WorldWideScience

Sample records for resistance training program

  1. Why do seniors leave resistance training programs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton E

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Elissa Burton,1 Anne-Marie Hill,1 Simone Pettigrew,2 Gill Lewin,3 Liz Bainbridge,1 Kaela Farrier,1 Phil Airey,4 Keith D Hill1 1School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, 2School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, 3School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, Curtin University, 4Council on the Ageing, Perth, WA, Australia Purpose: The proportion of the population, that is older, is growing at a faster rate than other age groups. Physical activity is important for older people because it assists in living independently. Participating in resistance training on a regular basis (twice weekly is recommended for older people; yet, fewer than 15% of people over 60 years achieve this level. The aim of this article was to investigate the factors contributing to older people’s decisions to stop participation in a resistance training program.Participants and methods: Participants were older people who had chosen to participate in a structured resistance training program specifically designed for seniors and then after a period of time discontinued. This population received a questionnaire in the mail focused on factors contributing to their cessation of resistance training exercise. Qualitative results were analyzed using inductive content analysis.Results: Fifty-six survey responses were received (average age 71.5 years, SD =9.0; 79% females. Injury, illness, and holidaying were the main reasons for ceasing participation. A small but important number of responses (11% reported that they considered they were not provided with sufficient support during the resistance training programs.Conclusions: To attract and retain their senior clients, the results indicate that program organizers need to provide tailored support to return to resistance training after injury and offer flexible and individualized services that accommodate older people’s life choices in retirement. Keywords: older people, strength training, gymnasium, retention, aging

  2. Reaching Resisters in a Teaching Assistant Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carolyn I.

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been limited longitudinal qualitative research examining the effects of training programs on graduate students' teaching performance. One gap in this research is a discussion of Teaching Assistants (TAs) who resist such programs and an examination of strategies for overcoming this resistance. This action research…

  3. Format of Basic Instruction Program Resistance Training Classes: Effect on Fitness Change in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, J. P.; Channell, Brian; Pugh, Chip; Tuck, Matt; Pendel, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    New resistance training programs such as CrossFit are gaining favor among college-aged students. CrossFit and related commercial resistance training programs may provide a valuable elective option within basic instruction program (BIP) curricula, but the fitness benefits of this course have not been compared with those of existing BIP resistance…

  4. A 12-week resistance training program elicits positive changes in hemodynamic responses in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinthya Campos Salazar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of a resistance training program in hemodynamic responses and adaptations in 60 yr. old elderly. Volunteers were 60 healthy-elderly who underwent a training program 3 times/wk. for 12 wk. Participants were randomly assigned to either a control group, an exercise group who trained at 30% intensity of 5 maximal repetitions (5RM (30% of 5RM or an exercise group at an intensity of 70% (70% of 5RM. Hemodynamic variables measured were mean arterial pressure (MAP, calculated before and immediately after the training session, and rate pressure product (RPP, estimated once a month and before and after finishing the program. Results indicated that resistance exercise training at 30% and 70% of 5RM, with a total exercise work of 872.7 and 890.9 kg did not elicited cardiovascular risks for the elderly. A 12-wk resistance exercise training reduced the cardiovascular strain as shown by the RPP (~16% and the MAP (~9%, with no adverse effects throughout the program. Unfortunately, all the hemodynamic benefits were reverted 6 days following completion of the program. In conclusion, a healthy elderly population must perform resistance training exercises to significantly reduce the cardiovascular stress. We suggest to conduct further research that looks into different exercise intensities in longer program duration and to determine the mechanisms responsible for the deleterious effects of the detraining by using physiological, biochemical and biomechanical variables.

  5. Effects of a group circuit progressive resistance training program compared with a treadmill training program for adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviram, Ronit; Harries, Netta; Namourah, Ibtisam; Amro, Akram; Bar-Haim, Simona

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether goal-directed group circuit progressive resistance exercise training (GT) can improve motor function in adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) and to compare outcomes with a treadmill training (TT) intervention. In a multi-centered matched pairs study, 95 adolescents with spastic CP (GMFCS II-III) were allocated to GT or TT interventions for 30 bi-weekly one hour training. Outcome measures of GMFM-66, GMFM-D%, GMFM-E%, TUG, 10 meter walk test (10 MWT), and 6 minute walk test (6 MWT) were made at baseline (T1), after interventions (T2) and 6 months post training (T3). Both training programs induced significant improvement in all outcome measures (T2-T1) that were mostly retained at T3. At the end of the intervention, the GT group showed an advantage in all measured changes compared to the TT group and in percentage changes. Differences were significant (p cerebral palsy. The GT program had generally greater benefits based on the functional measures.

  6. A Six-Week Resistance Training Program Does Not Change Shear Modulus of the Triceps Brachii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Ryota; Shikiba, Tomofumi; Tanaka, Jun; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effect of a 6-week resistance training program on the shear modulus of the triceps brachii (TB). Twenty-three young men were randomly assigned to either the training (n = 13) or control group (n = 10). Before and after conducting the resistance training program, the shear modulus of the long head of the TB was measured at the point 70% along the length of the upper arm from the acromial process of the scapula to the lateral epicondyle of the humerus using shear wave ultrasound elastography. Muscle thickness of the long head of the TB was also determined at the same site by ultrasonography used during both tests. A resistance exercise was performed 3 days a week for 6 weeks using a dumbbell mass-adjusted to 80% of the 1-repetition maximum (1RM). The training effect on the muscle thickness and 1RM was significant. Nevertheless, the muscle shear modulus was not significantly changed after the training program. From the perspective of muscle mechanical properties, the present results indicate that significant adaptation must occur to make the TB more resistant to subsequent damaging bouts during the 6-week training program to target the TB.

  7. Effects of two programs of metabolic resistance training on strength and hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Brandt Meister

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The effects of low intensity resistance training combined with vascular occlusion have been investigated by several studies. Similar results on strength and hypertrophy have been observed when such method was compared to high intensity protocols. However, due to the specific apparatus needed to apply vascular occlusion (ex.: Kaatsu on some exercises, alternative forms of metabolic training might be used. In the present study, an isometric contraction was performed within each concentric-eccentric transition phase, for every repetition, to elicit metabolic stress. Objective: The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of two resistance training protocols with metabolic characteristics on strength (1MR, circumference (CIRC and muscle thickness (measured with ultrasonography [MT]. Subjective perception of discomfort was also recorded with an analogical-visual pain scale (AVP. Methods: Twelve young, healthy men were trained with two different methods during 10 weeks. The right limb was trained with an isometric contraction within each concentric-eccentric transition phases for every repetition (ISO whereas the left limb was trained with a pneumatic cuff to apply vascular occlusion (OC on the knee extensor muscles. Both methods were trained at 20% 1MR. Results: It was observed increases on medial tight CIRC, proximal MT, medial MT, distal MT and 1MR, with no difference between both methods. The perception of discomfort was greater for ISO at the end of the third set and lower than reported by OC, at the beginning and end of the training program. Conclusions: Both protocols produced similar gains on strength and hypertrophy. The advantages of training with low loads are important to elderly or rehabilitation training programs. Other studies that compare this method with conventional resistance training are warranted.

  8. Factors influencing overweight children's commencement of and continuation in a resistance training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuigan Michael R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In light of the child overweight and obesity problem in Australia, resistance training programs have been trialled as an innovative way of assisting children increase lean body mass and reduce body fat. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors influencing overweight children's participation in a resistance training trial program. Method Parent-child pairs who participated in the trial program were invited to take part in a follow-up individual interview to discuss their program experiences. In total, 22 semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 parent-child pairs. Results The factors found to be most relevant to program commencement among parents were a desire for their child to lose weight and gain confidence, the proximity of the venue, and no cost for participation. For children, the most relevant factors were the opportunity to build strength and improve fitness and having supportive parents who facilitated program initiation. The factors most relevant to continuation for parents were the quality of the program management, being able to stay for the sessions, the child's improved weight status, coordination, and confidence, and no cost for participation. Weight loss and improved confidence were also motivators for continuation among the children, along with pleasant social interaction with peers and trainers and ongoing parental support. Conclusion Different factors variably influence program commencement and program continuation in both parents and children. This has important implications for future interventions that aim to successfully recruit and retain intervention participants.

  9. Specific balance training included in an endurance-resistance exercise program improves postural balance in elderly patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frih, Bechir; Mkacher, Wajdi; Jaafar, Hamdi; Frih, Ameur; Ben Salah, Zohra; El May, Mezry; Hammami, Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 6 months of specific balance training included in endurance-resistance program on postural balance in haemodialysis (HD) patients. Forty-nine male patients undergoing HD were randomly assigned to an intervention group (balance training included in an endurance-resistance training, n = 26) or a control group (resistance-endurance training only, n = 23). Postural control was assessed using six clinical tests; Timed Up and Go test, Tinetti Mobility Test, Berg Balance Scale, Unipodal Stance test, Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test and Activities Balance Confidence scale. All balance measures increased significantly after the period of rehabilitation training in the intervention group. Only the Timed Up and Go, Berg Balance Scale, Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test and Activities Balance Confidence scores were improved in the control group. The ranges of change in these tests were greater in the balance training group. In HD patients, specific balance training included in a usual endurance-resistance training program improves static and dynamic balance better than endurance-resistance training only. Implications for rehabilitation Rehabilitation using exercise in haemodialysis patients improved global mobility and functional abilities. Specific balance training included in usual endurance resistance training program could lead to improved static and dynamic balance.

  10. Impact of an antimicrobial resistance control program: pre- and post-training antibiotic use in children with typhoid fever

    OpenAIRE

    Elfrida A. Rachmah; Maftuchah Rochmanti; Dwiyanti Puspitasari

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics may lead to antimicrobial resistance. In 2012, Dr. Soetomo Hospital conducted training for pediatric residents on the proper use of antibiotics to limit antimicrobial resistance. Objective To evaluate the impact of a rational, antibiotic-use training program for pediatric residents on their antibiotic prescriptions for patients with typhoid fever. Methods A cross-sectional, analytic study was conducted. We collected data from children with typhoid fe...

  11. Effects of a resistance training program on balance and fatigue perception in patients with Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rubio, Araceli; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Casilda-López, Jesús; López-López, Laura; Valenza, Marie Carmen

    2017-11-22

    Fatigue and balance impairment leads to a loss of independence and are important to adequately manage. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a resistance training program on dynamic balance and fatigue in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Randomized controlled trial. Forty-six patients with PD were randomly allocated to an intervention group receiving a 8-week resistance training program focused on lower limbs or to a control group. Balance was assessed using the Mini-BESTest and fatigue was assessed by the Piper Fatigue Scale. Patients in the intervention group improved significantly (p<0.05) on dynamic balance (reactive postural control and total values) and perceived fatigue. An 8-week resistance training program was found to be effective at improving dynamic balance and fatigue in patients with PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Short-term inspiratory muscle training potentiates the benefits of aerobic and resistance training in patients undergoing CABG in phase II cardiac rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Bárbara Maria; Cardoso, Dannuey Machado; Gomes, Tiago José Nardi; Santos, Tamires Daros dos; Vicente, Marília Severo; Pereira, Sérgio Nunes; Barbosa, Viviane Acunha; Albuquerque, Isabella Martins de

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the efficiency of short-term inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined aerobic and resistance exercise on respiratory muscle strength, functional capacity and quality of life in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in the phase II cardiac rehabilitation program. A prospective, quasi-experimental study with 24 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and were randomly assigned to two groups in the Phase II cardiac rehabilitation program: inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined training (aerobic and resistance) group (GCR + IMT, n=12) and combined training with respiratory exercises group (GCR, n=12), over a period of 12 weeks, with two sessions per week. Before and after intervention, the following measurements were obtained: maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (PImax and PEmax), peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) and quality of life scores. Data were compared between pre- and post-intervention at baseline and the variation between the pre- and post-phase II cardiac rehabilitation program using the Student's t-test, except the categorical variables, which were compared using the Chi-square test. Values of Pinspiratory muscle training, even when applied for a short period, may potentiate the effects of combined aerobic and resistance training, becoming a simple and inexpensive strategy for patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in phase II cardiac rehabilitation.

  13. Effectiveness of A 16-week High-intensity Cardio-resistance Training (HICRT) Program in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Tina A; Greene, Daniel R; Ward, Nathan J; Reeser, Ginger E; Allen, Courtney M; Baumgartner, Nicholas W; Cohen, Neal J; Kramer, Arthur F; Hillman, Charles H; Barbey, Aron K

    2017-06-21

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a novel, 16-week High-Intensity Cardio-Resistance Training (HICRT) program on measures of aerobic fitness, agility, aerobic power, muscular endurance, lower body explosive power, and self-reported activity level. The intervention group (N=129; 63 f, 24.65±5.55 y) had a baseline VO2max of 39.83±9.13. These individuals participated in 26, 70-minute exercise sessions, and 4 fitness testing sessions. Participants were matched with a non-exercise control group, paired by sex, age, and baseline VO2max. Matched controls (N = 129, 63 f, 24.26±5.59 y) had a baseline VO2max of 39.86±8.59 and completed pre- and post-intervention VO2max testing only. The results demonstrate that participants in the fitness intervention group significantly increased their VO2max (2.72±0.31, Mdiff±SE; pfitness intervention showed a significant improvement in 3 of 5 components of the fitness field tests. Specifically, significant improvements were observed for the 1-minute rower (5.32±0.505, Mdiff±SE; pfitness for young and middle aged adults. HICRT affords flexibility for tailoring to meet desired health and fitness outcomes and makes perceivably daunting high-intensity functional training and multimodal sports training more accessible to general, traditionally non-athletic, populations.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  14. The effect of a resistance-training program on muscle strength, physical workload, muscle fatigue and musculoskeletal discomfort: An experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamberg-Reenen, H.H. van; Visser, B.; Beek, A.J. van der; Blatter, B.M.; Dieën, J.H. van; Mechelen, W. van

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of a resistance-training program on muscle strength of the back and neck/shoulder muscles, relative physical workload, muscle fatigue and musculoskeletal discomfort during a simulated assembly and lifting task. Twenty-two workers were

  15. Changes in the Force-Velocity Mechanical Profile After Short Resistance Training Programs Differing in Set Configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Fernández-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Mayo, Xián; Fariñas, Juan; Río-Rodríguez, Dan; Carballeira, Eduardo; Carnero, Elvis A; Standley, Robert A; Giráldez-García, Manuel A; Dopico-Calvo, Xurxo; Tuimil, Jose Luis

    2017-04-01

    The main aim of this study was to analyze the effect of resistance training programs differing in set configuration on mechanical force-velocity profiles. Thirteen participants performed 10 unilateral knee extension training sessions over 5 weeks. Each limb was randomized to one of the following set configurations: traditional (4 sets of 8 repetitions at maximum intended velocity, 10RM load, 3-min pause between sets) or interrepetition rest (32 maximum intended velocity repetitions, 10RM load, 17.4 s of rest between each repetition). Velocity of each repetition was recorded throughout the program. Before and after training, individual linear force velocities were calculated, and the following parameters were obtained: force and velocity axis intercept, slope, and estimated maximum power. Mean velocity was higher throughout the program for interrepetition rest configuration (0.54 ± 0.01 vs. 0.48 ± 0.01 m∙s -1 for interrepetition rest, and traditional configuration respectively; main effect of set configuration: P force and velocity intercepts, but a steeper negative slope after both training protocols (main effect of time: P resistance training velocity did not affect the adaptations. Our results suggest that, in a short-term program, maximum intended rather than actual velocity is a key factor to modulate strength adaptations.

  16. Preliminary evaluation of an after-school resistance training program for improving physical fitness in middle school-age boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, Avery D; McFarland, Jim E; Johnson, Larry; Kang, Jie; Bloom, Jason; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Hoffman, Jay R

    2007-04-01

    Most after-school physical activity programs for youth focus on aerobic games and activities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an after-school resistance training program on improving the physical fitness of middle school-age boys. 22 boys (M = 13.9 yr., SD = .4 yr.) participated in a periodized, multiple-set, 9-wk. (2x/week) resistance training program. All subjects were pre- and post-tested on their 10-repetition maximum squat, 10-repetition maximum bench press, vertical jump, medicine ball toss, flexibility, and also percentage of body fat and the progressive aerobic cardiovascular endurance run (PACER). Statistical analysis indicated that subjects significantly improved performance on the squat (19%), bench press (15%), flexibility (10%), vertical jump (5%), medicine ball toss (12%), and the PACER (36%). Although this design minus a control group limits interpretation, this after-school resistance-training program can improve muscular fitness and cardiovascular fitness in boys and should be replicated with appropriate experimental controls.

  17. Short-term inspiratory muscle training potentiates the benefits of aerobic and resistance training in patients undergoing CABG in phase II cardiac rehabilitation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Maria Hermes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To investigate the efficiency of short-term inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined aerobic and resistance exercise on respiratory muscle strength, functional capacity and quality of life in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in the phase II cardiac rehabilitation program. Methods: A prospective, quasi-experimental study with 24 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and were randomly assigned to two groups in the Phase II cardiac rehabilitation program: inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined training (aerobic and resistance group (GCR + IMT, n=12 and combined training with respiratory exercises group (GCR, n=12, over a period of 12 weeks, with two sessions per week. Before and after intervention, the following measurements were obtained: maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (PImax and PEmax, peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2 and quality of life scores. Data were compared between pre- and post-intervention at baseline and the variation between the pre- and post-phase II cardiac rehabilitation program using the Student's t-test, except the categorical variables, which were compared using the Chi-square test. Values of P<0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Compared to GCR, the GCR + IMT group showed larger increments in PImax (P<0.001, PEmax (P<0.001, peak VO2 (P<0.001 and quality of life scores (P<0.001. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the addition of inspiratory muscle training, even when applied for a short period, may potentiate the effects of combined aerobic and resistance training, becoming a simple and inexpensive strategy for patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in phase II cardiac rehabilitation.

  18. Addition of Glute-Ham-Gastroc Raise to a Resistance Training Program: Effect on Jump Propulsion and Landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Loren Z F; Yaremko, Anita; vonGaza, Gabriella L

    2017-09-01

    Chiu LZF, Yaremko A, and vonGaza GL. Addition of glute-ham-gastroc raise to a resistance training program: effect on jump propulsion and landing. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2562-2571, 2017-Exercises such as squats and cleans are commonly used in resistance training programs to enhance athletic performance. However, these exercises may not effectively train the gastrocnemius, an important muscle for energy generation and absorption. The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of adding glute-ham-gastroc raise exercise to target the gastrocnemius to a traditional resistance training program involving squats and cleans. Vertical jump height, weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion, and jump propulsion and landing mechanics were examined before and after an 8-week training intervention in female youth volleyball players. Approach (with: [INCREMENT] = 2.6 ± 1.7 cm; 90% confidence interval [CI] [1.8-3.6 cm] vs. without: [INCREMENT] = 1.8 ± 1.9 cm; 90% CI [0.8-2.8 cm]) and standing (with: [INCREMENT] = 2.7 ± 1.7 cm; 90% CI [1.7-3.6 cm] vs. without: [INCREMENT] = 1.6 ± 1.5 cm; 90% CI [0.8-2.4 cm]) vertical jump height increased more in the group performing glute-ham-gastroc raise. Weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion increased when glute-ham-gastroc raise was included (left: [INCREMENT] = 4.1 ± 4.1°; 90% CI [1.9-6.4°] and right: [INCREMENT] = 4.1 ± 3.9°; 90% CI [1.9-6.2°]) but did not appear to change with resistance training only (left: [INCREMENT] = 1.4 ± 4.5°; 90% CI [-1.0 to 3.9°] and right: [INCREMENT] = 2.5 ± 4.4°; [-0.3 to 4.5°]). No discernible differences were observed for changes in jump propulsion and landing mechanics between groups. Glute-ham-gastroc raise may have a beneficial effect with young athletes when added to squat- and clean-based resistance training programs.

  19. Increases in muscle strength and balance using a resistance training program administered via a telecommunications system in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, David; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Demolles, Deborah; Fielding, Roger A

    2011-11-01

    Resistance training programs have been found to improve muscle strength, physical function, and depressive symptoms in middle-aged and older adults. These programs have typically been provided in clinical facilities, health clubs, and senior centers, which may be inconvenient and/or cost prohibitive for some older adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an automated telemedicine intervention that provides real-time guidance and monitoring of resistance training in the home. A randomized clinical trial in 103 middle-aged or older participants. Participants were assigned to use of a theory-driven interactive voice response system designed to promote resistance training (Telephone-Linked Computer-based Long-term Interactive Fitness Trainer; n = 52) or to an attention control (n = 51) for a period of 12 months. Measurements of muscle strength, balance, walk distance, and mood were obtained at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. We observed increased strength, improved balance, and fewer depressive symptoms in the intervention group than in the control group. Using generalized estimating equations modeling, group differences were statistically significant for knee flexion strength (p = .035), single-leg stance time (p = .029), and Beck Depression Inventory (p = .030). This computer-based telecommunications exercise intervention led to improvements in participants' strength, balance, and depressive symptoms. Because of their low cost and easy accessibility, computer-based interventions may be a cost-effective way of promoting exercise in the home.

  20. EFFECTS OF A SHORT-TERM PLYOMETRIC AND RESISTANCE TRAINING PROGRAM ON FITNESS PERFORMANCE IN BOYS AGE 12 TO 15 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery D. Faigenbaum

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a six week training period of combined plyometric and resistance training (PRT, n = 13 or resistance training alone (RT, n = 14 on fitness performance in boys (12-15 yr. The RT group performed static stretching exercises followed by resistance training whereas the PRT group performed plyometric exercises followed by the same resistance training program. The training duration per session for both groups was 90 min. At baseline and after training all participants were tested on the vertical jump, long jump, medicine ball toss, 9.1 m sprint, pro agility shuttle run and flexibility. The PRT group made significantly (p < 0.05 greater improvements than RT in long jump (10.8 cm vs. 2.2 cm, medicine ball toss (39.1 cm vs. 17.7 cm and pro agility shuttle run time (-0.23 sec vs. -0.02 sec following training. These findings suggest that the addition of plyometric training to a resistance training program may be more beneficial than resistance training and static stretching for enhancing selected measures of upper and lower body power in boys

  1. Early-Phase Satellite Cell and Myonuclear Domain Adaptations to Slow-Speed vs. Traditional Resistance Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman-Montemayor, Jennifer R; Hikida, Robert S; Staron, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify adaptations in satellite cell (SC) content and myonuclear domain (MND) after 6-week slow-speed vs. "normal-speed" resistance training programs. Thirty-four untrained females were divided into slow speed (SS), traditional strength (TS), traditional muscular endurance (TE), and nontraining control (C) groups. Three sets each of leg press, squat, and knee extension were performed 2 days per week for the first week and 3 days per week for the following 5 weeks. The SS group performed 6-10 repetition maximum (6-10RM) for each set with 10-second concentric (con) and 4-second eccentric (ecc) contractions for each repetition. Traditional strength and TE performed 6-10RM and 20-30RM, respectively, at "normal" speed (1-2 seconds per con and ecc contractions). Traditional muscular endurance and SS trained at the same intensity (40-60% 1RM), whereas TS trained at 80-85% 1RM. Pretraining and posttraining muscle biopsies were analyzed for fiber cross-sectional area, fiber type, SC content, myonuclear number, and MND. Satellite cell content of type I, IIA, IIAX, and IIX fibers significantly increased in TS. However, SC content of only type IIAX and IIX fibers increased in SS, and there was no change in TE or C. Myonuclear number did not change in any group. Myonuclear domain of type I, IIA, IIAX, and IIX fibers increased in TS, whereas MND of only type IIA fibers increased in SS, and there was no change in TE or C. In conclusion, slow-speed resistance training increased SC content and MND more than training with a similar resistance at normal speed. However, high-intensity normal-speed training produced the greatest degree of fiber adaptation for each variable.

  2. Privacy Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recognizing that training and awareness are critical to protecting agency Personally Identifiable Information (PII), the EPA is developing online training for privacy contacts in its programs and regions.

  3. The effects of adding single-joint exercises to a multi-joint exercise resistance training program on upper body muscle strength and size in trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de França, Henrique Silvestre; Branco, Paulo Alexandre Nordeste; Guedes Junior, Dilmar Pinto; Gentil, Paulo; Steele, James; Teixeira, Cauê Vazquez La Scala

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was compare changes in upper body muscle strength and size in trained men performing resistance training (RT) programs involving multi-joint plus single-joint (MJ+SJ) or only multi-joint (MJ) exercises. Twenty young men with at least 2 years of experience in RT were randomized in 2 groups: MJ+SJ (n = 10; age, 27.7 ± 6.6 years) and MJ (n = 10; age, 29.4 ± 4.6 years). Both groups trained for 8 weeks following a linear periodization model. Measures of elbow flexors and extensors 1-repetition maximum (1RM), flexed arm circumference (FAC), and arm muscle circumference (AMC) were taken pre- and post-training period. Both groups significantly increased 1RM for elbow flexion (4.99% and 6.42% for MJ and MJ+SJ, respectively), extension (10.60% vs 9.79%, for MJ and MJ+SJ, respectively), FAC (1.72% vs 1.45%, for MJ and MJ+SJ, respectively), and AMC (1.33% vs 3.17% for MJ and MJ+SJ, respectively). Comparison between groups revealed no significant difference in any variable. In conclusion, 8 weeks of RT involving MJ or MJ+SJ resulted in similar alterations in muscle strength and size in trained participants. Therefore, the addition of SJ exercises to a RT program involving MJ exercises does not seem to promote additional benefits to trained men, suggesting MJ-only RT to be a time-efficient approach.

  4. Aerobic and resistance exercise training program intervention for enhancing gait function in elderly and chronically ill Taiwanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M S; Lin, T C; Jiang, B C

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to develop an effective exercise training program for enhancing the postural stability and gait function of chronically ill patients to avoid falls. Pre training-post-training. Analyses were limited to those randomized to the exercise intervention. The participants were chronically ill patients over 45 years old (47-89 years), of whom 25 completed the 12-week training regimen and assessment in the exercise group, whereas 29 completed the assessment in the control group, suffering from cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, or osteoporosis. The average age of the participants was 67.56 ± 10.70 years in the intervention group. All patients in this study signed institutional review board (IRB) agreements before participating (IRB approval no: FEMH-IRB-101029-E, v. 02, date: 20120429). The results revealed the beneficial effects of regular aerobic and resistance training, which improved in elderly, chronically ill patients. According to our data, most of the gait function measurements exhibited significant differences between the exercise group and control group. The duration of the 'timed up-and-go' test decreased from 7.67 s to 6.76 s (P = 0.00013), and the 'the base of support area' increased from 392.0 cm(2) to 433.2 cm(2) (P = 0.0088). Women attained more significant differences than men in the exercise and control groups (P = 0.0008), and the participants aged 45-65 years had a more satisfactory outcome than those aged > 65 years (P = 0.0109). Regular exercise regimens, such as aerobic, resistance or combination exercise training, enhance the gait function and sense of postural stability in elderly, chronically ill patients. Younger patients attained more positive results than older patients, and women attained more positive results than men. Regular exercise is a means of preventing falls; thus, the government and hospitals should increase promotional measures in aging communities to encourage regular exercise among elderly, chronically ill

  5. A Progressive Resistance Weight Training Program Designed to Improve the Armor Crewman’s Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-05

    highly recommended. Tracking the progress helps foster commitment. The New Hardcore Bodybuilding , published in 1990, is a best seller written by...Robert Kennedy. He discusses training strategies and formulas for gaining body mass. Kennedy acquired his information from successful bodybuilders who...recovery, exercise, nutrition, and special training tips which appear to have merit, according to professional bodybuilders . 27 In order to maximize size

  6. Evaluating Corporate Sales Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Jon M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Sales training programs require continual evaluation. The authors present a conceptual model of the interrelationships of planning, training, evaluation, and modification (IPTEM) in corporate sales training programs. (CT)

  7. RESISTANCE TRAINING FOR YOUTH: MYTHS AND FACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Radovanović

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Using resistance training with the aim of developing muscle strength among youth is still a matter of debate and often receives severe criticism. Previous research, which has not noted an increase in muscle strength, led to the conclusion that resistance training is ineffective among youth. However, the results of numerous more recent studies which have closely followed the published statements and recommendations obtained by leading global professional and health organizations, indicate that if carried out properly, resistance training among youth can have very positive results. In addition to its positive influence on muscle strength and endurance, as well as the potential increase in the success rate of motor performance, regular resistance training can result in the improvement of body composition, increased bone mineral density, an improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness, as well as its influence on one’s psychological well-being. The most commonly used types of load for resistance training include free weights and weight machines, which can have standard dimensions, but are also specially designed for younger people. It is also often the case that these training programs consist of body weight exercises, exercises with a medicine ball, expanders and elastic bands. Current findings from well-organized and monitored studies involving samples of youth indicated a very small possibility of injury during resistance training, provided that all the training recommendations for the given age group are adhered to.

  8. Effects of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms on low-resistance training using exercise machines: the 'Power Rehabilitation' program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shin-Ichiro; Otsuki, Takemi; Maeda, Megumi; Miura, Yoshie; Morii, Seiko; Kiyokane, Kenji; Hayakawa, Shin-Ichi; Maeda, Atsushi; Imakawa, Takayo; Harada, Shunpei; Handa, Torataro; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Murakami, Shuko; Kumagai, Naoko; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Chen, Ying; Suemori, Shin-Ichiro; Fukushima, Yumiko; Nishida, Seikoh; Fukushima, Keisuke

    2009-01-01

    The enhancement and promotion of health is necessary to maintain the quality of life (QOL) of the aged population in developed nations such as Japan where the number of elderly has been increasing rapidly. For this purpose, low-resistance training using exercise machines ('Power Rehabilitation') has been established as a rehabilitation program. To investigate the individual factors which influence the effects of 'Power Rehabilitation', single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene and the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) gene were analyzed, and the relationship between SNP patterns and the effects of 'Power Rehabilitation' was evaluated. 'Power Rehabilitation' had an effect on the physiological functions involved in the activities of daily life (ADL) rather than muscle strength and size. In addition, certain SNP patterns showed better improvement of parameters associated with the effects of 'Power Rehabilitation' as analyzed by comparison between SNP patterns and factor analysis. Large scale analyses are required to ensure this tendency and to discover individual factors which may help to promote the health and QOL of the aged population.

  9. Dietary intake modification in response to a participation in a resistance training program for sedentary older adults with prediabetes: findings from the Resist Diabetes study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Tanya M; Davy, Brenda M; Clark, Adrienne G; Baugh, Mary Elizabeth; Hedrick, Valisa E; Marinik, Elaina L; Flack, Kyle D; Savla, J; Winett, Sheila; Winett, Richard A

    2014-08-01

    Engagement in one type of health behavior change may exert a "spillover" effect resulting in other behavior changes. Few studies have examined dietary intake following prolonged training, and none have evaluated spontaneous dietary changes beyond alterations in energy or macronutrient intake following initiation of strength/resistance training (RT). The purpose of this observational investigation was to determine if spontaneous dietary intake modifications occur in response to initiation of an RT program, among older adults. Previously sedentary adults with prediabetes (n=134, age=59±1 years) were enrolled in a supervised 12-week RT program. Participants were not given dietary advice or encouraged to change eating behaviors. Three non-consecutive 24-hour dietary recalls were collected at baseline and after 12 weeks of RT. Reductions in intake of energy (1914±40 kcal vs. 1834±427 kcal, p=0.010), carbohydrate (211.6±4.9 g vs. 201.7±5.2 g, p=0.015), total sugar (87.4±2.7 g vs. 81.5±3.1 g, p=0.030), glycemic load (113.4±3.0 vs. 108.1±3.2, p=0.031), fruits and vegetables (4.6±0.2 servings vs. 4.1±0.2 servings, p=0.018), and sweets and desserts (1.1±0.07 servings vs. 0.89±0.07 servings, p=0.023) were detected over time. No changes in other dietary intake variables were observed. Mode of exercise and disease state may be important factors in determining whether dietary modifications occur with exercise initiation, among previously sedentary adults. Successful initiation of RT may represent an opportunity for health care professionals to promote beneficial changes in dietary habits, among older adults with prediabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Training Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Training Accreditation Program establishes the objectives and criteria against which DOE nuclear facility training is evaluated to determine its readiness for accreditation. Training programs are evaluated against the accreditation objectives and criteria by facility personnel during the initial self-evaluation process. From this self-evaluation, action plans are made by the contractor to address the scope of work necessary in order to upgrade any deficiencies noted. This scope of work must be formally documented in the Training Program Accreditation Plan. When reviewed and approved by the responsible Head of the Field Organization and cognizant Program Secretarial Office, EH-1 concurrence is obtained. This plan then becomes the document which guides accreditation efforts for the contractor

  11. Heavy resistance training and lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloomquist, Kira; Karlsmark, Tonny; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2014-01-01

    , and identify associations between progressive resistance training with heavy loads, and the development of BCRL. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a descriptive study. POPULATION: Women treated for breast cancer (n = 149), who had participated in the 'Body and Cancer' exercise intervention between 1 January 2010......BACKGROUND: There is limited knowledge regarding progressive resistance training during adjuvant chemotherapy and the risk of developing breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Furthermore, no studies have investigated the safety of resistance training with heavy loads (> 80% 1 repetition maximum......) in this population. 'Body and Cancer' is a six-week, nine-hour weekly, supervised, multimodal exercise intervention utilizing progressive resistance training with heavy loads for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of BCRL in former participants...

  12. Differences in Maximum Upper and Lower Limb Strength in Older Adults After a 12 Week Intense Resistance Training Program

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Nelson; Mendes, Romeu; Abrantes, Catarina; Sampaio, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify differences in maximum strength after an intense strength training program, contrasting muscle groups from upper limbs versus lower limbs. The sample consisted of 10 healthy elderly males (age 73?6 years) with independent living. The training program lasted 12 weeks (3 ? week, 50 to 80% of 1RM, 2?3 sets, 6 to 12 repetitions). Two muscle groups were analyzed: LOWER (sum of average values of three exercises for the lower limbs) and UPPER (sum of average...

  13. Training Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The cornerstone of safe operation of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is personnel performing the day-to-day functions which accomplish the facility mission. Training that is conducted efficiently and effectively and is directly related to the needs of the job (i.e. performance-based training) is fundamental to safe operation. Responsibility for the safe operation of these facilities is a line management function. Therefore, achieving performance-based training requires commitment from the organization for which training is provided. This commitment includes making subject matter experts available for participation in and review of the products of the performance-based training process. It also includes budgeting and scheduling the time required for both initial and continuing training. This commitment must be made by corporate and facility senior management from the beginning. Management must get involved at the start to ensure that they are not only cognizant of ongoing activities, but are also involved to the degree necessary to thoroughly understand the process. Policies implemented and support demonstrated by senior management provide the driving force to ensure that training programs receive the attention that is imperative if facility training programs are to be successful

  14. Manual Resistance versus Conventional Resistance Training: Impact on Strength and Muscular Endurance in Recreationally Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulvi-Medrano, Iván; Rial, Tamara; Cortell-Tormo, Juan M; Alakhdar, Yasser; La Scala Teixeira, Caue V; Masiá-Tortosa, Laura; Dorgo, Sandor

    2017-09-01

    Manual resistance training (MRT) has been widely used in the field of physical therapy. It has also been used as a strength training method due to the accommodating resistance nature of this modality. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of an 8-week MRT program on maximum strength and muscular endurance in comparison to conventional resistance training in recreationally trained men. Twenty healthy recreationally trained male subjects were recruited and divided into a MRT training group and a conventional training (CT) group. CT group performed bench press and lat pull-down exercises, and the MRT group performed similar movements with resistance provided by a personal trainer. Both groups completed similar training protocol and training load: 2 training sessions weekly for 3 sets of 8 repetitions at an intensity of 8 to 10 on the perceived exertion scale of 0-10. Initial maximum strength differences were not significant between the groups. Neither group showed significant changes in muscular strength or endurance. Despite the statistically non-significant pre- to post differences, a trend for improvement was observed and effect size (ES) calculations indicated greater magnitude of effects for strength and endurance changes in the MRT group in lat pulldown (g=0.84) compared to CT group. Effectiveness of MRT is similar to CT for improving muscular strength and endurance. MRT can be used as a supplemental or alternative strength training modality for recreationally trained subjects, or be considered by personal trainers especially in low equipped facility conditions.

  15. Intensive lifestyle intervention including high-intensity interval training program improves insulin resistance and fasting plasma glucose in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Marquis-Gravel

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Following a 9-month intensive lifestyle intervention combining HIIT and MedD counseling, obese subjects experienced significant improvements of FPG and insulin resistance. This is the first study to expose the effects of a long-term program combining HIIT and MedD on glycemic control parameters among obese subjects.

  16. Training programming: revisiting terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário C. Marques

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Does the way the literature presents the classic periodization or programming make sense? In our opinion, the answer is clearly no. To get started, periodization and programming are terms used interchangeably (as synonyms in scientific literature when they actually have different meanings. Thus, to periodize is to set periods for a process (e.g., to a season or the sports life, whereas programming is defined as to devise and order the necessary actions to carry out a project. Accordingly, coaches and physical conditioning professionals should divide or periodize the season in different cycles and then, within each cycle, programming the training sessions. The periodization should not only help to structure the training process, but also to express the goals to achieve, to control the training process evolution and allow a great execution of the action plan. When designing a plan, we simply organize all the “ingredients” that should be part of the work/training design in a concrete and detailed way. From a scientific point of view, the programming is nothing more than an adequate interpretation of the training biological laws (Tschione, 1992; Latonov, 1997, Issurin, 2008 and must have the performance improvement as the major reference criteria (Issurin 2010. In practice, during the last decades, we have followed a set of instructions mainly based on experienced coaches (Matveyev, 1981, Bompa, 1994, Zatsiorsky, 1995 who have obtained relevant results. As a consequence, it is very difficult to accept another solid scientific based vision or proposal since the accumulation of systematic experiences has led to the construction of a theoretical model, even though there are no scientific evidences. The multiplication and implementation of the traditional programming models (Matveyev, 1981, Bompa, 1994 have guided us to a set of erroneous terms, among which we highlight the “micro”, the “meso” and the “macro” cycles, that were never

  17. Resistance training program for fatigue management in the workplace: exercise protocol in a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Hélio Gustavo; Chiavegato, Luciana Dias; Valentim, Daniela Pereira; da Silva, Patricia Rodrigues; Padula, Rosimeire Simprini

    2016-12-22

    Fatigue is a multifactorial condition that leads to disease and loss in production, and it affects a large number of workers worldwide. This study aims to demonstrate a resistance exercise protocol that individuals will perform during the work schedule, and to evaluate the effectiveness of this exercises program for fatigue control. This is a cluster randomized controlled trial with two arms and is assessor blinded. A total of 352 workers of both sexes, aged 18-65 years, from a medium-sized dairy plant were enrolled in this study. Participants will be recruited from 13 production sectors according to the eligibility criteria and will be randomized by clusters to either the Progressive Resistance Exercise (PRE) intervention group or the Compensatory Workplace Exercise (CWE) comparative group. A resistance exercise program will be implemented for both groups. The groups will receive instructions on self-management, breaks, adjustments to workstations, and the benefits of physical exercise. The PRE group will perform resistance exercises with gradual loads in an exercise room, and the CWE group will perform exercise at their workstations using elastic bands. The exercise sessions will be held 3 times a week for 20 min. The primary outcome measures will be symptoms of physical and mental fatigue, and muscular fatigue based on a one-repetition maximum (1RM). The secondary outcome measures will be level of physical activity, musculoskeletal symptoms, physical condition, perceived exposure, and productivity. The workers will be assessed at baseline and after a 4-month program. A linear mixed model will be applied on an intention-to-treat basis. This intervention is expected to reduce symptoms of fatigue in the workers. The exercise program is indicating in the workplace, although there are few studies describing the effects of exercise on the control of fatigue in the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on adherence to the program, which may result in significant and

  18. Resistance training program for fatigue management in the workplace: exercise protocol in a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Gustavo Santos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatigue is a multifactorial condition that leads to disease and loss in production, and it affects a large number of workers worldwide. This study aims to demonstrate a resistance exercise protocol that individuals will perform during the work schedule, and to evaluate the effectiveness of this exercises program for fatigue control. Methods/Design This is a cluster randomized controlled trial with two arms and is assessor blinded. A total of 352 workers of both sexes, aged 18–65 years, from a medium-sized dairy plant were enrolled in this study. Participants will be recruited from 13 production sectors according to the eligibility criteria and will be randomized by clusters to either the Progressive Resistance Exercise (PRE intervention group or the Compensatory Workplace Exercise (CWE comparative group. A resistance exercise program will be implemented for both groups. The groups will receive instructions on self-management, breaks, adjustments to workstations, and the benefits of physical exercise. The PRE group will perform resistance exercises with gradual loads in an exercise room, and the CWE group will perform exercise at their workstations using elastic bands. The exercise sessions will be held 3 times a week for 20 min. The primary outcome measures will be symptoms of physical and mental fatigue, and muscular fatigue based on a one-repetition maximum (1RM. The secondary outcome measures will be level of physical activity, musculoskeletal symptoms, physical condition, perceived exposure, and productivity. The workers will be assessed at baseline and after a 4-month program. A linear mixed model will be applied on an intention-to-treat basis. Discussion This intervention is expected to reduce symptoms of fatigue in the workers. The exercise program is indicating in the workplace, although there are few studies describing the effects of exercise on the control of fatigue in the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on

  19. Effects of High vs. Low Protein Intake on Body Composition and Maximal Strength in Aspiring Female Physique Athletes Engaging in an 8-Week Resistance Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bill I; Aguilar, Danielle; Conlin, Laurin; Vargas, Andres; Schoenfeld, Brad Jon; Corson, Amey; Gai, Chris; Best, Shiva; Galvan, Elfego; Couvillion, Kaylee

    2018-02-06

    Aspiring female physique athletes are often encouraged to ingest relatively high levels of dietary protein in conjunction with their resistance-training programs. However, there is little to no research investigating higher vs. lower protein intakes in this population. This study examined the influence of a high vs. low protein diet in conjunction with an 8-week resistance training program in this population. Seventeen females (21.2±2.1 years; 165.1±5.1 cm; 61±6.1 kg) were randomly assigned to a high protein diet (HP: 2.5g/kg/day; n=8) or a low protein diet (LP: 0.9g/kg/day, n=9) and were assessed for body composition and maximal strength prior to and after the 8-week protein intake and exercise intervention. Fat-free mass (FFM) increased significantly more in the HP group as compared to the LP group (p=0.009), going from 47.1 ± 4.5kg to 49.2 ± 5.4kg (+2.1kg) and from 48.1 ± 2.7kg to 48.7 ± 2 (+0.6kg) in the HP and LP groups, respectively. Fat mass significantly decreased over time in the HP group (14.1 ± 3.6kg to 13.0 ± 3.3kg; p<0.01) but no change was observed in the LP group (13.2 ± 3.7kg to 12.5 ± 3.0kg). While maximal strength significantly increased in both groups, there were no differences in strength improvements between the two groups. In aspiring female physique athletes, a higher protein diet is superior to a lower protein diet in terms of increasing FFM in conjunction with a resistance training program.

  20. Effects of a resistance training program performed with an interocclusal splint for community-dwelling older adults: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hirase, Tatsuya; Inokuchi, Shigeru; Matsusaka, Nobuou; Nakahara, Kazumi; Okita, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To examine whether resistance training for elderly community-dwellers performed with an interocclusal splint resulted in greater lower extremity muscle strength and better balance than resistance training performed without an interocclusal splint. [Subjects and Methods] Eighty-eight elderly persons using Japanese community day centers were randomly divided into two groups: an intervention group (n=45), which performed resistance training with an interocclusal splint; and a control g...

  1. The resistance evaluation: Effects of a specific training program on professional fire-fighter cardio-respiratory fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.J. Mourão

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The fire-fighters have an increased risk for developing cardiac pathologies and also a higher index of premature death than other individuals that perform high risk jobs. In this way, low physical fitness obviously limits fire-fighter performance, as well as degrades their health. However this fact not only damages the individual fire-fighter but also the institution that he represents hence severely questioning property and general public safety. The cardio-respiratory fitness had been identify as the most important physical fitness component. In this way, we developed a 12 weeks training program, to improve the cardio-respiratory fitness in a Professional fire-fighters corporation. According to reference values, before training these fire-fighters did not have enough cardio-respiratory fitness to adequately perform their job requirements with efficacy and safety (VO2máx=44,17ml/kg/min. However after training there was great improvement (VO2máx=52,69 ml/kg/min, providing a safe and more qualified service for the general population.

  2. Differences in maximum upper and lower limb strength in older adults after a 12 week intense resistance training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Nelson; Mendes, Romeu; Abrantes, Catarina; Sampaio, Jaime

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify differences in maximum strength after an intense strength training program, contrasting muscle groups from upper limbs versus lower limbs. The sample consisted of 10 healthy elderly males (age 73±6 years) with independent living. The training program lasted 12 weeks (3 × week, 50 to 80% of 1RM, 2-3 sets, 6 to 12 repetitions). Two muscle groups were analyzed: LOWER (sum of average values of three exercises for the lower limbs) and UPPER (sum of average values of four exercises for the upper limbs). Measurement of 1RM was performed at intervals of 4 weeks by direct methods. Repeated measures ANOVA identified significant differences in muscle groups (F=8.1, p=0.006), time (F=730.0 p=0.000) and also their interaction (F=4.4, p=0.014). The gains in 1RM values were higher for upper limbs. These results may suggest that the muscles of the lower limbs are elicited more frequently and therefore, have a smaller potential to gain strength at older age. The muscles of the upper limbs are in accelerated muscle atrophy and their trainability is probably higher.

  3. The effects of a combined resisted jump training and rugby-conditioning program on selected physical, motor ability and anthropometric components of rugby players / Jacobus Johannes Oosthuizen

    OpenAIRE

    Oosthuizen, Jacobus Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Plyometrics is primarily used by coaches and sport scientists to improve explosive power among athletes who participate in dynamic, high intensity type of sports. One of the plyometric-related training methods that has received attention in recent years, is loaded or resistance (resistive) jump training. Limited research does, however, exist with regard to the benefits and use of this training method as well as in conjunction with other training methods, especially among team spor...

  4. Cardiometabolic Health Among Cancer Survivors: A 13-Week Pilot Study of a Combined Aerobic and Resistance Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Silvie; Almstedt, Hawley C; Tarleton, Heather P

    2016-05-01

    To explore the feasibility of combined aerobic and resistance training (CART) as a safe method of improving cardiometabolic health among cancer survivors.
. Descriptive and longitudinal pilot study for exercise intervention.
. University campus in Los Angeles, California.
. A multiethnic population of cancer survivors (N = 11) was recruited by convenience sampling and physician referral. 
. Consenting participants were prescribed CART for one hour per day, three days per week for 13 weeks.
. Components of cardiometabolic health were measured, including resting heart rate (HRrest), blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, body fat percentage, and android fat percentage at baseline and after 13 weeks of training. Fasting blood glucose, insulin, adiponectin, leptin, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and C-reactive protein (CRP) also were assessed at baseline and after 13 weeks of training.
. More than half of the participants reported living with at least two other chronic diseases or conditions in addition to a cancer diagnosis. Five of six African American and Hispanic participants reported the presence of at least two risk factors for metabolic syndrome, compared to one of five Caucasian participants. After 13 weeks of training, participants experienced an average decrease in waist circumference. Decrease in waist circumference was associated with a decrease in CRP. A relationship also was suggested between number of exercise sessions attended and improvement in HRrest. 
. A CART intervention among cancer survivors should continue to be explored in a larger sample to establish efficacy and effectiveness at improving cardiometabolic health. Because of the higher risk of comorbidity among cancer survivors in comparison to cancer-free adults, improving cardiometabolic health is as important as monitoring cancer recurrence. A need exists for increased attention to the post-treatment cardiometabolic health of cancer survivors and also for examining

  5. Cernavoda NPP operations training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the philosophy, content and minimum requirements for the Cernavoda Training Programs for all Station staff and to identify the training department organization and respective responsibilities necessary to provide the required training. The hierarchical documentation and requirements related to these programs is shown in figure Rd-TR1-1

  6. Guidance for training program evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    An increased concern about the training of nuclear reactor operators resulted from the incident at TMI-2 in 1979. Purpose of this guide is to provide a general framework for the systematic evaluation of training programs for DOE Category-A reactors. The primary goal of such evaluations is to promote continuing quality improvements in the selection, training and qualification programs

  7. Customer Satisfaction with Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Martin

    2001-01-01

    A model for evaluating customer satisfaction with training programs was tested with training purchasers. The model confirmed two types of projects: training aimed at achieving learning results and at changing job performance. The model did not fit for training intended to support organizational change. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  8. Effects of a community-based progressive resistance training program on muscle performance and physical function in adults with Down syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Nora; Taylor, Nicholas F; Dodd, Karen J

    2008-07-01

    To determine whether progressive resistance training improves muscle strength, muscle endurance, and physical function in adults with Down syndrome. Single-blind randomized controlled trial. General community. Adults (N=20) with Down syndrome (13 men, 7 women; mean age, 26.8+/-7.8 y) were randomly assigned through a concealed allocation block randomized method to either an intervention group (n=9) or a control group (n=11). The intervention was a supervised, group progressive resistance training program, consisting of 6 exercises using weight machines performed twice a week for 10 weeks. Participants completed 2 to 3 sets of between 10 to 12 repetitions of each exercise until they reached fatigue. The control group continued with their usual activities. The outcomes measured by blinded assessors were muscle strength (1-repetition maximum [1-RM]), muscle endurance (number of repetitions at 50% of 1-RM) for chest press and leg press, timed stairs test, and the grocery shelving task. The intervention group showed significant improvement in upper-limb muscle endurance compared with the control group (mean difference in the number of repetitions of the chest press at 50% of 1-RM was 16.7, 95% confidence interval, [CI] 7.1-26.2); and a trend toward an improvement in upper-limb muscle strength (mean difference in chest press 1-RM, 8.6 kg; 95% CI, -1.3 to 18.5 kg) and in upper-limb function (mean difference in grocery shelving task, -20.3s; 95% CI, -45.7 to 5.2s). There were no significant differences between the groups for lower-limb muscle performance or physical function measures. No major adverse events for the intervention were noted. Progressive resistance training is a safe and feasible fitness option that can improve upper-limb muscle endurance in adults with Down syndrome (ACTR identifier ACTRN 012606000515594.).

  9. The effects of a 2 week modified high intensity interval training program on the homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, N; Kenno, K A; Milne, K J

    2014-04-01

    High intensity interval training (HIIT) induces similar metabolic adaptations to traditional steady state aerobic exercise training. Until recently, most HIIT studies have examined maximum efforts in healthy populations. The current study aimed to examine the effects of a 2 week modified HIIT program on the homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). It was hypothesized that HIIT would improve HOMA-IR. Nine individuals with T2D (age=40.2±9.7 y; BMI=33.9±5.3; fasting plasma glucose [FPG]=8.7±2.9 mmol/L; HbA1C=7.3±1.2%; [mean±SD]) performed 6 individualized training sessions of HIIT (4x30 seconds at 100% of estimated maximum workload followed by 4 minutes of active rest) over 2 weeks. HOMA-IR was calculated from FPG and serum insulin and compared against a prior 2 week baseline period. Blood glucose was reduced immediately after each HIIT session (PHOMA-IR were unchanged after training. However, 6 of the 9 individuals exhibited reduced HOMA-IR values after the training period and there was a significant negative correlation between HOMA-IR value prior to training and change in HOMA-IR after HIIT. These observations tend to support the positive health benefits of HITT for individuals with T2D reported in recently published data using a modified HIIT protocol. However, they suggest that the magnitude of the disease should be assessed when examining the effects of exercise interventions in individuals with T2D.

  10. TAP 1, Training Program Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Training programs at DOE nuclear facilities should provide well-trained, qualified personnel to safely and efficiently operate the facilities in accordance with DOE requirements. A need has been identified for guidance regarding analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of consistent and reliable performance-based training programs. Accreditation of training programs at Category A reactors and high-hazard and selected moderate-hazard nonreactor nuclear facilities will assure consistent, appropriate, and cost-effective training of personnel responsible for the operation, maintenance, and technical support of these facilities. Training programs that are designed and based on systematically determined job requirements, instead of subjective estimation of trainee needs, yield training activities that are consistent and develop or improve knowledge, skills, and abilities that can be directly related to the work setting. Because the training is job-related, the content of these programs more efficiently meets the needs of the employee. Besides a better trained work force, a greater level of operational reactor safety can be realized. This manual is intended to provide an overview of the accreditation process and a brief description of the elements necessary to construct and maintain training programs that are based on the requirements of the job. Two companion manuals provide additional information to assist contractors in their efforts to accredit training programs

  11. Free leucine supplementation during an 8-week resistance training program does not increase muscle mass and strength in untrained young adult subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Andreo Fernando; Grala, Alan Pablo; da Silva, Rubens Alexandre; Soares-Caldeira, Lúcio Flávio; Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Ribeiro, Alex Silva; da Silva, Douglas Kratki; de Andrade, Walquíria Batista; Balvedi, Mario Carlos Welin

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of free leucine supplementation on changes in skeletal muscle mass and strength during a resistance training (RT) program in previously untrained, young subjects. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, 20 healthy young (22 ± 2 years) participants were assigned to two groups: a placebo-supplement group (PLA, N = 10) or a leucine-supplement group (LEU, N = 10). Both groups underwent an 8-week hypertrophic RT program (2 days/week), consuming an equivalent amount of leucine (3.0 g/day in a single post-training dose) or placebo (cornstarch). Quadriceps muscle strength, cross-sectional area (CSA) of the vastus lateralis (VL), and rectus femoris (RF), as well as the habitual dietary intake were assessed before and after the 8-week intervention period. There was a similar improvement in muscle strength (Leg press, LEU: +33% vs. PLA: +37%; P > 0.05, and knee extension, LEU: +31% vs. PLA: 34%; P > 0.05) and CSA (VL, LEU: 8.9% vs. PLA: 9.6%; P > 0.05, and RF, LEU: +21.6% vs. PLA: + 16.4%; P > 0.05) in the both groups from pre- to post-training. In addition, there was no significant (P > 0.05) difference in daily dietary intake between the LEU and PLA groups before and after the intervention period. Free leucine supplementation (3.0 g/day post-training) does not increase muscle strength or CSA during RT in healthy young subjects consuming adequate dietary protein intake.

  12. Strategies for Optimizing Strength, Power, and Muscle Hypertrophy in Women: Contribution of Upper Body Resistance Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kraemer, William

    1999-01-01

    To determine the performance and physiological effects of various physical conditioning programs in women, total body, upper-body resistance training groups, field training and aerobic training groups (n = 11 to 21...

  13. A high protein diet (3.4 g/kg/d) combined with a heavy resistance training program improves body composition in healthy trained men and women--a follow-up investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Jose; Ellerbroek, Anya; Silver, Tobin; Orris, Steve; Scheiner, Max; Gonzalez, Adriana; Peacock, Corey A

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of a high protein diet (>4 g/kg/d) in trained men and women who did not alter their exercise program has been previously shown to have no significant effect on body composition. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to determine if a high protein diet in conjunction with a periodized heavy resistance training program would affect indices of body composition, performance and health. Forty-eight healthy resistance-trained men and women completed this study (mean ± SD; Normal Protein group [NP n = 17, four female and 13 male]: 24.8 ± 6.9 yr; 174.0 ± 9.5 cm height; 74.7 ± 9.6 kg body weight; 2.4 ± 1.7 yr of training; High Protein group [HP n = 31, seven female and 24 male]: 22.9 ± 3.1 yr; 172.3 ± 7.7 cm; 74.3 ± 12.4 kg; 4.9 ± 4.1 yr of training). Moreover, all subjects participated in a split-routine, periodized heavy resistance-training program. Training and daily diet logs were kept by each subject. Subjects in the NP and HP groups were instructed to consume their baseline (~2 g/kg/d) and >3 g/kg/d of dietary protein, respectively. Subjects in the NP and HP groups consumed 2.3 and 3.4 g/kg/day of dietary protein during the treatment period. The NP group consumed significantly (p body weight (change: +1.3 ± 1.3 kg NP, -0.1 ± 2.5 HP), fat mass (change: -0.3 ± 2.2 kg NP, -1.7 ± 2.3 HP), and % body fat (change: -0.7 ± 2.8 NP, -2.4 ± 2.9 HP). The NP group gained significantly more body weight than the HP group; however, the HP group experienced a greater decrease in fat mass and % body fat. There was a significant time effect for FFM; however, there was a non-significant time by group effect for FFM (change: +1.5 ± 1.8 NP, +1.5 ± 2.2 HP). Furthermore, a significant time effect (p ≤ 0.05) was seen in both groups vis a vis improvements in maximal strength (i.e., 1-RM squat and bench) vertical jump and pull-ups; however, there were no

  14. Implications of Impaired Endurance Performance following Single Bouts of Resistance Training: An Alternate Concurrent Training Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doma, Kenji; Deakin, Glen B; Bentley, David J

    2017-11-01

    A single bout of resistance training induces residual fatigue, which may impair performance during subsequent endurance training if inadequate recovery is allowed. From a concurrent training standpoint, such carry-over effects of fatigue from a resistance training session may impair the quality of a subsequent endurance training session for several hours to days with inadequate recovery. The proposed mechanisms of this phenomenon include: (1) impaired neural recruitment patterns; (2) reduced movement efficiency due to alteration in kinematics during endurance exercise and increased energy expenditure; (3) increased muscle soreness; and (4) reduced muscle glycogen. If endurance training quality is consistently compromised during the course of a specific concurrent training program, optimal endurance development may be limited. Whilst the link between acute responses of training and subsequent training adaptation has not been fully established, there is some evidence suggesting that cumulative effects of fatigue may contribute to limiting optimal endurance development. Thus, the current review will (1) explore cross-sectional studies that have reported impaired endurance performance following a single, or multiple bouts, of resistance training; (2) identify the potential impact of fatigue on chronic endurance development; (3) describe the implications of fatigue on the quality of endurance training sessions during concurrent training, and (4) explain the mechanisms contributing to resistance training-induced attenuation on endurance performance from neurological, biomechanical and metabolic standpoints. Increasing the awareness of resistance training-induced fatigue may encourage coaches to consider modulating concurrent training variables (e.g., order of training mode, between-mode recovery period, training intensity, etc.) to limit the carry-over effects of fatigue from resistance to endurance training sessions.

