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Sample records for resistance random access

  1. Radiation Effects of Commercial Resistive Random Access Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dakai; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Wilcox, Edward; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Figueiredo, Marco; Buchner, Stephen; Khachatrian, Ani; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    We present results for the single-event effect response of commercial production-level resistive random access memories. We found that the resistive memory arrays are immune to heavy ion-induced upsets. However, the devices were susceptible to single-event functional interrupts, due to upsets from the control circuits. The intrinsic radiation tolerant nature of resistive memory makes the technology an attractive consideration for future space applications.

  2. Resistive random access memory utilizing ferritin protein with Pt nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenuma, Mutsunori; Kawano, Kentaro; Zheng Bin; Okamoto, Naofumi; Horita, Masahiro; Yoshii, Shigeo; Yamashita, Ichiro; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2011-01-01

    This study reports controlled single conductive paths found in resistive random access memory (ReRAM) formed by embedding Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) in NiO film. Homogeneous Pt NPs produced and placed by ferritin protein produce electric field convergence which leads to controlled conductive path formation. The ReRAM with Pt NPs shows stable switching behavior. A Pt NP density decrease results in an increase of OFF state resistance and decrease of forming voltage, whereas ON resistance was independent of the Pt NP density, which indicates that a single metal NP in a memory cell will achieve low power and stable operation.

  3. Analysis and modeling of resistive switching mechanisms oriented to resistive random-access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Da; Wu Jun-Jie; Tang Yu-Hua

    2013-01-01

    With the progress of the semiconductor industry, the resistive random-access memory (RAM) has drawn increasing attention. The discovery of the memristor has brought much attention to this study. Research has focused on the resistive switching characteristics of different materials and the analysis of resistive switching mechanisms. We discuss the resistive switching mechanisms of different materials in this paper and analyze the differences of those mechanisms from the view point of circuitry to establish their respective circuit models. Finally, simulations are presented. We give the prospect of using different materials in resistive RAM on account of their resistive switching mechanisms, which are applied to explain their resistive switchings

  4. Bipolar resistive switching characteristics in tantalum nitride-based resistive random access memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Ju; Jeon, Dong Su; Park, Ju Hyun; Kim, Tae Geun

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the bipolar resistive switching characteristics of TaN x -based resistive random access memory (ReRAM). The conduction mechanism is explained by formation and rupture of conductive filaments caused by migration of nitrogen ions and vacancies; this mechanism is in good agreement with either Ohmic conduction or the Poole-Frenkel emission model. The devices exhibit that the reset voltage varies from −0.82 V to −0.62 V, whereas the set voltage ranges from 1.01 V to 1.30 V for 120 DC sweep cycles. In terms of reliability, the devices exhibit good retention (>10 5  s) and pulse-switching endurance (>10 6 cycles) properties. These results indicate that TaN x -based ReRAM devices have a potential for future nonvolatile memory devices

  5. Tuning resistance states by thickness control in an electroforming-free nanometallic complementary resistance random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiang; Lu, Yang; Lee, Jongho; Chen, I.-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tuning low resistance state is crucial for resistance random access memory (RRAM) that aims to achieve optimal read margin and design flexibility. By back-to-back stacking two nanometallic bipolar RRAMs with different thickness into a complementary structure, we have found that its low resistance can be reliably tuned over several orders of magnitude. Such high tunability originates from the exponential thickness dependence of the high resistance state of nanometallic RRAM, in which electron wave localization in a random network gives rise to the unique scaling behavior. The complementary nanometallic RRAM provides electroforming-free, multi-resistance-state, sub-100 ns switching capability with advantageous characteristics for memory arrays.

  6. Tuning resistance states by thickness control in an electroforming-free nanometallic complementary resistance random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiang; Lu, Yang; Lee, Jongho; Chen, I-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tuning low resistance state is crucial for resistance random access memory (RRAM) that aims to achieve optimal read margin and design flexibility. By back-to-back stacking two nanometallic bipolar RRAMs with different thickness into a complementary structure, we have found that its low resistance can be reliably tuned over several orders of magnitude. Such high tunability originates from the exponential thickness dependence of the high resistance state of nanometallic RRAM, in which electron wave localization in a random network gives rise to the unique scaling behavior. The complementary nanometallic RRAM provides electroforming-free, multi-resistance-state, sub-100 ns switching capability with advantageous characteristics for memory arrays

  7. Role of an encapsulating layer for reducing resistance drift in phase change random access memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Jin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phase change random access memory (PCRAM devices exhibit a steady increase in resistance in the amorphous phase upon aging and this resistance drift phenomenon directly affects the device reliability. A stress relaxation model is used here to study the effect of a device encapsulating layer material in addressing the resistance drift phenomenon in PCRAM. The resistance drift can be increased or decreased depending on the biaxial moduli of the phase change material (YPCM and the encapsulating layer material (YELM according to the stress relationship between them in the drift regime. The proposed model suggests that the resistance drift can be effectively reduced by selecting a proper material as an encapsulating layer. Moreover, our model explains that reducing the size of the phase change material (PCM while fully reset and reducing the amorphous/crystalline ratio in PCM help to improve the resistance drift, and thus opens an avenue for highly reliable multilevel PCRAM applications.

  8. Low-energy Resistive Random Access Memory Devices with No Need for a Compliance Current

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zedong; Yu, Lina; Wu, Yong; Dong, Chang; Deng, Ning; Xu, Xiaoguang; Miao, J.; Jiang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A novel resistive random access memory device is designed with SrTiO3/ La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 (LSMO)/MgAl2O4 (MAO)/Cu structure, in which metallic epitaxial LSMO is employed as the bottom electrode rather than traditional metal materials. In this device, the critical external compliance current is no longer necessary due to the high self-resistance of LSMO. The LMSO bottom electrode can act as a series resistor to offer a compliance current during the set process. Besides, the device also has excelle...

  9. Low-energy Resistive Random Access Memory Devices with No Need for a Compliance Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zedong; Yu, Lina; Wu, Yong; Dong, Chang; Deng, Ning; Xu, Xiaoguang; Miao, J.; Jiang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A novel resistive random access memory device is designed with SrTiO3/ La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 (LSMO)/MgAl2O4 (MAO)/Cu structure, in which metallic epitaxial LSMO is employed as the bottom electrode rather than traditional metal materials. In this device, the critical external compliance current is no longer necessary due to the high self-resistance of LSMO. The LMSO bottom electrode can act as a series resistor to offer a compliance current during the set process. Besides, the device also has excellent switching features which are originated in the formation of Cu filaments under external voltage. Therefore it provides the possibility of reducing power consumption and accelerating the commercialization of resistive switching devices. PMID:25982101

  10. Low-power resistive random access memory by confining the formation of conducting filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yi-Jen; Lee, Si-Chen; Shen, Tzu-Hsien; Lee, Lan-Hsuan; Wen, Cheng-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their small physical size and low power consumption, resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices are potential for future memory and logic applications in microelectronics. In this study, a new resistive switching material structure, TiO x /silver nanoparticles/TiO x /AlTiO x , fabricated between the fluorine-doped tin oxide bottom electrode and the indium tin oxide top electrode is demonstrated. The device exhibits excellent memory performances, such as low operation voltage (<±1 V), low operation power, small variation in resistance, reliable data retention, and a large memory window. The current-voltage measurement shows that the conducting mechanism in the device at the high resistance state is via electron hopping between oxygen vacancies in the resistive switching material. When the device is switched to the low resistance state, conducting filaments are formed in the resistive switching material as a result of accumulation of oxygen vacancies. The bottom AlTiO x layer in the device structure limits the formation of conducting filaments; therefore, the current and power consumption of device operation are significantly reduced.

  11. Structural analysis of anodic porous alumina used for resistive random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeungwoo; Nigo, Seisuke; Kato, Seiichi; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Kido, Giyuu; Nakano, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    Anodic porous alumina with duplex layers exhibits a voltage-induced switching effect and is a promising candidate for resistive random access memory. The nanostructural analysis of porous alumina is important for understanding the switching effect. We investigated the difference between the two layers of an anodic porous alumina film using transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Diffraction patterns showed that both layers are amorphous, and the electron energy-loss spectroscopy indicated that the inner layer contains less oxygen than the outer layer. We speculate that the conduction paths are mostly located in the oxygen-depleted area.

  12. Surface effects of electrode-dependent switching behavior of resistive random-access memory

    KAUST Repository

    Ke, Jr Jian

    2016-09-26

    The surface effects of ZnO-based resistive random-access memory (ReRAM) were investigated using various electrodes. Pt electrodes were found to have better performance in terms of the device\\'s switching functionality. A thermodynamic model of the oxygen chemisorption process was proposed to explain this electrode-dependent switching behavior. The temperature-dependent switching voltage demonstrates that the ReRAM devices fabricated with Pt electrodes have a lower activation energy for the chemisorption process, resulting in a better resistive switching performance. These findings provide an in-depth understanding of electrode-dependent switching behaviors and can serve as design guidelines for future ReRAM devices.

  13. Stable switching of resistive random access memory on the nanotip array electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Tsai, Kun-Tong

    2016-09-13

    The formation/rupture of conducting filaments (CFs) in resistive random access memory (ReRAM) materials tune the electrical conductivities non-volatilely and are largely affected by its material composition [1], internal configurations [2] and external environments [3,4]. Therefore, controlling repetitive formation/rupture of CF as well as the spatial uniformity of formed CF are fundamentally important for improving the resistive switching (RS) performance. In this context, we have shown that by adding a field initiator, typically a textured electrode, both performance and switching uniformity of ReRAMs can be improved dramatically [5]. In addition, despite its promising characteristics, the scalable fabrication and structural homogeneity of such nanostructured electrodes are still lacking or unattainable, making miniaturization of ReRAM devices an exceeding challenge. Here, we employ nanostructured electrode (nanotip arrays, extremely uniform) formed spontaneously via a self-organized process to improve the ZnO ReRAM switching characteristics.

  14. Heavy ion radiation effects on TiN/HfO2/W resistive random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoli; Geer, Robert E.

    Resistive random access memory (ReRAM) is an attractive candidate for application in next-generation nonvolatile memory (NVM) devices for both aerospace and conventional commercial applications. ReRAM has several intrinsic advantages over other NVM technologies due to its simple metal-insulator-metal structure, high storage density, low power consumption, high switching speed, and high endurance. Most importantly, there are indications that ReRAM is an intrinsically radiation-hard device due to its defect-moderated, resistive switching mechanism and potentially well suited for applications in aerospace or other radiation intensive environments. We present a study of the effects of radiation on TiN/HfO2/W ReRAM devices carried out with a variety of ion sources, including He, N, Ne, and Ar, at fluences ranging from 1012 to 1015 cm- 2. Multiple (15- 16) devices were employed in each irradiation experiment. Half of the devices were programmed into high resistance states (HRS, off states) and the other half were programmed into low resistance states (LRS, on states) before radiation exposure. After radiation, the resistance of ReRAM devices in each state decreased with higher influence and with heavier ions. We observed spontaneous switching of the high resistance states of all devices to low resistance states following Ne and Ar radiation at a fluence of 1015 cm- 2. However, most devices remained functional after radiation. Forming voltage and initial resistance of fresh non-formed devices were also compared with non-irradiated devices. The effects of radiation on ReRAM switching are attributed to modified defect distributions within the conducting filament. The radiation-induced defect densities and the associated dependence on ion mass are discussed in terms of current defect-mediated switching models for TiN/HfO2/W ReRAM devices.

  15. Phenomenological analysis of random telegraph noise in amorphous TiOx-based bipolar resistive switching random access memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Kyu; Lee, Ju-Wan; Bae, Jong-Ho; Park, Jinwon; Chung, Sung-Woong; Roh, Jae Sung; Hong, Sung-Joo; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2012-07-01

    As dimensions of resistive random access memories (RRAMs) devices continue to shrink, the low-frequency noise of nanoscale devices has become increasingly important in evaluating the device reliability. Thus, we investigated random telegraph noise (RTN) caused by capture and emission of an electron at traps. We physically analyzed capture and emission processes through systematic measurements of amorphous TiOx (alpha-TiOx)-based bipolar RRAMs. RTNs were observed during high-resistance state (HRS) in most devices. However, discrete switching behavior was scarcely observed in low-resistance state (LRS) as most of traps in the alpha-TiOx were filled with mobile ions such as O2- in LRS. The capture and emission processes of an electron at traps are largely divided into two groups: (1) both capture and emission processes are mainly affected by electric field; and (2) one of the capture and emission processes is only influenced by the thermal process. This paper provides fundamental physics required to understand the mechanism of RTNs in alpha-TiOx-based bipolar RRAMs.

  16. Chemical insight into origin of forming-free resistive random-access memory devices

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, X.

    2011-09-29

    We demonstrate the realization of a forming-step free resistive random access memory (RRAM) device using a HfOx/TiOx/HfOx/TiOxmultilayer structure, as a replacement for the conventional HfOx-based single layer structure. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), along with electron energy loss spectroscopy(EELS)analysis has been carried out to identify the distribution and the role played by Ti in the RRAM stack. Our results show that Ti out-diffusion into the HfOx layer is the chemical cause of forming-free behavior. Moreover, the capability of Ti to change its ionic state in HfOx eases the reduction-oxidation (redox) reaction, thus lead to the RRAM devices performance improvements.

  17. Twin-bit via resistive random access memory in 16 nm FinFET logic technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yi-Hong; Hsu, Meng-Yin; King, Ya-Chin; Lin, Chrong Jung

    2018-04-01

    A via resistive random access memory (RRAM) cell fully compatible with the standard CMOS logic process has been successfully demonstrated for high-density logic nonvolatile memory (NVM) modules in advanced FinFET circuits. In this new cell, the transition metal layers are formed on both sides of a via, given two storage bits per via. In addition to its compact cell area (1T + 14 nm × 32 nm), the twin-bit via RRAM cell features a low operation voltage, a large read window, good data retention, and excellent cycling capability. As fine alignments between mask layers become possible, the twin-bit via RRAM cell is expected to be highly scalable in advanced FinFET technology.

  18. Metal oxide resistive random access memory based synaptic devices for brain-inspired computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bin; Kang, Jinfeng; Zhou, Zheng; Chen, Zhe; Huang, Peng; Liu, Lifeng; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2016-04-01

    The traditional Boolean computing paradigm based on the von Neumann architecture is facing great challenges for future information technology applications such as big data, the Internet of Things (IoT), and wearable devices, due to the limited processing capability issues such as binary data storage and computing, non-parallel data processing, and the buses requirement between memory units and logic units. The brain-inspired neuromorphic computing paradigm is believed to be one of the promising solutions for realizing more complex functions with a lower cost. To perform such brain-inspired computing with a low cost and low power consumption, novel devices for use as electronic synapses are needed. Metal oxide resistive random access memory (ReRAM) devices have emerged as the leading candidate for electronic synapses. This paper comprehensively addresses the recent work on the design and optimization of metal oxide ReRAM-based synaptic devices. A performance enhancement methodology and optimized operation scheme to achieve analog resistive switching and low-energy training behavior are provided. A three-dimensional vertical synapse network architecture is proposed for high-density integration and low-cost fabrication. The impacts of the ReRAM synaptic device features on the performances of neuromorphic systems are also discussed on the basis of a constructed neuromorphic visual system with a pattern recognition function. Possible solutions to achieve the high recognition accuracy and efficiency of neuromorphic systems are presented.

  19. Resistive Random Access Memory from Materials Development fnd Engineering to Novel Encryption and Neuromorphic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Karsten

    Resistive random access memory (ReRAM or RRAM) is a novel form of non-volatile memory that is expected to play a major role in future computing and memory solutions. It has been shown that the resistance state of ReRAM devices can be precisely tuned by modulating switching voltages, by limiting peak current, and by adjusting the switching pulse properties. This enables the realization of novel applications such as memristive neuromorphic computing and neural network computing. I have developed two processes based on 100 and 300mm wafer platforms to demonstrate functional HfO2 based ReRAM devices. The first process is designed for a rapid materials engineering and device characterization, while the second is an advanced hybrid ReRAM/CMOS combination based on the IBM 65nm 10LPe process technology. The 100mm wafer efforts were used to show impacts of etch processes on ReRAM switching performance and the need for a rigorous structural evaluation of ReRAM devices before starting materials development. After an etch development, a bottom electrode comparison between the inert materials Pt, Ru and W was performed where Ru showed superior results with respect to yield and resilience against environmental impacts such as humidity over a 2-month period. A comparison of amorphous and crystalline devices showed no statistical difference in the performance with respect to random telegraph noise. This demonstrates, that the forming process fundamentally alters the crystallographic structure within and around the filament. The 300mm wafer development efforts were aimed towards implementing ReRAM in the FEOL, combined with CMOS, to yield a seamless process flow of 1 transistor 1 ReRAM structures (1T1R). This technology was customized with custom-developed tungsten metal 1 (M1) and dual tungsten/copper via 1 (V1) structures, within which the ReRAM stack is embedded. The ReRAM itself consists of an inert W bottom electrode, HfO2 based active switching layer, a Ti oxygen scavenger

  20. A Collective Study on Modeling and Simulation of Resistive Random Access Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Debashis; Sahu, Paritosh Piyush; Tseng, Tseung Yuen

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we provide a comprehensive discussion on the various models proposed for the design and description of resistive random access memory (RRAM), being a nascent technology is heavily reliant on accurate models to develop efficient working designs and standardize its implementation across devices. This review provides detailed information regarding the various physical methodologies considered for developing models for RRAM devices. It covers all the important models reported till now and elucidates their features and limitations. Various additional effects and anomalies arising from memristive system have been addressed, and the solutions provided by the models to these problems have been shown as well. All the fundamental concepts of RRAM model development such as device operation, switching dynamics, and current-voltage relationships are covered in detail in this work. Popular models proposed by Chua, HP Labs, Yakopcic, TEAM, Stanford/ASU, Ielmini, Berco-Tseng, and many others have been compared and analyzed extensively on various parameters. The working and implementations of the window functions like Joglekar, Biolek, Prodromakis, etc. has been presented and compared as well. New well-defined modeling concepts have been discussed which increase the applicability and accuracy of the models. The use of these concepts brings forth several improvements in the existing models, which have been enumerated in this work. Following the template presented, highly accurate models would be developed which will vastly help future model developers and the modeling community.

  1. A novel ternary content addressable memory design based on resistive random access memory with high intensity and low search energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Runze; Shen, Wensheng; Huang, Peng; Zhou, Zheng; Liu, Lifeng; Liu, Xiaoyan; Kang, Jinfeng

    2018-04-01

    A novel ternary content addressable memory (TCAM) design based on resistive random access memory (RRAM) is presented. Each TCAM cell consists of two parallel RRAM to both store and search for ternary data. The cell size of the proposed design is 8F2, enable a ∼60× cell area reduction compared with the conventional static random access memory (SRAM) based implementation. Simulation results also show that the search delay and energy consumption of the proposed design at the 64-bit word search are 2 ps and 0.18 fJ/bit/search respectively at 22 nm technology node, where significant improvements are achieved compared to previous works. The desired characteristics of RRAM for implementation of the high performance TCAM search chip are also discussed.

  2. Coded Random Access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paolini, Enrico; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Liva, Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    The rise of machine-to-machine communications has rekindled the interest in random access protocols as a support for a massive number of uncoordinatedly transmitting devices. The legacy ALOHA approach is developed under a collision model, where slots containing collided packets are considered...... as waste. However, if the common receiver (e.g., base station) is capable to store the collision slots and use them in a transmission recovery process based on successive interference cancellation, the design space for access protocols is radically expanded. We present the paradigm of coded random access......, in which the structure of the access protocol can be mapped to a structure of an erasure-correcting code defined on graph. This opens the possibility to use coding theory and tools for designing efficient random access protocols, offering markedly better performance than ALOHA. Several instances of coded...

  3. Quantum random access memory

    OpenAIRE

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Lloyd, Seth; Maccone, Lorenzo

    2007-01-01

    A random access memory (RAM) uses n bits to randomly address N=2^n distinct memory cells. A quantum random access memory (qRAM) uses n qubits to address any quantum superposition of N memory cells. We present an architecture that exponentially reduces the requirements for a memory call: O(log N) switches need be thrown instead of the N used in conventional (classical or quantum) RAM designs. This yields a more robust qRAM algorithm, as it in general requires entanglement among exponentially l...

  4. Hydrogen-dependent low frequency noise and its physical mechanism of HfO2 resistance change random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. Q.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.; Peng, C.; Fang, W. X.; En, Y. F.; Huang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of hydrogen on low frequency noise characteristics of HfO2 resistance change random access memories (RRAMs) was investigated in this paper. The experimental results show that HfO2 RRAMs after hydrogen treatment take on the better uniformity of switch characteristics and the conduction enhancement behavior. Furthermore, it was found that the low frequency noise characteristics of the HfO2 RRAMs was significantly impacted by the hydrogen treatment, and at three kinds of typical resistance states, the low frequency noises of the HfO2 RRAMs after hydrogen treatment are larger than those of the fresh HfO2 RRAMs. The mechanism could be attributed to H induced oxygen vacancies, which serve as the additional traps for conduction due to the trap-assisted tunneling process. This will result in more random trap/detrap processes in the conducting filament, which gives rise to the larger low frequency noise in the HfO2 RRAMs. The results of this study may be useful in the design and application of HfO2 RRAMs.

  5. An energy efficient and high speed architecture for convolution computing based on binary resistive random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Han, Runze; Zhou, Zheng; Huang, Peng; Liu, Lifeng; Liu, Xiaoyan; Kang, Jinfeng

    2018-04-01

    In this work we present a novel convolution computing architecture based on metal oxide resistive random access memory (RRAM) to process the image data stored in the RRAM arrays. The proposed image storage architecture shows performances of better speed-device consumption efficiency compared with the previous kernel storage architecture. Further we improve the architecture for a high accuracy and low power computing by utilizing the binary storage and the series resistor. For a 28 × 28 image and 10 kernels with a size of 3 × 3, compared with the previous kernel storage approach, the newly proposed architecture shows excellent performances including: 1) almost 100% accuracy within 20% LRS variation and 90% HRS variation; 2) more than 67 times speed boost; 3) 71.4% energy saving.

  6. Realization of a reversible switching in TaO2 polymorphs via Peierls distortion for resistance random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Linggang; Sun, Zhimei; Zhou, Jian; Guo, Zhonglu

    2015-01-01

    Transition-metal-oxide based resistance random access memory (RRAM) is a promising candidate for next-generation universal non-volatile memories. Searching and designing appropriate materials used in the memories becomes an urgent task. Here, a structure with the TaO 2 formula was predicted using evolutionary algorithms in combination with first-principles calculations. This triclinic structure (T-TaO 2 ) is both energetically and dynamically more favorable than the commonly believed rutile structure (R-TaO 2 ). The metal-insulator transition (MIT) between metallic R-TaO 2 and T-TaO 2 (band gap: 1.0 eV) is via a Peierls distortion, which makes TaO 2 a potential candidate for RRAM. The energy barrier for the reversible phase transition is 0.19 eV/atom and 0.23 eV/atom, respectively, suggesting low power consumption for the resistance switch. The present findings about the MIT as the resistance-switch mechanism in Ta-O system will stimulate experimental work to fabricate tantalum oxides based RRAM

  7. Effects of different dopants on switching behavior of HfO2-based resistive random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Ning; Pang Hua; Wu Wei

    2014-01-01

    In this study the effects of doping atoms (Al, Cu, and N) with different electro-negativities and ionic radii on resistive switching of HfO 2 -based resistive random access memory (RRAM) are systematically investigated. The results show that forming voltages and set voltages of Al/Cu-doped devices are reduced. Among all devices, Cu-doped device shows the narrowest device-to-device distributions of set voltage and low resistance. The effects of different dopants on switching behavior are explained with deferent types of CFs formed in HfO 2 depending on dopants: oxygen vacancy (Vo) filaments for Al-doped HfO 2 devices, hybrid filaments composed of oxygen vacancies and Cu atoms for Cu-doped HfO 2 devices, and nitrogen/oxygen vacancy filaments for N-doped HfO 2 devices. The results suggest that a metal dopant with a larger electro-negativity than host metal atom offers the best comprehensive performance. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  8. Thermal stability and data retention of resistive random access memory with HfOx/ZnO double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Yun-Feng; Chen Fan; Zeng Ze-Cun; Lin PeiJie; Cheng Shu-Ying; Yu Jin-Ling

    2017-01-01

    As an industry accepted storage scheme, hafnium oxide (HfO x ) based resistive random access memory (RRAM) should further improve its thermal stability and data retention for practical applications. We therefore fabricated RRAMs with HfO x /ZnO double-layer as the storage medium to study their thermal stability as well as data retention. The HfO x /ZnO double-layer is capable of reversible bipolar switching under ultralow switching current (< 3 μA) with a Schottky emission dominant conduction for the high resistance state and a Poole–Frenkel emission governed conduction for the low resistance state. Compared with a drastically increased switching current at 120 °C for the single HfO x layer RRAM, the HfO x /ZnO double-layer exhibits excellent thermal stability and maintains neglectful fluctuations in switching current at high temperatures (up to 180 °C), which might be attributed to the increased Schottky barrier height to suppress current at high temperatures. Additionally, the HfO x /ZnO double-layer exhibits 10-year data retention @85 °C that is helpful for the practical applications in RRAMs. (paper)

  9. Error free physically unclonable function with programmed resistive random access memory using reliable resistance states by specific identification-generation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Po-Hao; Hsu, Kai-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Yu; Lee, Feng-Min; Lee, Ming-Hsiu; Lung, Hsiang-Lan; Hsieh, Kuang-Yeu; Chung Wang, Keh; Lu, Chih-Yuan

    2018-04-01

    A high performance physically unclonable function (PUF) implemented with WO3 resistive random access memory (ReRAM) is presented in this paper. This robust ReRAM-PUF can eliminated bit flipping problem at very high temperature (up to 250 °C) due to plentiful read margin by using initial resistance state and set resistance state. It is also promised 10 years retention at the temperature range of 210 °C. These two stable resistance states enable stable operation at automotive environments from -40 to 125 °C without need of temperature compensation circuit. The high uniqueness of PUF can be achieved by implementing a proposed identification (ID)-generation method. Optimized forming condition can move 50% of the cells to low resistance state and the remaining 50% remain at initial high resistance state. The inter- and intra-PUF evaluations with unlimited separation of hamming distance (HD) are successfully demonstrated even under the corner condition. The number of reproduction was measured to exceed 107 times with 0% bit error rate (BER) at read voltage from 0.4 to 0.7 V.

  10. Multi-step resistive switching behavior of Li-doped ZnO resistance random access memory device controlled by compliance current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Cheng [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Mathematic and Physical Sciences, R.O.C. Air Force Academy, Kaohsiung 820, Taiwan (China); Tang, Jian-Fu; Su, Hsiu-Hsien [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hong, Cheng-Shong; Huang, Chih-Yu [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Kaohsiung Normal University, Kaohsiung 802, Taiwan (China); Chu, Sheng-Yuan, E-mail: chusy@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2016-06-28

    The multi-step resistive switching (RS) behavior of a unipolar Pt/Li{sub 0.06}Zn{sub 0.94}O/Pt resistive random access memory (RRAM) device is investigated. It is found that the RRAM device exhibits normal, 2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors under different compliance currents. The transport mechanism within the device is investigated by means of current-voltage curves, in-situ transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is shown that the ion transport mechanism is dominated by Ohmic behavior under low electric fields and the Poole-Frenkel emission effect (normal RS behavior) or Li{sup +} ion diffusion (2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors) under high electric fields.

  11. Multi-step resistive switching behavior of Li-doped ZnO resistance random access memory device controlled by compliance current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chun-Cheng; Tang, Jian-Fu; Su, Hsiu-Hsien; Hong, Cheng-Shong; Huang, Chih-Yu; Chu, Sheng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The multi-step resistive switching (RS) behavior of a unipolar Pt/Li 0.06 Zn 0.94 O/Pt resistive random access memory (RRAM) device is investigated. It is found that the RRAM device exhibits normal, 2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors under different compliance currents. The transport mechanism within the device is investigated by means of current-voltage curves, in-situ transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is shown that the ion transport mechanism is dominated by Ohmic behavior under low electric fields and the Poole-Frenkel emission effect (normal RS behavior) or Li + ion diffusion (2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors) under high electric fields.

  12. Ion beam synthesis of indium-oxide nanocrystals for improvement of oxide resistive random-access memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafos, C.; Benassayag, G.; Cours, R.; Pécassou, B.; Guenery, P. V.; Baboux, N.; Militaru, L.; Souifi, A.; Cossec, E.; Hamga, K.; Ecoffey, S.; Drouin, D.

    2018-01-01

    We report on the direct ion beam synthesis of a delta-layer of indium oxide nanocrystals (In2O3-NCs) in silica matrices by using ultra-low energy ion implantation. The formation of the indium oxide phase can be explained by (i) the affinity of indium with oxygen, (ii) the generation of a high excess of oxygen recoils generated by the implantation process in the region where the nanocrystals are formed and (iii) the proximity of the indium-based nanoparticles with the free surface and oxidation from the air. Taking advantage of the selective diffusivity of implanted indium in SiO2 with respect to Si3N4, In2O3-NCs have been inserted in the SiO2 switching oxide of micrometric planar oxide-based resistive random access memory (OxRAM) devices fabricated using the nanodamascene process. Preliminary electrical measurements show switch voltage from high to low resistance state. The devices with In2O3-NCs have been cycled 5 times with identical operating voltages and RESET current meanwhile no switch has been observed for non implanted devices. This first measurement of switching is very promising for the concept of In2O3-NCs based OxRAM memories.

  13. A Novel Read Scheme for Large Size One-Resistor Resistive Random Access Memory Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zackriya, Mohammed; Kittur, Harish M; Chin, Albert

    2017-02-10

    The major issue of RRAM is the uneven sneak path that limits the array size. For the first time record large One-Resistor (1R) RRAM array of 128x128 is realized, and the array cells at the worst case still have good Low-/High-Resistive State (LRS/HRS) current difference of 378 nA/16 nA, even without using the selector device. This array has extremely low read current of 9.7 μA due to both low-current RRAM device and circuit interaction, where a novel and simple scheme of a reference point by half selected cell and a differential amplifier (DA) were implemented in the circuit design.

  14. One bipolar transistor selector - One resistive random access memory device for cross bar memory array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Aluguri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A bipolar transistor selector was connected in series with a resistive switching memory device to study its memory characteristics for its application in cross bar array memory. The metal oxide based p-n-p bipolar transistor selector indicated good selectivity of about 104 with high retention and long endurance showing its usefulness in cross bar RRAM devices. Zener tunneling is found to be the main conduction phenomena for obtaining high selectivity. 1BT-1R device demonstrated good memory characteristics with non-linearity of 2 orders, selectivity of about 2 orders and long retention characteristics of more than 105 sec. One bit-line pull-up scheme shows that a 650 kb cross bar array made with this 1BT1R devices works well with more than 10 % read margin proving its ability in future memory technology application.

  15. One bipolar transistor selector - One resistive random access memory device for cross bar memory array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluguri, R.; Kumar, D.; Simanjuntak, F. M.; Tseng, T.-Y.

    2017-09-01

    A bipolar transistor selector was connected in series with a resistive switching memory device to study its memory characteristics for its application in cross bar array memory. The metal oxide based p-n-p bipolar transistor selector indicated good selectivity of about 104 with high retention and long endurance showing its usefulness in cross bar RRAM devices. Zener tunneling is found to be the main conduction phenomena for obtaining high selectivity. 1BT-1R device demonstrated good memory characteristics with non-linearity of 2 orders, selectivity of about 2 orders and long retention characteristics of more than 105 sec. One bit-line pull-up scheme shows that a 650 kb cross bar array made with this 1BT1R devices works well with more than 10 % read margin proving its ability in future memory technology application.

  16. Uncorrelated multiple conductive filament nucleation and rupture in ultra-thin high-κ dielectric based resistive random access memory

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Xing

    2011-08-29

    Resistive switching in transition metal oxides could form the basis for next-generation non-volatile memory (NVM). It has been reported that the current in the high-conductivity state of several technologically relevant oxide materials flows through localized filaments, but these filaments have been characterized only individually, limiting our understanding of the possibility of multiple conductive filaments nucleation and rupture and the correlation kinetics of their evolution. In this study, direct visualization of uncorrelated multiple conductive filaments in ultra-thin HfO2-based high-κ dielectricresistive random access memory (RRAM) device has been achieved by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), along with electron energy loss spectroscopy(EELS), for nanoscale chemical analysis. The locations of these multiple filaments are found to be spatially uncorrelated. The evolution of these microstructural changes and chemical properties of these filaments will provide a fundamental understanding of the switching mechanism for RRAM in thin oxide films and pave way for the investigation into improving the stability and scalability of switching memory devices.

  17. 50 nm AlxOy resistive random access memory array program bit error reduction and high temperature operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Sheyang; Ogura Iwasaki, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    In order to decrease program bit error rate (BER) of array-level operation in AlxOy resistive random access memory (ReRAM), program BERs are compared by using 4 × 4 basic set and reset with verify methods on multiple 1024-bit-pages in 50 nm, mega-bit class ReRAM arrays. Further, by using an optimized reset method, 8.5% total BER reduction is obtained after 104 write cycles due to avoiding under-reset or weak reset and ameliorating over-reset caused wear-out. Then, under-set and over-set are analyzed by tuning the set word line voltage (VWL) of ±0.1 V. Moderate set current shows the best total BER. Finally, 2000 write cycles are applied at 125 and 25 °C, respectively. Reset BER increases 28.5% at 125 °C whereas set BER has little difference, by using the optimized reset method. By applying write cycles over a 25 to 125 to 25 °C temperature variation, immediate reset BER change can be found after the temperature transition.

  18. Investigation of thermal resistance and power consumption in Ga-doped indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanowire phase change random access memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Bo; Lee, Jeong-Soo, E-mail: m.meyyappan@nasa.gov, E-mail: ljs6951@postech.ac.kr [Division of IT Convergence Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Taekyung; Ju, Sanghyun [Department of Physics, Kyonggi University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do 443-760 (Korea, Republic of); Latypov, Marat I.; Pi, Dong-Hai; Seop Kim, Hyoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Meyyappan, M., E-mail: m.meyyappan@nasa.gov, E-mail: ljs6951@postech.ac.kr [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    The resistance stability and thermal resistance of phase change memory devices using ∼40 nm diameter Ga-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires (Ga:In{sub 2}O{sub 3} NW) with different Ga-doping concentrations have been investigated. The estimated resistance stability (R(t)/R{sub 0} ratio) improves with higher Ga concentration and is dependent on annealing temperature. The extracted thermal resistance (R{sub th}) increases with higher Ga-concentration and thus the power consumption can be reduced by ∼90% for the 11.5% Ga:In{sub 2}O{sub 3} NW, compared to the 2.1% Ga:In{sub 2}O{sub 3} NW. The excellent characteristics of Ga-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowire devices offer an avenue to develop low power and reliable phase change random access memory applications.

  19. Role of Al2O3 thin layer on improving the resistive switching properties of Ta5Si3-based conductive bridge random accesses memory device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dayanand; Aluguri, Rakesh; Chand, Umesh; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2018-04-01

    Ta5Si3-based conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) devices have been investigated to improve their resistive switching characteristics for their application in future nonvolatile memory technology. Changes in the switching characteristics by the addition of a thin Al2O3 layer of different thicknesses at the bottom electrode interface of a Ta5Si3-based CBRAM devices have been studied. The double-layer device with a 1 nm Al2O3 layer has shown improved resistive switching characteristics over the single layer one with a high on/off resistance ratio of 102, high endurance of more than 104 cycles, and good retention for more than 105 s at the temperature of 130 °C. The higher thermal conductivity of Al2O3 over Ta5Si3 has been attributed to the enhanced switching properties of the double-layer devices.

  20. Switching operation and degradation of resistive random access memory composed of tungsten oxide and copper investigated using in-situ TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Masashi; Takahashi, Akihito; Ohno, Yuuki; Nakane, Akitoshi; Tsurumaki-Fukuchi, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2015-11-27

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (in-situ TEM) was performed to investigate the switching operation of a resistive random access memory (ReRAM) made of copper, tungsten oxide and titanium nitride (Cu/WOx/TiN). In the first Set (Forming) operation to initialize the device, precipitation appeared inside the WOx layer. It was presumed that a Cu conducting filament was formed, lowering the resistance (on-state). The Reset operation induced a higher resistance (the off-state). No change in the microstructure was identified in the TEM images. Only when an additional Reset current was applied after switching to the off-state could erasure of the filament be seen (over-Reset). Therefore, it was concluded that structural change relating to the resistance switch was localized in a very small area around the filament. With repeated switching operations and increasing operational current, the WOx/electrode interfaces became indistinct. At the same time, the resistance of the off-state gradually decreased. This is thought to be caused by Cu condensation at the interfaces because of leakage current through the area other than through the filament. This will lead to device degradation through mechanisms such as endurance failure. This is the first accelerated aging test of ReRAM achieved using in-situ TEM.

  1. Aluminum oxide formation at Al/La(1-x)Sr(x)MnO3 interface: a computational study for resistance random access memory applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nodo; Lansac, Yves; Jang, Yun Hee

    2011-01-01

    Resistance random access memory (ReRAM) is emerging as a next-generation nonvolatile memory. One of the most promising materials for the ReRAM application is a composite of a reactive metal [such as aluminum (Al)] and a mixed-valance manganite [such as La(1-x)Ca(x)MnO3 (LCMO) and La(1-x)Sr(x)MnO3 (LSMO)]. One of the current hypotheses regarding the origin of the resistive switching of such systems is a voltage-controlled reversible formation of a high-resistance aluminum oxide (AlO(x)) layer at the Al/LC(S)MO interface through oxygen migration from LC(S)MO. To validate this hypothesis, quantum mechanics (density functional theory) calculations were carried out on an atomistic model of the resistive-switching phenomena at the Al/LSMO interface (the composite systems of Al/LSMO and AlO(x)/LSMO) as well as on the component materials such as Al, AlO(x), LaMnO3, LaMnO(3-delta), La(1-x)Sr(x)MnO3, and La(1-x)Sr(x)MnO(3-delta). The changes in the structure, energy, and electronic structure of these systems during the oxygen vacancy formation in LSMO, the oxygen migration through the Al/LSMO interface, and the AlO(x) formation were investigated.

  2. On Using the Volatile Mem-Capacitive Effect of TiO2 Resistive Random Access Memory to Mimic the Synaptic Forgetting Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Biplab; Mills, Steven; Lee, Bongmook; Pitts, W. Shepherd; Misra, Veena; Franzon, Paul D.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we report on mimicking the synaptic forgetting process using the volatile mem-capacitive effect of a resistive random access memory (RRAM). TiO2 dielectric, which is known to show volatile memory operations due to migration of inherent oxygen vacancies, was used to achieve the volatile mem-capacitive effect. By placing the volatile RRAM candidate along with SiO2 at the gate of a MOS capacitor, a volatile capacitance change resembling the forgetting nature of a human brain is demonstrated. Furthermore, the memory operation in the MOS capacitor does not require a current flow through the gate dielectric indicating the feasibility of obtaining low power memory operations. Thus, the mem-capacitive effect of volatile RRAM candidates can be attractive to the future neuromorphic systems for implementing the forgetting process of a human brain.

  3. Mechanistic Analysis of Oxygen Vacancy-Driven Conductive Filament Formation in Resistive Random Access Memory Metal/NiO/Metal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Handan; Pachter, Ruth

    2018-03-13

    Electrically switchable resistive random access memories have drawn much interest as nonvolatile memory device candidates based on metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure concepts. However, atomic level mechanisms that lead to conductive filament (CF) formation in MIM structures are often lacking, such as for the system with NiO as the oxide layer, which was found promising for resistive random access memory (RRAM) device applications. In this work, using density functional theory with a Hubbard-type on-site Coulomb correction, which we carefully benchmarked, we analyzed the intrinsic propensity toward CF formation in NiO upon introduction of oxygen vacancies, including interfacial effects of Ag or Pt electrodes. First, for stoichiometric MIM structural models, contributions from metal-induced gap states to the electronic density of states (DOS) were identified, accommodating oxygen vacancy states and showing that the interface region is reduced more easily than the bulklike region, for example, for the Ag/NiO/Ag structure. Moreover, a tendency toward oxygen vacancy clustering was demonstrated, important for CF formation. Indeed, by introducing ordered oxygen vacancies into the oxide layer for both MIM models, several extended defect states within the forbidden gap have resulted, which lead to defect-assisted transport. These were shown to be influenced by the spatial distribution and number of oxygen vacancies in the filament, where the degree of reduction of Ni atoms changes based on the immediate surroundings. Projected electronic DOS for individual Ni atoms in regions near and away from oxygen vacancies indicated that those Ni close to oxygen vacancies contribute most to the conductivity. Interestingly, based on charge analyses, these atoms are revealed to undergo significant reduction, generating a locally conductive region in the oxide layer that consists of metallic/near-metallic Ni (Ni 0 ), formed through local reduction.

  4. Structural changes and conductance thresholds in metal-free intrinsic SiOx resistive random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehonic, Adnan; Buckwell, Mark; Montesi, Luca; Garnett, Leon; Hudziak, Stephen; Fearn, Sarah; Chater, Richard; McPhail, David; Kenyon, Anthony J.

    2015-03-01

    We present an investigation of structural changes in silicon-rich silicon oxide metal-insulator-metal resistive RAM devices. The observed unipolar switching, which is intrinsic to the bulk oxide material and does not involve movement of metal ions, correlates with changes in the structure of the oxide. We use atomic force microscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy to examine the structural changes occurring as a result of switching. We confirm that protrusions formed at the surface of samples during switching are bubbles, which are likely to be related to the outdiffusion of oxygen. This supports existing models for valence-change based resistive switching in oxides. In addition, we describe parallel linear and nonlinear conduction pathways and suggest that the conductance quantum, G0, is a natural boundary between the high and low resistance states of our devices.

  5. Internal resistor of multi-functional tunnel barrier for selectivity and switching uniformity in resistive random access memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangheon; Woo, Jiyong; Lee, Daeseok; Cha, Euijun; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2014-01-01

    In this research, we analyzed the multi-functional role of a tunnel barrier that can be integrated in devices. This tunnel barrier, acting as an internal resistor, changes its resistance with applied bias. Therefore, the current flow in the devices can be controlled by a tunneling mechanism that modifies the tunnel barrier thickness for non-linearity and switching uniformity of devices. When a device is in a low-resistance state, the tunnel barrier controls the current behavior of the device because most of the bias is applied to the tunnel barrier owing to its higher resistance. Furthermore, the tunnel barrier induces uniform filament formation during set operation with the tunnel barrier controlling the current flow.

  6. Structural changes and conductance thresholds in metal-free intrinsic SiOx resistive random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehonic, Adnan; Buckwell, Mark; Montesi, Luca; Garnett, Leon; Hudziak, Stephen; Kenyon, Anthony J.; Fearn, Sarah; Chater, Richard; McPhail, David

    2015-01-01

    We present an investigation of structural changes in silicon-rich silicon oxide metal-insulator-metal resistive RAM devices. The observed unipolar switching, which is intrinsic to the bulk oxide material and does not involve movement of metal ions, correlates with changes in the structure of the oxide. We use atomic force microscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy to examine the structural changes occurring as a result of switching. We confirm that protrusions formed at the surface of samples during switching are bubbles, which are likely to be related to the outdiffusion of oxygen. This supports existing models for valence-change based resistive switching in oxides. In addition, we describe parallel linear and nonlinear conduction pathways and suggest that the conductance quantum, G 0 , is a natural boundary between the high and low resistance states of our devices

  7. Structural changes and conductance thresholds in metal-free intrinsic SiO{sub x} resistive random access memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehonic, Adnan, E-mail: a.mehonic@ee.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: t.kenyon@ucl.ac.uk; Buckwell, Mark; Montesi, Luca; Garnett, Leon; Hudziak, Stephen; Kenyon, Anthony J., E-mail: a.mehonic@ee.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: t.kenyon@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, UCL, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Fearn, Sarah; Chater, Richard; McPhail, David [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-28

    We present an investigation of structural changes in silicon-rich silicon oxide metal-insulator-metal resistive RAM devices. The observed unipolar switching, which is intrinsic to the bulk oxide material and does not involve movement of metal ions, correlates with changes in the structure of the oxide. We use atomic force microscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy to examine the structural changes occurring as a result of switching. We confirm that protrusions formed at the surface of samples during switching are bubbles, which are likely to be related to the outdiffusion of oxygen. This supports existing models for valence-change based resistive switching in oxides. In addition, we describe parallel linear and nonlinear conduction pathways and suggest that the conductance quantum, G{sub 0}, is a natural boundary between the high and low resistance states of our devices.

  8. Material insights of HfO2-based integrated 1-transistor-1-resistor resistive random access memory devices processed by batch atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Gang; Kim, Hee-Dong; Roelofs, Robin; Perez, Eduardo; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Zaumseil, Peter; Costina, Ioan; Wenger, Christian

    2016-06-17

    With the continuous scaling of resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices, in-depth understanding of the physical mechanism and the material issues, particularly by directly studying integrated cells, become more and more important to further improve the device performances. In this work, HfO2-based integrated 1-transistor-1-resistor (1T1R) RRAM devices were processed in a standard 0.25 μm complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process line, using a batch atomic layer deposition (ALD) tool, which is particularly designed for mass production. We demonstrate a systematic study on TiN/Ti/HfO2/TiN/Si RRAM devices to correlate key material factors (nano-crystallites and carbon impurities) with the filament type resistive switching (RS) behaviours. The augmentation of the nano-crystallites density in the film increases the forming voltage of devices and its variation. Carbon residues in HfO2 films turn out to be an even more significant factor strongly impacting the RS behaviour. A relatively higher deposition temperature of 300 °C dramatically reduces the residual carbon concentration, thus leading to enhanced RS performances of devices, including lower power consumption, better endurance and higher reliability. Such thorough understanding on physical mechanism of RS and the correlation between material and device performances will facilitate the realization of high density and reliable embedded RRAM devices with low power consumption.

  9. Material insights of HfO2-based integrated 1-transistor-1-resistor resistive random access memory devices processed by batch atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Gang; Kim, Hee-Dong; Roelofs, Robin; Perez, Eduardo; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Zaumseil, Peter; Costina, Ioan; Wenger, Christian

    2016-06-01

    With the continuous scaling of resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices, in-depth understanding of the physical mechanism and the material issues, particularly by directly studying integrated cells, become more and more important to further improve the device performances. In this work, HfO2-based integrated 1-transistor-1-resistor (1T1R) RRAM devices were processed in a standard 0.25 μm complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process line, using a batch atomic layer deposition (ALD) tool, which is particularly designed for mass production. We demonstrate a systematic study on TiN/Ti/HfO2/TiN/Si RRAM devices to correlate key material factors (nano-crystallites and carbon impurities) with the filament type resistive switching (RS) behaviours. The augmentation of the nano-crystallites density in the film increases the forming voltage of devices and its variation. Carbon residues in HfO2 films turn out to be an even more significant factor strongly impacting the RS behaviour. A relatively higher deposition temperature of 300 °C dramatically reduces the residual carbon concentration, thus leading to enhanced RS performances of devices, including lower power consumption, better endurance and higher reliability. Such thorough understanding on physical mechanism of RS and the correlation between material and device performances will facilitate the realization of high density and reliable embedded RRAM devices with low power consumption.

  10. Electrical characterizations of resistive random access memory devices based on GaV{sub 4}S{sub 8} thin layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranchant, J., E-mail: julien.tranchant@cnrs-imn.fr [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Janod, E.; Cario, L.; Corraze, B.; Souchier, E. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Leclercq, J.-L.; Cremillieu, P. [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL), UMR CNRS 5270, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, F 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Moreau, P.; Besland, M.-P. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2013-04-30

    The Mott insulator compound GaV{sub 4}S{sub 8} exhibits resistive switching (RS) properties under electric pulses which could be used in the domain of data storage for future replacement of Flash technology. In this work, we present the characterization and the resistive switching performances of three devices containing GaV{sub 4}S{sub 8} thin films with various electrode sizes and geometries, i.e. planar interdigit electrodes and Metal/Insulator/Metal Au/GaV{sub 4}S{sub 8}/Au structures. First, we evidence the good quality of the interfaces between GaV{sub 4}S{sub 8} layers and gold electrodes through transmission electron microscopy observations which allows reliable electrical characterizations. Then, we demonstrate a downscaling effect as the resistive switching amplitude ΔR/R = (R{sub high} − R{sub low}) / R{sub low} increases from a few percents to more than 600% as the electrode size decreases from 50 × 50 μm{sup 2} to 2 × 2 μm{sup 2}. Finally we show that other performances such as cycling endurance, reaching more than 65,000 RS cycles, data retention time till 10 years or writing speed below 100 ns confirm the high potential of GaV{sub 4}S{sub 8} as active material in future resistive random access memories or Mott memories. - Highlights: ► GaV{sub 4}S{sub 8} performance towards memory application is studied on various electrode sizes. ► Endurance in GaV{sub 4}S{sub 8} thin films reaches more than 65,000 cycles. ► We evidence writing/erasing times below 100 ns. ► Downscaling increases the resistance ratio of GaV{sub 4}S{sub 8} Mott memories up to 600%. ► Retention time at room temperature is extrapolated to 10 years.

  11. Dynamic computing random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traversa, F L; Bonani, F; Pershin, Y V; Di Ventra, M

    2014-01-01

    The present von Neumann computing paradigm involves a significant amount of information transfer between a central processing unit and memory, with concomitant limitations in the actual execution speed. However, it has been recently argued that a different form of computation, dubbed memcomputing (Di Ventra and Pershin 2013 Nat. Phys. 9 200–2) and inspired by the operation of our brain, can resolve the intrinsic limitations of present day architectures by allowing for computing and storing of information on the same physical platform. Here we show a simple and practical realization of memcomputing that utilizes easy-to-build memcapacitive systems. We name this architecture dynamic computing random access memory (DCRAM). We show that DCRAM provides massively-parallel and polymorphic digital logic, namely it allows for different logic operations with the same architecture, by varying only the control signals. In addition, by taking into account realistic parameters, its energy expenditures can be as low as a few fJ per operation. DCRAM is fully compatible with CMOS technology, can be realized with current fabrication facilities, and therefore can really serve as an alternative to the present computing technology. (paper)

  12. Magnetic random access memory (MRAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuankai; Wu, Yihong; Lil, Kebin; Qiu, Jinjun; Han, Guchang; Guo, Zaibing; Luo, Ping; An, Lihua; Liu, Zhiyong; Wang, Li; Tan, Seng Ghee; Zong, Baoyu; Liu, Bo

    2007-01-01

    The high density and high speed nonvolatile MTJ MRAMs are reviewed from perspective of the reading and writing operation. The reading operation of the MRAM with different sensing schemes and cell array structures is discussed, in particular the reference resistance generating schemes which are introduced to maximize the cell efficiency and reading reliability. The high density, low cost cross-point cell layout structures are analyzed systematically. The writing operation modes ranging from the half-select, toggle mode, guided SAF direct writing, thermally assisted writing, to the spin transfer switching are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The thermal factor always plays an important role in determine not only the thermal stability but also the reading and writing reliability.

  13. Resistive switching mechanism of ZnO/ZrO2-stacked resistive random access memory device annealed at 300 °C by sol-gel method with forming-free operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Wen-Yi; You, Hsin-Chiang; Wu, Cheng-Yen

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we used a sol-gel process to fabricate a ZnO-ZrO2-stacked resistive switching random access memory (ReRAM) device and investigated its switching mechanism. The Gibbs free energy in ZnO, which is higher than that in ZrO2, facilitates the oxidation and reduction reactions of filaments in the ZnO layer. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the device revealed a forming-free operation because of nonlattice oxygen in the oxide layer. In addition, the device can operate under bipolar or unipolar conditions with a reset voltage of 0 to ±2 V, indicating that in this device, Joule heating dominates at reset and the electric field dominates in the set process. Furthermore, the characteristics reveal why the fabricated device exhibits a greater discrete distribution phenomenon for the set voltage than for the reset voltage. These results will enable the fabrication of future ReRAM devices with double-layer oxide structures with improved characteristics.

  14. Architectures for a quantum random access memory

    OpenAIRE

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Lloyd, Seth; Maccone, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    A random access memory, or RAM, is a device that, when interrogated, returns the content of a memory location in a memory array. A quantum RAM, or qRAM, allows one to access superpositions of memory sites, which may contain either quantum or classical information. RAMs and qRAMs with n-bit addresses can access 2^n memory sites. Any design for a RAM or qRAM then requires O(2^n) two-bit logic gates. At first sight this requirement might seem to make large scale quantum versions of such devices ...

  15. Sign Compute Resolve for Random Access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goseling, Jasper; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Popovski, Petar

    2014-01-01

    We present an approach to random access that is based on three elements: physical-layer network coding, signature codes and tree splitting. Upon occurrence of a collision, physical-layer network coding enables the receiver to decode the sum of the information that was transmitted by the individua...

  16. Non-volatile magnetic random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Improvements are made in a non-volatile magnetic random access memory. Such a memory is comprised of an array of unit cells, each having a Hall-effect sensor and a thin-film magnetic element made of material having an in-plane, uniaxial anisotropy and in-plane, bipolar remanent magnetization states. The Hall-effect sensor is made more sensitive by using a 1 m thick molecular beam epitaxy grown InAs layer on a silicon substrate by employing a GaAs/AlGaAs/InAlAs superlattice buffering layer. One improvement avoids current shunting problems of matrix architecture. Another improvement reduces the required magnetizing current for the micromagnets. Another improvement relates to the use of GaAs technology wherein high electron-mobility GaAs MESFETs provide faster switching times. Still another improvement relates to a method for configuring the invention as a three-dimensional random access memory.

  17. Random Access to Grammar-Compressed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Landau, Gad M.; Raman, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Let S be a string of length N compressed into a context- free grammar S of size n. We present two representa- tions of S achieving O(logN) random access time, and either O(n-ak(n)) construction time and space on the pointer machine model, or O(n) construction time and space on the RAM. Here, k......(n) is the inverse of the kth row of Ackermann's function. Our representations also efficiently support decompression of any substring in S: we can decompress any substring of length m in the same complexity as a single random access query and ad- ditional O(m) time. Combining these results with fast algorithms...... is the number of occurrences of P in S. Finally, we are able to generalize our results to navigation and other operations on grammar-compressed trees. All of the above bounds signicantly improve the cur- rently best known results. To achieve these bounds, we introduce several new techniques and data structures...

  18. Architectures for a quantum random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Lloyd, Seth; Maccone, Lorenzo

    2008-11-01

    A random access memory, or RAM, is a device that, when interrogated, returns the content of a memory location in a memory array. A quantum RAM, or qRAM, allows one to access superpositions of memory sites, which may contain either quantum or classical information. RAMs and qRAMs with n -bit addresses can access 2n memory sites. Any design for a RAM or qRAM then requires O(2n) two-bit logic gates. At first sight this requirement might seem to make large scale quantum versions of such devices impractical, due to the difficulty of constructing and operating coherent devices with large numbers of quantum logic gates. Here we analyze two different RAM architectures (the conventional fanout and the “bucket brigade”) and propose some proof-of-principle implementations, which show that, in principle, only O(n) two-qubit physical interactions need take place during each qRAM call. That is, although a qRAM needs O(2n) quantum logic gates, only O(n) need to be activated during a memory call. The resulting decrease in resources could give rise to the construction of large qRAMs that could operate without the need for extensive quantum error correction.

  19. Introduction to magnetic random-access memory

    CERN Document Server

    Dieny, Bernard; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic random-access memory (MRAM) is poised to replace traditional computer memory based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductors (CMOS). MRAM will surpass all other types of memory devices in terms of nonvolatility, low energy dissipation, fast switching speed, radiation hardness, and durability. Although toggle-MRAM is currently a commercial product, it is clear that future developments in MRAM will be based on spin-transfer torque, which makes use of electrons’ spin angular momentum instead of their charge. MRAM will require an amalgamation of magnetics and microelectronics technologies. However, researchers and developers in magnetics and in microelectronics attend different technical conferences, publish in different journals, use different tools, and have different backgrounds in condensed-matter physics, electrical engineering, and materials science. This book is an introduction to MRAM for microelectronics engineers written by specialists in magnetic mat rials and devices. It presents the bas...

  20. Endurance Enhancement and High Speed Set/Reset of 50 nm Generation HfO2 Based Resistive Random Access Memory Cell by Intelligent Set/Reset Pulse Shape Optimization and Verify Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Kazuhide; Miyaji, Kousuke; Johguchi, Koh; Takeuchi, Ken

    2012-02-01

    This paper proposes a verify-programming method for the resistive random access memory (ReRAM) cell which achieves a 50-times higher endurance and a fast set and reset compared with the conventional method. The proposed verify-programming method uses the incremental pulse width with turnback (IPWWT) for the reset and the incremental voltage with turnback (IVWT) for the set. With the combination of IPWWT reset and IVWT set, the endurance-cycle increases from 48 ×103 to 2444 ×103 cycles. Furthermore, the measured data retention-time after 20 ×103 set/reset cycles is estimated to be 10 years. Additionally, the filamentary based physical model is proposed to explain the set/reset failure mechanism with various set/reset pulse shapes. The reset pulse width and set voltage correspond to the width and length of the conductive-filament, respectively. Consequently, since the proposed IPWWT and IVWT recover set and reset failures of ReRAM cells, the endurance-cycles are improved.

  1. Code-Expanded Random Access for Machine-Type Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich Pratas, Nuno; Thomsen, Henning; Stefanovic, Cedomir

    2012-01-01

    orthogonal preambles in multiple random access sub-frames, thus creating access codewords that are used for contention. In this way, for the same number of random access sub-frames and orthogonal preambles, the amount of available contention resources is drastically increased, enabling the support...... of an increased number of MTC users. We present the framework and analysis of the proposed code-expanded random access method and show that our approach supports load regions that are beyond the reach of current systems.......Abstract—The random access methods used for support of machine-type communications (MTC) in current cellular standards are derivatives of traditional framed slotted ALOHA and therefore do not support high user loads efficiently. Motivated by the random access method employed in LTE, we propose...

  2. Germanium Nitride Interfacial Layer for Chalcogenide Random Access Memory Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Liu, Bo; Song, Zhitang; Xu, Cheng; Rao, Feng; Liang, Shuang; Feng, Songlin; Chen, Bomy

    2008-01-01

    This work reports on the performance improvement of a chalcogenide random access memory device by applying germanium nitride as an interfacial layer. The device with an 8-nm-thick GeN film was fabricated using standard 0.18 µm complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The as-deposited GeN is in the amorphous state and has a smooth surface. An electrical test showed that this N-deficient layer induces a lower threshold voltage during the operation. It is believed that the reduction mainly originated from the excellent interfacial properties, high electrical resistivity, and low thermal conductivity of GeN, which is would be a prospective interfacial material in CRAM devices.

  3. Spin Injection in Thermally Assisted Magnetic Random Access Memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deak, James G

    2005-01-01

    An integrated thermal, micromagnetic, spin-momentum-transfer (SMT) model was developed to study the effect of SMT on the programming current required for thermally assisted magnetic random access memory (MRAM...

  4. Interference Calculation in Asynchronous Random Access Protocols using Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Meloni, Alessio; Murroni, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    The use of Aloha-based Random Access protocols is interesting when channel sensing is either not possible or not convenient and the traffic from terminals is unpredictable and sporadic. In this paper an analytic model for packet interference calculation in asynchronous Random Access protocols using diversity is presented. The aim is to provide a tool that avoids time-consuming simulations to evaluate packet loss and throughput in case decodability is still possible when a certain interference...

  5. Random telegraph noise and resistance switching analysis of oxide based resistive memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Shinhyun; Yang, Yuchao; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-07

    Resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices (e.g."memristors") are widely believed to be a promising candidate for future memory and logic applications. Although excellent performance has been reported, the nature of resistance switching is still under extensive debate. In this study, we perform systematic investigation of the resistance switching mechanism in a TaOx based RRAM through detailed noise analysis, and show that the resistance switching from high-resistance to low-resistance is accompanied by a semiconductor-to-metal transition mediated by the accumulation of oxygen-vacancies in the conduction path. Specifically, pronounced random-telegraph noise (RTN) with values up to 25% was observed in the device high-resistance state (HRS) but not in the low-resistance state (LRS). Through time-domain and temperature dependent analysis, we show that the RTN effect shares the same origin as the resistive switching effects, and both can be traced to the (re)distribution of oxygen vacancies (VOs). From noise and transport analysis we further obtained the density of states and average distance of the VOs at different resistance states, and developed a unified model to explain the conduction in both the HRS and the LRS and account for the resistance switching effects in these devices. Significantly, it was found that even though the conduction channel area is larger in the HRS, during resistive switching a localized region gains significantly higher VO and dominates the conduction process. These findings reveal the complex dynamics involved during resistive switching and will help guide continued optimization in the design and operation of this important emerging device class.

  6. Access Contested : Security, Identity, and Resistance in Asian ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    30 sept. 2011 ... Access Contested : Security, Identity, and Resistance in Asian Cyberspace. Couverture du livre Access Contested : Security, Identity, and Resistance in Asian Cyberspace. Directeur(s):. Ronald Deibert, John Palfrey, Rafal Rohozinski et Jonathan Zittrain. Maison(s) d'édition: MIT Press, CRDI. 30 septembre ...

  7. ALOHA Random Access that Operates as a Rateless Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefanovic, Cedomir; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    Various applications of wireless Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications have rekindled the research interest in random access protocols, suitable to support a large number of connected devices. Slotted ALOHA and its derivatives represent a simple solution for distributed random access in wireless...... approach for distributed random access in the slotted ALOHA framework is described in this paper. The proposed approach shares an operational analogy with rateless coding, expressed both through the user access strategy and the adaptive length of the contention period, with the objective to end...... the contention when the instantaneous throughput is maximized. The paper presents the related analysis, providing heuristic criteria for terminating the contention period and showing that very high throughputs can be achieved, even for a low number for contending users. The demonstrated results potentially have...

  8. Mobile access to virtual randomization for investigator-initiated trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno, Thomas M; Keszei, András P

    2017-08-01

    Background/aims Randomization is indispensable in clinical trials in order to provide unbiased treatment allocation and a valid statistical inference. Improper handling of allocation lists can be avoided using central systems, for example, human-based services. However, central systems are unaffordable for investigator-initiated trials and might be inaccessible from some places, where study subjects need allocations. We propose mobile access to virtual randomization, where the randomization lists are non-existent and the appropriate allocation is computed on demand. Methods The core of the system architecture is an electronic data capture system or a clinical trial management system, which is extended by an R interface connecting the R server using the Java R Interface. Mobile devices communicate via the representational state transfer web services. Furthermore, a simple web-based setup allows configuring the appropriate statistics by non-statisticians. Our comprehensive R script supports simple randomization, restricted randomization using a random allocation rule, block randomization, and stratified randomization for un-blinded, single-blinded, and double-blinded trials. For each trial, the electronic data capture system or the clinical trial management system stores the randomization parameters and the subject assignments. Results Apps are provided for iOS and Android and subjects are randomized using smartphones. After logging onto the system, the user selects the trial and the subject, and the allocation number and treatment arm are displayed instantaneously and stored in the core system. So far, 156 subjects have been allocated from mobile devices serving five investigator-initiated trials. Conclusion Transforming pre-printed allocation lists into virtual ones ensures the correct conduct of trials and guarantees a strictly sequential processing in all trial sites. Covering 88% of all randomization models that are used in recent trials, virtual randomization

  9. A random access memory immune to single event upset using a T-Resistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, A. Jr.

    1987-10-28

    In a random access memory cell, a resistance ''T'' decoupling network in each leg of the cell reduces random errors caused by the interaction of energetic ions with the semiconductor material forming the cell. The cell comprises two parallel legs each containing a series pair of complementary MOS transistors having a common gate connected to the node between the transistors of the opposite leg. The decoupling network in each leg is formed by a series pair of resistors between the transistors together with a third resistor interconnecting the junction between the pair of resistors and the gate of the transistor pair forming the opposite leg of the cell. 4 figs.

  10. Random access memory immune to single event upset using a T-resistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Jr., Agustin

    1989-01-01

    In a random access memory cell, a resistance "T" decoupling network in each leg of the cell reduces random errors caused by the interaction of energetic ions with the semiconductor material forming the cell. The cell comprises two parallel legs each containing a series pair of complementary MOS transistors having a common gate connected to the node between the transistors of the opposite leg. The decoupling network in each leg is formed by a series pair of resistors between the transistors together with a third resistor interconnecting the junction between the pair of resistors and the gate of the transistor pair forming the opposite leg of the cell.

  11. Self-Testing Static Random-Access Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Savio; Rennels, David

    1991-01-01

    Proposed static random-access memory for computer features improved error-detecting and -correcting capabilities. New self-testing scheme provides for detection and correction of errors at any time during normal operation - even while data being written into memory. Faults in equipment causing errors in output data detected by repeatedly testing every memory cell to determine whether it can still store both "one" and "zero", without destroying data stored in memory.

  12. SEU ground and flight data in static random access memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Duan, J.L.; Hou, M.D.; Sun, Y.M.; Yao, H.J.; Mo, D.; Zhang, Q.X.; Wang, Z.G.; Jin, Y.F.; Cai, J.R.; Ye, Z.H.; Han, J.W.; Lin, Y.L.; Huang, Z.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the vulnerabilities of single event effects (SEEs) simulated by heavy ions on ground and observed on SJ-5 research satellite in space for static random access memories (SRAMs). A single event upset (SEU) prediction code has been used to estimate the proton-induced upset rates based on the ground test curve of SEU cross-section versus heavy ion linear energy transfer (LET). The result agrees with that of the flight data

  13. Random access quantum information processors using multimode circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, R K; Leung, N; Chakram, S; Groszkowski, Peter; Lu, Y; Earnest, N; McKay, D C; Koch, Jens; Schuster, D I

    2017-12-04

    Qubit connectivity is an important property of a quantum processor, with an ideal processor having random access-the ability of arbitrary qubit pairs to interact directly. This a challenge with superconducting circuits, as state-of-the-art architectures rely on only nearest-neighbor coupling. Here, we implement a random access superconducting quantum information processor, demonstrating universal operations on a nine-qubit memory, with a Josephson junction transmon circuit serving as the central processor. The quantum memory uses the eigenmodes of a linear array of coupled superconducting resonators. We selectively stimulate vacuum Rabi oscillations between the transmon and individual eigenmodes through parametric flux modulation of the transmon frequency. Utilizing these oscillations, we perform a universal set of quantum gates on 38 arbitrary pairs of modes and prepare multimode entangled states, all using only two control lines. We thus achieve hardware-efficient random access multi-qubit control in an architecture compatible with long-lived microwave cavity-based quantum memories.

  14. Rural providers' access to online resources: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Laura J.; McElfresh, Karen R.; Warner, Teddy D.; Stromberg, Tiffany L.; Trost, Jaren; Jelinek, Devin A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The research determined the usage and satisfaction levels with one of two point-of-care (PoC) resources among health care providers in a rural state. Methods In this randomized controlled trial, twenty-eight health care providers in rural areas were stratified by occupation and region, then randomized into either the DynaMed or the AccessMedicine study arm. Study participants were physicians, physician assistants, and nurses. A pre- and post-study survey measured participants' attitudes toward different information resources and their information-seeking activities. Medical student investigators provided training and technical support for participants. Data analyses consisted of analysis of variance (ANOVA), paired t tests, and Cohen's d statistic to compare pre- and post-study effects sizes. Results Participants in both the DynaMed and the AccessMedicine arms of the study reported increased satisfaction with their respective PoC resource, as expected. Participants in both arms also reported that they saved time in finding needed information. At baseline, both arms reported too little information available, which increased to “about right amounts of information” at the completion of the study. DynaMed users reported a Cohen's d increase of +1.50 compared to AccessMedicine users' reported use of 0.82. DynaMed users reported d2 satisfaction increases of 9.48 versus AccessMedicine satisfaction increases of 0.59 using a Cohen's d. Conclusion Participants in the DynaMed arm of the study used this clinically oriented PoC more heavily than the users of the textbook-based AccessMedicine. In terms of user satisfaction, DynaMed users reported higher levels of satisfaction than the users of AccessMedicine. PMID:26807050

  15. Rural providers’ access to online resources: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D. Eldredge

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The research determined the usage and satisfaction levels with one of two point-of-care (PoC resources among health care providers in a rural state. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, twenty-eight health care providers in rural areas were stratified by occupation and region, then randomized into either the DynaMed or the AccessMedicine study arm. Study participants were physicians, physician assistants, and nurses. A pre- and post-study survey measured participants’ attitudes toward different information resources and their information-seeking activities. Medical student investigators provided training and technical support for participants. Data analyses consisted of analysis of variance (ANOVA, paired t tests, and Cohen’s d statistic to compare pre- and post-study effects sizes. Results: Participants in both the DynaMed and the AccessMedicine arms of the study reported increased satisfaction with their respective PoC resource, as expected. Participants in both arms also reported that they saved time in finding needed information. At baseline, both arms reported too little information available, which increased to ‘‘about right amounts of information’’ at the completion of the study. DynaMed users reported a Cohen’s d increase of þ1.50 compared to AccessMedicine users’ reported use of 0.82. DynaMed users reported d2 satisfaction increases of 9.48 versus AccessMedicine satisfaction increases of 0.59 using a Cohen’s d. Conclusion: Participants in the DynaMed arm of the study used this clinically oriented PoC more heavily than the users of the textbook-based AccessMedicine. In terms of user satisfaction, DynaMed users reported higher levels of satisfaction than the users of AccessMedicine.

