciências da Reabilitação, Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-27

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise training on hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic control in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (SC), sedentary hypertensive (SH), sedentary hypertensive ovariectomized (SHO), and resistance-trained hypertensive ovariectomized (RTHO). Resistance exercise training was performed on a vertical ladder (5 days/week, 8 weeks) at 40-60% maximal load. Direct arterial pressure was recorded. Vagal and sympathetic tones were measured by heart rate (HR) responses to methylatropine (3 mg/kg, iv) and propranolol (4 mg/kg, iv). Ovariectomy resulted in additional increases in blood pressure in hypertensive rats and was associated with decreased vagal tone. Resistance exercise trained rats had lower mean arterial pressure than untrained rats (RTHO: 159±2.2 vs SHO: 177±3.4 mmHg), as well as resting bradycardia (RTHO: 332±9.0 vs SHO: 356±5 bpm). Sympathetic tone was also lower in the trained group. Moreover, sympathetic tone was positively correlated with resting HR (r=0.7, P<0.05). The additional arterial pressure increase in hypertensive rats caused by ovarian hormone deprivation was attenuated by moderate-intensity dynamic resistance training. This benefit may be associated with resting bradycardia and reduced cardiac sympathetic tone after training, which suggests potential benefits of resistance exercise for the management of hypertension after ovarian hormone deprivation.

  2. Dynamic resistance training decreases sympathetic tone in hypertensive ovariectomized rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimojo, G.L.; Palma, R.K.; Brito, J.O.; Sanches, I.C.; Irigoyen, M.C.; De Angelis, K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise training on hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic control in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (SC), sedentary hypertensive (SH), sedentary hypertensive ovariectomized (SHO), and resistance-trained hypertensive ovariectomized (RTHO). Resistance exercise training was performed on a vertical ladder (5 days/week, 8 weeks) at 40-60% maximal load. Direct arterial pressure was recorded. Vagal and sympathetic tones were measured by heart rate (HR) responses to methylatropine (3 mg/kg, iv) and propranolol (4 mg/kg, iv). Ovariectomy resulted in additional increases in blood pressure in hypertensive rats and was associated with decreased vagal tone. Resistance exercise trained rats had lower mean arterial pressure than untrained rats (RTHO: 159±2.2 vs SHO: 177±3.4 mmHg), as well as resting bradycardia (RTHO: 332±9.0 vs SHO: 356±5 bpm). Sympathetic tone was also lower in the trained group. Moreover, sympathetic tone was positively correlated with resting HR (r=0.7, P<0.05). The additional arterial pressure increase in hypertensive rats caused by ovarian hormone deprivation was attenuated by moderate-intensity dynamic resistance training. This benefit may be associated with resting bradycardia and reduced cardiac sympathetic tone after training, which suggests potential benefits of resistance exercise for the management of hypertension after ovarian hormone deprivation

  3. Physiological changes with periodized resistance training in women tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, William J; Hakkinen, Keijo; Triplett-Mcbride, N Travis; Fry, Andrew C; Koziris, L Perry; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Bauer, Jeffrey E; Volek, Jeff S; McConnell, Tim; Newton, Robert U; Gordon, Scott E; Cummings, Don; Hauth, John; Pullo, Frank; Lynch, J Michael; Fleck, Steven J; Mazzetti, Scott A; Knuttgen, Howard G

    2003-01-01

    To compare the physiological and performance adaptations between periodized and nonperiodized resistance training in women collegiate tennis athletes. Thirty women (19 +/- 1 yr) were assigned to either a periodized resistance training group (P), nonperiodized training group (NV), or a control group (C). Assessments for body composition, anaerobic power, VO2(max), speed, agility, maximal strength, jump height, tennis-service velocity, and resting serum hormonal concentrations were performed before and after 4, 6, and 9 months of resistance training performed 2-3 d.wk (-1). Nine months of resistance training resulted in significant increases in fat-free mass; anaerobic power; grip strength; jump height; one-repetition maximum (1-RM) leg press, bench press, and shoulder press; serve, forehand, and backhand ball velocities; and resting serum insulin-like growth factor-1, testosterone, and cortisol concentrations. Percent body fat and VO2(max) decreased significantly in the P and NV groups after training. During the first 6 months, periodized resistance training elicited significantly greater increases in 1-RM leg press (9 +/- 2 vs 4.5 +/- 2%), bench press (22 +/- 5 vs 11 +/- 8%), and shoulder press (24 +/- 7 vs 18 +/- 6%) than the NV group. The absolute 1-RM leg press and shoulder press values in the P group were greater than the NV group after 9 months. Periodized resistance training also resulted in significantly greater improvements in jump height (50 +/- 9 vs 37 +/- 7%) and serve (29 +/- 5 vs 16 +/- 4%), forehand (22 +/- 3 vs 17 +/- 3%), and backhand ball velocities (36 +/- 4 vs 14 +/- 4%) as compared with nonperiodized training after 9 months. These data demonstrated that periodization of resistance training over 9 months was superior for enhancing strength and motor performance in collegiate women tennis players.

  4. Effects of arachidonic acid supplementation on training adaptations in resistance-trained males

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwood Mike; Rasmussen Chris; Cooke Matthew; Harvey Travis; Wilborn Colin D; Campbell Bill; Taylor Lem W; Kerksick Chad M; Iosia Mike; Roberts Michael D; Wilson Ronald; Jitomir Jean; Willoughby Darryn; Kreider Richard B

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background To determine the impact of AA supplementation during resistance training on body composition, training adaptations, and markers of muscle hypertrophy in resistance-trained males. Methods In a randomized and double blind manner, 31 resistance-trained male subjects (22.1 ± 5.0 years, 180 ± 0.1 cm, 86.1 ± 13.0 kg, 18.1 ± 6.4% body fat) ingested either a placebo (PLA: 1 g·day-1 corn oil, n = 16) or AA (AA: 1 g·day-1 AA, n = 15) while participating in a standardized 4 day·week-...

  5. Effects of two plyometric training programmes of different intensity on vertical jump performance in high school athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Sankey, Sean P.; Jones, Paul A.; Bampouras, Theodoros

    2008-01-01

    Although plyometric training is a significant component of most conditioning programme designs, little research exists with regards to the design/structure of specific plyometric training interventions and the intensity involved. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intensity\\ud manipulation on a 6-week plyometric training programmes on vertical jump performance. Eighteen healthy adolescent male subjects were randomly allocated to a periodised plyometric intensity (INCR), a cons...

  6. Training programmes to improve evidence uptake and utilisation by physiotherapists: a systematic scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stander, Jessica; Grimmer, Karen; Brink, Yolandi

    2018-01-15

    Research training programmes are a knowledge translation (KT) intervention which aim to improve research evidence uptake by clinicians. Whilst KT training programmes have been reported to significantly improve evidence uptake by physiotherapists, it is unclear which aspects of training optimally assist KT into physiotherapy practice. The purpose of the review was to establish the body of evidence regarding KT training programmes to improve physiotherapists' use of evidence-based practice (EBP) and clinical practice guidelines (CPG). A systematic scoping review was undertaken in line with the adapted Arksey and O'Malley framework. Nine electronic databases (CINAHL, BIOMED CENTRAL, Cochrane, Web of Science, PROQUEST, PUBMED, OTseeker, Scopus, ERIC) were searched. Targeted keywords identified primary research articles of any hierarchy, that described the nature and impact of KT training programmes for physiotherapists. Where systematic reviews were identified, the component primary studies were considered individually for relevance. Critical appraisal was not undertaken due to the nature of a scoping review, and data was reported descriptively. Ten systematic reviews were identified (yielding four relevant primary studies). Five additional primary studies were identified (two randomised controlled trials, two non-randomised controlled trials and one pre-post study) which were not included in the original systematic reviews. This provided nine eligible primary research studies for review. The KT strategies were all multi-faceted. Interactive sessions, didactic sessions, printed material and discussion and feedback were consistently associated with effective outcomes. When KT strategies addressed local barriers to EBP utilisation, there were better success rates for EBP and CPG uptake, irrespective of the outcome measures used. There were no consistent ways of measuring outcome. Multi-faceted KT strategies designed to address local barriers to knowledge translation were

  7. The WCO/IAEA joint training programmes for customs services on radioactive material smuggling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saka, E.; Duftschmid, K.

    1998-01-01

    One of the milestones of the WCO Enforcement Programme on Combating nuclear and other radioactive materials smuggling is to raise awareness among Customs services and reinforce their enforcement programmes by providing them training materials and training courses. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is recognized as a unique international organization in nuclear field to assist the WCO Secretariat by providing technical input in developing awareness/training materials and conducting training courses. In line with their policies for the effective combating of nuclear and other radioactive materials smuggling, both international organizations have agreed to co-operate by regular attendance each other's technical meetings. This approach was formalized with the signing of Memorandum of Understanding on 13 May 1997. The WCO and IAEA training strategy has been to give priority to the Eastern and Central Europe region and the first joint training course was held in Vienna for Customs Trainers on 2-6 June 1997 and the second course is scheduled for Customs and Police officers of the same region in September 1998. (author)

  8. The interactions between hemostasis and resistance training: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Dahan da Cunha; Neto, Frederico Ribeiro; de Santana, Frederico Santos; da Silva, Renato André Sousa; dos Santos-Neto, Leopoldo; Balsamo, Sandor

    2012-01-01

    Physical inactivity is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is strongly associated with changes in arterial structure. Regular physical activity and exercise contributes to the prevention of coronary artery disease. Therefore, cardiovascular and resistance training improve hemostatic parameters and promote a less thrombotic blood profile. This review highlights the studies, mechanisms, and outcomes relating to the effectiveness of resistance training on the process of hemostasis. The Pubmed, Scopus, Medline, Scielo, Lilacs, Ibecs, and Cochrane databases were used to locate the original articles. Seventeen studies were found during the research process. Of these, ten articles were excluded. Those protocols using a high volume of training for young adults showed a greater fibrinolytic response, and training protocols with intensities above 80% of 1 maximum repetition showed an increased platelet activity. In subjects with coronary artery disease, just one session of resistance training resulted in improvement in the fibrinolytic system (tissue plasminogen activator) without raising potential thrombotic markers. PMID:22419885

  9. Engaging Employers in Workplace Training - Lessons from the English Train to Gain Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazenod, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ambition of an employer-led vocational education and training system, a lack of employer engagement in workplace training continues to be reported in England. There seems to be a mismatch between national policy level expectations of how employers should be engaging in workplace training and the practicalities of employer engagement at…

  10. Muscle fiber size increases following resistance training in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, U; Stenager, Egon; Jakobsen, J

    2010-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that lower body progressive resistance training (PRT) leads to an increase of the muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) and a shift in the proportion of fiber types in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).......To test the hypothesis that lower body progressive resistance training (PRT) leads to an increase of the muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) and a shift in the proportion of fiber types in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS)....

  11. Programme evaluation training for health professionals in francophone Africa: process, competence acquisition and use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banza Baya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While evaluation is, in theory, a component of training programmes in health planning, training needs in this area remain significant. Improving health systems necessarily calls for having more professionals who are skilled in evaluation. Thus, the Université de Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso and the Université de Montréal (Canada have partnered to establish, in Burkina Faso, a master's-degree programme in population and health with a course in programme evaluation. This article describes the four-week (150-hour course taken by two cohorts (2005–2006/2006–2007 of health professionals from 11 francophone African countries. We discuss how the course came to be, its content, its teaching processes and the master's programme results for students. Methods The conceptual framework was adapted from Kirkpatrick's (1996 four-level evaluation model: reaction, learning, behaviour, results. Reaction was evaluated based on a standardized questionnaire for all the master's courses and lessons. Learning and behaviour competences were assessed by means of a questionnaire (pretest/post-test, one year after adapted from the work of Stevahn L, King JA, Ghere G, Minnema J: Establishing Essential Competencies for Program Evaluators. Am J Eval 2005, 26(1:43–59. Master's programme effects were tested by comparing the difference in mean scores between times (before, after, one year after using pretest/post-test designs. Paired sample tests were used to compare mean scores. Results The teaching is skills-based, interactive and participative. Students of the first cohort gave the evaluation course the highest score (4.4/5 for overall satisfaction among the 16 courses (3.4–4.4 in the master's programme. What they most appreciated was that the forms of evaluation were well adapted to the content and format of the learning activities. By the end of the master's programme, both cohorts of students considered that they had greatly improved their

  12. Effects of a 12-week exercise training programme on aerobic fitness, body composition, blood lipids and C-reactive protein in adolescents with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Patricia C H; Chia, Michael Y H; Tsou, Ian Y Y; Wansaicheong, Gervais K L; Tan, Benedict; Wang, John C K; Tan, John; Kim, Chung Gon; Boh, Gerald; Lim, Darren

    2008-04-01

    Developing effective exercise programmes for the paediatric population is a strategy for decreasing obesity and is expected to help in eventually limiting obesity-associated long-term health and societal impact. In this study, the effects of a 12-week twice weekly additional exercise training, which comprised a combination of circuit-based resistance training and aerobic exercises, in additional to typical physical education sessions, on aerobic fitness, body composition and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and lipids were analysed in 13- to 14-year-old obese boys contrasted with a control group. Both the exercise group (EG, n = 12) and control group (CG, n = 12) participated in the typical 2 sessions of 40-minute physical education (PE) per week in schools, but only EG participated in additional 2 sessions per week of 45 to 60 minutes per session of exercise training, which comprised a combination of circuit-based resistance training and aerobic exercises maintained at 65% to 85% maximum heart rate (HRmax = 220 - age). Body composition was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Fasting serum CRP and blood lipids were analysed pre- and postexercise programme. Aerobic fitness was measured by an objective laboratory submaximal exercise test, PWC170 (Predicted Work Capacity at HR 170 bpm). Exercise training significantly improved lean muscle mass, body mass index, fitness, resting HR, systolic blood pressure and triglycerides in EG. Serum CRP concentrations were elevated at baseline in both groups, but training did not result in a change in CRP levels. In the CG, body weight increased significantly at the end of the 12-week period. This study supports the value of an additional exercise training programme, beyond the typical twice weekly physical education classes, to produce physiological benefits in the management of obesity in adolescents, including prevention of weight gain.

  13. Reaching Resisters in a Teaching Assistant Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carolyn I.

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been limited longitudinal qualitative research examining the effects of training programs on graduate students' teaching performance. One gap in this research is a discussion of Teaching Assistants (TAs) who resist such programs and an examination of strategies for overcoming this resistance. This action research…

  14. Neuro-Functional Training Programme (NFTP): engaging and empowering people with a neurological condition

    OpenAIRE

    Twohig, Teresa; O' Sullivan, Trish; O' Donoghue, Elaine; Reen, Anne; O Sullivan, Liz; Morrisroe, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Neuro-Functional Training Programme (NFTP): An enhancing primary care initiative that supports self care in patients with a neurological condition, thus engaging and enpowering people.Problem Statement: The NFTP was established by Cork South Lee PCC Physiotherapy in February 2013 as a 4 fold initiative:1) To facilitate discharge planning of our complex Neurological patients. These include young patients with Acquired Brain Injury, discharges from  the National Rehabilitation Hos...

  15. Another award-winning year for CERN’s apprenticeship training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Anne Gentil-Beccot

    2015-01-01

    CERN has a long tradition of training apprentices. The Organization’s apprenticeship programme, which is based on the Swiss apprenticeship system, dates back to 1965. Since then, over 200 apprentices have been trained at CERN. Each year, seven or eight apprentice electricians, library assistants and physics laboratory technicians qualify after three or four years of training, depending on the job.   UIG prize ceremony 2014: Angelina Bakker (third from right), apprentice physics laboratory technician at CERN, receives her "Certificat fédéral de capacité". On Tuesday, 25 November 2014, CERN was presented with a prize for being the best apprenticeship training scheme provider in 2014. This prize is awarded each year to eight apprenticeship providers active in the different “vocational categories” in the canton of Geneva. The prizes are awarded by the Geneva Department of Public Education, Culture and Sport (DIP)...

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF SIMULATION CENTER AND TRAINING PROGRAMMES IN IVANO-FRANKIVSK PERINATAL CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoryana Kocherga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Current system of medical education in Ukraine needs improvement and reforms in order to enhance the proficiency of doctors and paramedics. Training of practical/technical skills, communication, as well as teamwork skills is considerably important.The use of simulation techniques and methods in medical education is called simulation training in medicine. Medical skills are acquired through cognitive (knowledge and psychomotor (practice skills. The first medical simulation centers appeared in Ukraine in 2006 according to the order of the Ministry of Health Care of Ukraine.On June 20, 2013, a new simulation training center was opened in Ivano-Frankivsk on the base of Regional Perinatal Center. Similar medical simulation centers were opened in the second half of 2013 in Volyn and Vinnytsia regions under the Ukrainian-Swiss Mother and Child Health Programme, which started in the area of perinatology. Their goal is to improve the teamwork of all specialists involved in the process of delivery and neonatal intensive care,as well as to engage internship doctors and senior medical students in clinical skills training programmes.The use of simulation techniques and training programs offers a powerful platform to study and practice clinical reasoning behaviors and patterns.

  17. Perceptual effects and efficacy of intermittent or continuous blood flow restriction resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitschen, P J; Kistler, B M; Jeong, J H; Chung, H R; Wu, P T; Walsh, M J; Wilund, K R

    2014-09-01

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) exercise may be an alternative form of resistance training; however, a side of effect of BFR resistance exercise is acute muscle pain. Typically, BFR exercise studies restrict blood flow with a cuff continuously during the exercise bout, including rest periods. However, others have used intermittent BFR where the cuff is inflated only during sets. We performed two studies to compare intermittent and continuous BFR exercise. In study one, eleven subjects randomly proceeded through three treatments of unilateral leg extensions to failure: (i) continuous BFR, (ii) intermittent BFR and (iii) control (exercise without BFR). Pain measurements were taken immediately after each set. In study two, subjects (n = 32) underwent a 5-week resistance training programme after random assignment to one of the three conditions. Lean mass and strength were assessed at baseline and after training. Continuous BFR resulted in significantly greater pain than intermittent BFR or control. Both BFR conditions resulted in significantly fewer repetitions to failure than control. This suggests that an acute bout of intermittent BFR exercise may produce as much muscle fatigue as an acute bout of continuous BFR exercise, but with less pain. With training, maximal knee extension (P = 0·033) and maximum knee flexion (P = 0·007) strength increased among all groups. There were no significant differences between groups in strength or lean mass. These results suggest that short-term low-load resistance training increases muscle strength to a similar extent as low-load resistance training without BFR. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity - an overview of human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leońska-Duniec, A; Ahmetov, I I; Zmijewski, P

    2016-09-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary.

  19. A 'Communication and Patient Safety' training programme for all healthcare staff: can it make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter; Allen, Kellie; Daly, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Communication breakdown is a factor contributing to most cases of patient harm, and this harm continues to occur at unacceptable levels. Responding to this evidence, the Metro South District of Queensland Health (Australia) has developed a communication skills training programme titled 'Communication and Patient Safety'. The three modules, each lasting 3½ h, cover both staff-to-patient and staff-to-staff communication issues, and an unusual feature is that clinical and non-clinical staff attend together. Following positive evaluation data from our initial pilot programme (involving 350 staff in a single hospital), the programme was expanded to all five hospitals in the district, and has now been completed by over 3000 staff. The results show that despite the significant time commitment, participants find the courses useful and relevant (Kirkpatrick level 1), they learn and retain new material (level 2), and they report changes in behaviour at individual, team and facility levels (level 3). Although it remains a challenge to obtain quantitative data showing that training such as this directly improves patient safety (level 4), our qualitative and informal feedback indicates that participants and their managers perceive clear improvements in the 'communication culture' after a workplace team has attended the courses. Improving 'communication for safety' in healthcare is a worldwide imperative, and other healthcare jurisdictions should be able to obtain similar results to ours if they develop and support interactive, non-didactic training in communication skills.

  20. Elastic Bands as a Component of Periodized Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Jordan M; Lowery, Ryan P; Oliveira de Souza, Eduardo; Wilson, Jacob M

    2016-08-01

    Joy, JM, Lowery, RP, Oliveira de Souza, E, and Wilson, JM. Elastic bands as a component of periodized resistance training. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2100-2106, 2016-Variable resistance training (VRT) has recently become a component of strength and conditioning programs. Prior research has demonstrated increases in power and/or strength using low loads of variable resistance. However, no study has examined using high loads of variable resistance as a part of a periodized training protocol to examine VRT within the context of a periodized training program and to examine a greater load of variable resistance than has been examined in prior research. Fourteen National Collegiate Athletic Association division II male basketball players were recruited for this study. Athletes were divided equally into either a variable resistance or control group. The variable resistance group added 30% of their 1 repetition maximum (1RM) as band tension to their prescribed weight 1 session per week. Rate of power development (RPD), peak power, strength, body composition, and vertical jump height were measured pretreatment and posttreatment. No baseline differences were observed between groups for any measurement of strength, power, or body composition. A significant group by time interaction was observed for RPD, in which RPD was greater in VRT posttraining than in the control group. Significant time effects were observed for all other variables including squat 1RM, bench press 1RM, deadlift 1RM, clean 3RM, vertical jump, and lean mass. Although there were no significant group ×-time interactions, the VRT group's percent changes and effect sizes indicate a larger treatment effect in the squat and bench press 1RM values and the vertical jump performed on the force plate and vertec. These results suggest that when using variable resistance as a component of a periodized training program, power and strength can be enhanced. Therefore, athletes who add variable resistance to 1 training

  1. The Efficacy of an 8-Week Concurrent Strength and Endurance Training Programme on Hand Cycling Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Jonpaul; Waldron, Mark; Patterson, Stephen; Smith, Paul; Price, Mike; Hunt, Alex

    2018-03-20

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week concurrent strength and endurance training programme in comparison to endurance training only on several key determinants of hand cycling performance. Five H4 and five H3 classified hand cyclists with at least one year's hand cycling training history consented to participate in the study. Subjects underwent a battery of tests to establish body mass, body composition, VO2peak, maximum aerobic power, gross mechanical efficiency, maximal upper body strength, and 30 km time trial performance. Subjects were matched into pairs based upon 30 km time trial performance and randomly allocated to either a concurrent strength and endurance or endurance training only, intervention group. Following an 8-week training programme based upon a conjugated block periodisation model, subjects completed a second battery of tests. A mixed model, 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed no significant changes between groups. However, the calculation of effect sizes (ES) revealed that both groups demonstrated a positive improvement in most physiological and performance measures with subjects in the concurrent group demonstrating a greater magnitude of improvement in body composition (ES -0.80 vs. -0.22) maximal aerobic power (ES 0.97 vs. 0.28), gross mechanical efficiency (ES 0.87 vs. 0.63), bench press 1 repetition maximum (ES 0.53 vs. 0.33), seated row 1 repetition maximum (ES 1.42 vs. 0.43), and 30 km time trial performance (ES -0.66 vs. -0.30). In comparison to endurance training only, an 8-week concurrent training intervention based upon a conjugated block periodisation model appears to be a more effective training regime for improving the performance capabilities of hand cyclists.

  2. Effects of resistance training on performance in previously trained endurance runners: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Ibañez, Manuel; Rodríguez-Pérez, Manuel

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this work was to identify, synthesize and evaluate the results of randomized controlled trials examining the effects of resistance training on performance indicators in previously trained endurance runners. A database search was carried out in PubMed, Science Direct, OvidSPMedLine, Wiley, Web of Science, ProQuest and Google Scholar. In accordance with the PRISMA checklist, 18 published articles dated prior to May 2016 involving 321 endurance runners were reviewed using the PEDro scale. Resistance training led to general improvements in muscular strength, running economy, muscle power factors, and direct performance in distances between 1,500 and 10,000 m. Such improvements were not accompanied by a significant increase in body mass or signs of overtraining. However, improvements did not occur in all cases, suggesting that they might depend on the specific characteristics of the resistance training applied. Although current evidence supports the effectiveness of resistance training to improve performance in already trained endurance runners, the methodological inconsistencies identified suggest that the results should be interpreted with caution. Future studies ought to investigate the benefits of resistance training in endurance runners while considering the existence of possible differentiated effects based on the specific characteristics of the resistance training carried out.

  3. Current training provision and training needs in oral health for UK general practice trainees: survey of General Practitioner Training Programme Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Aneeta; Crossman, Tim; Smith, Helen

    2016-05-11

    In the UK the incidence of oral cancers has risen by a third in the last decade, and there have been minimal improvements in survival rates. Moreover, a significant proportion of the population no longer access dental health services regularly, instead presenting their oral health concerns to their General Medical Practitioner. Therefore, General Practitioners (GP) have an important role in the diagnosis of oral health pathologies and the earlier detection of oral cancers. This study aims to understand the current provision of training in oral health and cancer for GP trainees and to identify how unmet training needs could be met. A cross-sectional survey of GP Training Programme Directors using an online questionnaire asking about current oral health education training (hospital placements and structured teaching), the competencies covered with trainees and ways to improve oral health training. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and content analysis was undertaken of free text responses. We obtained responses from 132 GP Training Programme Directors (GPTPDs), from 13 of the 16 UK medical deaneries surveyed. The majority of respondents (71.2%) indicated that their programmes did not provide any structured oral health training to GP trainees and that ≤ 10% of their trainees were undertaking hospital posts relevant to oral health. GPTPDs were of the view that the quality of oral health training was poor, relative to the specified competencies, and that teaching on clinical presentations of 'normal' oral anatomy was particularly poor. It was envisaged that oral health training could be improved by access to specialist tutors, e-learning programmes and problem-based-learning sessions. Respondents highlighted the need for training sessions to be relevant to GPs. Barriers to improving training in oral health were time constraints, competing priorities and reluctance to taking on the workload of dentists. This UK-wide survey has identified

  4. Youth resistance training: past practices, new perspectives, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, Avery D; Lloyd, Rhodri S; Myer, Gregory D

    2013-11-01

    Since the publication of the seminal review on youth resistance training by Kraemer and colleagues in 1989, a compelling body of evidence has found that resistance training can be a safe, effective, and worthwhile method of conditioning for children and adolescents. New perspectives for promoting resistance exercise as part of a long-term approach to youth physical development highlight the importance of integrating resistance training into youth fitness programs. Youth who do not enhance their muscular strength and motor skill proficiency early in life may not develop the prerequisite skills and abilities that would allow them to participate in a variety of activities and sports with confidence and vigor later in life. The identification of asymptomatic children with muscular weaknesses or imbalances may facilitate the development of a management plan which should rectify movement limitations and educate children and their families about the importance of daily physical activity.

  5. Outcomes of exertional rhabdomyolysis following high-intensity resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, A; Leong, K; Jones, N; Crump, N; Russell, D; Anderson, M; Steinfort, D; Johnson, D F

    2016-05-01

    High-intensity resistance training (HIRT) programmes are increasingly popular amongst personal trainers and those attending gymnasiums. We report the experience of exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) at two tertiary hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. To compare the clinical outcomes of ER with other causes of rhabdomyolysis. Retrospective cross-sectional study of patients presenting with a serum creatine kinase (CK) of greater than 25 000 units/L from 1 September 2013 to 31 August 2014 at two tertiary referral hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Records were examined to identify care measures implemented during hospital stay, clinical outcomes during admission and on subsequent follow up. Thirty four cases of rhabdomyolysis with a CK of greater than 25 000 units/L (normal range: 20-180 units/L) were identified during the 12-month study period. Twelve of the 34 cases (35%) had ER with 10 of 12 related to HIRT. No acute kidney injury, intensive care admission or death were seen among those with ER. All cases were managed conservatively, with 11 admitted and 9 receiving intravenous fluids only. In contrast, patients with rhabdomyolysis from other causes experienced significantly higher rates of intensive care admission (64%, P = 0.0002), acute kidney injury (82%, P = 0.0001) and death (27%, P = 0.069). ER resulting from HIRT appears to have a benign course compared with rhabdomyolysis of other aetiologies in patients with a serum CK greater than 25 000 units/L. Conservative management of ER appears to be adequate, although this requires confirmation in future prospective studies. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  6. SUITABILITY OF FIFA'S "THE 11" TRAINING PROGRAMME FOR YOUNG FOOTBALL PLAYERS - IMPACT ON PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Kuzmic

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of evidence regarding the use of injury prevention programmes for preadolescents participating in sport. "The 11" injury prevention programme was developed by FIFA's medical research centre (F-MARC to help reduce the risk of injury in football players aged 14 years and over. The aim of this study was to determine the suitability and effectiveness of "The 11" for younger football players. Twenty-four [12 experimental (EXP, 12 control (CON] young football players (age 10.4 ± 1.4 yr participated. The EXP group followed "The 11" training programme 5 days per week, for 6 weeks, completing all but one of the 10 exercises. Prior to, and after the intervention, both EXP and CON groups performed a battery of football-specific physical tests. Changes in performance scores within each group were compared using independent t-tests (p ? 0.05. Feedback was also gathered on the young players' perceptions of "The 11". No injuries occurred during the study in either group. Compliance to the intervention was 72%. Measures of leg power (3 step jump and counter-movement jump increased significantly (3.4 and 6.0% respectively, p < 0.05. Speed over 20 m improved by 2% (p < 0.05. Most players considered "The 11" beneficial but not enjoyable in the prescribed format. Given the observed improvements in the physical abilities and the perceived benefits of "The 11", it would appear that a modified version of the programme is appropriate and should be included in the training of young football players, for both physical development and potential injury prevention purposes, as well as to promote fair play. To further engage young football players in such a programme, some modification to "The 11" should be considered

  7. United Nations Environment Programme Capacity Building Pilot Project - Training on persistent organic pollutant analysis under the Stockholm Convention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, J.; Leslie, H.A.; van Leeuwen, S.P.J.; Wegener, J.W.M.; van Bavel, B; Lindstrom, G.; Lahoutifard, N.; Fiedler, H.

    2008-01-01

    Within the framework of a United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Capacity Building Project for training of laboratory staff in developing countries on persistent organic pollutant (POP) analysis, an interlaboratory study was organised following an initial evaluation of the performance of

  8. Resistance training and the enhancement of the gains in material-handling ability and physical fitness of British Army recruits during basic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A G; Rayson, M P; Jones, D A

    2002-03-15

    The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a modified British Army basic training that included resistance training in improving material-handling performance and physical fitness, and to compare the modified training directly with the normal basic training. Forty-three males [19.2 (2.6) years of age, 1764 (72) mm in height, 73.0 (10.6) kg in mass] and nine females [19.1 (2.2) years, 1641 (67) mm, 62.0 (7.2) kg] performed the modified basic training. Testing occurred in the week before and in the final week of the 11-week basic training. Improvements with the modified training were observed for all six material-handling tests, including 8-12% for maximal box lifting, 15-19% for repetitive lifting and carrying and 9-17% for loaded marching (all p material-handling ability and other aspects of physical fitness brought about in recruits by British Army basic training can be enhanced by the use of a physical training programme that includes a carefully designed resistance training element. Of particular note are the improvements shown in performance on material-handling tasks that require muscular strength, as these represent many of the tasks that soldiers encounter in their military careers.

  9. A study protocol of a randomised controlled trial to investigate if a community based strength training programme improves work task performance in young adults with Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Nicholas F

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle strength is important for young people with Down syndrome as they make the transition to adulthood, because their workplace activities typically emphasise physical rather than cognitive skills. Muscle strength is reduced up to 50% in people with Down syndrome compared to their peers without disability. Progressive resistance training improves muscle strength and endurance in people with Down syndrome. However, there is no evidence on whether it has an effect on work task performance or physical activity levels. The aim of this study is to investigate if a student-led community-based progressive resistance training programme can improve these outcomes in adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome. Methods A randomised controlled trial will compare progressive resistance training with a control group undertaking a social programme. Seventy adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome aged 14-22 years and mild to moderate intellectual disability will be randomly allocated to the intervention or control group using a concealed method. The intervention group will complete a 10-week, twice a week, student-led progressive resistance training programme at a local community gymnasium. The student mentors will be undergraduate physiotherapy students. The control group will complete an arts/social programme with a student mentor once a week for 90 minutes also for 10 weeks to control for the social aspect of the intervention. Work task performance (box stacking, pail carry, muscle strength (1 repetition maximum for chest and leg press and physical activity (frequency, duration, intensity over 7-days will be assessed at baseline (Week 0, following the intervention (Week 11, and at 3 months post intervention (Week 24 by an assessor blind to group allocation. Data will be analysed using ANCOVA with baseline measures as covariates. Discussion This paper outlines the study protocol for a randomised controlled trial on the

  10. Protein Supplementation Does Not Affect Myogenic Adaptations to Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Paul T; Fry, Christopher S; Igbinigie, Sherry; Deer, Rachel R; Jennings, Kristofer; Cope, Mark B; Mukherjea, Ratna; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2017-06-01

    It has been proposed that protein supplementation during resistance exercise training enhances muscle hypertrophy. The degree of hypertrophy during training is controlled in part through the activation of satellite cells and myonuclear accretion. This study aimed to determine the efficacy of protein supplementation (and the type of protein) during traditional resistance training on myofiber cross-sectional area, satellite cell content, and myonuclear addition. Healthy young men participated in supervised whole-body progressive resistance training 3 d·wk for 12 wk. Participants were randomized to one of three groups ingesting a daily 22-g macronutrient dose of soy-dairy protein blend (PB, n = 22), whey protein isolate (WP, n = 15), or an isocaloric maltodextrin placebo (MDP, n = 17). Lean mass, vastus lateralis myofiber-type-specific cross-sectional area, satellite cell content, and myonuclear addition were assessed before and after resistance training. PB and the pooled protein treatments (PB + WP = PRO) exhibited a greater whole-body lean mass %change compared with MDP (P = 0.057 for PB) and (P = 0.050 for PRO), respectively. All treatments demonstrated similar leg muscle hypertrophy and vastus lateralis myofiber-type-specific cross-sectional area (P supplementation during resistance training has a modest effect on whole-body lean mass as compared with exercise training without protein supplementation, and there was no effect on any outcome between protein supplement types (blend vs whey). However, protein supplementation did not enhance resistance exercise-induced increases in myofiber hypertrophy, satellite cell content, or myonuclear addition in young healthy men. We propose that as long as protein intake is adequate during muscle overload, the adaptations in muscle growth and function will not be influenced by protein supplementation.

  11. Strengthening Technical Specialist Training for an Expanding Nuclear Power Programme in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, John L.

    2014-01-01

    NTSTS: Future Plans: • Introduce new pathway in Nuclear Reactor Operations into FD/BEng (Plant Engineering) programmes. • Outline curriculum based on INPOs Nuclear Uniform Curriculum for Power Plant Technician, Maintenance and Non-licensed Operations Personnel. • Procurement of generic Pressurised Water Reactor Simulation Suite – due for delivery/commissioning by Sep 2014 • Gen 2 has established a partnership with Tecnatom SA of Spain – experienced in operator training for PWR and BWR. • Proposals to establish a bespoke Reactor Operations Training Centre (ROTC) close to NuGen’s planned AP1000 new build at Moorside, West Cumbria. • In longer term, ROTC could house full scope AP1000 simulator for licensed operator training

  12. EFFICACY OF A SPORTS SPECIFIC BALANCE TRAINING PROGRAMME ON THE INCIDENCE OF ANKLE SPRAINS IN BASKETBALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Cumps

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of a 22- week prescribed sports specific balance training programme on the incidence of lateral ankle sprains in basketball players. A controlled clinical trial was set up. In total 54 subjects of six teams participated and were assigned to either an intervention (IG or a control group (CG. The IG performed a prescribed balance training programme on top of their normal training routine, using balance semi-globes. The programme consisted of 4 basketball skills each session and its difficulty was progressively thought-out. The intervention lasted 22 weeks and was performed 3 times a week for 5 to 10 minutes. Efficacy of the intervention on the incidence of lateral ankle sprains was determined by calculating Relative Risks (RR, including their 95% Confidence Intervals or CI and incidence rates expressed per 1000h. RR (95% CI showed a significantly lower incidence of lateral ankle sprains in the IG compared to the CG for the total sample (RR= 0.30 [95% CI: 0.11-0.84] and in men (RR= 0.29 [95% CI: 0.09-0.93]. The difference in RR was not confirmed when examining the incidence rates and their 95%CI's, which overlapped. The risk for new or recurrent ankle sprains was slightly lower in the IG (new: RR= 0.76 [95% CI: 0.17-3.40]; re-injury: RR= 0.21 [95% CI: 0.03-1.44]. Based on these pilot results, the use of balance training is recommended as a routine during basketball activities for the prevention of ankle sprains

  13. Evaluation of a vocational training programme in primary health care rehabilitation: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruwsved, A; Söderback, I; Fernholm, C

    1996-01-01

    The content and effect of a new occupational therapy programme aimed for vocational training forming part of a research project named 'the Sollentuna Rehabilitation Project' are described for four patients (of 38) with musculoskeletal pain. In the programme, occupational therapy analysis and intervention alternated. Intervention was based on the model of human occupation, the rehabilitative, the biomechanical, and occupational adaptive frames of reference. Each patient participated in a structured interview and a job analysis. The programme was evaluated on five measurement occasions using the Goal Attainment Scale, self-assessments of patterns of daily occupation using an activity log, and self-estimation of pain using the 'Symtrack' instrument. On the fifth measurement occasion two of the patients had decreased their resting time and three were performing activities formerly avoided due to pain. Two patients' degree of assessed pain had decreased. Three of the four patients had attained their individual goals of occupational therapy (T= >50). The occupational therapy programme has proved to be applicable in primary health care for patients with musculoskeletal pain.