  15. Resistance training exercise program for intervention to enhance gait function in elderly chronically ill patients: multivariate multiscale entropy for center of pressure signal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Shu; Jiang, Bernard C

    2014-01-01

    Falls are unpredictable accidents, and the resulting injuries can be serious in the elderly, particularly those with chronic diseases. Regular exercise is recommended to prevent and treat hypertension and other chronic diseases by reducing clinical blood pressure. The "complexity index" (CI), based on multiscale entropy (MSE) algorithm, has been applied in recent studies to show a person's adaptability to intrinsic and external perturbations and widely used measure of postural sway or stability. The multivariate multiscale entropy (MMSE) was advanced algorithm used to calculate the complexity index (CI) values of the center of pressure (COP) data. In this study, we applied the MSE & MMSE to analyze gait function of 24 elderly, chronically ill patients (44% female; 56% male; mean age, 67.56 ± 10.70 years) with either cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, or osteoporosis. After a 12-week training program, postural stability measurements showed significant improvements. Our results showed beneficial effects of resistance training, which can be used to improve postural stability in the elderly and indicated that MMSE algorithms to calculate CI of the COP data were superior to the multiscale entropy (MSE) algorithm to identify the sense of balance in the elderly.

  16. Resistance Training Exercise Program for Intervention to Enhance Gait Function in Elderly Chronically Ill Patients: Multivariate Multiscale Entropy for Center of Pressure Signal Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Shu Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Falls are unpredictable accidents, and the resulting injuries can be serious in the elderly, particularly those with chronic diseases. Regular exercise is recommended to prevent and treat hypertension and other chronic diseases by reducing clinical blood pressure. The “complexity index” (CI, based on multiscale entropy (MSE algorithm, has been applied in recent studies to show a person’s adaptability to intrinsic and external perturbations and widely used measure of postural sway or stability. The multivariate multiscale entropy (MMSE was advanced algorithm used to calculate the complexity index (CI values of the center of pressure (COP data. In this study, we applied the MSE & MMSE to analyze gait function of 24 elderly, chronically ill patients (44% female; 56% male; mean age, 67.56±10.70 years with either cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, or osteoporosis. After a 12-week training program, postural stability measurements showed significant improvements. Our results showed beneficial effects of resistance training, which can be used to improve postural stability in the elderly and indicated that MMSE algorithms to calculate CI of the COP data were superior to the multiscale entropy (MSE algorithm to identify the sense of balance in the elderly.

  17. Wrist Resistance Training Improves Motor Control and Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Edward; Kim, You-Sin; Hill, Genevieve; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Kim, Chang Kook; Shim, Jae Kun

    2018-04-01

    Chu, E, Kim, Y-S, Hill, G, Kim, YH, Kim, CK, and Shim, JK. Wrist resistance training improves motor control and strength. J Strength Cond Res 32(4): 962-969, 2018-The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a 6-week direction-specific resistance training program on isometric torque control and isokinetic torque strength of the wrist joint. Nineteen subjects were randomly assigned to either the wrist training group (n = 9) or the control group (n = 10). The training group performed wrist exercises in 6 directions (flexion, extension, pronation, supination, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation), whereas the control group did not. Data were collected on the isometric torque control, 1-repetition maximum (1RM) strength, and isokinetic maximum torque (angular velocity of 60° per second wrist movements) before and after 6 weeks of resistance training and at 2-week intervals during training. The training group showed significant decreases in isometric torque control error in all 6 directions after 2 weeks of resistance training, whereas the control group did not show significant increase or decrease. After 4 weeks of training, the training group showed significant increases in maximum strength in all 6 directions as assessed by 1RM strength and isokinetic strength tests, whereas the control group did not show any statistically significant changes. This study shows that motor control significantly improves within the first 2 weeks of resistance training, whereas the wrist strength significantly improves within the first 4 weeks of resistance training. Based on the findings of this study, coaches and trainers should consider wrist resistance training to improve athletes' muscular strength and control of the wrist muscles.

  18. Does Resistance Training Stimulate Cardiac Muscle Hypertrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomer, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the left ventricular structural adaptations induced by resistance/strength exercise, focusing on human work, particularly well-trained strength athletes engaged in regular, moderate- to high-intensity resistance training (RT). The article discusses both genders and examines the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids in…

  19. Effects of a Six-Week Hip Thrust vs. Front Squat Resistance Training Program on Performance in Adolescent Males: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Bret; Vigotsky, Andrew D; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Beardsley, Chris; McMaster, Daniel T; Reyneke, Jan H T; Cronin, John B

    2017-04-01

    Contreras, B, Vigotsky, AD, Schoenfeld, BJ, Beardsley, C, McMaster, DT, Reyneke, JHT, and Cronin, JB. Effects of a six-week hip thrust vs. front squat resistance training program on performance in adolescent males: A randomized controlled trial. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 999-1008, 2017-The barbell hip thrust may be an effective exercise for increasing horizontal force production and may thereby enhance performance in athletic movements requiring a horizontal force vector, such as horizontal jumping and sprint running. The ergogenic ability of the squat is well known. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 6-week front squat and hip thrust programs in adolescent male athletes. Vertical jump height, horizontal jump distance, 10- and 20-m sprint times, and isometric midthigh pull peak force were among the measured performance variables, in addition to front squat and hip thrust 3 repetition maximum (3RM) strength. Magnitude-based effect sizes revealed potentially beneficial effects for the front squat in both front squat 3RM strength and vertical jump height when compared with the hip thrust. No clear benefit for one intervention was observed for horizontal jump performance. Potentially beneficial effects were observed for the hip thrust compared with the front squat in 10- and 20-m sprint times. The hip thrust was likely superior for improving normalized isometric midthigh pull strength and very likely superior for improving hip thrust 3RM and isometric midthigh pull strength. These results support the force vector theory.

  20. Customer satisfaction with training programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, M.

    2001-01-01

    In this contribution, a model of evaluation of customer satisfaction about training programs is described. The model is developed and implemented for an association of training companies. The evaluation has been conducted by an independent organisation to enhance the thrustworthiness of the

  1. The effect of a six-week combined aerobic-resistance training program along with green coffee consumption on anxiety and depression in overweight and obese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zivar Hassani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chlorogenic acid, a major polyphenol in green coffee, and physical activity are considered as two possible effective factors on anxiety and depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a six-week combined aerobic-resistance training along with green coffee consumption on anxiety and depression in overweight and obese women. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental study, 30 volunteer overweight and obese women were randomly divided into three groups of combined aerobic-resistance training, green coffee and combined training with green coffee. Training was performed four sessions per week for six weeks. The amount of green coffee consumption was 250 mg per day for six weeks. The anxiety and depression levels of the participants were assessed using the Beck questionnaire. Results: Results showed a significant improvement in anxiety and depression levels in the three study groups (P<0.05. Also, the results showed that changes in anxiety and depression levels in the group of combined training with green coffee consumption was significantly higher than the green coffee group (P=0.03 and P=0.01, respectively. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, green coffee consumption and combined training could be effective in improving anxiety and depression. Also, combined aerobic-resistance training along with green coffee consumption is more effective on improving anxiety and depression.

  2. Training Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In recent years increased attention has been given to all aspects of the operation of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. Contributing to this is the finding that the severity of the accident at Three Mile Island in 1979 has, in large part, been attributed to personnel training deficiencies. Initially the impact of the Three Mile Island accident and the lessons learned were directed at DOE Category A reactor facilities. This resulted in numerous initiatives to upgrade the safety of operations and to improve the training of personnel responsible for operating these facilities

  3. Air Pollution Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

    This catalog lists the universities, both supported and not supported by the Division of Air Pollution, which offer graduate programs in the field of air pollution. The catalog briefly describes the programs and their entrance requirements, the requirements, qualifications and terms of special fellowships offered by the Division of Air Pollution.…

  4. Elastic Bands as a Component of Periodized Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Jordan M; Lowery, Ryan P; Oliveira de Souza, Eduardo; Wilson, Jacob M

    2016-08-01

    Joy, JM, Lowery, RP, Oliveira de Souza, E, and Wilson, JM. Elastic bands as a component of periodized resistance training. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2100-2106, 2016-Variable resistance training (VRT) has recently become a component of strength and conditioning programs. Prior research has demonstrated increases in power and/or strength using low loads of variable resistance. However, no study has examined using high loads of variable resistance as a part of a periodized training protocol to examine VRT within the context of a periodized training program and to examine a greater load of variable resistance than has been examined in prior research. Fourteen National Collegiate Athletic Association division II male basketball players were recruited for this study. Athletes were divided equally into either a variable resistance or control group. The variable resistance group added 30% of their 1 repetition maximum (1RM) as band tension to their prescribed weight 1 session per week. Rate of power development (RPD), peak power, strength, body composition, and vertical jump height were measured pretreatment and posttreatment. No baseline differences were observed between groups for any measurement of strength, power, or body composition. A significant group by time interaction was observed for RPD, in which RPD was greater in VRT posttraining than in the control group. Significant time effects were observed for all other variables including squat 1RM, bench press 1RM, deadlift 1RM, clean 3RM, vertical jump, and lean mass. Although there were no significant group ×-time interactions, the VRT group's percent changes and effect sizes indicate a larger treatment effect in the squat and bench press 1RM values and the vertical jump performed on the force plate and vertec. These results suggest that when using variable resistance as a component of a periodized training program, power and strength can be enhanced. Therefore, athletes who add variable resistance to 1 training

  5. Resistance training during preadolescence. Issues and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blimkie, C J

    1993-06-01

    High intensity resistance training appears to be effective in increasing strength in preadolescents. Children make similar relative (percentage improvement), but smaller absolute, strength gains compared with adolescents and young adults in response to similar resistance training programmes. Resistance training appears to have little if any effect on muscle size, and strength gains during training have been associated with increases in levels of neuromuscular activation and changes in intrinsic contractile characteristics of muscle. Although unsubstantiated, improved motor coordination probably also contributes to the increase in strength, especially for more complex strength manoeuvres. On the basis of limited information, training-induced strength gains are lost during detraining, and the decay in strength has been associated with a reduction in neuromuscular activation. Short term resistance training appears to have no effect on somatic growth (height or weight) and body composition, and no proven positive influence on sports performance, injury rate or recovery from injury during preadolescence. Weightlifting has proved injurious to some children, especially when unsupervised and without instruction in proper weightlifting technique and load selection. In contrast, the risk of injury from prudently prescribed and closely supervised resistance training appears to be low during preadolescence. Lastly, short term resistance training appears to have no detrimental effect during preadolescence on either cardiorespiratory fitness or resting blood pressure.

  6. Program Trains NASTRAN Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grooms, H. R.; Hinz, P. J.; Collier, M. A.; Cox, Kim D.; Merriman, Warren J.; Commerford, Gerry

    1994-01-01

    Rockwell Environment and NASTRAN Trainer (RENT) computer program developed to assist new and current users of NASTRAN finite-element computer code. Provides organized, systematic collection of IBM(R) features consisting of panels, clists, skeletons, and messages, along with FORTRAN and Pascal programs and example NASTRAN data files. Enables each user to learn at his or her own pace. Written in VS/FORTRAN, VS/ Pascal, and IBM(R) job-control language for an IBM(R) computer system.

  7. Resistance Training for Pediatric Female Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracciolini, Andrea; Hanson, Emily; Kiefer, Adam W; Myer, Gregory D; Faigenbaum, Avery D

    2016-01-01

    Resistance training often is not an inherent component of current dance training for pediatric female dancers. Reasons for this include concerns surrounding injury to the immature skeleton and diminishing dancer aesthetic appearance, as well as questions related to the effectiveness of such training for increasing dancer strength and muscle endurance. Many forms of dance demand sufficient muscle strength and endurance for prolonged periods of high intensity dance, power generation during leaps and jumps, as well as stabilization of the lower extremity to prevent injury. The benefits of resistance training for the pediatric female dancer are multiple, including improved muscle strength and bone health and decreased risk for stress related injuries to the actively growing skeleton. Understanding the biomechanical changes that occur during growth that may predispose the female dancer to injury is important, as well as initiating individualized resistance training protocols early in training that may serve to improve performance and prevent future injury.

  8. Resistance training is medicine: effects of strength training on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Wayne L

    2012-01-01

    Inactive adults experience a 3% to 8% loss of muscle mass per decade, accompanied by resting metabolic rate reduction and fat accumulation. Ten weeks of resistance training may increase lean weight by 1.4 kg, increase resting metabolic rate by 7%, and reduce fat weight by 1.8 kg. Benefits of resistance training include improved physical performance, movement control, walking speed, functional independence, cognitive abilities, and self-esteem. Resistance training may assist prevention and management of type 2 diabetes by decreasing visceral fat, reducing HbA1c, increasing the density of glucose transporter type 4, and improving insulin sensitivity. Resistance training may enhance cardiovascular health, by reducing resting blood pressure, decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, and increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Resistance training may promote bone development, with studies showing 1% to 3% increase in bone mineral density. Resistance training may be effective for reducing low back pain and easing discomfort associated with arthritis and fibromyalgia and has been shown to reverse specific aging factors in skeletal muscle.

  9. Effects of Resistance Training on the Sit-and-Reach Test in Elderly Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Aline Rodrigues; Santarem Jose Maria; Filho, Wilson Jacob; Marucci, Maria de Fatima Nunes

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week resistance training program on older women's flexibility (evaluated through the sit- and-reach test performed before and after the training program). Participants were compared to inactive older women. The training program resulted in significant increases in participants' flexibility, suggesting that weight…

  10. Radiological control technician: Training program management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This manual defines and describes the DOE Radiological Control Technician Core Training Program qualification and training process, material development requirements, standards and policies, and administration. The manual applies to Radiological Control Technician Training Programs at all DOE contractor sites

  11. Youth resistance training: past practices, new perspectives, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, Avery D; Lloyd, Rhodri S; Myer, Gregory D

    2013-11-01

    Since the publication of the seminal review on youth resistance training by Kraemer and colleagues in 1989, a compelling body of evidence has found that resistance training can be a safe, effective, and worthwhile method of conditioning for children and adolescents. New perspectives for promoting resistance exercise as part of a long-term approach to youth physical development highlight the importance of integrating resistance training into youth fitness programs. Youth who do not enhance their muscular strength and motor skill proficiency early in life may not develop the prerequisite skills and abilities that would allow them to participate in a variety of activities and sports with confidence and vigor later in life. The identification of asymptomatic children with muscular weaknesses or imbalances may facilitate the development of a management plan which should rectify movement limitations and educate children and their families about the importance of daily physical activity.

  12. Tactical Vulnerability Assessment Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.; Renis, T.A.; Paulus, W.K.; Winblad, A.G.; Graves, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Department of Energy sponsors a 9-day training program for individuals who are responsible for evaluating and planning safeguards systems and for preparing DOE Master and Security Agreements (MSSAs). These agreements between DOE headquarters and operations offices establish required levels of protection. The curriculum includes: (1) the nature of potential insider and outsider threats involving theft or diversion of special nuclear material, (2) use of computerized tools for evaluating the effectiveness of physical protection and material control and accountability systems, and (3) methods for analyzing the benefits and costs of safeguards improvements and for setting priorities among proposed upgrades. The training program is varied and high interactive. Presentations are intermixed with class discussions and ''hands-on'' analysis using computer tools. At the end of the program, participants demonstrate what they have learned in a two-and-one-half day ''field exercise,'' which is conducted on a facility scale-model. The training program has been conducted six times and has been attended by representatives of all DOE facilities. Additional sessions are planned at four-month intervals. This paper describes the training program, use of the tools in preparing MSSAs for various DOE sites, and recent extensions and refinements of the evaluation tools

  13. Tactical Vulnerability Assessment Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.; Renis, T.A.; Paulus, W.K.; Winblad, A.E.; Graves, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Department of Energy sponsors a 9-day training program for individual who are responsible for evaluating and planning safeguards systems and for preparing DOE Master and Security Agreements (MSSAs). These agreements between DOE headquarters and operations offices establish required levels of protection. The curriculum includes: (1) the nature of potential insider and outsider threats involving theft or diversion of special nuclear material, (2) use of computerized tools for evaluating the effectiveness of physical protection and material control and acoountability systems, and (3) methods for analyzing the benefits and costs of safeguards improvements and for setting priorities among proposed upgrades. The training program is varied and highly interactive. Presentations are intermixed with class discussions and ''hands-on'' analysis using computer tools. At the end of the program, participants demonstrate what they have learned in a two-and-one-half day ''field excercise,'' which is conducted on a facility scale-model. The training programs has been conducted six times and has been attended by representatives of all DOE facilities. Additional sessions are planned at four-month intervals. This paper describes the training program, use of the tools in preparing MSSAs for various DOE sites, and recent extensions and refinements of the evaluation tools

  14. Best Practices in the Design of Aerobic Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    A., & Nadel, E. R. (1993). Effect of exercise training on cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance in humans. Med Sci...Naval Health Research Center Best Practices in the Design of Aerobic Training Programs Jason Jameson, Ph.D. Ross R. Vickers Jr., Ph.D...Aerobic Training Programs Jason Jameson Ross R. Vickers, Jr. Warfighter Performance Department Naval Health Research Center 140 Sylvester Road

  15. Relationship between resistance training and selfreported habitual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Similar to the non-exercising control group, resistance training resulted in no significant (p > 0.05) changes in the habitual intake of daily intake of total ... as a mode of training may not be an effective mode of exercise to promote overall physical activity in an attempt to modify the patterns of macronutrient and energy intake.

  16. Measuring Learning Resistance to Workplace Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jonathan E.; Lounsbury, John

    2016-01-01

    Training Transfer has been a topic bearing considerable mention over the past several decades. This article focuses on the connection between training transfer and learning resistance and presents research findings describing the design, creation, and testing of the Learning Efficiency Inventory (LEI). The LEI was designed to measure learning…

  17. Evaluation of muscle activity during a standardized shoulder resistance training bout in novice individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2012-01-01

    Momentary fatigue is an important variable in resistance training periodization programs. Although several studies have examined neuromuscular activity during single repetitions of resistance training, information is lacking in regard to neuromuscular fatigue indices throughout a full resistance......, infraspinatus, and serratus anterior increased, and MPF decreased within each set-indicating momentary neuromuscular fatigue. By contrast, no such change was observed between the 3 sets. This indicates that momentary neuromuscular fatigue in shoulder resistance training is induced more efficiently within a set...

  18. Effective safety training program design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilton, D.A.; Lombardo, G.J.; Pater, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in the oil industry require new strategies to reduce costs and retain valuable employees. Training is a potentially powerful tool for changing the culture of an organization, resulting in improved safety awareness, lower-risk behaviors and ultimately, statistical improvements. Too often, safety training falters, especially when applied to pervasive, long-standing problems. Stepping, Handling and Lifting injuries (SHL) more commonly known as back injuries and slips, trips and falls have plagued mankind throughout the ages. They are also a major problem throughout the petroleum industry. Although not as widely publicized as other immediately-fatal accidents, injuries from stepping, materials handling, and lifting are among the leading causes of employee suffering, lost time and diminished productivity throughout the industry. Traditional approaches have not turned the tide of these widespread injuries. a systematic safety training program, developed by Anadrill Schlumberger with the input of new training technology, has the potential to simultaneously reduce costs, preserve employee safety, and increase morale. This paper: reviews the components of an example safety training program, and illustrates how a systematic approach to safety training can make a positive impact on Stepping, Handling and Lifting injuries

  19. Environmental sampling technician training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreland, W.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is currently involved in extensive environmental monitoring activities to characterize various active/inactive waste sites that exist at the facility. There are also considerable reporting requirements that ORNL must meet on a continuing basis in order to remain in compliance with existing permit requirements under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Clean Air Act (CAA), and the Clean Water Act (CWA). Much of the environmental monitoring data that is used to characterize waste sites or is required in reports is obtained by environmental sampling technicians who must take samples at various locations throughout ORNL as well as other DOE installations. Because of the quality control and assurance measures included under NQA-1, ORNL has developed an Environmental Sampling Technician Training program. This presentation will describe how the Environmental Sampling Technician Training Program was developed and review the specific materials used in conducting the training

  20. training program in Jimma University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Education is the key to development; however, it is impossible to think the quality of education with out having academically qualified and professionally responsible teachers in our schools. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the existing problems of the new pre service teachers training program and based on ...

  1. Effects of an integrated health education and elastic band resistance training program on physical function and muscle strength in community-dwelling elderly women: Healthy Aging and Happy Aging II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung-Lyul; Kim, Hee-Jae; Woo, Shinae; Cho, Be-Long; Song, Misoon; Park, Yeon-Hwan; Lim, Jae-Young; Song, Wook

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, we determined the effect of an integrated health education and elastic band resistance training program on body composition, physical function, muscle strength and quality in community-dwelling elderly women. We recruited participants with eligibility inclusion criteria, and randomly assigned them to either the control group (n = 19) or the intervention group (n = 19). The integrated intervention program comprised of health education and individual counseling, and elastic band training for 18 weeks (8 weeks of supervised training and 10 weeks of self-directed training). We assessed body composition, muscle strength and quality, and physical function at pre-, after 8 weeks (mid-) and 18 weeks (post-training). After the intervention, there were no significant changes in skeletal muscle index, fat free mass, total lean mass and total fat mass for both the control group and intervention group. However, the interaction effect was significantly different in SPPB score (P strength (60 deg/s, P training of 8 weeks did not improve short physical performance battery score and isokinetic strength, whereas there was a significant increase of those outcomes (10.6% improvement, 9.8~23.5% improvement) after 10 weeks of following self-directed exercise compared with the baseline. These results show the effectiveness of following self-directed resistance training with health education after supervised training cessation in improvement of short physical performance battery and leg muscle strength. This intervention program might be an effective method to promote muscle strength and quality, and to prevent frailty in elderly women. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 825-833. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Objectives, regulations and requirements, training methods, certification and recertification, progression and incentives, and coverage of the ICPP operator training program are discussed in detail. (LK)

  3. In Hispanic, obese adolescents, a controlled aerobic exercise program teduced visceral and hepatic fat and improved insulin sensitivity, while resistance training only increased lean body mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolescent obesity is a serious public health concern. Aerobic and/or resistance exercise are potential strategies to improve metabolism, but data are scarce on the effects of well-controlled exercise programs in adolescents. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that a 12-wk controlled aerobic o...

  4. A Study of Training Program Characteristics and Training Program Effectiveness among Organizations Receiving Training Services from External Training Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Jeeyon; Hawley, Joshua D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of training program characteristics on training effectiveness among organizations receiving training services from external training providers. Two surveys were sent to HRD managers and senior managers per company. The results showed that the operational margin of the programs where private…

  5. Is inertial flywheel resistance training superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in improving muscle strength?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicens-Bordas, J; Esteve, E; Fort-Vanmeerhaeghe, A

    2018-01-01

    -dependent resistance training in improving other muscular adaptations. DESIGN: A systematic review with meta-analyses of randomised and non-randomised controlled trials. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials with no publication date......OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of this systematic review was to determine if inertial flywheel resistance training is superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in improving muscle strength. The secondary aim was to determine whether inertial flywheel resistance training is superior to gravity...... restrictions until November 2016. We performed meta-analyses on randomised and non-randomised controlled trials to determine the standardized mean difference between the effects of inertial flywheel and gravity-dependent resistance training on muscle strength. A total of 76 and 71 participants were included...

  6. Reading assessment and training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to ensure ourselves and the general public that the workers in the Nuclear Materials Processing Department (NMPD) could read, follow, and understand procedures. Procedures were randomly selected and analyzed for reading levels. A tenth grade reading level was established as the standard for all NMPD employees. Employees were tested to determine reading levels and approximately 12% could not read at the target level. A Procedure Walk-Through Evaluation was administered to each person not reaching tenth grade reading level. This was a job performance measure given to ensure that the worker was competent in his/her present job, and should remain there while completing reading training. A mandatory Reading Training Program utilizing Computer Based Training was established. This program is self-paced, individualized instruction and provided to the worker on Company time. Results of the CBT Program have been very good. Instruction is supplemented with test-taking skills seminars, practice exams, individual conferences with their own reading specialist, and some self-directed study books. This paper describes the program at Savannah River Site

  7. SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS WITH BLOOD FLOW RESTRICTED RESISTANCE TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Kacin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood flow restricted resistance (BFRR training with pneumatic tourniquet has been suggested as an alternative for conventional weight training due to the proven benefits for muscle strength and hypertrophy using relatively low resistance, hence reducing the mechanical stress across a joint. As such, it has become an important part of rehabilitation programs used in either injured or operated athletes. Despite a general consensus on effectiveness of BFRR training for muscle conditioning, there are several uncertainties regarding the interplay of various extrinsic and intrinsic factors on its safety and efficiency, which are being reviewed from a clinical perspective. Among extrinsic factors tourniquet cuff pressure, size and shape have been identified as key for safety and efficiency. Among intrinsic factors, limb anthropometrics, patient history and presence of cardiac, vascular, metabolic or peripheral neurologic conditions have been recognized as most important. Though there are a few potential safety concerns connected to BFRR training, the following have been identified as the most probable and health-hazardous: (a mechanical injury to the skin, muscle, and peripheral nerves, (b venous thrombosis due to vascular damage and disturbed hemodynamics and (c augmented arterial blood pressure responses due to combined high body exertion and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Based on reviewed literature and authors’ personal experience with the use of BFRR training in injured athletes, some guidelines for its safe application are outlined. Also, a comprehensive risk assessment tool for screening of subjects prior to their inclusion in a BFRR training program is being introduced.

  8. The interactions between hemostasis and resistance training: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nascimento DC

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Dahan da Cunha Nascimento1–3, Frederico Ribeiro Neto2, Frederico Santos de Santana1,2, Renato André Sousa da Silva1,4,5, Leopoldo dos Santos-Neto6,7, Sandor Balsamo1,2,61Physical Education Department, UNIEURO University Center, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 2GEPEEFS (Resistance training and Health Research Group, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 3Faculty of Physical Education, University of Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 4Center of Excellence in Medicine of Exercise (CEMEx Brasília, DF, Brazil; 5Postgraduate Program on Physical Activity and Health, Catholic University of Brasília-UCB, Taguatinga DF, Brazil; 6Graduation Program – Medical Sciences Faculty, University of Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 7General Internal Medical Center – University Hospital Brasília, University of Brasília, Brasília, DF, BrazilAbstract: Physical inactivity is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is strongly associated with changes in arterial structure. Regular physical activity and exercise contributes to the prevention of coronary artery disease. Therefore, cardiovascular and resistance training improve hemostatic parameters and promote a less thrombotic blood profile. This review highlights the studies, mechanisms, and outcomes relating to the effectiveness of resistance training on the process of hemostasis. The Pubmed, Scopus, Medline, Scielo, Lilacs, Ibecs, and Cochrane databases were used to locate the original articles. Seventeen studies were found during the research process. Of these, ten articles were excluded. Those protocols using a high volume of training for young adults showed a greater fibrinolytic response, and training protocols with intensities above 80% of 1 maximum repetition showed an increased platelet activity. In subjects with coronary artery disease, just one session of resistance training resulted in improvement in the fibrinolytic system (tissue plasminogen activator without raising potential thrombotic markers

  9. A genetic-based algorithm for personalized resistance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Jones

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Association studies have identified dozens of genetic variants linked to training responses and sport-related traits. However, no intervention studies utilizing the idea of personalised training based on athlete’s genetic profile have been conducted. Here we propose an algorithm that allows achieving greater results in response to high- or low-intensity resistance training programs by predicting athlete’s potential for the development of power and endurance qualities with the panel of 15 performance-associated gene polymorphisms. To develop and validate such an algorithm we performed two studies in independent cohorts of male athletes (study 1: athletes from different sports (n=28; study 2: soccer players (n=39. In both studies athletes completed an eight-week high- or low-intensity resistance training program, which either matched or mismatched their individual genotype. Two variables of explosive power and aerobic fitness, as measured by the countermovement jump (CMJ and aerobic 3-min cycle test (Aero3 were assessed pre and post 8 weeks of resistance training. In study 1, the athletes from the matched groups (i.e. high-intensity trained with power genotype or low-intensity trained with endurance genotype significantly increased results in CMJ (P=0.0005 and Aero3 (P=0.0004. Whereas, athletes from the mismatched group (i.e. high-intensity trained with endurance genotype or low-intensity trained with power genotype demonstrated non-significant improvements in CMJ (P=0.175 and less prominent results in Aero3 (P=0.0134. In study 2, soccer players from the matched group also demonstrated significantly greater (P<0.0001 performance changes in both tests compared to the mismatched group. Among non- or low responders of both studies, 82% of athletes (both for CMJ and Aero3 were from the mismatched group (P<0.0001. Our results indicate that matching the individual’s genotype with the appropriate training modality leads to more effective resistance

  10. A one-year resistance training program following weight loss has no significant impact on body composition and energy expenditure in postmenopausal women living with overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Luzia Jaeger; Messier, Virginie; Lavoie, Marie-Ève; Brochu, Martin; Lavoie, Jean-Marc; Prud'homme, Denis; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Doucet, Éric

    2018-03-13

    Resistance training (RT) has been shown to decrease fat mass (FM), and increase fat-free mass (FFM), which can be a useful for weight loss maintenance. To examine the effects of a 1-year RT intervention on weight loss maintenance following a 6-month dietary weight loss intervention. Following a 6-month dietary weight loss intervention (-6% ± 5.8; 5.05 kg ± 4.45), 70 postmenopausal women living with overweight or obesity were randomized to a control group (n = 34) or a RT group (n = 36) (3×/week first 6 months, 2×/week last 6 months, 70-80% of 1-repetition maximum). Body composition (DXA), abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) (CT scan), resting energy expenditure (EE) (indirect calorimetry), physical activity EE and total daily EE were measured (doubly-labelled water). A total of 54 participants completed the study (control group n = 29; RT group n = 25) and compliance to the RT program was on average 64%. Significant regains were noted for body weight 0.98 (3.71) kg vs. 1.33 (3.94) kg and FM regain 1.32 (2.69) kg vs. 0.81 (3.26) kg in control and RT groups after the 1-year weight maintenance phase. No group differences were noted. Resting EE and total daily EE did not change after the weight maintenance phase, and no differences were observed between groups. Both groups had significantly greater than predicted decrease in resting EE after the 6-month dietary intervention and at the end of the 1-year weight-loss maintenance phase. Our results suggest that a 1-year RT intervention following a 6-month dietary weight loss intervention does not improve weight loss maintenance, body composition or EE in post-menopausal women living with overweight or obesity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Administrators' Roles in Training Programs and Training Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Azman; Hua, Ng Kueh; Ismail, Yusof; Samah, Ainon Jauhariah Abu; Bakar, Rixal Abu; Ibrahim, Nurshahira

    2015-01-01

    An administrator plays a vital role in the growth and development of his/her subordinates. Despite this notion, the role of an administrator in the context of training programs and transfer of training is not well studied. Therefore, this study is set to examine the relationship between administrator's role in training programs and training…

  12. Organized Hypocrisy in EFL Teacher Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Abdul; Mohamed, Abdul Rashid; Ismail, Shaik Abdul Malik Mohamed; Rahman, Mohammad Mosiur

    2018-01-01

    Embracing the reasons for the failure of donor-sponsored English-teacher training programs is very critical since it precedes the revisions, improvements and quality assurance for the futuristic training programs. Ideating such philosophy, the current study concerns the blatant penetration with regard to the donor-aided training programs in…

  13. Resistance strength training exercise in children with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewelt, Aga; Krosschell, Kristin J; Stoddard, Gregory J; Weng, Cindy; Xue, Mei; Marcus, Robin L; Gappmaier, Eduard; Viollet, Louis; Johnson, Barbara A; White, Andrea T; Viazzo-Trussell, Donata; Lopes, Philippe; Lane, Robert H; Carey, John C; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2015-10-01

    Preliminary evidence in adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and in SMA animal models suggests exercise has potential benefits in improving or stabilizing muscle strength and motor function. We evaluated feasibility, safety, and effects on strength and motor function of a home-based, supervised progressive resistance strength training exercise program in children with SMA types II and III. Up to 14 bilateral proximal muscles were exercised 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. Nine children with SMA, aged 10.4 ± 3.8 years, completed the resistance training exercise program. Ninety percent of visits occurred per protocol. Training sessions were pain-free (99.8%), and no study-related adverse events occurred. Trends in improved strength and motor function were observed. A 12-week supervised, home-based, 3-day/week progressive resistance training exercise program is feasible, safe, and well tolerated in children with SMA. These findings can inform future studies of exercise in SMA. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Whey protein supplementation during resistance training augments lean body mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volek, Jeff S; Volk, Brittanie M; Gómez, Ana L; Kunces, Laura J; Kupchak, Brian R; Freidenreich, Daniel J; Aristizabal, Juan C; Saenz, Catherine; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Ballard, Kevin D; Quann, Erin E; Kawiecki, Diana L; Flanagan, Shawn D; Comstock, Brett A; Fragala, Maren S; Earp, Jacob E; Fernandez, Maria L; Bruno, Richard S; Ptolemy, Adam S; Kellogg, Mark D; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J

    2013-01-01

    Compared to soy, whey protein is higher in leucine, absorbed quicker and results in a more pronounced increase in muscle protein synthesis. To determine whether supplementation with whey promotes greater increases in muscle mass compared to soy or carbohydrate, we randomized non-resistance-trained men and women into groups who consumed daily isocaloric supplements containing carbohydrate (carb; n = 22), whey protein (whey; n = 19), or soy protein (soy; n = 22). All subjects completed a supervised, whole-body periodized resistance training program consisting of 96 workouts (~9 months). Body composition was determined at baseline and after 3, 6, and 9 months. Plasma amino acid responses to resistance exercise followed by supplement ingestion were determined at baseline and 9 months. Daily protein intake (including the supplement) for carb, whey, and soy was 1.1, 1.4, and 1.4 g·kg body mass⁻¹, respectively. Lean body mass gains were significantly (p mass decreased slightly but there were no differences between groups. Fasting concentrations of leucine were significantly elevated (20%) and postexercise plasma leucine increased more than 2-fold in whey. Fasting leucine concentrations were positively correlated with lean body mass responses. Despite consuming similar calories and protein during resistance training, daily supplementation with whey was more effective than soy protein or isocaloric carbohydrate control treatment conditions in promoting gains in lean body mass. These results highlight the importance of protein quality as an important determinant of lean body mass responses to resistance training.

  15. Development of a training assurance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palchinsky, J.; Waylett, W.J. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear industry has made a significant commitment to improve training through the implementation of accredited performance-based training programs. Senior management expects that human performance will improve as a result of significant resource allocations. How do they know if training is effective in achieving improved human performance? Florida Power and Light Company is developing a Training Assurance Program to track indicators of training performance and future trends. Integrating the company's Quality Improvement Program processes with systematic training processes is resulting in personnel functioning in a proactive mode and increased customer satisfaction with training performance

  16. Effects of Resistance Training on Ventricular Function and Hypertrophy in a Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barauna, Valério Garrone; Rosa, Kaleizu Teodoro; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; de Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to follow the ventricular function and cardiac hypertrophy in rats undergoing a resistance-training program for a period of 3 months. Design: Forty animals were divided into two major groups: control (n=16) and resistance trained (n=24). From the resistance-trained group, 12 animals were resistance trained for 1 month and another 12 for 3 months. The resistance-training protocol was performed with 4 sets of 12 repetitions using 65% to 75% of one repetition maximum (maximum lifted weight with the exercise apparatus). Methods: Echocardiographic analysis was performed at the beginning of the resistance-training period and at the end of each month. The repetition maximum was measured every 2 weeks. Cardiac hypertrophy was determined by echocardiography, by the absolute weight of the cardiac chambers and by histology of the left ventricle. Results: Before resistance training, both groups had similar repetition maximums, ranging from 1.8-fold to 2-fold the body weight; however, at the end of the resistance-training period, the repetition maximum of the resistance-trained group was 6-fold greater than the body weight. The left ventricular mass as assessed by echocardiography was 8%, 12% and 16% larger in the resistance-trained group than in the control group in the first, second and third months, respectively. This hypertrophy showed a similar increase in the interventricular septum and in the free posterior wall mass. There was no reduction in the end-diastolic left ventricular internal diameter during the 3-month resistance-training period. Systolic function did not differ between the groups throughout the resistance-training period. Conclusion: Resistance training induces the development of concentric cardiac hypertrophy without ventricular dysfunction or cavity reduction. Although diastolic function was not completely investigated, we cannot exclude the possibility that resistance training results in diastolic dysfunction. PMID

  17. Effect of Lower-Body Resistance Training on Upper-Body Strength Adaptation in Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomei, Sandro; Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Merni, Franco

    2018-01-01

    Bartolomei, S, Hoffman, JR, Stout, JR, and Merni, F. Effect of lower-body resistance training on upper-body strength adaptation in trained men. J Strength Cond Res 32(1): 13-18, 2018-The aim of this study was to examine the effect of 2 different lower-body strength training schemes on upper-body adaptations to resistance training. Twenty resistance-trained men (4.25 ± 1.6 years of experience) were randomly assigned to either a high intensity (HI; n = 9; age = 24.9 ± 2.9 years; body mass = 88.7 ± 17.2 kg; height = 177.0 ± 5.6 cm) or a mixed high volume and HI resistance training program (MP; n = 11; age = 26.0 ± 4.7 years; body mass = 82.8 ± 9.1 kg; height = 177.54 ± 5.9 cm). High-intensity group followed a HI training for both upper and lower body (4-5 reps at 88%-90% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM)), whereas the MP group performed high-volume training sessions focused on muscle hypertrophy for lower body (10-12 reps at 65%-70% of 1-RM) and a HI protocol for the upper body. Maximal strength and power testing occurred before and after the 6-week training program. Analysis of covariance was used to compare performance measures between the groups. Greater increases in MP groups compared with HI groups were observed for bench press 1RM (p = 0.007), bench press power at 50% of 1RM (p = 0.011), and for arm muscle area (p = 0.046). Significant difference between the 2 groups at posttest were also observed for fat mass (p = 0.009). Results indicated that training programs focused on lower-body muscle hypertrophy and maximal strength for upper body can stimulate greater strength and power gains in the upper body compared with HI resistance training programs for both the upper and lower body.

  18. Resistance training intensity and volume affect changes in rate of force development in resistance-trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangine, Gerald T; Hoffman, Jay R; Wang, Ran; Gonzalez, Adam M; Townsend, Jeremy R; Wells, Adam J; Jajtner, Adam R; Beyer, Kyle S; Boone, Carleigh H; Miramonti, Amelia A; LaMonica, Michael B; Fukuda, David H; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2016-12-01

    To compare the effects of two different resistance training programs, high intensity (INT) and high volume (VOL), on changes in isometric force (FRC), rate of force development (RFD), and barbell velocity during dynamic strength testing. Twenty-nine resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to either the INT (n = 15, 3-5 RM, 3-min rest interval) or VOL (n = 14, 10-12 RM, 1-min rest interval) training group for 8 weeks. All participants completed a 2-week preparatory phase prior to randomization. Measures of barbell velocity, FRC, and RFD were performed before (PRE) and following (POST) the 8-week training program. Barbell velocity was determined during one-repetition maximum (1RM) testing of the squat (SQ) and bench press (BP) exercises. The isometric mid-thigh pull was used to assess FRC and RFD at specific time bands ranging from 0 to 30, 50, 90, 100, 150, 200, and 250 ms. Analysis of covariance revealed significant (p resistance-trained men.

  19. Student science enrichment training program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1994-08-01

    This is a report on the Student Science Enrichment Training Program, with special emphasis on chemical and computer science fields. The residential summer session was held at the campus of Claflin College, Orangeburg, SC, for six weeks during 1993 summer, to run concomitantly with the college`s summer school. Fifty participants selected for this program, included high school sophomores, juniors and seniors. The students came from rural South Carolina and adjoining states which, presently, have limited science and computer science facilities. The program focused on high ability minority students, with high potential for science engineering and mathematical careers. The major objective was to increase the pool of well qualified college entering minority students who would elect to go into science, engineering and mathematical careers. The Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and engineering at Claflin College received major benefits from this program as it helped them to expand the Departments of Chemistry, Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science as a result of additional enrollment. It also established an expanded pool of well qualified minority science and mathematics graduates, which were recruited by the federal agencies and private corporations, visiting Claflin College Campus. Department of Energy`s relationship with Claflin College increased the public awareness of energy related job opportunities in the public and private sectors.

  20. Creatine supplementation alters homocysteine level in resistance trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereket-Yücel, S

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of creatine loading and resistance training on the homocysteine and lipid profiles of young males. Sixty male University students (22.34 ± 2.19 years, 1.79 ± 0.08 m, 77.18 ± 12.57 kg, 15.48 ± 4.57% body fat) were randomly divided in to three groups; control (CG=20), creatine supplement (CEG=20) and placebo (PEG=20). Both CEG and PEG participated in a same resistance-training regimen and either taking a creatine supplement (25 g/d for the first 5 days followed 5 g/d thereafter) or the same amount of placebo for 8 weeks. Participants in CG did not take any creatine supplementation and not engage any exercise program. After the body composition were assessed, the homocysteine (Hcy) concentrations, blood lipids, folic acid and vitamin B12 levels of all the participants were measured at the beginning and end of the eight weeks of resistance training. The analysis of the data indicated that the Hcy levels of the CEG after resistance training and receiving the creatine supplement (9.33 ± 4.60) was significantly lower than that of baseline (12.66 ± 5.89) measurements, F(1,18)=12.28, P=0.00. No significant differences were seen in the Hcy levels of the PEG (15.01 ± 10.87) after 8 weeks of training and receiving a placebo (12.46 ± 12.50), F(1,16)=4.65, P=0.05. Furthermore, there were no significant differences among groups in terms of Hcy levels, F(2,52)=1.72, P=0.19. The present study suggests that as well as strength gain; creatine supplementation with resistance training may afford some protection against emerging cardiovascular risk factors.

  1. TAP 3: Training Program Support Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The Training Accreditation Program (TAP) establishes objectives and criteria against which DOE nuclear facility training is evaluated to determine readiness for accreditation. TAP 3 has been developed to assist the contractor in preparing the initial Self-Evaluation Report, Training Program Accreditation Plan, and the CSER (contractor self-evaluation report).

  2. Methods for evaluation of industry training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morisseau, D.S.; Roe, M.L.; Persensky, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The NRC Policy Statement on Training and Qualification endorses the INPO-managed Training Accreditation Program in that it encompasses the elements of effective performance-based training. Those elements are: analysis of the job, performance-based learning objectives, training design and implementation, trainee evaluation, and program evaluation. As part of the NRC independent evaluation of utilities implementation of training improvement programs, the staff developed training review criteria and procedures that address all five elements of effective performance-based training. The staff uses these criteria to perform reviews of utility training programs that have already received accreditation. Although no performance-based training program can be said to be complete unless all five elements are in place, the last two, trainee and program evaluation, are perhaps the most important because they determine how well the first three elements have been implemented and ensure the dynamic nature of training. This paper discusses the evaluation elements of the NRC training review criteria. The discussion will detail the elements of evaluation methods and techniques that the staff expects to find as integral parts of performance-based training programs at accredited utilities. Further, the review of the effectiveness of implementation of the evaluation methods is discussed. The paper also addresses some of the qualitative differences between what is minimally acceptable and what is most desirable with respect to trainee and program evaluation mechanisms and their implementation

  3. Concurrent Training Followed by Detraining: Does the Resistance Training Intensity Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, António C; Marinho, Daniel A; Gil, Maria H; Izquierdo, Mikel; Rodríguez-Rosell, David; Neiva, Henrique P; Marques, Mário C

    2018-03-01

    Sousa, AC, Marinho, DA, Gil, MH, Izquierdo, M, Rodríguez-Rosell, D, Neiva, HP, and Marques, MC. Concurrent training followed by detraining: does the resistance training intensity matter? J Strength Cond Res 32(3): 632-642, 2018-The aim of this study was to analyze the training and detraining (DT) effects of concurrent aerobic training and resistance training against 3 different external loads on strength and aerobic variables. Thirty-two men were randomly assigned to 4 groups: low-load (LLG, n = 9), moderate-load (MLG, n = 9), high-load (HLG, n = 8), and control group (CG, n = 6). Resistance training consisted of full squat (FS) with a low load (40-55% 1 repetition maximum [1RM]), a moderate load (55-70% 1RM), or a high load (70-85% 1RM) combined with jump and sprint exercises. Aerobic training was performed at 75% of the maximal aerobic speed for 15-20 minutes. The training period lasted for 8-week, followed by 4-week DT. Pretraining, post-training, and post-DT evaluations included 20-m running sprints (0-10 m: T10; 0-20 m: T20), shuttle run test, countermovement vertical jump (CMJ) test, and loading test (1RM) in FS. All the experimental groups showed improvements (p ≤ 0.05) in all the parameters assessed, except the LLG for T10 and the HLG for T20. The LLG, MLG, and HLG showed great changes in 1RM and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max compared with the CG (p ≤ 0.05), whereas the HLG and MLG showed a greater percentage change than the CG in T10 (p training programs with low, moderate, or high external loads combined with low-intensity aerobic training could be effective for producing significant gains in strength and aerobic capacities. Moreover, the higher loads used increased gains in explosive efforts.

  4. The Efficacy of Stuttering Measurement Training: Evaluating Two Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Lauren A.; Stavros, Candace; Ebrahimian, Mineh; Wang, Yuedong; Ingham, Roger J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Two stuttering measurement training programs currently used for training clinicians were evaluated for their efficacy in improving the accuracy of total stuttering event counting. Method: Four groups, each with 12 randomly allocated participants, completed a pretest-posttest design training study. They were evaluated by their counts of…

  5. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: There is a phobia among doctors for the residency training program, since the establishment of ... Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaires were administered to residents at 3 training institutions in Nigeria. Results: ... Keywords: Decentralization, motivation, perception, remuneration, residents.

  6. Menopause: highlighting the effects of resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, R D; Prestes, J; Pereira, G B; Shiguemoto, G E; Perez, S E A

    2010-11-01

    The increase in lifespan and in the proportion of elderly women has increased the focus on menopause induced physiological alterations. These modifications are associated with the elevated risk of several pathologies such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, non-alcoholic fat liver disease, among others. Because of estrogen levels decline, many tissue and organs (muscular, bone, adipose tissue and liver) are affected. Additionally, body composition suffers important modifications. In this sense, there is a growing body of concern in understanding the physiological mechanisms involved and establishing strategies to prevent and reverse the effects of menopause. The hormone reposition therapy, diet and physical exercise have been recommended. Among the diverse exercise modalities, resistance training is not commonly used as a therapeutic intervention in the treatment of menopause. Thus, the aim of this review was to analyze the physiological alterations on several organs and systems induced by menopause and ovariectomy (experimental model to reproduce menopause), as well as, to study the effects of resistance training in preventing and reverting these modifications. In conclusion, resistance training promotes beneficial effects on several organs and systems, mainly, on muscular, bone and adipose tissue, allowing for a better quality of life in this population.

  7. Effects of resistance training in individuals with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazielle Cordeiro Aguiar

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Osteoarthritis (OA, the most common form of arthritis, is considered the main cause of pain and disability in the elderly. Objective: To evaluate the effect of systematic muscle strength training on functional performance and quality of life in individuals with knee OA. Methods: Subjects with knee OA (n = 27, 46 - 76 years completed the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, Medical Outcomes Short-Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36, and visual analog scale (VAS questionnaires, musculoskeletal assessments, and 10-repetition maximum and timed 10-meter walk tests both before and after training. The training consisted of an exercise resistance program and stretches for 12 weeks (three sessions of 80 each per week. Results: Twenty-two subjects completed the training. Reduced overall scores and WOMAC physical function indicated improved functional performance (p < 0.001 as well as increased gait speed (p < 0.001. The perception of pain decreased after training, as evidenced by the VAS, WOMAC pain domain, and SF-36 scores (p < 0.001. Quality of life improvements occurred primarily in the areas of pain, functional capacity, and SF-36 physical aspects. No change in body mass index was noted (p = 0.93. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the combination of resistance training for the quadriceps, gluteus, and abdominal muscles could be a viable alternative to improving functionality and quality of life in patients with knee OA. However, more studies are necessary to confirm our findings.

  8. Advocacy training in US advanced pediatric dentistry training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Homa; Casamassimo, Paul S; Lin, Hsuan L; Hayes, John R

    2008-01-01

    This study: (1) assessed pediatric dentistry residency program directors' attitudes toward and involvement in advocacy training; and (2) identified types and extent of advocacy training in U.S. pediatric dentistry programs. Between October 2005 and February 2006, all 66 pediatric dentistry residency program directors were invited to complete a 62-item online questionnaire. The survey investigated: (1) directors' attitudes toward advocacy training; (2) nature of advocacy training offered during residency; (3) extent of resident involvement in different settings; and (4) directors' involvement in advocacy. Forty-two program directors responded (64%). Overall, respondents agreed that advocacy by pediatric dentists for children beyond the dental office was important and that residency programs should provide advocacy training. Most programs did not routinely offer advocacy opportunities in nonclinical settings. Over half of programs required community outreach clinic rotations for all residents. One third offered didactic curriculum in the legislative process. Over 50% of program directors reported personal involvement in legislative oral health lobbying within 3 years, but fewer than a third were involved with professional political action committees (PACs). Advocacy is seen as on important in pediatric dentistry but variation in attitudes of program directors and program offerings exists in US training programs.

  9. TAP 3, Training Program Support Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    Training programs at DOE facilities should provide well-trained, qualified personnel to safely and efficiently operate the facilities in accordance with DOE requirements. A need has been identified for guidance regarding analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of consistent and reliable performance-based training programs. Accreditation of training programs at Category A reactors and high-hazard and selected moderate-hazard nonreactor nuclear facilities will assure consistent, appropriate, and cost-effective training of personnel responsible for the operation, maintenance, and technical support of these facilities. Training programs that are designed and based on systematically determined job requirements, instead of subjective estimation of trainee needs, yield training activities that are consistent and develop or improve knowledge, skills, and abilities that can be directly related to the work setting. Because the training is job-related, the content of these programs more efficiently and effectively meets the needs of the employee. Besides a better trained work force, a greater level of operational reactor safety can be realized. This manual is intended to provide an overview of the accreditation process and a brief description of the elements necessary to construct and maintain training programs that are based on the requirements of the job. Two companion manuals provide additional information to assist contractors in their efforts to accredit training programs

  10. Evaluation of Performance Improvements After Either Resistance Training or Sprint Interval-Based Concurrent Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Richard H; Elmer, David J; Barberio, Matthew D; Salom, Lorena P; Lee, Khalil A; Pascoe, David D

    2016-11-01

    Laird IV, RH, Elmer, DJ, Barberio, MD, Salom, LP, Lee, KA, and Pascoe, DD. Evaluation of performance improvements after either resistance training or sprint interval-based concurrent training. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3057-3065, 2016-The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of concurrent sprint interval and resistance training (CST) vs. resistance training (RT) on measures of strength, power, and aerobic fitness in recreationally active women. Twenty-eight women (20.3 ± 1.7 years; 63.0 ± 9.1; 51.1 ± 7.1 1 repetition maximum (1-RM) back squat (kg); V[Combining Dot Above]O2max: 35.4 ± 4.1 ml·kg·min) were recruited to complete an 11-week training program. Participants were matched-pair assigned to CST or RT cohorts after preliminary testing, which consisted of 1-RM back squats, maximal isometric squats, anaerobic power evaluations, and maximal oxygen consumption. All subjects trained 3 days per week with sprint-interval training occurring at least 4 hours after RT in the CST cohort. Both CST and RT resulted in significant improvements (p ≤ 0.05) in the 1-RM back squat (37.5 ± 7.8; 40.0 ± 9.6 kg), maximal isometric force (55.7 ± 51.3; 53.7 ± 36.7 kg), average peak anaerobic power testing (7.4 ± 6.2; 7.6 ± 6.4%), and zero-incline treadmill velocity, resulting in maximal oxygen consumption (1.8 ± 0.6; 0.8 ± 0.6 km·h). Only zero-incline treadmill velocity demonstrated a group-by-time interaction with a greater improvement after CST (p training might supplement programs already in place.

  11. ADMINISTRATORS’ ROLES IN TRAINING PROGRAMS AND TRAINING TRANSFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman Ismail

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An administrator plays a vital role in the growth and development of his/her subordinates. Despite this notion, the role of an administrator in the context of training programs and transfer of training is not well studied. Therefore, this study is set to examine the relationship between administrator’s role in training programs and training transfer. A survey method was utilized to gather 706 survey questionnaires from employees of local authorities of three cities in the state of Sarawak, Malaysia. The results of SmartPLS path model analysis confirmed that the ability of administrators to properly implement support, communication and assignment in planning and implementing training programs has been an important predictor of training transfer in the studied organization. Further, this study provides discussion, implications and conclusion.

  12. Radiation protection technologist training and certification program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this program is to establish training requirements and methods for certifying the technical competence of Radiation Protection Technologists. This manual delineates general requirements as well as academic training, on-the-job training, area of facility training, and examination or evaluation requirements for Radiation Protection Trainees (Trainees), Junior Radiation Protection Technologists (JRPT), Radiation Protection Technologists (RPT), and Senior Radiation Protection Technologists (SRPT). This document also includes recertification requirements for SRPTs. The appendices include training course outlines, on-the-job training outlines, and training certification record forms

  13. Resistance Training in Children and Young Adults: A Critical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Rami Shenouda; Mark Wilson; Scott Fletcher

    2017-01-01

    Resistance training is a method used by many athletes to increase their levels of performance. The benefits of this method are known to be increased strength, power and endurance. Resistance training in children has been a topic that has been long debated and there are some widely accepted beliefs and principles that guide clinicians involved in the discipline of sport and exercise medicine. While weight training is a form of resistance training that has proven beneficial effects on health an...

  14. Effect of specific resistance training on musculoskeletal pain symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Theisen; Andersen, Lars Louis; Jørgensen, Marie Birk

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Pedersen, MT, Andersen, LL, Jørgensen, MB, Søgaard, K, and Sjøgaard, G. Effect of specific resistance training on musculoskeletal pain symptoms: Dose-response relationship. J Strength Cond Res 27(1): 229-235, 2013-The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-response of strength...... training for relieving musculoskeletal pain in female office workers. The relation between the dose of training in terms of total training volume (sets × repetitions × load reported in training diaries) during a 16-week strength training program and changes in pain (calculated as pain index, 0-100%, from...... index in SRT and APE decreased significantly from baseline to follow-up (-25%/-22%) compared with changes in REF (-15%). In the dose-response analysis within the SRT group (n = 125), the total volume of training (mean 18.056 kg, SD = 13.798) was negatively correlated with changes in pain index (ß = -0...

  15. Effects of Training Attendance on Muscle Strength of Young Men after 11 Weeks of Resistance Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Paulo; Bottaro, Martim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Training attendance is an important variable for attaining optimal results after a resistance training (RT) program, however, the association of attendance with the gains of muscle strength is not well defined. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to verify if attendance would affect muscle strength gains in healthy young males. Methods Ninety two young males with no previous RT experience volunteered to participate in the study. RT was performed 2 days a week for 11 weeks. One repetition maximum (1RM) in the bench press and knee extensors peak torque (PT) were measured before and after the training period. After the training period, a two step cluster analysis was used to classify the participants in accordance to training attendance, resulting in three groups, defined as high (92 to 100%), intermediate (80 to 91%) and low (60 to 79%) training attendance. Results According to the results, there were no significant correlations between strength gains and training attendance, however, when attendance groups were compared, the low training attendance group showed lower increases in 1RM bench press (8.8%) than the other two groups (17.6% and 18.0% for high and intermediate attendance, respectively). Conclusions Although there is not a direct correlation between training attendance and muscle strength gains, it is suggested that a minimum attendance of 80% is necessary to ensure optimal gains in upper body strength. PMID:23802051

  16. Radiation monitor training program at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, L.C.; Kittinger, W.D.; Vogel, R.M.

    The Rocky Flats Radiation Monitor Training Program is tailored to train new health physics personnel in the field of radiation monitoring. The purpose of the prescribed materials and media is to be consistent in training in all areas of Rocky Flats radiation monitoring job involvement

  17. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to ascertain the perception of the residency ... the time of the study. Analysis of the respondents showed similar findings for both senior and junior levels of training. Discussion. The introduction of the residency training program .... Overseas training/ attachment should be re-introduced. 12. (10.1).