  16. New sources of grain mold resistance among accessions from Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifty-nine sorghum accessions from Sudan were evaluated in replicated plots at Isabela, Puerto Rico, for resistance against Fusarium thapsinum, one of the causal agents of grain mold. The environmental conditions during this study, especially at and after physiological maturity were optimal for gra...

  17. 78 FR 35645 - Certain Static Random Access Memories and Products Containing Same; Commission Determination...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-792] Certain Static Random Access Memories and Products Containing Same; Commission Determination Affirming a Final Initial Determination..., and the sale within the United States after importation of certain static random access memories and...

  18. A Rewritable, Random-Access DNA-Based Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei Yazdi, S. M. Hossein; Yuan, Yongbo; Ma, Jian; Zhao, Huimin; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2015-09-01

    We describe the first DNA-based storage architecture that enables random access to data blocks and rewriting of information stored at arbitrary locations within the blocks. The newly developed architecture overcomes drawbacks of existing read-only methods that require decoding the whole file in order to read one data fragment. Our system is based on new constrained coding techniques and accompanying DNA editing methods that ensure data reliability, specificity and sensitivity of access, and at the same time provide exceptionally high data storage capacity. As a proof of concept, we encoded parts of the Wikipedia pages of six universities in the USA, and selected and edited parts of the text written in DNA corresponding to three of these schools. The results suggest that DNA is a versatile media suitable for both ultrahigh density archival and rewritable storage applications.

  19. Vortex-Core Reversal Dynamics: Towards Vortex Random Access Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Koog

    2011-03-01

    An energy-efficient, ultrahigh-density, ultrafast, and nonvolatile solid-state universal memory is a long-held dream in the field of information-storage technology. The magnetic random access memory (MRAM) along with a spin-transfer-torque switching mechanism is a strong candidate-means of realizing that dream, given its nonvolatility, infinite endurance, and fast random access. Magnetic vortices in patterned soft magnetic dots promise ground-breaking applications in information-storage devices, owing to the very stable twofold ground states of either their upward or downward core magnetization orientation and plausible core switching by in-plane alternating magnetic fields or spin-polarized currents. However, two technologically most important but very challenging issues --- low-power recording and reliable selection of each memory cell with already existing cross-point architectures --- have not yet been resolved for the basic operations in information storage, that is, writing (recording) and readout. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a magnetic vortex random access memory (VRAM) in the basic cross-point architecture. This unique VRAM offers reliable cell selection and low-power-consumption control of switching of out-of-plane core magnetizations using specially designed rotating magnetic fields generated by two orthogonal and unipolar Gaussian-pulse currents along with optimized pulse width and time delay. Our achievement of a new device based on a new material, that is, a medium composed of patterned vortex-state disks, together with the new physics on ultrafast vortex-core switching dynamics, can stimulate further fruitful research on MRAMs that are based on vortex-state dot arrays.

  20. Optimization of magnetic parameters for toggle magnetoresistance random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shengyuan; Fujiwara, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic parameters of the synthetic antiferromagnetic (SAF) elements for toggle-mode magnetoresistance random access memories (Toggle-MRAMs) have been optimized using the critical field curves obtained by analytical method with the aid of numerical calculations, to maximize the operating field margin taking into account the required memory density, storage lifetime, half-select disturb robustness, and the available strength of operating field. The control of especially low-exchange coupling strength in the SAF in addition to the increase of the operating field has been found to be essential for the development of toggle-MRAM in near future

  1. Neutron detection using soft errors in dynamic Random Access Memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darambara, D.G.; Spyrou, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present results from experiments that have been performed to show the memory cycle time dependence of the soft errors produced by the interaction of alpha particles with dynamic random access memory devices, with a view to using these as position sensitive detectors. Furthermore, a preliminary feasibility study being carried out indicates the use of dynamic RAMs as neutron detectors by the utilization of (n, α) capture reactions in a Li converter placed on the top of the active area of the memory chip. ((orig.))

  2. Random Access to Grammar-Compressed Strings and Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Landau, Gad M.; Raman, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Grammar-based compression, where one replaces a long string by a small context-free grammar that generates the string, is a simple and powerful paradigm that captures (sometimes with slight reduction in efficiency) many of the popular compression schemes, including the Lempel-Ziv family, run...... representations of S achieving O(log N) random access time, and either O(n · αk(n)) construction time and space on the pointer machine model, or O(n) construction time and space on the RAM. Here, αk(n) is the inverse of the kth row of Ackermann's function. Our representations also efficiently support...

  3. Characterization of coded random access with compressive sensing based multi user detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Yalei; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Bockelmann, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communication requires new Medium Access Control (MAC) schemes and physical (PHY) layer concepts to support a massive number of access requests. The concept of coded random access, introduced recently, greatly outperforms other random access methods...... coded random access with CS-MUD on the PHY layer and show very promising results for the resulting protocol....

  4. 75 FR 16507 - In the Matter of Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory Controllers and Products Containing Same... synchronous dynamic random access memory controllers and products containing same by reason of infringement of... semiconductor chips having synchronous dynamic random access memory controllers and products containing same...

  5. Embedded Memory Hierarchy Exploration Based on Magnetic Random Access Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Vitório Cargnini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Static random access memory (SRAM is the most commonly employed semiconductor in the design of on-chip processor memory. However, it is unlikely that the SRAM technology will have a cell size that will continue to scale below 45 nm, due to the leakage current that is caused by the quantum tunneling effect. Magnetic random access memory (MRAM is a candidate technology to replace SRAM, assuming appropriate dimensioning given an operating threshold voltage. The write current of spin transfer torque (STT-MRAM is a known limitation; however, this has been recently mitigated by leveraging perpendicular magnetic tunneling junctions. In this article, we present a comprehensive comparison of spin transfer torque-MRAM (STT-MRAM and SRAM cache set banks. The non-volatility of STT-MRAM allows the definition of new instant on/off policies and leakage current optimizations. Through our experiments, we demonstrate that STT-MRAM is a candidate for the memory hierarchy of embedded systems, due to the higher densities and reduced leakage of MRAM.We demonstrate that adopting STT-MRAM in L1 and L2 caches mitigates the impact of higher write latencies and increased current draw due to the use of MRAM. With the correct system-on-chip (SoC design, we believe that STT-MRAM is a viable alternative to SRAM, which minimizes leakage current and the total power consumed by the SoC.

  6. Random access in large-scale DNA data storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organick, Lee; Ang, Siena Dumas; Chen, Yuan-Jyue; Lopez, Randolph; Yekhanin, Sergey; Makarychev, Konstantin; Racz, Miklos Z; Kamath, Govinda; Gopalan, Parikshit; Nguyen, Bichlien; Takahashi, Christopher N; Newman, Sharon; Parker, Hsing-Yeh; Rashtchian, Cyrus; Stewart, Kendall; Gupta, Gagan; Carlson, Robert; Mulligan, John; Carmean, Douglas; Seelig, Georg; Ceze, Luis; Strauss, Karin

    2018-03-01

    Synthetic DNA is durable and can encode digital data with high density, making it an attractive medium for data storage. However, recovering stored data on a large-scale currently requires all the DNA in a pool to be sequenced, even if only a subset of the information needs to be extracted. Here, we encode and store 35 distinct files (over 200 MB of data), in more than 13 million DNA oligonucleotides, and show that we can recover each file individually and with no errors, using a random access approach. We design and validate a large library of primers that enable individual recovery of all files stored within the DNA. We also develop an algorithm that greatly reduces the sequencing read coverage required for error-free decoding by maximizing information from all sequence reads. These advances demonstrate a viable, large-scale system for DNA data storage and retrieval.

  7. Design of ternary clocked adiabatic static random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengjun, Wang; Fengna, Mei

    2011-10-01

    Based on multi-valued logic, adiabatic circuits and the structure of ternary static random access memory (SRAM), a design scheme of a novel ternary clocked adiabatic SRAM is presented. The scheme adopts bootstrapped NMOS transistors, and an address decoder, a storage cell and a sense amplifier are charged and discharged in the adiabatic way, so the charges stored in the large switch capacitance of word lines, bit lines and the address decoder can be effectively restored to achieve energy recovery during reading and writing of ternary signals. The PSPICE simulation results indicate that the ternary clocked adiabatic SRAM has a correct logic function and low power consumption. Compared with ternary conventional SRAM, the average power consumption of the ternary adiabatic SRAM saves up to 68% in the same conditions.

  8. Spin-Hall-assisted magnetic random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, A. van den; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.; Cosemans, S.; Manfrini, M.; Van Roy, W.; Min, T.; Cornelissen, S.; Vaysset, A.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a write scheme for perpendicular spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory that significantly reduces the required tunnel current density and write energy. A sub-nanosecond in-plane polarized spin current pulse is generated using the spin-Hall effect, disturbing the stable magnetic state. Subsequent switching using out-of-plane polarized spin current becomes highly efficient. Through evaluation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, we quantitatively assess the viability of this write scheme for a wide range of system parameters. A typical example shows an eight-fold reduction in tunnel current density, corresponding to a fifty-fold reduction in write energy, while maintaining a 1 ns write time

  9. Design of ternary clocked adiabatic static random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Pengjun; Mei Fengna

    2011-01-01

    Based on multi-valued logic, adiabatic circuits and the structure of ternary static random access memory (SRAM), a design scheme of a novel ternary clocked adiabatic SRAM is presented. The scheme adopts bootstrapped NMOS transistors, and an address decoder, a storage cell and a sense amplifier are charged and discharged in the adiabatic way, so the charges stored in the large switch capacitance of word lines, bit lines and the address decoder can be effectively restored to achieve energy recovery during reading and writing of ternary signals. The PSPICE simulation results indicate that the ternary clocked adiabatic SRAM has a correct logic function and low power consumption. Compared with ternary conventional SRAM, the average power consumption of the ternary adiabatic SRAM saves up to 68% in the same conditions. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  10. Hentschel random access tracking system HSG 84.30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamzow, Heinz

    1990-08-01

    The development of the Random Access Tracking System was initiated at the University of Muenster, Department of Orthopaedic Physiology by Dr. Theysohn. This system is a real-time high-speed and high-resolution multi-point tracking system. The moving objects are identified with retro-reflective markers which are illuminated by halogen spotlights placed around the camera lens. The video interface generates deflection signals which are fed to unique Random Access Cameras manufactured by Hamamatsu Corporation. These signals perform high speed window scanning and can sample up to 7,500 markers per second. Under certain circumstances this can be increased to 15,000 markers per second. From 1 to 126 markers can be detected in a line scan search mode. Window size may be varied in steps from 0.5% to 4.0% of the field of view. Using a small window it is possible to obtain 1 part in 32,768 in each direction of the field of view. The raw data are reduced to 2-D centroids of the targets. On-line data storage and display are possible using an industry-standard ATPC with DMA interface. Real-time feed-back is also possible. The video interface provides for off-line 3-D reconstructions using the data from two or more synchronized cameras. The system can be adapted to meet the needs of particular applications by modifying sample-rate, data transfer rate, and the number and the dimensions of the windows.

  11. 3D Cross-Point Spin Transfer Torque Magnetic Random Access Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongxin; Wang, Xiaobin; Hao, Xiaojie; Wang, Zihui; Malmhall, Roger; Gan, Huadong; Satoh, Kimihiro; Zhang, Jing; Jung, Dong Ha; Zhou, Yuchen; Yen, Bing K.; Huai, Yiming

    We explore a 3D cross-point spin transfer torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM) array based on the integration of a perpendicular magnetic tunneling junction (pMTJ) with a matching two-terminal selector. The integrated two-terminal device provides a unique opportunity for a high density, low cost stackable storage class memory that can achieve a fast operation speed, long data retention, low bit error rate (BER) and high endurance. 55nm size pillar shaped pMTJ and selector devices have been fabricated and characterized. The selector is compatible with pMTJ whether it is in the high or low resistance state. The pMTJ can be RESET and SET after the selector turns on. We model the dynamic switching of the coupled pMTJ and selector devices. Our model shows the importance of the optimal matching of pMTJ magnetic properties with selector resistive properties to achieve high performance.

  12. 75 FR 14467 - In the Matter of: Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors and Products Containing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... Access Memory Semiconductors and Products Containing Same, Including Memory Modules; Notice of... semiconductors and products containing same, including memory modules, by reason of infringement of certain... importation of certain dynamic random access memory semiconductors or products containing the same, including...

  13. Viable chemical approach for patterning nanoscale magnetoresistive random access memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taeseung; Kim, Younghee; Chen, Jack Kun-Chieh; Chang, Jane P., E-mail: jpchang@seas.ucla.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    A reactive ion etching process with alternating Cl{sub 2} and H{sub 2} exposures has been shown to chemically etch CoFe film that is an integral component in magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM). Starting with systematic thermodynamic calculations assessing various chemistries and reaction pathways leading to the highest possible vapor pressure of the etch products reactions, the potential chemical combinations were verified by etch rate investigation and surface chemistry analysis in plasma treated CoFe films. An ∼20% enhancement in etch rate was observed with the alternating use of Cl{sub 2} and H{sub 2} plasmas, in comparison with the use of only Cl{sub 2} plasma. This chemical combination was effective in removing metal chloride layers, thus maintaining the desired magnetic properties of the CoFe films. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy showed visually and spectroscopically that the metal chloride layers generated by Cl{sub 2} plasma were eliminated with H{sub 2} plasma to yield a clean etch profile. This work suggests that the selected chemistries can be used to etch magnetic metal alloys with a smooth etch profile and this general strategy can be applied to design chemically based etch processes to enable the fabrication of highly integrated nanoscale MRAM devices.

  14. Neutron detection using soft errors in dynamic random access memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darambara, D.G.; Spyrou, N.M.

    1992-01-01

    The fact that energetic alpha particles have been observed to be capable of inducing single-event upsets in integrated circuit memories has become a topic of considerable interest in the past few years. One recognized difficulty with dynamic random access memory devices (dRAMs) is that the alpha-particle 'contamination' present within the dRAM encapsulating material interact sufficiently as to corrupt stored data. The authors essentially utilized the fact that these corruptions may be induced in dRAMs by the interaction of charged particles with the chip of the dRAM itself as a basis of a hardware system for neutron detection with a view to applications in neutron imaging and elemental analysis. The design incorporates a bank of dRAMs on which the particles are incident. Initially, these particles were alpha particles from an appropriate alpha-emitting source employed to assess system parameters. The sensitivity of the device to logic state upsets by ionizing radiation is a function of design and technology parameters, inducing storage node area, node capacitance, operating voltage, minority carrier lifetime, electric fields pattern in the bulk silicon, and specific device geometry. The soft error rate of the device in a given package depends on the flux of alphas, the energy spectrum, the distribution of incident angles, the target area, the total stored charge, the collection efficiency, the cell geometry, the supply voltage, the cycle and refreshing time, and the noise margin

  15. Radiation Dosimetry Using Three-Dimensional Optical Random Access Memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscovitch, M.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to determine particle type and energy plays an important role in the dosimetry of heavy charged particles (HCP) and neutrons. A new approach to radiation dosimetry is presented, which is shown to be capable of particle type and energy discrimination. This method is based on utilizing radiation induced changes in the digital information stored on three-dimensional optical random access memories (3D ORAM). 3D ORAM is a small cube (a few mm 3 ) composed of poly(methyl methacrylate) doped with a photochromic dye, and it was originally proposed as a memory device in high speed parallel computers. A Nd:YAG laser system is used to write and read binary information (bits) on the ORAM, which functions as a charged particle detector. Both the read and the write processes use two laser beams that simultaneously strike the material to cause a color change at their intersection (similar to the darkening of light-sensitive sunglasses when exposed to sunlight.) The laser produces color changes in the ORAM, which then reverts to the original color (''bit-flips'') at sites where energy is deposited from interaction with incident HCP or neutron-recoil protons. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. Calculations based on track structure theory (TST) predict that when HCP interact with the ORAM material, the local energy deposition is capable of inducing measurable ''bit-flips''. These predictions were recently confirmed experimentally using two types of ORAM systems, one based on spirobenzopyran and the other on anthracene, as the photochromic dyes

  16. Radiation dosimetry using three-dimensional optical random access memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscovitch, M.; Phillips, G.W.; Cullum, B.M.; Mobley, J.; Bogard, J.S.; Emfietzoglou, D.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to determine particle type and energy plays an important role in the dosimetry of heavy charged particles (HCP) and neutrons. A new approach to radiation dosimetry is presented, which is shown to be capable of particle type and energy discrimination. This method is based on utilising radiation induced changes in the digital information stored on three-dimensional optical random access memories (3D ORAM). 3D ORAM is a small cube (a few mm 3 ) composed of poly(methyl methacrylate) doped with a photochromic dye, and it was originally proposed as a memory device in high speed parallel computers. A Nd:YAG laser system is used to write and read binary information (bits) on the ORAM, which functions as a charged particle detector. Both the read and the write processes use two laser beams that simultaneously strike the material to cause a colour change at their intersection (similar to the darkening of light-sensitive sunglasses when exposed to sunlight). The laser produces colour changes in the ORAM, which then reverts to the original colour ('bit-flips') at sites where energy is deposited from interaction with incident HCP or neutron-recoil protons. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. Calculations based on track structure theory predict that when HCP interact with the ORAM material, the local energy deposition is capable of inducing measurable 'bit-flips'. These predictions were recently confirmed experimentally using two types of ORAM systems, one based on spirobenzopyran and the other on anthracene, as the photochromic dyes. (author)

  17. Characterization of tomato accessions for resistance to early blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fernando Jurca Grigolli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to characterize 50 tomato genotypes of the Vegetable Genebank of the FederalUniversity of Viçosa. They were evaluated together with the controls Débora, Fanny and Santa Clara, in a randomized block designwith two replications. The experiment was conducted in a research field of the UFV, from February to May 2007. We evaluated thedisease severity, which is the percentage of diseased leaf area. The severity values were transformed into area under the diseaseprogress curve (AUDPC, improving the result visualization. The analysis of variance and grouping of AUDPC means by the Scott-Knott test at 5 % significance were performed. The accessions BGH-2081, BGH-2034, BGH-700, BGH-2057, BGH-2035, BGH-2054, BGH-2018, BGH-2065, BGH-2008, and BGH-2032 had a lower mean AUDPC than the controls and are therefore indicatedfor future breeding programs.

  18. 78 FR 25767 - Certain Static Random Access Memories and Products Containing Same; Commission Determination To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-792] Certain Static Random Access Memories and Products Containing Same; Commission Determination To Review in Part a Final Initial... States after importation of certain static random access memories and products containing the same by...

  19. Scaling law of resistance fluctuations in stationary random resistor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennetta; Trefan; Reggiani

    2000-12-11

    In a random resistor network we consider the simultaneous evolution of two competing random processes consisting in breaking and recovering the elementary resistors with probabilities W(D) and W(R). The condition W(R)>W(D)/(1+W(D)) leads to a stationary state, while in the opposite case, the broken resistor fraction reaches the percolation threshold p(c). We study the resistance noise of this system under stationary conditions by Monte Carlo simulations. The variance of resistance fluctuations is found to follow a scaling law |p-p(c)|(-kappa(0)) with kappa(0) = 5.5. The proposed model relates quantitatively the defectiveness of a disordered media with its electrical and excess-noise characteristics.

  20. Random access with adaptive packet aggregation in LTE/LTE-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kaijie; Nikaein, Navid

    While random access presents a promising solution for efficient uplink channel access, the preamble collision rate can significantly increase when massive number of devices simultaneously access the channel. To address this issue and improve the reliability of the random access, an adaptive packet aggregation method is proposed. With the proposed method, a device does not trigger a random access for every single packet. Instead, it starts a random access when the number of aggregated packets reaches a given threshold. This method reduces the packet collision rate at the expense of an extra latency, which is used to accumulate multiple packets into a single transmission unit. Therefore, the tradeoff between packet loss rate and channel access latency has to be carefully selected. We use semi-Markov model to derive the packet loss rate and channel access latency as functions of packet aggregation number. Hence, the optimal amount of aggregated packets can be found, which keeps the loss rate below the desired value while minimizing the access latency. We also apply for the idea of packet aggregation for power saving, where a device aggregates as many packets as possible until the latency constraint is reached. Simulations are carried out to evaluate our methods. We find that the packet loss rate and/or power consumption are significantly reduced with the proposed method.

  1. Set statistics in conductive bridge random access memory device with Cu/HfO2/Pt structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Meiyun; Long, Shibing; Wang, Guoming; Xu, Xiaoxin; Li, Yang; Liu, Qi; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Ming; Lian, Xiaojuan; Miranda, Enrique; Suñé, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The switching parameter variation of resistive switching memory is one of the most important challenges in its application. In this letter, we have studied the set statistics of conductive bridge random access memory with a Cu/HfO 2 /Pt structure. The experimental distributions of the set parameters in several off resistance ranges are shown to nicely fit a Weibull model. The Weibull slopes of the set voltage and current increase and decrease logarithmically with off resistance, respectively. This experimental behavior is perfectly captured by a Monte Carlo simulator based on the cell-based set voltage statistics model and the Quantum Point Contact electron transport model. Our work provides indications for the improvement of the switching uniformity

  2. 76 FR 2336 - Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-851] Dynamic Random Access Memory...: Import Administration, International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. SUMMARY: On September..., uncut die, and cut die. Processed wafers fabricated in the ROK, but assembled into finished...

  3. 77 FR 26789 - Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory Controllers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-661] Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory Controllers and Products Containing Same; Determination Rescinding the Exclusion Order and Cease and Desist Orders AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION...

  4. Visual inspection requirements for high-reliability random-access memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, A.; McHenery, J.

    1981-09-01

    Visual inspection requirements are given for random-access memories for deep-space satellite electronics. The requirements, based primarily on Military Standard 883B, are illustrated in the order of their manufacturing operation to clarify and facilitate inspection procedures

  5. 76 FR 45295 - In the Matter of Certain Static Random Access Memories and Products Containing Same; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Static Random Access Memories and Products Containing Same; Notice of... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain static random access memories... importation of certain static random access memories and products containing same that infringe one or more of...

  6. Minimally access versus conventional hydrocelectomy: a randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Aly

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare our previously published new minimally access hydrocelectomy versus Jaboulay's procedure regarding operative outcome and patient's satisfaction. Materials and Methods: A total of 124 adult patients were divided into two groups: A and B. Group A patients were subjected to conventional surgical hydrocelectomy (Jaboulay's procedure) and group B patients were subjected to the new minimal access hydrocelectomy. The primary endpoint of the study was recurrence defined as a clinically detectable characteristic swelling in the scrotum and diagnosed by the two surgeons and confirmed by ultrasound imaging study. The secondary endpoints were postoperative hematoma, wound sepsis and persistent edema and hardening. Results: The mean operative time in group B was 15.1±4.24 minutes and in group A was 32.5±4.76 minutes (P≤0.02). The mean time to return to work was 8.5±2.1 (7–10) days in group B while in group A was 12.5±3.53 (10–15) days (P=0.0001). The overall complication rate in group B was 12.88% and in group A was 37%. The parameters of the study were postoperative hematoma, degree of scrotal edema, wound infection, patients’ satisfaction and recurrence. Conclusion: Hydrocelectomy is considered the gold standard technique for the treatment of hydrocele and the minimally access maneuvers provide the best operative outcomes regarding scrotal edema and hardening and patient's satisfaction when compared to conventional eversion-excision hydrocelectomies. PMID:26401869

  7. Minimally access versus conventional hydrocelectomy: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly Saber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObjective:To compare our previously published new minimally access hydrocelectomy versus Jaboulay's procedure regarding operative outcome and patient's satisfaction.Materials and Methods:A total of 124 adult patients were divided into two groups: A and B. Group A patients were subjected to conventional surgical hydrocelectomy (Jaboulay's procedure and group B patients were subjected to the new minimal access hydrocelectomy. The primary endpoint of the study was recurrence defined as a clinically detectable characteristic swelling in the scrotum and diagnosed by the two surgeons and confirmed by ultrasound imaging study. The secondary endpoints were postoperative hematoma, wound sepsis and persistent edema and hardening.Results:The mean operative time in group B was 15.1±4.24 minutes and in group A was 32.5±4.76 minutes (P≤0.02. The mean time to return to work was 8.5±2.1 (7–10 days in group B while in group A was 12.5±3.53 (10–15 days (P=0.0001. The overall complication rate in group B was 12.88% and in group A was 37%. The parameters of the study were postoperative hematoma, degree of scrotal edema, wound infection, patients’ satisfaction and recurrence.Conclusion:Hydrocelectomy is considered the gold standard technique for the treatment of hydrocele and the minimally access maneuvers provide the best operative outcomes regarding scrotal edema and hardening and patient's satisfaction when compared to conventional eversion-excision hydrocelectomies.

  8. Random Access for Machine-Type Communication based on Bloom Filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pratas, Nuno; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Madueño, Germán Corrales

    2016-01-01

    We present a random access method inspired on Bloom filters that is suited for Machine-Type Communications (MTC). Each accessing device sends a signature during the contention process. A signature is constructed using the Bloom filtering method and contains information on the device identity...... and the connection establishment cause. We instantiate the proposed method over the current LTE-A access protocol. However, the method is applicable to a more general class of random access protocols that use preambles or other reservation sequences, as expected to be the case in 5G systems. We show that our method...... utilizes the system resources more efficiently and achieves similar or lower latency of connection establishment in case of synchronous arrivals, compared to the variant of the LTE-A access protocol that is optimized for MTC traffic. A dividend of the proposed method is that allows the base station (BS...

  9. Spin-transfer torque switched magnetic tunnel junctions in magnetic random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jonathan Z.

    2016-10-01

    Spin-transfer torque (or spin-torque, or STT) based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) is at the heart of a new generation of magnetism-based solid-state memory, the so-called spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory, or STT-MRAM. Over the past decades, STT-based switchable magnetic tunnel junction has seen progress on many fronts, including the discovery of (001) MgO as the most favored tunnel barrier, which together with (bcc) Fe or FeCo alloy are yielding best demonstrated tunnel magneto-resistance (TMR); the development of perpendicularly magnetized ultrathin CoFeB-type of thin films sufficient to support high density memories with junction sizes demonstrated down to 11nm in diameter; and record-low spin-torque switching threshold current, giving best reported switching efficiency over 5 kBT/μA. Here we review the basic device properties focusing on the perpendicularly magnetized MTJs, both in terms of switching efficiency as measured by sub-threshold, quasi-static methods, and of switching speed at super-threshold, forced switching. We focus on device behaviors important for memory applications that are rooted in fundamental device physics, which highlights the trade-off of device parameters for best suitable system integration.

  10. Analysis of self-heating of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Deschenes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal assistance has been shown to significantly reduce the required operation power for spin torque transfer magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM. Proposed heating methods include modified material stack compositions that result in increased self-heating or external heat sources. In this work we analyze the self-heating process of a standard perpendicular magnetic anisotropy STT-MRAM device through numerical simulations in order to understand the relative contributions of Joule, thermoelectric Peltier and Thomson, and tunneling junction heating. A 2D rotationally symmetric numerical model is used to solve the coupled electro-thermal equations including thermoelectric effects and heat absorbed or released at the tunneling junction. We compare self-heating for different common passivation materials, positive and negative electrical current polarity, and different device thermal anchoring and boundaries resistance configurations. The variations considered are found to result in significant differences in maximum temperatures reached. Average increases of 3 K, 10 K, and 100 K for different passivation materials, positive and negative polarity, and different thermal anchoring configurations, respectively, are observed. The highest temperatures, up to 424 K, are obtained for silicon dioxide as the passivation material, positive polarity, and low thermal anchoring with thermal boundary resistance configurations. Interestingly it is also found that due to the tunneling heat, Peltier effect, device geometry, and numerous interfacial layers around the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ, most of the heat is dissipated on the lower potential side of the magnetic junction. This asymmetry in heating, which has also been observed experimentally, is important as thermally assisted switching requires heating of the free layer specifically and this will be significantly different for the two polarity operations, set and reset.

  11. Analysis of self-heating of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschenes, Austin; Muneer, Sadid; Akbulut, Mustafa; Gokirmak, Ali; Silva, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Thermal assistance has been shown to significantly reduce the required operation power for spin torque transfer magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM). Proposed heating methods include modified material stack compositions that result in increased self-heating or external heat sources. In this work we analyze the self-heating process of a standard perpendicular magnetic anisotropy STT-MRAM device through numerical simulations in order to understand the relative contributions of Joule, thermoelectric Peltier and Thomson, and tunneling junction heating. A 2D rotationally symmetric numerical model is used to solve the coupled electro-thermal equations including thermoelectric effects and heat absorbed or released at the tunneling junction. We compare self-heating for different common passivation materials, positive and negative electrical current polarity, and different device thermal anchoring and boundaries resistance configurations. The variations considered are found to result in significant differences in maximum temperatures reached. Average increases of 3 K, 10 K, and 100 K for different passivation materials, positive and negative polarity, and different thermal anchoring configurations, respectively, are observed. The highest temperatures, up to 424 K, are obtained for silicon dioxide as the passivation material, positive polarity, and low thermal anchoring with thermal boundary resistance configurations. Interestingly it is also found that due to the tunneling heat, Peltier effect, device geometry, and numerous interfacial layers around the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), most of the heat is dissipated on the lower potential side of the magnetic junction. This asymmetry in heating, which has also been observed experimentally, is important as thermally assisted switching requires heating of the free layer specifically and this will be significantly different for the two polarity operations, set and reset.

  12. Conductive-bridging random access memory: challenges and opportunity for 3D architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Debanjan; Roy, Sourav; Panja, Rajeswar; Dutta, Mrinmoy; Rahaman, Sheikh Ziaur; Mahapatra, Rajat; Maikap, Siddheswar

    2015-04-01

    The performances of conductive-bridging random access memory (CBRAM) have been reviewed for different switching materials such as chalcogenides, oxides, and bilayers in different structures. The structure consists of an inert electrode and one oxidized electrode of copper (Cu) or silver (Ag). The switching mechanism is the formation/dissolution of a metallic filament in the switching materials under external bias. However, the growth dynamics of the metallic filament in different switching materials are still debated. All CBRAM devices are switching under an operation current of 0.1 μA to 1 mA, and an operation voltage of ±2 V is also needed. The device can reach a low current of 5 pA; however, current compliance-dependent reliability is a challenging issue. Although a chalcogenide-based material has opportunity to have better endurance as compared to an oxide-based material, data retention and integration with the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process are also issues. Devices with bilayer switching materials show better resistive switching characteristics as compared to those with a single switching layer, especially a program/erase endurance of >105 cycles with a high speed of few nanoseconds. Multi-level cell operation is possible, but the stability of the high resistance state is also an important reliability concern. These devices show a good data retention of >105 s at >85°C. However, more study is needed to achieve a 10-year guarantee of data retention for non-volatile memory application. The crossbar memory is benefited for high density with low power operation. Some CBRAM devices as a chip have been reported for proto-typical production. This review shows that operation current should be optimized for few microamperes with a maintaining speed of few nanoseconds, which will have challenges and also opportunities for three-dimensional (3D) architecture.

  13. Screening of Turkish Melon Accessions for Resistance to ZYMV, WMV and CMV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan EKBIC

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Çukurova University Department of Horticulture more than 350 melon accessions were collected from different ecological parts of Turkey which is located on the secondary genetic diversification center of this crop, and their characterization studies are near completion. Furthermore, evaluation studies of these materials have started. In the present study 67 melon accessions, sampled from this germplasm, were tested for resistance to zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV and watermelon mosaic virus (WMV. After resistance tests made by mechanical inoculation, four accessions (‘CU 100’, ‘CU 287’, ‘CU 305’ and ‘CU 328’ were found resistant to ZYMV and three accessions (‘CU 305’, ‘C 264’, and ‘C 276’ to WMV. No resistant genotype was found to CMV.

  14. LTE-advanced random access mechanism for M2M communication: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Rashid; Sarowa, Sandeep; Jaglan, Reena Rathee; Khan, Mohammad Junaid; Agrawal, Sunil

    2016-03-01

    Machine Type Communications (MTC) enables one or more self-sufficient machines to communicate directly with one another without human interference. MTC applications include smart grid, security, e-Health and intelligent automation system. To support huge numbers of MTC devices, one of the challenging issues is to provide a competent way for numerous access in the network and to minimize network overload. In this article, the different control mechanisms for overload random access are reviewed to avoid congestion caused by random access channel (RACH) of MTC devices. However, past and present wireless technologies have been engineered for Human-to-Human (H2H) communications, in particular, for transmission of voice. Consequently the Long Term Evolution (LTE) -Advanced is expected to play a central role in communicating Machine to Machine (M2M) and are very optimistic about H2H communications. Distinct and unique characteristics of M2M communications create new challenges from those in H2H communications. In this article, we investigate the impact of massive M2M terminals attempting random access to LTE-Advanced all at once. We discuss and review the solutions to alleviate the overload problem by Third Generation Partnership Project (3GPP). As a result, we evaluate and compare these solutions that can effectively eliminate the congestion on the random access channel for M2M communications without affecting H2H communications.

  15. Access Contested: Security, Identity, and Resistance in Asian ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    30 sept. 2011 ... A daily battle for rights and freedoms in cyberspace is being waged in Asia. At the epicenter of this contest is China – home to the world's largest Internet population and what is perhaps the world's most advanced Internet censorship and surveillance regime in cyberspace. Resistance to China's Internet ...

  16. Access Contested: Security, Identity, and Resistance in Asian ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-09-30

    Sep 30, 2011 ... A daily battle for rights and freedoms in cyberspace is being waged in Asia. At the epicenter of this contest is China – home to the world's largest Internet population and what is perhaps the world's most advanced Internet censorship and surveillance regime in cyberspace. Resistance to China's Internet ...

  17. Fire blight resistance in wild accessions of Malus sieversii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fire blight (Erwinia amylovora) is a devastating bacterial disease in apple that results in severe economic losses. Epidemics are becoming more common as susceptible cultivars and rootstocks are being planted, and control is becoming more difficult as antibiotic-resistant strains develop. Resistan...

  18. Random access procedures and radio access network (RAN) overload control in standard and advanced long-term evolution (LTE and LTE-A) networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich Pratas, Nuno; Thomsen, Henning; Popovski, Petar

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe and discuss the current LTE random access procedure and the Radio Access Network Load Control solution within LTE/LTE-A. We provide an overview of the several considered load control solutions and give a detailed description of the standardized Extended Access Class B...

  19. Resistance and resistance fluctuations in random resistor networks under biased percolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennetta, Cecilia; Reggiani, L; Trefán, Gy; Alfinito, E

    2002-06-01

    We consider a two-dimensional random resistor network (RRN) in the presence of two competing biased processes consisting of the breaking and recovering of elementary resistors. These two processes are driven by the joint effects of an electrical bias and of the heat exchange with a thermal bath. The electrical bias is set up by applying a constant voltage or, alternatively, a constant current. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to analyze the network evolution in the full range of bias values. Depending on the bias strength, electrical failure or steady state are achieved. Here we investigate the steady state of the RRN focusing on the properties of the non-Ohmic regime. In constant-voltage conditions, a scaling relation is found between /(0) and V/V(0), where is the average network resistance, (0) the linear regime resistance, and V0 the threshold value for the onset of nonlinearity. A similar relation is found in constant-current conditions. The relative variance of resistance fluctuations also exhibits a strong nonlinearity whose properties are investigated. The power spectral density of resistance fluctuations presents a Lorentzian spectrum and the amplitude of fluctuations shows a significant non-Gaussian behavior in the prebreakdown region. These results compare well with electrical breakdown measurements in thin films of composites and of other conducting materials.

  20. A random access scheme with physical-layer network coding and user identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goseling, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    A slotted random access scheme is proposed that is based on physical-layer network coding. The scheme uses signature codes that enable the receiver to detect which users are active in each round and which linear combination of pckets is received. Feedback enables in each round, one of the users to

  1. Physical-layer network coding on the random-access channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goseling, Jasper; Gastpar, Michael; Weber, Jos H.

    We consider a physical-layer network coding strategy for the random-access channel, based on compute-and-forward. When packets collide, it is possible to reliably recover a linear combination of the packets at the receiver. Over many rounds of transmission, the receiver can thus obtain many linear

  2. Nanostructure-property relations for phase-change random access memory (PCRAM) line cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B. J.; Oosthoek, J. L. M.; Verheijen, M. A.; Kaiser, M.; Jedema, F. J.; Gravesteijn, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    Phase-change random access memory (PCRAM) cells have been studied extensively using electrical characterization and rather limited by detailed structure characterization. The combination of these two characterization techniques has hardly been exploited and it is the focus of the present work.

  3. Joint estimation and contention-resolution protocol for wireless random access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefanovic, Cedomir; Trillingsgaard, Kasper Fløe; Kiilerich Pratas, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    We propose a contention-based random-access protocol, designed for wireless networks where the number of users is not a priori known. The protocol operates in rounds divided into equal-duration slots, performing at the same time estimation of the number of users and resolution...

  4. Cosmic and terrestrial single-event radiation effects in dynamic random access memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massengill, L.W.

    1996-01-01

    A review of the literature on single-event radiation effects (SEE) on MOS integrated-circuit dynamic random access memories (DRAM's) is presented. The sources of single-event (SE) radiation particles, causes of circuit information loss, experimental observations of SE information upset, technological developments for error mitigation, and relationships of developmental trends to SE vulnerability are discussed

  5. 75 FR 55764 - Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... graphics random access memory, as well as various types of DRAMS, including fast page-mode, extended data...'' presumption that non-recurring, allocable subsidies continue to benefit the subsidy recipient throughout the... continue to allocate non-recurring benefits over the five-year AUL. Discount Rates and Benchmarks for Loans...

  6. Genetic analysis of seedling resistance to crown rust in five diploid oat (Avena strigosa) accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, A L; Park, R F

    2016-02-01

    Crown rust, caused by Puccinia coronata Corda f. sp. avenae Eriks., is a serious menace in oats, for which resistance is an effective means of control. Wild diploid oat accessions are a source of novel resistances that first need to be characterised prior to introgression into locally adapted oat cultivars. A genetic analysis of resistance to crown rust was carried out in three diverse diploid oat accessions (CIav6956, CIav9020, PI292226) and two cultivars (Saia and Glabrota) of A. strigosa. A single major gene conditioning resistance to Australian crown rust pathotype (Pt) 0000-2 was identified in each of the three accessions. Allelism tests suggested that these genes are either the same, allelic, or tightly linked with less than 1 % recombination. Similarly, a single gene was identified in Glabrota, and possibly two genes in Saia; both cultivars previously reported to carry two and three crown rust resistance genes, respectively. The identified seedling resistance genes could be deployed in combination with other resistance gene(s) to enhance durability of resistance to crown rust in hexaploid oat. Current diploid and hexaploid linkage maps and molecular anchor markers (simple sequence repeat [SSR] and diversity array technology [DArT] markers) should facilitate their mapping and introgression into hexaploid oat.

  7. Evaluation of Genetic Diversity and Host Resistance to Stem Rust in USDA NSGC Durum Wheat Accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Shiaoman; Rouse, Matthew N; Acevedo, Maricelis; Szabo-Hever, Agnes; Bockelman, Harold; Bonman, J Michael; Elias, Elias; Klindworth, Daryl; Xu, Steven

    2017-07-01

    The USDA-ARS National Small Grains Collection (NSGC) maintains germplasm representing global diversity of small grains and their wild relatives. To evaluate the utility of the NSGC durum wheat ( L. ssp. ) accessions, we assessed genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns in a durum core subset containing 429 lines with spring growth habit originating from 64 countries worldwide. Genetic diversity estimated using wheat single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers showed considerable diversity captured in this collection. Average LD decayed over a genetic distance to within 3 cM at = 0.2, with a fast LD decay for markers linked at >5 cM. We evaluated accessions for resistance to wheat stem rust, caused by a fungal pathogen, Pers. Pers. f. sp. Eriks. and E. Henn (), using races from both eastern Africa and North America, at seedling and adult plant stages. Five accessions were identified as resistant to all stem rust pathogen races evaluated. Genome-wide association analysis detected 17 significant associations at the seedling stage with nine likely corresponding to , , and and the remaining potentially being novel genes located on six chromosomes. A higher frequency of resistant accessions was found at the adult plant stage than at the seedling stage. However, few significant associations were detected possibly a result of strong G × E interactions not properly accounted for in the mixed model. Nonetheless, the resistant accessions identified in this study should provide wheat breeders with valuable resources for improving stem rust resistance. Copyright © 2017 Crop Science Society of America.

  8. NEW SOURCES OF GRAIN MOLD RESISTANCE AMONG SORGHUM ACCESSIONS FROM SUDAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Kajac Prom

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available   Fifty-nine sorghum accessions from Sudan were evaluated in replicated plots at Isabela, Puerto Rico, for resistance against Fusarium thapsinum, one of the causal agents of grain mold.  The environmental conditions such as temperature, relative humidity, and rainfall during this study, especially at and after physiological maturity were optimal for grain mold development.  Highly significant negative correlations between grain mold severity ratings in the field and on threshed grains with germination rate and seed weight were recorded, indicating that germination and seed weight were adversely affected when challenged with F. thapsinum.  Temperature showed a significant negative correlation with grain mold severity and a significant positive correlation with germination rate.  However, no significant correlation was observed between rainfall and grain mold severity or germination rate.  Accessions PI570011, PI570027, PI569992, PI569882, PI571312, PI570759, and PI267548 exhibited the lowest grain mold severities and among the highest germination rates, indicating that these accessions may possess genetic resistance to grain mold and might be useful in sorghum enhancement programs.  Four of these accessions had significantly higher germination rates than the resistant control genotypes with PI267548 having the highest germination rate.  PI267548 was the only white seeded accessions showing significantly better grain mold resistance than the control genotypes.

  9. 75 FR 44283 - In the Matter of Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors and Products Containing Same...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-707] In the Matter of Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors and Products Containing Same, Including Memory Modules; Notice of a... importation of certain dynamic random access memory semiconductors and products containing same, including...

  10. Heterogeneity of Powdery Mildew Resistance Revealed in Accessions of the ICARDA Wild Barley Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreiseitl, Antonin

    2017-01-01

    The primary genepool of barley comprises two subspecies – wild barley (Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum) and cultivated barley H. vulgare. subsp. vulgare. The former originated 5.5 million years ago in southwest Asia and is the immediate ancestor of cultivated barley, which arose around 10,000 years ago. In this study, the specific resistance of a set of 146 wild barley accessions, maintained by the International Center for Agriculture Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), to 32 isolates of barley powdery mildew caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei was evaluated. The set comprised 146 heterogeneous accessions of a previously tested collection. Seed was obtained by single seed descent and each accession was usually represented by five single plant progenies. In total, 687 plant progenies were tested. There were 211 phenotypes of resistance among the accessions, 87 of which were found in single plants, while 202 plants contained the eight most common phenotypes. The most frequent phenotype was found in 56 plants that were susceptible to all pathogen isolates, whereas the second most frequent phenotype, which occurred in 46 plants, was resistant to all isolates. The broad resistance diversity that was revealed is of practical importance and is an aid to determining the extent and role of resistance in natural ecosystems. PMID:28261253

  11. Topology-selective jamming of fully-connected, code-division random-access networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polydoros, Andreas; Cheng, Unjeng

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to introduce certain models of topology selective stochastic jamming and examine its impact on a class of fully-connected, spread-spectrum, slotted ALOHA-type random access networks. The theory covers dedicated as well as half-duplex units. The dominant role of the spatial duty factor is established, and connections with the dual concept of time selective jamming are discussed. The optimal choices of coding rate and link access parameters (from the users' side) and the jamming spatial fraction are numerically established for DS and FH spreading.

  12. A random-access microarray for programmable droplet storage, retrieval and manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Yi-Ming; Wang, Jhih-Jhe; Su, Yu-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an integrated microfluidic system that is capable of programmably metering, entrapping, coalescing, addressably storing, retrieving and manipulating emulsion droplets. A multilayer, flexible PDMS chip with specially designed fluidic channels dynamically reconfigured by pneumatically actuated diaphragms is utilized to integrate a variety of droplet manipulation schemes. Once droplets are formed, their motions are coordinated by a 2D multiplexing scheme, which exploits the bidirectional movement of diaphragms to implement a random-access microarray. In the prototype demonstration, a PDMS molding and bonding process is used to fabricate the proposed microfluidic system. Emulsion droplets with desired volumes and compositions are produced, addressably stored, manipulated and retrieved from a 4 × 4 array, which employs just 4 (= 2 × log 2 4) control inputs for the operation. It has been demonstrated that (1) the integration of droplet manipulation and 2D multiplexing schemes can be achieved readily using bidirectional diaphragm valves, (2) multiplexing of an N × N array could be realized utilizing only 2 × log 2 N control inputs and (3) a multifunctional, random-access microarray can be accomplished employing a multilayer PDMS chip. As such, the demonstrated random-access microarray could potentially serve as a platform for continuous tracking and multistep processing of emulsion droplets, which is desired for various biological and chemical applications. (paper)

  13. Discovery of a seventh Rpp soybean rust resistance locus in soybean accession PI 605823

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean rust, caused by the obligate biotrophic fungal pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. & Syd, is a disease threat to soybean production in regions of the world with mild winters. Host plant resistance to P. pachyrhizi conditioned by Rpp genes has been found in numerous soybean accessions, and at...

  14. Screening wild oat accessions from Morocco for resistance to Puccinia coronata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we report the screening of 338 new accessions of 11 different wild oat species (Avena) from the USDA Small Grains Collection for resistance to crown rust (Puccinia coronata). Wild oat species were originally collected in Morocco by C. Al Faiz, INRAT Rabat: Avena agadiriana, A. atlantica, A. bar...

  15. Non-volatile, high density, high speed, Micromagnet-Hall effect Random Access Memory (MHRAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiin C.; Katti, Romney R.; Stadler, Henry L.

    1991-01-01

    The micromagnetic Hall effect random access memory (MHRAM) has the potential of replacing ROMs, EPROMs, EEPROMs, and SRAMs because of its ability to achieve non-volatility, radiation hardness, high density, and fast access times, simultaneously. Information is stored magnetically in small magnetic elements (micromagnets), allowing unlimited data retention time, unlimited numbers of rewrite cycles, and inherent radiation hardness and SEU immunity, making the MHRAM suitable for ground based as well as spaceflight applications. The MHRAM device design is not affected by areal property fluctuations in the micromagnet, so high operating margins and high yield can be achieved in large scale integrated circuit (IC) fabrication. The MHRAM has short access times (less than 100 nsec). Write access time is short because on-chip transistors are used to gate current quickly, and magnetization reversal in the micromagnet can occur in a matter of a few nanoseconds. Read access time is short because the high electron mobility sensor (InAs or InSb) produces a large signal voltage in response to the fringing magnetic field from the micromagnet. High storage density is achieved since a unit cell consists only of two transistors and one micromagnet Hall effect element. By comparison, a DRAM unit cell has one transistor and one capacitor, and a SRAM unit cell has six transistors.

  16. Lipid-induced insulin resistance does not impair insulin access to skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Joyce M.; Castro, Ana Valeria B.; Broussard, Josiane L.; Ionut, Viorica; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma free fatty acids (FFA) induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Previously, we have shown that experimental insulin resistance induced by lipid infusion prevents the dispersion of insulin through the muscle, and we hypothesized that this would lead to an impairment of insulin moving from the plasma to the muscle interstitium. Thus, we infused lipid into our anesthetized canine model and measured the appearance of insulin in the lymph as a means to sample muscle interstitium under hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp conditions. Although lipid infusion lowered the glucose infusion rate and induced both peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance, we were unable to detect an impairment of insulin access to the lymph. Interestingly, despite a significant, 10-fold increase in plasma FFA, we detected little to no increase in free fatty acids or triglycerides in the lymph after lipid infusion. Thus, we conclude that experimental insulin resistance induced by lipid infusion does not reduce insulin access to skeletal muscle under clamp conditions. This would suggest that the peripheral insulin resistance is likely due to reduced cellular sensitivity to insulin in this model, and yet we did not detect a change in the tissue microenvironment that could contribute to cellular insulin resistance. PMID:25852002

  17. Flexible conductive-bridging random-access-memory cell vertically stacked with top Ag electrode, PEO, PVK, and bottom Pt electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seung, Hyun-Min; Kwon, Kyoung-Cheol; Lee, Gon-Sub; Park, Jea-Gun

    2014-10-01

    Flexible conductive-bridging random-access-memory (RAM) cells were fabricated with a cross-bar memory cell stacked with a top Ag electrode, conductive polymer (poly(n-vinylcarbazole): PVK), electrolyte (polyethylene oxide: PEO), bottom Pt electrode, and flexible substrate (polyethersulfone: PES), exhibiting the bipolar switching behavior of resistive random access memory (ReRAM). The cell also exhibited bending-fatigue-free nonvolatile memory characteristics: i.e., a set voltage of 1.0 V, a reset voltage of -1.6 V, retention time of >1 × 105 s with a memory margin of 9.2 × 105, program/erase endurance cycles of >102 with a memory margin of 8.4 × 105, and bending-fatigue-free cycles of ˜1 × 103 with a memory margin (Ion/Ioff) of 3.3 × 105.

  18. DMD-based random-access optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jinyang; Zhou, Yong; Winkler, Amy W.; Wang, Lidai; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    The scanning mechanism is a major technical focus in optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy. Flexible scanning access with fast scanning speed is desired to monitor biological and physiological dynamics with high temporal resolution. We developed random-access optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (RA-OR-PAM) using a digital micromirror device (DMD). Each micromirror on the DMD can be independently controlled, allowing imaging of regions of interest with arbitrary user-selected shapes without extraneous information. A global structural image is first acquired, and the regions of interest are selected. The laser beam then scans these regions exclusively, resulting in a faster frame rate than in a conventional raster scan. This system can rapidly scan arbitrarily shaped regions of interest with a lateral resolution of 3.6 μm within a 40×40 μm2 imaging area, a size comparable to the focal spot size of a 50 MHz ultrasound transducer. We demonstrated the random-access ability of RA-OR-PAM by imaging a monolayer of red blood cells. This system was then used to monitor blood flow in vivo within user-selected capillaries in a mouse ear. By imaging only the capillary of interest, the frame rate was increased by up to 13.3 times.

  19. Symptom and Resistance of Cultivated and Wild Capsicum Accessions to Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Heon Han

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available One hundred Capsicum accessions were screened for symptomatic response and resistance to Tomato spotted wilt virus-pb1 (TSWV-pb1. Symptom and its severity rating were checked by visual observation at 9, 12, 14, and 45 days after inoculation, respectively. Enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay was performed all tested individuals on non-inoculated upper leaves after the third rating to indentify viral infection. Leaf curling was predominant in almost susceptible individuals of each accession. Stem necrosis was most frequent in wild species while yellowing in commercial hybrids and Korean land race cultivars. Ring spot, a typical symptom of TSWV, was rarely detected in some of a few accessions. Different levels of resistance to TSWV-pb1 were observed among the tested accessions. High level of resistance was detected in 4 commercial cultivars of Kpc- 35, -36, -57, and -62, and 8 wild species of PBI-11, C00105, PBC076, PBC280, PBC426, PBC495, PBC537, and PI201238 through seedling test by mechanical inoculation.

  20. Materials investigation for thermally-assisted magnetic random access memory robust against 400 °C temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, A. J.; Trouilloud, P. L.; Bandiera, S.; Brown, S. L.; Gapihan, E.; O'Sullivan, E. J.; Worledge, D. C.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic materials are investigated in order to enable a new type of Thermally Assisted Magnetic Random Access Memory (TAS-MRAM). A TAS-MRAM materials stack that is robust against the 400 °C process temperatures required for embedded integration with complementary metal oxide silicon processes is demonstrated. In unpatterned sheet film stacks, a stable resistance-area product, tunneling magnetoresistance (MR) > 100%, and temperature-dependent exchange bias of 1500 Oe after 400 °C anneal are shown for this stack. It is further shown that by doping the sense and storage layers with Ta using thin laminations of Ta/CoFeB, the moment of each layer can be reduced by more than 40% without a major reduction in MR. In patterned nanopillar devices, it is shown that by reducing the moment of the sense and storage layers with laminations of Ta, and by adding a second MgO barrier, the resistance versus applied field loop quality is maintained, while the read field is reduced by more than 40% and devices survive 108 write cycles without breakdown or significant degradation.

  1. Thin Co/Ni-based bottom pinned spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory stacks with high annealing tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczak, Y.; Swerts, J.; Mertens, S.; Lin, T.; Couet, S.; Liu, E.; Sankaran, K.; Pourtois, G.; Kim, W.; Souriau, L.; Van Elshocht, S.; Kar, G.; Furnemont, A.

    2016-01-01

    Spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM) is considered as a replacement for next generation embedded and stand-alone memory applications. One of the main challenges in the STT-MRAM stack development is the compatibility of the stack with CMOS process flows in which thermal budgets up to 400 °C are applied. In this letter, we report on a perpendicularly magnetized MgO-based tunnel junction (p-MTJ) on a thin Co/Ni perpendicular synthetic antiferromagnetic layer with high annealing tolerance. Tunnel magneto resistance (TMR) loss after annealing occurs when the reference layer loses its perpendicular magnetic anisotropy due to reduction of the CoFeB/MgO interfacial anisotropy. A stable Co/Ni based p-MTJ stack with TMR values of 130% at resistance-area products of 9 Ω μm2 after 400 °C anneal is achieved via moment control of the Co/Ta/CoFeB reference layer. Thinning of the CoFeB polarizing layer down to 0.8 nm is the key enabler to achieve 400 °C compatibility with limited TMR loss. Thinning the Co below 0.6 nm leads to a loss of the antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling strength through Ru. Insight into the thickness and moment engineering of the reference layer is displayed to obtain the best magnetic properties and high thermal stability for thin Co/Ni SAF-based STT-MRAM stacks.

  2. Resist diabetes: A randomized clinical trial for resistance training maintenance in adults with prediabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda M Davy

    Full Text Available To determine whether a social cognitive theory (SCT-based intervention improves resistance training (RT maintenance and strength, and reduces prediabetes prevalence.Sedentary, overweight/obese (BMI: 25-39.9 kg/m2 adults aged 50-69 (N = 170 with prediabetes participated in the 15-month trial. Participants completed a supervised 3-month RT (2×/wk phase and were randomly assigned (N = 159 to one of two 6-month maintenance conditions: SCT or standard care. Participants continued RT at a self-selected facility. The final 6-month period involved no contact. Assessments occurred at baseline and months 3, 9, and 15. The SCT faded-contact intervention consisted of nine tailored transition (i.e., supervised training to training alone and nine follow-up sessions. Standard care involved six generic follow-up sessions. Primary outcomes were prevalence of normoglycemia and muscular strength.The retention rate was 76%. Four serious adverse events were reported. After 3 months of RT, 34% of participants were no longer prediabetic. This prevalence of normoglycemia was maintained through month 15 (30%, with no group difference. There was an 18% increase in the odds of being normoglycemic for each % increase in fat-free mass. Increases in muscular strength were evident at month 3 and maintained through month 15 (P<0.001, which represented improvements of 21% and 14% for chest and leg press, respectively. Results did not demonstrate a greater reduction in prediabetes prevalence in the SCT condition.Resistance training is an effective, maintainable strategy for reducing prediabetes prevalence and increasing muscular strength. Future research which promotes RT initiation and maintenance in clinical and community settings is warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01112709.

  3. Implementation of nitrogen-doped titanium-tungsten tunable heater in phase change random access memory and its effects on device performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Chun Chia; Zhao, Rong; Chong, Tow Chong; Shi, Luping

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped titanium-tungsten (N-TiW) was proposed as a tunable heater in Phase Change Random Access Memory (PCRAM). By tuning N-TiW's material properties through doping, the heater can be tailored to optimize the access speed and programming current of PCRAM. Experiments reveal that N-TiW's resistivity increases and thermal conductivity decreases with increasing nitrogen-doping ratio, and N-TiW devices displayed (∼33% to ∼55%) reduced programming currents. However, there is a tradeoff between the current and speed for heater-based PCRAM. Analysis of devices with different N-TiW heaters shows that N-TiW doping levels could be optimized to enable low RESET currents and fast access speeds.

  4. All-magnetic magnetoresistive random access memory based on four terminal mCell device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, D. M.; Sumbul, H. E.; Zhu, J.-G.; Pileggi, L.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) is a promising candidate to enable fast, non-volatile storage on chip. In this paper, we present an MRAM design where each bitcell is comprised entirely of four-terminal magnetic devices ("mCells") with no CMOS access transistors. We show that this design can achieve significant energy and area savings compared to the standard one transistor-one magnetic tunnel junction (1T1MTJ) bitcell based design. We estimate a write energy of ≈5 fJ/bit based on bitline and wordline voltages that operate at less than 100 mV with projected area smaller than that possible with aggressively scaled 10 nm node FinFETs in the 1T1MTJ design.

  5. Discovery of a seventh Rpp soybean rust resistance locus in soybean accession PI 605823.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Silas P; King, Zachary R; Walker, David R; Harris, Donna K; Pedley, Kerry F; Buck, James W; Boerma, H Roger; Li, Zenglu

    2018-01-01

    A novel Rpp gene from PI 605823 for resistance to Phakopsora pachyrhizi was mapped on chromosome 19. Soybean rust, caused by the obligate biotrophic fungal pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. & P. Syd, is a disease threat to soybean production in regions of the world with mild winters. Host plant resistance conditioned by resistance to P. pachyrhizi (Rpp) genes has been found in numerous soybean accessions, and at least 10 Rpp genes or alleles have been mapped to six genetic loci. Identifying additional disease-resistance genes will facilitate development of soybean cultivars with durable resistance. PI 605823, a plant introduction from Vietnam, was previously identified as resistant to US populations of P. pachyrhizi in greenhouse and field trials. In this study, bulked segregant analysis using an F 2 population derived from 'Williams 82' × PI 605823 identified a genomic region associated with resistance to P. pachyrhizi isolate GA12, which had been collected in the US State of Georgia in 2012. To further map the resistance locus, linkage mapping was carried out using single-nucleotide polymorphism markers and phenotypic data from greenhouse assays with an F 2:3 population derived from Williams 82 × PI 605823 and an F 4:5 population derived from '5601T' × PI 605823. A novel resistance gene, Rpp7, was mapped to a 154-kb interval (Gm19: 39,462,291-39,616,643 Glyma.Wm82.a2) on chromosome 19 that is different from the genomic locations of any previously reported Rpp genes. This new gene could be incorporated into elite breeding lines to help provide more durable resistance to soybean rust.

  6. Paging memory from random access memory to backing storage in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Inglett, Todd A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-05-21

    Paging memory from random access memory (`RAM`) to backing storage in a parallel computer that includes a plurality of compute nodes, including: executing a data processing application on a virtual machine operating system in a virtual machine on a first compute node; providing, by a second compute node, backing storage for the contents of RAM on the first compute node; and swapping, by the virtual machine operating system in the virtual machine on the first compute node, a page of memory from RAM on the first compute node to the backing storage on the second compute node.

  7. Materials and Physics Challenges for Spin Transfer Torque Magnetic Random Access Memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinonen, O.

    2014-10-05

    Magnetic random access memories utilizing the spin transfer torque effect for writing information are a strong contender for non-volatile memories scalable to the 20 nm node, and perhaps beyond. I will here examine how these devices behave as the device size is scaled down from 70 nm size to 20 nm. As device sizes go below ~50 nm, the size becomes comparable to intrinsic magnetic length scales and the device behavior does not simply scale with size. This has implications for the device design and puts additional constraints on the materials in the device.

  8. Three-dimensional integration technology of magnetic tunnel junctions for magnetoresistive random access memory application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushiji, Kay; Takagi, Hideki; Watanabe, Naoya; Fukushima, Akio; Kikuchi, Katsuya; Kurashima, Yuuichi; Sugihara, Atsushi; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yuasa, Shinji

    2017-06-01

    Three-dimensional integration processes (based on direct wafer bonding and back-surface silicon removal) for magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetization (p-MTJs) were developed. Perfect wafer bonding, namely, bonding without interfacial voids, and damageless silicon removal were successfully demonstrated by using very flat tantalum cap layers. Moreover, p-MTJ nanopillars subjected to these processes exhibited no degradation in magnetoresistance or spin-transfer-torque (STT) switching. Magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) technology incorporating these processes (direct wafer bonding and back-surface silicon removal) will make it possible to integrate epitaxial MTJs (with a single-crystal tunnel barrier) and ferromagnetic electrode layers (based on new materials).

  9. Spin-transfer-torque efficiency enhanced by edge-damage of perpendicular magnetic random access memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kyungmi [KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung-Jin, E-mail: kj-lee@korea.ac.kr [KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-07

    We numerically investigate the effect of magnetic and electrical damages at the edge of a perpendicular magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cell on the spin-transfer-torque (STT) efficiency that is defined by the ratio of thermal stability factor to switching current. We find that the switching mode of an edge-damaged cell is different from that of an undamaged cell, which results in a sizable reduction in the switching current. Together with a marginal reduction of the thermal stability factor of an edge-damaged cell, this feature makes the STT efficiency large. Our results suggest that a precise edge control is viable for the optimization of STT-MRAM.

  10. Spin-transfer-torque efficiency enhanced by edge-damage of perpendicular magnetic random access memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyungmi; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2015-08-01

    We numerically investigate the effect of magnetic and electrical damages at the edge of a perpendicular magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cell on the spin-transfer-torque (STT) efficiency that is defined by the ratio of thermal stability factor to switching current. We find that the switching mode of an edge-damaged cell is different from that of an undamaged cell, which results in a sizable reduction in the switching current. Together with a marginal reduction of the thermal stability factor of an edge-damaged cell, this feature makes the STT efficiency large. Our results suggest that a precise edge control is viable for the optimization of STT-MRAM.

  11. Single-word multiple-bit upsets in static random access devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, R.; Pinkerton, S.D.; Lie, T.J.; Crawford, K.B.

    1993-01-01

    Energetic ions and protons can cause single event upsets (SEUs) in static random access memory (SRAM) cells. In some cases multiple bits may be upset as the result of a single event. Space-borne electronics systems incorporating high-density SRAM are vulnerable to single-word multiple-bit upsets (SMUs). The authors review here recent observations of SMU, present the results of a systematic investigation of the physical cell arrangements employed in several currently available SRAM device types, and discuss implications for the occurrence and mitigation of SMU

  12. NEW SOURCES OF GRAIN MOLD RESISTANCE AMONG SORGHUM ACCESSIONS FROM SUDAN

    OpenAIRE

    Louis Kajac Prom; John Erpelding

    2009-01-01

      Fifty-nine sorghum accessions from Sudan were evaluated in replicated plots at Isabela, Puerto Rico, for resistance against Fusarium thapsinum, one of the causal agents of grain mold.  The environmental conditions such as temperature, relative humidity, and rainfall during this study, especially at and after physiological maturity were optimal for grain mold development.  Highly significant negative correlations between grain mold severity ratings in the field and on threshed grains ...

  13. A Meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials assessing hemodialysis access thrombosis based on access flow monitoring: Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchayi, Timothy; Salman, Loay; Tamariz, Leonardo J; Asif, Arif; Rizvi, Abid; Lenz, Oliver; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I.; Tabbara, Marwan; Contreras, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative recommends the routine use of hemodialysis arteriovenous (AV) access surveillance to detect hemodynamically significant stenoses and appropriately correct them to reduce the incidence of thrombosis and to improve accesses patency rates. Access blood flow monitoring is considered as one of the preferred surveillance method for both AV fistulas (AVF) and AV grafts (AVG); however, published studies have reported conflicting results of its utility that led healthcare professionals to doubt the benefits of this surveillance method. We performed a meta-analysis of the published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of AV access surveillance using access blood flow monitoring. Our hypothesis was that access blood flow monitoring lowers the risk of AV access thrombosis and that the outcome differs between AVF and AVG. The estimated overall pooled risk ratio (RR) of thrombosis was 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67 to 1.13) favoring access blood flow monitoring. The pooled RR of thrombosis were 0.64 (95% CI, 0.41 to 1.01) and 1.06 (95% CI, 0.77 to 1.46) in the subgroups of only AVF and only AVG, respectively. Our results added to the uncertainty of access blood flow monitoring as a surveillance method of hemodialysis accesses. PMID:25644548

  14. 75 FR 20564 - Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-851] Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of Countervailing Duty... access memory semiconductors from the Republic of Korea, covering the period January 1, 2008 through...

  15. Power Stabilization Strategy of Random Access Loads in Electric Vehicles Wireless Charging System at Traffic Lights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Tan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An opportunity wireless charging system for electric vehicles when they stop and wait at traffic lights is proposed in this paper. In order to solve the serious power fluctuation caused by random access loads, this study presents a power stabilization strategy based on counting the number of electric vehicles in a designated area, including counting method, power source voltage adjustment strategy and choice of counting points. Firstly, the circuit model of a wireless power system with multi-loads is built and the equation of each load is obtained. Secondly, after the counting method of electric vehicles is stated, the voltage adjustment strategy, based on the number of electric vehicles when the system is at a steady state, is set out. Then, the counting points are chosen according to power curves when the voltage adjustment strategy is adopted. Finally, an experimental prototype is implemented to verify the power stabilization strategy. The experimental results show that, with the application of this strategy, the charging power is stabilized with the fluctuation of no more than 5% when loads access randomly.

  16. The use of random amplified polymorphic DNA to evaluate the genetic variability of Ponkan mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coletta Filho Helvécio Della

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available RAPD analysis of 19 Ponkan mandarin accessions was performed using 25 random primers. Of 112 amplification products selected, only 32 were polymorphic across five accessions. The absence of genetic variability among the other 14 accessions suggested that they were either clonal propagations with different local names, or that they had undetectable genetic variability, such as point mutations which cannot be detected by RAPD.

  17. RSARF: Prediction of residue solvent accessibility from protein sequence using random forest method

    KAUST Repository

    Ganesan, Pugalenthi

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of protein structure from its amino acid sequence is still a challenging problem. The complete physicochemical understanding of protein folding is essential for the accurate structure prediction. Knowledge of residue solvent accessibility gives useful insights into protein structure prediction and function prediction. In this work, we propose a random forest method, RSARF, to predict residue accessible surface area from protein sequence information. The training and testing was performed using 120 proteins containing 22006 residues. For each residue, buried and exposed state was computed using five thresholds (0%, 5%, 10%, 25%, and 50%). The prediction accuracy for 0%, 5%, 10%, 25%, and 50% thresholds are 72.9%, 78.25%, 78.12%, 77.57% and 72.07% respectively. Further, comparison of RSARF with other methods using a benchmark dataset containing 20 proteins shows that our approach is useful for prediction of residue solvent accessibility from protein sequence without using structural information. The RSARF program, datasets and supplementary data are available at http://caps.ncbs.res.in/download/pugal/RSARF/. - See more at: http://www.eurekaselect.com/89216/article#sthash.pwVGFUjq.dpuf

  18. Boosting the FM-Index on the GPU: Effective Techniques to Mitigate Random Memory Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón, Alejandro; Marco-Sola, Santiago; Espinosa, Antonio; Ribeca, Paolo; Moure, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The recent advent of high-throughput sequencing machines producing big amounts of short reads has boosted the interest in efficient string searching techniques. As of today, many mainstream sequence alignment software tools rely on a special data structure, called the FM-index, which allows for fast exact searches in large genomic references. However, such searches translate into a pseudo-random memory access pattern, thus making memory access the limiting factor of all computation-efficient implementations, both on CPUs and GPUs. Here, we show that several strategies can be put in place to remove the memory bottleneck on the GPU: more compact indexes can be implemented by having more threads work cooperatively on larger memory blocks, and a k-step FM-index can be used to further reduce the number of memory accesses. The combination of those and other optimisations yields an implementation that is able to process about two Gbases of queries per second on our test platform, being about 8 × faster than a comparable multi-core CPU version, and about 3 × to 5 × faster than the FM-index implementation on the GPU provided by the recently announced Nvidia NVBIO bioinformatics library.