  14. Developing a training programme for radiation protection officers at industrial irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davor, P.

    2013-04-01

    A training programme for staff of irradiation facilities especially radiation safety officers at industrial irradiation facilities has been developed. The programme focused on technical and administrative basis for ensuring radiation safety at the practices. It consists of thirteen modules ranging from fundamentals of radiation, biological effects of ionizing radiation as well as the technical and administrative issues pertinent to radiation safety of the sources. The overall objective of this programme was to build competence in the area of radiation protection and raise the confidence level of staff of industrial irradiation facilities. The modules are structured in a manner that attempts to give a good understanding to participants on safety features of irradiators and use of radiation monitoring equipment. Each module has specific objectives and expected outcome and the course content is also stated under each module. The duration of the whole programme is sixteen weeks and the participants are expected to have some working knowledge in radiation protection and safe use of radiation sources. (au)

  15. Improving problem solving in primary school students: The effect of a training programme focusing on metacognition and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornoldi, Cesare; Carretti, Barbara; Drusi, Silvia; Tencati, Chiara

    2015-09-01

    Despite doubts voiced on their efficacy, a series of studies has been carried out on the capacity of training programmes to improve academic and reasoning skills by focusing on underlying cognitive abilities and working memory in particular. No systematic efforts have been made, however, to test training programmes that involve both general and specific underlying abilities. If effective, these programmes could help to increase students' motivation and competence. This study examined the feasibility of improving problem-solving skills in school children by means of a training programme that addresses general and specific abilities involved in problem solving, focusing on metacognition and working memory. The project involved a sample of 135 primary school children attending eight classes in the third, fourth, and fifth grades (age range 8-10 years). The classes were assigned to two groups, one attending the training programme in the first 3 months of the study (Training Group 1) and the other serving as a waiting-list control group (Training Group 2). In the second phase of the study, the role of the two groups was reversed, with Training Group 2 attending the training instead of Training Group 1. The training programme led to improvements in both metacognitive and working memory tasks, with positive-related effects on the ability to solve problems. The gains seen in Training Group 1 were also maintained at the second post-test (after 3 months). Specific activities focusing on metacognition and working memory may contribute to modifying arithmetical problem-solving performance in primary school children. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  16. Quality assurance of approved out of programme psychiatry training and research over the past 5 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman-Hicks, Victoria; Graham, Hannah; Leadbetter, Peter; Brittlebank, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Aims and method This paper intends to analyse the number of applications, trainee demographic and approval rate of those applying for out of programme training (OOPT) or out of programme research (OOPR) between January 2008 and April 2013 using the committee’s anonymised database. We also describe the process of application and approval by the Quality Assurance Committee. Results There were 90 applications, including 10 resubmissions during the 64-month period. Most applicants (77%) were higher trainees; 53% of applicants were from the London deanery; 60% of applications were for research posts and higher degrees (OOPR). Overall, 64% were approved by the committee: 70% for OOPRs and 53% for OOPTs. Clinical implications This paper shows with transparency the breakdown of applications to the Quality Assurance Committee. Around two-thirds of applications to the committee are supported (64%). Relatively few psychiatry trainees (2.5%) have applied for an OOPT or an OOPR over the past 5 years. PMID:26191450

  17. Exercise training characteristics in cardiac rehabilitation programmes: a cross-sectional survey of Australian practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Bridget; Glasziou, Paul; Briffa, Tom; Hoffmann, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training is a core component of cardiac rehabilitation (CR), however, little information exists regarding the specific exercise interventions currently provided for coronary heart disease in Australian practice. We aimed to analyse the current status of exercise-based CR services across Australia. Cross-sectional survey. Australian sites offering exercise-based CR were identified from publically available directories. All sites were invited by email to participate in an online Survey Monkey questionnaire between October 2014 and March 2015, with reminders via email and phone follow-up. Questions investigated the demographics and format of individual programmes, as well as specific exercise training characteristics. 297 eligible programmes were identified, with an 82% response rate. Most sites (82%) were based at hospital or outpatient centres, with home (15%), community (18%) or gym-based options (5%) less common. While CR was most often offered in a comprehensive format (72% of sites), the level of exercise intervention varied greatly among programmes. Most frequently, exercise was prescribed 1-2 times per week for 60 min over 7 weeks. Almost one-quarter (24%) had a sole practitioner supervising exercise, although the majority used a nurse/physiotherapist combination. Low to moderate exercise intensities were used in 60% of programmes, however, higher intensity prescriptions were not uncommon. Few sites (service remains within traditional models of care. A continuing focus on service improvement and evidence-based care should, therefore, be considered a core aim of those providing exercise for CR in order to improve health service delivery and optimise outcomes for patients.

  18. A Systematic Review of Resistance Training Versus Endurance Training in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iepsen, Ulrik Winning; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Ringbaek, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE:: Endurance training (ET) as part of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been shown to improve exercise capacity and health-related quality of life, but dyspnea limits the exercise intensity. Therefore, resistance training (RT), which...

  19. Corticosteroid injections, eccentric decline squat training and heavy slow resistance training in patellar tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M.; Kovanen, V.; Aagaard, P.

    2009-01-01

    A randomized-controlled single-blind trial was conducted to investigate the clinical, structural and functional effects of peritendinous corticosteroid injections (CORT), eccentric decline squat training (ECC) and heavy slow resistance training (HSR) in patellar tendinopathy. Thirty-nine male...

  20. A genetic-based algorithm for personalized resistance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Jones

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Association studies have identified dozens of genetic variants linked to training responses and sport-related traits. However, no intervention studies utilizing the idea of personalised training based on athlete’s genetic profile have been conducted. Here we propose an algorithm that allows achieving greater results in response to high- or low-intensity resistance training programs by predicting athlete’s potential for the development of power and endurance qualities with the panel of 15 performance-associated gene polymorphisms. To develop and validate such an algorithm we performed two studies in independent cohorts of male athletes (study 1: athletes from different sports (n=28; study 2: soccer players (n=39. In both studies athletes completed an eight-week high- or low-intensity resistance training program, which either matched or mismatched their individual genotype. Two variables of explosive power and aerobic fitness, as measured by the countermovement jump (CMJ and aerobic 3-min cycle test (Aero3 were assessed pre and post 8 weeks of resistance training. In study 1, the athletes from the matched groups (i.e. high-intensity trained with power genotype or low-intensity trained with endurance genotype significantly increased results in CMJ (P=0.0005 and Aero3 (P=0.0004. Whereas, athletes from the mismatched group (i.e. high-intensity trained with endurance genotype or low-intensity trained with power genotype demonstrated non-significant improvements in CMJ (P=0.175 and less prominent results in Aero3 (P=0.0134. In study 2, soccer players from the matched group also demonstrated significantly greater (P<0.0001 performance changes in both tests compared to the mismatched group. Among non- or low responders of both studies, 82% of athletes (both for CMJ and Aero3 were from the mismatched group (P<0.0001. Our results indicate that matching the individual’s genotype with the appropriate training modality leads to more effective resistance

  1. Neurosurgical training programme in selected European countries: from the young neurosurgeons' point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omerhodzic, Ibrahim; Tonge, Mehmet; Matos, Bostjan; Musabeliu, Erion; Raspanti, Cristina; Ferdinandov, Dilyan; Galimova, Rezeda; Muroi, Carl; Balik, Vladimir; Kursumovic, Adisa

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the Neurosurgical Training Programme (NTP) in some European countries. Although there is no official data on how many neurosurgeons are certified in Europe, our calculation shows that this number is somewhat lower than in the United States of America and even 3 times lower than in Japan (per 100.000 population). It is also evident that there is no consensus in the Programme duration or in the official NTP content, despite the recommendations of the EANS (The European Association of Neurosurgical Societies). Trainees from outside the European Union (EU) are under-represented in the EANS training courses. We believe that in the eastern part of Europe there is the most space for improvement in neurosurgical training. Solving of all these problems requires first and foremost their recognition and consideration - then devising a solution. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast several NTP's in Europe in order to promote a more coherent medical education. Some remarks and suggestions from the perspective of young neurosurgeons are given.

  2. Increasing leadership capacity for HIV/AIDS programmes by strengthening public health epidemiology and management training in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Donna S; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Woelk, Godfrey; Nsubuga, Peter; Sunderland, Nadine L; Hader, Shannon L; St Louis, Michael E

    2009-01-01

    Background Increased funding for global human immunodeficiency virus prevention and control in developing countries has created both a challenge and an opportunity for achieving long-term global health goals. This paper describes a programme in Zimbabwe aimed at responding more effectively to the HIV/AIDS epidemic by reinforcing a critical competence-based training institution and producing public health leaders. Methods The programme used new HIV/AIDS programme-specific funds to build on the assets of a local education institution to strengthen and expand the general public health leadership capacity in Zimbabwe, simultaneously ensuring that they were trained in HIV interventions. Results The programme increased both numbers of graduates and retention of faculty. The expanded HIV/AIDS curriculum was associated with a substantial increase in trainee projects related to HIV. The increased number of public health professionals has led to a number of practically trained persons working in public health leadership positions in the ministry, including in HIV/AIDS programmes. Conclusion Investment of a modest proportion of new HIV/AIDS resources in targeted public health leadership training programmes can assist in building capacity to lead and manage national HIV and other public health programmes. PMID:19664268

  3. The interactions between hemostasis and resistance training: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nascimento DC

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Dahan da Cunha Nascimento1–3, Frederico Ribeiro Neto2, Frederico Santos de Santana1,2, Renato André Sousa da Silva1,4,5, Leopoldo dos Santos-Neto6,7, Sandor Balsamo1,2,61Physical Education Department, UNIEURO University Center, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 2GEPEEFS (Resistance training and Health Research Group, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 3Faculty of Physical Education, University of Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 4Center of Excellence in Medicine of Exercise (CEMEx Brasília, DF, Brazil; 5Postgraduate Program on Physical Activity and Health, Catholic University of Brasília-UCB, Taguatinga DF, Brazil; 6Graduation Program – Medical Sciences Faculty, University of Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 7General Internal Medical Center – University Hospital Brasília, University of Brasília, Brasília, DF, BrazilAbstract: Physical inactivity is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is strongly associated with changes in arterial structure. Regular physical activity and exercise contributes to the prevention of coronary artery disease. Therefore, cardiovascular and resistance training improve hemostatic parameters and promote a less thrombotic blood profile. This review highlights the studies, mechanisms, and outcomes relating to the effectiveness of resistance training on the process of hemostasis. The Pubmed, Scopus, Medline, Scielo, Lilacs, Ibecs, and Cochrane databases were used to locate the original articles. Seventeen studies were found during the research process. Of these, ten articles were excluded. Those protocols using a high volume of training for young adults showed a greater fibrinolytic response, and training protocols with intensities above 80% of 1 maximum repetition showed an increased platelet activity. In subjects with coronary artery disease, just one session of resistance training resulted in improvement in the fibrinolytic system (tissue plasminogen activator without raising potential thrombotic markers

  4. An education and training programme for radiological institutes: impact on the reduction of the CT radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindera, Sebastian T; Treier, Reto; von Allmen, Gabriel; Nauer, Claude; Trueb, Philipp R; Vock, Peter; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt

    2011-10-01

    To establish an education and training programme for the reduction of CT radiation doses and to assess this programme's efficacy. Ten radiological institutes were counselled. The optimisation programme included a small group workshop and a lecture on radiation dose reduction strategies. The radiation dose used for five CT protocols (paranasal sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary angiography and abdomen) was assessed using the dose-length product (DLP) before and after the optimisation programme. The mean DLP values were compared with national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The average reduction of the DLP after optimisation was 37% for the sinuses (180 vs. 113 mGycm, P CT. The post-optimisation DLP values of the sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary arteries and abdomen were 68%, 10%, 20%, 55% and 15% below the DRL, respectively. The education and training programme for radiological institutes is effective in achieving a substantial reduction in CT radiation dose.

  5. Spatial scan statistics to assess sampling strategy of antimicrobial resistance monitoring programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira, Antonio; Houe, Hans; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2009-01-01

    Pie collection and analysis of data on antimicrobial resistance in human and animal Populations are important for establishing a baseline of the occurrence of resistance and for determining trends over time. In animals, targeted monitoring with a stratified sampling plan is normally used. However...... sampled by the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Programme (DANMAP), by identifying spatial Clusters of samples and detecting areas with significantly high or low sampling rates. These analyses were performed for each year and for the total 5-year study period for all...... collected and Susceptibility tested pig samples in Denmark between 2002 and 2006. For the yearly analysis, both high and low sampling rates areas were significant, with two clusters in 2002 (relative risk [RR]: 2.91, p

  6. Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes. IAEA regional workshop. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Within the European regional TC Project a workshop on Planning and Management Support for NPP Personnel SAT Based Training programmes was held at the Paks NPP Maintenance Training Centre in June 1998. It was organized jointly by IAEA and the Paks NPP. The objective of the workshop was to present the important experience gained by successful implementation of the IAEA Model Project on Strengthening Training for Safe Operation at Paks NPP as well as international experience in developing and carrying out the projects to upgrade NPP personnel training in particular maintenance training, and competence based Systematic Approach to Training (SAT). Twenty five participants from Armenia, Bulgaria, China, Czech republic, Hungary, Romania, Russia, Slovak Republic and Ukraine attended the workshop presenting and exchanging experiences in implementing NPP SAT-based training programmes

  7. Whey protein supplementation during resistance training augments lean body mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volek, Jeff S; Volk, Brittanie M; Gómez, Ana L; Kunces, Laura J; Kupchak, Brian R; Freidenreich, Daniel J; Aristizabal, Juan C; Saenz, Catherine; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Ballard, Kevin D; Quann, Erin E; Kawiecki, Diana L; Flanagan, Shawn D; Comstock, Brett A; Fragala, Maren S; Earp, Jacob E; Fernandez, Maria L; Bruno, Richard S; Ptolemy, Adam S; Kellogg, Mark D; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J

    2013-01-01

    Compared to soy, whey protein is higher in leucine, absorbed quicker and results in a more pronounced increase in muscle protein synthesis. To determine whether supplementation with whey promotes greater increases in muscle mass compared to soy or carbohydrate, we randomized non-resistance-trained men and women into groups who consumed daily isocaloric supplements containing carbohydrate (carb; n = 22), whey protein (whey; n = 19), or soy protein (soy; n = 22). All subjects completed a supervised, whole-body periodized resistance training program consisting of 96 workouts (~9 months). Body composition was determined at baseline and after 3, 6, and 9 months. Plasma amino acid responses to resistance exercise followed by supplement ingestion were determined at baseline and 9 months. Daily protein intake (including the supplement) for carb, whey, and soy was 1.1, 1.4, and 1.4 g·kg body mass⁻¹, respectively. Lean body mass gains were significantly (p mass decreased slightly but there were no differences between groups. Fasting concentrations of leucine were significantly elevated (20%) and postexercise plasma leucine increased more than 2-fold in whey. Fasting leucine concentrations were positively correlated with lean body mass responses. Despite consuming similar calories and protein during resistance training, daily supplementation with whey was more effective than soy protein or isocaloric carbohydrate control treatment conditions in promoting gains in lean body mass. These results highlight the importance of protein quality as an important determinant of lean body mass responses to resistance training.

  8. Effect of a training programme on blood culture contamination rate in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sánchez, M M; Arias-Rivera, S; Fraile-Gamo, P; Jareño-Collado, R; López-Román, S; Vadillo-Obesso, P; García-González, S; Pulido-Martos, M T; Sánchez-Muñoz, E I; Cacho-Calvo, J; Martín-Pellicer, A; Panadero-Del Olmo, L; Frutos-Vivar, F

    2018-03-30

    Blood culture contamination can occur from extraction to processing; its rate should not exceed 3%. To evaluate the impact of a training programme on the rate of contaminated blood cultures after the implementation of sample extraction recommendations based on the best evidence. Prospective before-after study in a polyvalent intensive care unit with 18 beds. Two phases were established (January-June 2012, October 2012-October 2015) with a training period between them. Main recommendations: sterile technique, surgical mask, double skin disinfection (70° alcohol and 2% alcoholic chlorhexidine), 70° alcohol disinfection of culture flasks and injection of samples without changing needles. Including all blood cultures of patients with extraction request. demographic, severity, pathology, reason for admission, stay and results of blood cultures (negative, positive and contaminated). Basic descriptive statistics: mean (standard deviation), median (interquartile range) and percentage (95% confidence interval). Calculated contamination rates per 100 blood cultures extracted. Bivariate analysis between periods. Four hundred and eight patients were included. Eight hundred and forty-one blood cultures were taken, 33 of which were contaminated. In the demographic variables, severity, diagnosis and stay of patients with contaminated samples, no differences were observed from those with uncontaminated samples. Pre-training vs post-training contamination rates: 14 vs 5.6 per 100 blood cultures extracted (P=.00003). An evidence-based training programme reduced the contamination of samples. It is necessary to continue working on the planning of activities and care to improve the detection of pollutants and prevent contamination of samples. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of a supervised exercise training programme on sleep quality in recently discharged heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suna, Jessica M; Mudge, Alison; Stewart, Ian; Marquart, Louise; O'Rourke, Peter; Scott, Adam

    2015-06-01

    Sleep disturbances, including insomnia and sleep-disordered breathing, are a common complaint in people with heart failure and impair well-being. Exercise training (ET) improves quality of life in stable heart failure patients. ET also improves sleep quality in healthy older patients, but there are no previous intervention studies in heart failure patients. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of ET on sleep quality in patients recently discharged from hospital with heart failure. This was a sub-study of a multisite randomised controlled trial. Participants with a heart failure hospitalisation were randomised within six weeks of discharge to a 12-week disease management programme including exercise advice (n=52) or to the same programme with twice weekly structured ET (n=54). ET consisted of two one-hour supervised aerobic and resistance training sessions, prescribed and advanced by an exercise specialist. The primary outcome was change in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) between randomisation and week 12. At randomisation, 45% of participants reported poor sleep (PSQI≥5). PSQI global score improved significantly more in the ET group than the control group (-1.5±3.7 vs 0.4±3.8, p=0.03). Improved sleep quality correlated with improved exercise capacity and reduced depressive symptoms, but not with changes in body mass index or resting heart rate. Twelve weeks of twice-weekly supervised ET improved sleep quality in patients recently discharged from hospital with heart failure. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  10. SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS WITH BLOOD FLOW RESTRICTED RESISTANCE TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Kacin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood flow restricted resistance (BFRR training with pneumatic tourniquet has been suggested as an alternative for conventional weight training due to the proven benefits for muscle strength and hypertrophy using relatively low resistance, hence reducing the mechanical stress across a joint. As such, it has become an important part of rehabilitation programs used in either injured or operated athletes. Despite a general consensus on effectiveness of BFRR training for muscle conditioning, there are several uncertainties regarding the interplay of various extrinsic and intrinsic factors on its safety and efficiency, which are being reviewed from a clinical perspective. Among extrinsic factors tourniquet cuff pressure, size and shape have been identified as key for safety and efficiency. Among intrinsic factors, limb anthropometrics, patient history and presence of cardiac, vascular, metabolic or peripheral neurologic conditions have been recognized as most important. Though there are a few potential safety concerns connected to BFRR training, the following have been identified as the most probable and health-hazardous: (a mechanical injury to the skin, muscle, and peripheral nerves, (b venous thrombosis due to vascular damage and disturbed hemodynamics and (c augmented arterial blood pressure responses due to combined high body exertion and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Based on reviewed literature and authors’ personal experience with the use of BFRR training in injured athletes, some guidelines for its safe application are outlined. Also, a comprehensive risk assessment tool for screening of subjects prior to their inclusion in a BFRR training program is being introduced.

  11. Radiation protection research and training programme 1990-91 Catalogue of contracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This catalogue contains summaries of contacts included in the 1990-91 radiation protection research and training programme, which is divided into three sectors: (a) human exposure to radiation and radioactivity: (i) measurement of radiation dose and its interpretation, (ii) transfer and behaviour of radionuclides in the environment; (b) consequences of radiation exposure to man; their assessment, prevention and treatment: (i) stochastic effects of radiation, (ii) non-stochastic effects of radiation, (iii) radiation effects on the developing organism; (c) risks and management of radiation exposure: (i) assessment of human exposure and risks, (ii) optimization and management of radiation protection

  12. Evaluating a Research Training Programme for People with Intellectual Disabilities Participating in Inclusive Research: The Views of Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullana, Judit; Pallisera, Maria; Català, Elena; Puyalto, Carolina

    2017-07-01

    This article presents the results of evaluating a research training programme aimed at developing the skills of people with intellectual disabilities to actively participate in inclusive research. The present authors opted for a responsive approach to evaluation, using a combination of interviews, questionnaires and focus groups to gather information on the views of students, trainers and members of the research team regarding how the programme progressed, the learning achieved and participants' satisfaction with the programme. The evaluation showed that most of the participants were satisfied with the programme and provided guidelines for planning contents and materials, demonstrating the usefulness of these types of programme in constructing the research group and empowering people with intellectual disabilities to participate in research. The evaluation revealed that the programme had been a positive social experience that fostered interest in lifelong learning for people with intellectual disabilities. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Outcomes in knowledge, attitudes and confidence of nursing staff working in nursing and residential care homes following a dementia training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Anthony; Scerri, Charles

    2017-11-08

    Dementia training programmes for staff working in long-term care settings have been found to be effective in improving staff outcomes. This study investigated the impact of a dementia training programme for all Maltese nursing staff working in public nursing/residential homes on their knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Additionally, we identified the predictors of these domains before and after the programme. A 14-hour training programme focusing on dementia management, care and policy was developed for all nursing staff working in public nursing and residential homes in Malta. A pretest-posttest design was used to evaluate the participants' knowledge of dementia, attitudes and confidence in working with residents with dementia using validated tools. Demographic variables were measured and compared with each staff domain. The majority of nursing staff attended the training programme with 261 fully completed questionnaires being collected pre-training and 214 post-training. The programme significantly improved nursing staff knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Stepwise regression analysis of each staff domain showed that the strongest predictor in all models at pre-training was the intensity of previous training programmes. Furthermore, staff who attended previous training continued to improve in their attitudes and confidence following programme completion. The study continues to shed further evidence on the impact of dementia training programs on staff outcomes. It also indicated that the intensity of previous participation in dementia training programmes was related to the participants' knowledge, attitudes and confidence and that continual exposure to training had a cumulative effect.

  14. Resistance training and aerobic training improve muscle strength and aerobic capacity in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars H; Overgaard, Kristian; Heje, Karen

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We investigated the effects of aerobic and resistance exercise in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). METHODS: Eighteen CIDP patients treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin performed 12 weeks of aerobic exercise and 12 weeks of resistance exercise...... after a run-in period of 12 weeks without exercise. Three times weekly the participants performed aerobic exercise on an ergometer bike or resistance exercise with unilateral training of knee and elbow flexion/extension. Primary outcomes were maximal oxygen consumption velocity (VO2 -max) and maximal...... resulted in an increase of 13.8% ± 16.0% (P = 0.0004) in cIKS. DISCUSSION: Aerobic exercise training and resistance exercise training improve fitness and strength in CIDP patients. Muscle Nerve, 2017....

  15. Teaching Emotion Recognition Skills to Young Children with Autism: A Randomised Controlled Trial of an Emotion Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Beth T.; Gray, Kylie M.; Tonge, Bruce J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Children with autism have difficulties in emotion recognition and a number of interventions have been designed to target these problems. However, few emotion training interventions have been trialled with young children with autism and co-morbid ID. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of an emotion training programme for a group…

  16. The Constraints of Ghanaian Polytechnics in Adopting Competency Based Training (CBT): The Case of a Pilot-Tested Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, Munkaila; Habib, Abdallah Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Polytechnics in Ghana view Competency Based Training (CBT) as a major intervention to the perennial constraints confronting its education and training. On the basis of this, and by government policy, a pilot programme of CBT was instituted in all the 10 polytechnics of Ghana, and was pilot tested in, at least, one department. Agricultural…

  17. A Train-the-Trainer Design for Green Ambassadors in an Environmental Education Programme on Plastic Waste Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yannes Tsz-Yan; Chow, Cheuk-Fai; So, Winnie Wing-Mui

    2018-01-01

    To educate a sustainable future, a train-the-trainer (TTT) approach was adopted to train student teachers (STs) from a teacher education institute to be green ambassadors (GAs) in an environmental education (EE) programme with the aim of promoting plastic waste recycling among primary school pupils. The design of the TTT course for the GAs not…

  18. THE EFFECT OF COMMUNICATION SKILLS TRAINING PROGRAMME ON THE ATTITUDE AND PERCEPTIONS OF THE RESIDENTS OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeba Mary Mani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Communication skills are essential for all practicing doctors, which can be taught and assessed by a structured programme. Hence, a specialty-based communication skills training programme was conducted among the residents of the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PMR Department. The aim of the study is to assess the change in attitude and perception among the residents of PMR by a communication skills training programme. MATERIALS AND METHODS It comprised of a data collection procedure. Here, a semi-structured questionnaire was administered to the subjects. It was given as a pre-intervention, post-intervention and as a second phase post-intervention questionnaire. The communication skills training programme (n=16 was conducted after a pre-test evaluation using the validated questionnaire tool. A half-day training programme using composite Teaching-Learning methods (lectures/role play/videos/check list were included. The post-test-1 (n=16 was conducted after the training programme and the post-test-2 (n=16 was conducted after 6 weeks. All the tests used the same validated questionnaire tool with scores allocated to each item. Settings- Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PMR Department among the residents. Study Design- Educational Intervention- A communication skills training programme using composite teaching learning methods. Statistical Analysis- Analysed using SPSS-16 package software. RESULTS The median pre-test score of the sixteen PMR residents was noted to be 33. The median post-test-1 score of the group was noted to be 37. A significant difference was noted between the pre- and post-test-1 score, which was statistically significant Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test z=-3.249 and p value <0.0001. The post-test-2, which was done after 6 weeks of the programme yielded a score of 36, a similar value of post-test-1. The comparison of pre-test score with post-test-1 and post-test-2 scores showed a highly significant improvement in the

  19. Creatine supplementation alters homocysteine level in resistance trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereket-Yücel, S

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of creatine loading and resistance training on the homocysteine and lipid profiles of young males. Sixty male University students (22.34 ± 2.19 years, 1.79 ± 0.08 m, 77.18 ± 12.57 kg, 15.48 ± 4.57% body fat) were randomly divided in to three groups; control (CG=20), creatine supplement (CEG=20) and placebo (PEG=20). Both CEG and PEG participated in a same resistance-training regimen and either taking a creatine supplement (25 g/d for the first 5 days followed 5 g/d thereafter) or the same amount of placebo for 8 weeks. Participants in CG did not take any creatine supplementation and not engage any exercise program. After the body composition were assessed, the homocysteine (Hcy) concentrations, blood lipids, folic acid and vitamin B12 levels of all the participants were measured at the beginning and end of the eight weeks of resistance training. The analysis of the data indicated that the Hcy levels of the CEG after resistance training and receiving the creatine supplement (9.33 ± 4.60) was significantly lower than that of baseline (12.66 ± 5.89) measurements, F(1,18)=12.28, P=0.00. No significant differences were seen in the Hcy levels of the PEG (15.01 ± 10.87) after 8 weeks of training and receiving a placebo (12.46 ± 12.50), F(1,16)=4.65, P=0.05. Furthermore, there were no significant differences among groups in terms of Hcy levels, F(2,52)=1.72, P=0.19. The present study suggests that as well as strength gain; creatine supplementation with resistance training may afford some protection against emerging cardiovascular risk factors.

  20. Inadequate sleep and muscle strength: Implications for resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Olivia E; Drinkwater, Eric J; Urwin, Charles S; Lamon, Séverine; Aisbett, Brad

    2018-02-02

    Inadequate sleep (e.g., an insufficient duration of sleep per night) can reduce physical performance and has been linked to adverse metabolic health outcomes. Resistance exercise is an effective means to maintain and improve physical capacity and metabolic health, however, the outcomes for populations who may perform resistance exercise during periods of inadequate sleep are unknown. The primary aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the effect of sleep deprivation (i.e. no sleep) and sleep restriction (i.e. a reduced sleep duration) on resistance exercise performance. A secondary aim was to explore the effects on hormonal indicators or markers of muscle protein metabolism. A systematic search of five electronic databases was conducted with terms related to three combined concepts: inadequate sleep; resistance exercise; performance and physiological outcomes. Study quality and biases were assessed using the Effective Public Health Practice Project quality assessment tool. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria and were rated as 'moderate' or 'weak' for global quality. Sleep deprivation had little effect on muscle strength during resistance exercise. In contrast, consecutive nights of sleep restriction could reduce the force output of multi-joint, but not single-joint movements. Results were conflicting regarding hormonal responses to resistance training. Inadequate sleep impairs maximal muscle strength in compound movements when performed without specific interventions designed to increase motivation. Strategies to assist groups facing inadequate sleep to effectively perform resistance training may include supplementing their motivation by training in groups or ingesting caffeine; or training prior to prolonged periods of wakefulness. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. A distance assisted training programme for nuclear medicine technologists methodology and international experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, Heather

    2002-01-01

    The Distance Assisted Training Programme for Nuclear Medicine Technologists (DAT) has been developed and coordinated through West mead Hospital, Sydney and directed under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The objective of the program is to provide primarily developing countries with teaching resources for development of technologist education and a framework for the delivery of training courses that can be adapted to best suit local need. Careful planning and development of learning materials, translation to several languages and program implementation have resulted in >400 technologists in 24 countries currently participating in the course of study within Asia, Latin America and Africa. The development and implementation of suitable assessment techniques has provided a structure for technologists to attain a common basic standard in competencies across the regions. Graduates have better opportunities to further their education as well as contribute to improved use of advancing technologies in nuclear medicine (Au)

  2. Competency-based teacher training: A systematic revision of a proven programme in medical didactics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griewatz, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Competency-based medical education (CBME requires factual knowledge to be practically applied together with skills and attitudes. With the National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM representing a strong official demand for competence-orientation, it is generally important to explicitly outline its characteristics and review its realisation in teacher trainings. Further requirements are given by the core competencies for medical teachers (KLM. As an example the MQ programme (“Medizindidaktische Qualifikation” in Baden-Wuerttemberg, a long established and well-accepted training, has been critically revised on this basis, concerning its suitability for the demands of CBME, its needs for adjustment and the efforts to be undertaken for its implementation.Methods: In a systematic quality management process the MQ curriculum and its organisational framing were analysed and further developed in a step-wise comprehensive approach, using the six-step cycle by Kern. The procedures included a thorough needs assessment (e.g. literature research, programme mapping, strategic decisions on structure and content, piloting and evaluation. During the process essential elements of project and change management were considered.Results: The experiences of the MQ example revealed helpful information for key factors to be considered in the pending change process any training provider will be confronted with. Guiding questions were developed related to the process phases. Our analyses showed persistent key points of proven value as stable foundation for change, as well as components needing special consideration to foster competence-oriented aims and transfer into practice: reflection, feedback, application-oriented methods and transparent competence development. These aspects have to be consciously perceived and experienced by participants. Taking this into account, we re-designed the course evidence

  3. Integrated Resistance and Aerobic Training Study - Sprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Moore, Alan; Ryder, Jeffrey; Everett, Meg; Bloomberg, Jacob; Sibonga, Jean; Shackelford, Linda; Platts, Steven; Martin, David; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; hide

    2010-01-01

    Space flight causes reductions in fitness/health: (1) Cardiovascular -- reduced VO2max, cardiac output (2) Bone -- reduced bone mineral density (3) Muscle -- reduced mass, strength and endurance. Exercise is the primary countermeasure to protect against these changes and was made operational before completely mature. Research continues to identify most effective/efficient exercise programs. Crew medical tests (cardio, muscle, bone) do not yield sufficient information to fine tune the effectiveness of exercise programs, thus there is a need for more detailed testing aimed at identifying the most effective training program. The objective of this program was to obtain detailed information about crew physical fitness pre-and post-flight and evaluate new evidence based exercise prescription with higher intensity, lower duration and frequency.

  4. Effect of a mental health training programme on Nigerian school pupils' perceptions of mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduguwa, Adeola Oluwafunmilayo; Adedokun, Babatunde; Omigbodun, Olayinka Olusola

    2017-01-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes and discriminatory behaviour towards persons with mental illness are known to start in childhood. In Nigeria, it is not unusual to see children taunting persons with mental illness. This behaviour continues into adulthood as evidenced by the day-to-day occurrences in the community of negative attitudes and social distance from persons with mental illness. School-based interventions for pupils have been found to increase knowledge about mental illness. Children are recognised as potential agents of change bringing in new ways of thinking. This study determined the effect of a 3-day mental health training for school pupils in Southwest Nigeria, on the perceptions of and social distance towards persons with mental illness. A total of 205 school pupils drawn from two administrative wards were randomly assigned to control and experimental groups. The mean age of the pupils was 14.91 years (±1.3). The pupils in the intervention group received a 5-h mental health training session spaced out over 3-days. Apart from didactic lectures, case history presentations and discussions and role-play were part the training. Outcome measures were rated using a knowledge, attitude and social distance questionnaire at baseline, immediately following the training for both group and 3-week post intervention for the intervention group. A Student Evaluation Form was administered to evaluate the pupils' assessment of the training programme. Frequencies, Chi square statistics, paired t test were used to analyse the data received. At immediate post-intervention, the intervention group had a significantly higher mean knowledge score compared to controls, 21.1 vs. 22.0; p = 0.097 to 26.1 vs 22.0; p training was useful to them. Multiple contacts and mixed-method training sessions produced a positive and sustained change in knowledge of and attitude towards persons with mental illness in school pupils in Nigeria.

  5. Training of engineers for Czechoslovak nuclear programme at Czech Technical University in Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klik, F.; Stoll, I.

    1983-01-01

    Between the year 1959 and the 1970's specialists for the Czechoslovak nuclear programme were only educated at the Faculty of Nuclar and Physics Engineering. In the early 1970's instruction and research related to nuclear power generation was introduced at the mechanical engineering and electrical engineering faculties. The specialization ''Nuclear power facilities'' was introduced within the study field ''Thermal and nuclear machines and equipment'' at the mechanical engineering faculty, and the electrical engineering faculty opened the study course ''Nuclear power plants'' in the study year 1975/1976. Most specialists for the nuclear programme are educated at the Faculty of Nuclear and Physics Engineering in the field ''Nuclear chemical engineering'' and in specializations ''Theory and technology of nuclear reactors'', ''Dosimetry and application of ionizing radiation'' in the study field ''Nuclear engineering''. The Faculty of Nuclear and Physics Engineering also trains specialists in the field ''Structure and materials properties'', the study courses ''Measuring technology'' and ''Control technology'' are run at the electrical engineering faculty and at the mechanical engineering faculty were introduced study courses of ''Applied mechanics'' and ''Mechanical engineering technology''. Graduates of all said study courses may be employed in the nuclear programme. (E.S.)