  18. Effects of different volume-equated resistance training loading strategies on muscular adaptations in well-trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Peterson, Mark D; Contreras, Bret; Sonmez, G T; Alvar, Brent A

    2014-10-01

    Regimented resistance training has been shown to promote marked increases in skeletal muscle mass. Although muscle hypertrophy can be attained through a wide range of resistance training programs, the principle of specificity, which states that adaptations are specific to the nature of the applied stimulus, dictates that some programs will promote greater hypertrophy than others. Research is lacking, however, as to the best combination of variables required to maximize hypertophic gains. The purpose of this study was to investigate muscular adaptations to a volume-equated bodybuilding-type training program vs. a powerlifting-type routine in well-trained subjects. Seventeen young men were randomly assigned to either a hypertrophy-type resistance training group that performed 3 sets of 10 repetition maximum (RM) with 90 seconds rest or a strength-type resistance training (ST) group that performed 7 sets of 3RM with a 3-minute rest interval. After 8 weeks, no significant differences were noted in muscle thickness of the biceps brachii. Significant strength differences were found in favor of ST for the 1RM bench press, and a trend was found for greater increases in the 1RM squat. In conclusion, this study showed that both bodybuilding- and powerlifting-type training promote similar increases in muscular size, but powerlifting-type training is superior for enhancing maximal strength.

  19. Resistance training for explosive and maximal strength: effects on early and late rate of force development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Felipe B D; Oliveira, Anderson S C; Rizatto, Guilherme F; Denadai, Benedito S

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify whether strength training designed to improve explosive and maximal strength would influence rate of force development (RFD). Nine men participated in a 6-week knee extensors resistance training program and 9 matched subjects participated as controls. Throughout the training sessions, subjects were instructed to perform isometric knee extension as fast and forcefully as possible, achieving at least 90% maximal voluntary contraction as quickly as possible, hold it for 5 s, and relax. Fifteen seconds separated each repetition (6-10), and 2 min separated each set (3). Pre- and post-training measurements were maximal isometric knee extensor (MVC), RFD, and RFD relative to MVC (i.e., %MVC·s(-1)) in different time-epochs varying from 10 to 250 ms from the contraction onset. The MVC (Nm) increased by 19% (275.8 ± 64.9 vs. 329.8 ± 60.4, p resistance training for explosive and maximal strength. This time-specific RFD adaptation highlight that resistance training programs should consider the specific neuromuscular demands of each sport. Key PointsThe time-specific RFD adaptation evoked by resistance training highlight that the method of analyzing RFD is essential for the interpretation of results.Confirming previous data, maximal contractile RFD and maximal force can be differently influenced by resistance training. Thus, the resistance training programs should consider the specific neuromuscular demands of each sport.In active non-strength trained individuals, a short-term resistance training program designed to increase both explosive and maximal strength seems to reduce the adaptive response (i.e. increased RFDMAX) evoked by training with an intended ballistic effort (i.e. high-RFD contraction).

  20. Integrated Resistance and Aerobic Training Study - Sprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Moore, Alan; Ryder, Jeffrey; Everett, Meg; Bloomberg, Jacob; Sibonga, Jean; Shackelford, Linda; Platts, Steven; Martin, David; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; hide

    2010-01-01

    Space flight causes reductions in fitness/health: (1) Cardiovascular -- reduced VO2max, cardiac output (2) Bone -- reduced bone mineral density (3) Muscle -- reduced mass, strength and endurance. Exercise is the primary countermeasure to protect against these changes and was made operational before completely mature. Research continues to identify most effective/efficient exercise programs. Crew medical tests (cardio, muscle, bone) do not yield sufficient information to fine tune the effectiveness of exercise programs, thus there is a need for more detailed testing aimed at identifying the most effective training program. The objective of this program was to obtain detailed information about crew physical fitness pre-and post-flight and evaluate new evidence based exercise prescription with higher intensity, lower duration and frequency.

  1. Trauma-Focused Training Program for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Marilyn Diane

    2016-01-01

    Teachers have reported that they have difficulty providing support to traumatized children and youth because of a lack of training in how to identify and respond to the needs of these children. The program, "Amazing Help Skills for Teachers to Unmask Trauma in Children and Youth" (AHSUM), is a trauma-focused training program, designed…

  2. Integrating Internationalization in Counseling Psychology Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Essel, Laura; Waehler, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Previous scholars have made specific suggestions regarding what counseling psychology training programs can do to help future psychologists become more cross-culturally aware. This article addresses the questions of whether and how U.S. counseling psychology training programs are currently employing these suggestions. Forty-seven American…

  3. Language Teaching Models in Teacher Training Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Aslan, Alper

    2016-01-01

    Any language teacher who has gone through some kind of training program for the teaching of English should be familiar with various specific language teaching models that constitute the core of the training process. A language teaching model is a guide that helps the trainee to sequence the activities designed for the expectations and needs of learners in a lesson. This paper reviews the common language teaching models in teacher training programs (PPP, OHE, III, TTT, TBLT, ESA, ARC) and disc...

  4. resistance training and changes to plasma lipoproteins in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to resistance training, HDL-cholesterol was reduced in women aged 54 - 71 years over 12 weeks. 12 ... the effect of a 24-week progressive resistance training programme on the blood lipid profiles of a sample ..... cise training on cardiovascular risk factors of sedentary, overweight, pre- menopausal and postmenopausal ...

  5. Effect of resistance training on total, central and abdominal adiposity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resistance training had no impact on the measures of centrally located and abdominal adiposity. Body mass and BMI should be used with caution in risk calculations and measures of total adiposity in individuals engaging in resistance training due to this mode of training increasing lean mass (and thus body mass and BMI) ...

  6. Training Program Handbook: A systematic approach to training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This DOE handbook describes a systematic method for establishing and maintaining training programs that meet the requirements and expectations of DOE Orders 5480.18B and 5480.20. The systematic approach to training includes 5 phases: Analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation.

  7. The Comparison of Two Methods of Exercise (intense interval training and concurrent resistance- endurance training on Fasting Sugar, Insulin and Insulin Resistance in Women with Mellitus Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Bazyar

    2016-05-01

    significantly reduced after the exercise program. The results between groups indicated a marked difference in fasting insulin (p=0.036 and insulin resistance (p=0.008 respectively.   Conclusions: Concurrent resistance- endurance training and the intensive training could have a positive effects on blood sugar levels, insulin and insulin resistance of women with diabetes mellitus.  

  8. Fissionable material handlers certification training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strangeland, J.V.

    1979-07-01

    A formal program for certification of fissionable material handlers is presented that cultivates safe working practices. This certification complies with the training requirements of the Department of Energy Directive 0530 (ERDA Manual Chapter 0530), Nuclear Criticality Safety. The program consists of a series of classroom lectures, on-the-job training, and examinations in criticality safety, radiation protection, industrial safety, emergency procedures, and the employee's specific work operations. The program for recertification is also discussed

  9. Studying creativity training programs: A methodological analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valgeirsdóttir, Dagný; Onarheim, Balder

    2017-01-01

    Throughout decades of creativity research, a range of creativity training programs have been developed, tested, and analyzed. In 2004 Scott and colleagues published a meta‐analysis of all creativity training programs to date, and the review presented here sat out to identify and analyze studies...... published since the seminal 2004 review. Focusing on quantitative studies of creativity training programs for adults, our systematic review resulted in 22 publications. All studies were analyzed, but comparing the reported effectiveness of training across studies proved difficult due to methodological...... inconsistencies, variations in reporting of results as well as types of measures used. Thus a consensus for future studies is called for to answer the question: Which elements make one creativity training program more effective than another? This is a question of equal relevance to academia and industry...

  10. Evaluation of training programs: A pragmatic perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Canadian nuclear regulatory agency endorses the Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) as the most reliable method of providing effective, efficient training to Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) personnel. However the benefits of SAT cannot be realized unless all five phases of SAT are implemented. This is particularly true with respect to evaluation. Although each phase of SAT builds on the preceding one, the evaluation phase continuously feeds back into each of the others and also provides the means to verify the entire training programme building process. It is useful, therefore, to examine the issues relating to the what, why, who, when and how of training programme evaluation. ''What'' identifies the various aspects of the training programme to be evaluated, including the need for training, the training standard, the task list, trainer competence, test results, training results, program acceptance and numerous indicators that identify a need for evaluation. ''Why'' addresses legal and regulatory aspects, resource management, worker and public safety, worker and trainer competence and morale, and the cost/benefit of the training program. ''Who'' examines the need to involve trainers, trainees, plant subject matter experts (SMEs), and both plant and training centre supervisory and management staff. ''When'' addresses time-related concerns such as the importance of ensuring at the outset that the training program is actually needed, the necessity of responding promptly to local, national and world events, changes in legal and regulatory responsibilities, and the overriding importance of timely, routine training program evaluations. ''How'' describes the process of conducting a training program evaluation, and addresses the relationships of these five aspects of evaluation to each other. (author). 10 refs

  11. Resistance Training in Children and Young Adults: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Shenouda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance training is a method used by many athletes to increase their levels of performance. The benefits of this method are known to be increased strength, power and endurance. Resistance training in children has been a topic that has been long debated and there are some widely accepted beliefs and principles that guide clinicians involved in the discipline of sport and exercise medicine. While weight training is a form of resistance training that has proven beneficial effects on health and wellbeing, powerlifting and heavy weight training should be avoided, as lifting maximal weights through various ranges of motion as fast as possible can lead to serious limb injuries. In order to determine the risks and benefits of resistance training in children and adolescents, it is important to review the literature to find a clear consensus. Further prospective research should be completed to determine the long-term sequelae of resistance training in children in comparison to the general population.

  12. Resistance training vs. static stretching: effects on flexibility and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Sam K; Whitehead, James R; Brinkert, Ronald H; Caine, Dennis J

    2011-12-01

    Morton, SK, Whitehead, JR, Brinkert, RH, and Caine, DJ. Resistance training vs. static stretching: Effects on flexibility and strength. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3391-3398, 2011-The purpose of this study was to determine how full-range resistance training (RT) affected flexibility and strength compared to static stretching (SS) of the same muscle-joint complexes in untrained adults. Volunteers (n = 25) were randomized to an RT or SS training group. A group of inactive volunteers (n = 12) served as a convenience control group (CON). After pretesting hamstring extension, hip flexion and extension, shoulder extension flexibility, and peak torque of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, subjects completed 5-week SS or RT treatments in which the aim was to stretch or to strength train the same muscle-joint complexes over similar movements and ranges. Posttests of flexibility and strength were then conducted. There was no difference in hamstring flexibility, hip flexion, and hip extension improvement between RT and SS, but both were superior to CON values. There were no differences between groups on shoulder extension flexibility. The RT group was superior to the CON in knee extension peak torque, but there were no differences between groups on knee flexion peak torque. The results of this preliminary study suggest that carefully constructed full-range RT regimens can improve flexibility as well as the typical SS regimens employed in conditioning programs. Because of the potential practical significance of these results to strength and conditioning programs, further studies using true experimental designs, larger sample sizes, and longer training durations should be conducted with the aim of confirming or disproving these results.

  13. General Electric's training program for BWR chemists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, R.N.; Lim, W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of the General Electric boiling water reactor chemistry training program from 1959 to the present. The original intention of this program was to provide practical hands on type training in radiochemistry to BWR chemistry supervisors with fossil station experience. This emphasis on radiochemistry has not changed through the years, but the training has expanded to include the high purity water chemistry of the BWR and has been modified to include new commission requirements, engineering developments and advanced instrumentation. Student and instructor qualifications are discussed and a description of the spin off courses for chemistry technicians and refresher training is presented

  14. Cernavoda NPP training programs The paper presents a general assessment of Cernavoda NPP personnel training programs,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valache, Cornelia

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a general assessment of Cernavoda NPP personnel training programs, highlighting the role of training in human performance improvement. Cernavoda NPP Personnel Training and Authorization Department (PTAD) is responsible for the training of CNE Cernavoda NPP personnel and its contractors. PTAD is structured in a manner ensuring the support and response to all plant training, qualification and authorization requirements. The training of personnel is continuously adapted based on IAEA Guides and INPO/WANO recommendations, to keep with world standards, based on the internal and external reviews. At Cernavoda NPP the Training Concept and the Training Programs are based on SAT - Systematic Approach to Training. The Training Concept is established on a set of training documents (RD's, SI's, IDP's), which address all the SAT phases: Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation. The Training Programs are structured on the initial and continuing personnel training. Their content and goals are responding to the training specific needs for each plant major job family. In order to successfully support NPP training programs, CNPP training center has upgraded classrooms with new presentation facilities and there are plans to expand the space of the building, to develop additional operator and maintenance skills facilities. By responding in a timely and completely manner to all plant training requirements PTAD will help in rising human performance of Cernavoda NPP personnel, supporting the safe, efficient and cost effective production of power. (author)

  15. Nuclear safety training program (NSTP) for dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cretskens, Pieter; Lenie, Koen; Mulier, Guido

    2014-01-01

    European Control Services (GDF Suez) has developed and is still developing specific training programs for the dismantling and decontamination of nuclear installations. The main topic in these programs is nuclear safety culture. We therefore do not focus on technical training but on developing the right human behavior to work in a 'safety culture' environment. The vision and techniques behind these programs have already been tested in different environments: for example the dismantling of the BN MOX Plant in Dessel (Belgium), Nuclear Safety Culture Training for Electrabel NPP Doel..., but also in the non-nuclear industry. The expertise to do so was found in combining the know-how of the Training and the Nuclear Department of ECS. In training, ECS is one of the main providers of education in risky tasks, like elevation and manipulation of charges, working in confined spaces... but it does also develop training on demand to improve safety in a certain topic. Radiation Protection is the core business in the Nuclear Department with a presence on most of the nuclear sites in Belgium. Combining these two domains in a nuclear safety training program, NSTP, is an important stage in a dismantling project due to specific contamination, technical and other risks. It increases the level of safety and leads to a harmonization of different working cultures. The modular training program makes it possible to evaluate constantly as well as in group or individually. (authors)

  16. Cardioprotective Properties of Aerobic and Resistance Training Against Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, C A; Souza, G I H; Oliveira, J C M F; Silva, L M; Mostarda, C T; Dourado, P M M; Oyama, L M; Lira, F S; Irigoyen, M C; Rodrigues, B

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the effects of aerobic and resistance exercise training on ventricular morphometry and function, physical capacity, autonomic function, as well as on ventricular inflammatory status in trained rats prior to myocardial infarction. Male Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: sedentary+Sham, sedentary+myocardial infarction, aerobic trained+myocardial infarction, and resistance trained+myocardial infarction. Sham and myocardial infarction were performed after training periods. In the days following the surgeries, evaluations were performed. Aerobic training prevents aerobic (to a greater extent) and resistance capacity impairments, ventricular dysfunction, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic disorders (vagal tonus decrease and sympathetic tonus increase) triggered by myocardial infarction. Resistance training was able to prevent negative changes to aerobic and resistance capacity (to a greater extent) but not to ventricular dysfunction, and it prevented cardiovascular sympathetic increments. Additionally, both types of training reduced left ventricle inflammatory cytokine concentration. Our results suggest that aerobic and, for the first time, dynamic resistance training were able to reduce sympathetic tonus to the heart and vessels, as well as preventing the increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations in the left ventricle of trained groups. These data emphasizes the positive effects of aerobic and dynamic resistance training on the prevention of the negative changes triggered by myocardial infarction. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. The evolution of a Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendation: the impact of resistance training on resting blood pressure in adults as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Amanda M; Moullec, Gregory; Lavoie, Kim L; Gour-Provençal, Gabrielle; Bacon, Simon L

    2013-05-01

    Ever since the first set of hypertension recommendations which were generated from the Canadian Hypertension Education Program, lifestyle and health behaviour have been a key focus. An initial recommendation focused on the benefits of aerobic exercise to reduce resting blood pressure (BP). However, until the 2013 edition, resistance exercise (RT) was not included. The current article describes a meta-analysis that was conducted which helped inform the creation of the newly introduced recommendation. Literature searches were conducted in 4 electronic databases. Inclusion criteria included: (1) randomized controlled trials with 4-week minimum, RT-alone intervention arms; (2) BP-lowering as the primary outcome; (3) human, adult participants; and (4) reporting control data, baseline, and postintervention resting systolic BP and diastolic BP. Nine studies (11 intervention groups, 452 participants) were identified. The analyses indicated that diastolic BP was significantly reduced (-2.2 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -3.9 to -0.5) in those randomized to RT compared with control participants. In contrast, no statistically significant change in systolic BP (-1.0 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -3.4 to 1.4) was observed. None of the studies found RT to increase BP and no adverse effects of RT were explicitly reported. Results suggest that participation in RT is not harmful and does not increase BP. However, more evidence is needed before recommending RT as a specific BP-lowering therapy. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Order effects of concurrent endurance and resistance training on post-exercise response of non-trained women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Blasio, Andrea; Gemello, Eugenio; Di Iorio, Angelo; Di Giacinto, Gabriella; Celso, Tiziana; Di Renzo, Donatella; Sablone, Andrea; Ripari, Patrizio

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise is used for the promotion and maintenance of good health and for the improvement of physical fitness. Both endurance and resistance exercises are needed to carry out a complete training program. Because time may be a barrier to physical exercise practice, the aim of this study was to verify whether the order of execution of endurance and resistance exercises, in concurrent training, has different effects on the metabolic responses during recovery. Thirteen healthy women [24.40 (1.67) years, Mean (SD)] were investigated for energy expenditure (EE), oxygen consumption (VO2), ventilation (Ve), respiratory frequency (RF), proportion of oxygen in expired air (FeO2) and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) both before and after three concurrent endurance and resistance trainings, carried out in different orders: endurance-resistance training (ERT), resistance-endurance training (RET) and alternating endurance-resistance training (AERT). AERT elicited a significantly greater increase of EE, VO2, and Ve and a greater decrease of FeO2. ERT elicited a lower increase of RPE. Acute post-exercise physiological responses to concurrent endurance and resistance physical exercise seem to depend on the order of execution of the two parts: among the selected protocols, AERT seems to elicit the best responses. Key pointsThe concurrent execution of both endurance and resistance exercise, in the same training session, could be a practical solution to conform to guidelines for health in the presence of lack of time.The order of concurrent execution of both endurance and resistance exercise, in the same training session, influences the amplitude of some post-exercise physiological responses.

  19. Mixed-Methods Resistance Training Increases Power and Strength of Young and Older Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Robert U.; Hakkinen, Keijo; Hakkinen, Arja; McCormick, Matt; Volek, Jeff; Kraemer, William J.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week, mixed-methods resistance training program on young and older men. Although results confirmed some age-related reductions in muscle strength and power, the older men demonstrated similar capacity to the younger men for increases in muscle strength and power via an appropriate, periodized resistance training…

  20. Effect of Resistance Training on Serum Meteorin-like Hormone Level and Insulin Resistance Index in Overweight Adolescent Boys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Alizadeh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Adipose tissue's phenotypic alteration due to exercise training is a new theory. However, the cellular–molecular mechanisms for these phenotypic alterations are not yet clearly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of six weeks resistance training on Meteorin-like hormone level and insulin resistance index in overweight adolescent boys. Materials and Methods: Twenty overweight adolescent boys (average age 18.5±1 years old, average weight 81.1±4.5 kg, and BMI 27.7±0.7 kg/m2 participated in this study. The subjects were randomly assigned into two groups: control (N=10 and resistance training (N=10. Subjects in training group performed six-week resistance training program 3 days/week. Anthropometrics parameters and fasting serum of Meteorin-like hormone levels, insulin and glucose were measured at the baseline and at the end of study. Results: The level of Meteorin-like hormone was significantly decreased in control group (p=0.008, but that of Meteorin-like hormone in resistance training was increased insignificantly (p=0.311. The variations of Meteorin-like hormone levels between two groups were significant (p=0.004. The changes of insulin resistance were increased in both groups which were statistically significant (p=0.032 and insignificant (p=0.632 for control and training groups respectively. We found a negative and insignificant correlation between changes in Meteorin-like hormone levels and changes in insulin resistance index (p=0.273. Conclusion: The results showed that six weeks’ resistance training has no effect on increasing Meteorin-like hormone serum level and improving insulin resistance index and body composition in overweight adolescent boys.

  1. Report of VA Medical Training Programs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Report of VA Medical Training Programs Database is used to track medical center health services trainees and VA physicians serving as faculty. The database also...

  2. Effects of an Intensive Resistant Training Sessions and Green Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Esmaeil Afzalpour

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intensive and acute exercise trainings may induce oxidative stress, but antioxidant supplements may attenuate its degenerative consequences. The aim of this research was to examine the effect of green tea supplementation on the oxidative stress indices after an intensive resistance training session. Materials and Methods: 40 non-athletes (without regular physical activity women were randomly divided into 4 equal (n=10 groups including green tea supplementation, green tea supplementation plus resistance training, resistance training, and control groups. After supplementation period (600 mg/day, 14 days, resistance training and green tea supplementation plus resistance training groups performed an intensive resistance training session at 75-85 % of one repetition maximum. The malondialdehyde and total thiol were measured as oxidative stress indices. Data were analyzed by using of repeated measure ANOVA and LSD tests at p<0.056T. Results: Results showed that after 14 days of green tea consumption, malondialdehyde significantly decreased in green tea supplementation (p=0.03 and green tea supplementation plus resistance training (p=0.01 groups, while total thiol increased significantly (p=0.01 in two green tea supplementation groups. However, an intensive resistance training session increased malondialdehyde (p=0.01 without any significantly changes in total thiol (p=0.426T. Conclusion: It seems that green tea supplementation can inhibit exercise-induced protein and lipid oxidation in non-athletes women via enhancement of antioxidant defense system of the body6T.6T

  3. Evaluation of a Soft Skills Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoensap-Kelly, Piyawan; Broussard, Lauren; Lindsly, Mallory; Troy, Megan

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a soft skills employee training program. We examined willingness to learn and delivery methods (face-to-face vs. online) and their associations with the training outcomes in terms of learning and behavioral change. Results showed that neither participants' willingness to learn nor delivery…

  4. REPORT ON MDTA INSTITUTIONAL TRAINING PROGRAM DEVELOPMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Employment Security (DOL), Washington, DC.

    THE DATA ON MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT TRAINING ACT (MDTA) PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS DURING 1964 AND 1965 REFLECT THE INCREASING EMPHASIS ON ASSISTING DISADVANTAGED TRAINEES SUCH AS JOBLESS TEENAGERS, NONWHITES, AND PERSONS OF LIMITED EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT. ALMOST HALF OF THE 321,456 ENROLLEES RECEIVED TRAINING IN THE SKILLED AND SEMI-SKILLED CATEGORIES,…

  5. Ethical Issues in Parent Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapon-Shevin, Mara

    1982-01-01

    Four areas of ethical concern are voiced in the training of parents of handicapped children: (1) selection of program goals, (2) problems involved with both positive reinforcement and punishment, (3) conflicts between experimentation and therapeutic intervention, and (4) level of parent training. Consideration of ethical issues at each step of…

  6. Development of MOT Training Programs at DENSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takamasa; Utsumi, Hiroo; Imaeda, Makoto

    MOT Training Programs are developed at DENSO. The purpose of these programs is to improve the quality of our business leaders. These programs consist of Basic Technology Management Courses and Specialized Technology Courses. They adopt a lot of group discussions including in-house cases to help improve the abilities and skills of DENSO‧s engineers. This paper describes the education programs to acquire management skills and technological abilities as a business leader.

  7. The Effect of Eight Weeks Resistance Training on Leptin and Insulin Resistance in Obese Female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khalili

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Leptin , the main peptide secreted by adipose tissue, is considered an alarming factor in the regulation of body fat content . With regard to the physiological effect of exercise as one of the potential regulators of leptin secretion from adipose tissue , this study was performed to examine the effects of resistance exercise on leptin. Materials & Methods: Twenty inactive and obese female students (10 controls and 10 experi-mentals participated in this study. The subjects in the experimental group performed an 8 week resistance training program (chest press, leg press, lat pull down, leg curl, bicep curl, leg extension with 60 - 70 percent of 1RM. ELISA was used to measure leptin. Results: The results of this study showed that 8 weeks of resistance training significantly decreased BMI (31.32 kg/m2 versus 29.73 kg/m2 , P=0.0001, weight body (80.5kg versus 76.25kg, P=0.0001, WHR (0.93 ver-sus0.89, P=0.0001 and body fat percent (27.48 versus 24.85, P=0.0001 in EG. Statistically significant differ-ences were not seen in leptin (P=0.939, insulin (P=0.336, glucose (P=0.264 and insulin resistance (P=0.306 between CG and EG. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that , there was no significant difference in leptin levels and insulin resistance between the control and experimental groups, after 8 weeks of resistance training. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (1:59-65

  8. The effects of resistance training on functional outcomes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panton, Lynn B; Golden, Jamie; Broeder, Craig E; Browder, Kathy D; Cestaro-Seifer, Deborah J; Seifer, Frederic D

    2004-04-01

    Aerobic exercise training is used for rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), although it has little effect on muscle weakness and atrophy. Resistance training may be a useful addition to aerobic programs for these patients. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of resistance training in addition to aerobic training on functional outcomes in patients with COPD. Seventeen COPD patients enrolled in an aerobic-based program that met twice a week were assigned to a 12-week control/aerobic [CON: n=8; 63 (8) years; mean (SD)] or a resistance/aerobic group [RES: n=9; 61 (7) years]. RES trained an additional twice a week on 12 resistance machines, performing three sets of 8-12 repetitions at 32-64% of their one-repetition maximum (1-RM) lifts. RES (P<0.05) increased upper (36%) and lower (36%) body strength, as well as lean body mass (5%), while CON showed little to no change. The 12-min walk distance increased (P<0.05) in only the RES [676 (219) to 875 (172) m]. Measurements of three of the eight tasks of activities of daily living improved in RES (P<0.05) compared to CON. This study demonstrated that progressive resistance training was well tolerated and improved functional outcomes in COPD patients that were currently involved in an aerobic training program.

  9. A Comprehensive Postdoctoral Training Program in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dickson, Robert B

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this training program is to significantly extend our existing, highly successful Doctoral Training Program in Tumor Biology and several Cancer Center mechanisms that provide traditional...

  10. Student retention in athletic training education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Thomas M; Mitchell, Murray F; Mensch, James M

    2009-01-01

    The success of any academic program, including athletic training, depends upon attracting and keeping quality students. The nature of persistent students versus students who prematurely leave the athletic training major is not known. Understanding the profiles of athletic training students who persist or leave is important. To (1) explore the relationships among the following variables: anticipatory factors, academic integration, clinical integration, social integration, and motivation; (2) determine which of the aforementioned variables discriminate between senior athletic training students and major changers; and (3) identify which variable is the strongest predictor of persistence in athletic training education programs. Descriptive study using a qualitative and quantitative mixed-methods approach. Thirteen athletic training education programs located in District 3 of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Ninety-four senior-level athletic training students and 31 college students who changed majors from athletic training to another degree option. Data were collected with the Athletic Training Education Program Student Retention Questionnaire (ATEPSRQ). Data from the ATEPSRQ were analyzed via Pearson correlations, multivariate analysis of variance, univariate analysis of variance, and a stepwise discriminant analysis. Open-ended questions were transcribed and analyzed using open, axial, and selective coding procedures. Member checks and peer debriefing techniques ensured trustworthiness of the study. Pearson correlations identified moderate relationships among motivation and clinical integration (r = 0.515, P motivation and academic integration (r = 0.509, P motivation (F(1,121) = 68.887, P motivation was the strongest predictor of persistence in athletic training education, accounting for 37.2% of the variance between groups. The theoretic model accurately classified 95.7% of the seniors and 53.8% of the major changers. A common theme emerging from the

  11. Changes in Body Composition and Strength of Female Athletes on Two Different Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyster, Nancy

    Thirty-one championship caliber women athletes participating on varsity teams at Ohio State University were trained using two different conditioning programs, in an attempt to determine the physiological outcomes of weight training versus cardiovascular-oriented conditioning. Fourteen tennis players followed a program of high-resistance weight…

  12. Training program attracts work and health researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skakon, Janne

    2007-01-01

    to examining work disability prevention issues. An innovative program that attracts international students, the Work Disability Prevention Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Strategic Training Program, aims to build research capacity in young researchers and to create a strong network that examines...

  13. ARL/OMS Consultant Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euster, Joanne R.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Academic Library Consultant Training Program begun in 1979, sponsored by Office of Management Studies (OMS) and designed to provide 80 consultants to aid academic libraries in improving performance. Viewpoints are included from OMS Director and participants concerning program objectives, trainee selection, workshops, internships, and the…

  14. The Skills Enhancement Training Program. Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food and Beverage Workers Union, Local 32, Washington, DC.

    This report describes a joint labor-management workplace literacy program called SET (Skills Enhancement Training) that targeted the more than 2,000 unionized employees of food service contractors at U.S. government institutions in Washington, D.C. Nineteen classes were offered and a total of 191 people self-selected themselves into the program.…

  15. Metabolic Response to Four Weeks of Muscular Endurance Resistance Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Farrell III

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous investigations have shown that muscular endurance resistance training (MERT is conducive in improving the onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA. However, the metabolic response and time course for adaption is still unclear. Objective: The aims of the current study were to evaluate and track the metabolic response to an individual session of MERT as well as to assess performance adaptations of supplementing an aerobic exercise training program with four weeks of MERT. Methods: Seventeen aerobically active men were randomly assigned to either the experimental (EX or control group (CON, 9 EX and 8 CON. Baseline measures included a graded exercise test (GXT and 1-repetition maximum (1RM testing for leg press (LP, leg curl (LC, and leg extension (LE. CON continued their regular aerobic activity while the EX supplemented their regular aerobic exercise with 4 weeks of MERT. Results: No significant group differences were observed for all pre-training variables. Following four weeks of training no significant differences in cardiorespiratory or metabolic variables were observed for either group. However, significant improvements in LC and LE 1-RM were observed in EX compared to CON. Substantial accumulations in blood lactate were observed following each MERT session. Conclusion: Four weeks of MERT did not improve cardiorespiratory or metabolic variables, but did significantly improve LC and LE. MERT was also observed to induce a blood lactate response similar to that of HIIT. These findings suggest greater than four weeks is need to see metabolic adaptations conducive for improved aerobic performance using MERT.

  16. Comparing the effects of two distinct eccentric modalities to traditional resistance training in resistance trained, higher functioning older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluchowski, Ashley; Dulson, Deborah; Merien, Fabrice; Plank, Lindsay; Harris, Nigel

    2017-11-01

    The effects of eccentric resistance exercise are of interest in the older adult cohort, but to our knowledge, there is no research on the relative effects of different eccentric modalities on a range of outcomes in higher functioning, resistance trained older adults. 33 resistance-trained older adults (aged 67±4.5years) were randomized into one of three supervised training groups: traditional (TRE), eccentric only (ERE) or eccentrically biased resistance exercise (EBRE) on a 45°, plate-loaded leg press machine. Participants trained twice per week with maximal strength, functional capacity, body composition and blood biomarkers measured before and after the eight-week intervention. Both eccentric and concentric strength, and important functional tasks for independent living significantly improved independent of group. Body composition and blood biomarkers were found to significantly improve in the EBRE group only however, no statistical differences were found between groups. Compared to traditional resistance training, the two eccentric modalities investigated here were equally effective for improvements in maximum muscular strength, functional capacity, body composition and metabolic biomarkers. When training the resistance trained older adult, very heavy isoinertial external loads (at least 70% of one repetition maximum) are effective irrespective of contraction mode. With heavy strength training, resistance trained older adults can continue to expect improvements in health and function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical training: a simulation program for phlebotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araki Toshitaka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Basic clinical skills training in the Japanese medical education system has traditionally incorporated on-the-job training with patients. Recently, the complementary use of simulation techniques as part of this training has gained popularity. It is not known, however, whether the participants view this new type of education program favorably; nor is the impact of this program known. In this study we developed a new simulation-based training program in phlebotomy for new medical residents and assessed their satisfaction with the program Methods The education program comprised two main components: simulator exercise sessions and the actual drawing of blood from other trainees. At the end of the session, we surveyed participant sentiment regarding the program. Results There were 43 participants in total. In general, they were highly satisfied with the education program, with all survey questions receiving scores of 3 or more on a scale of 1–5 (mean range: 4.3 – 4.8, with 5 indicating the highest level of satisfaction. Additionally, their participation as a 'patient' for their co-trainees was undertaken willingly and was deemed to be a valuable experience. Conclusion We developed and tested an education program using a simulator for blood collection. We demonstrated a high satisfaction level among the participants for this unique educational program and expect that it will improve medical training, patient safety, and quality of care. The development and dissemination of similar educational programs involving simulation for other basic clinical skills will be undertaken in the future.

  18. Dealing with Learner Resistance to Technology-Delivered Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of student resistance to technology-delivered training focuses on strategies at the IRS (Internal Revenue Service) that overcame learner resistance by maintaining a personal relationship with each student and flexibly addressing each student's personal style and concerns. Considers reasons for student resistance and the continued need…

  19. Intermittent hypoxic resistance training: is metabolic stress the key moderator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brendan R; Slattery, Katie M; Dascombe, Ben J

    2015-02-01

    Traditionally, researchers and practitioners have manipulated acute resistance exercise variables to elicit the desired responses to training. However, recent research indicates that altering the muscular environment during resistance training, namely by implementing a hypoxic stimulus, can augment muscle hypertrophy and strength. Intermittent hypoxic resistance training (IHRT), whereby participants inspire hypoxic air during resistance training, has been previously demonstrated to increase muscle cross-sectional area and maximum strength by significantly greater amounts than the equivalent training in normoxia. However, some recent evidence has provided conflicting results, reporting that the use of systemic hypoxia during resistance training provided no added benefit. While the definitive mechanisms that may augment muscular responses to IHRT are not yet fully understood, an increased metabolic stress is thought to be important for moderating many downstream processes related to hypertrophy. It is likely that methodological differences between conflicting IHRT studies have resulted in different degrees of metabolic stress during training, particularly when considering the inter-set recovery intervals used. Given that the most fundamental physiological stresses resulting from hypoxia are disturbances to oxidative metabolism, it becomes apparent that resistance training may only benefit from additional hypoxia if the exercise is structured to elicit a strong metabolic response. We hypothesize that for IHRT to be more effective in producing muscular hypertrophy and increasing strength than the equivalent normoxic training, exercise should be performed with relatively brief inter-set recovery periods, with the aim of providing a potent metabolic stimulus to enhance anabolic responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Predictors of a successful implementation of an ergonomic training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korunka, Christian; Dudak, Elisabeth; Molnar, Martina; Hoonakker, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Job, organizational and individual predictors of a successful implementation of an ergonomic training program were evaluated in a single-case study. The conceptual model of learning transfer of Baldwin and Ford (1988) was adapted for an ergonomic context. 116 employees in a large production company underwent a comprehensive ergonomic training. Transfer of training into practice was measured by the number of ergonomic improvements which were realized in the company in the years after the training. Job, organizational and individual variables explained 35% of the variance of learning transfer in to the organization. Psycho-social resistance attitudes and management support were found to be the most important predictors of implementation failure and success. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An examination of training on the VertiMax resisted jumping device for improvements in lower body power in highly trained college athletes .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, Matthew R; Peterson, Mark D; Oliverson, Jeff R; Ayllón, Fernando Naclerio; Potenziano, Ben J

    2008-05-01

    Training to develop superior muscular power has become a key component to most progressive sport conditioning programs. Conventional resistance training, plyometrics, and speed/agility modalities have all been employed in an effort to realize superlative combinations of training stimuli. New training devices such as the VertiMax resisted jump trainer are marketed as a means of improving lower body reactive power. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the VertiMax, in combination with traditional training modalities, for improvements in lower body power among highly trained athletes. Forty men and women Division I collegiate athletes representing the sports of baseball, basketball, soccer, gymnastics, and track completed a 12-week mixed-methods training program. Two groups were constructed with both groups performing the same conventional resistance training and strength training exercises. The training control group performed traditional plyometric exercises while the experimental group performed similar loaded jump training on the VertiMax. Lower body power was measured before and after the training program by the TENDO FiTROdyne Powerlizer and statistically compared for differences between groups. Data analyses identified a significant (p training alone (effect size = 0.09). These data convincingly demonstrate that the VertiMax represents an effective strategy for developing lower body power among trained college athletes, when combined with traditional strength and conditioning approaches.

  2. Effects of resistance training on jumping performance in pre-adolescent rhythmic gymnasts: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Marina; Battaglia, Claudia; Fiorilli, Giovanni; Innocenti, Giovanni; Iuliano, Enzo; Aquino, Giovanna; Calcagno, Giuseppe; Giombini, Arrigo; Di Cagno, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of two different resistance training programs on lower limb explosive and reactive strength in young female athletes. Fifty seven rhythmic gymnasts were randomly assigned to unspecific resistance training with dumbbells (12 repetition maximum squats) (n = 19; age = 12.0 +/- 1.8 years) or to specific resistance training with weighted belts (6% of body mass; n = 18; age = 11.9 +/- 1.0 years). Squat jump test, counter movement jump test, hopping test, flexibility of the hip, and anthropometric measures were assessed before and after six weeks training. The main result was that both unspecific resistance training and specific resistance training protocols positively affected the jumping performance, with an increase of the lower limb explosive strength of 6-7%, with no side effects. Counter movement jump flight time increased significantly (p rhythmic gymnastics training enhance jumping ability in young female athletes.

  3. Resistance training and cardiac hypertrophy: unravelling the training effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haykowsky, Mark J; Dressendorfer, Rudolph; Taylor, Dylan; Mandic, Sandra; Humen, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    Resistance training (RT) is a popular method of conditioning to enhance sport performance as well as an effective form of exercise to attenuate the age-mediated decline in muscle strength and mass. Although the benefits of RT on skeletal muscle morphology and function are well established, its effect on left ventricular (LV) morphology remains equivocal. Some investigations have found that RT is associated with an obligatory increase in LV wall thickness and mass with minimal alteration in LV internal cavity dimension, an effect called concentric hypertrophy. However, others report that short- (18 years) RT does not alter LV morphology, arguing that concentric hypertrophy is not an obligatory adaptation secondary to this form of exertion. This disparity between studies on whether RT consistently results in cardiac hypertrophy could be caused by: (i) acute cardiopulmonary mechanisms that minimise the increase in transmural pressure (i.e. ventricular pressure minus intrathoracic pressure) and LV wall stress during exercise; (ii) the underlying use of anabolic steroids by the athletes; or (iii) the specific type of RT performed. We propose that when LV geometry is altered after RT, the pattern is usually concentric hypertrophy in Olympic weightlifters. However, the pattern of eccentric hypertrophy (increased LV mass secondary to an increase in diastolic internal cavity dimension and wall thickness) is not uncommon in bodybuilders. Of particular interest, nearly 40% of all RT athletes have normal LV geometry, and these athletes are typically powerlifters. RT athletes who use anabolic steroids have been shown to have significantly higher LV mass compared with drug-free sport-matched athletes. This brief review will sort out some of the factors that may affect the acute and chronic outcome of RT on LV morphology. In addition, a conceptual framework is offered to help explain why cardiac hypertrophy is not always found in RT athletes.

  4. Biology of Breast Cancer: A Predoctoral Training Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maihle, Nita

    1998-01-01

    .... To date, 16 trainees have matriculated into this new training program. Two trainees have successfully completed this training program and have left the Mayo Clinic to continue their training/careers in breast cancer research...

  5. Region specific patella tendon hypertrophy in humans following resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M.; Reitelseder, S; Pedersen, T.G.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine if cross-sectional area (CSA) differs along the length of the human patellar tendon (PT), and if there is PT hypertrophy in response to resistance training. METHODS: Twelve healthy young men underwent baseline and post-training assessments. Maximal isometric knee extension strength......, subjects performed 12 weeks of heavy resistance knee extension training with one leg (Heavy-leg), and light resistance knee extension training with the other leg (Light-leg). RESULTS: The MVC increased for heavy-leg (15 +/- 4%, P .... CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this study is the first to report tendon hypertrophy following resistance training. Further, the data show that the human PT CSA varies along the length of the tendon....

  6. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    brief description of research in the la boratories of each University of Iowa mentor. At this point in time the program is 8 weeks long...www.uihealthcare.com/depts/med/urology/urolo gymds/luo.html A major research project in our la boratory is to develop a novel therapeutic...wright.shtml?menu =1&tab=facultyTab The Wright Labo ratory is focuse d on defining the composition, activity, and overall cellul ar function of

  7. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    the research program by each mentor will certainly produce important research findings, aided in part by the summer research of...our "translational" research in the form of clinical trials of our adenovirus vaccine in men with prostate cancer. Important in these trials is the ...epidemiology, and treatment. Living in Iowa City for the Summer Housing and Meals - All students will be housed in the one of the residence halls on the

  8. The effects of resistance training on explosive strength indicators in adolescent basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Eduardo J A M; Janeira, Manuel A A S

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a lower- and upper-body 10-week in-season resistance training program on explosive strength development in young basketball players. Twenty-five adolescent male athletes, aged 14-15 years old, were randomly assigned to an experimental group (EG; n = 15) and a control group (CG; n = 10). The subjects were assessed at baseline and after training for squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), Abalakov test, drop jump, and seated medicine ball throw (MBT). The EG showed significant increases (p training program with moderate volume and intensity loads increased vertical jump and MBT performance in adolescent male basketball players. Coaches should know that such a short resistance training program specifically designed for young basketball players induce increased explosivity levels, which are essential to a better basketball performance, with no extra overload on adolescents' skeletal muscle development.

  9. Nucleoelectric energy training programs in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanarro, A.; Izquierdo, L.

    1977-01-01

    The introduction of nucleoelectric energy in Spain is developing very rapidly. The nuclear power installed in Spain at the present time is 1,1 GWe and it is expected to increase to 8 GWe in 1980 and to 28 GWe in 1990. Spanish industry and technology are also rapidly increasing their participation in building nuclear stations, in manufacturing the necessary components and in the activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle. All of this requires properly trained personnel which is estimated at approximately 1200 high-level technicians, 1100 medium-level technicians and 1500 technical assistants by 1980. This personnel is trained: a) In engineering schools; b) In the Nuclear Studies Institute; and c) In the electric companies with nuclear programs. The majority of the high-level engineering schools in the Country include physics and basic nuclear technology courses in their programs. Some of them have an experimental low-power nuclear reactor. The Nuclear Studies Institute is an official organism depending on the Nuclear Energy Commission responsible, among other subjects, of training personnel for the peaceful use and development of nuclear energy in the Country. The electric companies also participate in training personnel for future nuclear stations and they plan to have advanced simulators of the PWR and BWR type stations for operator training. The report deals with the personnel requirement forecasts and describes the personnel training programs [es

  10. The Effects of Individualized Resistance Strength Programs on Knee Muscular Imbalances in Junior Elite Soccer Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwowski, Robert; Jadczak, Łukasz; Hejna, Rafał; Wieczorek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a resistance training program on the muscular strength of soccer players’ knees that initially presented unilateral and bilateral differences. For this study, a team of 24 male well-trained junior soccer players was divided into two strength program training groups: a Resistance Training Control Group (RTCG) composed of 10 players that did not have muscular imbalances and a Resistance Training Experimental Group (RTEG) composed of 14 players that had muscular imbalances. All players followed a resistance training program for six weeks, two times per week, during the transition period. The program of individualized strength training consisted of two parts. The first part, which was identical in terms of the choice of training loads, was intended for both training groups and contained two series of exercises including upper and lower body exercises. The second part of the program was intended only for RTEG and consisted of two additional series for the groups of muscles that had identified unilateral and bilateral differences. The applied program showed various directions in the isokinetic profile of changes. In the case of RTCG, the adaptations related mainly to the quadriceps muscle (the peak torque (PT) change for the dominant leg was statistically significant (p soccer players. PMID:26630271

  11. Effect of combined aerobic and resistance training in body composition of obese postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício E. Rossi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a 16-week program of combined aerobic and resistance training on the body composition of postmenopausal women who are obese. The participants were divided into two groups: training group (TG, n = 37 and non-trained control group (CG, n = 18. The trunk fat, fat mass, percentage of fat mass and fat-free mass were estimated using DXA. Three nonconsecutive 24-hour dietary recalls were conducted. The training protocol consisted of 50 minutes of resistance training followed by 30 minutes of aerobic training. After the 16-week training program, differences were observed in trunk fat (CG= 0.064 x TG= -0.571 Kg; p-value = .020, fat mass (CG= -0.088 x TG= -1.037 Kg; p-value = .020 and fat-free mass (CG= -0.388 x TG= 1.049 Kg; p = .001. Therefore, a 16-week program of systematic combined aerobic and resistance training in obese postmenopausal women was effective in improving fat-free mass and decreasing both whole and abdominal adiposity.

  12. Short radiological emergency response training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.D.; Greenhouse, N.A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents an outline of a radiological emergency response training program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the health physics and safety training staff. This course is given to groups from local, county, state, and federal agencies and industrial organizations. It is normally three days in length, although the structure is flexible to accommodate individual needs and prior training. An important feature of the course is an emergency exercise utilizing a short lived radionuclide to better simulate real accident conditions. Groups are encouraged to use their own instruments to gain better familiarity with their operating characteristics under field conditions. Immediately following the exercise, a critical review of the students' performance is conducted

  13. Integer programming of cement distribution by train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indarsih

    2018-01-01

    Cement industry in Central Java distributes cement by train to meet daily demand in Yogyakarta and Central Java area. There are five destination stations. For each destination station, there is a warehouse to load cements. Decision maker of cement industry have a plan to redesign the infrastructure and transportation system. The aim is to determine how many locomotives, train wagons, and containers and how to arrange train schedules with subject to the delivery time. For this purposes, we consider an integer programming to minimize the total of operational cost. Further, we will discuss a case study and the solution the problem can be calculated by LINGO software.

  14. 25 CFR 26.30 - Does the Job Training Program provide part-time training or short-term training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does the Job Training Program provide part-time training or short-term training? 26.30 Section 26.30 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Training Services § 26.30 Does the Job Training...

  15. Feminist self-defense and resistance training for college students: a critical review and recommendations for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidycz, Christine A; Dardis, Christina M

    2014-10-01

    There remains resistance to feminist self-defense and resistance training programming for women, despite (a) documented effectiveness of rape resistance strategies in avoiding rape, (b) consistently high rates of sexual victimization on college campuses, and (c) limited evidence of lasting change in sexual assault perpetration reduction within existing men's prevention programs. The current article seeks to discuss (1) the rationale for feminist self-defense and resistance training for women, (2) key components of feminist self-defense and resistance training, (3) barriers to its implementation, (4) outcomes of self-defense and resistance training programming, and (5) recommendations for future work. Such suggestions include increasing funding for large-scale self-defense and rape resistance outcome research to examine program effectiveness. Specifically, outcome research that examines the role of contextual factors (e.g., alcohol use) and women's victimization histories is needed. Finally, self-defense training and resistance training should be combined with bystander intervention and men's programs with the goal of providing synergistic effects on rape reduction. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Dynamic resistance training decreases sympathetic tone in hypertensive ovariectomized rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimojo, G.L.; Palma, R.K.; Brito, J.O.; Sanches, I.C. [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Programa de Ciências da Reabilitação, Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Irigoyen, M.C. [Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); De Angelis, K. [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Programa de Ciências da Reabilitação, Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-27

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise training on hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic control in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (SC), sedentary hypertensive (SH), sedentary hypertensive ovariectomized (SHO), and resistance-trained hypertensive ovariectomized (RTHO). Resistance exercise training was performed on a vertical ladder (5 days/week, 8 weeks) at 40-60% maximal load. Direct arterial pressure was recorded. Vagal and sympathetic tones were measured by heart rate (HR) responses to methylatropine (3 mg/kg, iv) and propranolol (4 mg/kg, iv). Ovariectomy resulted in additional increases in blood pressure in hypertensive rats and was associated with decreased vagal tone. Resistance exercise trained rats had lower mean arterial pressure than untrained rats (RTHO: 159±2.2 vs SHO: 177±3.4 mmHg), as well as resting bradycardia (RTHO: 332±9.0 vs SHO: 356±5 bpm). Sympathetic tone was also lower in the trained group. Moreover, sympathetic tone was positively correlated with resting HR (r=0.7, P<0.05). The additional arterial pressure increase in hypertensive rats caused by ovarian hormone deprivation was attenuated by moderate-intensity dynamic resistance training. This benefit may be associated with resting bradycardia and reduced cardiac sympathetic tone after training, which suggests potential benefits of resistance exercise for the management of hypertension after ovarian hormone deprivation.

  17. Dynamic resistance training decreases sympathetic tone in hypertensive ovariectomized rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimojo, G.L.; Palma, R.K.; Brito, J.O.; Sanches, I.C.; Irigoyen, M.C.; De Angelis, K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise training on hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic control in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (SC), sedentary hypertensive (SH), sedentary hypertensive ovariectomized (SHO), and resistance-trained hypertensive ovariectomized (RTHO). Resistance exercise training was performed on a vertical ladder (5 days/week, 8 weeks) at 40-60% maximal load. Direct arterial pressure was recorded. Vagal and sympathetic tones were measured by heart rate (HR) responses to methylatropine (3 mg/kg, iv) and propranolol (4 mg/kg, iv). Ovariectomy resulted in additional increases in blood pressure in hypertensive rats and was associated with decreased vagal tone. Resistance exercise trained rats had lower mean arterial pressure than untrained rats (RTHO: 159±2.2 vs SHO: 177±3.4 mmHg), as well as resting bradycardia (RTHO: 332±9.0 vs SHO: 356±5 bpm). Sympathetic tone was also lower in the trained group. Moreover, sympathetic tone was positively correlated with resting HR (r=0.7, P<0.05). The additional arterial pressure increase in hypertensive rats caused by ovarian hormone deprivation was attenuated by moderate-intensity dynamic resistance training. This benefit may be associated with resting bradycardia and reduced cardiac sympathetic tone after training, which suggests potential benefits of resistance exercise for the management of hypertension after ovarian hormone deprivation

  18. Physiological changes with periodized resistance training in women tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, William J; Hakkinen, Keijo; Triplett-Mcbride, N Travis; Fry, Andrew C; Koziris, L Perry; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Bauer, Jeffrey E; Volek, Jeff S; McConnell, Tim; Newton, Robert U; Gordon, Scott E; Cummings, Don; Hauth, John; Pullo, Frank; Lynch, J Michael; Fleck, Steven J; Mazzetti, Scott A; Knuttgen, Howard G

    2003-01-01

    To compare the physiological and performance adaptations between periodized and nonperiodized resistance training in women collegiate tennis athletes. Thirty women (19 +/- 1 yr) were assigned to either a periodized resistance training group (P), nonperiodized training group (NV), or a control group (C). Assessments for body composition, anaerobic power, VO2(max), speed, agility, maximal strength, jump height, tennis-service velocity, and resting serum hormonal concentrations were performed before and after 4, 6, and 9 months of resistance training performed 2-3 d.wk (-1). Nine months of resistance training resulted in significant increases in fat-free mass; anaerobic power; grip strength; jump height; one-repetition maximum (1-RM) leg press, bench press, and shoulder press; serve, forehand, and backhand ball velocities; and resting serum insulin-like growth factor-1, testosterone, and cortisol concentrations. Percent body fat and VO2(max) decreased significantly in the P and NV groups after training. During the first 6 months, periodized resistance training elicited significantly greater increases in 1-RM leg press (9 +/- 2 vs 4.5 +/- 2%), bench press (22 +/- 5 vs 11 +/- 8%), and shoulder press (24 +/- 7 vs 18 +/- 6%) than the NV group. The absolute 1-RM leg press and shoulder press values in the P group were greater than the NV group after 9 months. Periodized resistance training also resulted in significantly greater improvements in jump height (50 +/- 9 vs 37 +/- 7%) and serve (29 +/- 5 vs 16 +/- 4%), forehand (22 +/- 3 vs 17 +/- 3%), and backhand ball velocities (36 +/- 4 vs 14 +/- 4%) as compared with nonperiodized training after 9 months. These data demonstrated that periodization of resistance training over 9 months was superior for enhancing strength and motor performance in collegiate women tennis players.

  19. Comparison of Periodized and Non-Periodized Resistance Training on Maximal Strength: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tyler D; Tolusso, Danilo V; Fedewa, Michael V; Esco, Michael R

    2017-10-01

    Periodization is a logical method of organizing training into sequential phases and cyclical time periods in order to increase the potential for achieving specific performance goals while minimizing the potential for overtraining. Periodized resistance training plans are proposed to be superior to non-periodized training plans for enhancing maximal strength. The primary aim of this study was to examine the previous literature comparing periodized resistance training plans to non-periodized resistance training plans and determine a quantitative estimate of effect on maximal strength. All studies included in the meta-analysis met the following inclusion criteria: (1) peer-reviewed publication; (2) published in English; (3) comparison of a periodized resistance training group to a non-periodized resistance training group; (4) maximal strength measured by 1-repetition maximum (1RM) squat, bench press, or leg press. Data were extracted and independently coded by two authors. Random-effects models were used to aggregate a mean effect size (ES), 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and potential moderators. The cumulative results of 81 effects gathered from 18 studies published between 1988 and 2015 indicated that the magnitude of improvement in 1RM following periodized resistance training was greater than non-periodized resistance training (ES = 0.43, 95% CI 0.27-0.58; P training status (β = -0.59; P = 0.0305), study length (β = 0.03; P = 0.0067), and training frequency (β = 0.46; P = 0.0123) were associated with a change in 1RM. These results indicate that undulating programs were more favorable for strength gains. Improvements in 1RM were greater among untrained participants. Additionally, higher training frequency and longer study length were associated with larger improvements in 1RM. These results suggest that periodized resistance training plans have a moderate effect on 1RM compared to non-periodized training plans. Variation in training stimuli

  20. Effects of arachidonic acid supplementation on training adaptations in resistance-trained males

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwood Mike; Rasmussen Chris; Cooke Matthew; Harvey Travis; Wilborn Colin D; Campbell Bill; Taylor Lem W; Kerksick Chad M; Iosia Mike; Roberts Michael D; Wilson Ronald; Jitomir Jean; Willoughby Darryn; Kreider Richard B

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background To determine the impact of AA supplementation during resistance training on body composition, training adaptations, and markers of muscle hypertrophy in resistance-trained males. Methods In a randomized and double blind manner, 31 resistance-trained male subjects (22.1 ± 5.0 years, 180 ± 0.1 cm, 86.1 ± 13.0 kg, 18.1 ± 6.4% body fat) ingested either a placebo (PLA: 1 g·day-1 corn oil, n = 16) or AA (AA: 1 g·day-1 AA, n = 15) while participating in a standardized 4 day·week-...

  1. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grans, Camilla Figueiredo; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Abssamra, Marcos Elias Vergilino; Rocha, Leandro Yanase; Carrozzi, Nicolle Martins [Laboratório do Movimento Humano, Universidade São Judas Tadeu (USJT), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mostarda, Cristiano [Departamento de Educação Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão (UFMA), São Luís, MA (Brazil); Figueroa, Diego Mendrot [Laboratório de Hipertensão Experimental, Instituto do Coração (InCor), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Angelis, Kátia De [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Universidade Nove de Julho (Uninove), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia [Laboratório de Hipertensão Experimental, Instituto do Coração (InCor), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rodrigues, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.rodrigues@incor.usp.br [Laboratório do Movimento Humano, Universidade São Judas Tadeu (USJT), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats.

  2. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Figueiredo Grans

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. Objective: To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week. At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. Results: The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32% and trained infarcted (+46% in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%, myocardial performance index (-39% and systolic blood pressure (+6% improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%, as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46% in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Conclusion: Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats.

  3. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grans, Camilla Figueiredo; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Abssamra, Marcos Elias Vergilino; Rocha, Leandro Yanase; Carrozzi, Nicolle Martins; Mostarda, Cristiano; Figueroa, Diego Mendrot; Angelis, Kátia De; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Background Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. Objective To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. Results The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Conclusion Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats. PMID:25014059

  4. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grans, Camilla Figueiredo; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Abssamra, Marcos Elias Vergilino; Rocha, Leandro Yanase; Carrozzi, Nicolle Martins; Mostarda, Cristiano; Figueroa, Diego Mendrot; Angelis, Kátia De; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats

  5. Resistance training after myocardial infarction in rats: its role on cardiac and autonomic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grans, Camilla Figueiredo; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Abssamra, Marcos Elias Vergilino; Rocha, Leandro Yanase; Carrozzi, Nicolle Martins; Mostarda, Cristiano; Figueroa, Diego Mendrot; Angelis, Kátia De; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2014-07-01

    Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats.

  6. Effects of Classic Progressive Resistance Training Versus Eccentric-Enhanced Resistance Training in People With Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrocinio de Oliveira, Claudia Eliza; Moreira, Osvaldo Costa; Carrión-Yagual, Zoila Marilú; Medina-Pérez, Carlos; de Paz, José Antonio

    2017-11-27

    To compare the effects of classic progressive resistance training (PRT) versus eccentric strength-enhanced training (EST) on the performance of functional tests and different strength manifestations in the lower limb of people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Experimental trial. Strength training program. PwMS (N=52; 19 men, 33 women) belonging to MS associations from the Castilla y León, Spain. Participants were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: a control group that performed PRT or an experimental group that performed EST. In both groups, the knee extensor muscles were trained for 12 weeks. Before and after 12 weeks of training, maximal voluntary isometric contraction and 1 repetition maximum (1RM) of the knee extensors were evaluated, as were the Chair Stand Test (CST) and Timed 8-Foot Up and Go (TUG) functional tests. No differences were found between the groups in the initial values for different tests. Intragroup comparisons found significant differences in CST (F=69.4; P<.001), TUG (F=40.0; P<.001), and 1RM (F=57.8; P<.001). For intergroup comparisons, EST presented better results than PRT in the CST (EST, 4.7%±2.8%; PRT, 1.9%±2.8%; F=13.1; P=.001) and TUG (EST, -2.9±4.7; PRT, -.41±5.6; F=5.6; P=.022). In PwMS, EST leads to improvements in 1RM, TUG, and CST that are similar to those of PRT. However, for patients who participated in this study, the EST seems to promote a better transfer of strength adaptations to the functional tests, which are closer to daily-living activities. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. SEAFOOD MERCHANDISING, A GUIDE FOR TRAINING PROGRAMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BEAUMONT, JOHN A.

