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Sample records for resistance protein rb

  1. The RB-IL-6 axis controls self-renewal and endocrine therapy resistance by fine-tuning mitochondrial activity.

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    Kitajima, S; Yoshida, A; Kohno, S; Li, F; Suzuki, S; Nagatani, N; Nishimoto, Y; Sasaki, N; Muranaka, H; Wan, Y; Thai, T C; Okahashi, N; Matsuda, F; Shimizu, H; Nishiuchi, T; Suzuki, Y; Tominaga, K; Gotoh, N; Suzuki, M; Ewen, M E; Barbie, D A; Hirose, O; Tanaka, T; Takahashi, C

    2017-09-07

    Retinoblastoma (RB) protein inactivation during tumor progression is often associated with acquisition of immature phenotypes and resistance to therapy. Determination of an RB inactivation signature in a context of gaining undifferentiated phenotype in a p53-null sarcoma system revealed a critical role for interleukin (IL)-6. Using a Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), we discovered that poorly differentiated breast cancers are enriched for this RB inactivation signature. Accelerated IL-6 secretion following RB inactivation in an RB-intact luminal-type breast cancer cell line MCF-7 promoted a positive feed forward loop between IL-6 and STAT3 driving tumor growth and endocrine therapy resistance. In addition, some of RB-intact basal-like type breast cancer cell lines exhibited a similar phenotype following RB depletion. The mechanism whereby RB inactivation increases IL-6 production in MCF-7 cells appeared to involve fatty acid oxidation (FAO)-dependent mitochondrial metabolism and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK). In addition, IL-6, via STAT3-mediated feedback to mitochondria, autonomously adjusts mitochondrial superoxide to levels suitable to maintain stem cell-like activity. The gene expression profile of luminal-type breast cancer patients with low RB expression revealed high enrichment of genes involved in mitochondrial respiration and downstream targets of IL-6. These findings unveiled an unexpected strategy whereby RB suppresses malignant features of cancer cells through metabolic reprogramming and cell-autonomous inflammation.

  2. Functional ablation of pRb activates Cdk2 and causes antiestrogen resistance in human breast cancer cells.

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    Hemant Varma

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens are required for the proliferation of hormone dependent breast cancer cells, making estrogen receptor (ER positive tumors amenable to endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens. However, resistance to these agents remains a significant cause of treatment failure. We previously demonstrated that inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb family tumor suppressors causes antiestrogen resistance in MCF-7 cells, a widely studied model of estrogen responsive human breast cancers. In this study, we investigate the mechanism by which pRb inactivation leads to antiestrogen resistance. Cdk4 and cdk2 are two key cell cycle regulators that can phosphorylate and inactivate pRb, therefore we tested whether these kinases are required in cells lacking pRb function. pRb family members were inactivated in MCF-7 cells by expressing polyomavirus large tumor antigen (PyLT, and cdk activity was inhibited using the cdk inhibitors p16(INK4A and p21(Waf1/Cip1. Cdk4 activity was no longer required in cells lacking functional pRb, while cdk2 activity was required for proliferation in both the presence and absence of pRb function. Using inducible PyLT cell lines, we further demonstrated that pRb inactivation leads to increased cyclin A expression, cdk2 activation and proliferation in antiestrogen arrested cells. These results demonstrate that antiestrogens do not inhibit cdk2 activity or proliferation of MCF-7 cells in the absence of pRb family function, and suggest that antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cells resulting from pRb pathway inactivation would be susceptible to therapies that target cdk2.

  3. The E2F transcription factor is a cellular target for the RB protein.

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    Chellappan, S P; Hiebert, S; Mudryj, M; Horowitz, J M; Nevins, J R

    1991-06-14

    Although it is generally believed that the product of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene (RB1) is an important regulator of cell proliferation, the biochemical mechanism for its action is unclear. We now show that the RB protein is found in a complex with the E2F transcription factor and that only the under phosphorylated form of RB is in the E2F complex. Moreover, the adenovirus E1A protein can dissociate the E2F-RB complex, dependent on E1A sequence also critical for E1A to bind to RB. These sequences are also critical for E1A to immortalize primary cell cultures and to transform in conjunction with other oncogenes. Taken together, these results suggest that the interaction of RB with E2F is an important event in the control of cellular proliferation and that the dissociation of the complex is part of the mechanism by which E1A inactivates RB function.

  4. Interaction between RB protein and NuMA is required for proper alignment of spindle microtubules.

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    Uchida, Chiharu; Hattori, Takayuki; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Naoki; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Taya, Yoichi

    2014-02-01

    Retinoblastoma protein (pRB) controls cell cycle progression and cell cycle exit through interactions with cellular proteins. Many pRB-binding proteins, which function in gene transcription or modulation of chromatin structure, harbor LXCXE motifs in their binding domain for pRB. In this study, we found that nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA), a mitotic spindle organizer, interacts with pRB through LSCEE sequences located in its C-terminal region. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of pRB caused aberrant distribution of NuMA and alignment of spindle microtubules in mitotic cells. Abnormal organization of spindle microtubules was also accompanied by misalignment of an over-expressed NuMA mutant (mut-NuMA) with a defect in pRB binding caused by an LSGEK mutation. The mut-NuMA-over-expressing cells showed lower potency for survival than wild-type NuMA (wt-NuMA)-over-expressing cells during 2 weeks of culture. Interestingly, knockdown of pRB reduced the population of wt-NuMA-over-expressing cells to the same level as mut-NuMA cells after 2 weeks. Taken together, pRB may have a novel function in regulating the mitotic function of NuMA and spindle organization, which are required for proper cell cycle progression. © 2013 The Authors Genes to Cells © 2013 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Expression of multidrug resistance proteins in retinoblastoma

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    Swati Shukla

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To elucidate the mechanism of multidrug resistance in retinoblastoma, and to acquire more insights into in vivo drug resistance. METHODS: Three anticancer drug resistant Y79 human RB cells were generated against vincristine, etoposide or carboplatin, which are used for conventional chemotherapy in RB. Primary cultures from enucleated eyes after chemotherapy (PCNC were also prepared. Their chemosensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents (vincristine, etoposide and carboplatin were measured using MTT assay. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the expression of p53, Bcl-2 and various multidrug resistant proteins in retinoblastoma cells. RESULTS: Following exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs, PCNC showed less sensitivity to drugs. No significant changes observed in the p53 expression, whereas Bcl-2 expression was found to be increased in the drug resistant cells as well as in PCNC. Increased expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp was observed in drug resistant Y79 cells; however there was no significant change in the expression of P-gp found between primary cultures of primarily enucleated eyes and PCNC. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (Mrp-1 expression was found to be elevated in the drug resistant Y79 cells as well as in PCNC. No significant change in the expression of lung resistance associated protein (Lrp was observed in the drug resistant Y79 cells as well as in PCNC. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that multidrug resistant proteins are intrinsically present in retinoblastoma which causes treatment failure in managing retinoblastoma with chemotherapy.

  6. Expression of multidrug resistance proteins in retinoblastoma.

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    Shukla, Swati; Srivastava, Arpna; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Usha; Goswami, Sandeep; Chawla, Bhavna; Bajaj, Mandeep Singh; Kashyap, Seema; Kaur, Jasbir

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of multidrug resistance in retinoblastoma, and to acquire more insights into in vivo drug resistance. Three anticancer drug resistant Y79 human RB cells were generated against vincristine, etoposide or carboplatin, which are used for conventional chemotherapy in RB. Primary cultures from enucleated eyes after chemotherapy (PCNC) were also prepared. Their chemosensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents (vincristine, etoposide and carboplatin) were measured using MTT assay. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the expression of p53, Bcl-2 and various multidrug resistant proteins in retinoblastoma cells. Following exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs, PCNC showed less sensitivity to drugs. No significant changes observed in the p53 expression, whereas Bcl-2 expression was found to be increased in the drug resistant cells as well as in PCNC. Increased expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was observed in drug resistant Y79 cells; however there was no significant change in the expression of P-gp found between primary cultures of primarily enucleated eyes and PCNC. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (Mrp-1) expression was found to be elevated in the drug resistant Y79 cells as well as in PCNC. No significant change in the expression of lung resistance associated protein (Lrp) was observed in the drug resistant Y79 cells as well as in PCNC. Our results suggest that multidrug resistant proteins are intrinsically present in retinoblastoma which causes treatment failure in managing retinoblastoma with chemotherapy.

  7. Multiple protein biomarker assessment for recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST abuse in cattle.

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    Susann K J Ludwig

    Full Text Available Biomarker profiling, as a rapid screening approach for detection of hormone abuse, requires well selected candidate biomarkers and a thorough in vivo biomarker evaluation as previously done for detection of growth hormone doping in athletes. The bovine equivalent of growth hormone, called recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST is (illegally administered to enhance milk production in dairy cows. In this study, first a generic sample pre-treatment and 4-plex flow cytometric immunoassay (FCIA were developed for simultaneous measurement of four candidate biomarkers selected from literature: insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1, its binding protein 2 (IGFBP2, osteocalcin and endogenously produced antibodies against rbST. Next, bovine serum samples from two extensive controlled rbST animal treatment studies were used for in vivo validation and biomarker evaluation. Finally, advanced statistic tools were tested for the assessment of biomarker combination quality aiming to correctly identify rbST-treated animals. The statistical prediction tool k-nearest neighbours using a combination of the biomarkers osteocalcin and endogenously produced antibodies against rbST proved to be very reliable and correctly predicted 95% of the treated samples starting from the second rbST injection until the end of the treatment period and even thereafter. With the same biomarker combination, only 12% of untreated animals appeared false-positive. This reliability meets the requirements of Commission Decision 2002/657/EC for screening methods in veterinary control. From the results of this multidisciplinary study, it is concluded that the osteocalcin - anti-rbST-antibodies combination represent fit-for-purpose biomarkers for screening of rbST abuse in dairy cattle and can be reliably measured in both the developed 4-plex FCIA as well as in a cost-effective 2-plex microsphere-based binding assay. This screening method can be incorporated in routine veterinary monitoring

  8. A pathological study on overexpression of c-fos and Rb proteins in human radiation skin ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Yuejiao; Wang Dewen; Gao Yabing

    1996-01-01

    We performed an immunohistochemical study on human radiation skin ulcer by using antibodies against c-fos and Rb proteins and antigen-repairing method with a microwave oven. We found that the positive rates of overexpression of c-fos and Rb proteins were 84.0% and 100%, respectively. The overexpression of c-fos protein was mainly observed in cell nuclei of squamous epithelial cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and leiomyocytes in media and fibrocytes in adventitia of arterioles. The location of the Rb protein overexpression was mostly similar to that of c-fos protein. The overexpression of c-fos and Rb proteins may be related to cancer transformation and poor healing of radiation-induced skin ulcers

  9. p53, p21, Rb, and MDM2 proteins in tongue carcinoma from patients 75 years.

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    Regezi, J A; Dekker, N P; McMillan, A; Ramirez-Amador, V; Meneses-Garcia, A; Ruiz-Godoy Rivera, L M; Chrysomali, E; Ng, I O

    1999-07-01

    Relatively rare squamous cell carcinomas of the tongue in young patients may be associated with different etiologic factors and pathogenetic mechanisms than carcinomas from the same site in older patients. Alterations in cell cycle proteins likely contribute to the biologic behavior of these neoplasms. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate cell cycle proteins (p53, p21, Rb, MDM2) in lateral tongue cancers from patients at the two ends of the age spectrum. All available archived lateral tongue carcinomas from patients 75 years (23 males and 13 females) were stained and compared. Positive p53 staining was seen in 18/36 of the 75-year group (p = 0.149). Increased p21 staining (both percent of positive cells and intensity) was evident in 25/32 of the 75-year group (p = 1.0). Increased p21 expression was seen in both p53-positive and -negative cases in both age groups. Rb protein was increased in 16/29 of the 75-year group (p = 0.58). Fourteen cases (4/35 vs 10/36, p = 0.135) showed positive MDM2 staining; MDM2-positive cases were also p53 positive in 4/4 younger and 8/10 older patients. We conclude that p53, p21, Rb, and MDM2 are over-expressed in lateral tongue cancers, and that immunohistochemical profiles are heterogeneous. A p53-independent pathway of p21 induction is supported by the results; p53 suppression may be associated with MDM2 protein expression in a subset of cancers. Significant differences in the expression of p53, p21, Rb, and MDM2 proteins are not evident in lateral tongue carcinomas from patients 75 years.

  10. Lead Discovery for Alzheimer’s Disease Related Target Protein RbAp48 from Traditional Chinese Medicine

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    Hung-Jin Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency or loss of function of Retinoblastoma-associated proteins (RbAp48 is related with Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and AD disease is associated with age-related memory loss. During normal function, RbAp48 forms a complex with the peptide FOG-1 (friend of GATA-1 and has a role in gene transcription, but an unstable complex may affect the function of RbAp48. This study utilizes the world’s largest traditional Chinese medicine (TCM database and virtual screening to provide potential compounds for RbAp48 binding. A molecular dynamics (MD simulation was employed to understand the variations after protein-ligand interaction. FOG1 was found to exhibit low stability after RbAp48 binding; the peptide displayed significant movement from the initial docking position, a phenomenon which matched the docking results. The protein structure of the other TCM candidates was not variable during MD simulation and had a greater stable affinity for RbAp48 binding than FOG1. Our results reveal that the protein structure does not affect ligand binding, and the top three TCM candidates Bittersweet alkaloid II, Eicosandioic acid, and Perivine might resolve the instability of the RbAp48-FOG1 complex and thus be used in AD therapy.

  11. Protein phosphatase 2A associates with Rb2/p130 and mediates retinoic acid-induced growth suppression of ovarian carcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuocolo, Scott; Purev, Enkhtsetseg; Zhang, Dongmei

    2003-01-01

    following ATRA treatment. Finally, using both small interfering RNA specific to the catalytic subunit of PP2A and a variant of the SKOV3 cell line that overexpresses PP2A, we have shown that modulation of PP2A protein levels correlates with the ability of ATRA to inhibit growth of ovarian carcinoma cells......Levels of Rb2/p130 protein are increased 5-10-fold following all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment of the retinoid-sensitive ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line CAOV3, but not the retinoid-resistant adenocarcinoma cell line SKOV3. We found that this increase in Rb2/p130 protein levels in ATRA...

  12. A cDNA encoding a pRB-binding protein with properties of the transcription factor E2F

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Lees, J A; Vidal, M

    1992-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) plays an important role in the control of cell proliferation, apparently by binding to and regulating cellular transcription factors such as E2F. Here we describe the characterization of a cDNA clone that encodes a protein with properties of E2F. This clone, RBP3...

  13. Reduced cerebral infection of Neospora caninum in BALB/c mice vaccinated with recombinant Brucella abortus RB51 strains expressing N. caninum SRS2 and GRA7 proteins.

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    Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Sanakkayala, Neelima; Gulani, Jatinder; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Boyle, Stephen M; Lindsay, David S; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar

    2007-09-30

    Neospora caninum, an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite, is the causative agent of bovine neosporosis, an important disease affecting the reproductive performance of cattle worldwide. Currently there is no effective vaccine available to prevent N. caninum infection in cattle. In this study, we examined the feasibility of developing a live, recombinant N. caninum vaccine using Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 as the expression and delivery vector. We generated two recombinant RB51 strains each expressing SRS2 (RB51/SRS2) or GRA7 (RB51/GRA7) antigens of N. caninum. BALB/c mice immunized by single intraperitoneal inoculation of the recombinant RB51 strains developed IgG antibodies specific to the respective N. caninum antigen. In vitro stimulation of splenocytes from the vaccinated mice with specific antigen resulted in the production of interferon-gamma, but not IL-5 or IL-10, suggesting the development of a Th1 type immune response. Upon challenge with N. caninum tachyzoites, mice vaccinated with strain RB51/SRS2, but not RB51/GRA7, showed significant resistance to cerebral infection when compared to the RB51 vaccinated mice, as determined by the tissue parasite load using a real-time quantitative TaqMan assay. Interestingly, mice vaccinated with either strain RB51 or RB51/GRA7 also contained significantly lower parasite burden in their brains compared to those inoculated with saline. Mice vaccinated with strain RB51/SRS2 or RB51/GRA7 were protected to the same extent as the strain RB51 vaccinated mice against challenge with B. abortus virulent strain 2308. These results suggest that a recombinant RB51 strain expressing an appropriate protective antigen(s), such as SRS2 of N. caninum, can confer protection against both neosporosis and brucellosis.

  14. The uptake, distribution and translocation of 86Rb in alfalfa plants susceptible and resistant to the bacterial wilt and the effect of Corynebacterium insidiosum upon these processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanker, I.; Kudelova, A.

    1981-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants susceptible (S) and resistant (R) to bacterial wilt were fed via roots with a nutrient solution labelled with 86 Rb + , at different times after inoculation with Corynebacterium insidiosum (McCull.) H.L. Jens. The infection did not affect 86 Rb + uptake per plant in the course of a 14-day-period following inoculation; however, it affected its distribution differently in the S- and the R-plants. 86 Rb + uptake significantly decreased due to the infection in the S-plants on the day 49 after inoculation (a 4-h-exposure to 86 Rb + ), with the ions more slowly translocated to the shoots in diseased S-plants than in diseased R-plants. Likely factors causing these effects and their relationship to alfalfa resistance to bacterial wilt are discussed. (author)

  15. Cyclin D1 and Rb protein expression and their correlation with prognosis in patients with colon cancer

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    Giaginis Costas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclin D1 plays a major role as a potential contributor to the multistep process of oncogenesis; nevertheless its prognostic significance in colon cancer has already been examined in a few studies and needs to be further delineated. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of cyclin D1 and pRb and to correlate them with tumor histological stage and grade, proliferative capacity (Ki-67 labeling index and clinical parameters, in order to delineate their impact on prognosis. Methods One hundred and eleven patients, who underwent surgical resection of the colon for colon cancer constituted the group of our study. The immunohistochemical expression of cyclin D1, Rb and Ki-67 proteins was examined and correlated with clinico-pathological parameters and survival. Results The 5-years survival rate of patients presenting cyclin D1 positive tumors was 54%, while that of cyclin D1 negative ones was 67% (P = > 0.05. The survival rate of patients with pRb positive tumors was similar to that of pRb negatine ones. Significant association was observed between Ki-67 and cyclin D1 positivity (P = 0.045. Univariate analysis revealed worse survival in advanced stage patients presenting cyclin D1 positive tumors (P = 0.025. Additionally, the survival of patients aging less than 70 years old was correlated to cyclin D1 positivity (P = 0.009. Multivariate survival analysis revealed statistical significance for stage and hepatic metastasis. Conclusion Even though cyclin D1 and pRb have not disclosed any clear association with shorter survival, cyclin D1 positivity may be a useful predictor of subgroup patients with colon cancer being in advanced stage and early age.

  16. Deletion of a splice donor site ablates expression of the following exon and produces an unphosphorylated RB protein unable to bind SV40 T antigen.

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    Shew, J Y; Chen, P L; Bookstein, R; Lee, E Y; Lee, W H

    1990-01-01

    Studies of mutated retinoblastoma (RB) proteins in human tumor cells potentially reveal regions of the normal RB gene product that are required for its cancer suppression function. We here characterize a mutated RB protein of Mr 104,000 (p104) from a primary small-cell lung carcinoma. Unlike normal RB protein (pp110RB), p104 was unphosphorylated and unable to bind T antigen of SV40 both in vivo and in vitro. On the other hand, nuclear localization and DNA binding activity were preserved in the mutated protein. p104 was immunoprecipitable with four separate polyclonal antibodies recognizing different epitopes of the RB polypeptide, suggesting the presence of most exons in their correct reading frame. Following reverse transcription and in vitro amplification, RB mRNA from this tumor was shown to lack nucleotides encoded by exon 16. Analysis of genomic DNA from this tumor showed that exon 16 and its flanking splice donor and acceptor sequences were present and entirely normal; however, a 43-base pair (bp) region containing the splice donor site of intron 15 was deleted instead. Exon 15 was joined directly to exon 17 during mRNA processing via a cryptic splice donor site; exon 16 was presumably skipped because the preceding mutated intron was of insufficient length (less than 80 bp) for normal RB mRNA processing. These results demonstrate that loss of a single small exon disrupts several important biochemical properties of RB protein. In addition, sequence features of the 43-bp depletion suggest involvement of a novel deletional mechanism.

  17. Divergence of the mRNA targets for the Ssb proteins of bacteriophages T4 and RB69

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    Petrov Vasiliy M

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The single-strand binding (Ssb protein of phage T4 (T4 gp32, product of gene 32 is a mRNA-specific autogenous translational repressor, in addition to being a sequence-independent ssDNA-binding protein that participates in phage DNA replication, repair and recombination. It is not clear how this physiologically essential protein distinguishes between specific RNA and nonspecific nucleic acid targets. Here, we present phylogenetic evidence suggesting that ssDNA and specific RNA bind the same gp32 domain and that plasticity of this domain underlies its ability to configure certain RNA structures for specific binding. We have cloned and characterized gene 32 of phage RB69, a relative of T4 We observed that RB69 gp32 and T4 gp32 have nearly identical ssDNA binding domains, but diverge in their C-terminal domains. In T4 gp32, it is known that the C-terminal domain interacts with the ssDNA-binding domain and with other phage-induced proteins. In translation assays, we show that RB69 gp32 is, like T4 gp32, an autogenous translational repressor. We also show that the natural mRNA targets (translational operators for the 2 proteins are diverged in sequence from each other and yet can be repressed by either gp32. Results of chemical and RNase sensitivity assays indicate that the gp32 mRNA targets from the 2 related phages have similar structures, but differ in their patterns of contact with the 2 repressors. These and other observations suggest that a range of gp32-RNA binding specificities may evolve in nature due to plasticity of the protein-nucleic acid interaction and its response to modulation by the C-terminal domain of this translational repressor.

  18. Phosphorylation of pRb: mechanism for RB pathway inactivation in MYCN-amplified retinoblastoma.

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    Ewens, Kathryn G; Bhatti, Tricia R; Moran, Kimberly A; Richards-Yutz, Jennifer; Shields, Carol L; Eagle, Ralph C; Ganguly, Arupa

    2017-03-01

    A small, but unique subgroup of retinoblastoma has been identified with no detectable mutation in the retinoblastoma gene (RB1) and with high levels of MYCN gene amplification. This manuscript investigated alternate pathways of inactivating pRb, the encoded protein in these tumors. We analyzed the mutation status of the RB1 gene and MYCN copy number in a series of 245 unilateral retinoblastomas, and the phosphorylation status of pRb in a subset of five tumors using immunohistochemistry. There were 203 tumors with two mutations in RB1 (RB1 -/- , 83%), 29 with one (RB1 +/- , 12%) and 13 with no detectable mutations (RB1 +/+ , 5%). Eighteen tumors carried MYCN amplification between 29 and 110 copies: 12 had two (RB1 -/- ) or one RB1 (RB1 +/- ) mutations, while six had no mutations (RB1 +/+ ). Immunohistochemical staining of tumor sections with antibodies against pRb and phosphorylated Rb (ppRb) displayed high levels of pRb and ppRb in both RB1 +/+ and RB1 +/- tumors with MYCN amplification compared to no expression of these proteins in a classic RB1 -/- , MYCN-low tumor. These results establish that high MYCN amplification can be present in retinoblastoma with or without coding sequence mutations in the RB1 gene. The functional state of pRb is inferred to be inactive due to phosphorylation of pRb in the MYCN-amplified retinoblastoma without coding sequence mutations. This makes inactivation of RB1 by gene mutation or its protein product, pRb, by protein phosphorylation, a necessary condition for initiating retinoblastoma tumorigenesis, independent of MYCN amplification. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Complete Genome Sequences of T4-Like Bacteriophages RB3, RB5, RB6, RB7, RB9, RB10, RB27, RB33, RB55, RB59, and RB68.

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    Yaung, Stephanie J; Esvelt, Kevin M; Church, George M

    2015-01-02

    T4-like bacteriophages have been explored for phage therapy and are model organisms for phage genomics and evolution. Here, we describe the sequencing of 11 T4-like phages. We found a high nucleotide similarity among the T4, RB55, and RB59; RB32 and RB33; and RB3, RB5, RB6, RB7, RB9, and RB10 phages. Copyright © 2015 Yaung et al.

  20. Defensin susceptibility and colonization in the mouse model of AJ100, a polymyxin B-resistant, Brucella abortus RB51 isolate.

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    Halling, Shirley M; Jensen, Allen E; Olsen, Steven C

    2008-03-01

    Intracellular pathogens selected for increased susceptibility to polycations are commonly attenuated, yet the effect of decreased susceptibility to polycations on pathogenicity has not been researched. The polymyxin-resistant mutant Brucella abortus AJ100 was characterized by comparing its susceptibility to the polycationic antibiotic polymyxin B, defensins, and lactoferricin, and its colonization and clearance in the mouse model to the parent strain RB51. MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) values determined by Etest for AJ100 and RB51 were 1.5 and 0.25 mug/ml, respectively. Though AJ100 is less susceptible to polymyxin B than RB51, it was more susceptible than its parent strain to the cationic defensins melittin, magainin 2, and cecropin P1. In the mouse model, initial colonization of the spleen was lower for AJ100 than RB51, and the rate of clearance from the spleen was faster for AJ100 than RB51. However, initial colonization and clearance rates of AJ100 from the liver were indistinguishable from those of RB51. This study suggests that the susceptibility profile of Brucella to polycationic defensins rather than polymyxin B may be indicative of differential survival in the spleen and liver in the mouse and is indicative of spleen and liver residential macrophages' differing ability to inactivate Brucella.

  1. Multiple Protein Biomarker Assessment for Recombinant Bovine Somatotropin (rbST) Abuse in Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Susann K. J.; Smits, Nathalie G. E.; van der Veer, Grishja; Bremer, Maria G. E. G.; Nielen, Michel W. F.

    2012-01-01

    Biomarker profiling, as a rapid screening approach for detection of hormone abuse, requires well selected candidate biomarkers and a thorough in vivo biomarker evaluation as previously done for detection of growth hormone doping in athletes. The bovine equivalent of growth hormone, called recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) is (il)legally administered to enhance milk production in dairy cows. In this study, first a generic sample pre-treatment and 4-plex flow cytometric immunoassay (FCIA) ...

  2. Specific growth rate plays a critical role in hydrogen peroxide resistance of the marine oligotrophic ultramicrobacterium Sphingomonas alaskensis strain RB2256

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostrowski, M; Cavicchioli, R; Gottschal, JC; Blaauw, Maarten

    The marine oligotrophic ultramicrobacterium Sphingomonas alaskensis RB2256 has a physiology that is distinctly different from that of typical copiotrophic marine bacteria, such as Vibrio angustum S14. This includes a high level of inherent stress resistance and the absence of starvation-induced

  3. Laser damage resistance of RbTiOPO(4): evidence of polarization dependent anisotropy.

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    Wagner, F R; Hildenbrand, A; Natoli, J Y; Commandré, M; Théodore, F; Albrecht, H

    2007-10-17

    Nanosecond-laser induced damage of RbTiOPO(4) crystals (RTP) has been studied at 1064 nm as a function of propagation direction and polarization orientation. A significant difference in the Laser Induced Damage Threshold (LIDT) was observed for x-cut and y-cut crystals in Pockels cell configuration, where the light propagation direction is along the x and y axes of the crystal respectively. In Pockels cell configuration the polarization is oriented at 45? with respect to the z-axis of the crystal. Experiments with the polarization oriented parallel to the principal axes of the crystal pointed out the importance of the polarization direction for the LIDT whereas the propagation direction did not significantly influence the LIDT. Comparison of the experimental data with a simple model reveals the influence of frequency doubling on the LIDT in Pockels cell configuration. In the case of the y-cut Pockels cell, the generation of frequency doubled light causes an LIDT below the LIDT of x and z-polarized light at the fundamental wavelength.

  4. Molecular screening of compounds to the predicted Protein-Protein Interaction site of Rb1-E7 with p53- E6 in HPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Faraz; Sanehi, Parvish; Rawal, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is malignant neoplasm of the cervix uteri or cervical area. Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) which are heterogeneous groups of small double stranded DNA viruses are considered as the primary cause of cervical cancer, involved in 90% of all Cervical Cancers. Two early HPV genes, E6 and E7, are known to play crucial role in tumor formation. E6 binds with p53 and prevents its translocation and thereby inhibit the ability of p53 to activate or repress target genes. E7 binds to hypophosphorylated Rb and thereby induces cells to enter into premature S-phase by disrupting Rb-E2F complexes. The strategy of the research work was to target the site of interaction of Rb1 -E7 & p53-E6. A total of 88 compounds were selected for molecular screening, based on comprehensive literature survey for natural compounds with anti-cancer activity. Molecular docking analysis was carried out with Molegro Virtual Docker, to screen the 88 chosen compounds and rank them according to their binding affinity towards the site of interaction of the viral oncoproteins and human tumor suppressor proteins. The docking result revealed that Nicandrenone a member of Withanolides family of chemical compounds as the most likely molecule that can be used as a candidate drug against HPV induced cervical cancer. HPV - Human Papiloma Virus, HTSP - Human Tumor Suppressor Proteins, VOP - Viral oncoproteins.

  5. Hypothyroidism reduces ObRb-STAT3 leptin signalling in the hypothalamus and pituitary of rats associated with resistance to leptin acute anorectic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvino, Camila; Souza, Luana L; Costa-e-Sousa, Ricardo H; Almeida, Norma A S; Trevenzoli, Isis H; Pazos-Moura, Carmen C

    2012-10-01

    Leptin has been shown to regulate the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, acting primarily through the STAT3 pathway triggered through the binding of leptin to the long-chain isoform of the leptin receptor, ObRb. We previously demonstrated that although hyperthyroid rats presented leptin effects on TSH secretion, those effects were abolished in hypothyroid rats. We addressed the hypothesis that changes in the STAT3 pathway might explain the lack of TSH response to leptin in hypothyroidism by evaluating the protein content of components of leptin signalling via the STAT3 pathway in the hypothalamus and pituitary of hypothyroid (0·03% methimazole in the drinking water/21 days) and hyperthyroid (thyroxine 5 μg/100 g body weight /5 days) rats. Hypothyroid rats exhibited decreased ObRb and phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) protein in the hypothalamus, and in the pituitary gland they exhibited decreased ObRb, total STAT3, pSTAT3 and SOCS3 (P<0·05). Except for a modest decrease in pituitary STAT3, no other alterations were observed in hyperthyroid rats. Moreover, unlike euthyroid rats, the hypothyroid rats did not exhibit a reduction in food ingestion after a single injection of leptin (0·5 mg/kg body weight). Therefore, hypothyroidism decreased ObRb-STAT3 signalling in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland, which likely contributes to the loss of leptin action on food intake and TSH secretion, as previously observed in hypothyroid rats.

  6. Brucella abortus strain RB51 as a vector for heterologous protein expression and induction of specific Th1 type immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemulapalli, R; He, Y; Boyle, S M; Sriranganathan, N; Schurig, G G

    2000-06-01

    Brucella abortus strain RB51 is a stable, rough, attenuated mutant widely used as a live vaccine for bovine brucellosis. Our ultimate goal is to develop strain RB51 as a preferential vector for the delivery of protective antigens of other intracellular pathogens to which the induction of a strong Th1 type of immune response is needed for effective protection. As a first step in that direction, we studied the expression of a foreign reporter protein, beta-galactosidase of Escherichia coli, and the 65-kDa heat shock protein (HSP65) of Mycobacterium bovis in strain RB51. We cloned the promoter sequences of Brucella sodC and groE genes in pBBR1MCS to generate plasmids pBBSODpro and pBBgroE, respectively. The genes for beta-galactosidase (lacZ) and HSP65 were cloned in these plasmids and used to transform strain RB51. An enzyme assay in the recombinant RB51 strains indicated that the level of beta-galactosidase expression is higher under the groE promoter than under the sodC promoter. In strain RB51 containing pBBgroE/lacZ, but not pBBSODpro/lacZ, increased levels of beta-galactosidase expression were observed after subjecting the bacteria to heat shock or following internalization into macrophage-like J774A.1 cells. Mice vaccinated with either of the beta-galactosidase-expressing recombinant RB51 strains developed specific antibodies of predominantly the immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) isotype, and in vitro stimulation of their splenocytes with beta-galactosidase induced the secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), but not interleukin-4 (IL-4). A Th1 type of immune response to HSP65, as indicated by the presence of specific serum IgG2a, but not IgG1, antibodies, and IFN-gamma, but not IL-4, secretion by the specific-antigen-stimulated splenocytes, was also detected in mice vaccinated with strain RB51 containing pBBgroE/hsp65. Studies with mice indicated that expression of beta-galactosidase or HSP65 did not alter either the attenuation characteristics of strain RB51 or

  7. Diversity in fosfomycin resistance proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew K. Thompson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Certain strains of the soil microorganism Streptomyces produce an antibiotic, fosfomycin [(1 R,2 S-epoxypropylphosphonic acid], which is effective against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens by inhibiting the first committed step in cell-wall biosynthesis. Fosfomycin resistance proteins are metallo-enzymes that are known to inactivate the antibiotic by the addition of nucleophiles such as water, glutathione (GSH, l-cysteine and bacillithiol (BSH to the oxirane ring of the molecule. Progress in the characterisation of FosB-type fosfomycin resistance proteins found in many Gram-positive organisms has been slow. This paper provides a brief description of the diversity of fosfomycin resistance proteins in general and, more specifically, new data characterising the substrate selectivity, structure, mechanism and metal-ion dependence of FosB enzymes from pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus and Bacillus. These new findings include the high-resolution X-ray diffraction structures of FosB enzymes from Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus in various liganded states and kinetic data that suggest that Mn(II and BSH are the preferred divalent cation and thiol substrate for the reaction, respectively. The discovery of the inhibition of the enzyme by Zn(II led to the determination of a ternary structure of the FosB·Zn(II·fosfomycin·l-Cys complex which reveals both substrates present in a pose prior to reaction.

  8. EFFECTS OF LATE BLIGHT RESISTANT POTATO CONTAINING RB GENE ON THE SOIL MICROBES, PESTS AND PLANT DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eny Ida Riyanti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans is an important disease on potato.  Several potato hybrids have been generated by crossing local varieties (Atlantic and Granola with Katahdin SP951 which contains late blight resistance gene RB.  Prior to release, these hybrids need to be evaluated for their environ-mental effects on non-target organisms and natural pests and diseases. The objectives of the study were to investigate the effect of LBR potato hybrids on beneficial soil microbes, pests and diseases. The trial was conducted in the confined field trial (CFT in Lembang, West Java. The parental non-transgenic (NT clones (Granola, Atlantic and Katahdin and LBR hybrids (four clones of Atlantic x Katahdin SP951 hybrids; 10 clones of Granola x Katahdin SP951 were planted at a plant spacing of 30 cm x 70 cm. Fungicide applications were used as treat-ments (no spray, five and twenty times sprays. The experi-ment was arranged in a randomized completely block design with three replications. The parameters determined were popula-tions of N2 fixing and P solubilizing bacteria, soil C/N ratio as well as natural pests and diseases. The results showed that the transgenic LBR potato hybrids did not have negative effect on N fixing bacteria. The bacterial populations were around 1010-11 cells g-1 soil before planting, 1012 cells at 1.5 months after planting (MAP and 108 cells after harvest. For P- solubilizing bacteria, their populations were 1010 cells before planting, 1012 cells at 1.5 MAP and 1011 cells g-1  soil after harvest. The soil C/N ratio of the transgenic plot was not statistically different compared to non-transgenic plot, i.e. 12-15 before planting, 10-11 at 1.5 MAP, and 10 after harvest in non-spray plot. Pests and diseases such as Alternaria solani, Liriomyza, potato tubber moth, aphid and mites on the transgenic and non-transgenic plots were statistically not different. The resistance score for A. solani was 7.2 (parental tansgenic and

  9. Regulation by ToxR-Like Proteins Converges on vttRB Expression To Control Type 3 Secretion System-Dependent Caco2-BBE Cytotoxicity in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly A; Sofia, Madeline K; Weaver, Jacob W A; Seward, Christopher H; Dziejman, Michelle

    2016-06-01

    Genes carried on the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) pathogenicity island of Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 serogroup strain AM-19226 must be precisely regulated in order for bacteria to cause disease. Previously reported results showed that both T3SS function and the presence of bile are required to cause Caco2-BBE cell cytotoxicity during coculture with strain AM-19226. We therefore investigated additional parameters affecting in vitro cell death, including bacterial load and the role of three transmembrane transcriptional regulatory proteins, VttRA, VttRB, and ToxR. VttRA and VttRB are encoded on the horizontally acquired T3SS genomic island, whereas ToxR is encoded on the ancestral chromosome. While strains carrying deletions in any one of the three transcriptional regulatory genes are unable to cause eukaryotic cell death, the results of complementation studies point to a hierarchy of regulatory control that converges on vttRB expression. The data suggest both that ToxR and VttRA act upstream of VttRB and that modifying the level of either vttRA or vttRB expression can strongly influence T3SS gene expression. We therefore propose a model whereby T3SS activity and, hence, in vitro cytotoxicity are ultimately regulated by vttRB expression. In contrast to O1 and O139 serogroup V. cholerae strains that cause cholera using two main virulence factors (toxin-coregulated pilus [TCP] and cholera toxin [CT]), O39 serogroup strain AM-19226 uses a type 3 secretion system as its principal virulence mechanism. Although the regulatory network governing TCP and CT expression is well understood, the factors influencing T3SS-associated virulence are not. Using an in vitro mammalian cell model to investigate the role of three ToxR-like transmembrane transcriptional activators in causing T3SS-dependent cytotoxicity, we found that expression levels and a hierarchical organization were important for promoting T3SS gene expression. Furthermore, our results suggest that horizontally

  10. Regulation by ToxR-Like Proteins Converges on vttRB Expression To Control Type 3 Secretion System-Dependent Caco2-BBE Cytotoxicity in Vibrio cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly A.; Sofia, Madeline K.; Weaver, Jacob W. A.; Seward, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genes carried on the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) pathogenicity island of Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 serogroup strain AM-19226 must be precisely regulated in order for bacteria to cause disease. Previously reported results showed that both T3SS function and the presence of bile are required to cause Caco2-BBE cell cytotoxicity during coculture with strain AM-19226. We therefore investigated additional parameters affecting in vitro cell death, including bacterial load and the role of three transmembrane transcriptional regulatory proteins, VttRA, VttRB, and ToxR. VttRA and VttRB are encoded on the horizontally acquired T3SS genomic island, whereas ToxR is encoded on the ancestral chromosome. While strains carrying deletions in any one of the three transcriptional regulatory genes are unable to cause eukaryotic cell death, the results of complementation studies point to a hierarchy of regulatory control that converges on vttRB expression. The data suggest both that ToxR and VttRA act upstream of VttRB and that modifying the level of either vttRA or vttRB expression can strongly influence T3SS gene expression. We therefore propose a model whereby T3SS activity and, hence, in vitro cytotoxicity are ultimately regulated by vttRB expression. IMPORTANCE In contrast to O1 and O139 serogroup V. cholerae strains that cause cholera using two main virulence factors (toxin-coregulated pilus [TCP] and cholera toxin [CT]), O39 serogroup strain AM-19226 uses a type 3 secretion system as its principal virulence mechanism. Although the regulatory network governing TCP and CT expression is well understood, the factors influencing T3SS-associated virulence are not. Using an in vitro mammalian cell model to investigate the role of three ToxR-like transmembrane transcriptional activators in causing T3SS-dependent cytotoxicity, we found that expression levels and a hierarchical organization were important for promoting T3SS gene expression. Furthermore, our results

  11. RESISTANCE EVALUATION ON POPULATIONS OF CROSSES BETWEEN TRANSGENIC POTATO KATAHDIN RB AND NON-TRANSGENIC ATLANTIC AND GRANOLA TO LATE BLIGHT (Phytophthora infestans IN CONFINED FIELD TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberta Dinar Ambarwati

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Late blight resistance gene (RB gene isolated from Solanum bulbocastanum, is a broad resistance gene against all races of Phytophthora infestans. The gene was transformed into Katah-din event SP904 and SP951 using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and these transgenic plants have been crossed with susceptible potato cultivars Atlantic and Granola. Populations of the crosses have been molecularly characterized for the integration of the RB transgene. The study aimed to evaluate the resistance of the populations of crosses between transgenic Katahdin RB  and susceptible non-transgenic parents (Atlantic and Granola to late blight in a confined field trial at Pasir Sarongge, Cianjur, West Java. A total of 84 clones originated from four popula-tions were evaluated for resistance to late blight. These included 22 clones of Atlantic x transgenic Katahdin SP904, 16 clones of Atlantic x transgenic Katahdin SP951, 19 clones of Granola x transgenic Katahdin SP904, and 27 clones of Granola x transgenic Katahdin SP951. Observations of the late blight infection were conducted when late blight symptoms were detected, i.e. at 56, 60, 63, 70, and 77 days after planting (DAP. The result showed there were high variations in the resistance level of all the 84 clones tested. Clones of crosses between susceptible parents (Atlantic or Granola and resistant parents (transgenic Katahdin SP904 or Katahdin SP951 showed a similar pattern based on the area under disease progress curve (AUDPC value, i.e. 377.2 greater than the AUDPC of the resistant parents (180.1, but smaller than that of the susceptible parents (670.7. Observation at 77 DAP resulted four resistant potato clones having resistance score of 7.0-7.6, higher than the transgenic parents Katahdin SP904 (4.6 and Katahdin SP951 (6.8, i.e. clone B8 (Atlantic x transgenic Katahdin SP951 with resistance score of 7.6 and clones B26 (Atlantic x transgenic Katahdin SP951, C183 (Granola x transgenic Katahdin SP904, and D89

  12. p15(PAF) is an Rb/E2F-regulated S-phase protein essential for DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Ning; Feng, Mow-Jung; Chen, Yu-Ling; Yuan, Ray-Hwang; Jeng, Yung-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The p15(PAF)/KIAA0101 protein is a proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-associated protein overexpressed in multiple types of cancer. Attenuation of p15(PAF) expression leads to modifications in the DNA repair process, rendering cells more sensitive to ultraviolet-induced cell death. In this study, we identified that p15(PAF) expression peaks during the S phase of the cell cycle. We observed that p15(PAF) knockdown markedly inhibited cell proliferation, S-phase progression, and DNA synthesis. Depletion of p15(PAF) resulted in p21 upregulation, especially chromatin-bound p21. We further identified that the p15(PAF) promoter contains 3 E2F-binding motifs. Loss of Rb-mediated transcriptional repression resulted in upregulated p15(PAF) expression. Binding of E2F4 and E2F6 to the p15(PAF) promoter caused transcriptional repression. Overall, these results indicate that p15(PAF) is tightly regulated by the Rb/E2F complex. Loss of Rb/E2F-mediated repression during the G1/S transition phase leads to p15(PAF) upregulation, which facilitates DNA synthesis and S-phase progression.

  13. Drug efflux proteins in multidrug resistant bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanVeen, HW; Konings, WN

    Bacteria contain an array of transport proteins in their cytoplasmic membrane. Many of these proteins play an important role in conferring resistance to toxic compounds. The multidrug efflux systems encountered in prokaryotic cells are very similar to those observed in eukaryotic cells. Therefore, a

  14. Yeast ABC proteins involved in multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piecuch, Agata; Obłąk, Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Pleiotropic drug resistance is a complex phenomenon that involves many proteins that together create a network. One of the common mechanisms of multidrug resistance in eukaryotic cells is the active efflux of a broad range of xenobiotics through ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often used as a model to study such activity because of the functional and structural similarities of its ABC transporters to mammalian ones. Numerous ABC transporters are found in humans and some are associated with the resistance of tumors to chemotherapeutics. Efflux pump modulators that change the activity of ABC proteins are the most promising candidate drugs to overcome such resistance. These modulators can be chemically synthesized or isolated from natural sources (e.g., plant alkaloids) and might also be used in the treatment of fungal infections. There are several generations of synthetic modulators that differ in specificity, toxicity and effectiveness, and are often used for other clinical effects.

  15. Haploinsufficiency of the retinoblastoma protein gene reduces diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and hepatosteatosis in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercader, Josep; Ribot, Joan; Murano, Incoronata

    2009-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue activity dissipates energy as heat, and there is evidence that lack of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) may favor the development of the brown adipocyte phenotype in adipose cells. In this work we assessed the impact of germ line haploinsufficiency of the pRb gene (Rb...

  16. Tamoxifen induces resistance to activated protein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühl, Heiko; Schröder, Lars; Müller, Jens; Fimmers, Rolf; Sukhitashvili, Shorena; Welz, Julia; Kuhn, Walther C; Oldenburg, Johannes; Rudlowski, Christian; Pötzsch, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    The estrogen antagonist tamoxifen (TAM) increases the thrombotic risk similar to estrogen containing oral contraceptives (OC). In OC users this risk is attributed to alterations of hemostasis resulting in acquired resistance to activated protein C (APC). TAM-induced APC resistance has not been reported yet. Blood samples were collected prospectively from women with breast cancer before (n=25) and monthly after start of adjuvant TAM treatment (n=75). APC resistance was evaluated on basis of the effect of APC on the endogenous thrombin generation potential. To detect increased in vivo APC generation APC plasma levels were measured using a highly sensitive oligonucleotide-based enzyme capture assay. Routine hemostasis parameters were measured additionally. APC sensitivity decreased by 41% (p=0.001) compared to baseline after one month of TAM application and remained significantly decreased during the study period. Free protein S increased (p=0.008) while other analyzed procoagulant factors, inhibitors, and activation markers of coagulation decreased or did not change significantly. In five patients the APC concentration increased to non-physiological levels but an overall significant increase of APC was not observed. This is the first study showing acquired APC resistance under TAM therapy. Acquired APC resistance might explain the increased thrombotic risk during TAM treatment. Observed changes of hemostasis parameters suggest different determinants of TAM-induced APC resistance than in OC-induced APC resistance. The presence of acquired APC resistance in TAM patients warrants further evaluation if these patients may benefit from antithrombotic prophylaxis in the presence of additional thrombotic risk factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bipolar resistive switching in different plant and animal proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bag, A.

    2014-06-01

    We report bipolar resistive switching phenomena observed in different types of plant and animal proteins. Using protein as the switching medium, resistive switching devices have been fabricated with conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) and Al as bottom and top electrodes, respectively. A clockwise bipolar resistive switching phenomenon is observed in all proteins. It is shown that the resistive switching phenomena originate from the local redox process in the protein and the ion exchange from the top electrode/protein interface.

  18. Comparison between immune responses and resistance induced in BALB/c mice vaccinated with RB51 and Rev. 1 vaccines and challenged with Brucella melitensis bv. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, M E R; El-Gibaly, S M; Montasser, A M

    2002-08-02

    BALB/c mice were immunized with live rough Brucella abortus RB51 or smooth Brucella melitensis Rev. 1 vaccines and challenged with a B. melitensis field strain. Protection was assessed by a variety of serological tests and recovery of vaccinal and challenge strains by culture. Mice vaccinated with RB51 gave negative results in the conventional serological tests prior to challenge, namely; standard tube agglutination test (SAT), Rose Bengal plate test (RBPT), buffered acidified plate antigen test (BAPAT), and mercaptoethanol test (MET). Sero-conversion took place to a whole-cell bacterial buffered RB51 antigen after vaccination and persisted for 7 weeks post-vaccination. Mice challenged with B. melitensis were assessed for bacterial load and immune response for 12 weeks after challenge. Protection units were showed that Rev. 1 vaccine was superior to RB51 vaccine in protection of mice against B. melitensis. However, RB51 vaccine has the advantage that it would not elicit antibodies to standard serological tests based on the LPS O antigen. RB51 vaccine could therefore be used for control of B. melitensis infection and avoid confusion in the use of standard sero-diagnostic tests.

  19. Skin tumors Rb(eing uncovered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLOTILDE eCOSTA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Rb1 gene was the first bona fide tumor suppressor identified and cloned more than 25 years ago. Since then, a plethora of studies have revealed the functions of pRb and the existence of a sophisticated and strictly regulated pathway that modulates such functional roles. An emerging paradox affecting Rb1 in cancer connects the relatively low number of mutations affecting Rb1 gene in specific human tumors, compared with the widely functional inactivation of pRb in most, if not in all, human cancers. The existence of a retinoblastoma family of proteins pRb, p107 and p130 and their potential unique and overlapping functions as master regulators of cell cycle progression and transcriptional modulation by similar processes, may provide potential clues to explain such conundrum. Here, we will review the development of different genetically engineered mouse models, in particular those affecting stratified epithelia, and how they have offered new avenues to understand the roles of the Rb family members and their targets in the context of tumor development and progression.

  20. DPL-1 DP, LIN-35 Rb and EFL-1 E2F act with the MCD-1 zinc-finger protein to promote programmed cell death in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddien, Peter W; Andersen, Erik C; Huang, Michael C; Horvitz, H Robert

    2007-04-01

    The genes egl-1, ced-9, ced-4, and ced-3 play major roles in programmed cell death in Caenorhabditis elegans. To identify genes that have more subtle activities, we sought mutations that confer strong cell-death defects in a genetically sensitized mutant background. Specifically, we screened for mutations that enhance the cell-death defects caused by a partial loss-of-function allele of the ced-3 caspase gene. We identified mutations in two genes not previously known to affect cell death, dpl-1 and mcd-1 (modifier of cell death). dpl-1 encodes the C. elegans homolog of DP, the human E2F-heterodimerization partner. By testing genes known to interact with dpl-1, we identified roles in cell death for four additional genes: efl-1 E2F, lin-35 Rb, lin-37 Mip40, and lin-52 dLin52. mcd-1 encodes a novel protein that contains one zinc finger and that is synthetically required with lin-35 Rb for animal viability. dpl-1 and mcd-1 act with efl-1 E2F and lin-35 Rb to promote programmed cell death and do so by regulating the killing process rather than by affecting the decision between survival and death. We propose that the DPL-1 DP, MCD-1 zinc finger, EFL-1 E2F, LIN-35 Rb, LIN-37 Mip40, and LIN-52 dLin52 proteins act together in transcriptional regulation to promote programmed cell death.