  19. A random sample survey of initial drug resistance among tuberculosis cases in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, A.; de Kantor, I. N.

    1994-01-01

    A random sample survey of initial drug resistance among cases of tuberculosis in Latin America was carried out during the second half of the 1980s and the early 1990s. A total of 948 cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from patients presumed never before to have been treated for tuberculosis were collected from 30 randomly selected clusters in Latin America and tested for resistance to isoniazid, streptomycin, rifampicin, ethambutol, and thioacetazone. Initial drug resistance, although unevenly distributed, was detected in all the clusters tested and characterized one out of every six tuberculosis cases. Both single and multiple resistance to streptomycin and to isoniazid were the most prevalent forms throughout the region but were not sufficiently frequent to jeopardize significantly the outcome of short-course chemotherapy. However, localized pockets of high drug resistance occurred throughout the region and are cause for concern, especially in the case of rifampicin. PMID:7923539

  20. Stochastic analysis of the lateral-torsional buckling resistance of steel beams with random imperfections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, Zdeněk

    2013-10-01

    The paper deals with the statistical analysis of resistance of a hot-rolled steel IPE beam under major axis bending. The lateral-torsional buckling stability problem of imperfect beam is described. The influence of bending moments and warping torsion on the ultimate limit state of the IPE beam with random imperfections is analyzed. The resistance is calculated by means of the close form solution. The initial geometrical imperfections of the beam are considered as the formatively identical to the first eigen mode of buckling. Changes of mean values of the resistance, of mean values of internal bending moments, of the variance of resistance and of the variance of internal bending moments were studied in dependence on the beam non-dimensional slenderness. The values of non-dimensional slenderness for which the statistical characteristics of internal moments associated with random resistance are maximal were determined.

  1. The effect of Spirulina platensis versus soybean on insulin resistance in HIV-infected patients: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel, Azabji-Kenfack; Ekali, Loni G; Eugene, Sobngwi; Arnold, Onana E; Sandrine, Edie D; von der Weid, Denis; Gbaguidi, Emmanuel; Ngogang, Jeanne; Mbanya, Jean C

    2011-07-01

    HIV-infected patients develop abnormalities of glucose metabolism due to the virus and antiretroviral drugs. Spirulina and soybean are nutritional supplements that are cheap, accessible in our community and affect glucose metabolism. We carried out a randomized study to assess the effect of Spirulina platensis versus soybean as a food supplement on HIV/HAART-associated insulin resistance (IR) in 33 insulin-resistant HIV-infected patients. The study lasted for two months at the National Obesity Centre of Cameroon. Insulin resistance was measured using the short insulin tolerance test. Physical activity and diet did not change over the study duration. On-treatment analysis was used to analyze data. The Mann-Whitney U test, the Students T test and the Chi square test were used as appropriate. Curve gradients were analyzed using ANCOVA. Seventeen subjects were randomized to spirulina and 16 to soybean. Each received 19 g of supplement daily. The follow up rate was 65% vs. 100% for spirulina and soybean groups, respectively, and both groups were comparable at baseline. After eight weeks, insulin sensitivity (IS) increased by 224.7% vs. 60% in the spirulina and soybean groups respectively (p spirulina versus soybean, respectively, improved their IS (p = 0.049) with a 1.45 (1.05-2.02) chance of improving insulin sensitivity on spirulina. This pilot study suggests that insulin sensitivity in HIV patients improves more when spirulina rather than soybean is used as a nutritional supplement. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01141777.

  2. Variability of yield traits and disease resistance in winter triticale genetic resources accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Kociuba

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A systematic gathering of winter triticale accessions was started in Poland in 1982 by the Institute of Genetics, Breeding and Seed Science at the Agricultural University in Lublin (at present its name is: Institute of Genetics, Breeding and Plant Biotechnology at the University of Life Sciences in Lublin. First, breeding lines obtained in local breeding stations were gathered. Next, accessions were imported from the following world gene banks: Beltsville, Gatersleben, and VIR. Interesting hybrid materials obtained in research centers were also included in the collection. Now, the collection includes 2349 accessions (1329 of winter triticale and 1020 of spring triticale. The evaluation is conducted in a 4-year cycle of field experiments using the same methods. The gathered accessions represent a large range of variability of both morphological and commercial traits. The large differentiation of accessions especially concerns traits such as: plant height, number and weight of grains per spi- ke, protein content in grain, field resistance to powdery mildew, brown rust and leaf and spike diseases.

  3. Fracture resistance of lithium disilicate restorations after endodontic access preparation: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompolaki, Despoina; Kontogiorgos, Elias; Wilson, John B; Nagy, William W

    2015-10-01

    Endodontic access preparation through a lithium disilicate restoration is a frequently encountered clinical situation. The common practice of repairing the accessed crown with composite resin may result in a weakened restoration. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of endodontic access preparation on the fracture resistance and microstructural integrity of monolithic pressed and monolithic milled lithium disilicate complete coverage restorations. Twenty monolithic pressed (IPS e.max Press) and 20 monolithic milled (IPS e.max CAD) lithium disilicate restorations were fabricated. Ten of the pressed and 10 of the milled crowns were accessed for a simulated endodontic treatment and subsequently repaired by using a porcelain repair system and composite resin. All specimens were submitted to cyclic loading and then loaded to failure. Force data were recorded and analyzed with 2-way ANOVA followed by a post hoc test (Sidak correction) to indicate significant differences among the groups (α=.05). A Weibull analysis was also performed for each group. Eight (4 pressed and 4 milled) additional restorations were fabricated to complete a scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis and evaluate the surface damage created by the endodontic access preparation. A statistically significant difference (P=.019) was found between the pressed intact and pressed repaired restorations and between the pressed intact and milled repaired restorations (P=.002). Specimens that were examined with an SEM showed edge chipping involving primarily the glaze layer around the access openings. Endodontic access preparation of lithium disilicate restorations resulted in a significantly reduced load to failure in the pressed specimens, but not in the milled specimens. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Voltage induced magnetostrictive switching of nanomagnets: Strain assisted strain transfer torque random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asif; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Ghani, Tahir; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-01

    A spintronic device, called the "strain assisted spin transfer torque (STT) random access memory (RAM)," is proposed by combining the magnetostriction effect and the spin transfer torque effect which can result in a dramatic improvement in the energy dissipation relative to a conventional STT-RAM. Magnetization switching in the device which is a piezoelectric-ferromagnetic heterostructure via the combined magnetostriction and STT effect is simulated by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation incorporating the influence of thermal noise. The simulations show that, in such a device, each of these two mechanisms (magnetostriction and spin transfer torque) provides in a 90° rotation of the magnetization leading a deterministic 180° switching with a critical current significantly smaller than that required for spin torque alone. Such a scheme is an attractive option for writing magnetic RAM cells.

  5. A radiation-hardened 1K-bit dielectrically isolated random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandors, T.J.; Boarman, J.W.; Kasten, A.J.; Wood, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Dielectric Isolation has been used for many years as the bipolar technology for latch-up free, radiation hardened integrated circuits in strategic systems. The state-of-the-art up to this point has been the manufacture of MSI functions containing a maximum of several hundred isolated components. This paper discusses a 1024 Bit Random Access Memory chip containing over 4000 dielectrically isolated components which has been designed for strategic radiation environments. The process utilized and the circuit design of the 1024 Bit RAM have been previously discussed. The techniques used are similar to those employed for the MX digital integrated circuits except for specific items required to make this a true LSI technology. These techniques, along with electrical and radiation data for the RAM, are presented

  6. Dialysis Access Graft Thrombolysis: Randomized Study of Pulse-Spray Versus Continuous Urokinase Infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, Scott C.; Arora, Lokesh C.; Razavi, Mahmood K.; Sayre, James; McNamara, Thomas O.; Yoon, Chun

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To compare pulse-spray to continuous-infusion thrombolysis with high-dose urokinase in thrombosed dialysis access grafts. Methods: A prospective randomized controlled trial was performed. From August 1992 to September 1993, 30 thrombosed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts in 24 patients were included, 15 grafts in each group. The success of thrombolysis, mean time to thrombolysis, mean urokinase dose, and 60-day patency rate were evaluated. Results: In the pulse-spray group, the mean time to thrombolysis was 72 min with a mean urokinase dose of 560,000 U. The 60-day patency rate was 71%. In the continuous-infusion group, the mean infusion time to thrombolysis was 55 min with a mean dose of 479,000 U. The 60-day patency rate was 73%. Conclusion: No statistically significant difference was found between the two techniques in the mean time to thrombolysis, the mean urokinase dose used, or the 60-day patency rate

  7. Random Access Frames (RAF): Alternative to Rack and Standoff for Deep Space Habitat Outfitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, A. Scott; Polit-Casillas, Raul

    2014-01-01

    A modular Random Access Frame (RAF) system is proposed as an alternative to the International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR) for internal module layout and outfitting in a Deep Space Habitat (DSH). The ISPR approach was designed to allow for efficient interchangeability of payload and experiments for the International Space Station (ISS) when frequent resupply missions were available (particularly the now-retired Space Shuttle). Though the standard interface approach to the ISPR system allowed integration of subsystems and hardware from a variety of sources and manufacturers, the heavy rack and standoff approach may not be appropriate when resupply or swap-out capabilities are not available, such as on deep space, long-duration missions. The lightweight RAF concept can allow a more dense packing of stowage and equipment, and may be easily broken down for repurposing or reuse. Several example layouts and workstations are presented.

  8. A Cerebellar-model Associative Memory as a Generalized Random-access Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanerva, Pentti

    1989-01-01

    A versatile neural-net model is explained in terms familiar to computer scientists and engineers. It is called the sparse distributed memory, and it is a random-access memory for very long words (for patterns with thousands of bits). Its potential utility is the result of several factors: (1) a large pattern representing an object or a scene or a moment can encode a large amount of information about what it represents; (2) this information can serve as an address to the memory, and it can also serve as data; (3) the memory is noise tolerant--the information need not be exact; (4) the memory can be made arbitrarily large and hence an arbitrary amount of information can be stored in it; and (5) the architecture is inherently parallel, allowing large memories to be fast. Such memories can become important components of future computers.

  9. Spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory technologies for normally off computing (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, K.; Yuasa, S.; Fujita, S.; Ito, J.; Yoda, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakatani, Y.; Miyazaki, T.

    2014-01-01

    Most parts of present computer systems are made of volatile devices, and the power to supply them to avoid information loss causes huge energy losses. We can eliminate this meaningless energy loss by utilizing the non-volatile function of advanced spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) technology and create a new type of computer, i.e., normally off computers. Critical tasks to achieve normally off computers are implementations of STT-MRAM technologies in the main memory and low-level cache memories. STT-MRAM technology for applications to the main memory has been successfully developed by using perpendicular STT-MRAMs, and faster STT-MRAM technologies for applications to the cache memory are now being developed. The present status of STT-MRAMs and challenges that remain for normally off computers are discussed

  10. Spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory technologies for normally off computing (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, K., E-mail: ando-koji@aist.go.jp; Yuasa, S. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Fujita, S.; Ito, J.; Yoda, H. [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki 212-8582 (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); Nakatani, Y. [Department of Communication Engineering and Informatics, University of Electro-Communication, Chofu 182-8585 (Japan); Miyazaki, T. [WPI-AIMR, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    Most parts of present computer systems are made of volatile devices, and the power to supply them to avoid information loss causes huge energy losses. We can eliminate this meaningless energy loss by utilizing the non-volatile function of advanced spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) technology and create a new type of computer, i.e., normally off computers. Critical tasks to achieve normally off computers are implementations of STT-MRAM technologies in the main memory and low-level cache memories. STT-MRAM technology for applications to the main memory has been successfully developed by using perpendicular STT-MRAMs, and faster STT-MRAM technologies for applications to the cache memory are now being developed. The present status of STT-MRAMs and challenges that remain for normally off computers are discussed.

  11. High-density magnetoresistive random access memory operating at ultralow voltage at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Li, Zheng; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2011-11-22

    The main bottlenecks limiting the practical applications of current magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) technology are its low storage density and high writing energy consumption. Although a number of proposals have been reported for voltage-controlled memory device in recent years, none of them simultaneously satisfy the important device attributes: high storage capacity, low power consumption and room temperature operation. Here we present, using phase-field simulations, a simple and new pathway towards high-performance MRAMs that display significant improvements over existing MRAM technologies or proposed concepts. The proposed nanoscale MRAM device simultaneously exhibits ultrahigh storage capacity of up to 88 Gb inch(-2), ultralow power dissipation as low as 0.16 fJ per bit and room temperature high-speed operation below 10 ns.

  12. Design of an Event-Driven Random-Access-Windowing CCD-Based Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monacos, Steve P.; Lam, Raymond K.; Portillo, Angel A.; Ortiz, Gerardo G.

    2003-01-01

    Commercially available cameras are not design for the combination of single frame and high-speed streaming digital video with real-time control of size and location of multiple regions-of-interest (ROI). A new control paradigm is defined to eliminate the tight coupling between the camera logic and the host controller. This functionality is achieved by defining the indivisible pixel read out operation on a per ROI basis with in-camera time keeping capability. This methodology provides a Random Access, Real-Time, Event-driven (RARE) camera for adaptive camera control and is will suited for target tracking applications requiring autonomous control of multiple ROI's. This methodology additionally provides for reduced ROI read out time and higher frame rates compared to the original architecture by avoiding external control intervention during the ROI read out process.

  13. Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories induced by total dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Qi-Wen; Yu Xue-Feng; Cui Jiang-Wei; Guo Qi; Ren Di-Yuan; Cong Zhong-Chao; Zhou Hang

    2014-01-01

    Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories (SRAMs) during total dose irradiation is investigated in detail. As the dose accumulates, the data pattern of memory cells loading during irradiation is gradually imprinted on their background data pattern. We build a relationship between the memory cell's static noise margin (SNM) and the background data, and study the influence of irradiation on the probability density function of ΔSNM, which is the difference between two data sides' SNMs, to discuss the reason for pattern imprinting. Finally, we demonstrate that, for micron and deep sub-micron devices, the mechanism of pattern imprinting is the bias-dependent threshold shift of the transistor, but for a deep sub-micron device the shift results from charge trapping in the shallow trench isolation (STI) oxide rather than from the gate oxide of the micron-device. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  14. Single event upset in static random access memories in atmospheric neutron environments

    CERN Document Server

    Arita, Y; Ogawa, I; Kishimoto, T

    2003-01-01

    Single-event upsets (SEUs) in a 0.4 mu m 4Mbit complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) static random access memory (SRAM) were investigated in various atmospheric neutron environments at sea level, at an altitude of 2612 m mountain, at an altitude of commercial airplane, and at an underground depth of 476m. Neutron-induced SEUs increase with the increase in altitude. For a device with a borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) film, SEU rates induced by thermal neutrons increase with the decrease in the cell charge of a memory cell. A thermal neutron-induced SEU is significant in SRAMs with a small cell charge. With the conditions of small cell charge, thermal neutron-induced SEUs account for 60% or more of the total neutron-induced SEUs. The SEU rate induced by atmospheric thermal neutrons can be estimated by an acceleration test using sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf. (author)

  15. Random-Access Technique for Self-Organization of 5G Millimeter-Wave Cellular Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper Meynard Arana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The random-access (RA technique is a key procedure in cellular networks and self-organizing networks (SONs, but the overall processing time of this technique in millimeter-wave (mm-wave cellular systems with directional beams is very long because RA preambles (RAPs should be transmitted in all directions of Tx and Rx beams. In this paper, two different types of preambles (RAP-1 and RAP-2 are proposed to reduce the processing time in the RA stage. After analyzing the correlation property, false-alarm probability, and detection probability of the proposed RAPs, we perform simulations to show that the RAP-2 is suitable for RA in mm-wave cellular systems with directional beams because of the smaller processing time and high detection probability in multiuser environments.

  16. Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories induced by total dose irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi-Wen; Yu, Xue-Feng; Cui, Jiang-Wei; Guo, Qi; Ren, Di-Yuan; Cong, Zhong-Chao; Zhou, Hang

    2014-10-01

    Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories (SRAMs) during total dose irradiation is investigated in detail. As the dose accumulates, the data pattern of memory cells loading during irradiation is gradually imprinted on their background data pattern. We build a relationship between the memory cell's static noise margin (SNM) and the background data, and study the influence of irradiation on the probability density function of ΔSNM, which is the difference between two data sides' SNMs, to discuss the reason for pattern imprinting. Finally, we demonstrate that, for micron and deep sub-micron devices, the mechanism of pattern imprinting is the bias-dependent threshold shift of the transistor, but for a deep sub-micron device the shift results from charge trapping in the shallow trench isolation (STI) oxide rather than from the gate oxide of the micron-device.

  17. Low-energy neutron-induced single-event upsets in static random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaoqiang; Guo Hongxia; Wang Guizhen; Ling Dongsheng; Chen Wei; Bai Xiaoyan; Yang Shanchao; Liu Yan

    2009-01-01

    The visual analysis method of data process was provided for neutron-induced single-event upset(SEU) in static random access memory(SRAM). The SEU effects of six CMOS SRAMs with different feature size(from 0.13 μm to 1.50 μm) were studied. The SEU experiments were performed using the neutron radiation environment at Xi'an pulsed reactor. And the dependence of low-energy neutron-induced SEU cross section on SRAM's feature size was given. The results indicate that the decreased critical charge is the dominant factor for the increase of single event effect sensitivity of SRAM devices with decreased feature size. Small-sized SRAM devices are more sensitive than large-sized ones to single event effect induced by low-energy neutrons. (authors)

  18. Voltage induced magnetostrictive switching of nanomagnets: Strain assisted strain transfer torque random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Asif; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Ghani, Tahir; Young, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    A spintronic device, called the “strain assisted spin transfer torque (STT) random access memory (RAM),” is proposed by combining the magnetostriction effect and the spin transfer torque effect which can result in a dramatic improvement in the energy dissipation relative to a conventional STT-RAM. Magnetization switching in the device which is a piezoelectric-ferromagnetic heterostructure via the combined magnetostriction and STT effect is simulated by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation incorporating the influence of thermal noise. The simulations show that, in such a device, each of these two mechanisms (magnetostriction and spin transfer torque) provides in a 90° rotation of the magnetization leading a deterministic 180° switching with a critical current significantly smaller than that required for spin torque alone. Such a scheme is an attractive option for writing magnetic RAM cells.

  19. Thin Co/Ni-based bottom pinned spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory stacks with high annealing tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomczak, Y., E-mail: Yoann.Tomczak@imec.be [IMEC Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Chemistry, KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Swerts, J.; Mertens, S.; Lin, T.; Couet, S.; Sankaran, K.; Pourtois, G.; Kim, W.; Souriau, L.; Van Elshocht, S.; Kar, G.; Furnemont, A. [IMEC Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Liu, E. [Department of Chemistry, KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-01-25

    Spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM) is considered as a replacement for next generation embedded and stand-alone memory applications. One of the main challenges in the STT-MRAM stack development is the compatibility of the stack with CMOS process flows in which thermal budgets up to 400 °C are applied. In this letter, we report on a perpendicularly magnetized MgO-based tunnel junction (p-MTJ) on a thin Co/Ni perpendicular synthetic antiferromagnetic layer with high annealing tolerance. Tunnel magneto resistance (TMR) loss after annealing occurs when the reference layer loses its perpendicular magnetic anisotropy due to reduction of the CoFeB/MgO interfacial anisotropy. A stable Co/Ni based p-MTJ stack with TMR values of 130% at resistance-area products of 9 Ω μm{sup 2} after 400 °C anneal is achieved via moment control of the Co/Ta/CoFeB reference layer. Thinning of the CoFeB polarizing layer down to 0.8 nm is the key enabler to achieve 400 °C compatibility with limited TMR loss. Thinning the Co below 0.6 nm leads to a loss of the antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling strength through Ru. Insight into the thickness and moment engineering of the reference layer is displayed to obtain the best magnetic properties and high thermal stability for thin Co/Ni SAF-based STT-MRAM stacks.

  20. The storage system of PCM based on random access file system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenbing; Chen, Xiaogang; Zhou, Mi; Li, Shunfen; Li, Gezi; Song, Zhitang

    2016-10-01

    Emerging memory technologies such as Phase change memory (PCM) tend to offer fast, random access to persistent storage with better scalability. It's a hot topic of academic and industrial research to establish PCM in storage hierarchy to narrow the performance gap. However, the existing file systems do not perform well with the emerging PCM storage, which access storage medium via a slow, block-based interface. In this paper, we propose a novel file system, RAFS, to bring about good performance of PCM, which is built in the embedded platform. We attach PCM chips to the memory bus and build RAFS on the physical address space. In the proposed file system, we simplify traditional system architecture to eliminate block-related operations and layers. Furthermore, we adopt memory mapping and bypassed page cache to reduce copy overhead between the process address space and storage device. XIP mechanisms are also supported in RAFS. To the best of our knowledge, we are among the first to implement file system on real PCM chips. We have analyzed and evaluated its performance with IOZONE benchmark tools. Our experimental results show that the RAFS on PCM outperforms Ext4fs on SDRAM with small record lengths. Based on DRAM, RAFS is significantly faster than Ext4fs by 18% to 250%.

  1. On the designing of a tamper resistant prescription RFID access control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safkhani, Masoumeh; Bagheri, Nasour; Naderi, Majid

    2012-12-01

    Recently, Chen et al. have proposed a novel tamper resistant prescription RFID access control system, published in the Journal of Medical Systems. In this paper we consider the security of the proposed protocol and identify some existing weaknesses. The main attack is a reader impersonation attack which allows an active adversary to impersonate a legitimate doctor, e.g. the patient's doctor, to access the patient's tag and change the patient prescription. The presented attack is quite efficient. To impersonate a doctor, the adversary should eavesdrop one session between the doctor and the patient's tag and then she can impersonate the doctor with the success probability of '1'. In addition, we present efficient reader-tag to back-end database impersonation, de-synchronization and traceability attacks against the protocol. Finally, we propose an improved version of protocol which is more efficient compared to the original protocol while provides the desired security against the presented attacks.

  2. An Oncofetal Glycosaminoglycan Modification Provides Therapeutic Access to Cisplatin-resistant Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Roland; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Tortora, Davide; Clausen, Thomas M; Wang, Chris K; Kumar, Gunjan; Pereira, Marina Ayres; Ørum-Madsen, Maj S; Agerbæk, Mette Ø; Gustavsson, Tobias; Nordmaj, Mie A; Rich, Jamie R; Lallous, Nada; Fazli, Ladan; Lee, Sherry S; Douglas, James; Todenhöfer, Tilman; Esfandnia, Shaghayegh; Battsogt, Dulguun; Babcook, John S; Al-Nakouzi, Nader; Crabb, Simon J; Moskalev, Igor; Kiss, Bernhard; Davicioni, Elai; Thalmann, George N; Rennie, Paul S; Black, Peter C; Salanti, Ali; Daugaard, Mads

    2017-07-01

    Although cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) improves survival of unselected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC), only a minority responds to therapy and chemoresistance remains a major challenge in this disease setting. To investigate the clinical significance of oncofetal chondroitin sulfate (ofCS) glycosaminoglycan chains in cisplatin-resistant MIBC and to evaluate these as targets for second-line therapy. An ofCS-binding recombinant VAR2CSA protein derived from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (rVAR2) was used as an in situ, in vitro, and in vivo ofCS-targeting reagent in cisplatin-resistant MIBC. The ofCS expression landscape was analyzed in two independent cohorts of matched pre- and post-NAC-treated MIBC patients. An rVAR2 protein armed with cytotoxic hemiasterlin compounds (rVAR2 drug conjugate [VDC] 886) was evaluated as a novel therapeutic strategy in a xenograft model of cisplatin-resistant MIBC. Antineoplastic effects of targeting ofCS. In situ, ofCS was significantly overexpressed in residual tumors after NAC in two independent patient cohorts (pcisplatin only for the generation of chemoresistant xenografts are limitations of our animal model design. Targeting ofCS provides a promising second-line treatment strategy in cisplatin-resistant MIBC. Cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer overexpresses particular sugar chains compared with chemotherapy-naïve bladder cancer. Using a recombinant protein from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, we can target these sugar chains, and our results showed a significant antitumor effect in cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer. This novel treatment paradigm provides therapeutic access to bladder cancers not responding to cisplatin. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. All rights reserved.

  3. Tracking random walk of individual domain walls in cylindrical nanomagnets with resistance noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amrita; Mukhopadhyay, Soumik; Ghosh, Arindam

    2010-08-06

    The stochasticity of domain-wall (DW) motion in magnetic nanowires has been probed by measuring slow fluctuations, or noise, in electrical resistance at small magnetic fields. By controlled injection of DWs into isolated cylindrical nanowires of nickel, we have been able to track the motion of the DWs between the electrical leads by discrete steps in the resistance. Closer inspection of the time dependence of noise reveals a diffusive random walk of the DWs with a universal kinetic exponent. Our experiments outline a method with which electrical resistance is able to detect the kinetic state of the DWs inside the nanowires, which can be useful in DW-based memory designs.

  4. RADB: Random Access with Differentiated Barring for Latency-Constrained Applications in NB-IoT Network

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Yiming; Tian, Yuanwen; Cheng, Jingjing; Hossain, M. Shamim; Ghoneim, Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    With the development of LPWA (Low Power Wide Area) technology, the emerging NB-IoT (Narrowband Internet of Things) technology is becoming popular with wide area and low-data-rate services. In order to achieve objectives such as huge amount of connection and wide area coverage within NB-IoT, the problem of network congestion generated by random access of numerous devices should be solved. In this paper, we first introduce the background of NB-IoT and investigate the research on random access o...

  5. Accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2017-01-01

    This contribution is timely as it addresses accessibility in regards system hardware and software aligned with introduction of the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (CVAA) and adjoined game industry waiver that comes into force January 2017. This is an act created...... by the USA Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to increase the access of persons with disabilities to modern communications, and for other purposes. The act impacts advanced communications services and products including text messaging; e-mail; instant messaging; video communications; browsers; game...... platforms; and games software. However, the CVAA has no legal status in the EU. This text succinctly introduces and questions implications, impact, and wider adoption. By presenting the full CVAA and game industry waiver the text targets to motivate discussions and further publications on the subject...

  6. Access resistance of stimulation electrodes as a function of electrode proximity to the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdi, Joseph A; Minnikanti, Saugandhika; Peixoto, Nathalia; Agrawal, Anant; Cohen, Ethan D

    2015-02-01

    Epiretinal prostheses seek to effectively stimulate the retina by positioning electrode arrays close to its surface so current pulses generate narrow retinal electric fields. Our objective was to evaluate the use of the electrical impedance of insulated platinum electrodes as a measure of the proximity of insulated platinum electrodes to the inner surface of the retina. We examined the impedance of platinum disk electrodes, 0.25 mm in diameter, insulated with two widths (0.8 and 1.6 mm outer diameter) of transparent fluoropolymer in a rabbit retinal eyecup preparation. Optical coherence tomography measured the electrode's proximity to the retinal surface which was correlated with changes in the voltage waveform at the electrode. Electrode impedance changes during retinal deformation were also studied. When the 1.6 mm diameter insulated electrodes advanced towards the retinal surface from 1000 μm, their voltage step at current pulse onset increased, reflecting an access resistance increase of 3880 ± 630 Ω, with the 50% midpoint averaging 30 μm, while thin 0.8 mm insulated electrode advancement showed an access resistance increase 50% midpoint averaging 16 μm. Using impedance spectroscopy, electrode-retina proximity differences were seen in the 1.6 mm insulated electrode impedance modulus between 1 and 100 kHz and the waveform phase angle at 0.3-10 kHz, while thin 0.8 mm insulated electrode advancement produced smaller impedance modulus changes with retinal proximity between 3 and 100 kHz. These impedance changes with retinal proximity may reflect different sized zones of eye wall being coupled in series with the insulated platinum electrode. The proximity of stimulus electrodes to neural tissue in fluid-filled spaces can be estimated from access resistance changes in the stimulus pulse waveform. Because many prosthetic devices allow back telemetry communication of the stimulus electrode waveform, it is possible these series resistance increases observed with

  7. Probing Access Resistance of Solid-state Nanopores with a Scanning Probe Microscope Tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Changbae; Rollings, Ryan; Li, Jiali

    2012-02-06

    An apparatus that integrates solid-state nanopore ionic current measurement with a Scanning Probe Microscope has been developed. When a micrometer-scale scanning probe tip is near a voltage biased nanometer-scale pore (10-100 nm), the tip partially blocks the flow of ions to the pore and increases the pore access resistance. The apparatus records the current blockage caused by the probe tip and the location of the tip simultaneously. By measuring the current blockage map near a nanopore as a function of the tip position in 3D space in salt solution, we estimate the relative pore resistance increase due to the tip, ΔR/R(0), as a function of the tip location, nanopore geometry, and salt concentration. The amplitude of ΔR/R(0) also depends on the ratio of the pore length to its radius as Ohm's law predicts. When the tip is very close to the pore surface, ~10 nm, our experiments show that ΔR/R(0) depends on salt concentration as predicted by the Poisson and Nernst-Planck equations. Furthermore, our measurements show that ΔR/R(0) goes to zero when the tip is about five times the pore diameter away from the center of the pore entrance. The results in this work not only demonstrate a way to probe the access resistance of nanopores experimentally, they also provide a way to locate the nanopore in salt solution, and open the door to future nanopore experiments for detecting single biomolecules attached to a probe tip.

  8. Probing access resistance of solid-state nanopores with a scanning-probe microscope tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Changbae; Rollings, Ryan; Li, Jiali

    2012-02-06

    An apparatus that integrates solid-state nanopore ionic current measurement with a scanning-probe microscope is developed. When a micrometer-scale scanning-probe tip is near a voltage-biased nanometer-scale pore (10–100 nm), the tip partially blocks the flow of ions to the pore and increases the pore access resistance. The apparatus records the current blockage caused by the probe tip and the location of the tip simultaneously. By measuring the current blockage map near a nanopore as a function of the tip position in 3D space in salt solution, the relative pore resistance increases due to the tip and ΔR/R0 is estimated as a function of the tip location, nanopore geometry, and salt concentration. The amplitude of ΔR/R0 also depends on the ratio of the pore length to its radius as Ohm's law predicts. When the tip is very close to the pore surface, ≈10 nm, experiments show that ΔR/R0 depends on salt concentration as predicted by the Poisson and Nernst–Planck equations. Furthermore, the measurements show that ΔR/R0 goes to zero when the tip is about five times the pore diameter away from the center of the pore entrance. The results in this work not only demonstrate a way to probe the access resistance of nanopores experimentally; they also provide a way to locate the nanopore in salt solution, and open the door to future nanopore experiments for detecting single biomolecules attached to a probe tip. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Resistance of Wild Solanum Accessions to Aphids and Other Potato Pests in Quebec Field Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fréchette, B.; Bejan, M.; Lucas, É.; Giordanengo, P.; Vincent, C.

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments were done to determine the susceptibility of six wild potato accessions to the aphids Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and Myzus persicae (Sulzer). Densities of aphid colonies were compared between caged Solanum pinnatisectum Dunal (Solanales: Solanaceae), S. polyadenium Greenmam, S. tarijense Hawkes, S. infundibuliforme Philippi, S. oplocense Hawkes, and S. stoloniferum Schlechted and Bouché, and the commercially cultivated potato plant S. tuberosum L. cv. Désirée. Moreover the susceptibility of S. polyadenium and S. tarijense to the Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrlysomelidae), the potato flea beetle Epitrix cucumeris (Harris), and the potato leafhopper Empoasca fabae (Harris) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) was compared to that of S. tuberosum cv. Désirée in the field. Results indicated that S. polyadenium and S. tarijense were more resistant to M. persicae than S. pinnatisectum and the commercially cultivated S. tuberosum cv. Désirée. Solanum polyadenium was more resistant to aphids than S. tarijense in 2004, but not in 2005. Moreover, S. polyadenium and S. tarijense were more resistant than S. tuberosum cv. Désirée to L. decemlineata, E. cucumeris and E. fabae. PMID:21054161

  10. Evaluation of 19,460 Wheat Accessions Conserved in the Indian National Genebank to Identify New Sources of Resistance to Rust and Spot Blotch Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sherry R.; Srinivasan, Kalyani; Radhamani, J.; Parimalan, R.; Sivaswamy, M.; Tyagi, Sandhya; Yadav, Mamata; Kumari, Jyotisna; Deepali; Sharma, Sandeep; Bhagat, Indoo; Meeta, Madhu; Bains, N. S.; Chowdhury, A. K.; Saha, B. C.; Bhattacharya, P. M.; Kumari, Jyoti; Singh, M. C.; Gangwar, O. P.; Prasad, P.; Bharadwaj, S. C.; Gogoi, Robin; Sharma, J. B.; GM, Sandeep Kumar; Saharan, M. S.; Bag, Manas; Roy, Anirban; Prasad, T. V.; Sharma, R. K.; Dutta, M.; Sharma, Indu; Bansal, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive germplasm evaluation study of wheat accessions conserved in the Indian National Genebank was conducted to identify sources of rust and spot blotch resistance. Genebank accessions comprising three species of wheat–Triticum aestivum, T. durum and T. dicoccum were screened sequentially at multiple disease hotspots, during the 2011–14 crop seasons, carrying only resistant accessions to the next step of evaluation. Wheat accessions which were found to be resistant in the field were then assayed for seedling resistance and profiled using molecular markers. In the primary evaluation, 19,460 accessions were screened at Wellington (Tamil Nadu), a hotspot for wheat rusts. We identified 4925 accessions to be resistant and these were further evaluated at Gurdaspur (Punjab), a hotspot for stripe rust and at Cooch Behar (West Bengal), a hotspot for spot blotch. The second round evaluation identified 498 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts and 868 accessions potentially resistant to spot blotch. Evaluation of rust resistant accessions for seedling resistance against seven virulent pathotypes of three rusts under artificial epiphytotic conditions identified 137 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts. Molecular analysis to identify different combinations of genetic loci imparting resistance to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and spot blotch using linked molecular markers, identified 45 wheat accessions containing known resistance genes against all three rusts as well as a QTL for spot blotch resistance. The resistant germplasm accessions, particularly against stripe rust, identified in this study can be excellent potential candidates to be employed for breeding resistance into the background of high yielding wheat cultivars through conventional or molecular breeding approaches, and are expected to contribute toward food security at national and global levels. PMID:27942031

  11. Evaluation of 19,460 Wheat Accessions Conserved in the Indian National Genebank to Identify New Sources of Resistance to Rust and Spot Blotch Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep Kumar

    Full Text Available A comprehensive germplasm evaluation study of wheat accessions conserved in the Indian National Genebank was conducted to identify sources of rust and spot blotch resistance. Genebank accessions comprising three species of wheat-Triticum aestivum, T. durum and T. dicoccum were screened sequentially at multiple disease hotspots, during the 2011-14 crop seasons, carrying only resistant accessions to the next step of evaluation. Wheat accessions which were found to be resistant in the field were then assayed for seedling resistance and profiled using molecular markers. In the primary evaluation, 19,460 accessions were screened at Wellington (Tamil Nadu, a hotspot for wheat rusts. We identified 4925 accessions to be resistant and these were further evaluated at Gurdaspur (Punjab, a hotspot for stripe rust and at Cooch Behar (West Bengal, a hotspot for spot blotch. The second round evaluation identified 498 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts and 868 accessions potentially resistant to spot blotch. Evaluation of rust resistant accessions for seedling resistance against seven virulent pathotypes of three rusts under artificial epiphytotic conditions identified 137 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts. Molecular analysis to identify different combinations of genetic loci imparting resistance to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and spot blotch using linked molecular markers, identified 45 wheat accessions containing known resistance genes against all three rusts as well as a QTL for spot blotch resistance. The resistant germplasm accessions, particularly against stripe rust, identified in this study can be excellent potential candidates to be employed for breeding resistance into the background of high yielding wheat cultivars through conventional or molecular breeding approaches, and are expected to contribute toward food security at national and global levels.

  12. Evaluation of 19,460 Wheat Accessions Conserved in the Indian National Genebank to Identify New Sources of Resistance to Rust and Spot Blotch Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sundeep; Archak, Sunil; Tyagi, R K; Kumar, Jagdish; Vk, Vikas; Jacob, Sherry R; Srinivasan, Kalyani; Radhamani, J; Parimalan, R; Sivaswamy, M; Tyagi, Sandhya; Yadav, Mamata; Kumari, Jyotisna; Deepali; Sharma, Sandeep; Bhagat, Indoo; Meeta, Madhu; Bains, N S; Chowdhury, A K; Saha, B C; Bhattacharya, P M; Kumari, Jyoti; Singh, M C; Gangwar, O P; Prasad, P; Bharadwaj, S C; Gogoi, Robin; Sharma, J B; Gm, Sandeep Kumar; Saharan, M S; Bag, Manas; Roy, Anirban; Prasad, T V; Sharma, R K; Dutta, M; Sharma, Indu; Bansal, K C

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive germplasm evaluation study of wheat accessions conserved in the Indian National Genebank was conducted to identify sources of rust and spot blotch resistance. Genebank accessions comprising three species of wheat-Triticum aestivum, T. durum and T. dicoccum were screened sequentially at multiple disease hotspots, during the 2011-14 crop seasons, carrying only resistant accessions to the next step of evaluation. Wheat accessions which were found to be resistant in the field were then assayed for seedling resistance and profiled using molecular markers. In the primary evaluation, 19,460 accessions were screened at Wellington (Tamil Nadu), a hotspot for wheat rusts. We identified 4925 accessions to be resistant and these were further evaluated at Gurdaspur (Punjab), a hotspot for stripe rust and at Cooch Behar (West Bengal), a hotspot for spot blotch. The second round evaluation identified 498 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts and 868 accessions potentially resistant to spot blotch. Evaluation of rust resistant accessions for seedling resistance against seven virulent pathotypes of three rusts under artificial epiphytotic conditions identified 137 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts. Molecular analysis to identify different combinations of genetic loci imparting resistance to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and spot blotch using linked molecular markers, identified 45 wheat accessions containing known resistance genes against all three rusts as well as a QTL for spot blotch resistance. The resistant germplasm accessions, particularly against stripe rust, identified in this study can be excellent potential candidates to be employed for breeding resistance into the background of high yielding wheat cultivars through conventional or molecular breeding approaches, and are expected to contribute toward food security at national and global levels.

  13. Switching methods in magnetic random access memory for low power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchang, Han; Jiancheng, Huang; Cheow Hin, Sim; Tran, Michael; Sze Ter, Lim

    2015-06-01

    Effect of saturation magnetization (Ms) of the free layer (FL) on the switching current is analyzed for spin transfer torque (STT) magnetic random access memory (MRAM). For in-plane FL, critical switching current (Ic0) decreases as Ms decreases. However, reduction in Ms also results in a low thermal stability factor (Δ), which must be compensated through increasing shape anisotropy, thus limiting scalability. For perpendicular FL, Ic0 reduction by using low-Ms materials is actually at the expense of data retention. To save energy consumed by STT current, two electric field (EF) controlled switching methods are proposed. Our simulation results show that elliptical FL can be switched by an EF pulse with a suitable width. However, it is difficult to implement this type of switching in real MRAM devices due to the distribution of the required switching pulse widths. A reliable switching method is to use an Oersted field guided switching. Our simulation and experimental results show that the bi-directional magnetization switching could be realized by an EF with an external field as low as  ±5 Oe if the offset field could be removed.

  14. Making working memory work: the effects of extended practice on focus capacity and the processes of updating, forward access, and random access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, John M; Colflesh, Gregory J H; Cerella, John; Verhaeghen, Paul

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the effects of 10h of practice on variations of the N-Back task to investigate the processes underlying possible expansion of the focus of attention within working memory. Using subtractive logic, we showed that random access (i.e., Sternberg-like search) yielded a modest effect (a 50% increase in speed) whereas the processes of forward access (i.e., retrieval in order, as in a standard N-Back task) and updating (i.e., changing the contents of working memory) were executed about 5 times faster after extended practice. We additionally found that extended practice increased working memory capacity as measured by the size of the focus of attention for the forward-access task, but not for variations where probing was in random order. This suggests that working memory capacity may depend on the type of search process engaged, and that certain working-memory-related cognitive processes are more amenable to practice than others. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy for injection drug users: adherence, resistance, and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vlahov

    Full Text Available Injection drug users (IDUs continue to comprise a major risk group for HIV infection throughout the world and represent the focal population for HIV epidemics in Asia and Eastern Europe/Russia. HIV prevention programs have ranged from HIV testing and counseling, education, behavioral and network interventions, drug abuse treatment, bleach disinfection of needles, needle exchange and expanded syringe access, as well as reducing transition to injection and primary substance abuse prevention. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in 1996, dramatic clinical improvements have been seen. In addition, the treatment's impact on reducing HIV viral load (and therefore transmission by all routes provides a stronger rationale for an expansion of the focus on prevention to emphasize early identification and treatment of HIV infected individuals. However, treatment of IDUs has many challenges including adherence, resistance and relapse to high risk behaviors, all of which impact issues of access and ultimately effectiveness of potent antiretroviral treatment. A major current challenge in addressing the HIV epidemic revolves around an appropriate approach to HIV treatment for IDUs.

  16. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy for injection drug users: adherence, resistance, and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlahov David

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Injection drug users (IDUs continue to comprise a major risk group for HIV infection throughout the world and represent the focal population for HIV epidemics in Asia and Eastern Europe/Russia. HIV prevention programs have ranged from HIV testing and counseling, education, behavioral and network interventions, drug abuse treatment, bleach disinfection of needles, needle exchange and expanded syringe access, as well as reducing transition to injection and primary substance abuse prevention. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in 1996, dramatic clinical improvements have been seen. In addition, the treatment's impact on reducing HIV viral load (and therefore transmission by all routes provides a stronger rationale for an expansion of the focus on prevention to emphasize early identification and treatment of HIV infected individuals. However, treatment of IDUs has many challenges including adherence, resistance and relapse to high risk behaviors, all of which impact issues of access and ultimately effectiveness of potent antiretroviral treatment. A major current challenge in addressing the HIV epidemic revolves around an appropriate approach to HIV treatment for IDUs.

  17. Towards developing a compact model for magnetization switching in straintronics magnetic random access memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barangi, Mahmood; Erementchouk, Mikhail; Mazumder, Pinaki

    2016-08-01

    Strain-mediated magnetization switching in a magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ) by exploiting a combination of piezoelectricity and magnetostriction has been proposed as an energy efficient alternative to spin transfer torque (STT) and field induced magnetization switching methods in MTJ-based magnetic random access memories (MRAM). Theoretical studies have shown the inherent advantages of strain-assisted switching, and the dynamic response of the magnetization has been modeled using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. However, an attempt to use LLG for simulating dynamics of individual elements in large-scale simulations of multi-megabyte straintronics MRAM leads to extremely time-consuming calculations. Hence, a compact analytical solution, predicting the flipping delay of the magnetization vector in the nanomagnet under stress, combined with a liberal approximation of the LLG dynamics in the straintronics MTJ, can lead to a simplified model of the device suited for fast large-scale simulations of multi-megabyte straintronics MRAMs. In this work, a tensor-based approach is developed to study the dynamic behavior of the stressed nanomagnet. First, using the developed method, the effect of stress on the switching behavior of the magnetization is investigated to realize the margins between the underdamped and overdamped regimes. The latter helps the designer realize the oscillatory behavior of the magnetization when settling along the minor axis, and the dependency of oscillations on the stress level and the damping factor. Next, a theoretical model to predict the flipping delay of the magnetization vector is developed and tested against LLG-based numerical simulations to confirm the accuracy of findings. Lastly, the obtained delay is incorporated into the approximate solutions of the LLG dynamics, in order to create a compact model to liberally and quickly simulate the magnetization dynamics of the MTJ under stress. Using the developed delay equation, the

  18. Towards developing a compact model for magnetization switching in straintronics magnetic random access memory devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barangi, Mahmood, E-mail: barangi@umich.edu; Erementchouk, Mikhail; Mazumder, Pinaki [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2121 (United States)

    2016-08-21

    Strain-mediated magnetization switching in a magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ) by exploiting a combination of piezoelectricity and magnetostriction has been proposed as an energy efficient alternative to spin transfer torque (STT) and field induced magnetization switching methods in MTJ-based magnetic random access memories (MRAM). Theoretical studies have shown the inherent advantages of strain-assisted switching, and the dynamic response of the magnetization has been modeled using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. However, an attempt to use LLG for simulating dynamics of individual elements in large-scale simulations of multi-megabyte straintronics MRAM leads to extremely time-consuming calculations. Hence, a compact analytical solution, predicting the flipping delay of the magnetization vector in the nanomagnet under stress, combined with a liberal approximation of the LLG dynamics in the straintronics MTJ, can lead to a simplified model of the device suited for fast large-scale simulations of multi-megabyte straintronics MRAMs. In this work, a tensor-based approach is developed to study the dynamic behavior of the stressed nanomagnet. First, using the developed method, the effect of stress on the switching behavior of the magnetization is investigated to realize the margins between the underdamped and overdamped regimes. The latter helps the designer realize the oscillatory behavior of the magnetization when settling along the minor axis, and the dependency of oscillations on the stress level and the damping factor. Next, a theoretical model to predict the flipping delay of the magnetization vector is developed and tested against LLG-based numerical simulations to confirm the accuracy of findings. Lastly, the obtained delay is incorporated into the approximate solutions of the LLG dynamics, in order to create a compact model to liberally and quickly simulate the magnetization dynamics of the MTJ under stress. Using the developed delay equation, the

  19. Exploration of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy material system for application in spin transfer torque - Random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajarathinam, Anusha

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) materials have unique advantages when used in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) which are the most critical part of spin-torque transfer random access memory devices (STT-RAMs) that are being researched intensively as future non-volatile memory technology. They have high magnetoresistance which improves their sensitivity. The STT-RAM has several advantages over competing technologies, for instance, low power consumption, non-volatility, ultra-fast read and write speed and high endurance. In personal computers, it can replace SRAM for high-speed applications, Flash for non-volatility, and PSRAM and DRAM for high-speed program execution. The main aim of this research is to identify and optimize the best perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) material system for application to STT-RAM technology. Preliminary search for perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) materials for pinned layer for MTJs started with the exploration and optimization of crystalline alloys such as Co50Pd50 alloy, Mn50Al50 and amorphous alloys such as Tb21Fe72Co7 and are first presented in this work. Further optimization includes the study of Co/[Pd/Pt]x multilayers (ML), and the development of perpendicular synthetic antiferromagnets (SAF) utilizing these multilayers. Focused work on capping and seed layers to evaluate interfacial perpendicular anisotropy in free layers for pMTJs is then discussed. Optimization of the full perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction (pMTJ) includes the CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB trilayer coupled to a pinned/pinning layer with perpendicular Co/[Pd/Pt]x SAF and a thin Ta seeded CoFeB free layer. Magnetometry, simulations, annealing studies, transport measurements and TEM analysis on these samples will then be presented.

  20. Towards developing a compact model for magnetization switching in straintronics magnetic random access memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barangi, Mahmood; Erementchouk, Mikhail; Mazumder, Pinaki

    2016-01-01

    Strain-mediated magnetization switching in a magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ) by exploiting a combination of piezoelectricity and magnetostriction has been proposed as an energy efficient alternative to spin transfer torque (STT) and field induced magnetization switching methods in MTJ-based magnetic random access memories (MRAM). Theoretical studies have shown the inherent advantages of strain-assisted switching, and the dynamic response of the magnetization has been modeled using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. However, an attempt to use LLG for simulating dynamics of individual elements in large-scale simulations of multi-megabyte straintronics MRAM leads to extremely time-consuming calculations. Hence, a compact analytical solution, predicting the flipping delay of the magnetization vector in the nanomagnet under stress, combined with a liberal approximation of the LLG dynamics in the straintronics MTJ, can lead to a simplified model of the device suited for fast large-scale simulations of multi-megabyte straintronics MRAMs. In this work, a tensor-based approach is developed to study the dynamic behavior of the stressed nanomagnet. First, using the developed method, the effect of stress on the switching behavior of the magnetization is investigated to realize the margins between the underdamped and overdamped regimes. The latter helps the designer realize the oscillatory behavior of the magnetization when settling along the minor axis, and the dependency of oscillations on the stress level and the damping factor. Next, a theoretical model to predict the flipping delay of the magnetization vector is developed and tested against LLG-based numerical simulations to confirm the accuracy of findings. Lastly, the obtained delay is incorporated into the approximate solutions of the LLG dynamics, in order to create a compact model to liberally and quickly simulate the magnetization dynamics of the MTJ under stress. Using the developed delay equation, the

  1. Randomized trial of a peer resistance skill-building game for Hispanic early adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Anne E; Hughes, Charles; Hecht, Michael; Peragallo, Nilda; Nickerson, David

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents can use peer resistance skills to avoid being pressured into risky behavior, such as early sexual behavior. Avatar-based virtual reality technology offers a novel way to help build these skills. The aims of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of an avatar-based virtual reality peer resistance skill building game (DRAMA-RAMA), to explore the impact of game play on peer resistance self-efficacy, and to assess how positively the game was perceived. Forty-four low-income early adolescent Hispanic girls were assigned randomly to either the intervention (DRAMA-RAMA) or attention control game (Wii Dancing With the Stars) condition. All participants were offered a five-session curriculum that included peer resistance skill content before playing their respective game for 15 minutes, once a week, for 2 weeks. Participants completed electronic surveys at baseline, after game play, and at 2 months to assess demographics, peer resistance self-efficacy, and sexual behavior. They also completed a paper-pencil game experience questionnaire immediately after game play. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t test, chi-square, and analyses of covariance. Separate analyses of covariance showed a significant game effect at posttest for the peer resistance self-efficacy measure (F = 4.21, p Dancing With the Stars (p > .26). This randomized control trial provides preliminary support for the hypothesis that playing an avatar-based virtual reality technology game can strengthen peer resistance skills, and early adolescent Hispanic girls will have a positive response to this game.

  2. Tribenuron-methyl resistance and mutation diversity of Pro197 in flixweed (Descurainia Sophia L.) accessions from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Liu, Ming Jie; Yang, Qian; Mei, Yu; Li, Xue Feng; Zheng, Ming Qi

    2015-01-01

    Flixweed (Descurainia Sophia L.) is a problematic weed in winter wheat fields in China, which causes great loss of wheat yield. A total of 46 flixweed accessions from winter wheat-planting areas were collected and used for the survey of resistance to tribenuron-methyl and Pro197 mutation diversity. According to the "R" resistance rating system, 16 flixweed accessions have evolved resistance to tribenuron-methyl, 13 accessions have high risk of developing resistance to this herbicide and 17 accessions are susceptible. The mutation of Pro197 codon (CCT) changed proline (Pro) into leucine (Leu) (homozygous, RR), serine (Ser, RR), histidine (His, RR), threonine (Thr, RR), Pro/Leu (heterozygous, RS), Pro/Ser (RS), Pro/His, Pro/Thr (RS) and Pro/Tyr (RS). Among these amino acid changes, a Pro197-Pro/Tyr (heterozygous, RS) substitution caused by the mutation of two successive nucleotides was identified for the first time in resistant weed species. In addition, the Pro197-His and Pro197-Pro/His mutations have not been reported previously in flixweed. Finally, a CPAS marker was developed to identify flixweed plants with or without Pro197 mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic variations of Lansium domesticum Corr. accessions from Java, Sumatra and Ceram based on Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA fingerprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUSUMADEWI SRI YULITA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Yulita KS (2011 Genetic variations of Lansium domesticum Corr. accessions from Java, Bengkulu and Ceram based on Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA fingerprints. Biodiversitas 12: 125-130. Duku (Lansium domesticum Corr. is one of popular tropical fruits in SE Asia. The spesies has three varieties, known as duku, langsat and kokosan; and duku is the most popular one for being the sweetiest fruit. Indonesia has several local varieties of duku, such as duku Condet, duku Sumber and duku Palembang. This present study aimed to assess genetic diversity of 47 accessions of duku from Java, Sumatra, and Ceram based on RAPD fingerprints. Ten RAPD’s primers were initially screened and five were selected for the analysis. These five primers (OPA 7, 13, 18, OPB 7, and OPN 12 generated 53 scorable bands with an average of 10.6 polymorphic fragment per primer. Percentage of polymorphism ranged from 16.89% (OPA 7 and OPN 12 to 24.54% (OPB 7 with an average of 20.16% polymorphism. OPB 7 at 450 bp was exclusively possessed by accession 20 (Java, OPA 18 at 500 bp was by accession 6 (Java, 550 bp by 3 clones from Bengkulu. While OPN 12 at 300 bp and OPA 13 at 450 bp were shared among the accessions. Clustering analysis was performed based on RAPD profiles using the UPGMA method. The range of genetic similarity value among accessions was 0.02-0.65 suggesting high variation of gene pool existed among accessions.

  4. A note on the effective medium theory of random resistive-reactive medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Jayannavar, A.M.

    1981-06-01

    The effective medium theory for a system with randomly distributed point conductivity and polarizability is re-formulated, with attention to cross-terms involving the two disorder parameters. The treatment reveals a certain inconsistency of the conventional theory owing to the neglect of the Maxwell-Wagner effect. The results are significant for the critical resistivity and dielectric anomalies of a binary liquid mixture at the phase-separation point. (author)

  5. Simulation of Phase-Change Random Access Memory with Ring-Type Contactor for Low Reset Current by Finite Element Modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue-Feng, Gong; Yun, Ling; Zhi-Tang, Song; Song-Lin, Feng

    2008-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element models for phase change random access memory (PCRAM) is established to simulate thermal and electrical behaviours during RESET operation. The RESET behaviours of the conventional structure (CS) and the ring-type contact in bottom electrode (RIB) are compared with each other. The simulation results indicate that the RIB cell has advantages of high heat efficiency for melting phase change material in cell, reduction of contact area and lower RESET current with maintaining good resistance contrast. The RESET current decreases from 1.26mA to 1.2mA and the heat consumption in GST material during programming increases from 12% to 37% in RIB structure. Thus the RIB structure PCRAM cell is suitable for future device with high heat efficiency and smaller RESET current. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  6. Simulation of SET Operation in Phase-Change Random Access Memories with Heater Addition and Ring-Type Contactor for Low-Power Consumption by Finite Element Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue-Feng, Gong; Zhi-Tang, Song; Yun, Ling; Yan, Liu; Song-Lin, Feng

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model for phase change random access memory (PCRAM) is established for comprehensive electrical and thermal analysis during SET operation. The SET behaviours of the heater addition structure (HS) and the ring-type contact in bottom electrode (RIB) structure are compared with each other. There are two ways to reduce the RESET current, applying a high resistivity interfacial layer and building a new device structure. The simulation results indicate that the variation of SET current with different power reduction ways is little. This study takes the RESET and SET operation current into consideration, showing that the RIB structure PCRAM cell is suitable for future devices with high heat efficiency and high-density, due to its high heat efficiency in RESET operation. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  7. Resistance of Wheat Accessions to the English Grain Aphid Sitobion avenae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiang-Shun; Liu, Ying-Jie; Wang, Yu-Han; Wang, Zhe; Yu, Xin-lin; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Gai-Sheng; Liu, Xiao-Feng; Hu, Zu-Qing; Zhao, Hui-Yan; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2016-01-01

    The English grain aphid, Sitobion avenae, is a major pest species of wheat crops; however, certain varieties may have stronger resistance to infestation than others. Here, we investigated 3 classical resistance mechanisms (antixenosis, antibiosis, and tolerance) by 14 wheat varieties/lines to S. avenae under laboratory and field conditions. Under laboratory conditions, alatae given the choice between 2 wheat varieties, strongly discriminated against certain varieties. Specifically, the ‘Amigo’ variety had the lowest palatability to S. avenae alatae of all varieties. ‘Tm’ (Triticum monococcum), ‘Astron,’ ‘Xanthus,’ ‘Ww2730,’ and ‘Batis’ varieties also had lower palatability than other varieties. Thus, these accessions may use antibiosis as the resistant mechanism. In contrast, under field conditions, there were no significant differences in the number of alatae detected on the 14 wheat varieties. One synthetic line (98-10-30, a cross between of Triticum aestivum (var. Chris) and Triticum turgidum (var. durum) hybridization) had low aphid numbers but high yield loss, indicating that it has high antibiosis, but poor tolerance. In comparison, ‘Amigo,’ ‘Xiaoyan22,’ and some ‘186Tm’ samples had high aphid numbers but low yield loss rates, indicating they have low antibiosis, but good tolerance. Aphid population size and wheat yield loss rates greatly varied in different fields and years for ‘98-10-35,’ ‘Xiaoyan22,’ ‘Tp,’ ‘Tam200,’ ‘PI high,’ and other ‘186Tm’ samples, which were hybrid offspring of T. aestivum and wheat related species. Thus, these germplasm should be considered for use in future studies. Overall, S. avenae is best adapted to ‘Xinong1376,’ because it was the most palatable variety, with the greatest yield loss rates of all 14 wheat varieties. However, individual varieties/lines influenced aphid populations differently in different years. Therefore, we strongly recommend a combination of

  8. Identification and mapping of resistance genes to Phakopsora pachyrhizi in soybean (Glycine max L.) accession PI 594767-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, G A F; Alves, D P; Oliveira, J C; Brommonschenke, S H

    2016-08-05

    The goal of this study was to study resistance inheritance in the soybean (Glycine max L.) accession PI 594767-A to the Phakopsora pachyrhizi isolate PPUFV02, and map the resistance gene(s) identified using microsatellite markers. Crosses between PI 594767-A and the susceptible cultivar 'Conquista' gave rise to the segregating subpopulations 26C-2 and 26C-5, which in the F2 generation were evaluated for their reactions to PPUFV02. In addition, analyses with microsatellite markers linked to the Rpp1-Rpp5 loci were also performed. The segregation pattern obtained in 26C-2 revealed that resistance was governed by a recessive gene; a 1:2:1 segregation pattern was observed in 26C-5, indicating control by a gene with partial dominance. This variability may have been caused because environmental conditions, particularly temperature, when 26C-5 was assessed were unfavorable for pathogen development, allowing the phenotypic expression of heterozygous alleles in PI 594767-A. A resistance gene was located in the soybean linkage group G, in the genomic region between Sct_187r2 and Sat_064 that contains the Rpp1 locus. Resistance in PI 594767-A is probably conferred by a new Rpp1 gene allele, because this accession has a haplotype for Sct_187r2 and Sat_064, which differs from haplotypes of accessions that also contain resistance alleles that map the Rpp1 locus. The use of Sct_187r2 and Sat_064 will facilitate the introgression of the resistance allele from PI 594767-A and its pyramiding with other resistance genes into genotypes with superior agronomic characteristics, in order to obtain cultivars with broad-spectrum resistance to P. pachyrhizi.

  9. Design Optimization of Back-Gated Thin-Body Silicon-on-Insulator Capacitorless Dynamic Random Access Memory Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min Hee; Shin, Changhwan; King Liu, Tsu-Jae

    2012-02-01

    Highly scaled (22 nm-node) capacitorless single-transistor dynamic random access memory (DRAM) cell design is investigated via technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulations. It is found that the gate-sidewall spacer width and operating voltages can be adjusted to reduce band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) and thereby increase data retention time for bipolar junction transistor (BJT)-based operation. Read current variations due to random dopant fluctuations (RDF) are investigated via three-dimensional Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations. It is found that BJT-based operation is more robust to RDF effects than metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET)-based operation.

  10. Mapping quantitative trait loci conferring resistance to a widely virulent isolate of Cochliobolus sativus in wild barley accession PI 466423.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Matthew; Menke, Jon; Chao, Shiaoman; Steffenson, Brian J

    2016-10-01

    This research characterized the genetics of resistance of wild barley accession PI 466423 to a widely virulent pathotype of Cochliobolus sativus . Breeding lines were identified that combine the Midwest Six-rowed Durable Resistance Haplotype and resistance to the virulent isolate ND4008. Spot blotch, caused by Cochliobolus sativus, is a historically important foliar disease of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in the Upper Midwest region of the USA. However, for the last 50 years this disease has been of little consequence due to the deployment of resistant six-rowed malting cultivars. These durably resistant cultivars carry the Midwest Six-rowed Durable Resistant Haplotype (MSDRH) comprised of three Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) on chromosomes 1H, 3H and 7H, originally contributed by breeding line NDB112. Recent reports of C. sativus isolates (e.g. ND4008) with virulence on NDB112 indicate that widely grown cultivars of the region are vulnerable to spot blotch epidemics. Wild barley (H. vulgare ssp. spontaneum), the progenitor of cultivated barley, is a rich source of novel alleles, especially for disease resistance. Wild barley accession PI 466423 is highly resistant to C. sativus isolate ND4008. To determine the genetic architecture of resistance to isolate ND4008 in PI 466423, we phenotyped and genotyped an advanced backcross population (N = 244) derived from the wild accession and the recurrent parent 'Rasmusson', a Minnesota cultivar with the MSDRH. Disease phenotyping was done on BC2F4 seedlings in the greenhouse using isolate ND4008. The Rasmusson/PI 466423 population was genotyped with 7842 single nucleotide polymorphic markers. QTL analysis using composite interval mapping revealed four resistance loci on chromosomes 1H, 2H, 4H and 5H explaining 10.3, 7.4, 6.4 and 8.4 % of the variance, respectively. Resistance alleles on chromosomes 1H, 4H and 5H were contributed by PI 466423, whereas the one on chromosome 2H was contributed by Rasmusson. All four

  11. Universal access to care for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: an analysis of surveillance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzon, Dennis; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Wares, Fraser; Zignol, Matteo; Floyd, Katherine; Raviglione, Mario C

    2013-08-01

    The prospects for global tuberculosis control in the near future will be determined by the effectiveness of the response of countries to their burden of multidrug-resistant (MDR; resistance to, at least, isoniazid and rifampicin) tuberculosis. During the 2009 World Health Assembly, countries committed to achieve universal access to MDR-tuberculosis care by 2015. We assessed the progress towards the 2015 targets achieved by countries accounting for 90% of the estimated MDR-tuberculosis cases in the world in 2011. We analysed data reported to WHO by 30 countries expected to have more than 1000 MDR-tuberculosis cases among notified patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in 2011. In the 30 countries, 18% of the estimated MDR-tuberculosis cases were enrolled on treatment in 2011. Belarus, Brazil, Kazakhstan, Peru, South Africa, and Ukraine each detected and enrolled on treatment more than 50% of their estimated cases of MDR-tuberculosis. In Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Russia, enrolments increased steadily between 2009 and 2011 with a mean yearly change greater than 50%: however, in these countries enrolment in 2011 was low, ranging from 4% to 43% of the estimated cases. In the remaining countries (Afghanistan, Angola, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, China, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Mozambique, Burma, Nepal, Nigeria, North Korea, Pakistan, South Korea, Thailand, Uzbekistan, and Vietnam) progress in detection and enrolment was slower. In 23 countries, a median of 53% (IQR 41-71) patients with MDR-tuberculosis successfully completed their treatment after starting it in 2008-09. Six countries (Belarus, Brazil, Kazakhstan, Peru, South Africa, and Ukraine) can achieve universal access to MDR-tuberculosis care by 2015 should they sustain their current pace of progress. In other countries a radical scale-up will be needed for them to have an effect on their MDR-tuberculosis burden. Unless barriers to diagnosis and successful

  12. Resistance to lettuce aphid (Nasonovia ribisnigri) biotype 0 in wild lettuce accessions PI 491093 and PI 274378

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettuce aphid, Nasonovia ribisnigri Mosley (Homoptera : Aphididae), is a major insect pest of lettuce, Lactuca sativa L, in many commercial lettuce productions areas around the world. Resistance to lettuce aphid was first reported in Lactuca virosa L. accession IVT 280 and characterized as complete,...

  13. Evaluation of soybean germplasm accessions for resistance to Phakopsora pachyrhizi populations in the southeastern United States, 2009-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] germplasm accessions from the USDA Soybean Germplasm Collection were screened for resistance to soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) at up to five locations in the southeastern United States in 2009, 2011 and 2012. In 2009, plant introductions (PIs) from maturity gro...

  14. Effectiveness of Supplementary Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pharmacotherapy-Resistant Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Atsuo; Mitsuda, Dai; Sado, Mitsuhiro; Abe, Takayuki; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Iwashita, Satoru; Mimura, Masaru; Ono, Yutaka

    Antidepressant medication is efficacious in the treatment of depression, but not all patients improve with antidepressant medication alone. Despite this treatment gap, limited evidence regarding the effectiveness of supplementing psychotherapy for pharmacotherapy-resistant depression is available. Therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of supplementing usual medication management (treatment as usual [TAU]) with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in patients with pharmacotherapy-resistant depression seeking psychiatric specialty care. A 16-week assessor-masked randomized controlled trial with a 12-month follow-up was conducted in 1 university hospital and 1 psychiatric hospital from September 2008 to December 2014. Outpatients aged 20-65 years with pharmacotherapy-resistant depression (taking antidepressant medications for ≥ 8 weeks, 17-item GRID-Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [GRID-HDRS₁₇] score ≥ 16, Maudsley Staging Method for treatment-resistant depression score ≥ 3, and DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder) were randomly assigned (1:1) to CBT combined with TAU or to TAU alone. The primary outcome was the alleviation of depressive symptoms, as measured by change in the total GRID-HDRS₁₇ score from baseline to 16 weeks; primary analysis was done on an intention-to-treat basis. A total of 80 patients were randomized; 78 (97.5%) were assessed for the primary outcome, and 73 (91.3%) were followed up for 12 months. Supplementary CBT significantly alleviated depressive symptoms at 16 weeks, as shown by greater least squares mean changes in GRID-HDRS₁₇ scores in the intervention group than in the control group (-12.7 vs -7.4; difference = -5.4; 95% CI, -8.1 to -2.6; P depression treated in psychiatric specialty care settings may benefit from supplementing usual medication management with CBT. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry identifier: UMIN000001218​​. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  15. Identifying co-targets to fight drug resistance based on a random walk model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liang-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug resistance has now posed more severe and emergent threats to human health and infectious disease treatment. However, wet-lab approaches alone to counter drug resistance have so far still achieved limited success due to less knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance. Our approach apply a heuristic search algorithm in order to extract active network under drug treatment and use a random walk model to identify potential co-targets for effective antibacterial drugs. Results We use interactome network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and gene expression data which are treated with two kinds of antibiotic, Isoniazid and Ethionamide as our test data. Our analysis shows that the active drug-treated networks are associated with the trigger of fatty acid metabolism and synthesis and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH-related processes and those results are consistent with the recent experimental findings. Efflux pumps processes appear to be the major mechanisms of resistance but SOS response is significantly up-regulation under Isoniazid treatment. We also successfully identify the potential co-targets with literature confirmed evidences which are related to the glycine-rich membrane, adenosine triphosphate energy and cell wall processes. Conclusions With gene expression and interactome data supported, our study points out possible pathways leading to the emergence of drug resistance under drug treatment. We develop a computational workflow for giving new insights to bacterial drug resistance which can be gained by a systematic and global analysis of the bacterial regulation network. Our study also discovers the potential co-targets with good properties in biological and graph theory aspects to overcome the problem of drug resistance.