    GUIDELINES ARE SUGGESTED FOR THE PROMOTION AND ORGANIZATION OF TRAINING PROGRAMS THAT WILL AID IN THE ORDERLY DISTRIBUTION OF FISHERY PRODUCTS TO THE CONSUMER. THE MATERIAL WAS DEVELOPED AS A RESULT OF A RESEARCH PROJECT CONDUCTED BY THE EDUCATIONAL SERVICE BUREAU AND THE DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION SERVICE OF TEMPLE UNIVERSITY. CHAPTERS IN THE GUIDE…

  8. High School Weight Training: A Comprehensive Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscounte, Roger; Long, Ken

    1989-01-01

    Describes a weight training program, suitable for the general student population and the student-athlete, which is designed to produce improvement in specific, measurable areas including bench press (upper body), leg press (lower body), vertical jump (explosiveness); and 40-yard dash (speed). Two detailed charts are included, with notes on their…

  9. Counter Trafficking System Development "Analysis Training Program"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Dennis C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-12-01

    This document will detail the training curriculum for the Counter-Trafficking System Development (CTSD) Analysis Modules and Lesson Plans are derived from the United States Military, Department of Energy doctrine and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Global Security (GS) S Program.

  10. Evolution of GPU nuclear's training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, R.L.; Coe, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    GPU Nuclear Corporation (GPUN) manages the operators of Three Mile Island Unit 1 and Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Stations and the recovery activities at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 plant. From the time it was formed in January 1980 GPUN emphasized the use of behavioral learning objectives as the basis for all its training programs. This paper describes the evolution to a formalized performance based Training System Development (TSD) Process. The Training and Education Department staff increased from 10 in 1979 to the current 120 dedicated professionals, with a corresponding increase in facilities and acquisition of sophisticated Basic Principles Training Simulators and a Three Mile Island Unit 1 control Room Replica Simulator. The impact of these developments and achievement of full INPO accreditation are discussed and related to plant performance improvements

  11. 76 FR 2147 - UAW-Chrysler National Training Center Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Detroit, MI; UAW...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ...-Chrysler National Training Center Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Detroit, MI; UAW-Chrysler Technical Training Center Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Warren, MI; Notice of Revised... investigation, the Department confirmed that the proportion of Technology Training Joint Programs Staff...

  12. The interactions between hemostasis and resistance training: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Dahan da Cunha; Neto, Frederico Ribeiro; de Santana, Frederico Santos; da Silva, Renato André Sousa; dos Santos-Neto, Leopoldo; Balsamo, Sandor

    2012-01-01

    Physical inactivity is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is strongly associated with changes in arterial structure. Regular physical activity and exercise contributes to the prevention of coronary artery disease. Therefore, cardiovascular and resistance training improve hemostatic parameters and promote a less thrombotic blood profile. This review highlights the studies, mechanisms, and outcomes relating to the effectiveness of resistance training on the process of hemostasis. The Pubmed, Scopus, Medline, Scielo, Lilacs, Ibecs, and Cochrane databases were used to locate the original articles. Seventeen studies were found during the research process. Of these, ten articles were excluded. Those protocols using a high volume of training for young adults showed a greater fibrinolytic response, and training protocols with intensities above 80% of 1 maximum repetition showed an increased platelet activity. In subjects with coronary artery disease, just one session of resistance training resulted in improvement in the fibrinolytic system (tissue plasminogen activator) without raising potential thrombotic markers. PMID:22419885

  13. Muscle fiber size increases following resistance training in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, U; Stenager, Egon; Jakobsen, J

    2010-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that lower body progressive resistance training (PRT) leads to an increase of the muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) and a shift in the proportion of fiber types in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).......To test the hypothesis that lower body progressive resistance training (PRT) leads to an increase of the muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) and a shift in the proportion of fiber types in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS)....

  14. International survey of peritoneal dialysis training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Judith; Price, Valerie; Figueiredo, Ana; Riemann, Aase; Leung, Dora

    2006-01-01

    To survey nurses around the world about current practices for peritoneal dialysis (PD) home training programs. Random sampling of nurses to complete a written survey from the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis Nursing Liaison Committee. United States, Canada, South America (Brazil, Columbia), The Netherlands, Hong Kong. Surveys and responses were sent by fax whenever possible, or by regular mail, or hand carried, or conducted by telephone. Results were stratified by geographic areas as well as by cumulative responses and were expressed as medians with ranges. Kruskal-Wallis was used to evaluate differences in responses. Associations between variables were tested with Pearson correlation. Univariate regression analysis was used to evaluate the impact of variables on peritonitis rates. Variables with p training from a nurse colleague, 11% were guided by a corporate colleague, and 8% were simply self-taught. Clinics responding had a median of 30 PD patients (range 1-400) and reported they trained a median of 8 patients per year (range 0-86). Reported peritonitis rates were a median 0.46 per year or 1 episode every 26 months. Peritonitis rates, however, were not known by 53% of respondents. Total training time per patient had a very wide range of hours, from 6 to 96. There was no correlation between training time and peritonitis rates among the study respondents (p = 0.38), nor with any other variables. There is wide variation in practices for PD patient training programs within countries and around the world. Training time did not appear to be related to peritonitis rates. Randomized trials of training practices are needed to determine which approaches produce the best outcomes for patients.

  15. The influence of resistance training on the critical power function & time to fatigue at critical power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, D; Jenkins, D G

    1996-12-01

    The present study examined whether a six-week resistance training program would influence the critical power (CP) function, time to exhaustion (TE) at CP and/or peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak). The CP function is believed to provide an index of endurance ability (CP given by the slope), and anaerobic work capacity (the y-intercept). Eight healthy, untrained males undertook lower-body resistance training (90 min/day, 3-4 times/wk) for six weeks; eight controls refrained from resistance or endurance training for the same period. Before and immediately following the training period, subjects completed three trials to determine their CP function, a test of VO2 peak, a one-repetition maximum (1-RM) leg press test and TE at their CP. Training significantly increased both 1-RM leg press (28.6%, P 0.05) were found. Changes in the y-intercept following resistance training were negatively correlated with changes in the CP (r = -0.94, p < 0.05, N = 8). The present data show that the y-intercept of the CP function is sensitive to, and modified by, six weeks of resistance training. Given that resistance training had no significant influence on CP, TE at CP or VO2 peak, the present study has also shown that six weeks of resistance training will not alter indices of endurance ability. The negative relationship between changes in the y-intercept and CP exposes a potential limitation of the linear CP function when evaluating changes in endurance ability following an intervention which significantly alters the y-intercept.

  16. Health and fitness benefits of a resistance training intervention performed in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavanela, Plinio M; Crewther, Blair T; Lodo, Leandro; Florindo, Alex A; Miyabara, Elen H; Aoki, Marcelo S

    2012-03-01

    This study examined the effects of a workplace-based resistance training intervention on different health-, fitness-, and work-related measures in untrained men (bus drivers). The subjects were recruited from a bus company and divided into a training (n = 48) and control (n = 48) groups after initial prescreening. The training group performed a 24-week resistance training program, whereas the control group maintained their normal daily activities. Each group was assessed for body composition, blood pressure (BP), pain incidence, muscular endurance, and flexibility before and after the 24-week period. Work absenteeism was also recorded during this period and after a 12-week follow-up phase. In general, no body composition changes were identified in either group. In the training group, a significant reduction in BP and pain incidence, along with improvements in muscle endurance and flexibility were seen after 24 weeks (p training (vs. control) group during both the interventional and follow-up periods (p training intervention performed within the workplace improved different aspects of health and fitness in untrained men, thereby potentially providing other work-related benefits. Thus, both employers and employees may benefit from the setup, promotion, and support of a work-based physical activity program involving resistance training.

  17. 14 CFR 142.39 - Training program curriculum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program curriculum requirements... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES TRAINING CENTERS Aircrew Curriculum and Syllabus Requirements § 142.39 Training program curriculum requirements. Each training program curriculum...

  18. The effect of combined resisted agility and repeated sprint training vs. strength training on female elite soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalfawi, Shaher A I; Haugen, Thomas; Jakobsen, Tore A; Enoksen, Eystein; Tønnessen, Espen

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of in-season combined resisted agility and repeated sprint training with strength training on soccer players' agility, linear single sprint speed, vertical jump, repeated sprint ability (RSA), and aerobic capacity. Twenty well-trained elite female soccer players of age ± SD 19.4 ± 4.4 years volunteered to participate in this study. The participants were randomly assigned to either the agility and repeated sprint training group or to the strength training group. All the participants were tested before and after a 10-week specific conditioning program. The pretest and posttest were conducted on 3 separate days with 1 day of low-intensity training in between. Test day 1 consisted of squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and RSA. Test day 2 consisted of a 40-m maximal linear sprint and an agility test, whereas a Beep test was conducted on test day 3 to assess aerobic capacity. The agility and repeated sprint training implemented in this study did not have a significant effect on agility, although there was a tendency for moderate improvements from 8.23 ± 0.32 to 8.06 ± 0.21 seconds (d = 0.8). There was a significant (p agility performance (d = -0.1). No between-group differences were observed. The outcome of this study indicates the importance of a well-planned program of conditioning that does not result in a decreased performance of the players, the great importance of strength and conditioning specialist in implementing the training program, and the importance of choosing the time of the year to implement such conditioning training programs. However, the fact that the present training program did not cause any decline in performance indicates that it is useful in maintaining the soccer players' physical performance during the competition period.

  19. Evaluation of Airport Security Training Programs: Perspectives and Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Woohyun; Masacci, Fabio; De Gramatica, Martina; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Pollini, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    While many governments and airport operators have emphasized the importance of security training and committed a large amount of budget to security training programs, the implementation of security training programs was not proactive but reactive. Moreover, most of the security training programs were employed as a demand or a trendchasing activity from the government. In order to identify issues in airport security training and to develop desirable security training procedures in ...

  20. The Effects of Individualized Resistance Strength Programs on Knee Muscular Imbalances in Junior Elite Soccer Players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Śliwowski

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a resistance training program on the muscular strength of soccer players' knees that initially presented unilateral and bilateral differences. For this study, a team of 24 male well-trained junior soccer players was divided into two strength program training groups: a Resistance Training Control Group (RTCG composed of 10 players that did not have muscular imbalances and a Resistance Training Experimental Group (RTEG composed of 14 players that had muscular imbalances. All players followed a resistance training program for six weeks, two times per week, during the transition period. The program of individualized strength training consisted of two parts. The first part, which was identical in terms of the choice of training loads, was intended for both training groups and contained two series of exercises including upper and lower body exercises. The second part of the program was intended only for RTEG and consisted of two additional series for the groups of muscles that had identified unilateral and bilateral differences. The applied program showed various directions in the isokinetic profile of changes. In the case of RTCG, the adaptations related mainly to the quadriceps muscle (the peak torque (PT change for the dominant leg was statistically significant (p < 0.05. There were statistically significant changes in RTEG (p < 0.05 related to PT for the hamstrings in both legs, which in turn resulted in an increase in the conventional hamstring/quadriceps ratio (H/Q. It is interesting that the statistically significant (p < 0.05 changes were noted only for the dominant leg. No statistically significant changes in bilateral differences (BD were noted in either group. These results indicate that individualized resistance training programs could provide additional benefits to traditional strength training protocols to improve muscular imbalances in post-adolescent soccer players.

  1. Influence of resistance exercise training on glucose control in women with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenicchia, L M; Kanaley, J A; Azevedo, J L; Miller, C S; Weinstock, R S; Carhart, R L; Ploutz-Snyder, L L

    2004-03-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of acute and chronic resistance training on glucose and insulin responses to a glucose load in women with type 2 diabetes. Subjects consisted of type 2 diabetic women (n = 7) and age-matched controls (n = 8) with normal glucose tolerance. All subjects participated in 3 oral glucose tolerance tests: pretraining, 12 to 24 hours after the first exercise session (acute) and 60 to 72 hours after the final training session (chronic). Exercise training consisted of a whole body resistance exercise program using weight-lifting machines 3 days per week for 6 weeks. Resistance training was effective in increasing strength of all muscle groups in all subjects. Integrated glucose concentration expressed as area under the curve (AUC) was 3,355.0 +/- 324.6 mmol/L. min pretraining, improved significantly (P benefits, individuals must follow a regular schedule that includes daily exercise.

  2. Effect of Resistance Training on Hematological Blood Markers in Older Men and Women: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Bobeuf

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the effects of resistance training on hematological blood markers in older individuals. Twenty-nine men and women participated to this study. Subjects were randomized in 2 groups: (1 control (n=13 and (2 resistance training (n=16. At baseline and after the intervention, subjects were submitted to a blood sample to determine their hematological profile (red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelets, leukocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, red cell distribution width. At baseline, no difference was observed between groups. Moreover, we found no significant difference after the intervention on any of these markers. A 6-month resistance program in healthy older individuals seems to have no beneficial nor deleterious effects on hematological blood parameters. However, resistance training was well tolerated and should be recommended for other health purposes. Further studies are needed to confirm these results in a large population.

  3. Neuroscience Knowledge Among Athletic Training Professional Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M. Seavey

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Journal of Sports Medicine & Allied Health Sciences, 2016;2(1 ISSN: 2376-9289 Seavey, Beatty, Lenhoff, & Krause. Neuroscience Knowledge Among Athletic Training Professional Programs Neuroscience Knowledge Among Athletic Training Professional Programs Douglas M. Seavey, AT, Christopher T. Beatty, Tyler L. Lenhoff, & Bentley A. Krause, PhD, AT Ohio University, College of Health Sciences & Professions, Division of Athletic Training. ____________________________________________________________________ Context: Athletic trainers (ATs, more than any other healthcare professional, has expertise in areas of on-field assessment and management of sport related concussion and spinal cord injury. A search of the key words “brain” (n=>100 or “spinal cord/spine” (n=~50 were identified in National Athletic Trainers’ Association Position Statements on Concussion and Spinal Cord Injury. However, a significant gap exists in the basic science knowledge of neuroscience and neuroanatomy. Objective: The goal of this study is to identify the basic science coursework in professional and post-professional athletic training curricula. Design and Setting: This is a descriptive, curricula analysis of CAATE Professional and Post-Professional Athletic Training Programs using web-based search and review. Participants: Curricula for accredited Professional (n=336 and Post-Professional (n=15 Athletic Training Programs were reviewed and analyzed to characteristics basic science content. Interventions: This web-based program review of CAATE standard course content and elective options occurred. Main Outcome Measures: Course titles, numbers and descriptions were accessed at CAATE.net and offerings of anatomy, gross anatomy, neuroanatomy and neuroscience, human physiology, exercise physiology, psychology, chemistry and physics content were quantified. Main outcome measures include frequencies and distributions of courses in each subject area. Results: We reviewed 309

  4. Design of All Digital Flight Program Training Desktop Application System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available All digital flight program training desktop application system operating conditions are simple. Can make the aircraft aircrew learning theory and operation training closely. Improve the training efficiency and effectiveness. This paper studies the application field and design requirements of flight program training system. Based on the WINDOWS operating system desktop application, the design idea and system architecture of the all digital flight program training system are put forward. Flight characteristics, key airborne systems and aircraft cockpit are simulated. Finally, By comparing flight training simulator and the specific script program training system, The characteristics and advantages of the training system are analyzed in this paper.

  5. The effects of concurrent resistance and endurance training follow a detraining period in elementary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Albano P; Marinho, Daniel A; Costa, Aldo M; Izquierdo, Mikel; Marques, Mário C

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of an 8-week training period of resistance training alone (GR), or combined resistance and endurance training (GCOM), followed by 12 weeks of detraining (DT) on body composition, explosive strength, and ·VO₂max adaptations in a large sample of adolescent school boys. Forty-two healthy boys recruited from a Portuguese public high school (age: 13.3 ± 1.04 years) were assigned to 2 experimental groups to train twice a week for 8 weeks: GR (n = 15), GCOM (n = 15), and a control group (GC: n = 12; no training program). Significant training-induced differences were observed in 1- and 3-kg medicine ball throw gains (GR: +10.3 and +9.8%, respectively; GCOM: +14.4 and +7%, respectively), whereas no significant changes were observed after a DT period in both the experimental groups. Significant training-induced gains in the height and length of the countermovement (vertical-and-horizontal) jumps were observed in both the experimental groups. No differences were perceived after a DT period in lower limb power. Time at 20 m decreased significantly for both intervention programs (GR: -11.5% and GCOM: -12.4%, training, the ·VO₂max increased only significantly for GCOM (4.6%, p = 0.01). A significant loss was observed after a DT period in GR but not in GCOM. Performing resistance and endurance training in the same workout does not impair strength development in young school boys. As expected, strength training by itself does not improve aerobic capacity. Our results also suggest that training program effects even persist at the end of the DT period.

  6. Academic training: Advanced lectures on multiprocessor programming

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme 31 October 1, 2 November 2011 from 11:00 to 12:00 -  IT Auditorium, Bldg. 31   Three classes (60 mins) on Multiprocessor Programming Prof. Dr. Christoph von Praun Georg-Simon-Ohm University of Applied Sciences Nuremberg, Germany This is an advanced class on multiprocessor programming. The class gives an introduction to principles of concurrent objects and the notion of different progress guarantees that concurrent computations can have. The focus of this class is on non-blocking computations, i.e. concurrent programs that do not make use of locks. We discuss the implementation of practical non-blocking data structures in detail. 1st class: Introduction to concurrent objects 2nd class: Principles of non-blocking synchronization 3rd class: Concurrent queues Brief Bio of Christoph von Praun Christoph worked on a variety of analysis techniques and runtime platforms for parallel programs. Hist most recent research studies programming models an...

  7. Native American Training Program in Petroleum Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Winifred M.; Kokesh, Judith H.

    1999-04-27

    This report outlines a comprehensive training program for members of Native American tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The program has two components: short courses and internships. Programs are proposed for: (1) adult tribes representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings, setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry; (2) graduate and undergraduate college students who are tribal members and are studying in the appropriate fields; and (3) high school and middle school teachers, science teachers. Materials and program models already have been developed for some components of the projects. The plan is a coordinated, comprehensive effort to use existing resources to accomplish its goals. Partnerships will be established with the tribes, the BIA, tribal organizations, other government agencies, and the private sector to implement the program.

  8. Addressing muscle performance impairments in cerebral palsy: Implications for upper extremity resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Noelle G; Gannotti, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Case study and literature review. Muscle performance consists of not only strength but also muscle power, rate of force development, and endurance. Therefore, resistance training programs should address not only the force-generating capacity of the muscle but also the ability to produce force quickly. To discuss the National Strength and Conditioning Association's resistance training guidelines for youth as specifically related to optimal dosing for muscle strength versus muscle power. Dosing parameters of frequency, volume, intensity, duration, and velocity are discussed independently for strength and power. We describe how resistance training principles can be applied to the upper extremity in CP through a case study. The case describes an individual with spastic CP, who has a severe motor disability and is non-ambulatory, but has been able to perform resistance training focused on speed, power, and strength. Recommendations to optimize the dosing of this individual's resistance training program are made. Copyright © 2015 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of resistance training on performance in previously trained endurance runners: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Ibañez, Manuel; Rodríguez-Pérez, Manuel

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this work was to identify, synthesize and evaluate the results of randomized controlled trials examining the effects of resistance training on performance indicators in previously trained endurance runners. A database search was carried out in PubMed, Science Direct, OvidSPMedLine, Wiley, Web of Science, ProQuest and Google Scholar. In accordance with the PRISMA checklist, 18 published articles dated prior to May 2016 involving 321 endurance runners were reviewed using the PEDro scale. Resistance training led to general improvements in muscular strength, running economy, muscle power factors, and direct performance in distances between 1,500 and 10,000 m. Such improvements were not accompanied by a significant increase in body mass or signs of overtraining. However, improvements did not occur in all cases, suggesting that they might depend on the specific characteristics of the resistance training applied. Although current evidence supports the effectiveness of resistance training to improve performance in already trained endurance runners, the methodological inconsistencies identified suggest that the results should be interpreted with caution. Future studies ought to investigate the benefits of resistance training in endurance runners while considering the existence of possible differentiated effects based on the specific characteristics of the resistance training carried out.

  10. The Effect of an Educational Program on Strength-Training Adherence in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Charilaos; Jager, Johnna M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a strength-training program combined with an educational intervention on resistance-training knowledge, adherence, psychological parameters, and functionality in older individuals residing in assisted living facilities. Twenty-four (mean age: 83.8 ± 8.0 years) participants were divided into…

  11. The influence of resistance training on the magnitude of change in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Obesity is a global health concern affecting all walks of life, with alarming prevalence in South African employees. Various companies have already implemented health promotion programs in order to improve employee health; however research focusing on the effect of a resistance training intervention in order to address ...

  12. Older Adults' Perceived Changes in Physical Self-Worth Associated with Resistance Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, Rylee A.; Cannon, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Using Sonstroem, Harlow, and Josephs' (1994) expanded version of the Exercise and Self-Esteem Model (EXSEM; Sonstroem & Morgan, 1989), we explored how 9 older adults (6 women and 3 men, aged 65-72 years) involved in a resistance training program experienced and perceived changes in physical self-worth (i.e., improved strength, functional…

  13. Play Therapy Training among School Psychology, Social Work, and School Counseling Graduate Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascarella, Christina Bechle

    2012-01-01

    This study examined play therapy training across the nation among school psychology, social work, and school counseling graduate training programs. It also compared current training to previous training among school psychology and school counseling programs. A random sample of trainers was selected from lists of graduate programs provided by…

  14. HEALS Hypertension Control Program: Training Church Members as Program Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodani, Sunita; Beayler, Irmatine; Lewis, Jennifer; Sowders, Lindsey A

    2014-01-01

    Health disparities related to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) including stroke have remained higher in the African-Americans (AAs) than in other populations. HEALS is a faith-based hypertension (HTN) control program modified according to AA community needs, and delivered by the church-lay members called church health advisors (CHAs). This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of training CHAs as HEALS program leaders. Four CHAs completed a 10-hour HEALS program training workshop at the Church, conducted by the nutrition experts. Workshop was evaluated by CHAs on their level of satisfaction, clarity of contents covered and comfort in delivery the program to the church congregation. The overall six main HEALS curriculum components were completed. Workshop was highly evaluated by CHAs on length of training, balance between content and skills development, and level of satisfaction with program delivery. Church-based culturally modified health promotion interventions conducted by the community lay members may be a way to reduce health disparities in ethnic minorities.

  15. Model for behavior observation training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berghausen, P.E. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Continued behavior observation is mandated by ANSI/ANS 3.3. This paper presents a model for behavior observation training that is in accordance with this standard and the recommendations contained in US NRC publications. The model includes seventeen major topics or activities. Ten of these are discussed: Pretesting of supervisor's knowledge of behavior observation requirements, explanation of the goals of behavior observation programs, why behavior observation training programs are needed (legal and psychological issues), early indicators of emotional instability, use of videotaped interviews to demonstrate significant psychopathology, practice recording behaviors, what to do when unusual behaviors are observed, supervisor rationalizations for noncompliance, when to be especially vigilant, and prevention of emotional instability

  16. Training program attracts work and health researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skakon, Janne

    2007-01-01

    to examining work disability prevention issues. An innovative program that attracts international students, the Work Disability Prevention Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Strategic Training Program, aims to build research capacity in young researchers and to create a strong network that examines......Each year in Canada, the costs of disability arising from work-related causes – including workers’ compensation and health-care costs – exceed $6.7 billion. Despite the significant financial and social impacts of worker injury and illness, only a small fraction of Canadian researchers are dedicated...

  17. Changes of explosive strength in professional basketball players after a six week training cycle with plyometric training and resistance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lehnert

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Explosive strength of the lower extremities and agility are important parts of game performance in basketball. Although numerous studies have focused on the assessment of the training effect of plyometric training, studies focusing on elite players are missing. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to find out what changes in explosive strength of the lower extremities take place after a 6 week strength training with plyometric exercises and resistance exercises in elite basketball players. METHODS: Elite basketball players (n = 12; age 24.71 ± 1.5 years; height 197.0 ± 7.6 cm; weight 95.8 ± 8.1 kg performed during pre-season a 6 week training program with plyometric exercises and resistance exercises which were conducted biweekly during the pre-season. The changes in explosive strength were measured by the squat jump without arms, the counter movement jump without arms, the counter movement jump free arms and the 2 step run up jump. The players participated in two measurements. The 1st (pretesting was performed on the first day of pre-season and the 2nd (posttesting was completed two days after terminating the PT programme. The differences between the average values of the monitored parameters were determined by the Wilcoxon paired test. To calculate the effect size formula according to Fritz, Morris, and Richler (2012: R = Z/√N was used. RESULTS: Analysis of intra-group changes confirmed significant differences between the two measurements in tests of vertical jump squat (Z = 2.58, p = .01, r = .75, vertical jump from the point of the swing arm (Z = 2.49, p = .01, r = .72 and vertical jump from place without the swing arm (Z = 2.75, p = .01, r = .79. In case of the two step run up jump significant differences were not found (Z = 1.60, p = .11, r = .56. Analysis of intra-individual changes showed the significant interindividual differences in the changes of the explosive power of the lower limbs after a 6 week training. The

  18. Clinical training program for distributive pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, M R; Coffey, E L

    1997-03-15

    A training program to enable staff pharmacists in a state correctional system to shift their practice from distributive to clinical is described. Under a contract with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ), the University of Houston College of Pharmacy provides pharmaceutical services to 145,000 patients in 100 correctional facilities. An automated centralized distribution site was built in 1993 and four regional pharmacies were subsequently closed, resulting in the reallocation of eight distributive pharmacists positions to clinical services. Four of the eight pharmacists who would be displaced began a retraining program in preparation for decentralized clinical positions. The 18-month program, developed by university staff on contract to TDCJ and college faculty members, included 34 home-study modules, case studies, case presentations, seminars, and supervised practice experience. Three of the pharmacists completed the program, passed competency tests, and were certified for clinical practice privileges, including drug therapy assessment and written consultations. The three pharmacists now operate ambulatory care clinics at prison units. A clinical skills training program developed by a college of pharmacy correctional services division in cooperation with faculty members enabled staff pharmacists to convert their roles from distributive to clinical.

  19. Interdisciplinary research and training program in the plant sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolk, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    This document is the compiled progress reports from the Interdisciplinary Research and Training Program in the Plant Sciences funded through the MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory. Fourteen reports are included, covering topics such as the molecular basis of plant/microbe symbiosis, cell wall proteins and assembly, gene expression, stress responses, growth regulator biosynthesis, interaction between nuclear and organelle genomes, sensory transduction and tropisms, intracellular sorting and membrane trafficking, regulation of lipid metabolism, the molecular basis of disease resistance and plant pathogenesis, developmental biology of Cyanobacteria and hormonal involvement in environmental control of plant growth. 132 refs. (MHB)

  20. Allied-General operator training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayers, A.L.; Ebel, P.E.

    1975-01-01

    All operators at Allied-General Nuclear Services are initially trained in the basic concepts of radiation and radiation protection, they are drilled in the basic technical tools needed for further training, they are instructed in the design and operation of the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, and they are introduced to the actual operations via operating procedures. This all occurs during the Before-the-Baseline training phase and then the operators move on Beyond-the-Baseline. There they physically learn how to do their job at their own pace using checklists as a guide. All operators are then internally certified. Progression is based on demonstrated ability and those that qualify go on to jobs requiring NRC licenses. Upon internal certification, retraining commences immediately and will continue in its four month, one year, and two year cycles. Current feedback from the various classes that have completed the courses and are now in the retraining program indicates that this combination of initial technical training, on-the-job training, and retraining will produce and maintain effective, safe, and efficient operators

  1. Problems in Compulsory Postgraduate Clinical Training : Evaluation for Niigata University Postgraduate Clinical Training Program by Postgraduate Clinical Training Doctors on This Program(Present State and Problems in the New Postgraduate Training Program)

    OpenAIRE

    長谷川, 隆志; 鈴木, 栄一; Hasegawa, Takashi; Suzuki, Eiichi

    2007-01-01

    It was about one year and ten months after a program for compulsory postgraduate clinical training, Niigata University Postgraduate Clinical Training Program was carried out. In this program, questionnaire surveys by the postgraduate clinical training doctors for evaluation of this program were performed at each change of training course. To improve this program, the evaluation of this program by the training doctors was examined on the bases of these questionnaire surveys. An important probl...

  2. Protein Supplementation Does Not Affect Myogenic Adaptations to Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Paul T; Fry, Christopher S; Igbinigie, Sherry; Deer, Rachel R; Jennings, Kristofer; Cope, Mark B; Mukherjea, Ratna; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2017-06-01

    It has been proposed that protein supplementation during resistance exercise training enhances muscle hypertrophy. The degree of hypertrophy during training is controlled in part through the activation of satellite cells and myonuclear accretion. This study aimed to determine the efficacy of protein supplementation (and the type of protein) during traditional resistance training on myofiber cross-sectional area, satellite cell content, and myonuclear addition. Healthy young men participated in supervised whole-body progressive resistance training 3 d·wk for 12 wk. Participants were randomized to one of three groups ingesting a daily 22-g macronutrient dose of soy-dairy protein blend (PB, n = 22), whey protein isolate (WP, n = 15), or an isocaloric maltodextrin placebo (MDP, n = 17). Lean mass, vastus lateralis myofiber-type-specific cross-sectional area, satellite cell content, and myonuclear addition were assessed before and after resistance training. PB and the pooled protein treatments (PB + WP = PRO) exhibited a greater whole-body lean mass %change compared with MDP (P = 0.057 for PB) and (P = 0.050 for PRO), respectively. All treatments demonstrated similar leg muscle hypertrophy and vastus lateralis myofiber-type-specific cross-sectional area (P supplementation during resistance training has a modest effect on whole-body lean mass as compared with exercise training without protein supplementation, and there was no effect on any outcome between protein supplement types (blend vs whey). However, protein supplementation did not enhance resistance exercise-induced increases in myofiber hypertrophy, satellite cell content, or myonuclear addition in young healthy men. We propose that as long as protein intake is adequate during muscle overload, the adaptations in muscle growth and function will not be influenced by protein supplementation.

  3. Temporal Response of Angiogenesis and Hypertrophy to Resistance Training in Young Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Tanya M; Snijders, Tim; VAN Kranenburg, Janneau; VAN Loon, Luc J C; Verdijk, Lex B

    2018-01-01

    program. Increases in muscle fiber cross-sectional area are effectively matched by the changes in the microvasculature, providing further support for resistance training programs to optimize metabolic health.

  4. NASA's Space Life Sciences Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, G.; Lewis, L.; Atchison, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Life Sciences Training Program (SLSTP) is an intensive, six-week training program held every summer since 1985 at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). A major goal of the SLSTP is to develop a cadre of qualified scientists and engineers to support future space life sciences and engineering challenges. Hand-picked, undergraduate college students participate in lectures, laboratory sessions, facility tours, and special projects: including work on actual Space Shuttle flight experiments and baseline data collection. At NASA Headquarters (HQ), the SLSTP is jointly sponsored by the Life Sciences Division and the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs: it has been very successful in attracting minority students and women to the fields of space science and engineering. In honor of the International Space Year (ISY), 17 international students participated in this summer's program. An SLSTP Symposium was held in Washington D. C., just prior to the World Space Congress. The Symposium attracted over 150 SLSTP graduates for a day of scientific discussions and briefings concerning educational and employment opportunities within NASA and the aerospace community. Future plans for the SLSTP include expansion to the Johnson Space Center in 1995.

  5. Step aerobic combined with resistance training improves cutaneous microvascular reactivity in overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksom, D; Phanpheng, Y; Soogarun, S; Sapwarobol, S

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of combined aerobic and resistance exercise training on body weight and cutaneous microvascular reactivity in overweight individuals. A total of 41 overweight women aged 30-45 years (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m²) were randomized into sedentary time control (CON; N.=15), traditional aerobic dance (AD; N.=11), and step aerobic dance combined with upper-body resistance training (SAR; N.=15) groups. Exercise programs were 50 minutes/session, 3 times/week for 12 weeks. Maximal oxygen consumption and 1-RM strength of lower body increased (Pocclusive reactive hyperemia was positively and significantly correlated with adiponectin level (r=0.23). The present findings suggest that simultaneously performed step aerobic dance and resistance training exerts more favorable effects on weight loss and improving cutaneous microvascular reactivity in overweight women.

  6. 14 CFR 135.327 - Training program: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... § 135.327 Training program: Curriculum. (a) Each certificate holder must prepare and keep current a written training program curriculum for each type of aircraft for each crewmember required for that type... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Curriculum. 135.327...

  7. 30 CFR 75.161 - Plans for training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plans for training programs. 75.161 Section 75... for training programs. Each operator must submit to the district manager, of the Coal Mine Safety and... qualified. The program must provide— (a) For certified persons, annual training courses in first aid...

  8. 30 CFR 77.107-1 - Plans for training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plans for training programs. 77.107-1 Section... COAL MINES Qualified and Certified Persons § 77.107-1 Plans for training programs. Each operator must..., a program or plan setting forth what, when, how, and where the operator will train and retrain...

  9. C-130 Phase I Pilot Training Program (CCTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jack B.; And Others

    This is a detailed study of the C-130 Phase I (CCTS) pilot training program conducted by the 4442nd Combat Crew Training Wing at Stewart Air Force Base, Tennessee. The purpose of the study was to determine the most effective training program that will continue to produce highly qualified pilots at the least cost. The program was evaluated and…

  10. OSHA Training Programs. Module SH-48. Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Act) training programs is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module provides a list of OSHA training requirements and describes OSHA training programs and other safety organizations' programs. Following the introduction, 11 objectives (each keyed to a page in the…

  11. Youth resistance training: updated position statement paper from the national strength and conditioning association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, Avery D; Kraemer, William J; Blimkie, Cameron J R; Jeffreys, Ian; Micheli, Lyle J; Nitka, Mike; Rowland, Thomas W

    2009-08-01

    Faigenbaum, AD, Kraemer, WJ, Blimkie, CJR, Jeffreys, I, Micheli, LJ, Nitka, M, and Rowland, TW. Youth resistance training: Updated position statement paper from the National Strength and Conditioning Association. J Strength Cond Res 23(5): S60-S79, 2009-Current recommendations suggest that school-aged youth should participate daily in 60 minutes or more of moderate to vigorous physical activity that is developmentally appropriate and enjoyable and involves a variety of activities (). Not only is regular physical activity essential for normal growth and development, but also a physically active lifestyle during the pediatric years may help to reduce the risk of developing some chronic diseases later in life (). In addition to aerobic activities such as swimming and bicycling, research increasingly indicates that resistance training can offer unique benefits for children and adolescents when appropriately prescribed and supervised (). The qualified acceptance of youth resistance training by medical, fitness, and sport organizations is becoming universal ().Nowadays, comprehensive school-based programs are specifically designed to enhance health-related components of physical fitness, which include muscular strength (). In addition, the health club and sport conditioning industry is getting more involved in the youth fitness market. In the U.S.A., the number of health club members between the ages of 6 and 17 years continues to increase () and a growing number of private sport conditioning centers now cater to young athletes. Thus, as more children and adolescents resistance train in schools, health clubs, and sport training centers, it is imperative to determine safe, effective, and enjoyable practices by which resistance training can improve the health, fitness, and sports performance of younger populations.The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) recognizes and supports the premise that many of the benefits associated with adult resistance training

  12. A Combined Training Program for Veterans with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Figure 4. Quality of Life: Positive 10 Figure. 5 Quality of Life: Negative Figure 6: Quality of Life: Self - Esteem ...diagnosis of amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI). The investigators hope to learn if a combination of aerobic and resistance exercise program will...trial: 1) an exercise phase and 2) a cognitive training program. The exercise phase will be either a combined aerobic and resistance exercise

  13. A Systematic Review of Resistance Training Versus Endurance Training in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iepsen, Ulrik Winning; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Ringbaek, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE:: Endurance training (ET) as part of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been shown to improve exercise capacity and health-related quality of life, but dyspnea limits the exercise intensity. Therefore, resistance training (RT), which...

  14. Corticosteroid injections, eccentric decline squat training and heavy slow resistance training in patellar tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M.; Kovanen, V.; Aagaard, P.

    2009-01-01

    A randomized-controlled single-blind trial was conducted to investigate the clinical, structural and functional effects of peritendinous corticosteroid injections (CORT), eccentric decline squat training (ECC) and heavy slow resistance training (HSR) in patellar tendinopathy. Thirty-nine male...

  15. Electric Vehicle Service Personnel Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Gerald

    2013-06-21

    As the share of hybrid, plug-in hybrid (PHEV), electric (EV) and fuel-cell (FCV) vehicles grows in the national automotive fleet, an entirely new set of diagnostic and technical skills needs to be obtained by the maintenance workforce. Electrically-powered vehicles require new diagnostic tools, technique and vocabulary when compared to existing internal combustion engine-powered models. While the manufacturers of these new vehicles train their own maintenance personnel, training for students, independent working technicians and fleet operators is less focused and organized. This DOE-funded effort provided training to these three target groups to help expand availability of skills and to provide more competition (and lower consumer cost) in the maintenance of these hybrid- and electric-powered vehicles. Our approach was to start locally in the San Francisco Bay Area, one of the densest markets in the United States for these types of automobiles. We then expanded training to the Los Angeles area and then out-of-state to identify what types of curriculum was appropriate and what types of problems were encountered as training was disseminated. The fact that this effort trained up to 800 individuals with sessions varying from 2- day workshops to full-semester courses is considered a successful outcome. Diverse programs were developed to match unique time availability and educational needs of each of the three target audiences. Several key findings and observations arising from this effort include: • Recognition that hybrid and PHEV training demand is immediate; demand for EV training is starting to emerge; while demand for FCV training is still over the horizon • Hybrid and PHEV training are an excellent starting point for all EV-related training as they introduce all the basic concepts (electric motors, battery management, controllers, vocabulary, testing techniques) that are needed for all EVs, and these skills are in-demand in today’s market. • Faculty

  16. A hot particle training program for health physics technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.J.; Lewis, M.M.; Rigby, W.F.; Warnock, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    The measures that are needed to detect and control hot particles (irradiated fuel fragments and activated stellite particles) are quite different from the normal routine at nuclear power pants, and as a result, special training is needed. This article outlines the development of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station's Hot Particle Training Program for Health Physics Technicians, including the job and task analysis, the training objectives, the training materials, and the implementation and evaluation of the training program. In this paper the management, attitudinal, and technical goals of the training program are presented along with examples of training objectives and excerpts from the student handbook

  17. Resistance training enhances insulin suppression of endogenous glucose production in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honka, Miikka-Juhani; Bucci, Marco; Andersson, Jonathan; Huovinen, Ville; Guzzardi, Maria Angela; Sandboge, Samuel; Savisto, Nina; Salonen, Minna K; Badeau, Robert M; Parkkola, Riitta; Kullberg, Joel; Iozzo, Patricia; Eriksson, Johan G; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2016-03-15

    An altered prenatal environment during maternal obesity predisposes offspring to insulin resistance, obesity, and their consequent comorbidities, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Telomere shortening and frailty are additional risk factors for these conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of resistance training on hepatic metabolism and ectopic fat accumulation. Thirty-five frail elderly women, whose mothers' body mass index (BMI) was known, participated in a 4-mo resistance training program. Endogenous glucose production (EGP) and hepatic and visceral fat glucose uptake were measured during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia with [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose and positron emission tomography. Ectopic fat was measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. We found that the training intervention reduced EGP during insulin stimulation [from 5.4 (interquartile range 3.0, 7.0) to 3.9 (-0.4, 6.1) μmol·kg body wt(-1)·min(-1), P = 0.042] in the whole study group. Importantly, the reduction was higher among those whose EGP was more insulin resistant at baseline (higher than the median) [-5.6 (7.1) vs. 0.1 (5.4) μmol·kg body wt(-1)·min(-1), P = 0.015]. Furthermore, the decrease in EGP was associated with telomere elongation (r = -0.620, P = 0.001). The resistance training intervention did not change either hepatic or visceral fat glucose uptake or the amounts of ectopic fat. Maternal obesity did not influence the studied measures. In conclusion, resistance training improves suppression of EGP in elderly women. The finding of improved insulin sensitivity of EGP with associated telomere lengthening implies that elderly women can reduce their risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease with resistance training. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Effect of Kinetic Resistance Training and Technique on Special Strength Level and Effective Kinematic Variables in Instep Kick for Soccer Juniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Ali Shady

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Training with resistance is considered the essential and complementary part of players' preparation period during training season through developing different aspects. Objective: This study aims to investigate the Effect of Kinetic resistance training and technique on special power level and effective kinematic variables in instep kick for soccer juniors. Methodology: 20 junior soccer players (age: 17.54 ±0.5 years, body mass: 69.05 kg, height: 170 cm, training age=7.7 years participated in this study were randomly assigned into two groups experimental (n=10 trained with kinetic resistance training program and technique and control (n=10 trained with traditional soccer training program only where, the experimental approach was used. Results: The kinetic resistance trainings and technique positively affected the special power level, kicking accuracy and time and effective kinematic variables in instep kick. Conclusion: The researcher recommended that coaches should give attention to special strength developing and to be an essential part of the training program through kinetic resistance trainings and technique. Also coaches should depend on the kinematic variables affecting performance for detecting the improvement level in performance as a result of kinetic resistance trainings and technique.  Keywords: kinetic resistance, technique, special strength, kinematic, Instep Kick

  19. Effects of Instability Versus Traditional Resistance Training on Strength, Power and Velocity in Untrained Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Maté-Muñoz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was compare the effects of a traditional and an instability resistance circuit training program on upper and lower limb strength, power, movement velocity and jumping ability. Thirty-six healthy untrained men were assigned to two experimental groups and a control group. Subjects in the experimental groups performed a resistance circuit training program consisting of traditional exercises (TRT, n = 10 or exercises executed in conditions of instability (using BOSU® and TRX® (IRT, n = 12. Both programs involved three days per week of training for a total of seven weeks. The following variables were determined before and after training: maximal strength (1RM, average (AV and peak velocity (PV, average (AP and peak power (PP, all during bench press (BP and back squat (BS exercises, along with squat jump (SJ height and counter movement jump (CMJ height. All variables were found to significantly improve (p <0.05 in response to both training programs. Major improvements were observed in SJ height (IRT = 22.1%, TRT = 20.1%, CMJ height (IRT = 17.7%, TRT = 15.2%, 1RM in BS (IRT = 13.03%, TRT = 12.6%, 1RM in BP (IRT = 4.7%, TRT = 4.4%, AP in BS (IRT = 10.5%, TRT = 9.3%, AP in BP (IRT = 2.4%, TRT = 8.1%, PP in BS (IRT=19.42%, TRT = 22.3%, PP in BP (IRT = 7.6%, TRT = 11.5%, AV in BS (IRT = 10.5%, TRT = 9.4%, and PV in BS (IRT = 8.6%, TRT = 4.5%. Despite such improvements no significant differences were detected in the posttraining variables recorded for the two experimental groups. These data indicate that a circuit training program using two instability training devices is as effective in untrained men as a program executed under stable conditions for improving strength (1RM, power, movement velocity and jumping ability.

  20. Resistance training and aerobic training improve muscle strength and aerobic capacity in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars H; Overgaard, Kristian; Heje, Karen

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We investigated the effects of aerobic and resistance exercise in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). METHODS: Eighteen CIDP patients treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin performed 12 weeks of aerobic exercise and 12 weeks of resistance exercise...... after a run-in period of 12 weeks without exercise. Three times weekly the participants performed aerobic exercise on an ergometer bike or resistance exercise with unilateral training of knee and elbow flexion/extension. Primary outcomes were maximal oxygen consumption velocity (VO2 -max) and maximal...... resulted in an increase of 13.8% ± 16.0% (P = 0.0004) in cIKS. DISCUSSION: Aerobic exercise training and resistance exercise training improve fitness and strength in CIDP patients. Muscle Nerve, 2017....

  1. Resistance Training with Co-ingestion of Anti-inflammatory Drugs Attenuates Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele A. Cardinale

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The current study aimed to examine the effects of resistance exercise with concomitant consumption of high vs. low daily doses of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle. As a secondary aim, we compared the effects of eccentric overload with conventional training.Methods: Twenty participants were randomized to either a group taking high doses (3 × 400 mg/day of ibuprofen (IBU; 27 ± 5 year; n = 11 or a group ingesting a low dose (1 × 75 mg/day of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 26 ± 4 year; n = 9 during 8 weeks of supervised knee extensor resistance training. Each of the subject's legs were randomized to complete the training program using either a flywheel (FW device emphasizing eccentric overload, or a traditional weight stack machine (WS. Maximal mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (CI+IIP from permeabilized skeletal muscle bundles was assessed using high-resolution respirometry. Citrate synthase (CS activity was assessed using spectrophotometric techniques and mitochondrial protein content using western blotting.Results: After training, CI+IIP decreased (P < 0.05 in both IBU (23% and ASA (29% with no difference across medical treatments. Although CI+IIP decreased in both legs, the decrease was greater (interaction p = 0.015 in WS (33%, p = 0.001 compared with FW (19%, p = 0.078. CS activity increased (p = 0.027 with resistance training, with no interactions with medical treatment or training modality. Protein expression of ULK1 increased with training in both groups (p < 0.001. The increase in quadriceps muscle volume was not correlated with changes in CI+IIP (R = 0.16.Conclusion: These results suggest that 8 weeks of resistance training with co-ingestion of anti-inflammatory drugs reduces mitochondrial function but increases mitochondrial content. The observed changes were not affected by higher doses of NSAIDs consumption, suggesting that the resistance training

  2. Effects of fatigue from resistance training on barbell back squat biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, David R; Szivak, Tunde K; Comstock, Brett A; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Apicella, Jenna M; Kelly, Neil A; Creighton, Brent C; Flanagan, Shawn D; Looney, David P; Volek, Jeff S; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J

    2014-04-01

    Exhaustive resistance training programs that have been previously referred to as extreme conditioning protocols have increased in popularity in military and civilian populations in recent years. However, because of their highly fatiguing nature, proprioception is likely altered during such programs that would significantly affect the safety and efficacy of such programs. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the alterations in movement patterns that result from extreme conditioning protocols and to evaluate if these protocols can be deemed safe and effective. Twelve men (age 24 ± 4.2 years, height 173.1 ± 3.6 cm, weight 76.9 ± 7.8 kg, body fat percentage 9.0 ± 2.2%) and 13 women (age 24.5 ± 3.8 years, height 166.9 ± 8.5 cm, weight 66.1 ± 9.2 kg, body fat percentage 18.6 ± 4.0%) with at least 6 months of resistance training experience involving barbell bench press, barbell deadlift, and barbell back squat performed a highly fatiguing resistance training workout. During the barbell back squat, a 2-dimensional analysis was performed where the knee and hip angles were recorded throughout the 55 repetitions of the workout. At the early stages of the protocol, knee angle was significantly lower in men and in women demonstrating less knee flexion. Also, hip angle was significantly lower early in the program in men and in women, demonstrating a greater forward lean. The technique changes that occur in high repetition sets do not favor optimal strength development and may increase the risk of injury, clearly questioning the safety and efficacy of such resistance training programming. This is likely a display of self-preservation by individuals who are faced with high repetition programs.

  3. High-intensity resistance and cardiovascular training improve physical capacity in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quist, Morten; Rørth, Mikael Rahbek; Zacho, Morten

    2006-01-01

    .62+/-13.42 kg, post: 73.25+/-13.44 kg, P=0.016). There was a significant decrease in skin-fold measurements by 3% (P=0.031). The exercise intervention was well tolerated, provided that daily screening criteria were adhered to. The effects of resistance and cardiovascular training observed in this short......The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of a supervised high- and low-intensity structured training program in cancer patients concurrently undergoing chemotherapy. Seventy patients, in different stages of the disease and with different diagnoses (48 females, 22 males), between 18...... and 65 years of age (mean age 42.8) participated in a 9-h weekly training program over 6 weeks. The intervention involved physical exercise, relaxation, massage, and body-awareness training. Physical capacity (one-repetition maximum tests (1RM), VO2max) and body composition (weight, skin-fold) were...

  4. Impact of Polyphenol Supplementation on Acute and Chronic Response to Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Kyle S; Stout, Jeffrey R; Fukuda, David H; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Church, David D; Wang, Ran; Riffe, Joshua J; Muddle, Tyler W D; Herrlinger, Kelli A; Hoffman, Jay R

    2017-11-01

    Beyer, KS, Stout, JR, Fukuda, DH, Jajtner, AR, Townsend, JR, Church, DD, Wang, R, Riffe, JJ, Muddle, TWD, Herrlinger, KA, and Hoffman, JR. Impact of polyphenol supplementation on acute and chronic response to resistance training. J Strength Cond Res 31(11): 2945-2954, 2017-This study investigated the effect of a proprietary polyphenol blend (PPB) on acute and chronic adaptations to resistance exercise. Forty untrained men were assigned to control, PPB, or placebo. Participants in PPB or placebo groups completed a 4-week supplementation period (phase I), an acute high-volume exercise bout (phase II), and a 6-week resistance training program (phase III); whereas control completed only testing during phase II. Blood draws were completed during phases I and II. Maximal strength in squat, leg press, and leg extension were assessed before and after phase III. The exercise protocol during phase II consisted of squat, leg press, and leg extension exercises using 70% of the participant's strength. The resistance training program consisted of full-body exercises performed 3 d·wk. After phase I, PPB (1.56 ± 0.48 mM) had greater total antioxidant capacity than placebo (1.00 ± 0.90 mM). Changes in strength from phase III were similar between PPB and placebo. Polyphenol blend supplementation may be an effective strategy to increase antioxidant capacity without limiting strength gains from training.

  5. Inadequate sleep and muscle strength: Implications for resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Olivia E; Drinkwater, Eric J; Urwin, Charles S; Lamon, Séverine; Aisbett, Brad

    2018-02-02

    Inadequate sleep (e.g., an insufficient duration of sleep per night) can reduce physical performance and has been linked to adverse metabolic health outcomes. Resistance exercise is an effective means to maintain and improve physical capacity and metabolic health, however, the outcomes for populations who may perform resistance exercise during periods of inadequate sleep are unknown. The primary aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the effect of sleep deprivation (i.e. no sleep) and sleep restriction (i.e. a reduced sleep duration) on resistance exercise performance. A secondary aim was to explore the effects on hormonal indicators or markers of muscle protein metabolism. A systematic search of five electronic databases was conducted with terms related to three combined concepts: inadequate sleep; resistance exercise; performance and physiological outcomes. Study quality and biases were assessed using the Effective Public Health Practice Project quality assessment tool. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria and were rated as 'moderate' or 'weak' for global quality. Sleep deprivation had little effect on muscle strength during resistance exercise. In contrast, consecutive nights of sleep restriction could reduce the force output of multi-joint, but not single-joint movements. Results were conflicting regarding hormonal responses to resistance training. Inadequate sleep impairs maximal muscle strength in compound movements when performed without specific interventions designed to increase motivation. Strategies to assist groups facing inadequate sleep to effectively perform resistance training may include supplementing their motivation by training in groups or ingesting caffeine; or training prior to prolonged periods of wakefulness. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Effects of Weight Resistance Training on Swimmers with Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Víquez Ulate y Andrea Mora Campos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effect of weight resistance training on strength in swimmers with Down Syndrome (DS. Seven swimmers with DS participated in the study: 6 men and 1 woman, 23.14 years of age ± 4.59 and with 6.14 years ± 2.34 years of swimming. Instruments: One repetition maximum (RM test to determine the individual’s maximum muscular strength. Procedure: the study was conducted for 10 weeks (2 weeks at baseline, 6 weeks of treatment and 2 weeks to see the effects of retention. Results: significantly positive changes were detected in the maximum strength of pectoral muscles (F=5.768; p=0.006, dorsal muscles (F = 26.770; p=7.45e-007, femoral biceps (F = 32.530; p=1.76e-007, quadriceps (F = 8.391; p=0.001, triceps (F = 11.217; p=0.0002 and these adjustments were maintained with no significant changes for two weeks, while the biceps muscle (F=4.145; p=0.021 behaved differently since it suffered no significant adjustments during the program.

  7. ETPOD (European Training Program on Organ Donation): a successful training program to improve organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyalich, Marti; Guasch, Xavier; Paez, Gloria; Valero, Ricard; Istrate, Melania

    2013-04-01

    Advanced training of healthcare professionals active in organ donation is highlighted as a major means to overcome organ shortage. The objective of this study was to improve donation rates in the selected European target areas (TAs) by providing an advanced training program. A prospective intervention study was conducted in 25 TAs with active donor programs from 17 European countries, between 2007 and 2009. A training program based on collaborative methodology was designed at three different professional levels (health workers awareness, junior transplant coordinators, managers). Courses evaluation scores and donation figures in each TA were collected and compared before and after intervention. Courses with new developed training tools were implemented reaching out 3286 healthcare professionals. Feed-back questionnaires revealed a high degree of satisfaction among participants (average of 4.35 on a 1-5 scale). The number of utilized donors in the TAs increased from 15.7 ± 14.3 (95% CI: 9.8-21.6) to 20.0 ± 17.1 (95% CI: 13-27.1) (P = 0.014) and the number of organs recovered increased from 49.7 ± 48.5 (95% CI: 29.6-69.7) to 59.3 ± 52.1 (95% CI: 37.8-80.8) (P = 0.044). The European Training Program on Organ Donation is a successful training program, achieving a significant increase in organ donation figures. © 2012 The Authors Transplant International © 2012 European Society for Organ Transplantation. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Single- and multiple-set resistance training improves skeletal and respiratory muscle strength in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahin, Odilon; Rodrigues, Rejane P; Nascimento, Vanderson C; Da Silva-Grigoletto, Marzo E; Sousa, Evitom C; Marçal, Anderson C

    2014-01-01

    Aging involves a progressive reduction of respiratory muscle strength as well as muscle strength. Compare the effects of resistance training volume on the maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), functional performance, and muscle strength in elderly women. Thirty elderly women were randomly assigned to a group performing either single sets (1-SET) or three sets (3-SET) of exercises. The sit-to-stand test, MIP, MEP, and muscle strength were assessed before and after 24 training sessions. Progressive resistance training was performed two times per week for a total of 8-12 repetitions, using the main muscle groups of the upper and lower limbs. The main results showed that the participants significantly increased their MEP (Ptraining sessions, muscle strength also significantly increased (Ptraining programs increased MIP, MEP, muscle strength, and sit-to-stand test performance in elderly women after 24 sessions of training. In conclusion, our results suggested that elderly women who are not in the habit of physical activity may start with single-set resistance training programs as a short-term strategy for the maintenance of health.

  9. Online video-based resistance training improves the physical capacity of junior basketball athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klusemann, Markus J; Pyne, David B; Fay, Tristan S; Drinkwater, Eric J

    2012-10-01

    Junior basketball athletes require a well-designed resistance training program to improve their physical development. Lack of expert supervision and resistance training in junior development pathways may be overcome by implementing an online video-based program. The aim of this study was to compare the magnitude of improvement (change) in physical performance and strength and functional movement patterns of junior basketball athletes using either a fully supervised or an online video-based resistance training program. Thirty-eight junior basketball athletes (males, n = 17; age, 14 ± 1 year; height, 1.79 ± 0.10 m; mass, 67 ± 12 kg; females, n = 21; age, 15 ± 1 year; height, 1.70 ± 0.07 m; mass, 62 ± 8 kg) were randomly assigned into a supervised resistance training group (SG, n = 13), video training group (VG, n = 13) or control group (CG, n = 12) and participated in a 6-week controlled experimental trial. Pre- and posttesting included measures of physical performance (20-m sprint, step-in vertical jump, agility, sit and reach, line drill, and Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1), strength (15 s push-up and pull-up), and functional movement screening (FMS). Both SG and VG achieved 3-5% ± 2-4% (mean ± 90% confidence limits) greater improvements in several physical performance measures (vertical jump height, 20-m sprint time, and Yo-Yo endurance performance) and a 28 ± 21% greater improvement in push-up strength compared with the CG. The SG attained substantially larger gains in FMS scores over both the VG (12 ± 10%) and CG (13 ± 8%). Video-based training appears to be a viable option to improve physical performance and strength in junior basketball athletes. Qualified supervision is recommended to improve functional movement patterns in junior athletes.

  10. 14 CFR 91.1075 - Training program: Special rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Operations Program Management § 91.1075 Training program: Special rules. Other than the program manager, only... approved curriculums, curriculum segments, and portions of curriculum segments applicable for use in...

  11. Comparison of home- and gymnasium-based resistance training on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aging results in a natural loss of flexibility, which is especially essential in the maintenance of functional abilities of the aged to perform activities of daily living. Resistance training may provide a stimulus for flexibility, in addition to its extensive health benefits, since its action is through a full range of motion. The purpose of ...