  1. Brucella abortus strain RB51 leucine auxotroph as an environmentally safe vaccine for plasmid maintenance and antigen overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Parthiban; Seleem, Mohamed N; Contreras, Andrea; Purwantini, Endang; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M

    2008-11-01

    To avoid potentiating the spread of an antibiotic resistance marker, a plasmid expressing a leuB gene and a heterologous antigen, green fluorescent protein (GFP), was shown to complement a leucine auxotroph of cattle vaccine strain Brucella abortus RB51, which protected CD1 mice from virulent B. abortus 2308 and elicited GFP antibodies.

  2. Simple Coatings to Render Polystyrene Protein Resistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Hecker

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-specific protein adsorption is detrimental to the performance of many biomedical devices. Polystyrene is a commonly used material in devices and thin films. Simple reliable surface modification of polystyrene to render it protein resistant is desired in particular for device fabrication and orthogonal functionalisation schemes. This report details modifications carried out on a polystyrene surface to prevent protein adsorption. The trialed surfaces included Pluronic F127 and PLL-g-PEG, adsorbed on polystyrene, using a polydopamine-assisted approach. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D results showed only short-term anti-fouling success of the polystyrene surface modified with F127, and the subsequent failure of the polydopamine intermediary layer in improving its stability. In stark contrast, QCM-D analysis proved the success of the polydopamine assisted PLL-g-PEG coating in preventing bovine serum albumin adsorption. This modified surface is equally as protein-rejecting after 24 h in buffer, and thus a promising simple coating for long term protein rejection of polystyrene.

  3. Arctigenin induces cell cycle arrest by blocking the phosphorylation of Rb via the modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins in human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Hong, Se Chul; Jeong, Hyung Jin; Koo, Jin Suk

    2011-10-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, worldwide being second only to lung cancer as a cause of death. Arctigenin, a representative dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, occurs in a variety of plants. However, the molecular mechanisms of arctigenin for anti-tumor effect on gastric cancer have not been examined. This study examined the biological effects of arctigenin on the human gastric cancer cell line SNU-1 and AGS. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. In MTT assay, the proliferation of SNU-1 and AGS cells was significantly inhibited by arctigenin in a time and dose dependent manner, as compared with SNU-1 and AGS cells cultured in the absence of arctigenin. Inhibition of cell proliferation by arctigenin was in part associated with apoptotic cell death, as shown by changes in the expression ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax by arctigenin. Also, arctigenin blocked cell cycle arrest from G(1) to S phase by regulating the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Rb, cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK4, CDK2, p21Waf1/Cip1 and p15 INK4b. The antiproliferative effect of arctigenin on SNU-1 and AGS gastric cancer cells revealed in this study suggests that arctigenin has intriguing potential as a chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of bovine somatotropin (rbSt) concentration at different moisture levels on the physical stability of sucrose in freeze-dried rbSt/sucrose mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarciaux, J M; Hageman, M J

    1997-03-01

    The inherent instability of many proteins during freeze-drying and storage necessitates the addition of excipients to protect the proteins. It is emphasized in the literature that lyophilized sugar/protein composites should be stored at temperatures below their glass transition temperature (T(g)) to prevent crystallization of excipients. The influence of bovine somatotropin (rbSt) concentration on inhibition of sucrose crystallization at different relative humidities (RH) was of interest. Thermally modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) was used to measure T(g) and sucrose crystallization temperatures (T(c)) of the composites. Sorption isotherms of the various sucrose/rbSt mixtures were determined gravimetrically with a controlled atmosphere microbalance (CAM) and verified by Karl Fischer analysis of selected samples. The CAM was also used to determine lag times and sucrose crystal growth rates by monitoring weight losses resulting from water liberation upon crystallization of sucrose at 23 degrees C. Results obtained by MDSC indicate that the T(c) increased linearly from approximately 110 degrees C for pure sucrose to approximately 140 degrees C with 20% rbSt at very low water content ( or = 30% rbSt in nonisothermal conditions. Plasticization by water decreased both T(g) and T(c) quite similarly but didn't impact the noted effect of protein on T(c). Induction time for sucrose crystallization (i.e. nucleation) at approximately 45% RH (23 degrees C) increased almost 10-fold by addition of 10% rbSt, whereas rates of water loss due to crystallization decreased by no more than 2-3-fold. The overall results strongly indicate that formulations of higher protein concentration will be more resistant to sucrose crystallization and thus more robust when transiently exposed to storage temperatures above their T(g).

  5. Characterization of a novel WDR5-binding site that recruits RbBP5 through a conserved motif to enhance methylation of histone H3 lysine 4 by mixed lineage leukemia protein-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odho, Zain; Southall, Stacey M; Wilson, Jon R

    2010-10-22

    Histone modification is well established as a fundamental mechanism driving the regulation of transcription, replication, and DNA repair through the control of chromatin structure. Likewise, it is apparent that incorrect targeting of histone modifications contributes to misregulated gene expression and hence to developmental disorders and diseases of genomic instability such as cancer. The KMT2 family of SET domain methyltransferases, typified by mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1), is responsible for histone H3 lysine 4 methylation, a marker of active genes. To ensure that this modification is correctly targeted, a multiprotein complex associates with the methyltransferase and directs activity. We have identified a novel interaction site on the core complex protein WD repeat protein-5 (WDR5), and we mapped the complementary site on its partner retinoblastoma-binding protein-5 (RbBP5). We have characterized this interaction by x-ray crystallography and show how it is fundamental to the assembly of the complex and to the regulation of methyltransferase activity. We show which region of RbBP5 contributes directly to mixed lineage leukemia activation, and we combine our structural and biochemical data to produce a model to show how WDR5 and RbBP5 act cooperatively to stimulate activity.

  6. Over-expression of homologous antigens in a leucine auxotroph of Brucella abortus strain RB51 protects mice against a virulent B. suis challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Parthiban; Surendran, Naveen; Seleem, Mohamed N; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Boyle, Stephen M

    2011-04-12

    Infection by members of the Gram-negative bacterial genus Brucella causes brucellosis in a variety of mammals. Brucellosis in swine remains a challenge, as there is no vaccine in the USA approved for use in swine against brucellosis. Here, we developed an improved recombinant Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 that could afford protection against Brucella suis infection by over-expressing genes encoding homologous proteins: L7/L12 ribosomal protein, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase [SOD] and glycosyl-transferase [WboA]. Using strain RB51leuB as a platform and an antibiotic-resistance marker free plasmid, strains RB51leuB/SOD, RB51leuB/SOD/L7/L12 and RB51leuB/SOD/WboA were constructed to over-express the antigens: SOD alone, SOD and ribosomal protein L7/L12 or SOD and glycosyl-transferase, respectively. The ability of these vaccine candidates to protect against a virulent B. suis challenge were evaluated in a mouse model. All vaccine groups protected mice significantly (PBrucella antigens can be over-expressed in strain RB51leuB and elicit protective immune responses against brucellosis. Since the plasmid over-expressing homologous antigens does not carry an antibiotic resistance gene, it complies with federal regulations and therefore could be used to develop safer multi-species vaccines for prevention of brucellosis caused by other species of Brucella. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of a genetic interaction between the tumor suppressor EAF2 and the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) signaling pathway in C. elegans and prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Liquan; Wang, Dan [Department of Urology, The University of Pittsburgh, 5200 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15216 (United States); Fisher, Alfred L., E-mail: fishera2@uthscsa.edu [Division of Geriatrics, Gerontology, and Palliative Medicine, Department of Medicine, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Center for Healthy Aging, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); GRECC, STVAHCS, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Wang, Zhou, E-mail: wangz2@upmc.edu [Department of Urology, The University of Pittsburgh, 5200 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15216 (United States); GRECC, STVAHCS, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • RNAi screen identified genetic enhancers for the C. elegans homolog of EAF2. • EAF2 and RBBP4 proteins physically bind to each other and alter transcription. • Overexpression of EAF2 and RBBP4 induces the cell death in prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: The tumor suppressor EAF2 is regulated by androgen signaling and associated with prostate cancer. While EAF2 and its partner ELL have been shown to be members of protein complexes involved in RNA polymerase II transcriptional elongation, the biologic roles for EAF2 especially with regards to the development of cancer remains poorly understood. We have previously identified the eaf-1 gene in Caenorhabditiselegans as the ortholog of EAF2, and shown that eaf-1 interacts with the ELL ortholog ell-1 to control development and fertility in worms. To identify genetic pathways that interact with eaf-1, we screened RNAi libraries consisting of transcription factors, phosphatases, and chromatin-modifying factors to identify genes which enhance the effects of eaf-1(tm3976) on fertility. From this screen, we identified lin-53, hmg-1.2, pha-4, ruvb-2 and set-6 as hits. LIN-53 is the C. elegans ortholog of human retinoblastoma binding protein 4/7 (RBBP 4/7), which binds to the retinoblastoma protein and inhibits the Ras signaling pathway. We find that lin-53 showed a synthetic interaction with eaf-1(tm3976) where knockdown of lin-53 in an eaf-1(tm3976) mutant resulted in sterile worms. This phenotype may be due to cell death as the treated worms contain degenerated embryos with increased expression of the ced-1:GFP cell death marker. Further we find that the interaction between eaf-1 and lin-53/RBBP4/7 also exists in vertebrates, which is reflected by the formation of a protein complex between EAF2 and RBBP4/7. Finally, overexpression of either human EAF2 or RBBP4 in LNCaP cells induced the cell death while knockdown of EAF2 in LNCaP enhanced cell proliferation, indicating an important role of EAF2 in

  8. Enhanced efficacy of recombinant Brucella abortus RB51 vaccines against B. melitensis infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Contreras, Andrea; Sanakkayala, Neelima; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M; Schurig, Gerhardt G

    2004-09-08

    Brucella abortus strain RB51 is an attenuated rough strain, currently being used as the official live vaccine for bovine brucellosis in the USA and several other countries. In strain RB51, the wboA gene, encoding a glycosyltransferase required for the O-side chain synthesis, is disrupted by an IS711 element. Recently, we have demonstrated that strain RB51WboA, RB51 complemented with a functional wboA gene, remains rough but expresses low quantities of O-side chain in the cytoplasm. Mice vaccinated with strain RB51WboA develop greatly enhanced resistance against challenge with B. abortus virulent strain 2308. We have also demonstrated that overexpression of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) in strain RB51 (RB51SOD) significantly increases its vaccine efficacy against strain 2308 challenge. In this study, we constructed a new recombinant strain, RB51SOD/WboA, that over expresses SOD with simultaneous expression of O-side chain in the cytoplasm. We tested the vaccine potential of strains RB51SOD, RB51WboA, RB51SOD/WboA against challenge with virulent Brucella melitensis 16M and B. abortus 2308 in mice. In comparison with strain RB51, strain RB51SOD induced better protection against strain 2308, but not strain 16M, challenge. Similar to strain RB51WboA, vaccination with strain RB51SOD/WboA resulted in complete protection of the mice from infection with strain 2308. When challenged with strain 16M, mice vaccinated with either strain RB51WboA or strain RB51SOD/WboA were significantly better protected than those vaccinated with strain RB51 or RB51SOD. These results suggest that strains RB51WboA and RB51SOD/WboA are good vaccine candidates for inducing enhanced protection against B. melitensis infection.

  9. E2F/Rb Family Proteins Mediate Interferon Induced Repression of Adenovirus Immediate Early Transcription to Promote Persistent Viral Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueting Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are cytokines that have pleiotropic effects and play important roles in innate and adaptive immunity. IFNs have broad antiviral properties and function by different mechanisms. IFNs fail to inhibit wild-type Adenovirus (Ad replication in established cancer cell lines. In this study, we analyzed the effects of IFNs on Ad replication in normal human cells. Our data demonstrate that both IFNα and IFNγ blocked wild-type Ad5 replication in primary human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBEC and TERT-immortalized normal human diploid fibroblasts (HDF-TERT. IFNs inhibited the replication of divergent adenoviruses. The inhibition of Ad5 replication by IFNα and IFNγ is the consequence of repression of transcription of the E1A immediate early gene product. Both IFNα and IFNγ impede the association of the transactivator GABP with the E1A enhancer region during the early phase of infection. The repression of E1A expression by IFNs requires a conserved E2F binding site in the E1A enhancer, and IFNs increased the enrichment of the E2F-associated pocket proteins, Rb and p107, at the E1A enhancer in vivo. PD0332991 (Pabociclib, a specific CDK4/6 inhibitor, dephosphoryles pocket proteins to promote their interaction with E2Fs and inhibited wild-type Ad5 replication dependent on the conserved E2F binding site. Consistent with this result, expression of the small E1A oncoprotein, which abrogates E2F/pocket protein interactions, rescued Ad replication in the presence of IFNα or IFNγ. Finally, we established a persistent Ad infection model in vitro and demonstrated that IFNγ suppresses productive Ad replication in a manner dependent on the E2F binding site in the E1A enhancer. This is the first study that probes the molecular basis of persistent adenovirus infection and reveals a novel mechanism by which adenoviruses utilize IFN signaling to suppress lytic virus replication and to promote persistent infection.

  10. Structural Basis of Protein Oxidation Resistance: A Lysozyme Study

    OpenAIRE

    Girod, Marion; Enjalbert, Quentin; Brunet, Claire; Antoine, Rodolphe; Lemoine, Jérôme; Lukac, Iva; Radman, Miroslav; Krisko, Anita; Dugourd, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidative damage in proteins correlates with aging since it can cause irreversible and progressive degeneration of almost all cellular functions. Apparently, native protein structures have evolved intrinsic resistance to oxidation since perfectly folded proteins are, by large most robust. Here we explore the structural basis of protein resistance to radiation-induced oxidation using chicken egg white lysozyme in the native and misfolded form. We study the differential resistan...

  11. microRNA-4331 Promotes Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus (TGEV)-induced Mitochondrial Damage Via Targeting RB1, Upregulating Interleukin-1 Receptor Accessory Protein (IL1RAP), and Activating p38 MAPK Pathway In Vitro*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaomin; Bai, Xiaoyuan; Guan, Lijuan; Li, Juejun; Song, Xiangjun; Ma, Xuelian; Guo, Jianxiong; Zhang, Zhichao; Du, Qian; Huang, Yong; Tong, Dewen

    2018-01-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), a member of the coronaviridae family, could cause fatal diarrhea of piglets and result in numerous economic losses. Previous studies demonstrated that TGEV infection could lead to mitochondrial damage and upregulate miR-4331 level. So miR-4331 may play an important regulatory role in the control of mitochondrial function. To explore the potential role of miR-4331 in mitochondrial damage, we adopted a strategy consisting of quantitative proteomic analysis of porcine kidney (PK-15) cells in response to miR-4331 and TGEV infection. Eventually, 69 differentially expressed proteins were gained. The target of miR-4331 was identified. The effects of miR-4331 and its target RB1 on mitochondrial Ca2+ level, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP), p38 MAPK signaling pathway were investigated. The results showed that miR-4331 elevated mitochondrial Ca2+ level, reduced MMP, targets Retinoblastoma 1 (RB1), upregulated IL1RAP, and induced activation of p38 MAPK pathway during TGEV infection. RB1 was identified as the direct targets of miR-4331 and downregulated IL1RAP, suppressed the activation of p38 MPAK, and attenuated TGEV-induced mitochondrial damage. In addition, IL1RAP played a positive role in activating p38 MAPK signaling and negative role in TGEV-induced mitochondrial damage. The data indicate that miR-4331 aggravates TGEV-induced mitochondrial damage by repressing expression of RB1, promoting IL1RAP, and activating p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:29217619

  12. microRNA-4331 Promotes Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus (TGEV)-induced Mitochondrial Damage Via Targeting RB1, Upregulating Interleukin-1 Receptor Accessory Protein (IL1RAP), and Activating p38 MAPK PathwayIn Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaomin; Bai, Xiaoyuan; Guan, Lijuan; Li, Juejun; Song, Xiangjun; Ma, Xuelian; Guo, Jianxiong; Zhang, Zhichao; Du, Qian; Huang, Yong; Tong, Dewen

    2018-02-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), a member of the coronaviridae family, could cause fatal diarrhea of piglets and result in numerous economic losses. Previous studies demonstrated that TGEV infection could lead to mitochondrial damage and upregulate miR-4331 level. So miR-4331 may play an important regulatory role in the control of mitochondrial function. To explore the potential role of miR-4331 in mitochondrial damage, we adopted a strategy consisting of quantitative proteomic analysis of porcine kidney (PK-15) cells in response to miR-4331 and TGEV infection. Eventually, 69 differentially expressed proteins were gained. The target of miR-4331 was identified. The effects of miR-4331 and its target RB1 on mitochondrial Ca 2+ level, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP), p38 MAPK signaling pathway were investigated. The results showed that miR-4331 elevated mitochondrial Ca 2+ level, reduced MMP, targets Retinoblastoma 1 (RB1), upregulated IL1RAP, and induced activation of p38 MAPK pathway during TGEV infection. RB1 was identified as the direct targets of miR-4331 and downregulated IL1RAP, suppressed the activation of p38 MPAK, and attenuated TGEV-induced mitochondrial damage. In addition, IL1RAP played a positive role in activating p38 MAPK signaling and negative role in TGEV-induced mitochondrial damage. The data indicate that miR-4331 aggravates TGEV-induced mitochondrial damage by repressing expression of RB1, promoting IL1RAP, and activating p38 MAPK pathway. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Expression of the breast cancer resistance protein in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faneyte, Ian F.; Kristel, Petra M. P.; Maliepaard, Marc; Scheffer, George L.; Scheper, Rik J.; Schellens, Jan H. M.; van de Vijver, Marc J.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is involved in in vitro multidrug resistance and was first identified in the breast cancer cell line MCF7/AdrVp. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of BCRP in resistance of breast cancer to anthracycline treatment. EXPERIMENTAL

  14. A single point mutation in Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein is sufficient to overcome Tsw-gene-mediated resistance in pepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almási, Asztéria; Nemes, Katalin; Csömör, Zsófia; Tóbiás, István; Palkovics, László; Salánki, Katalin

    2017-06-01

    The nonstructural protein (NSs) of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was previously identified as an avirulence determinant for Tsw-based resistance on pepper. The NSs of wild-type (WT) and resistance-breaking (RB) TSWV strains isolated in Hungary had only two amino acid substitutions (104, 461). We have analysed the ability of the NSs and their point mutant variants to trigger Tsw-mediated hypersensitive responses and RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) activity in patch assays. We identified a single amino acid change at position 104 (T-A) that was responsible for the necrosis induction or loss, while a significant difference was not detected in the RSS activity of the two parental strains. We have successfully complemented the infection of the WT strain on resistant pepper cultivar with the infectious S RNA transcript of the RB strain and the WT-T104A point mutant. Our work provides direct evidence that a single amino acid change can induce an RB phenotype.

  15. Protein function prediction involved on radio-resistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezhoud, Karim; Mankai, Houda; Sghaier, Haitham; Barkallah, Insaf

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we identified 58 proteins under positive selection in ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria (IRRB) but absent in all ionizing-radiation-sensitive bacteria (IRSB). These are good reasons to believe these 58 proteins with their interactions with other proteins (interactomes) are a part of the answer to the question as to how IRRB resist to radiation, because our knowledge of interactomes of positively selected orphan proteins in IRRB might allow us to define cellular pathways important to ionizing-radiation resistance. Using the Database of Interacting Proteins and the PSIbase, we have predicted interactions of orthologs of the 58 proteins under positive selection in IRRB but absent in all IRSB. We used integrate experimental data sets with molecular interaction networks and protein structure prediction from databases. Among these, 18 proteins with their interactomes were identified in Deinococcus radiodurans R1. DNA checkpoint and repair, kinases pathways, energetic and nucleotide metabolisms were the important biological process that found. We predicted the interactomes of 58 proteins under positive selection in IRRB. It is hoped our data will provide new clues as to the cellular pathways that are important for ionizing-radiation resistance. We have identified news proteins involved on DNA management which were not previously mentioned. It is an important input in addition to protein that studied. It does still work to deepen our study on these new proteins

  16. IL12Rβ1ΔTM Is a Secreted Product of il12rb1 That Promotes Control of Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Aurelie A.; Fountain, Jeffrey J.; Miller, Halli E.; Cooper, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    IL12RB1 is a human gene that is important for resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. IL12RB1 is expressed by multiple leukocyte lineages, and encodes a type I transmembrane protein (IL12Rβ1) that associates with IL12p40 and promotes the development of host-protective TH1cells. Recently, we observed that il12rb1—the mouse homolog of IL12RB1—is alternatively spliced by leukocytes to produce a second isoform (IL12Rβ1ΔTM) that has biological properties distinct from IL12Rβ1. Although the expression of IL12Rβ1ΔTM is elicited by M. tuberculosis in vivo, and its overexpression enhances IL12p40 responsiveness in vitro, the contribution of IL12Rβ1ΔTM to controlling M. tuberculosis infection has not been tested. Here, we demonstrate that IL12Rβ1ΔTM represents a secreted product of il12rb1 that, when absent from mice, compromises their ability to control M. tuberculosis infection in extrapulmonary organs. Furthermore, elevated M. tuberculosis burdens in IL12Rβ1ΔTM-deficient animals are associated with decreased lymph node cellularity and a decline in TH1 development. Collectively, these data support a model wherein IL12Rβ1ΔTM is a secreted product of il12rb1 that promotes resistance to M. tuberculosis infection by potentiating TH cells response to IL-12. PMID:25404030

  17. Che-1 affects cell growth by interfering with the recruitment of HDAC1 by Rb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Tiziana; De Angelis, Roberta; De Nicola, Francesca; Barbato, Christian; Di Padova, Monica; Corbi, Nicoletta; Libri, Valentina; Benassi, Barbara; Mattei, Elisabetta; Chersi, Alberto; Soddu, Silvia; Floridi, Aristide; Passananti, Claudio; Fanciulli, Maurizio

    2002-11-01

    DNA tumor virus oncoproteins bind and inactivate Rb by interfering with the Rb/HDAC1 interaction. Che-1 is a recently identified human Rb binding protein that inhibits the Rb growth suppressing function. Here we show that Che-1 contacts the Rb pocket region and competes with HDAC1 for Rb binding site, removing HDAC1 from the Rb/E2F complex in vitro and from the E2F target promoters in vivo. Che-1 overexpression activates DNA synthesis in quiescent NIH-3T3 cells through HDAC1 displacement. Consistently, Che-1-specific RNA interference affects E2F activity and cell proliferation in human fibroblasts but not in the pocket protein-defective 293 cells. These findings indicate the existence of a pathway of Rb regulation supporting Che-1 as the cellular counterpart of DNA tumor virus oncoproteins.

  18. Frequent disruption of the RB1 pathway in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Kania, P W; Ino, Y

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, we analysed 34 de novo diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLCL) from a population-based lymphoma registry for alterations of the RB1 pathway at the genetic (RB1 and CDK4) and protein (pRb, cyclin D1, cyclin D3, CDK4, and E2F-1) level. The results were correlated with the data fr...

  19. BRCA1: RB Interaction in Breast Cancer Suppression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fan, Saijun

    2001-01-01

    .... Recent studies suggest that the tumor suppressor activity of BRCAl is due, in part, to physical/functional interactions with other tumor suppressors, including p53 and the retinoblastoma (RB) protein...

  20. BRCA1: RB Interaction in Breast Cancer Suppression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fan, Saijun

    2000-01-01

    .... Recent studies suggest that the tumor suppressor activity of BRCAl is due, in part, to physical/functional interactions with other tumor suppressors, including p53 and the retinoblastoma (RB) protein...

  1. Study of multidrug resistance and radioresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yoon Koo; Yoo, Young Do

    1999-04-01

    We investigated the mechanism of 5-FU, adriamycin, radiation resistance in Korean gastric cancer cells. First we investigated the relation between Rb and multidrug resistance. Rb stable transfectants exhibited 5- to 10- fold more resistance to adriamycin than the control cells. These Rb transfectants showed increased MDR1 expression. We also investigated up-regulation in radiation-resistant tumor tissues. HSP27, MRP-8, GST, and NKEF-B were up-regulated in radiation resistant tumor. Expression of NKEF-B was also increased by radiation exposure in Head and Neck cells. These results demonstrated that NKEF-B is a stress response protein and it may have an important role in radiation resistance.

  2. Whey protein supplementation during resistance training augments lean body mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volek, Jeff S; Volk, Brittanie M; Gómez, Ana L; Kunces, Laura J; Kupchak, Brian R; Freidenreich, Daniel J; Aristizabal, Juan C; Saenz, Catherine; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Ballard, Kevin D; Quann, Erin E; Kawiecki, Diana L; Flanagan, Shawn D; Comstock, Brett A; Fragala, Maren S; Earp, Jacob E; Fernandez, Maria L; Bruno, Richard S; Ptolemy, Adam S; Kellogg, Mark D; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J

    2013-01-01

    Compared to soy, whey protein is higher in leucine, absorbed quicker and results in a more pronounced increase in muscle protein synthesis. To determine whether supplementation with whey promotes greater increases in muscle mass compared to soy or carbohydrate, we randomized non-resistance-trained men and women into groups who consumed daily isocaloric supplements containing carbohydrate (carb; n = 22), whey protein (whey; n = 19), or soy protein (soy; n = 22). All subjects completed a supervised, whole-body periodized resistance training program consisting of 96 workouts (~9 months). Body composition was determined at baseline and after 3, 6, and 9 months. Plasma amino acid responses to resistance exercise followed by supplement ingestion were determined at baseline and 9 months. Daily protein intake (including the supplement) for carb, whey, and soy was 1.1, 1.4, and 1.4 g·kg body mass⁻¹, respectively. Lean body mass gains were significantly (p mass decreased slightly but there were no differences between groups. Fasting concentrations of leucine were significantly elevated (20%) and postexercise plasma leucine increased more than 2-fold in whey. Fasting leucine concentrations were positively correlated with lean body mass responses. Despite consuming similar calories and protein during resistance training, daily supplementation with whey was more effective than soy protein or isocaloric carbohydrate control treatment conditions in promoting gains in lean body mass. These results highlight the importance of protein quality as an important determinant of lean body mass responses to resistance training.

  3. Protein Supplementation Does Not Affect Myogenic Adaptations to Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Paul T; Fry, Christopher S; Igbinigie, Sherry; Deer, Rachel R; Jennings, Kristofer; Cope, Mark B; Mukherjea, Ratna; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2017-06-01

    It has been proposed that protein supplementation during resistance exercise training enhances muscle hypertrophy. The degree of hypertrophy during training is controlled in part through the activation of satellite cells and myonuclear accretion. This study aimed to determine the efficacy of protein supplementation (and the type of protein) during traditional resistance training on myofiber cross-sectional area, satellite cell content, and myonuclear addition. Healthy young men participated in supervised whole-body progressive resistance training 3 d·wk for 12 wk. Participants were randomized to one of three groups ingesting a daily 22-g macronutrient dose of soy-dairy protein blend (PB, n = 22), whey protein isolate (WP, n = 15), or an isocaloric maltodextrin placebo (MDP, n = 17). Lean mass, vastus lateralis myofiber-type-specific cross-sectional area, satellite cell content, and myonuclear addition were assessed before and after resistance training. PB and the pooled protein treatments (PB + WP = PRO) exhibited a greater whole-body lean mass %change compared with MDP (P = 0.057 for PB) and (P = 0.050 for PRO), respectively. All treatments demonstrated similar leg muscle hypertrophy and vastus lateralis myofiber-type-specific cross-sectional area (P supplementation during resistance training has a modest effect on whole-body lean mass as compared with exercise training without protein supplementation, and there was no effect on any outcome between protein supplement types (blend vs whey). However, protein supplementation did not enhance resistance exercise-induced increases in myofiber hypertrophy, satellite cell content, or myonuclear addition in young healthy men. We propose that as long as protein intake is adequate during muscle overload, the adaptations in muscle growth and function will not be influenced by protein supplementation.

  4. Tsw gene-based resistance is triggered by a functional RNA silencing suppressor protein of the Tomato spotted wilt virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronde, de D.; Butterbach, P.B.E.; Lohuis, H.; Hedil, M.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    As a result of contradictory reports, the avirulence (Avr) determinant that triggers Tsw gene-based resistance in Capsicum annuum against the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is still unresolved. Here, the N and NSs genes of resistance-inducing (RI) and resistance-breaking (RB) isolates were cloned

  5. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Liam K R; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alex J

    2016-03-22

    Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to anin vitrotranslation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosomein vitro To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection.IMPORTANCEAntimicrobial resistance ranks among the greatest threats currently facing human health. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which microorganisms resist the effect of antibiotics is central to understanding the biology of this phenomenon and has the potential to inform the development of new drugs capable of blocking or circumventing resistance. Members of the ABC-F family, which includelsa(A),msr(A),optr(A), andvga(A), collectively yield resistance to a broader range of clinically significant antibiotic classes than any other family of resistance determinants, although their mechanism of action has been controversial since their discovery 25 years ago. Here we present the first direct evidence that proteins of the ABC-F family act to protect the bacterial ribosome from antibiotic-mediated inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Sharkey et al.

  6. Dietary protein to maximize resistance training: a review and examination of protein spread and change theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, John D; Dixon, Brian M

    2012-09-08

    An appreciable volume of human clinical data supports increased dietary protein for greater gains from resistance training, but not all findings are in agreement. We recently proposed "protein spread theory" and "protein change theory" in an effort to explain discrepancies in the response to increased dietary protein in weight management interventions. The present review aimed to extend "protein spread theory" and "protein change theory" to studies examining the effects of protein on resistance training induced muscle and strength gains. Protein spread theory proposed that there must have been a sufficient spread or % difference in g/kg/day protein intake between groups during a protein intervention to see muscle and strength differences. Protein change theory postulated that for the higher protein group, there must be a sufficient change from baseline g/kg/day protein intake to during study g/kg/day protein intake to see muscle and strength benefits. Seventeen studies met inclusion criteria. In studies where a higher protein intervention was deemed successful there was, on average, a 66.1% g/kg/day between group intake spread versus a 10.2% g/kg/day spread in studies where a higher protein diet was no more effective than control. The average change in habitual protein intake in studies showing higher protein to be more effective than control was +59.5% compared to +6.5% when additional protein was no more effective than control. The magnitudes of difference between the mean spreads and changes of the present review are similar to our previous review on these theories in a weight management context. Providing sufficient deviation from habitual intake appears to be an important factor in determining the success of additional protein in enhancing muscle and strength gains from resistance training. An increase in dietary protein favorably effects muscle and strength during resistance training.

  7. Deregulation of p53 and RB Transcriptional Control Leads to Overexpression of DNA Methyltransferases in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-An Tang

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: This study provides cell and clinical evidence that p53 and RB pathways transcriptionally repress DNMT expression. Normal expression of DNMT3A, RB and MDM2 proteins can be a biomarker for good prognosis in lung cancer.

  8. Balancing selection favors guarding resistance proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, Van der R.A.L.; Wit, De P.J.G.M.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The co-evolutionary arms race model for plant–pathogen interactions implies that resistance (R) genes are relatively young and monomorphic. However, recent reports show R gene longevity and co-existence of multiple R genes in natural populations. This indicates that R genes are maintained by

  9. Protein expression on Cr resistant microorganism using electrophoresis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAJIDAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatmawati U, Suranto, Sajidan. 2009. Protein expression on Cr resistant microorganism using electrophoresis method. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 31-37. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI is known as toxic heavy metals, so the need is reduced to Cr(III is much less toxicity. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pantoea sp. and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are resistant Cr(VI microorganism and have ability to reduce Cr(VI. The aim of this research is to know ability of microorganism to reduce Cr(VI and to know protein band pattern between Cr(VI resistant microorganism and non resistant microorganism which inoculated on LB broth. SDS-PAGE was used to indentify protein expression. While, Cr(VI concentration was identified by 1.5 diphenylcarbazide method. The quantitative data was analyzed by two factorial ANOVA that continued with DMRT at 1% level test. The qualitative data i.e. protein expression analyzed by relative mobility (Rf. The results showed that the ability of microorganisms to reduce Cr(VI at initial concentration of 0.5 ppm, 1 ppm, 5 ppm and 10 ppm may vary, the average percentage of the ability of each microorganism in reducing Cr(VI is P. putida (65% > S. cerevisiae (64.45% >. P. aeruginosa (60.73% > Pantoea sp. (50.22% > K. pneumoniae (47.82% > without microorganisms (34.25%. The adding microorganisms have significantly influenced toward reduction of Cr(VI. The SDS-PAGE shows that protein expression between resistant and not resistant microorganisms are no different, but resistant microorganisms have more protein (protein band is thicker.

  10. Retinoblastoma protein partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, E J; Dyson, N J

    2001-01-01

    Studies of the retinoblastoma gene (Rb) have shown that its protein product (pRb) acts to restrict cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis, and promote cell differentiation. The frequent mutation of the Rb gene, and the functional inactivation of pRb in tumor cells, have spurred interest in the mechanism of pRb action. Recently, much attention has focused on pRb's role in the regulation of the E2F transcription factor. However, biochemical studies have suggested that E2F is only one of many pRb-targets and, to date, at least 110 cellular proteins have been reported to associate with pRb. The plethora of pRb-binding proteins raises several important questions. How many functions does pRb possess, which of these functions are important for development, and which contribute to tumor suppression? The goal of this review is to summarize the current literature of pRb-associated proteins.

  11. Antifolate resistance mediated by the multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijberg, J. H.; Broxterman, H. J.; Kool, M.; Assaraf, Y. G.; Peters, G. J.; Noordhuis, P.; Scheper, R. J.; Borst, P.; Pinedo, H. M.; Jansen, G.

    1999-01-01

    Transfection of multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) MRP1 and MRP2 in human ovarian carcinoma 2008 cells conferred a marked level of resistance to short-term (1-4 h) exposure to the polyglutamatable antifolates methotrexate (MTX; 21-74-fold), ZD1694 (4-138-fold), and GW1843 (101-156-fold). Evidence

  12. Heterologously expressed bacterial and human multidrug resistance proteins confer cadmium resistance to Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achard-Joris, M; van Saparoea, HBV; Driessen, AJM; Bourdineaud, JP; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    The human MDR1 gene is induced by cadmium exposure although no resistance to this metal is observed in human cells overexpressing hMDR1. To access the role of MDR proteins in cadmium resistance, human MDR1, Lactococcus lactis lmrA, and Oenococcus oeni omrA were expressed in an Escherichia coli tolC

  13. Multiple drug resistance protein (MDR-1, multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP and lung resistance protein (LRP gene expression in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvis Terci Valera

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Despite the advances in the cure rate for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, approximately 25% of affected children suffer relapses. Expression of genes for the multiple drug resistance protein (MDR-1, multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP, and lung resistance protein (LRP may confer the phenotype of resistance to the treatment of neoplasias. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the expression of the MDR-1, MRP and LRP genes in children with a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia via the semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and to determine the correlation between expression and event-free survival and clinical and laboratory variables. DESIGN: A retrospective clinical study. SETTING: Laboratory of Pediatric Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Bone marrow aspirates from 30 children with a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia were assessed for the expression of messenger RNA for the MDR-1, MRP and LRP genes by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. RESULTS: In the three groups studied, only the increased expression of LRP was related to worsened event-free survival (p = 0.005. The presence of the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA was correlated with increased LRP expression (p = 0.009 and increased risk of relapse or death (p = 0.05. The relative risk of relapse or death was six times higher among children with high LRP expression upon diagnosis (p = 0.05, as confirmed by multivariate analysis of the three genes studied (p = 0.035. DISCUSSION: Cell resistance to drugs is a determinant of the response to chemotherapy and its detection via RT-PCR may be of clinical importance. CONCLUSIONS: Evaluation of the expression of genes for resistance to antineoplastic drugs in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia upon diagnosis, and particularly the expression of the LRP gene, may be of clinical relevance, and should be the

  14. Synergistic effects of resistance training and protein intake: practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Cholewa, Jason Michael; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Zhi, X I A; Magagnin, Daiane; de Sá, Rafaele Bis Dal Ponte; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Teixeira, Tamiris da Silva; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2014-10-01

    Resistance training is a potent stimulus to increase skeletal muscle mass. The muscle protein accretion process depends on a robust synergistic action between protein intake and overload. The intake of protein after resistance training increases plasma amino acids, which results in the activation of signaling molecules leading to increased muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle hypertrophy. Although both essential and non-essential amino acids are necessary for hypertrophy, the intake of free L-leucine or high-leucine whole proteins has been specifically shown to increase the initiation of translation that is essential for elevated MPS. The literature supports the use of protein intake following resistance-training sessions to enhance MPS; however, less understood are the effects of different protein sources and timing protocols on MPS. The sum of the adaptions from each individual training session is essential to muscle hypertrophy, and thus highlights the importance of an optimal supplementation protocol. The aim of this review is to present recent findings reported in the literature and to discuss the practical application of these results. In that light, new speculations and questions will arise that may direct future investigations. The information and recommendations generated in this review should be of benefit to clinical dietitians as well as those engaged in sports. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Structural basis of protein oxidation resistance: a lysozyme study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girod, Marion; Enjalbert, Quentin; Brunet, Claire; Antoine, Rodolphe; Lemoine, Jérôme; Lukac, Iva; Radman, Miroslav; Krisko, Anita; Dugourd, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidative damage in proteins correlates with aging since it can cause irreversible and progressive degeneration of almost all cellular functions. Apparently, native protein structures have evolved intrinsic resistance to oxidation since perfectly folded proteins are, by large most robust. Here we explore the structural basis of protein resistance to radiation-induced oxidation using chicken egg white lysozyme in the native and misfolded form. We study the differential resistance to oxidative damage of six different parts of native and misfolded lysozyme by a targeted tandem/mass spectrometry approach of its tryptic fragments. The decay of the amount of each lysozyme fragment with increasing radiation dose is found to be a two steps process, characterized by a double exponential evolution of their amounts: the first one can be largely attributed to oxidation of specific amino acids, while the second one corresponds to further degradation of the protein. By correlating these results to the structural parameters computed from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we find the protein parts with increased root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) to be more susceptible to modifications. In addition, involvement of amino acid side-chains in hydrogen bonds has a protective effect against oxidation Increased exposure to solvent of individual amino acid side chains correlates with high susceptibility to oxidative and other modifications like side chain fragmentation. Generally, while none of the structural parameters alone can account for the fate of peptides during radiation, together they provide an insight into the relationship between protein structure and susceptibility to oxidation.

  16. Complement Fixation Test To Assess Humoral Immunity in Cattle and Sheep Vaccinated with Brucella abortus RB51

    OpenAIRE

    Adone, Rosanna; Ciuchini, Franco

    1999-01-01

    The live attenuated Brucella abortus strain RB51 is a rifampin-resistant, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-chain-deficient mutant of virulent B. abortus 2308. The reduced O-chain content in RB51 prevents this bacterium from inducing antibodies detectable by the conventional serologic tests for bovine brucellosis diagnosis that mainly identify antibodies to LPS. The absence of available serologic tests for RB51 also complicates the diagnosis of possible RB51 infections in...

  17. Immunoexpression of P16INK4a, Rb and TP53 proteins in bronchiolar columnar cell dysplasia (BCCD in lungs resected due to primary non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Chyczewski

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide. High mortality comes out mainly of the fact that majority of the cases are diagnosed in advanced stadium. An expanded diagnostics of precancerous conditions would certainly contribute to lowering the mortality rate. Many of the molecular changes accompanying the multistep cancer development could be observed using the immunohistochemistry method. In this paper we describe the morphology and cell cycle proteins immunoexpression of the novel probable preinvasive lesion - bronchiolar columnar cell dysplasia (BCCD. Thirty cases of BCCD selected out of 193 patients population, treated for primary non-small cell lung cancer were investigated. Loss of P16INK4a protein was observed in 70% of all cases and was statistically significant in patients with adenocarcinoma. Two cases show abnormal cytoplasmic localization of this protein. TP53 protein accumulates in 26.7% of all BCCD. Rb protein was active in 48.3% of the BCCD cases. In two cases we observed differentiation of the cells composing BCCD into multilayer epithelium of the squamous type, which occurs with formation of desmosomes. We suppose that BCCD may be preneoplastic lesion leading to adenocarcinoma as well as to peripheral squamous cell lung cancer.

  18. Resistive random access memory utilizing ferritin protein with Pt nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenuma, Mutsunori; Kawano, Kentaro; Zheng Bin; Okamoto, Naofumi; Horita, Masahiro; Yoshii, Shigeo; Yamashita, Ichiro; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2011-01-01

    This study reports controlled single conductive paths found in resistive random access memory (ReRAM) formed by embedding Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) in NiO film. Homogeneous Pt NPs produced and placed by ferritin protein produce electric field convergence which leads to controlled conductive path formation. The ReRAM with Pt NPs shows stable switching behavior. A Pt NP density decrease results in an increase of OFF state resistance and decrease of forming voltage, whereas ON resistance was independent of the Pt NP density, which indicates that a single metal NP in a memory cell will achieve low power and stable operation.

  19. Retinol binding protein 4, obesity, and insulin resistance in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldi Noor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Obesity is a global problem. Even in poor and developing countries, obesity has reached alarming levels. In childhood, obesity may lead to insulin resistance. Retinol binding protein (RBP4, secreted primarily by liver and adipose tissues, was recently proposed as a link between obesity and insulin resistance. The role of RBP4 in pediatric obesity and its relationship with insulin resistance have not been well elucidated. Objective To compare RBP4 levels in obese and lean adolescents and to assess for a relationship between RBP4 levels and insulin resistance. Method This cross-sectional study was conducted in three senior high schools in Padang, West Sumatera, Indonesia. Subjects were adolescents aged 14-18 years, who were obese or normal weight (n=56. We measured subjects’ body mass index (BMI and serum RBP4 concentrations. Insulin resistance was assessed using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index. Results Similar RBP4 levels were found in the obese and normoweight groups (P>0.05. Higher RBP4 levels were found in the insulin resistant compared to the non-insulin resistant group, but the difference was not significant (P > 0.05. Conclusion There is no significant difference in mean RBP4 levels in obese adolescents compared to normoweight adolescents. Nor are mean RBP4 levels significantly different between obese adolescents with and without insulin resistance.

  20. Analysis of p107-associated proteins: p107 associates with a form of E2F that differs from pRB-associated E2F-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyson, N; Dembski, M; Fattaey, A

    1993-01-01

    The binding of viral oncogenes to cellular proteins is thought to modulate the activities of these cellular targets. The p107 protein is targeted by many viral proteins, including adenovirus E1A, simian virus 40 large T antigen, and human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein. A panel of monoclonal...

  1. Brucella abortus RB51: enhancing vaccine efficacy and developing multivalent vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemulapalli, Ramesh; He, Yongqun; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M; Schurig, Gerhardt G

    2002-12-20

    Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 is an attenuated, stable rough mutant that is being used in many countries to control bovine brucellosis. Our earlier study demonstrated that the protective efficacy of strain RB51 can be significantly enhanced by overexpressing Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), a homologous protective antigen. We have also previously demonstrated that strain RB51 can be engineered to express heterologous proteins and mice vaccinated with such recombinant RB51 strains develop a strong Th1 type of immune response to the foreign proteins. The present study is aimed at combining these two characteristics to generate new recombinant RB51 vaccines with enhanced abilities to protect against brucellosis and simultaneously able to protect against infections by Mycobacterium spp. We constructed two recombinant RB51 strains, RB51SOD/85A which overexpresses SOD with simultaneous expression of the 85A, a protective protein of Mycobacterium spp., and RB51ESAT which expresses ESAT-6, another protective protein of M. bovis, as a fusion protein with the signal sequence and few additional amino terminal amino acids of SOD. Mice vaccinated with these recombinant strains developed specific immune responses to the mycobacterial proteins and significantly enhanced protection against Brucella challenge compared to the mice vaccinated with strain RB51 alone. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  2. Determination of virulence contribution from Phytophthora infestans effector IPI-O4 in a resistant potato host contaning the RB gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is one of the most destructive plant diseases. Despite decades of intensive breeding efforts, it remains a threat to potato production worldwide, because newly evolved pathogen strains have overcome major resistance genes qu...

  3. Targeting protein kinases to reverse multidrug resistance in sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Shen, Jacson; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-02-01

    Sarcomas are a group of cancers that arise from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. They can be classified into over 50 subtypes, accounting for approximately 1% of adult and 15% of pediatric cancers. Wide surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are the most common treatments for the majority of sarcomas. Among these therapies, chemotherapy can palliate symptoms and prolong life for some sarcoma patients. However, sarcoma cells can have intrinsic or acquired resistance after treatment with chemotherapeutics drugs, leading to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR attenuates the efficacy of anticancer drugs and results in treatment failure for sarcomas. Therefore, overcoming MDR is an unmet need for sarcoma therapy. Certain protein kinases demonstrate aberrant expression and/or activity in sarcoma cells, which have been found to be involved in the regulation of sarcoma cell progression, such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and survival. Inhibiting these protein kinases may not only decrease the proliferation and growth of sarcoma cells, but also reverse their resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs to subsequently reduce the doses of anticancer drugs and decrease drug side-effects. The discovery of novel strategies targeting protein kinases opens a door to a new area of sarcoma research and provides insight into the mechanisms of MDR in chemotherapy. This review will focus on the recent studies in targeting protein kinase to reverse chemotherapeutic drug resistance in sarcoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Testing of disease-resistance of pokeweed antiviral protein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transformation of pokeweed antiviral protein gene (PAP) into plants was shown to improve plant resistance to several viruses or fungi pathogens with no much negative effect on plant growth. The non-virulent defective PAP inhibits only the virus but does not interfere with the host. A non-virulent defective PAP gene ...

  5. Resistance of platelet proteins to effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodouz, K.N.; Habraken, J.W.; Moroff, G.

    1990-01-01

    Gamma irradiation of blood components prevents lymphocyte-induced graft-versus-host disease after transfusion in immunocompromised individuals. In this report we demonstrate the resistance of blood platelet proteins to gamma radiation-induced protein cleavage and aggregate formation when platelet concentrates were treated with a dose of 5000 rad. Results of one- and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of total platelet protein and cytoskeletal protein preparations indicate that platelet proteins are neither cleaved nor cross-linked under these conditions of irradiation. These results support those of a previous study that documented the lack of any adverse effect of 5000 rad gamma radiation on in vitro platelet properties

  6. Generation of a Retinoblastoma (Rb1-inducible dominant negative (DN mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha eTarang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma 1 (Rb1 is an essential gene regulating cellular proliferation, differentiation, and homeostasis. To exert these functions, Rb1 is recruited and physically interacts with a growing variety of signaling pathways. While Rb1 does not appear to be ubiquitously expressed, its expression has been confirmed in a variety of hematopoietic and neuronal-derived cells, including the inner ear hair cells (HCs. Studies in transgenic mice demonstrate that complete germline or conditional Rb1 deletion leads to abnormal cell proliferation, followed by massive apoptosis; making it difficult to fully address Rb1’s biochemical activities. To overcome these limitations, we developed a tetracycline-inducible TetO-CB-myc6-Rb1 (CBRb mouse model to achieve transient and inducible dominant negative (DN inhibition of the endogenous RB1 protein. Our strategy involved fusing the Rb1 gene to the lysosomal protease pre-procathepsin B (CB, thus allowing for further routing of the DN-CBRb fusion protein and its interacting complexes for proteolytic degradation. Moreover, reversibility of the system is achieved upon suppression of doxycycline (Dox administration. Preliminary characterization of DN-CBRb mice bred to a ubiquitous rtTA mouse line demonstrated a significant inhibition of the endogenous RB1 protein in the inner ear and in a number of other organs where RB1 is expressed. Examination of the postnatal (P DN-CBRb mice inner ear at P10 and P28 showed the presence of supernumerary inner HCs in the lower turns of the cochleae, which corresponds to the described expression domain of the endogenous Rb1 gene. Selective and reversible suppression of gene expression is both an experimental tool for defining function and a potential means to medical therapy. Given the limitations associated with Rb1-null mice lethality, this model provides a valuable resource for understanding RB1 activity, relative contribution to HC regeneration and its potential therapeutic

  7. Drug resistance-associated markers P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, and lung resistance protein as prognostic factors in ovarian carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, H. J.; Katsaros, D.; de Vries, E. G.; Massobrio, M.; Genta, F.; Danese, S.; Arisio, R.; Scheper, R. J.; Kool, M.; Scheffer, G. L.; Willemse, P. H.; van der Zee, A. G.; Suurmeijer, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    Intrinsic and/or acquired resistance to chemotherapy is the major obstacle to overcome in the treatment of patients with ovarian carcinoma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of drug resistance-associated proteins P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug

  8. Structural basis of protein oxidation resistance: a lysozyme study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Girod

    Full Text Available Accumulation of oxidative damage in proteins correlates with aging since it can cause irreversible and progressive degeneration of almost all cellular functions. Apparently, native protein structures have evolved intrinsic resistance to oxidation since perfectly folded proteins are, by large most robust. Here we explore the structural basis of protein resistance to radiation-induced oxidation using chicken egg white lysozyme in the native and misfolded form. We study the differential resistance to oxidative damage of six different parts of native and misfolded lysozyme by a targeted tandem/mass spectrometry approach of its tryptic fragments. The decay of the amount of each lysozyme fragment with increasing radiation dose is found to be a two steps process, characterized by a double exponential evolution of their amounts: the first one can be largely attributed to oxidation of specific amino acids, while the second one corresponds to further degradation of the protein. By correlating these results to the structural parameters computed from molecular dynamics (MD simulations, we find the protein parts with increased root-mean-square deviation (RMSD to be more susceptible to modifications. In addition, involvement of amino acid side-chains in hydrogen bonds has a protective effect against oxidation Increased exposure to solvent of individual amino acid side chains correlates with high susceptibility to oxidative and other modifications like side chain fragmentation. Generally, while none of the structural parameters alone can account for the fate of peptides during radiation, together they provide an insight into the relationship between protein structure and susceptibility to oxidation.