  6. The Nuclear Safeguards and Security Activities under Euratom Research and Training Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abousahl, S.; Palajova, Z.; Janssens, W.A.M.; Luetzenkirchen, K.; Goncalves, J.G.M.; Aregbe, Y.; )

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear safeguards and security are absolute priorities for the EU. At technical level, the Joint Research Centre (JRC) as the European Commission's in-house science service plays an important role in the field of nuclear research, training and education that include nuclear safety, safeguards and security. The JRC's nuclear research activities are defined in a Council Regulation on the research and training programme of the European Atomic Energy Community. The JRC works closely with EC safeguards authority, whose mission is to ensure that nuclear material within the EU is not diverted from its intended use according to Euratom treaty. Technologies, methodologies and trainings are developed according to the Euratom Safeguards inspectorate's needs. In the area of nuclear security, the JRC contributes to the development of specific expertise in the field of nuclear forensics and border security detection as well as related training efforts for first front-line responders and national experts. The JRC provides its expert support for the implementation of internal EU action plans mainly in the field of radiological and nuclear security. At an international level, the JRC cooperates with the IAEA mainly through the EC support programme on the control of nuclear materials and facilities in order to avoid proliferation or diversion. Close cooperation with IAEA nuclear security is developed through the recent signature of a dedicated practical arrangement. Key partnerships have also been developed in the field of safeguards and security with the US-DoE, Russia, Japan and China. In addition, JRC contributes significantly to the EU nuclear safeguards and security outreach activities implemented under the Instrument for Nuclear Safety Cooperation and Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace. In this paper we will highlight some of the JRC contributions to the enhancement of nuclear safeguards and security at EU and international levels. (author)

  7. Radiation protection research and training programme review radiation protection programme 1960-89 synopsis of results 1985-89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This document aims to trace the evolution of the CEC radiation protection programme over its 30 years of existence. During this time, research carried out in the framework of the Community programme has made major contributions to the scientific understanding of the action of ionizing radiation and the protection of man and his environment. This information was crucial for developing better radiation protection management for existing and new technologies and for providing the scientific basis for the regulatory activities of the Commission. One important feature of the programme was the success of bringing together scientists from different Member States to cooperate in the various fields of radiation protection and to integrate different areas of radiation protection research into a coherent approach. The structures thus developed within the programme have enabled research in radiation protection to be conducted in a cost-effective manner on behalf of the Member States. This document aims also to give a synopsis of the most important results of the 1985-89 radiation protection programme. This period was characterized by two challenges, the integration of two Member States into Community research and the impact of the Chernobyl accident. The programme has, in spite of reduced funding, continued to provide a high degree of expertise for the Community in the context of the needs in radiation protection. This has been explicity acknowledged in the evaluation of the 1980-89 programmes carried out by an independent panel

  8. Comparison of home- and gymnasium-based resistance training on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aging results in a natural loss of flexibility, which is especially essential in the maintenance of functional abilities of the aged to perform activities of daily living. Resistance training may provide a stimulus for flexibility, in addition to its extensive health benefits, since its action is through a full range of motion. The purpose of ...

  9. Resistance training and predicted risk of coronary heart disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of resistance training, designed to prevent the development of coronary heart disease (CHD) based on the Framingham Risk Assessment (FRA) score. Twenty-five healthy sedentary men with low CHD risk were assigned to participate in a 16-week (three days per week) ...

  10. Musculoskeletal adaptations to training with the advanced resistive exercise device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehr, James A; Lee, Stuart M C; English, Kirk L; Sibonga, Jean; Smith, Scott M; Spiering, Barry A; Hagan, R Donald

    2011-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been used as a means to prevent the musculoskeletal losses associated with spaceflight. Therefore, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration designed the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) to replace the initial device flown on the International Space Station. The ARED uses vacuum cylinders and inertial flywheels to simulate, in the absence of gravity, the constant mass and inertia, respectively, of free weight (FW) exercise. To compare the musculoskeletal effects of resistance exercise training using the ARED with the effects of training with FW. Previously untrained, ambulatory subjects exercised using one of two modalities: FW (6 men and 3 women) or ARED (8 men and 3 women). Subjects performed squat, heel raise, and dead lift exercises 3 d·wk(-1) for 16 wk. Squat, heel raise, and dead lift strength (one-repetition maximum; using FW and ARED), bone mineral density (via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), and vertical jump were assessed before, during, and after training. Muscle mass (via magnetic resonance imaging) and bone morphology (via quantitative computed tomography) were measured before and after training. Bone biomarkers and circulating hormones were measured before training and after 4, 8, and 16 wk. Muscle strength, muscle volume, vertical jump height, and lumbar spine bone mineral density (via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and quantitative computed tomography) significantly increased (P ≤ 0.05) in both groups. There were no significant differences between groups in any of the dependent variables at any time. After 16 wk of training, ARED exercise resulted in musculoskeletal effects that were not significantly different from the effects of training with FW. Because FW training mitigates bed rest-induced deconditioning, the ARED may be an effective countermeasure for spaceflight-induced deconditioning and should be validated during spaceflight.

  11. Evaluation of a pilot 'peer support' training programme for volunteers in a hospital-based cancer information and support centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnane, Nicole Anne; Waters, Trish; Aranda, Sanchia

    2011-01-01

    Volunteers from Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (Peter Mac) Patient Information and Support Centre (PISC) assist the Cancer Support Nurse by helping patients and families/carers find information and provide face-to-face peer support. Benefits of shared personal experiences between volunteer and patient are clearly different from professional support. Volunteers require specific skill sets and detailed preparation for this role. Volunteers completed a 3-day training programme adapted from the Cancer Council Victoria's 'Cancer Connect Telephone Peer Support Volunteer' training programme. The focus was role expectations and boundaries for peer support volunteers, debriefing, communication skills training, support services, complementary and alternative therapies and internet information. Assessment included a quiz and observation for a range of competencies. Role-play with simulated patients developed appropriate support skills. Eight volunteers participated. Pre-training questionnaires revealed all volunteers highly self-rated existing skills supporting people affected by cancer. During training, volunteers recognised these skills were inadequate. All agreed that role-play using an actor as a 'simulated patient' helped develop communication skills; however, the experience proved challenging. Post-training all reported increased knowledge of role definition and boundaries, supportive communication skills, supports available for patients and families/carers and importance of self-care. Facilitators recommended seven of the eight participants be accredited PISC Peer Support Volunteers. One volunteer was assessed unsuitable for consistently overstepping the boundaries of the peer support role and withdrew from training. Success of the programme resulted in a trained 'face-to-face peer support volunteer' group better equipped for their role. Sixteen months following training, all who completed the programme remain active volunteers in the PISC. Planned educational updates

  12. Strength Training for Adolescents with cerebral palsy (STAR): study protocol of a randomised controlled trial to determine the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy of resistance training for adolescents with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jennifer M; Theis, Nicola; Kilbride, Cherry; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Waugh, Charlie; Shortland, Adam; Lavelle, Grace; Noorkoiv, Marika; Levin, Wendy; Korff, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gait is inefficient in children with cerebral palsy, particularly as they transition to adolescence. Gait inefficiency may be associated with declines in gross motor function and participation among adolescents with cerebral palsy. Resistance training may improve gait efficiency through a number of biomechanical and neural mechanisms. The aim of the Strength Training for Adolescents with cerebral palsy (STAR) trial is to evaluate the effect of resistance training on gait efficiency, activity and participation in adolescents with cerebral palsy. We also aim to determine the biomechanical and neural adaptations that occur following resistance training and evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of such an intervention for adolescents with cerebral palsy. Methods and analysis 60 adolescents (Gross Motor Function Classification System level I–III) will be randomised to a 10-week resistance training group or a usual care control group according to a computer-generated random schedule. The primary outcome is gait efficiency. Secondary outcomes are habitual physical activity, participation, muscle–tendon mechanics and gross motor function. General linear models will be used to evaluate differences in continuous data between the resistance training and usual care groups at 10 and 22 weeks, respectively. A process evaluation will be conducted alongside the intervention. Fidelity of the resistance training programme to trial protocol will be quantified by observations of exercise sessions. Semistructured interviews will be conducted with participants and physiotherapists following the resistance training programme to determine feasibility and acceptability of the programme. Ethics and dissemination This trial has ethical approval from Brunel University London's Department of Clinical Sciences' Research Ethics Committee and the National Research Ethics Service (NRES) Committee London—Surrey Borders. The results of the trial will be submitted for

  13. Effectiveness of balance training programme in reducing the frequency of falling in established osteoporotic women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikó, Ibolya; Szerb, Imre; Szerb, Anna; Poor, Gyula

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of a 12-month sensomotor balance exercise programme on postural control and the frequency of falling in women with established osteoporosis. Randomized controlled trial where the intervention group was assigned the 12-month Balance Training Programme and the control group did not undertake any intervention beyond regular osteoporosis treatment. A total of 100 osteoporotic women - at least with one osteoporotic fracture - aged 65 years old and above. Balance was assessed in static and dynamic posture both with performance-based measures of balance, such as the Berg Balance Scale and the Timed Up and Go Test, and with a stabilometric computerized platform. Patients in the intervention group completed the 12-month sensomotor Balance Training Programme in an outpatient setting, guided by physical therapists, three times a week, for 30 minutes. The Berg Balance Scale and the Timed Up and Go Test showed a statistically significant improvement of balance in the intervention group ( p = 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). Balance tests using the stabilometer also showed a statistically significant improvement in static and dynamic postural balance for osteoporotic women after the completion of the Balance Training Programme. As a consequence, the one-year exercise programme significantly decreased the number of falls in the exercise group compared with the control group. The Balance Training Programme significantly improved the balance parameters and reduced the number of falls in postmenopausal women who have already had at least one fracture in the past.

  14. Hamstring activation during lower body resistance training exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, William P

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in hamstring activation during lower body resistance training exercises. This study also sought to assess differences in hamstring-to-quadriceps muscle activation ratios and gender differences therein. A randomized repeated measures design was used to compare six resistance training exercises that are commonly believed to train the hamstrings, including the squat, seated leg curl, stiff leg dead lift, single leg stiff leg dead lift, good morning, and Russian curl. Subjects included 34 college athletes. Outcome measures included the biceps femoris (H) and rectus femoris (Q) electromyography (EMG) and the H-to-Q EMG ratio, for each exercise. Main effects were found for the H (P ratio when analyzed for all subjects (P ratios of men, for the exercises assessed. In a separate analysis of strength matched women and men, women achieved between 35.9 to 76.0% of the H-to-Q ratios of men, for these exercises. Hamstring resistance training exercises offer differing degrees of H and Q activation and ratios. Women compared with men, are less able to activate the hamstrings and/or more able to activate the quadriceps. Women may require disproportionately greater training for the hamstrings compared with the quadriceps.

  15. Enhancing Allocentric Spatial Recall in Pre-schoolers through Navigational Training Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Boccia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Unlike for other abilities, children do not receive systematic spatial orientation training at school, even though navigational training during adulthood improves spatial skills. We investigated whether navigational training programme (NTP improved spatial orientation skills in pre-schoolers. We administered 12-week NTP to seventeen 4- to 5-year-old children (training group, TG. The TG children and 17 age-matched children (control group, CG who underwent standard didactics were tested twice before (T0 and after (T1 the NTP using tasks that tap into landmark, route and survey representations. We determined that the TG participants significantly improved their performances in the most demanding navigational task, which is the task that taps into survey representation. This improvement was significantly higher than that observed in the CG, suggesting that NTP fostered the acquisition of survey representation. Such representation is typically achieved by age seven. This finding suggests that NTP improves performance on higher-level navigational tasks in pre-schoolers.

  16. Effects and dose–response relationships of resistance training on physical performance in youth athletes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesinski, Melanie; Prieske, Olaf; Granacher, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To quantify age, sex, sport and training type-specific effects of resistance training on physical performance, and to characterise dose–response relationships of resistance training parameters that could maximise gains in physical performance in youth athletes. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of intervention studies. Data sources Studies were identified by systematic literature search in the databases PubMed and Web of Science (1985–2015). Weighted mean standardised mean differences (SMDwm) were calculated using random-effects models. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Only studies with an active control group were included if these investigated the effects of resistance training in youth athletes (6–18 years) and tested at least one physical performance measure. Results 43 studies met the inclusion criteria. Our analyses revealed moderate effects of resistance training on muscle strength and vertical jump performance (SMDwm 0.8–1.09), and small effects on linear sprint, agility and sport-specific performance (SMDwm 0.58–0.75). Effects were moderated by sex and resistance training type. Independently computed dose–response relationships for resistance training parameters revealed that a training period of >23 weeks, 5 sets/exercise, 6–8 repetitions/set, a training intensity of 80–89% of 1 repetition maximum (RM), and 3–4 min rest between sets were most effective to improve muscle strength (SMDwm 2.09–3.40). Summary/conclusions Resistance training is an effective method to enhance muscle strength and jump performance in youth athletes, moderated by sex and resistance training type. Dose–response relationships for key training parameters indicate that youth coaches should primarily implement resistance training programmes with fewer repetitions and higher intensities to improve physical performance measures of youth athletes. PMID:26851290

  17. Concurrent Training Followed by Detraining: Does the Resistance Training Intensity Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, António C; Marinho, Daniel A; Gil, Maria H; Izquierdo, Mikel; Rodríguez-Rosell, David; Neiva, Henrique P; Marques, Mário C

    2018-03-01

    Sousa, AC, Marinho, DA, Gil, MH, Izquierdo, M, Rodríguez-Rosell, D, Neiva, HP, and Marques, MC. Concurrent training followed by detraining: does the resistance training intensity matter? J Strength Cond Res 32(3): 632-642, 2018-The aim of this study was to analyze the training and detraining (DT) effects of concurrent aerobic training and resistance training against 3 different external loads on strength and aerobic variables. Thirty-two men were randomly assigned to 4 groups: low-load (LLG, n = 9), moderate-load (MLG, n = 9), high-load (HLG, n = 8), and control group (CG, n = 6). Resistance training consisted of full squat (FS) with a low load (40-55% 1 repetition maximum [1RM]), a moderate load (55-70% 1RM), or a high load (70-85% 1RM) combined with jump and sprint exercises. Aerobic training was performed at 75% of the maximal aerobic speed for 15-20 minutes. The training period lasted for 8-week, followed by 4-week DT. Pretraining, post-training, and post-DT evaluations included 20-m running sprints (0-10 m: T10; 0-20 m: T20), shuttle run test, countermovement vertical jump (CMJ) test, and loading test (1RM) in FS. All the experimental groups showed improvements (p ≤ 0.05) in all the parameters assessed, except the LLG for T10 and the HLG for T20. The LLG, MLG, and HLG showed great changes in 1RM and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max compared with the CG (p ≤ 0.05), whereas the HLG and MLG showed a greater percentage change than the CG in T10 (p training programs with low, moderate, or high external loads combined with low-intensity aerobic training could be effective for producing significant gains in strength and aerobic capacities. Moreover, the higher loads used increased gains in explosive efforts.

  18. Effects of resistance training in individuals with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazielle Cordeiro Aguiar

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Osteoarthritis (OA, the most common form of arthritis, is considered the main cause of pain and disability in the elderly. Objective: To evaluate the effect of systematic muscle strength training on functional performance and quality of life in individuals with knee OA. Methods: Subjects with knee OA (n = 27, 46 - 76 years completed the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, Medical Outcomes Short-Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36, and visual analog scale (VAS questionnaires, musculoskeletal assessments, and 10-repetition maximum and timed 10-meter walk tests both before and after training. The training consisted of an exercise resistance program and stretches for 12 weeks (three sessions of 80 each per week. Results: Twenty-two subjects completed the training. Reduced overall scores and WOMAC physical function indicated improved functional performance (p < 0.001 as well as increased gait speed (p < 0.001. The perception of pain decreased after training, as evidenced by the VAS, WOMAC pain domain, and SF-36 scores (p < 0.001. Quality of life improvements occurred primarily in the areas of pain, functional capacity, and SF-36 physical aspects. No change in body mass index was noted (p = 0.93. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the combination of resistance training for the quadriceps, gluteus, and abdominal muscles could be a viable alternative to improving functionality and quality of life in patients with knee OA. However, more studies are necessary to confirm our findings.

  19. Aerobic training prevents dexamethasone-induced peripheral insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionísio, T J; Louzada, J C A; Viscelli, B A; Dionísio, E J; Martuscelli, A M; Barel, M; Perez, O A B; Bosqueiro, J R; Brozoski, D T; Santos, C F; Amaral, S L

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated how proteins of the insulin signaling cascade could modulate insulin resistance after dexamethasone (Dexa) treatment and aerobic training. Rats were distributed into 4 groups: sedentary control (SC), sedentary+Dexa (SD), trained control (TC), and trained+Dexa (TD), and underwent aerobic training for 70 days or remained sedentary. Dexa was administered during the last 10 days (1 mg · kg(-1) per day i. p.). After 70 days, an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (ipGTT) was performed. Protein levels of IRS-1, AKT, and PKC-α in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle were identified using Western blots. Dexa treatment increased blood glucose and the area under the curve (AUC) of ipGTT. Training attenuated the hyperglycemia and the AUC induced by Dexa. Dexa reduced IRS-1 (- 16%) and AKT (- 43%) protein level with no changes in PKC-α levels. Moreover, these effects on IRS-1 and AKT protein level were prevented in trained animals. These results show for the first time that aerobic exercise prevented reductions of IRS-1 and AKT level induced by Dexa in the TA muscle, suggesting that aerobic exercise is a good strategy to prevent Dexa-induced peripheral insulin resistance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Evaluation of the agricultural vocational training programmes conducted by the Krishi Vigyan Kendras (Farm Science Centres in Indian Punjab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surinder Kaur Saini

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Krishin Vigyan Kendras-KVKs (Farm Science Centres have been established by the Indian Council of Agricultural Research in 569 districts. The trust areas of KVKs are refinement and demonstration of technologies, and training of farmers and extension functionaries. Imparting vocational trainings in agriculture and allied fields for the rural youth is one of its mandates. The study was undertaken to do a formative and summative (outcome and impact evaluation of the beekeeping and mushroom growing vocational training programmes in the Indian state of Punjab. One-group pre and post evaluation design was employed for conducting a formative and outcome evaluation. The knowledge tests were administered to 35 beekeeping and 25 mushroom cultivation trainees, before and after the training programmes organized in 2004. The trainees significantly gained in knowledge. A separate sample of 640 trainees, trained prior to 2004, was selected for finding the adoption status. Out of 640, a sample of 200 was selected by proportionate sampling technique out of three categories, namely: non-adopters, discontinued-adopters and continued-adopters for evaluating the long-term impact of these training programmes. Ex-post-facto one-shot case study design was applied for this impact analysis. The vocational training programmes have resulted in continued-adoption of beekeeping and mushroom cultivation enterprises by 20% and 51% trained farmers, respectively. Age and trainee occupation had significant influence on the adoption decision of beekeeping vocation, whereas education and family income significantly affected the adoption decision of mushroom cultivation. The continued adopters of beekeeping and mushroom growing had increased their family income by 49% and 24%, respectively. These training programmes are augmenting the dwindling farm income of the farmers in Indian Punjab.

  1. Improving reading comprehension in reading and listening settings: the effect of two training programmes focusing on metacognition and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretti, Barbara; Caldarola, Nadia; Tencati, Chiara; Cornoldi, Cesare

    2014-06-01

    Metacognition and working memory (WM) have been found associated with success in reading comprehension, but no studies have examined their combined effect on the training of reading comprehension. Another open question concerns the role of listening comprehension: In particular, it is not clear whether training to improve reading comprehension must necessarily be based on processing written material or whether, as suggested in a recent study by Clarke et al. (2010, Psychol. Sci., 21, 1106), a programme based on verbal language could also be effective. The study examined the feasibility of improving text comprehension in school children by comparing the efficacy of two training programmes, both involving metacognition and WM, but one based on listening comprehension, the other on reading comprehension. The study involved a sample of 159 pupils attending eight classes in the fourth and fifth grades (age range 9-11 years). The listening and reading programmes focused on the same abilities/processes strictly related to text comprehension, and particularly metacognitive knowledge and control, WM (per se and in terms of integrating information in a text). The training programmes were implemented by school teachers as part of the class's normal school activities, under the supervision of experts. Their efficacy was compared with the results obtained in an active control group that completed standard text comprehension activities. Our results showed that both the training programmes focusing on specific text comprehension skills were effective in improving the children's achievement, but training in reading comprehension generated greater gains than the listening comprehension programme. Our study suggests that activities focusing specifically on metacognition and WM could foster text comprehension, but the potential benefit is influenced by the training modality, that is, the Reading group obtained greater and longer-lasting improvements than the Active control or

  2. Resistance training intensity and volume affect changes in rate of force development in resistance-trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangine, Gerald T; Hoffman, Jay R; Wang, Ran; Gonzalez, Adam M; Townsend, Jeremy R; Wells, Adam J; Jajtner, Adam R; Beyer, Kyle S; Boone, Carleigh H; Miramonti, Amelia A; LaMonica, Michael B; Fukuda, David H; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2016-12-01

    To compare the effects of two different resistance training programs, high intensity (INT) and high volume (VOL), on changes in isometric force (FRC), rate of force development (RFD), and barbell velocity during dynamic strength testing. Twenty-nine resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to either the INT (n = 15, 3-5 RM, 3-min rest interval) or VOL (n = 14, 10-12 RM, 1-min rest interval) training group for 8 weeks. All participants completed a 2-week preparatory phase prior to randomization. Measures of barbell velocity, FRC, and RFD were performed before (PRE) and following (POST) the 8-week training program. Barbell velocity was determined during one-repetition maximum (1RM) testing of the squat (SQ) and bench press (BP) exercises. The isometric mid-thigh pull was used to assess FRC and RFD at specific time bands ranging from 0 to 30, 50, 90, 100, 150, 200, and 250 ms. Analysis of covariance revealed significant (p resistance-trained men.

  3. Influence of two high-intensity intermittent training programmes on anaerobic capacity in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Buśko

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the influence of a maximal effort training programme with variation of the pedalling rate on the anaerobic capacity, post-exercise maximal concentration of lactic acid (LA and acid-alkali balance changes in the capillary blood. Identification of the dependence between the lactic acid concentration and the anaerobic capacity produced in the Wingate test was also the goal. The hypothesis that cycloergometer training consisting of maximal efforts with a load equal to 10% of body weight (BW will elicit bigger changes of measured values in comparison to training with a load of 5% BW was verified. Twenty non-athletes, students of UPE took part in the study. They were divided into 2 groups. The first group (M10; n=9 performed maximal efforts with a load equal to 10% of body weight (BW. The second group (M5; n=11 performed maximal efforts with a load of 5% BW. Control measurements of anaerobic capacity (Wingate test were taken every Monday: before the test (0, during 4 weeks of training (1-4 and for 2 weeks after the test (5-6. Blood for the determination of lactic acid concentration and acid-alkali balance was taken from the fingertip before performing the Wingate test – in the 5th, 7th, 9th and 30th resting minute. Changes of maximal power (Pmax were not statistically significant in either group. Significant differences were found between the two groups after the second week of rest. For mean power (Pm the most important changes were noted in the first week from training (M10 – 6.5%; M5 – 11.0% No significant differences were found between groups. Average values of the individual LA concentration peak (the highest LA concentration occurring after the Wingate test for each individual changed significantly in group M10 from 15.233±2.367 mmol/l in the measurement made before training to 12.340±2.353 mmol/l in the measurement taken 2 weeks after training. Group M5 is characterised by a change of this factor

  4. Material Production for an EST Course: Coursebook Design for the English Training Programme for Architects and Civil Engineers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the material production of an EST (English for Science and Technology course in an English training programme for architects and civil engineers. The programme was specially designed for the construction professionals whose needs were investigated and analysed by the trainers, ESP (English for Specific Purposes specialists from the British Council and Chinese counterparts. The article firstly focuses on the theories of needs analysis which support the investigation and analysis of the programme. After that, the needs of this programme (for both organization and participants are recognized and organized with illustration of programme framework and a particular course (EST syllabus. Then the literature of material design is reviewed and the rationale for the material writing is discussed with the presentation of a sample unit.

  5. Resistance strength training exercise in children with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewelt, Aga; Krosschell, Kristin J; Stoddard, Gregory J; Weng, Cindy; Xue, Mei; Marcus, Robin L; Gappmaier, Eduard; Viollet, Louis; Johnson, Barbara A; White, Andrea T; Viazzo-Trussell, Donata; Lopes, Philippe; Lane, Robert H; Carey, John C; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2015-10-01

    Preliminary evidence in adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and in SMA animal models suggests exercise has potential benefits in improving or stabilizing muscle strength and motor function. We evaluated feasibility, safety, and effects on strength and motor function of a home-based, supervised progressive resistance strength training exercise program in children with SMA types II and III. Up to 14 bilateral proximal muscles were exercised 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. Nine children with SMA, aged 10.4 ± 3.8 years, completed the resistance training exercise program. Ninety percent of visits occurred per protocol. Training sessions were pain-free (99.8%), and no study-related adverse events occurred. Trends in improved strength and motor function were observed. A 12-week supervised, home-based, 3-day/week progressive resistance training exercise program is feasible, safe, and well tolerated in children with SMA. These findings can inform future studies of exercise in SMA. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Synergistic effects of resistance training and protein intake: practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Cholewa, Jason Michael; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Zhi, X I A; Magagnin, Daiane; de Sá, Rafaele Bis Dal Ponte; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Teixeira, Tamiris da Silva; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2014-10-01

    Resistance training is a potent stimulus to increase skeletal muscle mass. The muscle protein accretion process depends on a robust synergistic action between protein intake and overload. The intake of protein after resistance training increases plasma amino acids, which results in the activation of signaling molecules leading to increased muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle hypertrophy. Although both essential and non-essential amino acids are necessary for hypertrophy, the intake of free L-leucine or high-leucine whole proteins has been specifically shown to increase the initiation of translation that is essential for elevated MPS. The literature supports the use of protein intake following resistance-training sessions to enhance MPS; however, less understood are the effects of different protein sources and timing protocols on MPS. The sum of the adaptions from each individual training session is essential to muscle hypertrophy, and thus highlights the importance of an optimal supplementation protocol. The aim of this review is to present recent findings reported in the literature and to discuss the practical application of these results. In that light, new speculations and questions will arise that may direct future investigations. The information and recommendations generated in this review should be of benefit to clinical dietitians as well as those engaged in sports. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of arachidonic acid supplementation on training adaptations in resistance-trained males

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    Greenwood Mike

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the impact of AA supplementation during resistance training on body composition, training adaptations, and markers of muscle hypertrophy in resistance-trained males. Methods In a randomized and double blind manner, 31 resistance-trained male subjects (22.1 ± 5.0 years, 180 ± 0.1 cm, 86.1 ± 13.0 kg, 18.1 ± 6.4% body fat ingested either a placebo (PLA: 1 g·day-1 corn oil, n = 16 or AA (AA: 1 g·day-1 AA, n = 15 while participating in a standardized 4 day·week-1 resistance training regimen. Fasting blood samples, body composition, bench press one-repetition maximum (1RM, leg press 1RM and Wingate anaerobic capacity sprint tests were completed after 0, 25, and 50 days of supplementation. Percutaneous muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis on days 0 and 50. Results Wingate relative peak power was significantly greater after 50 days of supplementation while the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was significantly lower after 25 days of supplementation in the AA group. PGE2 levels tended to be greater in the AA group. However, no statistically significant differences were observed between groups in body composition, strength, anabolic and catabolic hormones, or markers of muscle hypertrophy (i.e. total protein content or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx protein content and other intramuscular markers (i.e. FP and EP3 receptor density or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx mRNA expression. Conclusion AA supplementation during resistance-training may enhance anaerobic capacity and lessen the inflammatory response to training. However, AA supplementation did not promote statistically greater gains in strength, muscle mass, or influence markers of muscle hypertrophy.

  8. Effects of arachidonic acid supplementation on training adaptations in resistance-trained males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael D; Iosia, Mike; Kerksick, Chad M; Taylor, Lem W; Campbell, Bill; Wilborn, Colin D; Harvey, Travis; Cooke, Matthew; Rasmussen, Chris; Greenwood, Mike; Wilson, Ronald; Jitomir, Jean; Willoughby, Darryn; Kreider, Richard B

    2007-11-28

    To determine the impact of AA supplementation during resistance training on body composition, training adaptations, and markers of muscle hypertrophy in resistance-trained males. In a randomized and double blind manner, 31 resistance-trained male subjects (22.1 +/- 5.0 years, 180 +/- 0.1 cm, 86.1 +/- 13.0 kg, 18.1 +/- 6.4% body fat) ingested either a placebo (PLA: 1 g.day-1 corn oil, n = 16) or AA (AA: 1 g.day-1 AA, n = 15) while participating in a standardized 4 day.week-1 resistance training regimen. Fasting blood samples, body composition, bench press one-repetition maximum (1RM), leg press 1RM and Wingate anaerobic capacity sprint tests were completed after 0, 25, and 50 days of supplementation. Percutaneous muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis on days 0 and 50. Wingate relative peak power was significantly greater after 50 days of supplementation while the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was significantly lower after 25 days of supplementation in the AA group. PGE2 levels tended to be greater in the AA group. However, no statistically significant differences were observed between groups in body composition, strength, anabolic and catabolic hormones, or markers of muscle hypertrophy (i.e. total protein content or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx protein content) and other intramuscular markers (i.e. FP and EP3 receptor density or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx mRNA expression). AA supplementation during resistance-training may enhance anaerobic capacity and lessen the inflammatory response to training. However, AA supplementation did not promote statistically greater gains in strength, muscle mass, or influence markers of muscle hypertrophy.

  9. Perspectives of rural health and human service practitioners following suicide prevention training programme in Australia: A thematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Martin; Ferguson, Monika; Walsh, Sandra; Martinez, Lee; Marsh, Michael; Cronin, Kathryn; Procter, Nicolas

    2018-01-08

    There are well-established training programmes available to support health and human services professionals working with people vulnerable to suicide. However, little is known about involving people with lived experience in the delivery of suicide prevention training with communities with increased rates of suicide. The aim of this paper was to report on a formative dialogical evaluation that explored the views of health and human services workers with regard to a suicide prevention training programme in regional (including rural and remote areas) South Australia which included meaningful involvement of a person with lived experience in the development and delivery of the training. In 2015, eight suicide prevention training workshops were conducted with health and human services workers. All 248 participants lived and worked in South Australian regional communities. We interviewed a subsample of 24 participants across eight sites. A thematic analysis of the interviews identified five themes: Coproduction is key, It is okay to ask the question, Caring for my community, I can make a difference and Learning for future training. The overall meta-theme was "Involvement of a person with lived experience in suicide prevention training supports regional communities to look out for people at risk of suicide." This paper highlights the need for suicide prevention training and other workforce development programmes to include lived experience participation as a core component in development and delivery. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. FAST CP: protocol of a randomised controlled trial of the efficacy of a 12-week combined Functional Anaerobic and Strength Training programme on muscle properties and mechanical gait deficiencies in adolescents and young adults with spastic-type cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Jarred G; Lichtwark, Glen A; Boyd, Roslyn N; Barber, Lee A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) have muscles that are smaller, weaker and more resistant to stretch compared to typically developing people. Progressive resistance training leads to increases in muscle size and strength. In CP, the benefits of resistance training alone may not transfer to improve other activities such as walking; however, the transfer of strength improvements to improved mobility may be enhanced by performing training that involves specific functional tasks or motor skills. This study aims to determine the efficacy of combined functional anaerobic and strength training in (1) influencing muscle strength, structure and function and (2) to determine if any changes in muscle strength and structure following training impact on walking ability and gross motor functional capacity and performance in the short (following 3 months of training) and medium terms (a further 3 months post-training). Methods and analysis 40 adolescents and young adults with CP will be recruited to undertake a 12-week training programme. The training programme will consist of 3×75 min sessions per week, made up of 5 lower limb resistance exercises and 2–3 functional anaerobic exercises per session. The calf muscles will be specifically targeted, as they are the most commonly impacted muscles in CP and are a key muscle group involved in walking. If, as we believe, muscle properties change following combined strength and functional training, there may be long-term benefits of this type of training in slowing the deterioration of muscle function in people with spastic-type CP. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the ethics committees at The University of Queensland (2014000066) and Children's Health Queensland (HREC/15/QRCH/30). The findings will be disseminated by publications in peer-reviewed journals, conferences and local research organisations’ media. Trial registration number Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials

  11. FAST CP: protocol of a randomised controlled trial of the efficacy of a 12-week combined Functional Anaerobic and Strength Training programme on muscle properties and mechanical gait deficiencies in adolescents and young adults with spastic-type cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Jarred G; Lichtwark, Glen A; Boyd, Roslyn N; Barber, Lee A

    2015-06-26

    Individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) have muscles that are smaller, weaker and more resistant to stretch compared to typically developing people. Progressive resistance training leads to increases in muscle size and strength. In CP, the benefits of resistance training alone may not transfer to improve other activities such as walking; however, the transfer of strength improvements to improved mobility may be enhanced by performing training that involves specific functional tasks or motor skills. This study aims to determine the efficacy of combined functional anaerobic and strength training in (1) influencing muscle strength, structure and function and (2) to determine if any changes in muscle strength and structure following training impact on walking ability and gross motor functional capacity and performance in the short (following 3 months of training) and medium terms (a further 3 months post-training). 40 adolescents and young adults with CP will be recruited to undertake a 12-week training programme. The training programme will consist of 3 × 75 min sessions per week, made up of 5 lower limb resistance exercises and 2-3 functional anaerobic exercises per session. The calf muscles will be specifically targeted, as they are the most commonly impacted muscles in CP and are a key muscle group involved in walking. If, as we believe, muscle properties change following combined strength and functional training, there may be long-term benefits of this type of training in slowing the deterioration of muscle function in people with spastic-type CP. Ethical approval has been obtained from the ethics committees at The University of Queensland (2014000066) and Children's Health Queensland (HREC/15/QRCH/30). The findings will be disseminated by publications in peer-reviewed journals, conferences and local research organisations' media. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12614001217695). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission

  12. Effect of specific resistance training on musculoskeletal pain symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Theisen; Andersen, Lars Louis; Jørgensen, Marie Birk

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Pedersen, MT, Andersen, LL, Jørgensen, MB, Søgaard, K, and Sjøgaard, G. Effect of specific resistance training on musculoskeletal pain symptoms: Dose-response relationship. J Strength Cond Res 27(1): 229-235, 2013-The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-response of strength...... training for relieving musculoskeletal pain in female office workers. The relation between the dose of training in terms of total training volume (sets × repetitions × load reported in training diaries) during a 16-week strength training program and changes in pain (calculated as pain index, 0-100%, from...... index in SRT and APE decreased significantly from baseline to follow-up (-25%/-22%) compared with changes in REF (-15%). In the dose-response analysis within the SRT group (n = 125), the total volume of training (mean 18.056 kg, SD = 13.798) was negatively correlated with changes in pain index (ß = -0...

  13. A System on a Programmable Chip Architecture for Data-Dependent Superimposed Training Channel Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Martín del Campo

    2009-01-01

    with the information, a series of known symbols, whose analysis is used to define the parameters of the filters that remove the distortion of the data. Nevertheless, a part of the available bandwidth has to be destined to these symbols. Until now, no alternative solution has demonstrated to be fully satisfying for commercial use, but one technique that looks promising is superimposed training (ST. This work describes a hybrid software-hardware FPGA implementation of a recent algorithm that belongs to the ST family, known as Data-dependent Superimposed Training (DDST, which does not need extra bandwidth for its training sequences (TS as it adds them arithmetically to the data. DDST also adds a third sequence known as data-dependent sequence, that destroys the interference caused by the data over the TS. As DDST's computational burden is too high for the commercial processors used in mobile systems, a System on a Programmable Chip (SOPC approach is used in order to solve the problem.

  14. How trainees would disclose medical errors: educational implications for training programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Andrew A; Bell, Sigall K; Krauss, Melissa J; Garbutt, Jane; Dunagan, W Claiborne; Fraser, Victoria J; Levinson, Wendy; Larson, Eric B; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2011-04-01

    The disclosure of harmful errors to patients is recommended, but appears to be uncommon. Understanding how trainees disclose errors and how their practices evolve during training could help educators design programmes to address this gap. This study was conducted to determine how trainees would disclose medical errors. We surveyed 758 trainees (488 students and 270 residents) in internal medicine at two academic medical centres. Surveys depicted one of two harmful error scenarios that varied by how apparent the error would be to the patient. We measured attitudes and disclosure content using scripted responses. Trainees reported their intent to disclose the error as 'definitely' (43%), 'probably' (47%), 'only if asked by patient' (9%), and 'definitely not' (1%). Trainees were more likely to disclose obvious errors than errors that patients were unlikely to recognise (55% versus 30%; p error rather than only an adverse event had occurred. Regarding apologies, trainees were split between conveying a general expression of regret (52%) and making an explicit apology (46%). Respondents at higher levels of training were less likely to use explicit apologies (trend p errors (odds ratio 1.40, p = 0.03). Trainees may not be prepared to disclose medical errors to patients and worrisome trends in trainee apology practices were observed across levels of training. Medical educators should intensify efforts to enhance trainees' skills in meeting patients' expectations for the open disclosure of harmful medical errors. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  15. Development of a training programme for radiation protection officers in industrial irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumuni, I. I.