  16. Fabrication and properties of nanoscale multiferroic heterostructures for application in magneto-electric random access memory (MERAM) devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gunwoo

    Magnetoelectric random access memory (MERAM) has emerged as a promising new class of non-volatile solid-state memory device. It offers nondestructive reading along with low power consumption during the write operation. A common implementation of MERAM involves use of multiferroic tunneling junctions (MFTJs), which besides offering non-volatility are both electrically and magnetically tunable. Fundamentally, a MFTJ consists of a heterostructure of an ultrathin multiferroic or ferroelectric material as the active tunneling barrier sandwiched between ferromagnetic electrodes. Thereby, the MFTJ exhibits both tunnel electroresistance (TER) and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effects with application of an electric and magnetic field, respectively. In this thesis work, we have developed two-dimensional (2D) thin-film multiferroic heterostructure METJ prototypes consisting of ultrathin ferroelectric BaTiO3 (BTO) layer and a conducting ferromagnetic La0.67Sr 0.33MnO3 (LSMO) electrode. The heteroepitaxial films are grown using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. This oxide heterostructure offers the opportunity to study the nano-scale details of the tunnel electroresistance (TER) effect using scanning probe microscopy techniques. We performed the measurements using the MFP-3D (Asylum Research) scanning probe microscope. The ultrathin BTO films (1.2-2.0 nm) grown on LSMO electrodes display both ferro- and piezo-electric properties and exhibit large tunnel resistance effect. We have explored the growth and properties of one-dimensional (1D) heterostructures, referred to as multiferoric nanowire (NW) heterostructures. The ferromagnetic/ferroelectric composite heterostructures are grown as sheath layers using PLD on lattice-matched template NWs, e.g. MgO, that are deposited by chemical vapor deposition utilizing the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. The one-dimensional geometry can substantially overcome the clamping effect of the substrate present in two

  17. Values, inter-attitudinal structure, and attitude change: value accessibility can increase a related attitude's resistance to change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Kevin L; Wegener, Duane T; Murray, Renee A

    2015-12-01

    Accessibility is one of the most basic structural properties of an attitude and an important factor to consider in attitude strength. Despite its importance, relatively little work has examined the role of attitude accessibility in an inter-attitudinal context, particularly as it relates to the strength of related attitudes in the network. The present research examines accessibility as a property of one attitude (toward an abstract goal or end-state, that is, a value) that might influence the strength of a different but related attitude (toward a social policy conceptually related to the value). In Study 1, a highly accessible evaluative component of a value increased resistance to change of attitudes and behavioral intentions toward a social policy related to that value. Similarly, a manipulation of value accessibility (Studies 2 and 3) led to increased resistance of attitudes and behavioral intentions toward a social policy related to that value. Implications for the role of accessibility in inter-attitudinal strength are discussed. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  18. Resistance exercise improves physical fatigue in women with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Anna; Palstam, Annie; Larsson, Anette; Löfgren, Monika; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Bjersing, Jan; Gerdle, Björn; Kosek, Eva; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa

    2016-07-30

    Fibromyalgia (FM) affects approximately 1-3 % of the general population. Fatigue limits the work ability and social life of patients with FM. A few studies of physical exercise have included measures of fatigue in FM, indicating that exercise can decrease fatigue levels. There is limited knowledge about the effects of resistance exercise on multiple dimensions of fatigue in FM. The present study is a sub-study of a multicenter randomized controlled trial in women with FM. The purpose of the present sub-study was to examine the effects of a person-centered progressive resistance exercise program on multiple dimensions of fatigue in women with FM, and to investigate predictors of the potential change in fatigue. A total of 130 women with FM (age 22-64 years) were included in this assessor-blinded randomized controlled multicenter trial examining the effects of person-centered progressive resistance exercise compared with an active control group. The intervention was performed twice a week for 15 weeks. Outcomes were five dimensions of fatigue measured with the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20). Information about background was collected and the women also completed several health-related questionnaires. Multiple linear stepwise regression was used to analyze predictors of change in fatigue in the total population. A higher improvement was found at the post-treatment examination for change in the resistance exercise group, as compared to change in the active control group in the MFI-20 subscale of physical fatigue (resistance group Δ -1.7, SD 4.3, controls Δ 0.0, SD 2.7, p = 0.013), with an effect size of 0.33. Sleep efficiency was the strongest predictor of change in the MFI-20 subscale general fatigue (beta = -0.54, p = 0.031, R (2) = 0.05). Participating in resistance exercise (beta = 1.90, p = 0.010) and working fewer hours per week (beta = 0.84, p = 0.005) were independent significant predictors of change in physical

  19. Random Transposon Mutagenesis for Cell-Envelope Resistant to Phage Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Cortés, Ruth; Arguijo-Hernández, Emma S; Carballo-Ontiveros, Marco A; Martínez-Peñafiel, Eva; Kameyama, Luis

    2016-01-01

    In order to identify host components involved in the infective process of bacteriophages, we developed a wide-range strategy to obtain cell envelope mutants, using Escherichia coli W3110 and its specific phage mEp213. The strategy consisted in four steps: (1) random mutagenesis using transposon miniTn10Km(r); (2) selection of phage-resistant mutants by replica-plating; (3) electroporation of the phage-resistant mutants with mEp213 genome, followed by selection of those allowing phage development; and (4) sequencing of the transposon-disrupted genes. This strategy allowed us to distinguish the host factors related to phage development or multiplication within the cell, from those involved in phage infection at the level of the cell envelope.

  20. New high resolution Random Telegraph Noise (RTN) characterization method for resistive RAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestro, M.; Diaz, J.; Crespo-Yepes, A.; Gonzalez, M. B.; Martin-Martinez, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Nafria, M.; Campabadal, F.; Aymerich, X.

    2016-01-01

    Random Telegraph Noise (RTN) is one of the main reliability problems of resistive switching-based memories. To understand the physics behind RTN, a complete and accurate RTN characterization is required. The standard equipment used to analyse RTN has a typical time resolution of ∼2 ms which prevents evaluating fast phenomena. In this work, a new RTN measurement procedure, which increases the measurement time resolution to 2 μs, is proposed. The experimental set-up, together with the recently proposed Weighted Time Lag (W-LT) method for the analysis of RTN signals, allows obtaining a more detailed and precise information about the RTN phenomenon.

  1. Effects on nasal airflow and resistance using two different RME appliances: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargani, Farhan; Magnuson, Anders; Ludwig, Björn

    2017-10-21

    To evaluate and compare the effects of tooth-borne (TB) and tooth-bone-borne (TBB) rapid maxillary expansion (RME) on nasal airflow and resistance. Fifty-four consecutive patients who met the eligibility criteria were recruited from September 2010 to December 2015. Of these 54 subjects, 40 agreed to participate in the part of the study involving evaluation of nasal flow and resistance. The 40 subjects were allocated to either the TB group, mean age 9.7 years (SD 1.5), or the TBB group, mean age 10.2 years (SD 1.4). All subjects performed rhinomanometric registration at baseline (T0), but only 30 attended the post-expansion registration (T1), of whom 16 had been randomized to the TB group and 14 to the TBB group. The study outcomes, nasal airflow and nasal airway resistance, were evaluated with linear regression adjusted for baseline variable of the outcome to compare the study groups with complete cases strategy as well as after multiple imputation (MI). Participants were randomly allocated in blocks of different sizes, using the concealed allocation principle in a 1:1 ratio. The randomization list was computer generated to ensure homogeneity between groups. Blinding was done only for outcome assessor due to clinical limitations. The care providers at the ENT unit who conducted all the rhinomanometry examinations were blinded to which group the patients were allocated to. Complete case analysis showed significantly higher post-expansion nasal airflow values for the TBB group compared with the TB group, mean difference 51.0 cm3/s (P = 0.018). The evaluation after MI showed a similar significant mean difference, 52.7 cm3/s (P = 0.020) in favour of the TBB group when taking into account the missing values from the T1 examination. Even reduction in nasal airway resistance showed similar pattern in favour of the TBB group. Our results represent the short-term effects. A longer follow-up period would have been preferable. The TBB RME induced significantly higher nasal

  2. Making medical devices accessible: a drug-resistant malaria detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilkstein, Tina

    2006-01-01

    People living in areas of the world that are affected by disease, famine, or poverty could have their lives drastically improved by currently available electronic technologies, but the cost, complexity and/or limited operating environments of devices which employ these technologies can make it impossible or impractical for many of those in-need populations to actually acquire and make use of them. The barriers to acquisition and use are understandable. Most medical device companies are located in the wealthier countries, as are their clientele, and, to these companies, taking technological advances and either creating new products, or make their pre-existing products more powerful is the logical business and scientific progression. As such, devices seen in production that would be useful are often hospital grade with high-accuracy and varying amounts of adjustability so as to allow them to be used in performing a variety of functions. But it is exactly this accuracy and flexibility that makes them too expensive and complex to easily be acquired and used in environments that have limited financial and skill resources. In this paper, as an example of how to make presently inaccessible technology accessible, a method of detecting drug-resistant malaria strains in laboratories is analyzed, barriers to use of such a system in a poorer, malaria affected region are looked at, and a device is designed and a prototype built that is simple and affordable. Such a system not only allows collection of epidemiological information, but also empowers doctors and researchers to investigate new drugs without expensive laboratories.

  3. Solution-processed flexible NiO resistive random access memory device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Jung; Lee, Heon; Hong, Sung-Hoon

    2018-04-01

    Non-volatile memories (NVMs) using nanocrystals (NCs) as active materials can be applied to soft electronic devices requiring a low-temperature process because NCs do not require a heat treatment process for crystallization. In addition, memory devices can be implemented simply by using a patterning technique using a solution process. In this study, a flexible NiO ReRAM device was fabricated using a simple NC patterning method that controls the capillary force and dewetting of a NiO NC solution at low temperature. The switching behavior of a NiO NC based memory was clearly observed by conductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM).

  4. ADNP-CSMA Random Multiple Access protocol application with the function of monitoring in Ad Hoc network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Gang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Ad Hoc networks,the net work of mobile nodes exchange information with their wireless transceiver equipment,the network throughput is in increased,compared to other such multiple hops network.Moreover along with the rapid development of modern information,communication business also will be increase.However,the access and adaptive of previous CSMA protocol are insufficient.According to these properties,this paper presents a kind of adaptive dual clock with monitoring function P-CSMA random multiple access protocol(ADNP-CSMA,and discusses two kinds of P-CSMA.ACK with monitoring function is introduced to maintain the stability of the whole system,and the introduction of dual clock mechanism reduces the channel of idle period.It calculate the system throughput expression through the method of average period,and the simulation results show that the system is constant in the case of high load throughput.

  5. Characterization of three loci controlling resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana accession Ms-0 to two powdery mildew diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, S; Ellwood, S; Findlay, K; Oliver, R P; Turner, J G

    1997-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana accession La-er was susceptible, and accession Ms-0 was resistant, to powdery mildew diseases caused by Erysiphe cruciferarum UEA1 and E. cichoracearum UCSC1. The resistance reaction phenotype of A. thaliana Ms-0 to both pathogens was characterized, and the resistance loci were genetically mapped. Growth of E. cruciferarum UEA1 on Ms-0 leaves was arrested after formation of the first appressorium: the underlying host epidermal cell collapsed, and occasionally there was necrosis of one or two host mesophyll cells. Growth of E. cichoracearum UCSC1 on Ms-0 leaves was arrested after emergence of several germ tubes from the conidium, and there was necrosis of host mesophyll cells at the sites of infection. Examination of F2 progeny of a cross La-er x Ms-0 indicated that two independently-segregating dominant loci were required for resistance to E. cruciferarum UEA1. One locus, named RPW6, was genetically mapped to chromosome 5, in a 5.6 cM interval flanked by pCITf16 and PI. The other locus, named RPW7, mapped to chromosome 3 in a 8.5 cM interval flanked by CDC2A and AFC1. Independent effects of RPW6 and RPW7 on E. cruciferarum UEA1 could be detected by quantitative measurements of growth of mycelium and production of conidia. Resistance to E. cichoracearum UCSC1 mapped to a single locus, named RPW8, at a location on chromosome 3 which we could not distinguish from RPW7. Evidently, RPW7 and RPW8 define either a complex resistance locus, or a common resistance gene with dual specificity.

  6. Fine Mapping and Characterization of Candidate Genes that Control Resistance to Cercospora sojina K. Hara in Two Soybean Germplasm Accessions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh-Tung Pham

    Full Text Available Frogeye leaf spot (FLS, caused by the fungus Cercospora sojina K. Hara, may cause a significant yield loss to soybean growers in regions with a warm and humid climate. Two soybean accessions, PI 594891 and PI 594774, were identified to carry a high level of resistance similar to that conditioned by the Rcs3 gene in 'Davis'. Previously, we reported that the resistance to FLS in these two plant introductions (PIs was controlled by a novel gene (s on chromosome 13 that is different from Rcs3. To fine-map the novel FLS resistance gene(s in these two PIs, F2: 3 seeds from the crosses between PI 594891 and PI 594774, and the FLS susceptible genotype 'Blackhawk' were genotyped with SNP markers that were designed based on the SoySNP50k iSelect BeadChip data to identify recombinant events and locate candidate genes. Analysis of lines possessing key recombination events helped narrow down the FLS-resistance genomic region in PI 594891 from 3.3 Mb to a 72.6 kb region with five annotated genes. The resistance gene in PI 594774 was fine-mapped into a 540 kb region that encompasses the 72.6 kb region found in PI 594891. Sequencing five candidate genes in PI 594891 identified three genes that have several mutations in the promoter, intron, 5', and 3' UTR regions. qPCR analysis showed a difference in expression levels of these genes in both lines compared to Blackhawk in the presence of C. sojina. Based on phenotype, genotype and haplotype analysis results, these two soybean accessions might carry different resistance alleles of the same gene or two different gene(s. The identified SNPs were used to develop Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR (KASP assays to detect the resistance alleles on chromosome 13 from the two PIs for marker-assisted selection.

  7. Effect of an occlusal screw-access hole on the fracture resistance of permanently cemented implant crowns: a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadid, Rola M; Abu-Naba'a, Layla; Al-Omari, Wael M; Asfar, Khaled R; El Masoud, Bilal M

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the fracture resistance of cement-retained metal-ceramic implant-supported posterior crowns. Three groups of 10 restorations each were tested: group A (cement-retained using zinc phosphate), group B (cement-retained using zinc oxide-eugenol), and group C (cement-retained using zinc phosphate but with an occlusal screw-access hole). All specimens were thermocycled and vertically loaded in a universal testing machine. Mean values of fracture loads were calculated and analyzed statistically. The cement-retained restorations without an occlusal screw-access hole showed significantly higher mean fracture loads than those having one. The type of cement did not affect the porcelain fracture resistance significantly.

  8. Subthreshold-swing-adjustable tunneling-field-effect-transistor-based random-access memory for nonvolatile operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, In; Cheon, Woo Young; Choi, Woo Young

    2016-04-01

    A subthreshold-swing-adjustable tunneling-field-effect-transistor-based random-access memory (SAT RAM) has been proposed and fabricated for low-power nonvolatile memory applications. The proposed SAT RAM cell demonstrates adjustable subthreshold swing (SS) depending on stored information: small SS in the erase state ("1" state) and large SS in the program state ("0" state). Thus, SAT RAM cells can achieve low read voltage (Vread) with a large memory window in addition to the effective suppression of ambipolar behavior. These unique features of the SAT RAM are originated from the locally stored charge, which modulates the tunneling barrier width (Wtun) of the source-to-channel tunneling junction.

  9. Development of measurement system for radiation effect on static random access memory based field programmable gate array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zhibin; He Baoping; Zhang Fengqi; Guo Hongxia; Luo Yinhong; Wang Yuanming; Zhang Keying

    2009-01-01

    Based on the detailed investigation in field programmable gate array(FPGA) radiation effects theory, a measurement system for radiation effects on static random access memory(SRAM)-based FPGA was developed. The testing principle of internal memory, function and power current was introduced. The hardware and software implement means of system were presented. Some important parameters for radiation effects on SRAM-based FPGA, such as configuration RAM upset section, block RAM upset section, function fault section and single event latchup section can be gained with this system. The transmission distance of the system can be over 50 m and the maximum number of tested gates can reach one million. (authors)

  10. Synergistic effects of total ionizing dose on single event upset sensitivity in static random access memory under proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Yao; Guo Hong-Xia; Zhang Feng-Qi; Zhao Wen; Wang Yan-Ping; Zhang Ke-Ying; Ding Li-Li; Luo Yin-Hong; Wang Yuan-Ming; Fan Xue

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic effects of the total ionizing dose (TID) on the single event upset (SEU) sensitivity in static random access memories (SRAMs) were studied by using protons. The total dose was cumulated with high flux protons during the TID exposure, and the SEU cross section was tested with low flux protons at several cumulated dose steps. Because of the radiation-induced off-state leakage current increase of the CMOS transistors, the noise margin became asymmetric and the memory imprint effect was observed. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  11. The role of adding metformin in insulin-resistant diabetic pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Moustafa Ibrahim; Hamdy, Ahmed; Shafik, Adel; Taha, Salah; Anwar, Mohammed; Faris, Mohammed

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess the impact of adding oral metformin to insulin therapy in pregnant women with insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus. The current non-inferiority randomized controlled trial was conducted at Ain Shams University Maternity Hospital. The study included pregnant women with gestational or pre-existing diabetes mellitus at gestations between 20 and 34 weeks, who showed insulin resistance (defined as poor glycemic control at a daily dose of ≥1.12 units/kg). Recruited women were randomized into one of two groups: group I, including women who received oral metformin without increasing the insulin dose; and group II, including women who had their insulin dose increased. The primary outcome was maternal glycemic control. Secondary outcomes included maternal bouts of hypoglycemia, need for another hospital admission for uncontrolled diabetes during pregnancy, gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, birth weight, birth trauma, congenital anomalies, 1- and 5-min Apgar score, neonatal hypoglycemia, need for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and adverse neonatal outcomes. A total number of 154 women with diabetes mellitus with pregnancy were approached; of them 90 women were eligible and were randomly allocated and included in the final analysis. The recruited 90 women were randomized into one of two groups: group I (metformin group) (n = 46), including women who received oral metformin in addition to the same initial insulin dose; and group II (control group) (n = 44), including women who had their insulin dose increased according to the standard protocol. The mean age of included women was 29.84 ± 5.37 years (range 20-42 years). The mean gestational age at recruitment was 28.7 ± 3.71 weeks (range 21-34 weeks). Among the 46 women of group I, 17 (36.9 %) women reached proper glycemic control at a daily metformin dose of 1,500 mg, 18 (39.2 %) at a daily dose of 2,000 mg, while 11 (23.9 %) received metformin at a daily

  12. Progressive resistance exercise in women with osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Renata Trajano Borges; Souza, Marcelo Cardoso de; Chiari, Aline; Jones, Anamaria; Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa; Lombardi Júnior, Império; Natour, Jamil

    2015-03-01

    To determine the effect of a progressive resistance exercise (PRE) program on women with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Eligible subjects included women aged 40 to 70 years with pain between 3 and 8 on a 10-cm pain scale. Among the 144 subjects screened, 60 met the eligibility criteria and were randomized to the experimental group (EG) or control group (CG). Subjects in the EG participated in a 12-week PRE program twice a week and CG remained on a waiting list for physical therapy. The PRE program consisted of strengthening exercises for knee extensors, knee flexors, hip abductors and hip adductors, all performed with 50% and 70% of the one-repetition maximum (1RM) using machines with free weights. Resistance was reevaluated every two weeks. Assessments of pain, muscle strength, walking distance, function and quality of life were performed at baseline, six weeks and 12 weeks by a blinded assessor. Twenty-nine female subjects were randomly assigned to the EG and 31 were randomly assigned to the CG. Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed significantly better results in the EG pain (from 7.0±1.3 to 4.3±3.1 in the EG and from 7.0±1.2 to 6.6±1.5 in the CG - pmuscle strength (extensors: p<0.001; flexors: p=0.002; and abductors: p<0.001). The PRE program was effective in reducing pain and improving function, some quality of life domains and strength in women with OA of the knee. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. A Randomized Trial Comparing Two Tongue-Pressure Resistance Training Protocols for Post-Stroke Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M; Bayley, Mark T; Peladeau-Pigeon, Melanie; Nagy, Ahmed; Namasivayam, Ashwini M; Stokely, Shauna L; Wolkin, Talia

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the outcomes of two tongue resistance training protocols. One protocol ("tongue-pressure profile training") emphasized the pressure-timing patterns that are typically seen in healthy swallows by focusing on gradual pressure release and saliva swallowing tasks. The second protocol ("tongue-pressure strength and accuracy training") emphasized strength and accuracy in tongue-palate pressure generation and did not include swallowing tasks. A prospective, randomized, parallel allocation trial was conducted. Of 26 participants who were screened for eligibility, 14 received up to 24 sessions of treatment. Outcome measures of posterior tongue strength, oral bolus control, penetration-aspiration and vallecular residue were made based on videofluoroscopy analysis by blinded raters. Complete data were available for 11 participants. Significant improvements were seen in tongue strength and post-swallow vallecular residue with thin liquids, regardless of treatment condition. Stage transition duration (a measure of the duration of the bolus presence in the pharynx prior to swallow initiation, which had been chosen to capture impairments in oral bolus control) showed no significant differences. Similarly, significant improvements were not seen in median scores on the penetration-aspiration scale. This trial suggests that tongue strength can be improved with resistance training for individuals with tongue weakness following stroke. We conclude that improved penetration-aspiration does not necessarily accompany improvements in tongue strength; however, tongue-pressure resistance training does appear to be effective for reducing thin liquid vallecular residue.

  14. Radiation immune RAM semiconductor technology for the 80's. [Random Access Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, W. A.; Panagos, P.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents current and short term future characteristics of RAM semiconductor technologies which were obtained by literature survey and discussions with cognizant Government and industry personnel. In particular, total ionizing dose tolerance and high energy particle susceptibility of the technologies are addressed. Technologies judged compatible with spacecraft applications are ranked to determine the best current and future technology for fast access (less than 60 ns), radiation tolerant RAM.

  15. Dynamic chromatin accessibility modeled by Markov process of randomly-moving molecules in the 3D genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinan; Fan, Caoqi; Zheng, Yuxuan; Li, Cheng

    2017-06-02

    Chromatin three-dimensional (3D) structure plays critical roles in gene expression regulation by influencing locus interactions and accessibility of chromatin regions. Here we propose a Markov process model to derive a chromosomal equilibrium distribution of randomly-moving molecules as a functional consequence of spatially organized genome 3D structures. The model calculates steady-state distributions (SSD) from Hi-C data as quantitative measures of each chromatin region's dynamic accessibility for transcription factors and histone modification enzymes. Different from other Hi-C derived features such as compartment A/B and interaction hubs, or traditional methods measuring chromatin accessibility such as DNase-seq and FAIRE-seq, SSD considers both chromatin-chromatin and protein-chromatin interactions. Through our model, we find that SSD could capture the chromosomal equilibrium distributions of activation histone modifications and transcription factors. Compared with compartment A/B, SSD has higher correlations with the binding of these histone modifications and transcription factors. In addition, we find that genes located in high SSD regions tend to be expressed at higher level. Furthermore, we track the change of genome organization during stem cell differentiation, and propose a two-stage model to explain the dynamic change of SSD and gene expression during differentiation, where chromatin organization genes first gain chromatin accessibility and are expressed before lineage-specific genes do. We conclude that SSD is a novel and better measure of dynamic chromatin activity and accessibility. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Treatment-Resistant Hypertension and Outcomes Based on Randomized Treatment Group in ALLHAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangalore, Sripal; Davis, Barry R; Cushman, William C; Pressel, Sara L; Muntner, Paul M; Calhoun, David A; Kostis, John B; Whelton, Paul K; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Rahman, Mahboob; Black, Henry R

    2017-04-01

    Although hypertension guidelines define treatment-resistant hypertension as blood pressure uncontrolled by ≥3 antihypertensive medications, including a diuretic, it is unknown whether patient prognosis differs when a diuretic is included. Participants in the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) were randomly assigned to first-step therapy with chlorthalidone, amlodipine, or lisinopril. At a Year 2 follow-up visit, those with average blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg systolic or ≥90 mm Hg diastolic on ≥3 antihypertensive medications, or blood pressure heart disease or nonfatal myocardial infarction) and secondary (all-cause mortality, stroke, heart failure, combined coronary heart disease, and combined cardiovascular disease) outcomes were identified for each treatment group. Of participants assigned to chlorthalidone, amlodipine, or lisinopril, 9.6%, 11.4%, and 19.7%, respectively, had treatment-resistant hypertension. During mean follow-up of 2.9 years, primary outcome incidence was similar for those assigned to chlorthalidone compared with amlodipine or lisinopril (amlodipine- vs chlorthalidone-adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.53-1.39; P = .53; lisinopril- vs chlorthalidone-adjusted HR = 1.06; 95% CI, 0.70-1.60; P = .78). Secondary outcome risks were similar for most comparisons except coronary revascularization, which was higher with amlodipine than with chlorthalidone (HR 1.86; 95% CI, 1.11-3.11; P = .02). An as-treated analysis based on diuretic use produced similar results. In this study, which titrated medications to a goal, participants assigned to chlorthalidone were less likely to develop treatment-resistant hypertension. However, prognoses in those with treatment-resistant hypertension were similar across treatment groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prospective randomized comparison of short-access mother-baby cholangioscopy versus direct cholangioscopy with ultraslim gastroscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Juergen; Meves, Volker C; Mayer, Gerhard; Behrens, Angelika; Frimberger, Eckart; Ell, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Mother-baby technologies, the criterion standard for cholangioscopy, have several limitations. A novel, short-access, mother-baby (SAMBA) system may improve this technique. Direct cholangioscopy (DC) was recently developed as an alternative to mother-baby cholangioscopy. Comparison of success rates with SAMBA and DC. Single-center, randomized, controlled trial. Academic tertiary-care referral center. Sixty patients with suspected cholangiopathies randomized to either SAMBA (n = 30) or DC (n = 30). Cholangioscopy under deep sedation. Technical success rate of diagnostic or therapeutic procedure. A total of 24 and 21 diagnostic procedures were performed in the SAMBA and DC groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in the overall technical success rates between SAMBA (90.0%) and DC (86.7%) (P = 1.0). There was better correlation between the endoscopic prediction and histologic findings in DC (P = .013). Procedure times were shorter in DC (P SAMBA allowed intrahepatic bile duct exploration in all cases, compared with 10.5% of cases in DC (P SAMBA and DC offer high technical success rates for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The advantages of DC consist of superior imaging, shorter total procedure time, and a wider working channel for adequate tissue sampling. SAMBA is better than DC with regard to intraductal stability and accessibility of the intrahepatic bile ducts. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The manufacture of system for testing static random access memory radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rui; Yang Chen

    2008-01-01

    Space radiation effects will lead to single event upset, event latch up and other phenomena in SRAM devices. This paper introduces the hardware, software composition and related testing technology of SRAM radiation effect testing device. Through to the SRAM chip current detection and power protection, it has solved the SRAM chip damage question in the SRAM experiment. It has accessed to the expected experimental data by using the device in different source of radiation conducted on SRAM Experimental study of radiation effects. It provides important references in the assessment of operational life and reinforcement of the memory carried in the satellites. (authors)

  19. On the Performance of One Stage Massive Random Access Protocols in 5G Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Nurul Huda; Pratas, Nuno; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of cellular system is expected to experience a proliferation in the number of emerging use cases alongside supporting high speed mobile broadband services. Massive Machine Type Communication (mMTC) catering to a large number of low-data rate, low-cost devices is such an emerging...... use case. Smart utility meters, automated sensors in farms, and vehicle tracking nodes for logistics monitoring are all examples of emerging mMTC devices. Ensuring efficient mechanisms to access the wireless channel for such a massive number of densely deployed devices is a key challenge posed by m...

  20. Activated Protein C-Resistance Determination and Vascular Access Thrombosis in Populations with High Prevalence of Factor V Leiden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androulakis, Nikolaos E; Tzenakis, Nikolaos; Nioti, Eleni; Spatharaki, Paraskevi; Vyzoukaki, Rodanthi; Papadopoulou, Anastasia; Kokonozaki, Maria; Alexandrakis, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Factor V Leiden heterozygosity occurs in 3-8% of the general European and US populations. Activated protein C resistance (APC-R)--a non-molecular laboratory test--can efficiently demonstrate the presence of this mutation and can be performed on most coagulation analyzers. On the other hand, fistula or graft thrombosis is a common and costly complication in hemodialysis patients. Our aim was to establish the value of APC-R determination in hemodialysis patients by assessing the risk of access thrombosis in patients with increased APC-R. A total of 133 patients (81 men, mean age 64.5 ± 14.9 years and 52 women, mean age 63.6 ± 15 years) were selected. Participants were divided into 2 groups: those with access thrombosis (54 patients, 40.6%) and those with no access thrombosis (79 patients, 59.4%), and they were tested for the most common congenital or acquired thrombophilia risk factors. Overall, 12 patients (9%) had an increased APC-R and 10 of them had at least 1 episode of access thrombosis (83.3%). Univariate analysis to estimate crude odds ratio (OR) showed an OR of 8.8 (95% CI 1.8-41.8) times higher risk for access thrombosis in these patients. No significant differences were found after adjusting for age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease and malignancy. Sex was also a factor influencing thrombosis, presenting a higher OR for women (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.4). This study revealed a significant association between access thrombosis and increased APC-R in hemodialysis patients. This indicates that the determination of APC-R should be considered--especially, in populations with a high prevalence of Factor V Leiden--as proper anticoagulant therapy in these patients may reduce the risk of access thrombosis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Ultrafast quantum random access memory utilizing single Rydberg atoms in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Kelly R; Fischer, Uwe R

    2013-12-13

    We propose a long-lived and rapidly accessible quantum memory unit, for which the operational Hilbert space is spanned by states involving the two macroscopically occupied hyperfine levels of a miscible binary atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the Rydberg state of a single atom. It is shown that an arbitrary qubit state, initially prepared using a flux qubit, can be rapidly transferred to and from the trapped atomic ensemble in approximately 10 ns and with a large fidelity of 97%, via an effective two-photon process using an external laser for the transition to the Rydberg level. The achievable ultrafast transfer of quantum information therefore enables a large number of storage and retrieval cycles from the highly controllable quantum optics setup of a dilute ultracold gas, even within the typically very short flux qubit lifetimes of the order of microseconds.

  2. Integration of Radiation-Hard Magnetic Random Access Memory with CMOS ICs

    CERN Document Server

    Cerjan, C J

    2000-01-01

    The research undertaken in this LDRD-funded project addressed the joint development of magnetic material-based nonvolatile, radiation-hard memory cells with Sandia National Laboratory. Specifically, the goal of this project was to demonstrate the intrinsic radiation-hardness of Giant Magneto-Resistive (GMR) materials by depositing representative alloy combinations upon radiation-hardened silicon-based integrated circuits. All of the stated goals of the project were achieved successfully. The necessary films were successfully deposited upon typical integrated circuits; the materials retained their magnetic field response at the highest radiation doses; and a patterning approach was developed that did not degrade the as-fabricated properties of the underlying circuitry. These results establish the feasibility of building radiation-hard magnetic memory cells.

  3. Atomic crystals resistive switching memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chunsen; Zhang David Wei; Zhou Peng

    2017-01-01

    Facing the growing data storage and computing demands, a high accessing speed memory with low power and non-volatile character is urgently needed. Resistive access random memory with 4F 2 cell size, switching in sub-nanosecond, cycling endurances of over 10 12 cycles, and information retention exceeding 10 years, is considered as promising next-generation non-volatile memory. However, the energy per bit is still too high to compete against static random access memory and dynamic random access memory. The sneak leakage path and metal film sheet resistance issues hinder the further scaling down. The variation of resistance between different devices and even various cycles in the same device, hold resistive access random memory back from commercialization. The emerging of atomic crystals, possessing fine interface without dangling bonds in low dimension, can provide atomic level solutions for the obsessional issues. Moreover, the unique properties of atomic crystals also enable new type resistive switching memories, which provide a brand-new direction for the resistive access random memory. (topical reviews)

  4. Genetic mapping and haplotype analysis of a locus for quantitative resistance to Fusarium graminearum in soybean accession PI 567516C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Peng; Gedling, Cassidy R; Patil, Gunvant; Vuong, Tri D; Shannon, J Grover; Dorrance, Anne E; Nguyen, Henry T

    2017-05-01

    A major novel quantitative disease resistance locus, qRfg_Gm06, for Fusarium graminearum was genetically mapped to chromosome 6. Genomic-assisted haplotype analysis within this region identified three putative candidate genes. Fusarium graminearum causes seed, root rot, and seedling damping-off in soybean which contributes to reduced stands and yield. A cultivar Magellan and PI 567516C were identified with low and high levels of partial resistance to F. graminearum, respectively. Quantitative disease resistance loci (QDRL) were mapped with 241 F 7:8 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross of Magellan × PI 567516C. Phenotypic evaluation for resistance to F. graminearum used the rolled towel assay in a randomized incomplete block design. The genetic map was constructed from 927 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. One major QDRL qRfg_Gm06 was detected and mapped to chromosome 6 with a LOD score of 20.3 explaining 40.2% of the total phenotypic variation. This QDRL was mapped to a ~400 kb genomic region of the Williams 82 reference genome. Genome mining of this region identified 14 putative candidate disease resistance genes. Haplotype analysis of this locus using whole genome re-sequencing (WGRS) of 106 diverse soybean lines narrowed the list to three genes. A SNP genotyping Kompetitive allele-specific PCR (KASP) assay was designed for one of the genes and was validated in a subset of the RILs and all 106 diverse lines.

  5. Direct-Access Online Care for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial Examining Patient Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornmehl, Heather; Singh, Sanminder; Johnson, Mary Ann; Armstrong, April W

    2017-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic disease requiring regular follow-up. To increase access to dermatological care, online management of AD is being studied. However, a critical knowledge gap exists in determining AD patients' quality of life in direct-to-patient online models. In this study, we examined quality of life in AD patients managed through a direct-access online model. We randomized 156 patients to receiving care through a direct-access online platform or in person. Patients were seen for six visits over 12 months. At each visit, the patients completed Dermatology Life Quality Index/Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI/CDLQI), and Short Form (SF-12). Between baseline and 12 months, the mean (standard deviation, SD) within-group difference in DLQI score in the online group was 4.1 (±2.3); for the in-person group, the within-group difference was 4.8 (±2.7). The mean (SD) within-group difference in CDLQI score in the online group was 4.7 (±2.8); for the in-person group, the within-group difference was 4.9 (±3.1). The mean (SD) within-group difference in physical component score (PCS) and mental component score (MCS) SF-12 scores in the online group was 6.5 (±3.8) and 8.6 (±4.3); for the in-person group, it was 6.8 (±3.2) and 9.1(±3.8), respectively. The difference in the change in DLQI, CDLQI, SF-12 PCS, and SF-12 MCS scores between the two groups was 0.72 (95% confidence interval [90% CI], -0.97 to 2.41), 0.23 (90% CI, -2.21 to 2.67), 0.34 (90% CI, -1.16 to 1.84), and 0.51 (90% CI, -1.11 to 2.13), respectively. All differences were contained within their equivalence margins. Adult and pediatric AD patients receiving direct-access online care had equivalent quality of life outcomes as those see in person. The direct-access online model has the potential to increase access to care for patients with chronic skin diseases.

  6. Randomized Clinical Trial Design to Assess Abatacept in Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtman, Howard; Gipson, Debbie S; Somers, Michael; Spino, Cathie; Adler, Sharon; Holzman, Lawrence; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Sedor, John; Overfield, Sandra; Elegbe, Ayanbola; Maldonado, Michael; Greka, Anna

    2018-01-01

    Treatment-resistant nephrotic syndrome is a rare form of glomerular disease that occurs in children and adults. No Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments consistently achieve remission of proteinuria and preservation of kidney function. CD80 (B7-1) can be expressed on injured podocytes, and administration of abatacept (modified CTLA4-Ig based on a natural ligand to CD80) has been associated with sustained normalization of urinary protein excretion and maintenance of glomerular filtration rate in experimental and clinical settings. In this report, we describe the rationale for and design of a randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of abatacept in patients with treatment-resistant nephrotic syndrome caused by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis or minimal change disease. The design is a hybrid of a parallel-group and crossover design (switchover) with the primary objectives assessed in the first period of the study and the secondary objectives assessed using data from both periods. All participants will receive the active agent in 1 of the periods. The duration of treatment will be 4 months per period. The primary outcome will be improvement in nephrotic-range proteinuria to subnephrotic range, that is, reduction from baseline to 4 months in urine protein:creatinine ratio ≥ 50% and to a level precision medicine-based approach to this serious kidney condition in which the selection of a therapeutic agent is guided by the underlying disease mechanism operating in individual patients.

  7. Asynchronous Advanced Encryption Standard Hardware with Random Noise Injection for Improved Side-Channel Attack Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Kotipalli

    2014-01-01

    (SCA resistance. These designs are based on a delay-insensitive (DI logic paradigm known as null convention logic (NCL, which supports useful properties for resisting SCAs including dual-rail encoding, clock-free operation, and monotonic transitions. Potential benefits include reduced and more uniform switching activities and reduced signal-to-noise (SNR ratio. A novel method to further augment NCL AES hardware with random voltage scaling technique is also presented for additional security. Thereby, the proposed components leak significantly less side-channel information than conventional clocked approaches. To quantitatively verify such improvements, functional verification and WASSO (weighted average simultaneous switching output analysis have been carried out on both conventional synchronous approach and the proposed NCL based approach using Mentor Graphics ModelSim and Xilinx simulation tools. Hardware implementation has been carried out on both designs exploiting a specified side-channel attack standard evaluation FPGA board, called SASEBO-GII, and the corresponding power waveforms for both designs have been collected. Along with the results of software simulations, we have analyzed the collected waveforms to validate the claims related to benefits of the proposed cryptohardware design approach.

  8. Family Access to a Dentist Study (FADS): A Multi-Center Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Suchitra; Riedy, Christine; Albert, Jeffrey M; Lee, Wonik; Slusar, Mary Beth; Curtan, Shelley; Ferretti, Gerald; Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Milgrom, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many low-income parent/caregivers do not understand the importance of cavity-free primary (baby) teeth and the chronic nature of dental caries (tooth decay). As a consequence, dental preventive and treatment utilization is low even when children are screened in schools and referred for care. This study aims to test a referral letter and Dental Information Guide (DIG) designed using the Common-Sense Model of Self-Regulation (CSM) framework to improve caregivers’ illness perception of dental caries and increase utilization of care by children with restorative dental needs. Methods A multi-site randomized controlled trial with caregivers of Kindergarten to 4th grade children in urban Ohio and rural Washington State will compare five arms: (1) CSM referral letter alone; (2) CSM referral letter + DIG; (3) reduced CSM referral letter alone; (4) reduced CSM referral letter + DIG; (5) standard (control) referral. At baseline, children will be screened at school to determine restorative dental needs. If in need of treatment, caregivers will be randomized to study arms and an intervention packet will be sent home. The primary outcome will be dental care based on a change in oral health status by clinical examination 7 months post-screening (ICDAS sealant codes 1 and 2; restoration codes 3–8; extraction). Enrollment commenced summer 2015 with results in summer 2016. Conclusion This study uses the CSM framework to develop and test behavioral interventions to increase dental utilization among low-income caregivers. If effective this simple intervention has broad applicability in clinical and community-based settings. PMID:26500170

  9. Dissection of the multigenic wheat stem rust resistance present in the Montenegrin spring wheat accession PI 362698.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurn, Jason D; Rouse, Matthew N; Chao, Shiaoman; Aoun, Meriem; Macharia, Godwin; Hiebert, Colin W; Pretorius, Zacharias A; Bonman, J Michael; Acevedo, Maricelis

    2018-01-22

    Research to identify and characterize stem rust resistance genes in common wheat, Triticum aestivum, has been stimulated by the emergence of Ug99-lineage races of the wheat stem rust pathogen, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), in Eastern Africa. The Montenegrin spring wheat landrace PI 362698 was identified as a source of Pgt resistance. This accession exhibits resistance to multiple Ug99-lineage and North American Pgt races at seedling and adult-plant stages. A recombinant inbred population was developed by crossing the susceptible line LMPG-6 with a single plant selection of PI 362698. A genetic map was constructed using the Illumina iSelect 90 K wheat assay and the markers csLv34, NB-LRR3, and wMAS000003 and quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was performed. QTL analysis identified five significant QTLs (α = 0.05) on chromosomes 2B, 3B, 6A, 6D, and 7A associated with wheat stem rust resistance. The QTL on chromosome 3B was identified using both field data from Kenya (Pgt Ug99-lineage races) and seedling data from Pgt race MCCF. This QTL potentially corresponds to Sr12 or a new allele of Sr12. The multi-pathogen resistance gene Sr57 located on chromosome 7D is present in PI 362698 according to the diagnostic markers csLv34 and wMAS000003, however a significant QTL was not detected at this locus. The QTLs on chromosomes 2B, 6A, and 6D were identified during seedling trials and are thought to correspond to Sr16, Sr8a, and Sr5, respectively. The QTL identified on chromosome 7A was detected using MCCF seedling data and may be Sr15 or a potentially novel allele of recently detected Ug99 resistance QTLs. The combination of resistance QTLs found in PI 362698 is like the resistance gene combination present in the broadly resistant cultivar Thatcher. As such, PI 362698 may not be a landrace as previously thought. PI 362698 has been crossed with North Dakota wheat germplasm for future breeding efforts. Additional work is needed to fully understand why the

  10. A novel multiplexer-based structure for random access memory cell in quantum-dot cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji Asfestani, Mazaher; Rasouli Heikalabad, Saeed

    2017-09-01

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is a new technology in scale of nano and perfect replacement for CMOS circuits in the future. Memory is one of the basic components in any digital system, so designing the random access memory (RAM) with high speed and optimal in QCA is important. In this paper, by employing the structure of multiplexer, a novel RAM cell architecture is proposed. The proposed architecture is implemented without the coplanar crossover approach. The proposed architecture is simulated using the QCADesigner version 2.0.3 and QCAPro. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed QCA RAM architecture has the best performance in terms of delay, circuit complexity, area, cell count and energy consumption in comparison with other QCA RAM architectures.

  11. Experimental study on reactor neutron induced effect of deep sub-micron CMOS static random access memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shanchao; Guo Xiaoqiang; Lin Dongsheng; Chen Wei; Li Ruibin; Bai Xiaoyan; Wang Guizhen

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates neutron irradiation effects of two kinds of commercial CMOS SRAM (static random access memory), of which one is 4M memory with the feature size of 0.25 μm and the other is 16M memory with the feature size of 0.13 μm. We designed a memory testing system of irradiation effects and performed the neutron irradiation experiment using the Xi'an Pulse Reactor. The upset of two kinds of memory cells did not present a threshold versus the increase of neutron fluence. The results showed that deep sub-micron SRAM behaved single-event upset (SEU) effect in neutron irradiation environment. The SEU effect of SRAM with smaller size and higher integrated level tends to upset is considered to be related to the reduction of the device feature size, and fewer charges for upsets of the memory cell also lead to the SEU effect. (authors)

  12. Calculation of energy-barrier lowering by incoherent switching in spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munira, Kamaram; Visscher, P. B.

    2015-05-01

    To make a useful spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) device, it is necessary to be able to calculate switching rates, which determine the error rates of the device. In a single-macrospin model, one can use a Fokker-Planck equation to obtain a low-current thermally activated rate ∝exp(-Ee f f/kBT ) . Here, the effective energy barrier Eeff scales with the single-macrospin energy barrier KV, where K is the effective anisotropy energy density and V the volume. A long-standing paradox in this field is that the actual energy barrier appears to be much smaller than this. It has been suggested that incoherent motions may lower the barrier, but this has proved difficult to quantify. In the present paper, we show that the coherent precession has a magnetostatic instability, which allows quantitative estimation of the energy barrier and may resolve the paradox.

  13. Concept of rewritable organic ferroelectric random access memory in two lateral transistors-in-one cell architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min-Hoi; Lee, Gyu Jeong; Keum, Chang-Min; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2014-01-01

    We propose a concept of rewritable ferroelectric random access memory (RAM) with two lateral organic transistors-in-one cell architecture. Lateral integration of a paraelectric organic field-effect transistor (OFET), being a selection transistor, and a ferroelectric OFET as a memory transistor is realized using a paraelectric depolarizing layer (PDL) which is patterned on a ferroelectric insulator by transfer-printing. For the selection transistor, the key roles of the PDL are to reduce the dipolar strength and the surface roughness of the gate insulator, leading to the low memory on–off ratio and the high switching on–off current ratio. A new driving scheme preventing the crosstalk between adjacent memory cells is also demonstrated for the rewritable operation of the ferroelectric RAM. (paper)

  14. Effects of resistance training on jumping performance in pre-adolescent rhythmic gymnasts: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Marina; Battaglia, Claudia; Fiorilli, Giovanni; Innocenti, Giovanni; Iuliano, Enzo; Aquino, Giovanna; Calcagno, Giuseppe; Giombini, Arrigo; Di Cagno, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of two different resistance training programs on lower limb explosive and reactive strength in young female athletes. Fifty seven rhythmic gymnasts were randomly assigned to unspecific resistance training with dumbbells (12 repetition maximum squats) (n = 19; age = 12.0 +/- 1.8 years) or to specific resistance training with weighted belts (6% of body mass; n = 18; age = 11.9 +/- 1.0 years). Squat jump test, counter movement jump test, hopping test, flexibility of the hip, and anthropometric measures were assessed before and after six weeks training. The main result was that both unspecific resistance training and specific resistance training protocols positively affected the jumping performance, with an increase of the lower limb explosive strength of 6-7%, with no side effects. Counter movement jump flight time increased significantly (p rhythmic gymnastics training enhance jumping ability in young female athletes.

  15. Sexual assault resistance education for university women: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (SARE trial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background More than one in six women will be sexually assaulted in their lifetimes, most by men they know. The situation on university campuses is even more startling, with as many as 1 in 4 female students being victims of rape or attempted rape. The associated physical and mental health effects are extensive and the social and economic costs are staggering. The aim of this randomized controlled trial is to determine whether a novel, small-group sexual assault resistance education program can reduce the incidence of sexual assault among university-attending women, when compared to current university practice of providing informational brochures. Methods/Design The trial will evaluate a theoretically and empirically sound four-unit, 12-hour education program that has been demonstrated in pilot studies to have short-term efficacy. Three of the four units provide information, skills, and practice aimed at decreasing the time needed for women to assess situations with elevated risk of acquaintance sexual assault as dangerous and to take action, reducing emotional obstacles to taking action, and increasing the use of the most effective methods of verbal and physical self-defense. The fourth unit focuses on facilitating a stronger positive sexuality from which women may resist sexual coercion by male intimates more successfully. The trial will extend the pilot evaluations by expanding the participant pool and examining the long term efficacy of the program. A total of 1716 first-year female students (age 17 to 24 years) from three Canadian universities will be enrolled. The primary outcome is completed sexual assault, measured by The Sexual Experiences Survey - Short Form Victimization instrument. Secondary outcomes include changes in knowledge, attitudes, and skills related to the process of sexual assault resistance. Outcomes will be measured at baseline, 1 week, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Discussion The results of the trial will be used to produce a maximally

  16. Changing Azole Resistance: A Secondary Analysis of the MUTT I Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajna, N Venkatesh; Lalitha, Prajna; Rajaraman, Revathi; Krishnan, Tiruvengada; Raghavan, Anita; Srinivasan, Muthiah; O'Brien, Kieran S; Zegans, Michael; McLeod, Stephen D; Acharya, Nisha R; Keenan, Jeremy D; Lietman, Thomas M; Rose-Nussbaumer, Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    The development of multiple triazole resistance in pathogenic filamentous fungi has become an increasing clinical concern and has been shown to increase the risk for treatment failure. To determine whether antifungal resistance increased during the Mycotic Ulcer Treatment Trial I (MUTT I), as measured by minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in baseline cultures. This secondary analysis of a double-masked, multicenter, randomized clinical trial included patients with culture- or smear-positive filamentous fungal corneal ulcer and a baseline visual acuity of 20/40 to 20/400. Culture-positive samples with susceptibility testing were included in this analysis. The patients were treated at multiple locations of the Aravind Eye Care Hospital system in South India. Data were collected from April 3, 2010, to December 31, 2011, and analyzed from July 15 to September 1, 2015. Corneal smears and cultures were obtained from all study participants at baseline. Susceptibility testing was performed for each culture-positive specimen. Minimum inhibitory concentration of voriconazole and natamycin in baseline cultures. Of 323 participants with smear-positive specimens (183 men [56.7%]; 140 women [43.3%]; median [interquartile range] age, 47 [38-56] years), fungal-positive cultures were obtained for 256 (79.3%). The MIC data were available for 221 of 323 participants (68.4%), because 35 samples had no growth during susceptibility testing. A 2.14-fold increase per year (95% CI, 1.13-4.56; P = .02) in voriconazole MICs after controlling for the infectious organism was found. This association was not found when looking at natamycin MICs of baseline cultures after controlling for the infectious organism (1.26; 95% CI, 0.13-12.55; P = .85). Susceptibility to voriconazole appeared to decrease during the relatively short enrollment period of the clinical trial. This decrease may be more related to increased resistance of environmental fungi rather than previous treatment with

  17. Effect of a poloidal shear flow on the probability of accessing the multiple saturated states in the resistive interchange instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Garcia, L.

    1993-01-01

    A systematic study based on 400 nonlinear single-helicity calculations with random initial perturbations shows that multiple nonlinear states exist at saturation. They are characterized by different values of the poloidal wave number of the dominant mode in the spectrum. As a consequence, the saturated states have different levels of fluctuations and different self-consistent poloidal flow profiles. The presence of an external shear poloidal flow does not always directly change the saturation level of the fluctuations. For low shear flows, it can increase the probability of accessing the high saturated levels. For very high values of the flow shear, however, there is suppression of the fluctuations. A curvature poloidal flow reduces the saturation level of each state and increases the probability of accessing the low fluctuation levels. Transitions between saturated states accompanied by sudden changes in flow profile have been observed. Most of the observed transitions are from a low to a high level of fluctuations

  18. Clinical Effectiveness, Access to, and Satisfaction with Care Using a Telehomecare Substitution Intervention: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn H. Bowles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hospitalization accounts for 70% of heart failure (HF costs; readmission rates at 30 days are 24% and rise to 50% by 90 days. Agencies anticipate that telehomecare will provide the close monitoring necessary to prevent HF readmissions. Methods and Results. Randomized controlled trial to compare a telehomecare intervention for patients 55 and older following hospital discharge for HF to usual skilled home care. Primary endpoints were 30- and 60-day all-cause and HF readmission, hospital days, and time to readmission or death. Secondary outcomes were access to care, emergency department (ED use, and satisfaction with care. All-cause readmissions at 30 days (16% versus 19% and over six months (46% versus 52% were lower in the telehomecare group but were not statistically significant. Access to care and satisfaction were significantly higher for the telehomecare patients, including the number of in-person visits and days in home care. Conclusions. Patient acceptance of the technology and current home care policies and processes of care were barriers to gaining clinical effectiveness and efficiency.

  19. Evaluation of Cucumis ficifolius A. Rich. Accessions for Resistance to Fusarium Wilt

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Fusarium wilt of melon (Cucumis melo L.), which is caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis is regarded as a severe disease worldwide. Among the races (0, 1, 2 and 1,2), no gene conferringhigh resistance to race 1,2 has been identified in melon Wild Cucumis species have been reported to possess resistance to some melon diseases, and some of the methods of overcome to the reproductive barriers in genus Cucumis interspecific crosses were reported. We evaluated C. ficifolius for novel r...

  20. Effects and prevalence of nonresponders after 12 weeks of high-intensity interval or resistance training in women with insulin resistance: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Cristian; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2017-04-01

    Our aim was to investigate the effects and prevalence of nonresponders (NR) to high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and resistance training (RT) in women with insulin resistance on cardiometabolic health parameters. Sedentary overweight/obese insulin-resistant women (age = 33.5 ± 6.5 yr; body mass index = 29.9 ± 3.7 kg/m 2 ) were randomly assigned to a triweekly HIIT program (HIIT; n = 18) or resistance training (RT; n = 17). Anthropometry (body mass, fat mass, muscle mass, waist circumference, and skinfold thickness), cardiovascular (blood pressure), metabolic [fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)], as well as muscle strength, and endurance performance covariables were measured before and after 12 wk in both intervention groups. The interindividual variability to exercise training of the subjects was categorized as responders and NR using as cut points two times the typical error of measurement in mean outcomes. After intervention, significant reduction in waist circumference, skinfold thicknesses, fat mass, blood pressure, fasting glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR ( P training. A uniqueness of the present study was to examine the NR prevalence in women with insulin resistance after high-intensity interval (HIIT) and resistance training (RT). This study demonstrates that 12 wk of HIIT and RT have similar effects and NR prevalence to improve glucose control variables. However, significantly different NR prevalence were observed in other anthropometric, cardiovascular, strength, and endurance performance measurements. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Randomized comparison of mefloquine-artesunate versus quinine in the treatment of multidrug-resistant falciparum malaria in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGready, R.; Brockman, A.; Cho, T.; Cho, D.; van Vugt, M.; Luxemburger, C.; Chongsuphajaisiddhi, T.; White, N. J.; Nosten, F.

    2000-01-01

    Since no effective malaria prevention measures have been identified for pregnant women living on the western border of Thailand, prompt diagnosis and efficient treatment are paramount, although drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum has narrowed the treatment options. An open randomized comparison

  2. Functional-task exercise versus resistance strength exercise to improve daily function in older women : A randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samson, MM; van Meeteren, NLU; Duursma, SA; Verhaar, HJJ; de Vreede, P.

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether a functional-task exercise program and a resistance exercise program have different effects on the ability of community-living older people to perform daily tasks. DESIGN: A randomized, controlled, single-blind trial. SETTING: Community leisure center in Utrecht, the

  3. Effectiveness of functional progressive resistance exercise training on walking ability in children with cerebral palsy: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtes, V.A.; Becher, J.G.; Janssen-Potten, Y.J.; Dekkers, H.; Smallenbroek, L.; Dallmeijer, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of functional progressive resistance exercise (PRE) training on walking ability in children with cerebral palsy (CP).Fifty-one ambulant children with spastic CP (mean age 10 years 5 months, 29 boys) were randomized to an intervention (n=

  4. Effectiveness of Functional Progressive Resistance Exercise Training on Walking Ability in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Becher, Jules G.; Janssen-Potten, Yvonne J.; Dekkers, Hurnet; Smallenbroek, Linda; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of functional progressive resistance exercise (PRE) training on walking ability in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Fifty-one ambulant children with spastic CP (mean age 10 years 5 months, 29 boys) were randomized to an intervention (n=26) or control group (n=25, receiving usual care).…

  5. Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis was associated with enteric commensal bacterial resistance among HIV-exposed infants in a randomized controlled trial, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powis, Kathleen M; Souda, Sajini; Lockman, Shahin; Ajibola, Gbolahan; Bennett, Kara; Leidner, Jean; Hughes, Michael D; Moyo, Sikhulile; van Widenfelt, Erik; Jibril, Haruna B; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Max; Shapiro, Roger L

    2017-11-01

    Despite declining risk of vertical HIV transmission, prophylactic cotrimoxazole (CTX) remains widely used to reduce morbidity and mortality in the event of HIV infection among exposed infants, with an inherent risk of conferring commensal antimicrobial resistance. Using data from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of infant CTX prophylaxis, we sought to quantify emergence of antibiotic resistance. HIV-exposed uninfected infants enrolled in the Botswana Mpepu study were randomized to prophylactic CTX or placebo between 14 and 34 days of life and continued through 15 months. Stool samples were collected from a subset of participating infants at randomization, three, and six months, and stored at -70°C prior to culture. Specimens that grew Escherichia coli (E. coli) or Klebsiella species (Klebsiella spp.) underwent antibiotic susceptibility testing by Kirby Bauer method using CTX (CTX 1.25/23.75 μg) and Amoxicillin (10 μg) in Mueller Hinton agar. Fisher's exact testing was used to compare prevalence of resistance by randomization arm (CTX/placebo). A total of 381 stool samples from 220 infants were cultured: 118 at randomization, 151 at three months, and 112 at six-months. E. coli was isolated from 206 specimens and Klebsiella spp. from 138 specimens. Resistance to CTX was common in both E. coli and Klebsiella spp. at the randomization visit (52.2% and 37.7% respectively) and did not differ by study arm. E. Coli isolates from CTX recipients at three and six months had 94.9% and 84.2% CTX resistance, as compared with 51.4% and 57.5% CTX resistance in isolates from placebo recipients (p=0.01). Klebsiella spp. isolates from CTX recipients had 79.0% and 68.8% CTX resistance at three and six months, as compared with 19.1% and 14.3% in isolates from placebo recipients (presistant commensal gastrointestinal bacteria compared with placebo recipients. Additional research is needed to determine the longer-term clinical, microbiologic, and public health

  6. Effects of a resistance training program on balance and fatigue perception in patients with Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rubio, Araceli; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Casilda-López, Jesús; López-López, Laura; Valenza, Marie Carmen

    2017-11-22

    Fatigue and balance impairment leads to a loss of independence and are important to adequately manage. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a resistance training program on dynamic balance and fatigue in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Randomized controlled trial. Forty-six patients with PD were randomly allocated to an intervention group receiving a 8-week resistance training program focused on lower limbs or to a control group. Balance was assessed using the Mini-BESTest and fatigue was assessed by the Piper Fatigue Scale. Patients in the intervention group improved significantly (p<0.05) on dynamic balance (reactive postural control and total values) and perceived fatigue. An 8-week resistance training program was found to be effective at improving dynamic balance and fatigue in patients with PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effect of Melatonin on Pediatric Drug-Resistant Epilepsy; a Randomized Double Blind Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Akhondian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAbout 15 to 40% of children with seizures are refractory to standard anti-epileptic drugs and for such patients, other treatments such as surgery and the ketogenic diet can reduce seizure frequency. Melatonin is a natural pineal gland hormone. The use of melatonin for controlling pediatric seizures is still controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of melatonin on seizures, parent's satisfaction, sleep, and behavior in children with drug-resistant epilepsy.Materials and Methods: In a pilot crossover study, children with drug-resistant epilepsy, who referred to the epileptic clinic of Ghaem Hospital, were randomly assigned to receive treatment with melatonin or a placebo for 4 weeks followed by a one-day washout period. Then patients who started with melatonin were switched to the placebo. Melatonin was administered 30 minutes before bedtime at a dose of 10 mg /m2 in 3mg tablets.ResultsTwenty patients, of which 11 (55% were male, were enrolled into the study. The range and mean age of patients were 2 to 13 years and 7.28 ± 3.46 years, respectively. The mean number of diurnal seizures in the study group during placebo treatment was 11.05 and during melatonin treatment was 6.25, which was statistically significant (P=0.021. However, the reduction of the mean duration of diurnal seizures in the study groups was not statistically significant (P=0.386. There was no correlation between decreasing in number or duration of seizures with melatonin plasma levels. Drowsiness was the only side effect of melatonin, which occurred in three patients. ConclusionMelatonin has probable beneficial effects on some epileptic patients with unclear mechanisms. Physicians can use it in selected epileptic children to improve seizures.

  8. Implementing Resistance Training in Secondary Schools: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Sarah G; Smith, Jordan J; Morgan, Philip J; Peralta, Louisa R; Hilland, Toni A; Eather, Narelle; Lonsdale, Chris; Okely, Anthony D; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Salmon, J O; Dewar, Deborah L; Estabrooks, Paul A; Pollock, Emma; Finn, Tara L; Lubans, David R

    2018-01-01

    Guidelines recommend that young people engage in muscle-strengthening activities on at least 3 d·wk. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a school-based intervention focused on resistance training (RT) for adolescents. The "Resistance Training for Teens" intervention was evaluated using a cluster-randomized, controlled trial with 607 adolescents (50.1% girls; 14.1 ± 0.5 yr) from 16 secondary schools. Teachers were trained to deliver the intervention, which included the following: (i) an interactive student seminar; (ii) a structured physical activity program, focused on RT; (iii) lunchtime fitness sessions; and (iv) Web-based smartphone apps. The primary outcome was muscular fitness (MF) and secondary outcomes included body mass index, RT skill competency, flexibility, physical activity, self-efficacy, and motivation. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 6 months (postprogram; primary end point), and 12 months (follow-up). Outcomes were assessed using linear mixed models, with three potential moderators tested using interaction terms (and subgroup analyses where appropriate). For the primary outcome (MF), a group-time effect was observed at 6 months for the upper body (2.0 repetitions; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.8-3.2), but not the lower body (-1.4 cm; 95% CI, -4.7-1.9). At 6 months, there were intervention effects for RT skill competency and self-efficacy, but no other secondary outcomes. Effects for upper body MF and RT skill competency were sustained at 12 months. Despite overall no effect for body mass index, there was a group-time effect at 12 months among students who were overweight/obese at baseline (-0.55 kg·m; 95% CI, -1.01 to -0.08). The school-based RT intervention resulted in immediate and sustained improvements in upper body MF and RT skill competency, demonstrating an effective and scalable approach to delivering RT within secondary schools.

  9. Red wine polyphenols do not improve obesity-associated insulin resistance: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerdeman, Jorn; Del Rio, Daniele; Calani, Luca; Eringa, Etto C; Smulders, Yvo M; Serné, Erik H

    2018-01-01

    Preclinical studies have suggested that polyphenols extracted from red wine (RWPs) favourably affect insulin sensitivity, but there is controversy over whether RWPs exert similar effects in humans. The aim of the present study was to determine whether RWPs improve insulin sensitivity in obese volunteers. Obese (body mass index >30 kg/m 2 ) volunteers were randomly allocated to RWPs 600 mg/d (n = 14) or matched placebo (n = 15) in a double-blind parallel-arm study for 8 weeks. The participants were investigated at baseline and at the end of the study. Insulin sensitivity was determined using a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp (M-value), a mixed-meal test (Matsuda index), and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). RWPs elicited no significant changes in M-value (RWP group: median [interquartile range; IQR] baseline 3.0 [2.4; 3.6]; end of study 3.3 [2.4; 4.8] vs placebo group: median [IQR] baseline 3.4 [2.8; 4.4]; end of study 2.9 [2.8; 5.9] mg/kg/min; P = .65), in Matsuda index (RWP group: median [IQR] baseline 3.3 [2.2; 4.8]; end of study 3.6 [2.4; 4.8] vs placebo group: median [IQR] baseline 4.0 [3.0; 6.0]; end of study 4.0 [3.0; 5.2]; P = .88), or in HOMA-IR. This study showed that 8 weeks of RWP supplementation did not improve insulin sensitivity in 29 obese volunteers. Our findings were not consistent with the hypothesis that RWPs ameliorate insulin resistance in human obesity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Galantamine alleviates inflammation and insulin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda M; Sangaleti, Carine T; Costa, Fernando O; Morais, Tercio L; Lopes, Heno F; Motta, Josiane M; Irigoyen, Maria C; Bortoloto, Luiz A; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Harris, Yael Tobi; Satapathy, Sanjaya K; Olofsson, Peder S; Akerman, Meredith; Chavan, Sangeeta S; MacKay, Meggan; Barnaby, Douglas P; Lesser, Martin L; Roth, Jesse; Tracey, Kevin J; Pavlov, Valentin A

    2017-07-20

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an obesity-driven condition of pandemic proportions that increases the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood, though inflammation has been implicated in MetS pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of galantamine, a centrally acting acetylcholinesterase inhibitor with antiinflammatory properties, on markers of inflammation implicated in insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk, and other metabolic and cardiovascular indices in subjects with MetS. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, subjects with MetS (30 per group) received oral galantamine 8 mg daily for 4 weeks, followed by 16 mg daily for 8 weeks or placebo. The primary outcome was inflammation assessed through plasma levels of cytokines and adipokines associated with MetS. Secondary endpoints included body weight, fat tissue depots, plasma glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), cholesterol (total, HDL, LDL), triglycerides, BP, heart rate, and heart rate variability (HRV). Galantamine resulted in lower plasma levels of proinflammatory molecules TNF (-2.57 pg/ml [95% CI -4.96 to -0.19]; P = 0.035) and leptin (-12.02 ng/ml [95% CI -17.71 to -6.33]; P < 0.0001), and higher levels of the antiinflammatory molecules adiponectin (2.71 μg/ml [95% CI 1.93 to 3.49]; P < 0.0001) and IL-10 (1.32 pg/ml, [95% CI 0.29 to 2.38]; P = 0.002) as compared with placebo. Galantamine also significantly lowered plasma insulin and HOMA-IR values, and altered HRV. Low-dose galantamine alleviates inflammation and insulin resistance in MetS subjects. These findings support further study of galantamine in MetS therapy. ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02283242. Fundação de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP) and Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq), Brazil, and the NIH.

  11. Comparison of Erysiphe cichoracearum and E. cruciferarum and a survey of 360 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions for resistance to these two powdery mildew pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, L; Ellwood, S; Wilson, I; Saenz, G; Xiao, S; Oliver, R P; Turner, J G; Somerville, S

    1999-12-01

    In previous work, UEA1 and UCSC1, two geographically distinct, powdery mildew isolates, were recognized for their ability to infect Arabidopsis thaliana. We have clarified the identity of these isolates by determining their host ranges, reexamining their morphology, and comparing their DNA sequences for the 5.8S ribosomal RNA and two flanking internal transcribed spacer sequences. These experiments confirm that UEA1 is a member of Erysiphe cruciferarum and that UCSC1 belongs to E. cichoracearum. Interactions of the two Erysiphe isolates with 360 A. thaliana accessions were examined to provide a comprehensive profile of naturally occurring powdery mildew resistance in this weedy species. The majority of A. thaliana accessions (213) were susceptible to both isolates. Among the accessions exhibiting some degree of resistance, most (84) responded differentially to UEA1 and UCSC1 and the remainder were resistant to both isolates. Notably, resistance to UCSC1 cosegregated with RPW7, a locus previously demonstrated to confer resistance to UEA1 in Ms-0 x Landsberg (erecta) crosses. With this large collection of resistant accessions, questions about species specificity, genetic diversity and the evolution of resistance to powdery mildews can be addressed.

  12. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Aspirin Resistance: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-ju Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin resistance (AR is a prevalent phenomenon and leads to significant clinical consequences, but the current evidence for effective interventional strategy is insufficient. The objective of this systematic review is thus to assess the efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM for AR. A systematical literature search was conducted in 6 databases until December 2012 to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs of CHM for AR. As a result, sixteen RCTs with a total of 1011 subjects were identified, suggesting that the interests of the medical profession and the public in the use of CHM for AR have grown considerably in the recent years. Tongxinluo capsule and Danshen-based prescriptions were the most frequently used herbal prescriptions, while danshen root, milkvetch root, Leech, and Rosewood were the most frequently used single herbs. Despite the apparent reported positive findings, it is premature to determine the efficacy and safety of CHM for the treatment of AR due to poor methodological quality and insufficient safety data. However, CHMs appeared to be well tolerated in all included studies. Thus, CHM as a promising candidate is worthy of improvement and development for further clinical AR trials. Large sample-size and well-designed rigorous RCTs are needed.

  13. Antipsychotic polypharmacy in clozapine resistant schizophrenia: a randomized controlled trial of tapering antipsychotic co-treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Tiihonen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a considerable disparity between clinical practice and recommendations based on meta-analyses of antipsychotic polypharmacy in clozapine resistant schizophrenia. For this reason, we investigated the clinical response to reducing the use olanzapine that had been previously added on clozapine treatment among seriously ill hospitalized patients. In a randomized controlled trial with crossover design, we studied volunteer patients (N = 15 who had olanzapine added on to clozapine in a state mental hospital. Clozapine monotherapy was just as effective as clozapine-olanzapine therapy, according to results from Clinical Global Impression Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning as primary outcome measures. Polypharmacy is widely used in treating schizophrenia, and usually, add-on medications are started because of worsening of the clinical state. A major confounding feature of these add-ons is whether observed improvements are caused by the medication or explained by the natural fluctuating course of the disorder. The present study, in spite of its small size, indicates the necessity of reconsidering the value of polypharmacy in treating schizophrenia.