  9. The RB/E2F pathway and regulation of RNA processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlander, Joseph [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, 1007 East Lowell Street, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bosco, Giovanni, E-mail: gbosco@email.arizona.edu [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, 1007 East Lowell Street, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2009-07-03

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB) is inactivated in a majority of cancers. RB restricts cell proliferation by inhibiting the E2F family of transcription factors. The current model for RB/E2F function describes its role in regulating transcription at gene promoters. Whether the RB or E2F proteins might play a role in gene expression beyond transcription initiation is not well known. This review describes evidence that points to a novel role for the RB/E2F network in the regulation of RNA processing, and we propose a model as a framework for future research. The elucidation of a novel role of RB in RNA processing will have a profound impact on our understanding of the role of this tumor suppressor family in cell and developmental biology.

  10. Using Resurrected Ancestral Proviral Proteins to Engineer Virus Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asunción Delgado

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Proviral factors are host proteins hijacked by viruses for processes essential for virus propagation such as cellular entry and replication. Pathogens and their hosts co-evolve. It follows that replacing a proviral factor with a functional ancestral form of the same protein could prevent viral propagation without fatally compromising organismal fitness. Here, we provide proof of concept of this notion. Thioredoxins serve as general oxidoreductases in all known cells. We report that several laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins display substantial levels of functionality within Escherichia coli. Unlike E. coli thioredoxin, however, these ancestral thioredoxins are not efficiently recruited by the bacteriophage T7 for its replisome and therefore prevent phage propagation in E. coli. These results suggest an approach to the engineering of virus resistance. Diseases caused by viruses may have a devastating effect in agriculture. We discuss how the suggested approach could be applied to the engineering of plant virus resistance.

  11. The E7 protein of the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus immortalizes normal rabbit keratinocytes and reduces pRb levels, while E6 cooperates in immortalization but neither degrades p53 nor binds E6AP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganzenmueller, Tina; Matthaei, Markus; Muench, Peter; Scheible, Michael; Iftner, Angelika; Hiller, Thomas; Leiprecht, Natalie; Probst, Sonja; Stubenrauch, Frank; Iftner, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause cervical cancer and are associated with the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. A suitable animal model for papillomavirus-associated skin carcinogenesis is the infection of domestic rabbits with the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV). As the immortalizing activity of CRPV genes in the natural target cells remains unknown, we investigated the properties of CRPV E6 and E7 in rabbit keratinocytes (RK) and their influence on the cell cycle. Interestingly, CRPV E7 immortalized RK after a cellular crisis but showed no such activity in human keratinocytes. Co-expressed CRPV E6 prevented cellular crisis. The HPV16 or CRPV E7 protein reduced rabbit pRb levels thereby causing rabbit p19 ARF induction and accumulation of p53 without affecting cellular proliferation. Both CRPV E6 proteins failed to degrade rabbit p53 in vitro or to bind E6AP; however, p53 was still inducible by mitomycin C. In summary, CRPV E7 immortalizes rabbit keratinocytes in a species-specific manner and E6 contributes to immortalization without directly affecting p53

  12. RB962962, a sugarcane cultivar for late harvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz José Oliveira Tavares de Melo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the Northeast of Brazil, sugarcane cultivar RB962962 is harvested at the end of the cycle, between December and February, with a high sugar yield per area. Recommended for sandy soils of medium texture and fertility, it is resistant to the major diseases and fast-growing in plant and ratoon crops.

  13. RB Research nuclear reactor RB reactor, Annual report for 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.

    2000-12-01

    Report on RB reactor operation during 2000 contains 3 parts. Part one contains a brief description of reactor operation and reactor components, relevant dosimetry data and radiation protection issues, personnel and financial data. Part two is devoted to maintenance of the reactor components, namely, fuel, heavy water, reactor vessel, heavy water circulation system, absorption rods and heavy water level-meters, maintenance of electronic, mechanical, electrical and auxiliary equipment. Part three contains data concerned with reactor operation and utilization with a comprehensive list of publications resulting from experiments done at the RB reactor. It contains data about reactor operation during previous 14 years, i.e. from 1986 - 2000

  14. Molecular determinants of resistance activation and suppression by Phytophthora infestans effector IPI-O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Liu, Zhenyu; Halterman, Dennis A

    2012-01-01

    Despite intensive breeding efforts, potato late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, remains a threat to potato production worldwide because newly evolved pathogen strains have consistently overcome major resistance genes. The potato RB gene, derived from the wild species Solanum bulbocastanum, confers resistance to most P. infestans strains through recognition of members of the pathogen effector family IPI-O. While the majority of IPI-O proteins are recognized by RB to elicit resistance (e.g. IPI-O1, IPI-O2), some family members are able to elude detection (e.g. IPI-O4). In addition, IPI-O4 blocks recognition of IPI-O1, leading to inactivation of RB-mediated programmed cell death. Here, we report results that elucidate molecular mechanisms governing resistance elicitation or suppression of RB by IPI-O. Our data indicate self-association of the RB coiled coil (CC) domain as well as a physical interaction between this domain and the effectors IPI-O4 and IPI-O1. We identified four amino acids within IPI-O that are critical for interaction with the RB CC domain and one of these amino acids, at position 129, determines hypersensitive response (HR) elicitation in planta. IPI-O1 mutant L129P fails to induce HR in presence of RB while IPI-O4 P129L gains the ability to induce an HR. Like IPI-O4, IPI-O1 L129P is also able to suppress the HR mediated by RB, indicating a critical step in the evolution of this gene family. Our results point to a model in which IPI-O effectors can affect RB function through interaction with the RB CC domain.

  15. E2F4 loss suppresses tumorigenesis in Rb mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunice Y; Cam, Hieu; Ziebold, Ulrike; Rayman, Joseph B; Lees, Jacqueline A; Dynlacht, Brian David

    2002-12-01

    The E2F transcription factors mediate the activation or repression of key cell cycle regulatory genes under the control of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) tumor suppressor and its relatives, p107 and p130. Here we investigate how E2F4, the major "repressive" E2F, contributes to pRB's tumor-suppressive properties. Remarkably, E2F4 loss suppresses the development of both pituitary and thyroid tumors in Rb(+/-) mice. Importantly, E2F4 loss also suppresses the inappropriate gene expression and proliferation of pRB-deficient cells. Biochemical analyses suggest that this tumor suppression occurs via a novel mechanism: E2F4 loss allows p107 and p130 to regulate the pRB-specific, activator E2Fs. We also detect these novel E2F complexes in pRB-deficient cells, suggesting that they play a significant role in the regulation of tumorigenesis in vivo.

  16. Interaction of c-Myc with the pRb-related protein p107 results in inhibition of c-Myc-mediated transactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, R.L.; Hijmans, E.M.; Zhu, L.; Bernards, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The product of the c-myc proto-oncogene, c-Myc, is a sequence-specific DNA binding protein with an Nterminal transactivation domain and a C-terminal DNA binding domain. Several lines of evidence indicate that c-Myc activity is essential for normal cell cycle progression. Since the abundance of

  17. Mutations of the Transporter Proteins GlpT and UhpT Confer Fosfomycin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Xu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus worldwide, fosfomycin has begun to be used more often, either alone or in combination with other antibiotics, for treating methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections, resulting in the emergence of fosfomycin-resistant strains. Fosfomycin resistance is reported to be mediated by fosfomycin-modifying enzymes (FosA, FosB, FosC, and FosX and mutations of the target enzyme MurA or the membrane transporter proteins UhpT and GlpT. Our previous studies indicated that the fos genes might not the major fosfomycin resistance mechanism in S. aureus, whereas mutations of glpT and uhpT seemed to be more related to fosfomycin resistance. However, the precise role of these two genes in S. aureus fosfomycin resistance remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of glpT and uhpT in S. aureus fosfomycin resistance. Homologous recombination was used to knockout the uhpT and glpT genes in S. aureus Newman. Gene complementation was generated by the plasmid pRB473 carrying these two genes. The fosfomycin minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of the strains was measured by the E-test to observe the influence of gene deletion on antibiotic susceptibility. In addition, growth curves were constructed to determine whether the mutations have a significant influence on bacterial growth. Deletion of uhpT, glpT, and both of them led to increased fosfomycin MIC 0.5 μg/ml to 32 μg/ml, 4 μg/ml, and >1024 μg/ml, respectively. By complementing uhpT and glpT into the deletion mutants, the fosfomycin MIC decreased from 32 to 0.5 μg/ml and from 4 to 0.25 μg/ml, respectively. Moreover, the transporter gene-deleted strains showed no obvious difference in growth curves compared to the parental strain. In summary, our study strongly suggests that mutations of uhpT and glpT lead to fosfomycin resistance in S. aureus, and that uhpT mutation may play a more important role. The high

  18. Differential gene expression profiling of endometrium during the mid-luteal phase of the estrous cycle between a repeat breeder (RB) and non-RB cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ken-Go; Hosoe, Misa; Kizaki, Keiichiro; Fujii, Shiori; Kanahara, Hiroko; Takahashi, Toru; Sakumoto, Ryosuke

    2017-03-23

    Repeat breeding directly affects reproductive efficiency in cattle due to an increase in services per conception and calving interval. This study aimed to investigate whether changes in endometrial gene expression profile are involved in repeat breeding in cows. Differential gene expression profiles of the endometrium were investigated during the mid-luteal phase of the estrous cycle between repeat breeder (RB) and non-RB cows using microarray analysis. The caruncular (CAR) and intercaruncular (ICAR) endometrium of both ipsilateral and contralateral uterine horns to the corpus luteum were collected from RB (inseminated at least three times but not pregnant) and non-RB cows on Day 15 of the estrous cycle (4 cows/group). Global gene expression profiles of these endometrial samples were analyzed with a 15 K custom-made oligo-microarray for cattle. Immunohistochemistry was performed to investigate the cellular localization of proteins of three identified transcripts in the endometrium. Microarray analysis revealed that 405 and 397 genes were differentially expressed in the CAR and ICAR of the ipsilateral uterine horn of RB, respectively when compared with non-RB cows. In the contralateral uterine horn, 443 and 257 differentially expressed genes were identified in the CAR and ICAR of RB, respectively when compared with non-RB cows. Gene ontology analysis revealed that genes involved in development and morphogenesis were mainly up-regulated in the CAR of RB cows. In the ICAR of both the ipsilateral and contralateral uterine horns, genes related to the metabolic process were predominantly enriched in the RB cows when compared with non-RB cows. In the analysis of the whole uterus (combining the data above four endometrial compartments), RB cows showed up-regulation of 37 genes including PRSS2, GSTA3 and PIPOX and down-regulation of 39 genes including CHGA, KRT35 and THBS4 when compared with non-RB cows. Immunohistochemistry revealed that CHGA, GSTA3 and PRSS2 proteins

  19. Nuclear export of proteins and drug resistance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joel G; Dawson, Jana; Sullivan, Daniel M

    2012-04-15

    The intracellular location of a protein is crucial to its normal functioning in a cell. Cancer cells utilize the normal processes of nuclear-cytoplasmic transport through the nuclear pore complex of a cell to effectively evade anti-neoplastic mechanisms. CRM1-mediated export is increased in various cancers. Proteins that are exported in cancer include tumor-suppressive proteins such as retinoblastoma, APC, p53, BRAC1, FOXO proteins, INI1/hSNF5, galectin-3, Bok, nucleophosmin, RASSF2, Merlin, p21(CIP), p27(KIP1), N-WASP/FAK, estradiol receptor and Tob, drug targets topoisomerase I and IIα and BCR-ABL, and the molecular chaperone protein Hsp90. Here, we review in detail the current processes and known structures involved in the export of a protein through the nuclear pore complex. We also discuss the export receptor molecule CRM1 and its binding to the leucine-rich nuclear export signal of the cargo protein and the formation of a nuclear export trimer with RanGTP. The therapeutic potential of various CRM1 inhibitors will be addressed, including leptomycin B, ratjadone, KOS-2464, and specific small molecule inhibitors of CRM1, N-azolylacrylate analogs, FOXO export inhibitors, valtrate, acetoxychavicol acetate, CBS9106, and SINE inhibitors. We will also discuss examples of how drug resistance may be reversed by targeting the exported proteins topoisomerase IIα, BCR-ABL, and galectin-3. As effective and less toxic CRM1 export inhibitors become available, they may be used as both single agents and in combination with current chemotherapeutic drugs. We believe that the future development of low-toxicity, small-molecule CRM1 inhibitors may provide a new approach to treating cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Lymphocyte proliferation in response to Brucella abortus 2308 or RB51 antigens in mice infected with strain 2308, RB51, or 19.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, M G; Olsen, S C; Pugh, G W

    1994-01-01

    Lymphocyte proliferation to 22 protein fractions (106 to 18 kDa) of Brucella abortus 2308 or the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen-deficient mutant of 2308, strain RB51, was measured for 20 weeks after infection of mice with strain 2308, RB51, or 19. Throughout the 20-week study, the 22 protein fractions of 2308 and RB51 induced a similar pattern of proliferation when they were incubated with lymphocytes from the infected mice. In addition, during the 20 weeks, lymphocytes from all groups of infec...

  1. Overexpression of Protective Antigen as a Novel Approach To Enhance Vaccine Efficacy of Brucella abortus Strain RB51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemulapalli, Ramesh; He, Yongqun; Cravero, Silvio; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M.; Schurig, Gerhardt G.

    2000-01-01

    Brucella abortus strain RB51 is an attenuated rough strain that is currently being used as the official live vaccine for bovine brucellosis in the United States and several other countries. We reasoned that overexpression of a protective antigen(s) of B. abortus in strain RB51 should enhance its vaccine efficacy. To test this hypothesis, we overexpressed Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) protein of B. abortus in strain RB51. This was accomplished by transforming strain RB51 with a broad-host-range plasmid, pBBR1MCS, containing the sodC gene along with its promoter. Strain RB51 overexpressing SOD (RB51SOD) was tested in BALB/c mice for its ability to protect against challenge infection with virulent strain 2308. Mice vaccinated with RB51SOD, but not RB51, developed antibodies and cell-mediated immune responses to Cu/Zn SOD. Strain RB51SOD vaccinated mice developed significantly (P RB51 alone. The presence of the plasmid alone in strain RB51 did not alter its vaccine efficacy. Also, overexpression of SOD did not alter the attenuation characteristic of strain RB51. PMID:10816475

  2. Molecular basis of glyphosate resistance: Different approaches through protein engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollegioni, Loredano; Schonbrunn, Ernst; Siehl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl-glycine) is the most-used herbicide in the world: glyphosate-based formulations exhibit broad-spectrum herbicidal activity with minimal human and environmental toxicity. The extraordinary success of this simple small molecule is mainly due to the high specificity of glyphosate towards the plant enzyme enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase in the shikimate pathway leading to biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. Starting in 1996, transgenic glyphosate-resistant plants were introduced thus allowing the application of the herbicide to the crop (post-emergence) to remove emerged weeds without crop damage. This review focuses on the evolution of mechanisms of resistance to glyphosate as obtained through natural diversity, the gene shuffling approach to molecular evolution, and a rational, structure-based approach to protein engineering. In addition, we offer rationale for the means by which the modifications made have had their intended effect. PMID:21668647

  3. The Rb-Sr system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, I.J.

    1983-11-01

    This manual is intended to serve as a guide to the chemical procedures involved in Rb-Sr isotopic analysis as conducted at the Institute of Nuclear Sciences. Included are notes on the experimental developments made over the last 2.5 years, especially those involving rock dissolution and cation exchange chromatography

  4. The immunological response of RB51 vaccinated buffalo calves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immune status of RB51 vaccinated buffaloes was evaluated using tube agglutination test (TAT) and ELISA, using both periplasmic protein antigen (PPA) and lipopolysaccharide antigen (LPS). For this purpose, three groups of buffalo calves were used. The first one received S19 vaccine subcutaneously; the second was ...

  5. "Hearing Loss" in QCM Measurement of Protein Adsorption to Protein Resistant Polymer Brush Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Yafei; Li, Dan; Wei, Ting; Wang, Mengmeng; Tang, Zengchao; Brash, John L; Chen, Hong

    2017-04-04

    Accurate quantification of nonspecific protein adsorption on biomaterial surfaces is essential for evaluation of their antifouling properties. The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is an acoustic sensor widely used for the measurement of protein adsorption. However, although the QCM is highly sensitive, it does have performance limitations when working with surfaces modified with thick viscous layers. In the case of polymer brush surfaces, factors such as the thickness and viscosity of the brush may bring such limitations. In the present work, three types of antifouling molecules were used to explore the applicability of QCM for the evaluation of the protein resistance of hydrophilic polymer brush surfaces. Adsorption was also measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) as a reference. It was shown that the detection of adsorbed protein requires that protein be located within a critical distance from the QCM chip surface, determined by the viscosity of polymer brush. For larger proteins like fibrinogen, adsorption is expected to occur mainly "on top" of the polymer brush, and brush thickness determines whether protein is located in the "detectable zone". For smaller proteins like lysozyme, adsorption is expected to occur mainly at the chip surface and within the polymer brush layer and to be detectable by QCM. However, the quantity of adsorbed lysozyme may be underestimated when secondary adsorption also occurred. It is concluded that QCM data suggesting very low protein adsorption on polymer brush surfaces should take account of these considerations and should be treated generally with caution.

  6. Inhibition of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) activity by rifampicin in human multidrug-resistant lung tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Courtois, A; Payen, L; Vernhet, L; de Vries, EGE; Guillouzo, A; Fardel, O

    1999-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) is a drug efflux membrane pump conferring multidrug resistance on tumor cells. In order to look for compounds that can lead to reversal of such a resistance, the antituberculosis compound rifampicin, belonging to the chemical class of rifamycins, was

  7. The expression and significance of P-glycoprotein, lung resistance protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To detect the expression of multidrug resistance molecules P-glycoprotein (P-gp, Lung resistnce protein (LRP and Multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP and analyze the relationship between them and the clinico-pathological features. Methods The expressions of P-gp, LRP and MRP in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 59 gastric cancer patients were determined by a labbelled Streptavidin-Peroxidase (SP immunohistochemical technique, and the results were analyzed in correlation with clinicopathological data. None of these patients received chemotherapy prior to surgery. Results The positive rates of P-gp, LRP, MRP were 86.4%, 84.7% and 27.1%, respectively. The difference between the positive rate of P-gp and MRP was significant statistically, as well as the difference between the expression of MRP and LRP. No significant difference was observed between P-gp and LRP, but the positively correlation between the expression of P-gp and LRP had been found. No significant correlation between the expression of P-gp, LRP, MRP and the grade of differentiation were observed. The expression of P-gp was correlated with clinical stages positively (r = 0.742, but the difference with the expression of P-gp in different stages was not significant. Conclusion The expressions of P-gp, LRP and MRP in patients with gastric cancer without prior chemotherapy are high, indicating that innate drug resistance may exist in gastric cancer.

  8. Activated protein C resistance testing for factor V Leiden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadauke, Stephan; Khor, Bernard; Van Cott, Elizabeth M

    2014-12-01

    Activated protein C resistance assays can detect factor V Leiden with high accuracy, depending on the method used. Factor Xa inhibitors such as rivaroxaban and direct thrombin inhibitors including dabigatran, argatroban, and bivalirudin can cause falsely normal results. Lupus anticoagulants can cause incorrect results in most current assays. Assays that include dilution into factor V-deficient plasma are needed to avoid interference from factor deficiencies or elevations, which can arise from a wide variety of conditions such as warfarin, liver dysfunction, or pregnancy. The pros and cons of the currently available assays are discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. 9-Deazapurines as Broad-Spectrum Inhibitors of the ABC Transport Proteins P-Glycoprotein, Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1, and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Katja; Schmitt, Sven Marcel; Wiese, Michael

    2017-11-09

    P-Glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) are the three major ABC transport proteins conferring resistance to many structurally diverse anticancer agents, leading to the phenomenon called multidrug resistance (MDR). Much effort has been put into the development of clinically useful compounds to reverse MDR. Broad-spectrum inhibitors of ABC transport proteins can be of great use in cancers that simultaneously coexpress two or three transporters. In this work, we continued our effort to generate new, potent, nontoxic, and multiply effective inhibitors of the three major ABC transporters. The best compound was active in a very low micromolar concentration range against all three transporters and restored sensitivity toward daunorubicin (P-gp and MRP1) and SN-38 (BCRP) in A2780/ADR (P-gp), H69AR (MRP1), and MDCK II BCRP (BCRP) cells. Additionally, the compound is a noncompetitive inhibitor of daunorubicin (MRP1), calcein AM (P-gp), and pheophorbide A (BCRP) transport.

  10. Cloning and Molecular Characterization of the Schistosoma mansoni Genes RbAp48 and Histone H4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia P Souza

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The human nuclear protein RbAp48 is a member of the tryptophan/aspartate (WD repeat family, which binds to the retinoblastoma (Rb protein. It also corresponds to the smallest subunit of the chromatin assembly factor and is able to bind to the helix 1 of histone H4, taking it to the DNA in replication. A cDNA homologous to the human gene RbAp48 was isolated from a Schistosoma mansoni adult worm library and named SmRbAp48. The full length sequence of SmRbAp48 cDNA is 1036 bp long, encoding a protein of 308 amino acids. The transcript of SmRbAp48 was detected in egg, cercariae and schistosomulum stages. The protein shows 84% similarity with the human RbAp48, possessing four WD repeats on its C-terminus. A hypothetical tridimensional structure for the SmRbAp48 C-terminal domain was constructed by computational molecular modeling using the b-subunit of the G protein as a model. To further verify a possible interaction between SmRbAp48 and S. mansoni histone H4, the histone H4 gene was amplified from adult worm genomic DNA using degenerated primers. The gene fragment of SmH4 is 294 bp long, encoding a protein of 98 amino acids which is 100% identical to histone H4 from Drosophila melanogaster.

  11. The cooperative effect of p53 and Rb in local nanotherapy in a rabbit VX2 model of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Shengli Dong,1 Qibin Tang,2 Miaoyun Long,3 Jian Guan,4 Lu Ye,5 Gaopeng Li6 1Department of General Surgery, The Second Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi Province, 2Department of Hepatobiliopancreatic Surgery, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, 3Department of Thyroid and Vascular Surgery, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, 4Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, 5Infection Department, Guangzhou No 8 Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, 6Department of Ultrasound, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, People's Republic of China Background/aim: A local nanotherapy (LNT combining the therapeutic efficacy of trans-arterial embolization, nanoparticles, and p53 gene therapy has been previously presented. The study presented here aimed to further improve the incomplete tumor eradication and limited survival enhancement and to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the LNT. Methods: In a tumor-targeting manner, recombinant expressing plasmids harboring wild-type p53 and Rb were either co-transferred or transferred separately to rabbit hepatic VX2 tumors in a poly-L-lysine-modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticle nanoplex and Lipiodol® (Guerbet, Villepinte, France emulsion via the hepatic artery. Subsequent co-expression of p53 and Rb proteins within the treated tumors was investigated by Western blotting and in situ analysis by laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The therapeutic effect was evaluated by the tumor growth velocity, apoptosis and necrosis rates, their sensitivity to Adriamycin® (ADM, mitomycin C, and fluorouracil, the microvessel density of tumor tissue, and the survival time of animals. Eventually, real-time polymerase chain reaction and enhanced chemiluminescence Western blotting

  12. RV Ronald H. Brown Cruise RB1201 (EM122)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Cruise RB1201 was led by Chief Scientist Molly Baringer (AOML, NOAA, Miami) as per previous cruises RB0602, RB0701 and RB0901. The three main objectives were:...

  13. Genomic landscape of retinoblastoma in Rb-/-p130-/-mice resembles human retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Irsan E; van Mil, Saskia E; MacPherson, David; Mol, Berber M; Moll, Annette C; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Cloos, Jacqueline; Te Riele, Hein; Dorsman, Josephine C

    2017-03-01

    Several murine retinoblastoma models have been generated by deleting the genes encoding for retinoblastoma susceptibility protein pRb and one of its family members p107 or p130. In Rb -/- p107 -/- retinoblastomas, somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) like Mdm2 amplification or Cdkn2a deletion targeting the p53-pathway occur, which is uncommon for human retinoblastoma. In our study, we determined SCNAs in retinoblastomas developing in Rb -/- p130 -/- mice and compared this to murine Rb -/- p107 -/- tumors and human tumors. Chimeric mice were made by injection of 129/Ola-derived Rb -/- p130 -/- embryonic stem cells into wild type C57BL/6 blastocysts. SCNAs of retinoblastoma samples were determined by low-coverage (∼0.5×) whole genome sequencing. In Rb -/- p130 -/- tumors, SCNAs included gain of chromosomes 1 (3/23 tumors), 8 (1/23 tumors), 10 (1/23 tumors), 11 (2/23 tumors), and 12 (4/23 tumors), which could be mapped to frequently altered chromosomes in human retinoblastomas. While the altered chromosomes in Rb -/- p130 -/- tumors were similar to those in Rb -/- p107 -/- tumors, the alteration frequencies were much lower in Rb -/- p130 -/- tumors. Most of the Rb -/- p130 -/- tumors (16/23 tumors, 70%) were devoid of SCNAs, in strong contrast to Rb -/- p107 -/- tumors, which were never (0/15 tumors) SCNA-devoid. Similarly, to human retinoblastoma, increased age at diagnosis significantly correlated with increased SCNA frequencies. Additionally, focal loss of Cdh11 was observed in one Rb -/- p130 -/- tumor, which enforces studies in human retinoblastoma that identified CDH11 as a retinoblastoma suppressor. Moreover, based on a comparison of genes altered in human and murine retinoblastoma, we suggest exploring the role of HMGA1 and SRSF3 in retinoblastoma development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Using Resurrected Ancestral Proviral Proteins to Engineer Virus Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2017-05-09

    Proviral factors are host proteins hijacked by viruses for processes essential for virus propagation such as cellular entry and replication. Pathogens and their hosts co-evolve. It follows that replacing a proviral factor with a functional ancestral form of the same protein could prevent viral propagation without fatally compromising organismal fitness. Here, we provide proof of concept of this notion. Thioredoxins serve as general oxidoreductases in all known cells. We report that several laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins display substantial levels of functionality within Escherichia coli. Unlike E. coli thioredoxin, however, these ancestral thioredoxins are not efficiently recruited by the bacteriophage T7 for its replisome and therefore prevent phage propagation in E. coli. These results suggest an approach to the engineering of virus resistance. Diseases caused by viruses may have a devastating effect in agriculture. We discuss how the suggested approach could be applied to the engineering of plant virus resistance. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Heat shock protein 90 and its co-chaperone protein phosphatase 5 interact with distinct regions of the tomato I-2 disease resistance protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Fuente van Bentem, S.; Vossen, J.H.; de Vries, K.J.; van Wees, A.C.M.; Tameling, W.I.L.; Dekker, H.L.; de Koster, C.G.; Haring, M.A.; Takken, F.L.W.; Cornelissen, B.J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Recent data suggest that plant disease resistance (R) proteins are present in multi-protein complexes. Tomato R protein I-2 confers resistance against the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. To identify components of the I-2 complex, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens using the I-2 leucine-rich

  16. The human multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP is a plasma membrane drug-efflux pump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaman, G. J.; Flens, M. J.; van Leusden, M. R.; de Haas, M.; Mülder, H. S.; Lankelma, J.; Pinedo, H. M.; Scheper, R. J.; Baas, F.; Broxterman, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    The multidrug-resistance associated protein MRP is a 180- to 195-kDa membrane protein associated with resistance of human tumor cells to cytotoxic drugs. We have investigated how MRP confers drug resistance in SW-1573 human lung carcinoma cells by generating a subline stably transfected with an

  17. Use of detergent extracts of Brucella abortus RB51 to detect serologic responses in RB51-vaccinated cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halling, S M; Koster, N A

    2001-09-01

    Serologic responses to the newly introduced rough Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 have been determined in a dot-blot format using gamma-irradiated RB51 cells as the antigen. Because gamma-irradiated cells are not easily prepared and the signal from cells was not always reliable, an alternative antigen was sought. Detergent extracts of B. abortus RB51 were prepared using zwittergent 3-14, Triton X-100, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and examined in a dot-blot format. Zwittergent 3-14 extracts and gamma-irradiated RB51 cells gave the same titers. Unlike gamma-irradiated RB51 cells, zwittergent 3-14 extracts produced signals consistently, and the signals were easily interpreted. Triton X-100 extracts interfered with signal development, and SDS extracts resulted in a high background signal. Western blot analyses revealed several outer membrane proteins in the zwittergent 3-14 extract. The major antigens in the extract had apparent molecular weights of <20,000.

  18. Positive muscle protein net balance and differential regulation of atrogene expression after resistance exercise and milk protein supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reitelseder, Søren; Agergaard, Jakob; Doessing, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Resistance exercise and amino acid availability are positive regulators of muscle protein net balance (NB). However, anabolic responses to resistance exercise and protein supplementation deserve further elucidation. The purpose was to compare intakes of whey, caseinate (both: 0.30 g/kg lean...

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Intracellular and Membrane Proteins From Voriconazole-Resistant Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae Il; Kim, Hwa Su; Choi, Chi Won; Yoo, Jung Sik; Yu, Jae Yon; Lee, Yeong Seon

    2013-12-01

    The proteomic analysis of voriconazole resistant Candida glabrata strain has not yet been investigated. In this study, differentially expressed proteins of intracellular and membrane fraction from voriconazole-susceptible, susceptible dose-dependent (S-DD), resistant C. glabrata strains were compared with each other and several proteins were identified. The proteins of intracellular and membrane were isolated by disrupting cells with glass bead and centrifugation from voriconazole susceptible, S-DD, and resistant C. glabrata strains. The abundance of expressed proteins was compared using two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and proteins showing continuous twofold or more increase or reduction of expression in resistant strains compared to susceptible and S-DD strain were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry method. Of 34 intracellular proteins, 15 proteins showed expression increase or reduction (twofold or more). The identified proteins included regulation, energy production, carbohydrate transport, amino acid transport, and various metabolism related proteins. The increase of expression of heat shock protein 70 was found. Among membrane proteins, 12, 31 proteins showed expression increase or decrease in the order of susceptible, S-DD, and resistant strains. This expression included carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid synthesis, and response to stress-related proteins. In membrane fractions, the change of expression of 10 heat shock proteins was observed, and 9 heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) showed the reduction of expression. The expression of Hsp70 protein in membrane fraction is related to voriconazole resistant C. glabrata strains.

  20. Protease-resistant prions selectively decrease Shadoo protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel C Watts

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The central event in prion diseases is the conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C into PrP(Sc, a partially protease-resistant and infectious conformer. However, the mechanism by which PrP(Sc causes neuronal dysfunction remains poorly understood. Levels of Shadoo (Sho, a protein that resembles the flexibly disordered N-terminal domain of PrP(C, were found to be reduced in the brains of mice infected with the RML strain of prions [1], implying that Sho levels may reflect the presence of PrP(Sc in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we examined levels of Sho during prion infection using a variety of experimental systems. Sho protein levels were decreased in the brains of mice, hamsters, voles, and sheep infected with different natural and experimental prion strains. Furthermore, Sho levels were decreased in the brains of prion-infected, transgenic mice overexpressing Sho and in infected neuroblastoma cells. Time-course experiments revealed that Sho levels were inversely proportional to levels of protease-resistant PrP(Sc. Membrane anchoring and the N-terminal domain of PrP both influenced the inverse relationship between Sho and PrP(Sc. Although increased Sho levels had no discernible effect on prion replication in mice, we conclude that Sho is the first non-PrP marker specific for prion disease. Additional studies using this paradigm may provide insight into the cellular pathways and systems subverted by PrP(Sc during prion disease.

  1. Extracellular proteins: Novel key components of metal resistance in cyanobacteria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin eGiner-Lamia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metals are essential for all living organisms and required for fundamental biochemical processes. However, when in excess, metals can turn into highly-toxic agents able to disrupt cell membranes, alter enzymatic activities and damage DNA. Metal concentrations are therefore tightly controlled inside cells, particularly in cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are ecologically relevant prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis and can be found in many different marine and freshwater ecosystems, including environments contaminated with heavy metals. As their photosynthetic machinery imposes high demands for metals, homeostasis of these micronutrients has been widely studied in cyanobacteria. So far, most studies have focused on how cells are capable of controlling their internal metal pools, with a strong bias towards the analysis of intracellular processes. Ultrastructure, modulation of physiology, dynamic changes in transcription and protein levels have been studied, but what takes place in the extracellular environment when cells are exposed to an unbalanced metal availability remains largely unknown. The interest in studying the subset of proteins present in the extracellular space has only recently begun and the identification and functional analysis of the cyanobacterial exoproteomes are just emerging. Remarkably, metal-related proteins such as the copper-chaperone CopM or the iron-binding protein FutA2 have already been identified outside the cell. With this perspective, we aim to raise the awareness that metal-resistance mechanisms are not yet fully known and hope to motivate future studies assessing the role of extracellular proteins on bacterial metal homeostasis, with a special focus on cyanobacteria.

  2. SynProt: A Database for Proteins of Detergent-Resistant Synaptic Protein Preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielot, Rainer; Smalla, Karl-Heinz; Müller, Anke; Landgraf, Peter; Lehmann, Anne-Christin; Eisenschmidt, Elke; Haus, Utz-Uwe; Weismantel, Robert; Gundelfinger, Eckart D.; Dieterich, Daniela C.

    2012-01-01

    Chemical synapses are highly specialized cell–cell contacts for communication between neurons in the CNS characterized by complex and dynamic protein networks at both synaptic membranes. The cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) organizes the apparatus for the regulated release of transmitters from the presynapse. At the postsynaptic side, the postsynaptic density constitutes the machinery for detection, integration, and transduction of the transmitter signal. Both pre- and postsynaptic protein networks represent the molecular substrates for synaptic plasticity. Their function can be altered both by regulating their composition and by post-translational modification of their components. For a comprehensive understanding of synaptic networks the entire ensemble of synaptic proteins has to be considered. To support this, we established a comprehensive database for synaptic junction proteins (SynProt database) primarily based on proteomics data obtained from biochemical preparations of detergent-resistant synaptic junctions. The database currently contains 2,788 non-redundant entries of rat, mouse, and some human proteins, which mainly have been manually extracted from 12 proteomic studies and annotated for synaptic subcellular localization. Each dataset is completed with manually added information including protein classifiers as well as automatically retrieved and updated information from public databases (UniProt and PubMed). We intend that the database will be used to support modeling of synaptic protein networks and rational experimental design. PMID:22737123

  3. Role of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in Cancer Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Karthika; Xie, Yi; Baer, Maria R.; Ross, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    Since cloning of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family member breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) and its characterization as a multidrug resistance efflux transporter in 1998, BCRP has been the subject of more than two thousand scholarly articles. In normal tissues, BCRP functions as a defense mechanism against toxins and xenobiotics, with expression in the gut, bile canaliculi, placenta, blood-testis and blood-brain barriers facilitating excretion and limiting absorption of potentially toxic substrate molecules, including many cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. BCRP also plays a key role in heme and folate homeostasis, which may help normal cells survive under conditions of hypoxia. BCRP expression appears to be a characteristic of certain normal tissue stem cells termed “side population cells,” which are identified on flow cytometric analysis by their ability to exclude Hoechst 33342, a BCRP substrate fluorescent dye. Hence, BCRP expression may contribute to the natural resistance and longevity of these normal stem cells. Malignant tissues can exploit the properties of BCRP to survive hypoxia and to evade exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs. Evidence is mounting that many cancers display subpopulations of stem cells that are responsible for tumor self-renewal. Such stem cells frequently manifest the “side population” phenotype characterized by expression of BCRP and other ABC transporters. Along with other factors, these transporters may contribute to the inherent resistance of these neoplasms and their failure to be cured. PMID:22248732

  4. The Role of RB in the Therapeutic Response of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bosco, Emily E

    2005-01-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB) participates in the growth regulation of breast cancer cells by controlling G-S phase progression and mediating cell cycle arrest in response to anti-mitogenic signaling...

  5. p53 protein aggregation promotes platinum resistance in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang-Hartwich, Y; Soteras, M G; Lin, Z P; Holmberg, J; Sumi, N; Craveiro, V; Liang, M; Romanoff, E; Bingham, J; Garofalo, F; Alvero, A; Mor, G

    2015-07-01

    High-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC), the most lethal gynecological cancer, often leads to chemoresistant diseases. The p53 protein is a key transcriptional factor regulating cellular homeostasis. A majority of HGSOCs have inactive p53 because of genetic mutations. However, genetic mutation is not the only cause of p53 inactivation. The aggregation of p53 protein has been discovered in different types of cancers and may be responsible for impairing the normal transcriptional activation and pro-apoptotic functions of p53. We demonstrated that in a unique population of HGSOC cancer cells with cancer stem cell properties, p53 protein aggregation is associated with p53 inactivation and platinum resistance. When these cancer stem cells differentiated into their chemosensitive progeny, they lost tumor-initiating capacity and p53 aggregates. In addition to the association of p53 aggregation and chemoresistance in HGSOC cells, we further demonstrated that the overexpression of a p53-positive regulator, p14ARF, inhibited MDM2-mediated p53 degradation and led to the imbalance of p53 turnover that promoted the formation of p53 aggregates. With in vitro and in vivo models, we demonstrated that the inhibition of p14ARF could suppress p53 aggregation and sensitize cancer cells to platinum treatment. Moreover, by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry we discovered that the aggregated p53 may function uniquely by interacting with proteins that are critical for cancer cell survival and tumor progression. Our findings help us understand the poor chemoresponse of a subset of HGSOC patients and suggest p53 aggregation as a new marker for chemoresistance. Our findings also suggest that inhibiting p53 aggregation can reactivate p53 pro-apoptotic function. Therefore, p53 aggregation is a potential therapeutic target for reversing chemoresistance. This is paramount for improving ovarian cancer patients' responses to chemotherapy, and thus increasing their

  6. Differential stimulation of myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein synthesis with protein ingestion at rest and after resistance exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Daniel R; Tang, Jason E; Burd, Nicholas A; Rerecich, Tracy; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Phillips, Stuart M

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to determine whether there is a differential stimulation of the contractile myofibrillar and the cellular sarcoplasmic proteins after ingestion of protein and how this is affected by resistance exercise. Fasted (FAST) muscle protein synthesis was measured in seven healthy young men with a primed constant infusion of l-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine. Participants then performed an intense bout of unilateral resistance exercise followed by the consumption of 25 g of whey protein to maximally stimulate protein synthesis. In the rested (FED) leg myofibrillar (MYO) protein synthesis was elevated (P 0.05). In contrast, MYO protein synthesis in the exercised (FED-EX) leg was stimulated above FAST at 1, 3 and 5 h (∼100, 216, and 229%, respectively; P < 0.01) with the increase at 5 h being greater than FED (P < 0.01). Thus, the synthesis of muscle contractile proteins is stimulated by both feeding and resistance exercise early (1 h) but has a greater duration and amplitude after resistance exercise. Sarcoplasmic (SARC) protein synthesis was similarly elevated (P < 0.01) above FAST by ∼104% at 3 h in both FED and FED-EX suggesting SARC protein synthesis is stimulated by feeding but that this response is not augmented by resistance exercise. In conclusion, myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein synthesis are similarly, but transiently, stimulated with protein feeding. In contrast, resistance exercise rapidly stimulates and sustains the synthesis of only the myofibrillar protein fraction after protein ingestion. These data highlight the importance of measuring the synthetic response of specific muscle protein fractions when examining the effects of exercise and nutrition. PMID:19124543

  7. The tumor suppressors pRB and p53 as regulators of adipocyte differentiation and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenborg, Philip; Feddersen, Søren; Madsen, Lise

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and p53 are crucial members of regulatory networks controlling the cell cycle and apoptosis, and a hallmark of virtually all cancers is dysregulation of expression or function of pRB or p53. Although they are best known for their role in cancer...... development, it is now evident that both are implicated in metabolism and cellular development. OBJECTIVE/METHODS: To review the role of pRB and p53 in adipocyte differentiation and function emphasizing that pRB and p53, via their effects on adipocyte development and function, play a role in the regulation...... of energy metabolism and homeostasis. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: pRB is required for adipose conversion and also involved in determining its mitochondrial capacity. p53 inhibits adipogenesis and results suggest that it is involved in maintaining function of adipose tissue....

  8. GENETIC STABILITY ANALYSIS OF RB GENE IN GENETICALLY MODIFIED POTATO LINES TOLERANT TO Phytophthora infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Listanto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Development of potato cultivars with high levels of broad spectrum resistance is a key long-term management strategy against late blight disease caused by Phytophthora infestans. Six progeny lines of hybridization between transgenic potato Katahdin SP951 with non-transgenic Granola and Atlantic were selected based on agronomical characteristics and resistance to late blight disease. The study aimed to analyze the number of insertions and stability of inserted RB gene in the transgenic potato lines. The research was carried out through plant DNA extraction, southern blot analysis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Southern blot analysis was used to detect the number of inserts integrated into potato genome, while PCR analysis was used to detect stability of RB gene from generation to generation. The results showed that the progenies obtained from hybridization between Atlantic and transgenic Katahdin SP951 (lines No. 20 and 27 and between Granola and transgenic Katahdin SP951 (line No. 69 contained one copy number of RB gene, according to the probing of nptII. The result is similar to that of inserted RB gene found in the parental transgenic Katahdin SP951. The presence of RB gene in four different generations (G0, G1, G2 and G3 showed stable integration of the gene into the plant genome. The single copy number of RB gene will repress the occurrence of silencing gene expression. The stability analysis of RB gene can determine that the gene is still present in plant genome after several generations.

  9. An RbAp48-like gene regulates adult stem cells in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuccelli, Lucia; Rossi, Leonardo; Lena, Annalisa; Scarcelli, Vittoria; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Evangelista, Monica; Iacopetti, Paola; Gremigni, Vittorio; Salvetti, Alessandra

    2010-03-01

    Retinoblastoma-associated proteins 46 and 48 (RbAp46 and RbAp48) are factors that are components of different chromatin-modelling complexes, such as polycomb repressive complex 2, the activity of which is related to epigenetic gene regulation in stem cells. To date, no direct findings are available on the in vivo role of RbAp48 in stem-cell biology. We recently identified DjRbAp48 - a planarian (Dugesia japonica) homologue of human RBAP48 - expression of which is restricted to the neoblasts, the adult stem cells of planarians. In vivo silencing of DjRbAp48 induces lethality and inability to regenerate, even though neoblasts proliferate and accumulate after wounding. Despite a partial reduction in neoblast number, we were always able to detect a significant number of these cells in DjRbAp48 RNAi animals. Parallel to the decrease in neoblasts, a reduction in the number of differentiated cells and the presence of apoptotic-like neoblasts were detectable in RNAi animals. These findings suggest that DjRbAp48 is not involved in neoblast maintenance, but rather in the regulation of differentiation of stem-cell progeny. We discuss our data, taking into account the possibility that DjRbAp48 might control the expression of genes necessary for cell differentiation by influencing chromatin architecture.

  10. Differential protein expression in the susceptible and resistant Myzus persicae (Sulzer) to imidacloprid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, JianYu; Zhang, ChangYu; Chen, XingJiang; Cao, Yi; Shang, ShengHua

    2014-10-01

    Myzus persicae, a serious economic agricultural pest, has developed resistance to imidacloprid (IMI), which was widely used to control this aphid worldwide. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of IMI resistance in M. persicae, we carried out a comparative proteomic analysis. Total proteins of the IMI-susceptible and resistant strains were extracted and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. More than 1300 protein spots were reproducibly detected, including 14 that were more abundant and 14 less abundant. Mass spectrometry analysis and database searching helped us to identify 25 differentially abundant proteins. The identified proteins were categorized into several functional groups including signal transduction, RNA processing, protein processing, transport processing, stress response, metabolisms, and cytoskeleton structure, etc. This study is the first analysis of differentially expressed proteins in IMI-susceptible and resistant M. Persicae, and gives new insights into the mechanisms of IMI resistance in M. persicae. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. RB research reactor Safety Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.; Pesic, M.; Vranic, S.

    1979-04-01

    This RB reactor safety report is a revised and improved version of the Safety report written in 1962. It contains descriptions of: reactor building, reactor hall, control room, laboratories, reactor components, reactor control system, heavy water loop, neutron source, safety system, dosimetry system, alarm system, neutron converter, experimental channels. Safety aspects of the reactor operation include analyses of accident causes, errors during operation, measures for preventing uncontrolled activity changes, analysis of the maximum possible accident in case of different core configurations with natural uranium, slightly and highly enriched fuel; influence of possible seismic events

  12. Suppression of the p53- or pRB-mediated G1 checkpoint is required for E2F-induced S-phase entry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomazzi, Marina; Moroni, M Cristina; Jensen, Michael R

    2002-01-01

    Deregulation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) pathway is a hallmark of cancer. In the absence of other genetic alterations, this deregulation results in lack of differentiation, hyperproliferation and apoptosis. The pRB protein acts as a transcriptional repressor by targeting the E2F transcrip......Deregulation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) pathway is a hallmark of cancer. In the absence of other genetic alterations, this deregulation results in lack of differentiation, hyperproliferation and apoptosis. The pRB protein acts as a transcriptional repressor by targeting the E2F...

  13. MicroRNA-140 mediates RB tumor suppressor function to control stem cell-like activity through interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akiyo; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Li, Fengkai; Cheng, Chaoyang; Takegami, Yujiro; Kohno, Susumu; Wan, Yuan Song; Hayashi, Naoyuki; Muranaka, Hayato; Nishimoto, Yuuki; Nagatani, Naoko; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Thai, Tran C; Suzuki, Sawako; Nakao, Shinji; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Hirose, Osamu; Barbie, David A; Takahashi, Chiaki

    2017-02-21

    We established an in vitro cell culture system to determine novel activities of the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein during tumor progression. Rb depletion in p53-null mouse-derived soft tissue sarcoma cells induced a spherogenic phenotype. Cells retrieved from Rb-depleted spheres exhibited slower proliferation and less efficient BrdU incorporation, however, much higher spherogenic activity and aggressive behavior. We discovered six miRNAs, including mmu-miR-18a, -25, -29b, -140, -337, and -1839, whose expression levels correlated tightly with the Rb status and spherogenic activity. Among these, mmu-miR-140 appeared to be positively controlled by Rb and to antagonize the effect of Rb depletion on spherogenesis and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, among genes potentially targeted by mmu-miR-140, Il-6 was upregulated by Rb depletion and downregulated by mmu-mir-140 overexpression. Altogether, we demonstrate the possibility that mmu-mir-140 mediates the Rb function to downregulate Il-6 by targeting its 3'-untranslated region. Finally, we detected the same relationship among RB, hsa-miR-140 and IL-6 in a human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Because IL-6 is a critical modulator of malignant features of cancer cells and the RB pathway is impaired in the majority of cancers, hsa-miR-140 might be a promising therapeutic tool that disrupts linkage between tumor suppressor inactivation and pro-inflammatory cytokine response.

  14. Alumina column Rb-82 generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Y.; Roth, E.P.

    1977-10-01

    The use of an alumina column for the adsorption of radioactive Sr for the generator production of 75-sec 82 Rb was evaluated in both batches and column experiments using 85 Sr and cyclotron-produced 82 Sr. Comparisons of alumina, Bio-Rex 70 and Chelex 100 ion exchangers were made to determine Sr adsorption, 82 Rb elution yield and Sr breakthrough. The adsorption of Sr is similar for alumina and Chelex 100 but different for Bio-Rex 70. Alumina and Chelex 100 exhibit a small fraction of poorly bound Sr which appears as higher breakthrough in the early elution volumes. The remaining Sr activity is strongly bound to these ion exchangers and the breakthrough remains stable at a lower breakthrough value through a large number of elutions. Bio-Rex 70 on the other hand does not exhibit the poorly bound Sr fraction and the breakthrough of Sr remains the lowest of the three ion exchangers through a moderate number of elutions and then the Sr breakthrough gradually increases with each additional elution

  15. Effect of protein/essential amino acids and resistance training on skeletal muscle hypertrophy: A case for whey protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stout Jeffrey R

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Regardless of age or gender, resistance training or provision of adequate amounts of dietary protein (PRO or essential amino acids (EAA can increase muscle protein synthesis (MPS in healthy adults. Combined PRO or EAA ingestion proximal to resistance training, however, can augment the post-exercise MPS response and has been shown to elicit a greater anabolic effect than exercise plus carbohydrate. Unfortunately, chronic/adaptive response data comparing the effects of different protein sources is limited. A growing body of evidence does, however, suggest that dairy PRO, and whey in particular may: 1 stimulate the greatest rise in MPS, 2 result in greater muscle cross-sectional area when combined with chronic resistance training, and 3 at least in younger individuals, enhance exercise recovery. Therefore, this review will focus on whey protein supplementation and its effects on skeletal muscle mass when combined with heavy resistance training.

  16. Role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP) in glutathione S-conjugate transport in mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M; deVries, EGE; Jansen, PLM

    1996-01-01

    The human multidrug resistance protein (MRP), a 190-kDa member of the ABC-protein superfamily, is an ATP-dependent glutathione S-conjugate carrier (GS-X pump) and is present in membranes of many, if not all, cells, Overexpression of MRP in tumor cells contributes to resistance to natural product

  17. Role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP) in glutathione S-conjugate transport in mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, M.; de Vries, E. G.; Jansen, P. L.