    2014-01-01

    The International Basic Safety Standards (BSS) for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources establish the basic requirements for protection against the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources that may deliver such exposure. One important aspect of the Safety Standard is education and training of all personnel involved in the activities of radiation and radioactive sources. According to the BSS a Radiation Protection Officer is an individual technically competent in radiation protection matters relevant for a given type of practice who is designated by the registrant or licensee to oversee the application of the requirements of the standards. By this assigned role, radiation protection officers for industrial irradiators should be adequately trained since these facilities involve very high dose rates during irradiation, such that a person accidentally exposed can receive a lethal dose within minutes or seconds and fatalities can occur. This training among others things will enable the radiation protection officers to understand practical application of the IAEA Safety Standard to industrial irradiator facilities, understand the requirements for safety assessments and emergency plans, be able to develop a radiation protection programme for irradiators, be familiar with the different types of industrial irradiators and their applications and understand the safety philosophy and design requirements for industrial irradiators. (author)

  16. Effect of Lower-Body Resistance Training on Upper-Body Strength Adaptation in Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomei, Sandro; Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Merni, Franco

    2018-01-01

    Bartolomei, S, Hoffman, JR, Stout, JR, and Merni, F. Effect of lower-body resistance training on upper-body strength adaptation in trained men. J Strength Cond Res 32(1): 13-18, 2018-The aim of this study was to examine the effect of 2 different lower-body strength training schemes on upper-body adaptations to resistance training. Twenty resistance-trained men (4.25 ± 1.6 years of experience) were randomly assigned to either a high intensity (HI; n = 9; age = 24.9 ± 2.9 years; body mass = 88.7 ± 17.2 kg; height = 177.0 ± 5.6 cm) or a mixed high volume and HI resistance training program (MP; n = 11; age = 26.0 ± 4.7 years; body mass = 82.8 ± 9.1 kg; height = 177.54 ± 5.9 cm). High-intensity group followed a HI training for both upper and lower body (4-5 reps at 88%-90% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM)), whereas the MP group performed high-volume training sessions focused on muscle hypertrophy for lower body (10-12 reps at 65%-70% of 1-RM) and a HI protocol for the upper body. Maximal strength and power testing occurred before and after the 6-week training program. Analysis of covariance was used to compare performance measures between the groups. Greater increases in MP groups compared with HI groups were observed for bench press 1RM (p = 0.007), bench press power at 50% of 1RM (p = 0.011), and for arm muscle area (p = 0.046). Significant difference between the 2 groups at posttest were also observed for fat mass (p = 0.009). Results indicated that training programs focused on lower-body muscle hypertrophy and maximal strength for upper body can stimulate greater strength and power gains in the upper body compared with HI resistance training programs for both the upper and lower body.

  17. Resistance training, insulin sensitivity and muscle function in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela, Flemming; Kjaer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Ageing is associated with a loss in both muscle mass and in the metabolic quality of skeletal muscle. This leads to sarcopenia and reduced daily function, as well as to an increased risk for development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. A major part, but not all, of these changes...... are associated with an age-related decrease in the physical activity level and can be counteracted by increased physical activity of a resistive nature. Strength training has been shown to improve insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in both healthy elderly individuals and patients with manifest diabetes...

  18. A biomechanical evaluation of resistance: fundamental concepts for training and sports performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, David M; Cronin, John; Newton, Robert U

    2010-04-01

    Newton's second law of motion describes the acceleration of an object as being directly proportional to the magnitude of the net force, in the same direction as the net force and inversely proportional to its mass (a = F/m). With respect to linear motion, mass is also a numerical representation of an object's inertia, or its resistance to change in its state of motion and directly proportional to the magnitude of an object's momentum at any given velocity. To change an object's momentum, thereby increasing or decreasing its velocity, a proportional impulse must be generated. All motion is governed by these relationships, independent of the exercise being performed or the movement type being used; however, the degree to which this governance affects the associated kinematics, kinetics and muscle activity is dependent on the resistance type. Researchers have suggested that to facilitate the greatest improvements to athletic performance, the resistance-training programme employed by an athlete must be adapted to meet the specific demands of their sport. Therefore, it is conceivable that one mechanical stimulus, or resistance type, may not be appropriate for all applications. Although an excellent means of increasing maximal strength and the rate of force development, free-weight or mass-based training may not be the most conducive means to elicit velocity-specific adaptations. Attempts have been made to combat the inherent flaws of free weights, via accommodating and variable resistance-training devices; however, such approaches are not without problems that are specific to their mechanics. More recently, pneumatic-resistance devices (variable) have been introduced as a mechanical stimulus whereby the body mass of the athlete represents the only inertia that must be overcome to initiate movement, thus potentially affording the opportunity to develop velocity-specific power. However, there is no empirical evidence to support such a contention. Future research should

  19. Effectiveness of accommodation and constant resistance training on maximal strength and power in trained athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Ataee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accommodation resistance is a training technique that may improve strength and power gains beyond those achieved by traditional free weights. In this method, chains are either added on a free-weight bar and combined with traditional plates or added to the bar as the entire load.Purpose. The aim of the current study was to compare the effectiveness of accommodation and constant resistance training methods during a four-week period on maximal strength and power in trained athletes.Methods. This study was comprised of 24 trained athletes, including 16 trained males [8 Wushu athletes (Kung-Fu and 8 wrestlers, age: 20.5 ± 2.00 yrs. old]. Participants were initially tested on weight, body circumference, fat percent, upper and lower body maximal strength, determined by the 1-repetition maximum (1RM test, which determines the greatest amount of weight a person can successfully lift, and upper and lower body power. Participants were equally randomized to either accommodation or constant resistance training groups. Both groups underwent resistance training for a four-week period that consisted of three sessions per week. Multivariate repeated-measures analyses of variance of the data were used to verify significant differences in strength and power between groups. The modified Bonferroni post hoc test was used to compare the obtained results in pre-, mid-, and post test.Results. In the accommodation resistance group, there was a significant difference in lower body maximal strength compared to the constant group (163.12 ± 18.82 kg in the accommodation group vs. 142.25 ± 20.04 kg in the constant group, P = 0.04. No significant differences were found in upper body power, lower body power, and upper body maximal strength between the two groups (P > 0.05.Conclusion. Although there was only a significant difference in lower body maximal strength between groups, accommodation resistance training may induce a physiological training response by improving the

  20. Effect of sand versus grass training surfaces during an 8-week pre-season conditioning programme in team sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnie, Martyn John; Dawson, Brian; Arnot, Mark Alexander; Pinnington, Hugh; Landers, Grant; Peeling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the use of sand and grass training surfaces throughout an 8-week conditioning programme in well-trained female team sport athletes (n = 24). Performance testing was conducted pre- and post-training and included measures of leg strength and balance, vertical jump, agility, 20 m speed, repeat speed (8 × 20 m every 20 s), as well as running economy and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). Heart rate (HR), training load (rating of perceived exertion (RPE) × duration), movement patterns and perceptual measures were monitored throughout each training session. Participants completed 2 × 1 h conditioning sessions per week on sand (SAND) or grass (GRASS) surfaces, incorporating interval training, sprint and agility drills, and small-sided games. Results showed a significantly higher (P < 0.05) HR and training load in the SAND versus GRASS group throughout each week of training, plus some moderate effect sizes to suggest lower perceptual ratings of soreness and fatigue on SAND. Significantly greater (P < 0.05) improvements in VO2max were measured for SAND compared to GRASS. These results suggest that substituting sand for grass training surfaces throughout an 8-week conditioning programme can significantly increase the relative exercise intensity and training load, subsequently leading to superior improvements in aerobic fitness.

  1. Spreading of Excellence in SARNET Network on Severe Accidents: The Education and Training Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Paci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The SARNET2 (severe accidents Research NETwork of Excellence project started in April 2009 for 4 years in the 7th Framework Programme (FP7 of the European Commission (EC, following a similar first project in FP6. Forty-seven organisations from 24 countries network their capacities of research in the severe accident (SA field inside SARNET to resolve the most important remaining uncertainties and safety issues on SA in water-cooled nuclear power plants (NPPs. The network includes a large majority of the European actors involved in SA research plus a few non-European relevant ones. The “Education and Training” programme in SARNET is a series of actions foreseen in this network for the “spreading of excellence.” It is focused on raising the competence level of Master and Ph.D. students and young researchers engaged in SA research and on organizing information/training courses for NPP staff or regulatory authorities (but also for researchers interested in SA management procedures.

  2. Effect of whole body resistance training on arterial compliance in young men.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakobowchuk, M.; McGowan, C.L.; Groot, P.C.E. de; Bruinsma, D.; Hartman, J.W.; Phillips, S.M.; MacDonald, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of resistance training on arterial stiffening is controversial. We tested the hypothesis that resistance training would not alter central arterial compliance. Young healthy men (age, 23 +/- 3.9 (mean +/- s.e.m.) years; n = 28,) were whole-body resistance trained five times a week for 12

  3. Home-based balance training programme using Wii Fit with balance board for Parkinsons's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esculier, Jean-Francois; Vaudrin, Joanie; Bériault, Patrick; Gagnon, Karine; Tremblay, Louis E

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of a home-based balance training programme using visual feedback (Nintendo Wii Fit game with balance board) on balance and functional abilities in subjects with Parkinson's disease, and to compare the effects with a group of paired healthy subjects. Ten subjects with moderate Parkinson's disease and 8 healthy elderly subjects. Subjects participated in a 6-week home-based balance training programme using Nintendo Wii Fit and balance board. Baseline measures were taken before training for the Sit-to-Stand test (STST), Timed-Up-and-Go (TUG), Tinetti Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (POMA), 10-m walk test, Community Balance and Mobility assessment (CBM), Activities-specific Balance and Confidence scale (ABC), unipodal stance duration, and a force platform. All measurements were taken again after 3 and 6 weeks of training. The Parkinson's disease group significantly improved their results in TUG, STST, unipodal stance, 10-m walk test, CBM, POMA and force platform at the end of the 6-week training programme. The healthy subjects group significantly improved in TUG, STST, unipodal stance and CBM. This pilot study suggests that a home-based balance programme using Wii Fit with balance board could improve static and dynamic balance, mobility and functional abilities of people affected by Parkinson's disease.

  4. Class@Baikal: the Endurance of the UNESCO Training-Through-Research Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, A.; Akhmanov, G.; Khlystov, O.; Tokarev, M.; Korost, D. V.; Poort, J.; Fokina, A.; Giliazetdinova, D. R.; Yurchenko, A.; Vodopyanov, S.

    2014-12-01

    In July 2014, by the initiative of the Moscow State University and Limnological Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, the first Training-through-Research Class@Baikal was launched in Lake Baikal, Russia. The cruise program focused on seafloor sampling and acoustic investigations of gas seeps, flares, mud volcanoes, slumps and debris flows, canyons and channels in the coastal proximity. A comprehensive multidisciplinary program to train students has been developed to cover sedimentology, fluid geochemistry, biology, geophysics and marine geology in general. Daily lectures were conducted on board by academics presenting pertinent research projects, and cruise planning and preliminary results were discussed with all the scientific crew. A daily blog with updates on the expedition activities, images, and ongoing cruise results, was also completed (i.e. visit the cruise blog: http://baikal.festivalnauki.ru/) and gave the opportunity to interact with experts as well as attract the interest also of a broader audience. This project is a follow up to the well-established UNESCO Training-through-Research (TTR) Floating University Programme (http://floatinguniversity.ru/) that covered large areas on the European and arctic margins since 1991 with 18 research cruises attended by about 1000 BSc, MSc and PhD students from Europe, Asia, Africa and America. The crucial goal of both programmes is the training of new generations of scientists through active research directly on the field. Students can access the collected data and samples for their Master and PhD projects. Typically an extensive set of analyses and data processing is completed in-house and the results and interpretations are presented at post cruise meetings and international conferences. The Baikal lake is 25 million years old rift zone and provides a large variety of active geological features that can be easily reached at daily sailing distance. This represents an extraordinary opportunity to switch and focus

  5. Changes in myonuclear domain size do not precede muscle hypertrophy during prolonged resistance-type exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, T; Smeets, J S J; van Kranenburg, J; Kies, A K; van Loon, L J C; Verdijk, L B

    2016-02-01

    Muscle fibre hypertrophy is accompanied by an increase in myonuclear number, an increase in myonuclear domain size or both. It has been suggested that increases in myonuclear domain size precede myonuclear accretion and subsequent muscle fibre hypertrophy during prolonged exercise training. In this study, we assessed the changes in muscle fibre size, myonuclear and satellite cell content throughout 12 weeks of resistance-type exercise training in young men. Twenty-two young men (23 ± 1 year) were assigned to a progressive, 12-weeks resistance-type exercise training programme (3 sessions per week). Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were taken before and after 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks of exercise training. Muscle fibre size, myonuclear content, myonuclear domain size and satellite cell content were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Type I and type II muscle fibre size increased gradually throughout the 12 weeks of training (type I: 18 ± 5%, type II: 41 ± 6%, P muscle fibres. No changes in type I and type II myonuclear domain size were observed at any time point throughout the intervention. Satellite cell content increased significantly over time in both type I and type II muscle fibres (P muscle fibre hypertrophy during prolonged resistance-type exercise training in vivo in humans. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effects of Training Attendance on Muscle Strength of Young Men after 11 Weeks of Resistance Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Paulo; Bottaro, Martim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Training attendance is an important variable for attaining optimal results after a resistance training (RT) program, however, the association of attendance with the gains of muscle strength is not well defined. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to verify if attendance would affect muscle strength gains in healthy young males. Methods Ninety two young males with no previous RT experience volunteered to participate in the study. RT was performed 2 days a week for 11 weeks. One repetition maximum (1RM) in the bench press and knee extensors peak torque (PT) were measured before and after the training period. After the training period, a two step cluster analysis was used to classify the participants in accordance to training attendance, resulting in three groups, defined as high (92 to 100%), intermediate (80 to 91%) and low (60 to 79%) training attendance. Results According to the results, there were no significant correlations between strength gains and training attendance, however, when attendance groups were compared, the low training attendance group showed lower increases in 1RM bench press (8.8%) than the other two groups (17.6% and 18.0% for high and intermediate attendance, respectively). Conclusions Although there is not a direct correlation between training attendance and muscle strength gains, it is suggested that a minimum attendance of 80% is necessary to ensure optimal gains in upper body strength. PMID:23802051

  7. A dedicated BI-RADS training programme: Effect on the inter-observer variation among screening radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmers, J.M.H., E-mail: j.timmers@lrcb.nl [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, PO Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and HTA, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Doorne-Nagtegaal, H.J. van [Comprehensive Cancer Centre the Netherlands (IKNL), location Amsterdam, PO Box 9236, 1006 AE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verbeek, A.L.M. [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, PO Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and HTA, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Heeten, G.J. den [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, PO Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, PO Box 22660, 100 MD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Broeders, M.J.M. [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, PO Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and HTA, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    Introduction: The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) was introduced in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme to improve communication between medical specialists. Following introduction, a substantial variation in the use of the BI-RADS lexicon for final assessment categories was noted among screening radiologists. We set up a dedicated training programme to reduce this variation. This study evaluates whether this programme was effective. Materials and methods: Two comparable test sets were read before and after completion of the training programme. Each set contained 30 screening mammograms of referred women selected from screening practice. The sets were read by 25 experienced and 30 new screening radiologists. Cohen's kappa (κ) was used to calculate the inter-observer agreement. The BI-RADS 2003 version was implemented in the screening programme as the BI-RADS 2008 version requires the availability of diagnostic work-up, and this is unavailable. Results: The inter-observer agreement of all participating radiologists (n = 55) with the expert panel increased from a pre-training κ-value of 0.44 to a post-training κ-value of 0.48 (p = 0.14). The inter-observer agreement of the new screening radiologists (n = 30) with the expert panel increased from κ = 0.41 to κ = 0.50 (p = 0.01), whereas there was no difference in agreement among the 25 experienced radiologists (from κ = 0.48 to κ = 0.46, p = 0.60). Conclusion: Our training programme in the BI-RADS lexicon resulted in a significant improvement of agreement among new screening radiologists. Overall, the agreement among radiologists was moderate (guidelines Landis and Koch). This is in line with results found in the literature.

  8. Insecticide resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus from Zanzibar: implications for vector control programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Zanzibar has a long history of lymphatic filariasis (LF) caused by the filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti, and transmitted by the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus Say. The LF Programme in Zanzibar has successfully implemented mass drug administration (MDA) to interrupt transmission, and is now in the elimination phase. Monitoring infections in mosquitoes, and assessing the potential role of interventions such as vector control, is important in case the disease re-emerges as a public health problem. Here, we examine Culex mosquito species from the two main islands to detect W. bancrofti infection and to determine levels of susceptibility to the insecticides used for vector control. Methods Culex mosquitoes collected during routine catches in Vitongoji, Pemba Island, and Makadara, Unguja Island were tested for W. bancrofti infection using PCR. Insecticide bioassays on Culex mosquitoes were performed to determine susceptibility to permethrin, deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, DDT and bendiocarb. Additional synergism assays with piperonyl butoxide (PBO) were used for lambda-cyhalothrin. Pyrosequencing was used to determine the kdr genotype and sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) subunit performed to identify ambiguous Culex species. Results None of the wild-caught Culex mosquitoes analysed were found to be positive for W. bancrofti. High frequencies of resistance to all insecticides were found in Wete, Pemba Island, whereas Culex from the nearby site of Tibirinzi (Pemba) and in Kilimani, Unguja Island remained relatively susceptible. Species identification confirmed that mosquitoes from Wete were Culex quinquefasciatus. The majority of the Culex collected from Tibirinzi and all from Kilimani could not be identified to species by molecular assays. Two alternative kdr alleles, both resulting in a L1014F substitution were detected in Cx. quinquefasciatus from Wete with no homozygote susceptible detected. Metabolic resistance to

  9. Insecticide resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus from Zanzibar: implications for vector control programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher M; Machin, Camille; Mohammed, Khalfan; Majambere, Silas; Ali, Abdullah S; Khatib, Bakari O; McHa, Juma; Ranson, Hilary; Kelly-Hope, Louise A

    2012-04-21

    Zanzibar has a long history of lymphatic filariasis (LF) caused by the filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti, and transmitted by the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus Say. The LF Programme in Zanzibar has successfully implemented mass drug administration (MDA) to interrupt transmission, and is now in the elimination phase. Monitoring infections in mosquitoes, and assessing the potential role of interventions such as vector control, is important in case the disease re-emerges as a public health problem. Here, we examine Culex mosquito species from the two main islands to detect W. bancrofti infection and to determine levels of susceptibility to the insecticides used for vector control. Culex mosquitoes collected during routine catches in Vitongoji, Pemba Island, and Makadara, Unguja Island were tested for W. bancrofti infection using PCR. Insecticide bioassays on Culex mosquitoes were performed to determine susceptibility to permethrin, deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, DDT and bendiocarb. Additional synergism assays with piperonyl butoxide (PBO) were used for lambda-cyhalothrin. Pyrosequencing was used to determine the kdr genotype and sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) subunit performed to identify ambiguous Culex species. None of the wild-caught Culex mosquitoes analysed were found to be positive for W. bancrofti. High frequencies of resistance to all insecticides were found in Wete, Pemba Island, whereas Culex from the nearby site of Tibirinzi (Pemba) and in Kilimani, Unguja Island remained relatively susceptible. Species identification confirmed that mosquitoes from Wete were Culex quinquefasciatus. The majority of the Culex collected from Tibirinzi and all from Kilimani could not be identified to species by molecular assays. Two alternative kdr alleles, both resulting in a L1014F substitution were detected in Cx. quinquefasciatus from Wete with no homozygote susceptible detected. Metabolic resistance to pyrethroids was also implicated

  10. Evaluation of Performance Improvements After Either Resistance Training or Sprint Interval-Based Concurrent Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Richard H; Elmer, David J; Barberio, Matthew D; Salom, Lorena P; Lee, Khalil A; Pascoe, David D

    2016-11-01

    Laird IV, RH, Elmer, DJ, Barberio, MD, Salom, LP, Lee, KA, and Pascoe, DD. Evaluation of performance improvements after either resistance training or sprint interval-based concurrent training. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3057-3065, 2016-The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of concurrent sprint interval and resistance training (CST) vs. resistance training (RT) on measures of strength, power, and aerobic fitness in recreationally active women. Twenty-eight women (20.3 ± 1.7 years; 63.0 ± 9.1; 51.1 ± 7.1 1 repetition maximum (1-RM) back squat (kg); V[Combining Dot Above]O2max: 35.4 ± 4.1 ml·kg·min) were recruited to complete an 11-week training program. Participants were matched-pair assigned to CST or RT cohorts after preliminary testing, which consisted of 1-RM back squats, maximal isometric squats, anaerobic power evaluations, and maximal oxygen consumption. All subjects trained 3 days per week with sprint-interval training occurring at least 4 hours after RT in the CST cohort. Both CST and RT resulted in significant improvements (p ≤ 0.05) in the 1-RM back squat (37.5 ± 7.8; 40.0 ± 9.6 kg), maximal isometric force (55.7 ± 51.3; 53.7 ± 36.7 kg), average peak anaerobic power testing (7.4 ± 6.2; 7.6 ± 6.4%), and zero-incline treadmill velocity, resulting in maximal oxygen consumption (1.8 ± 0.6; 0.8 ± 0.6 km·h). Only zero-incline treadmill velocity demonstrated a group-by-time interaction with a greater improvement after CST (p training might supplement programs already in place.

  11. Strategies for Optimizing Strength, Power, and Muscle Hypertrophy in Women: Contribution of Upper Body Resistance Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kraemer, William

    1999-01-01

    To determine the performance and physiological effects of various physical conditioning programs in women, total body, upper-body resistance training groups, field training and aerobic training groups (n = 11 to 21...

  12. Effect of support group peer facilitator training programmes on peer facilitator and support group member outcomes: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Delisle, Vanessa C; Gumuchian, Stephanie T; Kloda, Lorie A; Boruff, Jill; El-Baalbaki, Ghassan; K?rner, Annett; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Thombs, Brett D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Peer facilitators play an important role in determining the success of many support groups for patients with medical illnesses. However, many facilitators do not receive training for their role and report a number of challenges in fulfilling their responsibilities. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effects of training and support programmes for peer facilitators of support groups for people with medical illnesses on (1) the competency and self-efficacy of g...

  13. Recommendations for natural bodybuilding contest preparation: resistance and cardiovascular training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, E R; Fitschen, P J; Aragon, A A; Cronin, J; Schoenfeld, B J

    2015-03-01

    The anabolic effect of resistance training can mitigate muscle loss during contest preparation. In reviewing relevant literature, we recommend a periodized approach be utilized. Block and undulating models show promise. Muscle groups should be trained 2 times weekly or more, although high volume training may benefit from higher frequencies to keep volume at any one session from becoming excessive. Low to high (~3-15) repetitions can be utilized but most repetitions should occur in the 6-12 range using 70-80% of 1 repetition maximum. Roughly 40-70 reps per muscle group per session should be performed, however higher volume may be appropriate for advanced bodybuilders. Traditional rest intervals of 1-3 minutes are adequate, but longer intervals can be used. Tempo should allow muscular control of the load; 1-2 s concentric and 2-3 s eccentric tempos. Training to failure should be limited when performing heavy loads on taxing exercises, and primarily relegated to single-joint exercises and higher repetitions. A core of multi-joint exercises with some single-joint exercises to address specific muscle groups as needed should be used, emphasizing full range of motion and proper form. Cardiovascular training can be used to enhance fat loss. Interference with strength training adaptations increases concomitantly with frequency and duration of cardiovascular training. Thus, the lowest frequency and duration possible while achieving sufficient fat loss should be used. Full-body modalities or cycling may reduce interference. High intensities may as well; however, require more recovery. Fasted cardiovascular training may not have benefits over fed-state and could be detrimental.

  14. Responding to the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis crisis: mainstreaming programmatic management to the Philippine National Tuberculosis Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quelapio, M I D; Mira, N R C; Orillaza-Chi, R B; Belen, V; Muñez, N; Belchez, R; Egos, G E; Evangelista, M; Vianzon, R; Tupasi, T E

    2010-06-01

    The Philippines ranks eighth among 27 priority countries for multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). To describe a model of public-private partnership in MDR-TB management. An exploratory study of integrating MDR-TB management initiated in private-public mix DOTS into the National TB Programme (NTP). Recognising that MDR-TB was a threat to DOTS, the Tropical Disease Foundation initiated MDR-TB management in 1999. An official mandate for the integration of MDR-TB services into the NTP was issued by the Department of Health in 2008. With an increased government budget augmented by support from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, 1294 MDR-TB patients were placed on treatment from 1999 to 2008. The treatment success rate improved from 64% in 1999 to 75% in 2005. There are now five MDR-TB treatment centres with 181 treatment sites in Metro Manila, and three culture centres. People trained include 12 master trainers, 31 trainers, 25 treatment centre and 381 treatment site staff. Mainstreaming into the NTP of this unique model of MDR-TB management through a dynamic public-private collaboration can be considered best practice in implementation science of an evidence-based intervention leading to change in health care policy and practice.

  15. Scaffolding for motivation by parents, and child homework motivations and emotions: Effects of a training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moè, Angelica; Katz, Idit; Alesi, Marianna

    2018-03-05

    Based on the principles of scaffolding for motivation and on the assumptions of self-determination theory, two studies aimed to assess the role played by perceived parental autonomy-supportive scaffolding on child homework autonomous motivation, self-efficacy, affect, and engagement. The results of Study 1, which involved 122 parents and their children, showed that the higher the parental autonomous motivation, the more their children perceived them as autonomy-supportive while scaffolding for motivation, and hence developed autonomous motivation, self-efficacy, and engagement in homework. In Study 2, 37 parents were involved in a four-session training programme that focused on sustaining autonomy-supportive scaffolding modalities. The training decreased parental negative affect, prevented child negative affect increase, and maintained child homework motivation. The discussion focuses on the strength that parents have with regard to helping their children develop less negative, and potentially also more positive attitude towards homework, through autonomy support as a scaffold for motivation. © 2018 The British Psychological Society.

  16. 2003 - 2004 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME: 2nd Term - 12 January to 31 March 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 12, 13, 14 January Microelectronics and Nanoelectronics: Trends, and Applications to HEP Instrumentation by P. Jarron / CERN-EP 2, 3, 4 February Quantum Teleportation : Principles and Applications by N. Gisin / Univ. of Geneva, CH 16, 17, 18, 19, 20 February Physics of Extra Dimensions by V. Rubakov / Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, RU 1, 2, 3, 4, March Physics of Shower Simulation at LHC at the Example of GEANT4 by J.P. Wellisch / CERN-EP 8, 9, 11, 12 March Introduction to Cryogenic Engineering by H. Quack / Technische Universität Dresden, D 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 March Neutrinos By Y. Nir / Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, IL LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS 29, 30, 31 March, 1, 2 April Physics beyond the Standard Model by L. Ibanez / CERN-TH The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any chang...

  17. 2003 - 2004 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME: 2nd Term - 12 January to 31 March 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 12, 13, 14 January Microelectronics and Nanoelectronics: Trends, and Applications to HEP Instrumentation by P. Jarron / CERN-EP 2, 3, 4 February Quantum Teleportation : Principles and Applications by N. Gisin / Univ. of Geneva, CH 16, 17, 18, 19, 20 February Physics of Extra Dimensions by V. Rubakov / Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, RU 1, 2, 3, 4, March Physics of Shower Simulation at LHC at the Example of GEANT4 by J.P. Wellisch / CERN-EP 8, 9, 11, 12 March Introduction to Cryogenic Engineering by H. Quack / Technische Universität Dresden, D 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 March Neutrinos By Y. Nir / Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, IL LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS 29, 30, 31 March, 1, 2 April Physics beyond the Standard Model by L. Ibanez / CERN-TH The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to...

  18. Effects of aerobic training, resistance training, or both on psychological health in adolescents with obesity: The HEARTY randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfield, Gary S; Kenny, Glen P; Alberga, Angela S; Prud'homme, Denis; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Gougeon, Réjeanne; Phillips, Penny; Tulloch, Heather; Malcolm, Janine; Doucette, Steve; Wells, George A; Ma, Jinhui; Cameron, Jameason D; Sigal, Ronald J

    2015-12-01

    To determine the effects of aerobic training, resistance training, and combined training on mood, body image, and self-esteem in adolescents with obesity. After a 4-week prerandomization treatment, 304 postpubertal adolescents (91 males, 213 females) with obesity ages 14-18 years were randomized to 1 of 4 groups for 22 weeks: aerobic training (n = 75), resistance training (n = 78), combined aerobic and resistance training (n = 75), or nonexercising control (n = 76). All participants received dietary counseling, with a daily energy deficit of 250 kcal. Mood was measured using the Brunel Mood Scale. Body image was assessed using the Multiple Body Self-Relations Questionnaire, and physical self-perceptions and global self-esteem were measured using the Harter Physical Self-Perceptions Questionnaire. Median adherence was 62%, 56%, and 64% in aerobic, resistance, and combined training, respectively. Resistance and combined training produced greater improvements than control on vigor, and resistance training reduced depressive symptoms. All groups improved on body image and physical self-perceptions, but combined showed greater increases than control on perceived physical conditioning, while only resistance training showed greater increases than controls on global self-esteem. Both combined and resistance training demonstrated greater increases in perceived strength than control. Psychological benefits were more related to better adherence and reductions in body fat than changes in strength or fitness. Resistance training, alone or in combination with aerobic training, may provide psychological benefits in adolescents with overweight or obesity, and therefore could be an alternative to aerobic training for some individuals in the biological and psychological management of adolescent obesity. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Effects of resistance training and aerobic training on ambulation in chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severinsen, Kaare; Jakobsen, Johannes K; Pedersen, Asger R; Overgaard, Kristian; Andersen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to directly compare the effects of aerobic training (AT) with progressive resistance training (RT) after stroke to determine whether AT-induced fitness gains or RT-induced strength gains translate into improved ambulation across a 12-wk intervention and whether gains are retained 1 yr after cessation of formal training. This study is a randomized controlled 12-wk intervention trial with a 1-yr follow-up. Forty-three community-dwelling independent walkers with a chronic ischemic hemiparetic stroke were allocated to AT using a cycle ergometer (n = 13), RT using training machines (n = 14), or low-intensity sham training of the arms (n = 16). The main outcome measures were 6-min walk distance and fast 10-m walking speed. Comparisons between AT, RT, and sham training revealed no clinically relevant effects on walking velocity or walking distance. Muscle strength improved after RT (P muscle strength or aerobic capacity using non-task-specific training methods does not result in improved ambulation in patients with chronic stroke. Muscle strength gains were maintained at follow-up, whereas all improvements of aerobic capacity were lost, indicating a long-lasting effect of intensive RT even without maintenance training.

  20. A Training Programme on Managing Science Class Interactions: Its Impact on Teachers' Practises and on Their Pupils' Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morge, Ludovic; Toczek, Marie-Christine; Chakroun, Nadia

    2010-01-01

    This research evaluates the impact of a training programme on trainee physics and chemistry teachers, focusing on the way pupils' explanations are dealt with during teacher-pupil interaction. The population is composed of 10 teachers and 303 pupils, from which the experimental sample was taken (8 teachers and 172 pupils). The qualitative analysis…

  1. Fostering pupils’ lifelong learning competencies in the classroom : evaluation of a training programme using a multivariate multilevel growth curve approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüftenegger, Marko; Finsterwald, Monika; Klug, Julia; Bergsmann, Evelyn; van de Schoot, Rens; Schober, Barbara; Wagner, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based interventions to promote lifelong learning are needed not only in continuing education but also in schools, which lay important cornerstones for lifelong learning. The present article reports evaluation results about the effectiveness of one such training programme (TALK). TALK aims

  2. A Longitudinal Investigation of the Preservice Science Teachers' Beliefs about Science Teaching during a Science Teacher Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldur, Serkan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to investigate the changes in preservice science teachers' beliefs about science teaching during a science teacher training programme. The study was designed as a panel study, and the data were collected from the same participants at the end of each academic year during a four-year period. The participants…

  3. The effect of a clinical pharmacist-led training programme on intravenous medication errors : a controlled before and after study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Huong; Pham, Hong-Tham; Vo, Dang-Khoa; Nguyen, Tuan-Dung; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Taxis, Katja

    Background Little is known about interventions to reduce intravenous medication administration errors in hospitals, especially in low-and middle-income countries. Objective To assess the effect of a clinical pharmacist-led training programme on clinically relevant errors during intravenous

  4. Evaluating a Research Training Programme for People with Intellectual Disabilities Participating in Inclusive Research: The Views of Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullana, Judit; Pallisera, Maria; Català, Elena; Puyalto, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Background: This article presents the results of evaluating a research training programme aimed at developing the skills of people with intellectual disabilities to actively participate in inclusive research. Methods: The present authors opted for a responsive approach to evaluation, using a combination of interviews, questionnaires and focus…

  5. Convergence and Divergence: Examining Perceptions of Chinese and Expatriate Project Implementers on Cross-Cultural Teacher Training Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chunmei

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on a study of perceptions of Chinese and expatriate personnel on a Sino-British English teacher training programmme on a range of issues with regard to the programme. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews were conducted to gather information from 17 Chinese and three British project participants. It was found that there…

  6. The Effect of Using a Multiple Intelligences-Based Training Programme on Developing English Majors' Oral Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mahmoud Mohammad Sayed

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of using a Multiple Intelligences-Based Training Programme on developing first-year English majors' oral communication skills. Based on literature review and related studies, a list of 20 oral communication skills was prepared and displayed over a panel of jury members to select…

  7. A Programme-Wide Training Framework to Facilitate Scientific Communication Skills Development amongst Biological Sciences Masters Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divan, Aysha; Mason, Sam

    2016-01-01

    In this article we describe the effectiveness of a programme-wide communication skills training framework incorporated within a one-year biological sciences taught Masters course designed to enhance the competency of students in communicating scientific research principally to a scientific audience. In one class we analysed the numerical marks…

  8. Efficacy of physiotherapy including a craniocervical training programme for tension-type headache; a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ettekoven, H.; Lucas, C.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a multicentre, randomized controlled trial with blinded outcome assessment. The treatment period was 6 weeks with follow-up assessment immediately thereafter and after 6 months. The objective was to determine the effectiveness of a craniocervical training programme combined with

  9. "Now It Is about Me Having to Learn Something …." Partners' Experiences with a Dutch Conversation Partner Training Programme (PACT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielaert, Sandra M.; Berns, Philine; van de Sandt-Koenderman, Mieke W. M. E.; Dammers, Nina; Sage, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Background: The increase in the number of reported conversation partner programmes for conversation partners of people with aphasia demonstrates increased awareness of partner needs and the positive effect of trained partners on the communicative abilities of the person with aphasia. Predominantly small-scale studies describe the effectiveness of…

  10. Hypnosis-Induced Mental Training Programmes as a Strategy to Improve the Self-Concept of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, H. M.; Louw, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    The creation and implementation of strategies that could improve student development is receiving new research interest. The main objective of the research was to establish whether hypnosis-induced mental training programmes as a strategy could alter the self-concept of students which in turn could improve their overall academic functioning. Two…

  11. Do women with pelvic floor dysfunction referred by gynaecologists and urologists at hospitals complete a pelvic floor muscle training programme?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2013-01-01

    For decades women with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) have been referred to pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), but there is only little information on whether the women complete the programmes and why. The objectives of this study were to investigate to which extent women completed a PFMT...