  14. A randomized trial of motivational interviewing and facilitated contraceptive access to prevent rapid repeat pregnancy among adolescent mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jack; Lutz, Robyn; Osuagwu, Ngozi; Rotz, Dana; Goesling, Brian

    2017-10-01

    Most interventions designed to reduce teen pregnancy rates have not focused on pregnant and/or parenting adolescents. Therefore, a large randomized controlled trial was conducted regarding a motivational interviewing program entitled Teen Options to Prevent Pregnancy in a low-income sample of adolescent mothers. This program recommended monthly sessions between a participant and a registered nurse over 18 months. This program also featured facilitated birth control access through transportation assistance and a part-time contraceptive clinic. The impact of this program on rapid repeat pregnancies at 18 months after enrollment was evaluated. Five hundred ninety-eight adolescent females were enrolled from 7 obstetrics-gynecology clinics and 5 postpartum units of a large hospital system in a Midwestern city. Each participant was enrolled at least 28 weeks pregnant or less than 9 weeks postpartum. Each participant was randomized to either the Teen Options to Prevent Pregnancy intervention or a usual-care control condition. Intervention participants averaged 4.5 hours of assistance. Participants were contacted by blinded research staff at 6 and 18 months to complete self-report surveys. Differences in outcomes between the intervention and control groups were assessed using ordinary least-squares regression. There was an 18.1% absolute reduction in self-reported repeat pregnancy in the intervention group relative to the control group (20.5% vs 38.6%%; P Teen Options to Prevent Pregnancy program represents one of the few evidence-based interventions to reduce rapid repeat teen pregnancy. This relatively brief intervention may be a viable alternative to more time-intensive programs that adolescent mothers may be unable or unwilling to receive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Randomized trial of tourniquet vs blood pressure cuff for target vein dilation in ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Drew; Jeanmonod, Rebecca; Jeanmonod, Donald

    2014-07-01

    Ten percent of the time, peripheral intravenous access (PIV) is not obtained in 2 attempts in the emergency department. Typically, a tourniquet is used to dilate the target vein; but recent research showed that a blood pressure (BP) cuff improves dilation, which may translate to increased PIV success. We sought to determine if there is improved success in obtaining ultrasound-guided PIV using a BP cuff vs a tourniquet in "difficult stick" patients. This is a prospective, randomized, single-blinded trial. Adult patients requiring PIV with at least 2 prior failed attempts were enrolled. Patients were assigned to tourniquet or BP cuff for target vein dilation randomly. Nurses prepared the patient for PIV attempt by either placing a BP cuff inflated to 150 mm Hg or placing a tourniquet on the chosen extremity. The extremity was draped to blind the physician to assignment. Physicians then attempted ultrasound-guided PIV. Failures were defined as IVs requiring greater than 3 ultrasound-guided attempts or 30 minutes, or patient intolerance. If failure occurred, the physician was unblinded; and the patient could be crossed over and reattempted. Thirty-eight patients were enrolled. The success rate for the tourniquet group (n = 17) and BP cuff group (n = 21) was 82.4% and 47.6%, respectively (P = .04). There were no differences between groups for vessel depth, diameter, or procedure time. Six in the BP cuff group were crossed over and had successful PIV obtained with tourniquet. Tourniquet is superior to BP cuff for target vein dilation in ultrasound-guided PIV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chronic resistance training does not affect post-exercise blood pressure in normotensive older women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerage, Aline Mendes; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes; do Nascimento, Matheus Amarante; Pina, Fábio Luiz Cheche; Gonçalves, Cássio Gustavo Santana; Sardinha, Luís B; Cyrino, Edilson Serpeloni

    2015-06-01

    Resistance training has been recommended for maintenance or improvement of the functional health of older adults, but its effect on acute cardiovascular responses remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of 12 weeks of resistance training on post-exercise blood pressure (BP) in normotensive older women. Twenty-eight normotensive and physically inactive women (≥ 60 years) were randomly assigned to a training group (TG) or a control group (CG). The TG underwent a resistance training program (12 weeks, 8 exercises, 2 sets, 10-15 repetitions, 3 days/week), while the CG performed stretching exercises (12 weeks, 2 sets, 20 s each, 2 days/week). At baseline and after the intervention, participants were randomly submitted to two experimental sessions: a resistance exercise session (7 exercises, 2 sets, 10-15 repetitions) and a control session. BP was obtained pre- and post-sessions (90 min), through auscultation. Post-exercise hypotension was observed for systolic, diastolic, and mean BP in the TG (-6.1, -3.4, and -4.3 mmHg, respectively; P After the intervention period, the magnitude and pattern of this phenomenon for systolic, diastolic, and mean BP were similar between groups (TG -8.8, -4.1, and -5.7 mmHg, respectively; P exercise promotes reduction in post-exercise BP and 12 weeks of resistance training program do not change the occurrence or magnitude of this hypotension. (ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT02346981).

  17. Inflammation, insulin resistance, and diabetes--Mendelian randomization using CRP haplotypes points upstream.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Brunner

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Raised C-reactive protein (CRP is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. According to the Mendelian randomization method, the association is likely to be causal if genetic variants that affect CRP level are associated with markers of diabetes development and diabetes. Our objective was to examine the nature of the association between CRP phenotype and diabetes development using CRP haplotypes as instrumental variables.We genotyped three tagging SNPs (CRP + 2302G > A; CRP + 1444T > C; CRP + 4899T > G in the CRP gene and measured serum CRP in 5,274 men and women at mean ages 49 and 61 y (Whitehall II Study. Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c were measured at age 61 y. Diabetes was ascertained by glucose tolerance test and self-report. Common major haplotypes were strongly associated with serum CRP levels, but unrelated to obesity, blood pressure, and socioeconomic position, which may confound the association between CRP and diabetes risk. Serum CRP was associated with these potential confounding factors. After adjustment for age and sex, baseline serum CRP was associated with incident diabetes (hazard ratio = 1.39 [95% confidence interval 1.29-1.51], HOMA-IR, and HbA1c, but the associations were considerably attenuated on adjustment for potential confounding factors. In contrast, CRP haplotypes were not associated with HOMA-IR or HbA1c (p = 0.52-0.92. The associations of CRP with HOMA-IR and HbA1c were all null when examined using instrumental variables analysis, with genetic variants as the instrument for serum CRP. Instrumental variables estimates differed from the directly observed associations (p = 0.007-0.11. Pooled analysis of CRP haplotypes and diabetes in Whitehall II and Northwick Park Heart Study II produced null findings (p = 0.25-0.88. Analyses based on the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (1,923 diabetes cases, 2,932 controls using three SNPs in tight linkage disequilibrium with our

  18. Atomistic mechanisms of copper filament formation and composition in Al2O3-based conductive bridge random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nail, C.; Blaise, P.; Molas, G.; Bernard, M.; Roule, A.; Toffoli, A.; Perniola, L.; Vallée, C.

    2017-07-01

    Conductive filament formation and composition in Oxide-based Conductive Bridge Random Access Memory (CBRAM) are investigated. To this end, Al2O3/Cu-based CBRAM is electrically characterized and studied. Current-voltage characteristics exhibit different forming behaviors depending on device polarization exposing the charged species involved during the forming process. In order to get more insights at the microscopic level, ion diffusion is investigated in depth by first-principles calculations. We study different point defects in Al2O3 which can come either from the post-process of the material itself or after top electrode deposition or during device operation. Since the role of Oxygen Vacancies (VO) and Copper (Cu) ions is core to the switching mechanism, ab initio calculations focus on their displacements. For different charge states in Al2O3, we extract the thermodynamic and activation energies of Cu, Te, Al, and O related point defects. The results reveal that Cu is not the only ion diffusing in the Al2O3-based CBRAM switching mechanism while Te ions appear unfavorable. A Cu/VO based hybrid filament model is proposed, and the impact of Aluminum Vacancies (VAl) on the forming process is demonstrated.

  19. Perpendicular spin transfer torque magnetic random access memories with high spin torque efficiency and thermal stability for embedded applications (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Luc, E-mail: luc.thomas@headway.com; Jan, Guenole; Zhu, Jian; Liu, Huanlong; Lee, Yuan-Jen; Le, Son; Tong, Ru-Ying; Pi, Keyu; Wang, Yu-Jen; Shen, Dongna; He, Renren; Haq, Jesmin; Teng, Jeffrey; Lam, Vinh; Huang, Kenlin; Zhong, Tom; Torng, Terry; Wang, Po-Kang [TDK-Headway Technologies, Inc., Milpitas, California 95035 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Magnetic random access memories based on the spin transfer torque phenomenon (STT-MRAMs) have become one of the leading candidates for next generation memory applications. Among the many attractive features of this technology are its potential for high speed and endurance, read signal margin, low power consumption, scalability, and non-volatility. In this paper, we discuss our recent results on perpendicular STT-MRAM stack designs that show STT efficiency higher than 5 k{sub B}T/μA, energy barriers higher than 100 k{sub B}T at room temperature for sub-40 nm diameter devices, and tunnel magnetoresistance higher than 150%. We use both single device data and results from 8 Mb array to demonstrate data retention sufficient for automotive applications. Moreover, we also demonstrate for the first time thermal stability up to 400 °C exceeding the requirement of Si CMOS back-end processing, thus opening the realm of non-volatile embedded memory to STT-MRAM technology.

  20. Calculation of energy-barrier lowering by incoherent switching in spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munira, Kamaram [Center for Materials for Information Technology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35401 (United States); Visscher, P. B., E-mail: visscher@ua.edu [Center for Materials for Information Technology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35401 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35401 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    To make a useful spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) device, it is necessary to be able to calculate switching rates, which determine the error rates of the device. In a single-macrospin model, one can use a Fokker-Planck equation to obtain a low-current thermally activated rate ∝exp(−E{sub eff}/k{sub B}T). Here, the effective energy barrier E{sub eff} scales with the single-macrospin energy barrier KV, where K is the effective anisotropy energy density and V the volume. A long-standing paradox in this field is that the actual energy barrier appears to be much smaller than this. It has been suggested that incoherent motions may lower the barrier, but this has proved difficult to quantify. In the present paper, we show that the coherent precession has a magnetostatic instability, which allows quantitative estimation of the energy barrier and may resolve the paradox.

  1. Magnetoelectric assisted 180° magnetization switching for electric field addressable writing in magnetoresistive random-access memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiguang; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Yaojin; Li, Yanxi; Luo, Haosu; Li, Jiefang; Viehland, Dwight

    2014-08-26

    Magnetization-based memories, e.g., hard drive and magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM), use bistable magnetic domains in patterned nanomagnets for information recording. Electric field (E) tunable magnetic anisotropy can lower the energy barrier between two distinct magnetic states, promising reduced power consumption and increased recording density. However, integration of magnetoelectric heterostructure into MRAM is a highly challenging task owing to the particular architecture requirements of each component. Here, we show an epitaxial growth of self-assembled CoFe2O4 nanostripes with bistable in-plane magnetizations on Pb(Mg,Nb)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) substrates, where the magnetic switching can be triggered by E-induced elastic strain effect. An unprecedented magnetic coercive field change of up to 600 Oe was observed with increasing E. A near 180° magnetization rotation can be activated by E in the vicinity of the magnetic coercive field. These findings might help to solve the 1/2-selection problem in traditional MRAM by providing reduced magnetic coercive field in E field selected memory cells.

  2. Characterization of energy use in 300 mm DRAM (Dynamic Random Access Memory) wafer fabrication plants (fabs) in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Shih-Cheng; Xu, Tengfang; Chaung, Tony; Chan, David Y.-L.

    2010-01-01

    Driven by technology advances and demand for enhanced productivity, migration of wafer fabrication for DRAM (Dynamic Random Access Memory) toward increased wafer size has become the fast-growing trend in semiconductor industry. Taiwan accounts for about 18% of the total DRAM wafer production in the world. The energy use required for operating wafer fabrication plants (fabs) is intensive and has become one of the major concerns to production power reliability in the island. This paper characterizes the energy use in four 300 mm DRAM wafer fabs in Taiwan through performing surveys and on-site measurements. Specifically, the objectives of this study are to characterize the electric energy consumption and production of 300 mm DRAM fabs by using various performance metrics, including PEI ((production efficiency index), annual electric power consumption normalized by annual produced wafer area) and EUI ((electrical utilization index), annual electric power consumption normalized by UOP (units of production), which is defined as the product of annual produced wafer area and the average number of mask layers of a wafer). The results show that the PEI and EUI values are 0.743 kWh/cm 2 and 0.0272 kWh/UOP, respectively. Using EUI in assessing energy efficiency of the fab production provides more consistent comparisons than using PEI alone.

  3. Switching characteristics for ferroelectric random access memory based on RC model in poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene ultrathin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChangLi Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The switching characteristic of the poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethlene (P(VDF-TrFE films have been studied at different ranges of applied electric field. It is suggest that the increase of the switching speed upon nucleation protocol and the deceleration of switching could be related to the presence of a non-ferroelectric layer. Remarkably, a capacitor and resistor (RC links model plays significant roles in the polarization switching dynamics of the thin films. For P(VDF-TrFE ultrathin films with electroactive interlayer, it is found that the switching dynamic characteristics are strongly affected by the contributions of resistor and non-ferroelectric (non-FE interface factors. A corresponding experiment is designed using poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene:poly(styrene sulfonic (PEDOT-PSSH as interlayer with different proton concentrations, and the testing results show that the robust switching is determined by the proton concentration in interlayer and lower leakage current in circuit to reliable applications of such polymer films. These findings provide a new feasible method to enhance the polarization switching for the ferroelectric random access memory.

  4. Switching characteristics for ferroelectric random access memory based on RC model in poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) ultrathin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, ChangLi [Department of Physics, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Complex and Intelligent System Research Center, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang, XueJun [Complex and Intelligent System Research Center, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhang, XiuLi [Department of Physics, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); School of Fundamental Studies, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Du, XiaoLi [School of Fundamental Studies, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Xu, HaiSheng, E-mail: hsxu@ecust.edu.cn [Department of Physics, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Kunshan Hisense Electronics Co., Ltd., Kunshan, Jiangsu 215300 (China)

    2016-05-15

    The switching characteristic of the poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethlene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) films have been studied at different ranges of applied electric field. It is suggest that the increase of the switching speed upon nucleation protocol and the deceleration of switching could be related to the presence of a non-ferroelectric layer. Remarkably, a capacitor and resistor (RC) links model plays significant roles in the polarization switching dynamics of the thin films. For P(VDF-TrFE) ultrathin films with electroactive interlayer, it is found that the switching dynamic characteristics are strongly affected by the contributions of resistor and non-ferroelectric (non-FE) interface factors. A corresponding experiment is designed using poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonic) (PEDOT-PSSH) as interlayer with different proton concentrations, and the testing results show that the robust switching is determined by the proton concentration in interlayer and lower leakage current in circuit to reliable applications of such polymer films. These findings provide a new feasible method to enhance the polarization switching for the ferroelectric random access memory.

  5. ChIPWig: A Random Access-Enabling Lossless and Lossy Compression Method for ChIP-seq Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanmehr, Vida; Kim, Minji; Wang, Zhiying; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2017-10-26

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) experiments are inexpensive and time-efficient, and result in massive datasets that introduce significant storage and maintenance challenges. To address the resulting Big Data problems, we propose a lossless and lossy compression framework specifically designed for ChIP-seq Wig data, termed ChIPWig. ChIPWig enables random access, summary statistics lookups and it is based on the asymptotic theory of optimal point density design for nonuniform quantizers. We tested the ChIPWig compressor on 10 ChIP-seq datasets generated by the ENCODE consortium. On average, lossless ChIPWig reduced the file sizes to merely 6% of the original, and offered 6-fold compression rate improvement compared to bigWig. The lossy feature further reduced file sizes 2-fold compared to the lossless mode, with little or no effects on peak calling and motif discovery using specialized NarrowPeaks methods. The compression and decompression speed rates are of the order of 0:2 MB/sec using general purpose computers. The source code and binaries are freely available for download athttps://github.com/vidarmehr/ChIPWig-v2, implemented in C ++. milenkov@illinois.edu. Available on the Bioinformatics submission site.

  6. Willingness to participate in a randomized trial comparing catheters to fistulas for vascular access in incident hemodialysis patients: an international survey of nephrologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poinen, Krishna; Oliver, Matthew J.; Ravani, Pietro; van der Veer, Sabine N.; Jager, Kitty J.; van Biesen, Wim; Polkinghorne, Kevan R.; Rosenfeld, Aviva; Lewin, Adriane M.; Dulai, Mandeep; Quinn, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    Current guidelines favor fistulas over catheters as vascular access. Yet, the observational literature comparing fistulas to catheters has important limitations and biases that may be difficult to overcome in the absence of randomization. However, it is not clear if physicians would be willing to

  7. Efficacy of Water Resistance Therapy in Subjects Diagnosed With Behavioral Dysphonia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Marco; Jara, Rodrigo; Olavarria, Christian; Caceres, Paloma; Escuti, Geordette; Medina, Fernanda; Medina, Laura; Madrid, Sofia; Muñoz, Daniel; Laukkanen, Anne-Maria

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the efficacy of water resistance therapy (WRT) in a long-term period of voice treatment in subjects diagnosed with voice disorders. Twenty participants, with behavioral dysphonia, were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: (1) voice treatment with WRT, and (2) voice treatment with tube phonation with the distal end in air (TPA). Before and after voice therapy, participants underwent aerodynamic, electroglottographic, acoustic, and auditory-perceptual assessments. The Voice Handicap Index and self-assessment of resonant voice quality were also performed. The treatment included eight voice therapy sessions. For the WRT group, the exercises consisted of a sequence of five phonatory tasks performed with a drinking straw submerged 5 cm into water. For the TPA, the exercises consisted of the same phonatory tasks, and all of them were performed into the same straw but the distal end was in air. Wilcoxon test showed significant improvements for both groups for Voice Handicap Index (decrease), subglottic pressure (decrease), phonation threshold pressure (decrease), and self-perception of resonant voice quality (increase). Improvement in auditory-perceptual assessment was found only for the TPA group. No significant differences were found for any acoustic or electroglottographic variables. No significant differences were found between WRT and TPA groups for any variable. WRT and TPA may improve voice function and self-perceived voice quality in individuals with behavioral dysphonia. No differences between these therapy protocols should be expected. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clofazimine for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shenjie; Yao, Lan; Hao, Xiaohui; Liu, Yidian; Zeng, Linhai; Liu, Gang; Li, Mingwu; Li, Fujian; Wu, Meiying; Zhu, Yousheng; Sun, Hua; Gu, Jin; Wang, Xiafang; Zhang, Zhanjun

    2015-05-01

    Clofazimine (Cfz) has shown activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains in vitro and in animal studies. Here we evaluate the clinical efficacy and tolerability of using Cfz to treat MDR tuberculosis in China. We enrolled 105 patients who had sputum culture-positive MDR tuberculosis in 6 major tuberculosis specialty hospitals in China. Patients were randomly assigned to either the Cfz therapy group (n = 53) or control group (n = 52). Patients in the 2 groups were given 21 months of individual-based chemotherapy regimens based on medication history and drug susceptibility test results. The Cfz therapy group regimens incorporated 100 mg of Cfz once daily for 21 months. Three patients in each group discontinued therapy because of side effects or other reasons. Sputum culture conversion to negative was earlier in patients who received Cfz compared with controls (P = .042 by log-rank test). Chest computed tomography showed cavitary changes in 46 patients in the Cfz therapy group and 45 in the control group. Cavity closure was earlier in patient who received Cfz compared with controls (P = .047 by log-rank test). The treatment success rate in the Cfz group was 73.6%, higher than that in control group (53.8%; P = .035). Side effects in skin only occurred in the Cfz group. The rates of skin discoloration and ichthyosis were 94.3% and 47.2%, respectively. Using Cfz to treat MDR tuberculosis promotes cavity closure, accelerates sputum culture conversion, and improves treatment success rates. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Randomized controlled resistance training based physical activity trial for central European nursing home residing older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthalos, Istvan; Dorgo, Sandor; Kopkáné Plachy, Judit; Szakály, Zsolt; Ihász, Ferenc; Ráczné Németh, Teodóra; Bognár, József

    2016-10-01

    Nursing home residing older adults often experience fear of sickness or death, functional impairment and pain. It is difficult for these older adults to maintain a physically active lifestyle and to keep a positive outlook on life. This study evaluated the changes in quality of life, attitude to aging, assertiveness, physical fitness and body composition of nursing home residing elderly through a 15-week organized resistance training based physical activity program. Inactive older adults living in a state financed nursing home (N.=45) were randomly divided into two intervention groups and a control group. Both intervention groups were assigned to two physical activity sessions a week, but one of these groups also had weekly discussions on health and quality of life (Mental group). Data on anthropometric measures, fitness performance, as well as quality of life and attitudes to aging survey data were collected. Due to low attendance rate 12 subjects were excluded from the analyses. Statistical analysis included Paired Samples t-tests and Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance. Both intervention groups significantly improved their social participation, and their upper- and lower-body strength scores. Also, subjects in the Mental group showed improvement in agility fitness test and certain survey scales. No positive changes were detected in attitude towards aging and body composition measures in any groups. The post-hoc results suggest that Mental group improved significantly more than the Control group. Regular physical activity with discussions on health and quality of life made a more meaningful difference for the older adults living in nursing home than physical activity alone. Due to the fact that all participants were influenced by the program, it is suggested to further explore this area for better understanding of enhanced quality of life.

  10. Linezolid in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nosocomial pneumonia: a randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderink, Richard G; Niederman, Michael S; Kollef, Marin H; Shorr, Andrew F; Kunkel, Mark J; Baruch, Alice; McGee, William T; Reisman, Arlene; Chastre, Jean

    2012-03-01

    Post hoc analyses of clinical trial data suggested that linezolid may be more effective than vancomycin for treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nosocomial pneumonia. This study prospectively assessed efficacy and safety of linezolid, compared with a dose-optimized vancomycin regimen, for treatment of MRSA nosocomial pneumonia. This was a prospective, double-blind, controlled, multicenter trial involving hospitalized adult patients with hospital-acquired or healthcare-associated MRSA pneumonia. Patients were randomized to receive intravenous linezolid (600 mg every 12 hours) or vancomycin (15 mg/kg every 12 hours) for 7-14 days. Vancomycin dose was adjusted on the basis of trough levels. The primary end point was clinical outcome at end of study (EOS) in evaluable per-protocol (PP) patients. Prespecified secondary end points included response in the modified intent-to-treat (mITT) population at end of treatment (EOT) and EOS and microbiologic response in the PP and mITT populations at EOT and EOS. Survival and safety were also evaluated. Of 1184 patients treated, 448 (linezolid, n = 224; vancomycin, n = 224) were included in the mITT and 348 (linezolid, n = 172; vancomycin, n = 176) in the PP population. In the PP population, 95 (57.6%) of 165 linezolid-treated patients and 81 (46.6%) of 174 vancomycin-treated patients achieved clinical success at EOS (95% confidence interval for difference, 0.5%-21.6%; P = .042). All-cause 60-day mortality was similar (linezolid, 15.7%; vancomycin, 17.0%), as was incidence of adverse events. Nephrotoxicity occurred more frequently with vancomycin (18.2%; linezolid, 8.4%). For the treatment of MRSA nosocomial pneumonia, clinical response at EOS in the PP population was significantly higher with linezolid than with vancomycin, although 60-day mortality was similar.

  11. The mathematics of random mutation and natural selection for multiple simultaneous selection pressures and the evolution of antimicrobial drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Alan

    2016-12-20

    The random mutation and natural selection phenomenon act in a mathematically predictable behavior, which when understood leads to approaches to reduce and prevent the failure of the use of these selection pressures when treating infections and cancers. The underlying principle to impair the random mutation and natural selection phenomenon is to use combination therapy, which forces the population to evolve to multiple selection pressures simultaneously that invoke the multiplication rule of probabilities simultaneously as well. Recently, it has been seen that combination therapy for the treatment of malaria has failed to prevent the emergence of drug-resistant variants. Using this empirical example and the principles of probability theory, the derivation of the equations describing this treatment failure is carried out. These equations give guidance as to how to use combination therapy for the treatment of cancers and infectious diseases and prevent the emergence of drug resistance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Effects of Combined Resistive Underwater Exercises and Interferential Current Therapy in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaggar, Ragab K; Elshafey, Mohammed A

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to verify the effects of combined resistive underwater exercises and interferential current on the peak torque of the quadriceps and hamstrings and pain levels in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is a randomized controlled study; 30 children with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis were randomly distributed into two groups: the control group (n = 15) received the traditional physical therapy program and the study group (n = 15) received resistive underwater exercises and interferential current therapy. Peak torque of the quadriceps and hamstrings and pain levels were evaluated before treatment, 1 mo later, and after 3 mos using the HUMAC NORM, CSMI Testing and Rehabilitation Isokinetic System and visual analog scale, respectively. In the control group, all measures showed significant differences (P interferential current therapy is a potentially valuable treatment for patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  13. Effects of aerobic training, resistance training, or both on psychological health in adolescents with obesity: The HEARTY randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfield, Gary S; Kenny, Glen P; Alberga, Angela S; Prud'homme, Denis; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Gougeon, Réjeanne; Phillips, Penny; Tulloch, Heather; Malcolm, Janine; Doucette, Steve; Wells, George A; Ma, Jinhui; Cameron, Jameason D; Sigal, Ronald J

    2015-12-01

    To determine the effects of aerobic training, resistance training, and combined training on mood, body image, and self-esteem in adolescents with obesity. After a 4-week prerandomization treatment, 304 postpubertal adolescents (91 males, 213 females) with obesity ages 14-18 years were randomized to 1 of 4 groups for 22 weeks: aerobic training (n = 75), resistance training (n = 78), combined aerobic and resistance training (n = 75), or nonexercising control (n = 76). All participants received dietary counseling, with a daily energy deficit of 250 kcal. Mood was measured using the Brunel Mood Scale. Body image was assessed using the Multiple Body Self-Relations Questionnaire, and physical self-perceptions and global self-esteem were measured using the Harter Physical Self-Perceptions Questionnaire. Median adherence was 62%, 56%, and 64% in aerobic, resistance, and combined training, respectively. Resistance and combined training produced greater improvements than control on vigor, and resistance training reduced depressive symptoms. All groups improved on body image and physical self-perceptions, but combined showed greater increases than control on perceived physical conditioning, while only resistance training showed greater increases than controls on global self-esteem. Both combined and resistance training demonstrated greater increases in perceived strength than control. Psychological benefits were more related to better adherence and reductions in body fat than changes in strength or fitness. Resistance training, alone or in combination with aerobic training, may provide psychological benefits in adolescents with overweight or obesity, and therefore could be an alternative to aerobic training for some individuals in the biological and psychological management of adolescent obesity. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Effects of Ibuprofen and Resistance Training on Bone and Muscle: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Whitney R D; Chilibeck, Philip D; Candow, Darren G; Gordon, Julianne J; Mason, Riley S; Taylor-Gjevre, Regina; Nair, Bindu; Szafron, Michael; Baxter-Jones, Adam; Zello, Gordon A; Kontulainen, Saija A

    2017-04-01

    Resistance training with ibuprofen supplementation may improve musculoskeletal health in postmenopausal women. The study purpose was to determine the efficacy of resistance training and ibuprofen supplementation on bone and muscle properties in postmenopausal women. Participants (n = 90, 65.3 ± 4.9 yr) were randomly assigned to: supervised resistance training or stretching (placebo-exercise) with postexercise ibuprofen (400 mg) or placebo supplementation for 3 d·wk (9 months). Baseline and postintervention measurements included distal and shaft scans of the forearm and lower leg using peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Distal site outcomes included cross-sectional area, content, and density for total and trabecular bone, as well as estimated bone strength in compression. Shaft site outcomes included total bone area; cortical bone area, content, and density; estimated bone strength in torsion; and muscle area and density. Exercise-supplement-time interactions for total bone content at the distal radius (P = 0.009) and cortical density at the radius shaft (P = 0.038) were significant. Resistance training with ibuprofen decreased total bone content (-1.5%) at the distal radius in comparison to the resistance training (0.6%; P = 0.032) and ibuprofen alone (0.5%; P = 0.050). Change in cortical density at the radius shaft differed between the stretching with placebo and ibuprofen supplementation groups (-1.8% vs 1.1%; P = 0.050). Resistance training preserved muscle density in the lower leg more so than stretching (-3.1% vs -5.4%; P = 0.015). Ibuprofen consumed immediately after resistance training had a deleterious effect on bone mineral content at the distal radius, whereas resistance training or ibuprofen supplementation individually prevented bone loss. Resistance training prevented muscle density decline in the lower leg.

  15. Genetic Characterization of Resistance to Wheat Stem Rust Race TTKSK in Landrace and Wild Barley Accessions Identifies the rpg4/Rpg5 Locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Bullo Erena; Smith, Kevin P; Brueggeman, Robert S; Steffenson, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Race TTKSK of the wheat stem rust pathogen (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) threatens the production of wheat and barley worldwide because of its broad-spectrum virulence on many widely grown cultivars. Sources of resistance against race TTKSK were recently identified in several barley landraces (Hordeum vulgare subsp. vulgare) and wild barley accessions (H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum). The objectives of this study were to characterize the inheritance of resistance to wheat stem rust race TTKSK in four barley landraces (Hv501, Hv545, Hv602, and Hv612) and two wild barley (WBDC213 and WBDC345) accessions, map the resistance genes, and determine the allelic relationships among the genes in these accessions and the previously described rpg4/Rpg5 locus. Resistant accessions were crossed with the susceptible cv. Steptoe and resulting F3 populations were evaluated for resistance to race TTKSK at the seedling stage. Segregation of F3 families in populations involving the resistance sources of Hv501, Hv545, Hv612, WBDC213, and WBDC345 fit a 1:2:1 ratio for homozygous resistant (HR)/segregating (SEG)/homozygous susceptible (HS) progenies (with χ2=2.27 to 5.87 and P=0.053 to 0.321), indicating that a single gene confers resistance to race TTKSK. Segregation of F3 families in cross Steptoe/Hv602 did not fit a 1:2:1 ratio (HR/SEG/HS of 20:47:43 with χ2=11.95 and P=0.003), indicating that more than one gene is involved in imparting resistance to race TTKSK. Bulked segregant analysis using >1,500 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers positioned a resistance locus in all six populations on chromosome 5HL in very close proximity to the known location of the rpg4/Rpg5 complex locus. Allelism tests were conducted by making crosses among resistant accessions Hv501, Hv545, and Hv612 and also Q21861 with the rpg4/Rpg5 complex. No segregation was observed in F2 families inoculated with race TTKSK, demonstrating that all Hv lines carry the same allele for resistance and that it

  16. Voronoi polygons and self-consistent technique used to compute the airflow resistivity of randomly placed fibers in glass wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    2002-01-01

    harmonic waves at low frequencies, the effective mass density is determined by the friction between air and fibers. The friction is described by the airflow resistivity, which depends on frequency, but for frequencies below 1000 Hz in glass wool with density 15–30 kg/m3, the resistivity to airflow......Sound in glass wool propagates mainly in the air between glass fibers. For sound waves considered here, the distance between fibers is much smaller than the wavelength. Therefore, the sound velocity and attenuation can be computed from an effective mass density and compressibility. For simple...... is constant, and equal to the constant current value. A computation of resistivity from fiber density and diameter will be presented for a model of glass wool that consists of parallel randomly placed fibers with equal diameters. The computation is based on Voronoi polygons, and the results will be compared...

  17. Effects of aerobic and resistance exercise in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy: a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courneya, Kerry S; Segal, Roanne J; Mackey, John R; Gelmon, Karen; Reid, Robert D; Friedenreich, Christine M; Ladha, Aliya B; Proulx, Caroline; Vallance, Jeffrey K H; Lane, Kirstin; Yasui, Yutaka; McKenzie, Donald C

    2007-10-01

    Breast cancer chemotherapy may cause unfavorable changes in physical functioning, body composition, psychosocial functioning, and quality of life (QOL). We evaluated the relative merits of aerobic and resistance exercise in blunting these effects. We conducted a multicenter randomized controlled trial in Canada between 2003 and 2005 that randomly assigned 242 breast cancer patients initiating adjuvant chemotherapy to usual care (n = 82), supervised resistance exercise (n = 82), or supervised aerobic exercise (n = 78) for the duration of their chemotherapy (median, 17 weeks; 95% CI, 9 to 24 weeks). Our primary end point was cancer-specific QOL assessed by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Anemia scale. Secondary end points were fatigue, psychosocial functioning, physical fitness, body composition, chemotherapy completion rate, and lymphedema. The follow-up assessment rate for our primary end point was 92.1%, and adherence to the supervised exercise was 70.2%. Unadjusted and adjusted mixed-model analyses indicated that aerobic exercise was superior to usual care for improving self-esteem (P = .015), aerobic fitness (P = .006), and percent body fat (adjusted P = .076). Resistance exercise was superior to usual care for improving self-esteem (P = .018), muscular strength (P exercise groups but did not reach statistical significance. Exercise did not cause lymphedema or adverse events. Neither aerobic nor resistance exercise significantly improved cancer-specific QOL in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, but they did improve self-esteem, physical fitness, body composition, and chemotherapy completion rate without causing lymphedema or significant adverse events.

  18. Exact two-point resistance, and the simple random walk on the complete graph minus N edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chair, Noureddine, E-mail: n.chair@ju.edu.jo

    2012-12-15

    An analytical approach is developed to obtain the exact expressions for the two-point resistance and the total effective resistance of the complete graph minus N edges of the opposite vertices. These expressions are written in terms of certain numbers that we introduce, which we call the Bejaia and the Pisa numbers; these numbers are the natural generalizations of the bisected Fibonacci and Lucas numbers. The correspondence between random walks and the resistor networks is then used to obtain the exact expressions for the first passage and mean first passage times on this graph. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtain exact formulas for the two-point resistance of the complete graph minus N edges. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtain also the total effective resistance of this graph. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modified Schwatt's formula on trigonometrical power sum to suit our computations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We introduced the generalized bisected Fibonacci and Lucas numbers: the Bejaia and the Pisa numbers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first passage and mean first passage times of the random walks have exact expressions.

  19. Achieving the Recommended Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure: A Randomized Control Study Comparing Loss of Resistance Syringe to Pilot Balloon Palpation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Bulamba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Both under- and overinflation of endotracheal tube cuffs can result in significant harm to the patient. The optimal technique for establishing and maintaining safe cuff pressures (20–30 cmH2O is the cuff pressure manometer, but this is not widely available, especially in resource-limited settings where its use is limited by cost of acquisition and maintenance. Therefore, anesthesia providers commonly rely on subjective methods to estimate safe endotracheal cuff pressure. This study set out to determine the efficacy of the loss of resistance syringe method at estimating endotracheal cuff pressures. Methods. This was a randomized clinical trial. We enrolled adult patients scheduled to undergo general anesthesia for elective surgery at Mulago Hospital, Uganda. Study participants were randomized to have their endotracheal cuff pressures estimated by either loss of resistance syringe or pilot balloon palpation. The pressures measured were recorded. Results. One hundred seventy-eight patients were analyzed. 66.3% (59/89 of patients in the loss of resistance group had cuff pressures in the recommended range compared with 22.5% (20/89 from the pilot balloon palpation method. This was statistically significant. Conclusion. The loss of resistance syringe method was superior to pilot balloon palpation at administering pressures in the recommended range. This method provides a viable option to cuff inflation.

  20. Exact two-point resistance, and the simple random walk on the complete graph minus N edges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chair, Noureddine

    2012-01-01

    An analytical approach is developed to obtain the exact expressions for the two-point resistance and the total effective resistance of the complete graph minus N edges of the opposite vertices. These expressions are written in terms of certain numbers that we introduce, which we call the Bejaia and the Pisa numbers; these numbers are the natural generalizations of the bisected Fibonacci and Lucas numbers. The correspondence between random walks and the resistor networks is then used to obtain the exact expressions for the first passage and mean first passage times on this graph. - Highlights: ► We obtain exact formulas for the two-point resistance of the complete graph minus N edges. ► We obtain also the total effective resistance of this graph. ► We modified Schwatt’s formula on trigonometrical power sum to suit our computations. ► We introduced the generalized bisected Fibonacci and Lucas numbers: the Bejaia and the Pisa numbers. ► The first passage and mean first passage times of the random walks have exact expressions.

  1. The effect of resistance exercise on sleep: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Ana; Mavros, Yorgi; Heisz, Jennifer J; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A

    2018-06-01

    Impaired sleep quality and quantity are associated with future morbidity and mortality. Exercise may be an effective non-pharmacological intervention to improve sleep, however, little is known on the effect of resistance exercise. Thus, we performed a systematic review of the literature to determine the acute and chronic effects of resistance exercise on sleep quantity and quality. Thirteen studies were included. Chronic resistance exercise improves all aspects of sleep, with the greatest benefit for sleep quality. These benefits of isolated resistance exercise are attenuated when resistance exercise is combined with aerobic exercise and compared to aerobic exercise alone. However, the acute effects of resistance exercise on sleep remain poorly studied and inconsistent. In addition to the sleep benefits, resistance exercise training improves anxiety and depression. These results suggest that resistance exercise may be an effective intervention to improve sleep quality. Further research is needed to better understand the effects of acute resistance exercise on sleep, the physiological mechanisms underlying changes in sleep, the changes in sleep architecture with chronic resistance exercise, as well its efficacy in clinical cohorts who commonly experience sleep disturbance. Future studies should also examine time-of-day and dose-response effects to determine the optimal exercise prescription for sleep benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genotypic detection of rifampicin and isoniazid resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains by DNA sequencing: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El mashad Noha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis is a growing international health concern. It is the biggest killer among the infectious diseases in the world today. Early detection of drug resistance allows starting of an appropriate treatment. Resistance to drugs is due to particular genomic mutations in specific genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB. The aim of this study was to identify the presence of Isoniazid (INH and Rifampicin(RIF drug resistance in new and previously treated tuberculosis (TB cases using DNA sequencing. Methods This study was carried out on 153 tuberculous patients with positive Bactec 460 culture for acid fast bacilli. Results Of the 153 patients, 105 (68.6% were new cases and 48 (31.4% were previously treated cases. Drug susceptibility testing on Bactec revealed 50 resistant cases for one or more of the first line antituberculous. Genotypic analysis was done only for rifampicin resistant specimens (23 cases and INH resistant specimens (26 cases to detect mutations responsible for drug resistance by PCR amplification of rpoB gene for rifampicin resistant cases and KatG gene for isoniazid resistant cases. Finally, DNA sequencing was done for detection of mutation within rpoB and KatG genes. Genotypic analysis of RIF resistant cases revealed that 20/23 cases (86.9% of RIF resistance were having rpoB gene mutation versus 3 cases (13.1% having no mutation with a high statistical significant difference between them (P Conclusion We can conclude that rifampicin resistance could be used as a useful surrogate marker for estimation of multidrug resistance. In addition, Genotypic method was superior to that of the traditional phenotypic method which is time-consuming taking several weeks or longer.

  3. Effects of Milk Proteins Supplementation in Older Adults Undergoing Resistance Training: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Control Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, K; Chen, G-C; Wang, Y; Zhang, Z; Dai, X; Szeto, I M Y; Qin, L-Q

    2018-01-01

    Older adults experience age-related physiological changes that affect body weight and body composition. In general, nutrition and exercise have been identified as potent stimulators of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Milk proteins are excellent sources of all the essential amino acids and may represent an ideal protein source to promote muscle anabolism in older adults undergoing resistance training. However, several randomized control trials (RCTs) have yielded mixed results on the effects of milk proteins supplementation in combination with resistance training on body weight and composition. PubMed, Web of Science and Cochrane databases were searched for literature that evaluated the effects of milk proteins supplementation on body weight and composition among older adults (age ≥ 60 years) undergoing resistance training up to September 2016. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of effect sizes. The final analysis included 10 RCTs involving 574 participants (mean age range from 60 to 80.8 years). Overall, the combination of milk proteins supplementation and resistance training did not have significant effect on fat mass (0.30, 95% CI -0.25, 0.86 kg) or body weight (1.02, 95% CI: -0.01, 2.04 kg). However, a positive effect of milk proteins supplementation paired with resistance training on fat-free mass was observed (0.74, 95% CI 0.30, 1.17 kg). Greater fat-free mass gains were observed in studies that included more than 55 participants (0.73, 95% CI 0.30, 1.16 kg), and in studies that enrolled participants with aging-related medical conditions (1.60, 95% CI 0.92, 2.28 kg). There was no statistical evidence of publication bias among the studies. Our findings provide evidence that supplementation of milk protein, in combination with resistance training, is effective to elicit fat-free mass gain in older adults.

  4. Resistive Exercise for Arthritic Cartilage Health (REACH: A randomized double-blind, sham-exercise controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Richard M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article provides the rationale and methodology, of the first randomised controlled trial to our knowledge designed to assess the efficacy of progressive resistance training on cartilage morphology in women with knee osteoarthritis. Development and progression of osteoarthritis is multifactorial, with obesity, quadriceps weakness, joint malalignment, and abnormal mechanical joint forces particularly relevant to this study. Progressive resistance training has been reported to improve pain and disability in osteoarthritic cohorts. However, the disease-modifying potential of progressive resistance training for the articular cartilage degeneration characteristic of osteoarthritis is unknown. Our aim was to investigate the effect of high intensity progressive resistance training on articular cartilage degeneration in women with knee osteoarthritis. Methods Our cohort consisted of women over 40 years of age with primary knee osteoarthritis, according to the American College of Rheumatology clinical criteria. Primary outcome was blinded measurement of cartilage morphology via magnetic resonance imaging scan of the tibiofemoral joint. Secondary outcomes included walking endurance, balance, muscle strength, endurance, power, and velocity, body composition, pain, disability, depressive symptoms, and quality of life. Participants were randomized into a supervised progressive resistance training or sham-exercise group. The progressive resistance training group trained muscles around the hip and knee at 80% of their peak strength and progressed 3% per session, 3 days per week for 6 months. The sham-exercise group completed all exercises except hip adduction, but without added resistance or progression. Outcomes were repeated at 3 and 6 months, except for the magnetic resonance imaging scan, which was only repeated at 6 months. Discussion Our results will provide an evaluation of the disease-modifying potential of progressive

  5. Characterization of molecular diversity and genome-wide mapping of loci associated with resistance to stripe rust and stem rust in Ethiopian bread wheat accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muleta, Kebede T; Rouse, Matthew N; Rynearson, Sheri; Chen, Xianming; Buta, Bedada G; Pumphrey, Michael O

    2017-08-04

    The narrow genetic basis of resistance in modern wheat cultivars and the strong selection response of pathogen populations have been responsible for periodic and devastating epidemics of the wheat rust diseases. Characterizing new sources of resistance and incorporating multiple genes into elite cultivars is the most widely accepted current mechanism to achieve durable varietal performance against changes in pathogen virulence. Here, we report a high-density molecular characterization and genome-wide association study (GWAS) of stripe rust and stem rust resistance in 190 Ethiopian bread wheat lines based on phenotypic data from multi-environment field trials and seedling resistance screening experiments. A total of 24,281 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers filtered from the wheat 90 K iSelect genotyping assay was used to survey Ethiopian germplasm for population structure, genetic diversity and marker-trait associations. Upon screening for field resistance to stripe rust in the Pacific Northwest of the United States and Ethiopia over multiple growing seasons, and against multiple races of stripe rust and stem rust at seedling stage, eight accessions displayed resistance to all tested races of stem rust and field resistance to stripe rust in all environments. Our GWAS results show 15 loci were significantly associated with seedling and adult plant resistance to stripe rust at false discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted probability (P) rust in the Ethiopian wheat accessions. Many of the identified resistance loci were mapped close to previously identified rust resistance genes; however, three loci on the short arms of chromosomes 5A and 7B for stripe rust resistance and two on chromosomes 3B and 7B for stem rust resistance may be novel. Our results demonstrate that considerable genetic variation resides within the landrace accessions that can be utilized to broaden the genetic base of rust resistance in wheat breeding germplasm. The molecular markers identified in

  6. Right versus left radial artery access for coronary procedures: an international collaborative systematic review and meta-analysis including 5 randomized trials and 3210 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Sciahbasi, Alessandro; Bodí, Vicente; Fernández-Portales, Javier; Kanei, Yumiko; Romagnoli, Enrico; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Sangiorgi, Giuseppe; Lotrionte, Marzia; Modena, Maria Grazia

    2013-07-01

    Radial artery access is a mainstay in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease. However, there is uncertainty on the comparison of right versus left radial access for coronary procedures. We thus undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing right versus left radial access for coronary diagnostic and interventional procedures. Pertinent studies were searched in CENTRAL, Google Scholar, MEDLINE/PubMed, and Scopus, together with international conference proceedings. Randomized trials comparing right versus left radial (or ulnar) access for coronary diagnostic or interventional procedures were included. Risk ratios (RR) and weighted mean differences (WMD) were computed to generate point estimates (95% confidence intervals). A total of 5 trials (3210 patients) were included. No overall significant differences were found comparing right versus left radial access in terms of procedural time (WMD=0.99 [-0.53; 2.51]min, p=0.20), contrast use (WMD=1.71 [-1.32; 4.74]mL, p=0.27), fluoroscopy time (WMD=-35.79 [-3.54; 75.12]s, p=0.07) or any major complication (RR=2.00 [0.75; 5.31], p=0.49). However, right radial access was fraught with a significantly higher risk of failure leading to cross-over to femoral access (RR=1.65 [1.18; 2.30], p=0.003) in comparison to left radial access. Right and left radial accesses appear largely similar in their overall procedural and clinical performance during transradial diagnostic or interventional procedures. Nonetheless, left radial access can be recommended especially during the learning curve phase to reduce femoral cross-overs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of upper extremity proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation combined with elastic resistance bands on respiratory muscle strength: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme P. T. Areas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elastic resistance bands (ERB combined with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF are often used in resistance muscle training programs, which have potential effects on peripheral muscle strength. However, the effects of the combination of ERB and PNF on respiratory muscle strength warrant further investigation. OBJECTIVES: The assessment of the effects of PNF combined with ERB on respiratory muscle strength. METHOD: Twenty healthy, right-handed females were included. Subjects were randomized to either the resistance training program group (TG, n=10 or the control group (CG, n=10. Maximal expiratory pressure (MEP and inspiratory pressure (MIP were measured before and after four weeks of an upper extremity resistance training program. The training protocol consisted of upper extremity PNF combined with ERB, with resistance selected from 1 repetition maximum protocol. RESULTS: PNF combined with ERB showed significant increases in MIP and MEP (p<0.05. In addition, there were significant differences between the TG and CG regarding ∆MIP (p=0.01 and ∆MEP (p=0.04. CONCLUSIONS: PNF combined with ERB can have a positive impact on respiratory muscle strength. These results may be useful with respect to cardiopulmonary chronic diseases that are associated with reduced respiratory muscle strength.

  8. Development of Random Amplified Polymorphism DNA Markers Linked to CMV-B2 Resistance Gene in Melon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BUDI SETIADI DARYONO

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Two random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers linked to CMV-B2 resistance gene (Creb-2 in melon cultivar Yamatouri were cloned and sequenced to design sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR markers for detection of CMV-B2 resistance gene (Creb-2 in melon. SCOPE14 derived from OPE-14 yielded a single DNA band at 541 bp, while SCAPB05 derived from APB-05, yielded a single DNA band at 1,046 bp, respectively. Segregation of SCOPE14 and SCAPB05 markers in bulk of F2 plants demonstrated that they were co-segregated with RAPD markers from which the SCAR markers were originated. Furthermore, results of SCAR analysis in diverse melons showed SCAPB05 primers obtained a single 1,046 bp linked to Creb-2 in resistant cultivars Sanuki-shirouri and Kohimeuri. However, SCOPE14 failed to detect Creb-2 in diverse melons. Results of this study revealed that SCAR analysis not only confirmed melons that had been clearly scored for resistance to CMV-B2 by RAPD markers, but also clarified the ambiguous resistance results obtained by the RAPD markers.

  9. Effect of upper extremity proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation combined with elastic resistance bands on respiratory muscle strength: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areas, Guilherme P T; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Lobato, Arianne N; Silva, Alessandra A; Freire, Renato C; Areas, Fernando Z S

    2013-01-01

    Elastic resistance bands (ERB) combined with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) are often used in resistance muscle training programs, which have potential effects on peripheral muscle strength. However, the effects of the combination of ERB and PNF on respiratory muscle strength warrant further investigation. The assessment of the effects of PNF combined with ERB on respiratory muscle strength. Twenty healthy, right-handed females were included. Subjects were randomized to either the resistance training program group (TG, n=10) or the control group (CG, n=10). Maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) and inspiratory pressure (MIP) were measured before and after four weeks of an upper extremity resistance training program. The training protocol consisted of upper extremity PNF combined with ERB, with resistance selected from 1 repetition maximum protocol. PNF combined with ERB showed significant increases in MIP and MEP (p<0.05). In addition, there were significant differences between the TG and CG regarding ∆MIP (p=0.01) and ∆MEP (p=0.04). PNF combined with ERB can have a positive impact on respiratory muscle strength. These results may be useful with respect to cardiopulmonary chronic diseases that are associated with reduced respiratory muscle strength.

  10. Effect of daily consumption of probiotic yoghurt on insulin resistance in pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemi, Z; Samimi, M; Tabassi, Z; Naghibi Rad, M; Rahimi Foroushani, A; Khorammian, H; Esmaillzadeh, A

    2013-01-01

    Owing to excess body weight and increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines primarily during the third trimester, pregnancy is associated with elevated insulin resistance. To our knowledge, no report is available indicating the effects of probiotic yoghurt consumption on serum insulin levels in pregnant women. This study was designed to determine the effects of daily consumption of probiotic yoghurt on insulin resistance and serum insulin levels of Iranian pregnant women. In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 70 primigravida pregnant women with singleton pregnancy at their third trimester were participated. We randomly assigned participants to consume 200 g per day of conventional (n=33) or the probiotic group (n=37) for 9 weeks. The probiotic yoghurt was a commercially available product prepared with the starter cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus, enriched with probiotic culture of two strains of lactobacilli (Lactobacillus acidophilus LA5) and bifidobacteria (Bifidobacterium animalis BB12) with a total of min 1 × 10⁷ colony-forming units. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 9-week intervention to measure fasting plasma glucose and serum insulin levels. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used to calculate insulin resistance score. Although consumption of probiotic yogurt for 9 weeks did not affect serum insulin levels and HOMA-IR score, significant differences were found comparing changes in these variables between probiotic and conventional yogurts (changes from baseline in serum insulin levels: +1.2±1.2 vs +5.0±1.1 μIU/ml, respectively, P=0.02; and in HOMA-IR score: -0.2±0.3 vs 0.7±0.2, respectively, P=0.01). It is concluded that in contrast to conventional yogurt, daily consumption of probiotic yogurt for 9 weeks maintains serum insulin levels and might help pregnant women prevent developing insulin resistance.

  11. Matching of treatment-resistant heroin-dependent patients to medical prescription of heroin or oral methadone treatment: results from two randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanken, Peter; Hendriks, Vincent M.; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; van Ree, Jan M.; van den Brink, Wim

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate which baseline patient characteristics of treatment-resistant heroin addicts differentially predicted treatment response to medical heroin prescription compared to standard methadone maintenance treatment. DESIGN: Two open-label randomized controlled trials; pooled data.

  12. Novos acessos de tomateiro resistentes à mosca-branca biótipo B New accessions of tomato resistant to whitefly biotype B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elisa de Sena Fernandes

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi selecionar novas fontes de resistência a Bemisia tabaci biótipo B, entre 34 acessos de tomateiro (Lycopersicon esculentum, do Banco de Germoplasma de Hortaliças da UFV. Avaliaram-se os números de adultos, ovos e ninfas por planta, além da densidade de tricomas. Detectaram-se diferenças entre os acessos nas variáveis avaliadas. Os acessos BGH-166, BGH-616, BGH-850, BGH-990, BGH-2102 e BGH-2125 apresentaram menor número de adultos, ovos e ninfas por planta e tiveram menor densidade de tricomas. A resistência dos acessos de tomate à mosca-branca foi associada a uma menor densidade de tricomas.The objective of this work was to evaluate resistance to Bemisia tabaci biotype B in 34 tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum accessions from the Banco de Germoplasma de Hortaliças of UFV. The number of adults, eggs and nymphs per plant besides of trichome density were evaluated. Differences between accessions were found for the evaluated variables. Accessions BGH-166, BGH-616, BGH-850, BGH-990, BGH-2102 and BGH-2125 presented less infestation of adults, eggs and nymphs per plant and showed lower trichome density. The resistance of these tomato accessions to whitefly was associated to a lower trichome density.

  13. A stratified random survey of the proportion of poor quality oral artesunate sold at medicine outlets in the Lao PDR - implications for therapeutic failure and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengaloundeth, Sivong; Green, Michael D; Fernández, Facundo M; Manolin, Ot; Phommavong, Khamlieng; Insixiengmay, Vongsavanh; Hampton, Christina Y; Nyadong, Leonard; Mildenhall, Dallas C; Hostetler, Dana; Khounsaknalath, Lamphet; Vongsack, Latsamy; Phompida, Samlane; Vanisaveth, Viengxay; Syhakhang, Lamphone; Newton, Paul N

    2009-07-28

    Counterfeit oral artesunate has been a major public health problem in mainland SE Asia, impeding malaria control. A countrywide stratified random survey was performed to determine the availability and quality of oral artesunate in pharmacies and outlets (shops selling medicines) in the Lao PDR (Laos). In 2003, 'mystery' shoppers were asked to buy artesunate tablets from 180 outlets in 12 of the 18 Lao provinces. Outlets were selected using stratified random sampling by investigators not involved in sampling. Samples were analysed for packaging characteristics, by the Fast Red Dye test, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), mass spectrometry (MS), X-ray diffractometry and pollen analysis. Of 180 outlets sampled, 25 (13.9%) sold oral artesunate. Outlets selling artesunate were more commonly found in the more malarious southern Laos. Of the 25 outlets, 22 (88%; 95%CI 68-97%) sold counterfeit artesunate, as defined by packaging and chemistry. No artesunate was detected in the counterfeits by any of the chemical analysis techniques and analysis of the packaging demonstrated seven different counterfeit types. There was complete agreement between the Fast Red dye test, HPLC and MS analysis. A wide variety of wrong active ingredients were found by MS. Of great concern, 4/27 (14.8%) fakes contained detectable amounts of artemisinin (0.26-115.7 mg/tablet). This random survey confirms results from previous convenience surveys that counterfeit artesunate is a severe public health problem. The presence of artemisinin in counterfeits may encourage malaria resistance to artemisinin derivatives. With increasing accessibility of artemisinin-derivative combination therapy (ACT) in Laos, the removal of artesunate monotherapy from pharmacies may be an effective intervention.

  14. Lowering data retention voltage in static random access memory array by post fabrication self-improvement of cell stability by multiple stress application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Kiyoshi; Saraya, Takuya; Kobayashi, Masaharu; Hiramoto, Toshiro

    2018-04-01

    We propose a new version of the post fabrication static random access memory (SRAM) self-improvement technique, which utilizes multiple stress application. It is demonstrated that, using a device matrix array (DMA) test element group (TEG) with intrinsic channel fully depleted (FD) silicon-on-thin-buried-oxide (SOTB) six-transistor (6T) SRAM cells fabricated by the 65 nm technology, the lowering of data retention voltage (DRV) is more effectively achieved than using the previously proposed single stress technique.

  15. Muscle stretching exercises and resistance training in fibromyalgia: which is better? A three-arm randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assumpção, Ana; Matsutani, Luciana A; Yuan, Susan L; Santo, Adriana S; Sauer, Juliana; Mango, Pamela; Marques, Amelia P

    2017-11-29

    Exercise therapy is an effective component of fibromyalgia (FM) treatment. However, it is important to know the effects and specificities of the different types of exercise: muscle stretching and resistance training. To verify and compare the effectiveness of muscle stretching exercise and resistance training for symptoms and quality of life in FM patients. Randomized controlled trial. Physical therapy service, FM outpatient clinic. Forty-four women with FM (79 screened). Patients were randomly allocated into a stretching group (n=14), resistance group (n=16), and control group (n=14). Pain was assessed using the visual analog scale, pain threshold using a Fischer dolorimeter, FM symptoms using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and quality of life using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short- Form Health Survey (SF-36). The three intervention groups continued with usual medical treatment. In addition, the stretching and resistance groups performed two different exercise programs twice a week for 12 weeks. After treatment, the stretching group showed the highest SF-36 physical functioning score (p=0.01) and the lowest bodily pain score (p=0.01). The resistance group had the lowest FIQ depression score (p=0.02). The control group had the highest score for FIQ morning tiredness and stiffness, and the lowest score for SF-36 vitality. In clinical analyses, the stretching group had significant improvement in quality of life for all SF-36 domains, and the resistance group had significant improvement in FM symptoms and in quality of life for SF-36 domains of physical functioning, vitality, social function, emotional role, and mental health. Muscle stretching exercise was the most effective modality in improving quality of life, especially with regard to physical functioning and pain, and resistance training was the most effective modality in reducing depression. The trial included a control group and two intervention groups, both of which received exercise

  16. A randomized controlled trial and cost-effectiveness analysis of early cannulation arteriovenous grafts versus tunneled central venous catheters in patients requiring urgent vascular access for hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Emma; Thomson, Peter; Bainbridge, Leigh; Kasthuri, Ram; Mohr, Belinda; Kingsmore, David

    2017-03-01

    Early cannulation arteriovenous grafts (ecAVGs) are proposed as an alternative to tunneled central venous catheters (TCVCs) in patients requiring immediate vascular access for hemodialysis (HD). We compared bacteremia rates in patients treated with ecAVG and TCVC. The study randomized 121 adult patients requiring urgent vascular access for HD in a 1:1 fashion to receive an ecAVG with or without (+/-) an arteriovenous fistula (AVF; n = 60) or TCVC+/-AVF (n = 61). Patients were excluded if they had active systemic sepsis, no anatomically suitable vessels, or an anticipated life expectancy vascular access for HD. The strategy also proved to be cost-neutral. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Resistance versus Balance Training to Improve Postural Control in Parkinson's Disease: A Randomized Rater Blinded Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenstedt, Christian; Paschen, Steffen; Kruse, Annika; Raethjen, Jan; Weisser, Burkhard; Deuschl, Günther

    2015-01-01

    Reduced muscle strength is an independent risk factor for falls and related to postural instability in individuals with Parkinson's disease. The ability of resistance training to improve postural control still remains unclear. To compare resistance training with balance training to improve postural control in people with Parkinson's disease. 40 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (Hoehn&Yahr: 2.5-3.0) were randomly assigned into resistance or balance training (2x/week for 7 weeks). Assessments were performed at baseline, 8- and 12-weeks follow-up: primary outcome: Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB) scale; secondary outcomes: center of mass analysis during surface perturbations, Timed-up-and-go-test, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, Clinical Global Impression, gait analysis, maximal isometric leg strength, PDQ-39, Beck Depression Inventory. Clinical tests were videotaped and analysed by a second rater, blind to group allocation and assessment time. 32 participants (resistance training: n = 17, balance training: n = 15; 8 drop-outs) were analyzed at 8-weeks follow-up. No significant difference was found in the FAB scale when comparing the effects of the two training types (p = 0.14; effect size (Cohen's d) = -0.59). Participants from the resistance training group, but not from the balance training group significantly improved on the FAB scale (resistance training: +2.4 points, Cohen's d = -0.46; balance training: +0.3 points, Cohen's d = -0.08). Within the resistance training group, improvements of the FAB scale were significantly correlated with improvements of rate of force development and stride time variability. No significant differences were found in the secondary outcome measures when comparing the training effects of both training types. The difference between resistance and balance training to improve postural control in people with Parkinson's disease was small and not significant with this sample size. There was weak evidence that freely

  18. Resistance versus Balance Training to Improve Postural Control in Parkinson's Disease: A Randomized Rater Blinded Controlled Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schlenstedt

    Full Text Available Reduced muscle strength is an independent risk factor for falls and related to postural instability in individuals with Parkinson's disease. The ability of resistance training to improve postural control still remains unclear.To compare resistance training with balance training to improve postural control in people with Parkinson's disease.40 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (Hoehn&Yahr: 2.5-3.0 were randomly assigned into resistance or balance training (2x/week for 7 weeks. Assessments were performed at baseline, 8- and 12-weeks follow-up: primary outcome: Fullerton Advanced Balance (FAB scale; secondary outcomes: center of mass analysis during surface perturbations, Timed-up-and-go-test, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, Clinical Global Impression, gait analysis, maximal isometric leg strength, PDQ-39, Beck Depression Inventory. Clinical tests were videotaped and analysed by a second rater, blind to group allocation and assessment time.32 participants (resistance training: n = 17, balance training: n = 15; 8 drop-outs were analyzed at 8-weeks follow-up. No significant difference was found in the FAB scale when comparing the effects of the two training types (p = 0.14; effect size (Cohen's d = -0.59. Participants from the resistance training group, but not from the balance training group significantly improved on the FAB scale (resistance training: +2.4 points, Cohen's d = -0.46; balance training: +0.3 points, Cohen's d = -0.08. Within the resistance training group, improvements of the FAB scale were significantly correlated with improvements of rate of force development and stride time variability. No significant differences were found in the secondary outcome measures when comparing the training effects of both training types.The difference between resistance and balance training to improve postural control in people with Parkinson's disease was small and not significant with this sample size. There was weak evidence that

  19. Progressive resistance training in head and neck cancer patients during concomitant chemoradiotherapy - design of the DAHANCA 31 randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonkvist, Camilla K; Lønbro, Simon; Vinther, Anders

    2017-01-01

    at Herlev and Aarhus University Hospitals, patients with stage III/IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, scheduled for CCRT are randomized 1:1 to either a 12-week PRT program or control group, both with 1 year follow-up. Planned enrollment is 72 patients, and stratification variables are study...... training adherence, changes in body composition, muscle strength, functional performance, weight, adverse events, dietary intake, self-reported physical activity, quality of life, labor market affiliation, blood biochemistry, plasma cytokine concentrations, NK-cell frequency in blood, sarcomeric protein...... content in muscles, as well as muscle fiber type and fiber size in muscle biopsies. Muscle biopsies are optional. DISCUSSION: This randomized study investigates the impact of a 12-week progressive resistance training program on lean body mass and several other physiological endpoints, as well as impact...

  20. Pilot randomized controlled trial: elastic-resistance-training and lifestyle-activity intervention for sedentary older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubans, David R; Mundey, Chris M; Lubans, Nicole J; Lonsdale, Chris C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and feasibility of a resistance-training (RT) and lifestyle-activity program for sedentary older adults. Eligible participants (N = 44) were randomized to an 8-wk intervention or a control group. The primary outcome was lower body muscle strength, and participants completed a range of secondary outcomes. There was a significant group-by-time interaction for lower body muscle strength (difference = 3.9 repetitions [reps], 95% CI = 2.0-5.8 reps; p lifestyle-activity program delivered in the community setting is an efficacious and feasible approach to improve health in sedentary older adults.

  1. Effects of a resistance training program performed with an interocclusal splint for community-dwelling older adults: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hirase, Tatsuya; Inokuchi, Shigeru; Matsusaka, Nobuou; Nakahara, Kazumi; Okita, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To examine whether resistance training for elderly community-dwellers performed with an interocclusal splint resulted in greater lower extremity muscle strength and better balance than resistance training performed without an interocclusal splint. [Subjects and Methods] Eighty-eight elderly persons using Japanese community day centers were randomly divided into two groups: an intervention group (n=45), which performed resistance training with an interocclusal splint; and a control g...

  2. Comparison of the effectiveness of resistance training in women with chronic computer-related neck pain: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Lin, Caina; Liu, Cuicui; Ke, Songjian; Wan, Qing; Luo, Haijie; Huang, Zhuxi; Xin, Wenjun; Ma, Chao; Wu, Shaoling

    2017-10-01

    Chronic computer-related neck pain is common among office workers. Studies have proposed neck strengthening exercise as a therapy to pain relieving and function improvement. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of different loading resistance trainings and we hypothesized that women with work-related neck pain could benefit more from progressive resistance training for pain and function recovery. A randomized controlled trial was conducted and subjects characterized by monotonous jobs were recruited. One hundred and nine employed women with chronic neck pain were randomly allocated into three groups, namely, progressive resistance training (PRT), fixed resistance training (FRT), and control group (CG). In PRT and FRT, four exercises for neck muscles with an elastic rubber band were performed on regular basis for 6 weeks. The therapeutic effectiveness was then evaluated at pretreatment, 2, 4, and 6 weeks during training period, and 3-month posttreatment. Assessment tools included visual analog scale (VAS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and maximal isometric neck strength. The outcomes were significantly better in PRT and FRT than those in CG at 6-week timepoint and 3-month follow-up (p = 0.000), in terms of VAS, NDI, PPT, and neck muscle strength. Besides, there were statistically significant decreases observed in VAS scores of PRT group compared with those in FRT at 4-, 6-week timepoints, and 3-month follow-up (p training was an effective method for pain relieving, mobility improving, pain threshold, and neck muscle strength enhancing in women with chronic computer-related neck pain. Thus, our study provided evidence that women with work-related neck pain might benefit more from PRT, which may have important implications for future clinical practice. The study was qualified and registered in the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry as ChiCTR-TRC-12002723.

  3. Metformin versus chromium picolinate in clomiphene citrate-resistant patients with PCOs: A double-blind randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Amooee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chromium picolinate could be effective in clomiphen citrate resistant PCOS patients. Objective: To compare the effects of chromium picolinate vs. metformin in clomiphen citrate resistant PCOS patients. Materials and Methods: The present randomized clinical trial was performed on 92 women with clomiphen citrate-resistant PCOS at the clinics which were affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. The subjects were randomly assigned to two groups receiving either chromium picolinate (200μg daily or metformin (1500mg daily for 3 months. Anthropometric and hormonal profile were measured and compared both before and after the treatment. Ovulation and pregnancy rate was measured in the two study groups, as well. Results: Chromium picolinate significantly decreased fasting blood sugar (FBS after 3 months of treatment (p=0.042. In the same way, the serum levels of fasting insulin had significantly decreased leading to an increase in insulin sensitivity as measured by QUICKI index (p=0.014. In comparison to the patients who received chromium picolinate, those who received metformin had significantly lower levels of testosterone (p=0.001 and free testosterone (p=0.001 after 3 months of treatment. Nevertheless, no significant difference was found between the two study groups regarding ovulation (p=0.417 and pregnancy rates (p=0.500. Conclusion: Chromium picolinate decreased FBS and insulin levels and, thus, increased insulin sensitivity in clomiphene citrate-resistance PCOS women. These effects were comparable with metformin; however, metformin treatment was associated with decreased hyperandrogenism. Overall, chromium picolinate was better tolerated compared to metformin; nonetheless, the two study groups were not significantly different regarding ovulation and pregnancy rates.

  4. Randomized sham-controlled trial of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Antonio; Simpson, Helen B; Fallon, Brian A; Rossi, Simone; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2010-03-01

    In open trials, 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the supplementary motor area (SMA) improved symptoms and normalized cortical hyper-excitability of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we present the results of a randomized sham-controlled double-blind study. Medication-resistant OCD patients (n=21) were assigned 4 wk either active or sham rTMS to the SMA bilaterally. rTMS parameters consisted of 1200 pulses/d, at 1 Hz and 100% of motor threshold (MT). Eighteen patients completed the study. Response to treatment was defined as a > or = 25% decrease on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (YBOCS). Non-responders to sham and responders to active or sham rTMS were offered four additional weeks of open active rTMS. After 4 wk, the response rate in the completer sample was 67% (6/9) with active and 22% (2/9) with sham rTMS. At 4 wk, patients receiving active rTMS showed on average a 25% reduction in the YBOCS compared to a 12% reduction in those receiving sham. In those who received 8-wk active rTMS, OCD symptoms improved from 28.2+/-5.8 to 14.5+/-3.6. In patients randomized to active rTMS, MT measures on the right hemisphere increased significantly over time. At the end of 4-wk rTMS the abnormal hemispheric laterality found in the group randomized to active rTMS normalized. The results of the first randomized sham-controlled trial of SMA stimulation in the treatment of resistant OCD support further investigation into the potential therapeutic applications of rTMS in this disabling condition.