    1996-01-01

    The human multidrug resistance protein (MRP), a 190-kDa member of the ABC-protein superfamily, is an ATP-dependent glutathione S-conjugate carrier (GS-X pump) and is present in membranes of many, if not all, cells. Overexpression of MRP in tumor cells contributes to resistance to natural product

  18. Effect of protein/essential amino acids and resistance training on skeletal muscle hypertrophy: A case for whey protein

    OpenAIRE

    Stout Jeffrey R; Lockwood Christopher M; Hulmi Juha J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Regardless of age or gender, resistance training or provision of adequate amounts of dietary protein (PRO) or essential amino acids (EAA) can increase muscle protein synthesis (MPS) in healthy adults. Combined PRO or EAA ingestion proximal to resistance training, however, can augment the post-exercise MPS response and has been shown to elicit a greater anabolic effect than exercise plus carbohydrate. Unfortunately, chronic/adaptive response data comparing the effects of different pro...

  19. Overexpression of Protective Antigen as a Novel Approach To Enhance Vaccine Efficacy of Brucella abortus Strain RB51

    OpenAIRE

    Vemulapalli, Ramesh; He, Yongqun; Cravero, Silvio; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M.; Schurig, Gerhardt G.

    2000-01-01

    Brucella abortus strain RB51 is an attenuated rough strain that is currently being used as the official live vaccine for bovine brucellosis in the United States and several other countries. We reasoned that overexpression of a protective antigen(s) of B. abortus in strain RB51 should enhance its vaccine efficacy. To test this hypothesis, we overexpressed Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) protein of B. abortus in strain RB51. This was accomplished by transforming strain RB51 with a broad-host-r...

  20. The role of p53 and pRB in apoptosis and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hickman, Emma S; Moroni, M Cristina; Helin, Kristian

    2002-01-01

    Loss of function of both the p53 pathway and the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) pathway plays a significant role in the development of most human cancers. Loss of pRB results in deregulated cell proliferation and apoptosis, whereas loss of p53 desensitizes cells to checkpoint signals, including...... apoptosis. In the past two years, mouse genetics and gene expression profiling have led to major advances in our understanding of how the pRB and p53 pathways regulate apoptosis and thus the development of tumours....

  1. [Activated protein C resistance and factor V Leiden: clinical interest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guermazi, S; Znazen, R

    2011-10-01

    Activated protein C resistance (APCR) is a coagulation abnormality often linked to FV Leiden mutation, a single nucleotide G1691A substitution resulting in arginine 506→glutamine missense factor V mutation. FV Leiden has a frequency of 20 to 30% in groups of patients with venous thrombosis while it is of 4 to 10% in normal subjects. FV Leiden is considered as a weak risk factor of thrombosis except in homozygote. FV Leiden is implicated in deep venous thrombosis occurrence. Duration of oral anticoagulant treatment is six months in patients developing a first venous thrombosis except in patients with combined defects or a clinical context suggesting a high risk of severe relapse. Detection of APCR by coagulation methods is often used in first intention with a high specificity if plasmas tested are diluted in factor V deficient plasma. Genotyping study is essential to establish the heterozygote or homozygote statute and certain teams perform it directly. Nevertheless, APCR not related to FV Leiden could be an independent thrombosis risk factor. APCR and FV Leiden are included in laboratory investigations of thrombophilic markers in patients less than 50 years with venous thrombosis. In arterial thrombosis, FV Leiden implication is weak or absent. FV Leiden increases the risk of thrombosis in other situations as in patients with cancer. An association with recurrent miscarriages and other vasculoplacental complications is also reported in many studies but the data concerning the efficacy of antithrombotic treatment to prevent recurrence are currently insufficient. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Short-chained oligo(ethylene oxide)-functionalized gold nanoparticles: realization of significant protein resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Kathryn R; Sims, Christopher M; Wood, Imani T; Vanderah, David J; Walker, Marlon L

    2018-01-01

    Protein corona formed on nanomaterial surfaces play an important role in the bioavailability and cellular uptake of nanomaterials. Modification of surfaces with oligoethylene glycols (OEG) are a common way to improve the resistivity of nanomaterials to protein adsorption. Short-chain ethylene oxide (EO) oligomers have been shown to improve the protein resistance of planar Au surfaces. We describe the application of these EO oligomers for improved protein resistance of 30 nm spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Functionalized AuNPs were characterized using UV-Vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and zeta potential measurements. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used for separation and quantitation of AuNPs and AuNP-protein mixtures. Specifically, nonequilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (NECEEM) was employed for the determination of equilibrium and rate constants for binding between citrate-stabilized AuNPs and two model proteins, lysozyme and fibrinogen. Semi-quantitative CE analysis was carried out for mixtures of EO-functionalized AuNPs and proteins, and results demonstrated a 2.5-fold to 10-fold increase in protein binding resistance to lysozyme depending on the AuNP surface functionalization and a 15-fold increase in protein binding resistance to fibrinogen for both EO oligomers examined in this study. Graphical abstract Using capillary electrophoresis, the addition of short-chained oligo(ethylene oxide) ligands to gold nanoparticles was shown to improve protein binding resistance up to 15-fold.

  3. Identification and network of outer membrane proteins regulating streptomysin resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Bao-Cheng; Xu, Wen-Jiao; Lin, Xiang-Min; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2008-09-01

    Bacterial Outer membrane (OM) proteins involved in antibiotic resistance have been reported. However, little is known about the OM proteins and their interaction network regulating streptomycin (SM) resistance. In the present study, a subproteomic approach was utilized to characterize OM proteins of Escherichia coli with SM resistance. TolC, OmpT and LamB were found to be up-regulated, and FadL, OmpW and a location-unknown protein Dps were down-regulated in the SM-resistant E. coli strain. These changes at the level of protein expression were validated using Western blotting. The possible roles of the altered proteins involved in the SM resistance were investigated using genetic modified strains with the deletion of these altered genes. It is found that decreased and elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations and survival capabilities of the gene deleted strains and their resistant strains, Delta tolC, Delta ompT, Delta dps, Delta tolC-R, Delta ompT-R, Delta dps-R and Delta fadL-R, were correlated with the changes of TolC, OmpT, Dps and FadL at the protein expression levels detected by 2-DE gels, respectively. The results may suggest that these proteins are the key OM proteins and play important roles in the regulation of SM resistance in E. coli. Furthermore, an interaction network of altered OM proteins involved in the SM resistance was proposed in this report. Of the six altered proteins, TolC may play a central role in the network. These findings may provide novel insights into mechanisms of SM resistance in E. coli.

  4. Whey protein hydrolysate augments tendon and muscle hypertrophy independent of resistance exercise contraction mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, S K; Vendelbo, M H

    2014-01-01

    In a comparative study, we investigated the effects of maximal eccentric or concentric resistance training combined with whey protein or placebo on muscle and tendon hypertrophy. 22 subjects were allocated into either a high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate + carbohydrate group (WHD...... or contraction mode effects. In conclusion, high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate augments muscle and tendon hypertrophy following 12 weeks of resistance training – irrespective of contraction mode....

  5. Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    prostate cancer patients have abnormalities in the AKT signaling pathway. These abnormalities are driven by mutations in the PTEN and AKT proteins as...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0560 TITLE: Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase Pathway...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Intracellular and Membrane Proteins From Voriconazole-Resistant Candida glabrata

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Jae Il; Kim, Hwa Su; Choi, Chi Won; Yoo, Jung Sik; Yu, Jae Yon; Lee, Yeong Seon

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The proteomic analysis of voriconazole resistant Candida glabrata strain has not yet been investigated. In this study, differentially expressed proteins of intracellular and membrane fraction from voriconazole-susceptible, susceptible dose-dependent (S-DD), resistant C. glabrata strains were compared with each other and several proteins were identified. Methods The proteins of intracellular and membrane were isolated by disrupting cells with glass bead and centrifugation from voric...

  7. Complement Fixation Test To Assess Humoral Immunity in Cattle and Sheep Vaccinated with Brucella abortus RB51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adone, Rosanna; Ciuchini, Franco

    1999-01-01

    The live attenuated Brucella abortus strain RB51 is a rifampin-resistant, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-chain-deficient mutant of virulent B. abortus 2308. The reduced O-chain content in RB51 prevents this bacterium from inducing antibodies detectable by the conventional serologic tests for bovine brucellosis diagnosis that mainly identify antibodies to LPS. The absence of available serologic tests for RB51 also complicates the diagnosis of possible RB51 infections in humans exposed to this strain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of a complement fixation (CF) test performed with the rough strain B. abortus RB51, previously deprived of anticomplementary activity, in detecting anti-B. abortus RB51 antibodies in cattle and sheep experimentally vaccinated with this strain. The results of this study showed that a CF test with RB51 as the antigen is able to specifically detect antibodies following RB51 vaccination in cattle and sheep. In addition, this method could be a useful tool for detecting B. abortus RB51 infection in humans. PMID:10548564

  8. Timing of postexercise protein intake is important for muscle hypertrophy with resistance training in elderly humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esmarck, B.; Andersen, J.L.; Olsen, S.

    2001-01-01

    1. Age-associated loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength can partly be counteracted by resistance training, causing a net synthesis of muscular proteins. Protein synthesis is influenced synergistically by postexercise amino acid supplementation, but the importance of the timing of protein intake...... ± S.E.M.)) completed a 12 week resistance training programme (3 times per week) receiving oral protein in liquid form (10 g protein, 7 g carbohydrate, 3 g fat) immediately after (P0) or 2 h after (P2) each training session. Muscle hypertrophy was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and from...

  9. RB research nuclear reactor - Annual report for 1985, I - III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, H.; Pesic, M.; Vranic, S.; Petronijevic, M.; Jevremovic, M.; Ilic, I.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the operation of the RB reactor during 1985. The report includes 3 parts: Engineering description and operation of the RB reactor, reactor components and maintenance, and RB reactor utilization in 1985 [sr

  10. Observation of Serum Bactericidal Activity of Brucella abortus RB51 OMPs Combined with Brucella abortus RB51 Live Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahime Gholizadeh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: vaccination is vital against brucellosis. Although current vaccines have low efficiency, some cell wall compartments such as Outer Membrane Proteins could be used as an immunogenic candidate in vaccine development. By this mean, our aim in this study was to evaluate the humoral immunity of the combination of Brucella abortus RB51 OMPs with the Brucella abortus RB51 live attenuated vaccine, by Serum Bactericidal Acitivity test. Materials and Methods: In this project, first Brucella abortus RB51 was cultivated in brucella agar. The OMPs were extracted by Sodium N-Lauryl Sarcosinate method, then added to the RB51 live attenuated vaccine. Immunization was done by injection of the vaccine to mice and rabbits. The blood was drawn on days 0, 15,30, and 45 from the rabbits and the sera were seperated. Brucella abortus 544 was also injected as challenge. Spleen colony count was also performed. Results: The data from Serum Bactericidal Assay has showed, there was a very high Humoral immunity and response as a bactericidal titre of the serum against Rb51 Live vaccine. There was a significant decrease of colonies in the group vaccinated with the combined vaccine in the Spleen colony count test. Statistical analysis of groups variances showed a significant difference between groups (P<0.05.Conclusions: The Serum Bactericidal Assay results showed despite previous studies, both the combine and live vaccine are capable to stimulate the Humoral immunity. greater activity of combined vaccine to boost the humoral activity might be due to the synergistic effect of this vaccine.

  11. Structure, function and subcellular localization of the potato Resistance protein Rx1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Resistance proteins are part of the plant’s immune system and mediate a defence response upon recognizing their cognate pathogens. They are thought to be present in the cell as part of a larger protein complex. The modular architecture of R proteins suggests that they form a scaffold for various

  12. Flexible diet choice offsets protein costs of pathogen resistance in a caterpillar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.P; Cory, J.S; Wilson, K; Raubenheimer, D; Simpson, S.J

    2005-01-01

    Mounting effective resistance against pathogens is costly in terms of energy and nutrients. However, it remains unexplored whether hosts can offset such costs by adjusting their dietary intake so as to recoup the specific resources involved. We test this possibility by experimentally challenging caterpillars (Spodoptera littoralis) with a highly virulent entomopathogen (nucleopolyhedrovirus), under dietary regimes varying in the content of protein and digestible carbohydrate. We found that dietary protein influenced both resistance to pathogen attack and constitutive immune function to a greater extent than did dietary carbohydrate, indicating higher protein costs of resistance than energy costs. Moreover, when allowed to self-compose their diet, insects surviving viral challenge increased their relative intake of protein compared with controls and those larvae dying of infection, thus demonstrating compensation for protein costs associated with resistance. These results suggest that the change in the host's nutritional demands to fight infection induces a compensatory shift in feeding behaviour. PMID:16618675

  13. Differentially expressed proteins in fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant isolates of Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yinzhong; Zhang, Lijun; Jia, Xiaofang; Zhang, Yongxin; Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-06-01

    The current study aimed to identify the differences presented in the proteome of fluconazole-susceptible isolates of Candida glabrata compared to those with fluconazole-resistant ones. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis was applied to identify proteins that were differentially expressed in fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant isolates of C. glabrata. Eight proteins including aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, translation elongation factor 3, 3-phosphoglycerate kinase, ribosomal protein L5, coproporphyrinogen III oxidase, pyruvate kinase, G-beta like protein, and F1F0-ATPase alpha subunit were found to be more abundantly represented, while four proteins including vitamin B12-(cobalamin)-independent isozyme of methionine synthase, microtubule-associated protein, adenylosuccinate synthetase, and aldose reductase were found to be less abundantly represented in fluconazole-resistant strains versus those with fluconazole-susceptible ones. These differentially expressed proteins were primarily associated with energy metabolism, stress response, and macromolecule synthesis. Proteins associated with energy metabolism, stress response, and macromolecule synthesis may play a role in the development of fluconazole resistance in the clinical isolates of C. glabrata. Multiple different mechanisms are involved in the development of fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata. These findings provide a scientific basis for discovering new genes and mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata.

  14. Final report on the IAEA research contracts No. 1194/RB, 1194/R1/RB and 1194/R2/RB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zobor, E.; Janosy, J.S.; Szentgali, A.

    1980-09-01

    The final report summarizes the research activities made in the framework of the IAEA Research Contracts No. 1194/RB, 1194/R1/RB and 1194/R2/RB. A multilevel hierarchical control system is treated which uses weakly-coupled low dimensional subsystems under the supervision of a dynamic coordinator program. This self-organizing adaptive control system was checked by a 5 MW research reactor. As an example the paper describes the experimental computer control system of the 5 MW WWR-SM research reactor, where the reactor power and outlet temperature have been controlled on the basis of the treated control concept since 1978. (author)

  15. Innate resistance to avian influenza: Of MHC's and Mx proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza (AI) is an economically important virus of poultry that has significant impact on global trade. Recently, increased attention to animal genomics has been applied to enhance innate resistance to infectious diseases in poultry. Two known contributors to innate resistance are the host m...

  16. Whey Protein Supplementation Enhances Whole Body Protein Metabolism and Performance Recovery after Resistance Exercise: A Double-Blind Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Daniel W D; Abou Sawan, Sidney; Mazzulla, Michael; Williamson, Eric; Moore, Daniel R

    2017-07-11

    No study has concurrently measured changes in free-living whole body protein metabolism and exercise performance during recovery from an acute bout of resistance exercise. We aimed to determine if whey protein ingestion enhances whole body net protein balance and recovery of exercise performance during overnight (10 h) and 24 h recovery after whole body resistance exercise in trained men. In a double-blind crossover design, 12 trained men (76 ± 8 kg, 24 ± 4 years old, 14% ± 5% body fat; means ± standard deviation (SD)) performed resistance exercise in the evening prior to consuming either 25 g of whey protein (PRO; MuscleTech 100% Whey) or an energy-matched placebo (CHO) immediately post-exercise (0 h), and again the following morning (~10 h of recovery). A third randomized trial, completed by the same participants, involving no exercise and no supplement served as a rested control trial (Rest). Participants ingested [ 15 N]glycine to determine whole body protein kinetics and net protein balance over 10 and 24 h of recovery. Performance was assessed pre-exercise and at 0, 10, and 24 h of recovery using a battery of tests. Net protein balance tended to improve in PRO ( P = 0.064; effect size (ES) = 0.61, PRO vs. CHO) during overnight recovery. Over 24 h, net balance was enhanced in PRO ( P = 0.036) but not in CHO ( P = 0.84; ES = 0.69, PRO vs. CHO), which was mediated primarily by a reduction in protein breakdown (PRO protein supplementation improved MVC (ES = 0.76), REP (ES = 0.44), and peak power (ES = 0.55). In conclusion, whey protein supplementation enhances whole body anabolism, and may improve acute recovery of exercise performance after a strenuous bout of resistance exercise.

  17. Mechanisms of multidrug resistance in HL60 cells. Analysis of resistance associated membrane proteins and levels of mdr gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, T; Latoud, C; Arnold, S T; Safa, A R; Felsted, R L; Center, M S

    1989-10-15

    HL60 cells isolated for resistance to Adriamycin do not contain P-glycoprotein, as determined with immunological probes. These cells, however, are multidrug resistant and defective in the cellular accumulation of drug. In view of these findings, we have examined in greater detail certain properties of the HL60/Adr cells and have compared these properties to an HL60 drug-resistant isolate (HL60/Vinc) which contains high levels of P-glycoprotein. The results of these studies demonstrated that verapamil induces a major increase in cellular drug accumulation in both HL60/Adr and HL60/Vinc isolates. An 125I-labeled photoaffinity analog of verapamil labeled P-glycoprotein contained in membranes of HL60/Vinc cells. In contrast, this agent did not label any protein selectively associated with drug resistance in membranes of the HL60/Adr isolate. The photoactive dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker [3H]azidopine and [125I]NASV, a photoaffinity analog of vinblastine, labelled P-glycoprotein in membranes from HL60/Vinc cells, whereas in experiments with the HL60/Adr isolate there was no detectable labeling of a drug resistance associated membrane protein. Additional studies have been carried out to analyze membrane proteins of HL60/Adr cells labeled with the photoaffinity agent 8-azido-alpha-[32P]ATP (AzATP32). The results demonstrate that this agent labeled a resistance associated membrane protein of 190 kilodaltons (P190). P190 is essentially absent in membranes of drug-sensitive cells. Labeling of P190 with AzATP32 in membranes of resistant cells was blocked completely when incubations were carried out in the presence of excess unlabeled ATP. Additional studies were carried out to analyze mdr gene amplification and expression in sensitive and resistant cells. Experiments carried out with human 5',mdr1 (1.1 kb) and mdr3 (1.0 kb) cDNAs demonstrate that both of these sequences were highly amplified in the HL60/Vinc isolate. Only the mrd1 gene sequence however, was

  18. Contemporary Issues in Protein Requirements and Consumption for Resistance Trained Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Jacob

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years an explosion of research papers concerning protein consumption has been published. The need to consolidate this information has become critical from both practical and future research standpoints. For this reason, the following paper presents an in depth analysis of contemporary issues in protein requirements and consumption for resistance trained athletes. Specifically, the paper covers: 1. protein requirements for resistance trained athletes; 2. the effect of the digestion rate of protein on muscular protein balance; 3. the optimal timing of protein intake relative to exercise; 4. the optimal pattern of protein ingestion, relative to how an individual should consume their protein throughout a 24 hour period, and what sources are utilized during this time frame; 5. protein composition and its interaction with measures of protein balance and strength performance; 6. the combination of protein and carbohydrates on plasma insulin levels and protein balance; 7. the efficacy of protein supplements and whole food protein sources. Our goal is to provide the reader with practical information in optimizing protein intake as well as for provision of sound advice to their clients. Finally, special care was taken to provide future research implications.

  19. Resistance to activated protein C is a risk factor for fibrostenosis in Crohn’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Novacek, Gottfried; Miehsler, Wolfgang; Palkovits, Julia; Reinisch, Walter; Waldhör, Thomas; Kapiotis, Stylianos; Gangl, Alfred; Vogelsang, Harald

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of resistance to activated protein C (aPCR), the most common known inherited thrombophilic disorder, on the risk of intestinal operation of fibrostenosis in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD).

  20. Regulation of Multidrug Resistance Proteins by Genistein in a Hepatocarcinoma Cell Line: Impact on Sorafenib Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Ciriaci, Nadia; Arias, Agostina; Ceballos, Mar?a Paula; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Luquita, Marcelo Gabriel; Mottino, Aldo Domingo; Ghanem, Carolina In?s; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Ruiz, Mar?a Laura

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most frequent cancer worldwide. Sorafenib is the only drug available that improves the overall survival of HCC patients. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), Multidrug resistance-associated proteins 2 and 3 (MRP2 and 3) and Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are efflux pumps that play a key role in cancer chemoresistance. Their modulation by dietary compounds may affect the intracellular accumulation and therapeutic efficacy of drugs that are substrates of t...

  1. Características agronômicas e químicas das variedades de cana-de-açúcar RB83-5486 e RB86-7515 sob irrigação e sequeiro Agronomic and chemical characteristics of RB83-5486 and RB86-7515 sugarcane varieties under irrigated and rainfed conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo A. R. Macêdo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, neste trabalho, avaliar as características agronômicas e a composição química de variedades de cana-de-açúcar sob irrigação e sequeiro colhidas em final de safra. O delineamento experimental foi bloco ao acaso, com seis repetições, duas variedades (RB83-5486 e RB86-7515, em dois ambientes: irrigado e sequeiro. As produções de colmo e matéria seca foram favorecidas pela irrigação, com destaque para a RB86-7515. Maiores teores de proteína bruta, fibra em detergente ácido, celulose e menores teores de matéria seca, Brix, carboidratos não fibrosos (CNF e digestibilidade in vitro da matéria seca (DIVMS foram registrados nas variedades sob irrigação. A fibra em detergente neutro (FDN e a relação FDN por Brix foram mais elevadas em condições irrigadas e a RB86-7515 apresentou maiores valores. A lignina foi maior na RB86-7515 irrigada. A RB83-5486 apresentou Brix e CNF mais elevados e melhor DIVMS que a RB86-7515. Maior potencial produtivo foi expresso em condições irrigadas, destacando-se a RB86-7515 enquanto a irrigação alterou a composição química, afetando negativamente o valor nutritivo das variedades; já a RB83-5486 apresentou melhor perfil nutricional.The study aimed to evaluate the agronomic characteristics and chemical composition of sugarcane varieties, harvested at the end of the dry season, under irrigated and rainfed conditions. The experimental design was in a completely randomized blocks with six replications. Two varieties (RB83-5486 and RB86-7515 under irrigated and rainfed conditions were studied. The stalk and dry matter yield were improved by irrigation, especially in case of RB86-7515. Higher contents of crude protein, acid detergent fiber, cellulose and lower contents of dry matter, Brix, non-fiber carbohydrates (NFC and in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD were obtained in the varieties under irrigation. The neutral detergent fiber (NDF and NDF/brix were higher in irrigated

  2. Clinicopathological significance of p16, cyclin D1, Rb and MIB-1 levels in skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-qi Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the expression of p16, cyclin D1, retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb and MIB-1 in skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma tissues, and to determine the clinicopathological significance of the above indexes in these diseases. Methods: A total of 100 skull base chordoma, 30 chondrosarcoma, and 20 normal cartilage tissue samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The expression levels of p16, cyclinD1, Rb and MIB-1 proteins were assessed for potential correlation with the clinicopathological features. Results: As compared to normal cartilage specimen (control, there was decreased expression of p16, and increased expression of cyclin D1, Rb and MIB-1 proteins, in both skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma specimens. MIB-1 LI levels were significantly increased in skull base chordoma specimens with negative expression of p16, and positive expression of cyclin D1 and Rb (P  0.05. However, p16 and MIB-1 levels correlated with the intradural invasion, and expression of p16, Rb and MIB-1 correlated with the number of tumor foci (P < 0.05. Further, the expression of p16 and MIB-1 appeared to correlate with the prognosis of patients with skull base chordoma. Conclusions: The abnormal expression of p16, cyclin D1 and Rb proteins might be associated with the tumorigenesis of skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma. Keywords: p16, Cyclin D1, Rb, MIB-1, Skull base chordoma, Skull base chondrosarcoma

  3. Decay of84fRb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passaro, A.M.P.

    1987-01-01

    For the first time, low intensity beta ramifications were determined in the decay of 84 Rb to 84 Kr. The methodology and apparatus employed are presented as well as the advantages and experimental array. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  4. Half-life measurement of 89Rb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaoqing; Yuan Daqing; Xu Lijun; Chen Kesheng; Wu Yongle; Zheng Yanming; Yao Shunhe

    2013-01-01

    89 Rb is an important fission product used for monitoring possible release of fission products from fuel element. The half-life is one of important nuclear parameters. The half-life of 89 Rb was determined using reference source method with two sets of HPGe detectors by place-relay way. In reference source method, the ratio of net full- energy peak areas from the measure nuclide and the reference source was used to avoid the count correction caused by dead time and pileup. For the very short half-life of 89 Rb, the half-life iterative method was used in data analysis and the translation method was used in data unification. Finally, the measured half-life of 89 Rb is (14.41±0.04) min. (authors)

  5. In vitro Rb-1 gene transfer to retinoblastoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sang Wook; Ham, Yong Hoh; Kim, Mee Heui

    1994-04-01

    After transfection of Rb-vector to packaging cell line (CRIP) by Ca-P precipitation method, we could select nineteen colonies of G-418 resistant clone by ring cloning. Each colony was transduced to NIH3T3 cells to select the one which produces high titer virus. After NIH3T3 cells transduction, we could get 28 colony counts for the high, 127 for the middle, and 6 for the low viral titer. With the supernatant of the high viral titer colony (CRIPRb 2-5). We transduct retinoblastoma cell lines. 5 figs, 11 refs. (Author)

  6. Cooperation between Rb and Arf in suppressing mouse retinoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkrite, Karina; Sundby, Maggie; Mu, David; Mukai, Shizuo; MacPherson, David

    2012-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a pediatric cancer that has served as a paradigm for tumor suppressor gene function. Retinoblastoma is initiated by RB gene mutations, but the subsequent cooperating mutational events leading to tumorigenesis are poorly characterized. We investigated what these additional genomic alterations might be using human retinoblastoma samples and mouse models. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization studies revealed deletions in the CDKN2A locus that include ARF and P16INK4A, both of which encode tumor suppressor proteins, in both human and mouse retinoblastoma. Through mouse genetic analyses, we found that Arf was the critical tumor suppressor gene in the deleted region. In mice, inactivation of one allele of Arf cooperated with Rb and p107 loss to rapidly accelerate retinoblastoma, with frequent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the Arf locus. Arf has been reported to exhibit p53-independent tumor suppressor roles in other systems; however, our results showed no additive effect of p53 and Arf coinactivation in promoting retinoblastoma. Moreover, p53 inactivation completely eliminated any selection for Arf LOH. Thus, our data reveal important insights into the p53 pathway in retinoblastoma and show that Arf is a key collaborator with Rb in retinoblastoma suppression. PMID:22484813

  7. High dietary protein intake, reducing or eliciting insulin resistance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietman, A.; Schwarz, J.; Tome, D.; Kok, F.J.; Mensink, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary proteins have an insulinotropic effect and thus promote insulin secretion, which indeed leads to enhanced glucose clearance from the blood. In the long term, however, a high dietary protein intake is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Moreover, branched-chain amino acids

  8. Differential expression of salivary proteins between susceptible and insecticide-resistant mosquitoes of Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Innocent Djegbe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito, a major pest and vector of filariasis and arboviruses in the tropics, has developed multiple resistance mechanisms to the main insecticide classes currently available in public health. Among them, the insensitive acetylcholinesterase (ace-1(R allele is widespread worldwide and confers cross-resistance to organophosphates and carbamates. Fortunately, in an insecticide-free environment, this mutation is associated with a severe genetic cost that can affect various life history traits. Salivary proteins are directly involved in human-vector contact during biting and therefore play a key role in pathogen transmission. METHODS AND RESULTS: An original proteomic approach combining 2D-electrophoresis and mass spectrometry was adopted to compare the salivary expression profiles of two strains of C. quinquefasciatus with the same genetic background but carrying either the ace-1(R resistance allele or not (wild type. Four salivary proteins were differentially expressed (>2 fold, P<0.05 in susceptible (SLAB and resistant (SR mosquito strains. Protein identification indicated that the D7 long form, a major salivary protein involved in blood feeding success, presented lower expression in the resistant strain than the susceptible strain. In contrast, three other proteins, including metabolic enzymes (endoplasmin, triosephosphate isomerase were significantly over-expressed in the salivary gland of ace-1(R resistant mosquitoes. A catalogue of 67 salivary proteins of C. quinquefasciatus sialotranscriptome was also identified and described. CONCLUSION: The "resistance"-dependent expression of salivary proteins in mosquitoes may have considerable impact on biting behaviour and hence on the capacity to transmit parasites/viruses to humans. The behaviour of susceptible and insecticide-resistant mosquitoes in the presence of vertebrate hosts and its impact on pathogen transmission urgently requires further

  9. Skeletal muscle protein metabolism in the elderly: Interventions to counteract the 'anabolic resistance' of ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Stuart M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Age-related muscle wasting (sarcopenia is accompanied by a loss of strength which can compromise the functional abilities of the elderly. Muscle proteins are in a dynamic equilibrium between their respective rates of synthesis and breakdown. It has been suggested that age-related sarcopenia is due to: i elevated basal-fasted rates of muscle protein breakdown, ii a reduction in basal muscle protein synthesis (MPS, or iii a combination of the two factors. However, basal rates of muscle protein synthesis and breakdown are unchanged with advancing healthy age. Instead, it appears that the muscles of the elderly are resistant to normally robust anabolic stimuli such as amino acids and resistance exercise. Ageing muscle is less sensitive to lower doses of amino acids than the young and may require higher quantities of protein to acutely stimulate equivalent muscle protein synthesis above rest and accrue muscle proteins. With regard to dietary protein recommendations, emerging evidence suggests that the elderly may need to distribute protein intake evenly throughout the day, so as to promote an optimal per meal stimulation of MPS. The branched-chain amino acid leucine is thought to play a central role in mediating mRNA translation for MPS, and the elderly should ensure sufficient leucine is provided with dietary protein intake. With regards to physical activity, lower, than previously realized, intensity high-volume resistance exercise can stimulate a robust muscle protein synthetic response similar to traditional high-intensity low volume training, which may be beneficial for older adults. Resistance exercise combined with amino acid ingestion elicits the greatest anabolic response and may assist elderly in producing a 'youthful' muscle protein synthetic response provided sufficient protein is ingested following exercise.

  10. Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B contributes to LPS-induced leptin resistance in male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Beatriz de Carvalho; Rorato, Rodrigo C.; Uchoa, Ernane Torres; Marangon, Paula B.; Elias, Carol F.; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Leptin resistance is induced by the feedback inhibitors tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) and decreased Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) signaling. To investigate the participation of PTP1B and SHP-2 in LPS-induced leptin resistance, we injected repeated (6-LPS) intraperitoneal LPS doses (100 μg/kg ip) for comparison with a single (1-LPS) treatment and evaluated the expression of SHP-2, PTP1B, p-ERK1/2, and p-STAT3 in the hypothalamus of male Wistar rats. The single LPS treatment increased the expression of p-STAT3 and PTP1B but not SHP-2. The repeated LPS treatment reduced SHP-2, increased PTP1B, and did not change p-STAT3. We observed that the PTP1B expression induced by the endotoxin was highly colocalized with leptin receptor cells in the hypothalamus of LepRb-IRES-Cre-tdTomato reporter mice. The single, but not the repeated, LPS treatment decreased the food intake and body weight. Leptin had no stimulatory effect on the hypophagia, body weight loss, or pSTAT3 expression in 6-LPS rats, indicating leptin unresponsiveness. Notably, the PTP1B inhibitor (3.0 nmol/rat in 5 μl icv) restored the LPS-induced hypophagia in 6-LPS rats and restored the ability of leptin to reduce food intake and body weight as well as to phosphorylate STAT3 in the arcuate, paraventricular, and ventromedial nuclei of the hypothalamus. The present data suggest that an increased PTP1B expression in the hypothalamus underlies the development of leptin resistance during repeated exposure to LPS. Our findings contribute to understanding the mechanisms involved in leptin resistance during low-grade inflammation as seen in obesity. PMID:25352433

  11. Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B contributes to LPS-induced leptin resistance in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Beatriz de Carvalho; Rorato, Rodrigo C; Uchoa, Ernane Torres; Marangon, Paula B; Elias, Carol F; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose; Elias, Lucila L K

    2015-01-01

    Leptin resistance is induced by the feedback inhibitors tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) and decreased Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) signaling. To investigate the participation of PTP1B and SHP-2 in LPS-induced leptin resistance, we injected repeated (6-LPS) intraperitoneal LPS doses (100 μg/kg ip) for comparison with a single (1-LPS) treatment and evaluated the expression of SHP-2, PTP1B, p-ERK1/2, and p-STAT3 in the hypothalamus of male Wistar rats. The single LPS treatment increased the expression of p-STAT3 and PTP1B but not SHP-2. The repeated LPS treatment reduced SHP-2, increased PTP1B, and did not change p-STAT3. We observed that the PTP1B expression induced by the endotoxin was highly colocalized with leptin receptor cells in the hypothalamus of LepRb-IRES-Cre-tdTomato reporter mice. The single, but not the repeated, LPS treatment decreased the food intake and body weight. Leptin had no stimulatory effect on the hypophagia, body weight loss, or pSTAT3 expression in 6-LPS rats, indicating leptin unresponsiveness. Notably, the PTP1B inhibitor (3.0 nmol/rat in 5 μl icv) restored the LPS-induced hypophagia in 6-LPS rats and restored the ability of leptin to reduce food intake and body weight as well as to phosphorylate STAT3 in the arcuate, paraventricular, and ventromedial nuclei of the hypothalamus. The present data suggest that an increased PTP1B expression in the hypothalamus underlies the development of leptin resistance during repeated exposure to LPS. Our findings contribute to understanding the mechanisms involved in leptin resistance during low-grade inflammation as seen in obesity. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2-mediated transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2007-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  13. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2-mediated transport.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2007-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  14. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2-) mediated transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2006-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  15. Identifying the Proteins that Mediate the Ionizing Radiation Resistance of Deinococcus Radiodurans R1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battista, John R

    2010-02-22

    The primary objectives of this proposal was to define the subset of proteins required for the ionizing radiation (IR) resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans R1, characterize the activities of those proteins, and apply what was learned to problems of interest to the Department of Energy.

  16. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2-mediated transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2006-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  17. Rivaroxaban Causes Missed Diagnosis of Protein S Deficiency but Not of Activated Protein C Resistance (Factor V Leiden).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryamchik, Elena; Rosenbaum, Matthew W; Van Cott, Elizabeth M

    2018-01-01

    - Rivaroxaban causes a false increase in activated protein C resistance (APCR) ratios and protein S activity. - To investigate whether this increase masks a diagnosis of factor V Leiden (FVL) or protein S deficiency in a "real-world" population of patients undergoing rivaroxaban treatment and hypercoagulation testing. - During a 2.5-year period, we compared 4 groups of patients (n = 60): FVL heterozygous (FVL-HET)/taking rivaroxaban, wild-type/taking rivaroxaban, FVL-HET/no rivaroxaban, and normal APCR/no rivaroxaban. Patients taking rivaroxaban were tested for protein S functional activity and free antigen (n = 32). - The FVL-HET patients taking rivaroxaban had lower APCR ratios than wild-type patients ( P < .001). For FVL-HET patients taking rivaroxaban, mean APCR was 1.75 ± 0.12, versus 1.64 ± 0.3 in FVL-HET patients not taking rivaroxaban ( P = .005). Activated protein C resistance in FVL-HET patients fell more than 3 SDs below the cutoff of 2.2 at which the laboratory reflexes FVL DNA testing. No cases of FVL were missed despite rivaroxaban. In contrast, rivaroxaban falsely elevated functional protein S activity, regardless of the presence or absence of FVL ( P < .001). A total of 4 of 32 patients (12.5%) had low free protein S antigen (range, 58%-67%), whereas their functional protein S activity appeared normal (range 75%-130%). Rivaroxaban would have caused a missed diagnosis of all cases of protein S deficiency during the study if testing relied on the protein S activity assay alone. - Despite rivaroxaban treatment, APCR testing can distinguish FVL-HET from normal patients, rendering indiscriminate FVL DNA testing of all patients on rivaroxaban unnecessary. Free protein S should be tested in patients taking rivaroxaban to exclude hereditary protein S deficiency.

  18. Characterization of protein changes associated with sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) resistance and susceptibility to Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Rebecca L; Hill, Amy L; Nuñez, Alberto

    2007-09-19

    Fusarium oxysporum (F-19) is a serious threat to sugar beet. Resistance exists, but the basis for resistance and disease is unknown. Protein extracts from sugar beet genotypes C1200.XH024 (resistant, R) and Fus7 (susceptible, S) were analyzed by multidimensional liquid chromatography at 2 and 5 days postinoculation (dpi) and compared to mock-inoculated controls. One hundred twenty-one (R) and 73 (S) protein peaks were induced/repressed by F-19, approximately 12 (R) and 8% (S) of the total proteome detected. Temporal protein regulation occurred within and between each genotype, indicating that the timing of expression may be important for resistance. Thirty-one (R) and 48 (S) of the differentially expressed peaks were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization with tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry; others were below detection level. Comparison between the two genotypes uncovered R- and S-specific proteins with potential roles in resistance and disease development, respectively. Use of these proteins to select for new sources of resistance and to develop novel disease control strategies is discussed.

  19. [The roles of epigenetics and protein post-translational modifications in bacterial antibiotic resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Long-xiang; Yu, Zhao-xiao; Guo, Si-yao; Li, Ping; Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Xie, Jian-ping

    2015-08-01

    The increasing antibiotic resistance is now threatening to take us back to a pre-antibiotic era. Bacteria have evolved diverse resistance mechanisms, on which in-depth research could help the development of new strategies to control antibiotic-resistant infections. Epigenetic alterations and protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) play important roles in multiple cellular processes such as metabolism, signal transduction, protein degradation, DNA replication regulation and stress response. Recent studies demonstrated that epigenetics and PTMs also play vital roles in bacterial antibiotic resistance. In this review, we summarize the regulatory roles of epigenetic factors including DNA methylation and regulatory RNAs as well as PTMs such as phosphorylation and succinylation in bacterial antibiotic resistance, which may provide innovative perspectives on selecting antibacterial targets and developing antibiotics.

  20. Partly replacing meat protein with soy protein alters insulin resistance and blood lipids in postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, van M.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Rietman, A.; Siebelink, E.; Mensink, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing protein intake and soy consumption appear to be promising approaches to prevent metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, the effect of soy consumption on insulin resistance, glucose homeostasis, and other characteristics of MetS is not frequently studied in humans. We aimed to investigate the

  1. Rb and p53 gene deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from irradiated and control mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Woloschak, G.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1997-08-01

    This study was conducted on mouse lung adenocarcinoma tissues that were formalin-treated and paraffin-embedded 25 years ago to investigate the large gene deletions of mRb and p53 in B6CF{sub 1} male mice. A total of 80 lung tissue samples from irradiated mice and 40 lung samples from nonirradiated controls were randomly selected and examined in the mRb portion of this study. The results showed a significant (P < 0.05) higher percentage of mRb deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to 60 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses than those from mice receiving 24 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses at low doses and low dose rates; however, the percentage was not significantly different (P > 0.05) from that for spontaneous lung adenocarcinomas or lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to single-dose {gamma} irradiation at a similar total dose. mRb fragments 3 (71%) and 5 (67%), the parts of the gene that encoded the pocket binding region of Rb protein to adenovirus E1A and SV40 T-antigen, were the most frequently deleted fragments. p53 gene deletion analysis was carried out on normal lungs and lung adenocarcinomas that were initially found to bear mRb deletions. Exons 1,4,5,6, and 9 were chosen to be analyzed.

  2. The tumor suppressor Rb and its related Rbl2 genes are regulated by Utx histone demethylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashima, Minoru; Ishimura, Akihiko; Yoshida, Masakazu [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan); Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Takeshi, E-mail: suzuki-t@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Utx increases expression of Rb and Rbl2 genes through its demethylase activity. {yields} Utx changes histone H3 methylation on the Rb and Rbl2 promoters. {yields} Utx induces decreased cell proliferation of mammalian primary cells. -- Abstract: Utx is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that encodes histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase. In this study, we found that ectopic expression of Utx enhanced the expression of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene Rb and its related gene Rbl2. This activation was dependent on the demethylase activity of Utx, and was suggested to contribute to the decreased cell proliferation induced by Utx. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that over-expressed Utx was associated with the promoter regions of Rb and Rbl2 resulting in the removal of repressive H3K27 tri-methylation and the increase in active H3K4 tri-methylation. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Utx revealed the recruitment of endogenous Utx protein on the promoters of Rb and Rbl2 genes. These results indicate that Rb and Rbl2 are downstream target genes of Utx and may play important roles in Utx-mediated cell growth control.

  3. TIMP-1 increases expression and phosphorylation of proteins associated with drug resistance in breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hekmat, Omid; Munk, Stephanie; Fogh, Louise

    2013-01-01

    spectrometry to analyze global proteome and phosphoproteome differences of MCF-7 breast cancer cells expressing high or low levels of TIMP-1. In TIMP-1 high expressing cells, 312 proteins and 452 phosphorylation sites were up-regulated. Among these were the cancer drug targets topoisomerase 1, 2A and 2B, which......Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) is a protein with a potential biological role in drug resistance. To elucidate the unknown molecular mechanisms underlying the association between high TIMP-1 levels and increased chemotherapy resistance, we employed SILAC-based quantitative mass...... may explain the resistance phenotype to topoisomerase inhibitors that was observed in cells with high TIMP-1 levels. Pathway analysis showed an enrichment of proteins from functional categories such as apoptosis, cell cycle, DNA repair, transcription factors, drug targets and proteins associated...

  4. Rb-mediated neuronal differentiation through cell-cycle-independent regulation of E2f3a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danian Chen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available It has long been known that loss of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb perturbs neural differentiation, but the underlying mechanism has never been solved. Rb absence impairs cell cycle exit and triggers death of some neurons, so differentiation defects may well be indirect. Indeed, we show that abnormalities in both differentiation and light-evoked electrophysiological responses in Rb-deficient retinal cells are rescued when ectopic division and apoptosis are blocked specifically by deleting E2f transcription factor (E2f 1. However, comprehensive cell-type analysis of the rescued double-null retina exposed cell-cycle-independent differentiation defects specifically in starburst amacrine cells (SACs, cholinergic interneurons critical in direction selectivity and developmentally important rhythmic bursts. Typically, Rb is thought to block division by repressing E2fs, but to promote differentiation by potentiating tissue-specific factors. Remarkably, however, Rb promotes SAC differentiation by inhibiting E2f3 activity. Two E2f3 isoforms exist, and we find both in the developing retina, although intriguingly they show distinct subcellular distribution. E2f3b is thought to mediate Rb function in quiescent cells. However, in what is to our knowledge the first work to dissect E2f isoform function in vivo we show that Rb promotes SAC differentiation through E2f3a. These data reveal a mechanism through which Rb regulates neural differentiation directly, and, unexpectedly, it involves inhibition of E2f3a, not potentiation of tissue-specific factors.

  5. Identification of target genes of the p16INK4A-pRB-E2F pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernell, Richard; Helin, Kristian; Müller, Heiko

    2003-01-01

    Deregulation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) pathway is a hallmark of human cancer. The core members of this pathway include the tumor suppressor protein, pRB, which through binding to a number of cellular proteins, most notably members of the E2F transcription factor family, regulates...... progression through the cell division cycle. With the aim of identifying transcriptional changes provoked by deregulation of the pRB pathway, we have used cell lines that conditionally express a constitutively active phosphorylation site mutant of pRB (pRBDeltaCDK) or p16INK4A (p16). The expression of p......RBDeltaCDK and p16 resulted in significant repression and activation of a large number of genes as measured by high density oligonucleotide array analysis. Transcriptional changes were found in genes that are essential for DNA replication and cell proliferation. In agreement with previous results, we found a high...

  6. Correlation between substitutions in penicillin-binding protein 1 and amoxicillin resistance in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbara, Emiko; Noguchi, Norihisa; Kawai, Takashi; Sasatsu, Masanori

    2007-01-01

    The correlation between the substitutions of penicillin-binding protein 1 (PBP1) and amoxicillin resistance was studied for the determination of the substitutions in PBP1 which confer amoxicillin resistance in Helicobacter pylori. By the comparison of the amino acid sequences of PBP1 in the amoxicillinresistant (n=3), low-susceptible (n=3), and susceptible (n=13) H. pylori isolates, the substitution Asn562-->Tyr, which is adjacent to KTG motif (555-557), was common and specific to amoxicillin-resistant H. pylori. Additionally, all amoxicillin-resistant isolates had multiple substitutions such as Ser414-->Arg in the transpeptidase region of PBP1 of H. pylori. Furthermore all transformants obtained by the natural transformation using the pbp1 genes of amoxicillin-resistant H. pylori isolates had multiple substitutions including Asn562-->Tyr. These results suggest that multiple amino acid substitutions in the transpeptidase region of PBP1 are closely related to amoxicillin resistance in H. pylori.

  7. OSPREY Predicts Resistance Mutations Using Positive and Negative Computational Protein Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojewole, Adegoke; Lowegard, Anna; Gainza, Pablo; Reeve, Stephanie M; Georgiev, Ivelin; Anderson, Amy C; Donald, Bruce R

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance in protein targets is an increasingly common phenomenon that reduces the efficacy of both existing and new antibiotics. However, knowledge of future resistance mutations during pre-clinical phases of drug development would enable the design of novel antibiotics that are robust against not only known resistant mutants, but also against those that have not yet been clinically observed. Computational structure-based protein design (CSPD) is a transformative field that enables the prediction of protein sequences with desired biochemical properties such as binding affinity and specificity to a target. The use of CSPD to predict previously unseen resistance mutations represents one of the frontiers of computational protein design. In a recent study (Reeve et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112(3):749-754, 2015), we used our OSPREY (Open Source Protein REdesign for You) suite of CSPD algorithms to prospectively predict resistance mutations that arise in the active site of the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SaDHFR) in response to selective pressure from an experimental competitive inhibitor. We demonstrated that our top predicted candidates are indeed viable resistant mutants. Since that study, we have significantly enhanced the capabilities of OSPREY with not only improved modeling of backbone flexibility, but also efficient multi-state design, fast sparse approximations, partitioned continuous rotamers for more accurate energy bounds, and a computationally efficient representation of molecular-mechanics and quantum-mechanical energy functions. Here, using SaDHFR as an example, we present a protocol for resistance prediction using the latest version of OSPREY. Specifically, we show how to use a combination of positive and negative design to predict active site escape mutations that maintain the enzyme's catalytic function but selectively ablate binding of an inhibitor.

  8. Landscape mapping of functional proteins in insulin signal transduction and insulin resistance: a network-based protein-protein interaction analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjib Chakraborty

    Full Text Available The type 2 diabetes has increased rapidly in recent years throughout the world. The insulin signal transduction mechanism gets disrupted sometimes and it's known as insulin-resistance. It is one of the primary causes associated with type-2 diabetes. The signaling mechanisms involved several proteins that include 7 major functional proteins such as INS, INSR, IRS1, IRS2, PIK3CA, Akt2, and GLUT4. Using these 7 principal proteins, multiple sequences alignment has been created. The scores between sequences also have been developed. We have constructed a phylogenetic tree and modified it with node and distance. Besides, we have generated sequence logos and ultimately developed the protein-protein interaction network. The small insulin signal transduction protein arrangement shows complex network between the functional proteins.