  12. Comparison between Synchronous and Asynchronous Instructional Delivery Method of Training Programme on In-Service Physical Educators' Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanouilidou, Kyriaki; Derri, Vassiliki; Antoniou, Panagiotis; Kyrgiridis, Pavlos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the influences of a training programme's instructional delivery method (synchronous and asynchronous) on Greek in-service physical educators' cognitive understanding on student assessment. Forty nine participants were randomly divided into synchronous, asynchronous, and control group. The experimental groups…

  13. Effects of a Short Teacher Training Programme on the Management of Children's Sexual Behaviours: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnaud, Jean-Paul; Turner, William

    2015-01-01

    This small-scale quasi-experimental study set out to examine the effects of a brief training programme aiming to develop primary school teachers' knowledge, attitudes and confidence in recognising and responding to children who display sexual behaviours. Data on prevalence of sexual behaviours observed by teachers in the study, their level of…

  14. The Effect of a Training Programme in Creativity on Developing the Creative Abilities among Children with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dababneh, Kholoud A.; al-Masa'deh, Mu'tasem M.; Oliemat, Enass M.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of a training programme in creativity on developing creative abilities among 9-10-year-old children with visual impairment in Jordan. The study sample consisted of 41 students from fourth and fifth grades, who were randomly selected and divided into two experimental groups and two control groups. To…

  15. Effects of Self-Efficacy Training Programmes on Adolescents' Sexual Risk-Taking Behaviour in Oyo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Titilayo Monsurat

    2017-01-01

    Adolescents' sexual risk-taking behavioural issues have generated concerns among parents, teachers and social workers. The study examined the effects of self-efficacy training programmes on adolescents' sexual risk-taking behaviour and also investigated whether socio-economic status and gender would moderate the effects of treatment on sexual…

  16. Teaching general practitioners and doctors-in-training to discuss advance care planning: evaluation of a brief multimodality education programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detering, Karen; Silvester, William; Corke, Charlie; Milnes, Sharyn; Fullam, Rachael; Lewis, Virginia; Renton, Jodie

    2014-09-01

    To develop and evaluate an interactive advance care planning (ACP) educational programme for general practitioners and doctors-in-training. Development of training materials was overseen by a committee; informed by literature and previous teaching experience. The evaluation assessed participant confidence, knowledge and attitude toward ACP before and after training. Training provided to metropolitan and rural settings in Victoria, Australia. 148 doctors participated in training. The majority were aged at least 40 years with more than 10 years work experience; 63% had not trained in Australia. The programme included prereading, a DVD, interactive patient e-simulation workshop and a training manual. All educational materials followed an evidence-based stepwise approach to ACP: Introducing the topic, exploring concepts, introducing solutions and summarising the conversation. The primary outcome was the change in doctors' self-reported confidence to undertake ACP conversations. Secondary measures included pretest/post-test scores in patient ACP e-simulation, change in ACP knowledge and attitude, and satisfaction with programme materials. 69 participants completed the preworkshop and postworkshop evaluation. Following education, there was a significant change in self-reported confidence in six of eight items (p=0.008 -0.08). There was a significant improvement (ptraining, and most participants were supportive of patient autonomy and ACP pretraining. Educational materials were rated highly. A short multimodal interactive education programme improves doctors' confidence with ACP and performance on an ACP patient e-simulation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Resistance training vs. static stretching: effects on flexibility and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Sam K; Whitehead, James R; Brinkert, Ronald H; Caine, Dennis J

    2011-12-01

    Morton, SK, Whitehead, JR, Brinkert, RH, and Caine, DJ. Resistance training vs. static stretching: Effects on flexibility and strength. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3391-3398, 2011-The purpose of this study was to determine how full-range resistance training (RT) affected flexibility and strength compared to static stretching (SS) of the same muscle-joint complexes in untrained adults. Volunteers (n = 25) were randomized to an RT or SS training group. A group of inactive volunteers (n = 12) served as a convenience control group (CON). After pretesting hamstring extension, hip flexion and extension, shoulder extension flexibility, and peak torque of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, subjects completed 5-week SS or RT treatments in which the aim was to stretch or to strength train the same muscle-joint complexes over similar movements and ranges. Posttests of flexibility and strength were then conducted. There was no difference in hamstring flexibility, hip flexion, and hip extension improvement between RT and SS, but both were superior to CON values. There were no differences between groups on shoulder extension flexibility. The RT group was superior to the CON in knee extension peak torque, but there were no differences between groups on knee flexion peak torque. The results of this preliminary study suggest that carefully constructed full-range RT regimens can improve flexibility as well as the typical SS regimens employed in conditioning programs. Because of the potential practical significance of these results to strength and conditioning programs, further studies using true experimental designs, larger sample sizes, and longer training durations should be conducted with the aim of confirming or disproving these results.

  18. Co-producing public involvement training with members of the public and research organisations in the East Midlands: creating, delivering and evaluating the lay assessor training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horobin, Adele; Brown, George; Higton, Fred; Vanhegan, Stevie; Wragg, Andrew; Wray, Paula; Walker, Dawn-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Members of the public share their views with researchers to improve health and social care research. Lay assessing is one way of doing this. This is where people, drawing upon personal and general life experience, comment on material, such as grant applications and patient information, to highlight strengths and weaknesses and to suggest improvements. This paper reports on setting up a training programme for lay assessors. Meetings were held between interested public and staff from research organisations. People discussed what lay assessing is, why they want to do it, skills and support needed and if training was wanted. They were invited to form a group to develop the training together. Training was delivered in the East Midlands. People who attended gave their thoughts about it by completing questionnaires and joining a feedback event. The group developed the structure of the training programme together and it oversaw the development of the training content by individual members. People who attended training reported feeling more confident about lay assessing. This was particularly so for those who had not done lay assessing before. They indicated how valuable it was to talk with others at the training. Our findings support the National Institute for Health Research recommendations for improving learning and development for public involvement in research. This project has created a solid base for local research organisations to work together in public involvement training. Lay assessor training is now part of a wider programme of shared resources called the Sharebank. Background Involving members of the public in research can improve its quality and incorporate the needs and views of patients. One method for doing this is lay assessing, where members of the public are consulted to improve research materials. This paper documents the establishment of a pilot training programme for lay assessors. It describes a way of working that embodies a regional, cross

  19. The College of Anaesthetists of Ireland Simulation Training programme: a descriptive report and analysis of course participants' feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafferkey, Aine; Coyle, Elizabeth; Greaney, David; Harte, Sinead; Hayes, Niamh; Langdon, Miriam; Straub, Birgitt; Burlacu, Crina

    2018-03-20

    Simulation-based education is a modern training modality that allows healthcare professionals to develop knowledge and practice skills in a safe learning environment. The College of Anaesthetists of Ireland (CAI) was the first Irish postgraduate medical training body to introduce mandatory simulation training into its curriculum. Extensive quality assurance and improvement data has been collected on all simulation courses to date. Describe The College of Anaesthetists of Ireland Simulation Training (CAST) programme and report the analysis of course participants' feedback. A retrospective review of feedback forms from four simulation courses from March 2010 to August 2016 took place. Qualitative and quantitative data from 1069 participants who attended 112 courses was analysed. Feedback was overall very positive. Course content and delivery were deemed to be appropriate. Participants agreed that course participation would influence their future practice. A statistically significant difference (P simulation training in specialist anaesthesia training in Ireland.

  20. Effect of a self-efficacy promotion training programme on the body weight changes in patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliasgharpour, Mansooreh; Shomali, Maryam; Moghaddam, Masoumeh Zakeri; Faghihzadeh, Sograt

    2012-09-01

    Haemodialysis is the most common form of medical management of patients affected by end-stage renal disease (ESRD). For haemodialysis to be successful, strict fluid and weight control is recommended. Education, in terms of self-care activities, is an important intervention for improving patients' outcomes. A self-efficacy promotion training programme can be an effective strategy to bring about behavioural change. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a self-efficacy promotion training programme on the body weight changes in patients undergoing haemodialysis. In this single-blind quasi-experimental study, we recruited a convenience sample of 63 patients undergoing haemodialy-sis from two teaching hospitals and allocated them randomly to the experimental or control group. Patients in the experimental group received a six-session self-efficacy promotion training programme while the control group received the routine care of the institute. Mean body weight gain and self-efficacy were measured before, immediately and two months after the study. The groups did not differ significantly regarding the study variable before the study. However, immediately and two months after the study, the mean body weight gain and self-efficacy in the experimental group were significantly lower and higher, respectively, than the control group (p training programme is effective in decreasing weight gain and increasing self-efficacy in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Nurses in haemodialysis units can use self-efficacy promotion training programmes as an effective intervention for improving patients' outcomes. © 2012 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  1. Training Deep Convolutional Neural Networks with Resistive Cross-Point Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokmen, Tayfun; Onen, Murat; Haensch, Wilfried

    2017-01-01

    In a previous work we have detailed the requirements for obtaining maximal deep learning performance benefit by implementing fully connected deep neural networks (DNN) in the form of arrays of resistive devices. Here we extend the concept of Resistive Processing Unit (RPU) devices to convolutional neural networks (CNNs). We show how to map the convolutional layers to fully connected RPU arrays such that the parallelism of the hardware can be fully utilized in all three cycles of the backpropagation algorithm. We find that the noise and bound limitations imposed by the analog nature of the computations performed on the arrays significantly affect the training accuracy of the CNNs. Noise and bound management techniques are presented that mitigate these problems without introducing any additional complexity in the analog circuits and that can be addressed by the digital circuits. In addition, we discuss digitally programmable update management and device variability reduction techniques that can be used selectively for some of the layers in a CNN. We show that a combination of all those techniques enables a successful application of the RPU concept for training CNNs. The techniques discussed here are more general and can be applied beyond CNN architectures and therefore enables applicability of the RPU approach to a large class of neural network architectures.

  2. Shoulder injuries attributed to resistance training: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolber, Morey J; Beekhuizen, Kristina S; Cheng, Ming-Shun S; Hellman, Madeleine A

    2010-06-01

    The popularity of resistance training (RT) is evident by the more than 45 million Americans who engage in strength training regularly. Although the health and fitness benefits ascribed to RT are generally agreed upon, participation is not without risk. Acute and chronic injuries attributed to RT have been cited in the epidemiological literature among both competitive and recreational participants. The shoulder complex in particular has been alluded to as one of the most prevalent regions of injury. The purpose of this manuscript is to present an overview of documented shoulder injuries among the RT population and where possible discern mechanisms of injury and risk factors. A literature search was conducted in the PUBMED, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and OVID databases to identify relevant articles for inclusion using combinations of key words: resistance training, shoulder, bodybuilding, weightlifting, shoulder injury, and shoulder disorder. The results of the review indicated that up to 36% of documented RT-related injuries and disorders occur at the shoulder complex. Trends that increased the likelihood of injury were identified and inclusive of intrinsic risk factors such as joint and muscle imbalances and extrinsic risk factors, namely, that of improper attention to exercise technique. A majority of the available research was retrospective in nature, consisting of surveys and descriptive epidemiological reports. A paucity of research was available to identify predictive variables leading to injury, suggesting the need for future prospective-based investigations.

  3. Parent training in nonviolent resistance for adult entitled dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Eli; Dolberger, Dan; Nortov, Efi; Omer, Haim

    2012-03-01

    "Adult entitled dependence" is a condition characterized by the extreme dependence of grown children on their family and by levels of dysfunction, seemingly excessive in light of their apparent capacity to function. The family and the dependent adult become involved in an interaction in which the very attempts to alleviate the problem may aggravate it. Parent-training in nonviolent resistance (NVR) is an intervention that has been shown to be helpful to parents of behaviorally disturbed youth. Parent training in NVR offers parents means to shift away from a stance of helplessness toward realistic goals that are accomplishable without the collaboration of their offspring. We report on the parents of 27 entitled dependent grown children who participated in parent training in NVR. Additionally, we present 2 detailed case studies that exemplify the problem and the therapeutic process. Before treatment, the dependent adults were not working or studying, drew heavily on parental services (financial or otherwise), and were resistant to parental attempts to change the situation. Most parents succeeded in overcoming their helplessness and reducing the provision of parental services. In a considerable proportion of cases, the grown children started working or studying or moved to independent lodgings. © FPI, Inc.

  4. Effects of Resistance Training on Ventricular Function and Hypertrophy in a Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barauna, Valério Garrone; Rosa, Kaleizu Teodoro; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; de Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to follow the ventricular function and cardiac hypertrophy in rats undergoing a resistance-training program for a period of 3 months. Design: Forty animals were divided into two major groups: control (n=16) and resistance trained (n=24). From the resistance-trained group, 12 animals were resistance trained for 1 month and another 12 for 3 months. The resistance-training protocol was performed with 4 sets of 12 repetitions using 65% to 75% of one repetition maximum (maximum lifted weight with the exercise apparatus). Methods: Echocardiographic analysis was performed at the beginning of the resistance-training period and at the end of each month. The repetition maximum was measured every 2 weeks. Cardiac hypertrophy was determined by echocardiography, by the absolute weight of the cardiac chambers and by histology of the left ventricle. Results: Before resistance training, both groups had similar repetition maximums, ranging from 1.8-fold to 2-fold the body weight; however, at the end of the resistance-training period, the repetition maximum of the resistance-trained group was 6-fold greater than the body weight. The left ventricular mass as assessed by echocardiography was 8%, 12% and 16% larger in the resistance-trained group than in the control group in the first, second and third months, respectively. This hypertrophy showed a similar increase in the interventricular septum and in the free posterior wall mass. There was no reduction in the end-diastolic left ventricular internal diameter during the 3-month resistance-training period. Systolic function did not differ between the groups throughout the resistance-training period. Conclusion: Resistance training induces the development of concentric cardiac hypertrophy without ventricular dysfunction or cavity reduction. Although diastolic function was not completely investigated, we cannot exclude the possibility that resistance training results in diastolic dysfunction. PMID

  5. Evaluation of muscle activity during a standardized shoulder resistance training bout in novice individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2012-01-01

    Momentary fatigue is an important variable in resistance training periodization programs. Although several studies have examined neuromuscular activity during single repetitions of resistance training, information is lacking in regard to neuromuscular fatigue indices throughout a full resistance......, infraspinatus, and serratus anterior increased, and MPF decreased within each set-indicating momentary neuromuscular fatigue. By contrast, no such change was observed between the 3 sets. This indicates that momentary neuromuscular fatigue in shoulder resistance training is induced more efficiently within a set...

  6. Training Volume, Not Frequency, Indicative of Maximal Strength Adaptations to Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquhoun, Ryan J; Gai, Christopher M; Aguilar, Danielle; Bove, Daniel; Dolan, Jeffrey; Vargas, Andres; Couvillion, Kaylee; Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Campbell, Bill I

    2018-01-05

    To compare the effects of a high- versus a moderate-training frequency on maximal strength and body composition. 28 young, healthy resistance-trained males were randomly assigned to either: 3x/week (3x; n=16) or 6x/week (6x; n=12). Dependent variables (DVs) assessed at baseline and after the 6-week training intervention included: squat 1RM (SQ1RM), bench press 1RM (BP1RM), deadlift 1RM (DL1RM), powerlifting total (PLT), Wilk's coefficient (WC), fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM). Data for each DV was analyzed via a 2x2 between-within factorial repeated measures ANOVA. There was a main effect for time (p < 0.001) for SQ1RM (3x: + 16.8 kg; 6x: + 16.7 kg), BP1RM (3x: + 7.8 kg; 6x: + 8.8 kg), DL1RM (3x: + 19 kg; 6x: + 21 kg), PLT (3x: + 43.6 kg; 6x: + 46.5 kg), WC (3x: + 27; 6x: + 27.1), and FFM (3x: + 1.7 kg; 6x: + 2.6 kg). There were no group x time interactions or main effects for group. The primary finding was that 6-weeks of resistance training lead to significant increases in maximal strength and fat-free mass. Additionally, it appears that increased training frequency does not lead to additional strength improvements when volume and intensity are equated. Practical Application: High frequency (6x/wk) resistance training does not appear to offer additional strength and hypertrophy benefits over lower frequency (3x/wk), when volume and intensity are equated. Coaches and practitioners can therefore expect similar increases in strength and lean body mass with both 3- and 6-weekly sessions.

  7. The effects of low-volume resistance training with and without advanced techniques in trained subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieβsing, Jùrgen; Fisher, James; Steele, James; Rothe, Frank; Raubold, Kristin; Eichmann, Björn

    2016-03-01

    This study examined low-volume resistance training (RT) in trained participants with and without advanced training methods. Trained participants (RT experience 4±3 years) were randomised to groups performing single-set RT: ssRM (N.=21) performing repetitions to self-determined repetition maximum (RM), ssMMF (N.=30) performing repetitions to momentary muscular failure (MMF), and ssRP (N.=28) performing repetitions to self-determined RM using a rest pause (RP) method. Each performed supervised RT twice/week for 10 weeks. Outcomes included maximal isometric strength and body composition using bioelectrical impedance analysis. The ssRM group did not significantly improve in any outcome. The ssMMF and ssRP groups both significantly improved strength (p groups. Strength ES's were considered large for ssMMF (0.91 to 1.57) and ranging small to large for ssRP (0.42 to 1.06). Body composition data revealed significant improvements (PTraining to self-determined RM is not efficacious for trained participants. Training to MMF produces greatest improvements in strength and body composition, however, RP style training does offer some benefit.

  8. Outcomes of a virtual-reality simulator-training programme on basic surgical skills in robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phé, Véronique; Cattarino, Susanna; Parra, Jérôme; Bitker, Marc-Olivier; Ambrogi, Vanina; Vaessen, Christophe; Rouprêt, Morgan

    2017-06-01

    The utility of the virtual-reality robotic simulator in training programmes has not been clearly evaluated. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of a virtual-reality robotic simulator-training programme on basic surgical skills. A simulator-training programme in robotic surgery, using the da Vinci Skills Simulator, was evaluated in a population including junior and seasoned surgeons, and non-physicians. Their performances on robotic dots and suturing-skin pod platforms before and after virtual-simulation training were rated anonymously by surgeons experienced in robotics. 39 participants were enrolled: 14 medical students and residents in surgery, 14 seasoned surgeons, 11 non-physicians. Junior and seasoned surgeons' performances on platforms were not significantly improved after virtual-reality robotic simulation in any of the skill domains, in contrast to non-physicians. The benefits of virtual-reality simulator training on several tasks to basic skills in robotic surgery were not obvious among surgeons in our initial and early experience with the simulator. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Corticosteroid injections, eccentric decline squat training and heavy slow resistance training in patellar tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M; Kovanen, V; Aagaard, P

    2009-01-01

    A randomized-controlled single-blind trial was conducted to investigate the clinical, structural and functional effects of peritendinous corticosteroid injections (CORT), eccentric decline squat training (ECC) and heavy slow resistance training (HSR) in patellar tendinopathy. Thirty-nine male...... patients were randomized to CORT, ECC or HSR for 12 weeks. We assessed function and symptoms (VISA-p questionnaire), tendon pain during activity (VAS), treatment satisfaction, tendon swelling, tendon vascularization, tendon mechanical properties and collagen crosslink properties. Assessments were made at 0...

  10. Radiation protection research and training programme, radiation protection programme revision 1988-89, post-Chernobyl actions executive summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The CEC radiation protection research programme has taken several important initiatives to address the scientific problems created by the Chernobyl accident. It has defined additional research requirements, reoriented some existing research contracts and strategically placed some new contracts. It also asked for a revision of the current 1985-89 programme to deal with some particularly urgent issues: evaluation of data on the transfer of radionuclides in the food chain; improvement of reliable long-distance atmospheric transport models; radiological aspects of nuclear accident scenarios: (a) real-time emergency response systems, (b) the RADE-AID system; monitoring and surveillance in accident situations; underlying data for derived emergency reference levels; improvement of practical countermeasures against nuclear contamination in the agricultural environment; improvement of practical countermeasures against nuclear contamination in the urban environment; improvement of practical countermeasures: preventive medication; treatment and biological dosimetry of exposed persons; feasibility of studies on health effects due to the reactor accident at Chernobyl. This synopsis aims to present, in an easily understandable way, the rationale for and the principal results of the research undertaken in this area. As a whole, this research has considerably improved Community ability to handle such emergency situations and has developed the cohesion of Community science

  11. An education and training programme for radiological institutes: impact on the reduction of the CT radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindera, Sebastian T.; Allmen, Gabriel von; Vock, Peter; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt [University of Berne, University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Berne, Berne (Switzerland); Treier, Reto; Trueb, Philipp R. [Federal Office of Public Health, Radiation Protection Division, Berne (Switzerland); Nauer, Claude [University of Berne, University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University Hospital Berne, Berne (Switzerland)

    2011-10-15

    To establish an education and training programme for the reduction of CT radiation doses and to assess this programme's efficacy. Ten radiological institutes were counselled. The optimisation programme included a small group workshop and a lecture on radiation dose reduction strategies. The radiation dose used for five CT protocols (paranasal sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary angiography and abdomen) was assessed using the dose-length product (DLP) before and after the optimisation programme. The mean DLP values were compared with national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The average reduction of the DLP after optimisation was 37% for the sinuses (180 vs. 113 mGycm, P < 0.001), 9% for the brain (982 vs. 896 mGycm, P < 0.05), 24% for the chest (425 vs. 322 mGycm, P < 0.05) and 42% for the pulmonary arteries (352 vs. 203 mGycm, P < 0.001). No significant change in DLP was found for abdominal CT. The post-optimisation DLP values of the sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary arteries and abdomen were 68%, 10%, 20%, 55% and 15% below the DRL, respectively. The education and training programme for radiological institutes is effective in achieving a substantial reduction in CT radiation dose. (orig.)

  12. Impact of exercise training without caloric restriction on inflammation, insulin resistance and visceral fat mass in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, M; Michallet, A-S; Monneret, D; Perrin, C; Estève, F; Lombard, P R; Faure, P; Lévy, P; Favre-Juvin, A; Pépin, J-L; Wuyam, B; Flore, P

    2015-08-01

    Exercise training has been shown to improve cardiometabolic health in obese adolescents. Evaluate the impact of a 12-week exercise-training programme (without caloric restriction) on obese adolescents' cardiometabolic and vascular risk profiles. We measured systemic markers of oxidation, inflammation, metabolic variables and endothelial function in 20 obese adolescents (OB) (age: 14.5 ± 1.5 years; body mass index: 34.0 ± 4.7 kg m(-2) ) and 20 age- and gender-matched normal-weight adolescents (NW). Body composition was assessed by magnetic resonance imagery. Peak aerobic capacity and maximal fat oxidation were evaluated during specific incremental exercise tests. OB participated in a 12-week exercise-training programme. OB presented lower peak aerobic capacity (24.2 ± 5.9 vs. 39.8 ± 8.3 mL kg(-1)  min(-1) , P training, despite lack of weight loss, VO2peak (mL.kg(-1) .min(-1) ) and maximal fat oxidation increased (P training on improving the inflammatory profile and insulin resistance of OB in the absence of weight loss. However, those who lost a greater amount of visceral fat mass showed greater benefits in terms of insulin profile, triglycerides and maximal fat oxidation. © 2014 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2014 World Obesity.

  13. The Effect of Eight Weeks Resistance Training on Leptin and Insulin Resistance in Obese Female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khalili

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Leptin , the main peptide secreted by adipose tissue, is considered an alarming factor in the regulation of body fat content . With regard to the physiological effect of exercise as one of the potential regulators of leptin secretion from adipose tissue , this study was performed to examine the effects of resistance exercise on leptin. Materials & Methods: Twenty inactive and obese female students (10 controls and 10 experi-mentals participated in this study. The subjects in the experimental group performed an 8 week resistance training program (chest press, leg press, lat pull down, leg curl, bicep curl, leg extension with 60 - 70 percent of 1RM. ELISA was used to measure leptin. Results: The results of this study showed that 8 weeks of resistance training significantly decreased BMI (31.32 kg/m2 versus 29.73 kg/m2 , P=0.0001, weight body (80.5kg versus 76.25kg, P=0.0001, WHR (0.93 ver-sus0.89, P=0.0001 and body fat percent (27.48 versus 24.85, P=0.0001 in EG. Statistically significant differ-ences were not seen in leptin (P=0.939, insulin (P=0.336, glucose (P=0.264 and insulin resistance (P=0.306 between CG and EG. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that , there was no significant difference in leptin levels and insulin resistance between the control and experimental groups, after 8 weeks of resistance training. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (1:59-65

  14. Effects of a 12 Week SAQ Training Programme on Agility with and without the Ball among Young Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanović, Zoran; Sporiš, Goran; Trajković, Nebojša; James, Nic; Samija, Krešimir

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 12 week conditioning programme involving speed, agility and quickness (SAQ) training and its effect on agility performance in young soccer players. Soccer players were randomly assigned to two groups: experimental group (EG; n = 66, body mass: 71.3 ± 5.9 kg; body height: 1.77 ± 0.07 m) and control group (CG; n = 66, body mass: 70.6 ± 4.9 kg; body height: 1.76 ± 0.06 m). Agility performance was assessed using field tests: Slalom; Slalom with ball; Sprint with 90° turns; Sprint with 90° turns with ball; Sprint with 180° turns; Sprint with backward and forward running; Sprint 4 x 5 m. Statistically significant improvements (p agility, with and without the ball, with the exception being the Sprint with backward and forward running. This suggests that SAQ training is an effective way of improving agility, with and without the ball, for young soccer players and can be included in physical conditioning programmes. Key pointsSAQ training appears to be an effective way of improving agility with and without the ball in young soccer playersSoccer coaches could use this training during pre-season and in-season trainingCompared with pre-training, there was a statistically significant improvement in all but one measure of agility, both with and without the ball after SAQ training.

  15. Muscle metabolism and performance improvement after two training programmes of sprint running differing in rest interval duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraslanidis, Ploutarchos; Petridou, Anatoli; Bogdanis, Gregory C; Galanis, Nikiforos; Tsalis, George; Kellis, Spiros; Mougios, Vassilis

    2011-08-01

    Repeated-sprint training often involves short sprints separated by inadequate recovery intervals. The effects of interval duration on metabolic and performance parameters are unclear. We compared the effects of two training programmes, differing in rest interval duration, on muscle (vastus lateralis) metabolism and sprint performance. Sixteen men trained three times a week for 8 weeks, each training session comprising 2-3 sets of two 80-m sprints. Sprints were separated by 10 s (n = 8) or 1 min (n = 8). Both training programmes improved performance in the 100-, 200-, and 300-m sprints, but the improvement was greater in the 10-s group during the final 100 m of the 200- and 300-m runs. Independent of interval duration, training mitigated the drop of muscle ATP after two 80-m sprints. The drop in phosphocreatine and the increases in glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate after two 80-m sprints were greater in the 10-s group. In conclusion, training with a limited number of repeated short sprints (≤10 s) may be more effective in improving speed maintenance in 200- and 300-m runs when performed with a 1:1 rather than a 1:6 exercise-to-rest ratio. This may be due to a greater activation of glycolysis caused, in part, by the limited resynthesis of phosphocreatine during the very short rest interval.

  16. Multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica isolated from conventional pig farms using antimicrobial agents in preventative medicine programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron-Veas, Karla; Fraile, Lorenzo; Napp, Sebastian; Garrido, Victoria; Grilló, María Jesús; Migura-Garcia, Lourdes

    2018-04-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted to investigate the presence of multidrug antimicrobial resistance (multi-AR) in Salmonella enterica in pigs reared under conventional preventative medicine programmes in Spain and the possible association of multi-AR with ceftiofur or tulathromycin treatment during the pre-weaning period. Groups of 7-day-old piglets were treated by intramuscular injection with ceftiofur on four farms (n=40 piglets per farm) and with tulathromycin on another four farms (n=40 piglets per farm). A control group of untreated piglets (n=30 per farm) was present on each farm. Faecal swabs were collected for S. enterica culture prior to treatment, at 2, 7 and 180days post-treatment, and at slaughter. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of 14 antimicrobial agents, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and detection of resistance genes representing five families of antimicrobial agents were performed. Plasmids carrying cephalosporin resistant (CR) genes were characterised. Sixty-six S. enterica isolates were recovered from five of eight farms. Forty-seven isolates were multi-AR and four contained bla CTX-M genes harboured in conjugative plasmids of the IncI1 family; three of these isolates were recovered before treatment with ceftiofur. The most frequent AR genes detected were tet(A) (51/66, 77%), sul1 (17/66, 26%); tet(B) (15/66, 23%) and qnrB (10/66, 15%). A direct relation between the use of ceftiofur in these conditions and the occurrence of CR S. enterica was not established. However, multi-AR was common, especially for ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamides and tetracycline. These antibiotics are used frequently in veterinary medicine in Spain and, therefore, should be used sparingly to minimise the spread of multi-AR. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolic Response to Four Weeks of Muscular Endurance Resistance Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Farrell III

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous investigations have shown that muscular endurance resistance training (MERT is conducive in improving the onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA. However, the metabolic response and time course for adaption is still unclear. Objective: The aims of the current study were to evaluate and track the metabolic response to an individual session of MERT as well as to assess performance adaptations of supplementing an aerobic exercise training program with four weeks of MERT. Methods: Seventeen aerobically active men were randomly assigned to either the experimental (EX or control group (CON, 9 EX and 8 CON. Baseline measures included a graded exercise test (GXT and 1-repetition maximum (1RM testing for leg press (LP, leg curl (LC, and leg extension (LE. CON continued their regular aerobic activity while the EX supplemented their regular aerobic exercise with 4 weeks of MERT. Results: No significant group differences were observed for all pre-training variables. Following four weeks of training no significant differences in cardiorespiratory or metabolic variables were observed for either group. However, significant improvements in LC and LE 1-RM were observed in EX compared to CON. Substantial accumulations in blood lactate were observed following each MERT session. Conclusion: Four weeks of MERT did not improve cardiorespiratory or metabolic variables, but did significantly improve LC and LE. MERT was also observed to induce a blood lactate response similar to that of HIIT. These findings suggest greater than four weeks is need to see metabolic adaptations conducive for improved aerobic performance using MERT.

  18. Workplace-based assessments in Foundation Programme training: do trainees in difficulty use them differently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Colin; Bhat, Sarita; Herbert, Anne; Baker, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Trainee-led workplace-based assessment (WPBA) is increasingly used in postgraduate medical training. Trainees in difficulty are known to behave differently from their peers; these differences may be reflected in their use of WPBAs and may give new insights into the behaviour and assessment of struggling trainees. Data were extracted for 76 115 assessments, completed by 1900 UK Foundation Programme (FP) trainees. Of these 1900 trainees, 95 (5%) were FP trainees in difficulty (FTiDs). We analysed aspects of the use of WPBAs, using multiple logistic regressions, to compare the behaviours of FTiDs with those of their peers. Of 48 possible comparisons, only two (i.e. the rate expected to occur by chance) showed statistically significant differences: relative to their peers, FTiDs were more likely to choose nurse assessors in direct observations of procedural skills (odds ratio [OR] 7.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23-40.43) and more likely to choose non-clinical assessors for assessments using the mini-peer assessment tool (OR 30.44, 95% CI 1.34-689.29). Key features of assessor choice for FTiDs are familiarity and likelihood of receiving a positive assessment. This analysis has not demonstrated that FTiDs use WPBAs any differently from their peers who are not in difficulty, although it does suggest associations and trends that require further exploration. These null results are interesting and raise hypotheses for prospective confirmation or disproof, and for further qualitative work investigating how struggling trainees use WPBAs in order to guide the future implementation of WPBAs in postgraduate training. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2013.

  19. [Integrating the e-learning programme EGONE into the block of training in obstetrics and gynaecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weninger, Laura; Liebhardt, Hubert; Brachmann, Stephanie; Varga, Dominic; Atassi, Ziad; Wöckel, Achim; Fegert, Jörg; Haller, Urs; Kreienberg, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    EGONE is an E-Learning Forum for Gynaecology, Obstetrics, Neonatology and Reproductive Endocrinology based on the Swiss Catalogue of Learning Objectives. For two semesters, students attending the gynaecology block at the Medical Faculty of the University of Ulm have been provided with licences to use EGONE. Students can work on a specially equipped computer and practise whenever they want. The aim of this study was to generate hypotheses as to which factors favour the use of EGONE and which didactic implications for the learning success the application of EGONE has. During August 2009, 28 medical students in their 8th and 9th semester were interviewed after having completed their block of training in gynaecology. The instruments used included a questionnaire and a partially standardised interview. We found that the e-learning offering EGONE was basically met with a positive response from the medical students at the University of Ulm. Regarding the integration of EGONE, three problem areas were identified: shortage of equipment, lack of dependable access and functional, but not curricular integration. Students' suggestions for better integration of EGONE were related to two subject areas: establishing an assisted learning centre (e.g., PC pool with library) and developing curricular independence and relevance (e.g., specific application to patient cases, conducting seminars with EGONE). The integration of the e-learning programme EGONE presupposes a logical, didactic concept for the whole clinical block of training in gynaecology as well as dependable, sufficient infrastructure and technical equipment and providing didactic support to users. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  20. Assessment of a training programme for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jam Gatell, M Rosa; Santé Roig, Montserrat; Hernández Vian, Óscar; Carrillo Santín, Esther; Turégano Duaso, Concepción; Fernández Moreno, Inmaculada; Vallés Daunis, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most frequent nosocomial infection in intensive care units (ICUs). Most published studies have analysed nurses' theoretical knowledge about a specific procedure; however, the transfer of this knowledge to the practice has received little attention. To assess the impact of training session on nurses' knowledge regarding VAP, compliance with VAP preventive measures, VAP incidence and determining whether nursing workload affects compliance. A prospective, quasiexperimental, pre- and post-study of the nursing team in a 16-bed medical/surgical ICU. Pre-intervention phase: a questionnaire to assess nurses' knowledge of VAP prevention measures, direct observation and review of clinical records to assess compliance. Intervention phase: eight training sessions for nurses. The post-intervention phase mirrored the pre-intervention phase. Nurses answered more questions correctly on the post-intervention questionnaire than on the pre-intervention (17·87 ± 2·69 versus 15·91 ± 2·68, p = 0·002). Compliance with the following measures was better during the post-intervention period (p = 0·001): use of the smallest possible nasogastric tube, controlled aspiration of subglottic secretions and endotracheal tube cuff pressure, use of oral chlorhexidine and recording the endotracheal tube fixation number. VAP incidence remained unchanged throughout the study. However, a trend towards lower incidence of late (>4 days after intubation) VAP was observed (4·6 versus 3·1 episodes/1000 ventilation days, p = 0·37). The programme improved both knowledge of and compliance with VAP preventive measures, although improved knowledge did not always result in improved compliance. © 2012 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care © 2012 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  1. Assessment of a training programme for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jam Gatell, M Rosa; Santé Roig, Montserrat; Hernández Vian, Óscar; Carrillo Santín, Esther; Turégano Duaso, Concepción; Fernández Moreno, Inmaculada; Vallés Daunis, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Background Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most frequent nosocomial infection in intensive care units (ICUs). Most published studies have analysed nurses' theoretical knowledge about a specific procedure; however, the transfer of this knowledge to the practice has received little attention. Aim To assess the impact of training session on nurses' knowledge regarding VAP, compliance with VAP preventive measures, VAP incidence and determining whether nursing workload affects compliance. Method A prospective, quasiexperimental, pre- and post-study of the nursing team in a 16-bed medical/surgical ICU. Pre-intervention phase: a questionnaire to assess nurses' knowledge of VAP prevention measures, direct observation and review of clinical records to assess compliance. Intervention phase: eight training sessions for nurses. The post-intervention phase mirrored the pre-intervention phase. Findings Nurses answered more questions correctly on the post-intervention questionnaire than on the pre-intervention (17·87 ± 2·69 versus 15·91 ± 2·68, p = 0·002). Compliance with the following measures was better during the post-intervention period (p = 0·001): use of the smallest possible nasogastric tube, controlled aspiration of subglottic secretions and endotracheal tube cuff pressure, use of oral chlorhexidine and recording the endotracheal tube fixation number. VAP incidence remained unchanged throughout the study. However, a trend towards lower incidence of late (>4 days after intubation) VAP was observed (4·6 versus 3·1 episodes/1000 ventilation days, p = 0·37). Conclusion The programme improved both knowledge of and compliance with VAP preventive measures, although improved knowledge did not always result in improved compliance. PMID:23061618

  2. Concurrent training and caffeine supplementation on resistance training performance - A short research report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B Ugatti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the influence of caffeine supplementation (4.5 mg⋅kg−1 on lower body resistance training (RT performance preceded with and without an acute bout of endurance exercise. In a double-blinded crossover study, 10 moderately active males (20.6±2.1 yo carried out six exercise sessions (2 x 1RM sessions; 2 x resistance sessions; 2 concurrent sessions. Resistance exercise sessions (CAF+RES and PLA+RES were carried out with 4 maximum sets of leg press, leg extension and leg curl to volitional fatigue at 65% of 1RM for each exercise with 1 min inter-set and inter-session rest interval. Sessions consisted on 4 maximum sets to volitional fatigue at 65% of 1RM for each exercise with 1 min of rest interval between sets and exercises. Concurrent training sessions (CAF+CON and PLA+CON were identical but were preceded by 30 min of continuous treadmill running at 75-85% HRmax. Physical performance showed a significant main effect for treatment (p < 0.0001, protocol (p < 0.02, exercises (p < 0.0001 and sets (p < 0.0001. Physical performance during RES was reduced after endurance exercise, indicating a cumulative effect of CON. Caffeine supplementation blunted this cumulative effect. We conclude that caffeine supplementation could be used to improve the RT performance when it is done immediately after an aerobic training.

  3. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. The role of quality management, hardware certification and accredited training in PV programmes in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, M. C. [Institute for Sustainable Power, Highlands Ranch, CO (United States); Oldach, R.; Bates, J. [IT Power Ltd, The Manor house, Chineham (United Kingdom)

    2003-09-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the role of quality management, hardware certification and accredited training in PV programmes in developing countries. The objective of this document is to provide assistance to those project developers that are interested in implementing or improving support programmes for the deployment of PV systems for rural electrification. It is to enable them to address and implement quality assurance measures, with an emphasis on management, technical and training issues and other factors that should be considered for the sustainable implementation of rural electrification programmes. It is considered important that quality also addresses the socio-economic and the socio-technical aspects of a programme concept. The authors summarise that, for a PV programme, there are three important areas of quality control to be implemented: quality management, technical standards and quality of training.