  12. Resistance training and predicted risk of coronary heart disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of resistance training, designed to prevent the development of coronary heart disease (CHD) based on the Framingham Risk Assessment (FRA) score. Twenty-five healthy sedentary men with low CHD risk were assigned to participate in a 16-week (three days per week) ...

  13. Musculoskeletal adaptations to training with the advanced resistive exercise device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehr, James A; Lee, Stuart M C; English, Kirk L; Sibonga, Jean; Smith, Scott M; Spiering, Barry A; Hagan, R Donald

    2011-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been used as a means to prevent the musculoskeletal losses associated with spaceflight. Therefore, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration designed the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) to replace the initial device flown on the International Space Station. The ARED uses vacuum cylinders and inertial flywheels to simulate, in the absence of gravity, the constant mass and inertia, respectively, of free weight (FW) exercise. To compare the musculoskeletal effects of resistance exercise training using the ARED with the effects of training with FW. Previously untrained, ambulatory subjects exercised using one of two modalities: FW (6 men and 3 women) or ARED (8 men and 3 women). Subjects performed squat, heel raise, and dead lift exercises 3 d·wk(-1) for 16 wk. Squat, heel raise, and dead lift strength (one-repetition maximum; using FW and ARED), bone mineral density (via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), and vertical jump were assessed before, during, and after training. Muscle mass (via magnetic resonance imaging) and bone morphology (via quantitative computed tomography) were measured before and after training. Bone biomarkers and circulating hormones were measured before training and after 4, 8, and 16 wk. Muscle strength, muscle volume, vertical jump height, and lumbar spine bone mineral density (via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and quantitative computed tomography) significantly increased (P ≤ 0.05) in both groups. There were no significant differences between groups in any of the dependent variables at any time. After 16 wk of training, ARED exercise resulted in musculoskeletal effects that were not significantly different from the effects of training with FW. Because FW training mitigates bed rest-induced deconditioning, the ARED may be an effective countermeasure for spaceflight-induced deconditioning and should be validated during spaceflight.

  14. A generic hazardous waste management training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.J.; Karnofsky, B.

    1988-01-01

    The main purpose of this training program element is to familiarize personnel involved in hazardous waste management with the goals of RCRA and how they are to be achieved. These goals include: to protect health and the environment; to conserve valuable material and energy resources; to prohibit future open dumping on the land; to assure that hazardous waste management practices are conducted in a manner which protects human health and the environment; to insure that hazardous waste is properly managed thereby reducing the need for corrective actions in the future; to establish a national policy to reduce or eliminate the generation of hazardous waste, wherever feasible. Another objective of this progam element is to present a brief overview of the RCRA regulations and how they are implemented/enforced by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and each of the fifty states. This element also discusses where the RCRA regulations are published and how they are updated. In addition it details who is responsible for compliance with the regulations. Finally, this part of the training program provides an overview of the activities and materials that are regulated. 1 ref

  15. The Effect of Resistance Training on Cardio-Metabolic Factors in Males with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghalavand

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes is one of the most important metabolic diseases in the world and exercise is a common advice to manage diabetes and reduce its complications. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of resistance training on blood glucose, blood pressure and resting heart rate in males with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods In this semi-experimental study, 20 males with type 2 diabetes with mean age of 46 ± 3.4 years old who met the inclusion criteria were selected. The participants were randomly assigned into resistance training (n = 10 and control (n = 10 groups. Resistance exercise training program was performed for eight weeks, three sessions per week. Cardiovascular and biochemical parameters were measured before and after the intervention. To analyze the measured parameters changes t-test was used at P ≤ 0.05 significance level. Results After eight weeks, a significant decrease in fasting blood sugar (P = 0.002, glycosylated hemoglobin (P = 0.025 and systolic blood pressure (P = 0.022 was observed in the resistance group. In addition, there was a significant difference in blood sugar (P = 0.003 and glycosylated hemoglobin (P = 0.031 between the two groups. Conclusions Findings of this study confirmed the positive influence of resistance training to control blood glucose and blood pressure in males with type 2 diabetes.

  16. Hamstring activation during lower body resistance training exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, William P

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in hamstring activation during lower body resistance training exercises. This study also sought to assess differences in hamstring-to-quadriceps muscle activation ratios and gender differences therein. A randomized repeated measures design was used to compare six resistance training exercises that are commonly believed to train the hamstrings, including the squat, seated leg curl, stiff leg dead lift, single leg stiff leg dead lift, good morning, and Russian curl. Subjects included 34 college athletes. Outcome measures included the biceps femoris (H) and rectus femoris (Q) electromyography (EMG) and the H-to-Q EMG ratio, for each exercise. Main effects were found for the H (P ratio when analyzed for all subjects (P ratios of men, for the exercises assessed. In a separate analysis of strength matched women and men, women achieved between 35.9 to 76.0% of the H-to-Q ratios of men, for these exercises. Hamstring resistance training exercises offer differing degrees of H and Q activation and ratios. Women compared with men, are less able to activate the hamstrings and/or more able to activate the quadriceps. Women may require disproportionately greater training for the hamstrings compared with the quadriceps.

  17. Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging Research and Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0198 TITLE: Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging Research and Training Program PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Catherine...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging Research and Training Program 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0198 5c. PROGRAM...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The focus of our BRAIN training program over the past year of the project is to successfully convert the

  18. Effects and prevalence of nonresponders after 12 weeks of high-intensity interval or resistance training in women with insulin resistance: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Cristian; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2017-04-01

    Our aim was to investigate the effects and prevalence of nonresponders (NR) to high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and resistance training (RT) in women with insulin resistance on cardiometabolic health parameters. Sedentary overweight/obese insulin-resistant women (age = 33.5 ± 6.5 yr; body mass index = 29.9 ± 3.7 kg/m 2 ) were randomly assigned to a triweekly HIIT program (HIIT; n = 18) or resistance training (RT; n = 17). Anthropometry (body mass, fat mass, muscle mass, waist circumference, and skinfold thickness), cardiovascular (blood pressure), metabolic [fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)], as well as muscle strength, and endurance performance covariables were measured before and after 12 wk in both intervention groups. The interindividual variability to exercise training of the subjects was categorized as responders and NR using as cut points two times the typical error of measurement in mean outcomes. After intervention, significant reduction in waist circumference, skinfold thicknesses, fat mass, blood pressure, fasting glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR ( P training. A uniqueness of the present study was to examine the NR prevalence in women with insulin resistance after high-intensity interval (HIIT) and resistance training (RT). This study demonstrates that 12 wk of HIIT and RT have similar effects and NR prevalence to improve glucose control variables. However, significantly different NR prevalence were observed in other anthropometric, cardiovascular, strength, and endurance performance measurements. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Olympic weightlifting and plyometric training with children provides similar or greater performance improvements than traditional resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouachi, Anis; Hammami, Raouf; Kaabi, Sofiene; Chamari, Karim; Drinkwater, Eric J; Behm, David G

    2014-06-01

    A number of organizations recommend that advanced resistance training (RT) techniques can be implemented with children. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Olympic-style weightlifting (OWL), plyometrics, and traditional RT programs with children. Sixty-three children (10-12 years) were randomly allocated to a 12-week control OWL, plyometric, or traditional RT program. Pre- and post-training tests included body mass index (BMI), sum of skinfolds, countermovement jump (CMJ), horizontal jump, balance, 5- and 20-m sprint times, isokinetic force and power at 60 and 300° · s(-1). Magnitude-based inferences were used to analyze the likelihood of an effect having a standardized (Cohen's) effect size exceeding 0.20. All interventions were generally superior to the control group. Olympic weightlifting was >80% likely to provide substantially better improvements than plyometric training for CMJ, horizontal jump, and 5- and 20-m sprint times, whereas >75% likely to substantially exceed traditional RT for balance and isokinetic power at 300° · s(-1). Plyometric training was >78% likely to elicit substantially better training adaptations than traditional RT for balance, isokinetic force at 60 and 300° · s(-1), isokinetic power at 300° · s(-1), and 5- and 20-m sprints. Traditional RT only exceeded plyometric training for BMI and isokinetic power at 60° · s(-1). Hence, OWL and plyometrics can provide similar or greater performance adaptations for children. It is recommended that any of the 3 training modalities can be implemented under professional supervision with proper training progressions to enhance training adaptations in children.

  20. 14 CFR 91.1079 - Training program: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and keep current a written training program curriculum for each type of aircraft for each crewmember required for that type aircraft. The curriculum must include ground and flight training required by this... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Curriculum. 91.1079...

  1. The Rwanda Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Rwanda Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (RFELTP) is a 2-year public health leadership development training program that provides applied epidemiology and public health laboratory training while the trainees provide public health service to the Ministry of Health. RFELTP is hosted at the National ...

  2. Special Olympics Training Programs around the World...A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaestra, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Two tables present results of an international survey on Special Olympics training programs for the mentally retarded. Table 1 looks at such sports and fiscal aspects of the program as funding, existence of year-round training, and ratio of coaches to athletes. Table 2 reports perceived values of training and competition. (DB)

  3. Family Therapy Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Douglas Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study describes the current state of family therapy training in a sample of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. Method: Child and adolescent psychiatry fellows (N = 66) from seven training programs completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, family therapy training experiences, common models of treatment and…

  4. Evaluation of Training Programs in Russian Manufacturing Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherov, Dmitry; Manokhina, Daria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the features of training evaluation process in Russian manufacturing companies. On the basis of three assumptions regarding the differences in group of employees involved in training, duration and costs of a training program, the authors tried to find out the peculiarities of training evaluation tools and levels…

  5. Aerobic training prevents dexamethasone-induced peripheral insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionísio, T J; Louzada, J C A; Viscelli, B A; Dionísio, E J; Martuscelli, A M; Barel, M; Perez, O A B; Bosqueiro, J R; Brozoski, D T; Santos, C F; Amaral, S L

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated how proteins of the insulin signaling cascade could modulate insulin resistance after dexamethasone (Dexa) treatment and aerobic training. Rats were distributed into 4 groups: sedentary control (SC), sedentary+Dexa (SD), trained control (TC), and trained+Dexa (TD), and underwent aerobic training for 70 days or remained sedentary. Dexa was administered during the last 10 days (1 mg · kg(-1) per day i. p.). After 70 days, an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (ipGTT) was performed. Protein levels of IRS-1, AKT, and PKC-α in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle were identified using Western blots. Dexa treatment increased blood glucose and the area under the curve (AUC) of ipGTT. Training attenuated the hyperglycemia and the AUC induced by Dexa. Dexa reduced IRS-1 (- 16%) and AKT (- 43%) protein level with no changes in PKC-α levels. Moreover, these effects on IRS-1 and AKT protein level were prevented in trained animals. These results show for the first time that aerobic exercise prevented reductions of IRS-1 and AKT level induced by Dexa in the TA muscle, suggesting that aerobic exercise is a good strategy to prevent Dexa-induced peripheral insulin resistance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Neuromuscular Adaptations to Low-Load Blood Flow Restricted Resistance Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summer B. Cook, Brendan R. Scott, Katherine L. Hayes, Bethany G. Murphy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Low-load blood flow restricted (BFR resistance exercise has been suggested to be as effective as moderate and high-load resistance training for increasing muscle size and strength. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of 6 weeks of HL or low-load BFR resistance training on neuromuscular function, strength, and hypertrophy of the knee extensors. Eighteen participants aged 18-22 years old were randomized to one of three training groups: moderate load (ML: 70% of 1 repetition maximum [1-RM]; BFR (20% 1-RM with a vascular restriction set to ~180 mmHg; and a control group (CON that did not exercise. Participants performed leg extension (LE and leg press exercises 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Measurements of isometric torque, LE 1-RM, central activation, electrically evoked torque, and muscle volume of the knee extensors were obtained before and after training. Isometric peak torque did not change following the training (p = 0.13. LE 1-RM improved in the ML (34 ± 20%; d = 0.78 and BFR (14 ± 5%; d = 0.67 groups compared to the CON group (0.6 ± 8%; d = 0.09; time x group interaction p = 0.02. Muscle volume increased in the ML (5.6%; d = 0.19 and BFR groups (2.5%; d = 0.09 with no change in the CON group (time x group interaction p = 0.001. There were no changes in central activation and evoked torque in any groups following the training (p > 0.05. Strength and hypertrophy were evident following ML and BFR resistance training programs indicating that both modalities are effective, although ML training appears to be a more potent and efficient. Neuromuscular changes were not evident and warrant more research.

  7. The Effect of a Nine-Weeks Training Program on The Center of Pressure Indicators With Open and Closed Eyes Condition in the Elderly Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Gol Rafati

    2018-04-01

    Conclusion The lower extremity muscle resistance training improves the center of pressure, static balance and reduces the fall risk. It is suggested that planning sufficient physical activities and training among all age groups is necessary. Appropriate resistance training program can prevent balance disorders and falling among the elderly population.

  8. Scapular-muscle performance: two training programs in adolescent swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Annemie; De Mey, Kristof; Maenhout, Annelies; Calders, Patrick; Cools, Ann M

    2011-01-01

    Swimming requires well-balanced scapular-muscle performance. An additional strength-training program for the shoulders is pursued by swimmers, but whether these muscle-training programs need to be generic or specific for endurance or strength is unknown. To evaluate isokinetic scapular-muscle performance in a population of adolescent swimmers and to compare the results of training programs designed for strength or muscle endurance. Controlled laboratory study. University human research laboratory. Eighteen adolescent swimmers. Each participant pursued a 12-week scapular-training program designed to improve either muscle strength or muscle endurance. Bilateral peak force, fatigue index, and protraction/retraction strength ratios before and after the scapular-training program. Scapular protraction/retraction ratios were slightly higher than 1 (dominant side  =  1.08, nondominant side  =  1.25, P  =  .006). Side-to-side differences in retraction strength were apparent both before and after the training program (P  =  .03 and P  = .05, respectively). After the training program, maximal protraction (P training groups. The fatigue indexes for protraction on both sides (P training program. We describe the scapular-muscle characteristics of a group of adolescent swimmers. Both muscle-strength and muscle-endurance programs improved absolute muscle strength. Neither of the strength programs had a positive effect on scapular-muscle endurance. Our results may be valuable for coaches and physiotherapists when they are designing exercise programs for swimmers.

  9. Resistance (weight lifting) training in an adolescent with McArdle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Benítez, Sergio; Fleck, Steven J; Naclerio, Fernando; Martín, Miguel Angel; Lucia, Alejandro

    2013-06-01

    Owing to the risk of severe rhabdomyolysis, clinicians advise McArdle disease patients to refrain from strenuous exercise, particularly weight lifting. A 15-year-old male McArdle disease patient performed a 6-week, supervised, light- to moderate-intensity (~65-70% of one-repetition-maximum) resistance (weight lifting) training program (2 sessions/week). Training resulted in ~27% and ~6% increase in one-repetition-maximum bench press and multipower squat performance while inducing no myoglobinuria. The patient changed to a lower disease severity class, that is, he became virtually asymptomatic in terms of exercise limitations. The authors' preliminary data suggest that supervised, light to moderate resistance training is feasible in children with McArdle disease and has potential clinical benefits.

  10. Explosive heavy-resistance training in old and very old adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caserotti, Paolo; Aagaard, P; Buttrup Larsen, J

    2008-01-01

    Age-related decline in muscle power predicts falls, motor impairments and disability. Recent guidelines suggested that training programs should be tailored to maximize muscle power. This study investigated the effects of 12 weeks of explosive-type heavy-resistance training (75-80% of 1 repetition......% in TG80 and TG60, respectively, while jump peak power increased in TG60 (5%). Finally, LEP increased 28% in TG80 and 12% in TG60. These findings demonstrate that explosive-type heavy-resistance training seems to be safe and well tolerated in healthy women even in the eighth decade of life and elicits...... adaptive neuromuscular changes in selected physiological variables that are commonly associated with the risk of falls and disability in aged individuals....

  11. Staff training program of CANDU projects in Saskatoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huterer, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the training process for a nuclear project on a new site. When AECL opened a project office Saskatoon, senior management recognized the need for large scale staff training and made the necessary commitments. Two types of training programs were initiated, general and technical. The general training plan included topics related to nuclear project life cycle. Technical training was discipline and task specific. Based on the job descriptions and staff qualifications, technical training requirements were documented for the entire staff. The training strategy was developed and implemented. Detailed records were maintained to monitor the progress, draw conclusions, and plan training for future nuclear facilities. (author)

  12. The Optimal Training Program for an Infantry Battalion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Danna, James

    1999-01-01

    ... is being implemented. In the conclusion, the study makes a recommendation for the optimal training program that focuses on the critical components of ground combat and the recommended strategy to train them.

  13. An Intensive Training Program for Effective Teaching Assistants in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragisich, Vera; Keller, Valerie; Zhao, Meishan

    2016-01-01

    We report an intensive graduate teaching assistant (GTA) training program developed at The University of Chicago. The program has been assessed and has been successful in preparing GTAs for effective discussion and laboratory teaching for both general and organic chemistry. We believe that this training program can provide insightful information…

  14. Nuclear Education and Training Programs of Potential Interest to Utilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atomic Energy Commission, Washington, DC.

    This compilation of education and training programs related to nuclear applications in electric power generation covers programs conducted by nuclear reactor vendors, public utilities, universities, technical institutes, and community colleges, which were available in December 1968. Several training-program consultant services are also included.…

  15. The Ethiopian Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ethiopian Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (EFELTP) is a comprehensive two-year competency-based training and service program designed to build sustainable public health expertise and capacity. Established in 2009, the program is a partnership between the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of ...

  16. Synergistic effects of resistance training and protein intake: practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Cholewa, Jason Michael; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Zhi, X I A; Magagnin, Daiane; de Sá, Rafaele Bis Dal Ponte; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Teixeira, Tamiris da Silva; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2014-10-01

    Resistance training is a potent stimulus to increase skeletal muscle mass. The muscle protein accretion process depends on a robust synergistic action between protein intake and overload. The intake of protein after resistance training increases plasma amino acids, which results in the activation of signaling molecules leading to increased muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle hypertrophy. Although both essential and non-essential amino acids are necessary for hypertrophy, the intake of free L-leucine or high-leucine whole proteins has been specifically shown to increase the initiation of translation that is essential for elevated MPS. The literature supports the use of protein intake following resistance-training sessions to enhance MPS; however, less understood are the effects of different protein sources and timing protocols on MPS. The sum of the adaptions from each individual training session is essential to muscle hypertrophy, and thus highlights the importance of an optimal supplementation protocol. The aim of this review is to present recent findings reported in the literature and to discuss the practical application of these results. In that light, new speculations and questions will arise that may direct future investigations. The information and recommendations generated in this review should be of benefit to clinical dietitians as well as those engaged in sports. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of arachidonic acid supplementation on training adaptations in resistance-trained males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Mike

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the impact of AA supplementation during resistance training on body composition, training adaptations, and markers of muscle hypertrophy in resistance-trained males. Methods In a randomized and double blind manner, 31 resistance-trained male subjects (22.1 ± 5.0 years, 180 ± 0.1 cm, 86.1 ± 13.0 kg, 18.1 ± 6.4% body fat ingested either a placebo (PLA: 1 g·day-1 corn oil, n = 16 or AA (AA: 1 g·day-1 AA, n = 15 while participating in a standardized 4 day·week-1 resistance training regimen. Fasting blood samples, body composition, bench press one-repetition maximum (1RM, leg press 1RM and Wingate anaerobic capacity sprint tests were completed after 0, 25, and 50 days of supplementation. Percutaneous muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis on days 0 and 50. Results Wingate relative peak power was significantly greater after 50 days of supplementation while the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was significantly lower after 25 days of supplementation in the AA group. PGE2 levels tended to be greater in the AA group. However, no statistically significant differences were observed between groups in body composition, strength, anabolic and catabolic hormones, or markers of muscle hypertrophy (i.e. total protein content or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx protein content and other intramuscular markers (i.e. FP and EP3 receptor density or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx mRNA expression. Conclusion AA supplementation during resistance-training may enhance anaerobic capacity and lessen the inflammatory response to training. However, AA supplementation did not promote statistically greater gains in strength, muscle mass, or influence markers of muscle hypertrophy.

  18. Effects of arachidonic acid supplementation on training adaptations in resistance-trained males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael D; Iosia, Mike; Kerksick, Chad M; Taylor, Lem W; Campbell, Bill; Wilborn, Colin D; Harvey, Travis; Cooke, Matthew; Rasmussen, Chris; Greenwood, Mike; Wilson, Ronald; Jitomir, Jean; Willoughby, Darryn; Kreider, Richard B

    2007-11-28

    To determine the impact of AA supplementation during resistance training on body composition, training adaptations, and markers of muscle hypertrophy in resistance-trained males. In a randomized and double blind manner, 31 resistance-trained male subjects (22.1 +/- 5.0 years, 180 +/- 0.1 cm, 86.1 +/- 13.0 kg, 18.1 +/- 6.4% body fat) ingested either a placebo (PLA: 1 g.day-1 corn oil, n = 16) or AA (AA: 1 g.day-1 AA, n = 15) while participating in a standardized 4 day.week-1 resistance training regimen. Fasting blood samples, body composition, bench press one-repetition maximum (1RM), leg press 1RM and Wingate anaerobic capacity sprint tests were completed after 0, 25, and 50 days of supplementation. Percutaneous muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis on days 0 and 50. Wingate relative peak power was significantly greater after 50 days of supplementation while the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was significantly lower after 25 days of supplementation in the AA group. PGE2 levels tended to be greater in the AA group. However, no statistically significant differences were observed between groups in body composition, strength, anabolic and catabolic hormones, or markers of muscle hypertrophy (i.e. total protein content or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx protein content) and other intramuscular markers (i.e. FP and EP3 receptor density or MHC type I, IIa, and IIx mRNA expression). AA supplementation during resistance-training may enhance anaerobic capacity and lessen the inflammatory response to training. However, AA supplementation did not promote statistically greater gains in strength, muscle mass, or influence markers of muscle hypertrophy.

  19. Effect of aerobic training and resistance training on circulating irisin level and their association with change of body composition in overweight/obese adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H-J; Lee, H-J; So, B; Son, J S; Yoon, D; Song, W

    2016-06-20

    The novel myokine irisin has been reported as a therapeutic target for metabolic disease. The objective of this study is to reveal the effects of aerobic training (AT) and resistance training (RT) on circulating irisin levels and their associations with change of body composition in overweight/obese adults. Twenty eight overweight/obese adults (BMI>23 kg/m(2)) were included in this study and compared before and after 8 weeks of exercise program (60 min/day, 5 times in a week). The subjects, in both aerobic and resistance training, showed significant improvement in anthropometric parameters and exercise capacities including maximal oxygen uptake and muscle strength. Interestingly, the circulating irisin was significantly increased in resistance training group (p=0.002) but not in aerobic training (p=0.426) compared to control group. In addition, we found the positive correlation between change of the circulating irisin and muscle mass (r=0.432, p=0.022) and the negative correlation between change of the circulating irisin and fat mass (r=-0.407, p=0.031). In the present pilot study, we found that circulating irisin level was increased by 8 weeks of resistance training in overweight/obese adults, suggesting that resistance training could be the efficient exercise type in overweight/obese considering positive change of body composition concomitant with increase of irisin levels.

  20. Effects of a Resistance Training Intervention on Strength, Power, and Performance in Adolescent Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowse, Rebecca A; McGuigan, Mike R; Harrison, Craig

    2017-11-01

    Dowse, RA, McGuigan, MR, and Harrison, C. Effects of a resistance training intervention on strength, power, and performance in adolescent dancers. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2017-The aim of this study was to determine whether a 9-week resistance training program could have a significant effect on maximum lower-body strength and power, dynamic balance, and dance performance in adolescent dancers. Twelve competitive adolescent female dancers trained in jazz, ballet, and contemporary were recruited from local dance schools and assigned to a resistance training group (dance experience 9.2 ± 2.4 years; age 14.2 ± 1.9 years; height 155.6 ± 9.1 cm; and mass 48.9 ± 13.8 kg). Anthropometry (height, seated height, mass, and skinfolds), subjective dancing performance, dynamic balance (eyes open [EO] and eyes closed), maximum lower-body strength (isometric midthigh pull), and power (vertical countermovement jump, squat jump, and single-leg countermovement jump) were assessed before and after the 9-week intervention period. Posttesting identified a significant improvement EO overall stability (p = 0.003; effect size [ES] = 0.88), EO anterior-posterior stability (p = 0.003; ES = 0.92), peak force (p change in mass (p = 0.023; ES = 0.09) that was attributed to growth and no significant change in body fat or the sum of skinfolds. This study demonstrated that resistance training can have a significant effect on dynamic balance, maximum lower-body strength, and power without adversely affecting artistic or esthetic components. The results suggest that incorporating resistance training may enhance strength and power adaptations and manage growth-related changes in adolescent dancers.

  1. A profile of the resistance training practices of elite Spanish club teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverter-Masía, Joaquín; Legaz-Arrese, Alejandro; Munguía-Izquierdo, Diego; Barbany, Joan Ramón; Serrano-Ostáriz, Enrique

    2009-08-01

    This study describes the results of a survey of the resistance training practices of the following Spanish sports teams: soccer and basketball professional leagues, and top-division leagues for handball, volleyball, indoor soccer, and field hockey. The response rate was 81.8% (77 of 94). This survey examines (a) strength and conditioning (S&C) coach profiles, (b) resistance training exercises, (c) resistance training load, (d) repetition velocity, and (e) training leading to muscle failure. The results indicate that 80.5% of coaches held a university degree, with 22% holding a master's degrees, 40% held National Federation certification, and none held Strength and Conditioning Specialist certification. Respondents relied on nonscientific sources of information to develop their conditioning programs. Fifty-eight percent of the S&C coaches were hired full time, with 18% performing the duties of a first trainer. Many S&C coaches did not use weightlifting (54%), full squat (51%), load squat jump (35%), or bench press throw (100%) exercises. Thirty-eight percent of respondents did not control the load intensity or did not use a load of 50-90% of 1 repetition maximum. For these load intensities, 70% did not perform the combination of maximum repetition velocity and nonmuscular failure. More significant deficiencies in the fundamental principles of resistance training were observed in indoor soccer, soccer, field hockey, and among lower performing handball and basketball teams. These results indicate that the profile of the S&C coaches in the Spanish teams is insufficient for an optimal application of resistance training. Spanish S&C coaches should therefore take advantage of advances made through scientific research in the area of strength and conditioning by acquiring master's degrees and specific certificates and consulting peer-reviewer journals.

  2. Resistance training with soy vs whey protein supplements in hyperlipidemic males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leddy John J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most individuals at risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD can reduce risk factors through diet and exercise before resorting to drug treatment. The effect of a combination of resistance training with vegetable-based (soy versus animal-based (whey protein supplementation on CVD risk reduction has received little study. The study's purpose was to examine the effects of 12 weeks of resistance exercise training with soy versus whey protein supplementation on strength gains, body composition and serum lipid changes in overweight, hyperlipidemic men. Methods Twenty-eight overweight, male subjects (BMI 25–30 with serum cholesterol >200 mg/dl were randomly divided into 3 groups (placebo (n = 9, and soy (n = 9 or whey (n = 10 supplementation and participated in supervised resistance training for 12 weeks. Supplements were provided in a double blind fashion. Results All 3 groups had significant gains in strength, averaging 47% in all major muscle groups and significant increases in fat free mass (2.6%, with no difference among groups. Percent body fat and waist-to-hip ratio decreased significantly in all 3 groups an average of 8% and 2%, respectively, with no difference among groups. Total serum cholesterol decreased significantly, again with no difference among groups. Conclusion Participation in a 12 week resistance exercise training program significantly increased strength and improved both body composition and serum cholesterol in overweight, hypercholesterolemic men with no added benefit from protein supplementation.

  3. Effects of Resistance versus Endurance Training on Plasma Lipocalin-2 in Young Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadasi, Mehrzad; Mohammadi Domieh, Amin

    2014-06-01

    Lipocalin-2 (Lcn2) has been recognized as an adipocyte-derived acute phase protein that is positively correlated with obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The effects of resistance and endurance training (RT vs. ET) on plasma lipocalin-2 are still unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of RT vs. ET on plasma lipocalin-2 in young men. Twenty nine healthy and sedentary young men (age, 21-29 years) participated in this study. The subjects were randomly assigned to RT group (n=9), ET group (n=10) or control group (n=10). The experimental groups performed either RT or ET, 3 days a week for 8 weeks. The endurance training program included continuous running at an intensity corresponding to 65-80% of maximal heart rate, while resistance training consisted of 2-4 sets of circuit weight training for 8 stations and at an intensity corresponding to 65-80% of 1-RM in each station. No significant changes in the body mass, BMI, body fat percentage and WHR were found after the RT and ET. The results showed that Lcn2 decreased after RT and ET compared with the control group (Presistance determined by HOMA-IR, did not change in the RT and ET compared with the control group. Lcn2 decreases after 8 weeks RT and ET, but this improvement was not accompanied by decreased hs-CRP and insulin resistance in healthy and sedentary young men.

  4. Resistance training, insulin sensitivity and muscle function in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela, Flemming; Kjaer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Ageing is associated with a loss in both muscle mass and in the metabolic quality of skeletal muscle. This leads to sarcopenia and reduced daily function, as well as to an increased risk for development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. A major part, but not all, of these changes...... are associated with an age-related decrease in the physical activity level and can be counteracted by increased physical activity of a resistive nature. Strength training has been shown to improve insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in both healthy elderly individuals and patients with manifest diabetes...

  5. Abortion training in Canadian obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liauw, J; Dineley, B; Gerster, K; Hill, N; Costescu, D

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the current state of abortion training in Canadian Obstetrics and Gynecology residency programs. Surveys were distributed to all Canadian Obstetrics and Gynecology residents and program directors. Data were collected on inclusion of abortion training in the curriculum, structure of the training and expected competency of residents in various abortion procedures. We distributed and collected surveys between November 2014 and May 2015. In total, 301 residents and 15 program directors responded, giving response rates of 55% and 94%, respectively. Based on responses by program directors, half of the programs had "opt-in" abortion training, and half of the programs had "opt-out" abortion training. Upon completion of residency, 66% of residents expected to be competent in providing first-trimester surgical abortion in an ambulatory setting, and 35% expected to be competent in second-trimester surgical abortion. Overall, 15% of residents reported that they were not aware of or did not have access to abortion training within their program, and 69% desired more abortion training during residency. Abortion training in Canadian Obstetrics and Gynecology residency programs is inconsistent, and residents desire more training in abortion. This suggests an ongoing unmet need for training in this area. Policies mandating standardized abortion training in obstetrics and gynecology residency programs are necessary to improve delivery of family planning services to Canadian women. Abortion training in Canadian Obstetrics and Gynecology residency programs is inconsistent, does not meet resident demand and is unlikely to fulfill the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada objectives of training in the specialty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Quality Assurance Plan for Transportation Management Division Transportation Training Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) implemented new rules requiring minimum levels of training for certain key individuals who handle, package, transport, or otherwise prepare hazardous materials for transportation. In response to these rules, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Transportation Management Division (TMD), has developed a transportation safety training program. This program supplies designed instructional methodology and course materials to provide basic levels of DOT training to personnel for whom training has become mandatory. In addition, this program provides advanced hazardous waste and radioactive material packaging and transportation training to help personnel achieve proficiency and/or certification as hazardous waste and radioactive material shippers. This training program does not include site-specific or task-specific training beyond DOT requirements

  7. System for the quality assurance of personnel training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rjona, Orison; Venegas, Maria del C.; Rodriguez, Lazaro; Lopez, Miguel A.; Armenteros, Ana L.

    1999-01-01

    In this work are described the fundamental possibilities and characteristics of a software that allows to carry out the management and automatic evaluation of all data gotten during jobs analysis and design, development, implementation and evaluation of personnel training programs of nuclear and radioactive installations and risk industries. The system that is introduced, GESAT, proportion a tool of centralized managerial control of training data and the obtaining of the quality objectives of each installation in the training of their personnel. GESAT includes all phases of SAT method (Systematic Approach to Training). It constitutes the necessary practical support for the elaboration, implementation and evaluation of training programs, allowing the establishment of restrictions and controls and avoiding inconsistencies in the process. It offers the possibility of automatic evaluation that identify fundamental deficiencies in the planning and implementation of training programs. This evaluation facilitates the systematic feed back and the continuous improvement of the training programs.(author)

  8. Effectiveness of accommodation and constant resistance training on maximal strength and power in trained athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Ataee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accommodation resistance is a training technique that may improve strength and power gains beyond those achieved by traditional free weights. In this method, chains are either added on a free-weight bar and combined with traditional plates or added to the bar as the entire load.Purpose. The aim of the current study was to compare the effectiveness of accommodation and constant resistance training methods during a four-week period on maximal strength and power in trained athletes.Methods. This study was comprised of 24 trained athletes, including 16 trained males [8 Wushu athletes (Kung-Fu and 8 wrestlers, age: 20.5 ± 2.00 yrs. old]. Participants were initially tested on weight, body circumference, fat percent, upper and lower body maximal strength, determined by the 1-repetition maximum (1RM test, which determines the greatest amount of weight a person can successfully lift, and upper and lower body power. Participants were equally randomized to either accommodation or constant resistance training groups. Both groups underwent resistance training for a four-week period that consisted of three sessions per week. Multivariate repeated-measures analyses of variance of the data were used to verify significant differences in strength and power between groups. The modified Bonferroni post hoc test was used to compare the obtained results in pre-, mid-, and post test.Results. In the accommodation resistance group, there was a significant difference in lower body maximal strength compared to the constant group (163.12 ± 18.82 kg in the accommodation group vs. 142.25 ± 20.04 kg in the constant group, P = 0.04. No significant differences were found in upper body power, lower body power, and upper body maximal strength between the two groups (P > 0.05.Conclusion. Although there was only a significant difference in lower body maximal strength between groups, accommodation resistance training may induce a physiological training response by improving the

  9. Comparison of gravity-resisted and gym-based core training on core ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using a gravity-resisted core training intervention is likely to produce beneficial gains in core endurance for resistance trained males to a greater extent than a programme of similar exercises conducted conventionally in a gym. Keywords: Gravity-resisted core training; Exercise; Rehabilitation; Core endurance ...

  10. Effect of whole body resistance training on arterial compliance in young men.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakobowchuk, M.; McGowan, C.L.; Groot, P.C.E. de; Bruinsma, D.; Hartman, J.W.; Phillips, S.M.; MacDonald, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of resistance training on arterial stiffening is controversial. We tested the hypothesis that resistance training would not alter central arterial compliance. Young healthy men (age, 23 +/- 3.9 (mean +/- s.e.m.) years; n = 28,) were whole-body resistance trained five times a week for 12

  11. NTC operator training program viewed from SAT-based training process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshio

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Training Center Ltd. (NTC) was established in June 1972 to train PWR plant operators. Operator training was started in Apr. 1974. Presently we have three full-scope, control-room simulators. Recently IAEA recommended that its Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) be used for the training of NPP personnel. We thoroughly examined the SAT-based process and compared it against the NTC training program. As a result, we have recognized that the NTC training program satisfies the SAT-based training process. We now intend to improve the feedback step of the NTC training system. Our efforts continue to produce a relevant program at the forefront of our profession. (author)

  12. High-intensity interval training combined with resistance training improves physiological capacities, strength and quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaenker, Pierre; Favret, Fabrice; Lonsdorfer, Evelyne; Muff, Guillaume; de Seze, Jérôme; Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve

    2018-02-01

    Numerous studies have shown that mild-to-moderate intensity or resistance exercise training improves physical capacities such as, peak oxygen consumption, maximal tolerated power and strength in multiple sclerosis patients. However, few studies have evaluated the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) associated to with resistance training. Only few studies have analyzed difference between men and women before and after combined training. Moreover, the evaluation of exercise between ambulatory multiple sclerosis patients without disability (Expanded Disability Status Score [EDSS] 0-3) and patients with disabilities (EDSS 3.5-5) was not largely published. The main objective of our study was to determine if HIIT combined with resistance training improved aerobic and strength capacities as well as quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients and if gender and disabilities play a role in these changes. This study was an open-label uncontrolled study. The study was performed outside from conventional care facilities and including homebased training. Twenty-six multiple sclerosis patients have completed the program (19 women, 7 men; mean age 44.6±7.9 years, EDSS 2 [0-5]). We conducted a 12-week program of high-intensity interval training combined with resistance training at body weight. Peak oxygen consumption, maximal tolerated power, lactates, isokinetic strength of quadriceps and hamstrings (at 90°/s, 180°/s, and 240°/s) and quality of life were evaluated before and after the program. Peak oxygen consumption and maximum tolerated power improved by 13.5% and 9.4%, respectively. Isokinetic muscle strength increased in both quadriceps and hamstrings at each speed, with a rebalancing of strength between the two legs in quadriceps. Quality of life was also enhanced in three domains. Women showed better improvements than men in V̇O2peak, maximal tolerated power, lactates at the end of test, and heart rate peak, strength in both quadriceps and hamstrings

  13. Analysis of System Training Impact for Major Defense Acquisition Programs (MDAPs): Training Systems Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    consideration of embedded training. Mine-Resistant Ambush Protection Rapid Acquisition—operator training was provided after fielding. Husky Mounted Detection ...Acquisition—training for multiuse mission. The study objective was to identify and analyze the specific benefits of early and effective incorporation...but the lesson learned once again is to develop training in concert with systems development—even in rapid acquisitions. Husky Mounted Detection

  14. Startup circuit training program reduces metabolic risk in Latino adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jaimie Nicole; Gyllenhammer, Lauren E; Vanni, Amanda A; Meija, Mathew; Tung, Amy; Schroeder, E Todd; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Goran, Michael I

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to test the effects of a circuit training (CT; aerobic + strength training) program, with and without motivational interviewing (MI) behavioral therapy, on reducing adiposity and type 2 diabetes risk factors in Latina teenagers. Thirty-eight Latina adolescents (15.8 ± 1.1 yr) who are overweight/obese were randomly assigned to control (C; n = 12), CT (n = 14), or CT + MI (n = 12). The CT classes were held twice a week (60-90 min) for 16 wk. The CT + MI group also received individual or group MI sessions every other week. The following were measured before and after intervention: strength by one-repetition maximum; cardiorespiratory fitness (V·O 2max) by submaximal treadmill test; physical activity by accelerometry; dietary intake by records; height, weight, waist circumference; total body composition by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; visceral adipose tissue, subcutaneous adipose tissue, and hepatic fat fraction by magnetic resonance imaging; and glucose/insulin indices by fasting blood draw. Across-intervention group effects were tested using repeated-measures ANOVA with post hoc pairwise comparisons. CT and CT + MI participants, compared with controls, significantly increased fitness (+16% and +15% vs -6%, P = 0.03) and leg press (+40% vs +20%, P = 0.007). Compared with controls, CT participants also decreased waist circumference (-3% vs +3%; P < 0.001), subcutaneous adipose tissue (-10% vs 8%, P = 0.04), visceral adipose tissue (-10% vs +6%, P = 0.05), fasting insulin (-24% vs +6%, P = 0.03), and insulin resistance (-21% vs -4%, P = 0.05). CT may be an effective starter program to reduce fat depots and improve insulin resistance in Latino youth who are overweight/obese, whereas the additional MI therapy showed no additive effect on these health outcomes.

  15. Resistance training with vascular occlusion in inclusion body myositis: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualano, Bruno; Neves, Manoel; Lima, Fernanda Rodrigues; Pinto, Ana Lúcia De Sá; Laurentino, Gilberto; Borges, Claudia; Baptista, Luciana; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; Aoki, Marcelo Saldanha; Moriscot, Anselmo; Lancha, Antonio Herbert; Bonfá, Eloísa; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos

    2010-02-01

    Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy that produces remarkable muscle weakness. Resistance training with vascular occlusion has been shown to improve muscle strength and cross-sectional area in other muscle wasting conditions. We evaluated the efficacy of a moderate-intensity resistance training program combined with vascular occlusion by examining functional capacity, muscle morphology, and changes in the expression of genes related to muscle protein synthesis and proteolysis in a patient with IBM. A 65-yr-old man with IBM resistant to all proposed treatments underwent resistance training with vascular occlusion for 12 wk. Leg press one-repetition maximum; thigh cross-sectional area; balance, mobility, and muscle function; quality of life; and blood markers of inflammation and muscle damage were assessed at baseline and after the 12-wk program. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of mechanogrowth factor, mammalian target of rapamycin, atrogin-1, and muscle RING finger-1 were also quantified. After the 12-wk training program, the patient's leg press one-repetition maximum, balance and mobility function, and thigh cross-sectional area increased 15.9%, 60%, and 4.7%, respectively. All Short Form-36 Health Survey Questionnaire subscales demonstrated improvements as well, varying from 18% to 600%. mRNA expression of mechanogrowth factor increased 3.97-fold, whereas that of atrogin-1 decreased 0.62-fold. Muscle RING finger-1 and mammalian target of rapamycin mRNA levels were only slightly altered, 1.18- and 1.28-fold, respectively. Importantly, the exercise did not induce disease flare. We describe a novel, and likely the first, nonpharmacological therapeutic tool that might be able to counteract the muscle atrophy and the declining strength that usually occur in IBM.

  16. Resistance training to improve power and sports performance in adolescent athletes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Simon K; Lubans, David R; Callister, Robin

    2012-11-01

    Resistance training in untrained adolescents can positively effect health-related fitness as well as improve muscular power and sports performance. The impact of resistance training on adolescent athletes is less clear. The purpose of this review is to determine the effectiveness of resistance training programs on muscular power and sports performance in adolescent athletes. Systematic review and meta-analysis of previously published studies investigating resistance training in adolescent athlete populations. A systematic search of Medline, Embase, and SPORTDiscus databases was conducted on 21st March 2011 to identify studies evaluating resistance training programs on power and sports performance in adolescent athletes. Thirty-four studies were identified. All but two of the studies reported at least one statistically significant improvement in an alactic muscular power outcome. The most common indicators of alactic power were vertical jump (25 studies) and sprint running (13 studies) performance. Fourteen studies provided data to allow for pooling of results in a meta-analysis. A positive effect was detected for resistance training programs on vertical jump performance (mean difference 3.08 [95% CI 1.65, 4.51], Z=4.23 [Ptraining interventions can improve muscular power in adolescent athletes. A positive effect on sports performance attributable to participation in resistance training was reported by almost half the included studies, however limited objective evidence to support these claims was found. Improvements in motor performance skills, such as jumping, are widely stated as indicators of improvements in sporting performance. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Danish integrated antimicrobial in resistance monitoring and research program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Anette Marie; Heuer, Ole Eske; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe

    2007-01-01

    a systematic and continuous monitoring program of antimicrobial drug consumption and antimicrobial agent resistance in animals, food, and humans, the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program (DANMAP). Monitoring of antimicrobial drug resistance and a range of research......Resistance to antimicrobial agents is an emerging problem worldwide. Awareness of the undesirable consequences of its widespread occurrence has led to the initiation of antimicrobial agent resistance monitoring programs in several countries. In 1995, Denmark was the first country to establish...... activities related to DANMAP have contributed to restrictions or bans of use of several antimicrobial agents in food animals in Denmark and other European Union countries....

  18. Retention Initiatives Used by Professional Bachelor's Athletic Training Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Retaining athletic training students has been identified as problematic by approximately half of athletic training program (ATP) directors. It is unknown what ATP directors do to improve athletic training student retention. Objective: To identify initiatives that ATP directors use to improve the retention rates of athletic training…

  19. Strength Training: Program Organization and Proper Neck Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Dan

    During the 1960s, weightlifters and bodybuilders were the primary source for strength training methods, and their techniques were used by coaches to train athletes. In weight-training, it is the responsibility of trainers and coaches to provide the athlete with a program that produces the best results, consumes the least amount of time, and best…

  20. Recommendations for natural bodybuilding contest preparation: resistance and cardiovascular training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, E R; Fitschen, P J; Aragon, A A; Cronin, J; Schoenfeld, B J

    2015-03-01

    The anabolic effect of resistance training can mitigate muscle loss during contest preparation. In reviewing relevant literature, we recommend a periodized approach be utilized. Block and undulating models show promise. Muscle groups should be trained 2 times weekly or more, although high volume training may benefit from higher frequencies to keep volume at any one session from becoming excessive. Low to high (~3-15) repetitions can be utilized but most repetitions should occur in the 6-12 range using 70-80% of 1 repetition maximum. Roughly 40-70 reps per muscle group per session should be performed, however higher volume may be appropriate for advanced bodybuilders. Traditional rest intervals of 1-3 minutes are adequate, but longer intervals can be used. Tempo should allow muscular control of the load; 1-2 s concentric and 2-3 s eccentric tempos. Training to failure should be limited when performing heavy loads on taxing exercises, and primarily relegated to single-joint exercises and higher repetitions. A core of multi-joint exercises with some single-joint exercises to address specific muscle groups as needed should be used, emphasizing full range of motion and proper form. Cardiovascular training can be used to enhance fat loss. Interference with strength training adaptations increases concomitantly with frequency and duration of cardiovascular training. Thus, the lowest frequency and duration possible while achieving sufficient fat loss should be used. Full-body modalities or cycling may reduce interference. High intensities may as well; however, require more recovery. Fasted cardiovascular training may not have benefits over fed-state and could be detrimental.

  1. Longer Interset Rest Periods Enhance Muscle Strength and Hypertrophy in Resistance-Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Pope, Zachary K; Benik, Franklin M; Hester, Garrett M; Sellers, John; Nooner, Josh L; Schnaiter, Jessica A; Bond-Williams, Katherine E; Carter, Adrian S; Ross, Corbin L; Just, Brandon L; Henselmans, Menno; Krieger, James W

    2016-07-01

    Schoenfeld, BJ, Pope, ZK, Benik, FM, Hester, GM, Sellers, J, Nooner, JL, Schnaiter, JA, Bond-Williams, KE, Carter, AS, Ross, CL, Just, BL, Henselmans, M, and Krieger, JW. Longer interset rest periods enhance muscle strength and hypertrophy in resistance-trained men. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1805-1812, 2016-The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of short rest intervals normally associated with hypertrophy-type training versus long rest intervals traditionally used in strength-type training on muscular adaptations in a cohort of young, experienced lifters. Twenty-one young resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to either a group that performed a resistance training (RT) program with 1-minute rest intervals (SHORT) or a group that employed 3-minute rest intervals (LONG). All other RT variables were held constant. The study period lasted 8 weeks with subjects performing 3 total body workouts a week comprised 3 sets of 8-12 repetition maximum (RM) of 7 different exercises per session. Testing was performed prestudy and poststudy for muscle strength (1RM bench press and back squat), muscle endurance (50% 1RM bench press to failure), and muscle thickness of the elbow flexors, triceps brachii, and quadriceps femoris by ultrasound imaging. Maximal strength was significantly greater for both 1RM squat and bench press for LONG compared to SHORT. Muscle thickness was significantly greater for LONG compared to SHORT in the anterior thigh, and a trend for greater increases was noted in the triceps brachii (p = 0.06) as well. Both groups saw significant increases in local upper body muscle endurance with no significant differences noted between groups. This study provides evidence that longer rest periods promote greater increases in muscle strength and hypertrophy in young resistance-trained men.

  2. Psychological Assessment Training in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihura, Joni L; Roy, Manali; Graceffo, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    We surveyed American Psychological Association-accredited clinical psychology doctoral programs' (n = 83) training in psychological assessment-specifically, their coverage of various assessment topics and tests in courses and practica, and whether the training was optional or required. We report results overall and separately per training model (clinical science, scientist-practitioner, and practitioner-focused). Overall, our results suggest that psychological assessment training is as active, or even more active, than in previous years. Areas of increased emphasis include clinical interviewing and psychometrics; multimethod, outcomes, health, and collaborative or therapeutic assessment; and different types of cognitive and self-report personality tests. All or almost all practice-focused programs offered training with the Thematic Apperception Test and Rorschach compared to about half of the scientist-practitioner programs and a third of the clinical science programs. Although almost all programs reported teaching multimethod assessment, what constitutes different methods of assessing psychopathology should be clarified in future studies because many programs appear to rely on one method-self-report (especially clinical science programs). Although doctoral programs covered many assessment topics and tests in didactic courses, there appears to be a shortage of program-run opportunities for students to obtain applied assessment training. Finally, we encourage doctoral programs to be familiar with (a) internships' assessment expectations and opportunities, (b) the professional guidelines for assessment training, and (c) the American Psychological Association's requirements for preinternship assessment competencies.

  3. General Employee Radiological Training and Radiological Worker Training: Program management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This manual defines and describes the DOE General Employee Radiological Training (GERT) and Radiological Worker I and II (RW I and II) Training programs. It includes material development requirements, standards and policies, and program administration. This manual applies to General Employee Radiological Training and Radiological Worker Training at all DOE contractor sites. The training materials of both GERT and RW I and II training reflect the requirements identified in the DOE Radiological Control Manual and DOE Order 5480.11. The training programs represent the minimum requirement for the standardized core materials. Each contractor shall implement the program in its entirety and may augment the standardized core materials to increase the general employee and radiological worker level of competency

  4. Evolving Perceptions of the Plastic Surgery Integrated Residency Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Elizabeth; Mast, Bruce; Pierson, Justine M; Leavitt, Adam; Reintgen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a transition in plastic surgery residency training. Many programs across the country are now using integrated training modalities vs. independent training programs. This change in residency training has brought into question the effectiveness of integrated residency programs, in which medical students immediately enter the plastic surgery specialty upon graduation. This study assessed plastic surgery residency program directors and faculty members׳ viewpoints on the transition to integrated training programs and the effect this transition has had on the training of plastic surgery residents. An anonymous 13-question survey was formulated using a pilot survey sent to members of the plastic surgery department at the University of Florida. The final survey was then electronically sent via SurveyMonkey.com to 92 current plastic surgery residency program directors. Program directors were identified via program lists provided by the American Council of Academic Surgeons. Program directors were then asked to forward the survey to faculty members of their respective institutions. Responses collected were analyzed via SurveyMonkey.com and Microsoft Excel. University of Florida College of Medicine, Department of Plastic Surgery. Plastic surgery residency program directors as identified by the American Council of Academic Surgeons. A response rate of 40.2% was achieved via 37 of the 92 plastic surgery program directors responding to the electronic survey. An additional 6 anonymous faculty members also responded to the survey, 13.9% of all responses. Institutions indicated that the majority was using integrated residency programs, with some institutions using both integrated and independent training programs simultaneously. Most respondents indicated that they supported the transition to the integrated residency program at their respective institutions. Respondents indicated several reasons as to why or why not programs have transitioned to the

  5. Effects of aerobic training, resistance training, or both on psychological health in adolescents with obesity: The HEARTY randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfield, Gary S; Kenny, Glen P; Alberga, Angela S; Prud'homme, Denis; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Gougeon, Réjeanne; Phillips, Penny; Tulloch, Heather; Malcolm, Janine; Doucette, Steve; Wells, George A; Ma, Jinhui; Cameron, Jameason D; Sigal, Ronald J

    2015-12-01

    To determine the effects of aerobic training, resistance training, and combined training on mood, body image, and self-esteem in adolescents with obesity. After a 4-week prerandomization treatment, 304 postpubertal adolescents (91 males, 213 females) with obesity ages 14-18 years were randomized to 1 of 4 groups for 22 weeks: aerobic training (n = 75), resistance training (n = 78), combined aerobic and resistance training (n = 75), or nonexercising control (n = 76). All participants received dietary counseling, with a daily energy deficit of 250 kcal. Mood was measured using the Brunel Mood Scale. Body image was assessed using the Multiple Body Self-Relations Questionnaire, and physical self-perceptions and global self-esteem were measured using the Harter Physical Self-Perceptions Questionnaire. Median adherence was 62%, 56%, and 64% in aerobic, resistance, and combined training, respectively. Resistance and combined training produced greater improvements than control on vigor, and resistance training reduced depressive symptoms. All groups improved on body image and physical self-perceptions, but combined showed greater increases than control on perceived physical conditioning, while only resistance training showed greater increases than controls on global self-esteem. Both combined and resistance training demonstrated greater increases in perceived strength than control. Psychological benefits were more related to better adherence and reductions in body fat than changes in strength or fitness. Resistance training, alone or in combination with aerobic training, may provide psychological benefits in adolescents with overweight or obesity, and therefore could be an alternative to aerobic training for some individuals in the biological and psychological management of adolescent obesity. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Effects of resistance training and aerobic training on ambulation in chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severinsen, Kaare; Jakobsen, Johannes K; Pedersen, Asger R; Overgaard, Kristian; Andersen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to directly compare the effects of aerobic training (AT) with progressive resistance training (RT) after stroke to determine whether AT-induced fitness gains or RT-induced strength gains translate into improved ambulation across a 12-wk intervention and whether gains are retained 1 yr after cessation of formal training. This study is a randomized controlled 12-wk intervention trial with a 1-yr follow-up. Forty-three community-dwelling independent walkers with a chronic ischemic hemiparetic stroke were allocated to AT using a cycle ergometer (n = 13), RT using training machines (n = 14), or low-intensity sham training of the arms (n = 16). The main outcome measures were 6-min walk distance and fast 10-m walking speed. Comparisons between AT, RT, and sham training revealed no clinically relevant effects on walking velocity or walking distance. Muscle strength improved after RT (P muscle strength or aerobic capacity using non-task-specific training methods does not result in improved ambulation in patients with chronic stroke. Muscle strength gains were maintained at follow-up, whereas all improvements of aerobic capacity were lost, indicating a long-lasting effect of intensive RT even without maintenance training.

  7. 14 CFR 121.403 - Training program: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Curriculum. 121.403...: Curriculum. (a) Each certificate holder must prepare and keep current a written training program curriculum for each type of airplane with respect to dispatchers and each crewmember required for that type...

  8. Training programs in research into the effectiveness of teacher behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomic, W.

    2008-01-01

    This article contends that studies into the effectiveness of teacher behavior should give more attention both to a systematic design of training programs as well as to the collection of implementation data concerning teacher behavior, before incorporating the training program into an experimental

  9. Export Management Specialist. A Training Program. Instructor's Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication provides instructors with materials for an export management specialist (EMS) training program. The objective of the training program is to assist companies in reaching their export goals by educating current and potential managers about the basics of exporting. It provides a foundation for considering international trade and for…

  10. 10 CFR 1046.12 - Physical fitness training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Physical fitness training program. 1046.12 Section 1046.12... Force Personnel § 1046.12 Physical fitness training program. (a) Each incumbent security police officer, who has not met the applicable physical fitness qualification standard, shall participate in a DOE...

  11. Training in Buprenorphine and Office-Based Opioid Treatment: A Survey of Psychiatry Residency Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Joji; Ellison, Tatyana V; Connery, Hilary S; Surber, Charles; Renner, John A

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatrists are well suited to provide office-based opioid treatment (OBOT), but the extent to which psychiatry residents are exposed to buprenorphine training and OBOT during residency remains unknown. Psychiatry residency programs in the USA were recruited to complete a survey. Forty-one programs were included in the analysis for a response rate of 23.7 %. In total, 75.6 % of the programs currently offered buprenorphine waiver training and 78.1 % provided opportunities to treat opioid dependence with buprenorphine under supervision. Programs generally not only reported favorable beliefs about OBOT and buprenorphine waiver training but also reported numerous barriers. The majority of psychiatry residency training programs responding to this survey offer buprenorphine waiver training and opportunities to treat opioid-dependent patients, but numerous barriers continue to be cited. More research is needed to understand the role residency training plays in impacting future practice of psychiatrists.

  12. Effects of aerobic and/or resistance training on body mass and fat mass in overweight or obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Leslie H; Slentz, Cris A; Bateman, Lori A; Shields, A Tamlyn; Piner, Lucy W; Bales, Connie W; Houmard, Joseph A; Kraus, William E

    2012-12-15

    Recent guidelines on exercise for weight loss and weight maintenance include resistance training as part of the exercise prescription. Yet few studies have compared the effects of similar amounts of aerobic and resistance training on body mass and fat mass in overweight adults. STRRIDE AT/RT, a randomized trial, compared aerobic training, resistance training, and a combination of the two to determine the optimal mode of exercise for obesity reduction. Participants were 119 sedentary, overweight or obese adults who were randomized to one of three 8-mo exercise protocols: 1) RT: resistance training, 2) AT: aerobic training, and 3) AT/RT: aerobic and resistance training (combination of AT and RT). Primary outcomes included total body mass, fat mass, and lean body mass. The AT and AT/RT groups reduced total body mass and fat mass more than RT (P body mass more than AT (P body mass reductions over AT alone. Balancing time commitments against health benefits, it appears that AT is the optimal mode of exercise for reducing fat mass and body mass, while a program including RT is needed for increasing lean mass in middle-aged, overweight/obese individuals.

  13. Integrating Advanced Physical Training Programs into the Marine Corps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-20

    CrossFit: Forging Elite Fitness, (unknown, CrossFit: Forging Elite Fitness n.d.), CrossFit, as advertised on its website, is a principal strength and...of other elite and professional athletes worldwide. 5 NIKE SPARQ Training Web Site, About Us, (unknown, Nike Sparq Training n.d.) , According to...Program Manual. Program Manual, Washington, D.C.: Headquarters Marine Corps, 2002. unknown. Nike Sparq Training. http://www.sparqtraining.com

  14. Shoulder Muscle Activation of Novice and Resistance Trained Women during Variations of Dumbbell Press Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Luczak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has compared the effects of trunk inclination angle on muscle activation using barbells and Smith machines in men. Whether similar effects occur with the use of dumbbells or in women remains unknown. The purpose was to compare upper extremity surface electromyographical (EMG activity between dumbbell bench, incline, and shoulder presses. Dominate arm EMG data were recorded for collegiate-aged female resistance trained individuals ( and novice female resistance trained exercisers ( from which average EMG amplitude for each repetition phase (concentric, eccentric was computed. No significant differences were found between experienced and novice resistance trained individuals. For the upper trapezius and anterior deltoid muscles, shoulder press activation was significantly greater than incline press which in turn was significantly greater than bench press across both phases. The bench and incline presses promoted significantly greater pectoralis major sternal activation compared to the shoulder press (both phases. While pectoralis major clavicular activation during the incline press eccentric phase was significantly greater than both the bench and shoulder presses, activation during the bench press concentric phase promoted significantly greater activation than the incline press which in turn was significantly greater than the shoulder press. These results provide evidence for selecting exercises in resistance and rehabilitation programs.