  9. Two Chloroplast Proteins Suppress Drought Resistance by Affecting ROS Production in Guard Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Fuxing; Hong, Yechun; Huang, Jirong; Shi, Huazhong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-12-01

    Chloroplast as the site for photosynthesis is an essential organelle in plants, but little is known about its role in stomatal regulation and drought resistance. In this study, we show that two chloroplastic proteins essential for thylakoid formation negatively regulate drought resistance in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). By screening a mutant pool with T-DNA insertions in nuclear genes encoding chloroplastic proteins, we identified an HCF106 knockdown mutant exhibiting increased resistance to drought stress. The hcf106 mutant displayed elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in guard cells, improved stomatal closure, and reduced water loss under drought conditions. The HCF106 protein was found to physically interact with THF1, a previously identified chloroplastic protein crucial for thylakoid formation. The thf1 mutant phenotypically resembled the hcf106 mutant and displayed more ROS accumulation in guard cells, increased stomatal closure, reduced water loss, and drought resistant phenotypes compared to the wild type. The hcf106thf1 double mutant behaved similarly as the thf1 single mutant. These results suggest that HCF106 and THF1 form a complex to modulate chloroplast function and that the complex is important for ROS production in guard cells and stomatal control in response to environmental stresses. Our results also suggest that modulating chloroplastic proteins could be a way for improving drought resistance in crops. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Whey Protein Supplementation Enhances Whole Body Protein Metabolism and Performance Recovery after Resistance Exercise: A Double-Blind Crossover Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W. D. West

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available No study has concurrently measured changes in free-living whole body protein metabolism and exercise performance during recovery from an acute bout of resistance exercise. We aimed to determine if whey protein ingestion enhances whole body net protein balance and recovery of exercise performance during overnight (10 h and 24 h recovery after whole body resistance exercise in trained men. In a double-blind crossover design, 12 trained men (76 ± 8 kg, 24 ± 4 years old, 14% ± 5% body fat; means ± standard deviation (SD performed resistance exercise in the evening prior to consuming either 25 g of whey protein (PRO; MuscleTech 100% Whey or an energy-matched placebo (CHO immediately post-exercise (0 h, and again the following morning (~10 h of recovery. A third randomized trial, completed by the same participants, involving no exercise and no supplement served as a rested control trial (Rest. Participants ingested [15N]glycine to determine whole body protein kinetics and net protein balance over 10 and 24 h of recovery. Performance was assessed pre-exercise and at 0, 10, and 24 h of recovery using a battery of tests. Net protein balance tended to improve in PRO (P = 0.064; effect size (ES = 0.61, PRO vs. CHO during overnight recovery. Over 24 h, net balance was enhanced in PRO (P = 0.036 but not in CHO (P = 0.84; ES = 0.69, PRO vs. CHO, which was mediated primarily by a reduction in protein breakdown (PRO < CHO; P < 0.01. Exercise decreased repetitions to failure (REP, maximal strength (MVC, peak and mean power, and countermovement jump performance (CMJ at 0 h (all P < 0.05 vs. Pre. At 10 h, there were small-to-moderate effects for enhanced recovery of the MVC (ES = 0.56, mean power (ES = 0.49, and CMJ variables (ES: 0.27–0.49 in PRO. At 24 h, protein supplementation improved MVC (ES = 0.76, REP (ES = 0.44, and peak power (ES = 0.55. In conclusion, whey protein supplementation enhances whole body anabolism, and may improve acute recovery of

  11. Increased Prevalence of Activated Protein C Resistance During ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    centrifuged this time at 3000 gravitational under identical conditions. The resulting platelet poor plasma (PPP) was either tested immediately or stored in aliquots at in a -80oC freezer until testing. Protein C activity was measured using a clot-based assay.

  12. Targeting the cyclin dependent kinase and retinoblastoma axis overcomes standard of care resistance in BRAFV600E-mutant melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Antoneicka L.; Lee, Samantha E.; Dawson, Louis K.; Marlow, Laura A.; Edenfield, Brandy H.; Durham, William F.; Flotte, Thomas J.; Thompson, Michael; Small, Daniel L.; Synnott, Aidan J.; Markovic, Svetomir N.; Copland, John A.

    2018-01-01

    Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) mouse models were used to discover new therapies for naïve and drug resistant BRAFV600E-mutant melanoma. Tumor histology, oncogenic protein expression, and antitumor activity were comparable between patient and PDTX-matched models thereby validating PDTXs as predictive preclinical models of therapeutic response in patients. PDTX models responsive and non-responsive to BRAF/MEK standard of care (SOC) therapy were used to identify efficacious combination therapies. One such combination includes a CDK4/6 inhibitor that blocks cell cycle progression. The rationale for this is that the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) is 95% wildtype in BRAF mutant melanoma. We discovered that 77/77 stage IV metastatic melanoma tissues were positive for inactive phosphorylated pRb (pRb-Ser780). Rb is hyperphosphorylated and inactivated by CDK4/6:cyclin D1 and when restored to its hypophosphorylated active form blocks cell cycle progression. The addition of a CDK4/6 inhibitor to SOC therapy was superior to SOC. Importantly, triple therapy in an upfront treatment and salvage therapy setting provided sustained durable response. We also showed that CDK4/6 blockade resensitized drug resistant melanoma to SOC therapy. Durable response was associated with sustained suppression of pRb-Ser780. Thus, reactivation of pRb may prove to be a clinical biomarker of response and the mechanism responsible for durable response. In light of recent clinical trial data using this triple therapy against BRAFV600E-mutant melanoma, our findings demonstrating superior and prolonged durable response in PDTX models portend use of this therapeutic strategy against naïve and SOC resistant BRAF V600E-mutant metastatic melanoma coupled with pRB-Ser780 as a biomarker of response. PMID:29541385

  13. Phosphorylation of pRb by cyclin D kinase is necessary for development of cardiac hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichsen, R.; Hansen, A.H.; Busk, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    of hypertrophy, and it is important to elucidate the mechanisms of how these proteins are involved in the hypertrophic response in cardiomyocytes. MATERIALS AND METHODS, AND RESULTS: In the present study, by immunohistochemistry with a phosphorylation-specific antibody, we found that cyclin D-cdk4....../6-phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (pRb) during hypertrophy and expression of an unphosphorylatable pRb mutant impaired hypertrophic growth in cardiomyocytes. Transcription factor E2F was activated by hypertrophic elicitors but activation was impaired by pharmacological inhibition of cyclin D-cdk4....../6. Inhibition of cyclin E-cdk2 complex only partly impaired E2F activity and did not prevent hypertrophic growth, but diminished endoreplication during hypertrophy. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that cyclin D-cdk4/6-dependent phosphorylation of pRb and activation of E2F is necessary for hypertrophic...

  14. Increased Levels of Antinutritional and/or Defense Proteins Reduced the Protein Quality of a Disease-Resistant Soybean Cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Daniele O B; Carvalho, Ana F U; Oliveira, José Tadeu A; Farias, Davi F; Castelar, Ivan; Oliveira, Henrique P; Vasconcelos, Ilka M

    2015-07-22

    The biochemical and nutritional attributes of two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivars, one susceptible (Seridó) and the other resistant (Seridó-RCH) to stem canker, were examined to assess whether the resistance to pathogens was related to levels of antinutritional and/or defense proteins in the plant and subsequently affected the nutritional quality. Lectin, urease, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase activities were higher in the resistant cultivar. Growing rats were fed with isocaloric and isoproteic diets prepared with defatted raw soybean meals. Those on the Seridó-RCH diet showed the worst performance in terms of protein quality indicators. Based on regression analysis, lectin, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase appear to be involved in the resistance trait but also in the poorer nutritional quality of Seridó-RCH. Thus, the development of cultivars for disease resistance may lead to higher concentrations of antinutritional compounds, affecting the quality of soybean seeds. Further research that includes the assessment of more cultivars/genotypes is needed.

  15. Possibly similar genetic basis of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab protein in 3 resistant colonies of the sugarcane borer collected from Louisiana, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Chen, Mao; Gowda, Anilkumar; Kerns, David L; Huang, Fangneng

    2018-04-01

    The sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.), is a major maize borer pest and a target of transgenic maize expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins in South America and the mid-southern region of the United States. Evolution of resistance in target pest populations is a great threat to the long-term efficacy of Bt crops. In this study, we compared the genetic basis of resistance to Cry1Ab protein in 3 resistant colonies of sugarcane borer established from field populations in Louisiana, USA. Responses of larvae to the Cry1Ab protein for the parental and 10 other cross colonies were assayed in a diet-incorporated bioassay. All 3 resistant colonies were highly resistant to the Cry1Ab protein with a resistance ratio of >555.6 fold. No maternal effect or sex linkage was evident for the resistance in the 3 colonies; and the resistance was functionally nonrecessive at the Cry1Ab concentrations of ≤ 3.16 μg/g, but it became recessive at ≥10 μg/g. In an interstrain complementation test for allelism, the F 1 progeny from crosses between any 2 of the 3 resistant colonies exhibited the similar resistance levels as their parental colonies, indicating that the 3 colonies most likely shared a locus of Cry1Ab resistance. Results generated from this study should provide useful information in developing effective strategies for managing Bt resistance in the insect. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. MRP proteins as potential mediators of heavy metal resistance in zebrafish cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yong; Li, Qing; Wang, Youhui; Cui, Zongbin

    2011-04-01

    Acquired resistance of mammalian cells to heavy metals is closely relevant to enhanced expression of several multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP), but it remains unclear whether MRP proteins confer resistance to heavy metals in zebrafish. In this study, we obtained zebrafish (Danio rerio) fibroblast-like ZF4 cells with resistance to toxic heavy metals after chronic cadmium exposure and selection for 6months. These cadmium-resistant cells (ZF4-Cd) were maintained in 5μM cadmium and displayed cross-resistance to cadmium, mercury, arsenite and arsenate. ZF4-Cd cells remained the resistance to heavy metals after protracted culture in cadmium-free medium. In comparison with ZF4-WT cells, ZF4-Cd cells exhibited accelerated rate of cadmium excretion, enhanced activity of MRP-like transport, elevated expression of abcc2, abcc4 and mt2 genes, and increased content of cellular GSH. Inhibition of MRP-like transport activity, GSH biosynthesis and GST activity significantly attenuated the resistance of ZF4-Cd cells to heavy metals. The results indicate that some of MRP transporters are involved in the efflux of heavy metals conjugated with cellular GSH and thus play crucial roles in heavy metal detoxification of zebrafish cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of the protein profiles of the antibiotic- resistant Salmonella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    2005-05-18

    May 18, 2005 ... ice-cold 100% acetone and air-dried. The dried whole cell proteins and other samples (flagillin, CFUS) for 2DE were digested (100oC,. 5 min) in 4 µl of 10% SDS and dissolved in 100 µl of urea sample buffer containing 8 M urea, 4% Triton X-100, 20 mM dithiothreitol,. 2% ampholyte (pH 3.5~10) and traces ...

  18. Poly(C)-binding protein 1 mediates drug resistance in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiani; Zhu, Changli; Yang, Kangqun; Li, Jin; Du, Nan; Zong, Mingzhu; Zhou, Jianwei; He, Jingdong

    2017-02-21

    Oxaliplatin (L-OHP) is standard treatment for colorectal cancer. However, resistance to L-OHP often leads to treatment failure or cancer relapse. Understanding of the mechanism underlying L-OHP resistance is important to overcome the resistance and improve colorectal cancer treatment. This study aimed to identify new proteins that mediates L-OHP resistance in colorectal cancer and elucidate their mode of function. HT-29 cells were exposed to gradually increased concentration of L-OHP to select L-OHP resistant HT-29/L-OHP cell line. Proteomic analysis of HT-29 and HT-29/L-OHP cells were performed to identify differentially expressed proteins, including Poly(C)-binding protein 1 (PCBP1). PCBP1 expression level in 20 cases of L-OHP sensitive patients and 20 cases of L-OHP refractory patients was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Chemoresistance and Akt activation in HT-29 and HT-29/L-OHP cells were analyzed by MTT assay and Western blot analysis. We identified 37 proteins showing differential expression in HT-29/L-OHP and HT-29 cells. In particular, PCBP1 protein level increased 15.6 fold in HT-29/L-OHP cells compared to HT-29 cells. Knockdown of PCBP1 sensitized HT-29/L-OHP and HT-29 cells to L-OHP, while overexpression of PCBP1 increased L-OHP resistance in HT-29 cells. In addition, PCBP1 expression was significantly higher in tumor samples from L-OHP refractory patients than in those from L-OHP responsive patients. Furthermore, we found that knockdown of PCBP1 inhibited the activation of Akt in HT-29/L-OHP and HT-29 cells. In conclusion, our findings suggest that PCBP1 is a molecular marker of L-OHP resistance in colorectal cancer and a promising target for colorectal cancer therapy.

  19. The Protein Elicitor PevD1 Enhances Resistance to Pathogens and Promotes Growth in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Mengjie; Khan, Najeeb Ullah; Wang, Ningbo; Yang, Xiufen; Qiu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    The protein elicitor PevD1, isolated from Verticillium dahlia, could enhance resistance to TMV in tobacco and Verticillium wilt in cotton. Here, the pevd1 gene was over-expressed in wild type (WT) Arabidopsis, and its biological functions were investigated. Our results showed that the transgenic lines were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 than the WT line was. In transgenic plants, both the germination time and bolting time required were significan...

  20. 50 years of the RB reactor utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.; Pesic, M.; Ljubenov, V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the 50 th anniversary of the RB reactor operation, which was the first nuclear reactor built in former Yugoslavia. Information about the construction period, basic technical characteristics and experimental possibilities of the facility, description of first experiments performed 50 years ago, utilisation and modifications done during the implementation of different state nuclear programs and the most important research results are presented in the paper. Role of the RB reactor in the forthcoming decommissioning of the RA research reactor and some plans for future utilisation are underlined also. (author)

  1. Insulin resistance enhances the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in ovarian granulosa cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linghui Kong

    Full Text Available The ovary is the main regulator of female fertility. Granulosa cell dysfunction may be involved in various reproductive endocrine disorders. Here we investigated the effect of insulin resistance on the metabolism and function of ovarian granulosa cells, and dissected the functional status of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in these cells. Our data showed that dexamethasone-induced insulin resistance in mouse granulosa cells reduced insulin sensitivity, accompanied with an increase in phosphorylation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Furthermore, up-regulation of cytochrome P450 subfamily 17 and testosterone and down-regulation of progesterone were observed in insulin-resistant mouse granulosa cells. Inhibition of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase after induction of insulin resistance in mouse granulosa cells decreased phosphorylation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase, downregulated cytochrome P450 subfamily 17 and lowered progesterone production. This insulin resistance cell model can successfully demonstrate certain mechanisms such as hyperandrogenism, which may inspire a new strategy for treating reproductive endocrine disorders by regulating cell signaling pathways.

  2. Colistin resistance associated with outer membrane protein change in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter asburiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kádár, Béla; Kocsis, Béla; Tóth, Ákos; Kristóf, Katalin; Felső, Péter; Kocsis, Béla; Böddi, Katalin; Szabó, Dóra

    2017-06-01

    In this study, outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of colistin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter asburiae were analyzed. One colistin-susceptible and three colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae sequence type 258 strains as well as one colistin-susceptible E. asburiae and its colistin-heteroresistant counterpart strain were involved in the study. OMP analysis of each strain was performed by microchip method. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight/mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) investigation was carried out after separation of OMPs by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and in-gel digestion. The MALDI-TOF/MS analysis of OMPs in the colistin-susceptible K. pneumoniae found 16 kDa proteins belonging to the LysM domain/BON superfamily, as well as DNA starvation proteins, whereas OmpX and OmpW were detected in the colistin-resistant counterpart strains. OmpC and OmpW were detected in the colistin-susceptible E. asburiae, whereas OmpA and OmpX were identified in the colistin-resistant counterpart. This study demonstrated that OMP differences were between colistin-susceptible and -resistant counterpart strains. The altered Gram-negative cell wall may contribute to acquired colistin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae.

  3. Prediction of HIV drug resistance from genotype with encoded three-dimensional protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaxia; Weber, Irene T; Harrison, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance has become a severe challenge for treatment of HIV infections. Mutations accumulate in the HIV genome and make certain drugs ineffective. Prediction of resistance from genotype data is a valuable guide in choice of drugs for effective therapy. In order to improve the computational prediction of resistance from genotype data we have developed a unified encoding of the protein sequence and three-dimensional protein structure of the drug target for classification and regression analysis. The method was tested on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. Our graph based sequence-structure approach gives high accuracy with a new sparse dictionary classification method, as well as support vector machine and artificial neural networks classifiers. Cross-validated regression analysis with the sparse dictionary gave excellent correlation between predicted and observed resistance. The approach of encoding the protein structure and sequence as a 210-dimensional vector, based on Delaunay triangulation, has promise as an accurate method for predicting resistance from sequence for drugs inhibiting HIV protease and reverse transcriptase.

  4. Myofibrillar protein synthesis following ingestion of soy protein isolate at rest and after resistance exercise in elderly men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yifan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased amino acid availability stimulates muscle protein synthesis, however, aged muscle appears less responsive to the anabolic effects of amino acids when compared to the young. We aimed to compare changes in myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS in elderly men at rest and after resistance exercise following ingestion of different doses of soy protein and compare the responses to those we previously observed with ingestion of whey protein isolate. Methods Thirty elderly men (age 71 ± 5 y completed a bout of unilateral knee-extensor resistance exercise prior to ingesting no protein (0 g, or either 20 g or 40 g of soy protein isolate (0, S20, and S40 respectively. We compared these responses to previous responses from similar aged men who had ingested 20 g and 40 g of whey protein isolate (W20 and W40. A primed constant infusion of L-[1-13 C]leucine and L-[ring-13 C6]phenylalanine and skeletal muscle biopsies were used to measure whole-body leucine oxidation and MPS over 4 h post-protein consumption in both exercised and non-exercised legs. Results Whole-body leucine oxidation increased with protein ingestion and was significantly greater for S20 vs. W20 (P = 0.003. Rates of MPS for S20 were less than W20 (P = 0.02 and not different from 0 g (P = 0.41 in both exercised and non-exercised leg muscles. For S40, MPS was also reduced compared with W40 under both rested and post-exercise conditions (both P P = 0.04. Conclusions The relationship between protein intake and MPS is both dose and protein source-dependent, with isolated soy showing a reduced ability, as compared to isolated whey protein, to stimulate MPS under both rested and post-exercise conditions. These differences may relate to the lower postprandial leucinemia and greater rates of amino acid oxidation following ingestion of soy versus whey protein.

  5. Dietary protein safety and resistance exercise: what do we really know?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowery Lonnie M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Resistance trainers continue to receive mixed messages about the safety of purposely seeking ample dietary protein in their quest for stimulating protein synthesis, improving performance, or maintaining health. Despite protein's lay popularity and the routinely high intakes exhibited by strength athletes, liberal and purposeful protein consumption is often maligned by "experts". University textbooks, instructors, and various forms of literature from personal training groups and athletic organizations continue to use dissuasive language surrounding dietary protein. Due to the widely known health benefits of dietary protein and a growing body of evidence on its safety profile, this is unfortunate. In response, researchers have critiqued unfounded educational messages. As a recent summarizing example, the International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN Position Stand: Protein and Exercise reviewed general literature on renal and bone health. The concluding remark that "Concerns that protein intake within this range [1.4 – 2.0 g/kg body weight per day] is unhealthy are unfounded in healthy, exercising individuals." was based largely upon data from non-athletes due to "a lack of scientific evidence". Future studies were deemed necessary. This assessment is not unique in the scientific literature. Investigators continue to cite controversy, debate, and the lack of direct evidence that allows it. This review discusses the few existing safety studies done specific to athletes and calls for protein research specific to resistance trainers. Population-specific, long term data will be necessary for effective education in dietetics textbooks and from sports governing bodies.

  6. A Nucleotide Phosphatase Activity in the Nucleotide Binding Domain of an Orphan Resistance Protein from Rice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Pohl, Ehmke; Hussey, Patrick J.; Cann, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Plant resistance proteins (R-proteins) are key components of the plant immune system activated in response to a plethora of different pathogens. R-proteins are P-loop NTPase superfamily members, and current models describe their main function as ATPases in defense signaling pathways. Here we show that a subset of R-proteins have evolved a new function to combat pathogen infection. This subset of R-proteins possesses a nucleotide phosphatase activity in the nucleotide-binding domain. Related R-proteins that fall in the same phylogenetic clade all show the same nucleotide phosphatase activity indicating a conserved function within at least a subset of R-proteins. R-protein nucleotide phosphatases catalyze the production of nucleoside from nucleotide with the nucleotide monophosphate as the preferred substrate. Mutation of conserved catalytic residues substantially reduced activity consistent with the biochemistry of P-loop NTPases. Kinetic analysis, analytical gel filtration, and chemical cross-linking demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding domain was active as a multimer. Nuclear magnetic resonance and nucleotide analogues identified the terminal phosphate bond as the target of a reaction that utilized a metal-mediated nucleophilic attack by water on the phosphoester. In conclusion, we have identified a group of R-proteins with a unique function. This biochemical activity appears to have co-evolved with plants in signaling pathways designed to resist pathogen attack. PMID:22157756

  7. A nucleotide phosphatase activity in the nucleotide binding domain of an orphan resistance protein from rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Campillo, Alba de San Eustaquio; Pohl, Ehmke; Hussey, Patrick J; Cann, Martin J

    2012-02-03

    Plant resistance proteins (R-proteins) are key components of the plant immune system activated in response to a plethora of different pathogens. R-proteins are P-loop NTPase superfamily members, and current models describe their main function as ATPases in defense signaling pathways. Here we show that a subset of R-proteins have evolved a new function to combat pathogen infection. This subset of R-proteins possesses a nucleotide phosphatase activity in the nucleotide-binding domain. Related R-proteins that fall in the same phylogenetic clade all show the same nucleotide phosphatase activity indicating a conserved function within at least a subset of R-proteins. R-protein nucleotide phosphatases catalyze the production of nucleoside from nucleotide with the nucleotide monophosphate as the preferred substrate. Mutation of conserved catalytic residues substantially reduced activity consistent with the biochemistry of P-loop NTPases. Kinetic analysis, analytical gel filtration, and chemical cross-linking demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding domain was active as a multimer. Nuclear magnetic resonance and nucleotide analogues identified the terminal phosphate bond as the target of a reaction that utilized a metal-mediated nucleophilic attack by water on the phosphoester. In conclusion, we have identified a group of R-proteins with a unique function. This biochemical activity appears to have co-evolved with plants in signaling pathways designed to resist pathogen attack.

  8. Whey protein precludes lipid and protein oxidation and improves body weight gain in resistance-exercised rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Fabiano Kenji; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Neves, Leandro Xavier; dos Santos, Rinaldo Cardoso; Pedrosa, Maria Lúcia

    2011-08-01

    Resistance exercise such as weight-lifting (WL) increases oxidation products in plasma, but less is known regarding the effect of WL on oxidative damage to tissues. Dietary compounds are known to improve antioxidant defences. Whey protein (WP) is a source of protein in a variety of sport supplements and can enhance physical performance. To evaluate the effect of WL on biomarkers of lipid and protein oxidation, on liver antioxidants and on muscle growth in the absence or presence of WP in rats. Thirty-two male Fisher rats were randomly assigned to sedentary or exercise-trained groups and were fed with control or WP diets. The WL programme consisted of inducing the animals to perform sets of jumps with weights attached to the chest. After 8 weeks, arteriovenous blood samples, abdominal fat, liver and gastrocnemius muscle were collected for analysis. WP precludes WL-mediated increases in muscle protein carbonyl content and maintains low levels of TBARS in exercised and sedentary animals. WL reduced liver CAT activity, whereas WP increased hepatic glutathione content. In addition, WL plus WP generated higher body and muscle weight than exercise without WP. These data suggest that WP improves antioxidant defences, which contribute to the reduction of lipid and protein oxidation as well as body and muscle weight gain in resistance-exercised rats.

  9. Hepatic protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor gamma links obesity-induced inflammation to insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Brenachot, Xavier; Ramadori, Giorgio; Ioris, Rafael M.; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Altirriba, Jordi; Aras, Ebru; Ljubicic, Sanda; Kohno, Daisuke; Fabbiano, Salvatore; Clement, Sophie; Goossens, Nicolas; Trajkovski, Mirko; Harroch, Sheila; Negro, Francesco; Coppari, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation engenders insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) but the inflammatory effectors linking obesity to insulin resistance are incompletely understood. Here, we show that hepatic expression of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Receptor Gamma (PTPR-γ) is stimulated by inflammation in obese/T2DM mice and positively correlates with indices of inflammation and insulin resistance in humans. NF-κB binds to the promoter of Ptprg and is required for inflammation-ind...

  10. The heat shock protein/chaperone network and multiple stress resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Jacob, Pierre

    2016-11-15

    Crop yield has been greatly enhanced during the last century. However, most elite cultivars are adapted to temperate climates and are not well suited to more stressful conditions. In the context of climate change, stress resistance is a major concern. To overcome these difficulties, scientists may help breeders by providing genetic markers associated with stress resistance. However, multi-stress resistance cannot be obtained from the simple addition of single stress resistance traits. In the field, stresses are unpredictable and several may occur at once. Consequently, the use of single stress resistance traits is often inadequate. Although it has been historically linked with the heat stress response, the heat shock protein (HSP)/chaperone network is a major component of multiple stress responses. Among the HSP/chaperone

  11. The small heat shock protein 20 RSI2 interacts with and is required for stability and function of tomato resistance protein I-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, G.; Lukasik, E.; van den Burg, H.A.; Vossen, J.H.; Cornelissen, B.J.C.; Takken, F.L.W.

    2010-01-01

    Race-specific disease resistance in plants depends on the presence of resistance (R) genes. Most R genes encode NB-ARC-LRR proteins that carry a C-terminal leucine-rich repeat (LRR). Of the few proteins found to interact with the LRR domain, most have proposed (co)chaperone activity. Here, we report

  12. Differential protein abundance in promastigotes of nitric oxide-sensitive and resistant Leishmania chagasi strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcolea, Pedro J; Tuñón, Gabriel I L; Alonso, Ana; García-Tabares, Francisco; Ciordia, Sergio; Mena, María C; Campos, Roseane N S; Almeida, Roque P; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-11-01

    Leishmania chagasi is the causative agent of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil. Domestic and stray dogs are the main reservoirs. The life cycle of the parasite involves two stages. Promastigotes are extracellular and develop within the sand fly gut. Amastigotes survive inside the harsh environment of the phagolysosome of mammalian host phagocytes, which display the nitric oxide defense mechanism. Surprisingly, we were able to isolate promastigotes that are also resistant to NO. This finding may be explained by the preadaptative hypothesis. An insight into the proteome of NO-sensitive and resistant promastigotes is presented herein. Total protein extracts were prepared from promastigote cultures of an NO-sensitive and a resistant strain at early-logarithmic, mid-logarithmic and stationary phase. A population enriched in metacyclic promastigotes was also isolated by Percoll gradient centrifugation. In vitro infectivity of both strains was compared. Differential protein abundance was analyzed by 2DE-MALDI-TOF/TOF. The most striking results were tested at the mRNA level by qRT-PCR. Three biological replicates were performed in all cases. NO-resistant L. chagasi promastigotes are more infective than NO-sensitive ones. Among the differentially abundant spots, 40 proteins could be successfully identified in the sensitive strain and 38 in resistant promastigotes. The increase of G6PD and the decrease of ARG and GPX transcripts and proteins contribute to NO resistance in L. chagasi promastigotes. These proteins may be studied as potential drug targets and/or vaccine candidates in the future. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein B, a novel small GTPase, is involved in the regulation of DNA gyrase and drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jun; Han, Jiao; Wu, Hanyu; Hu, Xinling; Deng, Jiaoyu; Fleming, Joy; Maxwell, Anthony; Bi, Lijun; Mi, Kaixia

    2013-01-01

    DNA gyrase plays a vital role in resolving DNA topological problems and is the target of antibiotics such as fluoroquinolones. Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein A (MfpA) from Mycobacterium smegmatis is a newly identified DNA gyrase inhibitor that is believed to confer intrinsic resistance to fluoroquinolones. However, MfpA does not prevent drug-induced inhibition of DNA gyrase in vitro, implying the involvement of other as yet unknown factors. Here, we have identified a new factor, named Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein B (MfpB), which is involved in the protection of DNA gyrase against drugs both in vivo and in vitro. Genetic results suggest that MfpB is necessary for MfpA protection of DNA gyrase against drugs in vivo; an mfpB knockout mutant showed greater susceptibility to ciprofloxacin than the wild-type, whereas a strain overexpressing MfpA and MfpB showed higher loss of susceptibility. Further biochemical characterization indicated that MfpB is a small GTPase and its GTP bound form interacts directly with MfpA and influences its interaction with DNA gyrase. Mutations in MfpB that decrease its GTPase activity disrupt its protective efficacy. Our studies suggest that MfpB, a small GTPase, is required for MfpA-conferred protection of DNA gyrase. PMID:23275532

  14. DRPPP: A machine learning based tool for prediction of disease resistance proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Tarun; Jaiswal, Varun; Chauhan, Rajinder S

    2016-11-01

    Plant disease outbreak is increasing rapidly around the globe and is a major cause for crop loss worldwide. Plants, in turn, have developed diverse defense mechanisms to identify and evade different pathogenic microorganisms. Early identification of plant disease resistance genes (R genes) can be exploited for crop improvement programs. The present prediction methods are either based on sequence similarity/domain-based methods or electronically annotated sequences, which might miss existing unrecognized proteins or low similarity proteins. Therefore, there is an urgent need to devise a novel machine learning technique to address this problem. In the current study, a SVM-based tool was developed for prediction of disease resistance proteins in plants. All known disease resistance (R) proteins (112) were taken as a positive set, whereas manually curated negative dataset consisted of 119 non-R proteins. Feature extraction generated 10,270 features using 16 different methods. The ten-fold cross validation was performed to optimize SVM parameters using radial basis function. The model was derived using libSVM and achieved an overall accuracy of 91.11% on the test dataset. The tool was found to be robust and can be used for high-throughput datasets. The current study provides instant identification of R proteins using machine learning approach, in addition to the similarity or domain prediction methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Towards ultracold RbCa molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Michaela; Whitson, Hayley; Parsagian, Alexandria

    2012-06-01

    Ultracold heteronuclear molecules have seen increasing interest in the scientific community over the last few years. By controlling their ro-vibrational energy levels, ultracold molecules can be used for high precision spectroscopy, to study cold collisions with rich internal dynamics, as model systems for condensed matter physics, and as qubits in quantum information processing. We study the novel combination RbCa. In addition to a permanent electric dipole moment, it also possesses a permanent magnetic dipole moment. This makes it an ideal candidate to study strong long-range dipole-dipole interactions. We are currently in the process of adding a Ca MOT to our existing Rb MOT and will discuss our current and future efforts toward our goal of creating, for the first time, ultracold RbCa molecules. Molecules, once created, will be detected through resonantly enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI). We have also performed ab initio calculations to determine the electronic energy levels of RbCa, and calculated Franck-Condon factors between the ground and several excited states

  16. An aluminium column 82Rb generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Y.; Roth, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    The use of an alumina column for the adsorption of radioactive Sr for the generator production of 75-s 82 Rb was evaluated in both batch and column experiments using commercially available 85 Sr and cyclotron-produced 82 Sr. Comparisons of alumina, Bio-Rex 70 and Chelex 100 ion exchangers were made to determine Sr adsorption, 82 Rb elution yield and Sr breakthrough. The adsorption of Sr is similar for alumina and Chelex 100 but different for Bio-Rex 70. Alumina and Chelex 100 have a higher breakthrough of Sr in the early elution volumes. After continued elution with 200-300 ml of solution the breakthrough of 82 Sr decreases and remains stable at a lower break-through value through a large number of elutions. However, with Bio-Rex 70 the breakthrough of 82 Sr remains the lowest of the three ion exchangers in the early volumes and remains low through a moderate number of elutions after which Sr breakthrough begins to increase steadily. The alumina-column 82 Rb generator was found to be superior to Bio-Rex 70 or Chelex 100 for low breakthrough of 82 Sr after many elutions of 82 Rb with up to 3 l of eluent solution. (author)

  17. Protein Arrays for Multidrug-resistance in Human Leukemia Cell Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhong Lu

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel technique was developed, that was high throughput simultaneousscreening of multiple resistance protein expression based on a protein array system. Themethod combined the advantage of the specificity of enzyme-linked immunosorbentassays with the sensitivity and high throughput of microspot. In this system, the multipleresistance protein arrays were created by spotting the captured antibodies onto the glassslide. The arrays were then incubated with cell samples of leukemia patients. The boundproteins were recognized by biotin-conjugated antibodies and detected by CCD.Experiments demonstrated that three multiple resistance proteins, including Pgp, MRPand BCRP which are members of the ATP-binding-cassette (ABC superfamily ofmembrane transporters could be simultaneously detected using this new approach.Research work shows the result is coincident with flow cytometry (FCM (P>0.01. Itprovided a methodology to develop many high-density protein array systems to detect avariety of proteins. The protein arrays will provide a powerful tool to identify theleukemia cell protein expression and rapidly validate their MDR determination.

  18. Humanin skeletal muscle protein levels increase after resistance training in men with impaired glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidlund, Eva-Karin; von Walden, Ferdinand; Venojärvi, Mika; Risérus, Ulf; Heinonen, Olli J; Norrbom, Jessica; Sundberg, Carl Johan

    2016-12-01

    Humanin (HN) is a mitochondrially encoded and secreted peptide linked to glucose metabolism and tissue protecting mechanisms. Whether skeletal muscle HN gene or protein expression is influenced by exercise remains unknown. In this intervention study we show, for the first time, that HN protein levels increase in human skeletal muscle following 12 weeks of resistance training in persons with prediabetes. Male subjects (n = 55) with impaired glucose regulation (IGR) were recruited and randomly assigned to resistance training, Nordic walking or a control group. The exercise interventions were performed three times per week for 12 weeks with progressively increased intensity during the intervention period. Biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle and venous blood samples were taken before and after the intervention. Skeletal muscle and serum protein levels of HN were analyzed as well as skeletal muscle gene expression of the mitochondrially encoded gene MT-RNR2, containing the open reading frame for HN To elucidate mitochondrial training adaptation, mtDNA, and nuclear DNA as well as Citrate synthase were measured. Skeletal muscle HN protein levels increased by 35% after 12 weeks of resistance training. No change in humanin protein levels was seen in serum in any of the intervention groups. There was a significant correlation between humanin levels in serum and the improvements in the 2 h glucose loading test in the resistance training group. The increase in HN protein levels in skeletal muscle after regular resistance training in prediabetic males may suggest a role for HN in the regulation of glucose metabolism. Given the preventative effect of exercise on diabetes type 2, the role of HN as a mitochondrially derived peptide and an exercise-responsive mitokine warrants further investigation. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  19. Insulin resistance and protein energy metabolism in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Edward D; Ikizler, Talat Alp

    2010-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR), the reciprocal of insulin sensitivity is a known complication of advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with a number of metabolic derangements. The complex metabolic abnormalities observed in CKD such as vitamin D deficiency, obesity, metabolic acidosis, inflammation, and accumulation of "uremic toxins" are believed to contribute to the etiology of IR and acquired defects in the insulin-receptor signaling pathway in this patient population. Only a few investigations have explored the validity of commonly used assessment methods in comparison to gold standard hyperinsulinemic hyperglycemic clamp technique in CKD patients. An important consequence of insulin resistance is its role in the pathogenesis of protein energy wasting, a state of metabolic derangement characterized by loss of somatic and visceral protein stores not entirely accounted for by inadequate nutrient intake. In the general population, insulin resistance has been associated with accelerated protein catabolism. Among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, enhanced muscle protein breakdown has been observed in patients with Type II diabetes compared to ESRD patients without diabetes. In the absence of diabetes mellitus (DM) or severe obesity, insulin resistance is detectable in dialysis patients and strongly associated with increased muscle protein breakdown, primarily mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Recent epidemiological data indicate a survival advantage and better nutritional status in insulin-free Type II DM patients treated with insulin sensitizer thiazolidinediones. Given the high prevalence of protein energy wasting in ESRD and its unequivocal association with adverse clinical outcomes, insulin resistance may represent an important modifiable target for intervention in the ESRD population.

  20. RB1CC1 activates RB1 pathway and inhibits proliferation and cologenic survival in human cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokuhiro Chano

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available RB1-inducible coiled-coil 1 (RB1CC1, also known as FIP200 plays a role in the enhancement of the RB1 pathway through the direct binding to a GC-rich region 201bp upstream (from the initiation ATG of the RB1 promoter. Here, we identified hSNF5 and p53 as the binding partners of RB1CC1 by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assays. Interaction between these molecules and the RB1 pathway was analyzed by the assays of chromatin immunoprecipitation, luciferase-reporter, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot. The tumor growth suppression by RB1CC1 was evaluated by flow cytometry or by a cell growth assay. The nuclear RB1CC1 complex involving hSNF5 and/or p53 activated transcription of RB1, p16 and p21, and suppressed tumor cell growth. Furthermore, nuclear RB1CC1 expression significantly correlated with those of RB1 and p16 in breast cancer tissue in vivo, and the Ki-67 proliferation index was dependent on p53 as well as RB1CC1. The present study indicates that RB1CC1 together with hSNF5 and/or p53 enhances the RB1 pathway through transcriptional activation of RB1, p16 and p21. Evaluation of RB1CC1 expression combined with RB1 and p53 status is expected to provide useful information in clinical practice and future therapeutic strategies in breast cancer.

  1. Protein source in a high-protein diet modulates reductions in insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in fa/fa Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Jennifer L; Devassy, Jessay G; Wu, Yinghong; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G; Aukema, Harold M

    2016-01-01

    High-protein diets are being promoted to reduce insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in metabolic syndrome. Therefore, the effect of protein source in high-protein diets on reducing insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis was examined. Fa/fa Zucker rats were provided normal-protein (15% of energy) casein, high-protein (35% of energy) casein, high-protein soy, or high-protein mixed diets with animal and plant proteins. The high-protein mixed diet reduced area under the curve for insulin during glucose tolerance testing, fasting serum insulin and free fatty acid concentrations, homeostatic model assessment index, insulin to glucose ratio, and pancreatic islet cell area. The high-protein mixed and the high-protein soy diets reduced hepatic lipid concentrations, liver to body weight ratio, and hepatic steatosis rating. These improvements were observed despite no differences in body weight, feed intake, or adiposity among high-protein diet groups. The high-protein casein diet had minimal benefits. A high-protein mixed diet was the most effective for modulating reductions in insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis independent of weight loss, indicating that the source of protein within a high-protein diet is critical for the management of these metabolic syndrome parameters. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  2. Soybean NDR1-like proteins bind pathogen effectors and regulate resistance signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selote, Devarshi; Shine, M B; Robin, Guillaume P; Kachroo, Aardra

    2014-04-01

    Nonrace specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1) is a conserved downstream regulator of resistance (R) protein-derived signaling. We identified two NDR1-like sequences (GmNDR1a, b) from soybean, and investigated their roles in R-mediated resistance and pathogen effector detection. Silencing GmNDR1a and b in soybean shows that these genes are required for resistance derived from the Rpg1-b, Rpg3, and Rpg4 loci, against Pseudomonas syringae (Psg) expressing avrB, avrB2 and avrD1, respectively. Immunoprecipitation assays show that the GmNDR1 proteins interact with the AvrB2 and AvrD1 Psg effectors. This correlates with the enhanced virulence of Psg avrB2 and Psg avrD1 in GmNDR1-silenced rpg3 rpg4 plants, even though these strains are not normally more virulent on plants lacking cognate R loci. The GmNDR1 proteins interact with GmRIN4 proteins, but not with AvrB, or its cognate R protein Rpg1-b. However, the GmNDR1 proteins promote AvrB-independent activation of Rpg1-b when coexpressed with a phosphomimic derivative of GmRIN4b. The role of GmNDR1 proteins in Rpg1-b activation, their direct interactions with AvrB2/AvrD1, and a putative role in the virulence activities of Avr effectors, provides the first experimental evidence in support of the proposed role for NDR1 in transducing extracellular pathogen-derived signals. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Characterization of drug transport by the human multidrug resistance protein 3 (ABCC3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelcer, N.; Saeki, T.; Reid, G.; Beijnen, J. H.; Borst, P.

    2001-01-01

    We have characterized the substrate specificity and mechanism of transport of the human multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3). A murine fibroblast-like cell line generated from the kidneys of mice that lack Mdr1a/b and Mrp1 was retrovirally transduced with MRP3 cDNA. Stable clones

  4. Crystal structure of the TLDc domain of oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaise, Mickael; Alsarraf, Husam Mohammad Ali Baker; Wong, Jaslyn

    2012-01-01

    structure of the TLDc domain of the oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish. The structure was determined by X-ray crystallography to atomic resolution (0.97Å) and adopts an overall globular shape. Two antiparallel β-sheets form a central β-sandwich, surrounded by two helices and two one-turn helices...

  5. Coat protein-mediated resistance against an Indian isolate of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Coat protein (CP)-mediated resistance against an Indian isolate of the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) subgroup IB was demonstrated in transgenic lines of Nicotiana benthamiana through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Out of the fourteen independently transformed lines developed, two lines were ...

  6. Combined protein-rich diet with resistance exercise intervention to counteract sarcopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrema, Annemarthe L.; Westerman, Marjan J.; Dongen, Ellen Van J.I.; Kudla, Urszula; Veltkamp, Martijn

    2018-01-01

    Interventions combining protein-rich diets with resistance exercises seem a promising avenue in helping to prevent sarcopenia. However, compliance to health interventions is generally low. The aim of the present study was to provide qualitative insights into the drivers and barriers that older

  7. Nutritional regulation of muscle protein synthesis with resistance exercise: strategies to enhance anabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Churchward-Venne Tyler A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Provision of dietary amino acids increases skeletal muscle protein synthesis (MPS, an effect that is enhanced by prior resistance exercise. As a fundamentally necessary process in the enhancement of muscle mass, strategies to enhance rates of MPS would be beneficial in the development of interventions aimed at increasing skeletal muscle mass particularly when combined with chronic resistance exercise. The purpose of this review article is to provide an update on current findings regarding the nutritional regulation of MPS and highlight nutrition based strategies that may serve to maximize skeletal muscle protein anabolism with resistance exercise. Such factors include timing of protein intake, dietary protein type, the role of leucine as a key anabolic amino acid, and the impact of other macronutrients (i.e. carbohydrate on the regulation of MPS after resistance exercise. We contend that nutritional strategies that serve to maximally stimulate MPS may be useful in the development of nutrition and exercise based interventions aimed at enhancing skeletal muscle mass which may be of interest to elderly populations and to athletes.

  8. Effects of resistance training associated with whey protein supplementation on liver and kidney biomarkers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Ramiro; Silva, Priscila; Alves, Jadson; Stefani, Giuseppe; Petry, Marcelo; Rhoden, Cláudia; Dal Lago, Pedro; Schneider, Claudia Dornelles

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of whey protein (WP) supplementation and resistance training (RT) on liver and kidney biomarkers. The sedentary + WP group showed higher levels of plasma liver and kidney dysfunction markers compared with the other groups. In addition, WP supplementation associated with RT resulted in physiologic cardiac hypertrophy. WP supplementation without RT affected liver and kidney function.

  9. Association of ERCC1 protein expression to platinum resistance in epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl Steffensen, Karina; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Jakobsen, Anders

    was to investigate if immunohistochemical expression of ERCC1 protein was associated with resistance to standard combination carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy in newly diagnosed ovarian cancer patients. Methods: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 101 patients with newly diagnosed ovarian...

  10. Expression of multidrug resistance-associated proteins predicts prognosis in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasschaert, SLA; de Bont, ESJM; Boezen, M; vander Kolk, DM; Daenen, SMJG; Faber, KN; Kamps, WA; de Vries, EGE; Vellenga, E

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are treated with a variety of chemotherapeutic drugs, which can be transported by six multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP). These MRPs have strongly overlapping functional activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the

  11. Increased levels of the multidrug resistance protein in lateral membranes of proliferating hepatocyte-derived cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofsen, H; Vos, TA; Schippers, IJ; Kuipers, F; Moshage, H; Jansen, PLM; Muller, M

    Background & Aims: The multidrug resistance protein (MRP) functions as an organic anion efflux carrier. Recent studies suggest that hepatocytes contain two mrp homologues, named mrp1 and mrp2, localized on the lateral and canalicular membrane, respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate the

  12. Analysis of the protein profiles of the antibiotic-resistant Salmonella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The emergent Salmonella typhimurium definitive phage type (DT) 104 is of particular global concern due to its frequent isolation and multiple antibiotic resistances. There is thus a need to know the kind of proteins expressed by S. typhimurium DT104 so as to provide a basis for developing an intervention. This study ...

  13. C-reactive protein, insulin resistance and risk of cardiovascular disease: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.W.; Olsen, M.H.; Rasmussen, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and insulin resistance (IR), a metabolic disorder, are closely related. CRP and IR have both been identified as significant risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) after adjustment for conventional CVD risk factors...

  14. Generation of PVY coat protein siRNAs in transgenic potatoes resistant to PVY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic potatoes expressing the potato virus Y coat protein (PVY-CP) inverted hairpin RNA (ihRNA) construct driven by the Solanum bulbocastanum ubiquitin 409s promoter exhibited resistance to PVY in glass house studies using PVYNTN and PVYO as inocula and in field studies using naturally occurrin...

  15. Transgenic maize plants expressing the Totivirus antifungal protein, KP4, are highly resistant to corn smut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Aron; Islamovic, Emir; Kaur, Jagdeep; Gold, Scott; Shah, Dilip; Smith, Thomas J

    2011-10-01

    The corn smut fungus, Ustilago maydis, is a global pathogen responsible for extensive agricultural losses. Control of corn smut using traditional breeding has met with limited success because natural resistance to U. maydis is organ specific and involves numerous maize genes. Here, we present a transgenic approach by constitutively expressing the Totivirus antifungal protein KP4, in maize. Transgenic maize plants expressed high levels of KP4 with no apparent negative impact on plant development and displayed robust resistance to U. maydis challenges to both the stem and ear tissues in the greenhouse. More broadly, these results demonstrate that a high level of organ independent fungal resistance can be afforded by transgenic expression of this family of antifungal proteins. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. The heat-shock protein/chaperone network and multiple stress resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Pierre; Hirt, Heribert; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid

    2017-04-01

    Crop yield has been greatly enhanced during the last century. However, most elite cultivars are adapted to temperate climates and are not well suited to more stressful conditions. In the context of climate change, stress resistance is a major concern. To overcome these difficulties, scientists may help breeders by providing genetic markers associated with stress resistance. However, multistress resistance cannot be obtained from the simple addition of single stress resistance traits. In the field, stresses are unpredictable and several may occur at once. Consequently, the use of single stress resistance traits is often inadequate. Although it has been historically linked with the heat stress response, the heat-shock protein (HSP)/chaperone network is a major component of multiple stress responses. Among the HSP/chaperone 'client proteins', many are primary metabolism enzymes and signal transduction components with essential roles for the proper functioning of a cell. HSPs/chaperones are controlled by the action of diverse heat-shock factors, which are recruited under stress conditions. In this review, we give an overview of the regulation of the HSP/chaperone network with a focus on Arabidopsis thaliana. We illustrate the role of HSPs/chaperones in regulating diverse signalling pathways and discuss several basic principles that should be considered for engineering multiple stress resistance in crops through the HSP/chaperone network. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Yersinia enterocolitica serum resistance proteins YadA and ail bind the complement regulator C4b-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirjavainen, Vesa; Jarva, Hanna; Biedzka-Sarek, Marta; Blom, Anna M; Skurnik, Mikael; Meri, Seppo

    2008-08-29

    Many pathogens are equipped with factors providing resistance against the bactericidal action of complement. Yersinia enterocolitica, a Gram-negative enteric pathogen with invasive properties, efficiently resists the deleterious action of human complement. The major Y. enterocolitica serum resistance determinants include outer membrane proteins YadA and Ail. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen (O-ag) and outer core (OC) do not contribute directly to complement resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze a possible mechanism whereby Y. enterocolitica could inhibit the antibody-mediated classical pathway of complement activation. We show that Y. enterocolitica serotypes O:3, O:8, and O:9 bind C4b-binding protein (C4bp), an inhibitor of both the classical and lectin pathways of complement. To identify the C4bp receptors on Y. enterocolitica serotype O:3 surface, a set of mutants expressing YadA, Ail, O-ag, and OC in different combinations was tested for the ability to bind C4bp. The studies showed that both YadA and Ail acted as C4bp receptors. Ail-mediated C4bp binding, however, was blocked by the O-ag and OC, and could be observed only with mutants lacking these LPS structures. C4bp bound to Y. enterocolitica was functionally active and participated in the factor I-mediated degradation of C4b. These findings show that Y. enterocolitica uses two proteins, YadA and Ail, to bind C4bp. Binding of C4bp could help Y. enterocolitica to evade complement-mediated clearance in the human host.

  18. Yersinia enterocolitica serum resistance proteins YadA and ail bind the complement regulator C4b-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesa Kirjavainen

    Full Text Available Many pathogens are equipped with factors providing resistance against the bactericidal action of complement. Yersinia enterocolitica, a Gram-negative enteric pathogen with invasive properties, efficiently resists the deleterious action of human complement. The major Y. enterocolitica serum resistance determinants include outer membrane proteins YadA and Ail. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS O-antigen (O-ag and outer core (OC do not contribute directly to complement resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze a possible mechanism whereby Y. enterocolitica could inhibit the antibody-mediated classical pathway of complement activation. We show that Y. enterocolitica serotypes O:3, O:8, and O:9 bind C4b-binding protein (C4bp, an inhibitor of both the classical and lectin pathways of complement. To identify the C4bp receptors on Y. enterocolitica serotype O:3 surface, a set of mutants expressing YadA, Ail, O-ag, and OC in different combinations was tested for the ability to bind C4bp. The studies showed that both YadA and Ail acted as C4bp receptors. Ail-mediated C4bp binding, however, was blocked by the O-ag and OC, and could be observed only with mutants lacking these LPS structures. C4bp bound to Y. enterocolitica was functionally active and participated in the factor I-mediated degradation of C4b. These findings show that Y. enterocolitica uses two proteins, YadA and Ail, to bind C4bp. Binding of C4bp could help Y. enterocolitica to evade complement-mediated clearance in the human host.