  4. Effects of a shoot training programme with a reduced hoop diameter rim on free-throw performance and kinematics in young basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlifa, Riadh; Aouadi, Ridha; Shephard, Roy; Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel; Hermassi, Souhail; Gabbett, Tim J

    2013-01-01

    The present paper investigated the effects of a shoot training programme with a reduced hoop diameter (0.35 m) rim on kinematics and performance of basketball free-throws. Eighteen young male basketball players were divided into control (CG, n = 9) and experimental (EG, n = 9) groups. Both groups undertook a 10-week training programme comprising two training sessions per week. Under fatigued conditions, each participant shot 150 free-throws in each training session, with the CG using a standard rim, and the EG a smaller rim. All other training was identical between groups. Ball release parameters, player's kinematics and mean of successful free-throws (out of 150 attempts) were determined for each participant, before and after completion of the training programme. Following training, a significant increase (P training with a reduced rim significantly improves free-throw performance in young basketball players.

  5. The effects of a 6 week plyometric training programme on explosive strength and agility in professional basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lehnert

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Explosive strength of the lower extremities and agility are important parts of game performance in basketball. Although numerous studies have focused on the assessment of the training effect of plyometric training, studies focusing on elite players are missing. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to find out what changes in explosive strength of the lower extremities take place after a 6 week plyometric training applied in training units during the pre-season in elite basketball players. METHODS: Elite basketball players (N = 12, age 24.36 ± 3.9 years, height 196.2 ± 9.6 cm, weight 92.9 ± 13.9 kg performed a 6 week plyometric training (PT programme predominantly focused on explosive strength of the lower body and upper body and was conducted in sixteen training units during pre-season. The changes in explosive strength were measured by the Counter Movement Jump Free Arms test and Two Step Run Up Jump test; agility was measured using the “T” Drill test and Hexagonal Obstacle test. The players participated in three measurements. The 1st (pretesting was performed on the first day of pre-season, the 2nd (post-testing was done two days after completing the PT programme and the 3rd (post-testing six weeks after completing the PT programme. Friedman’s ANOVA for repeated measurements was used to determine the significance of differences between the measurement sessions (p < .05. RESULTS: A significant effect of the training programme was observed only for the Hexagonal Obstacle test (p = .01. A post hoc analysis revealed a significant increase in test performance between the 1st and 3rd measurement (p < .01 and between the 2nd and 3rd measurement (p < .01. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the study of elite basketball players did not positively support the assumption that plyometric exercises can be an effective tool for the improvement of explosive strength and agility. However, in some players the

  6. Assessment of bone grafts placed within an oral and maxillofacial training programme for implant rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaing, L; Grubor, D; Chandu, A

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to review the survival of bone grafting procedures, performed by surgical trainees and assess factors affecting survival of these bone grafts as an adjunct to implant rehabilitation. Data were collected from patients between 2003 and 2009 receiving bone grafting. Graft failure was defined as any complete or partial graft loss, graft which had to be removed or regrafted, or was unable to have an implant placed. Implant survival rates were not assessed in this study. Seventy-five patients received 86 bone grafts over a period of 7 years. Overall graft survival was 87.3% with 7 complete graft failures (8.1%) and 3 partial graft failures (4.6%). All failed grafts were of the block graft type, predominately in the anterior maxilla. The main reason for failure was secondary infection. Other complications occurred in about 27% of patients. Factors significantly increasing the risk of graft failure included use of bone block augmentation (p = 0.001), mixed autogenous/bone substitute grafts (p = 0.007) and diabetes mellitus (p = 0.006). Smoking was not found to affect graft survival. Good results were found in a series of patients treated in an oral and maxillofacial training programme. Care should be taken in regards to planning block grafts in diabetic patients. © 2011 Australian Dental Association.

  7. Workplace-based assessment in surgical training: experiences from the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eardley, Ian; Bussey, Maria; Woodthorpe, Adrian; Munsch, Chris; Beard, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    The Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme was launched in the United Kingdom in 2007. At its heart was the reliance upon clear, defined curricula, competence-based training and the use of workplace-based assessments to assess the competence. The principle assessments used were Case-based Discussion, Procedure-based Assessments (PBA), Direct Observation of Procedural Skills, and Clinical Evaluation Exercise and a Multisource Feedback tool. We report the initial experience with that system, and most importantly, the experience with workplace-based assessment. Themes include issues around faculty development, misuse of assessments, inappropriate timing of assessments, concerns about validity and reliability of the assessments and concerns about the actual process of workplace-based assessments. Of the assessments, the PBA performed best. As a consequence, there has been an increased focus upon faculty development, while some of the assessments have been redesigned in line with the PBA. A global rating scale has been introduced that uses clinical anchors. The rating scales have also been altered with a reduction in the number of ratings while an enhanced description of the complexity of the case has been introduced within the Case-based Discussion and the Clinical Evaluation Exercise. A re-evaluation will take place in the near future. © 2013 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  8. Impact of an antimicrobial stewardship programme on antibiotic usage and resistance in a tertiary hospital in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z-G; Chen, F; Ou, Y

    2017-10-01

    Antimicrobial misuse has been commonly observed in China. This phenomenon can cause antibiotic resistance. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of an antimicrobial stewardship programme implemented in a tertiary hospital in China from 2011 to 2014. The antimicrobial stewardship programme began in 2011. Data on the consumption of antibiotics and antimicrobial resistance between 2011 and 2014 were collected. Comparison of the 2011 data with those of 2014 showed that antibiotic defined daily doses/per 100 patient-days decreased from 92.5±2.8 to 35.8±1.2 (Padministrative management, especially information management, was effective in reducing antibiotic consumption and lessening antibiotic resistance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Public health systems strengthening in Africa: the role of South Africa Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuonza, Lazarus; Tint, Khin San; Harris, Bernice; Nabukenya, Immaculate

    2011-01-01

    The South Africa Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme (SAFELTP) was created in 2006 after recognizing the need to build and sustain the country's human resource capacity in field (applied) epidemiology and public health practice. The programme was formed as a collaboration between the South Africa Department of Health (DoH), the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD), the National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS), the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the University of Pretoria. The primary goal of the programme was to produce field-trained epidemiologists equipped with knowledge and practical skills to effectively and efficiently address the public health priorities of South Africa. SAFELTP is a 2-year full-time training, consisting of a combination of classroom-based instruction (30%) and mentored field work (70%). The training places emphasis on public health surveillance, investigation of disease epidemics, public health laboratory practice and communication of epidemiologic information, among other aspects of epidemiology research. At completion, residents are awarded a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree from the University of Pretoria. Since its inception in 2006, 48 residents have enrolled onto the programme and 30 (62%) of them have completed the training. Over the past 5 years, the residents have conducted more than 92 outbreak investigations, 47 surveillance evaluations, 19 planned studies, analyzed 37 large databases and presented more than 56 papers at local and international conferences. In recognition of the high-quality work, at least five SAFELTP residents have received awards at various international scientific conferences during the 5 years. In conclusion, the South Africa FELTP is now fully established and making valuable contributions to the country's public health system, albeit with innumerable challenges.

  10. Perceptions of the impact of an advanced training programme on the management skills of health professionals in Gauteng, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mutyabule

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. South Africa’s health sector spans the private and the public sectors. Within the sectors, health managers take on strategic leadership roles without formal training in management or leadership – a trend more common in the public sector than the private sector. Health managers are selected based on their clinical skills rather than their leadership or management skills. Objective. To compare self-rated competencies in management and leadership before and after training of the participants; to assess participants’ experience of the training programme; and to evaluate the management and leadership skills of the participants after training. Methods. A cross-sectional, descriptive analytical method and 360° interviewing were used in this study. Participants were evaluated ~18 months after completion of the training programme. A 360° evaluation (360° E of six of the 12 leadership/management competencies was done with the supervisors, colleagues, and subordinates of the participants. Results. All participants rated themselves as improved in 12 managerial and leadership competencies. The 360° E affirmed five of these competencies as improved, with the ability to create and implement a marketing plan rating poorly. Conclusion. Training in management leads to improvement in both leadership and managerial skills of health professionals.

  11. The Comparison of Two Methods of Exercise (intense interval training and concurrent resistance- endurance training on Fasting Sugar, Insulin and Insulin Resistance in Women with Mellitus Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Bazyar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Exercise is an important component of health and an integral approach to the management of diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of intense interval training and concurrent resistance- endurance training on fasting sugar, insulin and insulin resistance in women with mellitus diabetes.   Methods: Fifty-two overweight female diabetic type 2 patients (aged 45-60 years old with fasting blood glucose≥ 126 mg/dl were selected to participate in the present study. Participants were assigned to intense interval training group (N=17, concurrent resistance- endurance training group (N=17 and control group (N=18. The exercises incorporated 10 weeks of concurrent resistance- endurance training and intense interval training. Fasting blood sugar, serum insulin concentrations levels were measured. Concurrent training group trained eight weeks, three times a week of endurance training at 60% of maximum heart rate (MHR and two resistance training sessions per week with 70% of one repetition maximum (1-RM. Intense interval training group trained for eight weeks, three sessions per week for 4 to 10 repeats Wingate test on the ergometer 30s performed with maximum effort. The control group did no systematic exercise. At the end of experiment 42 subjects were succeed and completed the study period, and 10 subjects were removed due to illness and absence in the exercise sessions. Fasting blood sugar and insulin levels 24 hours before and 48 hours after the last training session was measured.   Results: The findings indicated that in periodic fasting, the blood sugar in intensive training group had a marked decrease (p= 0.000 however, the fasting blood sugar of exercise and power stamina groups reduced significantly (p=0.062. The results showed no significant difference between the groups (171/0 p =0.171. Fasting insulin (p <0.001 and insulin resistance (0001/0 = p=0.001 in periodic intensive training group were

  12. Experiences on implementation of on-the-job training programmes for maintenance personnel in Asco and Vandellos II NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Anez, F.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a process and methodology for definition and implementation of On-Job-Training Programmes (OJTP) for new maintenance personnel in Asco and Vandellos II. The content of these OJTP has been defined for each maintenance job position. A simplified task analysis was carried out to specify common and specific training. Generally, the specific maintenance training programs includes training modules in classroom and workshop environment on (1) maintenance of components and (2) maintenance fundamentals of mechanical, electrical and instrumentation. This specific training has been finally completed with a OJT programme based on the execution, observation or/and discussion about the main maintenance activities under entitled worker supervision. Each lesson, task or activity is defined in a format where the training objective, milestones and deliverables are specified. The list of activities makes up the OJTP. It is based on applicable plant procedures and maintenance instruction to each job position. Several participants or actors have been defined to implement the OJTP: co-ordinator of the process, tutors for each OJT task, line maintenance manager and trainee. Co-ordinator is the link among all actors. He knows the OJTP scope and plans the training activities according to the line maintenance manager. Co-ordinator carries out a tracking process, informs to training and maintenance managers about the progress in the programme, elaborates the progress and final reports and keeps training records. Tutors, usually entitled workers in the job position, transfer the knowledge to the trainee and discuss, review and assess the trainee's performance. Trainee carries out the scheduled tasks, keeps records of work done, prepares deliverables and informs about his activities to the Co-ordinator. The OJT programme for each new maintenance worker starts with a launching meeting with all involved actors. The goals of this meeting are to explain the OJTP scope and

  13. Caffeine enhances upper body strength in resistance-trained women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penhollow Tina

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research has indicated that low-to-moderate dosages of caffeine supplementation are ergogenic for sustained endurance efforts as well as high-intensity exercise. The effects of caffeine supplementation on strength-power performance are equivocal, with some studies indicating a benefit and others demonstrating no change in performance. The majority of research that has examined the effects of caffeine supplementation on strength-power performance has been carried out in both trained and untrained men. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the acute effects of caffeine supplementation on strength and muscular endurance in resistance-trained women. Methods In a randomized manner, 15 women consumed caffeine (6 mg/kg or placebo (PL seven days apart. Sixty min following supplementation, participants performed a one-repetition maximum (1RM barbell bench press test and repetitions to failure at 60% of 1RM. Heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP were assessed at rest, 60 minutes post-consumption, and immediately following completion of repetitions to failure. Results Repeated measures ANOVA indicated a significantly greater bench press maximum with caffeine (p ≤ 0.05 (52.9 ± 11.1 kg vs. 52.1 ± 11.7 kg with no significant differences between conditions in 60% 1RM repetitions (p = 0.81. Systolic blood pressure was significantly greater post-exercise, with caffeine (p Conclusions These findings indicate a moderate dose of caffeine may be sufficient for enhancing strength performance in resistance-trained women.

  14. Diminished Baroreflex Control of Forearm Vascular Resistance Following Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, G. W.; Thompson, C. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Convertino, V. A.

    1991-01-01

    The stimulus-response characteristics of cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR units in mm Hg x min x I00 ml/ml) were studied in 14 volunteers before and after 10 wk of endurance training. We assessed the relationship betaleen reflex stimulus (changes in central venous pressure, CVP) and response (FVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors with lower body negative pressure (LBNP, 0 to - 2O mm Hg). Changes in CVP during LBNP were estimated from pressure changes in a large peripheral vein in the dependent arm of the subject in the right lateral decubitus position. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO(sub 2max)) and total blood volume increased with endurance training from 37.8 +/- 1.4 ml/min x kg and 63.6 +/- 2.1 ml/kg to 45.3 +/- 1.4 ml/ min x kg and 69.3 +/- 2.8 ml/kg respectively (P less than 0.05). Reflex forearm vasoconstriction occurred in response to a reduction in estimated CVP, and the absolute change in FVR per unit of CVP was reduced from -5.96 +/- 0.79 to -4.06 +/- 0.52 units x mm/ Hg (P less than 0.05) following exercise training but was unchanged from -6.10 to 0.57 to -6.22 +/- 0.94 units x mm/ Hg for the time control group (N = 7). Resting values for FVR were similar before and after exercise training; however, resting estimated CVP was elevated from 9.5 +/- 0.5 mm x Hg before training to 11.3 +/- 0.6 mm x Hg after training. The reduction in sensitivity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of FVR was linearly related to the increase in blood volume (r = 0.65, P less than 0.05). suggesting that diminished cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of FVR in physically fit individuals is related, in part, to a training-induced blood volume expansion.

  15. Effects of Classic Progressive Resistance Training Versus Eccentric-Enhanced Resistance Training in People With Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrocinio de Oliveira, Claudia Eliza; Moreira, Osvaldo Costa; Carrión-Yagual, Zoila Marilú; Medina-Pérez, Carlos; de Paz, José Antonio

    2017-11-27

    To compare the effects of classic progressive resistance training (PRT) versus eccentric strength-enhanced training (EST) on the performance of functional tests and different strength manifestations in the lower limb of people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Experimental trial. Strength training program. PwMS (N=52; 19 men, 33 women) belonging to MS associations from the Castilla y León, Spain. Participants were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: a control group that performed PRT or an experimental group that performed EST. In both groups, the knee extensor muscles were trained for 12 weeks. Before and after 12 weeks of training, maximal voluntary isometric contraction and 1 repetition maximum (1RM) of the knee extensors were evaluated, as were the Chair Stand Test (CST) and Timed 8-Foot Up and Go (TUG) functional tests. No differences were found between the groups in the initial values for different tests. Intragroup comparisons found significant differences in CST (F=69.4; P<.001), TUG (F=40.0; P<.001), and 1RM (F=57.8; P<.001). For intergroup comparisons, EST presented better results than PRT in the CST (EST, 4.7%±2.8%; PRT, 1.9%±2.8%; F=13.1; P=.001) and TUG (EST, -2.9±4.7; PRT, -.41±5.6; F=5.6; P=.022). In PwMS, EST leads to improvements in 1RM, TUG, and CST that are similar to those of PRT. However, for patients who participated in this study, the EST seems to promote a better transfer of strength adaptations to the functional tests, which are closer to daily-living activities. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A managed multidisciplinary programme on multi-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Danish university hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Knudsen, Inge Jenny Dahl

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacteria-producing extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes are resistant to commonly used antimicrobials. In 2008, routine monitoring revealed a clonal hospital outbreak of ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-KP). METHODS: At a 510-bed Danish university hospital......, a multidisciplinary change project inspired by Kotter's Eight Steps of Change was designed. In addition to revision of antimicrobial guidelines and restriction of selected antimicrobials, the complex, managed, multi-faceted intervention comprised training and education, enhanced isolation precautions, and a series...... of actions to improve the infection control measures and standardise procedures across the hospital. A prospective interrupted time series design was used to analyse data collected at hospital level from January 2008 through December 2011. RESULTS: Though overall antimicrobial consumption remained unaffected...

  17. Resistance Training in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with Severe Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vanerson Passos Neves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Resistance training (RT has been recommended as a non-pharmacological treatment for moderate hypertension. In spite of the important role of exercise intensity on training prescription, there is still no data regarding the effects of RT intensity on severe hypertension (SH. Objective: This study examined the effects of two RT protocols (vertical ladder climbing, performed at different overloads of maximal weight carried (MWC, on blood pressure (BP and muscle strength of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR with SH. Methods: Fifteen male SHR ENT#091;206 ± 10 mmHg of systolic BP (SBPENT#093; and five Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY; 119 ± 10 mmHg of SBP were divided into 4 groups: sedentary (SED-WKY and SHR (SED-SHR; RT1-SHR training relative to body weight (~40% of MWC; and RT2-SHR training relative to MWC test (~70% of MWC. Systolic BP and heart rate (HR were measured weekly using the tail-cuff method. The progression of muscle strength was determined once every fifteen days. The RT consisted of 3 weekly sessions on non-consecutive days for 12-weeks. Results: Both RT protocols prevented the increase in SBP (delta - 5 and -7 mmHg, respectively; p > 0.05, whereas SBP of the SED-SHR group increased by 19 mmHg (p 0.05. Conclusions: Our data indicated that both RT protocols were effective in preventing chronic elevation of SBP in SH. Additionally, a higher RT overload induced a greater increase in muscle strength.

  18. Noninvasive optical imaging of resistance training adaptations in human muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Robert V.; Cotter, Joshua; Ganesan, Goutham; Le, Lisa; Agustin, Janelle P.; Duarte, Bridgette; Cutler, Kyle; O'Sullivan, Thomas; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2017-12-01

    A quantitative and dynamic analysis of skeletal muscle structure and function can guide training protocols and optimize interventions for rehabilitation and disease. While technologies exist to measure body composition, techniques are still needed for quantitative, long-term functional imaging of muscle at the bedside. We evaluate whether diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) can be used for long-term assessment of resistance training (RT). DOSI measures of tissue composition were obtained from 12 adults before and after 5 weeks of training and compared to lean mass fraction (LMF) from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Significant correlations were detected between DXA LMF and DOSI-measured oxy-hemo/myoglobin, deoxy-hemo/myoglobin, total-hemo/myoglobin, water, and lipid. RT-induced increases of ˜6% in oxy-hemo/myoglobin (3.4±1.0 μM, p=0.00314) and total-hemo/myoglobin (4.9±1.1 μM, p=0.00024) from the medial gastrocnemius were detected with DOSI and accompanied by ˜2% increases in lean soft tissue mass (36.4±12.4 g, p=0.01641) and ˜60% increases in 1 rep-max strength (41.5±6.2 kg, p = 1.9E-05). DOSI measures of vascular and/or muscle changes combined with correlations between DOSI and DXA suggest that quantitative diffuse optical methods can be used to evaluate body composition, provide feedback on long-term interventions, and generate new insight into training-induced muscle adaptations.

  19. Number of repetition after different rest intervals between static stretching and resistance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Dias

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Therefore, 30-minute interval between static stretching and resistance exercises was needed to achieve greater repetition performance. Thus, static stretching for lower limbs may be avoided before a resistance training session.

  20. Effects of load-volume on EPOC after acute bouts of resistance training in resistance-trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, George J; Greer, Beau K; Campbell, Sara C; Panton, Lynn B

    2013-07-01

    Recent investigations have shown excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) to be elevated for up to 48 hours in both untrained and trained subjects after resistance training (RT). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of load-volume on EPOC. Eight trained men (aged 22 ± 3 years) participated in 2 randomized RT bouts separated by at least 1 week with total load-volumes of 10,000 and 20,000 kg, respectively. Intensity of RT (85% 1 repetition maximum) did not differ between trials. Exercise energy expenditure and resting metabolic rate (RMR) were measured by indirect calorimetry at 8.5 hours before, 1.5 hours before, and during RT bouts and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after exercise. Creatine kinase (CK) was measured before and after RT, and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours postexercise; ratings of perceived muscle soreness were measured on a similar time course save the immediate postexercise time point. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to analyze dependent variables. During the 20,000 kg trial, subjects expended significantly (p EPOC above baseline RMR.

  1. Innovative Access Programme for Young Mothers Wishing to Train in Childbirth Education: From Concept to Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Mary L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the conception, planning, implementation and evaluation of an access programme arising out of an innovative collaboration between two charities, Straight Talking and the National Childbirth Trust. The access programme was designed at the request of a group of young mothers who had finished compulsory education and subsequently…

  2. Evaluation of a communication and stress management training programme for infertile couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lone; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Boivin, Jackey

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates a patient education programme focussed on improving communication and stress management skills among couples in fertility treatment.......This study evaluates a patient education programme focussed on improving communication and stress management skills among couples in fertility treatment....

  3. Development of Health Promoting Leadership--Experiences of a Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Andrea; Axelsson, Runo; Axelsson, Susanna Bihari

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyse the experiences of an intervention programme for development of health promoting leadership in Gothenburg in Sweden. The more specific purpose is to identify critical aspects of such a programme as part of the development of a health promoting workplace. Design/methodology/approach: A…

  4. Evidence for Resistance Training as a Treatment Therapy in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Strasser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, investigators have paid increasing attention to the effects of resistance training (RT on several metabolic syndrome variables. Evidence suggests that skeletal muscle is responsible for up to 40% of individuals' total body weight and may be influential in modifying metabolic risk factors via muscle mass development. Due to the metabolic consequences of reduced muscle mass, it is understood that normal aging and/or decreased physical activity may lead to a higher prevalence of metabolic disorders. The purpose of this review is to (1 evaluate the potential clinical effectiveness and biological mechanisms of RT in the treatment of obesity and (2 provide up-to-date evidence relating to the impact of RT in reducing major cardiovascular disease risk factors (including dyslipidaemia and type 2 diabetes. A further aim of this paper is to provide clinicians with recommendations for facilitating the use of RT as therapy in obesity and obesity-related metabolic disorders.

  5. Importance of mind-muscle connection during progressive resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Vinstrup, Jonas; Jakobsen, Markus Due

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study evaluates whether focusing on using specific muscles during bench press can selectively activate these muscles. METHODS: Altogether 18 resistance-trained men participated. Subjects were familiarized with the procedure and performed one-maximum repetition (1RM) test during...... electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded for the triceps brachii and pectoralis major muscles. Subsequently, peak EMG of the filtered signals were normalized to maximum maximorum EMG of each muscle. RESULTS: In both muscles, focusing on using the respective muscles increased muscle activity at relative loads...... between 20 and 60 %, but not at 80 % of 1RM. Overall, a threshold between 60 and 80 % rather than a linear decrease in selective activation with increasing intensity appeared to exist. The increased activity did not occur at the expense of decreased activity of the other muscle, e.g. when focusing...

  6. Order effects of concurrent endurance and resistance training on post-exercise response of non-trained women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Blasio, Andrea; Gemello, Eugenio; Di Iorio, Angelo; Di Giacinto, Gabriella; Celso, Tiziana; Di Renzo, Donatella; Sablone, Andrea; Ripari, Patrizio

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise is used for the promotion and maintenance of good health and for the improvement of physical fitness. Both endurance and resistance exercises are needed to carry out a complete training program. Because time may be a barrier to physical exercise practice, the aim of this study was to verify whether the order of execution of endurance and resistance exercises, in concurrent training, has different effects on the metabolic responses during recovery. Thirteen healthy women [24.40 (1.67) years, Mean (SD)] were investigated for energy expenditure (EE), oxygen consumption (VO2), ventilation (Ve), respiratory frequency (RF), proportion of oxygen in expired air (FeO2) and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) both before and after three concurrent endurance and resistance trainings, carried out in different orders: endurance-resistance training (ERT), resistance-endurance training (RET) and alternating endurance-resistance training (AERT). AERT elicited a significantly greater increase of EE, VO2, and Ve and a greater decrease of FeO2. ERT elicited a lower increase of RPE. Acute post-exercise physiological responses to concurrent endurance and resistance physical exercise seem to depend on the order of execution of the two parts: among the selected protocols, AERT seems to elicit the best responses. Key pointsThe concurrent execution of both endurance and resistance exercise, in the same training session, could be a practical solution to conform to guidelines for health in the presence of lack of time.The order of concurrent execution of both endurance and resistance exercise, in the same training session, influences the amplitude of some post-exercise physiological responses.

  7. The effective of preventive training programme on the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan Çağlayan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to prevent non-contact Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL injuries that occur more frequently because of anatomic, hormonal and muscular differences in female athletes, with a training programme including neuromuscular, proprioceptive and flexilibity training drills and seeing the changes on physical and physiological parameters on female athletes. Material and Methods: Our study consists of 76 female soccer players (Experimental Group (EG: 20, age:17.2±3.38years and Control Group (CG: 56, age:17.5±3.14years whom participated in Turkish Female Soccer 1. League. EG were given a training programme for six weeks, three days a week, nearly 30 minutes. Retrospective questionnaire that enclosed six months was applied to both EG and CG. For the assesment of physical and physological affects of training programme; leg strength, speed, vertical jump, aerobic and anaerobic capacity, balance, flexibility, height, weight and skinfold thickness were measured. Results: As a result of statistical analysises there wasn’t seen any significant difference on the incidence of ACL injury between EG and CG (p>0.05. A significant difference was detected on vertical jump, aerobic-anaerobic power, balance, leg strength and body fat percentage at the level of (p<0.01, speed and flexibility at the level of p<0.05. Conclusion: After six-week recovery training program there was’t not seen any ACL injury until the end of the season. Furthermore, we observed significant differences after evaulation of biomotor properties of female athletes. We suggest that this kind of researchs must be made perennial with the participation of more athletes with multidisipliner workship.

  8. An analysis of the introduction and efficacy of a novel training programme for ERC basic life support assessors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Christopher J; Jones, Christopher M; Harvey, Philip; Hulme, Jonathan; Owen, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Existing ERC BLS/AED accreditation procedures allow BLS instructors to assess the capability of BLS/AED providers, without undergoing additional training as an assessor. The reliability of instructor-based assessment has been questioned. This study sought to determine the efficacy of a simple training programme for BLS/AED instructors aimed at standardising assessment decisions. An Assessment Training Programme (ATP) which provides additional, assessment-focused tuition for BLS instructors was introduced. Eighteen ERC accredited instructors participated in the study. Nine received standard ERC training (instructors); nine received additional training through the ATP (assessors). The assessment of 73 students' BLS/AED capabilities was carried out by an assessor, ERC instructor and ERC instructor trainer concurrently. Participants independently completed an ERC assessment form. Decisions for instructors and assessors were compared to the instructor trainers' decisions; those not agreeing were deemed to be incorrect. Instructors (49.3%) had lower raw pass rates than assessors (67.1%) and instructor trainers (64.4%). There was a significant difference in overall decisions between instructors and instructor trainers (p=0.035), and instructors and assessors (p=0.015). There was no difference between assessors and instructor trainers (p=0.824). Instructors were more prone to incorrectly failing candidates than assessors (sensitivities of 80.5% and 63.8% respectively, p=0.077). AED-capability decisions were significantly different from instructor trainers in both the instructor (p=0.007) and assessor groups (p=0.031). BLS instructors incorrectly fail candidates for reasons that should not normally constitute a true assessment failure. The ATP is an effective intervention to reduce false-failure rates and improve compliance with an experienced instructor trainer's decision. Consideration should be made to integrate such programmes into current BLS instructor accreditation

  9. Randomised controlled trial: Effects of aerobic exercise training programme on indices of adiposity and metabolic markers in hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamina, S.; Okoye, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of interval training programme on blood pressure, maximal oxygen consumption, indices of adiposity and metabolic markers in black African men with essential hypertension. Methods: The study was conducted at Murtala Muhammed Specialist Hospital, Kano, Nigeria, from October 24, 2007 to February 24, 2009. It comprised 245 male patients with mild to moderate (systolic blood pressure 140-179 and diastolic blood pressure 90-109 mmHg) essential hypertension who were age-matched and grouped into experimental and control groups. The experimental group was involved in an 8-week training programme of between 45 and 60 minutes, while the controls remained sedentary during the period. Cardiovascular parameters, maximal oxygen consumption, per cent body fat, waist-to-hip ratio, body mass index, fasting blood sugar, total cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein and artherogenic index were assessed. Analysis of co-variance and Pearson correlation tests were used in data analysis which was done using SPSS 16. Results: The study had 140 (57.1%) cases with a mean age of 58.90+-7.35 years, and 105 (42.9%) controls with a mean age of 58.27+-6.24 years. It revealed significant increased effect of interval training programme on maximal oxygen consumption and high-density lipoprotein. There was significant reduction in on all the other controls. Changes in maximal oxygen consumption as a result of interval training significantly and negatively correlated with the other variables except high-density lipoprotein. Conclusions: The therapeutic role of interval exercise training on blood pressure reduction may be mediated through elevation of high-density lipoprotein, reduction of other markers of metabolism, and reduction in bodyweight and fatness. (author)

  10. Elevation of cardiac troponins measured after recreational resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savukoski, Tanja; Mehtälä, Laura; Lindahl, Bertil; Venge, Per; Pettersson, Kim

    2015-08-01

    Whereas elevated cardiac troponin (cTn) concentrations i.e. above the 99th percentile of healthy reference population (recommended cutoff for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction) are well-documented in healthy individuals after prolonged and/or intensive exercises such as marathons, data on less-strenuous sports are scarce. Therefore, our aim was to investigate cTnI and cTnT release in response to recreational resistance training, here a single-bout of 1-h kettlebell workout. Serum samples were collected from 11 apparently healthy volunteers the previous day (pre-exercise), three hours after the kettlebell class (post-exercise), the next day and three days later. The aliquoted samples were analyzed with Abbott Laboratories' Architect high-sensitivity (hs)-cTnI assay (limit of detection, LoD = 2 ng/L), our 3+1-type cTnI assay free from cTn-specific autoantibody interference (LoD = 3 ng/L) and Roche Diagnostics' hs-cTnT assay (LoD = 5 ng/L). The post-exercise cTn concentrations were significantly higher than the pre-exercise values (median 5.5-9.6 ng/L vs. 26 ng/L, n = 2) and/or hs-cTnT (>14 ng/L, n = 4). The cTn concentrations returned to baseline during the three days of follow-up. Our study demonstrates abnormally elevated cTns with well-validated sensitive cTn assays after resistance training. This confirms that different kinds of recreational physical activity are yet another confounder that may affect the determination and use of 99th percentile reference values. Therefore, exercise-associated changes should be carefully addressed as part of the evaluation what is "normal cTn". Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Safety and efficacy of resistance training in germ cell cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Frank; Jones, L W; Tolver, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Bleomycin–etoposid–cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy is curative in most patients with disseminated germ cell cancer (GCC) but also associated with toxic actions and dysfunction in non-targeted tissues. We investigated changes in muscle function during BEP and the safety and effic...... blunted several positive adaptations observed in healthy controls. Thus, our study does not support the general application of resistance training in this setting but larger-scaled trials are required to confirm this finding....... and efficacy of resistance training to modulate these changes. Methods: Thirty GCC patients were randomly assigned to resistance training (resistance training group (INT), n=15) or usual care (CON, n=15) during 9 weeks of BEP therapy. Resistance training consisted of thrice weekly sessions of four exercises, 3...... changes compared with the INT-group (PResistance training was safe and attenuated dysfunction in selected endpoints, but BEP...

  12. Chronic Resistance Training Does Not Ameliorate Unloading-Induced Decrements in Neuromuscular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschenes, Michael R; McCoy, Raymond W; Mangis, Katherine A

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of long-term resistance training in preventing the detrimental effects of muscle unloading on neuromuscular function. Eleven untrained men and 11 men with extensive backgrounds in resistance training were tested for several parameters of neuromuscular function at various isokinetic contractile velocities before and after 7 days of muscle unloading. Measurements included muscle mass, strength, power, total work, electromyography, and neuromuscular transmission efficiency using superimposed electrical stimulation of maximally contracting muscles. Muscle performance was superior in resistance-trained subjects before and after unloading. In both groups of participants, unloading resulted in significantly (P neuromuscular transmission efficiency was significantly altered by unloading in trained or untrained participants. Chronic resistance training was found to be ineffective in neutralizing the deleterious effects of unloading on neuromuscular function. It appears that positive adaptations associated with long-term resistance training provide no prophylactic effect when neuromuscular systems are subjected to unloading.

  13. Mechanical massage and mental training programmes affect employees' anxiety, stress susceptibility and detachment-a randomised explorative pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Jasmin; Handlin, Linda; Harlén, Mikael; Lindmark, Ulrika; Ekström, Anette

    2015-09-02

    Working people's reduced ability to recover has been proposed as a key factor behind the increase in stress-related health problems. One not yet evidence-based preventive method designed to help employees keep healthy and be less stressed is an armchair with built-in mechanical massage and mental training programmes, This study aimed to evaluate possible effects on employees' experience of levels of "Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility", "Detachment" and "Social Desirability" when using mechanical massage and mental training programmes, both separately and in combination, during working hours. Employees from four different workplaces were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: i) Massage and mental training (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage while listening to the mental training programmes, n=19), ii) Massage (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage only, n=19), iii) Mental training (sitting in the armchair and listening to the mental training programmes only, n=19), iv) Pause (sitting in the armchair but not receiving mechanical massage or listening to the mental training programmes, n=19), v) Control (not sitting in the armchair at all, n=17). In order to discover how the employees felt about their own health they were asked to respond to statements from the "Swedish Scale of Personality" (SSP), immediately before the randomisation, after four weeks and after eight weeks (end-of-study). There were no significant differences between the five study groups for any of the traits studied ("Somatic Trait Anxiety", "Psychic Trait Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility", "Detachment" and "Social Desirability") at any of the occasions. However, the massage group showed a significant decrease in the subscale "Somatic Trait Anxiety" (p=0.032), during the entire study period. Significant decreases in the same subscale were also observed in the pause group between start and week eight (p=0.040) as well as between week four and week

  14. Effect of Resistance Training on Serum Meteorin-like Hormone Level and Insulin Resistance Index in Overweight Adolescent Boys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Alizadeh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Adipose tissue's phenotypic alteration due to exercise training is a new theory. However, the cellular–molecular mechanisms for these phenotypic alterations are not yet clearly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of six weeks resistance training on Meteorin-like hormone level and insulin resistance index in overweight adolescent boys. Materials and Methods: Twenty overweight adolescent boys (average age 18.5±1 years old, average weight 81.1±4.5 kg, and BMI 27.7±0.7 kg/m2 participated in this study. The subjects were randomly assigned into two groups: control (N=10 and resistance training (N=10. Subjects in training group performed six-week resistance training program 3 days/week. Anthropometrics parameters and fasting serum of Meteorin-like hormone levels, insulin and glucose were measured at the baseline and at the end of study. Results: The level of Meteorin-like hormone was significantly decreased in control group (p=0.008, but that of Meteorin-like hormone in resistance training was increased insignificantly (p=0.311. The variations of Meteorin-like hormone levels between two groups were significant (p=0.004. The changes of insulin resistance were increased in both groups which were statistically significant (p=0.032 and insignificant (p=0.632 for control and training groups respectively. We found a negative and insignificant correlation between changes in Meteorin-like hormone levels and changes in insulin resistance index (p=0.273. Conclusion: The results showed that six weeks’ resistance training has no effect on increasing Meteorin-like hormone serum level and improving insulin resistance index and body composition in overweight adolescent boys.

  15. Effects of low-load resistance training with blood flow restriction on muscle size and strength of professional soccer players with muscle imbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedito Sergio Denadai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were to determine whether low intensity resistance training combined with blood flow restriction (LI-BFR could affect the concentric hamstrings/quadriceps muscle strength ratio (Hcon:Qcon of professional soccer players with Hcon:Qcon imbalance (Study 1, and whether hamstrings strength response observed after LI-BFR is associated with muscle hypertrophy (Study 2. In the Study 1, athletes were randomly divided into a training group (n = 6 and a control group (n = 5. In the Study 2, all athletes (n = 11 have performed the training programme. The athletes participated in a 6-week (twice a week supervised training programme (unilateral knee flexion at 30% 1RM consisting of 12 training sessions. Peak concentric torque of knee flexors (+8%; P < 0.001 and Hcon:Qcon (+9%; P < 0.01 were significantly increased after LI-BFR. Moreover, the cross sectional area (CSA of the hamstrings was significantly increased (+10%; P < 0.001 after LI-BFR. Thus, the addition of hamstrings strength training programme using LI-BFR during preseason is able to enhance both Hcon:Qcon and hamstrings CSA of professional soccer players with Hcon:Qcon imbalance.