  15. Shoulder Muscle Activation of Novice and Resistance Trained Women during Variations of Dumbbell Press Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczak, Joshua; Bosak, Andy; Riemann, Bryan L

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has compared the effects of trunk inclination angle on muscle activation using barbells and Smith machines in men. Whether similar effects occur with the use of dumbbells or in women remains unknown. The purpose was to compare upper extremity surface electromyographical (EMG) activity between dumbbell bench, incline, and shoulder presses. Dominate arm EMG data were recorded for collegiate-aged female resistance trained individuals (n = 12) and novice female resistance trained exercisers (n = 12) from which average EMG amplitude for each repetition phase (concentric, eccentric) was computed. No significant differences were found between experienced and novice resistance trained individuals. For the upper trapezius and anterior deltoid muscles, shoulder press activation was significantly greater than incline press which in turn was significantly greater than bench press across both phases. The bench and incline presses promoted significantly greater pectoralis major sternal activation compared to the shoulder press (both phases). While pectoralis major clavicular activation during the incline press eccentric phase was significantly greater than both the bench and shoulder presses, activation during the bench press concentric phase promoted significantly greater activation than the incline press which in turn was significantly greater than the shoulder press. These results provide evidence for selecting exercises in resistance and rehabilitation programs.

  16. Shoulder Muscle Activation of Novice and Resistance Trained Women during Variations of Dumbbell Press Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczak, Joshua; Bosak, Andy; Riemann, Bryan L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has compared the effects of trunk inclination angle on muscle activation using barbells and Smith machines in men. Whether similar effects occur with the use of dumbbells or in women remains unknown. The purpose was to compare upper extremity surface electromyographical (EMG) activity between dumbbell bench, incline, and shoulder presses. Dominate arm EMG data were recorded for collegiate-aged female resistance trained individuals (n = 12) and novice female resistance trained exercisers (n = 12) from which average EMG amplitude for each repetition phase (concentric, eccentric) was computed. No significant differences were found between experienced and novice resistance trained individuals. For the upper trapezius and anterior deltoid muscles, shoulder press activation was significantly greater than incline press which in turn was significantly greater than bench press across both phases. The bench and incline presses promoted significantly greater pectoralis major sternal activation compared to the shoulder press (both phases). While pectoralis major clavicular activation during the incline press eccentric phase was significantly greater than both the bench and shoulder presses, activation during the bench press concentric phase promoted significantly greater activation than the incline press which in turn was significantly greater than the shoulder press. These results provide evidence for selecting exercises in resistance and rehabilitation programs. PMID:26464884

  17. GESAT: System for management and evaluation of training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjona, O.; Venegas, M.; Rodriguez, L.; Lopez, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describe the criteria considered to design the GESAT system, the elements considered to select the relational model, selection of the database language and the main features and possibilities of this system. GESAT allow the management of training programs based on the Systematic Approach to Training. Include the information related with all SAT phases, the results of the job analysis, training plans design, development of materials, training implementation, and the subsequent evaluation

  18. Criteria to evaluate SAT-based training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjona, O.; Venegas, M.; Rodriguez, L.; Lopez, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper present some coefficients of error obtained to evaluate the quality of the design development and implementation of SAT-based personnel training programs. With the attainment of these coefficients, with the use of the GESAT system, is facilitated the continuos evaluation of training programs and the main deficiencies in the design, development and implementation of training programs are obtained, through the comparison between the program features and their standards or wanted features and doing an statistics analysis of the data kept in the GESAT system

  19. Shoulder injuries attributed to resistance training: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolber, Morey J; Beekhuizen, Kristina S; Cheng, Ming-Shun S; Hellman, Madeleine A

    2010-06-01

    The popularity of resistance training (RT) is evident by the more than 45 million Americans who engage in strength training regularly. Although the health and fitness benefits ascribed to RT are generally agreed upon, participation is not without risk. Acute and chronic injuries attributed to RT have been cited in the epidemiological literature among both competitive and recreational participants. The shoulder complex in particular has been alluded to as one of the most prevalent regions of injury. The purpose of this manuscript is to present an overview of documented shoulder injuries among the RT population and where possible discern mechanisms of injury and risk factors. A literature search was conducted in the PUBMED, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and OVID databases to identify relevant articles for inclusion using combinations of key words: resistance training, shoulder, bodybuilding, weightlifting, shoulder injury, and shoulder disorder. The results of the review indicated that up to 36% of documented RT-related injuries and disorders occur at the shoulder complex. Trends that increased the likelihood of injury were identified and inclusive of intrinsic risk factors such as joint and muscle imbalances and extrinsic risk factors, namely, that of improper attention to exercise technique. A majority of the available research was retrospective in nature, consisting of surveys and descriptive epidemiological reports. A paucity of research was available to identify predictive variables leading to injury, suggesting the need for future prospective-based investigations.

  20. Parent training in nonviolent resistance for adult entitled dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Eli; Dolberger, Dan; Nortov, Efi; Omer, Haim

    2012-03-01

    "Adult entitled dependence" is a condition characterized by the extreme dependence of grown children on their family and by levels of dysfunction, seemingly excessive in light of their apparent capacity to function. The family and the dependent adult become involved in an interaction in which the very attempts to alleviate the problem may aggravate it. Parent-training in nonviolent resistance (NVR) is an intervention that has been shown to be helpful to parents of behaviorally disturbed youth. Parent training in NVR offers parents means to shift away from a stance of helplessness toward realistic goals that are accomplishable without the collaboration of their offspring. We report on the parents of 27 entitled dependent grown children who participated in parent training in NVR. Additionally, we present 2 detailed case studies that exemplify the problem and the therapeutic process. Before treatment, the dependent adults were not working or studying, drew heavily on parental services (financial or otherwise), and were resistant to parental attempts to change the situation. Most parents succeeded in overcoming their helplessness and reducing the provision of parental services. In a considerable proportion of cases, the grown children started working or studying or moved to independent lodgings. © FPI, Inc.

  1. Effect of resistance training using bodyweight in the elderly: Comparison of resistance exercise movement between slow and normal speed movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yuya; Tanimoto, Michiya; Oba, Naoko; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Miyachi, Motohiko; Ishii, Naokata

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigated whether a slow movement protocol can be applied to resistance training using bodyweight. In addition, the intervention program combined plyometric exercise with resistance exercise to improve physical function overall. A total of 39 active elderly adults participated in a 16-week intervention. The program consisted of five resistance exercises and four plyometric exercises using their own bodyweight with a single set for each exercise. Participants were assigned to one of two experimental groups. One group carried out resistance exercise with slow movement and tonic force generation (3-s concentric, 3-s eccentric and 1-s isometric actions with no rest between each repetition). The other group as a movement comparison followed the same regimen, but at normal speed (1-s eccentric and 1-s concentric actions with 1-s rest between each repetition). Muscle size, strength and physical function were measured before and after the intervention period. After the intervention, strengths of upper and lower limbs, and maximum leg extensor power were significantly improved in both groups. Muscle size did not change in either group. There were no significant differences in any of the parameters between groups. The intervention program using only own bodyweight that comprised resistance exercise with slow movement and plyometric exercise can improve physical function in the elderly, even with single sets for each exercise. However, there was no enhanced muscle hypertrophic effect. Further attempts, such as increasing performing multiple sets, would be required to induce muscle hypertrophy. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2015; 15: 1270-1277. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. Effects of Creatine and Resistance Training on Bone Health in Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilibeck, Philip D; Candow, Darren G; Landeryou, Tim; Kaviani, Mojtaba; Paus-Jenssen, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Our primary purpose was to determine the effect of 12 months of creatine (Cr) supplementation during a supervised resistance training program on properties of bone in postmenopausal women. Participants were randomized (double-blind) into two groups: resistance training (3 d·wk) and Cr supplementation (0.1 g·kg·d) or resistance training and placebo (Pl). Our primary outcome measures were lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD). Secondary outcome measures were total hip and whole-body BMD, bone geometric properties at the hip, speed of sound at the distal radius and tibia, whole-body lean tissue mass, muscle thickness, and bench press and hack squat strength. Forty-seven women (57 (SD, 6) yr; Cr, n = 23; Pl, n = 24) were randomized, with 33 analyzed after 12 months (Cr, n = 15; Pl, n = 18). Cr attenuated the rate of femoral neck BMD loss (-1.2%; absolute change (95% confidence interval), -0.01 (-0.025 to 0.005) g·cm) compared with Pl (-3.9%; -0.03 (-0.044 to -0.017) g·cm; P < 0.05) and also increased femoral shaft subperiosteal width, a predictor of bone bending strength (Cr, 0.04 (-0.09 to 0.16) cm); Pl, -0.12 (-0.23 to -0.01) cm; P < 0.05). Cr increased relative bench press strength more than Pl (64% vs 34%; P < 0.05). There were no differences between groups for other outcome measures. There were no differences between groups for reports of serum liver enzyme abnormalities, and creatinine clearance was normal for Cr participants throughout the intervention. Twelve months of Cr supplementation during a resistance training program preserves femoral neck BMD and increases femoral shaft superiosteal width, a predictor of bone bending strength, in postmenopausal women.

  3. Comparison of Resistance and Chair Yoga Training on Subjective Sleep Quality in MCI Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Karydaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-rated sleep disorders are common in older adults, resulting in various health problems. Two types of exercise are suggested as an affordable and accessible non-pharmacological treatment and are being compared and discussed. Objectives: This randomized, controlled, 12-week trial investigates the effects of different types of exercise (resistance vs chair yoga training on subjective sleep quality, in women with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI. Methods: In order to measure cognitive function, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE was used. Forty nine participants enrolled in the study were randomized to a resistance training program (n=16, or a chair yoga program (n=15, or a control group (n=18. All participants engaged in cognitive activities. Results: At baseline, PSQI scores for CYG, RTG and CG (8.2±5.1, 6.1±4.3, 7.4±4.1, respectively and MMSE (28.3±1.4, 27.8±1.2, 28.0±2.3, respectively did not differ statistically between the three groups (F2,46= 1.993, p= 0.143. After the intervention, a significant improvement in PSQI total score was noted in resistance training group (t=2.335, df15, p=0.03. Conclusions: There were no significant differences between groups before and after test for the PSQI subscale scores (sleep onset latency (h, time spent in bed before sleep (min, morning waking up (h and sleep duration (h. No significant difference was found in PSQI subscales scores within each group. This study proposes that resistance training is an effective treatment approach to improve sleep quality in women with mild cognitive impairment.

  4. Physiological Adaptations following Resistance Training in Youth Athletes-A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legerlotz, Kirsten; Marzilger, Robert; Bohm, Sebastian; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2016-11-01

    To understand the mechanisms for the effects of resistance training on functional parameters, and to assess the injury risk of the involved tissues, it is necessary to examine the underlying morphological and structural changes of the respective tissues. The presented information on physiological adaptations have been deduced from cross-sectional studies comparing youth athletes with controls and children with adults as well as from longitudinal studies examining the effects of resistance training in untrained children and adolescents and in youth athletes. The evidence indicates, that training induced changes in motor performance rely partly on enhanced neuromuscular control, and partly on morphological adaptation of muscles and tendons, such as changes in muscle, muscle fiber and tendon cross-sectional area, muscle composition, and tendon material properties, with the bone also adapting by increasing bone mineral content and cortical area. Although the training induced adaptations of the investigated tissues follows similar principles in children as in adults, the magnitude of the adaptive response appears to be more subtle. As studies investigating physiological adaptation in youth athletes are sparse, more research in this area is warranted to elucidate the specific physiological stimulus-response relationship necessary for effective training programs and injury prevention.

  5. 14 CFR 121.407 - Training program: Approval of airplane simulators and other training devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the pilot flight training requirements prescribed in the certificate holder's approved low-altitude... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Approval of airplane simulators and other training devices. 121.407 Section 121.407 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...

  6. The Development of X-Ray Training Program for Physical Protection Training of Nuclear Security Guards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Hyun Chul [KINAC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In the 2010 Nuclear Security Summit, there was a movement to strengthen the international effort to protect nuclear materials and other radioactive materials against malicious acts. By recognizing the importance of human resource development and training in nuclear security, the Republic of Korea (ROK) pledged to establish an international training center on nuclear security. Consequently, the International Nuclear Security Academy (INSA) was established in Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) in February 2014. The INSA contributes to meet not only the domestic needs but also international needs for nuclear nonproliferation and security training. Meanwhile, since 2012, KINAC is the only physical protection training provider for nuclear facility operators designated by Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC). In this paper, we are going to introduce our four-year physical protection training activities for nuclear facility operators and describe X-Ray Web-Based Training (WBT) program to be used for physical protection training of nuclear security guards. KINAC/INSA, as the only physical protection training provider for nuclear facility operators designated by NSSC, puts emphasis on delivering effective and high-quality training program. We, open a door for nuclear facility operators to share lessons they learned. Considering the survey result on the training program, we will apply X-Ray WBT program for training of nuclear security guards. Efforts to improve training quality will be continued.

  7. Training Volume, Not Frequency, Indicative of Maximal Strength Adaptations to Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquhoun, Ryan J; Gai, Christopher M; Aguilar, Danielle; Bove, Daniel; Dolan, Jeffrey; Vargas, Andres; Couvillion, Kaylee; Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Campbell, Bill I

    2018-01-05

    To compare the effects of a high- versus a moderate-training frequency on maximal strength and body composition. 28 young, healthy resistance-trained males were randomly assigned to either: 3x/week (3x; n=16) or 6x/week (6x; n=12). Dependent variables (DVs) assessed at baseline and after the 6-week training intervention included: squat 1RM (SQ1RM), bench press 1RM (BP1RM), deadlift 1RM (DL1RM), powerlifting total (PLT), Wilk's coefficient (WC), fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM). Data for each DV was analyzed via a 2x2 between-within factorial repeated measures ANOVA. There was a main effect for time (p < 0.001) for SQ1RM (3x: + 16.8 kg; 6x: + 16.7 kg), BP1RM (3x: + 7.8 kg; 6x: + 8.8 kg), DL1RM (3x: + 19 kg; 6x: + 21 kg), PLT (3x: + 43.6 kg; 6x: + 46.5 kg), WC (3x: + 27; 6x: + 27.1), and FFM (3x: + 1.7 kg; 6x: + 2.6 kg). There were no group x time interactions or main effects for group. The primary finding was that 6-weeks of resistance training lead to significant increases in maximal strength and fat-free mass. Additionally, it appears that increased training frequency does not lead to additional strength improvements when volume and intensity are equated. Practical Application: High frequency (6x/wk) resistance training does not appear to offer additional strength and hypertrophy benefits over lower frequency (3x/wk), when volume and intensity are equated. Coaches and practitioners can therefore expect similar increases in strength and lean body mass with both 3- and 6-weekly sessions.

  8. The effects of low-volume resistance training with and without advanced techniques in trained subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieβsing, Jùrgen; Fisher, James; Steele, James; Rothe, Frank; Raubold, Kristin; Eichmann, Björn

    2016-03-01

    This study examined low-volume resistance training (RT) in trained participants with and without advanced training methods. Trained participants (RT experience 4±3 years) were randomised to groups performing single-set RT: ssRM (N.=21) performing repetitions to self-determined repetition maximum (RM), ssMMF (N.=30) performing repetitions to momentary muscular failure (MMF), and ssRP (N.=28) performing repetitions to self-determined RM using a rest pause (RP) method. Each performed supervised RT twice/week for 10 weeks. Outcomes included maximal isometric strength and body composition using bioelectrical impedance analysis. The ssRM group did not significantly improve in any outcome. The ssMMF and ssRP groups both significantly improved strength (p groups. Strength ES's were considered large for ssMMF (0.91 to 1.57) and ranging small to large for ssRP (0.42 to 1.06). Body composition data revealed significant improvements (PTraining to self-determined RM is not efficacious for trained participants. Training to MMF produces greatest improvements in strength and body composition, however, RP style training does offer some benefit.

  9. The lung cancer exercise training study: a randomized trial of aerobic training, resistance training, or both in postsurgical lung cancer patients: rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford Jeffrey

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Lung Cancer Exercise Training Study (LUNGEVITY is a randomized trial to investigate the efficacy of different types of exercise training on cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak, patient-reported outcomes, and the organ components that govern VO2peak in post-operative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Methods/Design Using a single-center, randomized design, 160 subjects (40 patients/study arm with histologically confirmed stage I-IIIA NSCLC following curative-intent complete surgical resection at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC will be potentially eligible for this trial. Following baseline assessments, eligible participants will be randomly assigned to one of four conditions: (1 aerobic training alone, (2 resistance training alone, (3 the combination of aerobic and resistance training, or (4 attention-control (progressive stretching. The ultimate goal for all exercise training groups will be 3 supervised exercise sessions per week an intensity above 70% of the individually determined VO2peak for aerobic training and an intensity between 60 and 80% of one-repetition maximum for resistance training, for 30-45 minutes/session. Progressive stretching will be matched to the exercise groups in terms of program length (i.e., 16 weeks, social interaction (participants will receive one-on-one instruction, and duration (30-45 mins/session. The primary study endpoint is VO2peak. Secondary endpoints include: patient-reported outcomes (PROs (e.g., quality of life, fatigue, depression, etc. and organ components of the oxygen cascade (i.e., pulmonary function, cardiac function, skeletal muscle function. All endpoints will be assessed at baseline and postintervention (16 weeks. Substudies will include genetic studies regarding individual responses to an exercise stimulus, theoretical determinants of exercise adherence, examination of the psychological mediators of the exercise - PRO relationship, and exercise-induced changes

  10. Corticosteroid injections, eccentric decline squat training and heavy slow resistance training in patellar tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M; Kovanen, V; Aagaard, P

    2009-01-01

    A randomized-controlled single-blind trial was conducted to investigate the clinical, structural and functional effects of peritendinous corticosteroid injections (CORT), eccentric decline squat training (ECC) and heavy slow resistance training (HSR) in patellar tendinopathy. Thirty-nine male...... patients were randomized to CORT, ECC or HSR for 12 weeks. We assessed function and symptoms (VISA-p questionnaire), tendon pain during activity (VAS), treatment satisfaction, tendon swelling, tendon vascularization, tendon mechanical properties and collagen crosslink properties. Assessments were made at 0...

  11. Pediatrics in disasters: evaluation of a global training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lindsey; Guan, Hongyan; Ortiz-Hernández, Ana A; Llamosas Gallardo, Beatriz; Rivera, Genesis; Wathen, Joseph; Shulman, Benjamin; Berman, Stephen

    2014-08-01

    The findings of this evaluation document partial success for the PEDS training program to achieve its 3 aims. It will take several years for the dissemination of this program to reach a critical mass of pediatricians and other physicians in many LMICs. Obtaining stronger support from MOHs and other governmental agencies is necessary to achieve this goal. Another additional approach would be to integrate the training into medical school and residency programs.

  12. Adaptations to a New Physical Training Program in the Combat Controller Training Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Traditional bodybuilding -type resistance training (e.g., bench press, bicep curls) was replaced by functional strength training. Functional strength...as opposed to the single joint, externally stabilized motion of many bodybuilding exercises. Addition of athletic trainer visits. Prior to the

  13. Chronic resistance training does not affect post-exercise blood pressure in normotensive older women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerage, Aline Mendes; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes; do Nascimento, Matheus Amarante; Pina, Fábio Luiz Cheche; Gonçalves, Cássio Gustavo Santana; Sardinha, Luís B; Cyrino, Edilson Serpeloni

    2015-06-01

    Resistance training has been recommended for maintenance or improvement of the functional health of older adults, but its effect on acute cardiovascular responses remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of 12 weeks of resistance training on post-exercise blood pressure (BP) in normotensive older women. Twenty-eight normotensive and physically inactive women (≥ 60 years) were randomly assigned to a training group (TG) or a control group (CG). The TG underwent a resistance training program (12 weeks, 8 exercises, 2 sets, 10-15 repetitions, 3 days/week), while the CG performed stretching exercises (12 weeks, 2 sets, 20 s each, 2 days/week). At baseline and after the intervention, participants were randomly submitted to two experimental sessions: a resistance exercise session (7 exercises, 2 sets, 10-15 repetitions) and a control session. BP was obtained pre- and post-sessions (90 min), through auscultation. Post-exercise hypotension was observed for systolic, diastolic, and mean BP in the TG (-6.1, -3.4, and -4.3 mmHg, respectively; P After the intervention period, the magnitude and pattern of this phenomenon for systolic, diastolic, and mean BP were similar between groups (TG -8.8, -4.1, and -5.7 mmHg, respectively; P exercise promotes reduction in post-exercise BP and 12 weeks of resistance training program do not change the occurrence or magnitude of this hypotension. (ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT02346981).

  14. Progressive resistance training in elderly hiv-positive patients: does it work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Maria Loiola de Souza

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elderly people present alterations in body composition and physical fitness, compromising their quality of life. Chronic diseases, including HIV/AIDS, worsen this situation. Resistance exercises are prescribed to improve fitness and promote healthier and independent aging. Recovery of strength and physical fitness is the goal of exercise in AIDS wasting syndrome. OBJECTIVE: This study describes a case series of HIV-positive elderly patients who participated in a progressive resistance training program and evaluates their body composition, muscular strength, physical fitness and the evolution of CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts. METHODS: Subjects were prospectively recruited for nine months. The training program consisted of three sets of 8-12 repetitions of leg press, seated row, lumbar extension and chest press, performed with free weight machines hts, twice/week for one year. Infectious disease physicians followed patients and reported all relevant clinical data. Body composition was assessed by anthropometric measures and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry before and after the training program. RESULTS: Fourteen patients, aged 62-71 years old, of both genders, without regular physical activity who had an average of nine years of HIV/AIDS history were enrolled. The strengths of major muscle groups increased (74%-122%, p=0.003-0.021 with a corresponding improvement in sit-standing and walking 2.4 m tests (p=0.003. There were no changes in clinical conditions and body composition measures, but triceps and thigh skinfolds were significantly reduced (p=0.037. In addition, there were significant increases in the CD4+ counts (N=151 cells; p=0.008 and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio (0.63 to 0.81, p=0.009. CONCLUSION: Resistance training increased strength, improved physical fitness, reduced upper and lower limb skinfolds, and were associated with an improvement in the CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ counts in HIV positive elderly patients without significant side effects.

  15. Resistance Training in Type 2 Diabetic Patients Improves Uric Acid Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sousa Moisés S.S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance training (RT can provide several benefits for individuals with Type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance training on the strength levels and uric acid (UA concentration in individuals with Type 2 diabetes. The study included 68 patients (57.7±9.0 years that participated in an organized program of RT for 12 weeks. The volunteers were divided into two groups: an experimental group (EG; n=34 that performed the resistance training program consisting of seven exercises executed in an alternating order based on segments; and a control group (CG; n=34 that maintained their normal daily life activities. Muscle strength and uric acid were measured both pre- and post-experiment. The results showed a significant increase in strength of the subjects in the EG for all exercises included in the study (p<0.001. Comparing the strength levels of the post-test, intergroup differences were found in supine sitting (p<0.001, leg extension (p<0.001, shoulder press (p<0.001, leg curl (p=0.001, seated row (p<0.001, leg press (p=0.001 and high pulley (p<0.001. The measured uric acid was significantly increased in both experimental and control groups (p<0.001 and p=0.001, respectively. The intergroup comparison showed a significant increase for the EG (p=0.024. We conclude that the training program was effective for strength gains despite an increase in uric acid in Type 2 diabetics.

  16. Differences in neuroradiology training programs around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, T; Huisman, T A G M; Fiehler, J; Savic, L J; Yousem, D M

    2015-03-01

    No previous study compares neuroradiology training programs and teaching schedules across the globe, to our knowledge. This study was conducted to better understand international program requisites. Data from 43 countries were collected by an e-mail-based questionnaire (response rate, 84.0%). Radiologists across the world were surveyed regarding the neuroradiology training schemes in their institutions. Answers were verified by officers of the national neuroradiology societies. While many countries do not provide fellowship training in neuroradiology (n = 16), others have formal postresidency curricula (n = 27). Many programs have few fellows and didactic sessions, but the 1- or 2-year duration of fellowship training is relatively consistent (n = 23/27, 85%). There is a wide variety of fellowship offerings, lessons provided, and ratios of teachers to learners in neuroradiology training programs globally. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  17. Hanford general employee training - A million dollar cost beneficial program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, P.R.

    1991-02-01

    In January 1990, Westinghouse Hanford Company implemented an interactive videodisc training program entitled Hanford General Employee Training. Covering all Institute of Nuclear Power Operations general employee training objectives, training mandated by US Department of Energy orders, and training prescribed by internal Westinghouse Hanford Company policies, Hanford General Employee Training presents and manages engaging training programs individually tailored to each of the 9,000 employees. Development costs for a sophisticated program such as Hanford General Employee Training were high compared to similar costs for developing ''equivalent'' traditional training. Hardware ($500,000) and labor costs ($400,000) totaled $900,000. Annual maintenance costs, equipment plus labor, are totalling about $200,000. On the benefit side, by consolidating some 17 previous Westinghouse Hanford Company courses and more effectively managing the instructional process, Hanford General Employee Training reduced the average student training time from over 11 hours to just under 4 hours. For 9,000 employees, the computed net annual savings exceeds $1.3 million. 2 refs

  18. Application of Higher Diploma Program training skills

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RPO

    This article examines the application Higher Diploma training skills in classroom ... of learning materials at hand, and mismatch between course content and time .... classroom teaching. 1.4 Significance of the study. The study tried to assess the application of HDP training skills at actual setting and this revealed the real.

  19. Training program for nuclear power plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, M.; Ikeda, K.; Shinomiya, Y.; Hada, M.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear power generation in Japan reached 24.7% of its electric power supply with its capacity and time availability factors of 76.2% and 77.1%, respectively (in the calendar year 1986 - as of December 31, 1986). One of the reasons for such high performance is attributable to high quality of operating and maintenance personnel in the nuclear power plants. Ministry of International Trade and Industry of the Japanese Government has an overall responsibility with relation to the safety regulations and supervises all scope of training, while the Thermal and Nuclear Power Engineering Society is authorized to conduct licensing activities to qualify the chief shift supervisor of nuclear power plant operation and individual utility companies are required to train their plant operating and maintenance personnel. General status of training for plant personnel is briefly described in this paper, touching the practical education and training systems of utility companies and operation and maintenance training facilities

  20. Effects of Different Concurrent Resistance and Aerobic Training Frequencies on Muscle Power and Muscle Quality in Trained Elderly Men: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Rodrigo; Fuchs, Sandra C; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Pinto, Ronei Silveira; Radaelli, Régis; Schoenell, Maira; Izquierdo, Mikel; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Umpierre, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Muscle power is a strong predictor of functional status in the elderly population and is required to perform different daily activities. To compare the effects of different weekly training frequencies on muscle power and muscle quality induced by concurrent training (resistance + aerobic) in previously trained elderly men. Twenty-four trained elderly men (65 ± 4 years), previously engaged in a regular concurrent training program, three times per week, for the previous five months, were randomly allocated to concurrent training programs in which training was performed either twice a week (2·week -1 , n = 12) or three times per week (3·week -1 , n = 12). The groups trained with an identical exercise intensity and volume per session for 10 weeks. Before and after the exercise training, we examined muscle power, as estimated by countermovement jump height; knee extensor isokinetic peak torque at 60 and 180 o. s -1 ; and muscle quality, a quotient between the one-repetition maximum of the knee extensors and the sum of quadriceps femoris muscle thickness determined by ultrasonography. Additionally, as secondary outcomes, blood pressure and reactive hyperemia were evaluated. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures were used and statistical significance was set at α = 0.05. Muscular power (2·week -1 : 7%, and 3·week -1 : 10%) and muscle quality (2·week -1 : 15%, and 3·week -1 : 8%) improved with the concurrent exercise training ( p concurrent training. Concurrent training performed twice a week promotes similar adaptations in muscular power and muscle quality when compared with the same program performed three times per week in previously trained elderly men.

  1. Comparison of Lower Body Specific Resistance Training on the Hamstring to Quadriceps Strength Ratios in Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgo, Sandor; Edupuganti, Pradeep; Smith, Darla R.; Ortiz, Melchor

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we compared hamstring (H) and quadriceps (Q) strength changes in men and women, as well as changes in conventional and functional H:Q ratios following an identical 12-week resistance training program. An isokinetic dynamometer was used to assess 14 male and 14 female participants before and after the intervention, and conventional…

  2. Progressive resistance training in head and neck cancer patients undergoing concomitant chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonkvist, Camilla K; Vinther, Anders; Zerahn, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma undergoing concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) frequently experience weight loss, especially loss of lean body mass (LBM), and reduced functional performance. This study investigated whether a 12-week hospital-based progressive...... resistance training (PRT) program during CCRT is feasible in the clinical setting before planning initiation of a larger randomized study which is the long-term goal. Study design: Prospective pilot study. Methods: Twelve patients receiving CCRT were planned to attend a 12-week PRT program. Primary endpoint...... was feasibility measured as attendance to training sessions. Secondary endpoints included changes in functional performance, muscle strength, and body composition measured by Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) scans. Furthermore, sarcomeric protein content, pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) activity...

  3. Influence of 3 Months Resistance Training on C-Reactive Protein Serum Levels and Muscle Hypertrophy in Elderly Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Saremi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Sarcopenia is the decline of muscle mass and strength with age. Evidence suggests that inflammation play important roles in age-related muscle atrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 3 months resistance training on skeletal muscle mass and C-reactive protein levels in elderly men. Methods & Materials: In this quasi – experimental study with pretest–posttest design, twenty-five middle-age men (age: 64.10±3.40 yr, body mass index: 28.29±2.38 kg/m 2 were randomly assigned to resistance training (n=13 and control (n=12 groups. Resistance training program was performed 50-60 min/d, 3d/wk, for 3 months. Serum C-reactive protein levels and body composition (DEXA were measured before and after the intervention. Results: After resistance training, leg press (lower body strength index, bench press (upper body strength index, and skeletal muscle mass were significantly increased (P0.05. Concurrently, C-reactive protein levels were significantly decreased in training group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Three months resistance training caused an improvement in muscle mass and strength in elderly men, and this improvement were accompanied by decreases in C-reactive protein serum levels.

  4. International Training Program on Nuclear Engineering at Kinki University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohara, Sin-ya; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Itoh, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Outline of the Training Program: • This training program is a 3-years program since 2013. • This program is conducted with 5 universities’ cooperation: Kyushu Univ., Nagoya Univ., Kyung Hee Univ., Kyoto Univ. and Kinki Univ.; • Education is provided in 3 experimental fields: Kinki Univ. Reactor: UTR-KINKI, Kyung Hee Univ. Reactor: AGN-201K, Reconstruction Support Test Field in Fukushima: RSTF; • The language used in the program is English which is not mother tongue for neither Japanese nor Korean students

  5. Concurrent training and caffeine supplementation on resistance training performance - A short research report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B Ugatti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the influence of caffeine supplementation (4.5 mg⋅kg−1 on lower body resistance training (RT performance preceded with and without an acute bout of endurance exercise. In a double-blinded crossover study, 10 moderately active males (20.6±2.1 yo carried out six exercise sessions (2 x 1RM sessions; 2 x resistance sessions; 2 concurrent sessions. Resistance exercise sessions (CAF+RES and PLA+RES were carried out with 4 maximum sets of leg press, leg extension and leg curl to volitional fatigue at 65% of 1RM for each exercise with 1 min inter-set and inter-session rest interval. Sessions consisted on 4 maximum sets to volitional fatigue at 65% of 1RM for each exercise with 1 min of rest interval between sets and exercises. Concurrent training sessions (CAF+CON and PLA+CON were identical but were preceded by 30 min of continuous treadmill running at 75-85% HRmax. Physical performance showed a significant main effect for treatment (p < 0.0001, protocol (p < 0.02, exercises (p < 0.0001 and sets (p < 0.0001. Physical performance during RES was reduced after endurance exercise, indicating a cumulative effect of CON. Caffeine supplementation blunted this cumulative effect. We conclude that caffeine supplementation could be used to improve the RT performance when it is done immediately after an aerobic training.

  6. The effects of high resistance-few repetitions and low resistance-high repetitions resistance training on climbing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Espen; Andersen, Vidar; Saeterbakken, Atle Hole

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of different strength training intensities on climbing performance, climbing-specific tests and a general strength test. Thirty lower grade and intermediate-level climbers participated in a 10-week training programme. The participants were randomized into three groups: high resistance-few repetitions training groups (HR-FR), low resistance-high repetitions training groups (LR-HR) and a control group (CON) which continued climbing/training as usual. Post-testing results demonstrated statistical tendencies for climbing performance improvements in the HR-FR and LR-HR (p = 0.088-0.090, effect size = 0.55-0.73), but no differences were observed between the groups (p = 0.950). For the climbing-specific tests, no differences were observed between the groups (p = 0.507-1.000), but the HR-FR and LR-HR improved their time in both Dead-hang (p = 0.004-0.026) and Bent-arm hang (p training groups reduced their climbing sessions during the intervention compared to the CON group (p = 0.057-0.074). In conclusion, HR-FR and LR-HR training programmes demonstrated an 11% and 12% non-significant improvement in climbing performance despite a 50% reduction in climbing sessions, but improved the results in strength and climbing-specific tests. None of the training intensities was superior compared to the others.

  7. Staff training program of CANDU nuclear projects in Saskatoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huterer, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the training process for a nuclear project on a new site. When Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. opened a project office in Saskatoon, senior management recognized the need for large-scale staff training and made the necessary commitments. Two types of training program were initiated: general and technical. The general training plan included topics related to the nuclear project life cycle. Technical training was discipline and task specific. Based on the job descriptions and staff qualifications, technical training requirements were documented for the entire staff. The training strategy was developed and implemented. Detailed records were maintained to monitor the progress, draw conclusions and plan training for future nuclear facilities. (orig.)

  8. Do volunteers reduce the costs of parent training programs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scavenius Sonne-Schmidt, Christoffer; Amilon, Anna; Schultz, Esben Anton

    costs. This study evaluates the cost-effectiveness of the volunteer-delivered parent training program Caring in Chaos. The analyses show that Caring in Chaos is as effective as similar programs while the recurrent costs associated with the program are substantially lower than that of (other) similar...

  9. A Discrepancy-Based Methodology for Nuclear Training Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, Jeffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    A three-phase comprehensive process for commercial nuclear power training program evaluation is presented. The discrepancy-based methodology was developed after the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor accident. It facilitates analysis of program components to identify discrepancies among program specifications, actual outcomes, and industry…

  10. The Special Education Director's Role in Inservice Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donatell, Henry

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed in the article on the special education director's role in inservice training programs are planning procedures (including evaluation of the present program by all staff), types of programs offered (such as summer curriculum writing and teacher orientation week), and evaluation methods. (CL)

  11. The effects of d-aspartic acid supplementation in resistance-trained men over a three month training period: A randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey W Melville

    Full Text Available Research on d-aspartic acid (DAA has demonstrated increases in total testosterone levels in untrained men, however research in resistance-trained men demonstrated no changes, and reductions in testosterone levels. The long-term consequences of DAA in a resistance trained population are currently unknown.To evaluate the effectiveness of DAA to alter basal testosterone levels over 3 months of resistance training in resistance-trained men.Randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled trial in healthy resistance-trained men, aged 18-36, had been performing regular resistance training exercise for at least 3 d.w-1 for the previous 2 years. Randomised participants were 22 men (d-aspartic acid n = 11; placebo n = 11 (age, 23.8±4.9 y, training age, 3.2±1.5 y.D-aspartic acid (6 g.d-1, DAA versus equal-weight, visually-matched placebo (PLA. All participants performed 12 weeks of supervised, periodised resistance training (4 d.w-1, with a program focusing on all muscle groups.Basal hormones, total testosterone (TT, free testosterone (FT, estradiol (E2, sex-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG and albumin (ALB; isometric strength; calf muscle cross-sectional area (CSA; calf muscle thickness; quadriceps muscle CSA; quadriceps muscle thickness; evoked V-wave and H-reflexes, were assessed at weeks zero (T1, after six weeks (T2 and after 12 weeks (T3.No change in basal TT or FT were observed after the intervention. DAA supplementation (n = 10 led to a 16%, 95% CI [-27%, -5%] reduction in E2 from T1-T3 (p<0.01. The placebo group (n = 9 demonstrated improvements in spinal responsiveness (gastrocnemius at the level of the alpha motoneuron. Both groups exhibited increases in isometric strength of the plantar flexors by 17%, 95% CI [7%, 28%] (p<0.05 as well as similar increases in hypertrophy in the quadriceps and calf muscles.The results of this paper indicate that DAA supplementation is ineffective at changing testosterone levels, or positively affecting training

  12. Brownfields Tabor Commons Green Jobs Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    This training curriculum is designed to inform entry level tradeswomen about the green job opportunities in areas such as deconstruction, weatherization, eco or solar roofing, stormwater systems and more.

  13. Effectiveness of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training for frequent neck/shoulder pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Saervoll, Charlotte A; Mortensen, Ole S

    2011-01-01

    symptoms; 174 women and 24 men working at least 30 h per week and with frequent neck/shoulder pain were randomly assigned to resistance training with elastic tubing for 2 or 12 minutes per day 5 times per week, or weekly information on general health (control group). Primary outcomes were changes......UNLABELLED: Regular physical exercise is a cornerstone in rehabilitation programs, but adherence to comprehensive exercise remains low. This study determined the effectiveness of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training for relieving neck/shoulder pain in healthy adults with frequent......, muscle strength increased 2.0 Nm (95% confidence interval 0.5 to 3.5Nm, p=0.01) in the 2-minute group and 1.7Nm (95% confidence interval 0.2 to 3.3 Nm, p=0.02) in the 12-minute group. In conclusion, as little as 2 minutes of daily progressive resistance training for 10 weeks results in clinically...

  14. Study on Nuclear Facility Cyber Security Awareness and Training Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Woon; Song, Jae-Gu; Lee, Cheol-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Cyber security awareness and training, which is a part of operational security controls, is defined to be implemented later in the CSP implementation schedule. However, cyber security awareness and training is a prerequisite for the appropriate implementation of a cyber security program. When considering the current situation in which it is just started to define cyber security activities and to assign personnel who has responsibilities for performing those activities, a cyber security awareness program is necessary to enhance cyber security culture for the facility personnel to participate positively in cyber security activities. Also before the implementation of stepwise CSP, suitable education and training should be provided to both cyber security teams (CST) and facility personnel who should participate in the implementation. Since such importance and urgency of cyber security awareness and training is underestimated at present, the types, trainees, contents, and development strategies of cyber security awareness and training programs are studied to help Korean nuclear facilities to perform cyber security activities more effectively. Cyber security awareness and training programs should be developed ahead of the implementation of CSP. In this study, through the analysis of requirements in the regulatory standard RS-015, the types and trainees of overall cyber security training programs in nuclear facilities are identified. Contents suitable for a cyber security awareness program and a technical training program are derived. It is suggested to develop stepwise the program contents in accordance with the development of policies, guides, and procedures as parts of the facility cyber security program. Since any training programs are not available for the specialized cyber security training in nuclear facilities, a long-term development plan is necessary. As alternatives for the time being, several cyber security training courses for industrial control systems by

  15. Study on Nuclear Facility Cyber Security Awareness and Training Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung-Woon; Song, Jae-Gu; Lee, Cheol-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Cyber security awareness and training, which is a part of operational security controls, is defined to be implemented later in the CSP implementation schedule. However, cyber security awareness and training is a prerequisite for the appropriate implementation of a cyber security program. When considering the current situation in which it is just started to define cyber security activities and to assign personnel who has responsibilities for performing those activities, a cyber security awareness program is necessary to enhance cyber security culture for the facility personnel to participate positively in cyber security activities. Also before the implementation of stepwise CSP, suitable education and training should be provided to both cyber security teams (CST) and facility personnel who should participate in the implementation. Since such importance and urgency of cyber security awareness and training is underestimated at present, the types, trainees, contents, and development strategies of cyber security awareness and training programs are studied to help Korean nuclear facilities to perform cyber security activities more effectively. Cyber security awareness and training programs should be developed ahead of the implementation of CSP. In this study, through the analysis of requirements in the regulatory standard RS-015, the types and trainees of overall cyber security training programs in nuclear facilities are identified. Contents suitable for a cyber security awareness program and a technical training program are derived. It is suggested to develop stepwise the program contents in accordance with the development of policies, guides, and procedures as parts of the facility cyber security program. Since any training programs are not available for the specialized cyber security training in nuclear facilities, a long-term development plan is necessary. As alternatives for the time being, several cyber security training courses for industrial control systems by

  16. Resistance training on physical performance in disabled older female cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ades, Philip A; Savage, Patrick D; Cress, M Elaine; Brochu, Martin; Lee, N Melinda; Poehlman, Eric T

    2003-08-01

    We evaluated the value of resistance training on measures of physical performance in disabled older women with coronary heart disease (CHD). The study intervention consisted of a 6-month program of resistance training in a randomized controlled trial format. Training intensity was at 80% of the single-repetition maximal lift. Control patients performed light yoga and breathing exercises. Study participants included 42 women with CHD, all >or= 65 yr of age and community dwelling. Subjects were screened by questionnaire to have low self-reported physical function. The primary study measurements related to the performance of 16 household activities of the Continuous Scale Physical Functional Performance test (CSPFP). These ranged from dressing, to kitchen and cleaning activities, to carrying groceries and walking onto a bus with luggage, and a 6-min walk. Activities were measured in time to complete a task, weight carried during a task, or distance walked. Other measures included body composition, measures of aerobic fitness and strength, and questionnaire-based measures of physical function and depression score. Study groups were similar at baseline by age, aerobic capacity, strength, body composition, and in performing the CSPFP. After conditioning, 13 of 16 measured activities were performed more rapidly, or with increased weight carried, compared with the control group (all P weight-bearing over a distance, increased by 40% (P Benefits extend beyond strength-related activities, as endurance, balance, coordination, and flexibility all improved. Strength training should be considered an important component in the rehabilitation of older women with CHD.

  17. Caffeine enhances upper body strength in resistance-trained women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penhollow Tina

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research has indicated that low-to-moderate dosages of caffeine supplementation are ergogenic for sustained endurance efforts as well as high-intensity exercise. The effects of caffeine supplementation on strength-power performance are equivocal, with some studies indicating a benefit and others demonstrating no change in performance. The majority of research that has examined the effects of caffeine supplementation on strength-power performance has been carried out in both trained and untrained men. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the acute effects of caffeine supplementation on strength and muscular endurance in resistance-trained women. Methods In a randomized manner, 15 women consumed caffeine (6 mg/kg or placebo (PL seven days apart. Sixty min following supplementation, participants performed a one-repetition maximum (1RM barbell bench press test and repetitions to failure at 60% of 1RM. Heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP were assessed at rest, 60 minutes post-consumption, and immediately following completion of repetitions to failure. Results Repeated measures ANOVA indicated a significantly greater bench press maximum with caffeine (p ≤ 0.05 (52.9 ± 11.1 kg vs. 52.1 ± 11.7 kg with no significant differences between conditions in 60% 1RM repetitions (p = 0.81. Systolic blood pressure was significantly greater post-exercise, with caffeine (p Conclusions These findings indicate a moderate dose of caffeine may be sufficient for enhancing strength performance in resistance-trained women.

  18. Tools to improve Angra 1/2 general training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso, Haroldo Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Since Brazil restarted Angra 2 construction in 1995, as a result of the studies of future energy consumption, the Training Department of Eletronuclear developed the training program for site personnel. This new situation has demanded additional efforts and new routines. In the following paragraphs there is a description of significant aspects in this concern. Most of them are now under discussion in the Training Department and some alternative solutions are being adopted in order to face the new challenges. (author)

  19. Diminished Baroreflex Control of Forearm Vascular Resistance Following Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, G. W.; Thompson, C. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Convertino, V. A.

    1991-01-01

    The stimulus-response characteristics of cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR units in mm Hg x min x I00 ml/ml) were studied in 14 volunteers before and after 10 wk of endurance training. We assessed the relationship betaleen reflex stimulus (changes in central venous pressure, CVP) and response (FVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors with lower body negative pressure (LBNP, 0 to - 2O mm Hg). Changes in CVP during LBNP were estimated from pressure changes in a large peripheral vein in the dependent arm of the subject in the right lateral decubitus position. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO(sub 2max)) and total blood volume increased with endurance training from 37.8 +/- 1.4 ml/min x kg and 63.6 +/- 2.1 ml/kg to 45.3 +/- 1.4 ml/ min x kg and 69.3 +/- 2.8 ml/kg respectively (P less than 0.05). Reflex forearm vasoconstriction occurred in response to a reduction in estimated CVP, and the absolute change in FVR per unit of CVP was reduced from -5.96 +/- 0.79 to -4.06 +/- 0.52 units x mm/ Hg (P less than 0.05) following exercise training but was unchanged from -6.10 to 0.57 to -6.22 +/- 0.94 units x mm/ Hg for the time control group (N = 7). Resting values for FVR were similar before and after exercise training; however, resting estimated CVP was elevated from 9.5 +/- 0.5 mm x Hg before training to 11.3 +/- 0.6 mm x Hg after training. The reduction in sensitivity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of FVR was linearly related to the increase in blood volume (r = 0.65, P less than 0.05). suggesting that diminished cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of FVR in physically fit individuals is related, in part, to a training-induced blood volume expansion.

  20. Highway construction on-the-job training program review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    "This study provides information about the experiences of trainees, contractors, Montana Department of : Transportation (MDT) field staff, and other state DOT staff in their states On-the-Job Training (OJT) Program. : Obtaining this information is...

  1. The Flight Service Station Training Program : 1981-1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    This report describes the performance of the ATC classes in the Flight Service Station Training Program 1981 to 1985 on the skills tests and laboratory exercises in Preflight (pilot briefing), Inflight, and Emergency Services. Over 80% of the final g...

  2. Introduction of the SAT based training programs at Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, I.

    1998-01-01

    An introduction of the SAT based training programs at Paks nuclear power plant is described in detail, including framework of project operation; project implementation; process of SAT applied at Paks NPP and the needs of its introduction

  3. Effects of oral adenosine-5'-triphosphate supplementation on athletic performance, skeletal muscle hypertrophy and recovery in resistance-trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jacob M; Joy, Jordan M; Lowery, Ryan P; Roberts, Michael D; Lockwood, Christopher M; Manninen, Anssi H; Fuller, John C; De Souza, Eduardo O; Baier, Shawn M; Wilson, Stephanie Mc; Rathmacher, John A

    2013-09-22

    Currently, there is a lack of studies examining the effects of adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) supplementation utilizing a long-term, periodized resistance-training program (RT) in resistance-trained populations. Therefore, we investigated the effects of 12 weeks of 400 mg per day of oral ATP on muscular adaptations in trained individuals. We also sought to determine the effects of ATP on muscle protein breakdown, cortisol, and performance during an overreaching cycle. The study was a 3-phase randomized, double-blind, and placebo- and diet-controlled intervention. Phase 1 was a periodized resistance-training program. Phase 2 consisted of a two week overreaching cycle in which volume and frequency were increased followed by a 2-week taper (Phase 3). Muscle mass, strength, and power were examined at weeks 0, 4, 8, and 12 to assess the chronic effects of ATP; assessment performance variables also occurred at the end of weeks 9 and 10, corresponding to the mid and endpoints of the overreaching cycle. There were time (psupplementation. During the overreaching cycle, there were group x time effects for strength and power, which decreased to a greater extent in the placebo group. Protein breakdown was also lower in the ATP group. Our results suggest oral ATP supplementation may enhance muscular adaptations following 12-weeks of resistance training, and prevent decrements in performance following overreaching. No statistically or clinically significant changes in blood chemistry or hematology were observed. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01508338.

  4. 49 CFR 1552.23 - Security awareness training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... employee to identify— (i) Uniforms and other identification, if any are required at the flight school, for... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY FLIGHT SCHOOLS Flight School Security Awareness Training § 1552.23 Security awareness training programs. (a) General. A flight...

  5. Cost Avoidance Techniques for RC-135 Program Flying Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Background ..................................................................................................................... 1 Problem Statement...34 1 COST AVOIDANCE TECHNIQUES FOR RC-135 PROGRAM FLYING TRAINING I. Introduction Background The 338th Combat Training...Approach TAC/VOR/LOC Approach - GPS AR01 Receiver A/R Day AR02 Receiver A/R Night R050 Rec A/R-Tanker Auto Off P015 Instrument ( IFR ) Departure TO40

  6. Resistance training among young athletes: safety, efficacy and injury prevention effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, A D; Myer, G D

    2010-01-01

    A literature review was employed to evaluate the current epidemiology of injury related to the safety and efficacy of youth resistance training. Several case study reports and retrospective questionnaires regarding resistance exercise and the competitive sports of weightlifting and powerlifting reveal that injuries have occurred in young lifters, although a majority can be classified as accidental. Lack of qualified instruction that underlies poor exercise technique and inappropriate training loads could explain, at least partly, some of the reported injuries. Current research indicates that resistance training can be a safe, effective and worthwhile activity for children and adolescents provided that qualified professionals supervise all training sessions and provide age-appropriate instruction on proper lifting procedures and safe training guidelines. Regular participation in a multifaceted resistance training programme that begins during the preseason and includes instruction on movement biomechanics may reduce the risk of sports-related injuries in young athletes. Strategies for enhancing the safety of youth resistance training are discussed.

  7. Energy Systems Training Programs and Certifications Survey White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Daryl [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nimbalkar, Sachin U. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wenning, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thirumaran, Kiran [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guo, Wei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Compressed air system, industrial refrigeration system, chilled water system, pump system, fan system, steam system, process heating system, and combined heat and power system are the major industrial energy systems. By helping enhance knowledge and skills of workforce, training and certification programs on these systems are essential to improve energy efficiency of manufacturing facilities. A literature survey of currently available training and certification programs on these systems was conducted.

  8. EG and G Idaho Health Physics Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    Selection, training and qualification program for health physics technicians to be hired at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is detailed. This program results from compliance with ANSI-N18.1 for selection and training of nuclear power plant personnel to be qualified to appraise any emergency condition and take prompt and effective action. Salary progression charts are also proposed for entry level technician, through journeyman level. (PCS)

  9. EG and G Idaho Health Physics Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Selection, training and qualification program for health physics technicians to be hired at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is detailed. This program results from compliance with ANSI-N18.1 for selection and training of nuclear power plant personnel to be qualified to appraise any emergency condition and take prompt and effective action. Salary progression charts are also proposed for entry level technician, through journeyman level

  10. Effects of different uphill interval-training programs on running economy and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Kyle R; Hopkins, Will G; McGuigan, Michael R; Kilding, Andrew E

    2013-11-01

    Runners use uphill running as a movement-specific form of resistance training to enhance performance. However, the optimal parameters for prescribing intervals are unknown. The authors adopted a dose-response design to investigate the effects of various uphill interval-training programs on physiological and performance measures. Twenty well-trained runners performed an incremental treadmill test to determine aerobic and biomechanical measures, a series of jumps on a force plate to determine neuromuscular measures, and a 5-km time trial. Runners were then randomly assigned to 1 of 5 uphill interval-training programs. After 6 wk all tests were repeated. To identify the optimal training program for each measure, each runner's percentage change was modeled as a quadratic function of the rank order of the intensity of training. Uncertainty in the optimal training and in the corresponding effect on the given measure was estimated as 90% confidence limits using bootstrapping. There was no clear optimum for time-trial performance, and the mean improvement over all intensities was 2.0% (confidence limits ±0.6%). The highest intensity was clearly optimal for running economy (improvement of 2.4% ± 1.4%) and for all neuromuscular measures, whereas other aerobic measures were optimal near the middle intensity. There were no consistent optima for biomechanical measures. These findings support anecdotal reports for incorporating uphill interval training in the training programs of distance runners to improve physiological parameters relevant to running performance. Until more data are obtained, runners can assume that any form of high-intensity uphill interval training will benefit 5-km time-trial performance.

  11. Supervisor's role in training programs as a manager of learning program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the training literature, a supervisor's role in training programs has two major elements: supervisor support and supervisor communication. The ability of supervisors to play effective roles in training programs may increase employees' motivation to learn. The nature of this relationship is interesting, but the role of supervisor's role as a predicting variable is less emphasized in a training program models. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the effect of supervisor's role in training programs on motivation to learn using 152 usable questionnaires gathered from non-academic employees who have worked in a technological based public university, Malaysia. The outcomes of stepwise regression analysis showed that the supervisor support and supervisor communication significantly associated with motivation to learn. Statistically, this result demonstrates that supervisor's role in training programs does act as an important predictor of motivation to learn in the organizational sample. In addition, discussion, implication and conclusion are elaborated.

  12. A short executive function training program improves preschoolers’ working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma eBlakey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive training has been shown to improve executive functions in middle childhood and adulthood. However, fewer studies have targeted the preschool years – a time when executive functions undergo rapid development. The present study tested the effects of a short four session executive function training program in 54 four-year-olds. The training group significantly improved their working memory from pre-training relative to an active control group. Notably, this effect extended to a task sharing few surface features with the trained tasks, and continued to be apparent three months later. In addition, the benefits of training extended to a measure of mathematical reasoning three months later, indicating that training executive functions during the preschool years has the potential to convey benefits that are both long-lasting and wide-ranging.

  13. NET-ZERO ENERGY BUILDING OPERATOR TRAINING PROGRAM (NZEBOT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brizendine, Anthony; Byars, Nan; Sleiti, Ahmad; Gehrig, Bruce; Lu, Na

    2012-12-31

    The primary objective of the Net-Zero Energy Building Operator Training Program (NZEBOT) was to develop certificate level training programs for commercial building owners, managers and operators, principally in the areas of energy / sustainability management. The expected outcome of the project was a multi-faceted mechanism for developing the skill-based competency of building operators, owners, architects/engineers, construction professionals, tenants, brokers and other interested groups in energy efficient building technologies and best practices. The training program draws heavily on DOE supported and developed materials available in the existing literature, as well as existing, modified, and newly developed curricula from the Department of Engineering Technology & Construction Management (ETCM) at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNC-Charlotte). The project goal is to develop a certificate level training curriculum for commercial energy and sustainability managers and building operators that: 1) Increases the skill-based competency of building professionals in energy efficient building technologies and best practices, and 2) Increases the workforce pool of expertise in energy management and conservation techniques. The curriculum developed in this project can subsequently be used to establish a sustainable energy training program that can contribute to the creation of new “green” job opportunities in North Carolina and throughout the Southeast region, and workforce training that leads to overall reductions in commercial building energy consumption. Three energy training / education programs were developed to achieve the stated goal, namely: 1. Building Energy/Sustainability Management (BESM) Certificate Program for Building Managers and Operators (40 hours); 2. Energy Efficient Building Technologies (EEBT) Certificate Program (16 hours); and 3. Energy Efficent Buildings (EEB) Seminar (4 hours). Training Program 1 incorporates the following

  14. Social anxiety and training in neurolinguistic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konefal, J; Duncan, R C

    1998-12-01

    The Liebowitz Social Phobia Scale measured the effect of training on social anxiety responses of 28 adults prior to and following a 21-day residential training, and at 6 mo. follow-up. Significant reductions posttraining and at follow-up were evident in the mean self-reported global scale scores on fear and avoidance behavior in social situations. The item scores, aggregated to reflect the situational domains of formal and informal speaking, being observed by others, and assertion, showed significant and continuing reduction from posttraining through follow-up. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that this training may be associated with reduced responses to social anxiety, but as there was no formal control group, pretest scores from another study were used. Interpretation is limited.

  15. The effect of different training programs on eccentric energy utilization in college-aged males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Sheldon B; Doyle, Tim L A; McGuigan, Michael R

    2009-10-01

    The Eccentric Utilization Ratio (EUR), which is the ratio of countermovement jump (CMJ) to squat jump (SJ) performance measures, is a useful indicator of training status in elite athletes and their utilization of the stretch-shortening cycle. This investigation sought to determine if EUR was sensitive to different types of resistance training in untrained college-aged males. Twenty-nine college-aged males completed 8 weeks of training and were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 training programs: weight training (n = 10), plyometrics (n = 10), or weightlifting (n = 9). Testing occurred 3 times (pre, mid, post) with a CMJ and SJ conducted on a force plate integrated with a position transducer. Height, weight, and a 1RM (repetition maximum) squat also were measured. Weightlifting significantly (p training program might not be a long enough time period to see changes in this group of participants. Results did indicate that high-velocity and high-force training programs, consisting of weightlifting and plyometrics, improved lower-body performance, especially in the areas of jump height and power.