  19. Rb and p53 gene deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from irradiated and control mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted on mouse lung adenocarcinoma tissues that were formalin-treated and paraffin-embedded 25 years ago to investigate the large gene deletions of mRb and p53 in B6CF 1 male mice. A total of 80 lung tissue samples from irradiated mice and 40 lung samples from nonirradiated controls were randomly selected and examined in the mRb portion of this study. The results showed a significant (P 0.05) from that for spontaneous lung adenocarcinomas or lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to single-dose γ irradiation at a similar total dose. mRb fragments 3 (71%) and 5 (67%), the parts of the gene that encoded the pocket binding region of Rb protein to adenovirus E1A and SV40 T-antigen, were the most frequently deleted fragments. p53 gene deletion analysis was carried out on normal lungs and lung adenocarcinomas that were initially found to bear mRb deletions. Exons 1,4,5,6, and 9 were chosen to be analyzed

  20. Bioinformatics and structural characterization of a hypothetical protein from Streptococcus mutans: implication of antibiotic resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Nan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available As an oral bacterial pathogen, Streptococcus mutans has been known as the aetiologic agent of human dental caries. Among a total of 1960 identified proteins within the genome of this organism, there are about 500 without any known functions. One of these proteins, SMU.440, has very few homologs in the current protein databases and it does not fall into any protein functional families. Phylogenetic studies showed that SMU.440 is related to a particular ecological niche and conserved specifically in some oral pathogens, due to lateral gene transfer. The co-occurrence of a MarR protein within the same operon among these oral pathogens suggests that SMU.440 may be associated with antibiotic resistance. The structure determination of SMU.440 revealed that it shares the same fold and a similar pocket as polyketide cyclases, which indicated that it is very likely to bind some polyketide-like molecules. From the interlinking structural and bioinformatics studies, we have concluded that SMU.440 could be involved in polyketide-like antibiotic resistance, providing a better understanding of this hypothetical protein. Besides, the combination of multiple methods in this study can be used as a general approach for functional studies of a protein with unknown function.

  1. Effect of resistance exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on members of the STARS signalling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissing, Kristian; Rahbek, Stine K; Lamon, Severine; Farup, Jean; Stefanetti, Renae J; Wallace, Marita A; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Russell, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    The striated muscle activator of Rho signalling (STARS) pathway is suggested to provide a link between external stress responses and transcriptional regulation in muscle. However, the sensitivity of STARS signalling to different mechanical stresses has not been investigated. In a comparative study, we examined the regulation of the STARS signalling pathway in response to unilateral resistance exercise performed as either eccentric (ECC) or concentric (CONC) contractions as well as prolonged training; with and without whey protein supplementation. Skeletal muscle STARS, myocardian-related transcription factor-A (MRTF-A) and serum response factor (SRF) mRNA and protein, as well as muscle cross-sectional area and maximal voluntary contraction, were measured. A single-bout of exercise produced increases in STARS and SRF mRNA and decreases in MRTF-A mRNA with both ECC and CONC exercise, but with an enhanced response occurring following ECC exercise. A 31% increase in STARS protein was observed exclusively after CONC exercise (P protein levels increased similarly by 48% with both CONC and ECC exercise (P hypertrophy and produced increases in MRTF-A protein of 125% and 99%, respectively (P protein. There was no effect of whey protein supplementation. These results show that resistance exercise provides an acute stimulation of the STARS pathway that is contraction mode dependent. The responses to acute exercise were more pronounced than responses to accumulated training, suggesting that STARS signalling is primarily involved in the initial phase of exercise-induced muscle adaptations. PMID:23753523

  2. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induces multidrug resistance protein in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Y

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yingqian Lv, Shan Zhao, Jinzhu Han, Likang Zheng, Zixin Yang, Li Zhao Department of Oncology, The Second Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Multidrug resistance is the major cause of chemotherapy failure in many solid tumors, including colon cancer. Hypoxic environment is a feature for all solid tumors and is important for the development of tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α is the key transcription factor that mediates cellular response to hypoxia. HIF-1α has been shown to play an important role in tumor resistance; however, the mechanism is still not fully understood. Here, we found that HIF-1α and the drug resistance-associated gene multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1 were induced by treatment of colon cancer cells with the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride. Inhibition of HIF-1α by RNA interference and dominant-negative protein can significantly reduce the induction of MRP1 by hypoxia. Bioinformatics analysis showed that a hypoxia response element is located at -378 to -373 bp upstream of the transcription start site of MRP1 gene. Luciferase reporter assay combined with mutation analysis confirmed that this element is essential for hypoxia-mediated activation of MRP gene. Furthermore, RNA interference revealed that HIF-1α is necessary for this hypoxia-driven activation of MRP1 promoter. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that HIF-1α could directly bind to this HRE site in vivo. Together, these data suggest that MRP1 is a downstream target gene of HIF-1α, which provides a potential novel mechanism for HIF-1α-mediated drug resistance in colon cancer and maybe other solid tumors as well. Keywords: hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, multidrug resistance associated protein, transcriptional regulation, chemotherapy tolerance

  3. Identification of glycan structure alterations on cell membrane proteins in desoxyepothilone B resistant leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Miyako; Saldanha, Rohit; Göbel, Anja; Kavallaris, Maria; Packer, Nicolle H

    2011-11-01

    Resistance to tubulin-binding agents used in cancer is often multifactorial and can include changes in drug accumulation and modified expression of tubulin isotypes. Glycans on cell membrane proteins play important roles in many cellular processes such as recognition and apoptosis, and this study investigated whether changes to the glycan structures on cell membrane proteins occur when cells become resistant to drugs. Specifically, we investigated the alteration of glycan structures on the cell membrane proteins of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cells that were selected for resistance to desoxyepothilone B (CEM/dEpoB). The glycan profile of the cell membrane glycoproteins was obtained by sequential release of N- and O-glycans from cell membrane fraction dotted onto polyvinylidene difluoride membrane with PNGase F and β-elimination respectively. The released glycan alditols were analyzed by liquid chromatography (graphitized carbon)-electrospray ionization tandem MS. The major N-glycan on CEM cell was the core fucosylated α2-6 monosialo-biantennary structure. Resistant CEM/dEpoB cells had a significant decrease of α2-6 linked sialic acid on N-glycans. The lower α2-6 sialylation was caused by a decrease in activity of β-galactoside α2-6 sialyltransferase (ST6Gal), and decreased expression of the mRNA. It is clear that the membrane glycosylation of leukemia cells changes during acquired resistance to dEpoB drugs and that this change occurs globally on all cell membrane glycoproteins. This is the first identification of a specific glycan modification on the surface of drug resistant cells and the mechanism of this downstream effect on microtubule targeting drugs may offer a route to new interventions to overcome drug resistance.

  4. P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein activities in relation to treatment outcome in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EGE; van Putten, WLJ; Verdonck, LF; Ossenkoppele, GJ; Verhoef, GEG; Vellenga, E

    Despite treatment with intensive chemotherapy, a considerable number of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) die from their disease due to the occurrence of resistance. Overexpression of the transporter proteins P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 1 has been identified

  5. Intracellular polyamine pools, oligopeptide-binding protein A expression, and resistance to aminoglycosides in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria BR Acosta

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of intracellular free polyamine (putrescine and spermidine pools in multiple resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics was investigated among in vitro selected kanamycin-resistant Escherichia coli J53 mutants expressing diminished oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA levels and/or defective ornithine decarboxylase (ODC activity. The results suggest that diminished OppA content, but not defective ODC activity expression, increased the relative concentration of free spermidine as compared to the wild type strain. Moreover, by adding exogenous polyamines or polyamine synthesis inhibitors to cultures with different mutant strains, a direct relationship between the intracellular OppA levels and resistance to kanamycin was revealed. Collectively these results further suggest a complex relation among OppA expression, aminoglycoside resistance and polyamine metabolism.

  6. The typical RB76 recombination breakpoint of the invasive recombinant tomato yellow leaf curl virus of Morocco can be generated experimentally but is not positively selected in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belabess, Z; Urbino, C; Granier, M; Tahiri, A; Blenzar, A; Peterschmitt, M

    2018-01-02

    TYLCV-IS76 is an unusual recombinant between the highly recombinogenic tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV), two Mediterranean begomoviruses (Geminiviridae). In contrast with the previously reported TYLCV/TYLCSV recombinants, it has a TYLCSV derived fragment of only 76 nucleotides, and has replaced its parental viruses in natural conditions (Morocco, Souss region). The viral population shift coincided with the deployment of the popular Ty-1 resistant tomato cultivars, and according to experimental studies, has been driven by a strong positive selection in such resistant plants. However, although Ty-1 cultivars were extensively used in Mediterranean countries, TYLCV-IS76 was not reported outside Morocco. This, in combination with its unusual recombination pattern suggests that it was generated through a rare and possibly multistep process. The potential generation of a recombination breakpoint (RB) at locus 76 (RB76) was investigated over time in 10 Ty-1 resistant and 10 nearly isogenic susceptible tomato plants co-inoculated with TYLCV and TYLCSV clones. RB76 could not be detected in the recombinant progeny using the standard PCR/sequencing approach that was previously designed to monitor the emergence of TYLCV-IS76 in Morocco. Using a more sensitive PCR test, RB76 was detected in one resistant and five susceptible plants. The results are consistent with a very low intra-plant frequency of RB76 bearing recombinants throughout the test and support the hypothesis of a rare emergence of TYLCV-IS76. More generally, RBs were more scattered in resistant than in susceptible plants and an unusual RB at position 141 (RB141) was positively selected in the resistant cultivar; interestingly, RB141 bearing recombinants were detected in resistant tomato plants from the field. Scenarios of TYLCV-IS76 pre-emergence are proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparisons of protein profiles of beech bark disease resistant and susceptible American beech (Fagus grandifolia

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    Mason Mary E

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beech bark disease is an insect-fungus complex that damages and often kills American beech trees and has major ecological and economic impacts on forests of the northeastern United States and southeastern Canadian forests. The disease begins when exotic beech scale insects feed on the bark of trees, and is followed by infection of damaged bark tissues by one of the Neonectria species of fungi. Proteomic analysis was conducted of beech bark proteins from diseased trees and healthy trees in areas heavily infested with beech bark disease. All of the diseased trees had signs of Neonectria infection such as cankers or fruiting bodies. In previous tests reported elsewhere, all of the diseased trees were demonstrated to be susceptible to the scale insect and all of the healthy trees were demonstrated to be resistant to the scale insect. Sixteen trees were sampled from eight geographically isolated stands, the sample consisting of 10 healthy (scale-resistant and 6 diseased/infested (scale-susceptible trees. Results Proteins were extracted from each tree and analysed in triplicate by isoelectric focusing followed by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Gels were stained and protein spots identified and intensity quantified, then a statistical model was fit to identify significant differences between trees. A subset of BBD differential proteins were analysed by mass spectrometry and matched to known protein sequences for identification. Identified proteins had homology to stress, insect, and pathogen related proteins in other plant systems. Protein spots significantly different in diseased and healthy trees having no stand or disease-by-stand interaction effects were identified. Conclusions Further study of these proteins should help to understand processes critical to resistance to beech bark disease and to develop biomarkers for use in tree breeding programs and for the selection of resistant trees prior to or in early stages of BBD

  8. Evolutionary analysis of RB/Rpi-blb1 locus in the Solanaceae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhengqing; Si, Weina; Gao, Rongchao; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yang, Sihai

    2015-12-01

    Late blight caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans is one of the most severe threats to potato production worldwide. Numerous studies suggest that the most effective protective strategy against the disease would be to provide potato cultivars with durable resistance (R) genes. However, little is known about the origin and evolutional history of these durable R-genes in potato. Addressing this might foster better understanding of the dynamics of these genes in nature and provide clues for identifying potential candidate R-genes. Here, a systematic survey was executed at RB/Rpi-blb1 locus, an exclusive broad-spectrum R-gene locus in potato. As indicated by synteny analysis, RB/Rpi-blb1 homologs were identified in all tested genomes, including potato, tomato, pepper, and Nicotiana, suggesting that the RB/Rpi-blb1 locus has an ancient origin. Two evolutionary patterns, similar to those reported on RGC2 in Lactuca, and Pi2/9 in rice, were detected at this locus. Type I RB/Rpi-blb1 homologs have frequent copy number variations and sequence exchanges, obscured orthologous relationships, considerable nucleotide divergence, and high non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions (Ka/Ks) between or within species, suggesting rapid diversification and balancing selection in response to rapid changes in the oomycete pathogen genomes. These characteristics may serve as signatures for cloning of late blight resistance genes.

  9. Characterization of a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein Involved in Tubercidin Resistance in Leishmania major.

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    Juliana Ide Aoki

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tubercidin (TUB is a toxic adenosine analog with potential antiparasitic activity against Leishmania, with mechanism of action and resistance that are not completely understood. For understanding the mechanisms of action and identifying the potential metabolic pathways affected by this drug, we employed in this study an overexpression/selection approach using TUB for the identification of potential targets, as well as, drug resistance genes in L. major. Although, TUB is toxic to the mammalian host, these findings can provide evidences for a rational drug design based on purine pathway against leishmaniasis.After transfection of a cosmid genomic library into L. major Friedlin (LmjF parasites and application of the overexpression/selection method, we identified two cosmids (cosTUB1 and cosTU2 containing two different loci capable of conferring significant levels of TUB resistance. In the cosTUB1 contained a gene encoding NUPM1-like protein, which has been previously described as associated with TUB resistance in L. amazonensis. In the cosTUB2 we identified and characterized a gene encoding a 63 kDa protein that we denoted as tubercidin-resistance protein (TRP. Functional analysis revealed that the transfectants were less susceptible to TUB than LmjF parasites or those transfected with the control vector. In addition, the trp mRNA and protein levels in cosTUB2 transfectants were higher than LmjF. TRP immunolocalization revealed that it was co-localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, a cellular compartment with many functions. In silico predictions indicated that TRP contains only a hypothetical transmembrane domain. Thus, it is likely that TRP is a lumen protein involved in multidrug efflux transport that may be involved in the purine metabolic pathway.This study demonstrated for the first time that TRP is associated with TUB resistance in Leishmania. The next challenge is to determine how TRP mediates TUB resistance and whether purine

  10. Induction of antigen-specific Th1-type immune responses by gamma-irradiated recombinant Brucella abortus RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanakkayala, Neelima; Sokolovska, Anna; Gulani, Jatinder; Hogenesch, Harm; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Vemulapalli, Ramesh

    2005-12-01

    Brucella abortus strain RB51 is an attenuated rough mutant used as the live vaccine against bovine brucellosis in the United States and other countries. We previously reported the development of strain RB51 as a bacterial vaccine vector for inducing Th1-type immune responses against heterologous proteins. Because safety concerns may preclude the use of strain RB51-based recombinant live vaccines, we explored the ability of a gamma-irradiated recombinant RB51 strain to induce heterologous antigen-specific immune responses in BALB/c mice. Exposure of strain RB51G/LacZ expressing Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase to a minimum of 300 kilorads of gamma radiation resulted in complete loss of replicative ability. These bacteria, however, remained metabolically active and continued to synthesize beta-galactosidase. A single intraperitoneal inoculation of mice with 10(9) CFU equivalents of gamma-irradiated, but not heat-killed, RB51G/LacZ induced a beta-galactosidase-specific Th1-type immune response. Though no obvious differences were detected in immune responses to B. abortus-specific antigens, mice vaccinated with gamma-irradiated, but not heat-killed, RB51G/LacZ developed significant protection against challenge with virulent B. abortus. In vitro experiments indicated that gamma-irradiated and heat-killed RB51G/LacZ induced maturation of dendritic cells; however, stimulation with gamma-irradiated bacteria resulted in more interleukin-12 secretion. These results suggest that recombinant RB51 strains exposed to an appropriate minimum dose of gamma radiation are unable to replicate but retain their ability to stimulate Th1 immune responses against the heterologous antigens and confer protection against B. abortus challenge in mice.

  11. Oxidative stress and protein damage responses mediate artemisinin resistance in malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocamora, Frances; Zhu, Lei; Liong, Kek Yee; Dondorp, Arjen; Miotto, Olivo; Mok, Sachel; Bozdech, Zbynek

    2018-03-01

    Due to their remarkable parasitocidal activity, artemisinins represent the key components of first-line therapies against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However, the decline in efficacy of artemisinin-based drugs jeopardizes global efforts to control and ultimately eradicate the disease. To better understand the resistance phenotype, artemisinin-resistant parasite lines were derived from two clones of the 3D7 strain of P. falciparum using a selection regimen that mimics how parasites interact with the drug within patients. This long term in vitro selection induced profound stage-specific resistance to artemisinin and its relative compounds. Chemosensitivity and transcriptional profiling of artemisinin-resistant parasites indicate that enhanced adaptive responses against oxidative stress and protein damage are associated with decreased artemisinin susceptibility. This corroborates our previous findings implicating these cellular functions in artemisinin resistance in natural infections. Genomic characterization of the two derived parasite lines revealed a spectrum of sequence and copy number polymorphisms that could play a role in regulating artemisinin response, but did not include mutations in pfk13, the main marker of artemisinin resistance in Southeast Asia. Taken together, here we present a functional in vitro model of artemisinin resistance that is underlined by a new set of genetic polymorphisms as potential genetic markers.

  12. Targeting heat shock proteins in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Arun A; Zoubeidi, Amina; Gleave, Martin E; Chi, Kim N

    2015-01-01

    The survival of malignant cells is constantly threatened by a myriad of cellular insults. In the context of such proteotoxic stress, cancer cells activate cytoprotective adaptive pathways. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved molecular chaperones that are expressed at low levels under normal conditions, but upregulated by cellular stress. As molecular chaperones, HSPs control the stability and function of client proteins, preventing aggregation of misfolded proteins, facilitating intracellular protein trafficking, maintaining protein conformation to enable ligand binding, phosphorylating proteins in signalling complexes and degrading severely damaged proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. A key client protein of several HSPs is the androgen receptor (AR). HSPs facilitate binding of dihydrotestosterone to the AR, and enhance AR-mediated transcriptional activity. The integral role of HSPs in AR function speaks to their potential utility as therapeutic targets in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), a disease state characterized by persistent activation of the androgen-AR axis. Inhibition of HSPs has the additional benefit of potentially modulating signalling and transcriptional networks that are associated with HSP client proteins in CRPC cells. As a consequence, HSPs represent highly attractive targets in the development of treatments for CRPC.

  13. Resistance training with soy vs whey protein supplements in hyperlipidemic males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leddy John J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most individuals at risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD can reduce risk factors through diet and exercise before resorting to drug treatment. The effect of a combination of resistance training with vegetable-based (soy versus animal-based (whey protein supplementation on CVD risk reduction has received little study. The study's purpose was to examine the effects of 12 weeks of resistance exercise training with soy versus whey protein supplementation on strength gains, body composition and serum lipid changes in overweight, hyperlipidemic men. Methods Twenty-eight overweight, male subjects (BMI 25–30 with serum cholesterol >200 mg/dl were randomly divided into 3 groups (placebo (n = 9, and soy (n = 9 or whey (n = 10 supplementation and participated in supervised resistance training for 12 weeks. Supplements were provided in a double blind fashion. Results All 3 groups had significant gains in strength, averaging 47% in all major muscle groups and significant increases in fat free mass (2.6%, with no difference among groups. Percent body fat and waist-to-hip ratio decreased significantly in all 3 groups an average of 8% and 2%, respectively, with no difference among groups. Total serum cholesterol decreased significantly, again with no difference among groups. Conclusion Participation in a 12 week resistance exercise training program significantly increased strength and improved both body composition and serum cholesterol in overweight, hypercholesterolemic men with no added benefit from protein supplementation.

  14. Identification of Adenyl Cyclase Activity in a Disease Resistance Protein in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Hussein, Rana

    2012-11-01

    Cyclic nucleotide, cAMP, is an important signaling molecule in animals and plants. However, in plants the enzymes that synthesize this second messenger, adenyl cyclases (ACs), remain elusive. Given the physiological importance of cAMP in signaling, particularly in response to biotic and abiotic stresses, it is thus important to identify and characterize ACs in higher plants. Using computational approaches, a disease resistance protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, At3g04220 was found to have an AC catalytic center motif. In an attempt to prove that this candidate has adenyl cyclases activity in vitro, the coding sequence of the putative AC catalytic domain of this protein was cloned and expressed in E. coli and the recombinant protein was purified. The nucleotide cyclase activity of the recombinant protein was examined using cyclic nucleotide enzyme immunoassays. In parallel, the expression of At3g04220 was measured in leaves under three different stress conditions in order to determine under which conditions the disease resistance protein could function. Results show that the purified recombinant protein has Mn2+ dependent AC activity in vitro, and the expression analysis supports a role for At3g04220 and cAMP in plant defense.

  15. Effects of resistance training and protein supplementation on bone turnover in young adult women

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    Sinning Wayne E

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The strength of aging bone depends on the balance between the resorption and formation phases of the remodeling process. The purpose of this study was to examine the interaction of two factors with the potential to exert opposing influences on bone turnover, resistance exercise training and high dietary protein intake. It was hypothesized that resistance training by young, healthy, untrained women with protein intakes near recommended levels (0.8 g·kg-1·d-1 would promote bone formation and/or inhibit bone resorption, and that subsequent supplementation to provide 2.4 g protein·kg-1·d-1 would reverse these effects. Methods Bone formation was assessed with serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP and osteocalcin (OC, and bone resorption with urinary calcium and deoxypyridinoline (DPD. Biochemical, strength, anthropometric, dietary, and physical activity data were obtained from 24 healthy, untrained, eumenorrheic women (18–29y at baseline, after eight weeks of resistance training (3 d·wk-1, ~1 hr·d-1; 3 sets, 6–10 repetitions, 13 exercises, 75–85% maximum voluntary contraction, and after 12 weeks of resistance training and 10 days of protein/placebo supplementation. Subjects were randomized (double-blind to either a high protein (HP or training control (TC group and, during the final 10 days, consumed either enough purified whey protein to bring daily protein intake to 2.4 g·kg-1·d-1, or an equivalent dose of isoenergetic, carbohydrate placebo. Results Strength, lean tissue mass, and DPD increased significantly in both groups over time, while percent body fat and BAP decreased (repeated measures ANOVA, p ≤ 0.05, Bonferroni correction. No significant changes were observed for serum OC or urinary calcium, and no significant group (TC, HP × time (baseline, week 8, week 12 interactions emerged for any of the biochemical measures. Conclusion (1 Twelve weeks of high-intensity resistance training did not appear to

  16. The effects of whey protein with or without carbohydrates on resistance training adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulmi, Juha J; Laakso, Mia; Mero, Antti A; Häkkinen, Keijo; Ahtiainen, Juha P; Peltonen, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition intake in the context of a resistance training (RT) bout may affect body composition and muscle strength. However, the individual and combined effects of whey protein and carbohydrates on long-term resistance training adaptations are poorly understood. A four-week preparatory RT period was conducted in previously untrained males to standardize the training background of the subjects. Thereafter, the subjects were randomized into three groups: 30 g of whey proteins (n = 22), isocaloric carbohydrates (maltodextrin, n = 21), or protein + carbohydrates (n = 25). Within these groups, the subjects were further randomized into two whole-body 12-week RT regimens aiming either for muscle hypertrophy and maximal strength or muscle strength, hypertrophy and power. The post-exercise drink was always ingested immediately after the exercise bout, 2-3 times per week depending on the training period. Body composition (by DXA), quadriceps femoris muscle cross-sectional area (by panoramic ultrasound), maximal strength (by dynamic and isometric leg press) and serum lipids as basic markers of cardiovascular health, were analysed before and after the intervention. Twelve-week RT led to increased fat-free mass, muscle size and strength independent of post-exercise nutrient intake (P whey protein group reduced more total and abdominal area fat when compared to the carbohydrate group independent of the type of RT (P protein vs. carbohydrate group (P whey proteins when compared to carbohydrates or combination of proteins and carbohydrates did not have a major effect on muscle size or strength when ingested two to three times a week. However, whey proteins may increase abdominal fat loss and relative fat-free mass adaptations in response to resistance training when compared to fast-acting carbohydrates.

  17. Mutation in ribosomal protein S5 leads to spectinomycin resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

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    Elena eIlina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Spectinomycin remains a useful reserve option for therapy of gonorrhea. The emergence of multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains with decreased susceptibility to cefixime and to ceftriaxone makes it the only medicine still effective for treatment of gonorrhea infection in analogous cases. However, adoption of spectinomycin as a routinely used drug of choice was soon followed by reports of spectinomycin resistance. The main molecular mechanism of spectinomycin resistance in N. gonorrhoeae was C1192T substitution in 16S rRNA genes. Here we reported a Thr-24→Pro mutation in ribosomal protein S5 found in spectinomycin resistant clinical N. gonorrhoeae strain, which carried no changes in 16S rRNA. In a series of experiments, the transfer of rpsE gene allele encoding the mutant ribosomal protein S5 to the recipient N. gonorrhoeae strains was analyzed. The relatively high rate of transformation (ca. 10-5 CFUs indicates the possibility of spread of spectinonycin resistance within gonococcal population due to the horizontal gene transfer.

  18. Characterization of BRPMBL, the Bleomycin Resistance Protein Associated with the Carbapenemase NDM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dortet, Laurent; Girlich, Delphine; Virlouvet, Anne-Laure; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice; Iorga, Bogdan I; Naas, Thierry

    2017-03-01

    The metallo-β-lactamase NDM-1 is among the most worrisome resistance determinants and is spreading worldwide among Gram-negative bacilli. A bleomycin resistance gene, ble MBL , downstream of the bla NDM-1 gene has been associated with resistance almost systematically. Here, we characterized the corresponding protein, BRP MBL , conferring resistance to bleomycin, an antitumoral glycopeptide molecule. We have determined whether the expression of the bla NDM-1 - ble MBL operon is inducible in the presence of carbapenems and/or bleomycin-like molecules using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), determination of imipenem and zeocin MICs, and carbapenemase-specific activity assays. We showed that the bla NDM-1 - ble MBL operon is constitutively expressed. Using electrophoretic mobility shift and DNA protection assays performed with purified glutathione S -transferase (GST)-BRP MBL , we demonstrated that BRP MBL is able to bind and sequester bleomycin-like molecules, thus preventing bleomycin-dependent DNA degradation. In silico modeling confirmed that the mechanism of action required the dimerization of the BRP MBL protein in order to sequester bleomycin and prevent DNA damage. BRP MBL acts specifically on bleomycin-like molecules since cloning and expression of ble MBL in Staphyloccoccus aureus did not confer cross-resistance to any other antimicrobial glycopeptides such as vancomycin and teicoplanin. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Screening and identification of resistance related proteins from apple leaves inoculated with Marssonina coronaria (EII. & J. J. Davis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miaomiao; Xu, Jianhua; Qiu, Zonghao; Zhang, Juan; Ma, Fengwang; Zhang, Junke

    2014-02-07

    Apple, an invaluable fruit crop worldwide, is often prone to infection by pathogenic fungi. Identification of potentially resistance-conferring apple proteins is one of the most important aims for studying apple resistance mechanisms and promoting the development of disease-resistant apple strains. In order to find proteins which promote resistance to Marssonina coronaria, a deadly pathogen which has been related to premature apple maturation, proteomes from apple leaves inoculated with M. coronaria were characterized at 3 and 6 days post-inoculation by two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Overall, 59 differentially accumulated protein spots between inoculation and non-inoculation were successfully identified and aligned as 35 different proteins or protein families which involved in photosynthesis, amino acid metabolism, transport, energy metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, binding, antioxidant, defense and stress. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was also used to examine the change of some defense and stress related genes abundance under inoculated conditions. In a conclusion, different proteins in response to Marssonina coronaria were identified by proteomic analysis. Among of these proteins, there are some PR proteins, for example class III endo-chitinase, beta-1,3-glucanase and thaumatine-like protein, and some antioxidant related proteins including aldo/keto reductase AKR, ascorbate peroxidase and phi class glutathione S-transferase protein that were associated with disease resistance. The transcription levels of class III endo-chitinase (L13) and beta-1, 3-glucanase (L17) have a good relation with the abundance of the encoded protein's accumulation, however, the mRNA abundance of thaumatine-like protein (L22) and ascorbate peroxidase (L28) are not correlated with their protein abundance of encoded protein. To elucidate the resistant mechanism, the data in the present study will promote us to investigate further the expression regulation of these

  20. Deficiency of G1 regulators P53, P21Cip1 and/or pRb decreases hepatocyte sensitivity to TGFβ cell cycle arrest

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    Harrison David J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGFβ is critical to control hepatocyte proliferation by inducing G1-growth arrest through multiple pathways leading to inhibition of E2F transcription activity. The retinoblastoma protein pRb is a key controller of E2F activity and G1/S transition which can be inhibited in viral hepatitis. It is not known whether the impairment of pRb would alter the growth inhibitory potential of TGFβ in disease. We asked how Rb-deficiency would affect responses to TGFβ-induced cell cycle arrest. Results Primary hepatocytes isolated from Rb-floxed mice were infected with an adenovirus expressing CRE-recombinase to delete the Rb gene. In control cells treatment with TGFβ prevented cells to enter S phase via decreased cMYC activity, activation of P16INK4A and P21Cip and reduction of E2F activity. In Rb-null hepatocytes, cMYC activity decreased slightly but P16INK4A was not activated and the great majority of cells continued cycling. Rb is therefore central to TGFβ-induced cell cycle arrest in hepatocytes. However some Rb-null hepatocytes remained sensitive to TGFβ-induced cell cycle arrest. As these hepatocytes expressed very high levels of P21Cip1 and P53 we investigated whether these proteins regulate pRb-independent signaling to cell cycle arrest by evaluating the consequences of disruption of p53 and p21Cip1. Hepatocytes deficient in p53 or p21Cip1 showed diminished growth inhibition by TGFβ. Double deficiency had a similar impact showing that in cells containing functional pRb; P21Cip and P53 work through the same pathway to regulate G1/S in response to TGFβ. In Rb-deficient cells however, p53 but not p21Cip deficiency had an additive effect highlighting a pRb-independent-P53-dependent effector pathway of inhibition of E2F activity. Conclusion The present results show that otherwise genetically normal hepatocytes with disabled p53, p21Cip1 or Rb genes respond less well to the antiproliferative effects of TGFβ. As the function of

  1. Partly replacing meat protein with soy protein alters insulin resistance and blood lipids in postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nielen, Monique; Feskens, Edith J M; Rietman, Annemarie; Siebelink, Els; Mensink, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Increasing protein intake and soy consumption appear to be promising approaches to prevent metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, the effect of soy consumption on insulin resistance, glucose homeostasis, and other characteristics of MetS is not frequently studied in humans. We aimed to investigate the effects of a 4-wk, strictly controlled, weight-maintaining, moderately high-protein diet rich in soy on insulin sensitivity and other cardiometabolic risk factors. We performed a randomized crossover trial of 2 4-wk diet periods in 15 postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity to test diets with 22 energy percent (En%) protein, 27 En% fat, and 50 En% carbohydrate. One diet contained protein of mixed origin (mainly meat, dairy, and bread), and the other diet partly replaced meat with soy meat analogues and soy nuts containing 30 g/d soy protein. For our primary outcome, a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGT) was performed at the end of both periods. Plasma total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, insulin, and C-reactive protein were assessed, and blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and intrahepatic lipid content were measured at the start and end of both periods. Compared with the mixed-protein diet, the soy-protein diet resulted in greater insulin sensitivity [FSIGT: insulin sensitivity, 34 ± 29 vs. 22 ± 17 (mU/L)(-1) · min(-1), P = 0.048; disposition index, 4974 ± 2543 vs. 2899 ± 1878, P = 0.038; n = 11]. Total cholesterol was 4% lower after the soy-protein diet than after the mixed-protein diet (4.9 ± 0.7 vs. 5.1 ± 0.6 mmol/L, P = 0.001), and LDL cholesterol was 9% lower (2.9 ± 0.7 vs. 3.2 ± 0.6 mmol/L, P = 0.004; n = 15). Thus, partly replacing meat with soy in a moderately high-protein diet has clear advantages regarding insulin sensitivity and total and LDL cholesterol. Therefore, partly replacing meat products with soy products could be important in preventing MetS. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials

  2. Stress proteins and phytohormones: their role in formation of plant resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosakivska, I.V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Using the disc-electrophoresis methods, we have studied protein biosynthesis of different plants, including 11 species of Orchidaceae, some other tropical and subtropical plants, 9 different fruit plants, and 4 cultivars of Triticum aestivum L. under stresses factors such as high and low temperature, clinostating, radioactive irradiation and osmotic shock. Specific and unspecific reactions of plants protein system on stresses were found. De novo synthesis of 35 and 45 kD polypeptides were observed in total and mitochondrial proteins fractions after heat-shock and radioactive irradiation. This suggests that mitochondries participate in formation of plant resistance. Intensive synthesis of ABA revealed as the universal reaction of all studied plants on action of different kinds of stresses. Specific changes in balance of phytohormones were found under different stresses. We observed the correlation between endogenous ABA, IAA and cytokinin level and plant resistance. We also found the interaction between the process of biosynthesis of proteins and phytohormone balance, as well as their direct participation in formation of plant resistance. (author)

  3. The origin of the RB1 imprint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Kanber

    Full Text Available The human RB1 gene is imprinted due to a differentially methylated CpG island in intron 2. This CpG island is part of PPP1R26P1, a truncated retrocopy of PPP1R26, and serves as a promoter for an alternative RB1 transcript. We show here by in silico analyses that the parental PPP1R26 gene is present in the analysed members of Haplorrhini, which comprise Catarrhini (Old World Monkeys, Small apes, Great Apes and Human, Platyrrhini (New World Monkeys and tarsier, and Strepsirrhini (galago. Interestingly, we detected the retrocopy, PPP1R26P1, in all Anthropoidea (Catarrhini and Platyrrhini that we studied but not in tarsier or galago. Additional retrocopies are present in human and chimpanzee on chromosome 22, but their distinct composition indicates that they are the result of independent retrotransposition events. Chimpanzee and marmoset have further retrocopies on chromosome 8 and chromosome 4, respectively. To examine the origin of the RB1 imprint, we compared the methylation patterns of the parental PPP1R26 gene and its retrocopies in different primates (human, chimpanzee, orangutan, rhesus macaque, marmoset and galago. Methylation analysis by deep bisulfite sequencing showed that PPP1R26 is methylated whereas the retrocopy in RB1 intron 2 is differentially methylated in all primates studied. All other retrocopies are fully methylated, except for the additional retrocopy on marmoset chromosome 4, which is also differentially methylated. Using an informative SNP for the methylation analysis in marmoset, we could show that the differential methylation pattern of the retrocopy on chromosome 4 is allele-specific. We conclude that the epigenetic fate of a PPP1R26 retrocopy after integration depends on the DNA sequence and selective forces at the integration site.

  4. Triclosan Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Is Due to FabV, a Triclosan-Resistant Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lei; Lin, Jinshui; Ma, Jincheng; Cronan, John E.; Wang, Haihong

    2009-01-01

    Triclosan, a very widely used biocide, specifically inhibits fatty acid synthesis by inhibition of enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase. Escherichia coli FabI is the prototypical triclosan-sensitive enoyl-ACP reductase, and E. coli is extremely sensitive to the biocide. However, other bacteria are resistant to triclosan, because they encode triclosan-resistant enoyl-ACP reductase isozymes. In contrast, the triclosan resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 has been attributed to active...

  5. Vaginal washing fluid C-reactive protein levels in women with recurrent or treatment resistant vaginitis

    OpenAIRE

    Aytekin Tokmak; İrfan Özer; Selçuk Erkılınç; Ali İrfan Güzel; Mahmut Kuntay Kokanalı; Mustafa Uğur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in vaginal washing fluid (VWF) in women with a history of recurrent and/or treatment resistant vaginitis. Methods: This prospective case control study was conducted in the gynecology clinic of the current hospital. A total of 64 women (33 with a history of recurrent and/ or treatment resistant vaginitis as study group and 31 healthy women as control group) were enrolled in the study. The recorded parameters we...

  6. Systems biology analysis of mitogen activated protein kinase inhibitor resistance in malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecena, Helma; Tveit, Daniel; Wang, Zi; Farhat, Ahmed; Panchal, Parvita; Liu, Jing; Singh, Simar J; Sanghera, Amandeep; Bainiwal, Ajay; Teo, Shuan Y; Meyskens, Frank L; Liu-Smith, Feng; Filipp, Fabian V

    2018-04-04

    Kinase inhibition in the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is a standard therapy for cancer patients with activating BRAF mutations. However, the anti-tumorigenic effect and clinical benefit are only transient, and tumors are prone to treatment resistance and relapse. To elucidate mechanistic insights into drug resistance, we have established an in vitro cellular model of MAPK inhibitor resistance in malignant melanoma. The cellular model evolved in response to clinical dosage of the BRAF inhibitor, vemurafenib, PLX4032. We conducted transcriptomic expression profiling using RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR arrays. Pathways of melanogenesis, MAPK signaling, cell cycle, and metabolism were significantly enriched among the set of differentially expressed genes of vemurafenib-resistant cells vs control. The underlying mechanism of treatment resistance and pathway rewiring was uncovered to be based on non-genomic adaptation and validated in two distinct melanoma models, SK-MEL-28 and A375. Both cell lines have activating BRAF mutations and display metastatic potential. Downregulation of dual specific phosphatases, tumor suppressors, and negative MAPK regulators reengages mitogenic signaling. Upregulation of growth factors, cytokines, and cognate receptors triggers signaling pathways circumventing BRAF blockage. Further, changes in amino acid and one-carbon metabolism support cellular proliferation despite MAPK inhibitor treatment. In addition, treatment-resistant cells upregulate pigmentation and melanogenesis, pathways which partially overlap with MAPK signaling. Upstream regulator analysis discovered significant perturbation in oncogenic forkhead box and hypoxia inducible factor family transcription factors. The established cellular models offer mechanistic insight into cellular changes and therapeutic targets under inhibitor resistance in malignant melanoma. At a systems biology level, the MAPK pathway undergoes major rewiring while acquiring inhibitor resistance

  7. Involvement of outer membrane proteins and peroxide-sensor genes in Burkholderia cepacia resistance to isothiazolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Shi, Qing-shan; Ouyang, You-sheng; Chen, Yi-ben

    2014-04-01

    Isothiazolones are used as preservatives in various modern industrial products. Although microorganisms that exhibit resistance towards these biocides have been identified, the underlying resistance mechanisms are still unclear. Therefore, we investigated the resistance properties of the following Burkholderia cepacia strains to Kathon (a representative of isothiazolones): a wild-type (WT) strain; a laboratory resistance strain (BC-IR) induced from WT; and an isolated strain (BC-327) screened from industrial contamination samples. The bacterial cell structure was disrupted by 50 μg ml⁻¹ Kathon treatment. BC-IR and BC-327 did not display resistance in the presence of 1 ml L⁻¹ Tween 80, 1 ml L⁻¹ Triton X-100, 0.1 % sodium dodecyl sulfate or 1 mmol L⁻¹ EDTA-2Na. Additionally, BC-IR and BC-327 exhibited lower relative conductivity from 10 to 180 min. The types as well as the levels of outer-membrane proteins (OMPs) were altered among WT, BC-IR and BC-327. Finally, the two Kathon-resistance strains BC-IR and BC-327 presented higher resistance capacity to H₂O₂. We measured the levels of peroxide-sensor genes and observed that the transcriptional activator oxyR, superoxide dismutase sod1, sod2, catalase cat1 and cat3 were all up-regulated under oxidative conditions for all strains. Taken together, OMPs and peroxide-sensor genes in B. cepacia contributed to isothiazolone resistance; However, the laboratory strain BC-IR exhibited a different resistance mechanism and properties compared to the isolated strain BC-327.

  8. Resistance Training and Co-supplementation with Creatine and Protein in Older Subjects with Frailty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J; Longhurst, G; Roschel, H; Gualano, B

    2016-01-01

    Studies assessing the effects co-supplementation with creatine and protein, along with resistance training, in older individuals with frailty are lacking. This is an exploratory trial from the Pro-Elderly study ("Protein Intake and Resistance Training in Aging") aimed at gathering knowledge on the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of co-supplementation with creatine and protein supplementation, combined with resistance training, in older individuals with frailty. A 14-week, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, placebo controlled exploratory trial. The subjects were randomly assigned to whey protein and creatine co-supplementation (WHEY+CR) or whey protein supplementation (WHEY) group. All subjects undertook a supervised exercise training program and were assessed at baseline and after 14 weeks. Muscle function, body composition, blood parameters, and self-reported adverse events were assessed. No interaction effects (between-group differences) were observed for any dependent variables (p > 0.05 for all). However, there were main time-effects in handgrip (WHEY+CR = 26.65 ± 31.29; WHEY = 13.84 ± 14.93 Kg; p = 0.0005), timed-up-and-go (WHEY+CR = -11.20 ± 9.37; WHEY = -17.76 ± 21.74 sec; p = 0.006), and timed-stands test (WHEY+CR = 47.50 ± 35.54; WHEY = 46.87 ± 24.23 reps; p = 0.0001), suggesting that WHEY+CR and WHEY were similarly effective in improving muscle function. All of the subjects showed improvements in at least two of the three functional tests, regardless of their treatments. Body composition and blood parameters were not changed (p > 0.05). No severe adverse effects were observed. Co-supplementation with creatine and whey protein was well-tolerable and free of adverse events in older subjects with frailty undertaking resistance training. Creatine supplementation did not augment the adaptive effects of resistance training along with whey protein on body composition or muscle function in this population. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01890382.

  9. Inventory and function of yeast ABC proteins: about sex, stress, pleiotropic drug and heavy metal resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, B E; Wolfger, H; Kuchler, K

    1999-12-06

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first eukaryotic organism whose complete genome sequence has been determined, uncovering the existence of numerous genes encoding proteins of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family. Fungal ABC proteins are implicated in a variety of cellular functions, ranging from clinical drug resistance development, pheromone secretion, mitochondrial function, peroxisome biogenesis, translation elongation, stress response to cellular detoxification. Moreover, some yeast ABC proteins are orthologues of human disease genes, which makes yeast an excellent model system to study the molecular mechanisms of ABC protein-mediated disease. This review provides a comprehensive discussion and update on the function and transcriptional regulation of all known ABC genes from yeasts, including those discovered in fungal pathogens.

  10. The impact of protein quality on the promotion of resistance exercise-induced changes in muscle mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Stuart M

    2016-01-01

    Protein supplementation during resistance exercise training augments hypertrophic gains. Protein ingestion and the resultant hyperaminoacidemia provides the building blocks (indispensable amino acids - IAA) for, and also triggers an increase in, muscle protein synthesis (MPS), suppression of muscle protein breakdown (MPB), and net positive protein balance (i.e., MPS > MPB). The key amino acid triggering the rise in MPS is leucine, which stimulates the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex-1, a key signalling protein, and triggers a rise in MPS. As such, ingested proteins with a high leucine content would be advantageous in triggering a rise in MPS. Thus, protein quality (reflected in IAA content and protein digestibility) has an impact on changes in MPS and could ultimately affect skeletal muscle mass. Protein quality has been measured by the protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS); however, the digestible indispensable amino acid score (DIAAS) has been recommended as a better method for protein quality scoring. Under DIAAS there is the recognition that amino acids are individual nutrients and that protein quality is contingent on IAA content and ileal (as opposed to fecal) digestibility. Differences in protein quality may have important ramifications for exercise-induced changes in muscle mass gains made with resistance exercise as well as muscle remodelling. Thus, the purpose of this review is a critical appraisal of studies examining the effects of protein quality in supplementation on changes in muscle mass and strength as well as body composition during resistance training.

  11. Transgenic sugarcane resistant to Sorghum mosaic virus based on coat protein gene silencing by RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinlong; Gao, Shiwu; Lin, Qinliang; Wang, Hengbo; Que, Youxiong; Xu, Liping

    2015-01-01

    As one of the critical diseases of sugarcane, sugarcane mosaic disease can lead to serious decline in stalk yield and sucrose content. It is mainly caused by Potyvirus sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and/or Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), with additional differences in viral strains. RNA interference (RNAi) is a novel strategy for producing viral resistant plants. In this study, based on multiple sequence alignment conducted on genomic sequences of different strains and isolates of SrMV, the conserved region of coat protein (CP) genes was selected as the target gene and the interference sequence with size of 423 bp in length was obtained through PCR amplification. The RNAi vector pGII00-HACP with an expression cassette containing both hairpin interference sequence and cp4-epsps herbicide-tolerant gene was transferred to sugarcane cultivar ROC22 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. After herbicide screening, PCR molecular identification, and artificial inoculation challenge, anti-SrMV positive transgenic lines were successfully obtained. SrMV resistance rate of the transgenic lines with the interference sequence was 87.5% based on SrMV challenge by artificial inoculation. The genetically modified SrMV-resistant lines of cultivar ROC22 provide resistant germplasm for breeding lines and can also serve as resistant lines having the same genetic background for study of resistance mechanisms.

  12. Transgenic Sugarcane Resistant to Sorghum mosaic virus Based on Coat Protein Gene Silencing by RNA Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlong Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the critical diseases of sugarcane, sugarcane mosaic disease can lead to serious decline in stalk yield and sucrose content. It is mainly caused by Potyvirus sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV and/or Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV, with additional differences in viral strains. RNA interference (RNAi is a novel strategy for producing viral resistant plants. In this study, based on multiple sequence alignment conducted on genomic sequences of different strains and isolates of SrMV, the conserved region of coat protein (CP genes was selected as the target gene and the interference sequence with size of 423 bp in length was obtained through PCR amplification. The RNAi vector pGII00-HACP with an expression cassette containing both hairpin interference sequence and cp4-epsps herbicide-tolerant gene was transferred to sugarcane cultivar ROC22 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. After herbicide screening, PCR molecular identification, and artificial inoculation challenge, anti-SrMV positive transgenic lines were successfully obtained. SrMV resistance rate of the transgenic lines with the interference sequence was 87.5% based on SrMV challenge by artificial inoculation. The genetically modified SrMV-resistant lines of cultivar ROC22 provide resistant germplasm for breeding lines and can also serve as resistant lines having the same genetic background for study of resistance mechanisms.

  13. Multidrug-resistance proteins are weak tumor associated antigens for colorectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnebacher Michael

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug resistance (MDR is a clinically, highly relevant phenomenon. Under chemotherapy many tumors show an increasing resistance towards the applied substance(s and to a certain extent also towards other agents. An important molecular cause of this phenomenon is an increased expression of transporter proteins. The functional relationship between high expression levels and chemotherapy resistance makes these MDR and MRP (MDR related protein proteins to interesting therapeutic targets. We here wanted to systematically analyze, whether these proteins are tumor specific antigens which could be targeted immunologically. Results Using the reverse immunology approach, 30 HLA-A2.1 restricted MDR and MRP derived peptides (MDP were selected. Stimulated T cell lines grew well and mainly contained activated CD8+ cells. Peptide specificity and HLA-A2.1 restriction were proven in IFN-γ-ELISpot analyses and in cytotoxicity tests against MDP loaded target cells for a total of twelve peptides derived from MDR-1, MDR-3, MRP-1, MRP-2, MRP-3 and MRP-5. Of note, two of these epitopes are shared between MDR-1 and MDR-3 as well as MRP-2 and MRP-3. However, comparably weak cytotoxic activities were additionally observed against HLA-A2.1+ tumor cells even after upregulation of MDR protein expression by in vitro chemotherapy. Conclusions Taken together, these data demonstrate that human T cells can be sensitised towards MDPs and hence, there is no absolute immunological tolerance. However, our data also hint towards rather low endogenous tumor cell processing and presentation of MDPs in the context of HLA-A2.1 molecules. Consequently, we conclude that MDR and MRP proteins must be considered as weak tumor specific antigens-at least for colorectal carcinoma. Their direct contribution to therapy-failure implies however, that it is worth to further pursue this approach.

  14. Effect of protein source and resistance training on body composition and sex hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krieger Diane R

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence suggests an inverse relationship between soy protein intake and serum concentrations of male sex hormones. Anecdotal evidence indicates that these alterations in serum sex hormones may attenuate changes in lean body mass following resistance training. However, little empirical data exists regarding the effects of soy and milk-based proteins on circulating androgens and exercise induced body composition changes. Methods For 12 weeks 20 subjects were supplemented with 50 g per day of one of four different protein sources (Soy concentrate; Soy isolate; Soy isolate and whey blend, and Whey blend only in combination with a resistance-training program. Body composition, testosterone, estradiol and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG were measured at baseline and week 12. Results Protein supplementation resulted in a significant increase in lean body mass independent of protein source (0.5 ± 1.1 and 0.9 ± 1.4 kg, p = 0.006, p = 0.007. No significant differences were observed between groups for total and free testosterone, SHBG, percentage body fat, BMI or body weight. The Testosterone/Estradiol ratio increased across all groups (+13.4, p = 0.005 and estradiol decreased (p = 0.002. Within group analysis showed significant increases in the Testosterone/Estradiol ratio in soy isolate + whey blend group (+16.3, p = 0.030. Estradiol was significantly lower in the whey blend group (-9.1 ± 8.7 pg/ml, p = 0.033. Conclusion This investigation shows that 12 week supplementation with soy protein does not decrease serum testosterone or inhibit lean body mass changes in subjects engaged in a resistance exercise program.

  15. Protein supplementation during resistance-type exercise training in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenders, Marika; Verdijk, Lex B; Van der Hoeven, Letty; Van Kranenburg, Janneau; Nilwik, Rachel; Wodzig, Will K W H; Senden, Joan M G; Keizer, Hans A; Van Loon, Luc J C

    2013-03-01

    Resistance training has been well established as an effective treatment strategy to increase skeletal muscle mass and strength in the elderly. We assessed whether dietary protein supplementation can further augment the adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training in healthy elderly men and women. Healthy elderly men (n = 31, 70 ± 1 yr) and women (n = 29, 70 ± 1 yr) were randomly assigned to a progressive, 24-wk resistance-type exercise training program with or without additional protein supplementation (15 g·d-1). Muscle hypertrophy was assessed on a whole-body Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), limb (computed tomography), and muscle fiber (biopsy) level. Strength was assessed regularly by 1-repetition maximum (RM) strength testing. Functional capacity was assessed with a sit-to-stand and handgrip test. One-RM strength increased by 45% ± 6% versus 40% ± 3% (women) and 41% ± 4% versus 44% ± 3% (men) in the placebo versus protein group, respectively (P muscle mass (women, 4% ± 1% vs 3% ± 1%; men, 3% ± 1% vs 3% ± 1%) and quadriceps cross-sectional area (women, 9% ± 1% vs 9% ± 1%; men, 9% ± 1% vs 10% ± 1%) increased similarly in the placebo versus protein groups (P muscle fiber size increased over time in both placebo and protein groups (25% ± 13% vs 30% ± 9% and 23% ± 12% vs 22% ± 10% in the women and men, respectively). Sit-to-stand improved by 18% ± 2% and 19% ± 2% in women and men, respectively (P training increases skeletal muscle mass and strength, augments functional capacity, improves glycemia and lipidemia, and reduces blood pressure in healthy elderly men and women. Additional protein supplementation (15 g·d-1) does not further increase muscle mass, strength, and/or functional capacity.