  16. Empowerment of Bilingual Education Professionals: The Training of Trainers Programme for Educators in Multilingual Settings in Southern Africa (ToTSA) 2002-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Carol; Pluddemann, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a South Africa-based training programme in multilingual education for African educators and assesses its potentially transformative effects on participants. Based on a range of data collected during four course runs, as well as an e-mail survey of past participants, the authors explore how the programme has supported…

  17. The Early-Career Development of Science Teachers from Initial Training Onwards: The Advantages of a Multifaceted Five-Year Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Julian; Howarth, Sue; King, Chris; Perry, John; Tas, Maarten; Twidle, John; Warhurst, Adrian; Garrett, Caro

    2014-01-01

    If a programme were to be devised for the early-career development of science teachers, what might such a programme look like? This was the focus of a meeting of science educators interested in developing such a structure, from the start of initial teacher training onwards. The contributions, modified and written up here, include a suggested…

  18. Evaluation of a training programme on knowledge and compliance of nurse assistants' hand hygiene in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T-T; Wu, S-C

    2008-02-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the impact of a comprehensive training programme in hand hygiene for nurse assistants (NAs) on their knowledge and compliance, as well as on the infection rate of nursing home residents. An intervention was conducted in northern Taiwan at three long-term care facilities. Forty NAs participated in a hand-hygiene training programme that included 1h of in-service classes and 30 min of hands-on training. Demographic data and NAs' knowledge and compliance regarding hand hygiene were collected and the infection rate of residents calculated. Three months after hand-hygiene training the NAs had significantly more knowledge (from 13.82 to 15.41, P<0.001) and better compliance (from 9.34% to 30.36%, P<0.001) than before the intervention. There was a reduction in residents' infection rate from 1.74% (December 2004 to February 2005) and 2.04% (June 2005 to August 2005) to 1.52% (December 2005 to February 2006) (P<0.001).

  19. Resist diabetes: A randomized clinical trial for resistance training maintenance in adults with prediabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda M Davy

    Full Text Available To determine whether a social cognitive theory (SCT-based intervention improves resistance training (RT maintenance and strength, and reduces prediabetes prevalence.Sedentary, overweight/obese (BMI: 25-39.9 kg/m2 adults aged 50-69 (N = 170 with prediabetes participated in the 15-month trial. Participants completed a supervised 3-month RT (2×/wk phase and were randomly assigned (N = 159 to one of two 6-month maintenance conditions: SCT or standard care. Participants continued RT at a self-selected facility. The final 6-month period involved no contact. Assessments occurred at baseline and months 3, 9, and 15. The SCT faded-contact intervention consisted of nine tailored transition (i.e., supervised training to training alone and nine follow-up sessions. Standard care involved six generic follow-up sessions. Primary outcomes were prevalence of normoglycemia and muscular strength.The retention rate was 76%. Four serious adverse events were reported. After 3 months of RT, 34% of participants were no longer prediabetic. This prevalence of normoglycemia was maintained through month 15 (30%, with no group difference. There was an 18% increase in the odds of being normoglycemic for each % increase in fat-free mass. Increases in muscular strength were evident at month 3 and maintained through month 15 (P<0.001, which represented improvements of 21% and 14% for chest and leg press, respectively. Results did not demonstrate a greater reduction in prediabetes prevalence in the SCT condition.Resistance training is an effective, maintainable strategy for reducing prediabetes prevalence and increasing muscular strength. Future research which promotes RT initiation and maintenance in clinical and community settings is warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01112709.

  20. Educational impact of in-training assessment (ITA) in postgraduate medical education: a qualitative study of an ITA programme in actual practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringsted, C; Henriksen, A H; Skaarup, A M; Van der Vleuten, C P M

    2004-07-01

    To investigate the experiences and opinions of programme directors, clinical supervisors and trainees on an in-training assessment (ITA) programme on a broad spectrum of competence for first year training in anaesthesiology. How does the programme work in practice and what are the benefits and barriers? What are the users' experiences and thoughts about its effect on training, teaching and learning? What are their attitudes towards this concept of assessment? Semistructured interviews were conducted with programme directors, supervisors and trainees from 3 departments. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. The content of the interviews was analysed in a consensus process among the authors. The programme was of benefit in making goals and objectives clear, in structuring training, teaching and learning, and in monitoring progress and managing problem trainees. There was a generally positive attitude towards assessment. Trainees especially appreciated the coupling of theory with practice and, in general, the programme inspired an academic dialogue. Issues of uncertainty regarding standards of performance and conflict with service declined over time and experience with the programme, and departments tended to resolve practical problems through structured planning. Three interrelated factors appeared to influence the perceived value of assessment in postgraduate education: (1) the link between patient safety and individual practice when assessment is used as a licence to practise without supervision rather than as an end-of-training examination; (2) its benefits to educators and learners as an educational process rather than as merely a method of documenting competence, and (3) the attitude and rigour of assessment practice.

  1. Mirror training to augment cross-education during resistance training: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howatson, Glyn; Zult, Tjerk; Farthing, Jonathan P; Zijdewind, Inge; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2013-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been shown to be a potent stimulus for neuromuscular adaptations. These adaptations are not confined to the exercising muscle and have been consistently shown to produce increases in strength and neural activity in the contralateral, homologous resting muscle; a phenomenon known as cross-education. This observation has important clinical applications for those with unilateral dysfunction given that cross-education increases strength and attenuates atrophy in immobilized limbs. Previous evidence has shown that these improvements in the transfer of strength are likely to reside in areas of the brain, some of which are common to the mirror neuron system (MNS). Here we examine the evidence for the, as yet, untested hypothesis that cross-education might benefit from observing our own motor action in a mirror during unimanual resistance training, thereby activating the MNS. The hypothesis is based on neuroanatomical evidence suggesting brain areas relating to the MNS are activated when a unilateral motor task is performed with a mirror. This theory is timely because of the growing body of evidence relating to the efficacy of cross-education. Hence, we consider the clinical applications of mirror training as an adjuvant intervention to cross-education in order to engage the MNS, which could further improve strength and reduce atrophy in dysfunctional limbs during rehabilitation.

  2. Effects of a relaxation training programme on immediate and prolonged stress responses in women with preterm labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Li-Lan; Lin, Li-Chan; Cheng, Po-Jen; Chen, Chung-Hey; Wu, Shiao-Chi; Chang, Chuan-Lin

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a report of an experimental study of the effects of relaxation-training programme on immediate and prolonged stress responses in women with preterm labour. Hospitalized pregnant women with preterm labour experience developmental and situational stress. However, few studies have been performed on stress management in such women. An experimental pretest and repeated post-test design was used to compare the outcomes for two groups in northern Taiwan from December 2008, to May 2010. A total of 129 women were randomly assigned to an experimental (n = 68) or control (n = 61) group. The experimental group participants were instructed to listen daily to a 13-minute relaxation programme. Measurements involved the stress visual analogue scale, finger temperatures, State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale and Pregnancy-related Anxiety. Two-way analysis of variance and hierarchical linear modelling were used to analyse the group differences. Compared with those in the control group, participants in the experimental group showed immediate improvements in the stress visual analogue scale scores and finger temperatures. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory-State subscale score for the experimental group was significantly lower than that for the control group (P = 0·03). However, no statistically significant differences for the Perceived Stress Scale and Pregnancy-related Anxiety scores were found between the experimental group and the control group. The relaxation-training programme could improve the stress responses of women with preterm labour. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Low-Load Resistance Training with Blood Flow Occlusion as a Countermeasure to Disuse Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Cook, S. B.

    2009-01-01

    Decreases in strength and neuromuscular function are observed following prolonged disuse. Exercise countermeasures to prevent muscle dysfunction during disuse typically involve high intensity resistance training. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of low-load resistance training with a blood flow occlusion to mitigate muscle loss and dysfunction during 30 days of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS).

  4. Format of Basic Instruction Program Resistance Training Classes: Effect on Fitness Change in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, J. P.; Channell, Brian; Pugh, Chip; Tuck, Matt; Pendel, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    New resistance training programs such as CrossFit are gaining favor among college-aged students. CrossFit and related commercial resistance training programs may provide a valuable elective option within basic instruction program (BIP) curricula, but the fitness benefits of this course have not been compared with those of existing BIP resistance…

  5. Resistance training and testosterone levels in male patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molsted, Stig; Andersen, Jesper L.; Eidemak, Inge

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated serum testosterone and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels' associations with muscle fibre size and resistance training in male dialysis patients. METHODS: Male patients were included in a 16-week control period followed by 16 weeks of resistance training thric...

  6. National Strength and Conditioning Association Position Statement: Health Aspects of Resistance Exercise and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Michael S.; Rozenek, Ralph

    2001-01-01

    Resistance training may enhance cardiovascular health, improve body composition, increase bone mineral density, reduce anxiety and depression, reduce the risk of injury during other sports, and increase muscular strength and endurance. The paper describes the effects of resistance training on: the cardiovascular system, energy expenditure and body…

  7. Comparison of the effects of aerobic and resistance training on cardiac autonomic adaptations in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Larissa C R; Tezini, Geisa C S V; Schujmann, Débora S; Porto, Jaqueline M; Rossi, Bruno R O; Souza, Hugo C D

    2011-07-05

    We have compared the effects of two types of physical training on the cardiac autonomic control in ovariectomized and sham-operated rats according to different approaches: double autonomic blockade (DAB) with methylatropine and propranolol; baroreflex sensibility (BRS) and spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). Wistar female rats (±250g) were divided into two groups: sham-operated and ovariectomized. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups: sedentary rats, rats submitted to aerobic trained and rats submitted to resistance training. Ovariectomy did not change arterial pressure, basal heart rate (HR), DAB and BRS responses, but interfered with HRV by reducing the low-frequency oscillations (LF=0.20-0.75Hz) in relation to sedentary sham-operated rats. The DAB showed that both types of training promoted an increase in the predominance of vagal tonus in sham-operated rats, but HR variations due to methylatropine were decreased in the resistance trained rats compared to sedentary rats. Evaluation of BRS showed that resistance training for sham-operated and ovariectomized rats reduced the tachycardic responses in relation to aerobic training. Evaluation of HRV in trained rats showed that aerobic training reduced LF oscillations in sham-operated rats, whereas resistance training had a contrary effect. In the ovariectomized rats, aerobic training increased high frequency oscillations (HF=0.75-2.5Hz), whereas resistance training produced no effect. In sham-operated rats, both types of training increased the vagal autonomic tonus, but resistance training reduced HF oscillations and BRS as well. In turn, both types of training had similar results in ovariectomized rats, except for HRV, as aerobic training promoted an increase in HF oscillations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of different volume-equated resistance training loading strategies on muscular adaptations in well-trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Peterson, Mark D; Contreras, Bret; Sonmez, G T; Alvar, Brent A

    2014-10-01

    Regimented resistance training has been shown to promote marked increases in skeletal muscle mass. Although muscle hypertrophy can be attained through a wide range of resistance training programs, the principle of specificity, which states that adaptations are specific to the nature of the applied stimulus, dictates that some programs will promote greater hypertrophy than others. Research is lacking, however, as to the best combination of variables required to maximize hypertophic gains. The purpose of this study was to investigate muscular adaptations to a volume-equated bodybuilding-type training program vs. a powerlifting-type routine in well-trained subjects. Seventeen young men were randomly assigned to either a hypertrophy-type resistance training group that performed 3 sets of 10 repetition maximum (RM) with 90 seconds rest or a strength-type resistance training (ST) group that performed 7 sets of 3RM with a 3-minute rest interval. After 8 weeks, no significant differences were noted in muscle thickness of the biceps brachii. Significant strength differences were found in favor of ST for the 1RM bench press, and a trend was found for greater increases in the 1RM squat. In conclusion, this study showed that both bodybuilding- and powerlifting-type training promote similar increases in muscular size, but powerlifting-type training is superior for enhancing maximal strength.

  9. Effect of support group peer facilitator training programmes on peer facilitator and support group member outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisle, Vanessa C; Gumuchian, Stephanie T; Kloda, Lorie A; Boruff, Jill; El-Baalbaki, Ghassan; Körner, Annett; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Thombs, Brett D

    2016-11-17

    Peer facilitators play an important role in determining the success of many support groups for patients with medical illnesses. However, many facilitators do not receive training for their role and report a number of challenges in fulfilling their responsibilities. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effects of training and support programmes for peer facilitators of support groups for people with medical illnesses on (1) the competency and self-efficacy of group facilitators and (2) self-efficacy for disease management, health outcomes and satisfaction with support groups among group members. Searches included the CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Web of Science databases from inception through 8 April 2016; reference list reviews; citation tracking of included articles; and trial registry reviews. Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in any language that evaluated the effects of training programmes for peer facilitators compared with no training or alternative training formats on (1) competency or self-efficacy of peer facilitators, and (2) self-efficacy for disease management, health outcomes and satisfaction with groups of group members. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool was used to assess risk of bias. There were 9757 unique titles/abstracts and 2 full-text publications reviewed. 1 RCT met inclusion criteria. The study evaluated the confidence and self-efficacy of cancer support group facilitators randomised to 4 months access to a website and discussion forum (N=23; low resource) versus website, discussion forum and 2-day training workshop (N=29). There were no significant differences in facilitator confidence (Hedges' g=0.16, 95% CI -0.39 to 0.71) or self-efficacy (Hedges' g=0.31, 95% CI -0.24 to 0.86). Risk of bias was unclear or high for 4 of 6 domains. Well-designed and well-conducted, adequately powered trials of peer support group facilitator training programmes for patients with medical illnesses

  10. Muscle fibre capillarization is a critical factor in muscle fibre hypertrophy during resistance exercise training in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; Joanisse, Sophie; Leenders, Marika; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2017-04-01

    Adequate muscle fibre perfusion is critical for the maintenance of muscle mass; it is essential in the rapid delivery of oxygen, nutrients and growth factors to the muscle, stimulating muscle fibre growth. Muscle fibre capillarization is known to decrease substantially with advancing age. However, whether (relative) low muscle fibre capillarization negatively impacts the muscle hypertrophic response following resistance exercise training in older adults is unknown. Twenty-two healthy older men (71 ± 1 years) performed 24 weeks of progressive resistance type exercise training. To assess the change in muscle fibre characteristics, percutaneous biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were taken before and following 12 and 24 weeks of the intervention programme. A comparison was made between participants who had a relatively low type II muscle fibre capillary-to-fibre perimeter exchange index (CFPE; LOW group) and high type II muscle fibre CFPE (HIGH group) at baseline. Type I and type II muscle fibre size, satellite cell, capillary content and distance between satellite cells to the nearest capillary were determined by immunohistochemistry. Overall, type II muscle fibre size (from 5150 ± 234 to 6719 ± 446 µm 2 , P muscle fibre, P muscle fibre capillarization, whereas muscle fibre size (from 5170 ± 390 to 7133 ± 314 µm 2 , P muscle fibre, P muscle fibre capillarization were observed in response to 12 and 24 weeks of resistance exercise training in both the LOW and HIGH group. Type II muscle fibre capillarization at baseline may be a critical factor for allowing muscle fibre hypertrophy to occur during prolonged resistance exercise training in older men. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  11. Effects of creatine supplementation and resistance training on muscle strength and weightlifting performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Eric S; Volek, Jeff S

    2003-11-01

    Creatine monohydrate has become the supplement of choice for many athletes striving to improve sports performance. Recent data indicate that athletes may not be using creatine as a sports performance booster per se but instead use creatine chronically as a training aid to augment intense resistance training workouts. Although several studies have evaluated the combined effects of creatine supplementation and resistance training on muscle strength and weightlifting performance, these data have not been analyzed collectively. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effects of creatine supplementation on muscle strength and weightlifting performance when ingested concomitant with resistance training. The effects of gender, interindividual variability, training status, and possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Of the 22 studies reviewed, the average increase in muscle strength (1, 3, or 10 repetition maximum [RM]) following creatine supplementation plus resistance training was 8% greater than the average increase in muscle strength following placebo ingestion during resistance training (20 vs. 12%). Similarly, the average increase in weightlifting performance (maximal repetitions at a given percent of maximal strength) following creatine supplementation plus resistance training was 14% greater than the average increase in weightlifting performance following placebo ingestion during resistance training (26 vs. 12%). The increase in bench press 1RM ranged from 3 to 45%, and the improvement in weightlifting performance in the bench press ranged from 16 to 43%. Thus there is substantial evidence to indicate that creatine supplementation during resistance training is more effective at increasing muscle strength and weightlifting performance than resistance training alone, although the response is highly variable.

  12. Mental health promotion in the Internet age: a consultation with Australian young people to inform the design of an online mindfulness training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monshat, Kaveh; Vella-Brodrick, Dianne; Burns, Jane; Herrman, Helen

    2012-06-01

    Mindfulness training (MT) has been shown to lead to significant improvements in psychological distress and emotion regulation skills. The Internet has many advantages as a medium for building emotional skills in young people. The aim of this study was to involve young people in designing an online MT programme. A draft programme was initially designed based on a review of the literature and an established face-to-face programme for medical students. Twenty young people were then recruited through online advertising and 13 (age 16-26) interviewed. They were asked to comment on how useful, easy to use and enjoyable they found the proposed programme and how the draft version and its planned evaluation strategy could be improved. Interviewee responses were independently processed by two of the authors within a qualitative thematic analysis paradigm. The results showed that young people were eager to engage with the design of this health promotion programme and provided valuable input. All interviewees believed that young people would find the programme desirable. They provided a variety of suggestions about how training structure and content could be improved, how best it could be evaluated and how young people could be encouraged to engage with and complete the programme. It thus appears that online MT is a feasible mental health promotion strategy for young people and that it can be evaluated in a controlled trial. The result of this consultation process was the Mindful Awareness Training and Education (MATE) programme, which has been detailed.

  13. Number of repetition after different rest intervals between static stretching and resistance training

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, H.; Paz, G.A.; Maia, M. de F.; Leite, T.; Miranda, H.; Simão, R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different intervals between static stretching for hip adductor, quadriceps and hamstring muscles and resistance training in repetition performance. Method: Twenty-two trained men were submitted to the 10 repetition maximum test and retest for leg extension, leg curl and hip adduction exercises. Three protocols were conducted in a randomized design – PWI: resistance training immediately after static stretching; P15: fift...

  14. Effects of nonlinear resistance and aerobic interval training on cytokines and insulin resistance in sedentary men who are obese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikseresht, Mahmoud; Agha-Alinejad, Hamid; Azarbayjani, Mohammad A; Ebrahim, Khosrow

    2014-09-01

    Regular exercise training has been shown to reduce systemic inflammation, but there is limited research directly comparing different types of training. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of nonlinear resistance training (NRT) and aerobic interval training (AIT) on serum interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-20, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels, insulin resistance index (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance), and aerobic capacity in middle-aged men who are obese. Sedentary volunteers were assigned to NRT (n = 12), AIT (n = 12), and (CON, n = 10) control groups. The experimental groups performed 3 weekly sessions for 12 weeks, whereas the CON grouped maintained a sedentary lifestyle. Nonlinear resistance training consisted of 40-65 minutes of weight training at different intensities with flexible periodization. Aerobic interval training consisted of running on a treadmill (4 sets of 4 minutes at 80-90% of maximal heart rate, with 3-minute recovery intervals). Serum IL-10, IL-20, and TNF-α levels did not change significantly in response to training (all p > 0.05), but IL-10:TNF-α ratio increased significantly with AIT compared with CON (2.95 ± 0.84 vs. 2.52 ± 0.65; p = 0.02). After the training period, maximal oxygen uptake increased significantly in AIT and NRT compared with CON (both p resistance (homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance) (both p ≤ 0.05; AIT: 0.84 ± 0.34, NRT: 0.84 ± 0.27, and CON: 1.62 ± 0.56) and fasting insulin levels (both p ≤ 0.05; AIT: 3.61 ± 1.48, NRT: 3.66 ± 0.92, and CON: 6.20 ± 2.64 μU·ml), but the AIT seems to have better anti-inflammatory effects (as indicated by the IL-10:TNF-α ratio) compared with NRT.

  15. Manual on Cost-Effectiveness of Training Modalities in Population Education. Population Education Programme Service Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This manual is the result of a regional training workshop on the cost-effectiveness of different training strategies in population education by Unesco in Kathmandu, Nepal, June 1-8, 1987. The purpose of the manual is to enable project staff to initiate studies to determine cost-effective training strategies in population growth control education.…

  16. A pilot external quality assurance programme for line-probe assay detection of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, K L; Yip, C W; Tang, H S; Lai, Y W; Lam, T K; Kam, K M

    2013-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB; resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin) is difficult to detect and control. Line-probe assays (LiPA) are widely used for the rapid detection of MDR-TB. To ensure the quality of the test, a pilot external quality assurance (EQA) programme was initiated to assess the feasibility of running such a programme and the possibility of improving the proficiency of TB laboratories in performing the test. Prepared filter-paper-based Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA samples were shipped to participant laboratories for LiPA EQA. The tests were performed blind, and the results were returned to the organising laboratory for comparison and analysis. A total of four rounds of EQA samples were dispatched to five laboratories in four countries. Overall inter- and intra-laboratory reproducibility was respectively 97% and 96%. The strengths and weaknesses of the participant laboratories in performing the test were discussed. A LiPA EQA programme can ensure quality and improve the performance of TB laboratories. This is a critical step during the initial stages at the time of setting up this method of testing.

  17. Progressive resistance training (PRT) improves rheumatoid arthritis outcomes: A district general hospital (DGH) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsley, Klara; Berntzen, Berna; Erwood, Lisa; Bellerby, Toby; Williamson, Lyn

    2018-03-01

    Rheumatoid cachexia is common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and develops soon after diagnosis, despite adequate drug therapy. It is associated with multiple adverse effects on body composition, function and mortality. Progressive resistance training (PRT) improves these outcomes but is not widely prescribed outside of a research setting. The aim of the present study was to explore the practicality and effectiveness of providing PRT to patients in a district general hospital within the constraints of existing resources. Patients attending a rheumatology clinic were invited to participate in a weekly PRT class for 6 weeks, supervised by a physiotherapist. Outcome measures included: body composition measures (waist and hip circumference, weight, percentage body fat); functional measures (grip strength, 60-s sit-to-stand test, single leg stance, Health Assessment Questionnaire); mood; fatigue and disease activity measures (sleep scale, hospital anxiety and depression scale, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy, pain visual analogue scale). These were measured at baseline and at 6 weeks. A total of 83 patients completed the programme (60% female, mean age 51.2 years), of whom 34.9% had early RA. Improvements were seen in multiple measures inpatients with early RA and with established inflammatory arthritis, and were not affected by age or gender. Patients with early and established inflammatory arthritis alike benefited from a 6-week PRT programme provided within a National Health Service setting. Although further work is needed to look at long-term effects, we suggest that this intervention should be more widely available. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Effects of Resistance Training on the Sit-and-Reach Test in Elderly Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Aline Rodrigues; Santarem Jose Maria; Filho, Wilson Jacob; Marucci, Maria de Fatima Nunes

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week resistance training program on older women's flexibility (evaluated through the sit- and-reach test performed before and after the training program). Participants were compared to inactive older women. The training program resulted in significant increases in participants' flexibility, suggesting that weight…

  19. Collagen peptide supplementation in combination with resistance training improves body composition and increases muscle strength in elderly sarcopenic men: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdzieblik, Denise; Oesser, Steffen; Baumstark, Manfred W; Gollhofer, Albert; König, Daniel

    2015-10-28

    Protein supplementation in combination with resistance training may increase muscle mass and muscle strength in elderly subjects. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of post-exercise protein supplementation with collagen peptides v. placebo on muscle mass and muscle function following resistance training in elderly subjects with sarcopenia. A total of fifty-three male subjects (72·2 (sd 4·68) years) with sarcopenia (class I or II) completed this randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study. All the participants underwent a 12-week guided resistance training programme (three sessions per week) and were supplemented with either collagen peptides (treatment group (TG)) (15 g/d) or silica as placebo (placebo group (PG)). Fat-free mass (FFM), fat mass (FM) and bone mass (BM) were measured before and after the intervention using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Isokinetic quadriceps strength (IQS) of the right leg was determined and sensory motor control (SMC) was investigated by a standardised one-leg stabilisation test. Following the training programme, all the subjects showed significantly higher (Ptraining further improved body composition by increasing FFM, muscle strength and the loss in FM.

  20. The inclusion of LGBT+ health issues within undergraduate healthcare education and professional training programmes: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Edward; Brown, Michael

    2018-05-01

    An inclusive health curriculum within undergraduate and continuing professional development programmes (CPD) should include issues related to people whom identify as LGBT+. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the education and training requirements of undergraduate students and health professionals regarding the inclusion of LGBT+ health issues. A systematic review of the available published empirical studies. A systematic literature search was undertaken of the following databases: CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase and Sociological Abstracts. All papers reviewed were from the years 2007 to 2017 and written in English. Three research questions informing the literature review were: (i) What are the education and training requirements of undergraduate students and health professionals regarding the health needs of LGBT+ people? (ii) What are the approaches utilized in the education and training of undergraduate students and health professionals regarding the health needs of LGBT+ people? (iii) What are the best practice examples of the education and training of undergraduate students and health professionals? Following the application of definitive criteria, 22 papers were included in the review. Quality appraisal and data extraction was undertaken by the two authors. The 22 papers were reviewed in detail in the final data analysis and synthesis where four main themes were identified: (1) Cultural competence and inclusivity. (2) Existing knowledge of LGBT+ health-related issues. (3) Curriculum developments and outcomes. (4) Evidence of best practice in education delivery. The review highlights the importance of the inclusion of LGBT+ health-related issues within the health curriculum and continuing professional development programmes and the implications for education and training, clinical practice and research. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of a resistance and balance exercise programme for women with osteoporosis and vertebral fracture: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanghelle, Brita; Bentzen, Hege; Giangregorio, Lora; Pripp, Are Hugo; Bergland, Astrid

    2018-04-03

    Osteoporotic vertebral fractures are common, and are associated with reduced functioning and health related quality of life. The primary aims of this randomized controlled trial are to examine the immediate and long-term effects of a 12-weeks supervised group exercise programme on habitual walking speed in older women with osteoporosis and a history of vertebral fracture. The secondary aims are to examine the immediate and long-term effects of the exercise program on physical fitness, fear of falling and quality of life. The study is a single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Women aged 65 years or older with osteoporosis and a history of vertebral fracture are included. The intervention group receives a 12-week multicomponent exercise programme, including resistance training combined with balance training. The control group receives usual care. Adherence to the programme will be of importance for the internal validity of the study. Participants in the exercise group who don't attend will be followed up with motivational phone calls. The primary outcome is habitual walking speed over 10 m. Secondary outcomes are health related quality of life (Qualeffo-41, SF-36), physical activity (I-PAQ), Patient Specific Functional Scale, Fear of falling (FES-1) and physical fitness (Senior Fitness test, Functional reach test, 4 square step test, grip strength). Sample size, based on the primary outcome, is 150 participants randomized into the two arms on a 1:1 allocation, including an estimated 20% drop out. Descriptive data will be reported as mean (standard deviation), median (range) or count (percent) as appropriate. The data will be analysed following the intention-to-treat principle. Between group differences in primary and secondary outcomes at 3 months follow-up will be assessed using linear regression models with respective outcome at baseline as covariate and the randomised group as factor. This trial will generate new knowledge on the effects of a multicomponent

  2. Is inertial flywheel resistance training superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in improving muscle strength? A systematic review with meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicens-Bordas, J; Esteve, E; Fort-Vanmeerhaeghe, A; Bandholm, T; Thorborg, K

    2018-01-01

    The primary aim of this systematic review was to determine if inertial flywheel resistance training is superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in improving muscle strength. The secondary aim was to determine whether inertial flywheel resistance training is superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in improving other muscular adaptations. A systematic review with meta-analyses of randomised and non-randomised controlled trials. We searched MEDLINE, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials with no publication date restrictions until November 2016. We performed meta-analyses on randomised and non-randomised controlled trials to determine the standardized mean difference between the effects of inertial flywheel and gravity-dependent resistance training on muscle strength. A total of 76 and 71 participants were included in the primary and secondary analyses, respectively. After systematic review, we included three randomised and four non-randomised controlled trials. In the primary analysis for the primary outcome muscle strength, the pooled results from randomised controlled trials showed no difference (SMD=-0.05; 95%CI -0.51 to 0.40; p=0.82; I 2 =0%). In the secondary analyses of the primary outcome, the pooled results from non-randomised controlled trials showed no difference (SMD=0.02; 95%CI -0.45 to 0.49; p=0.93; I 2 =0%; and SMD=0.03; 95%CI -0.43 to 0.50; p=0.88; I 2 =0%). Meta-analysis on secondary outcomes could not be performed. Based on the available data, inertial flywheel resistance training was not superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in enhancing muscle strength. Data for other strength variables and other muscular adaptations was insufficient to draw firm conclusions from. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Paediatric burns in LMICs: An evaluation of the barriers and facilitators faced by staff involved in burns education training programmes in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lyndsey; Fioratou, Evridiki; Broadis, Emily

    2016-08-01

    A burn prevention and education programme - the Reduction of Burn and Scald Mortality and Morbidity in Children in Malawi project - was implemented from January 2010-2013 in Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Malawi. This study aimed to investigate the barriers and facilitators of implementing education-training programmes. Semi-structured interviews with 14 Scottish and Malawian staff delivering and receiving teaching at training education programmes were conducted. All interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. Overarching barriers and facilitators were similar for both sets of staff. Scottish participants recognised that limited experience working in LMICs narrowed the challenges they anticipated. Time was a significant barrier to implementation of training courses for both sets of participants. Lack of hands on practical experience was the greatest barrier to implementing the skills learnt for Malawian staff. Sustainability was a significant facilitator to successful implementation of training programmes. Encouraging involvement of Malawian staff in the co-ordination and delivery of teaching enabled those who attend courses to teach others. A recognition of and response to the barriers and facilitators associated with introducing paediatric burn education training programmes can contribute to the development of sustainable programme implementation in Malawi and other LMICs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes in circulating angiogenic factors after an acute training bout before and after resistance training with or without whole-body-vibration training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beijer, Åsa; Degens, Hans; May, Francisca; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Joern; Rosenberger, Andre

    2012-07-01

    Both Resistance Exercise and Whole-Body-Vibration training are currently considered as countermeasures against microgravity-induced physiological deconditioning. Here we investigated the effects of whole-body vibration superimposed upon resistance exercise. Within this context, the present study focuses on changes in circulating angiogenic factors as indicators of skeletal muscle adaption. Methods: Twenty-six healthy male subjects (25.2 ± 4.2 yr) were included in this two-group parallel-designed study and randomly assigned to one of the training interventions: either resistance exercise (RE) or resistance vibration exercise (RVE). Participants trained 2-3 times per week for 6 weeks (completing 16 training sessions), where one session took 9 ± 1 min. Participants trained with weights on a guided barbell. The individual training load was set at 80% of their 1-Repetition-Maximum. Each training session consisted of three sets with 8 squats and 12 heel raises, following an incremental training design with regards to weight (RE and RVE) and vibration frequency (RVE only). The vibration frequency was increased from 20 Hz in the first week till 40 Hz during the last two weeks with 5-Hz weekly increments. At the first and 16 ^{th} training session, six blood samples (pre training and 2 min, 5 min, 15 min, 35 min and 75 min post training) were taken. Circulating levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Endostatin and Matrix Metalloproteinases -2 and -9 (MMPs) were determined in serum using Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assays. Results: MMP-2 levels increased by 7.0% (SE = 2.7%, P resistance exercise, both with and without superimposed vibration, leads to a transient rise in circulating angiogenic factors, 2) which is not altered after a period of resistance exercise with or without vibration.

  5. Vastus lateralis exhibits non-homogenous adaptation to resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Adam J; Fukuda, David H; Hoffman, Jay R; Gonzalez, Adam M; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Mangine, Gerald T; Fragala, Maren S; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2014-11-01

    Variations in transverse point of measure on the vastus lateralis (VL) may significantly affect the relationship between structure and function. The purpose of this study was to compare changes in muscle architecture at 2 commonly used points of measure (VL0 and VL5). Maximal strength (1-repetition maximum [1RM] barbell squat) and muscle architecture were assessed PRE and POST 15 weeks of periodized resistance training. VL0 was 50% of the straight line distance between the greater trochanter and lateral epicondyle of the femur. VL5 was 5cm medial to VL0. Increases in 1RM strength (3.7 ± 2.4 kg; P = 0.004) were observed. Changes in muscle thickness (MT) at VL5 were significantly greater than at VL0 (P = 0.006). Changes in strength correlated with changes in muscle architecture at VL0 only (MT: r = 0.561; fascicle length: r = 0.503). Changes in muscle architecture appear to occur in a non-homogeneous manner. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effects of Weight Resistance Training on Swimmers with Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Víquez Ulate y Andrea Mora Campos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effect of weight resistance training on strength in swimmers with Down Syndrome (DS. Seven swimmers with DS participated in the study: 6 men and 1 woman, 23.14 years of age ± 4.59 and with 6.14 years ± 2.34 years of swimming. Instruments: One repetition maximum (RM test to determine the individual’s maximum muscular strength. Procedure: the study was conducted for 10 weeks (2 weeks at baseline, 6 weeks of treatment and 2 weeks to see the effects of retention. Results: significantly positive changes were detected in the maximum strength of pectoral muscles (F=5.768; p=0.006, dorsal muscles (F = 26.770; p=7.45e-007, femoral biceps (F = 32.530; p=1.76e-007, quadriceps (F = 8.391; p=0.001, triceps (F = 11.217; p=0.0002 and these adjustments were maintained with no significant changes for two weeks, while the biceps muscle (F=4.145; p=0.021 behaved differently since it suffered no significant adjustments during the program.

  7. Choosing the Best Training Programme: Is there a Case for Statistical Treatment Rules?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staghøj, Jonas; Svarer, Michael; Rosholm, Michael

    2010-01-01

    When treatment effects of active labour market programmes (ALMPs) are heterogeneous in an observable way across the population, the allocation of the unemployed into different programmes becomes particularly important. In this article, we present a statistical model that can be used to allocate...... unemployed into different ALMPs. The model presented is a duration model that uses the timing-of-events framework to identify causal effects. We compare different assignment rules, and the results suggest that a significant reduction in the average duration of unemployment may result if a statistical...

  8. Effects of interset whole-body vibration on bench press resistance training in trained and untrained individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timon, Rafael; Collado-Mateo, Daniel; Olcina, Guillermo; Gusi, Narcis

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated positive effects of acute vibration exercise on concentric strength and power, but few have observed the effects of vibration exposure on resistance training. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of whole body vibration applied to the chest via hands on bench press resistance training in trained and untrained individuals. Nineteen participants (10 recreationally trained bodybuilders and 9 untrained students) performed two randomized sessions of resistance training on separate days. Each strength session consisted of 3 bench press sets with a load of 75% 1RM to failure in each set, with 2 minutes' rest between sets. All subjects performed the same strength training with either, vibration exposure (12 Hz, 4 mm) of 30 seconds immediately before each bench press set or without vibration. Number of total repetitions, kinematic parameters, blood lactate and perceived exertion were analyzed. In the untrained group, vibration exposure caused a significant increase in the mean velocity (from 0.36±0.02 to 0.39±0.03 m/s) and acceleration (from 0.75±0.10 to 0.86±0.09 m/s2), as well as a decrease in perceived effort (from 8±0.57 to 7.35±0.47) in the first bench press set, but no change was observed in the third bench press set. In the recreationally trained bodybuilders, vibration exposure did not cause any improvement on the performance of bench press resistance training. These results suggest that vibration exposure applied just before the bench press exercise could be a good practice to be implemented by untrained individuals in resistance training.

  9. Comparative Effectiveness of Low-Volume Time-Efficient Resistance Training Versus Endurance Training in Patients With Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Gregers Winding; Birgitte Rosenmeier, Jaya; Petersen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cardiorespiratory fitness is positively related to heart failure (HF) prognosis, but lack of time and low energy are barriers for adherence to exercise. We, therefore, compared the effect of low-volume time-based resistance exercise training (TRE) with aerobic moderate-intensity cycling...... (AMC) on maximal and submaximal exercise capacity, health-related quality of life, and vascular function. METHODS: Twenty-eight HF patients (New York Heart Association class I-II) performed AMC (n = 14) or TRE (n = 14). Maximal and submaximal exercise capacity, health-related quality of life......, and vascular function were evaluated before and after a 6-wk training intervention with 3 training sessions per week. The AMC group and the TRE group trained for 45 and 25 min per training session, respectively. During the training sessions, the TRE and AMC groups trained at 60 ± 4% and 59 ± 2% (mean...