  5. 39% access time improvement, 11% energy reduction, 32 kbit 1-read/1-write 2-port static random-access memory using two-stage read boost and write-boost after read sensing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yasue; Moriwaki, Shinichi; Kawasumi, Atsushi; Miyano, Shinji; Shinohara, Hirofumi

    2016-04-01

    We propose novel circuit techniques for 1 clock (1CLK) 1 read/1 write (1R/1W) 2-port static random-access memories (SRAMs) to improve read access time (tAC) and write margins at low voltages. Two-stage read boost (TSR-BST) and write word line boost (WWL-BST) after the read sensing schemes have been proposed. TSR-BST reduces the worst read bit line (RBL) delay by 61% and RBL amplitude by 10% at V DD = 0.5 V, which improves tAC by 39% and reduces energy dissipation by 11% at V DD = 0.55 V. WWL-BST after read sensing scheme improves minimum operating voltage (V min) by 140 mV. A 32 kbit 1CLK 1R/1W 2-port SRAM with TSR-BST and WWL-BST has been developed using a 40 nm CMOS.

  6. Randomized Clinical Trial Design to Assess Abatacept in Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Trachtman

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: This study advances efforts to validate CD80 as a therapeutic target for treatment-resistant nephrotic syndrome, and implements a precision medicine-based approach to this serious kidney condition in which the selection of a therapeutic agent is guided by the underlying disease mechanism operating in individual patients.

  7. Residual resistivity and its anisotropy in random CoNi and CuNi ferromagnetic alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Turek, Ilja; Záležák, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 200, č. 5 (2010), 052029/1-052029/4 ISSN 1742-6588. [International Conference on Magnetism - ICM 2009. Karlsruhe, 26.07.2009-31.07.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : residual resistivity * anisotropic magnetoresistance * ferromagnets Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  8. Identification and mapping of Sr46 from Aegilops tauschii accession CIae 25 conferring resistance to race TTKSK (Ug99) of wheat stem rust pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guotai; Zhang, Qijun; Friesen, Timothy L; Rouse, Matthew N; Jin, Yue; Zhong, Shaobin; Rasmussen, Jack B; Lagudah, Evans S; Xu, Steven S

    2015-03-01

    Mapping studies confirm that resistance to Ug99 race of stem rust pathogen in Aegilops tauschii accession Clae 25 is conditioned by Sr46 and markers linked to the gene were developed for marker-assisted selection. The race TTKSK (Ug99) of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal pathogen for wheat stem rust, is considered as a major threat to global wheat production. To address this threat, researchers across the world have been devoted to identifying TTKSK-resistant genes. Here, we report the identification and mapping of a stem rust resistance gene in Aegilops tauschii accession CIae 25 that confers resistance to TTKSK and the development of molecular markers for the gene. An F2 population of 710 plants from an Ae. tauschii cross CIae 25 × AL8/78 were first evaluated against race TPMKC. A set of 14 resistant and 116 susceptible F2:3 families from the F2 plants were then evaluated for their reactions to TTKSK. Based on the tests, 179 homozygous susceptible F2 plants were selected as the mapping population to identify the simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence tagged site (STS) markers linked to the gene by bulk segregant analysis. A dominant stem rust resistance gene was identified and mapped with 16 SSR and five new STS markers to the deletion bin 2DS5-0.47-1.00 of chromosome arm 2DS in which Sr46 was located. Molecular marker and stem rust tests on CIae 25 and two Ae. tauschii accessions carrying Sr46 confirmed that the gene in CIae 25 is Sr46. This study also demonstrated that Sr46 is temperature-sensitive being less effective at low temperatures. The marker validation indicated that two closely linked markers Xgwm210 and Xwmc111 can be used for marker-assisted selection of Sr46 in wheat breeding programs.

  9. Effects of Home Access to Active Videogames on Child Self-Esteem, Enjoyment of Physical Activity, and Anxiety Related to Electronic Games: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rebecca A; Smith, Anne J; Howie, Erin K; Pollock, Clare; Straker, Leon

    2014-08-01

    Active-input videogames could provide a useful conduit for increasing physical activity by improving a child's self-confidence, physical activity enjoyment, and reducing anxiety. Therefore this study evaluated the impact of (a) the removal of home access to traditional electronic games or (b) their replacement with active-input videogames, on child self-perception, enjoyment of physical activity, and electronic game use anxiety. This was a crossover, randomized controlled trial, conducted over a 6-month period in participants' family homes in metropolitan Perth, Australia, from 2007 to 2010. Children 10-12 years old were recruited through school and community media. Of 210 children who were eligible, 74 met inclusion criteria, and 8 withdrew, leaving 66 children (33 girls) for analysis. A counterbalanced randomized order of three conditions sustained for 8 weeks each: No home access to electronic games, home access to traditional electronic games, and home access to active-input electronic games. Perception of self-esteem (Harter's Self Perception Profile for Children), enjoyment of physical activity (Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale questionnaire), and anxiety toward electronic game use (modified Loyd and Gressard Computer Anxiety Subscale) were assessed. Compared with home access to traditional electronic games, neither removal of all electronic games nor replacement with active-input games resulted in any significant change to child self-esteem, enjoyment of physical activity, or anxiety related to electronic games. Although active-input videogames have been shown to be enjoyable in the short term, their ability to impact on psychological outcomes is yet to be established.

  10. Genetic analysis and mapping of genes for resistance to multiple strains of Soybean mosaic virus in a single resistant soybean accession PI 96983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongqing; Zheng, Guijie; Han, Lu; Dagang, Wang; Yang, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Saihua; Zhi, Haijian

    2013-07-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is one of the most broadly distributed soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) diseases and causes severe yield loss and seed quality deficiency. Multiple studies have proved that a single dominant gene can confer resistance to several SMV strains. Plant introduction (PI) 96983 has been reported to contain SMV resistance genes (e.g., Rsv1 and Rsc14) on chromosome 13. The objective of this study was to delineate the genetics of resistance to SMV in PI 96983 and determine whether one gene can control resistance to more than one Chinese SMV strain. In this study, PI 96983 was identified as resistant and Nannong 1138-2 was identified as susceptible to four SMV strains SC3, SC6, SC7, and SC17. Genetic maps based on 783 F2 individuals from the cross of PI 96983 × Nannong 1138-2 showed that the gene(s) conferring resistance to SC3, SC6, and SC17 were between SSR markers BARCSOYSSR_13_1114 and BARCSOYSSR_13_1136, whereas SC7 was between markers BARCSOYSSR_13_1140 and BARCSOYSSR_13_1185. The physical map based on 58 recombinant lines confirmed these results. The resistance gene for SC7 was positioned between BARCSOYSSR_13_1140 and BARCSOYSSR_13_1155, while the resistance gene(s) for SC3, SC6, and SC17 were between BARCSOYSSR_13_1128 and BARCSOYSSR_13_1136. We concluded that, there were two dominant resistance genes flanking Rsv1 or one of them at the reported genomic location of Rsv1. One of them (designated as "Rsc-pm") conditions resistance for SC3, SC6, and SC17 and another (designated as "Rsc-ps") confers resistance for SC7. The two tightly linked genes identified in this study would be helpful to cloning of resistance genes and breeding of multiple resistances soybean cultivars to SMV through marker-assisted selection (MAS).

  11. DASH diet, insulin resistance, and serum hs-CRP in polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemi, Z; Esmaillzadeh, A

    2015-03-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects of Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan on insulin resistance and serum hs-CRP in overweight and obese women with PCOS. This randomized controlled clinical trial was done on 48 women diagnosed with PCOS. Subjects were randomly assigned to consume either the control (n=24) or the DASH eating pattern (n=24) for 8 weeks. The DASH diet consisted of 52% carbohydrates, 18% proteins, and 30% total fats. It was designed to be rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy products and low in saturated fats, cholesterol, refined grains, and sweets. Sodium content of the DASH diet was designed to be less than 2 400 mg/day. The control diet was also designed to contain 52% carbohydrates, 18% protein, and 30% total fat. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 8 weeks intervention to measure -insulin resistance and serum hs-CRP levels. -Adherence to the DASH eating pattern, compared to the -control diet, resulted in a significant reduction of serum insulin levels (-1.88 vs. 2.89 μIU/ml, p=0.03), HOMA-IR score (-0.45 vs. 0.80; p=0.01), and serum hs-CRP levels (-763.29 vs. 665.95 ng/ml, p=0.009). Additionally, a significant reduction in waist (-5.2 vs. -2.1 cm; p=0.003) and hip circumference (-5.9 vs. -1 cm; pDASH group compared with the control group. In conclusion, consumption of the DASH eating pattern for 8 weeks in overweight and obese women with PCOS resulted in the improvement of insulin resistance, serum hs-CRP levels, and abdominal fat accumulation. www.irct.ir: IRCT201304235623N6. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. The study protocol of the Norwegian randomized controlled trial of electroconvulsive therapy in treatment resistant depression in bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oedegaard Ketil J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment of depressive phases of bipolar disorder is challenging. The effects of the commonly used antidepressants in bipolar depression are questionable. Electroconvulsive therapy is generally considered to be the most effective treatment even if there are no randomized controlled trials of electroconvulsive therapy in bipolar depression. The safety of electroconvulsive therapy is well documented, but there are some controversies as to the cognitive side effects. The aim of this study is to compare the effects and side effects of electroconvulsive therapy to pharmacological treatment in treatment resistant bipolar depression. Cognitive changes and quality of life during the treatment will be assessed. Methods/Design A prospective, randomised controlled, multi-centre six- week acute treatment trial with seven clinical assessments. Follow up visit at 26 weeks or until remission (max 52 weeks. A neuropsychological test battery designed to be sensitive to changes in cognitive function will be used. Setting: Nine study centres across Norway, all acute psychiatric departments. Sample: n = 132 patients, aged 18 and over, who fulfil criteria for treatment resistant depression in bipolar disorder, Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale Score of at least 25 at baseline. Intervention: Intervention group: 3 sessions per week for up to 6 weeks, total up to 18 sessions. Control group: algorithm-based pharmacological treatment as usual. Discussion This study is the first randomized controlled trial that aims to investigate whether electroconvulsive therapy is better than pharmacological treatment as usual in treatment resistant bipolar depression. Possible long lasting cognitive side effects will be evaluated. The study is investigator initiated, without support from industry. Trial registration NCT00664976

  13. The Therapeutic Potential of Resistant Starch in Modulation of Insulin Resistance, Endotoxemia, Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Biomarkers in Women with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, P; Farhangi, M Abbasalizad; Sarmadi, B; Gargari, B P; Zare Javid, A; Pouraghaei, M; Dehghan, P

    2016-01-01

    This trial aims to determine the effects of resistant starch (RS) subtype 2 (RS2) on glycemic status, metabolic endotoxemia and markers of oxidative stress. A randomized, controlled, parallel-group clinical trial group of 56 females with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was divided to 2 groups. The intervention group (n = 28) and control group (n = 28) received 10 g/day RS2 or placebo for 8 weeks, respectively. Fasting blood samples were taken to determine glycemic status, endotoxin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), antioxidant enzymes concentrations as well as uric acid at baseline and after the intervention. After 8 weeks, RS2 caused a significant decrease in the levels of MDA (-34.10%), glycosylated hemoglobin (-9.40%), insulin (-29.36%), homeostasis model of insulin resistance (-32.85%) and endotoxin (-25.00%), a significant increase in TAC (18.10%) and glutathione peroxidase (11.60%) as compared with control. No significant changes were observed in fasting plasma glucose, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, hs-CRP, superoxide dismutase, catalase and uric acid in the RS2 group as compared with the control group. Supplementation with RS2 may be improved glycemic status, endotoxemia and markers of oxidative stress in patients with T2DM. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Resistance to a new biotype of the lettuce aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri in Lactuca virosa accession IVT280

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, ten C.J.M.; Dicke, M.; Loon, van J.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Host plant resistance is an effective protection strategy to control aphids in many crops. However, the evolution of insensitive aphid biotypes necessitates the search for new resistance sources. Wild relatives of crop plants can be important sources for resistance genes to be introgressed into new

  15. A 20-week program of resistance or concurrent exercise improves symptoms of schizophrenia: results of a blind, randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Andrade e Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To evaluate the effects of 20 weeks of resistance and concurrent training on psychotic and depressive symptoms, quality of life outcomes, and serum IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF concentrations in patients with schizophrenia.Methods:In this blind, randomized controlled clinical trial, 34 patients with schizophrenia were assigned to one of three groups: control (CTRL, n=13, resistance exercise (RESEX, n=12, or concurrent exercise (CONCEX, n=9. Symptoms, quality of life, strength, and other variables were assessed.Results:A significant time-by-group interaction was found for the RESEX and CONCEX groups on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS total score for disease symptoms (p = 0.007, positive symptoms (p = 0.003, and on the arm extension one-repetition maximum (1RM test (p = 0.016. In addition, significant improvements on negative symptoms (p = 0.027, on the role-physical domain of the Short Form-36 Health Survey (p = 0.019, and on the chest press 1RM test (p = 0.040 were observed in the RESEX group. No changes were observed for the other variables investigated.Conclusions:In this sample of patients with schizophrenia, 20 weeks of resistance or concurrent exercise program improved disease symptoms, strength, and quality of life. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01674543.

  16. Effects of low-dose ibuprofen supplementation and resistance training on bone and muscle in postmenopausal women: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney R.D. Duff

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the effects of nine months of exercise training and ibuprofen supplementation (given immeditately after exercise sessions on bone and muscle in postmenopausal women. Methods: In a double-blind randomized trial, participants (females: n = 90, mean age 64.8, SD 4.3 years were assigned (computer generated, double blind to receive supervised resistance training or stretching 3 days/week, and ibuprofen (400 mg, post-exercise or placebo (i.e. 4 groups for 9 months. In this proof-of-concept study the sample size was halved from required 200 identified via 90% power calculation. Baseline and post-intervention testing included: Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA for lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total body areal bone mineral density (aBMD; geometry of proximal femur; total body lean tissue and fat mass; predicted 1-repetition maximum muscle strength testing (1RM; biceps curl, hack squat. Results: Exercise training or ibuprofen supplementation had no effects on aBMD of the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total body. There was a significant exercise × supplement × time interaction for aBMD of Ward's region of the femoral neck (p = 0.015 with post hoc comparison showing a 6% decrease for stretching with placebo vs. a 3% increase for stretching with ibuprofen (p = 0.017. Resistance training increased biceps curl and hack squat strength vs. stretching (22% vs. 4% and 114% vs. 12%, respectively (p < 0.01 and decreased percent body fat compared to stretching (2% vs. 0% (p < 0.05. Conclusions: Ibuprofen supplementation provided some benefits to bone when taken independent of exercise training in postmenopausal women. This study provides evidence towards a novel, easily accessible stimulus for enhancing bone health [i.e. ibuprofen]. Keywords: Aging, Osteoporosis, Sarcopenia, Ibuprofen

  17. Screening of Lycopersicon sp. accessions for resistance to Pepper yellow mosaic virus Identificação de fontes de resistência de acessos de Lycopersicon sp. ao Pepper yellow mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Pinto Juhász

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The tomato is a crop of great economical importance, however it is susceptible to a large number of pests and diseases, including viral disease for which the best control strategy is genetic resistance. The disease, caused by Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV has become a recent problem. Consequently, the idea of this work was to screen 376 accessions of Lycopersicon sp. to find possible sources of resistance to PepYMV. Out of 355 accessions of L. esculentum inoculated with PepYMV, 52 did not express symptoms. However, the virus reached high concentration in the tissues as measured by indirect ELISA, and therefore they were not considered as safe sources of resistance. Among 21 accessions of wild Lycopersicon species, one of L. hirsutum was shown to be resistant, with no observed symptoms. A low concentration of the virus was detected as measured by indirect ELISA. This accession seems to be suitable for breeding programs aiming at incorporating resistance for this disease into commercial tomato cultivars.O tomateiro é uma olerícola de grande importância econômica, porém suscetível a um grande número de patógenos, dentre os quais os vírus, cuja forma de controle mais eficiente é a resistência genética. A doença causada pelo Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV tem se tornado um problema recente. Por isso, o presente estudo teve por objetivo avaliar 376 acessos de Lycopersicon sp. visando identificar fontes de resistência ao PepYMV. Dos 355 acessos de L. esculentum inoculados com o PepYMV, 52 não apresentaram sintomas. No entanto, não foram considerados fonte segura de resistência por conterem alta concentração viral quando avaliados pelo teste de ELISA indireto. Dentre os 21 acessos de espécies silvestres do gênero, foi detectado um acesso de L. hirsutum resistente por ser assintomático. Baixa concentração do vírus foi detectada pelo teste de ELISA indireto. Este acesso pode ser indicado para programas de melhoramento

  18. High prevalence of multidrug resistance and random distribution of mobile genetic elements among uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) of the four major phylogenetic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijavec, Matija; Starcic Erjavec, Marjanca; Ambrozic Avgustin, Jerneja; Reissbrodt, Rolf; Fruth, Angelika; Krizan-Hergouth, Veronika; Zgur-Bertok, Darja

    2006-08-01

    One hundred and ten UTI Escherichia coli strains, from Ljubljana, Slovenia, were analyzed for antibiotic resistances, mobile DNA elements, serotype, and phylogenetic origin. A high prevalence of drug resistance and multidrug resistance was found. Twenty-six percent of the isolates harbored a class 1 integron, while a majority of the strains (56%) harbored rep sequences characteristic of F-like plasmids. int as well as rep sequences were found to be distributed in a random manner among strains of the four major phylogenetic groups indicating that all groups have a similar tendency to acquire and maintain mobile genetic elements frequently associated with resistance determinants.

  19. Randomized Clinical Trial Design to Assess Abatacept in Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Howard Trachtman; Debbie S. Gipson; Michael Somers; Cathie Spino; Sharon Adler; Lawrence Holzman; Jeffrey B. Kopp; John Sedor; Sandra Overfield; Ayanbola Elegbe; Michael Maldonado; Anna Greka

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Treatment-resistant nephrotic syndrome is a rare form of glomerular disease that occurs in children and adults. No Food and Drug Administration−approved treatments consistently achieve remission of proteinuria and preservation of kidney function. CD80 (B7-1) can be expressed on injured podocytes, and administration of abatacept (modified CTLA4-Ig based on a natural ligand to CD80) has been associated with sustained normalization of urinary protein excretion and maintenance of glo...

  20. A randomized trial of protein supplementation compared with extra fast food on the effects of resistance training to increase metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambre, David; Vergara, Marta; Lood, Yvonne; Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta; Lindström, Torbjörn; Nystrom, Fredrik H

    2012-10-01

    To prospectively evaluate the effects of resistance training combined with increased energy intake or protein-supplementation on lean body-mass, resting metabolic-rate (RMR) and cardiovascular risk factors. Twenty-four healthy males (aged 19-32 years) performed resistance exercise for 12 weeks aiming for at least 1 hour training-sessions 3 times a week. The participants were randomized to consume extra protein (33 g whey protein/day) or a meal of fast-food/day (1350 kcal, 41 g protein). Body-composition was measured with Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) and RMR by indirect calorimetry. Fasting blood samples were drawn before and after the 3-month training period and after 12 months. The body weight increased from 75.1 ± 6.9 kg to 78.7 ± 7.2 kg (p Fasting serum-insulin levels increased in the fast-food group compared with the extra-protein group (p = 0.03). ApoB increased from 0.691 ± 0.14 g/L to 0.768 ± 0.17 g/L, p = 0.004, in the fast-food group only. Long-term follow up after 12 months showed that RMR, body weight, total fat and lean body-masses did not differ from baseline (n = 19). Resistance training for 12 weeks increased RMR and lean body-mass similarly when based on either an increased energy-intake or protein supplement. However, the increase in RMR was higher than expected from the increase in lean body-mass. Thus resistance training could potentially decrease the risk of obesity by induction of increased RMR.

  1. Community Impact of Pharmacy-Randomized Intervention to Improve Access to Syringes and Services for Injection Drug Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Natalie D.; Amesty, Silvia; Rivera, Alexis V.; Harripersaud, Katherine; Turner, Alezandria; Fuller, Crystal M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In an effort to reduce HIV transmission among injection drug users (IDUs), New York State deregulated pharmacy syringe sales in 2001 through the Expanded Syringe Access Program by removing the requirement of a prescription. With evidence suggesting pharmacists' ability to expand their public health role, a structural, pharmacy-based…

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Mobile Clinical Decision Aid to Improve Access to Kidney Transplantation: iChoose Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Patzer

    2016-05-01

    Discussion: Engaging patients in health care choices can increase patient empowerment and improve knowledge and understanding of treatment choices. If the effectiveness of iChoose Kidney has a greater impact on patients with low health literacy, lower socioeconomic status, and minority race, this decision aid could help reduce disparities in access to kidney transplantation.

  3. A Randomized Clinical Trial Investigating the Effect of a Healthcare Access Model for Individuals with Severe Psychiatric Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, E Sally; Maru, Mihoko; Kash-MacDonald, Megan; Archer-Williams, Mariah; Hashemi, Lobat; Boardman, Judith

    2016-08-01

    We conducted a randomized trial to examine a model for integrating primary care into a community mental health setting. Two hundred individuals were recruited and randomly assigned to receive primary care delivered by a nurse practitioner (n = 94) or services-as-usual (n = 106), assessed on health and mental health outcomes, and followed for 12 months. Intent-to-Treat and exposure analyses were conducted and suggest that participants who engaged with the nurse practitioner experienced gains in perceptions of primary care quality. Health benefits accrued for individuals having receiving nurse practitioner services in a mental health setting to address primary care needs.

  4. Performance analysis of spectral-phase-encoded optical code-division multiple-access system regarding the incorrectly decoded signal as a nonstationary random process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Meng; Yao, Minyu; Zhang, Hongming

    2005-11-01

    The performance of a spectral-phase-encoded (SPE) optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) system is analyzed. Regarding the incorrectly decoded signal (IDS) as a nonstationary random process, we derive a novel probability distribution for it. The probability distribution of the IDS is considered a chi-squared distribution with degrees of freedom r=1, which is more reasonable and accurate than in previous work. The bit error rate (BER) of an SPE OCDMA system under multiple-access interference is evaluated. Numerical results show that the system can sustain very low BER even when there are multiple simultaneous users, and as the code length becomes longer or the initial pulse becomes shorter, the system performs better.

  5. Multi-channel Dual Clocks three-dimensional probability Random Multiple Access protocol for Wireless Public Bus Networks based on RTS/CTS mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Sheng Jie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A MAC protocol for public bus networks, called Bus MAC protocol, designed to provide high quality Internet service for bus passengers. The paper proposed a multi-channel dual clocks three-demission probability random multiple access protocol based on RTS/CTS mechanism, decreasing collisions caused by multiple access from multiple passengers. Use the RTS/CTS mechanism increases the reliability and stability of the system, reducing the collision possibility of the information packets to a certain extent, improves the channel utilization; use the multi-channel mechanism, not only enables the channel load balancing, but also solves the problem of the hidden terminal and exposed terminal. Use the dual clocks mechanism, reducing the system idle time. At last, the different selection of the three-dimensional probabilities can make the system throughput adapt to the network load which could realize the maximum of the system throughput.

  6. Revisiting racial disparities in access to surgical management of drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy post implementation of Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kanika; Kalakoti, Piyush; Henry, Miriam; Mishra, Vikas; Riel-Romero, Rosario Maria; Notarianni, Christina; Nanda, Anil; Sun, Hai

    2017-07-01

    Prior to enactment of the Affordable Care Act(ACA), several reports demonstrated remarkable racial disparities in access to surgical care for epileptic patients. Implementation of ACA provided healthcare access to 7-16 million uninsured Americans. The current study investigates racial disparity post ACA era in (1) access to surgical management of drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (DRTLE); (2) short-term outcomes in the surgical cohort. Adult patients with DRTLE registered in the National Inpatient Sample (2012-2013) were identified. Association of race (African Americans and other minorities with respect to Caucasians) with access to surgical management of TLE, and short-term outcomes [discharge disposition, length of stay (LOS) and hospital charges] in the surgical cohort were investigated using multivariable regression techniques. Of the 4062 patients with DRTLE, 3.6%(n=148) underwent lobectomy. Overall, the mean age of the cohort was 42.35±16.33years, and 54% were female. Regression models adjusted for patient demographics, clinical and hospital characteristics demonstrated no racial disparities in access to surgical care for DRTLE. Likewise, no racial disparity was noted in outcomes in the surgical cohort. Our study reflects no racial disparity in access to surgical care in patients with DRTLE post 2010 amendment of the ACA. The seismic changes to the US healthcare system may plausibly have accounted for addressing the gap in racial disparity for epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Resistance exercise improves muscle strength, health status and pain intensity in fibromyalgia--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Anette; Palstam, Annie; Löfgren, Monika; Ernberg, Malin; Bjersing, Jan; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Gerdle, Björn; Kosek, Eva; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa

    2015-06-18

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by persistent widespread pain, increased pain sensitivity and tenderness. Muscle strength in women with FM is reduced compared to healthy women. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a progressive resistance exercise program on muscle strength, health status, and current pain intensity in women with FM. A total of 130 women with FM (age 22-64 years, symptom duration 0-35 years) were included in this assessor-blinded randomized controlled multi-center trial examining the effects of progressive resistance group exercise compared with an active control group. A person-centred model of exercise was used to support the participants' self-confidence for management of exercise because of known risks of activity-induced pain in FM. The intervention was performed twice a week for 15 weeks and was supervised by experienced physiotherapists. Primary outcome measure was isometric knee-extension force (Steve Strong®), secondary outcome measures were health status (FIQ total score), current pain intensity (VAS), 6MWT, isometric elbow-flexion force, hand-grip force, health related quality of life, pain disability, pain acceptance, fear avoidance beliefs, and patient global impression of change (PGIC). Outcomes were assessed at baseline and immediately after the intervention. Long-term follow up comprised the self-reported questionnaires only and was conducted after 13-18 months. Between-group and within-group differences were calculated using non-parametric statistics. Significant improvements were found for isometric knee-extension force (p = 0.010), health status (p = 0.038), current pain intensity (p = 0.033), 6MWT (p = 0.003), isometric elbow flexion force (p = 0.02), pain disability (p = 0.005), and pain acceptance (p = 0.043) in the resistance exercise group (n = 56) when compared to the control group (n = 49). PGIC differed significantly (p = 0.001) in favor of the resistance exercise group at post-treatment examinations

  8. The supply voltage scaled dependency of the recovery of single event upset in advanced complementary metal—oxide—semiconductor static random-access memory cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Da-Wei; Qin Jun-Rui; Chen Shu-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Using computer-aided design three-dimensional simulation technology, the supply voltage scaled dependency of the recovery of single event upset and charge collection in static random-access memory cells are investigated. It reveals that the recovery linear energy transfer threshold decreases with the supply voltage reducing, which is quite attractive for dynamic voltage scaling and subthreshold circuit radiation-hardened design. Additionally, the effect of supply voltage on charge collection is also investigated. It is concluded that the supply voltage mainly affects the bipolar gain of the parasitical bipolar junction transistor (BJT) and the existence of the source plays an important role in supply voltage variation. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  9. The supply voltage scaled dependency of the recovery of single event upset in advanced complementary metal—oxide—semiconductor static random-access memory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Wei; Qin, Jun-Rui; Chen, Shu-Ming

    2013-02-01

    Using computer-aided design three-dimensional simulation technology, the supply voltage scaled dependency of the recovery of single event upset and charge collection in static random-access memory cells are investigated. It reveals that the recovery linear energy transfer threshold decreases with the supply voltage reducing, which is quite attractive for dynamic voltage scaling and subthreshold circuit radiation-hardened design. Additionally, the effect of supply voltage on charge collection is also investigated. It is concluded that the supply voltage mainly affects the bipolar gain of the parasitical bipolar junction transistor (BJT) and the existence of the source plays an important role in supply voltage variation.

  10. Resistance training enhances muscular performance in patients with anorexia nervosa: A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández del Valle, María; Larumbe Zabala, Eneko; Villaseñor Montarroso, Ángel; Cardona González, Claudia Andrea; Díez Vega, Ignacio; López Mojares, Luis Miguel; Pérez Ruiz, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Low-intensity exercise applied in anorexia nervosa patients has been shown to have a harmless effect on body composition and to effect short-term improvements in muscular strength and agility. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a high-intensity resistance training program designed for adolescents to improve strength and agility in anorexia nervosa restricting-type patients (AN-R). METHODS: From a total of 36 female patients with AN-R, one group (interven...

  11. Resistance training program for fatigue management in the workplace: exercise protocol in a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Hélio Gustavo; Chiavegato, Luciana Dias; Valentim, Daniela Pereira; da Silva, Patricia Rodrigues; Padula, Rosimeire Simprini

    2016-12-22

    Fatigue is a multifactorial condition that leads to disease and loss in production, and it affects a large number of workers worldwide. This study aims to demonstrate a resistance exercise protocol that individuals will perform during the work schedule, and to evaluate the effectiveness of this exercises program for fatigue control. This is a cluster randomized controlled trial with two arms and is assessor blinded. A total of 352 workers of both sexes, aged 18-65 years, from a medium-sized dairy plant were enrolled in this study. Participants will be recruited from 13 production sectors according to the eligibility criteria and will be randomized by clusters to either the Progressive Resistance Exercise (PRE) intervention group or the Compensatory Workplace Exercise (CWE) comparative group. A resistance exercise program will be implemented for both groups. The groups will receive instructions on self-management, breaks, adjustments to workstations, and the benefits of physical exercise. The PRE group will perform resistance exercises with gradual loads in an exercise room, and the CWE group will perform exercise at their workstations using elastic bands. The exercise sessions will be held 3 times a week for 20 min. The primary outcome measures will be symptoms of physical and mental fatigue, and muscular fatigue based on a one-repetition maximum (1RM). The secondary outcome measures will be level of physical activity, musculoskeletal symptoms, physical condition, perceived exposure, and productivity. The workers will be assessed at baseline and after a 4-month program. A linear mixed model will be applied on an intention-to-treat basis. This intervention is expected to reduce symptoms of fatigue in the workers. The exercise program is indicating in the workplace, although there are few studies describing the effects of exercise on the control of fatigue in the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on adherence to the program, which may result in significant and

  12. Resistance training program for fatigue management in the workplace: exercise protocol in a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Gustavo Santos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatigue is a multifactorial condition that leads to disease and loss in production, and it affects a large number of workers worldwide. This study aims to demonstrate a resistance exercise protocol that individuals will perform during the work schedule, and to evaluate the effectiveness of this exercises program for fatigue control. Methods/Design This is a cluster randomized controlled trial with two arms and is assessor blinded. A total of 352 workers of both sexes, aged 18–65 years, from a medium-sized dairy plant were enrolled in this study. Participants will be recruited from 13 production sectors according to the eligibility criteria and will be randomized by clusters to either the Progressive Resistance Exercise (PRE intervention group or the Compensatory Workplace Exercise (CWE comparative group. A resistance exercise program will be implemented for both groups. The groups will receive instructions on self-management, breaks, adjustments to workstations, and the benefits of physical exercise. The PRE group will perform resistance exercises with gradual loads in an exercise room, and the CWE group will perform exercise at their workstations using elastic bands. The exercise sessions will be held 3 times a week for 20 min. The primary outcome measures will be symptoms of physical and mental fatigue, and muscular fatigue based on a one-repetition maximum (1RM. The secondary outcome measures will be level of physical activity, musculoskeletal symptoms, physical condition, perceived exposure, and productivity. The workers will be assessed at baseline and after a 4-month program. A linear mixed model will be applied on an intention-to-treat basis. Discussion This intervention is expected to reduce symptoms of fatigue in the workers. The exercise program is indicating in the workplace, although there are few studies describing the effects of exercise on the control of fatigue in the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on

  13. Resistance Exercise and Inflammation in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Adjuvant Radiation Therapy: Mediation Analysis From a Randomized, Controlled Intervention Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Martina E., E-mail: m.schmidt@dkfz.de [Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Meynköhn, Anna; Habermann, Nina [Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wiskemann, Joachim [Division of Medical Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Oelmann, Jan; Hof, Holger; Wessels, Sabine [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Klassen, Oliver [Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Jürgen; Potthoff, Karin [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Steindorf, Karen; Ulrich, Cornelia M. [Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: To explore the mediating role of inflammatory parameters in the development of fatigue, pain, and potentially related depressive symptoms during radiation therapy for breast cancer and its mitigation by resistance exercise. Methods and Materials: Breast cancer patients scheduled for adjuvant radiation therapy were randomized to 12-week progressive resistance exercise training (EX) or a relaxation control group. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) were measured in serum samples collected before, at the end, and 6 weeks after radiation therapy from 103 chemotherapy-naïve participants. Fatigue was assessed with the multidimensional Fatigue Assessment Questionnaire, pain with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30, and depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Analysis of covariance models, partial correlations, Freedman-Schatzkin tests, and R{sup 2} effect-size measures for mediation were calculated. Results: The analysis of covariance models revealed a significant intervention effect on IL-6 (P=.010) and the IL-6/IL-1ra ratio (P=.018), characterized by a marked increase during radiation therapy among controls, but no significant change in EX. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist did not change significantly in either group (P=.88). Increased IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra levels at the end of radiation therapy were significantly associated with increased physical fatigue and pain 6 weeks after radiation. We observed significant partial mediation by IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra of the effect of resistance exercise on physical fatigue (Freedman-Schatzkin P=.023 and P<.001) and pain (both P<.001). Hereby IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra mediated between 15% and 24% of the variance of physical fatigue and pain explained by the intervention. Conclusions: This randomized, controlled trial showed a significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine level after adjuvant radiation therapy in breast

  14. Resistance Exercise and Inflammation in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Adjuvant Radiation Therapy: Mediation Analysis From a Randomized, Controlled Intervention Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Martina E.; Meynköhn, Anna; Habermann, Nina; Wiskemann, Joachim; Oelmann, Jan; Hof, Holger; Wessels, Sabine; Klassen, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Potthoff, Karin; Steindorf, Karen; Ulrich, Cornelia M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the mediating role of inflammatory parameters in the development of fatigue, pain, and potentially related depressive symptoms during radiation therapy for breast cancer and its mitigation by resistance exercise. Methods and Materials: Breast cancer patients scheduled for adjuvant radiation therapy were randomized to 12-week progressive resistance exercise training (EX) or a relaxation control group. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) were measured in serum samples collected before, at the end, and 6 weeks after radiation therapy from 103 chemotherapy-naïve participants. Fatigue was assessed with the multidimensional Fatigue Assessment Questionnaire, pain with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30, and depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Analysis of covariance models, partial correlations, Freedman-Schatzkin tests, and R 2 effect-size measures for mediation were calculated. Results: The analysis of covariance models revealed a significant intervention effect on IL-6 (P=.010) and the IL-6/IL-1ra ratio (P=.018), characterized by a marked increase during radiation therapy among controls, but no significant change in EX. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist did not change significantly in either group (P=.88). Increased IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra levels at the end of radiation therapy were significantly associated with increased physical fatigue and pain 6 weeks after radiation. We observed significant partial mediation by IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra of the effect of resistance exercise on physical fatigue (Freedman-Schatzkin P=.023 and P<.001) and pain (both P<.001). Hereby IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra mediated between 15% and 24% of the variance of physical fatigue and pain explained by the intervention. Conclusions: This randomized, controlled trial showed a significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine level after adjuvant radiation therapy in breast

  15. Combined metformin-clomiphene in clomiphene-resistant polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Hashim, Hatem; Foda, Osama; Ghayaty, Essam

    2015-09-01

    Our objective was to compare the effectiveness of metformin plus clomiphene citrate vs. gonadotrophins, laparoscopic ovarian diathermy, aromatase inhibitors, N-acetyl-cysteine and other insulin sensitizers+clomiphene for improving fertility outcomes in women with clomiphene-resistant polycystic ovary syndrome. PubMed, SCOPUS and CENTRAL databases were searched until April 2014 with the key words: PCOS, polycystic ovary syndrome, metformin, clomiphene citrate, ovulation induction and pregnancy. The search was limited to articles conducted with humans and published in English. The PRISMA statement was followed. Twelve randomized controlled trials (n = 1411 women) were included. Ovulation and clinical pregnancy rates per woman randomized. Compared with gonadotrophins, the metformin+clomiphene combination resulted in significantly fewer ovulations (odds ratio 0.25; 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.41; p < 0.00001, 3 trials, I(2) = 85%, n = 323) and pregnancies (odds ratio 0.45; 95% confidence interval 0.27-0.75; p = 0.002, 3 trials, I(2) = 0%, n = 323). No significant differences were found when metformin+clomiphene was compared with laparoscopic ovarian diathermy (odds ratio 0.88; 95% confidence interval 0.53-1.47; p = 0.62, 1 trial, n = 282; odds ratio 0.96; 95% confidence interval 0.60-1.54; p = 0.88, 2 trials, I(2) = 0%, n = 332, for ovulation and pregnancy rates, respectively). Likewise, no differences were observed in comparison with aromatase inhibitors (odds ratio 0.88; 95% confidence interval 0.58-1.34; p = 0.55, 3 trials, I(2) = 3%, n = 409; odds ratio 0.85; 95% confidence interval 0.53-1.36; p = 0.50, 2 trials, n = 309, for ovulation and pregnancy rates, respectively). There is evidence for the superiority of gonadotrophins, but the metformin+clomiphene combination is mainly relevant for clomiphene-resistant polycystic ovary syndrome patients and, if not effective, a next step could be gonadotrophins. More attempts with metformin+clomiphene are only relevant

  16. Thermal stability and data retention of resistive random access memory with HfO x /ZnO double layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yun-Feng; Chen, Fan; Zeng, Ze-Cun; Lin, PeiJie; Cheng, Shu-Ying; Yu, Jin-Ling

    2017-08-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61006003 and 61674038), the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province, China (Grant Nos. 2015J01249 and 2010J05134), the Science Foundation of Fujian Education Department of China (Grant No. JAT160073), and the Science Foundation of Fujian Provincial Economic and Information Technology Commission of China (Grant No. 83016006).

  17. Progressive resistance training in head and neck cancer patients during concomitant chemoradiotherapy -- design of the DAHANCA 31 randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonkvist, Camilla K; Lønbro, Simon; Vinther, Anders

    2017-01-01

    training adherence, changes in body composition, muscle strength, functional performance, weight, adverse events, dietary intake, self-reported physical activity, quality of life, labor market affiliation, blood biochemistry, plasma cytokine concentrations, NK-cell frequency in blood, sarcomeric protein......BACKGROUND: Head and neck cancer patients undergoing concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) frequently experience loss of muscle mass and reduced functional performance. Positive effects of exercise training are reported for many cancer types but biological mechanisms need further elucidation....... This randomized study investigates whether progressive resistance training (PRT) may attenuate loss of muscle mass and functional performance. Furthermore, biochemical markers and muscle biopsies will be investigated trying to link biological mechanisms to training effects. METHODS: At the Departments of Oncology...

  18. Wi-Fi/WiGig Coordination for Optimal WiGig Concurrent Transmissions in Random Access Scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Ehab Mahmoud; Sakaguchi, Kei; Sampei, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    Wireless Gigabit (WiGig) access points (APs) using 60 GHz unlicensed frequency band are considered as key enablers for future Gbps WLANs. Due to its short range transmission with high susceptibility to path blocking, a multiple number of WiGig APs should be installed to fully cover a typical target environment. However, using autonomously operated WiGig APs with IEEE 802.11ad DCF, the exhaustive search analog beamforming and the maximum received power based autonomous users association preven...

  19. Effects of elastic band resistance training and nutritional supplementation on physical performance of institutionalised elderly--A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesen, Stefan; Halper, Barbara; Hofmann, Marlene; Jandrasits, Waltraud; Franzke, Bernhard; Strasser, Eva-Maria; Graf, Alexandra; Tschan, Harald; Bachl, Norbert; Quittan, Michael; Wagner, Karl Heinz; Wessner, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of elastic band resistance training in combination with nutrient supplementation on muscular strength and the ability to perform mobility-related activities of daily living in older adults living in retirement care facilities. Randomized controlled trial, with a 6-month intervention period. A retirement care facility, Vienna, Austria. One hundred and seventeen older adults (14 males (12%) and 103 females (88%)), aged 65 to 97 years (mean age: 82.8 ± 6.0), having a mini-mental state examination score ≥ 23 and no chronic diseases posing a medical contraindication to training therapy. Participants were randomly assigned, but stratified by sex, to one of three intervention groups: supervised resistance exercise training (RT), RT in combination with nutrient supplementation (RTS), or cognitive training group (CT). All interventions were performed two times a week for 6 months. RT was designed to train all major muscle groups using elastic bands. The nutrient supplement (rich in proteins, vitamin D, B2, B12) was distributed every morning as well as after each RT session. A battery of motor ability tests and functional test were performed prior to as well as following 3 months and finally after 6 months of intervention. These tests included isokinetic torque measurements of the knee extensors and flexors in concentric mode at 60 and 120°/s, isometric handgrip strength, senior arm-lifting test, chair stand test, maximum walking speed and a 6-minute walking test (6 MWT). A repeated-measures ANOVA analysis revealed significant improvements in physical function of lower (p=0.002) and upper extremities (p=0.006) for RT and/or RTS in comparison to CT. For isokinetic measurements, 6 MWT, and gait speed time effects (pbody weight is safe and beneficial in improving functional performance of institutionalised older people. Multinutrient supplementation did not offer additional benefits to the effects of RT in improving muscular performance. Copyright

  20. Vitamin D therapy to reduce blood pressure and left ventricular hypertrophy in resistant hypertension: randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, Miles D; Ireland, Sheila; Houston, J Graeme; Gandy, Stephen J; Waugh, Shelley; Macdonald, Thomas M; Mackenzie, Isla S; Struthers, Allan D

    2014-04-01

    Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are associated with higher prevalent blood pressure. We tested whether high-dose intermittent oral vitamin D therapy could reduce blood pressure and left ventricular mass in patients with hypertension resistant to conventional treatment. We conducted a parallel-group, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial. Patients with supine office blood pressure >140/90 mm Hg on ≥3 antihypertensive agents received 100 000 U oral vitamin D3 or matching placebo every 2 months. Office and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, glucose, and cholesterol were measured at baseline, 2, 4, and 6 months; left ventricular mass index was measured by cardiac MRI on a subgroup at baseline and 6 months. The primary outcome was mean 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure at 6 months. A total of 68 participants were randomized, 34 in each group. Mean age was 63 (SD 11) years, mean baseline office blood pressure was 154/84 (13/10) mm Hg, and mean baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was 42 (16) nmol/L. Treatment with vitamin D did not reduce 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (adjusted treatment effects: systolic, +3 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -4 to +11; P=0.33; diastolic, -2 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -6 to +2; P=0.29); similar results were seen for office blood pressure. Left ventricular mass index was measured in a subgroup (n=25); no reduction was seen with vitamin D treatment (adjusted treatment effect, +4 g/m(2); 95% confidence interval, 0 to +7; P=0.04). There was no significant change in cholesterol or glucose levels. Thus, 6 months of intermittent, high-dose oral vitamin D3 did not reduce blood pressure or left ventricular mass in patients with resistant hypertension.

  1. Conductive bridge random access memory characteristics of SiCN based transparent device due to indium diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dayanand; Aluguri, Rakesh; Chand, Umesh; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2018-03-01

    In this work, the transparent bipolar resistive switching characteristics of a SiCN-based ITO/SiCN/AZO structure due to In diffusion from ITO is studied. The SiCN based device is found to be 80% transparent in the visible wavelength region. This device, with AZO as both top and bottom electrodes, does not show any RRAM property due to deposition of the high quality O2-free SiCN film. Replacing the AZO top electrode with ITO in this device results in good resistive switching (RS) characteristics with a high on/off ratio and long retention. Replacing the SiCN film with ZrO2 also results in excellent RS characteristics due to the formation of an oxygen vacancies filament inside the ZrO2 film. A resistance ratio of on/off is found to be higher in the SiCN based device compared to that of the ZrO2 device. Diffusion of In from ITO into the SiCN film on application of high positive voltage during forming can be attributed to the occurrence of RS in the device, which is confirmed by the analyses of energy dispersive spectroscopy and secondary-ion mass spectrometry. This study shows a pathway for the fabrication of CBRAM based transparent devices for non-volatile memory application.

  2. Putative resistance gene markers associated with quantitative trait loci for fire blight resistance in Malus ‘Robusta 5’ accessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Breeding of fire blight resistant scions and rootstocks is a goal of several international apple breeding programs, as options are limited for management of this destructive disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora. A broad, large-effect quantitative trait locus (QTL) for fire blight resistance has been reported on linkage group 3 of Malus ‘Robusta 5’. In this study we identified markers derived from putative fire blight resistance genes associated with the QTL by integrating further genetic mapping studies with bioinformatics analysis of transcript profiling data and genome sequence databases. Results When several defined E.amylovora strains were used to inoculate three progenies from international breeding programs, all with ‘Robusta 5’ as a common parent, two distinct QTLs were detected on linkage group 3, where only one had previously been mapped. In the New Zealand ‘Malling 9’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora ICMP11176, the proximal QTL co-located with SNP markers derived from a leucine-rich repeat, receptor-like protein ( MxdRLP1) and a closely linked class 3 peroxidase gene. While the QTL detected in the German ‘Idared’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea222_JKI or ICMP11176 was approximately 6 cM distal to this, directly below a SNP marker derived from a heat shock 90 family protein gene ( HSP90). In the US ‘Otawa3’ X ‘Robusta5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea273 or E2002a, the position of the LOD score peak on linkage group 3 was dependent upon the pathogen strains used for inoculation. One of the five MxdRLP1 alleles identified in fire blight resistant and susceptible cultivars was genetically associated with resistance and used to develop a high resolution melting PCR marker. A resistance QTL detected on linkage group 7 of the US population co-located with another HSP90 gene-family member and a WRKY transcription factor

  3. Putative resistance gene markers associated with quantitative trait loci for fire blight resistance in Malus ‘Robusta 5’ accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardiner Susan E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breeding of fire blight resistant scions and rootstocks is a goal of several international apple breeding programs, as options are limited for management of this destructive disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora. A broad, large-effect quantitative trait locus (QTL for fire blight resistance has been reported on linkage group 3 of Malus ‘Robusta 5’. In this study we identified markers derived from putative fire blight resistance genes associated with the QTL by integrating further genetic mapping studies with bioinformatics analysis of transcript profiling data and genome sequence databases. Results When several defined E.amylovora strains were used to inoculate three progenies from international breeding programs, all with ‘Robusta 5’ as a common parent, two distinct QTLs were detected on linkage group 3, where only one had previously been mapped. In the New Zealand ‘Malling 9’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora ICMP11176, the proximal QTL co-located with SNP markers derived from a leucine-rich repeat, receptor-like protein ( MxdRLP1 and a closely linked class 3 peroxidase gene. While the QTL detected in the German ‘Idared’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea222_JKI or ICMP11176 was approximately 6 cM distal to this, directly below a SNP marker derived from a heat shock 90 family protein gene ( HSP90. In the US ‘Otawa3’ X ‘Robusta5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea273 or E2002a, the position of the LOD score peak on linkage group 3 was dependent upon the pathogen strains used for inoculation. One of the five MxdRLP1 alleles identified in fire blight resistant and susceptible cultivars was genetically associated with resistance and used to develop a high resolution melting PCR marker. A resistance QTL detected on linkage group 7 of the US population co-located with another HSP90 gene-family member and a WRKY

  4. Identification of Differentially-Expressed Genes in Response to Mycosphaerella fijiensis in the Resistant Musa Accession 'Calcutta-4' Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Timm, Eduardo; Hidalgo Pardo, Lisette; Pacheco Coello, Ricardo; Chávez Navarrete, Tatiana; Navarrete Villegas, Oscar; Santos Ordóñez, Efrén

    2016-01-01

    Bananas and plantains are considered an important crop around the world. Banana production is affected by several constraints, of which Black Sigatoka Disease, caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis, is considered one of the most important diseases in banana plantations. The banana accession 'Calcutta-4' has a natural resistance to Black Sigatoka; however, the fruit is not valuable for commercialization. Gene identification and expression studies in 'Calcutta-4' might reveal possible gene candidates for resistant to the disease and elucidate mechanisms for resistance. A subtracted cDNA library was generated from leaves after 6, 9 and 12 days inoculated with M. fijiensis conidia on greenhouse banana plants of the accession 'Calcutta-4'. Bioinformatic analysis revealed 99 good quality sequences. Blast2go analysis revealed that 31% of the sequences could not be categorized and, according to the Biological Process Category, 32 and 28 ESTs are related to general metabolic and cellular processes, respectively; while 10 ESTs response to stimulus. Seven sequences were redundant and one was similar to genes that may be involved in pathogen resistance including the putative disease resistance protein RGA1. Genes encoding zinc finger domains were identified and may play an important role in pathogen resistance by inducing the expression of downstream genes. Expression analysis of four selected genes was performed using RT-qPCR during the early stage of the disease development at 6, 9, 12 and 15 days post inoculation showing a peak of up regulation at 9 or 12 days post inoculation. Three of the four genes showed an up-regulation of expression in 'Calcutta-4' when compared to 'Williams' after inoculation with M. fijiensis, suggesting a fine regulation of specific gene candidates that may lead to a resistance response. The genes identified in early responses in a plant-pathogen interaction may be relevant for the resistance response of 'Calcutta-4' to Black Sigatoka

  5. Identification of Differentially-Expressed Genes in Response to Mycosphaerella fijiensis in the Resistant Musa Accession 'Calcutta-4' Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Sánchez Timm

    Full Text Available Bananas and plantains are considered an important crop around the world. Banana production is affected by several constraints, of which Black Sigatoka Disease, caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis, is considered one of the most important diseases in banana plantations. The banana accession 'Calcutta-4' has a natural resistance to Black Sigatoka; however, the fruit is not valuable for commercialization. Gene identification and expression studies in 'Calcutta-4' might reveal possible gene candidates for resistant to the disease and elucidate mechanisms for resistance. A subtracted cDNA library was generated from leaves after 6, 9 and 12 days inoculated with M. fijiensis conidia on greenhouse banana plants of the accession 'Calcutta-4'. Bioinformatic analysis revealed 99 good quality sequences. Blast2go analysis revealed that 31% of the sequences could not be categorized and, according to the Biological Process Category, 32 and 28 ESTs are related to general metabolic and cellular processes, respectively; while 10 ESTs response to stimulus. Seven sequences were redundant and one was similar to genes that may be involved in pathogen resistance including the putative disease resistance protein RGA1. Genes encoding zinc finger domains were identified and may play an important role in pathogen resistance by inducing the expression of downstream genes. Expression analysis of four selected genes was performed using RT-qPCR during the early stage of the disease development at 6, 9, 12 and 15 days post inoculation showing a peak of up regulation at 9 or 12 days post inoculation. Three of the four genes showed an up-regulation of expression in 'Calcutta-4' when compared to 'Williams' after inoculation with M. fijiensis, suggesting a fine regulation of specific gene candidates that may lead to a resistance response. The genes identified in early responses in a plant-pathogen interaction may be relevant for the resistance response of 'Calcutta-4' to

  6. Identification of Differentially-Expressed Genes in Response to Mycosphaerella fijiensis in the Resistant Musa Accession ‘Calcutta-4’ Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco Coello, Ricardo; Chávez Navarrete, Tatiana; Navarrete Villegas, Oscar; Santos Ordóñez, Efrén

    2016-01-01

    Bananas and plantains are considered an important crop around the world. Banana production is affected by several constraints, of which Black Sigatoka Disease, caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis, is considered one of the most important diseases in banana plantations. The banana accession ‘Calcutta-4’ has a natural resistance to Black Sigatoka; however, the fruit is not valuable for commercialization. Gene identification and expression studies in ‘Calcutta-4’ might reveal possible gene candidates for resistant to the disease and elucidate mechanisms for resistance. A subtracted cDNA library was generated from leaves after 6, 9 and 12 days inoculated with M. fijiensis conidia on greenhouse banana plants of the accession ‘Calcutta-4’. Bioinformatic analysis revealed 99 good quality sequences. Blast2go analysis revealed that 31% of the sequences could not be categorized and, according to the Biological Process Category, 32 and 28 ESTs are related to general metabolic and cellular processes, respectively; while 10 ESTs response to stimulus. Seven sequences were redundant and one was similar to genes that may be involved in pathogen resistance including the putative disease resistance protein RGA1. Genes encoding zinc finger domains were identified and may play an important role in pathogen resistance by inducing the expression of downstream genes. Expression analysis of four selected genes was performed using RT-qPCR during the early stage of the disease development at 6, 9, 12 and 15 days post inoculation showing a peak of up regulation at 9 or 12 days post inoculation. Three of the four genes showed an up-regulation of expression in ‘Calcutta-4’ when compared to ‘Williams’ after inoculation with M. fijiensis, suggesting a fine regulation of specific gene candidates that may lead to a resistance response. The genes identified in early responses in a plant-pathogen interaction may be relevant for the resistance response of ‘Calcutta-4

  7. Effects of metformin and leuprolide acetate on insulin resistance and testosterone levels in nondiabetic postmenopausal women: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shrita M; Iqbal, Nayyar; Kaul, Shailja; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Rickels, Michael R; Reilly, Muredach P; Scattergood, Theresa; Basu, Arpita; Fuller, Carissa; Cappola, Anne R

    2010-11-01

    To determine whether insulin sensitizers lower androgen levels and whether androgen suppression improves insulin resistance in nondiabetic postmenopausal women. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Clinical and Translational Research Center of a university hospital. Thirty-five postmenopausal women aged 50-79 years with insulin resistance and higher T levels. Subjects were randomized to metformin plus leuprolide acetate (LA) placebo, LA plus metformin placebo, or LA placebo plus metformin placebo in a 1:1:1 fashion during a 12-week period. Insulin sensitivity (M) assessed by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and free T by equilibrium dialysis. In those randomized to metformin, free T decreased by 19% compared with placebo, along with an expected improvement in M. Total T also decreased significantly, whereas sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) did not change. In those randomized to LA, the percent change in M was not different from placebo, despite a 48% relative decrease in free T levels. These data are the first to establish a causal link between insulin resistance and T in postmenopausal women. They confirm that treatment of insulin resistance decreases T production in this population and demonstrate that pharmacologic lowering of T does not affect insulin resistance. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Dual-Task Management and Resistance Training on Gait Performance in Older Individuals: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollesen, Bettina; Mattes, Klaus; Schulz, Sören; Bischoff, Laura L.; Seydell, L.; Bell, Jeffrey W.; von Duvillard, Serge P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dual-task (DT) training is a well-accepted modality for fall prevention in older adults. DT training should include task-managing strategies such as task switching or task prioritization to improve gait performance under DT conditions. Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial to evaluate a balance and task managing training (BDT group) in gait performance compared to a single task (ST) strength and resistance training and a control group, which received no training. A total of 78 older individuals (72.0 ± 4.9 years) participated in this study. The DT group performed task managing training incorporating balance and coordination tasks while the ST group performed resistance training only. Training consisted of 12 weekly sessions, 60 min each, for 12 weeks. We assessed the effects of ST and BDT training on walking performance under ST and DT conditions in independent living elderly adults. ST and DT walking (visual verbal Stroop task) were measured utilizing a treadmill at self-selected walking speed (mean for all groups: 4.4 ± 1 km h-1). Specific gait variables, cognitive performance, and fear of falling were compared between all groups. >Results: Training improved gait performance for step length (p changes in cognitive performance. Both interventions reduced fear of falling (p management strategies into balance and strength training in our population revealed a promising modality to prevent falls in older individuals. Trial registration: German register of clinical trials DRKS00012382. PMID:29326581

  9. A Cationic Amphiphilic Random Copolymer with pH-Responsive Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungyoup; Takahashi, Haruko; Nadres, Enrico T; Mortazavian, Hamid; Caputo, Gregory A; Younger, John G; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2017-01-01

    In this report, we demonstrate the pH-dependent, in vitro antimicrobial activity of a cationic, amphiphilic random copolymer against clinical isolates of drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The polymer was developed toward a long-term goal of potential utility in the treatment of skin infections. The proposed mechanism of action of the polymer is through selectively binding to bacterial membranes and subsequent disruption of the membrane structure/integrity, ultimately resulting in bacterial cell death. The polymer showed bactericidal activity against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant or vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus. The polymer was effective in killing S. aureus at neutral pH, but inactive under acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The polymer did not exhibit any significant hemolytic activity against human red blood cells or display cytotoxicity to human dermal fibroblasts over a range of pH values (5.5-7.4). These results indicate that the polymer activity was selective against bacteria over human cells. Using this polymer, we propose a new potential strategy for treatment of skin infections using the pH-sensitive antimicrobial polymer agent that would selectively target infections at pH-neutral wound sites, but not the acidic, healthy skin.

  10. Characterization of Vibrio vulnificus isolated from cockles (Anadara granosa): antimicrobial resistance, plasmid profiles and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, S; Elhadi, N; Hassan, Z; Rusul, G; Lihan, S; Fifadara, N; Yuherman; Purwati, E

    1998-08-01

    Antibiotic susceptibility, plasmid profiles and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) were used to study strains of Vibrio vulnificus isolated from cockles (Anadara granosa). Thirty-six isolates were analyzed. The prevalent biotypes were 1 (72.2% of the isolates) and 2 (27.8%). Among these, 21 strains of biotype 1 and two strains of biotype 2 contained plasmid DNA bands ranging in size from 1.4 to 9.7 MDa. Thirty-one (83.3%) were found to be resistant to one or more of the antimicrobial agents tested, however no specific correlation between antimicrobial resistance patterns and a single biotype was found. In addition, no particular plasmid profile was predictive of a particular pattern of antibiotic susceptibility. Two primers produced polymorphisms in all strains tested, producing bands ranging from 0.25 to 2.7 kb, indicating a high variability among both biotype 1 and biotype 2 of the V. vulnificus strains investigated. RAPD identity across biotypes was also observed among Vibrio vulnificus strains.

  11. Fatigue resistance of randomly oriented short glass fiber reinforced polyester composite materials immersed in seawater environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeghader, Djamel; Redjel, Bachir

    2018-02-01

    Randomly oriented short fiber mat reinforced polyester composite laminates immersed in natural seawater for various periods were tested in static and cyclic fatigue loading under three-point bending conditions. Water absorption increased the weight of the specimen while the extraction of soluble compounds induces a weak weight loss. Wöhler curves carried out from repetitive fatigue tests were drawn for the different periods of immersion time. These curves, which are characterized by an important and a significant scatter in their lifetime, were modeled by straight lines. These glass-polyester laminates deteriorate in fatigue tests at a constant rate by cycle decade. This rate increases with increasing immersion time in seawater at a constant speed. A comparison between different mathematical models of endurance curves shows that Wöhler's equation gives a good representation of the average part of the curve.

  12. Resistance training concomitant to radiotherapy of spinal bone metastases - survival and prognostic factors of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rief, Harald; Bruckner, Thomas; Schlampp, Ingmar; Bostel, Tilman; Welzel, Thomas; Debus, Jürgen; Förster, Robert

    2016-07-27

    To compare the effects of resistance training versus passive physical therapy on bone survival in the metastatic bone during radiation therapy (RT) as combined treatment in patients with spinal bone metastases. Secondly, to evaluate overall survival and progression-free-survival (PFS) as well as to quantify prognostic factors of bone survival after combined treatment. In this randomized trial 60 patients were allocated from September 2011 until March 2013 into one of the two groups: resistance training (group A) or passive physical therapy (group B) with thirty patients in each group during RT. We estimated patient survival using Kaplan-Meier survival method. The Wald-test was used to evaluate the prognostic importance of pathological fracture, primary site, Karnofsky performance status, localization of metastases, number of metastases, and cerebral metastases. Median follow-up was 10 months (range 2-35). Bone survival showed no significant difference between groups (p = .303). Additionally no difference between groups could be detected in overall survival (p = .688) and PFS (p = .295). Local bone progression was detected in 16.7 % in group B, no irradiated bone in group A showed a local progression over the course (p = 0.019). In univariate analysis breast cancer, prostate cancer, and the presence of cerebral metastases had a significant impact on bone survival in group B, while no impact could be demonstrated in group A. In this group of patients with spinal bone metastases we were able to show that guided resistance training of the paravertebral muscles had no essential impact on survival concomitant to RT. Importantly, no local bone progression in group A was detected, nevertheless no prognostic factor for combined treatment could be evaluated. Clinical trial identifier NCT 01409720 . Registered 8 February 2011.

  13. Effect of brief daily resistance training on rapid force development in painful neck and shoulder muscles: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Kenneth; Schraefel, Mc; Andersen, Christoffer H; Ebbesen, Frederik S; Christiansen, David H; Skotte, Jørgen; Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Lars L

    2013-09-01

    To determine the effect of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training on rapid force development of painful neck/shoulder muscles. 198 generally healthy adults with frequent neck/shoulder muscle pain (mean: age 43.1 years, computer use 93% of work time, 88% women, duration of pain 186 day during the previous year) were randomly allocated to 2- or 12 min of daily progressive resistance training with elastic tubing or to a control group receiving weekly information on general health. A blinded assessor took measures at baseline and at 10-week follow-up; participants performed maximal voluntary contractions at a static 90-degree shoulder joint angle. Rapid force development was determined as the rate of torque development and maximal muscle strength was determined as the peak torque. Compared with the control group, rate of torque development increased 31.0 Nm s(-1) [95% confidence interval: (1.33-11.80)] in the 2-min group and 33.2 Nm s(-1) (1.66-12.33) in the 12-min group from baseline to 10-week follow-up, corresponding to an increase of 16.0% and 18.2% for the two groups, respectively. The increase was significantly different compared to controls (Ppain (r = 0.27, Ppain. Small daily amounts of progressive resistance training in adults with frequent neck/shoulder pain increases rapid force development and, to a less extent, maximal force capacity. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  14. A randomized placebo-controlled prevention trial of aspirin and/or resistant starch in young people with familial adenomatous polyposis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burn, John; Bishop, D Timothy; Chapman, Pamela D

    2011-01-01

    Evidence supporting aspirin and resistant starch (RS) for colorectal cancer prevention comes from epidemiologic and laboratory studies (aspirin and RS) and randomized controlled clinical trials (aspirin). Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) strikes young people and, untreated, confers virtually......, patients were randomly assigned to the following four study arms: aspirin plus RS placebo; RS plus aspirin placebo; aspirin plus RS; RS placebo plus aspirin placebo; they were followed with standard annual clinical examinations including endoscopy. The primary endpoint was polyp number in the rectum...

  15. Random Number Generation for High Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Memory (DRAM), Double Data Rate Random Access Memory ( DDR RAM ), Static Random Access Memory (SRAM), Extended Data Out Random Access 45 Memory (EDO RAM ...Random Access Memory ( DDR RAM ), Static Random Access Memory (SRAM), Extended Data Out Random Access Memory (EDO RAM ), Rambus Random Access 20 Memory...FTE Equivalent: Total Number: PERCENT_SUPPORTEDNAME FTE Equivalent: Total Number: National Academy Member Rajendra V. Boppana 0.30 Ram C. Tripathi 0.08

  16. Towards a behavioral vaccine: exposure to accessible temptation when self-regulation is endorsed enhances future resistance to similar temptations in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Cara; de Ridder, Denise; de Vet, Emely; Grubliauskiene, Aiste; Dewitte, Siegfried

    2015-03-01

    Access to temptation is blamed for the rising prevalence of obesity in children. A popular way to counter this is to restrict physical access to temptation. As restrictions cannot be widely applied and may have adverse long-term effects, we examine whether accessible temptations in situations that endorse self-regulation train self-regulation. Specifically, we design a method that enhances children's self-regulatory skills in the long term. In two studies, participants were exposed to temptation in phase one and their self-regulatory skills were measured in phase two. In Study 1, we endorsed self-regulation in the presence of accessible temptation for four consecutive days and measured consumption on the fifth day. In Study 2, we exposed children to temptation similarly and, in addition, manipulated temptation strength to show that being tempted is crucial for the skill to develop. Next, we measured saliva and preferences. The findings suggest that exposure to temptation in a situation that supports self-regulation leads to better resistance to temptations in later contexts of accessible temptation in girls, but not boys. Our findings suggest that interventions aiming at strengthening children's self-regulatory skills through controlled exposure to temptation might be a productive long-term strategy to reduce consumption of unhealthy food. © 2014 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  17. Improving management of resistant hypertension: Rationale and protocol for a cluster randomized trial addressing physician managers in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltermann, Birgitta; Viehmann, Anja; Kersting, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined as uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) despite ≥3 antihypertensive agents. It is estimated to account for 12-28% of all hypertensive patients. Despite a higher risk of cardiovascular events, hypertension therapy in these patients is often insufficient. In a previous study we successfully tested an evidence-based, physician manager-centered hypertension management. For this cluster randomized trial (CRT), a random sample of 102 German primary care practices will be randomized into two study arms (1:1). Physician managers and practice assistants of the intervention arm will participate in three-session medical education on hypertension management to implement 1) standardized diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for RH patients, 2) structured recall of patients with uncontrolled BP, and 3) teaching and supervision of RH patients on BP self-measurements. Practice tools are provided to facilitate implementation, e.g., how to distinguish true from pseudo RH and guideline-based medication selection. Physicians will specify guideline-algorithms for their practice to manage RH. A secured web-based peer-group exchange with hypertension specialists is offered to both professional groups. Physicians of both study arms will consecutively recruit patients with RH. BP will be measured by ambulatory BP monitoring at baseline and after 12 months. The primary endpoint is defined as treatment success with either normalized BP (24h<130/80 mmHg) and/or a reduction by ≥20 mmHg systolic and/or ≥10 mmHg diastolic. Secondary analyses will focus on changes in physicians' knowledge and practice routines. This CRT will determine the effectiveness of a physician manager-centered intervention on treatment success in high-risk patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Integrated Optical Content Addressable Memories (CAM and Optical Random Access Memories (RAM for Ultra-Fast Address Look-Up Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Vagionas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Electronic Content Addressable Memories (CAM implement Address Look-Up (AL table functionalities of network routers; however, they typically operate in the MHz regime, turning AL into a critical network bottleneck. In this communication, we demonstrate the first steps towards developing optical CAM alternatives to enable a re-engineering of AL memories. Firstly, we report on the photonic integration of Semiconductor Optical Amplifier-Mach Zehnder Interferometer (SOA-MZI-based optical Flip-Flop and Random Access Memories on a monolithic InP platform, capable of storing the binary prefix-address data-bits and the outgoing port information for next hop routing, respectively. Subsequently the first optical Binary CAM cell (B-CAM is experimentally demonstrated, comprising an InP Flip-Flop and a SOA-MZI Exclusive OR (XOR gate for fast search operations through an XOR-based bit comparison, yielding an error-free 10 Gb/s operation. This is later extended via physical layer simulations in an optical Ternary-CAM (T-CAM cell and a 4-bit Matchline (ML configuration, supporting a third state of the “logical X” value towards wildcard bits of network subnet masks. The proposed functional CAM and Random Access Memories (RAM sub-circuits may facilitate light-based Address Look-Up tables supporting search operations at 10 Gb/s and beyond, paving the way towards minimizing the disparity with the frantic optical transmission linerates, and fast re-configurability through multiple simultaneous Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM memory access requests.

  19. An augmented SMS intervention to improve access to antenatal CD4 testing and ART initiation in HIV-infected pregnant women: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden-Peterson, Scott; Bennett, Kara; Hughes, Michael D; Veres, Adrian; John, Oaitse; Pradhananga, Rosina; Boyer, Matthew; Brown, Carolyn; Sakyi, Bright; van Widenfelt, Erik; Keapoletswe, Koona; Mine, Madisa; Moyo, Sikhulile; Asmelash, Aida; Siedner, Mark; Mmalane, Mompati; Shapiro, Roger L; Lockman, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Less than one-third of HIV-infected pregnant women eligible for combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) globally initiate treatment prior to delivery, with lack of access to timely CD4 results being a principal barrier. We evaluated the effectiveness of an SMS-based intervention to improve access to timely antenatal ART. We conducted a stepped-wedge cluster randomized trial of a low-cost programmatic intervention in 20 antenatal clinics in Gaborone, Botswana. From July 2011-April 2012, 2 clinics were randomly selected every 4 weeks to receive an ongoing clinic-based educational intervention to improve CD4 collection and to receive CD4 results via an automated SMS platform with active patient tracing. CD4 testing before 26 weeks gestation and ART initiation before 30 weeks gestation were assessed. Three-hundred-sixty-six ART-naïve women were included, 189 registering for antenatal care under Intervention and 177 under Usual Care periods. Of CD4-eligible women, 100 (59.2%) women under Intervention and 79 (50.6%) women under Usual Care completed CD4 phlebotomy before 26 weeks gestation, adjusted odds ratio (aOR, adjusted for time that a clinic initiated Intervention) 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI]0.47-1.63, P = 0.67). The SMS-based platform reduced time to clinic receipt of CD4 test result from median of 16 to 6 days (PSMS-based intervention delivered CD4 results more rapidly and efficiently, and this type of SMS-based results delivery platform may be useful for a variety of tests and settings. However, the intervention did not appear to improve access to timely antenatal CD4 testing or ART initiation, as obstacles other than CD4 impeded ART initiation during pregnancy.