  16. Mutation of p107 exacerbates the consequences of Rb loss in embryonic tissues and causes cardiac and blood vessel defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Seth D; West, Julie C; Danielian, Paul S; Caron, Alicia M; Stone, James R; Lees, Jacqueline A

    2009-09-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor-suppressor protein, pRb, is a member of the pocket protein family that includes p107 and p130. These proteins have well-defined roles in regulating entry into and exit from the cell cycle and also have cell cycle-independent roles in facilitating differentiation. Here we investigate the overlap between pocket protein's function during embryonic development by using conditional mutant alleles to generate Rb;p107 double-mutant embryos (DKOs) that develop in the absence of placental defects. These DKOs die between e13.5 and e14.5, much earlier than either the conditional Rb or the germline p107 single mutants, which survive to birth or are largely viable, respectively. Analyses of the e13.5 DKOs shows that p107 mutation exacerbates the phenotypes resulting from pRb loss in the central nervous system and lens, but not in the peripheral nervous system. In addition, these embryos exhibit novel phenotypes, including increased proliferation of blood vessel endothelial cells, and heart defects, including double-outlet right ventricle (DORV). The DORV is caused, at least in part, by a defect in blood vessel endothelial cells and/or heart mesenchymal cells. These findings demonstrate novel, overlapping functions for pRb and p107 in numerous murine tissues.

  17. Hydraulic Resistance of Vitreous Cutters: The Impact of Blade Design and Cut Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Tommaso; Querzoli, Giorgio; Angelini, Giampiero; Malvasi, Carlo; Rossi, Alessandro; Morini, Mario; Esposito, Graziana; Micera, Alessandra; di Luca, Natale Mario; Ripandelli, Guido

    2016-07-01

    To measure the hydraulic resistance (HR) of vitreous cutters equipped with a Regular guillotine Blade (RB) or double edge blade (DEB) at cut rates comprised between 0 and 12,000 cuts per minute (CPM) and compare it with vitreous fragment size. This was an in vitro experimental study; in vivo HR measure and vitreous sampling. HR, defined as aspiration pressure/flow rate, was measured in balanced salt solution (BSS; Alcon, Fort Worth, TX) (in vitro) and during pars plana vitrectomy of 20 consecutive patients aged 18 to 65, undergoing macular surgery. HR was recorded at increasing cut rates (500-6000 CPM for the RB and 500-12,000 CPM for the DEB; 5 mL/min flow). Vitreous samples were withdrawn and analyzed with Western and collagen type II and IX immunostaining to evaluate protein size. The main outcome measures were hydraulic resistance (mm Hg/ml/min [±SD]) and optic density for Western blot and immunostaining. RB and DEB showed identical HR in BSS between 0 and 3000 CPM. Above 3000 CPM, RB HR steadily increased, and was significantly higher than DEB HR. Vitreous HR was also similar for the two blades between 0 and 1500 CPM. Above 1500 CPM, RB offered a significantly higher resistance. Western blot and immunostaining of vitreous samples did not yield a significant difference in size, regardless of blade type and cut rate. DEB is more efficient, offering a lower HR than RB over 1500 CPM in human vitreous. There is no viscosity reduction as a function of cut-rate between 1500 and 12,000 CPM, as HR does not vary. Future vitreous cutters will benefit of a DEB; optimal cut rate needs to be defined, and the simple increase of cut rate does not provide benefits after a certain limit to be assessed.

  18. Metabolic responses to high protein diet in Korean elite bodybuilders with high-intensity resistance exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choue Ryowon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High protein diet has been known to cause metabolic acidosis, which is manifested by increased urinary excretion of nitrogen and calcium. Bodybuilders habitually consumed excessive dietary protein over the amounts recommended for them to promote muscle mass accretion. This study investigated the metabolic response to high protein consumption in the elite bodybuilders. Methods Eight elite Korean bodybuilders within the age from 18 to 25, mean age 21.5 ± 2.6. For data collection, anthropometry, blood and urinary analysis, and dietary assessment were conducted. Results They consumed large amounts of protein (4.3 ± 1.2 g/kg BW/day and calories (5,621.7 ± 1,354.7 kcal/day, as well as more than the recommended amounts of vitamins and minerals, including potassium and calcium. Serum creatinine (1.3 ± 0.1 mg/dl and potassium (5.9 ± 0.8 mmol/L, and urinary urea nitrogen (24.7 ± 9.5 mg/dl and creatinine (2.3 ± 0.7 mg/dl were observed to be higher than the normal reference ranges. Urinary calcium (0.3 ± 0.1 mg/dl, and phosphorus (1.3 ± 0.4 mg/dl were on the border of upper limit of the reference range and the urine pH was in normal range. Conclusions Increased urinary excretion of urea nitrogen and creatinine might be due to the high rates of protein metabolism that follow high protein intake and muscle turnover. The obvious evidence of metabolic acidosis in response to high protein diet in the subjects with high potassium intake and intensive resistance exercise were not shown in this study results. However, this study implied that resistance exercise with adequate mineral supplementation, such as potassium and calcium, could reduce or offset the negative effects of protein-generated metabolic changes. This study provides preliminary information of metabolic response to high protein intake in bodybuilders who engaged in high-intensity resistance exercise. Further studies will be needed to determine the effects of the intensity

  19. Multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1 genetic variants, MRP1 protein levels and severity of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutgers Bea

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1 protects against oxidative stress and toxic compounds generated by cigarette smoking, which is the main risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. We have previously shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in MRP1 significantly associate with level of FEV1 in two independent population based cohorts. The aim of our study was to assess the associations of MRP1 SNPs with FEV1 level, MRP1 protein levels and inflammatory markers in bronchial biopsies and sputum of COPD patients. Methods Five SNPs (rs212093, rs4148382, rs504348, rs4781699, rs35621 in MRP1 were genotyped in 110 COPD patients. The effects of MRP1 SNPs were analyzed using linear regression models. Results One SNP, rs212093 was significantly associated with a higher FEV1 level and less airway wall inflammation. Another SNP, rs4148382 was significantly associated with a lower FEV1 level, higher number of inflammatory cells in induced sputum and with a higher MRP1 protein level in bronchial biopsies. Conclusions This is the first study linking MRP1 SNPs with lung function and inflammatory markers in COPD patients, suggesting a role of MRP1 SNPs in the severity of COPD in addition to their association with MRP1 protein level in bronchial biopsies.

  20. Protein supplementation augments the adaptive response of skeletal muscle to resistance-type exercise training: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cermak, N.M.; Res, P.T.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Saris, W.H.M.; Loon, van L.J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Protein ingestion after a single bout of resistance-type exercise stimulates net muscle protein accretion during acute postexercise recovery. Consequently, it is generally accepted that protein supplementation is required to maximize the adaptive response of the skeletal muscle to

  1. Role of diacylglycerol in adrenergic-stimulated sup 86 Rb uptake by proximal tubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baines, A.D.; Drangova, R.; Ho, P. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-05-01

    We used rat proximal tubule fragments purified by Percoll centrifugation to examine the role of diacylglycerol (DAG) in noradrenergic-stimulated Na+ reabsorption. Tubular DAG concentration and ouabain-inhibitable 86Rb uptake increased within 30 s after adding norepinephrine (NE) and remained elevated for at least 5 min. NE (1 microM) increased DAG content 17% and ouabain-inhibitable 86Rb uptake 23%. Cirazoline-stimulated 86Rb uptake was not inhibited by BaCl, quinidine, or bumetanide (1-10 microM) or by the omission of HCO3- or Cl- from the medium, but it was completely inhibited by ouabain and furosemide. Oleoyl-acetyl glycerol, L-alpha-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol, and L-alpha-1,2-dioleoylglycerol (DOG) increased total 86Rb uptake 8-11%. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (5 nM) increased uptake by only 4%. Staurosporine at 5 nM inhibited DOG stimulation completely, whereas 50 nM staurosporine was required to inhibit NE stimulation completely. Sphingosine inhibited DOG stimulation by 66% but did not inhibit NE stimulation. Amiloride (1 mM) completely blocked DOG stimulation. Monensin increased 86Rb uptake 31% and completely blocked the DOG effect but reduced the NE effect by only 26% (P = 0.08). In tubules from salt-loaded rats, NE did not increase DAG concentration, but NE-stimulated 86Rb uptake was reduced by only 23% (P = 0.15). Thus DAG released by NE may stimulate Na+ entry through Na(+)-H+ exchange. NE predominantly stimulates Na(+)-K(+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) by activating a protein kinase that is insensitive to DAG and TPA and is inhibited by staurosporine but not by sphingosine. NE may also stimulate K+ efflux through a BaCl-insensitive K+ channel that is inhibited by millimolar furosemide.

  2. Immune responses and safety after dart or booster vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, S C; Johnson, C

    2012-05-01

    One alternative for management of brucellosis in Yellowstone National Park bison (Bison bison) is vaccination of calves and yearlings. Although Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccination protects bison against experimental challenge, the effect of booster vaccinations was unknown. This study characterized immunologic responses after dart or booster vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51. In two studies, 8- to 10-month-old female bison were inoculated with saline (n = 14), hand vaccinated with 1.1 × 10(10) to 2.0 × 10(10) CFU of RB51 (n = 21), or dart vaccinated with 1.8 × 10(10) CFU of RB51 (n = 7). A subgroup of hand vaccinates in study 1 was randomly selected for booster vaccination 15 months later with 2.2 × 10(10) CFU of RB51. Compared to single vaccinates, booster-vaccinated bison had greater serologic responses to RB51. However, there was a trend for antigen-specific proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from booster vaccinates to be reduced compared to responses of PBMC from single vaccinates. PBMC from booster vaccinates tended to have greater gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production than those from single vaccinates. In general, dart vaccination with RB51 induced immunologic responses similar to those of hand vaccination. All vaccinates (single hand, dart, or booster) demonstrated greater (P RB51 in early gestation did not induce abortion or fetal infection. Our data suggest that booster vaccination does not induce strong anamnestic responses. However, phenotypic data on resistance to experimental challenge are required to fully assess the effect of booster vaccination on protective immunity.

  3. The flagellum of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is required for resistance to clearance by surfactant protein A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiping Zhang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein A (SP-A is an important lung innate immune protein that kills microbial pathogens by opsonization and membrane permeabilization. We investigated the basis of SP-A-mediated pulmonary clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using genetically-engineered SP-A mice and a library of signature-tagged P. aeruginosa mutants. A mutant with an insertion into flgE, the gene that encodes flagellar hook protein, was preferentially cleared by the SP-A(+/+ mice, but survived in the SP-A(-/- mice. Opsonization by SP-A did not play a role in flgE clearance. However, exposure to SP-A directly permeabilized and killed the flgE mutant, but not the wild-type parental strain. P. aeruginosa strains with mutation in other flagellar genes, as well as mucoid, nonmotile isolates from cystic fibrosis patients, were also permeabilized by SP-A. Provision of the wild-type fliC gene restored the resistance to SP-A-mediated membrane permeabilization in the fliC-deficient bacteria. In addition, non-mucoid, motile revertants of CF isolates reacquired resistance to SP-A-mediated membrane permeability. Resistance to SP-A was dependent on the presence of an intact flagellar structure, and independent of flagellar-dependent motility. We provide evidence that flagellar-deficient mutants harbor inadequate amounts of LPS required to resist membrane permeabilization by SP-A and cellular lysis by detergent targeting bacterial outer membranes. Thus, the flagellum of P. aeruginosa plays an indirect but important role resisting SP-A-mediated clearance and membrane permeabilization.

  4. Selection and characterization of resistance to the Vip3Aa20 protein from Bacillus thuringiensis in Spodoptera frugiperda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Oderlei; Bernardi, Daniel; Horikoshi, Renato J; Okuma, Daniela M; Miraldo, Leonardo L; Fatoretto, Julio; Medeiros, Fernanda Cl; Burd, Tony; Omoto, Celso

    2016-09-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda is one the main target pests of maize events expressing Vip3Aa20 protein from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in Brazil. In this study, we selected a resistant strain of S. frugiperda on Bt maize expressing Vip3Aa20 protein and characterized the inheritance and fitness costs of the resistance. The resistance ratio of the Vip3Aa20-resistant strain of S. frugiperda was >3200-fold. Neonates of the Vip3Aa20-resistant strain were able to survive and emerge as fertile adults on Vip3Aa20 maize, while larvae from susceptible and heterozygous strains did not survive. The inheritance of Vip3Aa20 resistance was autosomal recessive and monogenic. Life history studies to investigate fitness cost revealed an 11% reduction in the survival rate until adult stage and a ∼50% lower reproductive rate of the Vip3Aa20-resistant strain compared with susceptible and heterozygous strains. This is the first characterization of S. frugiperda resistance to Vip3Aa protein. Our results provide useful information for resistance management programs designed to prevent or delay resistance evolution to Vip3Aa proteins in S. frugiperda. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by whey and caseinate ingestion after resistance exercise in elderly individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Kasper; Reitelseder, Søren; Petersen, S.G.

    2011-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a well-known phenomenon in elderly individuals and resistance exercise together with sufficient amino acid (AA) availability has proved to be a counteractive implement. However, the source of AA and supplement timing require further investigation. The objective was to compare muscle...... protein synthesis (MPS) to intakes of whey and caseinate after heavy resistance exercise in healthy elderly individuals, and, furthermore, to compare the timing effect of caseinate intake. Twenty-four elderly men and women (mean ± SEM; 68 ± 1 years) were randomized to one of four groups: caseinate intake...... and caseinate feeding immediately after heavy resistance exercise in elderly individuals, and MPS is similar with caseinate ingestion before and after exercise....

  6. Surveillance of artemether-lumefantrine associated Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance protein-1 gene polymorphisms in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavishe, Reginald A; Paulo, Petro; Kaaya, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    ) is the recommended first-line drug in treatment of uncomplicated malaria. This study surveyed the distribution of the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance protein-1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with increased parasite tolerance to ALu, in Tanzania. METHODS: A total of 687 Plasmodium...... in all regions, ranging from 17% - 26%. CONCLUSION: This is the first country-wide survey on Pfmdr1 mutations associated with ACT resistance. Distribution of individual Pfmdr1 mutations at codons 86, 184 and 1246 varies throughout Tanzanian regions. There is a general homogeneity in distribution......BACKGROUND: Resistance to anti-malarials is a major public health problem worldwide. After deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) there have been reports of reduced sensitivity to ACT by malarial parasites in South-East Asia. In Tanzania, artemether-lumefantrine (ALu...

  7. Mutations in the bacterial ribosomal protein l3 and their association with antibiotic resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Rasmus N; Ntokou, Eleni; Nørgaard, Katrine

    2015-01-01

    Different groups of antibiotics bind to the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) in the large subunit of the bacterial ribosome. Resistance to these groups of antibiotics has often been linked with mutations or methylations of the 23S rRNA. In recent years, there has been a rise in the number...... of studies where mutations have been found in the ribosomal protein L3 in bacterial strains resistant to PTC-targeting antibiotics but there is often no evidence that these mutations actually confer antibiotic resistance. In this study, a plasmid exchange system was used to replace plasmid-carried wild...... background. Ten plasmid-carried mutated L3 genes were constructed, and their effect on growth and antibiotic susceptibility was investigated. Additionally, computational modeling of the impact of L3 mutations in E. coli was used to assess changes in 50S structure and antibiotic binding. All mutations...

  8. Protein resistance efficacy of PEO-silane amphiphiles: Dependence on PEO-segment length and concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufin, Marc A; Barry, Mikayla E; Adair, Paige A; Hawkins, Melissa L; Raymond, Jeffery E; Grunlan, Melissa A

    2016-09-01

    In contrast to modification with conventional PEO-silanes (i.e. no siloxane tether), silicones with dramatically enhanced protein resistance have been previously achieved via bulk-modification with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-silane amphiphiles α-(EtO)3Si(CH2)2-oligodimethylsiloxane13-block-PEOn-OCH3 when n=8 and 16 but not when n=3. In this work, their efficacy was evaluated in terms of optimal PEO-segment length and minimum concentration required in silicone. For each PEO-silane amphiphile (n=3, 8, and 16), five concentrations (5, 10, 25, 50, and 100μmol per 1g silicone) were evaluated. Efficacy was quantified in terms of the modified silicones' abilities to undergo rapid, water-driven surface restructuring to form hydrophilic surfaces as well as resistance to fibrinogen adsorption. Only n=8 and 16 were effective, with a lower minimum concentration in silicone required for n=8 (10μmol per 1g silicone) versus n=16 (25μmol per 1g silicone). Silicone is commonly used for implantable medical devices, but its hydrophobic surface promotes protein adsorption which leads to thrombosis and infection. Typical methods to incorporate poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) into silicones have not been effective due to the poor migration of PEO to the surface-biological interface. In this work, PEO-silane amphiphiles - comprised of a siloxane tether (m=13) and variable PEO segment lengths (n=3, 8, 16) - were blended into silicone to improve its protein resistance. The efficacy of the amphiphiles was determined to be dependent on PEO length. With the intermediate PEO length (n=8), water-driven surface restructuring and resulting protein resistance was achieved with a concentration of only 1.7wt%. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Towards predictive resistance models for agrochemicals by combining chemical and protein similarity via proteochemometric modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Westen, Gerard J P; Bender, Andreas; Overington, John P

    2014-10-01

    Resistance to pesticides is an increasing problem in agriculture. Despite practices such as phased use and cycling of 'orthogonally resistant' agents, resistance remains a major risk to national and global food security. To combat this problem, there is a need for both new approaches for pesticide design, as well as for novel chemical entities themselves. As summarized in this opinion article, a technique termed 'proteochemometric modelling' (PCM), from the field of chemoinformatics, could aid in the quantification and prediction of resistance that acts via point mutations in the target proteins of an agent. The technique combines information from both the chemical and biological domain to generate bioactivity models across large numbers of ligands as well as protein targets. PCM has previously been validated in prospective, experimental work in the medicinal chemistry area, and it draws on the growing amount of bioactivity information available in the public domain. Here, two potential applications of proteochemometric modelling to agrochemical data are described, based on previously published examples from the medicinal chemistry literature.

  10. IQGAP1 Protein Binds Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) and Modulates Trastuzumab Resistance*

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Colin D.; Li, Zhigang; Dillon, Deborah A.; Sacks, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is overexpressed in 20–25% of breast cancers. Increased HER2 expression is an adverse prognostic factor and correlates with decreased patient survival. HER2-positive (HER2(+)) breast cancer is treated with trastuzumab. Unfortunately, some patients are intrinsically refractory to therapy, and many who do respond initially become resistant within 1 year. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying HER2 signaling and trastuzumab resistance is essential to reduce breast cancer mortality. IQGAP1 is a ubiquitously expressed scaffold protein that contains multiple protein interaction domains. By regulating its binding partners IQGAP1 integrates signaling pathways, several of which contribute to breast tumorigenesis. We show here that IQGAP1 is overexpressed in HER2(+) breast cancer tissue and binds directly to HER2. Knockdown of IQGAP1 decreases HER2 expression, phosphorylation, signaling, and HER2-stimulated cell proliferation, effects that are all reversed by reconstituting cells with IQGAP1. Reducing IQGAP1 up-regulates p27, and blocking this increase attenuates the growth inhibitory effects of IQGAP1 knockdown. Importantly, IQGAP1 is overexpressed in trastuzumab-resistant breast epithelial cells, and reducing IQGAP1 both augments the inhibitory effects of trastuzumab and restores trastuzumab sensitivity to trastuzumab-resistant SkBR3 cells. These data suggest that inhibiting IQGAP1 function may represent a rational strategy for treating HER2(+) breast carcinoma. PMID:21724847

  11. High-resolution structure of the antibiotic resistance protein NimA from Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S.; Tedesco, Consiglia; McSweeney, Seán M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the 1.2 Å atomic resolution crystal structure of the 5-nitroimidazole antibiotic resistance protein NimA from Deinococcus radiodurans (DrNimA) is presented. Many anaerobic human pathogenic bacteria are treated using 5-nitroimidazole-based (5-Ni) antibiotics, a class of inactive prodrugs that contain a nitro group. The nitro group must be activated in an anaerobic one-electron reduction and is therefore dependent on the redox system in the target cells. Antibiotic resistance towards 5-Ni drugs is found to be related to the nim genes (nimA, nimB, nimC, nimD, nimE and nimF), which are proposed to encode a reductase that is responsible for converting the nitro group of the antibiotic into a nonbactericidal amine. A mechanism for the Nim enzyme has been proposed in which two-electron reduction of the nitro group leads to the generation of nontoxic derivatives and confers resistance against these antibiotics. The cofactor was found to be important in the mechanism and was found to be covalently linked to the reactive His71. In this paper, the 1.2 Å atomic resolution crystal structure of the 5-nitroimidazole antibiotic resistance protein NimA from Deinococcus radiodurans (DrNimA) is presented. A planar cofactor is clearly visible and well defined in the electron-density map adjacent to His71, the identification of the cofactor and its properties are discussed

  12. SynProt: A Comprehensive Database for Proteins of the Detergent-Resistant Synaptic Junctions Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer ePielot

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical synapses are highly specialized cell-cell contacts for communication between neurons in the CNS characterized by complex and dynamic protein networks at both synaptic membranes. The cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ organizes the apparatus for the regulated release of transmitters from the presynapse. At the postsynaptic side, the postsynaptic density constitutes the machinery for detection, integration and transduction of the transmitter signal. Both pre- and postsynaptic protein networks represent the molecular substrates for synaptic plasticity. Their function can be altered both by regulating their composition and by post-translational modification of their components. For a comprehensive understanding of synaptic networks the entire ensemble of synaptic proteins has to be considered. To support this, we established a comprehensive database for synaptic junction proteins (SynProt database primarily based on proteomics data obtained from biochemical preparations of detergent-resistant synaptic junctions. The database currently contains 2,788 non-redundant entries of rat, mouse and some human proteins, which mainly have been manually extracted from twelve proteomic studies and annotated for synaptic subcellular localization. Each dataset is completed with manually added information including protein classifiers as well as automatically retrieved and updated information from public databases (UniProt and PubMed. We intend that the database will be used to support modeling of synaptic protein networks and rational experimental design.

  13. Physical Cross-Linking Starch-Based Zwitterionic Hydrogel Exhibiting Excellent Biocompatibility, Protein Resistance, and Biodegradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lei; Zhang, Yabin; Wang, Qiangsong; Zhou, Xin; Yang, Boguang; Ji, Feng; Dong, Dianyu; Gao, Lina; Cui, Yuanlu; Yao, Fanglian

    2016-06-22

    In this work, a novel starch-based zwitterionic copolymer, starch-graft-poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (ST-g-PSBMA), was synthesized via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization. Starch, which formed the main chain, can be degraded completely in vivo, and the pendent segments of PSBMA endowed the copolymer with excellent protein resistance properties. This ST-g-PSBMA copolymer could self-assemble into a physical hydrogel in normal saline, and studies of the formation mechanism indicated that the generation of the physical hydrogel was driven by electrostatic interactions between PSBMA segments. The obtained hydrogels were subjected to detailed analysis by scanning electron microscopy, swelling ratio, protein resistance, and rheology tests. Toxicity and hemolysis analysis demonstrated that the ST-g-PSBMA hydrogels possess excellent biocompatibility and hemocompatibility. Moreover, the cytokine secretion assays (IL-6, TNF-α, and NO) confirmed that ST-g-PSBMA hydrogels had low potential to trigger the activation of macrophages and were suitable for in vivo biomedical applications. On the basis of these in vitro results, the ST-g-PSBMA hydrogels were implanted in SD rats. The tissue responses to hydrogel implantation and the hydrogel degradation in vivo were determined by histological analysis (Hematoxylin and eosin, Van Gieson, and Masson's Trichrome stains). The results presented in this study demonstrate that the physical cross-linking, starch-based zwitterionic hydrogels possess excellent protein resistance, low macrophage-activation properties, and good biocompatibility, and they are a promising candidate for an in vivo biomedical application platform.

  14. Serum levels of uncoupling proteins in patients with differential insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Heng-Chih; Lee, Chin-Chan; Chou, Kuei-Mei; Lu, Shang-Chieh; Sun, Chiao-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The uncoupling protein (UCP) belongs to a family of energy-dissipating proteins in mitochondria. Increasing evidences have indicated that UCPs have immense impact on glucose homeostasis and are key proteins in metabolic syndrome. For applying the findings to clinical practice, we designed a study to explore the association between serum UCPs 1–3 and insulin resistance. This investigation prospectively recorded demographical parameter and collected blood samples of 1071 participants from 4 districts in Northeastern Taiwan during the period from August 2013 to July 2014. Propensity score matching by age and sex in patients with top and bottom third homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) levels was performed, and 326 subjects were enrolled for further studies. The mean age of the patients was 59.4 years and the majority of them (65.5%) were females. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 35.5%. Our results demonstrated that serum UCPs 1–3 were significantly associated with differences in HOMA-IR levels. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that low UCP 1 and features of metabolic syndrome, namely hypertension, diabetes, body mass index, and high-density lipoprotein, were independent determinants for high HOMA-IR levels. We thus determined that low serum UCP 1 is a predictor for high resistance to insulin. PMID:28984759

  15. Role of the Vibrio cholerae matrix protein Bap1 in cross-resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marylise Duperthuy

    Full Text Available Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs that are released from Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria can serve as vehicles for the translocation of effectors involved in infectious processes. In this study we have investigated the role of OMVs of the Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor A1552 strain in resistance to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs. To assess this potential role, we grew V. cholerae with sub-lethal concentrations of Polymyxin B (PmB or the AMP LL-37 and analyzed the OMVs produced and their effects on AMP resistance. Our results show that growing V. cholerae in the presence of AMPs modifies the protein content of the OMVs. In the presence of PmB, bacteria release OMVs that are larger in size and contain a biofilm-associated extracellular matrix protein (Bap1. We demonstrated that Bap1 binds to the OmpT porin on the OMVs through the LDV domain of OmpT. In addition, OMVs from cultures incubated in presence of PmB also provide better protection for V. cholerae against LL-37 compared to OMVs from V. cholerae cultures grown without AMPs or in presence of LL-37. Using a bap1 mutant we showed that cross-resistance between PmB and LL-37 involved the Bap1 protein, whereby Bap1 on OMVs traps LL-37 with no subsequent degradation of the AMP.

  16. The SNARE protein SNAP23 and the SNARE-interacting protein Munc18c in human skeletal muscle are implicated in insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boström, Pontus; Andersson, Linda; Vind, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    association between lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle and insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes in humans, as well as to identify a potential regulator of SNAP23. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies from patients with type 2 diabetes and healthy, insulin-sensitive control......OBJECTIVE: Our previous studies suggest that the SNARE protein synaptosomal-associated protein of 23 kDa (SNAP23) is involved in the link between increased lipid levels and insulin resistance in cardiomyocytes. The objective was to determine whether SNAP23 may also be involved in the known...... subjects for expression (mRNA and protein) and intracellular localization (subcellular fractionation and immunohistochemistry) of SNAP23, and for expression of proteins known to interact with SNARE proteins. Insulin resistance was determined by a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Potential mechanisms...

  17. Competition between Phytophthora infestans effectors leads to increased aggressiveness on plants containing broad-spectrum late blight resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis A Halterman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The destructive plant disease potato late blight is caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary. This disease has remained particularly problematic despite intensive breeding efforts to integrate resistance into cultivated potato, largely because of the pathogen's ability to quickly evolve to overcome major resistance genes. The RB gene, identified in the wild potato species S. bulbocastanum, encodes a protein that confers broad-spectrum resistance to most P. infestans isolates through its recognition of highly conserved members of the corresponding pathogen effector family IPI-O. IpiO is a multigene family of effectors and while the majority of IPI-O proteins are recognized by RB to elicit host resistance, some variants exist that are able to elude detection (e.g. IPI-O4. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present study, analysis of ipiO variants among 40 different P. infestans isolates collected from Guatemala, Thailand, and the United States revealed a high degree of complexity within this gene family. Isolate aggressiveness was correlated with increased ipiO diversity and especially the presence of the ipiO4 variant. Furthermore, isolates expressing IPI-O4 overcame RB-mediated resistance in transgenic potato plants even when the resistance-eliciting IPI-O1 variant was present. In support of this finding, we observed that expression of IPI-O4 via Agrobacterium blocked recognition of IPI-O1, leading to inactivation of RB-mediated programmed cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana. CONCLUSIONS: In this study we definitively demonstrate and provide the first evidence that P. infestans can defeat an R protein through inhibition of recognition of the corresponding effector protein.

  18. Association between Twist and multidrug resistance gene-associated proteins in Taxol®-resistant MCF-7 cells and a 293 cell model of Twist overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Tan, Rui-Zhi; Zhang, Zhi-Xia; Yin, Rui; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Cui, Wei-Jia; He, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) severely limits the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Previous studies have identified Twist as a key factor of acquired MDR in breast, gastric and prostate cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms of action of Twist in MDR remain unclear. In the present study, the expression levels of MDR-associated proteins, including lung resistance-related protein (LRP), topoisomerase IIα (TOPO IIα), MDR-associated protein (MRP) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and the expression of Twist in cancerous tissues and pericancerous tissues of human breast cancer, were examined. In order to simulate Taxol ® resistance in cells, a Taxol ® -resistant human mammary adenocarcinoma cell subline (MCF-7/Taxol ® ) was established by repeatedly exposing MCF-7 cells to high concentrations of Taxol ® (up to 15 µg/ml). Twist was also overexpressed in 293 cells by transfecting this cell line with pcDNA5/FRT/TO vector containing full-length hTwist cDNA to explore the dynamic association between Twist and MDR gene-associated proteins. It was identified that the expression levels of Twist, TOPO IIα, MRP and P-gp were upregulated and LRP was downregulated in human breast cancer tissues, which was consistent with the expression of these proteins in the Taxol ® -resistant MCF-7 cell model. Notably, the overexpression of Twist in 293 cells increased the resistance to Taxol ® , Trichostatin A and 5-fluorouracil, and also upregulated the expression of MRP and P-gp. Taken together, these data demonstrated that Twist may promote drug resistance in cells and cancer tissues through regulating the expression of MDR gene-associated proteins, which may assist in understanding the mechanisms of action of Twist in drug resistance.

  19. Cross-resistance to purified Bt proteins, Bt corn and Bt cotton in a Cry2Ab2-corn resistant strain of Spodoptera frugiperda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Kerns, David L; Head, Graham P; Price, Paula; Huang, Fangneng

    2017-12-01

    Gene-pyramiding by combining two or more dissimilar Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins into a crop has been used to delay insect resistance. The durability of gene-pyramiding can be reduced by cross-resistance. Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, is a major target pest of the Cry2Ab2 protein used in pyramided Bt corn and cotton. Here, we provide the first experimental evaluation of cross-resistance in S. frugiperda selected with Cry2Ab2 corn to multiple Bt sources including purified Bt proteins, Bt corn and Bt cotton. Concentration - response bioassays showed that resistance ratios for Cry2Ab2-resistant (RR) relative to Cry2Ab2-susceptible (SS) S. frugiperda were -1.4 for Cry1F, 1.2 for Cry1A.105, >26.7 for Cry2Ab2, >10.0 for Cry2Ae and -1.1 for Vip3A. Larvae of Cry2Ab2-heterozygous (RS), SS and RR S. frugiperda were all susceptible to Bt corn and Bt cotton containing Cry1 (Cry1F or Cry1A.105) and/or Vip3A proteins. Pyramided Bt cotton containing Cry1Ac + Cry2Ab2 or Cry1Ab + Cry2Ae were also effective against SS and RS, but not RR. These findings suggest that Cry2Ab2-corn-selected S. frugiperda is not cross-resistant to Cry1F, Cry1A.105 or Vip3A protein, or corn and cotton plants containing these Bt proteins, but it can cause strong cross-resistance to Cry2Ae and Bt crops expressing similar Bt proteins. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. MDM2 Antagonist Nutlin-3a Reverses Mitoxantrone Resistance by Inhibiting Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Mediated Drug Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Throm, Stacy L.; Murley, Laura L.; Miller, Laura A.; Zatechka, D. Steven; Guy, R. Kiplin; Kennedy, Rachel; Stewart, Clinton F.

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2), a clinical marker for identifying the side population (SP) cancer stem cell subgroup, affects intestinal absorption, brain penetration, hepatobiliary excretion, and multidrug resistance of many anti-cancer drugs. Nutlin-3a is currently under pre-clinical investigation in a variety of solid tumor and leukemia models as a p53 reactivation agent, and has been recently demonstrated to also have p53 independent actions in cancer cells. In the present study, we first report that nutlin-3a can inhibit the efflux function of BCRP. We observed that although the nutlin-3a IC50 did not differ between BCRP over-expressing and vector control cells, nutlin-3a treatment significantly potentiated the cells to treatment with the BCRP substrate mitoxantrone. Combination index calculations suggested synergism between nutlin-3a and mitoxantrone in cell lines over-expressing BCRP. Upon further investigation, it was confirmed that nutlin-3a increased the intracellular accumulation of BCRP substrates such as mitoxantrone and Hoechst 33342 in cells expressing functional BCRP without altering the expression level or localization of BCRP. Interestingly, nutlin-3b, considered virtually “inactive” in disrupting the MDM2/p53 interaction, reversed Hoechst 33342 efflux with the same potency as nutlin-3a. Intracellular accumulation and bi-directional transport studies using MDCKII cells suggested that nutlin-3a is not a substrate of BCRP. Additionally, an ATPase assay using Sf9 insect cell membranes over-expressing wild-type BCRP indicated that nutlin-3a inhibits BCRP ATPase activity in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, our studies demonstrate that nutlin-3a inhibits BCRP efflux function, which consequently reverses BCRP-related drug resistance. PMID:21459080

  1. A Novel Inducible Protein Production System and Neomycin Resistance as Selection Marker for Methanosarcina mazei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Mondorf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanosarcina mazei is one of the model organisms for the methanogenic order Methanosarcinales whose metabolism has been studied in detail. However, the genetic toolbox is still limited. This study was aimed at widening the scope of utilizable methods in this group of organisms. (i Proteins specific to methanogens are oftentimes difficult to produce in E. coli. However, a protein production system is not available for methanogens. Here we present an inducible system to produce Strep-tagged proteins in Ms. mazei. The promoter p1687, which directs the transcription of methyl transferases that demethylate methylamines, was cloned into plasmid pWM321 and its activity was determined by monitoring β-glucuronidase production. The promoter was inactive during growth on methanol but was rapidly activated when trimethylamine was added to the medium. The gene encoding the β-glucuronidase from E. coli was fused to a Strep-tag and was cloned downstream of the p1687 promoter. The protein was overproduced in Ms. mazei and was purified in an active form by affinity chromatography. (ii Puromycin is currently the only antibiotic used as a selectable marker in Ms. mazei and its relatives. We established neomycin resistance as a second selectable marker by designing a plasmid that confers neomycin resistance in Ms. mazei.

  2. Biological protein-resistance layer construction of recombinant hirudin on polymethyl methacrylate IOL surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhiwen; Jiao, Yan; Ren, Li; Wang, Yingjun

    2015-03-01

    In this article, the surface of intraocular len material PMMA was first aminated for activation on which some polar groups generated such as C-N, COO(-), -OH, NH3(+), etc. Then the anticoagulant drugs recombinant hirudin (rH) was grafted with amido bonds to look forward to resist the adsorption of nonspecific protein or cells in tear, even the cataract. The detailed analysis and discussion about the grafting quantity, molography, wettability, electric charges, chemical structure, and the dynamic adsorption of protein Fn on the material surface were carried on by the technology of ultraviolet photometric, contact angle, solid Zeta potential, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and quartz crystal microbalance. The surface with a certain amount of rH modification existed more hydrophilic due to the amphiphilic structure than before, on which the protein adsorption was the most unstable. The results indicated that the rH modification improved the resistance of PMMA to nonspecific adsorption of protein Fn to achieve the expectative effect. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Natural Resistance Associated Macrophage Protein Is Involved in Immune Response of Blunt Snout Bream, Megalobrama amblycephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu-Hong; Mao, Ying; Lv, Yi-Na; Tang, Lei-Lei; Zhou, Yi; Zhong, Huan; Xiao, Jun; Yan, Jin-Peng

    2018-03-29

    The natural resistance-associated macrophage protein gene ( Nramp ), has been identified as one of the significant candidate genes responsible for modulating vertebrate natural resistance to intracellular pathogens. Here, we identified and characterized a new Nramp family member, named as maNramp , in the blunt snout bream. The full-length cDNA of maNramp consists of a 153 bp 5'UTR, a 1635 bp open reading frame encoding a protein with 544 amino acids, and a 1359 bp 3'UTR. The deduced protein (maNRAMP) possesses the typical structural features of NRAMP protein family, including 12 transmembrane domains, three N-linked glycosylation sites, and a conserved transport motif. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that maNRAMP shares the significant sequence consistency with other teleosts, and shows the higher sequence similarity to mammalian Nramp2 than Nramp1 . It was found that maNramp expressed ubiquitously in all normal tissues tested, with the highest abundance in the spleen, followed by the head kidney and intestine, and less abundance in the muscle, gill, and kidney. After lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, the mRNA level of maNramp was rapidly up-regulated, which reached a peak level at 6 h. Altogether, these results indicated that maNramp might be related to fish innate immunity and similar to mammalian Nramp1 in function.

  4. Characterization of a Novel WDR5-binding Site That Recruits RbBP5 through a Conserved Motif to Enhance Methylation of Histone H3 Lysine 4 by Mixed Lineage Leukemia Protein-1*

    OpenAIRE

    Odho, Zain; Southall, Stacey M.; Wilson, Jon R.

    2010-01-01

    Histone modification is well established as a fundamental mechanism driving the regulation of transcription, replication, and DNA repair through the control of chromatin structure. Likewise, it is apparent that incorrect targeting of histone modifications contributes to misregulated gene expression and hence to developmental disorders and diseases of genomic instability such as cancer. The KMT2 family of SET domain methyltransferases, typified by mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1), is re...

  5. A Lipid Transfer Protein Increases the Glutathione Content and Enhances Arabidopsis Resistance to a Trichothecene Mycotoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E McLaughlin

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB or scab is one of the most important plant diseases worldwide, affecting wheat, barley and other small grains. Trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON accumulate in the grain, presenting a food safety risk and health hazard to humans and animals. Despite considerable breeding efforts, highly resistant wheat or barley cultivars are not available. We screened an activation tagged Arabidopsis thaliana population for resistance to trichothecin (Tcin, a type B trichothecene in the same class as DON. Here we show that one of the resistant lines identified, trichothecene resistant 1 (trr1 contains a T-DNA insertion upstream of two nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP genes, AtLTP4.4 and AtLTP4.5. Expression of both nsLTP genes was induced in trr1 over 10-fold relative to wild type. Overexpression of AtLTP4.4 provided greater resistance to Tcin than AtLTP4.5 in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae relative to wild type or vector transformed lines, suggesting a conserved protection mechanism. Tcin treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production in Arabidopsis and ROS stain was associated with the chloroplast, the cell wall and the apoplast. ROS levels were attenuated in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls. Exogenous addition of glutathione and other antioxidants enhanced resistance of Arabidopsis to Tcin while the addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, increased sensitivity, suggesting that resistance was mediated by glutathione. Total glutathione content was significantly higher in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls, highlighting the importance of AtLTP4.4 in maintaining the redox state. These results demonstrate that trichothecenes cause ROS accumulation and overexpression of AtLTP4.4 protects against trichothecene-induced oxidative stress by increasing the glutathione

  6. First-principles calculations of two cubic fluoropervskite compounds: RbFeF3 and RbNiF3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubarak, A.A.; Al-Omari, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    We present first-principles calculations of the structural, elastic, electronic, magnetic and optical properties for RbFeF 3 and RbNiF 3 . The full-potential linear augmented plan wave (FP-LAPW) method within the density functional theory was utilized to perform the present calculations. We employed the generalized gradient approximation as exchange-correlation potential. It was found that the calculated analytical lattice parameters agree with previous studies. The analysis of elastic constants showed that the present compounds are elastically stable and anisotropic. Moreover, both compounds are classified as a ductile compound. The calculations of the band structure and density functional theory revealed that the RbFeF 3 compound has a half-metallic behavior while the RbNiF 3 compound has a semiconductor behavior with indirect (M–Γ) band gap. The ferromagnetic behavior was studied for both compounds. The optical properties were calculated for the radiation of up to 40 eV. A beneficial optics technology is predicted as revealed from the optical spectra. - Highlights: • RbFeF 3 and RbNiCl 3 compounds are elastically stable. • RbFeF 3 and RbNiCl 3 compounds are classified as a ductile compound. • The RbFeF 3 compound has a half-metallic behavior while the RbNiF 3 compound has a semiconductor behavior. • The optical properties were calculated for the radiation of up to 40 eV

  7. Autophagy is induced by resistance exercise in young men but unfolded protein response is induced regardless of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentilä, Jaakko; Ahtiainen, Juha P; Paulsen, Gøran; Raastad, Truls; Häkkinen, Keijo; Mero, Antti A; Hulmi, Juha J

    2018-04-02

    Autophagy and unfolded protein response (UPR) appear to be important for skeletal muscle homeostasis and may be altered by exercise. Our aim was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise and training on indicators of UPR and autophagy in healthy untrained young men (n = 12, 27 ± 4 years) and older men (n = 8, 61 ± 6 years) as well as in resistance-trained individuals (n = 15, 25 ± 5 years). Indicators of autophagy and UPR were investigated from the muscle biopsies after a single resistance exercise bout and after 21 weeks of resistance training. Lipidated LC3II as an indicator of autophagosome content increased at 48 hours post resistance exercise (P resistance-training period (P resistance exercise in untrained young and older men (P resistance-training period regardless of age. UPR was unchanged within the first few hours after the resistance exercise bout regardless of the training status. Changes in autophagy and UPR ER indicators did not correlate with a resistance-training-induced increase in muscle strength and size. Autophagosome content is increased by resistance training in young previously untrained men, but this response may be blunted by aging. However, unfolded protein response is induced by an unaccustomed resistance exercise bout in a delayed manner regardless of age. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrasensitive probing of the protein resistance of PEG surfaces by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kingshott, P.; McArthur, S.; Thissen, H.

    2002-01-01

    The highly sensitive surface analytical techniques X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight static secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used to test the resistance of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings towards adsorption of lysozyme (LYS) and fibronectin (FN). PEG...... temperature to maximise the graft density of the PEG chains. XPS showed that the grafted density of PEG chains was slightly higher on the allylamine surface. XPS detected no adsorption of either protein on either PEG coating. ToF-SIMS analysis, on the other hand, found, in the positive ion spectra, minute...... but statistically significant signals assignable to amino acid fragment ions from both proteins adsorbed to the lower density PEG coating and from LYS but not FN on the higher density PEG coating. Negative ion spectra contained relatively more intense protein fragment ion signals for the lower density PEG coating...

  9. Interplay between unfolded protein response and autophagy promotes tumor drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ming-Ming; Ni, Jiang-Dong; Song, Deye; Ding, Muliang; Huang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is involved in the quality control of secreted protein via promoting the correct folding of nascent protein and mediating the degradation of unfolded or misfolded protein, namely ER-associated degradation. When the unfolded or misfolded proteins are abundant, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is elicited, an adaptive signaling cascade from the ER to the nucleus, which restores the homeostatic functions of the ER. Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process where cellular long-lived proteins and damaged organelles are engulfed and degraded for recycling to maintain homeostasis. The UPR and autophagy occur simultaneously and are involved in pathological processes, including tumorigenesis, chemoresistance of malignancies and neurodegeneration. Accumulative data has indicated that the UPR may induce autophagy and that autophagy is able to alleviate the UPR. However, the detailed mechanism of interplay between autophagy and UPR remains to be fully understood. The present review aimed to depict the core pathways of the two processes and to elucidate how autophagy and UPR are regulated. Moreover, the review also discusses the molecular mechanism of crosstalk between the UPR and autophagy and their roles in malignant survival and drug resistance.

  10. Computer monitoring of the RB reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milovanovic, S.; Pesic, M.; Milovanovic, T.

    1998-01-01

    Personal computer based acquisition system designed for monitoring of operation of the RB experimental reactor in the Institute of Nuclear Sciences 'Vinca' (former 'Boris Kidric') and experiences acquired during its use are shown in this paper. The monitoring covers generally all nuclear aspects of the reactor operation (start-up, nominal power operation, power changing, shut down and maintenance), but the emphasis is put on: real time (especially fast changing) reactivity measurement; supervising time dependence of the safety rods positions during shut down, and detection of position inaccuracy or failure operation of safety/control rods during the reactor operation or maintenance. (author)

  11. Protein supplementation before and after exercise does not further augment skeletal muscle hypertrophy after resistance training in elderly men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdijk, Lex B; Jonkers, Richard A M; Gleeson, Benjamin G; Beelen, Milou; Meijer, Kenneth; Savelberg, Hans H C M; Wodzig, Will K W H; Dendale, Paul; van Loon, Luc J C

    2009-02-01

    Considerable discrepancy exists in the literature on the proposed benefits of protein supplementation on the adaptive response of skeletal muscle to resistance-type exercise training in the elderly. The objective was to assess the benefits of timed protein supplementation on the increase in muscle mass and strength during prolonged resistance-type exercise training in healthy elderly men who habitually consume adequate amounts of dietary protein. Healthy elderly men (n = 26) aged 72 +/- 2 y were randomly assigned to a progressive, 12-wk resistance-type exercise training program with (protein group) or without (placebo group) protein provided before and immediately after each exercise session (3 sessions/wk, 20 g protein/session). One-repetition maximum (1RM) tests were performed regularly to ensure a progressive workload during the intervention. Muscle hypertrophy was assessed at the whole-body (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), limb (computed tomography), and muscle fiber (biopsy) level. The 1RM strength increased approximately 25-35% in both groups (P hypertrophy was greater in type II (placebo: 28 +/- 6%; protein: 29 +/- 4%) than in type I (placebo: 5 +/- 4%; protein: 13 +/- 6%) fibers, but the difference between groups was not significant. Timed protein supplementation immediately before and after exercise does not further augment the increase in skeletal muscle mass and strength after prolonged resistance-type exercise training in healthy elderly men who habitually consume adequate amounts of dietary protein. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00744094.

  12. RB research nuclear reactor - Annual report for 1986, I - III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, H.; Pesic, M.; Vranic, S.; Petronijevic, M.; Jevremovic, M.; Ilic, I.