  16. Resistance training enhances muscular performance in patients with anorexia nervosa: A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández del Valle, María; Larumbe Zabala, Eneko; Villaseñor Montarroso, Ángel; Cardona González, Claudia Andrea; Díez Vega, Ignacio; López Mojares, Luis Miguel; Pérez Ruiz, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Low-intensity exercise applied in anorexia nervosa patients has been shown to have a harmless effect on body composition and to effect short-term improvements in muscular strength and agility. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a high-intensity resistance training program designed for adolescents to improve strength and agility in anorexia nervosa restricting-type patients (AN-R). METHODS: From a total of 36 female patients with AN-R, one group (interven...

  17. Resistance Training and Co-supplementation with Creatine and Protein in Older Subjects with Frailty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J; Longhurst, G; Roschel, H; Gualano, B

    2016-01-01

    Studies assessing the effects co-supplementation with creatine and protein, along with resistance training, in older individuals with frailty are lacking. This is an exploratory trial from the Pro-Elderly study ("Protein Intake and Resistance Training in Aging") aimed at gathering knowledge on the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of co-supplementation with creatine and protein supplementation, combined with resistance training, in older individuals with frailty. A 14-week, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, placebo controlled exploratory trial. The subjects were randomly assigned to whey protein and creatine co-supplementation (WHEY+CR) or whey protein supplementation (WHEY) group. All subjects undertook a supervised exercise training program and were assessed at baseline and after 14 weeks. Muscle function, body composition, blood parameters, and self-reported adverse events were assessed. No interaction effects (between-group differences) were observed for any dependent variables (p > 0.05 for all). However, there were main time-effects in handgrip (WHEY+CR = 26.65 ± 31.29; WHEY = 13.84 ± 14.93 Kg; p = 0.0005), timed-up-and-go (WHEY+CR = -11.20 ± 9.37; WHEY = -17.76 ± 21.74 sec; p = 0.006), and timed-stands test (WHEY+CR = 47.50 ± 35.54; WHEY = 46.87 ± 24.23 reps; p = 0.0001), suggesting that WHEY+CR and WHEY were similarly effective in improving muscle function. All of the subjects showed improvements in at least two of the three functional tests, regardless of their treatments. Body composition and blood parameters were not changed (p > 0.05). No severe adverse effects were observed. Co-supplementation with creatine and whey protein was well-tolerable and free of adverse events in older subjects with frailty undertaking resistance training. Creatine supplementation did not augment the adaptive effects of resistance training along with whey protein on body composition or muscle function in this population. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01890382.

  18. Resistance Training in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with Severe Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vanerson Passos Neves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Resistance training (RT has been recommended as a non-pharmacological treatment for moderate hypertension. In spite of the important role of exercise intensity on training prescription, there is still no data regarding the effects of RT intensity on severe hypertension (SH. Objective: This study examined the effects of two RT protocols (vertical ladder climbing, performed at different overloads of maximal weight carried (MWC, on blood pressure (BP and muscle strength of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR with SH. Methods: Fifteen male SHR ENT#091;206 ± 10 mmHg of systolic BP (SBPENT#093; and five Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY; 119 ± 10 mmHg of SBP were divided into 4 groups: sedentary (SED-WKY and SHR (SED-SHR; RT1-SHR training relative to body weight (~40% of MWC; and RT2-SHR training relative to MWC test (~70% of MWC. Systolic BP and heart rate (HR were measured weekly using the tail-cuff method. The progression of muscle strength was determined once every fifteen days. The RT consisted of 3 weekly sessions on non-consecutive days for 12-weeks. Results: Both RT protocols prevented the increase in SBP (delta - 5 and -7 mmHg, respectively; p > 0.05, whereas SBP of the SED-SHR group increased by 19 mmHg (p 0.05. Conclusions: Our data indicated that both RT protocols were effective in preventing chronic elevation of SBP in SH. Additionally, a higher RT overload induced a greater increase in muscle strength.

  19. Noninvasive optical imaging of resistance training adaptations in human muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Robert V.; Cotter, Joshua; Ganesan, Goutham; Le, Lisa; Agustin, Janelle P.; Duarte, Bridgette; Cutler, Kyle; O'Sullivan, Thomas; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2017-12-01

    A quantitative and dynamic analysis of skeletal muscle structure and function can guide training protocols and optimize interventions for rehabilitation and disease. While technologies exist to measure body composition, techniques are still needed for quantitative, long-term functional imaging of muscle at the bedside. We evaluate whether diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) can be used for long-term assessment of resistance training (RT). DOSI measures of tissue composition were obtained from 12 adults before and after 5 weeks of training and compared to lean mass fraction (LMF) from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Significant correlations were detected between DXA LMF and DOSI-measured oxy-hemo/myoglobin, deoxy-hemo/myoglobin, total-hemo/myoglobin, water, and lipid. RT-induced increases of ˜6% in oxy-hemo/myoglobin (3.4±1.0 μM, p=0.00314) and total-hemo/myoglobin (4.9±1.1 μM, p=0.00024) from the medial gastrocnemius were detected with DOSI and accompanied by ˜2% increases in lean soft tissue mass (36.4±12.4 g, p=0.01641) and ˜60% increases in 1 rep-max strength (41.5±6.2 kg, p = 1.9E-05). DOSI measures of vascular and/or muscle changes combined with correlations between DOSI and DXA suggest that quantitative diffuse optical methods can be used to evaluate body composition, provide feedback on long-term interventions, and generate new insight into training-induced muscle adaptations.

  20. Number of repetition after different rest intervals between static stretching and resistance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Dias

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Therefore, 30-minute interval between static stretching and resistance exercises was needed to achieve greater repetition performance. Thus, static stretching for lower limbs may be avoided before a resistance training session.

  1. The effect of resistance training on quadriceps muscle volume and some growth factors in elderly and young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negaresh, R; Ranjbar, R; Habibi, A; Mokhtarzade, M; Fokin, A; Gharibvand, M M

    2017-01-01

    Aging process is associated with loss of muscle mass, strength and growth factors dysfunction. Resistance training is one of the effective methods to overcome a decline in muscle mass, strength and also can modulate the level of myostatin, follistatin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) factors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 8 week resistance training on different anabolic factors which influence muscle hypertrophy in elderly and young men. Fifteen elderly and sixteen young men volunteered and participated in a periodized 3-day per week progressive resistance training program for a total of 8 weeks. Daily calorie intake, muscle volume, cross-sectional area (by computed tomography) and myostatin, follistatin, IGF-1, growth hormone (GH) and testosterone were calculated before and after the training protocol. At the end of the training period, the strength in the elderly group increased significantly compared to the young group (p0,05). Quadriceps muscle volume and cross-sectional area increased more in the younger group (pchange was not different in either groups (p>0,05). Follistatin and testosterone increased in both groups (pResistance training improved hypertrophy and lead to anabolic conditions in elder and young subjects, but in different ways. In this regard, GH-IGF-1 axis and growth factors profile at the baseline had an important role in different age-related hypertrophy.

  2. Enrollment of SME Managers to Growth-oriented Training Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Torben; Jensen, Kent Wickstrøm; Schou Nielsen, Pia

    2015-01-01

    on the extent to which such programs result in additionality, i.e. improved growth performance compared to non-intervention. Design/methodology Selection and self-selection processes are explored through a study of a large-scale training program for growth oriented managers of small Danish firms. This program......Purpose: Entrepreneurial learning through formal growth-oriented training programs for SME managers promises to enhance the growth competences and growth intentions of the enrolled managers. The impact of such programs, however, depends on who enrolls since initial competence and growth...... has from 2012 to 2015 trained about 700 SME managers. Data are currently available for 366 of these participants. This evidence is compared with survey results from a randomly selected control group of 292 growth oriented SME managers in the same firm-size group. The data were analyzed through...

  3. Workplace Violence Training Programs for Health Care Workers: An Analysis of Program Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbury, Sheila; Hodgson, Michael; Zankowski, Donna; Lipscomb, Jane

    2017-06-01

    Commercial workplace violence (WPV) prevention training programs differ in their approach to violence prevention and the content they present. This study reviews 12 such programs using criteria developed from training topics in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service Workers and a review of the WPV literature. None of the training programs addressed all the review criteria. The most significant gap in content was the lack of attention to facility-specific risk assessment and policies. To fill this gap, health care facilities should supplement purchased training programs with specific training in organizational policies and procedures, emergency action plans, communication, facility risk assessment, and employee post-incident debriefing and monitoring. Critical to success is a dedicated program manager who understands risk assessment, facility clinical operations, and program management and evaluation.

  4. Appling Andragogy Theory in Photoshop Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alajlan, Abdulrahman Saad

    2015-01-01

    Andragogy is a strategy for teaching adults that can be applied to Photoshop training. Photoshop workshops are frequented by adult learners, and thus andragogical models for instruction would be extremely helpful for prospective trainers looking to improve their classroom designs. Adult learners are much different than child learners, given the…

  5. Planning an Injection Mold Design Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allyn, Edward P.

    With the increased use of plastics worldwide the shortage of trained personnel in moldmaking and design for plastic injection molds is becoming critical. Local schools and community colleges should provide courses in mold design and mold making, since most workers presently learn while working under experienced designers on the job. Following this…

  6. Review of Current Aircrew Coordination Training Program and Master Plan for Program Enhancement: Aircrew Coordination Training Master Plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grubb, G

    2001-01-01

    ...) program to develop a master plan of continuous improvement. Research source materials included policies, training courseware, evaluation guides, research papers and reports, and assessment summaries of operational trend data...

  7. Core stability: the centerpiece of any training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Lisa S; Teeple, Peter

    2005-06-01

    Core strengthening and stability exercises have become key components of training programs for athletes of all levels. The core muscles act as a bridge between upper and lower limbs, and force is transferred from the core, often called the powerhouse, to the limbs. Stability initially requires maintenance of a neutral spine but must progress beyond the neutral zone in a controlled manner. Some studies have demonstrated a relationship between core stability and increased incidence of injury. A training program should start with exercises that isolate specific core muscles but must progress to include complex movements and incorporate other training principles.

  8. CHAMPS: Peer Leadership Program. Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallenari, Alison; Epps, Pat

    CHAMPS Peer Leadership is a program for the prevention of drug, alcohol, and tobacco use, and other negative behaviors and issues facing children. The program asks children to take responsibility for themselves and make positive changes in their schools and communities. Students who have process skills such as goal setting, team building,…

  9. Effects of load-volume on EPOC after acute bouts of resistance training in resistance-trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, George J; Greer, Beau K; Campbell, Sara C; Panton, Lynn B

    2013-07-01

    Recent investigations have shown excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) to be elevated for up to 48 hours in both untrained and trained subjects after resistance training (RT). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of load-volume on EPOC. Eight trained men (aged 22 ± 3 years) participated in 2 randomized RT bouts separated by at least 1 week with total load-volumes of 10,000 and 20,000 kg, respectively. Intensity of RT (85% 1 repetition maximum) did not differ between trials. Exercise energy expenditure and resting metabolic rate (RMR) were measured by indirect calorimetry at 8.5 hours before, 1.5 hours before, and during RT bouts and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after exercise. Creatine kinase (CK) was measured before and after RT, and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours postexercise; ratings of perceived muscle soreness were measured on a similar time course save the immediate postexercise time point. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to analyze dependent variables. During the 20,000 kg trial, subjects expended significantly (p EPOC above baseline RMR.

  10. How to Train Safe Drivers: Setting Up and Evaluating a Fatigue Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamos Giannis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue is considered as a serious risk driving behavior, causing road accidents, which in many cases involve fatalities and severe injuries. According to CARE database statistics, professional drivers are indicated as a high-risk group to be involved in a fatigue-related accident. Acknowledging these statistics, a training program on driving fatigue was organized, aiming at raising awareness of professional drivers of a leading company in building materials, in Greece. Selected experimental methods were used for collecting data before and after the training program, which allowed monitoring and assessing the potential behavioural changes. A questionnaire survey was conducted before the program implementation to 162 drivers of the company, while two months after the program, the same drivers replied to a second questionnaire. Impact assessment of the program relied on statistical analysis of the responses. Results showed the degree of penetration of the training program in the professional drivers' behavior towards safe driving.

  11. Training program for pain assessment in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, E; Moreau, F; Soriot-Thomas, S; Tourneux, P

    2018-01-01

    Pain management is correlated with pain assessment in the newborn infant. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a 2-week training program composed of short (20min), repeated training sessions conducted in the unit. Pain assessment was studied by means of audits. Each audit included data recorded from the newborn infant's medical charts on the day the infant was admitted to the unit and 3 days before the audit. An audit was performed before the training program and then repeated every month for 12 months. Eighty-eight (53.7%) members of the neonatology staff were trained during the 2-week training program. After the training program, pain assessment "at least once a day" increased by 39.0% and pain assessment "at least once a shift" increased by 21.5% compared to baseline (Punit trained 53.7% of the neonatology staff and increased the frequency of pain assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Recovery Act. Development of a Model Energy Conservation Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-07-05

    The overall objective of this project was to develop an updated model Energy Conservation training program for stationary engineers. This revision to the IUOE National Training Fund’s existing Energy Conservation training curriculum is designed to enable stationary engineers to incorporate essential energy management into routine building operation and maintenance tasks. The curriculum uses a blended learning approach that includes classroom, hands-on, computer simulation and web-based training in addition to a portfolio requirement for a workplace-based learning application. The Energy Conservation training program goal is development of a workforce that can maintain new and existing commercial buildings at optimum energy performance levels. The grant start date was July 6, 2010 and the project continued through September 30, 2012, including a three month non-funded extension.

  13. Blood Pressure and Hemodynamic Adaptations after a Training Program in Young Individuals with Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Barboza Seron

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular diseases affect people worldwide. Individuals with Down Syndrome (DS have an up to sixteen-time greater risk of mortality from cardiovascular diseases. Objective: To evaluate the effects of aerobic and resistance exercises on blood pressure and hemodynamic variables of young individuals with DS. Methods: A total of 29 young individuals with DS participated in the study. They were divided into two groups: aerobic training (AT (n = 14, and resistance training (TR (n = 15. Their mean age was 15.7 ± 2.82 years. The training program lasted 12 weeks, and had a frequency of three times a week for AT and twice a week for RT. AT was performed in treadmill/ bicycle ergometer, at an intensity between 50%-70% of the HR reserve. RT comprised nine exercises with three sets of 12 repetition-maximum. Systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, mean blood pressure (MBP and hemodynamic variables were assessed beat-to-beat using the Finometer device before/after the training program. Descriptive analysis, the Shapiro-Wilk test to check the normality of data, and the two-way ANOVA for repeated measures were used to compare pre- and post-training variables. The Pearson’s correlation coefficient was calculated to correlate hemodynamic variables. The SPSS version 18.0 was used with the significance level set at p < 0.05. Results: After twelve weeks of aerobic and/or resistance training, significant reductions in variables SBP, DBP and MBP were observed. Conclusion: This study suggests a chronic hypotensive effect of moderate aerobic and resistance exercises on young individuals with DS.

  14. Effects of Plyometric and Cluster Resistance Training on Explosive Power and Maximum Strength in Karate Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Aminaei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of plyometric and cluster resistance training on explosive power and maximum strength in karate players. Eighteen women, karate players (age mean ± SD 18.22 ± 3.02 years, mean height 163 ± 0.63cm, and mean body mass 53.25 ± 7.34 kg were selected as volunteer samples. They were divided into two groups with respect to their recorded one repetition maximum squat exercise: [1] plyometric training (PT=9 and [2] Cluster training (CT=9 groups and performed a 9-week resistance training protocol that included three stages; [1] General fitness (2 weeks, [2] Strength (4 weeks and [3] Power (3 weeks. Each group performed strength and power trainings for 7 weeks in stage two and three with owned protocol. The subjects were evaluated three times before stage one and after two and three stages for maximum strength and power. Data was analyzed using two way Repeated Measures (ANOVA at a significance level of (P≤0.05. The statistical analysis showed that training stages on all research variables had a significant impact. The maximum strength of the pre-test, post-test strength and post-test power were in cluster group: 29.05 ± 1.54; 32.89 ± 2.80 and 48.74 ± 4.33w and in plyometric group were 26.98 ± 1.54; 38.48 ± 2.80 and 49.82 ± 4.33w respectively. The explosive power of the pre-test, post-test strength and post-test power in cluster group were 359.32±36.20; 427.91±34.56 and 460.55±36.80w and in plyometric group were 333.90±36.20; 400.33±34.56 and 465.20±36.80w respectively. However, there were not statistically significant differences in research variables between resistance cluster and plyometric training groups after 7 weeks. The results indicated both cluster and plyometric training program seems to improve physical fitness elements at the same levels.

  15. Effects of eccentric-focused and conventional resistance training on strength and functional capacity of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Caroline Pieta; Toscan, Rafael; de Camargo, Mainara; Pereira, Evelyn Possobom; Griebler, Nathália; Baroni, Bruno Manfredini; Tiggemann, Carlos Leandro

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of eccentric training using a constant load with longer exposure time at the eccentric phase on knee extensor muscle strength and functional capacity of elderly subjects in comparison with a conventional resistance training program. Twenty-six healthy elderly women (age = 67 ± 6 years) were randomly assigned to an eccentric-focused training group (ETG; n = 13) or a conventional training group (CTG; n = 13). Subjects underwent 12 weeks of resistance training twice a week. For the ETG, concentric and eccentric phases were performed using 1.5 and 4.5 s, respectively, while for CTG, each phase lasted 1.5 s. Maximum dynamic strength was assessed by the one-repetition maximum (1RM) test in the leg press and knee extension exercises, and for functional capacity, subjects performed specific tests (6-m walk test, timed up-and-go test, stair-climbing test, and chair-rising test). Both groups improved knee extension 1RM (24-26 %; p = 0.021), timed up-and-go test (11-16 %; p training volume and intensity does not promote different adaptations in strength or functional capacity compared to conventional resistance training in elderly woman.

  16. The Importance of Training Needs’ Questionnaire in order to Arrange Science Teacher Training Program

    OpenAIRE

    M. C. Tapilouw; H. Firman; S. Redjeki; D. T. Chandra

    2017-01-01

    An ideal teacher training program is by participant’s need. The major aim of this study is getting information about science teacher’s perception and needs in their professional’s life as a science teacher in Junior High School. The main idea of teacher training is to strengthen the integrated science of Natural Science concepts and problem-based learning. Data is gathered by spreading training needs questionnaire to 20 science teachers under an education foundation in Bandung. The questionna...

  17. Effects of exercise training on coronary collateralization and control of collateral resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    Coronary collateral vessels serve as a natural protective mechanism to provide coronary flow to ischemic myocardium secondary to critical coronary artery stenosis. The innate collateral circulation of the normal human heart is typically minimal and considerable variability occurs in extent of collateralization in coronary artery disease patients. A well-developed collateral circulation has been documented to exert protective effects upon myocardial perfusion, contractile function, infarct size, and electrocardiographic abnormalities. Thus therapeutic augmentation of collateral vessel development and/or functional adaptations in collateral and collateral-dependent arteries to reduce resistance into the ischemic myocardium represent a desirable goal in the management of coronary artery disease. Tremendous evidence has provided documentation for the therapeutic benefits of exercise training programs in patients with coronary artery disease (and collateralization); mechanisms that underlie these benefits are numerous and multifaceted, and currently under investigation in multiple laboratories worldwide. The role of enhanced collateralization as a major beneficial contributor has not been fully resolved. This topical review highlights literature that examines the effects of exercise training on collateralization in the diseased heart, as well as effects of exercise training on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle control of regional coronary tone in the collateralized heart. Future directions for research in this area involve further delineation of cellular/molecular mechanisms involved in effects of exercise training on collateralized myocardium, as well as development of novel therapies based on emerging concepts regarding exercise training and coronary artery disease. PMID:21565987

  18. Different Levels of Eccentric Resistance during Eight Weeks of Training Affect Muscle Strength and Lean Tissue Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, K. L.; Loehr, J. A.; Lee, S. M. C.; Laughlin, M. S.; Hagan, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    Coupling concentric and eccentric muscle contractions appears to be important in the development of muscle strength and hypertrophy. The interim Resistive Exercise Device (iRED) currently used aboard the International Space Station does not seem to be as effective as free weight training in ambulatory subjects and has not completely protected against muscular deconditioning due to space flight. The lack of protection during space flight could be caused by iRED's proportionally lower eccentric resistance (60-70%) compared to concentric resistance. PURPOSE: To determine the effects of 8 wks of lower body resistive exercise training using five levels of eccentric resistance on muscle strength and lean tissue mass. METHODS: Forty untrained males (34.9 +/- 7 yrs, 80.9 +/- 9.8 kg, 178.2 +/- 7.1 cm; mean +/- SD) completed three 1-repetition maximum (1-RM) strength tests for both the supine leg press (LP) and supine heel raise (HR) prior to training; subjects were matched for LP strength and randomly assigned to one of five training groups. Concentric load (% 1-RM) was constant across groups during training, but each group trained with different levels of eccentric load (0%, 33%, 66%, 100%, or 138% of concentric). Subjects trained 3 d / wk for 8 wks using a periodized program for LP and HR based on percentages of the highest pre-training 1-RM. LP and HR 1-RM and leg lean mass (LLM; assessed by DEXA) were measured pre- and post-training. A two-way ANOVA was used to analyze all dependent measures. Tukey's post hoc tests were used to test significant main effects. Within group pre- to post-training changes were compared using paired t-tests with a Bonferroni adjustment. Statistical significance was set a priori at p 0.05. All data are expressed as mean +/- SE. RESULTS: LP 1-RM strength increased significantly in all groups pre- to post-training. The 138% group increase (20.1 +/- 3.7%) was significantly greater than the 0% (7.9 +/- 2.8%), 33% (7.7 +/- 4.6%), and 66% (7.5 +/- 4

  19. Evidence for Resistance Training as a Treatment Therapy in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Strasser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, investigators have paid increasing attention to the effects of resistance training (RT on several metabolic syndrome variables. Evidence suggests that skeletal muscle is responsible for up to 40% of individuals' total body weight and may be influential in modifying metabolic risk factors via muscle mass development. Due to the metabolic consequences of reduced muscle mass, it is understood that normal aging and/or decreased physical activity may lead to a higher prevalence of metabolic disorders. The purpose of this review is to (1 evaluate the potential clinical effectiveness and biological mechanisms of RT in the treatment of obesity and (2 provide up-to-date evidence relating to the impact of RT in reducing major cardiovascular disease risk factors (including dyslipidaemia and type 2 diabetes. A further aim of this paper is to provide clinicians with recommendations for facilitating the use of RT as therapy in obesity and obesity-related metabolic disorders.

  20. Importance of mind-muscle connection during progressive resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Vinstrup, Jonas; Jakobsen, Markus Due

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study evaluates whether focusing on using specific muscles during bench press can selectively activate these muscles. METHODS: Altogether 18 resistance-trained men participated. Subjects were familiarized with the procedure and performed one-maximum repetition (1RM) test during...... electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded for the triceps brachii and pectoralis major muscles. Subsequently, peak EMG of the filtered signals were normalized to maximum maximorum EMG of each muscle. RESULTS: In both muscles, focusing on using the respective muscles increased muscle activity at relative loads...... between 20 and 60 %, but not at 80 % of 1RM. Overall, a threshold between 60 and 80 % rather than a linear decrease in selective activation with increasing intensity appeared to exist. The increased activity did not occur at the expense of decreased activity of the other muscle, e.g. when focusing...

  1. Battle Staff Training System in Support of Force XXI Training Program: Methodology and Lessons Learned

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andre, Charles

    1997-01-01

    .... The TSPs combine computer-based instruction (CBI) and text. Each TSP presents a course of instruction as CD-ROM based programs and supplemental text based instruction with a training management system...

  2. The effects of resistance training on quality of life in cancer: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramp, Fiona; James, Abigail; Lambert, Jessica

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to carry out a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of resistance training upon quality of life (QoL) in cancer. A wide range of electronic databases were searched from inception to October 2009 using relevant key words. Reference lists of all studies identified for inclusion and relevant reviews were also searched. Relevant journals were hand searched and experts in the field contacted. Randomized controlled trials that investigated the specific effect of resistance training on QoL in adult cancer survivors were included. Two review authors independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data based upon predefined criteria. A meta-analysis was performed for QoL using a random effects model. Six studies were identified for inclusion. Two studies demonstrated a significantly beneficial effect of resistance training on QoL compared to usual care. Post-test means ± standard deviations were available for all comparisons providing data for 278 participants who received a resistance training intervention and 270 control participants. The results of the meta-analysis demonstrated that, at the end of the intervention period, resistance training was statistically more effective than the control intervention (SMD -0.17, 95% CIs -0.34 to -0.00). Overall, there was heterogeneity between studies in relation to tumor type, stage of cancer treatment, type of cancer treatment, and duration of the intervention. Existing evidence suggests that strength training programs for cancer survivors have marginal benefit. Further, fully powered studies are required to determine the optimal type, intensity, and timing of resistance training.

  3. Changes in Maximal Strength, Velocity, and Power After 8 Weeks of Training With Pneumatic or Free Weight Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, David M; Bronson, Stefanie; Cronin, John B; Newton, Robert U

    2016-04-01

    Because free weight (FW) and pneumatic (PN) resistance are characterized by different inertial properties, training with either resistance could afford unique strength, velocity, and power adaptations. Eighteen resistance-trained men completed baseline tests to determine their FW and PN bench press 1 repetition maximum (1RM). During the FW session, 4 explosive repetitions were performed at loads of 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90% 1RM to assess force, velocity, and power. Participants were then assigned to a FW or PN training group, which involved three 90-minute sessions per week for 8 weeks. Both intervention groups completed identical periodized programs with the exception of the resistance used to perform all bench press movements. Free weight participants significantly increased their FW and PN 1RM (10.4 and 9.4%), and maximum (any load) force (9.8%), velocity (11.6%), and power (22.5%). Pneumatic-trained participants also exhibited increases in FW and PN 1RM (11.6 and 17.5%), and maximum force (8.4%), velocity (13.6%), and power (33.4%). Both interventions improved peak barbell velocity at loads of 15 and 30% 1RM; however, only the PN-trained individuals displayed improvements in peak force and power at these same loads. Training with PN resistance may offer advantages if attempting to improve power at lighter relative loads by affording an opportunity to consistently achieve higher accelerations and velocities (F = ma), in comparison with FW. Exploiting the inertial properties of the resistance, whether mass, elastic or PN, could afford an opportunity to develop mixed-method training strategies and/or elicit unique neuromuscular adaptations to suit the specific needs of athletes from sports characterized by varying demands.

  4. Neurophysiology training in the Neurology Specialist Education Program in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Antigüedad, A; Matías-Guiu, J; Hernández-Pérez, M A; Jiménez Hernández, M D; Martín González, M R; Morales Ortiz, A; Delgado, G; Frank, A; López de Silanes, C; Martínez-Vila, E

    2011-06-01

    The training period in neurophysiology is a substantial part of the Neurology Specialist Program in Spain. The National Neurology Committee (La Comisión Nacional de Neurología (CNN), which is the body reporting to the Ministries of Health and Education, must ensure compliance to the Program. During the first trimester of 2008, the CNN sent a questionnaire, in which there was a question asking about this training period, to each of the managers of the 69 teaching units accredited for neurology training in Spain, for them to answer. Of the 69 questionnaires issued, 49 were received completed, which was a response rate of 71%. The neurophysiology training period of the neurology specialist program in Spain was carried out in the same hospital in 44 teaching unit (90%): the remaining 5 sent their neurology trainees to 4 different hospitals. The Unit that carried out the neurophysiology training period was incorporated into the Neurology Department in 27 (55%) cases, and the formula was mixed in 3 (6%). A total of 69% of tutors were satisfied with the training, but was 90% in the hospitals where the unit was integrated into Neurology, and was 65% where this relationship did not exist. The neurologists in training were informed about EEG in 49% of education units, performed EMG/ENG 57%, and informed about evoked potentials in 35% after their training period. Although the level of satisfaction is high, the level of responsibility assumed by the neurologists in training during their rotation into neurophysiology does not appear to comply to the demands laid out in the training program, particularly in these units not integrated into Neurology Departments. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Athletic Training Student Socialization Part I: Socializing Students in Undergraduate Athletic Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Professional socialization is a key process in the professional development of athletic training students. The published athletic training education research has focused on many perspectives regarding socialization; however, it has yet to investigate the program director's (PD's) opinion. Objective: To gain insights from the PD on methods…

  6. Training Program Design. Interdisciplinary Team Training and Humanistic Patient Care for Hospices. Monograph 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, David J.; Mortenson, Lee E.

    This monograph, the third in a series of five, provides training information for hospice staff in improving interdisciplinary team functions and humanistic care provisions. Its purpose is to describe the steps in designing a training program for a particular hospice and the activities undertaken between the selection of the trainers and the…

  7. Training Transfer, Metacognition Skills, and Performance Outcomes in Blended versus Traditional Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovengo, Rick D.

    2014-01-01

    The military instituted blended e-learning training programs to reduce manpower requirements and to lower training costs by leveraging technology, but success in this relationship has not been studied specifically. Working within theoretical constructs of motivation, expectancy, and social cognition this quasi-experimental study examined the…

  8. Culturally Competent Training Program: A Key to Training Lay Health Advisors for Promoting Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mei-yu; Song, Lixin; Seetoo, Amy; Cai, Cuijuan; Smith, Gary; Oakley, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    The lay health advisor (LHA) training program for breast cancer screening was conducted among Chinese-English bilingual trainees residing in Southeast Michigan. Guided by Bandura's Social Learning Theory, the development of the training curriculum followed the health communication process recommended by the National Cancer Institute. Data analysis…

  9. Elevation of cardiac troponins measured after recreational resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savukoski, Tanja; Mehtälä, Laura; Lindahl, Bertil; Venge, Per; Pettersson, Kim

    2015-08-01

    Whereas elevated cardiac troponin (cTn) concentrations i.e. above the 99th percentile of healthy reference population (recommended cutoff for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction) are well-documented in healthy individuals after prolonged and/or intensive exercises such as marathons, data on less-strenuous sports are scarce. Therefore, our aim was to investigate cTnI and cTnT release in response to recreational resistance training, here a single-bout of 1-h kettlebell workout. Serum samples were collected from 11 apparently healthy volunteers the previous day (pre-exercise), three hours after the kettlebell class (post-exercise), the next day and three days later. The aliquoted samples were analyzed with Abbott Laboratories' Architect high-sensitivity (hs)-cTnI assay (limit of detection, LoD = 2 ng/L), our 3+1-type cTnI assay free from cTn-specific autoantibody interference (LoD = 3 ng/L) and Roche Diagnostics' hs-cTnT assay (LoD = 5 ng/L). The post-exercise cTn concentrations were significantly higher than the pre-exercise values (median 5.5-9.6 ng/L vs. 26 ng/L, n = 2) and/or hs-cTnT (>14 ng/L, n = 4). The cTn concentrations returned to baseline during the three days of follow-up. Our study demonstrates abnormally elevated cTns with well-validated sensitive cTn assays after resistance training. This confirms that different kinds of recreational physical activity are yet another confounder that may affect the determination and use of 99th percentile reference values. Therefore, exercise-associated changes should be carefully addressed as part of the evaluation what is "normal cTn". Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Philippine Atomic Energy Commission and its training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragot, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    This article briefly but comprehensively enumerates the functions and responsibilities of the Commission with emphasis on its local and overseas training program. It emphasizes the significance of these programs in meeting the manpower need of the country especially with the construction of the first nuclear power plant. (author)

  11. UNITE and Management Training Program for Workplace Communication & Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Sanda

    This curriculum provides materials for a training program designed to enable front-line supervisors and union stewards to minimize production disruptions stemming from ongoing, unresolved conflicts among production workers. The program accomplishes this goal by giving participants the tools and confidence to design, implement, and run a process…

  12. The listening cube: a three dimensional auditory training program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raeve, L.; Anderson, I.; Bammens, M.; Jans, J.; Haesevoets, M.; Pans, R.; Vandistel, H.; Vrolix, Y.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Here we present the Listening Cube, an auditory training program for children and adults receiving cochlear implants, developed during the clinical practice at the KIDS Royal Institute for the Deaf in Belgium. We provide information on the content of the program as well as guidance as to

  13. A Nontraditional Work/Training Program for Community Health Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorak, Sandra A.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses Project SCOPE (Seniors' Community Outreach Programs and Education) which provided an enriched on-the-job training program in community health work. Activities were directed toward developing skills in conducting a needs assessment, networking, care planning, resource utilization and community development. Discusses project's…

  14. Examining Internationalization in U.S. Counseling Psychology Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Erica J.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.; Aegisdottir, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather more information about the process of internationalization in U.S. counseling psychology programs. Participants included 26 training directors and 83 doctoral students, representing 32 of the 63 APA-accredited counseling psychology programs. Results suggested that the presence of international training…

  15. Evaluating vocational training program for women in Brazil | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    28 avr. 2016 ... It also allows tracks satisfaction levels, self-esteem, and public participation of the participants. The Mulheres Mil program was scaled up in 2011 and is expected to benefit 100,000 women by the end of 2014. It will then be integrated into a national skills training program throughout Brazil, with the goal of ...

  16. Actuarial Sciences Graduate Training Program (India-Waterloo ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Actuarial Sciences Graduate Training Program (India-Waterloo). The explosive growth of India's economy has led to a proliferation of insurance companies and a dire need for actuarial professionals. The University of Waterloo (Ontario) Canada has established a program to build actuarial talent for India's financial services ...

  17. Using Research to Design Integrated Education and Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Michele; Schaffer, William R.

    2016-01-01

    With the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014, Northampton Community College began the creation of Integrated Education and Training (IE&T) programs in October 2015. After a needs assessment was conducted with the partners, programs were created to address the needs in the hospitality and healthcare sectors.…

  18. Awareness Training Program on Responsible Gambling for Casino Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Isabelle; Boutin, Claude; Ladouceur, Robert; Lachance, Stella; Dufour, Magali

    2008-01-01

    Over the last years, several comprehensive training programs for problem gambling have been developed and implemented in various casinos around the world. However, the efficacy of these programs has rarely been assessed and evaluated scientifically. A workshop called "Des gens qui font la difference" (People Making a Difference) was…

  19. Evaluating vocational training program for women in Brazil | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-28

    Apr 28, 2016 ... It also allows tracks satisfaction levels, self-esteem, and public participation of the participants. The Mulheres Mil program was scaled up in 2011 and is expected to benefit 100,000 women by the end of 2014. It will then be integrated into a national skills training program throughout Brazil, with the goal of ...

  20. Delegation and Empowerment in CAATE Accredited Athletic Training Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Johanna; White, Kristi; Starkey, Chad; Krause, B. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Context: The use of delegation can potentially alleviate some of the stress with administering an athletic training education program (ATEP) and allow program directors (PDs) to focus on other aspects of their academic role. Objectives: To determine the reasons PDs delegate and do not delegate tasks to other faculty of ATEPs accredited by the…

  1. Safety and efficacy of resistance training in germ cell cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Frank; Jones, L W; Tolver, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Bleomycin–etoposid–cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy is curative in most patients with disseminated germ cell cancer (GCC) but also associated with toxic actions and dysfunction in non-targeted tissues. We investigated changes in muscle function during BEP and the safety and effic...... blunted several positive adaptations observed in healthy controls. Thus, our study does not support the general application of resistance training in this setting but larger-scaled trials are required to confirm this finding....... and efficacy of resistance training to modulate these changes. Methods: Thirty GCC patients were randomly assigned to resistance training (resistance training group (INT), n=15) or usual care (CON, n=15) during 9 weeks of BEP therapy. Resistance training consisted of thrice weekly sessions of four exercises, 3...... changes compared with the INT-group (PResistance training was safe and attenuated dysfunction in selected endpoints, but BEP...

  2. Chronic Resistance Training Does Not Ameliorate Unloading-Induced Decrements in Neuromuscular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschenes, Michael R; McCoy, Raymond W; Mangis, Katherine A

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of long-term resistance training in preventing the detrimental effects of muscle unloading on neuromuscular function. Eleven untrained men and 11 men with extensive backgrounds in resistance training were tested for several parameters of neuromuscular function at various isokinetic contractile velocities before and after 7 days of muscle unloading. Measurements included muscle mass, strength, power, total work, electromyography, and neuromuscular transmission efficiency using superimposed electrical stimulation of maximally contracting muscles. Muscle performance was superior in resistance-trained subjects before and after unloading. In both groups of participants, unloading resulted in significantly (P neuromuscular transmission efficiency was significantly altered by unloading in trained or untrained participants. Chronic resistance training was found to be ineffective in neutralizing the deleterious effects of unloading on neuromuscular function. It appears that positive adaptations associated with long-term resistance training provide no prophylactic effect when neuromuscular systems are subjected to unloading.

  3. [Impact of a disaster preparedness training program on health staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Cotanda, Cristina; Rebordosa Martínez, Mónica; Trenchs Sainz de la Maza, Victoria; Luaces Cubells, Carles

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a disaster preparedness training program in a Paediatric Emergency Department (PED). A quasi-experimental study was conducted using an anonymous questionnaire that was distributed to health care providers of a PED in a tertiary paediatric hospital. The questions concerned the disaster plan (DP), including theoretical and practical aspects. Questionnaires were distributed and completed in January 2014 (period 1) and November 2014 (period 2). The disaster training program includes theoretical and practical sessions. A total of 110 questionnaires were collected in period 1, and 80 in period 2. Almost three-quarters (71.3%) of PED staff attended the theoretical sessions, and 43.8% attended the practical sessions. The application of this training program significantly improved knowledge about the DP, but no improvement was observed in the practical questions. PED staff felt more prepared to face a disaster after the training program (15.5% vs. 41.8%, Ptraining program improved some knowledge about the disaster plan, but it has not improved responses in practical situations, which may be due to the low attendance at practical sessions and the time between the training program and the questionnaires. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Program Director Survey: Attitudes Regarding Child Neurology Training and Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Ignacio; Feist, Terri B; Gilbert, Donald L

    2016-04-01

    As a result of major clinical and scientific advances and changes in clinical practice, the role of adult neurology training for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability (NDD) certification has become controversial. The most recently approved requirements for board eligibility for child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents still include 12 months in adult neurology rotations. The objective of this study was to assess United States child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residency program directors' opinions regarding optimal residency training. The authors developed an 18-item questionnaire and contacted all 80 child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors via e-mail, using SurveyMonkey. A total of 44 program directors responded (55%), representing programs that train 78 categorical and 94 total resident positions, approximately 70% of those filled in the match. Respondents identified multiple areas where child neurology residents need more training, including genetics and neuromuscular disease. A substantial majority (73%) believed child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents need less than 12 adult neurology training months; however, most (75%) also believed adult hospital service and man-power needs (55%) and finances (34%) would pose barriers to reducing adult neurology. Most (70%) believed reductions in adult neurology training should be program flexible. A majority believed the written initial certification examination should be modified with more child neurology and fewer basic neuroscience questions. Nearly all (91%) felt the views of child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors are under-represented within the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Residency Review Committee. The requirement for 12 adult neurology months for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability certification is not consistent with the views of the majority of program

  5. Protein supplementation during resistance-type exercise training in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenders, Marika; Verdijk, Lex B; Van der Hoeven, Letty; Van Kranenburg, Janneau; Nilwik, Rachel; Wodzig, Will K W H; Senden, Joan M G; Keizer, Hans A; Van Loon, Luc J C

    2013-03-01

    Resistance training has been well established as an effective treatment strategy to increase skeletal muscle mass and strength in the elderly. We assessed whether dietary protein supplementation can further augment the adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training in healthy elderly men and women. Healthy elderly men (n = 31, 70 ± 1 yr) and women (n = 29, 70 ± 1 yr) were randomly assigned to a progressive, 24-wk resistance-type exercise training program with or without additional protein supplementation (15 g·d-1). Muscle hypertrophy was assessed on a whole-body Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), limb (computed tomography), and muscle fiber (biopsy) level. Strength was assessed regularly by 1-repetition maximum (RM) strength testing. Functional capacity was assessed with a sit-to-stand and handgrip test. One-RM strength increased by 45% ± 6% versus 40% ± 3% (women) and 41% ± 4% versus 44% ± 3% (men) in the placebo versus protein group, respectively (P muscle mass (women, 4% ± 1% vs 3% ± 1%; men, 3% ± 1% vs 3% ± 1%) and quadriceps cross-sectional area (women, 9% ± 1% vs 9% ± 1%; men, 9% ± 1% vs 10% ± 1%) increased similarly in the placebo versus protein groups (P muscle fiber size increased over time in both placebo and protein groups (25% ± 13% vs 30% ± 9% and 23% ± 12% vs 22% ± 10% in the women and men, respectively). Sit-to-stand improved by 18% ± 2% and 19% ± 2% in women and men, respectively (P training increases skeletal muscle mass and strength, augments functional capacity, improves glycemia and lipidemia, and reduces blood pressure in healthy elderly men and women. Additional protein supplementation (15 g·d-1) does not further increase muscle mass, strength, and/or functional capacity.

  6. Evaluation of a localization training program for hearing impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuk, Francis; Keenan, Denise M; Lau, Chi; Crose, Bryan; Schumacher, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based and a laboratory-based localization training program. This study examined the effectiveness of a localization training program on improving the localization ability of 15 participants with a mild-to-moderately severe hearing loss. These participants had worn the study hearing aids in a previous study. The training consisted of laboratory-based training and home-based training. The participants were divided into three groups: a control group, a group that performed the laboratory training first followed by the home training, and a group that completed the home training first followed by the laboratory training. The participants were evaluated before any training (baseline), at 2 weeks, 1 month, 2 months, and 3 months after baseline testing. All training was completed by the second month. The participants only wore the study hearing aids between the second month and the third month. Localization testing and laboratory training were conducted in a sound-treated room with a 360 degree, 12 loudspeaker array. There were three stimuli each randomly presented three times from each loudspeaker (nine test items from each loudspeaker) for a total of 108 items on each test or training trial. The stimuli, including a continuous noise, a telephone ring, and a speech passage "Search for the sound from this speaker" were high-pass filtered above 2000 Hz. The test stimuli had a duration of 300 ms, whereas the training stimuli had five durations (3 s, 2 s, 1 s, 500 ms, and 300 ms) and four back attenuation (-8, -4, -2, and 0 dB re: front presentation) values. All stimuli were presented at 30 dB SL or the most comfortable listening level of the participants. Each participant completed 6 to 8, 2 hr laboratory-based training within a month. The home training required a two-loudspeaker computer system using 30 different sounds of various durations (5) by attenuation (4) combinations. The participants were required to use the home training

  7. Training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    A training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff personnel has been developed and implemented. The program is compliant with requirements and provides evidence that a systematic approach has been taken to indoctrinate new technical staff. Development involved task analysis to determine activities where training was necessary and the standard which must be attained to qualify. Structured mentoring is used where experienced personnel interact with candidates using checksheets to guide candidates through various steps and to provide evidence that steps have been accomplished. Credit can be taken for the previous experience of personnel by means of evaluation boards which can credit or modify checksheet steps. Considering just the wealth of business practice and site specific information a new person at a facility needs to assimilate, the program has been effective in indoctrinating new technical staff personnel and integrating them into a productive role. The program includes continuing training

  8. Effect of Eight Weeks High Intensity Interval Training and Medium Intensity Interval Training and Aloe vera Intake on Serum Vaspin and Insulin Resistance in Diabetic Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darya Asgari Hazaveh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The use of herbal supplements and exercise training for the treatment of diabetic has increased.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of eight weeks high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training and Aloe vera intake on serum vaspin and insulin resistance in diabetic male rats. Materials and Methods: During this experimental study, 32 diabetic rats with STZ Wistar were randomly divided into four groups including the control, high intensity interval training +supplement, moderate intensity interval training + supplement and supplement. Training program was planned for 8 weeks and 3 sessions per week. Each session consisted of 6 to 12 periods of 2-minute activity with the intensity of 90% and 60% with one minute rest (speed: 10m/min. In the supplement groups, 300milligrams Aloe vera solution per kilogram of body weight Gavage was given 5 sessions per week for 8 weeks. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: The results showed that high and moderate intensity interval training with supplement has no significant effect on the of serum vaspin (p=0.112. High intensity interval training with supplement had significant effects on insulin in diabetic male rats (0.000. Conclusion: .Based on the findings of this study, it seems that supplementation of Aloe vera with high intensity interval training can have better effects on serum insulin in diabetic rats.

  9. Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasse, Miriam; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To review the literature on teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents and to identify formats and content of these programs and their effects. DATA SOURCES Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to mid-July 2008) and the Education Resources Information Center database (pre-1966 to mid-July 2008) were searched using and combining the MeSH terms teaching, internship and residency, and family practice; and teaching, graduate medical education, and family practice. STUDY SELECTION The initial MEDLINE and Education Resources Information Center database searches identified 362 and 33 references, respectively. Titles and abstracts were reviewed and studies were included if they described the format or content of a teaching-skills program or if they were primary studies of the effects of a teaching-skills program for family medicine residents or family medicine and other specialty trainees. The bibliographies of those articles were reviewed for unidentified studies. A total of 8 articles were identified for systematic review. Selection was limited to articles published in English. SYNTHESIS Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents vary from half-day curricula to a few months of training. Their content includes leadership skills, effective clinical teaching skills, technical teaching skills, as well as feedback and evaluation skills. Evaluations mainly assessed the programs’ effects on teaching behaviour, which was generally found to improve following participation in the programs. Evaluations of learner reactions and learning outcomes also suggested that the programs have positive effects. CONCLUSION Family medicine residency training programs differ from all other residency training programs in their shorter duration, usually 2 years, and the broader scope of learning within those 2 years. Few studies on teaching-skills training, however, were designed specifically for family medicine residents. Further studies assessing the

  10. Preventing Occupational Skin Disease: A Review of Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zack, Bethany; Arrandale, Victoria H; Holness, D Linn

    Occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) is a common occupational disease that impacts a variety of worker groups. Skin protection and disease prevention training programs have shown promise for improving prevention practices and reducing the incidence of OCD. This review details the features of training programs for primary prevention of OCD and identifies gaps in the literature. Twelve studies were identified for in-depth review: many studies included wet workers employed in health care, hairdressing, cleaning, and food preparation; 1 program featured manufacturing workers. Few programs provided content on allergic contact dermatitis, and only 1 was evaluated for long-term effectiveness. Effective programs were similar in content, delivery method, and timing and were characterized by industry specificity, multimodal learning, participatory elements, skin care resource provision, repeated sessions, and management engagement. Long-term effectiveness, generalizability beyond OCD, workplace health and safety culture impact, and translation of programs in the North American context represent areas for future research.

  11. Resist diabetes: A randomized clinical trial for resistance training maintenance in adults with prediabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda M Davy

    Full Text Available To determine whether a social cognitive theory (SCT-based intervention improves resistance training (RT maintenance and strength, and reduces prediabetes prevalence.Sedentary, overweight/obese (BMI: 25-39.9 kg/m2 adults aged 50-69 (N = 170 with prediabetes participated in the 15-month trial. Participants completed a supervised 3-month RT (2×/wk phase and were randomly assigned (N = 159 to one of two 6-month maintenance conditions: SCT or standard care. Participants continued RT at a self-selected facility. The final 6-month period involved no contact. Assessments occurred at baseline and months 3, 9, and 15. The SCT faded-contact intervention consisted of nine tailored transition (i.e., supervised training to training alone and nine follow-up sessions. Standard care involved six generic follow-up sessions. Primary outcomes were prevalence of normoglycemia and muscular strength.The retention rate was 76%. Four serious adverse events were reported. After 3 months of RT, 34% of participants were no longer prediabetic. This prevalence of normoglycemia was maintained through month 15 (30%, with no group difference. There was an 18% increase in the odds of being normoglycemic for each % increase in fat-free mass. Increases in muscular strength were evident at month 3 and maintained through month 15 (P<0.001, which represented improvements of 21% and 14% for chest and leg press, respectively. Results did not demonstrate a greater reduction in prediabetes prevalence in the SCT condition.Resistance training is an effective, maintainable strategy for reducing prediabetes prevalence and increasing muscular strength. Future research which promotes RT initiation and maintenance in clinical and community settings is warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01112709.

  12. Resistance training improves metabolic economy during functional tasks in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Michael J; Fields, David A; Byrne, Nuala M; Hunter, Gary R

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect resistance training has on metabolic economy during typical activities of daily living in a geriatric population. Twenty-nine men and women (age: 66.7 +/- 4.4 years, body mass: 72.3 +/- 11.9 kg) participated in a 26-week heavy-resistance training program. Before and after training, heart rate and expiratory gases were measured for subjects performing 3 tasks that would mimic common everyday activities encountered by this population: (a) walking (WLK) at 3 miles per hour (4.8 km x h(-1)), (b) carrying a box (CAR) to simulate holding a bag of groceries with 1 hand (30% of maximal isometric strength) while walking at 2 miles per hour (3.2 km x h(-1)), and (c) climbing stairs (STR). No time by gender interaction was observed for the WLK, CAR, and STR activities; consequently, the values for men and women were pooled. Both strength and fat-free mass increased significantly (p exchange ratio decreased significantly (p rate decreased significantly (p economy during daily tasks and improve ease of physical activity, thereby providing a possible mechanism for increasing quality of life in an older and geriatric population.

  13. INPO JTA application: developing a competency-based training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    Developing a competency-based training program requires the support of a strong curriculum development program. The major thrust of Arkansas Power and Light Company's competency-based curriculum development program is the identification of competencies using position task analysis data, panels, and INPO JTA data. Eight steps in the curriculum development approach provide the logic and rationale of the process: (1) establish competencies, (2) conduct competency verification, (3) develop competency tests, (4) develop curriculum, (5) develop instructional media, (6) validate curriculum and conduct field testing, (7) perform training effectiveness evaluation, and (8) revise the curriculum as needed. The processes describe how INPO JTA's and NRC procedures are cross-referenced to show that standards and requirements imposed or sanctioned by NRC and INPO are met. The competency-based approach to curriculum and training development eliminates the traditional scatterload approach to training and focuses on training to the competency. The primary benefits of competency-based training include accountability, minimal job training to meet job or position requirements, and a process to document an individual's job proficiency

  14. Biosafety Education and Training Programs for Ukrainian Microbiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushkina, V.; Volyansky, A.; Popova, N.

    2007-01-01

    In the period of the Soviet Union Ukrainian Mechnikov Anti-Plaque Research Institute was one of the main bases of centralized training for laboratory diagnosis of especially dangerous infections. Not only specialists, but medical technicians were obligatory trained. In training programs special attention was paid to the safety regime in accurate work out of practical manipulations in investigational classical methods (cultivating technique, pipeting, animals' infection and dissection, etc.), protective clothes usage, anti-epidemic measures use at different accidents. This approach gave effective results not only in laboratories but also during field work (natural plaque foci investigations, etc.) and at emergencies. Recently in world practice to increase the level of biosafety technical equipment and devices are developed and used very intensively. During training maximal time is paid to their mastering. At such training biosafety practically depends on safe and reliable work of engineer-technical systems. At present in Ukrainian Anti-Plaque Institute with the support of Canadian Government Training Centre on biosafety and biodefense for specialists of Ukraine and FSU countries is being organized. Teaching programs will include complex study of hand manipulations and modern technical means knowledge. To our mind such initial training had to be available for all specialists of BSL 1-2 microbiological laboratories of any subordination. For this goal all kinds of programs will be developed. Such complex approach will promote to decrease biological risks in microbiological laboratories and prevent infectious agents import from working territories.(author)

  15. Training program for fundamental surgical skill in robotic laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Irene; Mukherjee, Mukul; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Siu, Ka-Chun

    2011-09-01

    Although the use of robotic laparoscopic surgery has increased in popularity, training protocols for gaining proficiency in robotic surgical skills are not well established. The purpose of this study was to examine a fundamental training program that provides an effective approach to evaluate and improve robotic surgical skills performance using the da Vinci(™) Surgical System. Fifteen medical students without any robotic surgical experience were recruited. Participants went through a 4-day training program for developing fundamental robotic surgical skills and received a retention test 1 day after the completion of training. Data analysis included time to task completion, average speed, total distance traveled and movement curvature of the instrument tips, and muscle activities of the participants' forearms. Surgical performance was graded by the modified Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills for robotic laparoscopic surgery. Finally, participants evaluated their own performance after each session through questionnaires. Significant training effects were shown for the time to task completion (p movement curvature (p mastery, familiarity, and self-confidence and less difficulty in performing fundamental tasks with the surgical robot in both post-testing and retention sessions. Our 4-day training program comprising of a series of training tasks from fundamental to surgical skill levels was effective in improving surgical skills. Further studies are required to verify these findings with a longer period of retention. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Train Repathing in Emergencies Based on Fuzzy Linear Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelei Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Train pathing is a typical problem which is to assign the train trips on the sets of rail segments, such as rail tracks and links. This paper focuses on the train pathing problem, determining the paths of the train trips in emergencies. We analyze the influencing factors of train pathing, such as transferring cost, running cost, and social adverse effect cost. With the overall consideration of the segment and station capability constraints, we build the fuzzy linear programming model to solve the train pathing problem. We design the fuzzy membership function to describe the fuzzy coefficients. Furthermore, the contraction-expansion factors are introduced to contract or expand the value ranges of the fuzzy coefficients, coping with the uncertainty of the value range of the fuzzy coefficients. We propose a method based on triangular fuzzy coefficient and transfer the train pathing (fuzzy linear programming model to a determinate linear model to solve the fuzzy linear programming problem. An emergency is supposed based on the real data of the Beijing-Shanghai Railway. The model in this paper was solved and the computation results prove the availability of the model and efficiency of the algorithm.

  17. Train repathing in emergencies based on fuzzy linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xuelei; Cui, Bingmou

    2014-01-01

    Train pathing is a typical problem which is to assign the train trips on the sets of rail segments, such as rail tracks and links. This paper focuses on the train pathing problem, determining the paths of the train trips in emergencies. We analyze the influencing factors of train pathing, such as transferring cost, running cost, and social adverse effect cost. With the overall consideration of the segment and station capability constraints, we build the fuzzy linear programming model to solve the train pathing problem. We design the fuzzy membership function to describe the fuzzy coefficients. Furthermore, the contraction-expansion factors are introduced to contract or expand the value ranges of the fuzzy coefficients, coping with the uncertainty of the value range of the fuzzy coefficients. We propose a method based on triangular fuzzy coefficient and transfer the train pathing (fuzzy linear programming model) to a determinate linear model to solve the fuzzy linear programming problem. An emergency is supposed based on the real data of the Beijing-Shanghai Railway. The model in this paper was solved and the computation results prove the availability of the model and efficiency of the algorithm.

  18. Breaking bad news: A communication competency for ophthalmology training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilkert, Sarah M; Cebulla, Colleen M; Jain, Shelly Gupta; Pfeil, Sheryl A; Benes, Susan C; Robbins, Shira L

    As the ophthalmology accreditation system undergoes major changes, training programs must evaluate residents in the 6 core competencies, including appropriately communicating bad news. Although the literature is replete with recommendations for breaking bad news across various non-ophthalmology specialties, no formal training programs exist for ophthalmology. There are many valuable lessons to be learned from our colleagues regarding this important skill. We examine the historic basis for breaking bad news, explore current recommendations among other specialties, and then evaluate a pilot study in breaking bad news for ophthalmology residents. The results of this study are limited by a small number of residents at a single academic center. Future studies from multiple training programs should be conducted to further evaluate the need and efficacy of formal communication skills training in this area, as well as the generalizability of our pilot training program. If validated, this work could serve as a template for future ophthalmology resident training and evaluation in this core competency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Audiology training in Nigeria--II: A cost-effective approach to training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyiborhoro, J M

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide some ways and means so that an audiology training program can be implemented in a developing country (Nigeria). Specific problems facing students, faculty and the training process itself are examined. Suggestions are provided to reduce these problems. In addition to mobilization of local resources, it is suggested that international cooperation be sought in the development, establishment and implementation of audiology training programs in developing countries. While the present approach may not be unique, it may provide some cost-effective means for meeting the shortage of hearing health care professionals in many developing countries.

  20. Advances of NOAA Training Program in Climate Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeyeva, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    Since 2002, NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Climate Services Division (CSD) has offered numerous training opportunities to NWS staff. After eight-years of development, the training program offers three instructor-led courses and roughly 25 online (distance learning) modules covering various climate topics, such as: climate data and observations, climate variability and change, and NWS national / local climate products (tools, skill, and interpretation). Leveraging climate information and expertise available at all NOAA line offices and partners allows for the delivery of the most advanced knowledge and is a very critical aspect of the training program. The emerging NOAA Climate Service (NCS) requires a well-trained, climate-literate workforce at the local level capable of delivering NOAA's climate products and services as well as providing climate-sensitive decision support. NWS Weather Forecast Offices and River Forecast Centers presently serve as local outlets for the NCS climate services. Trained NWS climate service personnel use proactive and reactive approaches and professional education methods in communicating climate variability and change information to local users. Both scientifically-sound messages and amiable communication techniques are important in developing an engaged dialog between the climate service providers and users. Several pilot projects have been conducted by the NWS CSD this past year that apply the program's training lessons and expertise to specialized external user group training. The technical user groups included natural resources managers, engineers, hydrologists, and planners for transportation infrastructure. Training of professional user groups required tailoring instructions to the potential applications for each group of users. Training technical users identified the following critical issues: (1) knowledge of target audience expectations, initial knowledge status, and potential use of climate information; (2) leveraging

  1. Research training needs in Peruvian national TB/HIV programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background There are few published reports of research training needs assessments and research training programs. In an effort to expand this nascent field of study and to bridge the gap between research and practice, we sought to systematically assess the research training needs of health care professionals working at Peruvian governmental institutions leading HIV and tuberculosis (TB) control and among senior stakeholders in the field. Methods Six institutional workshops were conducted with the participation of 161 mid-level health professionals from agencies involved in national HIV and TB control. At each workshop informants completed a structured questionnaire and participated in small and large group discussions. Additional data and institutional commitment was obtained through in-depth interviews from 32 senior managers and researchers from the Ministry of Health, academia and NGOs. Results Participants exhibited an overwhelming receptivity for additional research training, observing a gap between current levels of research training and their perceived importance. Specialized skills in obtaining funding, developing research protocols, particularly in operational, behavioral and prevention research were considered in greatest need. Beyond research training, participants identified broader social, economic and political factors as influential in infectious disease control. Conclusions The needs assessment suggests that future training should focus on operational research techniques, rather than on clinical skill building or program implementation only. Strengthening health systems not only requires additional research training, but also adequate financial resources to implement research findings. PMID:20875140

  2. 25 CFR 26.32 - What constitutes a complete Job Training Program application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What constitutes a complete Job Training Program... JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Training Services § 26.32 What constitutes a complete Job Training Program application? A request for training includes: (a) Intake and application data; (b) Feasible...