  20. Effects of combined endurance and resistance training in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A pilot, randomized, controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Merico

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on available evidence, muscle strengthening and cardiovascular exercises can help maintain function and not adversely affect the progression of disease in patients with ALS. However, this evidence is not sufficiently detailed to recommend a specific exercise prescription. The purpose of this project was to assess clinical outcomes of a combined exercise programme to increase knowledge of rehabilitation in ALS patients. 38 ALS patients were assigned randomly to two groups: one group underwent a specific exercise programme (ALS-EP based on a moderate aerobic workout and isometric contractions, and the second group followed a standard neuromotor rehabilitation treatment. Objective evaluation consisted of cardiovascular measures, muscle strength and fatigue. Some positive effects of physical activity on ALS patients were found. Among the benefits, an overall improvement of functional independence in all patients, independently of the type of exercise conducted was seen. In addition, improvements in muscle power, oxygen consumption and fatigue were specifically observed in the ALS-EP group, all hallmarks of a training effect for the specific exercises. In conclusion, moderate intensity exercise is beneficial in ALS, helping in avoiding deconditioning and muscle atrophy resulting from progressive inactivity.

  1. Assignment refusal and its relation to outcome in a randomized controlled trial comparing Cognitive Therapy and Fluvoxamine in treatment-resistant patients with obsessive compulsive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landsheer, Johannes A.; Smit, Johannes H.; van Oppen, Patricia; van Balkom, Anton J L M

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Fluvoxamine was compared to that of Cognitive Therapy (CT) in a 12-week randomized controlled trial (RCT) in 48 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), who were treatment-resistant to a previous behavior therapy (BT). A considerable amount of patients did not comply

  2. Impact of amoxicillin therapy on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections : A randomized, placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Coenen, Samuel; Lammens, Christine; Adriaenssens, Niels; Kowalczyk, Anna; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Bielicka, Zuzana; Hupkova, Helena; Lannering, Christina; Mölstad, Sigvard; Fernandez-Vandellos, Patricia; Torres, Antoni; Parizel, Maxim; Ieven, Margareta; Butler, Chris C.; Verheij, Theo; Little, Paul; Goossens, Hermanon; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Bruno, Pascale; Hering, Iris; Lemiengre, Marieke; Loens, Katherine; Malmvall, Bo Eric; Muras, Magdalena; Romano, Nuria Sanchez; Prat, Matteu Serra; Svab, Igor; Swain, Jackie; Tarsia, Paolo; Leus, Frank; Veen, Robert; Worby, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effect of amoxicillin treatment on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Methods: Patients were prescribed amoxicillin 1 g, three times daily (n = 52) or placebo (n = 50) for

  3. Protocol of an expertise based randomized trial comparing surgical Venae Sectio versus radiological Puncture of Vena Subclavia for insertion of Totally Implantable Access Port in oncological patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radeleff Boris

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Totally Implantable Access Ports (TIAP are being extensively used world-wide and can be expected to gain further importance with the introduction of new neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatments in oncology. Two different techniques for the implantation can be selected: A direct puncture of a central vein and the utilization of a Seldinger device or the surgical Venae sectio. It is still unclear which technique has the optimal benefit/risk ratio for the patient. Design A single-center, expertise based randomized, controlled superiority trial to compare two different TIAP implantation techniques. 100 patients will be included and randomized pre-operatively. All patients aged 18 years or older scheduled for primary elective implantation of a TIAP under local anesthesia who signed the informed consent will be included. The primary endpoint is the primary success rate of the randomized technique. Control Intervention: Venae Sectio will be employed to insert a TIAP by a surgeon; Experimental intervention: Punction of V. Subclavia will be used to place a TIAP by a radiologist. Duration of study: Approximately 10 months, follow up time: 90 days. Organisation/Responsibility The PORTAS 2 – Trial will be conducted in accordance with the protocol and in compliance with the moral, ethical, and scientific principles governing clinical research as set out in the Declaration of Helsinki (1989 and Good Clinical Practice (GCP. The Center of Clinical Trials at the Department of Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg is responsible for design and conduct of the trial including randomization and documentation of patients' data. Data management and statistical analysis will be performed by the independent Institute for Medical Biometry and Informatics (IMBI, University of Heidelberg. Trial Registration The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00600444.

  4. Studies on nonvolatile resistance memory switching in ZnO thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Six decades of research on ZnO has recently sprouted a new branch in the domain of resistive random access memories. Highly resistive and c-axis oriented ZnO thin films were grown by us using d.c. discharge assisted pulsed laser deposition on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates at room temperature. The resistive switching ...

  5. Resistance exercise training improves heart rate variability and muscle performance: a randomized controlled trial in coronary artery disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, F R; Arena, R; Phillips, S A; Bonjorno, J C; Mendes, R G; Arakelian, V M; Bassi, D; Nogi, C; Borghi-Silva, A

    2015-06-01

    Resistance exercise (RE) is an important part of cardiac rehabilitation. However, it is not known about the low intensity of RE training that could modify the heart rate variability (HRV), muscular strength and endurance in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). To investigate the effects of high repetition/low load resistance training (HR/LL-RT) program on HRV and muscular strength and endurance in CAD patients. Randomized and controlled trial. Patients seen at the Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Laboratory between May 2011 and November 2013. Twenty male patients with CAD were randomized to a training group (61.3±5.2 years) or control group (61±4.4 years). 1 repetition maximum (1-RM) maneuver, discontinuous exercise test on the leg press (DET-L), and resting HRV were performed before and after 8 weeks of HR/LL-RT on a 45° leg press. RMSSD, SD1, mean HR and ApEn indices were calculated. The HR/LL-RT program consisted of a lower limb exercise using a 45° leg press; 3 sets of 20 repetitions, two times a week. The initial load was set at 30% of the 1-RM load and the duration of the HR/LL-RT program was performed for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks of HR/LL-RT there were significant increases of RMSSD and SD1 indices in the training group only (P<0.05). There was a significant decrease in mean HR after HR/LL-RT in the training group (P<0.05). There was a significantly higher ApEn after in the training group (P<0.05). There were significantly higher values in the training group in contrast to the control group (P<0.05). These results show positive improvements on HRV, as well as muscle strength and endurance in CAD patients. Eight weeks of HR/LL-RT is an effective sufficient to beneficially modify important outcomes as HRV, muscle strength and endurance in CAD patients.

  6. Effect of almonds on insulin secretion and insulin resistance in nondiabetic hyperlipidemic subjects: a randomized controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C; Marchie, Augustine; Josse, Andrea R; Nguyen, Tri H; Faulkner, Dorothea A; Lapsley, Karen G; Singer, William

    2008-07-01

    Nuts appear to have a marked effect in cohort studies in reducing the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), but their demonstrated ability to lower cholesterol can only explain a proportion of the reduction in risk. Our aim was to assess whether improvement in carbohydrate metabolism provides a further explanation for the effect of nuts in reducing CHD. The effects of whole almonds, taken as snacks, were compared with the effects of low saturated fat (<5% energy) whole-wheat muffins (control) in the therapeutic diets of hyperlipidemic subjects. In a randomized crossover study, 27 hyperlipidemic men and women consumed 3 isoenergetic (mean, 423 kcal/d) supplements each for 1 month. Supplements provided 22.2% of energy and consisted of full-dose almonds (73 +/- 3 g/d), half-dose almonds plus half-dose muffins, and full-dose muffins. Subjects were assessed at weeks 0, 2, and 4 and fasting blood samples were obtained. Twenty-four-hour urinary output was collected at the end of week 4 on each treatment. Mean body weights differed by less than 300 g between treatments. No differences were seen in baseline or treatment values for fasting glucose, insulin, C-peptide, or insulin resistance as measured by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. However, 24-hour urinary C-peptide output as a marker of 24-hour insulin secretion was significantly reduced on the half-and full-dose almonds by comparison to the control after adjustment for urinary creatinine output (P = .002 and P = .004, respectively). We conclude that reductions in 24-hour insulin secretion appear to be a further metabolic advantage of nuts that in the longer term may help to explain the association of nut consumption with reduced CHD risk.

  7. Slow movement resistance training using body weight improves muscle mass in the elderly: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuku, S; Kajioka, T; Sakakibara, H; Shimaoka, K

    2018-04-01

    To examine the effect of a 12-week slow movement resistance training using body weight as a load (SRT-BW) on muscle mass, strength, and fat distribution in healthy elderly people. Fifty-three men and 35 women aged 70 years old or older without experience in resistance training participated, and they were randomly assigned to a SRT-BW group or control group. The control group did not receive any intervention, but participants in this group underwent a repeat measurement 12 weeks later. The SRT-BW program consisted of 3 different exercises (squat, tabletop push-up, and sit-up), which were designed to stimulate anterior major muscles. Initially, these exercises were performed by 2 sets of 10 repetitions, and subsequently, the number of repetitions was increased progressively by 2 repetitions every 4 weeks. Participants were instructed to perform each eccentric and concentric phase of movement slowly (spending 4 seconds on each movement), covering the full range of motion. We evaluated muscle mass, strength, and fat distribution at baseline and after 12 weeks of training. Changes over 12 weeks were significantly greater in the SRT-BW group than in the control group, with a decrease in waist circumference, hip circumference, and abdominal preperitoneal and subcutaneous fat thickness, and an increase in thigh muscle thickness, knee extension strength, and hip flexion strength. In conclusion, relatively short-term SRT-BW was effective in improving muscle mass, strength, and fat distribution in healthy elderly people. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. DNA of a circular minichromosome linearized by restriction enzymes or other reagents is resistant to further cleavage: an influence of chromatin topology on the accessibility of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumala, Sławomir; Hadj-Sahraoui, Yasmina; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna; Hancock, Ronald

    2012-10-01

    The accessibility of DNA in chromatin is an essential factor in regulating its activities. We studied the accessibility of the DNA in a ∼170 kb circular minichromosome to DNA-cleaving reagents using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and fibre-fluorescence in situ hybridization on combed DNA molecules. Only one of several potential sites in the minichromosome DNA was accessible to restriction enzymes in permeabilized cells, and in growing cells only a single site at an essentially random position was cut by poisoned topoisomerase II, neocarzinostatin and γ-radiation, which have multiple potential cleavage sites; further sites were then inaccessible in the linearized minichromosomes. Sequential exposure to combinations of these reagents also resulted in cleavage at only a single site. Minichromosome DNA containing single-strand breaks created by a nicking endonuclease to relax any unconstrained superhelicity was also cut at only a single position by a restriction enzyme. Further sites became accessible after ≥95% of histones H2A, H2B and H1, and most non-histone proteins were extracted. These observations suggest that a global rearrangement of the three-dimensional packing and interactions of nucleosomes occurs when a circular minichromosome is linearized and results in its DNA becoming inaccessible to probes.

  9. Lamotrigine Augmentation Versus Placebo in Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors-Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalkhali, Mohammadrasoul; Aram, Setareh; Zarrabi, Homa; Kafie, Moosa; Heidarzadeh, Abtin

    2016-04-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors are frequently used in first-line treatments for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Nevertheless, many of these patients do not respond well to initial therapy. The hypothesis of glutamatergic dysfunction in specific brain regions has been proposed in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder. This study was designed to evaluate the possible efficacy of lamotrigine, a glutamatergic agent in Serotonin reuptake inhibitors-resistant patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. This study was a 12-week, double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of adjunctive fixed-doses of lamotrigine (100 mg) to Serotonin reuptake inhibitors therapy in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Eligible subjects who had a total Y-BOCS of 21 or above were randomly assigned to receive adjunctive treatment with either lamotrigine (n = 26), or placebo (n = 27). Response to lamotrigine was defined as clinical improvement (>25% decrease in the total Y-BOCS score), which was administered at weeks 0, 8 and 12. At the endpoint (week 12), significant differences were observed in obsession, compulsion, and total Y-BOCS scores comparing lamotrigine to placebo (P = 0.01, 0.005 and 0.007 respectively). The mean reduction in obsession, compulsion and total scores in lamotrigine group was about 4.15, 4.50 and 8.73, respectively. Similarly, the mean reductions in the placebo group were 2.52, 2.56 and 5.07. Effect sizes for efficacy measureswerecalculatedbyCohen'sd, and it was calculated as 0.54 for the total YBOCS. Our findings provide evidence that this augmentation is well tolerated and may be an effective strategy for patients with refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  10. Effect of Access to an Electronic Medical Resource on Performance Characteristics of a Certification Examination: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipner, Rebecca S; Brossman, Bradley G; Samonte, Kelli M; Durning, Steven J

    2017-09-05

    Electronic resources are increasingly used in medical practice. Their use during high-stakes certification examinations has been advocated by many experts, but whether doing so would affect the capacity to differentiate between high and low abilities is unknown. To determine the effect of electronic resources on examination performance characteristics. Randomized controlled trial. Medical certification program. 825 physicians initially certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) who passed the Internal Medicine Certification examination or sat for the Internal Medicine Maintenance of Certification (IM-MOC) examination in 2012 to 2015. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 conditions: closed book using typical or additional time, or open book (that is, UpToDate [Wolters Kluwer]) using typical or additional time. All participants took the same modified version of the IM-MOC examination. Primary outcomes included item difficulty (how easy or difficult the question was), item discrimination (how well the question differentiated between high and low abilities), and average question response time. Secondary outcomes included examination dimensionality (that is, the number of factors measured) and test-taking strategy. Item response theory was used to calculate question characteristics. Analysis of variance compared differences among conditions. Closed-book conditions took significantly less time than open-book conditions (mean, 79.2 seconds [95% CI, 78.5 to 79.9 seconds] vs. 110.3 seconds [CI, 109.2 to 111.4 seconds] per question). Mean discrimination was statistically significantly higher for open-book conditions (0.34 [CI, 0.32 to 0.35] vs. 0.39 [CI, 0.37 to 0.41] per question). A strong single dimension showed that the examination measured the same factor with or without the resource. Only 1 electronic resource was evaluated. Inclusion of an electronic resource with time constraints did not adversely affect test performance and did not change

  11. All-optical clocked flip-flops and random access memory cells using the nonlinear polarization rotation effect of low-polarization-dependent semiconductor optical amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Xinyu; Tian, Qinghua; Wang, Lina; Xin, Xiangjun

    2018-03-01

    Basic configurations of various all-optical clocked flip-flops (FFs) and optical random access memory (RAM) based on the nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) effect of low-polarization-dependent semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) are proposed. As the constituent elements, all-optical logic gates and all-optical SR latches are constructed by taking advantage of the SOA's NPR switch. Different all-optical FFs (AOFFs), including SR-, D-, T-, and JK-types as well as an optical RAM cell were obtained by the combination of the proposed all-optical SR latches and logic gates. The effectiveness of the proposed schemes were verified by simulation results and demonstrated by a D-FF and 1-bit RAM cell experimental system. The proposed all-optical clocked FFs and RAM cell are significant to all-optical signal processing.

  12. Design and measurement of fully digital ternary content addressable memory using ratioless static random access memory cells and hierarchical-AND matching comparator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikata, Daisuke; Ali, Mohammad Alimudin Bin Mohd; Hosoda, Kento; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2018-04-01

    A 36-bit × 32-entry fully digital ternary content addressable memory (TCAM) using the ratioless static random access memory (RL-SRAM) technology and fully complementary hierarchical-AND matching comparators (HAMCs) was developed. Since its fully complementary and digital operation enables the effect of device variabilities to be avoided, it can operate with a quite low supply voltage. A test chip incorporating a conventional TCAM and a proposed 24-transistor ratioless TCAM (RL-TCAM) cells and HAMCs was developed using a 0.18 µm CMOS process. The minimum operating voltage of 0.25 V of the developed RL-TCAM, which is less than half of that of the conventional TCAM, was measured via the conventional CMOS push–pull output buffers with the level-shifting and flipping technique using optimized pull-up voltage and resistors.

  13. Nanoscale CuO solid-electrolyte-based conductive-bridging, random-access memory cell with a TiN liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Sun; Kim, Dong-Won; Kim, Hea-Jee; Jin, Soo-Min; Song, Myung-Jin; Kwon, Ki-Hyun; Park, Jea-Gun; Jalalah, Mohammed; Al-Hajry, Ali

    2018-01-01

    The Conductive-bridge random-access memory (CBRAM) cell is a promising candidate for a terabit-level non-volatile memory due to its remarkable advantages. We present for the first time TiN as a diffusion barrier in CBRAM cells for enhancing their reliability. CuO solid-electrolyte-based CBRAM cells implemented with a 0.1-nm TiN liner demonstrated better non-volatile memory characteristics such as 106 AC write/erase endurance cycles with 100-μs AC pulse width and a long retention time of 7.4-years at 85 °C. In addition, the analysis of Ag diffusion in the CBRAM cell suggests that the morphology of the Ag filaments in the electrolyte can be effectively controlled by tuning the thickness of the TiN liner. These promising results pave the way for faster commercialization of terabit-level non-volatile memories.

  14. Quantifying data retention of perpendicular spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory chips using an effective thermal stability factor method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Luc, E-mail: luc.thomas@headway.com; Jan, Guenole; Le, Son; Wang, Po-Kang [TDK-Headway Technologies, Inc., 463 S. Milpitas Boulevard, Milpitas, California 95035 (United States)

    2015-04-20

    The thermal stability of perpendicular Spin-Transfer-Torque Magnetic Random Access Memory (STT-MRAM) devices is investigated at chip level. Experimental data are analyzed in the framework of the Néel-Brown model including distributions of the thermal stability factor Δ. We show that in the low error rate regime important for applications, the effect of distributions of Δ can be described by a single quantity, the effective thermal stability factor Δ{sub eff}, which encompasses both the median and the standard deviation of the distributions. Data retention of memory chips can be assessed accurately by measuring Δ{sub eff} as a function of device diameter and temperature. We apply this method to show that 54 nm devices based on our perpendicular STT-MRAM design meet our 10 year data retention target up to 120 °C.

  15. Low leakage Ru-strontium titanate-Ru metal-insulator-metal capacitors for sub-20 nm technology node in dynamic random access memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovici, M., E-mail: Mihaela.Ioana.Popovici@imec.be; Swerts, J.; Redolfi, A.; Kaczer, B.; Aoulaiche, M.; Radu, I.; Clima, S.; Everaert, J.-L.; Van Elshocht, S.; Jurczak, M. [Imec, Leuven 3001 (Belgium)

    2014-02-24

    Improved metal-insulator-metal capacitor (MIMCAP) stacks with strontium titanate (STO) as dielectric sandwiched between Ru as top and bottom electrode are shown. The Ru/STO/Ru stack demonstrates clearly its potential to reach sub-20 nm technology nodes for dynamic random access memory. Downscaling of the equivalent oxide thickness, leakage current density (J{sub g}) of the MIMCAPs, and physical thickness of the STO have been realized by control of the Sr/Ti ratio and grain size using a heterogeneous TiO{sub 2}/STO based nanolaminate stack deposition and a two-step crystallization anneal. Replacement of TiN with Ru as both top and bottom electrodes reduces the amount of electrically active defects and is essential to achieve a low leakage current in the MIM capacitor.

  16. CMOS integration of high-k/metal gate transistors in diffusion and gate replacement (D&GR) scheme for dynamic random access memory peripheral circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentoni Litta, Eugenio; Ritzenthaler, Romain; Schram, Tom; Spessot, Alessio; O’Sullivan, Barry; Machkaoutsan, Vladimir; Fazan, Pierre; Ji, Yunhyuck; Mannaert, Geert; Lorant, Christophe; Sebaai, Farid; Thiam, Arame; Ercken, Monique; Demuynck, Steven; Horiguchi, Naoto

    2018-04-01

    Integration of high-k/metal gate stacks in peripheral transistors is a major candidate to ensure continued scaling of dynamic random access memory (DRAM) technology. In this paper, the CMOS integration of diffusion and gate replacement (D&GR) high-k/metal gate stacks is investigated, evaluating four different approaches for the critical patterning step of removing the N-type field effect transistor (NFET) effective work function (eWF) shifter stack from the P-type field effect transistor (PFET) area. The effect of plasma exposure during the patterning step is investigated in detail and found to have a strong impact on threshold voltage tunability. A CMOS integration scheme based on an experimental wet-compatible photoresist is developed and the fulfillment of the main device metrics [equivalent oxide thickness (EOT), eWF, gate leakage current density, on/off currents, short channel control] is demonstrated.

  17. Aerobic physical activity and resistance training: an application of the theory of planned behavior among adults with type 2 diabetes in a random, national sample of Canadians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunamuni Nandini

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aerobic physical activity (PA and resistance training are paramount in the treatment and management of type 2 diabetes (T2D, but few studies have examined the determinants of both types of exercise in the same sample. Objective The primary purpose was to investigate the utility of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB in explaining aerobic PA and resistance training in a population sample of T2D adults. Methods A total of 244 individuals were recruited through a random national sample which was created by generating a random list of household phone numbers. The list was proportionate to the actual number of household telephone numbers for each Canadian province (with the exception of Quebec. These individuals completed self-report TPB constructs of attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and intention, and a 3-month follow-up that assessed aerobic PA and resistance training. Results TPB explained 10% and 8% of the variance respectively for aerobic PA and resistance training; and accounted for 39% and 45% of the variance respectively for aerobic PA and resistance training intentions. Conclusion These results may guide the development of appropriate PA interventions for aerobic PA and resistance training based on the TPB.

  18. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Short-term Toe Resistance Training to Improve Toe Pinch Force in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Hiroaki; Miyatake, Nobuyuki; Murao, Satoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2018-02-01

    Resistance training is effective against type 2 diabetes (T2DM), but the effect of resistance training on toe pinch force (TPF) is unknown. Here we investigated the effect of short-term toe resistance training on TPF in patients with T2DM, in a prospective, parallel-group, single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Twelve patients with T2DM who were hospitalized to improve glycemic control were enrolled. The patients were randomly allocated to the intervention (n=6) and control (n=6) groups. The intervention group performed traditional aerobic exercise and 4 newly developed toe-resistance training exercises. The control group performed aerobic exercise only. After 2 weeks of the exercise intervention program, we evaluated anthropometric parameters, clinical parameters, motor function, and muscle parameters in each patient. After the exercise intervention program, the TPF and toe muscle quality, isometric knee extension force, and knee muscle quality were significantly higher in the intervention group compared to the control group. Two weeks of toe-resistance training significantly increased the TPF in the T2DM patients. Toe resistance training is thus recommended in clinical practice for patients with T2DM.

  19. The effect of resistance training during radiotherapy on spinal bone metastases in cancer patients - a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rief, Harald; Petersen, Lina C; Omlor, Georg; Akbar, Michael; Bruckner, Thomas; Rieken, Stefan; Haefner, Matthias F; Schlampp, Ingmar; Förster, Robert; Debus, Jürgen; Welzel, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    To compare the effects of resistance training versus passive physical therapy on bone density in the metastatic bone during radiation therapy (RT) as combined treatment in patients with spinal bone metastases. Secondly, to quantify pathological fractures after combined treatment. In this randomized trial, 60 patients were allocated from September 2011 until March 2013 into one of the two groups: resistance training (group A) or passive physical therapy (group B) with thirty patients in each group during RT. Bone density in metastatic and non-metastatic vertebral bone was assessed at baseline, 3 and 6 months after RT. Bone density in all metastases increased significantly by 28.3% (IQR 11.4-139.0) and 80.3% (IQR 32.6-250.6) after 3 and 6 months in group A (both p < 0.01). The bone density in group A was significantly increased compared to control group after 3 and 6months (both p < 0.01, median 59.7; IQR 21.1-98.3 and median 62.9; IQR -9.7 to 161.7). The bone density data in group B showed no significant increase over the course of time (p = 0.289, median 5.5, IQR 0.0-62.2 and p = 0.057, median 52.1, IQR 0.0-162.7). 23.3% of the patients in group A and 30.0% of the patients in group B had pathological fractures, no fracture was assigned to intervention, and no difference between groups after 3 and 6 months was observed (p = 0.592 and p = 0.604). Our trial demonstrated that resistance training concomitant to RT can improve bone density in spinal bone metastases. This combined treatment is effective, practicable, and without side effects for patients. Importantly, the pathological fracture rate in the intervention group was not increased. The results offer a rationale for future large controlled investigations to confirm these findings. Clinical trial identifier NCT01409720. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of protein-carbohydrate supplementation on immunity and resistance training outcomes: a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naclerio, Fernando; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Ashrafi, Nadia; Seijo, Marco; Nielsen, Birthe; Allgrove, Judith; Earnest, Conrad P

    2017-02-01

    To examine the impact of ingesting hydrolyzed beef protein, whey protein, and carbohydrate on resistance training outcomes, body composition, muscle thickness, blood indices of health and salivary human neutrophil peptides (HNP1-3), as reference of humoral immunity followed an 8-week resistance training program in college athletes. Twenty-seven recreationally physically active males and females (n = 9 per treatment) were randomly assigned to one of the three groups: hydrolyzed beef protein, whey protein, or non-protein isoenergetic carbohydrate. Treatment consisted of ingesting 20 g of supplement, mixed with orange juice, once a day immediately post-workout or before breakfast on non-training days. Measurements were performed pre- and post-intervention on total load (kg) lifted at the first and last workout, body composition (via plethysmography) vastus medialis thickness (mm) (via ultrasonography), and blood indices of health. Salivary HNP1-3 were determined before and after performing the first and last workout. Salivary concentration and secretion rates of the HNP1-3 decreased in the beef condition only from pre-first-workout (1.90 ± 0.83 μg/mL; 2.95 ± 2.83 μg/min, respectively) to pre-last-workout (0.92 ± 0.63 μg/mL, p = 0.025, d = 1.03; 0.76 ± 0.74 μg/min, p = 0.049, d = 0.95), and post-last-workout (0.95 ± 0.60 μg/mL, p = 0.032, d = 1.00; 0.59 ± 0.52 μg/min, p = 0.027, d = 1.02). No other significant differences between groups were observed. Supplementation with a carbohydrate-protein beverage may support resistance training outcomes in a comparable way as the ingestion of only carbohydrate. Furthermore, the ingestion of 20 g of hydrolyzed beef protein resulted in a decreased level and secretion rates of the HNP1-3 from baseline with no negative effect on blood indices of health.

  1. Artesunate dose escalation for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in a region of reported artemisinin resistance: a randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Bethell

    Full Text Available The emergence of artemisinin resistance has raised concerns that the most potent antimalarial drug may be under threat. The currently recommended daily dose of artesunate (AS is 4 mg/kg, and is administered for 3 days together with a partner antimalarial drug. This study investigated the impact of different AS doses on clinical and parasitological responses in malaria patients from an area of known artemisinin resistance in western Cambodia.Adult patients with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria were randomized into one of three 7-day AS monotherapy regimens: 2, 4 or 6 mg/kg/day (total dose 14, 28 and 42 mg/kg. Clinical, parasitological, pharmacokinetic and in vitro drug sensitivity data was collected over a 7-day inpatient period and during weekly follow-up to 42 days.143 patients were enrolled (n = 75, 40 and 28 to receive AS 2, 4 and 6 mg/kg/day respectively. Cure rates were high in all treatment groups at 42 days despite almost half the patients remaining parasitemic on Day 3. There was no impact of increasing AS dose on median parasite clearance times, median parasite clearance rates or on the proportion of patients remaining parasitemic on Day 3. However at the lowest dose used (2 mg/kg/d patients with parasitemia >10,000/µL had longer median (IQR parasite clearance times than those with parasitemia <10,000/µL (63 (48-75 vs. 84 (66-96 hours, p<0.0001. 19% of patients in the high-dose arm developed neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count <1.0×10(9/L by Day 14 and resulted in the arm being halted early.There is no pharmacodynamic benefit of increasing the daily dose of AS (4 mg/kg currently recommended for short-course combination treatment of uncomplicated malaria, even in regions with emerging artemisinin resistance, as long as the partner drug retains high efficacy.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00722150.

  2. Electroconvulsive Therapy Added to Non-Clozapine Antipsychotic Medication for Treatment Resistant Schizophrenia: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zheng

    Full Text Available This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs examined the efficacy and safety of the combination of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT and antipsychotic medication (except for clozapine versus the same antipsychotic monotherapy for treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS. Two independent investigators extracted data for a random effects meta-analysis and pre-specified subgroup and meta-regression analyses. Weighted and standard mean difference (WMD/SMD, risk ratio (RR ±95% confidence intervals (CIs, number needed to treat (NNT, and number needed to harm (NNH were calculated. Eleven studies (n = 818, duration = 10.2±5.5 weeks were identified for meta-analysis. Adjunctive ECT was superior to antipsychotic monotherapy regarding (1 symptomatic improvement at last-observation endpoint with an SMD of -0.67 (p<0.00001; I2 = 62%, separating the two groups as early as weeks 1–2 with an SMD of -0.58 (p<0.00001; I2 = 0%; (2 study-defined response (RR = 1.48, p<0.0001 with an NNT of 6 (CI = 4–9 and remission rate (RR = 2.18, p = 0.0002 with an NNT of 8 (CI = 6–16; (3 PANSS positive and general symptom sub-scores at endpoint with a WMD between -3.48 to -1.32 (P = 0.01 to 0.009. Subgroup analyses were conducted comparing double blind/rater-masked vs. open RCTs, those with and without randomization details, and high quality (Jadad≥adadup analyses were Jadad<3 studies. The ECT-antipsychotic combination caused more headache (p = 0.02 with an NNH of 6 (CI = 4–11 and memory impairment (p = 0.001 with an NNH of 3 (CI = 2–5. The use of ECT to augment antipsychotic treatment (clozapine excepted can be an effective treatment option for TRS, with increased frequency of self-reported memory impairment and headache.CRD42014006689 (PROSPERO.

  3. The feasibility of progressive resistance training in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizza, Lisa; Smith, Caroline A; Swaraj, Soji; Agho, Kingsley; Cheema, Birinder S

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of executing a randomized controlled trial of progressive resistance training (PRT) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Women with PCOS were randomized to an experimental (PRT) group or a no-exercise (usual care) control group. The PRT group was prescribed two supervised and two unsupervised (home-based) training sessions per week for 12 weeks. Feasibility outcomes included recruitment and attrition, adherence, adverse events, and completion of assessments. Secondary outcomes, collected pre and post intervention, included a range of pertinent physiological, functional and psychological measures. Fifteen participants were randomised into the PRT group (n = 8) or control group (n = 7); five women (n = 2 in PRT group and n = 3 in control group) withdrew from the study. The most successful recruitment sources were Facebook (40 %) and online advertisement (27 %), while least successful methods were referrals by clinicians, colleagues and flyers. In the PRT group, attendance to supervised sessions was higher (95 %; standard deviation ±6 %) compared to unsupervised sessions (51 %; standard deviation ±28 %). No adverse events were attributed to PRT. Change in menstrual cycle status was not significantly different between groups over time (p = 0.503). However, the PRT group significantly increased body weight (p = 0.01), BMI (p = 0.04), lean mass (p = 0.01), fat-free mass (p = 0.005) and lower body strength (p = 0.03), while reducing waist circumference (p = 0.03) and HbA1c (p = 0.033) versus the control group. The PRT group also significantly improved across several domains of disease-specific and general health-related quality of life, depression, anxiety and exercise self-efficacy. A randomized controlled trial of PRT in PCOS would be feasible, and this mode of exercise may elicit a therapeutic effect on clinically important outcomes in this cohort. The success of a large

  4. Effect of resistance training on non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease a randomized-clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelber-Sagi, Shira; Buch, Assaf; Yeshua, Hanny; Vaisman, Nahum; Webb, Muriel; Harari, Gil; Kis, Ofer; Fliss-Isakov, Naomi; Izkhakov, Elena; Halpern, Zamir; Santo, Erwin; Oren, Ran; Shibolet, Oren

    2014-04-21

    To evaluate the effect of resistance training (RT) on non alcoholic liver disease (NAFLD) patients. A randomized clinical trial enrolling NAFLD patients without secondary liver disease (e.g., without hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus or excessive alcohol consumption). Patients were randomly allocated either to RT, three times weekly, for 3 mo or a control arm consisting of home stretching. The RT included leg press, chest press, seated rowing, latissimus pull down etc. with 8-12 repetitions, 3 sets for each exercise, for a total duration of 40 min. Hepatic ultrasound, fasting blood tests, anthropometrics and body composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry were assessed. At baseline and follow-up, patients filled out a detailed semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire reporting their habitual nutritional intake. Steatosis was quantified by the hepatorenal-ultrasound index (HRI) representing the ratio between the brightness level of the liver and the right kidney. The HRI has been previously demonstrated to be highly reproducible and was validated against liver biopsy and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Eighty two patients with primary NAFLD were randomized to receive 3 mo of either RT or stretching. After dropout or exclusion from analysis because of protocol violation (weight change > 3 kg), thirty three patients in the RT arm and 31 in the stretching arm completed the study per protocol. All baseline characteristics were similar for the two treatment groups with respect to demographics, anthropometrics and body composition, blood tests and liver steatosis on imaging. HRI score was reduced significantly in the RT arm as compared to the stretching arm (-0.25 ± 0.37 vs -0.05 ± 0.28, P = 0.017). The RT arm had a significantly higher reduction in total, trunk and android fat with increase in lean body mass. There was no correlation between the reduction in HRI in the RT arm and weight change during the study, but it was positively correlated

  5. Genetic mapping of resistance to Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjumov) biotype 2 in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) accession CI2401

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fazel-Najafabadi, M.; Peng, J.; Peairs, F.B.; Šimková, Hana; Kilian, A.; Lapitan, N. L. V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 203, č. 3 (2015), s. 607-614 ISSN 0014-2336 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/2554 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : RWA resistance * RWA biotype 2 * Marker-assisted selection Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.618, year: 2015

  6. Dissection of the multigenic wheat stem rust resistance present in the Montenegrin spring wheat accession PI 362698

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research to identify and characterize stem rust resistance genes in common wheat, Triticum aestivum, has been stimulated by the emergence of Ug99-lineage races of the wheat stem rust pathogen, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), in Eastern Africa. The Montenegrin spring wheat landrace PI 362698 ...

  7. Effectiveness of functional progressive resistance exercise training on walking ability in children with cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtes, Vanessa A; Becher, Jules G; Janssen-Potten, Yvonne J; Dekkers, Hurnet; Smallenbroek, Linda; Dallmeijer, Annet J

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of functional progressive resistance exercise (PRE) training on walking ability in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Fifty-one ambulant children with spastic CP (mean age 10 years 5 months, 29 boys) were randomized to an intervention (n=26) or control group (n=25, receiving usual care). The intervention consisted of 12 weeks functional PRE circuit training, for 3 times a week. Main outcome measures were walking ability and participation. Secondary outcomes were muscle strength and anaerobic muscle power. Possible adverse outcomes were spasticity and passive range of motion (ROM). Muscle strength increased significantly in the training group compared to the control group, but walking ability, participation and anaerobic muscle power did not change. Spasticity and ROM remained unchanged, except for a significant decrease in rectus femoris length in the intervention group. It is concluded that twelve weeks of functional PRE-training does not improve walking ability, despite improved muscle strength. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An augmented SMS intervention to improve access to antenatal CD4 testing and ART initiation in HIV-infected pregnant women: a cluster randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Dryden-Peterson

    Full Text Available Less than one-third of HIV-infected pregnant women eligible for combination antiretroviral therapy (ART globally initiate treatment prior to delivery, with lack of access to timely CD4 results being a principal barrier. We evaluated the effectiveness of an SMS-based intervention to improve access to timely antenatal ART.We conducted a stepped-wedge cluster randomized trial of a low-cost programmatic intervention in 20 antenatal clinics in Gaborone, Botswana. From July 2011-April 2012, 2 clinics were randomly selected every 4 weeks to receive an ongoing clinic-based educational intervention to improve CD4 collection and to receive CD4 results via an automated SMS platform with active patient tracing. CD4 testing before 26 weeks gestation and ART initiation before 30 weeks gestation were assessed.Three-hundred-sixty-six ART-naïve women were included, 189 registering for antenatal care under Intervention and 177 under Usual Care periods. Of CD4-eligible women, 100 (59.2% women under Intervention and 79 (50.6% women under Usual Care completed CD4 phlebotomy before 26 weeks gestation, adjusted odds ratio (aOR, adjusted for time that a clinic initiated Intervention 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI]0.47-1.63, P = 0.67. The SMS-based platform reduced time to clinic receipt of CD4 test result from median of 16 to 6 days (P<0.001, was appreciated by clinic staff, and was associated with reduced operational cost. However, rates of ART initiation remained low, with 56 (36.4% women registering under Intervention versus 37 (24.2% women under Usual Care initiating ART prior to 30 weeks gestation, aOR 1.06 (95%CI 0.53-2.13, P = 0.87.The augmented SMS-based intervention delivered CD4 results more rapidly and efficiently, and this type of SMS-based results delivery platform may be useful for a variety of tests and settings. However, the intervention did not appear to improve access to timely antenatal CD4 testing or ART initiation, as obstacles other than CD4

  9. Impact of amoxicillin resistance on the efficacy of amoxicillin-containing regimens for Helicobacter pylori eradication: analysis of five randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Jyh; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chen, Chieh-Chang; Fang, Yu-Jen; Bair, Ming-Jong; Chang, Chi-Yang; Lee, Ji-Yuh; Hsu, Wen-Feng; Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Lin, Jaw-Town; Liou, Jyh-Ming

    2017-12-01

    The impact of amoxicillin resistance on the efficacy of regimens containing amoxicillin for Helicobacter pylori eradication remains unknown. To investigate whether the efficacy of an amoxicillin-containing regimen is affected by amoxicillin resistance and to identify the optimal breakpoint for amoxicillin resistance. This was a pooled analysis of five randomized trials conducted in Taiwan from 2007 to 2016. Patients who received amoxicillin-containing regimens were recruited. MICs were determined by agar dilution testing. Meta-analysis was performed to assess the risk ratio of eradication failure in amoxicillin-resistant strains compared with susceptible strains of seven different regimens. We performed further the pooled analysis and logistic regression in patients treated with clarithromycin triple therapy to identify the optimal breakpoint for amoxicillin resistance. A total of 2339 patients with available amoxicillin MICs were enrolled. Meta-analysis showed that the presence of amoxicillin resistance was consistently associated with increased risk of treatment failure of amoxicillin-containing regimens at different breakpoints (risk ratio: 1.41, 95% CI 1.12-1.78, P = 0.004 when the cut-off was 0.5 mg/L). The heterogeneity was low (I2 = 0%, P = 0.615). Pooled analysis also showed that amoxicillin resistance was an independent risk factor for treatment failure of clarithromycin triple therapy at different breakpoints. The best correlation was observed when the breakpoint of amoxicillin resistance was ≥0.125 mg/L (kappa coefficient 0.298), at which the resistance rate was 11.1% (110 of 990). The efficacies of amoxicillin-containing regimens are affected by amoxicillin resistance and the optimal breakpoint MIC is ≥ 0.125 mg/L. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Effects of short term elastic resistance training on muscle mass and strength in untrained older adults: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Wagner Rodrigues; Safons, Marisete Peralta; Bottaro, Martim; Blasczyk, Juscelino Castro; Diniz, Leonardo Rios; Fonseca, Romulo Maia Carlos; Bonini-Rocha, Ana Clara; de Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó

    2015-08-12

    The current recommendations on resistance training involving older adults have reported an improvement of body composition variables. Despite this, there is a lack of knowledge on how elastic resistance training (ERT) affects the muscle mass in older adults population. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a short-term ERT on muscle mass of health and untrained older adults. Forty older adults were randomized into two groups of 20 individuals each: Control Group (CG = 66.2 ± 6.6 years) and Training Group (TG = 69.1 ± 6.3 years). TG underwent an ERT twice a week during 8 weeks and control group did not receive any specific intervention. The primary outcome was the upper and lower limbs muscle mass, measured by Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. The secondary outcomes were knee isokinetic peak torque (PT) at 60°/s and 120°/s speeds and isometric handgrip strength. A 2×2 mixed model (group [TG and CG] × time [pre and post]) analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to determine the effect on primary and secondary outcomes. The results of the ANOVA showed no significant effects in group x time interaction for (1) upper limbs fat free mass (F [1.38] = 1.80, p = 0.19, effect size [ES] = 0.1) and for (2) lower limbs fat free mass (F [1.38] = 0.03, p = 0.88, ES = 0.02). Regarding muscle strength, the ANOVA showed no significant effects in group x time interaction for (3) PT at 60°/s (F [1.38] = 0.33, p = 0.56, ES = 3.0), for (4) PT at 120°/s (F [1.38] = 0.80, p = 0.38, ES = 4.1) and for handgrip strength (F [1.38] = 0.65, p = 0.42-value, ES = 0.9). Analysis of PT in TG showed a significant change of 4.5%, but only at 120°/s (p = 0.01) when comparing pre and post-training (time interaction). Eight weeks of ERT did not show significant changes in muscle mass and strength of untrained older adults. NCT02253615 (09/25/14).

  11. Effects of low-intensity endurance and resistance training on mobility in chronic stroke survivors: a pilot randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Nicola; Straudi, Sofia; Malagoni, Anna Maria; Argirò, Matteo; Felisatti, Michele; Nardini, Eleonora; Zambon, Christel; Basaglia, Nino; Manfredini, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    Chronic stroke survivors are exposed to long-term disability and physical deconditioning, effects that may impact their independence and quality of life. Community-based programs optimizing the dose of exercise therapy that are simultaneously low risk and able to achieve high adherence should be identified. We tested the hypothesis that an 8-week, community-based, progressive mixed endurance-resistance exercise program at lower cardiovascular and muscular load yielded more mobility benefits than a higher-intensity program in chronic stroke survivors. A two-arm, parallel-group, pilot randomized, controlled clinical trial. Hospital (recruitment); community-based adapted physical activity center (training). Thirty-five chronic stroke patients (mean age: 68.4±10.4 years; 27 males). Participants were randomized to a low-intensity experimental (LI-E; N.=18) or a high-intensity active control group (HI-C; N.=17). Patients in the LI-E group performed over-ground intermittent walking (weeks 1-8) and muscle power training with portable tools (weeks 5-8); patients in the HI-C group executed treadmill walking (weeks 1-8) and strength training with gym machines (weeks 5-8). Changes in mobility, assessed using the 6-Minute Walking Distance test, were the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included quality of life (Short-Form-36 Questionnaire), gait speed (10-Meter Walking Test), balance (Berg Balance Scale) and muscle performance of the lower limbs (strength and power of the quadriceps and femoral biceps). After 8 weeks, the 6MWD revealed more improvement for the LI-E group than the HI-C group (P=0.009). The SF36 physical activity domain (P=0.012) and peak power of the femoral quadriceps and biceps were also significantly improved for the LI-E group (P=0.008 and Pmuscle power of the affected limb was the muscle parameter most correlated with mobility in the entire population. A low-intensity exercise program exhibited better results in terms of mobility, quality of life and

  12. Progressive Resistance Training and Cancer Testis (PROTRACT) - Efficacy of resistance training on muscle function, morphology and inflammatory profile in testicular cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: design of a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper F; Andersen, Jesper L; Adamsen, Lis

    2011-01-01

    of developing considerable long-term morbidity, including second malignant neoplasms, cardiovascular disease, and pulmonary toxicity. One neglected side effect is the significant muscular fatigue mentioned by many patients with testicular cancer both during and after treatment. Very limited information exists...... be attenuated or even reversed by high intensity progressive resistance training (HIPRT). METHODS: The PROTRACT study is a randomized controlled trial in 30 testicular cancer patients undergoing three cycles of BEP chemotherapy. Participants will be randomized to either a 9-week HIPRT program (STR) initiated...

  13. Addition of non-invasive ventilatory support to combined aerobic and resistance training improves dyspnea and quality of life in heart failure patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Hugo Souza; Cruz, Cristiano Gonçalves; David, Bruno Costa; Rodrigues, Erenaldo; Abade, Camille Magalhães; Junior, Roque Aras; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Dos Reis, Francisco Borges Faria; Gomes Neto, Mansueto

    2017-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that combined aerobic and resistance training and non-invasive ventilatory support result in additional benefits compared with combined aerobic and resistance training alone in heart failure patients. A randomized, single-blind, controlled study. Cardiac rehabilitation center. A total of 46 patients with New York Heart Association class II/III heart failure were randomly assigned to a 10-week program of combined aerobic and resistance training, plus non-invasive ventilatory support ( n = 23) or combined aerobic and resistance training alone ( n = 23). Before and after intervention, results for the following were obtained: 6-minute walk test, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume at one second, maximal inspiratory muscle pressure, and maximal expiratory muscle pressure, with evaluation of dyspnea by the London Chest Activity of Daily Living scale, and quality of life with the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure questionnaire. Of the 46 included patients, 40 completed the protocol. The combined aerobic and resistance training plus non-invasive ventilatory support, as compared with combined aerobic and resistance training alone, resulted in significantly greater benefit for dyspnea (mean change: 4.8 vs. 1.3, p = 0.004), and quality of life (mean change: 19.3 vs. 6.8, p = 0.017 ). In both groups, the 6-minute walk test improved significantly (mean change: 45.7 vs. 44.1, p = 0.924), but without a statistically significant difference. Non-invasive ventilatory support combined with combined aerobic and resistance training provides additional benefits for dyspnea and quality of life in moderate heart failure patients. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02384798. Registered 03 April 2015.

  14. A randomized trial of a peer resistance skill building game for Hispanic early adolescent girls: Impact and feasibility of DRAMA-RAMA™

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Anne E.; Hughes, Charles; Hecht, Michael; Peragallo, Nilda; Nickerson, David

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Research suggests that adolescents can use peer resistance skills to avoid being pressured into risky behavior, such as early sexual behavior. Avatar-based Virtual Reality (AVR) technology offers a novel way to build these skills. OBJECTIVES Study aims were to: evaluate the feasibility of an AVR peer resistance skill building game (DRAMA-RAMA™); explore the impact of game play on peer resistance self-efficacy; and assess how positively the game was perceived. METHOD 45 low income early adolescent Hispanic girls were randomly assigned to either the intervention (DRAMA-RAMA™) or comparison game (Wii Dancing with the Stars™ [Wii DWTS™]) condition. All participants were offered a 5 session curriculum that included peer resistance skill content before playing their respective game for 15 minutes, once a week, for two weeks. Participants completed electronic surveys assessing demographics, peer resistance self-efficacy, and sexual behavior at baseline, after game play, and at 2 months. They also completed a paper-pencil game experience questionnaire immediately after playing their game. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi-square, and analyses of covariance. RESULTS The separate analyses of covariance showed a significant game effect at post-test for the peer resistance self-efficacy measure (F = 4.21, p DRAMA-RAMA™ was rated as positively as the Wii DWTS™ (p ≥ .26). DISCUSSION This randomized control trial provides initial support for the hypothesis that playing an AVR technology game can strengthen peer resistance skills, and early adolescent Hispanic girls will have a positive response to this game. PMID:23150043

  15. A Randomized Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Study of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation for Treatment-Resistant Major Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eBlumberger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS has demonstrated some efficacy in treatment-resistant major depression (TRD. The majority of previous controlled studies have used anodal stimulation to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and a control location such as the supraorbital region on for the cathode. Several open label studies have suggested effectiveness from anodal stimulation to the left DLPFC combined with cathodal stimulation to the right DLPFC. Thus, this study evaluated the efficacy of tDCS using anodal stimulation to the left DLPFC and cathodal stimulation to the right DLPFC compared to sham tDCS. Methods: Subjects between the ages of 18 and 65 were recruited from a tertiary care university hospital. Twenty-four subjects with TRD and a 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS greater than 21 were randomized to receive tDCS or sham tDCS. The rates of remission were compared between the two treatment groups.Results: The remission rates did not differ significantly between the two groups using an intention to treat analysis. More subjects in the active tDCS group had failed a course of electroconvulsive therapy in the current depressive episode. Side effects did not differ between the two groups and in general the treatment was very well tolerated. Conclusion: Anodal stimulation to the left DLPFC and cathodal stimulation to the right DLPFC was not efficacious in TRD. However, a number of methodological limitations warrant caution in generalizing from this study. Ongoing, controlled studies should provide further clarification on the efficacy of this stimulation configuration in TRD.

  16. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System ... If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  17. Resistive RAMs as analog trimming elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziza, H.; Perez, A.; Portal, J. M.

    2018-04-01

    This work investigates the use of Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM) as an analog trimming device. The analog storage feature of the RRAM cell is evaluated and the ability of the RRAM to hold several resistance states is exploited to propose analog trim elements. To modulate the memory cell resistance, a series of short programming pulses are applied across the RRAM cell allowing a fine calibration of the RRAM resistance. The RRAM non volatility feature makes the analog device powers up already calibrated for the system in which the analog trimmed structure is embedded. To validate the concept, a test structure consisting of a voltage reference is evaluated.

  18. Erotized, AIDS-HIV information on public-access television: a study of obscenity, state censorship and cultural resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukenbill, W B

    1998-06-01

    This study analyzes court records of a county-level obscenity trial in Austin, Texas, and the appeal of the guilty verdict beginning with a Texas appellate court up to the U.S. Supreme Court of two individuals who broadcast erotized AIDS and HIV safer sex information on a public-access cable television. The trial and appellate court decisions are reviewed in terms of argument themes, and the nature of sexual value controversy is outlined. Erotic materials often conflict with broad-based sexual and community values, and providing erotized HIV and AIDS information products can be a form of radical political action designed to force societal change. This study raises question as to how this trial and this type of informational product might affect the programs and activities of information resource centers, community-based organizations, libraries, and the overall mission of public health education.

  19. The Study of Mental and Resistance Training (SMART) study—resistance training and/or cognitive training in mild cognitive impairment: a randomized, double-blind, double-sham controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiatarone Singh, Maria A; Gates, Nicola; Saigal, Nidhi; Wilson, Guy C; Meiklejohn, Jacinda; Brodaty, Henry; Wen, Wei; Singh, Nalin; Baune, Bernhard T; Suo, Chao; Baker, Michael K; Foroughi, Nasim; Wang, Yi; Sachdev, Perminder S; Valenzuela, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) increases dementia risk with no pharmacologic treatment available. The Study of Mental and Resistance Training was a randomized, double-blind, double-sham controlled trial of adults with MCI. Participants were randomized to 2 supervised interventions: active or sham physical training (high intensity progressive resistance training vs seated calisthenics) plus active or sham cognitive training (computerized, multidomain cognitive training vs watching videos/quizzes), 2-3 days/week for 6 months with 18-month follow-up. Primary outcomes were global cognitive function (Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale; ADAS-Cog) and functional independence (Bayer Activities of Daily Living). Secondary outcomes included executive function, memory, and speed/attention tests, and cognitive domain scores. One hundred adults with MCI [70.1 (6.7) years; 68% women] were enrolled and analyzed. Resistance training significantly improved the primary outcome ADAS-Cog; [relative effect size (95% confidence interval) -0.33 (-0.73, 0.06); P benefit was 74% higher (P = .02) for Executive Domain compared with combined training [z-score change = 0.42 (0.22, 0.63) resistance training vs 0.11 (-0.60, 0.28) combined] and 48% higher (P benefits over 18 months. Copyright © 2014 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Soft-error tolerance and energy consumption evaluation of embedded computer with magnetic random access memory in practical systems using computer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebashi, Ryusuke; Sakimura, Noboru; Sugibayashi, Tadahiko

    2017-08-01

    We evaluated the soft-error tolerance and energy consumption of an embedded computer with magnetic random access memory (MRAM) using two computer simulators. One is a central processing unit (CPU) simulator of a typical embedded computer system. We simulated the radiation-induced single-event-upset (SEU) probability in a spin-transfer-torque MRAM cell and also the failure rate of a typical embedded computer due to its main memory SEU error. The other is a delay tolerant network (DTN) system simulator. It simulates the power dissipation of wireless sensor network nodes of the system using a revised CPU simulator and a network simulator. We demonstrated that the SEU effect on the embedded computer with 1 Gbit MRAM-based working memory is less than 1 failure in time (FIT). We also demonstrated that the energy consumption of the DTN sensor node with MRAM-based working memory can be reduced to 1/11. These results indicate that MRAM-based working memory enhances the disaster tolerance of embedded computers.

  1. Cross-point-type spin-transfer-torque magnetoresistive random access memory cell with multi-pillar vertical body channel MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Taro; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, from the viewpoint of cell size and sensing margin, the impact of a novel cross-point-type one transistor and one magnetic tunnel junction (1T–1MTJ) spin-transfer-torque magnetoresistive random access memory (STT-MRAM) cell with a multi-pillar vertical body channel (BC) MOSFET is shown for high density and wide sensing margin STT-MRAM, with a 10 ns writing period and 1.2 V V DD. For that purpose, all combinations of n/p-type MOSFETs and bottom/top-pin MTJs are compared, where the diameter of MTJ (D MTJ) is scaled down from 55 to 15 nm and the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio is increased from 100 to 200%. The results show that, benefiting from the proposed STT-MRAM cell with no back bias effect, the MTJ with a high TMR ratio (200%) can be used in the design of smaller STT-MRAM cells (over 72.6% cell size reduction), which is a difficult task for conventional planar MOSFET based design.

  2. Excellent scalability including self-heating phenomena of vertical-channel field-effect-diode type capacitor-less one transistor dynamic random access memory cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamoto, Takuya; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    The scalability study and the impact of the self-heating effect (SHE) on memory operation of the bulk vertical-channel field effect diode (FED) type capacitorless one transistor (1T) dynamic random access memory (DRAM) cell are investigated via device simulator for the first time. The vertical-channel FED type 1T-DRAM cell shows the excellent hold characteristics (100 ms at 358 K of ambient temperature) with large enough read current margin (1 µA/cell) even when silicon pillar diameter (D) is scaled down from 20 to 12 nm. It is also shown that by employing the vertical-channel FED type, maximum lattice temperature in the memory cell due to SHE (T_{\\text{L}}^{\\text{Max}}) can be suppressed to a negligible small value and only reach 300.6 from 300 K ambient temperature due to the low lateral electric field, while the vertical-channel bipolar junction transistor (BJT) type 1T-DRAM shows significant SHE (T_{\\text{L}}^{\\text{Max}} = 330.6 K). Moreover, this excellent thermal characteristic can be maintained even when D is scaled down from 20 to 12 nm.

  3. The Effect of 8 Weeks Aerobic Exercise on Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Motahari-Tabari, Narges; Shirvani, Marjan Ahmad; Shirzad-e-Ahoodashty, Mahbobeh; Yousefi-Abdolmaleki, Elham; Teimourzadeh, Mojgan

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes complications are the main reasons behind morbidity and mortality preventable by healthy diet and physical activity. There are few studies about the effect of aerobic exercises on insulin resistance in human. Also various training protocols are associated with different results. Since approaches to decrease insulin resistance may be followed by more effectiveness treatment, this study assessed the effect of aerobic exercise on insulin resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. In this r...

  4. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of the ACCESS Program: A Group Intervention to Improve Social, Adaptive Functioning, Stress Coping, and Self-Determination Outcomes in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Tasha M; Winder-Patel, Breanna; Ruder, Steven; Xing, Guibo; Stahmer, Aubyn; Solomon, Marjorie

    2017-12-12

    The purpose of this pilot randomized controlled trial was to investigate the acceptability and efficacy of the Acquiring Career, Coping, Executive control, Social Skills (ACCESS) Program, a group intervention tailored for young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to enhance critical skills and beliefs that promote adult functioning, including social and adaptive skills, self-determination skills, and coping self-efficacy. Forty-four adults with ASD (ages 18-38; 13 females) and their caregivers were randomly assigned to treatment or waitlist control. Compared to controls, adults in treatment significantly improved in adaptive and self-determination skills, per caregiver report, and self-reported greater belief in their ability to access social support to cope with stressors. Results provide evidence for the acceptability and efficacy of the ACCESS Program.

  5. Does progressive resistance and balance exercise reduce falls in residential aged care? Randomized controlled trial protocol for the SUNBEAM program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hewitt J

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Hewitt,1 Kathryn M Refshauge,1 Stephen Goodall,2 Timothy Henwood,3 Lindy Clemson1 1Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, 2Centre for Health Economic Research and Evaluation, University of Technology, Sydney, NSW, 3University of Queensland/Blue Care Research and Practice Development Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Introduction: Falls are common among older adults. It is reported that approximately 60% of residents of aged care facilities fall each year. This is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and a significant burden for health care providers and the health system. Among community dwelling older adults, exercise appears to be an effective countermeasure, but data are limited and inconsistent among studies in residents of aged care communities. This trial has been designed to evaluate whether the SUNBEAM program (Strength and Balance Exercise in Aged Care reduces falls in residents of aged care facilities. Research question: Is the program more effective and cost-effective than usual care for the prevention of falls? Design: Single-blinded, two group, cluster randomized trial. Participants and setting: 300 residents, living in 20 aged care facilities. Intervention: Progressive resistance and balance training under the guidance of a physiotherapist for 6 months, then facility-guided maintenance training for 6 months. Control: Usual care. Measurements: Number of falls, number of fallers, quality of life, mobility, balance, fear of falling, cognitive well-being, resource use, and cost-effectiveness. Measurements will be taken at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Analysis: The number of falls will be analyzed using a Poisson mixed model. A logistic mixed model will be used to analyze the number of residents who fall during the study period. Intention-to-treat analysis will be used. Discussion: This study addresses a significant shortcoming in aged care research, and has potential to impact

  6. Effect of a comprehensive programme to provide universal access to care for sputum-smear-positive multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in China: a before-and-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renzhong; Ruan, Yunzhou; Sun, Qiang; Wang, Xiexiu; Chen, Mingting; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Yanlin; Zhao, Jin; Chen, Cheng; Xu, Caihong; Su, Wei; Pang, Yu; Cheng, Jun; Chi, Junying; Wang, Qian; Fu, Yunting; Huan, Shitong; Wang, Lixia; Wang, Yu; Chin, Daniel P

    2015-04-01

    China has a quarter of all patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) worldwide, but less than 5% are in quality treatment programmes. In a before-and-after study we aimed to assess the effect of a comprehensive programme to provide universal access to diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up for MDRTB in four Chinese cities (population 18 million). We designated city-level hospitals in each city to diagnose and treat MDRTB. All patients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosed in Center for Disease Control (CDC) clinics and hospitals were tested for MDRTB with molecular and conventional drug susceptibility tests. Patients were treated with a 24 month treatment package for MDRTB based on WHO guidelines. Outpatients were referred to the CDC for directly observed therapy. We capped total treatment package cost at US$4644. Insurance reimbursement and project subsidies limited patients' expenses to 10% of charges for services within the package. We compared data from a 12 month programme period (2011) to those from a retrospective survey of all patients with MDRTB diagnosed in the same cities during a baseline period (2006-09). 243 patients were diagnosed with MDRTB or rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis during the 12 month programme period compared with 92 patients (equivalent to 24 per year) during the baseline period. 172 (71%) of 243 individuals were enrolled in the programme. Time from specimen collection for resistance testing to treatment initiation decreased by 90% (from median 139 days [IQR 69-207] to 14 days [10-21]), the proportion of patients who started on appropriate drug regimen increased 2·7 times (from nine [35%] of 26 patients treated to 166 [97%] of 172), and follow-up by the CDC after initial hospitalisation increased 24 times (from one [4%] of 23 patients to 163 [99%] of 164 patients). 6 months after starting treatment, the proportion of patients remaining on treatment increased ten times (from two [8%] of 26 patients to 137 [80

  7. Antimicrobial resistance of H. pylori to the outcome of 10-days vs. 7-days Moxifloxacin based therapy for the eradication: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Antibiotic resistance decreases success of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) eradication. Recently published results show low rate of resistance and better compliance with moxifloxacin based regiments. Aims&methods Whether 7 days moxifloxacin with lansoprasole and amoxycillin can be compared with 10 days moxifloxacin with lansoprasole and amoxycillin according to moxifloxacin resistance. Patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia who had culture and histology positive Hp infection (n = 150) were randomly assigned into two groups. The first group (n = 75) received moxifloxacin 400 mg/d during 7 days and the other (n = 75) received moxifloxacin 400 mg/d during 10 days. All patients received amoxycillin 1 g twice daily, lansoprasole 30 mg twice daily. All Hp cultures were tested for sensitivity to moxifloxacin. Results 138 patients (92%) completed the study, 68 in the first group and 70 in the second. Eradication rates were 84% (57/68) and 76% (57/75) in the 7 days moxifloxacin group and 90% and 84% in the second group (63/70, 63/75) according to the PP and ITT analysis; p = n.s. Among 129 patients (86% of study group), 6% of strains were primary resistant to moxifloxacin. Eradication of moxifloxacin sensitive/resistant strains was 98%/66%, p < 0.05 Conclusion According to our results we recommend 7 days moxiflixacin based triple therapy. PMID:20398300

  8. The effect of 12 weeks of aerobic, resistance or combination exercise training on cardiovascular risk factors in the overweight and obese in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Suleen S; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Hills, Andrew P; Pal, Sebely

    2012-08-28

    Evidence suggests that exercise training improves CVD risk factors. However, it is unclear whether health benefits are limited to aerobic training or if other exercise modalities such as resistance training or a combination are as effective or more effective in the overweight and obese. The aim of this study is to investigate whether 12 weeks of moderate-intensity aerobic, resistance, or combined exercise training would induce and sustain improvements in cardiovascular risk profile, weight and fat loss in overweight and obese adults compared to no exercise. Twelve-week randomized parallel design examining the effects of different exercise regimes on fasting measures of lipids, glucose and insulin and changes in body weight, fat mass and dietary intake. Participants were randomized to either: Group 1 (Control, n = 16); Group 2 (Aerobic, n = 15); Group 3 (Resistance, n = 16); Group 4 (Combination, n = 17). Data was analysed using General Linear Model to assess the effects of the groups after adjusting for baseline values. Within-group data was analyzed with the paired t-test and between-group effects using post hoc comparisons. Significant improvements in body weight (-1.6%, p = 0.044) for the Combination group compared to Control and Resistance groups and total body fat compared to Control (-4.4%, p = 0.003) and Resistance (-3%, p = 0.041). Significant improvements in body fat percentage (-2.6%, p = 0.008), abdominal fat percentage (-2.8%, p = 0.034) and cardio-respiratory fitness (13.3%, p = 0.006) were seen in the Combination group compared to Control. Levels of ApoB48 were 32% lower in the Resistance group compared to Control (p = 0.04). A 12-week training program comprising of resistance or combination exercise, at moderate-intensity for 30 min, five days/week resulted in improvements in the cardiovascular risk profile in overweight and obese participants compared to no exercise. From our observations, combination exercise gave greater benefits for weight loss

  9. The effect of 12 weeks of aerobic, resistance or combination exercise training on cardiovascular risk factors in the overweight and obese in a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Suleen S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence suggests that exercise training improves CVD risk factors. However, it is unclear whether health benefits are limited to aerobic training or if other exercise modalities such as resistance training or a combination are as effective or more effective in the overweight and obese. The aim of this study is to investigate whether 12 weeks of moderate-intensity aerobic, resistance, or combined exercise training would induce and sustain improvements in cardiovascular risk profile, weight and fat loss in overweight and obese adults compared to no exercise. Methods Twelve-week randomized parallel design examining the effects of different exercise regimes on fasting measures of lipids, glucose and insulin and changes in body weight, fat mass and dietary intake. Participants were randomized to either: Group 1 (Control, n = 16; Group 2 (Aerobic, n = 15; Group 3 (Resistance, n = 16; Group 4 (Combination, n = 17. Data was analysed using General Linear Model to assess the effects of the groups after adjusting for baseline values. Within-group data was analyzed with the paired t-test and between-group effects using post hoc comparisons. Results Significant improvements in body weight (−1.6%, p = 0.044 for the Combination group compared to Control and Resistance groups and total body fat compared to Control (−4.4%, p = 0.003 and Resistance (−3%, p = 0.041. Significant improvements in body fat percentage (−2.6%, p = 0.008, abdominal fat percentage (−2.8%, p = 0.034 and cardio-respiratory fitness (13.3%, p = 0.006 were seen in the Combination group compared to Control. Levels of ApoB48 were 32% lower in the Resistance group compared to Control (p = 0.04. Conclusion A 12-week training program comprising of resistance or combination exercise, at moderate-intensity for 30 min, five days/week resulted in improvements in the cardiovascular risk profile in overweight and obese

  10. Disease management in the treatment of patients with chronic heart failure who have universal access to health care: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra; Freimark, Dov; Freedman, Laurence S; Kaufman, Galit; Ziv, Arnona; Murad, Havi; Benderly, Michal; Silverman, Barbara G; Friedman, Nurit; Cukierman-Yaffe, Tali; Asher, Elad; Grupper, Avishay; Goldman, Dorit; Amitai, Miriam; Matetzky, Shlomi; Shani, Mordechai; Silber, Haim

    2017-05-01

    The efficacy of disease management programs in improving the outcome of heart failure patients remains uncertain and may vary across health systems. This study explores whether a countrywide disease management program is superior to usual care in reducing adverse health outcomes and improving well-being among community-dwelling adult patients with moderate-to-severe chronic heart failure who have universal access to advanced health-care services and technologies. In this multicenter open-label trial, 1,360 patients recruited after hospitalization for heart failure exacerbation (38%) or from the community (62%) were randomly assigned to either disease management or usual care. Disease management, delivered by multi-disciplinary teams, included coordination of care, patient education, monitoring disease symptoms and patient adherence to medication regimen, titration of drug therapy, and home tele-monitoring of body weight, blood pressure and heart rate. Patients assigned to usual care were treated by primary care practitioners and consultant cardiologists. The primary composite endpoint was the time elapsed till first hospital admission for heart failure exacerbation or death from any cause. Secondary endpoints included the number of all hospital admissions, health-related quality of life and depression during follow-up. Intention-to-treat comparisons between treatments were adjusted for baseline patient data and study center. During the follow-up, 388 (56.9%) patients assigned to disease management and 387 (57.1%) assigned to usual care had a primary endpoint event. The median (range) time elapsed until the primary endpoint event or end of study was 2.0 (0-5.0) years among patients assigned to disease management, and 1.8 (0-5.0) years among patients assigned to usual care (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.908; 95% confidence interval, 0.788 to 1.047). Hospital admissions were mostly (70%) unrelated to heart failure. Patients assigned to disease management had a better

  11. Twenty four-hour helpline access to expert management advice for food-allergy-triggered anaphylaxis in infants, children and young people: a pragmatic, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, M M; Dunngalvin, A; Sheikh, A; Cullinane, C; Fitzsimons, J; Hourihane, J O'B

    2013-12-01

    Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening emergency. If promptly administered, adrenaline is potentially life-saving. Many food-allergic-children/carers are unsure when to use their adrenaline autoinjectors, contributing to a low quality of life and worse outcomes in the setting of an acute allergic reaction. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of 24-hour telephone access to specialist clinical advice on disease-specific quality of life. A pragmatic two-arm, parallel-group randomized control trial was conducted. Children/carers (<16 years) with food allergy, trained in adrenaline auto-injector use, were recruited from a hospital-based paediatric allergy clinic. Baseline disease-specific quality of life was ascertained using the validated Food-Allergy-Related Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (FAQLQ), either Parent Form, Child Form or Teenager Form depending on child's age. Participants were then centrally randomized for a 6-month period to 24-hour telephone specialist support line or to usual care. The primary outcome measure was a change in FAQL scores, at one and 6 months postrandomization, compared with baseline. The minimum clinically important difference (MCID) in score is 0.5. Fifty two children/carers were recruited. FAQL scores remained static in the control group across the three time points. Scores gradually improved in the intervention group, with a significant difference seen at 6 months (T1-T3 Mean difference = -1.5, (CI 0.87-2.25) P < 0.005] Follow-up questionnaires, 6 months after the intervention was removed, T4, showed sustained significant difference between the groups (control M = 3.0; intervention M = 1.1[t = -4.113, P < 0.05]). The 24-hour helpline improved food-allergy-specific quality of life in children. Six-month intervention support resulted in sustained benefits for at least a further 6 months. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Dietary tartary buckwheat intake attenuates insulin resistance and improves lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ju; Liu, Yanping; Yue, Yanfen; Qin, Yuchang; Li, Zaigui

    2016-12-01

    Tartary buckwheat (TB) is rich in protein, dietary fiber, and flavonoids and has been reported to affect type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in animal experiments, but limited information on the benefit of TB as a whole food in T2DM patients is available. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that a daily replacement of a portion of the staple food with TB will improve risk factors of T2DM, including fasting glucose, insulin resistance, and lipid profile. In a parallel, randomized, open-label, controlled trial, 165 T2DM patients were randomly assigned to a control diet group (DC group; systematic diet plans and intensive nutritional education) or a TB intervention group (TB group; daily replacement of a portion of staple food with TB food). Blood samples and diet information were collected at baseline and after 4 weeks of intervention. The TB group decreased fasting insulin (2.46-2.39 Ln mU/L), total cholesterol (5.08-4.79 mmol/L), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (3.00-2.80 mmol/L) compared with the DC group at 4 weeks (Pintake dose showed a reduction in insulin, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, but also insulin resistance was observed when TB intake dose was greater than 110 g/d. These results support the hypothesis that TB may improve insulin resistance and lipid profile in T2DM patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Panax ginseng and Salvia miltiorrhiza supplementation during eccentric resistance training in middle-aged and older adults: A double-blind randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Fu; Chou, Chun-Chung; Chao, Hsiao-Han; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2016-12-01

    Muscle damage induced by an acute bout of eccentric exercise results in transient arterial stiffening. In this study, we sought to determine the effects of progressive eccentric resistance exercise training on vascular functions, and whether herb supplementation would enhance training adaptation by ameliorating the arterial stiffening effects. By using a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled design, older adults were randomly assigned to either the Panax ginseng and Salvia miltiorrhiza supplementation group (N=12) or the placebo group (N=11). After pre-training testing, all subjects underwent 12 weeks of unilateral eccentric-only exercise training on knee extensor. Maximal leg strength and muscle quality increased in both groups (Psupplement group. Eccentric exercise training did not elicit any significant changes in muscle damage, oxidative and inflammatory biomarkers. There were no significant changes in blood pressure or endothelium-dependent vasodilation. None of the measures of arterial stiffness changed significantly with eccentric resistance training in both groups. These results suggest that Chinese herb supplementation does not appear to modulate vascular, and inflammatory adaptations to eccentric exercise training in middle-aged and older adults. However, Chinese herb supplementation abolished the increase in muscle mass induced by eccentric resistance training. (Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02007304. Registered Dec. 5, 2013). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Consumption of Fresh Yellow Onion Ameliorates Hyperglycemia and Insulin Resistance in Breast Cancer Patients During Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour-Sadegh, Farnaz; Montazeri, Vahid; Adili, Ali; Esfehani, Ali; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza; Pirouzpanah, Saeed

    2017-09-01

    Doxorubicin has been found to be associated with insulin resistance in animal models. Onion, a so-called functional food, is noted to affect the insulin signaling pathway of diabetes in vitro. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the effects of consuming fresh yellow onions on insulin-related indices compared with a low-onion-containing diet among breast cancer (BC) patients treated with doxorubicin. This parallel-design, randomized, triple-blind, controlled clinical trial was conducted on 56 eligible BC patients (aged 30-63 years), diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma. Following their second cycle of chemotherapy, subjects were assigned in a stratified-random allocation to receive body mass index-dependent 100 to 160 g/d of onion as high onion group (HO; n = 28) or 30 to 40 g/d small onions in low onion group (LO; n = 28) for 8 weeks intervention. Participants, care givers, and those who assessed laboratory analyses were blinded to the assignments (IRCT Registry No.: IRCT2012103111335N1). The compliance level of participants in the analysis was as high as 87.85%. A total of 23 available cases was analyzed in each group. The daily use of HO resulted in a significant decrease in serum fasting blood glucose and insulin levels in comparison with LO, over the period of study ( P insulin resistance relative to changes in the LO group ( P insulin sensitivity check index ( P insulin resistance in BC during doxorubicin-based chemotherapy.