  10. Effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians: cluster randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Louis; Jakobsen, Markus D; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen

    2012-01-01

    To determine the effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians.......To determine the effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians....

  11. Effect of 8-Week Resistance Training on Hypertrophy, Strength, and Myostatin Concentration in Old and Young Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoof Negaresh

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion Resistance training was associated with a decline in myostatin level and increase in the muscle mass and cross-sectional area. Hence, the beneficial effect of resistance training may decrease age-related muscle atrophy and affect elderly health.

  12. Concurrent training: a meta-analysis examining interference of aerobic and resistance exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jacob M; Marin, Pedro J; Rhea, Matthew R; Wilson, Stephanie M C; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Anderson, Jody C

    2012-08-01

    The primary objective of this investigation was to identify which components of endurance training (e.g., modality, duration, frequency) are detrimental to resistance training outcomes. A meta-analysis of 21 studies was performed with a total of 422 effect sizes (ESs). Criteria for the study included were (a) compare strength training alone to strength plus endurance training (concurrent) or to compare combinations of concurrent training; (b) the outcome measures include at least one measure of strength, power, or hypertrophy; and (c) the data necessary to calculate ESs must be included or available. The mean ES for hypertrophy for strength training was 1.23; for endurance training, it was 0.27; and for concurrent training, it was 0.85, with strength and concurrent training being significantly greater than endurance training only. The mean ES for strength development for strength training was 1.76; for endurance training, it was 0.78; and for concurrent training, it was 1.44. Strength and concurrent training was significantly greater than endurance training. The mean ES for power development for strength training only was 0.91; for endurance training, it was 0.11; and for concurrent training, it was 0.55. Significant differences were found between all the 3 groups. For moderator variables, resistance training concurrently with running, but not cycling, resulted in significant decrements in both hypertrophy and strength. Correlational analysis identified significant negative relationships between frequency (-0.26 to -0.35) and duration (-0.29 to -0.75) of endurance training for hypertrophy, strength, and power. Significant relationships (p training are a factor of the modality, frequency, and duration of the endurance training selected.

  13. Resistance training for explosive and maximal strength: effects on early and late rate of force development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Felipe B D; Oliveira, Anderson S C; Rizatto, Guilherme F; Denadai, Benedito S

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify whether strength training designed to improve explosive and maximal strength would influence rate of force development (RFD). Nine men participated in a 6-week knee extensors resistance training program and 9 matched subjects participated as controls. Throughout the training sessions, subjects were instructed to perform isometric knee extension as fast and forcefully as possible, achieving at least 90% maximal voluntary contraction as quickly as possible, hold it for 5 s, and relax. Fifteen seconds separated each repetition (6-10), and 2 min separated each set (3). Pre- and post-training measurements were maximal isometric knee extensor (MVC), RFD, and RFD relative to MVC (i.e., %MVC·s(-1)) in different time-epochs varying from 10 to 250 ms from the contraction onset. The MVC (Nm) increased by 19% (275.8 ± 64.9 vs. 329.8 ± 60.4, p resistance training for explosive and maximal strength. This time-specific RFD adaptation highlight that resistance training programs should consider the specific neuromuscular demands of each sport. Key PointsThe time-specific RFD adaptation evoked by resistance training highlight that the method of analyzing RFD is essential for the interpretation of results.Confirming previous data, maximal contractile RFD and maximal force can be differently influenced by resistance training. Thus, the resistance training programs should consider the specific neuromuscular demands of each sport.In active non-strength trained individuals, a short-term resistance training program designed to increase both explosive and maximal strength seems to reduce the adaptive response (i.e. increased RFDMAX) evoked by training with an intended ballistic effort (i.e. high-RFD contraction).

  14. Marathon Running, Accreditation of Study Programmes and Professional Development in Consultancies: Are They All about the Same? A Cognitive Perspective on Transfer of Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Three challenges are presented which address problems of transfer of training: running marathon, accreditation of study programmes, professional development in consultancies. It is discussed in-how-far and why different approaches to transfer of training stress commonalities or differences between these challenges. The results are used to analyse…

  15. Mental health training programmes for non-mental health trained professionals coming into contact with people with mental ill health: a systematic review of effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Alison; Scantlebury, Arabella; Hughes-Morley, Adwoa; Mitchell, Natasha; Wright, Kath; Scott, William; McDaid, Catriona

    2017-05-25

    The police and others in occupations where they come into close contact with people experiencing/with mental ill health, often have to manage difficult and complex situations. Training is needed to equip them to recognise and assist when someone has a mental health issue or learning/intellectual disability. We undertook a systematic review of the effectiveness of training programmes aimed at increasing knowledge, changing behaviour and/or attitudes of the trainees with regard to mental ill health, mental vulnerability, and learning disabilities. Databases searched from 1995 onwards included: ASSIA, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials (CENTRAL), Criminal Justice Abstracts, Embase, ERIC, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Social Science Citation Index. Courses, training, or learning packages aimed at helping police officers and others who interact with the public in a similar way to deal with people with mental health problems were included. Primary outcomes were change in practice and change in outcomes for the groups of people the trainees come into contact with. Systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non- randomised controlled trials (non-RCTs) were included and quality assessed. In addition non-comparative evaluations of training for police in England were included. From 8578 search results, 19 studies met the inclusion criteria: one systematic review, 12 RCTs, three prospective non-RCTs, and three non-comparative studies. The training interventions identified included broad mental health awareness training and packages addressing a variety of specific mental health issues or conditions. Trainees included police officers, teachers and other public sector workers. Some short term positive changes in behaviour were identified for trainees, but for the people the trainees came into contact with there was little or no evidence of benefit. A variety of training programmes exist for non-mental health professionals who come into contact with

  16. HIV drug resistance following a decade of the free antiretroviral therapy programme in India: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Karade

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Although the overall burden of resistance against first-line ART agents remained steady over the study decade, periodic monitoring is essential. There is the need to develop an HIV-1 subtype C-specific resistance database in India.

  17. Comparison of the effects of endurance, resistance and concurrent training on insulin resistance and adiponectin-leptin ratio in diabetic rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Saremi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The obesity-related hormones leptin and adiponectin are independently and oppositely associated with insulin resistance. Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of endurance, resistance and concurrent training on insulin resistance and adiponectin-leptin ratio in diabetic rats. Methods: Ten out of 50 male Wistar rats were separated as healthy subjects. Then diabetes was induced in the remaining rats by the injection of streptozotocin. Diabetic rats divided into 4 groups: Control, resistance training (5 sessions/week, 4 reps/3 sets, endurance training (5 sets per week of treadmill running and concurrent training. The resistance training protocol consisted of ten weeks climbing up the ladder, while endurance training performed on treadmill for ten weeks. Concurrent training group completed a combination of both resistances and endurance treadmill training. Blood samples were taken to assess leptin, adiponectin and insulin resistance. Findings: Endurance, resistance and concurrent training significantly decreased insulin resistance and glucose (P0.05. On the one hand, adiponctin level and adiponctin-leptin ratio significantly increased in all of training groups (P<0.05. Conclusion: Exercise training, as defined in this study, leads to improvements in adiponectin-leptin ratio and concurrent training has more impact on insulin resistance index in diabetic rats.

  18. Identifying motivators and barriers to older community-dwelling people participating in resistance training: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Elissa; Lewin, Gill; Pettigrew, Simone; Hill, Anne-Marie; Bainbridge, Liz; Farrier, Kaela; Langdon, Trish; Airey, Phil; Hill, Keith D

    2017-08-01

    Participation rates of older people in resistance training (RT) are low despite increasing research showing many health benefits. To increase the number of older people participating in RT it is important to know what would motivate people to become involved, what motivates those who participate to continue, and the factors preventing many older people from commencing participation. To investigate these issues, a questionnaire was mailed to three groups of older people: (1) those receiving home care services, (2) members of a peak non-government seniors' organisation and (3) those participating in a specific gym-based RT programme. In total, 1327 questionnaires were returned (response rate = 42.5%). To feel good physically and mentally were the main reasons motivating participation among all three groups, and falls prevention was identified as an important motivator for the home care respondents. Pain, injury and illness were the main barriers to participating, or continuing to participate. However, medical advice was a factor influencing participation commencement. The results suggest organisations providing RT programmes for older people should tailor the promotion and delivery of programmes to address key motivators and barriers specific to each group to increase the proportion of older people initiating and continuing to engage in RT.

  19. Quality control in the optical industry: From a work analysis of lens inspection to a training programme, an experimental case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebsamen, Maryline; Boucheix, Jean-Michel; Fayol, Michel

    2010-01-01

    A cognitive work analysis of quality inspection in the optical industry has been carried out in order to devise a training programme. The task concerned the inspection of high quality human eyeglass lenses. We conducted an experimental investigation of defect detection and acceptability decision-making tasks in 18 experts and novice inspectors. Detection and decision-making were investigated together and separately in two experimental sessions. We showed the effect of expertise on reaction times and errors, and we described the cognitive processes of novice inspectors. On the basis of the processing differences between the two groups, a training programme for new inspectors was devised and described. Finally, training effects were tested.

  20. Mobility as an Intercultural Training Agenda: An Awareness-Raising Programme for Youth Workers and Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davcheva, Leah

    2011-01-01

    This self-study intercultural learning resource has been created for facilitators of mobility programmes for young people. It helps youth facilitators to gain a deeper understanding of the challenges and opportunities that face the mobile young people they work with. Users explore the intercultural aspects of the "mobility" phenomenon from…

  1. Rational Emotive Behavior Based on Academic Procrastination Prevention: Training Programme of Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düsmez, Ihsan; Barut, Yasar

    2016-01-01

    The research is an experimental study which has experimental and control groups, and based on pre-test, post-test, monitoring test model. Research group consists of second and third grade students of Primary School Education and Psychological Counseling undergraduate programmes in Giresun University Faculty of Educational Sciences. The research…

  2. Inflammation relates to resistance training-induced hypertrophy in elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norheim, Kristoffer L.; Cullum, Christopher K.; Andersen, Jesper L.

    2017-01-01

    on the relationship between systemic inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) and changes in muscle mass, as well as the influence of resistance training upon muscle mass. Method: Unilateral leg press resistance exercise was conducted daily during the hospital period. Outcomes included changes in whole body...... although our findings are potentially affected by changes in hydration status. Resistance training during hospitalization increases skeletal muscle mass, and patients with high levels of systemic inflammation demonstrate less ability to increase or preserve muscle mass in response to resistance training...... = 84.8 T 1.9 yr, mean T SE). Lean mass at the midthigh region of the trained leg increased by 2.4% T 1.1% (P G 0.05) after the intervention period. There was a negative association between changes in midthigh lean mass of the trained leg and CRP (rs = j0.53, P G 0.05). Leg extension power increased...

  3. Virtual vitreoretinal surgery: construction of a training programme on the Eyesi Surgical Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet; Grauslund, Jakob

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the construct validity of a full virtual reality vitreoretinal training program at the Eyesi Surgical simulator. Design and methods: A virtual vitreoretinal training program was composed on the Eyesi Surgical simulator, software version 2.9.2 (VRmagic...... developed a training program in virtual vitreoretinal surgery with construct validity for four out of six modules and for overall score. This makes the program a useful tool in the training of future vitreoretinal surgeons....... GmbH, Manheim, Germany). It was completed twice by three groups: Group 1: Twenty medical students Group 2: Ten ophthalmology residents Group 3: Five vitreoretinal surgeons The program consisted of six training modules (Figure 1): Navigation level 2 (Nav2) Forceps Training level 5 (ForT5) Bimanual...

  4. Biomedical scientist training officers' evaluation of integrated (co-terminus) Applied Biomedical Science BSc programmes: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, S J; Cunningham, J M

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) portfolio for pre-registration training in 2003 allowed universities to develop integrated (co-terminus) biomedical science BSc programmes. Students undertake structured placements within clinical pathology laboratories as part of their degree. The clinical training and professional development of students is undertaken by training officers (TOs), who are experienced Health Professions Council (HPC)-registered biomedical scientists and usually also members of the IBMS. This study aims to evaluate TOs' perceptions of these integrated degrees as a means of delivering pre-registration training for biomedical scientists. A questionnaire to collect quantitative data and be completed anonymously was sent to TOs, via staff at participating universities. Items considered TOs' perceptions in four categories: how well students fitted into the laboratory team, their professional and scientific development, the impact of delivering integrated degrees on service delivery, and the commitment to training students. Surveys took place in 2007, 2008 and 2009 and involved TOs taking students from 10, 14 and 17 universities each year, respectively. The response rates to the survey were 60% in 2007, 34% in 2008 and 12% in 2009. Participants were representative in terms of age, gender and pathology discipline and had a broad range of experience with students. The overall mean score for TOs perceptions was 3.38 in 2007 which increased significantly to 3.99 in 2009 (Kruskall Wallis test chi2 = 21.13, P<0.01). Mean scores in three of the four categories were positive in 2007, although the impact on service delivery was perceived negatively. In all areas, means were significantly greater in 2009. The results indicate that TOs view the integrated degrees favourably and are happy with the scientific and professional development of students. Although designing training sessions suitable for undergraduates took extra work initially

  5. Assessment of Knowledge, Attitudes and Competencies of Health Professionals Attended an International Training Programme in Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despena Andrioti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Continuing education is a fundamental aspect of health personnel professional life. These enable health professionals improve patient-centred care, stay current and provide quality services.Objectives: To assess knowledge, attitudes and competencies from the interprofessional training programme in public health held in cooperation with WHO/EURO.Methods: A structured questioner for self-ratings on perceived seminar usefulness and implementation was placed on the internet followed by email notification to the 300 participants. We have received 128 completed questionnaires (42.5%.Programme effects were tested by categorical analysis using Pearson chi-Square or Fisher's exact test. Logistic regression was used to reveal correlation between implementation of competencies according to discipline and type of employer. All tests were considered to be significant at a 5% level. Analysis was carried out using SPSS 20.0. Findings: 85.9% (p = 0.021 <0.05 of the participants applied the knowledge they acquired in the seminar. The application of the competencies in public health services differed according to position (p<0.05. Supervisors achieved higher scores (81.4% in the administration and management than the officers (48.5%. Health professionals felt that their performance has been improved and consequently the quality of the services (75%. Conclusion: The international programme gave them confidence that the acquired knowledge and skills were equal to those of their European colleagues and that they are able to deal with public health issues and to provide the respective services.

  6. Not all instability training devices enhance muscle activation in highly resistance-trained individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J; Behm, David G

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the soleus, bicep femoris, rectus femoris, lower abdominal, and lumbosacral erector spinae (LSES) muscles with a variety of (a) instability devices, (b) stable and unstable (Dyna Disc) exercises, and (c) a fatiguing exercise in 16 highly conditioned individuals. The device protocol had participants assume standing and squatting postures while balancing on a variety of unstable platforms (Dyna Disc, BOSU ball, wobble board, and a Swiss ball) and a stable floor. The exercise protocol had subjects performing, static front lunges, static side lunges, 1-leg hip extensions, 1-leg reaches, and calf raises on a floor or an unstable Dyna Disc. For the fatigue experiment, a wall sit position was undertaken under stable and unstable (BOSU ball) conditions. Results for the device experiment demonstrated increased activity for all muscles when standing on a Swiss ball and all muscles other than the rectus femoris when standing on a wobble board. Only lower abdominals and soleus EMG activity increased while squatting on a Swiss ball and wobble board. Devices such as the Dyna Disc and BOSU ball did not exhibit significant differences in muscle activation under any conditions, except the LSES in the standing Dyna Disc conditions. During the exercise protocol, there were no significant changes in muscle activity between stable and unstable (Dyna Disc) conditions. With the fatigue protocol, soleus EMG activity was 51% greater with a stable base. These results indicate that the use of moderately unstable training devices (i.e., Dyna Disc, BOSU ball) did not provide sufficient challenges to the neuromuscular system in highly resistance-trained individuals. Since highly trained individuals may already possess enhanced stability from the use of dynamic free weights, a greater degree of instability may be necessary.

  7. Effects of a Six-Week Strength Training Programme on Change of Direction Performance in Youth Team Sport Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A. Bourgeois

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of eccentric phase-emphasis strength training (EPE on unilateral strength and performance in 180- and 45-degree change of direction (COD tasks in rugby union players. A 12-week cross-over design was used to compare the efficacy of resistance training executed with 3 s eccentric duration (EPE, n = 12 against conventional strength training, with no constraints on tempo (CON, n = 6. Players in each condition were categorised as ‘fast’ (FAST or ‘slow’ (SLOW using median trial times from baseline testing. Players recorded greater isometric strength improvements following EPE (ES = −0.54 to 1.80. Whilst these changes were not immediate, players improved in strength following cessation. Improvements in 180-degree COD performance was recorded at all test-points following EPE (ES = −1.32 to −0.15. Improvements in 45-degree COD performance were apparent for FAST following CON (ES = −0.96 to 0.10, but CON was deleterious for SLOW (ES = −0.60 to 1.53. Eccentric phase-emphasis strength training shows potential for sustained strength enhancement. Positive performance changes in COD tasks were category- and condition-specific. The data indicate the greatest improvement occurred at nine weeks following resistance training in these players. Performance benefits may also be specific to COD task, player category, and relative to emphasis on eccentric phase activity.

  8. Potential benefits of resistance exercise training on nutritional status in renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, C; Grossi, L; Dwyer, J

    1998-01-01

    Resistance or strength exercise training may help reverse the malnutrition common among patients in chronic renal failure and delay the progression of renal disease. Resistance training is characterized by resisting, lifting, and lowering weights. It results in muscle mass accretion, improved physical function, and slowed progression of muscle wasting. Resistance exercise training for a period of 8 to 12 weeks results in significant increases in muscle mass, muscle strength, and muscle function in frail "healthy" elderly individuals as well as in specific patient populations. States of malnutrition leading to muscle wasting directly affect lean tissue mass and functional capacity. Even at dietary protein intake below the Recommended Dietary Allowances, resistance training appears to exert an anabolic effect by improving energy intake and protein use allowing nitrogen retention. The potential benefits of resistance exercise extend beyond this direct impact on protein metabolism. They include improvements in functional capacity such as gait, balance, mobility, strength, exercise tolerance, improved glucose uptake, insulin sensitivity, and self-efficacy and self-esteem. Currently, the effects of resistance exercise in renal patients are unknown, although they are well shown in the case of other diseases. The potential benefits that resistance exercise training may have on muscle mass and function, nutritional status, hyperglycemia, disease progression, and the overall mental well-being of renal patients deserve further investigation. As an adjunct to current treatment modalities for chronic renal failure, resistance exercise may serve as a cost-effective, interdisciplinary, noninvasive approach to counteract malnutrition and improve the quality of life.

  9. Let the Pleasure Guide Your Resistance Training Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsangedy, Hassan Mohamed; da Silva Machado, Daniel Gomes; Krinski, Kleverton; Duarte do Nascimento, Paulo Henrique; de Amorim Oliveira, Gledson Tavares; Santos, Tony Meireles; Hargreaves, Elaine A; Parfitt, Gaynor

    2018-02-09

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and reliability of the Feeling Scale (FS) to self-regulate resistance training (RT) intensity. Sixteen sedentary men (39.7±7.5 years) performed 3 familiarization sessions, 2 one repetition maximum testing (1RM), and 16 RT sessions (4 sessions for each FS descriptor; randomized). The FS descriptors were "very good" (FS+5), "good" (FS+3), "fairly good" (FS+1), and "fairly bad" (FS-1). Resistance exercises were leg press, chest press, knee extension, and seated biceps curl. Participants were instructed to select a load associated with the verbal/numerical descriptor of the FS to perform 3 sets of 10 repetitions. Participants lifted a significantly greater %1RM as the FS level decreased from FS+5 to FS-1 (P<0.001). Mean %1RM for the FS descriptors of +5, +3, +1, and -1, respectively, were: leg press 42.5%±9.5; 58.2%±7.4; 69.9%±7.0; 80.7%±5.4; knee extensor 37.4%±9.6; 54.5%±9.3; 65.3±8.7; 78.2%±5.9; chest press 42.4%±11.3; 54.9%±11.4; 66.4%±12.6; 78.2%±13.5; and biceps curl 39.0%±8.1; 54.0%±9.7; 68.4%±5.9; 83.2%±3.0. The interclass correlation coefficient over the 4 experimental sessions ranged from 0.73 and 0.99 for %1RM, and 0.77 and 0.99 for weight lifted, with a coefficient of variation of approximately 7%, 4%, 2%, and 2% for FS descriptors of +5, +3, +1, and -1, respectively. This study is the first to demonstrate that the FS can be used to self-regulate exercise intensity in RT. The lower the FS descriptor the higher the weight lifted. In addition, the load self-selected for each FS descriptor was reliable across the four sessions.

  10. Modeling the Responses to Resistance Training in an Animal Experiment Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony G. Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to test whether systems models of training effects on performance in athletes can be used to explore the responses to resistance training in rats. 11 Wistar Han rats (277 ± 15 g underwent 4 weeks of resistance training consisting in climbing a ladder with progressive loads. Training amount and performance were computed from total work and mean power during each training session. Three systems models relating performance to cumulated training bouts have been tested: (i with a single component for adaptation to training, (ii with two components to distinguish the adaptation and fatigue produced by exercise bouts, and (iii with an additional component to account for training-related changes in exercise-induced fatigue. Model parameters were fitted using a mixed-effects modeling approach. The model with two components was found to be the most suitable to analyze the training responses (R2=0.53; P<0.001. In conclusion, the accuracy in quantifying training loads and performance in a rodent experiment makes it possible to model the responses to resistance training. This modeling in rodents could be used in future studies in combination with biological tools for enhancing our understanding of the adaptive processes that occur during physical training.

  11. Ultrasound assessment of lower limb muscle mass in response to resistance training in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Manoj K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantifying the improvements in lower limb or quadriceps muscle mass following resistance training (RT, is an important outcome measure in COPD. Ultrasound is a portable, radiation free imaging technique that can measure the size of superficial muscles belonging to the quadriceps group such as the rectus femoris, but has not been previously used in COPD patients following RT. We compared the responsiveness of ultrasound derived measures of quadriceps mass against dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA, in patients with COPD and healthy controls following a programme of high intensity knee extensor RT. Methods Portable ultrasound was used to assess the size of the dominant quadriceps in 45 COPD patients and 19 healthy controls-before, during, and after 8 weeks of bilateral high intensity isokinetic knee extensor RT. Scanning was performed at the mid-thigh region, and 2 indices of quadriceps mass were measured-rectus femoris cross-sectional area (RFcsa and quadriceps muscle thickness (Qt. Thigh lean mass (Tdexa was determined by DEXA. Results Training resulted in a significant increase in Tdexa, RFcsa and Qt in COPD patients [5.7%, 21.8%, 12.1% respectively] and healthy controls [5.4%, 19.5%, 10.9 respectively]. The effect size for the changes in RFcsa (COPD= 0.77; Healthy=0.83 and Qt (COPD=0.36; Healthy=0.78 were greater than the changes in Tdexa (COPD=0.19; Healthy=0.26 following RT. Conclusions Serial ultrasound measurements of the quadriceps can detect changes in muscle mass in response to RT in COPD. The technique has good reproducibility, and may be more sensitive to changes in muscle mass when compared to DEXA. Trial registration http://www.controlled-trials.com (Identifier: ISRCTN22764439

  12. Effects of Methoxyisoflavone, Ecdysterone, and Sulfo-Polysaccharide Supplementation on Training Adaptations in Resistance-Trained Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Michael

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Methoxyisoflavone (M, 20-hydroxyecdysone (E, and sulfo-polysaccharide (CSP3 have been marketed to athletes as dietary supplements that can increase strength and muscle mass during resistance-training. However, little is known about their potential ergogenic value. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these supplements affect training adaptations and/or markers of muscle anabolism/catabolism in resistance-trained athletes. Methods Forty-five resistance-trained males (20.5 ± 3 yrs; 179 ± 7 cm, 84 ± 16 kg, 17.3 ± 9% body fat were matched according to FFM and randomly assigned to ingest in a double blind manner supplements containing either a placebo (P; 800 mg/day of M; 200 mg of E; or, 1,000 mg/day of CSP3 for 8-weeks during training. At 0, 4, and 8-weeks, subjects donated fasting blood samples and completed comprehensive muscular strength, muscular endurance, anaerobic capacity, and body composition analysis. Data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA. Results No significant differences (p > 0.05 were observed in training adaptations among groups in the variables FFM, percent body fat, bench press 1 RM, leg press 1 RM or sprint peak power. Anabolic/catabolic analysis revealed no significant differences among groups in active testosterone (AT, free testosterone (FT, cortisol, the AT to cortisol ratio, urea nitrogen, creatinine, the blood urea nitrogen to creatinine ratio. In addition, no significant differences were seen from pre to post supplementation and/or training in AT, FT, or cortisol. Conclusion Results indicate that M, E, and CSP3 supplementation do not affect body composition or training adaptations nor do they influence the anabolic/catabolic hormone status or general markers of catabolism in resistance-trained males.

  13. College-School Dialogue and Mentoring in Teacher Training Programmes in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maunganidze, Omega

    2015-01-01

    Globally, mentoring has been recognized as one of the effective approaches in professional training and development of teachers. Most importantly, in Zimbabwe, mentoring has been largely adopted as one of the Teaching Practice strategies by teacher training colleges and schools. Good quality mentoring in schools makes an important contribution to…

  14. Training in the Retail Trade in Italy. Report for the FORCE Programme. First Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Patrizia; And Others

    An international team of researchers studied the following aspects of training in Italy's retail sector: structure and characteristics, institutional and social context, employment and labor, changing conditions and their implications for skill requirements, and training and recruitment. Data were collected from an analysis of social and…

  15. Regulatory evaluation of nuclear power plant on-the-job training programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J.

    1996-01-01

    It is now well recognized internationally in the nuclear industry that a Systematic Approach to Training (SAT), as described in IAEA-TECDOC-525, represents the currently most effective method of providing effective, efficient training to Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) personnel. For this reason the Canadian regulator, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), has made SAT a requirement for the training of NPP personnel whose job activities could affect plant or public safety. In this respect the AECB recognizes that the SAT process will dictate on-the-job-training (OJT) and the prudent use of Job Performance Measures (JPMs) as the most effective method of providing parts of the required training to some work groups. The AECB has adopted a process of training program evaluation for NPP operations personnel which comprises methods to evaluate all types of training including OJT. This paper describes some variations which have been identified in the conduct of OJT at Canadian utilities. It then presents the three step process established by the AECB to effectively evaluate training programs expertise is required. The concept of utility self-evaluations is introduced. Finally, the importance of consistency on the part of the regulator in following a systematic approach to evaluation through the application of a viable standard is addressed. (author). 2 figs

  16. An Evaluation of the Team-Teach Behaviour Support Training Programme in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, James; Walker, Lawrence; Hornby, Garry

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the perceptions of teachers and other professionals of Team-Teach behaviour support training in New Zealand. Analysis of course evaluations, questionnaires, interviews and documents provide the findings. Comparisons are made with Team-Teach training in the UK and similarities and differences between New Zealand training…

  17. The Impact of In-Service Technology Training Programmes on Technology Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbo, Mishack; Makgato, Moses; Muller, Helene

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the impact the Advanced Certificate in Education (ACE) in-service technology training program has on technology teachers' knowledge and understanding of technology. The training of technology teachers is an initiative toward teachers' professional development within the mathematics, science, and technology sphere…

  18. Training in the Motor Vehicle Repair and Sales Sector in Greece. Report for the FORCE Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaionnou, Skevos; Patsatzis, N.

    A study listed and analyzed the vocational training and continuing training systems for staff in the motor vehicle repair and sales sector in Greece. Heavy taxation on motor vehicles led to difficulty in replacing vehicles that resulted in a very high demand for vehicle repairs, which, in conjunction with the ambiguous legislation governing the…

  19. Training in the Motor Vehicle Repair and Sales Sector. Report for the FORCE Programme. European Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauner, Felix; And Others

    Trends in training for employment in the motor vehicle repair and sales sectors in the 12 European Community (EC) countries were identified through a review of 12 national reports that were prepared by 16 research teams involved in an EC study on continuing training in the motor vehicle sales and repair sector. Special attention was paid to the…

  20. Effectiveness of basic clinical skills training programmes : a cross-sectional comparison of four medical schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmen, R; Scherpbier, A; van der Vleuten, C; Denekens, J; Derese, A; van Rossum, Herman; Hoogenboom, R; Kramer, A; Van Royen, P; Bossaert, L

    Objective Training in physical diagnostic skills is an important part of undergraduate medical education. The objective of this study was to study the outcome of skills training at four medical schools. Context At the time of the study, three schools had a traditional lecture-based curriculum and

  1. Effectiveness of training programmes used in two stables of thoroughbred race horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarska, E; Cywińska, A; Ostaszewski, P; Kowalska, A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the training methods used in two stables and their effects on selected blood parameters and race results. A total number of 36 thoroughbred race horses was examined in two groups, trained by two trainers. Twenty-four horses (group A) were trained at Sluzewiec and the remaining twelve horses (group B) were kept and trained in a private stable. The experiment lasted for five months. The activities of CPK (creatine phosphokinase) and AST (aspartate aminotransferase) and the concentration of LA (lactic acid) were determined. The speed was controlled and recorded by a Garmin GPS system. The analysis of the General Handicap rating demonstrated that the training methods used in stable A were more effective and resulted in better classification of these horses. Training methods in both stables were evaluated and compared on the basis of maximal speeds during training sessions and related post exercise LA concentrations. The main differences between training methods used in both stables concerned the workload and the time of work with the rider. Analysis of the values measured in individual horses from stable B have shown that AST and CK activities were high not only in all young, 2-year-old horses but also in three older ones. This seems to confirm the lack of balance and proper movement coordination in these horses, resulting in high activities of muscle enzymes.

  2. Effectiveness of Resistance Circuit-Based Training for Maximum Oxygen Uptake and Upper-Body One-Repetition Maximum Improvements: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco Antonio; Rubio-Arias, Jacobo Á; Ramos-Campo, Domingo Jesús; Alcaraz, Pedro E

    2017-12-01

    It is well known that concurrent increases in both maximal strength and aerobic capacity are associated with improvements in sports performance as well as overall health. One of the most popular training methods used for achieving these objectives is resistance circuit-based training. The objective of the present systematic review with a meta-analysis was to evaluate published studies that have investigated the effects of resistance circuit-based training on maximum oxygen uptake and one-repetition maximum of the upper-body strength (bench press exercise) in healthy adults. The following electronic databases were searched from January to June 2016: PubMed, Web of Science and Cochrane. Studies were included if they met the following criteria: (1) examined healthy adults aged between 18 and 65 years; (2) met the characteristics of resistance circuit-based training; and (3) analysed the outcome variables of maximum oxygen uptake using a gas analyser and/or one-repetition maximum bench press. Of the 100 articles found from the database search and after all duplicates were removed, eight articles were analysed for maximum oxygen uptake. Of 118 healthy adults who performed resistance circuit-based training, maximum oxygen uptake was evaluated before and after the training programme. Additionally, from the 308 articles found for one-repetition maximum, eight articles were analysed. The bench press one-repetition maximum load, of 237 healthy adults who performed resistance circuit-based training, was evaluated before and after the training programme. Significant increases in maximum oxygen uptake and one-repetition maximum bench press were observed following resistance circuit-based training. Additionally, significant differences in maximum oxygen uptake and one-repetition maximum bench press were found between the resistance circuit-based training and control groups. The meta-analysis showed that resistance circuit-based training, independent of the protocol used in the

  3. Comparison of Periodized and Non-Periodized Resistance Training on Maximal Strength: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tyler D; Tolusso, Danilo V; Fedewa, Michael V; Esco, Michael R

    2017-10-01

    Periodization is a logical method of organizing training into sequential phases and cyclical time periods in order to increase the potential for achieving specific performance goals while minimizing the potential for overtraining. Periodized resistance training plans are proposed to be superior to non-periodized training plans for enhancing maximal strength. The primary aim of this study was to examine the previous literature comparing periodized resistance training plans to non-periodized resistance training plans and determine a quantitative estimate of effect on maximal strength. All studies included in the meta-analysis met the following inclusion criteria: (1) peer-reviewed publication; (2) published in English; (3) comparison of a periodized resistance training group to a non-periodized resistance training group; (4) maximal strength measured by 1-repetition maximum (1RM) squat, bench press, or leg press. Data were extracted and independently coded by two authors. Random-effects models were used to aggregate a mean effect size (ES), 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and potential moderators. The cumulative results of 81 effects gathered from 18 studies published between 1988 and 2015 indicated that the magnitude of improvement in 1RM following periodized resistance training was greater than non-periodized resistance training (ES = 0.43, 95% CI 0.27-0.58; P training status (β = -0.59; P = 0.0305), study length (β = 0.03; P = 0.0067), and training frequency (β = 0.46; P = 0.0123) were associated with a change in 1RM. These results indicate that undulating programs were more favorable for strength gains. Improvements in 1RM were greater among untrained participants. Additionally, higher training frequency and longer study length were associated with larger improvements in 1RM. These results suggest that periodized resistance training plans have a moderate effect on 1RM compared to non-periodized training plans. Variation in training stimuli

  4. Maximal power output during incremental exercise by resistance and endurance trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivelavan, D S; Sumathilatha, S

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed at comparing the maximal power output by resistance trained and endurance trained athletes during incremental exercise. Thirty male athletes who received resistance training (Group I) and thirty male athletes of similar age group who received endurance training (Group II) for a period of more than 1 year were chosen for the study. Physical parameters were measured and exercise stress testing was done on a cycle ergometer with a portable gas analyzing system. The maximal progressive incremental cycle ergometer power output at peak exercise and carbon dioxide production at VO2max were measured. Highly significant (P biofeedback and perk up the athlete's performance.

  5. Concurrent speed endurance and resistance training improves performance, running economy and muscle NHE1 in moderately trained runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Casper; Christensen, Peter Møller; Larsen, Sonni

    2014-01-01

    -week intervention period (INT) 21 male runners (maximum oxygen uptake (VO2-max): 59±1 mL/min/kg; mean ± SE) either maintained their training (CON, n=11) or performed high intensity concurrent training (HICT, n=12) consisting of two weekly sessions of SET followed by HRT and two weekly sessions......The purpose of this study was to examine whether speed endurance training (SET, repeated 30-s sprints) and heavy resistance training (HRT, 80-90% of 1 repetition maximum) performed in succession are compatible and leads to performance improvements in moderately trained endurance runners. For an 8...... of aerobic training with an average reduction in running distance of 42%. After 4-weeks of HICT, performance was improved (P

  6. Shared decision-making for psychiatric medication: A mixed-methods evaluation of a UK training programme for service users and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, Shulamit; Morant, Nicola; Stead, Ute; Perry, Ben

    2017-12-01

    Shared decision making (SDM) is recognised as a promising strategy to enhance good collaboration between clinicians and service users, yet it is not practised regularly in mental health. Develop and evaluate a novel training programme to enhance SDM in psychiatric medication management for service users, psychiatrists and care co-ordinators. The training programme design was informed by existing literature and local stakeholders consultations. Parallel group-based training programmes on SDM process were delivered to community mental health service users and providers. Evaluation consisted of quantitative measures at baseline and 12-month follow-up, post-programme participant feedback and qualitative interviews. Training was provided to 47 service users, 35 care-coordinators and 12 psychiatrists. Participant feedback was generally positive. Statistically significant changes in service users' decisional conflict and perceptions of practitioners' interactional style in promoting SDM occurred at the follow-up. Qualitative data suggested positive impacts on service users' and care co-ordinators confidence to explore medication experience, and group-based training was valued. The programme was generally acceptable to service users and practitioners. This indicates the value of conducting a larger study and exploring application for non-medical decisions.

  7. Resistance training for activity limitations in older adults with skeletal muscle function deficits: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papa EV

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Evan V Papa,1 Xiaoyang Dong,2 Mahdi Hassan1 1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Physical Therapy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USA Abstract: Human aging results in a variety of changes to skeletal muscle. Sarcopenia is the age-associated loss of muscle mass and is one of the main contributors to musculoskeletal impairments in the elderly. Previous research has demonstrated that resistance training can attenuate skeletal muscle function deficits in older adults, however few articles have focused on the effects of resistance training on functional mobility. The purpose of this systematic review was to 1 present the current state of literature regarding the effects of resistance training on functional mobility outcomes for older adults with sk