  3. The Effect of 10 Weeks of Resistance Training on Serum Myostatin and Body Composition Levels in Obese Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad ebrahim Bahram

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Studies are indicative of negative regulatory role of myostatin in skeletal muscle growth. In the present study, the effect of 10 weeks of resistance training was investigated on serum level of myostatin and body composition in obese adolescents. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 16 students of Mohammad Naraghi Technical and Vocational Institute of Kashan with body mass index of 30-35, were purposefully selected and randomly divided into two groups of experimental and control. Resistance training program included 3 sets of 8-10 reps with 50-90% 1RM for 3 days a week. Before starting the training program and 48 h after the last training session, blood samples were taken from all participants. Before and after the training, plasma level of myostatin were measured. Data were analyzed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov, dependent t-, and independent t-tests at significance level of p<0.05. Results: In this study, 10 weeks of resistance training resulted in a significant decrease in serum level of myostatin (p=0.0001, weight (p=0.015, body mass index (p=0.02, and fat percentage (p=0.0001 in the experimental group as compared to the control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: According to the findings of the current study, it can be concluded that resistance training-induced changes reduce myostatin level and some anthropometric parameters related to obesity and overweight, which may be effective in the prevention of muscle atrophy and loss of muscle mass, and can play a role as an autocrine mechanism for guiding mechanical load stimuli in response to the growth of skeletal muscle.

  4. Mirror training to augment cross-education during resistance training: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howatson, Glyn; Zult, Tjerk; Farthing, Jonathan P; Zijdewind, Inge; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2013-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been shown to be a potent stimulus for neuromuscular adaptations. These adaptations are not confined to the exercising muscle and have been consistently shown to produce increases in strength and neural activity in the contralateral, homologous resting muscle; a phenomenon known as cross-education. This observation has important clinical applications for those with unilateral dysfunction given that cross-education increases strength and attenuates atrophy in immobilized limbs. Previous evidence has shown that these improvements in the transfer of strength are likely to reside in areas of the brain, some of which are common to the mirror neuron system (MNS). Here we examine the evidence for the, as yet, untested hypothesis that cross-education might benefit from observing our own motor action in a mirror during unimanual resistance training, thereby activating the MNS. The hypothesis is based on neuroanatomical evidence suggesting brain areas relating to the MNS are activated when a unilateral motor task is performed with a mirror. This theory is timely because of the growing body of evidence relating to the efficacy of cross-education. Hence, we consider the clinical applications of mirror training as an adjuvant intervention to cross-education in order to engage the MNS, which could further improve strength and reduce atrophy in dysfunctional limbs during rehabilitation.

  5. BRAC/Job Corps Clerical Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherhood of Railway, Airline and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and Station Employees.

    The Brotherhood of Railway and Airline Clerks (BRAC) Railroad Clerical Program contains two main parts. The first part deals with the railroad industry and provides: an outline of basic railroad history, a glossary of railroad terms, a description of the kinds of work done in railroad offices, sample forms used in the railroad industry,…

  6. Employment Clothing for Women in Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Cherry

    1996-01-01

    Eighty-one women in social service employment programs were surveyed to determine knowledge of employment clothing. They were compared on demographics. Differences were found in possession of business clothing, resources for clothing, education, income, residence, and homelessness. Findings indicate a need to educate low-income participants on…

  7. High intensity interval training does not impair strength gains in response to resistance training in premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Paulo; de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Filho, Suedi Gonçalves Cardoso; La Scala Teixeira, Cauê Vazquez; Steele, James; Fisher, James; Carneiro, Juliana Alves; Campos, Mário Hebling

    2017-06-01

    To compare the increases in upper- and lower-body muscle strength in premenopausal women performing resistance training (RT) alone or alongside concurrent high-intensity interval training (CT). Sixteen women (26-40 years) were randomly assigned into two groups that performed either RT or CT. Both groups performed the same RT program; however, CT performed additional high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on a bicycle ergometer before RT. The study lasted 8 weeks and the participants were tested for ten repetition maximum (10RM) load in elbow flexion (barbell biceps curl) and knee extension exercises pre- and post-intervention. RT was performed with 10-12 repetitions to self-determined repetition maximum in the first four weeks and then progressed to 8-10. During CT, HIIT was performed before RT with six 1-min bouts at 7-8 of perceived subjective exertion (RPE) and then progressed to eight bouts at 9-10 RPE. Analysis of variance revealed significant increases in upper and lower body strength for both the RT and CT groups. Biceps barbell curl 10RM load increased from 12.9 ± 3.2 kg to 14 ± 1.5 kg in CT (p training does not seem to impair muscle strength increases in the knee extensors or elbow flexors of pre-menopausal women. This information should be considered when prescribing exercise sessions, since both activities may be combined without negative effects in muscle strength.

  8. Low-Load Resistance Training with Blood Flow Occlusion as a Countermeasure to Disuse Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Cook, S. B.

    2009-01-01

    Decreases in strength and neuromuscular function are observed following prolonged disuse. Exercise countermeasures to prevent muscle dysfunction during disuse typically involve high intensity resistance training. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of low-load resistance training with a blood flow occlusion to mitigate muscle loss and dysfunction during 30 days of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS).

  9. Resistance training and testosterone levels in male patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molsted, Stig; Andersen, Jesper L.; Eidemak, Inge

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated serum testosterone and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels' associations with muscle fibre size and resistance training in male dialysis patients. METHODS: Male patients were included in a 16-week control period followed by 16 weeks of resistance training thric...

  10. National Strength and Conditioning Association Position Statement: Health Aspects of Resistance Exercise and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Michael S.; Rozenek, Ralph

    2001-01-01

    Resistance training may enhance cardiovascular health, improve body composition, increase bone mineral density, reduce anxiety and depression, reduce the risk of injury during other sports, and increase muscular strength and endurance. The paper describes the effects of resistance training on: the cardiovascular system, energy expenditure and body…

  11. The Impact of Resistance Training on Swimming Performance: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Emmet; Harrison, Andrew J; Lyons, Mark

    2017-11-01

    The majority of propulsive forces in swimming are produced from the upper body, with strong correlations between upper body strength and sprint performance. There are significant gaps in the literature relating to the impact of resistance training on swimming performance, specifically the transfer to swimming performance. The aims of this systematic literature review are to (1) explore the transfer of resistance-training modalities to swimming performance, and (2) examine the effects of resistance training on technical aspects of swimming. Four online databases were searched with the following inclusion criteria: (1) journal articles with outcome measures related to swimming performance, and (2) competitive swimmers participating in a structured resistance-training programme. Exclusion criteria were (1) participants with a mean age force resistance-training programmes are optimal. Stroke length is best achieved through resistance training with low repetitions at a high velocity/force. Resisted swims are the most appropriate training modality for improving stroke rate. Future research is needed with respect to the effects of long-term resistance-training interventions on both technical parameters of swimming and overall swimming performance. The results of such work will be highly informative for the scientific community, coaches and athletes.

  12. Effect of resistance training on muscle strength and rate of force development in healthy older adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guizelini, Pedrode Camargo; de Aguiar, Rafael Alves; Denadai, Benedito Sérgio; Caputo, Fabrizio; Greco, Camila Coelho

    2018-02-01

    Rapid force capacity, identified by rate of rise in contractile force at the onset of contraction, i.e., the rate of force development (RFD), has been considered an important neuromuscular parameter of physical fitness in elderly individuals. Randomized control studies conducted in adults have found that resistance training may elicit different outcomes in terms of RFD and muscle strength. Thus, the main purpose of this study was to review systematically the literature for studies regarding the influence of resistance training on muscle strength and RFD in elderly persons. A literature search was performed in major electronic databases from inception to March 2017. Studies including health individuals with a mean age≥60years, describing the effect of resistance training on RFD and muscle strength were found eligible. The outcomes were calculated as the difference in percentage change between control and experimental groups (% change) and data were presented as mean±95% confidence limits. Meta-analyses were performed using a random-effects model and, in addition, simple and multiple meta-regression analyses were used to identify effects of age, training type, sessions per week and training duration on % change in RFD and muscle strength. Thirteen training effects were collected from 10 studies included in the meta-analysis. The resistance training program had a moderate beneficial effect on both muscle strength (% change=18.40%, 95% CL 13.69-23.30, pchange=26.68, 95% CL 14.41-35.52, pchanges in muscle strength and RFD. It can be concluded that explosive training and heavy strength training are effective resistance training methods aiming to improve both muscle strength and RFD after short-to-medium training period. However, muscle strength and RFD seem to adapt differently to resistance training programs, suggesting caution for their interchangeable use in clinical assessments of the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of the effects of aerobic and resistance training on cardiac autonomic adaptations in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Larissa C R; Tezini, Geisa C S V; Schujmann, Débora S; Porto, Jaqueline M; Rossi, Bruno R O; Souza, Hugo C D

    2011-07-05

    We have compared the effects of two types of physical training on the cardiac autonomic control in ovariectomized and sham-operated rats according to different approaches: double autonomic blockade (DAB) with methylatropine and propranolol; baroreflex sensibility (BRS) and spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). Wistar female rats (±250g) were divided into two groups: sham-operated and ovariectomized. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups: sedentary rats, rats submitted to aerobic trained and rats submitted to resistance training. Ovariectomy did not change arterial pressure, basal heart rate (HR), DAB and BRS responses, but interfered with HRV by reducing the low-frequency oscillations (LF=0.20-0.75Hz) in relation to sedentary sham-operated rats. The DAB showed that both types of training promoted an increase in the predominance of vagal tonus in sham-operated rats, but HR variations due to methylatropine were decreased in the resistance trained rats compared to sedentary rats. Evaluation of BRS showed that resistance training for sham-operated and ovariectomized rats reduced the tachycardic responses in relation to aerobic training. Evaluation of HRV in trained rats showed that aerobic training reduced LF oscillations in sham-operated rats, whereas resistance training had a contrary effect. In the ovariectomized rats, aerobic training increased high frequency oscillations (HF=0.75-2.5Hz), whereas resistance training produced no effect. In sham-operated rats, both types of training increased the vagal autonomic tonus, but resistance training reduced HF oscillations and BRS as well. In turn, both types of training had similar results in ovariectomized rats, except for HRV, as aerobic training promoted an increase in HF oscillations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. 78 FR 35808 - Proposed priority-Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long-Term Training Program-Vocational...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... training programs in the specialty of physical medicine and rehabilitation. Program Authority: 29 U.S.C...: (1) The curriculum aligns with evidence-based and competency-based practices in the field of... will be included in the evaluation; and how the data and results from the evaluation will be used to...

  15. European advanced driver training programs: Reasons for optimism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Washington

    2011-03-01

    This paper reviews the predominant features and empirical evidence surrounding post licensing advanced driver training programs focused on novice drivers. A clear articulation of differences between the renewed and current US advanced driver training programs is provided. While the individual quantitative evaluations range from marginally to significantly effective in reducing novice driver crash risk, they have been criticized for evaluation deficiencies ranging from small sample sizes to confounding variables to lack of exposure metrics. Collectively, however, the programs sited in the paper suggest at least a marginally positive effect that needs to be validated with further studies. If additional well controlled studies can validate these programs, a pilot program in the US should be considered.

  16. Natural resources youth training program (NRYTP), resource rangers 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    In 2010, for a second year, the natural resources youth training program (NRYTP) was developed in northern Manitoba thanks to Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak Inc. (MKO) and the collaboration of 42 sponsors. 16 aboriginal youth representing six northern communities took part in the five-week program located at the Egg Lake camp. The objective was to provide these resources rangers with knowledge and training in the most widespread resource sectors in northern Manitoba, including mining, forestry and hydropower. Trainers and experts provided by industry partners offered training sessions, hands-on work experience and other activities to help resource rangers to acquire a better understanding of the employability in this field in the northern region and the knowledge and skills the resource-based careers require. Life and professional skills training was given by the camp staff and local professionals. On-site elders and cultural events also allowed the integration of a northern Cree cultural component. Three staff members, a cook and elders assisted daily the resource rangers. Many improvements and refinements have been made since the success of the 2009 program, including the involvement of a larger number of communities, program contributors and program graduates. The program length has doubled and the number of jobs created has increased, important cultural aspects were introduced and the overall expenses were reduced.

  17. PGH Training Centers helps institutionalize surgical sterilization in Philippine program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The Philippine Study and Training Center for Surgical Sterilization (STCSS) was established in August 1974 under the auspices of the Philippine General Hospital and the University of the Philippines College of Medicine to institutionalize surgical sterilization in the medical schools and family planning organizations. The success of the program is documented by the increase in acceptors from 1400 in 1974 to 49,000 in 1976 and from the increase in sterilization centers from 50 when the program began to 165 in 1975. Approximately 300 doctors have completed the program which provides a variety of procedures to the public. Follow-up evaluation trips made by the program staff members to program graduates allow the program to benefit from feedback on conditions under which the graduates work and thus to keep its content realistic and practical. Such visits also revealed the need to train not only a physician but also his or her support staff, and courses to this effect are currently being planned. This national training center is closely allied with the Philippine Sterilization Certifying Board and engages in a variety of research activities. Research findings and training materials have been published in 2 manuals.

  18. The FBI Crime Resistance Program. Technical Assistance Bulletin 24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National School Resource Network, Washington, DC.

    To promote the concept that citizen involvement and responsibility for crime resistance are prime factors in law enforcement, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) assists local agencies in developing programs to encourage citizen participation. One facet of this program is directed toward educating students about their vulnerability to crime…

  19. Summer Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    the research program by each mentor will certainly produce important research findings, aided in part by the summer research of the ...adenovirus vaccine in men with prostate cancer. Important in these trials is the safety of the vaccine and its ability to induce anti-tumor immunity... Living in Iowa City for the Summer Housing and Meals - All students will be housed in the Mayflower Residence Hall on the Campus of the University

  20. 25 CFR 26.4 - Who administers the Job Placement and Training Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who administers the Job Placement and Training Program... PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM General Applicability § 26.4 Who administers the Job Placement and Training Program? The Job Placement and Training Program is administered by the Bureau of Indian Affairs or a...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1713-6 - First-aid training program; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false First-aid training program; minimum... § 75.1713-6 First-aid training program; minimum requirements. (a) All first-aid training programs...) Refresher first-aid training programs required under the provisions of § 75.1713-5 shall include five class...

  2. Older adults' perceived changes in physical self-worth associated with resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, Rylee A; Cannon, Jack

    2009-06-01

    Using Sonstroem, Harlow, and Josephs' (1994) expanded version of the Exercise and Self-Esteem Model (EXSEM; Sonstroem & Morgan, 1989), we explored how 9 older adults (6 women and 3 men, aged 65-72 years) involved in a resistance training program experienced and perceived changes in physical self-worth (i.e., improved strength, functional competency, physical condition, and body satisfaction). We conducted three in-depth interviews with each participant over the course of the program. In individual log books, participants recorded the weight lifted and the number of repetitions for each exercise. Our findings showed the course of changes in physical self-perceptions in these older adults and how actual individual changes in strength performance related to perceived changes in important psychological outcomes.

  3. Veterinary surveillance laboratories: developing the training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Staci L; McCline, Katasha T; Hanfelt, Margery M

    2010-01-01

    The increased need and demand for onsite, frequent, rapid, and portable food and bottled water testing for indicators of microbiological and chemical agents led to the deployment of 2 laboratory veterinary equipment sets. A Surveillance Food Laboratory Program (SFLP) was developed to allow Veterinary Corps commanders to establish targeted testing programs to enhance food safety and wholesomeness, along with faster responses to food defense, suspected foodborne illness, and food/water risk assessment missions. To support the deployment of the veterinary equipment sets and the SFLP, 2 new functional courses were developed by the Department of Veterinary Science. The Surveillance Food Laboratory Technician Course teaches essential technical skills that include sample processing, assay methodologies, results review, and interpretation of results produced by these laboratories. The Surveillance Food Laboratory Manager Course, developed for designated managers of the laboratories and laboratory programs, teaches the skills critical to ensuring proper surveillance laboratory oversight, testing, evaluation of results, risk communication, and response to presumptive positive results produced by the laboratories. Together, the courses allowed for the successful deployment of the unique veterinary equipment sets, resulting in development of fully operational surveillance laboratories in support of food protection missions in every major theater of operations.

  4. Forty years of training program in the JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    This report is to compile the past training program of researchers, engineers and regulatory members at the NuTEC (Nuclear Technology and Education Center) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the past basic seminars for the public, in addition to advice and perspective on the future program from relevant experts, in commemoration of the forty years of the NuTEC. It covers the past five years of educational courses and seminars in utilization of radioisotopes and nuclear energy for domestic and for international training provided at Tokyo and Tokai Education Centers and covers the activity of the Asia-Pacific nuclear technology transfer, including the activity of various committees and meetings. Especially, fifty six experts and authorities have contributed to the report with positive advice and perspective on the training program in the 21st century based on their reminiscences. (author)

  5. Balance Training Programs in Athletes – A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brachman Anna

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available It has become almost routine practice to incorporate balance exercises into training programs for athletes from different sports. However, the type of training that is most efficient remains unclear, as well as the frequency, intensity and duration of the exercise that would be most beneficial have not yet been determined. The following review is based on papers that were found through computerized searches of PubMed and SportDiscus from 2000 to 2016. Articles related to balance training, testing, and injury prevention in young healthy athletes were considered. Based on a Boolean search strategy the independent researchers performed a literature review. A total of 2395 articles were evaluated, yet only 50 studies met the inclusion criteria. In most of the reviewed articles, balance training has proven to be an effective tool for the improvement of postural control. It is difficult to establish one model of training that would be appropriate for each sport discipline, including its characteristics and demands. The main aim of this review was to identify a training protocol based on most commonly used interventions that led to improvements in balance. Our choice was specifically established on the assessment of the effects of balance training on postural control and injury prevention as well as balance training methods. The analyses including papers in which training protocols demonstrated positive effects on balance performance suggest that an efficient training protocol should last for 8 weeks, with a frequency of two training sessions per week, and a single training session of 45 min. This standard was established based on 36 reviewed studies.

  6. Balance Training Programs in Athletes - a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachman, Anna; Kamieniarz, Anna; Michalska, Justyna; Pawłowski, Michał; Słomka, Kajetan J; Juras, Grzegorz

    2017-09-01

    It has become almost routine practice to incorporate balance exercises into training programs for athletes from different sports. However, the type of training that is most efficient remains unclear, as well as the frequency, intensity and duration of the exercise that would be most beneficial have not yet been determined. The following review is based on papers that were found through computerized searches of PubMed and SportDiscus from 2000 to 2016. Articles related to balance training, testing, and injury prevention in young healthy athletes were considered. Based on a Boolean search strategy the independent researchers performed a literature review. A total of 2395 articles were evaluated, yet only 50 studies met the inclusion criteria. In most of the reviewed articles, balance training has proven to be an effective tool for the improvement of postural control. It is difficult to establish one model of training that would be appropriate for each sport discipline, including its characteristics and demands. The main aim of this review was to identify a training protocol based on most commonly used interventions that led to improvements in balance. Our choice was specifically established on the assessment of the effects of balance training on postural control and injury prevention as well as balance training methods. The analyses including papers in which training protocols demonstrated positive effects on balance performance suggest that an efficient training protocol should last for 8 weeks, with a frequency of two training sessions per week, and a single training session of 45 min. This standard was established based on 36 reviewed studies.

  7. Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leah Glameyer

    2012-07-12

    The overall goal of this project has been to develop curricula, certification requirements, and accreditation standards for training on energy efficient practices and technologies for commercial building technicians. These training products will advance industry expertise towards net-zero energy commercial building goals and will result in a substantial reduction in energy use. The ultimate objective is to develop a workforce that can bring existing commercial buildings up to their energy performance potential and ensure that new commercial buildings do not fall below their expected optimal level of performance. Commercial building equipment technicians participating in this training program will learn how to best operate commercial buildings to ensure they reach their expected energy performance level. The training is a combination of classroom, online and on-site lessons. The Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) developed curricula using subject matter and adult learning experts to ensure the training meets certification requirements and accreditation standards for training these technicians. The training targets a specific climate zone to meets the needs, specialized expertise, and perspectives of the commercial building equipment technicians in that zone. The combination of efficient operations and advanced design will improve the internal built environment of a commercial building by increasing comfort and safety, while reducing energy use and environmental impact. Properly trained technicians will ensure equipment operates at design specifications. A second impact is a more highly trained workforce that is better equipped to obtain employment. Organizations that contributed to the development of the training program include TEEX and the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) (both members of The Texas A&M University System). TEES is also a member of the Building Commissioning Association. This report includes a description of the project

  8. Effects of creatine supplementation and resistance training on muscle strength and weightlifting performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Eric S; Volek, Jeff S

    2003-11-01

    Creatine monohydrate has become the supplement of choice for many athletes striving to improve sports performance. Recent data indicate that athletes may not be using creatine as a sports performance booster per se but instead use creatine chronically as a training aid to augment intense resistance training workouts. Although several studies have evaluated the combined effects of creatine supplementation and resistance training on muscle strength and weightlifting performance, these data have not been analyzed collectively. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effects of creatine supplementation on muscle strength and weightlifting performance when ingested concomitant with resistance training. The effects of gender, interindividual variability, training status, and possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Of the 22 studies reviewed, the average increase in muscle strength (1, 3, or 10 repetition maximum [RM]) following creatine supplementation plus resistance training was 8% greater than the average increase in muscle strength following placebo ingestion during resistance training (20 vs. 12%). Similarly, the average increase in weightlifting performance (maximal repetitions at a given percent of maximal strength) following creatine supplementation plus resistance training was 14% greater than the average increase in weightlifting performance following placebo ingestion during resistance training (26 vs. 12%). The increase in bench press 1RM ranged from 3 to 45%, and the improvement in weightlifting performance in the bench press ranged from 16 to 43%. Thus there is substantial evidence to indicate that creatine supplementation during resistance training is more effective at increasing muscle strength and weightlifting performance than resistance training alone, although the response is highly variable.

  9. Number of repetition after different rest intervals between static stretching and resistance training

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, H.; Paz, G.A.; Maia, M. de F.; Leite, T.; Miranda, H.; Simão, R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different intervals between static stretching for hip adductor, quadriceps and hamstring muscles and resistance training in repetition performance. Method: Twenty-two trained men were submitted to the 10 repetition maximum test and retest for leg extension, leg curl and hip adduction exercises. Three protocols were conducted in a randomized design – PWI: resistance training immediately after static stretching; P15: fift...

  10. Effects of nonlinear resistance and aerobic interval training on cytokines and insulin resistance in sedentary men who are obese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikseresht, Mahmoud; Agha-Alinejad, Hamid; Azarbayjani, Mohammad A; Ebrahim, Khosrow

    2014-09-01

    Regular exercise training has been shown to reduce systemic inflammation, but there is limited research directly comparing different types of training. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of nonlinear resistance training (NRT) and aerobic interval training (AIT) on serum interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-20, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels, insulin resistance index (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance), and aerobic capacity in middle-aged men who are obese. Sedentary volunteers were assigned to NRT (n = 12), AIT (n = 12), and (CON, n = 10) control groups. The experimental groups performed 3 weekly sessions for 12 weeks, whereas the CON grouped maintained a sedentary lifestyle. Nonlinear resistance training consisted of 40-65 minutes of weight training at different intensities with flexible periodization. Aerobic interval training consisted of running on a treadmill (4 sets of 4 minutes at 80-90% of maximal heart rate, with 3-minute recovery intervals). Serum IL-10, IL-20, and TNF-α levels did not change significantly in response to training (all p > 0.05), but IL-10:TNF-α ratio increased significantly with AIT compared with CON (2.95 ± 0.84 vs. 2.52 ± 0.65; p = 0.02). After the training period, maximal oxygen uptake increased significantly in AIT and NRT compared with CON (both p resistance (homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance) (both p ≤ 0.05; AIT: 0.84 ± 0.34, NRT: 0.84 ± 0.27, and CON: 1.62 ± 0.56) and fasting insulin levels (both p ≤ 0.05; AIT: 3.61 ± 1.48, NRT: 3.66 ± 0.92, and CON: 6.20 ± 2.64 μU·ml), but the AIT seems to have better anti-inflammatory effects (as indicated by the IL-10:TNF-α ratio) compared with NRT.

  11. Educational Program on Thorough Training of Japanese Communication Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Shinya; Ohashi, Kazuhito; Totsuji, Hiroo

    “The Educational Program for Raising Creative Engineers by Thorough Training of Japanese Communication Ability” of Okayama University was adopted in 2004 as Support Program for Distinctive University Education (Characteristic Good Practice) by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan. To educate the effective Japanese communication ability of the students, it is indispensable to write the large quantity compositions spending time sufficiently. This paper reports that the excellent educational effects can be achieved through the thorough training of Japanese communication ability.

  12. The Work Disability Prevention CIHR Strategic Training Program: Program Performance After 5 Years of Implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loisel, P.; Hong, Q.N.; Imbeau, D.; Lippel, K.; Guzman, J.; MacEachen, E.; Corbiere, M.; Santos, B.R.; Anema, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The Work Disability Prevention (WDP) Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Strategic Training Program was developed in 2001 and is a unique program in the world. The main objective of this program is to help future researchers develop transdisciplinary knowledge, skills and

  13. AN INNOVATIVE APPROACH FOR TRAINING IN PROGRAMMING USING VIRTUAL LABORATORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galya Shivacheva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes and analyses the computer programming educational technology in Faculty of Technics and Technologies of Yambol, using traditional methodologies, e-learning and virtual laboratories. It reviews the characteristics of computer programming education, focusing on animation and simulations created by other higher education institutions on algorithm visualizations. The innovative approach has connected with using Moodle Virtual Lab and the Open Judge System for automatic students’ assessment and testing. In addition, the Virtual Laboratory for Training in Programming (VLTP provides a virtual environment with animations, simulations and visualizations of the basic terms, algorithms and data structures in programming sphere.

  14. Is inertial flywheel resistance training superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in improving muscle strength? A systematic review with meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicens-Bordas, J; Esteve, E; Fort-Vanmeerhaeghe, A; Bandholm, T; Thorborg, K

    2018-01-01

    The primary aim of this systematic review was to determine if inertial flywheel resistance training is superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in improving muscle strength. The secondary aim was to determine whether inertial flywheel resistance training is superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in improving other muscular adaptations. A systematic review with meta-analyses of randomised and non-randomised controlled trials. We searched MEDLINE, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials with no publication date restrictions until November 2016. We performed meta-analyses on randomised and non-randomised controlled trials to determine the standardized mean difference between the effects of inertial flywheel and gravity-dependent resistance training on muscle strength. A total of 76 and 71 participants were included in the primary and secondary analyses, respectively. After systematic review, we included three randomised and four non-randomised controlled trials. In the primary analysis for the primary outcome muscle strength, the pooled results from randomised controlled trials showed no difference (SMD=-0.05; 95%CI -0.51 to 0.40; p=0.82; I 2 =0%). In the secondary analyses of the primary outcome, the pooled results from non-randomised controlled trials showed no difference (SMD=0.02; 95%CI -0.45 to 0.49; p=0.93; I 2 =0%; and SMD=0.03; 95%CI -0.43 to 0.50; p=0.88; I 2 =0%). Meta-analysis on secondary outcomes could not be performed. Based on the available data, inertial flywheel resistance training was not superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in enhancing muscle strength. Data for other strength variables and other muscular adaptations was insufficient to draw firm conclusions from. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cosmetic Surgery Training in Plastic Surgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichols, Colton H L; Diaconu, Silviu; Alfadil, Sara; Woodall, Jhade; Grant, Michael; Lifchez, Scott; Nam, Arthur; Rasko, Yvonne

    2017-09-01

    Over the past decade, plastic surgery programs have continued to evolve with the addition of 1 year of training, increase in the minimum number of required aesthetic cases, and the gradual replacement of independent positions with integrated ones. To evaluate the impact of these changes on aesthetic training, a survey was sent to residents and program directors. A 37 question survey was sent to plastic surgery residents at all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved plastic surgery training programs in the United States. A 13 question survey was sent to the program directors at the same institutions. Both surveys were analyzed to determine the duration of training and comfort level with cosmetic procedures. Eighty-three residents (10%) and 11 program directors (11%) completed the survey. Ninety-four percentage of residents had a dedicated cosmetic surgery rotation (an increase from 68% in 2015) in addition to a resident cosmetic clinic. Twenty percentage of senior residents felt they would need an aesthetic surgery fellowship to practice cosmetic surgery compared with 31% in 2015. Integrated chief residents were more comfortable performing cosmetic surgery cases compared with independent chief residents. Senior residents continue to have poor confidence with facial aesthetic and body contouring procedures. There is an increase in dedicated cosmetic surgery rotations and fewer residents believe they need a fellowship to practice cosmetic surgery. However, the comfort level of performing facial aesthetic and body contouring procedures remains low particularly among independent residents.

  16. Effects of resistance training on cardiovascular health in non-obese active adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Clare Chung-Wah; McManus, Alison Mary; So, Hung-Kwan; Chook, Ping; Au, Chun-Ting; Li, Albert Martin; Kam, Jack Tat-Chi; So, Raymond Chi-Hung; Lam, Christopher Wai-Kei; Chan, Iris Hiu-Shuen; Sung, Rita Yn-Tz

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the benefits of a 10-wk resistance training programme on cardiovascular health in non-obese and active adolescents. METHODS This is a pragmatic randomised controlled intervention. The study was carried out in a Hong Kong Government secondary school. Thirty-eight lean and active boys and girls were randomised to either the resistance training group or the control group. Students in the resistance training group received in-school 10-wk supervised resistance training twice per week, with each session lasting 70 min. Main outcome measures taken before and after training included brachial endothelial dependent flow-mediated dilation, body composition, fasting serum lipids, fasting glucose and insulin, high sensitive C-reactive protein, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure and aerobic fitness. RESULTS The only training related change was in endothelial dependent flow-mediated dilation which increased from 8.5% to 9.8%. A main effect of time and an interaction (P < 0.005) indicated that this improvement was a result of the 10-wk resistance training. Main effects for time (P < 0.05) in a number of anthropometric, metabolic and vascular variables were noted; however, there were no significant interactions indicating the change was more likely an outcome of normal growth and development as opposed to a training effect. CONCLUSION Ten weeks of resistance training in school appears to have some vascular benefit in active, lean children PMID:27610345

  17. Changes in circulating angiogenic factors after an acute training bout before and after resistance training with or without whole-body-vibration training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beijer, Åsa; Degens, Hans; May, Francisca; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Joern; Rosenberger, Andre

    2012-07-01

    Both Resistance Exercise and Whole-Body-Vibration training are currently considered as countermeasures against microgravity-induced physiological deconditioning. Here we investigated the effects of whole-body vibration superimposed upon resistance exercise. Within this context, the present study focuses on changes in circulating angiogenic factors as indicators of skeletal muscle adaption. Methods: Twenty-six healthy male subjects (25.2 ± 4.2 yr) were included in this two-group parallel-designed study and randomly assigned to one of the training interventions: either resistance exercise (RE) or resistance vibration exercise (RVE). Participants trained 2-3 times per week for 6 weeks (completing 16 training sessions), where one session took 9 ± 1 min. Participants trained with weights on a guided barbell. The individual training load was set at 80% of their 1-Repetition-Maximum. Each training session consisted of three sets with 8 squats and 12 heel raises, following an incremental training design with regards to weight (RE and RVE) and vibration frequency (RVE only). The vibration frequency was increased from 20 Hz in the first week till 40 Hz during the last two weeks with 5-Hz weekly increments. At the first and 16 ^{th} training session, six blood samples (pre training and 2 min, 5 min, 15 min, 35 min and 75 min post training) were taken. Circulating levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Endostatin and Matrix Metalloproteinases -2 and -9 (MMPs) were determined in serum using Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assays. Results: MMP-2 levels increased by 7.0% (SE = 2.7%, P resistance exercise, both with and without superimposed vibration, leads to a transient rise in circulating angiogenic factors, 2) which is not altered after a period of resistance exercise with or without vibration.

  18. [Evaluation in medical residency training programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokythas, O; Patzwahl, R; Straka, M; Binkert, C

    2016-01-01

    For resident doctors the acquisition of technical and professional competence is decisive for the successful practice of their activities. Competency and professional development of resident doctors benefit from regular self-reflection and assessment by peers. While often promoted and recommended by national educational authorities, the implementation of a robust evaluation process in the clinical routine is often counteracted by several factors. The aim of the study was to test a self-developed digital evaluation system for the assessment of radiology residents at our institute for practicality and impact with regard to the radiological training. The intranet-based evaluation system was implemented in January 2014, which allowed all Radiology consultants to submit a structured assessment of the Radiology residents according to standardized criteria. It included 7 areas of competency and 31 questions, as well as a self-assessment module, both of which were filled out electronically on a 3-month basis using a 10-point scale and the opportunity to make free text comments. The results of the mandatory self-evaluation by the residents were displayed beside the evaluation by the supervisor. Access to results was restricted and quarterly discussions with the residents were conducted confidentially and individually. The system was considered to be practical to use and stable in its functionality. The centrally conducted anonymous national survey of residents revealed a noticeable improvement of satisfaction with the institute assessment for the criterion "regular feedback"compared to the national average. Since its implementation the system has been further developed and extended and is now available for other institutions.

  19. The Effect of 8-week Aerobic and Concurrent (aerobic- resistance Exercise Training on Serum IL-6 Levels and Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Yousefipoor

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introductoin: Increased level of serum IL-6 is related to development of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. The American Diabetes Association and the American College of Sports Medicine recommend that combination of resistance and aerobic exercise is favorable for patients with type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 8 weeks of aerobic exercise and concurrent (aerobic-resistance exercise on serum IL-6 Levels and insulin resistance in Type 2 Diabetic patients. Methods: In this study, from patients referring to Kermanshah Diabetes Association, 24 volunteers participated in the study as subjects and were divided into aerobic (n=8, concurrent (n=8, and control group (n=8 randomly. Training program for the aerobic group included 3 sessions of running per week with 60 to 80% maximal heart rate for 8 weeks but the concurrent group in addition to running, performed resistance training of major muscles groups. Before and after the intervention, body weight, BMI, fasting blood glucose, serum IL-6 and HOMA-IR were measured. Results: HOMA-IR and fasting blood glucose were significantly decreased in both training groups after intervention, but showed no significant changes in the control group. No significant changes were observed for serum IL-6 levels, body weight or BMI. Conclusion: performing 8 weeks of aerobic or concurrent training with improvement of insulin resistance and fasting blood glucose could be helpful for type 2 diabetic patients; however, it cannot significantly affect serum IL-6 levels, body weight, or BMI in these patients.

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of a logger safety training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jennifer L; Grushecky, Shawn T

    2006-01-01

    Logger safety training programs are rarely, if ever, evaluated as to their effectiveness in reducing injuries. Workers' compensation claim rates were used to evaluate the effectiveness of a logger safety training program, the West Virginia Loggers' Safety Initiative (LSI). There was no claim rate decline detected in the majority (67%) of companies that participated in all 4 years of the LSI. Furthermore, their rate did not differ from the rest of the WV logging industry that did not participate in the LSI. Worker turnover was significantly related to claim rates; companies with higher turnover of employees had higher claim rates. Companies using feller bunchers to harvest trees at least part of the time had a significantly lower claim rate than companies not using them. Companies that had more inspections per year had lower claim rates. High injury rates persist even in companies that receive safety training; high employee turnover may affect the efficacy of training programs. The logging industry should be encouraged to facilitate the mechanization of logging tasks, to address barriers to employee retention, and to increase the number of in-the-field performance monitoring inspections. Impact on industry There are many states whose logger safety programs include only about 4-8 hours of safe work practices training. These states may look to West Virginia's expanded training program (the LSI) as a model for their own programs. However, the LSI training may not be reaching loggers due to the delay in administering training to new employees and high levels of employee turnover. Regardless of training status, loggers' claim rates decline significantly the longer they work for a company. It may be that high injury rates in the state of West Virginia would be best addressed by finding ways to encourage and facilitate companies to become more mechanized in their harvesting practices, and to increase employee tenure. Increasing the number of yearly performance inspections

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Short-term Toe Resistance Training to Improve Toe Pinch Force in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Hiroaki; Miyatake, Nobuyuki; Murao, Satoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2018-02-01

    Resistance training is effective against type 2 diabetes (T2DM), but the effect of resistance training on toe pinch force (TPF) is unknown. Here we investigated the effect of short-term toe resistance training on TPF in patients with T2DM, in a prospective, parallel-group, single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Twelve patients with T2DM who were hospitalized to improve glycemic control were enrolled. The patients were randomly allocated to the intervention (n=6) and control (n=6) groups. The intervention group performed traditional aerobic exercise and 4 newly developed toe-resistance training exercises. The control group performed aerobic exercise only. After 2 weeks of the exercise intervention program, we evaluated anthropometric parameters, clinical parameters, motor function, and muscle parameters in each patient. After the exercise intervention program, the TPF and toe muscle quality, isometric knee extension force, and knee muscle quality were significantly higher in the intervention group compared to the control group. Two weeks of toe-resistance training significantly increased the TPF in the T2DM patients. Toe resistance training is thus recommended in clinical practice for patients with T2DM.

  2. Effect of protein source and resistance training on body composition and sex hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krieger Diane R

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence suggests an inverse relationship between soy protein intake and serum concentrations of male sex hormones. Anecdotal evidence indicates that these alterations in serum sex hormones may attenuate changes in lean body mass following resistance training. However, little empirical data exists regarding the effects of soy and milk-based proteins on circulating androgens and exercise induced body composition changes. Methods For 12 weeks 20 subjects were supplemented with 50 g per day of one of four different protein sources (Soy concentrate; Soy isolate; Soy isolate and whey blend, and Whey blend only in combination with a resistance-training program. Body composition, testosterone, estradiol and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG were measured at baseline and week 12. Results Protein supplementation resulted in a significant increase in lean body mass independent of protein source (0.5 ± 1.1 and 0.9 ± 1.4 kg, p = 0.006, p = 0.007. No significant differences were observed between groups for total and free testosterone, SHBG, percentage body fat, BMI or body weight. The Testosterone/Estradiol ratio increased across all groups (+13.4, p = 0.005 and estradiol decreased (p = 0.002. Within group analysis showed significant increases in the Testosterone/Estradiol ratio in soy isolate + whey blend group (+16.3, p = 0.030. Estradiol was significantly lower in the whey blend group (-9.1 ± 8.7 pg/ml, p = 0.033. Conclusion This investigation shows that 12 week supplementation with soy protein does not decrease serum testosterone or inhibit lean body mass changes in subjects engaged in a resistance exercise program.

  3. High school physical educators' and sport coaches' knowledge of resistance training principles and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGladrey, Brian W; Hannon, James C; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Shultz, Barry B; Shaw, Janet M

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of knowledge that current and preservice high school (HS) physical educators and sport coaches possess regarding the principles and methods involved in youth resistance training (RT) and to determine if that knowledge was acceptable based on a predetermined criterion (passing score). A panel of 10 experts in RT or sport pedagogy used a Delphi technique to create a 90-question assessment (examination) that was administered to 287 HS physical educators and sport coaches and 140 university physical education teacher education (PETE) students. An analysis of the results revealed that neither group demonstrated the minimal knowledge necessary to design, implement, and supervise RT programs based on a passing score of 75%: HS physical educators/coaches, mean = 59.30, SD = 14.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 57.64-60.96], t(286) = -18.61, p = 0.000; university PETE students, mean = 56.61, SD = 16.59, 95% CI = 53.84-59.38, t(139) = -13.12, p = 0.000. The pass rate for physical educators and sport coaches was 14.3% and for university PETE students it was 20.7%. The results of this study indicate that both current and preservice physical educators and sport coaches need additional education and training specific to the design and implementation of RT programs for HS students. Given that school districts typically require their educators attend in-service training programs, it may be advisable to develop an in-service program that allows both current and preservice HS physical educators and sport coaches to earn an RT certification that specifically addresses the unique physical and psychosocial needs of school-aged youth.

  4. Vastus lateralis exhibits non-homogenous adaptation to resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Adam J; Fukuda, David H; Hoffman, Jay R; Gonzalez, Adam M; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Mangine, Gerald T; Fragala, Maren S; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2014-11-01

    Variations in transverse point of measure on the vastus lateralis (VL) may significantly affect the relationship between structure and function. The purpose of this study was to compare changes in muscle architecture at 2 commonly used points of measure (VL0 and VL5). Maximal strength (1-repetition maximum [1RM] barbell squat) and muscle architecture were assessed PRE and POST 15 weeks of periodized resistance training. VL0 was 50% of the straight line distance between the greater trochanter and lateral epicondyle of the femur. VL5 was 5cm medial to VL0. Increases in 1RM strength (3.7 ± 2.4 kg; P = 0.004) were observed. Changes in muscle thickness (MT) at VL5 were significantly greater than at VL0 (P = 0.006). Changes in strength correlated with changes in muscle architecture at VL0 only (MT: r = 0.561; fascicle length: r = 0.503). Changes in muscle architecture appear to occur in a non-homogeneous manner. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Factors associated with participation in resistance training: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ryan E; Lubans, David R; Karunamuni, Nandini; Kennedy, Sarah; Plotnikoff, Ronald

    2017-10-01

    Regular participation in resistance training (RT) is critical to health and recommended in most international physical activity guidelines. Few people, however, participate in RT. The purpose of this review was to assess the demographic, behavioural, intrapersonal, interpersonal and environmental factors associated with participating in RT. Eligible studies were from English peer-reviewed published articles that examined correlates or determinants of RT in adult samples. Searches were performed from August 2015 to April 2016 in six databases. We identified 51 independent data sets, from nine countries, primarily of moderate to high quality, and 23 factors related to participating in RT. Education, perceived health status, quality of life, affective judgements, self-efficacy, intention, self-regulation behaviours, subjective norm and programme leadership were associated with RT. Low education levels and poor health status were associated with low participation rates in RT. Intrapersonal factors including affective judgements, self-efficacy, and self-regulation behaviours, and interpersonal factors including subjective norms and programme leadership may be important for promoting RT behaviours. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Effects of whey isolate, creatine, and resistance training on muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribb, Paul J; Williams, Andrew D; Stathis, Chris G; Carey, Michael F; Hayes, Alan

    2007-02-01

    Studies that have attributed gains in lean body mass to dietary supplementation during resistance exercise (RE) training have not reported these changes alongside adaptations at the cellular and subcellular levels. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of two popular supplements--whey protein (WP) and creatine monohydrate (CrM) (both separately and in combination)--on body composition, muscle strength, fiber-specific hypertrophy (i.e., type I, IIa, IIx), and contractile protein accrual during RE training. In a double-blind randomized protocol, resistance-trained males were matched for strength and placed into one of four groups: creatine/carbohydrate (CrCHO), creatine/whey protein (CrWP), WP only, or carbohydrate only (CHO) (1.5 g x kg(-1) body weight per day). All assessments were completed the week before and after an 11-wk structured, supervised RE program. Assessments included strength (1RM, three exercises), body composition (DEXA), and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies for determination of muscle fiber type (I, IIa, IIx), cross-sectional area (CSA), contractile protein, and creatine (Cr) content. Supplementation with CrCHO, WP, and CrWP resulted in significantly greater (P hypertrophy compared with CHO. Up to 76% of the strength improvements in the squat could be attributed to hypertrophy of muscle involved in this exercise. However, the hypertrophy responses within these groups varied at the three levels assessed (i.e., changes in lean mass, fiber-specific hypertrophy, and contractile protein content). Although WP and/or CrM seem to promote greater strength gains and muscle morphology during RE training, the hypertrophy responses within the groups varied. These differences in skeletal muscle morphology may have important implications for various populations and, therefore, warrant further investigation.

  7. Changes in Sprint and Jump Performances After Traditional, Plyometric, and Combined Resistance Training in Male Youth Pre- and Post-Peak Height Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Rhodri S; Radnor, John M; De Ste Croix, Mark B A; Cronin, John B; Oliver, Jon L

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 6-week training interventions using different modes of resistance (traditional strength, plyometric, and combined training) on sprinting and jumping performances in boys before and after peak height velocity (PHV). Eighty school-aged boys were categorized into 2 maturity groups (pre- or post-PHV) and then randomly assigned to (a) plyometric training, (b) traditional strength training, (c) combined training, or (d) a control group. Experimental groups participated in twice-weekly training programs for 6 weeks. Acceleration, maximal running velocity, squat jump height, and reactive strength index data were collected pre- and postintervention. All training groups made significant gains in measures of sprinting and jumping irrespective of the mode of resistance training and maturity. Plyometric training elicited the greatest gains across all performance variables in pre-PHV children, whereas combined training was the most effective in eliciting change in all performance variables for the post-PHV cohort. Statistical analysis indicated that plyometric training produced greater changes in squat jump and acceleration performances in the pre-PHV group compared with the post-PHV cohort. All other training responses between pre- and post-PHV cohorts were not significant and not clinically meaningful. The study indicates that plyometric training might be more effective in eliciting short-term gains in jumping and sprinting in boys who are pre-PHV, whereas those who are post-PHV may benefit from the additive stimulus of combined training.

  8. Effects of interset whole-body vibration on bench press resistance training in trained and untrained individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timon, Rafael; Collado-Mateo, Daniel; Olcina, Guillermo; Gusi, Narcis

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated positive effects of acute vibration exercise on concentric strength and power, but few have observed the effects of vibration exposure on resistance training. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of whole body vibration applied to the chest via hands on bench press resistance training in trained and untrained individuals. Nineteen participants (10 recreationally trained bodybuilders and 9 untrained students) performed two randomized sessions of resistance training on separate days. Each strength session consisted of 3 bench press sets with a load of 75% 1RM to failure in each set, with 2 minutes' rest between sets. All subjects performed the same strength training with either, vibration exposure (12 Hz, 4 mm) of 30 seconds immediately before each bench press set or without vibration. Number of total repetitions, kinematic parameters, blood lactate and perceived exertion were analyzed. In the untrained group, vibration exposure caused a significant increase in the mean velocity (from 0.36±0.02 to 0.39±0.03 m/s) and acceleration (from 0.75±0.10 to 0.86±0.09 m/s2), as well as a decrease in perceived effort (from 8±0.57 to 7.35±0.47) in the first bench press set, but no change was observed in the third bench press set. In the recreationally trained bodybuilders, vibration exposure did not cause any improvement on the performance of bench press resistance training. These results suggest that vibration exposure applied just before the bench press exercise could be a good practice to be implemented by untrained individuals in resistance training.

  9. Comparative Effectiveness of Low-Volume Time-Efficient Resistance Training Versus Endurance Training in Patients With Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Gregers Winding; Birgitte Rosenmeier, Jaya; Petersen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cardiorespiratory fitness is positively related to heart failure (HF) prognosis, but lack of time and low energy are barriers for adherence to exercise. We, therefore, compared the effect of low-volume time-based resistance exercise training (TRE) with aerobic moderate-intensity cycling...... (AMC) on maximal and submaximal exercise capacity, health-related quality of life, and vascular function. METHODS: Twenty-eight HF patients (New York Heart Association class I-II) performed AMC (n = 14) or TRE (n = 14). Maximal and submaximal exercise capacity, health-related quality of life......, and vascular function were evaluated before and after a 6-wk training intervention with 3 training sessions per week. The AMC group and the TRE group trained for 45 and 25 min per training session, respectively. During the training sessions, the TRE and AMC groups trained at 60 ± 4% and 59 ± 2% (mean...

  10. Effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians: cluster randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Louis; Jakobsen, Markus D; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen

    2012-01-01

    To determine the effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians.......To determine the effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians....

  11. Effect of 8-Week Resistance Training on Hypertrophy, Strength, and Myostatin Concentration in Old and Young Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoof Negaresh

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion Resistance training was associated with a decline in myostatin level and increase in the muscle mass and cross-sectional area. Hence, the beneficial effect of resistance training may decrease age-related muscle atrophy and affect elderly health.

  12. Mapping training needs for dissemination and implementation research: lessons from a synthesis of existing D&I research training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David A; Proctor, Enola K; Brownson, Ross C; Straus, Sharon E

    2017-09-01

    With recent growth in the field of dissemination and implementation (D&I) research, multiple training programs have been developed to build capacity, including summer training institutes, graduate courses, degree programs, workshops, and conferences. While opportunities for D&I research training have expanded, course organizers acknowledge that available slots are insufficient to meet demand within the scientific and practitioner community. In addition, individual programs have struggled to best fit various needs of trainees, sometimes splitting coursework between specific D&I content and more introductory grant writing material. This article, stemming from a 2013 NIH workshop, reviews experiences across multiple training programs to align training needs, career stage and role, and availability of programs. We briefly review D&I needs and opportunities by career stage and role, discuss variations among existing training programs in format, mentoring relationships, and other characteristics, identify challenges of mapping needs of trainees to programs, and present recommendations for future D&I research training.

  13. A Survey of Hospice Volunteer Coordinators: Training Methods and Objectives of Current Hospice Volunteer Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Cara M; Herndon, Christopher M

    2017-06-01

    Currently more than 5800 hospice organizations operate in the United States. 1 Hospice organizations are required by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to use volunteers for services provided to patients. 2 Although CMS regulates the amount of hours hospice volunteers should provide, there are currently no national requirements for objectives of training. 3 The purpose of this study was to gather information from a sample of hospices regarding volunteer coordinator background, current training for volunteers, importance of training objectives, and any comments regarding additional objectives. Representative state hospice organizations were contacted by e-mail requesting their participation and distribution of the survey throughout their member hospices. The survey asked demographical questions, along with ratings of training components based on perceived level of importance and time spent on each objective. A total of 90 surveys were received, and the response rate was undeterminable. Results showed the majority of hospices were nonprofit, had less than 100 currently trained volunteers, and maintained an average daily patient census of less than 50. Questions regarding training programs indicated that most use live lecture methods of approximately 19 hours or less in duration. Overall, responding hospice organizations agreed that all objectives surveyed were important in training volunteers. The small number of respondents to this survey makes generalization nationwide difficult, however it is a strong starting point for the development of further surveys on hospice volunteer training and achieving a standardized set of training objectives and delivery methods.

  14. Concurrent training: a meta-analysis examining interference of aerobic and resistance exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jacob M; Marin, Pedro J; Rhea, Matthew R; Wilson, Stephanie M C; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Anderson, Jody C

    2012-08-01

    The primary objective of this investigation was to identify which components of endurance training (e.g., modality, duration, frequency) are detrimental to resistance training outcomes. A meta-analysis of 21 studies was performed with a total of 422 effect sizes (ESs). Criteria for the study included were (a) compare strength training alone to strength plus endurance training (concurrent) or to compare combinations of concurrent training; (b) the outcome measures include at least one measure of strength, power, or hypertrophy; and (c) the data necessary to calculate ESs must be included or available. The mean ES for hypertrophy for strength training was 1.23; for endurance training, it was 0.27; and for concurrent training, it was 0.85, with strength and concurrent training being significantly greater than endurance training only. The mean ES for strength development for strength training was 1.76; for endurance training, it was 0.78; and for concurrent training, it was 1.44. Strength and concurrent training was significantly greater than endurance training. The mean ES for power development for strength training only was 0.91; for endurance training, it was 0.11; and for concurrent training, it was 0.55. Significant differences were found between all the 3 groups. For moderator variables, resistance training concurrently with running, but not cycling, resulted in significant decrements in both hypertrophy and strength. Correlational analysis identified significant negative relationships between frequency (-0.26 to -0.35) and duration (-0.29 to -0.75) of endurance training for hypertrophy, strength, and power. Significant relationships (p training are a factor of the modality, frequency, and duration of the endurance training selected.

  15. Ventilatory requirements of quadriceps resistance training in people with COPD and healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houchen-Wolloff L

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Linzy Houchen-Wolloff,1 Carolyn J Sandland,1 Samantha L Harrison,1 Manoj K Menon,1 Mike D Morgan,1 Michael C Steiner,1 Sally J Singh1,21Centre for Exercise and Rehabilitation Science, Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester, UK; 2Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Coventry University, Coventry, UKBackground: It is proposed that resistance training (RT does not activate the cardiopulmonary system to the same extent as whole-body exercise. This is important for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD who are ventilatory limited.Objective: The aim was to assess the ventilatory response to an isokinetic quadriceps RT program in people with COPD and healthy controls.Design: Observational.Registration number: ISRCTN22764439.Setting: Outpatient, university teaching hospital.Participants and outcome measures: People with COPD (n=14 and healthy controls (n=11 underwent breath-by-breath analysis of their ventilation during an RT session (five sets of 30 maximal knee extensions at 180°/sec. Subjects performed a maximal cycle ergometry test (CET at baseline. Peak ventilation (VE; L/min and oxygen consumption (VO2; mL/kg/min were collected. The same system measured VO2 and VE during the RT session. Parameters are presented as a percentage of the maximal CET. Isokinetic workload, symptom scores, heart rate (HR, and oxygen saturation were documented post-training.Results: People with COPD worked at higher percentages of their maximal capacity than controls (mean range between sets 1–5 for VO2 =49.1%–60.1% [COPD], 45.7%–51.43% [controls] and for VE =57.6%–72.2% [COPD], 49.8%–63.6% [controls], although this was not statistically significant (P>0.1 in all cases. In absolute terms, the difference between groups was only significant for actual VO2 on set 2 (P<0.05. Controls performed more isokinetic work than patients with COPD (P<0.05. Median Borg symptom scores after RT were the same in both groups (3

  16. Impact of the draft DOE Training and Qualification Standard on an established training and qualification program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    One of the provisions of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 97-2 was that the US Department of Energy (DOE) hor e llipsis Develop and institute ahor e llipsiscourse in criticality and criticality safety hor e llipsis to serve as the foundation for a program of formal qualification of criticality engineers. In response, a draft DOE standard establishing requirements for a formal qualification program for nuclear criticality safety (NCS) engineers has been prepared and is currently in review. The Oak Ridge Y-12 plant implemented a formal training and qualification program for NCS engineers in 1995. The program complies with existing DOE requirements. The program was developed using a performance-based systematic approach to training and is accomplished through structured mentoring where experienced personnel interact with candidates through various learning exercises. Self-study, exercises, and work under instruction are all utilized. The candidate's performance is evaluated by mentors and oral boards. Competency gained through experience at other sites can also be credited. Technical portions of the program are primarily contained in an initial Engineer-in-Training segment and in subsequent task-specific qualifications. The Engineer-in-Training segment exposes the candidate to fundamental NCS concepts through example problems; ensures the initial compliance training requirements are met; and includes readings from applicable procedures, technical documents, and standards. Upon completion of this initial training, candidates proceed to task qualifications. Tasks are defined NCS activities such as operational reviews, criticality safety evaluations, criticality safety computations, criticality accident alarm system (CAAS) evaluations, support for emergency management, etc. Qualification on a task basis serves to break up training into manageable pieces and expedites qualification of candidates to perform specific production activities. The

  17. Protein supplementation before and after exercise does not further augment skeletal muscle hypertrophy after resistance training in elderly men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdijk, Lex B; Jonkers, Richard A M; Gleeson, Benjamin G; Beelen, Milou; Meijer, Kenneth; Savelberg, Hans H C M; Wodzig, Will K W H; Dendale, Paul; van Loon, Luc J C

    2009-02-01

    Considerable discrepancy exists in the literature on the proposed benefits of protein supplementation on the adaptive response of skeletal muscle to resistance-type exercise training in the elderly. The objective was to assess the benefits of timed protein supplementation on the increase in muscle mass and strength during prolonged resistance-type exercise training in healthy elderly men who habitually consume adequate amounts of dietary protein. Healthy elderly men (n = 26) aged 72 +/- 2 y were randomly assigned to a progressive, 12-wk resistance-type exercise training program with (protein group) or without (placebo group) protein provided before and immediately after each exercise session (3 sessions/wk, 20 g protein/session). One-repetition maximum (1RM) tests were performed regularly to ensure a progressive workload during the intervention. Muscle hypertrophy was assessed at the whole-body (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), limb (computed tomography), and muscle fiber (biopsy) level. The 1RM strength increased approximately 25-35% in both groups (P hypertrophy was greater in type II (placebo: 28 +/- 6%; protein: 29 +/- 4%) than in type I (placebo: 5 +/- 4%; protein: 13 +/- 6%) fibers, but the difference between groups was not significant. Timed protein supplementation immediately before and after exercise does not further augment the increase in skeletal muscle mass and strength after prolon