  15. Dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with aspirin resistance following coronary artery bypass grafting: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial [NCT01159639

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasparovic Hrvoje

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery disease remains the dominant cause of mortality in developed countries. While platelets have been recognized to play a pivotal role in atherothrombosis, the ideal antiplatelet regime after coronary artery surgery remains elusive. The evolution of CABG has presently moved beyond technical improvements to involve modulation of pharmacologic management designed to improve patient outcomes. The aim of this trial will be to test the hypothesis that the addition of clopidogrel to patients with documented postoperative aspirin resistance will reduce the incidence of major cardiovascular events. Methods Patients scheduled for isolated coronary artery surgery will be eligible for the study. Patients in whom postoperative multiple electrode aggregometry documents aspirin resistance will be randomized into two groups. The control group will receive 300 mg of aspirin. The dual antiplatelet group will receive 75 mg of clopidogrel in addition to 300 mg of aspirin. Patients will be followed for 6 months. Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (death from any cause, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization due to cardiovascular pathology as well as bleeding events will be recorded. Discussion This will be the first trial that will specifically address the issue of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients undergoing coronary artery surgery who have been found to be aspirin resistant. In the event that the addition of clopidogrel proves to be beneficial in this subset of surgical patients, this study could significantly impact their future antiplatelet management. This randomized controlled trial has been registered at the ClinicalTrials.gov website (Identifier NCT01159639.

  16. Nonvolatile memory design magnetic, resistive, and phase change

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hai

    2011-01-01

    The manufacture of flash memory, which is the dominant nonvolatile memory technology, is facing severe technical barriers. So much so, that some emerging technologies have been proposed as alternatives to flash memory in the nano-regime. Nonvolatile Memory Design: Magnetic, Resistive, and Phase Changing introduces three promising candidates: phase-change memory, magnetic random access memory, and resistive random access memory. The text illustrates the fundamental storage mechanism of these technologies and examines their differences from flash memory techniques. Based on the latest advances,

  17. Renal access in PNL under sonographic guidance: Do we really need to insert an open end ureteral catheter in dilated renal systems? A prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryildirim, Bilal; Tuncer, Murat; Camur, Emre; Ustun, Fatih; Tarhan, Fatih; Sarica, Kemal

    2017-10-03

    To evaluate the true necessity of open end ureteral catheter insertion in patients with moderate to severe pelvicalyceal system dilation treated with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) under sonographic guidance. 50 cases treated with PNL under sonographic guidance in prone position for solitary obstructing renal stones were evaluated. Patients were randomly divided into two groups; Group 1: Patients in whom a open end ureteral catheter was inserted prior to the procedure; Group 2: Patients receiving no catheter before PNL. In addition to the duration of the procedure as a whole and also all relevant stages as well, radiation exposure time, hospitalization period, mean nephrostomy tube duration, mean drop in Hb levels and all intra and postoperative complications have been evaluated. Mean size of the stones was 308.5 ± 133.2 mm2. Mean total duration of the PNL procedure in cases with open end ureteral catheter was significantly longer than the other cases (p < 0.001). Evaluation of the outcomes of the PNL procedures revealed no statistically significant difference between two groups regarding the stone-free rates (86% vs 84%). Additionally, there was no significant difference with respect to the duration of nephrostomy tube, hospitalization period and secondary procedures needed, complication rates as well as the post-operative Hb drop levels in both groups (p = 0.6830). Our results indicate that the placement of an open end ureteral catheter prior to a PNL procedure performed under sonographic access may not be indicated in selected cases presenting with solitary obstructing renal pelvic and/or calyceal stones.

  18. Influence of cooling rate in planar thermally assisted magnetic random access memory: Improved writeability due to spin-transfer-torque influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavent, A.; Ducruet, C.; Portemont, C.; Creuzet, C.; Alvarez-Hérault, J.; Vila, L.; Sousa, R. C.; Prejbeanu, I. L.; Dieny, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of a controlled cooling rate on magnetic field reversal assisted by spin transfer torque (STT) in thermally assisted magnetic random access memory. By using a gradual linear decrease of the voltage at the end of the write pulse, the STT decays more slowly or at least at the same rate as the temperature. This condition is necessary to make sure that the storage layer magnetization remains in the desired written direction during cooling of the cell. The influence of the write current pulse decay rate was investigated on two exchange biased synthetic ferrimagnet (SyF) electrodes. For a NiFe based electrode, a significant improvement in writing reproducibility was observed using a gradual linear voltage transition. The write error rate decreases by a factor of 10 when increasing the write pulse fall-time from ∼3 ns to 70 ns. For comparison, a second CoFe/NiFe based electrode was also reversed by magnetic field assisted by STT. In this case, no difference between sharp and linear write pulse fall shape was observed. We attribute this observation to the higher thermal stability of the CoFe/NiFe electrode during cooling. In real-time measurements of the magnetization reversal, it was found that Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) coupling in the SyF electrode vanishes for the highest pulse voltages that were used due to the high temperature reached during write. As a result, during the cooling phase, the final state is reached through a spin-flop transition of the SyF storage layer

  19. Effects of a community-based progressive resistance training program on muscle performance and physical function in adults with Down syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Nora; Taylor, Nicholas F; Dodd, Karen J

    2008-07-01

    To determine whether progressive resistance training improves muscle strength, muscle endurance, and physical function in adults with Down syndrome. Single-blind randomized controlled trial. General community. Adults (N=20) with Down syndrome (13 men, 7 women; mean age, 26.8+/-7.8 y) were randomly assigned through a concealed allocation block randomized method to either an intervention group (n=9) or a control group (n=11). The intervention was a supervised, group progressive resistance training program, consisting of 6 exercises using weight machines performed twice a week for 10 weeks. Participants completed 2 to 3 sets of between 10 to 12 repetitions of each exercise until they reached fatigue. The control group continued with their usual activities. The outcomes measured by blinded assessors were muscle strength (1-repetition maximum [1-RM]), muscle endurance (number of repetitions at 50% of 1-RM) for chest press and leg press, timed stairs test, and the grocery shelving task. The intervention group showed significant improvement in upper-limb muscle endurance compared with the control group (mean difference in the number of repetitions of the chest press at 50% of 1-RM was 16.7, 95% confidence interval, [CI] 7.1-26.2); and a trend toward an improvement in upper-limb muscle strength (mean difference in chest press 1-RM, 8.6 kg; 95% CI, -1.3 to 18.5 kg) and in upper-limb function (mean difference in grocery shelving task, -20.3s; 95% CI, -45.7 to 5.2s). There were no significant differences between the groups for lower-limb muscle performance or physical function measures. No major adverse events for the intervention were noted. Progressive resistance training is a safe and feasible fitness option that can improve upper-limb muscle endurance in adults with Down syndrome (ACTR identifier ACTRN 012606000515594.).

  20. Resistance profiles and adherence at primary virological failure in three different highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens: analysis of failure rates in a randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, B T; Barfod, T S; Kirk, O

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the interplay between resistance and adherence in the virological failure of three fundamentally different highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens. METHODS: We retrospectively identified 56 verified primary virological failures (viral load >400 HIV-1 RNA...... collected from patient files, and genotyping was performed on plasma samples collected at time of failure. RESULTS: Treatment interruption or poor adherence was mainly caused by side effects and accounted for 74% of failures, and was associated with absence of resistance mutations. In the 30 failing...... adherent patients on randomized treatment failed in the RS-arm, none in the NN-arm, and six in the ASD-arm. CONCLUSIONS: Primary virological failure was caused mainly by treatment interruption. No primary protease inhibitor (PI) mutations were found in patients failing on boosted saquinavir, whereas...

  1. Directly administered antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected drug users does not have an impact on antiretroviral resistance: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, Duncan Smith-Rohrberg; Kozal, Michael J; Bruce, R Douglas; Springer, Sandra A; Altice, Frederick L

    2007-12-15

    Directly administered antiretroviral therapy (DAART) is an effective intervention that improves clinical outcomes among HIV-infected drug users. Its effects on antiretroviral drug resistance, however, are unknown. We conducted a community-based, prospective, randomized controlled trial of DAART compared with self-administered therapy (SAT). We performed a modified intention-to-treat analysis among 115 subjects who provided serum samples for HIV genotypic resistance testing at baseline and at follow-up. The main outcomes measures included total genotypic sensitivity score, future drug options, number of new drug resistance mutations (DRMs), and number of new major International AIDS Society (IAS) mutations. The adjusted probability of developing at least 1 new DRM did not differ between the 2 arms (SAT: 0.41 per person-year [PPY], DAART: 0.49 PPY; adjusted relative risk [RR] = 1.04; P = 0.90), nor did the number of new mutations (SAT: 0.76 PPY, DAART: 0.83 PPY; adjusted RR = 0.99; P = 0.99) or the probability of developing new major IAS new drug mutations (SAT: 0.30 PPY, DAART: 0.33 PPY; adjusted RR = 1.12; P = 0.78). On measures of GSS and FDO, the 2 arms also did not differ. In this trial, DAART provided on-treatment virologic benefit for HIV-infected drug users without affecting the rate of development of antiretroviral medication resistance.

  2. Vitamin D3-Supplemented Yogurt Drink Improves Insulin Resistance and Lipid Profiles in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Double Blinded Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Xing, Baoheng

    2016-01-01

    Our study aimed to examine the effects of daily consumption of vitamin D3-supplemented yogurt (VDY) drink on insulin resistance and lipid profiles in pregnant gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) patients. Participants aged 24-32 years in their second trimester were randomly assigned to consume either plain yogurt or VDY daily for 16 weeks. Metabolic and lipid profiles including levels of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), serum insulin, triacylglycerol (TAG), total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were assessed at baseline (week 0) and end of trial (week 16). After 16 weeks of intervention, insulin-related variables including FPG and serum insulin levels were markedly lower in VDY group participants. Insulin resistance parameters, such as homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance and β cell function, were also significantly reduced in VDY group participants. Moreover, levels of TAG, TC and LDL, as well as the TC to high-density lipoprotein ratio, had also significantly decreased in the VDY group. Daily consumption of VDY drink improves insulin resistance and lipid profiles in women with GDM. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Effects of a progressive resistance exercise program with high-speed component on the physical function of older women with sarcopenic obesity: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Karina S S; Dias, João M D; Araújo, Marília C; Pinheiro, Ana C; Moreira, Bruno S; Dias, Rosângela C

    2016-07-11

    Sarcopenic obesity is associated with disability in older people, especially in women. Resistance exercises are recommended for this population, but their efficacy is not clear. To evaluate the effects of a progressive resistance exercise program with high-speed component on the physical function of older women with sarcopenic obesity. Twenty-eight women 65 to 80 years old, with a body mass index ≥30kg/m2 and handgrip strength ≤21kg were randomly allocated to two groups. The experimental group underwent a 10-week resistance exercise program designed to improve strength, power, and endurance of lower-limb muscles, with open chain and closed chain exercises. The control group had their health status monitored through telephone calls. The primary outcomes were lower limb muscle performance measured by knee extensor strength, power and fatigue by isokinetic dynamometry, and mobility measured by the Short Physical Performance Battery and by gait velocity. The secondary outcome was health-related quality of life assessed by the SF-36 Questionnaire. The average rate of adherence was 85%, with few mild adverse effects. There were no significant between-group differences for any of the outcomes. In this study, a progressive resistance exercise program with high-speed component was not effective for improving the physical function of older women with sarcopenic obesity.

  4. Effects of a progressive resistance exercise program with high-speed component on the physical function of older women with sarcopenic obesity: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina S. S. Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Sarcopenic obesity is associated with disability in older people, especially in women. Resistance exercises are recommended for this population, but their efficacy is not clear. Objective To evaluate the effects of a progressive resistance exercise program with high-speed component on the physical function of older women with sarcopenic obesity. Method Twenty-eight women 65 to 80 years old, with a body mass index ≥30kg/m2 and handgrip strength ≤21kg were randomly allocated to two groups. The experimental group underwent a 10-week resistance exercise program designed to improve strength, power, and endurance of lower-limb muscles, with open chain and closed chain exercises. The control group had their health status monitored through telephone calls. The primary outcomes were lower limb muscle performance measured by knee extensor strength, power and fatigue by isokinetic dynamometry, and mobility measured by the Short Physical Performance Battery and by gait velocity. The secondary outcome was health-related quality of life assessed by the SF-36 Questionnaire. Results The average rate of adherence was 85%, with few mild adverse effects. There were no significant between-group differences for any of the outcomes. Conclusion In this study, a progressive resistance exercise program with high-speed component was not effective for improving the physical function of older women with sarcopenic obesity.

  5. Development, feasibility, and efficacy of a customized exercise device to deliver intradialytic resistance training in patients with end stage renal disease: Non-randomized controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Danwin; Green, Simon; Fiatarone Singh, Maria; Barnard, Robert; Cheema, Birinder S

    2016-10-01

    Introduction This study assessed the feasibility and efficacy of a novel resistance training device used within an intradialytic progressive resistance training (PRT) intervention. Methods Non-randomized, within-subjects crossover design with outcomes assessed at baseline (week 0), postcontrol (week 13) and post-PRT intervention (week 26). Twenty-two hemodialysis patients (59% men, 71 ± 11 years) performed PRT three sessions per week for 12 weeks. The resistance training device was developed to enable the performance of 2 upper body and 3 lower body exercises, unilaterally and bilaterally, both before and during dialysis, with loads of 2.5 to 59 kg. Feasibility outcomes included adverse events, adherence and training load progression. Changes in upper and lower body muscular strength, six-minute walk, aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and depression were evaluated. Findings The PRT intervention was delivered without serious adverse events, resulted in 71.2% ± 23.3% adherence and significant adaptation of all training loads from pre to mid to post training (83.8%-185.6%, all P Emotional) significantly increased (all P outcomes. Discussion PRT using the novel resistance training device was feasible and improved measures of physical and psychological health. This device can be utilized in most dialysis centers. Future studies are required to evaluate dose-response effects of PRT prescriptions in subpopulations, and the translation of PRT to standard dialysis practice. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  6. Resistance training in the early postoperative phase reduces hospitalization and leads to muscle hypertrophy in elderly hip surgery patients--a controlled, randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, Charlotte; Magnusson, S Peter; Rosted, Anna

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To better understand how immobilization and surgery affect muscle size and function in the elderly and to identify effective training regimes. DESIGN: A prospective randomized, controlled study. SETTING: Bispebjerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty......-six patients (aged 60-86) scheduled for unilateral hip replacement due to primary hip osteoarthrosis. INTERVENTION: Patients were randomized to standard home-based rehabilitation (1 h/d x 12 weeks), unilateral neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the operated side (1 h/d x 12 weeks), or unilateral...... resistance training of the operated side (3/wk x 12 weeks). MEASUREMENTS: Hospital length of stay (LOS), quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), isokinetic muscle strength, and functional performance. Patients were tested presurgery and 5 and 12 weeks postsurgery. RESULTS: Mean+/-standard error LOS...

  7. Bias dependent specic contact resistance of phase change material to metal contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Deepu; in 't Zandt, Micha; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of contact resistance of phase change materials (PCM) to metal electrodes is important for scaling, device modeling and optimization of phase change random access memory (PCRAM) cells. In this article, we report the systematic determination of the speci_c contact resistance (_c) with

  8. Speci﬿c contact resistance of phase change materials to metal electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Deepu; in 't Zandt, Micha A.A.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2010-01-01

    For phase change random access memory (PCRAM) cells, it is important to know the contact resistance of phase change materials (PCMs) to metal electrodes at the contacts. In this letter, we report the systematic determination of the speci﬿c contact resistance (Ͽc ) of doped Sb2Te and Ge2Sb2Te5 to TiW

  9. The Effect of Green Tea versus Sour Tea on Insulin Resistance, Lipids Profiles and Oxidative Stress in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mozaffari-Khosravi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: By decreasing oxidative stress and whereby decreasing insulin resistance, it may be possible to decrease complications of Diabetes Mellitus (DM. Green tea and sour tea contain phytochemicals which have anti-oxidative function. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of sour and green tea consumption on insulin resistance and oxidative stress in DM. Methods: This study is a randomized clinical trial in which 100 type 2 diabetes patients were randomly assigned into sour tea group (ST and green tea group (GT. The patients were instructed to drink 150ml sour tea and green tea infusion, respectively, three times a day for 4 weeks. Fasting blood sugar (FBS, fructosamine, lipid profiles, fasting blood insulin (FBI, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; beta cell function (b%, insulin sensitivity (S% and malondialdehyde (MDA were monitored. Results: HDL-c significantly increased in both groups. The median of FBI in GT showed significant decrease (8.5 to 6.6 μIU/mL unlike the ST which showed significant increase (8.2 to 16.3 μIU/mL. The median of HOMA-IR after the intervention in GT showed lower levels than the ST (1.1 vs. 1.6, P=0.004. The median of b% only in ST showed significant increase from 38.2% at the baseline to 47.7% after the intervention. The mean of S% only in ST showed significant decrease after the intervention. Conclusion: This study shows that the use of 150 ml infusion of green tea or sour tea, three times a day for four weeks, has positive effect on insulin resistance and certain lipoproteins in type 2 DM. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201107317161N1

  10. Giant magneto-resistance devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hirota, Eiichi; Inomata, Koichiro

    2002-01-01

    This book deals with the application of giant magneto-resistance (GMR) effects to electronic devices. It will appeal to engineers and graduate students in the fields of electronic devices and materials. The main subjects are magnetic sensors with high resolution and magnetic read heads with high sensitivity, required for hard-disk drives with recording densities of several gigabytes. Another important subject is novel magnetic random-access memories (MRAM) with non-volatile non-destructive and radiation-resistant characteristics. Other topics include future GMR devices based on bipolar spin transistors, spin field-effect transistors (FETs) and double-tunnel junctions.

  11. Randomized, controlled trial of resistance training in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy: results on cancer-related fatigue and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steindorf, K; Schmidt, M E; Klassen, O; Ulrich, C M; Oelmann, J; Habermann, N; Beckhove, P; Owen, R; Debus, J; Wiskemann, J; Potthoff, K

    2014-11-01

    Exercise has been reported to decrease cancer-related fatigue and to increase quality of life (QoL) in various breast cancer (BC) populations. However, studies investigating exercise during radiotherapy or resistance training are scarce. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial (BEST study) to assess the efficacy of 12-week resistance training on fatigue beyond possible psychosocial effects of a group-based intervention. One hundred sixty patients with BC stage 0-III were randomly assigned to a 12-week progressive resistance training (2 times/week) or a 12-week relaxation control (RC, 2 times/week). Both interventions were group-based. The primary end point fatigue was assessed with a 20-item multidimensional questionnaire, QoL with EORTC questionnaires. Statistical analyses were based on analysis of covariance models for the individual changes from baseline to week 13. Adherence to the intervention program as well as the completion rate (97%) for the primary outcome variable fatigue was high. In intention-to-treat analyses for the N = 155 patients, significant between-group mean differences (MD) favoring the exercise group (EX) were observed for general fatigue (P = 0.044), especially for the subscale physical fatigue [MD = -0.8; 95% confidence interval -1.5 to -0.2, P = 0.013], but not for affective (P = 0.91) or cognitive fatigue (P = 0.65). For QoL, significantly larger improvements regarding the role function (P = 0.035) and pain (P = 0.040) were noted among exercisers compared with RCs. Future perspective improved significantly stronger in the RC group compared with the EX group (P = 0.047). The 12-week resistance training program was a safe, feasible and efficacious strategy to improve cancer-related fatigue and components of QoL in BC patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. As exercise was compared with another group-based intervention, results indicate that resistance training effects on fatigue and QoL go beyond psychosocial benefits, and that the

  12. Long-term reliable physically unclonable function based on oxide tunnel barrier breakdown on two-transistors two-magnetic-tunnel-junctions cell-based embedded spin transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Satoshi; Tanamoto, Tetsufumi; Noguchi, Hiroki; Ikegami, Kazutaka; Abe, Keiko; Fujita, Shinobu

    2017-04-01

    Among the diverse applications of spintronics, security for internet-of-things (IoT) devices is one of the most important. A physically unclonable function (PUF) with a spin device (spin transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory, STT-MRAM) is presented. Oxide tunnel barrier breakdown is used to realize long-term stability for PUFs. A secure PUF has been confirmed by evaluating the Hamming distance of a 32-bit STT-MRAM-PUF fabricated using 65 nm CMOS technology.

  13. A multi-level intervention in subsidized housing sites to increase fruit and vegetable access and intake: Rationale, design and methods of the ‘Live Well, Viva Bien’ cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim M. Gans

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adequate fruit and vegetable (F&V intake is important for disease prevention. Yet, most Americans, especially low-income and racial/ethnic minorities, do not eat adequate amounts. These disparities are partly attributable to food environments in low-income neighborhoods where residents often have limited access to affordable, healthful food and easy access to inexpensive, unhealthful foods. Increasing access to affordable healthful food in underserved neighborhoods through mobile markets is a promising, year-round strategy for improving dietary behaviors and reducing F&V intake disparities. However, to date, there have been no randomized controlled trials studying their effectiveness. The objective of the ‘Live Well, Viva Bien’ (LWVB cluster randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the efficacy of a multicomponent mobile market intervention at increasing F&V intake among residents of subsidized housing complexes. Methods/Design One housing complex served as a pilot site for the intervention group and the remaining 14 demographically-matched sites were randomized into either the intervention or control group. The intervention group received bimonthly, discount, mobile, fresh F&V markets in conjunction with a nutrition education intervention (two F&V campaigns, newsletters, DVDs and cooking demonstrations for 12 months. The control group received physical activity and stress reduction interventions. Outcome measures include F&V intake (measured by two validated F&V screeners at baseline, six-month and twelve-months along with potential psychosocial mediating variables. Extensive quantitative and qualitative process evaluation was also conducted throughout the study. Discussion Modifying neighborhood food environments in ways that increase access to affordable, healthful food is a promising strategy for improving dietary behaviors among low-income, racial and ethnic minority groups at increased risk for obesity and other

  14. A multi-level intervention in subsidized housing sites to increase fruit and vegetable access and intake: Rationale, design and methods of the 'Live Well, Viva Bien' cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Kim M; Gorham, Gemma; Risica, Patricia M; Dulin-Keita, Akilah; Dionne, Laura; Gao, Tina; Peters, Sarah; Principato, Ludovica

    2016-06-28

    Adequate fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake is important for disease prevention. Yet, most Americans, especially low-income and racial/ethnic minorities, do not eat adequate amounts. These disparities are partly attributable to food environments in low-income neighborhoods where residents often have limited access to affordable, healthful food and easy access to inexpensive, unhealthful foods. Increasing access to affordable healthful food in underserved neighborhoods through mobile markets is a promising, year-round strategy for improving dietary behaviors and reducing F&V intake disparities. However, to date, there have been no randomized controlled trials studying their effectiveness. The objective of the 'Live Well, Viva Bien' (LWVB) cluster randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the efficacy of a multicomponent mobile market intervention at increasing F&V intake among residents of subsidized housing complexes. One housing complex served as a pilot site for the intervention group and the remaining 14 demographically-matched sites were randomized into either the intervention or control group. The intervention group received bimonthly, discount, mobile, fresh F&V markets in conjunction with a nutrition education intervention (two F&V campaigns, newsletters, DVDs and cooking demonstrations) for 12 months. The control group received physical activity and stress reduction interventions. Outcome measures include F&V intake (measured by two validated F&V screeners at baseline, six-month and twelve-months) along with potential psychosocial mediating variables. Extensive quantitative and qualitative process evaluation was also conducted throughout the study. Modifying neighborhood food environments in ways that increase access to affordable, healthful food is a promising strategy for improving dietary behaviors among low-income, racial and ethnic minority groups at increased risk for obesity and other food-related chronic diseases. Discount, mobile F&V markets

  15. Electroacupuncture and Rosiglitazone Combined Therapy as a Means of Treating Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Tsung Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To evaluate the efficacy of rosiglitazone (TZD and electroacupuncture (EA combined therapy as a treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients by randomized single-blind placebo controlled clinical trial. Methods. A total of 31 newly diagnostic T2DM patients, who fulfilled the study's eligibility criteria, were recruited. The individuals were randomly assigned into two groups, the control group (TZD, N=15 and the experimental group (TZD + EA, N=16. Changes in their plasma free fatty acid (FFA, glucose, and insulin levels, together with their homeostasis model assessment (HOMA indices, were statistically compared before and after treatment. Hypoglycemic activity (% was also compared between these two groups. Results. There was no significant difference in hypoglycemic activity between the TZD and TZD + EA group. The effectiveness of the combined therapy seems to derive from an improvement in insulin resistance and a significant lowering of the secreted insulin rather than the effect of TZD alone on T2DM. The combined treatment had no significant adverse effects. A lower plasma FFA concentration is likely to be the mechanism that causes this effect. Conclusion. This combined therapy seems to suppress endogenous insulin secretion by improving insulin resistance via a mechanism involving a reduction in plasma FFA. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01577095.

  16. Impact comparison of ketamine and sodium thiopental on anesthesia during electroconvulsive therapy in major depression patients with drug-resistant; a double-blind randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Salehi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is one of the available and the most effective therapies for the treatment of resistant depression. Considering the crucial role of seizure duration on therapeutic response in patients treated with ECT, this study aimed to compare the effect of ketamine and sodium thiopental anesthesia during ECT for treatment of patients with drug-resistant major depression (DRMD. Materials and Methods: In a double-blind randomized clinical trial, 160 patients with DRMD were selected consequently and were assigned randomly into two groups including ketamine 0.8 mg/kg and sodium thiopental 1.5 mg/kg. The seizure duration, recovery time, and the side effects of anesthesia were evaluated after 1-h after anesthesia. Data of recovery time and complication collected in 2 nd , 4 th , 6 th , and 8 th ECT. Depression was assessed by Hamilton depression scale. Results: The results indicated that ketamine and sodium thiopental had a significant effect on the reduction of depression scores in patients with DRMD (P 0.05. But ketamine was more effective in improvement of depression score and increasing systolic and diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.05. The mean of seizure duration showed a decreasing trend and was significant between two study groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Anesthesia induced by ketamine during ECT therapy increased blood pressure and seizure duration. Therefore, due to lower medical complication and attack rate of seizure, ketamine is an appropriate option for anesthesia with ECT in patients with DRMD.

  17. Consumption of Fresh Yellow Onion Ameliorates Hyperglycemia and Insulin Resistance in Breast Cancer Patients During Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour-Sadegh, Farnaz; Montazeri, Vahid; Adili, Ali; Esfehani, Ali; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza; Pirouzpanah, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Doxorubicin has been found to be associated with insulin resistance in animal models. Onion, a so-called functional food, is noted to affect the insulin signaling pathway of diabetes in vitro. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the effects of consuming fresh yellow onions on insulin-related indices compared with a low–onion-containing diet among breast cancer (BC) patients treated with doxorubicin. Methods. This parallel-design, randomized, triple-blind, controlled clinical trial was conducted on 56 eligible BC patients (aged 30-63 years), diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma. Following their second cycle of chemotherapy, subjects were assigned in a stratified-random allocation to receive body mass index–dependent 100 to 160 g/d of onion as high onion group (HO; n = 28) or 30 to 40 g/d small onions in low onion group (LO; n = 28) for 8 weeks intervention. Participants, care givers, and those who assessed laboratory analyses were blinded to the assignments (IRCT Registry No.: IRCT2012103111335N1). Results. The compliance level of participants in the analysis was as high as 87.85%. A total of 23 available cases was analyzed in each group. The daily use of HO resulted in a significant decrease in serum fasting blood glucose and insulin levels in comparison with LO, over the period of study (P onion to ameliorate hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in BC during doxorubicin-based chemotherapy. PMID:27352956

  18. Effect of low-dose spironolactone on resistant hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled trial in a sub-Saharan African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoumessi, Romance Nguetse; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Kaze, Francois Folefack; Essouma, Mickael; Menanga, Alain Patrick; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Mbanya, Jean Claude; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2016-03-23

    Low-dose spironolactone has been proven to be effective for resistant hypertension in the general population, but this has yet to be confirmed in type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients. We assessed the efficacy of a low-dose spironolactone on resistant hypertension in a sub-Saharan African population of T2DM patients from Cameroon. This was a four-week single blinded randomized controlled trial in 17 subjects presenting with resistant hypertension in specialized diabetes care units in Cameroon. They were randomly assigned to treatment with a daily 25 mg of spironolactone (n = 9) or to an alternative antihypertensive regimen (n = 8), on top of any ongoing regimen and prevailing lifestyle prescriptions. They were seen at the start of the treatment, then 2 and 4 weeks later. The primary outcome was change in office and self-measured blood pressure (BP) during follow-up, and secondary outcomes were changes in serum potassium, sodium, and creatinine levels. Compared with alternative treatment, low-dose spironolactone was associated with significant decrease in office systolic BP (-33 vs. -14 mmHg; p = 0.024), and in diastolic BP (-14 vs. -5 mmHg; p = 0.006). After 1 month of spironolactone, all the patients were controlled based on BP below 130/80 mmHg, with significant office BP reduction from 158 ± 17/86 ± 11 to 125 ± 11/72 ± 8, vs. 158 ± 8/94 ± 8 to 144 ± 17/89 ± 12 mmHg in the alternative treatment group. There was no significant variation in sodium and creatinine levels in both groups, but a mild increase of potassium levels in the spironolactone group. Add-on low-dose spironolactone was effective in reducing BP to optimal levels in T2DM Cameroonian patients despite mild increase in serum potassium. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT02426099. Date of registration April 2015.

  19. Effects of high-velocity resistance training on muscle function, muscle properties, and physical performance in individuals with hip osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Ikezoe, Tome; Tsukagoshi, Rui; Akiyama, Haruhiko; So, Kazutaka; Kuroda, Yutaka; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of high-velocity resistance training on muscle function, muscle properties, and physical performance in patients with hip osteoarthritis by comparison with those of low-velocity resistance training. Single-blind randomized controlled trial. Home-based exercise programmes. A total of 46 women with hip osteoarthritis were randomly assigned to the high-velocity (n = 23) or low-velocity (n = 23) training group. Both groups underwent an eight-week daily home-based resistance training programme using an elastic band. Exercises involved hip abduction, extension, and flexion and knee extension. Participants in the high-velocity group performed the concentric phase of each repetition as rapidly as possible and returned to the initial position eccentrically in 3 s. Participants in the low-velocity group performed both the concentric and eccentric phases in 3 s. The following outcome measures were evaluated: isometric muscle strength, muscle power, muscle thickness, muscle echo intensity, maximum walking speed, Timed Up and Go test, 3-minute walking test, Harris Hip Score, and hip pain. Decreases in the time for performing the Timed Up and Go test (mean changes: high-velocity group -0.46 s, low-velocity group -0.23 s) and echo intensity of the gluteus maximus (mean changes: high-velocity group -6.8, low-velocity group -1.0) were significantly greater in the high-velocity group than in the low-velocity group. No significant difference was observed in changes of other outcome measures between the groups. This study revealed that high-velocity training for patients with hip osteoarthritis has partially a greater effect on muscle properties and physical performance than low-velocity training.

  20. Effects of short-term resistance training and pulsed electromagnetic fields on bone metabolism and joint function in severe haemophilia A patients with osteoporosis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhampour, Behrouz; Torkaman, Giti; Hoorfar, Hamid; Hedayati, Mehdi; Ravanbod, Roya

    2014-05-01

    To assess the effects of short-term resistance training and pulsed electromagnetic fields on bone metabolism and joint function in patients with haemophilia with osteoporosis. A randomized, controlled, patient and blood sample assessor-blinded, six-week trial, three times weekly. Hospital outpatients with severe haemophilia A and osteoporosis. Forty-eight patients were randomly assigned to resistance training (RT, n = 13), combined resistance training with pulsed electromagnetic fields (RTPEMF, n = 12), pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF, n = 11) and control (n = 12) groups. The RT group received 30-40 minutes of resistance exercises and placebo pulsed electromagnetic fields. The RTPEMF group received the same exercises with lower repetition and 30 minutes of pulsed electromagnetic fields. The PEMF group was exposed to 60 minutes of pulsed electromagnetic fields (30 Hz and 40 Gauss). Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, N-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen, and joint function, using the modified Colorado Questionnaire, were measured before and after the programme. The absolute change of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase was significant in the RT and RTPEMF groups compared with the control group (25.41 ± 14.40, 15.09 ± 5.51, and -4.73 ± 2.93 U/L, respectively). The absolute changes in the total score for joint function were significant for knees, ankles, and elbows in the RT group (9.2 ± 1.38, 5.1 ± 0.5, and 3.2 ± 0.8, respectively) and the RTPEMF group (7.7 ± 1.0, 3.3 ± 0.6, and 2.5 ± 0.7, respectively) compared to the PEMF and control groups. This value was significant for knee joints in the PEMF group compared to the control group (3.4 ± 0.5 and 0.66 ± 0.4, respectively). Resistance training is effective for improving bone formation and joint function in severe haemophilia A patients with osteoporosis.

  1. A Phytosterol-Enriched Spread Improves Lipid Profile and Insulin Resistance of Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Double-Blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Xing, Baoheng

    2016-08-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has become a serious health risk among pregnant women throughout the world. Phytosterol-enriched margarines are capable of lowering total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), but little is known about its effects on GDM. We aimed to examine the effects of daily consumption of a phytosterol-enriched spread on insulin resistance and lipid profile in pregnant GDM women. Pregnant women suffering from GDM in their second trimester were recruited and randomly assigned to consume a margarine spread either with or without phytosterols daily for 16 weeks. Serum lipid profile and glucose and insulin metabolisms were assessed at week 0 (baseline) and week 16 (end of trial). After 16 weeks, levels of triacylglycerol, TC, and LDL were significantly decreased, while high-density lipoprotein was significantly increased, compared with the baseline in the phytosterol group. In addition, in the same treatment group, glucose metabolic parameters, including fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin levels, the quantitative insulin check index, homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance, and β-cell function, were also significantly improved. Daily consumption of a phytosterol-enriched spread improved insulin resistance and lipid profile in women with GDM.

  2. Resistance Training Combined With Diet Decreases Body Fat While Preserving Lean Mass Independent of Resting Metabolic Rate: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Todd; Mull, Stephanie; Aragon, Alan Albert; Krieger, James; Schoenfeld, Brad Jon

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of resistance training only (RT; n = 10), dietary intervention only (DIET; n = 10), resistance training plus diet (RT+DIET; n = 10), and control (CON; n = 10) on body composition and resting metabolic rate (RMR) in a cohort of 40 premenopausal female volunteers. Subjects in DIET and RT+DIET were provided with daily macronutrient and calorie goals based on DXA and RMR tests, with protein maintained at 3.1 g/kg/day. Subjects in the RT and RT+DIET groups performed a supervised progressive RT program consisting of exercises for all the major muscle groups of the body. Results showed a significant month-by-group interaction for change in fat mass with no significant linear trend for control. The three treatment groups all showed significant linear decreases in fat mass, but the slope of the decrease became progressively steeper from the RT, to DIET, to RT+DIET. A significant linear increase for lean mass was seen for resistance training only. There was a nonsignificant increase in RMR in all groups from Month 0 to Month 4 but no significant month by group interaction. In conclusion, significant reductions in fat mass were achieved by all experimental groups, but results were maximized by RT+DIET. Only the RT group showed significant increases in lean mass.

  3. Sub-1-V-60 nm vertical body channel MOSFET-based six-transistor static random access memory array with wide noise margin and excellent power delay product and its optimization with the cell ratio on static random access memory cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Ryosuke; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2018-04-01

    In this study, with the aim to achieve a wide noise margin and an excellent power delay product (PDP), a vertical body channel (BC)-MOSFET-based six-transistor (6T) static random access memory (SRAM) array is evaluated by changing the number of pillars in each part of a SRAM cell, that is, by changing the cell ratio in the SRAM cell. This 60 nm vertical BC-MOSFET-based 6T SRAM array realizes 0.84 V operation under the best PDP and up to 31% improvement of PDP compared with the 6T SRAM array based on a 90 nm planar MOSFET whose gate length and channel width are the same as those of the 60 nm vertical BC-MOSFET. Additionally, the vertical BC-MOSFET-based 6T SRAM array achieves an 8.8% wider read static noise margin (RSNM), a 16% wider write margin (WM), and an 89% smaller leakage. Moreover, it is shown that changing the cell ratio brings larger improvements of RSNM, WM, and write time in the vertical BC-MOSFET-based 6T SRAM array.

  4. Sources of resistance to Crinipellis perniciosa in progenies of cacao accessions collected in the Brazilian Amazon Fontes de resitência a Crinipellis perniciosa em progênies de cacaueiros coletados na Amazônia brasileira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Rodrigues Lavigne de Mello Paim

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The witches' broom disease caused by the fungus Crinipellis perniciosa is the main phytossanitary constraint for cacao production in Brazil. The integrated management of the disease involves resistance as one of the components. The breeding program conducted by the Brazilian Institution, CEPLAC is directed toward the pyramidation of resistance genes from different sources to achieve a more durable resistance. This study aimed to identify sources of resistance in progenies of cacao accessions collected in the basins of ten Amazonian rivers and compared to progenies from the Peruvian clones 'Scavina 6' and 'Sacavina 12'. Progenies from 40 Amazonian accessions and 'Scavina' were evaluated in the field for six years for witches' broom resistance through multivariate and repeated measurement analyses evaluating the effect of progeny, area, block, year, and their interactions. There were differences in the mean number of vegetative brooms on some Amazonian progenies and 'Scavina' descendants. There was an increase in the number of vegetative brooms in the last year for 'Scavina' progenies, but that was not observed for the Amazonian progenies 64, 66, 156, 194, 195, 269 and 274. There were different gene/alleles for resistance in the Amazonian progenies in comparison to the traditional 'Scavina' accessions. These new sources of resistance will be important for pyramiding resistance genes and consequently increasing the stability and durability of the resistance to witches' broom.A doença vassoura-de-bruxa, causada pelo fungo Crinipellis perniciosa, é o principal problema fitossanitário para o cultivo do cacaueiro no Brasil. O manejo integrado da doença envolve a resistência como um dos componentes. O programa de melhoramento genético do cacaueiro conduzido pela Instituição brasileira CEPLAC é direcionado para acumular genes de resistência de diferentes fontes visando à obtenção de uma resistência mais durável. O objetivo deste estudo foi

  5. Towards a behavioral vaccine : exposure to accessible temptation when self-regulation is endorsed enhances future resistance to similar temptations in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Cara; de Ridder, Denise; de Vet, Emely; Grubliauskiene, Aiste; Dewitte, Siegfried

    BACKGROUND: Access to temptation is blamed for the rising prevalence of obesity in children. A popular way to counter this is to restrict physical access to temptation. As restrictions cannot be widely applied and may have adverse long-term effects, we examine whether accessible temptations in

  6. Towards a behavioral vaccine: Exposure to accessible temptation when self-regulation is endorsed enhances future resistance to similar temptations in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de C.; Ridder, de D.T.D.; Vet, de E.W.M.L.; Grubliauskiene, A.; Dewitte, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Access to temptation is blamed for the rising prevalence of obesity in children. A popular way to counter this is to restrict physical access to temptation. As restrictions cannot be widely applied and may have adverse long-term effects, we examine whether accessible temptations in

  7. Exercise-induced muscle damage is reduced in resistance-trained males by branched chain amino acids: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howatson Glyn

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well documented that exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD decreases muscle function and causes soreness and discomfort. Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA supplementation has been shown to increase protein synthesis and decrease muscle protein breakdown, however, the effects of BCAAs on recovery from damaging resistance training are unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of a BCAA supplementation on markers of muscle damage elicited via a sport specific bout of damaging exercise in trained volunteers. Methods Twelve males (mean ± SD age, 23 ± 2 y; stature, 178.3 ± 3.6 cm and body mass, 79.6 ± 8.4 kg were randomly assigned to a supplement (n = 6 or placebo (n = 6 group. The damaging exercise consisted of 100 consecutive drop-jumps. Creatine kinase (CK, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC, muscle soreness (DOMS, vertical jump (VJ, thigh circumference (TC and calf circumference (CC were measured as markers of muscle damage. All variables were measured immediately before the damaging exercise and at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h post-exercise. Results A significant time effect was seen for all variables. There were significant group effects showing a reduction in CK efflux and muscle soreness in the BCAA group compared to the placebo (P Conclusion The present study has shown that BCAA administered before and following damaging resistance exercise reduces indices of muscle damage and accelerates recovery in resistance-trained males. It seems likely that BCAA provided greater bioavailablity of substrate to improve protein synthesis and thereby the extent of secondary muscle damage associated with strenuous resistance exercise. Clinical Trial Registration Number: NCT01529281.

  8. Protein supplementation increases muscle mass gain during prolonged resistance-type exercise training in frail elderly people: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieland, Michael; Dirks, Marlou L; van der Zwaluw, Nikita; Verdijk, Lex B; van de Rest, Ondine; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2012-10-01

    Protein supplementation has been proposed as an effective dietary strategy to augment the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training in elderly people. Our objective was to assess the impact of protein supplementation on muscle mass, strength, and physical performance during prolonged resistance-type exercise training in frail elderly men and women. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with 2 arms in parallel among 62 frail elderly subjects (78 ± 1 year). These elderly subjects participated in a progressive resistance-type exercise training program (2 sessions per week for 24 weeks) during which they were supplemented twice daily with either protein (2 * 15 g) or a placebo. Lean body mass (DXA), strength (1-RM), and physical performance (SPPB) were assessed at baseline, and after 12 and 24 weeks of intervention. Lean body mass increased from 47.2 kg (95% CI, 43.5-50.9) to 48.5 kg (95% CI, 44.8-52.1) in the protein group and did not change in the placebo group (from 45.7 kg, 95% CI, 42.1-49.2 to 45.4 kg, 95% CI, 41.8-48.9) following the intervention (P value for treatment × time interaction = .006). Strength and physical performance improved significantly in both groups (P = .000) with no interaction effect of dietary protein supplementation. Prolonged resistance-type exercise training represents an effective strategy to improve strength and physical performance in frail elderly people. Dietary protein supplementation is required to allow muscle mass gain during exercise training in frail elderly people. clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01110369. Copyright © 2012 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Progressive resistance versus relaxation training for breast cancer patients during adjuvant chemotherapy: design and rationale of a randomized controlled trial (BEATE study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martina E; Wiskemann, Joachim; Krakowski-Roosen, Holger; Knicker, Axel J; Habermann, Nina; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Steindorf, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue is a common severe symptom in breast cancer patients, especially during chemotherapy. Exercise appears to be promising in prevention or treatment of fatigue. Resistance training as an accompanying treatment to chemotherapy has been minimally investigated, yet might counteract muscle degradation and inflammation caused by many chemotherapeutics, and thus forestall or reduce fatigue. Previous exercise trials mostly compared the intervention with 'usual care'. Therefore, it is unclear to what extent the observed effects on fatigue are based on physical adaptations by exercise itself, or rather on psycho-social factors linked to the group support or attention by the trainer. The BEATE study is a randomized, controlled intervention trial comparing a 12-week supervised progressive resistance training program with a supervised group-based progressive muscle relaxation training in 100 patients with breast cancer under adjuvant chemotherapy. The primary endpoint is cancer-related fatigue; secondary endpoints include quality of life, depression, and cognitive capacity. In addition, isokinetic and isometric muscle strength, cardiorespiratory fitness, and body composition are measured, and biomarkers, such as inflammatory parameters, cortisol, and oxidative stress are analyzed in blood, saliva and urine. Safety of the resistance training during chemotherapy is monitored. Strengths of the BEATE study include the investigation of progressive resistance training parallel with chemotherapy, the choice of a control group that enables an evaluation of the physiological effects of exercise beyond potential psycho-social effects, and the comprehensive and high-quality assessment of physiological factors and biomarkers potentially related to fatigue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Quality of life and fatigue of patients with spinal bone metastases under combined treatment with resistance training and radiation therapy- a randomized pilot trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rief, Harald; Gioules, Alexandros; Debus, Jürgen; Akbar, Michael; Keller, Monika; Omlor, Georg; Welzel, Thomas; Bruckner, Thomas; Rieken, Stefan; Häfner, Matthias F; Schlampp, Ingmar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this trial was to compare the effects of resistance training versus passive physical therapy on quality of life (QoL), fatigue, and emotional distress outcomes during radiation therapy in patients with spinal bone metastases under radiotherapy (RT). In this randomized trial, 60 patients were treated from September 2011 until March 2013 into one of the two groups: isometric resistance training or physical therapy with thirty patients in each group during RT. EORTC QLQ-BM22, EORTC QLQ-FA13, and FBK-R10 were assessed at baseline, three months, and six months after RT. Psychosocial aspects in resistance training group (Arm A) were significantly improved after three (p = 0.001) and six months (p = 0.010). Other rated items of the QLQ-BM22 painful site, and pain characteristics were without significant differences. Functional interference showed a positive trend after six months (p = 0.081). After six months, physical fatigue (p = 0.013), and interference with daily life (p = 0.006) according to the QLQ-FA13 assessment improved in Arm A significantly. Emotional distress was in Arm A lower after six months (p = 0.016). The Cohen’s effect size confirmed the clinically significant improvement of these findings. In this group of patients we were able to show that guided isometric resistance training of the paravertebral muscles can improve functional capacity, reduce fatigue and thereby enhance QoL over a 6-months period in patients with stable spinal metastases. The results offer a rationale for future large controlled investigations to confirm these findings

  11. Combination of Vancomycin and β-Lactam Therapy for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia: A Pilot Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Joshua S; Sud, Archana; O'Sullivan, Matthew V N; Robinson, James O; Ferguson, Patricia E; Foo, Hong; van Hal, Sebastiaan J; Ralph, Anna P; Howden, Benjamin P; Binks, Paula M; Kirby, Adrienne; Tong, Steven Y C; Tong, Steven; Davis, Joshua; Binks, Paula; Majumdar, Suman; Ralph, Anna; Baird, Rob; Gordon, Claire; Jeremiah, Cameron; Leung, Grace; Brischetto, Anna; Crowe, Amy; Dakh, Farshid; Whykes, Kelly; Kirkwood, Maria; Sud, Archana; Menon, Mahesh; Somerville, Lucy; Subedi, Shrada; Owen, Shirley; O'Sullivan, Matthew; Liu, Eunice; Zhou, Fei; Robinson, Owen; Coombs, Geoffrey; Ferguson, Patrician; Ralph, Anna; Liu, Eunice; Pollet, Simon; Van Hal, Sebastian; Foo, Hong; Van Hal, Sebastian; Davis, Rebecca

    2016-01-15

    In vitro laboratory and animal studies demonstrate a synergistic role for the combination of vancomycin and antistaphylococcal β-lactams for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia. Prospective clinical data are lacking. In this open-label, multicenter, clinical trial, adults with MRSA bacteremia received vancomycin 1.5 g intravenously twice daily and were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive intravenous flucloxacillin 2 g every 6 hours for 7 days (combination group) or no additional therapy (standard therapy group). Participants were stratified by hospital and randomized in permuted blocks of variable size. Randomization codes were kept in sealed, sequentially numbered, opaque envelopes. The primary outcome was the duration of MRSA bacteremia in days. We randomly assigned 60 patients to receive vancomycin (n = 29), or vancomycin plus flucloxacillin (n = 31). The mean duration of bacteremia was 3.00 days in the standard therapy group and 1.94 days in the combination group. According to a negative binomial model, the mean time to resolution of bacteremia in the combination group was 65% (95% confidence interval, 41%-102%; P = .06) that in the standard therapy group. There was no difference in the secondary end points of 28- and 90-day mortality, metastatic infection, nephrotoxicity, or hepatotoxicity. Combining an antistaphylococcal β-lactam with vancomycin may shorten the duration of MRSA bacteremia. Further trials with a larger sample size and objective clinically relevant end points are warranted. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12610000940077 (www.anzctr.org.au). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. The lung cancer exercise training study: a randomized trial of aerobic training, resistance training, or both in postsurgical lung cancer patients: rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford Jeffrey

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Lung Cancer Exercise Training Study (LUNGEVITY is a randomized trial to investigate the efficacy of different types of exercise training on cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak, patient-reported outcomes, and the organ components that govern VO2peak in post-operative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Methods/Design Using a single-center, randomized design, 160 subjects (40 patients/study arm with histologically confirmed stage I-IIIA NSCLC following curative-intent complete surgical resection at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC will be potentially eligible for this trial. Following baseline assessments, eligible participants will be randomly assigned to one of four conditions: (1 aerobic training alone, (2 resistance training alone, (3 the combination of aerobic and resistance training, or (4 attention-control (progressive stretching. The ultimate goal for all exercise training groups will be 3 supervised exercise sessions per week an intensity above 70% of the individually determined VO2peak for aerobic training and an intensity between 60 and 80% of one-repetition maximum for resistance training, for 30-45 minutes/session. Progressive stretching will be matched to the exercise groups in terms of program length (i.e., 16 weeks, social interaction (participants will receive one-on-one instruction, and duration (30-45 mins/session. The primary study endpoint is VO2peak. Secondary endpoints include: patient-reported outcomes (PROs (e.g., quality of life, fatigue, depression, etc. and organ components of the oxygen cascade (i.e., pulmonary function, cardiac function, skeletal muscle function. All endpoints will be assessed at baseline and postintervention (16 weeks. Substudies will include genetic studies regarding individual responses to an exercise stimulus, theoretical determinants of exercise adherence, examination of the psychological mediators of the exercise - PRO relationship, and exercise-induced changes

  13. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Benthic Images Collected from Stratified Random Sites (StRS) across American Samoa in 2015 (NCEI Accession 0159168)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data described here are benthic habitat imagery that result from benthic photo-quadrat surveys conducted along transects at stratified random sites across...

  14. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training compared to progressive muscle relaxation in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: the BEST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Karin; Schmidt, Martina E; Wiskemann, Joachim; Hof, Holger; Klassen, Oliver; Habermann, Nina; Beckhove, Philipp; Debus, Juergen; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Steindorf, Karen

    2013-03-28

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment. During and after radiotherapy breast cancer patients often suffer from CRF which frequently impairs quality of life (QoL). Despite the high prevalence of CRF in breast cancer patients and the severe impact on the physical and emotional well-being, effective treatment methods are scarce.Physical activity for breast cancer patients has been reported to decrease fatigue, to improve emotional well-being and to increase physical strength. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms of CRF and the molecular-biologic changes induced by exercise, however, are poorly understood.In the BEST trial we aim to assess the effects of resistance training on fatigue, QoL and physical fitness as well as on molecular, immunological and inflammatory changes in breast cancer patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. The BEST study is a prospective randomized, controlled intervention trial investigating the effects of a 12-week supervised progressive resistance training compared to a 12-week supervised muscle relaxation training in 160 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. To determine the effect of exercise itself beyond potential psychosocial group effects, patients in the control group perform a group-based progressive muscle relaxation training. Main inclusion criterion is histologically confirmed breast cancer stage I-III after lumpectomy or mastectomy with indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. Main exclusion criteria are acute infectious diseases, severe neurological, musculosceletal or cardiorespiratory disorders. The primary endpoint is cancer-related fatigue; secondary endpoints include immunological and inflammatory parameters analyzed in peripheral blood, saliva and urine. In addition, QoL, depression, physical performance and cognitive capacity will be assessed. The BEST study is the first randomized controlled trial comparing progressive

  15. Creatine fails to augment the benefits from resistance training in patients with HIV infection: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgos K Sakkas

    Full Text Available Progressive resistance exercise training (PRT improves physical functioning in patients with HIV infection. Creatine supplementation can augment the benefits derived from training in athletes and improve muscle function in patients with muscle wasting. The objective of this study was to determine whether creatine supplementation augments the effects of PRT on muscle strength, energetics, and body composition in HIV-infected patients.This is a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, clinical research center-based, outpatient study in San Francisco. 40 HIV-positive men (20 creatine, 20 placebo enrolled in a 14-week study. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive creatine monohydrate or placebo for 14 weeks. Treatment began with a loading dose of 20 g/day or an equivalent number of placebo capsules for 5 days, followed by maintenance dosing of 4.8 g/day or placebo. Beginning at week 2 and continuing to week 14, all subjects underwent thrice-weekly supervised resistance exercise while continuing on the assigned study medication (with repeated 6-week cycles of loading and maintenance. The main outcome measurements included muscle strength (one repetition maximum, energetics ((31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, composition and size (magnetic resonance imaging, as well as total body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Thirty-three subjects completed the study (17 creatine, 16 placebo. Strength increased in all 8 muscle groups studied following PRT, but this increase was not augmented by creatine supplementation (average increase 44 vs. 42%, difference 2%, 95% CI -9.5% to 13.9% in creatine and placebo, respectively. There were no differences between groups in changes in muscle energetics. Thigh muscle cross-sectional area increased following resistance exercise, with no additive effect of creatine. Lean body mass (LBM increased to a significantly greater extent with creatine. CONCLUSIONS / SIGNIFICANCE: Resistance exercise improved

  16. Random Assignment of Schools to Groups in the Drug Resistance Strategies Rural Project: Some New Methodological Twists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Jonathan; Miller-Day, Michelle; Krieger, Janice L.; Zhou, Jiangxiu; Hecht, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Random assignment to groups is the foundation for scientifically rigorous clinical trials. But assignment is challenging in group randomized trials when only a few units (schools) are assigned to each condition. In the DRSR project, we assigned 39 rural Pennsylvania and Ohio schools to three conditions (rural, classic, control). But even with 13 schools per condition, achieving pretest equivalence on important variables is not guaranteed. We collected data on six important school-level variables: rurality, number of grades in the school, enrollment per grade, percent white, percent receiving free/assisted lunch, and test scores. Key to our procedure was the inclusion of school-level drug use data, available for a subset of the schools. Also, key was that we handled the partial data with modern missing data techniques. We chose to create one composite stratifying variable based on the seven school-level variables available. Principal components analysis with the seven variables yielded two factors, which were averaged to form the composite inflate-suppress (CIS) score which was the basis of stratification. The CIS score was broken into three strata within each state; schools were assigned at random to the three program conditions from within each stratum, within each state. Results showed that program group membership was unrelated to the CIS score, the two factors making up the CIS score, and the seven items making up the factors. Program group membership was not significantly related to pretest measures of drug use (alcohol, cigarettes, marijuana, chewing tobacco; smallest p>.15), thus verifying that pretest equivalence was achieved. PMID:23722619

  17. Both resistance training and aerobic training reduce hepatic fat content in type 2 diabetic subjects with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (the RAED2 Randomized Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Elisabetta; Negri, Carlo; Targher, Giovanni; Faccioli, Niccolò; Lanza, Massimo; Zoppini, Giacomo; Zanolin, Elisabetta; Schena, Federico; Bonora, Enzo; Moghetti, Paolo

    2013-10-01

    Although lifestyle interventions are considered the first-line therapy for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is extremely common in people with type 2 diabetes, no intervention studies have compared the effects of aerobic (AER) or resistance (RES) training on hepatic fat content in type 2 diabetic subjects with NAFLD. In this randomized controlled trial, we compared the 4-month effects of either AER or RES training on insulin sensitivity (by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp), body composition (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), as well as hepatic fat content and visceral (VAT), superficial (SSAT), and deep (DSAT) subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (all quantified by an in-opposed-phase magnetic resonance imaging technique) in 31 sedentary adults with type 2 diabetes and NAFLD. After training, hepatic fat content was markedly reduced (P AER and the RES training groups (mean relative reduction from baseline [95% confidence interval] -32.8% [-58.20 to -7.52] versus -25.9% [-50.92 to -0.94], respectively). Additionally, hepatic steatosis (defined as hepatic fat content >5.56%) disappeared in about one-quarter of the patients in each intervention group (23.1% in the AER group and 23.5% in the RES group). Insulin sensitivity during euglycemic clamp was increased, whereas total body fat mass, VAT, SSAT, and hemoglobin A1c were reduced comparably in both intervention groups. This is the first randomized controlled study to demonstrate that resistance training and aerobic training are equally effective in reducing hepatic fat content among type 2 diabetic patients with NAFLD. Copyright © 2013 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  18. Impact of Resistance Training on Factors Involved in the Development of New-Onset Diabetes After Transplantation in Renal Transplant Recipients: An Open Randomized Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karelis, Antony D; Hébert, Marie-Josée; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Räkel, Agnès

    2016-10-01

    New-onsetdiabetes after transplant (NODAT) is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease after transplantation. Kidney transplantation (KT) recipients have low levels of exercise capacity. Resistance training (RT) might be of special benefit in this population because underlying disease and immunosuppressive drugs favour muscle loss and insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of implementing an RT program within a population of KT recipients and its impact on the incidence of NODAT and cardiometabolic risk factors. This pilot study was an open-randomized study. We randomized 24 patients with a 1:1 allocation to 2 parallel groups, the exercise group (E) or the control group (C). The E group was submitted to RT 3 times a week for 16 weeks. Anthropometric, body composition, cardiometabolic risk factors, muscle strength, cardiorespiratory fitness and well-being were measured before and after 16 weeks. Of the 24 recruited participants, 20 completed the study (10 in the E group and 10 in the C group). No injuries were reported. The intervention was associated with a significant increase in muscle strength (p=0.003). A significant group effect, in favour of the E group, was detected for the well-being score (p=0.03). However, no changes in body composition, cardiometabolic risk factors or cardiorespiratory fitness were noted for either group after the intervention. This pilot study suggests that RT appears to be secure and feasible and improves strength and well-being in patients after KT. However, it does not improve cardiometabolic risk factors. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Linezolid vs glycopeptide antibiotics for the treatment of suspected methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nosocomial pneumonia: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkey, Allan J; O'Donnell, Max R; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2011-05-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of nosocomial pneumonia. Societal guidelines suggest linezolid may be the preferred treatment of MRSA nosocomial pneumonia. We investigated the efficacy of linezolid compared with glycopeptide antibiotics (vancomycin or teicoplanin) for nosocomial pneumonia. This was a systematic review and meta-analysis of English language, randomized, controlled trials comparing linezolid to glycopeptide antibiotics for suspected MRSA pneumonia in subjects > 12 years of age. A highly sensitive search of PubMed MEDLINE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases identified relevant studies. Eight trials encompassing 1,641 subjects met entry criteria. Linezolid was not superior to glycopeptide antibiotics for end points of clinical success (relative risk [RR] linezolid vs glycopeptide, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.97-1.11; P = .28), microbiologic success (RR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.97-1.31; P = .12), or mortality (RR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.69-1.18; P = .47). In addition, clinical success in the subgroup of subjects with MRSA-positive respiratory tract culture (RR, 1.23; 95% CI, 0.97-1.57; P = .09) was not significantly different from those without MRSA (RR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.83-1.09; P = .48), P for interaction, 0.07. The risk for adverse events was not different between the two antibiotic classes (RR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.86-1.07; P = .48). Randomized controlled trials do not support superiority of linezolid over glycopeptide antibiotics for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia. We recommend that decisions between linezolid or glycopeptide antibiotics for empirical or MRSA-directed therapy of nosocomial pneumonia depend on local availability, antibiotic resistance patterns, preferred routes of delivery, and cost, rather than presumed differences in efficacy.

  20. Does vitamin-D intake during resistance training improve the skeletal muscle hypertrophic and strength response in young and elderly men? - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agergaard, Jakob; Trøstrup, Jeanette; Uth, Jacob; Iversen, Jonas Vestergard; Boesen, Anders; Andersen, Jesper L; Schjerling, Peter; Langberg, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that vitamin-D intake can improve skeletal muscle function and strength in frail vitamin-D insufficient individuals. We investigated whether vitamin-D intake can improve the muscular response to resistance training in healthy young and elderly individuals, respectively. Healthy untrained young (n = 20, age 20-30) and elderly (n = 20, age 60-75) men were randomized to 16 weeks of daily supplementary intake of either 48 μg of vitamin-D + 800 mg calcium (Vitamin-D-group) or 800 mg calcium (Placebo-group) during a period and at a latitude of low sunlight (December-April, 56°N). During the last 12 weeks of the supplementation the subjects underwent progressive resistance training of the quadriceps muscle. Muscle hypertrophy, measured as changes in cross sectional area (CSA), and isometric strength of the quadriceps were determined. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for fiber type morphology changes and mRNA expression of vitamin-D receptor (VDR), cytochrome p450 27B1 (CYP27B1) and Myostatin. In the vitamin-D groups, serum 25(OH)D concentration increased significantly and at week 12 was significantly different from placebo in both young men (71.6 vs. 50.4 nmol/L, respectively) and elderly men (111.2 vs. 66.7 nmol/L, respectively). After 12 weeks of resistance training, quadriceps CSA and isometric strength increased compared to baseline in young (CSA p strength p = 0.005) and elderly (CSA p = 0.001, strength p strength/CSA in elderly compared to young (p = 0.008). In the young vitamin-D group, the change in fiber type IIa percentage was greater after 12 weeks training (p = 0.030) and Myostatin mRNA expression lower compared to the placebo group (p = 0.006). Neither resistance training nor vitamin-D intake changed VDR mRNA expression. No additive effect of vitamin-D intake during 12 weeks of resistance training could be detected on either whole muscle hypertrophy or muscle strength, but improved muscle

  1. Impact of amoxicillin therapy on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Coenen, Samuel; Lammens, Christine; Adriaenssens, Niels; Kowalczyk, Anna; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Bielicka, Zuzana; Hupkova, Helena; Lannering, Christina; Mölstad, Sigvard; Fernandez-Vandellos, Patricia; Torres, Antoni; Parizel, Maxim; Ieven, Margareta; Butler, Chris C; Verheij, Theo; Little, Paul; Goossens, Herman

    2016-11-01

    To determine the effect of amoxicillin treatment on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Patients were prescribed amoxicillin 1 g, three times daily (n = 52) or placebo (n = 50) for 7 days. Oropharyngeal swabs obtained before, within 48 h post-treatment and at 28-35 days were assessed for proportions of amoxicillin-resistant (ARS; amoxicillin MIC ≥2 mg/L) and -non-susceptible (ANS; MIC ≥0.5 mg/L) streptococci. Alterations in amoxicillin MICs and in penicillin-binding-proteins were also investigated. ITT and PP analyses were conducted. ARS and ANS proportions increased 11- and 2.5-fold, respectively, within 48 h post-amoxicillin treatment compared with placebo [ARS mean increase (MI) 9.46, 95% CI 5.57-13.35; ANS MI 39.87, 95% CI 30.96-48.78; P  0.1588). ARS/ANS were grouped by pbp mutations. Group 1 strains exhibited significantly lower amoxicillin resistance (mean MIC 2.8 mg/L, 95% CI 2.6-3.1) than group 2 (mean MIC 9.3 mg/L, 95% CI 8.1-10.5; P < 0.0001). Group 2 strains predominated immediately post-treatment (61.07%) and although decreased by days 28-35 (30.71%), proportions remained higher than baseline (18.70%; P = 0.0004). By utilizing oropharyngeal streptococci as model organisms this study provides the first prospective, experimental evidence that resistance selection in patients receiving amoxicillin is modest and short-lived, probably due to 'fitness costs' engendered by high-level resistance-conferring mutations. This evidence further supports European guidelines that recommend amoxicillin when an antibiotic is indicated for community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  2. Progressive Abduction Loading Therapy with Horizontal-Plane Viscous Resistance Targeting Weakness and Flexion Synergy to Treat Upper Limb Function in Chronic Hemiparetic Stroke: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael D; Carmona, Carolina; Drogos, Justin; Dewald, Julius P A

    2018-01-01

    Progressive abduction loading therapy has emerged as a promising exercise therapy in stroke rehabilitation to systematically target the loss of independent joint control (flexion synergy) in individuals with chronic moderate/severe upper-extremity impairment. Preclinical investigations have identified abduction loading during reaching exercise as a key therapeutic factor to improve reaching function. An augmentative approach may be to additionally target weakness by incorporating resistance training to increase constitutive joint torques of reaching with the goal of improving reaching function by "overpowering" flexion synergy. The objective was, therefore, to determine the therapeutic effects of horizontal-plane viscous resistance in combination with progressive abduction loading therapy. 32 individuals with chronic hemiparetic stroke were randomly allocated to two groups. The two groups had equivalent baseline characteristics on all demographic and outcome metrics including age (59 ± 11 years), time poststroke (10.1 ± 7.6 years), and motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer, 26.7 ± 6.5 out of 66). Both groups received