    1987-01-01

    This report includes data concerning the RB reactor operation in 1986, state of the reactor components, data about the employed personnel and the database of experimental and other reactor related devices. It is made of 3 parts: Engineering description and operation of the RB reactor including dosimetry, reactor staff data and financial report; Reactor facility components and maintenance; RB reactor operation and utilization in 1986 [sr

  13. Identification of proteins associated with pyrethroid resistance by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis in Culex pipiens pallens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weijie; Lv, Yuan; Fang, Fujin; Hong, Shanchao; Guo, Qin; Hu, Shengli; Zou, Feifei; Shi, Linna; Lei, Zhentao; Ma, Kai; Zhou, Dan; Zhang, Donghui; Sun, Yan; Ma, Lei; Shen, Bo; Zhu, Changliang

    2015-02-10

    Mosquito control based on chemical insecticides is considered as an important element in the current global strategies for the control of mosquito-borne diseases. Unfortunately, the development of pyrethroid resistance in important vector mosquito species jeopardizes the effectiveness of insecticide-based mosquito control. To date, the mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance are still unclear. Recent advances in proteomic techniques can facilitate to identify pyrethroid resistance-associated proteins at a large-scale for improving our understanding of resistance mechanisms, and more importantly, for seeking some genetic markers used for monitoring and predicting the development of resistance. We performed a quantitative proteomic analysis between a deltamethrin-susceptible strain and a deltamethrin-resistant strain of laboratory population of Culex pipiens pallens using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis was used to find the relative processes that these differentially expressed proteins were involved in. One differentially expressed protein was chosen to confirm by Western blot in the laboratory and field populations of Cx. pipiens pallens. We identified 30 differentially expressed proteins assigned into 10 different categories, including oxidoreductase activity, transporter activity, catalytic activity, structural constituent of cuticle and hypothetical proteins. GO analysis revealed that 25 proteins were sub-categorized into 35 hierarchically-structured GO classifications. Western blot results showed that CYP6AA9 as one of the up-regulated proteins was confirmed to be overexpressed in the deltamethrin-resistant strains compared with the deltamethrin-susceptible strains both in the laboratory and field populations. This is the first study to use modern proteomic tools for identifying pyrethroid resistance-related proteins in Cx. pipiens. The present study brought to light many proteins that were not

  14. Cytotoxicity of rhein, the active metabolite of sennoside laxatives, is reduced by multidrug resistance-associated protein 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorkom, BAP; Timmer-Bosscha, H; de Jong, S; Kleibeuker, JH; de Vries, EGE

    2002-01-01

    Anthranoid laxatives, belonging to the anthraquinones as do anthracyclines, possibly Increase colorectal cancer risk. Anthracyclines Interfere with topoisomerase II, Intercalate DNA and are substrates for P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein I. P-glycoprotein and multidrug

  15. Identification of putative drug targets in Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) using computer aided protein data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md Anayet; Khan, Md Arif; Sharmin, Tahmina; Hasan Mazumder, Md Habibul; Chowdhury, Afrin Sultana

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) is a Gram-positive, facultative aerobic bacterium which is evolved from the extensive exposure of Vancomycin to Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) that had become the most common cause of hospital and community-acquired infections. Due to the emergence of different antibiotic resistance strains, there is an exigency to develop novel drug targets to address the provocation of multidrug-resistant bacteria. In this study, in-silico genome subtraction methodology was used to design potential and pathogen specific drug targets against VRSA. Our study divulged 1987 proteins from the proteome of 34,549 proteins, which have no homologues in human genome after sequential analysis through CD-HIT and BLASTp. The high stringency analysis of the remaining proteins against database of essential genes (DEG) resulted in 169 proteins which are essential for S. aureus. Metabolic pathway analysis of human host and pathogen by KAAS at the KEGG server sorted out 19 proteins involved in unique metabolic pathways. 26 human non-homologous membrane-bound essential proteins including 4 which were also involved in unique metabolic pathway were deduced through PSORTb, CELLO v.2.5, ngLOC. Functional classification of uncharacterized proteins through SVMprot derived 7 human non-homologous membrane-bound hypothetical essential proteins. Study of potential drug target against Drug Bank revealed pbpA-penicillin-binding protein 1 and hypothetical protein MQW_01796 as the best drug target candidate. 2D structure was predicted by PRED-TMBB, 3D structure and functional analysis was also performed. Protein-protein interaction network of potential drug target proteins was analyzed by using STRING. The identified drug targets are expected to have great potential for designing novel drugs against VRSA infections and further screening of the compounds against these new targets may result in the discovery of novel therapeutic compounds that can be

  16. A phosphorylation switch on RbBP5 regulates histone H3 Lys4 methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pamela; Chaturvedi, Chandra-Prakash; Tremblay, Veronique; Cramet, Myriam; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Skiniotis, Georgios; Brand, Marjorie; Shilatifard, Ali; Couture, Jean-François

    2015-01-15

    The methyltransferase activity of the trithorax group (TrxG) protein MLL1 found within its COMPASS (complex associated with SET1)-like complex is allosterically regulated by a four-subunit complex composed of WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY30 (also referred to as WRAD). We report structural evidence showing that in WRAD, a concave surface of the Ash2L SPIa and ryanodine receptor (SPRY) domain binds to a cluster of acidic residues, referred to as the D/E box, in RbBP5. Mutational analysis shows that residues forming the Ash2L/RbBP5 interface are important for heterodimer formation, stimulation of MLL1 catalytic activity, and erythroid cell terminal differentiation. We also demonstrate that a phosphorylation switch on RbBP5 stimulates WRAD complex formation and significantly increases KMT2 (lysine [K] methyltransferase 2) enzyme methylation rates. Overall, our findings provide structural insights into the assembly of the WRAD complex and point to a novel regulatory mechanism controlling the activity of the KMT2/COMPASS family of lysine methyltransferases. © 2015 Zhang et al; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. The human retinoblastoma susceptibility gene (RB1): an evolutionary story in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Maria C; Tavares, William C; Brant, Ayslan C; Boroni, Mariana; Seuánez, Héctor N

    2017-06-01

    The tumor suppressor gene RB1 (Human Retinoblastoma Susceptibility Gene) plays a prominent role in normal development, gene transcription, DNA replication, repair, and mitosis. Its complete biallelic dysfunction in retinoblasts is the main cause of retinoblastoma in the human. Although this gene has been evolutionary conserved, comparisons between the reference and human RB1 coding region with its counterparts in 19 non-human primates showed 359 sites where nucleotide replacements took place during the radiation of these species. These resulted in missense substitutions in 97 codons, 91 of which by amino acids with radically different physicochemical properties. Several in frame deletions and two insertions were also observed in the N-terminal region of the pRB protein where the highest number of amino acid substitutions and radical amino changes were found. Fifty-six codons were inferred to be under negative selection and five under positive selection. Differences in codon usage showed evident phylogenetic signals, with hominids generally presenting higher indices of codon bias than other catarrhines. The lineage leading to platyrrhines and, within platyrrhines, the lineage leading to Saimiri boliviensis showed a high rate of nucleotide substitutions and amino acids. Finally, several RB1 alterations associated to retinoblastoma in the human were present in several non-human primates without an apparent pathological effect.

  18. Performance and stress resistance of Nile tilapias fed different crude protein levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Kennedy Luz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different levels of diet crude protein on the performance and stress resistance rate (Re of Oreochromis niloticus larvae and fingerlings. In the first experiment, 5, 15 and 25 day-old animals were submitted to 1, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30 and 40 minutes of air exposure on a sieve. In the second experiment, tilapia larvae were fed with 32, 40 and 55% crude protein (CP diets. Animals after 15 and 30 days of feeding (21 and 36 days of life, respectively were submitted to the air exposure test for 7 and 10 minutes. Re was estimated based on survival 24 hours after the tests. In the first experiment, it was observed that 5-day-old animals were more resistant than animals with 10 and 20 days of feeding (15 and 25 days of life, respectively, when Re starts to decrease for longer than 7 minutes. In the second experiment, the different diets affected survival, performance and Re, and, in general, the worst results observed were the ones for the animals which received the 55% CP diet. The air exposure tests were efficient to evaluate the effect of diet on the resistance rate of Nile tilapia.

  19. Localization and activity of multidrug resistance protein 1 in the secretory pathway of Leishmania parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Matthew A; Waller, Ross F; Chow, Larry M C; Zaman, Muhammad M; Cotton, Leanne M; McConville, Malcolm J; Wirth, Dyann F

    2004-03-01

    Upregulation of the multidrug resistance protein 1 (LeMDR1) in the protozoan parasite, Leishmania enriettii, confers resistance to hydrophobic drugs such as vinblastine, but increases the sensitivity of these parasites to the mitochondrial drug, rhodamine 123. In order to investigate the mechanism of action of LeMDR1, the subcellular localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged versions of LeMDR1 and the fate of the traceable-fluorescent LeMDR1 substrate calcein AM were examined in both Leishmania mexicana and L. enriettii LeMDR1 -/- and overexpressing cell lines. The LeMDR1-GFP chimera was localized by fluorescence microscopy to a number of secretory and endocytic compartments, including the Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and a multivesicular tubule (MVT)-lysosome. Pulse-chase labelling experiments with calcein AM suggested that the Golgi and ER pools, but not the MVT-lysosome pool, of LeMDR1 were active in pumping calcein AM out of the cell. Cells labelled with calcein AM under conditions that slow vesicular transport (low temperature and stationary growth) inhibited export and resulted in the accumulation of fluorescent calcein in both the Golgi and the mitochondria. We propose that LeMDR1 substrates are pumped into secretory compartments and exported from the parasite by exocytosis. Accumulation of MDR substrates in the ER can result in alternative transport to the mitochondrion, explaining the reciprocal sensitivity of drug-resistant Leishmania to vinblastine and rhodamine 123.

  20. Hepatitis B X-interacting protein promotes cisplatin resistance and regulates CD147 via Sp1 in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Ma, Xiangdong; Yang, Hong; Hua, Wei; Chen, Biliang; Cai, Guoqing

    2017-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is the highest mortality rate of all female reproductive malignancies. Drug resistance is a major cause of treatment failure in malignant tumors. Hepatitis B X-interacting protein acts as an oncoprotein, regulates cell proliferation, and migration in breast cancer. We aimed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of hepatitis B X-interacting protein on resistance to cisplatin in human ovarian cancer cell lines. The mRNA and protein levels of hepatitis B X-interacting protein were detected using RT-PCR and Western blotting in cisplatin-resistant and cisplatin-sensitive tissues, cisplatin-resistant cell lines A2780/CP and SKOV3/CP, and cisplatin-sensitive cell lines A2780 and SKOV3. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured to evaluate cellular sensitivity to cisplatin in A2780/CP cells. Luciferase reporter gene assay was used to determine the relationship between hepatitis B X-interacting protein and CD147. The in vivo function of hepatitis B X-interacting protein on tumor burden was assessed in cisplatin-resistant xenograft models. The results showed that hepatitis B X-interacting protein was highly expressed in ovarian cancer of cisplatin-resistant tissues and cells. Notably, knockdown of hepatitis B X-interacting protein significantly reduced cell viability in A2780/CP compared with cisplatin treatment alone. Hepatitis B X-interacting protein and cisplatin cooperated to induce apoptosis and increase the expression of c-caspase 3 as well as the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. We confirmed that hepatitis B X-interacting protein up-regulated CD147 at the protein expression and transcriptional levels. Moreover, we found that hepatitis B X-interacting protein was able to activate the CD147 promoter through Sp1. In vivo, depletion of hepatitis B X-interacting protein decreased the tumor volume and weight induced by cisplatin. Taken together, these results indicate that hepatitis B X-interacting protein promotes cisplatin resistance and regulated CD147 via Sp1 in

  1. Undetectable bacterial resistance to phage lytic proteins from the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increase in antibiotic resistance world-wide revitalized the interest in the use of phage lysins to combat pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we tested for the emergence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus to any of three phage lytic proteins constructs. The investigated cell wall lytic enzymes w...

  2. Comparison of protein profiles of beech bark disease-resistant or beech bark disease-susceptible American beech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary E. Mason; Marek Krasowski; Judy Loo; Jennifer. Koch

    2011-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of beech bark proteins from trees resistant and susceptible to beech bark disease (BBD) was conducted. Sixteen trees from eight geographically isolated stands, 10 resistant (healthy) and 6 susceptible (diseased/infested) trees, were studied. The genetic complexity of the sample unit, the sampling across a wide geographic area, and the complexity of...

  3. Assessment of Relationship Between Bacterial Stripe Resistance And Leaf Protein Bands In Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talei, D.; Fotokian, M. H.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial stripe as a new rice disease in Iran is more frequent nowadays. The objective of this study was to assessment of resistance in rice varieties together with evaluating of zymogram bands resulted from SDS PAGE electrophoresis of leaf proteins. For this purpose, 30 lines were tested in a randomized complete block design with three replications. The analysis of variance showed that there was significant difference between genotypes for resistance. Mean compare based on field results revealed that Domsiyah had the lowest resistance while Nemat and 7162 demonstrated the highest resistance. Laboratory results showed that there were significant difference between protein bands resulted from sensitive and resistance verities. Twenty bands were observed through SDS PAGE electrophoresis of leaf proteins. The 9th and 12th bands were found in sensitive varieties while were not in resistance genotypes. According to the results of this study, 7162 variety can be considered as the sources of resistance in breeding programs. Meanwhile attending to existence of 9th and 12th bands in sensitive varieties, resistance against bacterial stripe of rice maybe influenced by absence of these proteins.

  4. Analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid in Acetobacter: molecular mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria are used for industrial vinegar production because of their remarkable ability to oxidize ethanol and high resistance to acetic acid. Although several molecular machineries responsible for acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria have been reported, the entire mechanism that confers acetic acid resistance has not been completely understood. One of the promising methods to elucidate the entire mechanism is global analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Recently, two proteins whose production was greatly enhanced by acetic acid in Acetobacter aceti were identified to be aconitase and a putative ABC-transporter, respectively; furthermore, overexpression or disruption of the genes encoding these proteins affected acetic acid resistance in A. aceti, indicating that these proteins are involved in acetic acid resistance. Overexpression of each gene increased acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter, which resulted in an improvement in the productivity of acetic acid fermentation. Taken together, the results of the proteomic analysis and those of previous studies indicate that acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria is conferred by several mechanisms. These findings also provide a clue to breed a strain having high resistance to acetic acid for vinegar fermentation.

  5. Effects of whey protein supplement in the elderly submitted to resistance training: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonetti, Tamy; Grande, Antonio Jose; Milton, Karen; Foster, Charlie; Alexandre, Maria Cecilia Manenti; Uggioni, Maria Laura Rodrigues; Rosa, Maria Inês da

    2017-05-01

    We performed a systematic review to map the evidence and analyze the effect of whey protein supplementation in the elderly submitted to resistance training. A comprehensive search on Medline, LILACS, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for relevant publications was conducted until August 2015. The terms used in the search were: "Resistance training"; "Whey protein"; "Elderly". A total of 632 studies were screened. Five studies were included composing a sample of 391 patients. The supplement whey protein was associated with higher total protein ingestion 9.40 (95% CI: 4.03-14.78), and with an average change in plasma leucine concentration. The supplementation was also associated with increased mixed muscle protein synthesis 1.26 (95% CI: 0.46-2.07) compared to the control group. We observed an increase in total protein intake, resulting in increased concentration of leucine and mixed muscle protein fractional synthesis rate.

  6. The effect of resistance training combined with timed ingestion of protein on muscle fiber size and muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.L.; Tufekovic, G.; Zebis, M.K.

    2005-01-01

    ) concentric and eccentric contractions of the knee extensor muscle was measured in an isokinetic dynamometer. After 14 weeks of resistance training, the protein group showed hypertrophy of type I (18% +/- 5%; P muscle fibers, whereas no change above baseline occurred...... in the carbohydrate group. Squat jump height increased only in the protein group, whereas countermovement jump height and peak torque during slow isokinetic muscle contraction increased similarly in both groups. In conclusion, a minor advantage of protein supplementation over carbohydrate supplementation during......Acute muscle protein metabolism is modulated not only by resistance exercise but also by amino acids. However, less is known about the long-term hypertrophic effect of protein supplementation in combination with resistance training. The present study was designed to compare the effect of 14 weeks...

  7. Kinetic Ductility and Force-Spike Resistance of Proteins from Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossio, Pilar; Hummer, Gerhard; Szabo, Attila

    2016-08-23

    Ductile materials can absorb spikes in mechanical force, whereas brittle ones fail catastrophically. Here we develop a theory to quantify the kinetic ductility of single molecules from force spectroscopy experiments, relating force-spike resistance to the differential responses of the intact protein and the unfolding transition state to an applied mechanical force. We introduce a class of unistable one-dimensional potential surfaces that encompass previous models as special cases and continuously cover the entire range from ductile to brittle. Compact analytic expressions for force-dependent rates and rupture-force distributions allow us to analyze force-clamp and force-ramp pulling experiments. We find that the force-transmitting protein domains of filamin and titin are kinetically ductile when pulled from their two termini, making them resistant to force spikes. For the mechanostable muscle protein titin, a highly ductile model reconciles data over 10 orders of magnitude in force loading rate from experiment and simulation. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of whey protein isolate on strength, body composition and muscle hypertrophy during resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Alan; Cribb, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    Sarcopenia (skeletal muscle wasting with aging) is thought to underlie a number of serious age-related health issues. While it may be seen as inevitable, decreasing this gradual loss of muscle is vital for healthy aging. Thus, it is imperative to investigate exercise and nutrition-based strategies designed to build a reservoir of muscle mass as early as possible. Elderly individuals are still able to respond to both resistance training and the anabolic signals provided by protein ingestion, provided specific amino acids, such as leucine, are present. Whey proteins are a rich source of these essential amino acids and rapidly elevate plasma amino acids, thus providing the foundations for preservation of muscle mass. Several studies involving supplementation with whey protein have been shown to be effective in augmenting the effects of resistance exercise, particularly when supplementation occurs in the hours surrounding the exercise training. While further work is required, particularly in elderly people, simple dietary and exercise strategies that may improve the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass will likely result in a decrease in the overall burden of a number of diseases and improve the quality of life as we age.

  9. Configurable Resistive Switching between Memory and Threshold Characteristics for Protein-Based Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong

    2015-05-01

    The employ of natural biomaterials as the basic building blocks of electronic devices is of growing interest for biocompatible and green electronics. Here, resistive switching (RS) devices based on naturally silk protein with configurable functionality are demonstrated. The RS type of the devices can be effectively and exactly controlled by controlling the compliance current in the set process. Memory RS can be triggered by a higher compliance current, while threshold RS can be triggered by a lower compliance current. Furthermore, two types of memory devices, working in random access and WORM modes, can be achieved with the RS effect. The results suggest that silk protein possesses the potential for sustainable electronics and data storage. In addition, this finding would provide important guidelines for the performance optimization of biomaterials based memory devices and the study of the underlying mechanism behind the RS effect arising from biomaterials. Resistive switching (RS) devices with configurable functionality based on protein are successfully achieved. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Coagulation inhibitors and activated protein C resistance in recurrent pregnancy losses in Indian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Lalita Jyotsna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thrombophilias, both acquired and inherited, have been investigated in the etiopathogenesis of unexplained recurrent pregnancy loss. Aim: To study coagulation inhibitors and activated protein C resistance (APCR in recurrent pregnancy losses (RPL occurring in second and third trimesters. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 pregnant women (group A with two or more recurrent unexplained fetal loses were evaluated for APCR, protein C deficiency, protein S deficiency, antithrombin deficiency, and antiphospholipid antibodies (APLA. Thirty age-matched controls were taken (group B comprising of pregnant women with at least one live issue. Statistical Analysis: Comparisons between two group frequencies and group means were made using Chi square test and Student′s t test, respectively. Results: Protein C and protein S levels were reduced in group A compared with group B and the difference was statistically significant (P=0.005 and P=0.032, respectively. The mean value of antithrombin was slightly reduced in group A compared with group B. APCR was observed in 16.6% cases and 3.3% controls. However, the difference was not statistically significant. APLA was observed in 20% cases and none of the controls. Of these, lupus anticoagulant was positive in 16.6% cases and anticardiolipin antibodies in 10% cases. Combined defects were seen in seven patients. Conclusion: There is a significant risk of RPL in pregnant women with thrombophilias. Therefore, screening for thrombophilias may be justified in pregnant women with unexplained recurrent fetal wastage, especially in second and third trimester.

  11. ISOELECTRIC FOCUSING OF MEMBRANE PROTEINS OF PROBIOTIC B. COAGULANS AND ITS BACTERIOPHAGE RESISTANT MUTANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Rajesh Pandey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are the most notorious type of infection in the probiotic and dairy fermentations. Two phage resistant mutants viz. B. co PIII and B. co MIII (B. coagulans mutants PIII and MIII obtained in previous studies (Dubey and Vakil, 2010, were further characterized for their protein profile in comparison with the parental probiotic strain –B. coagulans. The cell lysates were subjected to ultra-centrifugation and the purified membrane fractions were resolved using 2D gel electrophoresis. The Isoelectric focussing showed 187, 202 and 154 protein spots for the parental strain, mutant B. co PIII and mutant B. co MIII, respectively. Ten and 18 protein spots were missing as compared to parent for mutants B.co PIII and B.co MIII whereas there were 21 and 14 new spots noticed for these two mutants. Eight membrane proteins present only in the phage sensitive parental culture could be tentatively identified by comparison with the complete proteome of B. coagulans by use of UniprotKB and then CELLO database It is quite likely that some of these identified membrane proteins may be also functioning as receptors for phage adsorption followed by entry of nucleic acid into the phage sensitive host cell.

  12. The role of cytoskeleton and adhesion proteins in the resistance to photodynamic therapy. Possible therapeutic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Venosa, Gabriela; Perotti, Christian; Batlle, Alcira; Casas, Adriana

    2015-08-01

    It is known that Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) induces changes in the cytoskeleton, the cell shape, and the adhesion properties of tumour cells. In addition, these targets have also been demonstrated to be involved in the development of PDT resistance. The reversal of PDT resistance by manipulating the cell adhesion process to substrata has been out of reach. Even though the existence of cell adhesion-mediated PDT resistance has not been reported so far, it cannot be ruled out. In addition to its impact on the apoptotic response to photodamage, the cytoskeleton alterations are thought to be associated with the processes of metastasis and invasion after PDT. In this review, we will address the impact of photodamage on the microfilament and microtubule cytoskeleton components and its regulators on PDT-treated cells as well as on cell adhesion. We will also summarise the impact of PDT on the surviving and resistant cells and their metastatic potential. Possible strategies aimed at taking advantage of the changes induced by PDT on actin, tubulin and cell adhesion proteins by targeting these molecules will also be discussed.

  13. Application of protein typing in molecular epidemiological investigation of nosocomial infection outbreak of aminoglycoside-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min; Tang, Min; Ding, Yinghuan; Wu, Zecai; Xiang, Chengyu; Yang, Kui; Zhang, Zhang; Li, Baolin; Deng, Zhenghua; Liu, Jinbo

    2017-12-16

    Pseudomonas aeruginosan has emerged as an important pathogen elated to serious infections and nosocomial outbreaks worldwide. This study was conducted to understand the prevalence of aminoglycoside (AMG)-resistant P. aeruginosa in our hospital and to provide a scientific basis for control measures against nosocomial infections. Eighty-two strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from clinical departments and divided into AMG-resistant strains and AMG-sensitive strains based on susceptibility test results. AMG-resistant strains were typed by drug resistance gene typing (DRGT) and protein typing. Five kinds of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) genes were detected in the AMG-resistant group. AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were classified into three types and six subtypes by DRGT. Four protein peaks, namely, 9900.02, 7600.04, 9101.25 and 10,372.87 Da, were significantly and differentially expressed between the two groups. AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were also categorised into three types and six subtypes at the distance level of 10 by protein typing. AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa was cloned spread in our hospital; the timely implementation of nosocomial infection prevention and control strategies were needed in preventing outbreaks and epidemic of AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa. SELDI-TOF MS technology can be used for bacterial typing, which provides a new method of clinical epidemiological survey and nosocomial infection control.

  14. Stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by whey and caseinate ingestion after resistance exercise in elderly individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, K J; Reitelseder, S; Petersen, S G

    2011-01-01

    protein synthesis (MPS) to intakes of whey and caseinate after heavy resistance exercise in healthy elderly individuals, and, furthermore, to compare the timing effect of caseinate intake. Twenty-four elderly men and women (mean ± SEM; 68 ± 1 years) were randomized to one of four groups: caseinate intake......Sarcopenia is a well-known phenomenon in elderly individuals and resistance exercise together with sufficient amino acid (AA) availability has proved to be a counteractive implement. However, the source of AA and supplement timing require further investigation. The objective was to compare muscle...... before exercise (CasPre), caseinate intake immediately after exercise (CasPost), whey intake immediately after exercise (Whey), or intake of a non-caloric control drink (Control). Muscle myofibrillar and collagen fractional synthesis rates (FSR) were measured by a primed continuous infusion of L-[1...

  15. Leucine supplementation improves acquired growth hormone resistance in rats with protein-energy malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Wang, Xinying; Zhao, Jie; Wan, Xiao; Zhang, Li; Wu, Chao; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) can lead to growth hormone (GH) resistance. Leucine supplementation diets have been shown to increase protein synthesis in muscles. Our study aimed at investigating if long-term leucine supplementation could modulate GH-insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 system function and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-related signal transduction in skeletal muscles in a rat model of severe malnutrition. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 50; weight, 302 ± 5 g) were divided into 5 treatment groups, including 2 control groups (a normal control group that was fed chow and ad libitum water [CON, n = 10] and a malnourished control group [MC, n = 10] that was fed a 50% chow diet). After undergoing a weight loss stage for 4 weeks, rats received either the chow diet (MC-CON, n = 10), the chow diet supplemented with low-dose leucine (MC-L, n = 10), or the chow diet supplemented with high-dose leucine (MC-H, n = 10) for 2 weeks. The muscle masses of the gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus were significantly reduced in the MC group. Re-feeding increased muscle mass, especially in the MC-L and MC-H groups. In the MC group, serum IGF-1, IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3, and hepatic growth hormone receptor (GHR) levels were significantly decreased and phosphorylation of the downstream anabolic signaling effectors protein kinase B (Akt), mTOR, and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) were significantly lower than in other groups. However, serum IGF-1 and IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-3 concentrations and hepatic growth hormone receptor (GHR) levels were significantly higher in the MC-L and MC-H groups than in the MC-CON group, and serum IGFBP-1 levels was significantly reduced in the MC-L and MC-H groups. These changes were consistent with those observed for hepatic mRNA expression levels. Phosphorylation of the downstream anabolic signaling effectors Akt, mTOR, and S6K1 were also significantly higher in the MC-L and MC-H groups than in the MC

  16. Enhanced immune response of red deer (Cervus elaphus) to live rb51 vaccine strain using composite microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas-Gamboa, Angela M; Ficht, Thomas A; Davis, Donald S; Elzer, Philip H; Wong-Gonzalez, Alfredo; Rice-Ficht, Allison C

    2009-01-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic disease of nearly worldwide distribution. The occurrence of the infection in humans is largely dependent on the prevalence of brucellosis in animal reservoirs, including wildlife. The current vaccine used for cattle Brucella abortus strain RB51, has proven ineffective in protecting bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus nelsoni) from infection and abortion. To test possible improvements in vaccine efficacy, a novel approach of immunization was examined from April 2004 to November 2006 using alginate composite microspheres containing a nonimmunogenic, eggshell-precursor protein of the parasite Fasciola hepatica (Vitelline protein B, VpB) to deliver live vaccine strain RB51. Red deer (Cervus elaphus), used as a model for elk, were vaccinated orally (PO) or subcutaneously (SC) with 1.5x10(10) viable organisms per animal. Humoral responses postvaccination (immunoglobulin G [IgG] levels), assessed at different time points, indicated that capsules containing live RB51 elicited an anti-Brucella specific IgG response. Furthermore, the encapsulated vaccine elicited a cell-mediated response that the nonencapsulated vaccinates failed to produce. Finally, red deer were challenged with B. abortus strain 19 by conjunctival exposure. Only animals that received encapsulated RB51 vaccine by either route exhibited a significant reduction in bacterial counts in their spleens. These data suggest that alginate-VpB microspheres provide a method to enhance the RB51 vaccine performance in elk.

  17. Insight into the architecture of the NuRD complex: structure of the RbAp48-MTA1 subcomplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqarni, Saad S M; Murthy, Andal; Zhang, Wei; Przewloka, Marcin R; Silva, Ana P G; Watson, Aleksandra A; Lejon, Sara; Pei, Xue Y; Smits, Arne H; Kloet, Susan L; Wang, Hongxin; Shepherd, Nicholas E; Stokes, Philippa H; Blobel, Gerd A; Vermeulen, Michiel; Glover, David M; Mackay, Joel P; Laue, Ernest D

    2014-08-08

    The nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex is a widely conserved transcriptional co-regulator that harbors both nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase activities. It plays a critical role in the early stages of ES cell differentiation and the reprogramming of somatic to induced pluripotent stem cells. Abnormalities in several NuRD proteins are associated with cancer and aging. We have investigated the architecture of NuRD by determining the structure of a subcomplex comprising RbAp48 and MTA1. Surprisingly, RbAp48 recognizes MTA1 using the same site that it uses to bind histone H4, showing that assembly into NuRD modulates RbAp46/48 interactions with histones. Taken together with other results, our data show that the MTA proteins act as scaffolds for NuRD complex assembly. We further show that the RbAp48-MTA1 interaction is essential for the in vivo integration of RbAp46/48 into the NuRD complex. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Jejunal proteins secreted by db/db mice or insulin-resistant humans impair the insulin signaling and determine insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serenella Salinari

    Full Text Available Two recent studies demonstrated that bariatric surgery induced remission of type 2 diabetes very soon after surgery and far too early to be attributed to weight loss. In this study, we sought to explore the mechanism/s of this phenomenon by testing the effects of proteins from the duodenum-jejunum conditioned-medium (CM of db/db or Swiss mice on glucose uptake in vivo in Swiss mice and in vitro in both Swiss mice soleus and L6 cells. We studied the effect of sera and CM proteins from insulin resistant (IR and insulin-sensitive subjects on insulin signaling in human myoblasts.db/db proteins induced massive IR either in vivo or in vitro, while Swiss proteins did not. In L6 cells, only db/db proteins produced a noticeable increase in basal (473Ser-Akt phosphorylation, lack of GSK3β inhibition and a reduced basal (389Thr-p70-S6K1 phosphorylation. Human IR serum markedly increased basal (473Ser-Akt phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. Human CM IR proteins increased by about twofold both basal and insulin-stimulated (473Ser-Akt. Basal (9Ser-GSK3β phosphorylation was increased by IR subjects serum with a smaller potentiating effect of insulin.These findings show that jejunal proteins either from db/db mice or from insulin resistant subjects impair muscle insulin signaling, thus inducing insulin resistance.

  19. Inhibition of Retinoblastoma Protein Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    cleft is a well characterized binding site for viral and cellular proteins that contain an LxCxE amino acid sequence. From a structural alignment ...a structural alignment (Figure 2a), the binding of the LxCxE peptide and interdomain docking appear incompatible. We reasoned that molecules that...phosphorylated Rb demonstrates that molecules that interfere with the structural changes induced by Rb phosphorylation can act as Rb activators. We note that

  20. C-reactive protein, insulin resistance and risk of cardiovascular disease: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.W.; Olsen, M.H.; Rasmussen, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and insulin resistance (IR), a metabolic disorder, are closely related. CRP and IR have both been identified as significant risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) after adjustment for conventional CVD risk factors...... ischaemic heart disease and nonfatal stroke, amounted to 222 cases. In Cox proportional-hazard models, adjusted for age, sex, smoking habit, total cholesterol, waist circumference, levels of triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, physical activity...

  1. Light-load resistance exercise increases muscle protein synthesis and hypertrophy signaling in elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Jakob; Bülow, Jacob; Jensen, Jacob K

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The present study investigated whether well-tolerated light-load resistance exercise (LL-RE) affects skeletal muscle fractional synthetic rate (FSR) and anabolic intracellular signaling as a way to counteract age-related loss of muscle mass. METHODS: Untrained healthy men (age: +65...... and 12g whey protein at 7 hours post-exercise; N=10) or placebo (4g maltodextrin/hour; N=10). Quadriceps muscle biopsies were taken at 0, 3, 7 and 10 hours post-exercise from both the resting and exercised leg. Myofibrillar-FSR and activity of select targets from the mTORC1-signalling cascade were...

  2. Resistance to β-Lactams in Neisseria ssp Due to Chromosomally Encoded Penicillin-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapun, André; Morlot, Cécile; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2016-09-28

    Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are human pathogens that cause a variety of life-threatening systemic and local infections, such as meningitis or gonorrhoea. The treatment of such infection is becoming more difficult due to antibiotic resistance. The focus of this review is on the mechanism of reduced susceptibility to penicillin and other β-lactams due to the modification of chromosomally encoded penicillin-binding proteins (PBP), in particular PBP2 encoded by the penA gene. The variety of penA alleles and resulting variant PBP2 enzymes is described and the important amino acid substitutions are presented and discussed in a structural context.

  3. Data for chitin binding activity of Moringa seed resistant protein (MSRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anudeep Sandanamudi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chitin binding activity of moringa seed resistant protein (MSRP isolated from defatted moringa seed flour was investigated in the present study “Characterization of soluble dietary fiber from Moringa oleifera seeds and its immunomodulatory effects” (S. Anudeep, V.K. Prasanna, S.M. Adya, C. Radha, 2016 [1]. The assay reaction mixture contained 0.4 mg/ml of MSRP and different amounts (20–100 mg of chitin. MSRP exhibited binding activity over wide range of chitin concentration. Maximum binding activity was observed at 80 mg of chitin. The property of MSRP to bind chitin can be exploited for its purification.

  4. Branched-Chain Amino Acid Ingestion Stimulates Muscle Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis following Resistance Exercise in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R. Jackman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ingestion of intact protein or essential amino acids (EAA stimulates mechanistic target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1 signaling and muscle protein synthesis (MPS following resistance exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the response of myofibrillar-MPS to ingestion of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs only (i.e., without concurrent ingestion of other EAA, intact protein, or other macronutrients following resistance exercise in humans. Ten young (20.1 ± 1.3 years, resistance-trained men completed two trials, ingesting either 5.6 g BCAA or a placebo (PLA drink immediately after resistance exercise. Myofibrillar-MPS was measured during exercise recovery with a primed, constant infusion of L-[ring13C6] phenylalanine and collection of muscle biopsies pre and 4 h-post drink ingestion. Blood samples were collected at time-points before and after drink ingestion. Western blotting was used to measure the phosphorylation status of mTORC1 signaling proteins in biopsies collected pre, 1-, and 4 h-post drink. The percentage increase from baseline in plasma leucine (300 ± 96%, isoleucine (300 ± 88%, and valine (144 ± 59% concentrations peaked 0.5 h-post drink in BCAA. A greater phosphorylation status of S6K1Thr389 (P = 0.017 and PRAS40 (P = 0.037 was observed in BCAA than PLA at 1 h-post drink ingestion. Myofibrillar-MPS was 22% higher (P = 0.012 in BCAA (0.110 ± 0.009%/h than PLA (0.090 ± 0.006%/h. Phenylalanine Ra was ~6% lower in BCAA (18.00 ± 4.31 μmol·kgBM−1 than PLA (21.75 ± 4.89 μmol·kgBM−1; P = 0.028 after drink ingestion. We conclude that ingesting BCAAs alone increases the post-exercise stimulation of myofibrillar-MPS and phosphorylation status mTORC1 signaling.

  5. Protein-protein association and cellular localization of four essential gene products encoded by tellurite resistance-conferring cluster "ter" from pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkovicova, Lenka; Vavrova, Silvia Minarikova; Mravec, Jozef; Grones, Jozef; Turna, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Gene cluster "ter" conferring high tellurite resistance has been identified in various pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7. However, the precise mechanism as well as the molecular function of the respective gene products is unclear. Here we describe protein-protein association and localization analyses of four essential Ter proteins encoded by minimal resistance-conferring fragment (terBCDE) by means of recombinant expression. By using a two-plasmid complementation system we show that the overproduced single Ter proteins are not able to mediate tellurite resistance, but all Ter members play an irreplaceable role within the cluster. We identified several types of homotypic and heterotypic protein-protein associations among the Ter proteins by in vitro and in vivo pull-down assays and determined their cellular localization by cytosol/membrane fractionation. Our results strongly suggest that Ter proteins function involves their mutual association, which probably happens at the interface of the inner plasma membrane and the cytosol.

  6. Outer membrane protein STM3031 (Ail/OmpX-like protein) plays a key role in the ceftriaxone resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wensi S; Lin, Jing-Fang; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Chang, Hsin-Yu

    2009-08-01

    Previously, the putative outer membrane protein STM3031 has been correlated with ceftriaxone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In this study, this protein was almost undetectable in the ceftriaxone-susceptible strain 01-4, but its levels were increased in 01-4 isogenic strains for which MICs were higher. The stm3031 gene deletion mutant, R200(Deltastm3031), was generated and showed >64-fold lower ceftriaxone resistance than R200, supporting a key role for STM3031 in ceftriaxone resistance. To investigate which outer membrane protein(s) was associated with resistance, the outer membrane protein profiles of 01-4, R200, and R200(Deltastm3031) were compared proteomically. Nine proteins were identified as altered. The expression levels of AcrA, TolC, STM3031, STM1530, VacJ, and Psd in R200 were increased; those of OmpC, OmpD, and OmpW were decreased. The expression levels of OmpD, OmpW, STM1530, VacJ, and Psd, but not those of OmpC, AcrA, and TolC, in R200(Deltastm3031) were returned to the levels in strain 01-4. Furthermore, the genes' mRNA levels correlated with their protein levels when the three strains were compared. The detection of higher AcrB levels, linked to higher acrB, acrD, and acrF mRNA levels, in strain R200 than in strains 01-4 and R200(Deltastm3031) suggests that AcrB, AcrD, and AcrF participate in ceftriaxone resistance. Taken together with the location of STM3031 in the outer membrane, these results suggest that STM3031 plays a key role in ceftriaxone resistance, probably by reducing permeability via a decreased porin OmpD level and enhancing export via increased AcrD efflux pump activity.

  7. E2F-Rb complexes assemble and inhibit cdc25A transcription in cervical carcinoma cells following repression of human papillomavirus oncogene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, L; Goodwin, E C; Naeger, L K

    2000-01-01

    in the absence of E2 expression. Expression of the E2 protein also led to posttranscriptional increase in the level of E2F4, p105(Rb), and p130 and induced the formation of nuclear E2F4-p130 and E2F4-p105(Rb) complexes. This resulted in marked rearrangement of the protein complexes that formed at the distal E2F...... site in the cdc25A promoter, including the replacement of free E2F complexes with E2F4-p105(Rb) complexes. These experiments indicated that repression of E2F-responsive promoters following HPV E6/E7 repression was mediated by activation of the Rb tumor suppressor pathway and the assembly of repressing...

  8. Scrapie susceptibility-linked polymorphisms modulate the in vitro conversion of sheep prion protein to protease-resistant forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossers, A.; Belt, P.B.G.M.; Raymond, G.J.; Caughey, B.; Vries, de R.; Smits, M.

    1997-01-01

    Prion diseases are natural transmissible neurodegenerative disorders in humans and animals. They are characterized by the accumulation of a protease-resistant scrapie-associated prion protein (PrPSc) of the host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrPC) mainly in the central nervous system.

  9. Zwitterionic polymers exhibiting high resistance to nonspecific protein adsorption from human serum and plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Jon; Zhang, Zheng; Chen, Shengfu; Hower, Jason C; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2008-05-01

    This study examined six different polymer and self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surface modifications for their interactions with human serum and plasma. It was demonstrated that zwitterionic polymer surfaces are viable alternatives to more traditional surfaces based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as nonfouling surfaces. All polymer surfaces were formed using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and they showed an increased resistance to nonspecific protein adsorption compared to SAMs. This improvement is due to an increase in the surface packing density of nonfouling groups on the surface, as well as a steric repulsion from the flexible polymer brush surfaces. The zwitterionic polymer surface based on carboxybetaine methacrylate (CBMA) also incorporates functional groups for protein immobilization in the nonfouling background, making it a strong candidate for many applications such as in diagnostics and drug delivery.

  10. Study of peripheral blood multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 expression of children intractable epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xuan; Liu, Xiaoming; Chen, Shengzhi; Li, Rui

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) expression of peripheral blood of children intractable epilepsy. Sixty children with epilepsy admitted to outpatient and inpatient services of Xuzhou Children's Hospital between November 2010 and October 2011 were divided into a refractory epilepsy group and a drug-controlled epilepsy group, with 30 cases each. Thirty healthy children who went to the hospital in the same year for health examination were enrolled as a control group. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot method were used to determine peripheral blood MRP1 level, mRNA, and protein content of the 3 groups. MRP1 expression in the refractory epilepsy group was significantly higher than those of the epilepsy group with good drug control and of the control group. All differences had statistical significance (P0.05). Peripheral blood MRP1 expression in patients with refractory epilepsy increases.

  11. DNA replication proteins as potential targets for antimicrobials in drug-resistant bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijk, Erika; Wittekoek, Bert; Kuijper, Ed J; Smits, Wiep Klaas

    2017-05-01

    With the impending crisis of antimicrobial resistance, there is an urgent need to develop novel antimicrobials to combat difficult infections and MDR pathogenic microorganisms. DNA replication is essential for cell viability and is therefore an attractive target for antimicrobials. Although several antimicrobials targeting DNA replication proteins have been developed to date, gyrase/topoisomerase inhibitors are the only class widely used in the clinic. Given the numerous essential proteins in the bacterial replisome that may serve as a potential target for inhibitors and the relative paucity of suitable compounds, it is evident that antimicrobials targeting the replisome are underdeveloped so far. In this review, we report on the diversity of antimicrobial compounds targeting DNA replication and highlight some of the challenges in developing new drugs that target this process. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  12. The effects of soy and whey protein supplementation on acute hormonal reponses to resistance exercise in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, William J; Solomon-Hill, Glenn; Volk, Brittanie M; Kupchak, Brian R; Looney, David P; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Comstock, Brett A; Szivak, Tunde K; Hooper, David R; Flanagan, Shawn D; Maresh, Carl M; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-01-01

    For many resistance-trained men concerns exist regarding the production of estrogen with the consumption of soy protein when training for muscle strength and size. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of soy and whey protein supplementation on sex hormones following an acute bout of heavy resistance exercise in resistance trained men. Ten resistance-trained men (age 21.7 ± 2.8 [SD] years; height 175.0 ± 5.4 cm; weight 84.2 ± 9.1 kg) volunteered to participate in an investigation. Utilizing a within subject randomized crossover balanced placebo design, all subjects completed 3 experimental treatment conditions supplementing with whey protein isolate (WPI), soy protein isolate (SPI), and maltodextrin placebo control for 14 days with participants ingesting 20 g of their assigned supplement each morning at approximately the same time each day. Following supplementation, subjects performed an acute heavy resistance exercise test consisting of 6 sets of 10 repetitions in the squat exercise at 80% of the subject's one repetition maximum. This investigation observed lower testosterone responses following supplementation with soy protein in addition to a positive blunted cortisol response with the use of whey protein at some recovery time points. Although sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) was proposed as a possible mechanism for understanding changes in androgen content, SHBG did not differ between experimental treatments. Importantly, there were no significant differences between groups in changes in estradiol concentrations. Our main findings demonstrate that 14 days of supplementation with soy protein does appear to partially blunt serum testosterone. In addition, whey influences the response of cortisol following an acute bout of resistance exercise by blunting its increase during recovery. Protein supplementation alters the physiological responses to a commonly used exercise modality with some differences due to the type of protein

  13. Comparison of Biological and Immunological Characterization of Lipopolysaccharides From Brucella abortus RB51 and S19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianmehr, Zahra; Kaboudanian Ardestani, Sussan; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Alamian, Saeed; Ahmadian, Shahin

    2015-11-01

    Brucella abortus RB51 is a rough stable mutant strain, which has been widely used as a live vaccine for prevention of brucellosis in cattle instead of B. abortus strain S19. B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has unique properties in comparison to other bacterial LPS. In the current study, two types of LPS, smooth (S-LPS) and rough (R-LPS) were purified from B. abortus S19 and RB51, respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate biological and immunological properties of purified LPS as an immunogenical determinant. Primarily, S19 and RB51 LPS were extracted and purified by two different modifications of the phenol water method. The final purity of LPS was determined by chemical analysis (2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate (KDO), glycan, phosphate and protein content) and different staining methods, following sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously three times at biweekly intervals with the same amount of purified LPSs. The humoral immunity was evaluated by measuring specific IgG levels and also different cytokine levels, such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-10, were determined for assessing T-cell immune response. Biochemical analysis data and SDS-PAGE profile showed that the chemical nature of S19 LPS is different from RB51 LPS. Both S and R-LPS induce an immune response. T-cell immune response induced by both S and R-LPS had almost the same pattern whereas S19 LPS elicited humoral immunity, which was higher than RB51 LPS. Purified LPS can be considered as a safe adjuvant and can be used as a component in prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines targeting infectious disease, cancer and allergies.

  14. The Aspergillus fumigatus Damage Resistance Protein Family Coordinately Regulates Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Azole Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Song

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ergosterol is a major and specific component of the fungal plasma membrane, and thus, the cytochrome P450 enzymes (Erg proteins that catalyze ergosterol synthesis have been selected as valuable targets of azole antifungals. However, the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus has developed worldwide resistance to azoles largely through mutations in the cytochrome P450 enzyme Cyp51 (Erg11. In this study, we demonstrate that a cytochrome b5-like heme-binding damage resistance protein (Dap family, comprised of DapA, DapB, and DapC, coordinately regulates the functionality of cytochrome P450 enzymes Erg5 and Erg11 and oppositely affects susceptibility to azoles. The expression of all three genes is induced in an azole concentration-dependent way, and the decreased susceptibility to azoles requires DapA stabilization of cytochrome P450 protein activity. In contrast, overexpression of DapB and DapC causes dysfunction of Erg5 and Erg11, resulting in abnormal accumulation of sterol intermediates and further accentuating the sensitivity of ΔdapA strains to azoles. The results of exogenous-hemin rescue and heme-binding-site mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that the heme binding of DapA contributes the decreased azole susceptibility, while DapB and -C are capable of reducing the activities of Erg5 and Erg11 through depletion of heme. In vivo data demonstrate that inactivated DapA combined with activated DapB yields an A. fumigatus mutant that is easily treatable with azoles in an immunocompromised mouse model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Compared to the single Dap proteins found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we suggest that this complex Dap family regulatory system emerged during the evolution of fungi as an adaptive means to regulate ergosterol synthesis in response to environmental stimuli.

  15. Overexpression of centrosomal protein Nlp confers breast carcinoma resistance to paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weihong; Song, Yongmei; Xu, Binghe; Zhan, Qimin

    2012-02-01

    Nlp (ninein-like protein), an important molecule involved in centrosome maturation and spindle formation, plays an important role in tumorigenesis and its abnormal expression was recently observed in human breast and lung cancers. In this study, the correlation between overexpression of Nlp and paclitaxel chemosensitivity was investigated to explore the mechanisms of resistance to paclitaxel and to understand the effect of Nlp upon apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents. Nlp expression vector was stably transfected into breast cancer MCF-7 cells. With Nlp overexpression, the survival rates, cell cycle distributions and apoptosis were analyzed in transfected MCF-7 cells by MTT test and FCM approach. The immunofluorescent assay was employed to detect the changes of microtubule after paclitaxel treatment. Immunoblotting analysis was used to examine expression of centrosomal proteins and apoptosis associated proteins. Subsequently, Nlp expression was retrospectively examined with 55 breast cancer samples derived from paclitaxel treated patients. Interestingly, the survival rates of MCF-7 cells with Nlp overexpressing were higher than that of control after paclitaxel treatment. Nlp overexpression promoted G2-M arrest and attenuated apoptosis induced by paclitaxel, which was coupled with elevated Bcl-2 protein. Nlp expression significantly lessened the microtubule polymerization and bundling elicited by paclitaxel attributing to alteration on the structure or dynamics of β-tubulin but not on its expression. The breast cancer patients with high expression of Nlp were likely resistant to the treatment of paclitaxel, as the response rate in Nlp negative patients was 62.5%, whereas was 58.3 and 15.8% in Nlp (+) and Nlp (++) patients respectively (p = 0.015). Nlp expression was positive correlated with those of Plk1 and PCNA. These findings provide insights into more rational chemotherapeutic regimens in clinical practice, and more effective approaches might be

  16. Effects of Postexercise Protein Intake on Muscle Mass and Strength During Resistance Training: Is There an Optimal Ratio Between Fast and Slow Proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Marina; Hausswirth, Christophe; Tiollier, Eve; Molle, Odeline; Louis, Julien; Durguerian, Alexandre; Neveux, Nathalie; Bigard, Xavier

    2017-10-01

    While effects of the two classes of proteins found in milk (i.e., soluble proteins, including whey, and casein) on muscle protein synthesis have been well investigated after a single bout of resistance exercise (RE), the combined effects of these two proteins on the muscle responses to resistance training (RT) have not yet been investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of protein supplementation varying by the ratio between milk soluble proteins (fast-digested protein) and casein (slow-digested protein) on the muscle to a 9-week RT program. In a double-blind protocol, 31 resistance-trained men, were assigned to 3 groups receiving a drink containing 20g of protein comprising either 100% of fast protein (FP(100), n = 10), 50% of fast and 50% of slow proteins (FP(50), n = 11) or 20% of fast protein and 80% of casein (FP(20), n = 10) at the end of training bouts. Body composition (DXA), and maximal strength in dynamic and isometric were analyzed before and after RT. Moreover, blood plasma aminoacidemia kinetic after RE was measured. The results showed a higher leucine bioavailability after ingestion of FP(100) and FP(50) drinks, when compared with FP(20) (p< .05). However, the RT-induced changes in lean body mass (p < .01), dynamic (p < .01), and isometric muscle strength (p < .05) increased similarly in all experimental groups. To conclude, compared with the FP(20) group, the higher rise in plasma amino acids following the ingestion of FP(100) and FP(50) did not lead to higher muscle long-term adaptations.

  17. Isolation of Brucella melitensis from a RB51-vaccinated seronegative goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Enrique; Rivera, Aldo; Palomares, E Gabriela; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Díaz-Aparicio, Efrén

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the etiology of abortions presented in a goat herd declared as free of brucellosis and vaccinated with RB51 located in Mexico. The serological diagnosis of brucellosis in 33 animals was performed. The study included three goats that aborted in the last third of gestation and 15 goats that gave birth normally; samples of milk and vaginal exudate were subjected to bacteriological study. All animals were negative for serological diagnosis, and isolation of Brucella melitensis was achieved in a single goat from vaginal exudate. However, the particularity is that this goat was negative to the card, indirect ELISA, and radial immunodiffusion tests. Isolation of a field strain was confirmed by biochemical test resistance to rifampicin and PCR. It is concluded that a goat which aborted in the last third of gestation was found spreading B. melitensis through vaginal discharge despite being vaccinated with RB51 and seronegative for brucellosis.

  18. Thin film galvanic cell with RbAg4I5 solid electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodnaruk, L.I.; Danilov, A.V.; Kulinkovich, V.E.; Aleskovskij, V.B.

    1975-01-01

    In order to decrease the size and weight and to increase the specific capacity and energy of galvanic cells, some solid electrolytes in the form of thin films are proposed. The galvanic cells were prepared by a combined method: the cathodic and anodic materials (Te and Ag) were evaporated under vacuo to cover an electrolyte layer, the latter being obtained by impregnating the porous materials with RbAg 4 I 5 acetonic solution. The most specific charge curves of the galvanic cells at various current densities are given: specific energy of the samples was 0.2 to 0.7 watt-h/kg, their capacity being 0.1 to 0.2 mah. Behaviour of the cells when stored (that of Ag(RbAg 4 I 5 ) interface in particular) was investigated, namely, the effect of the storage time on the capacity and internal resistance of the galvanic cell

  19. Microbial conversion of major ginsenoside Rb1 to minor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteria from Amla in sugar syrup and Boiled Amla in jaggery syrup converted ginsenoside Rb1 to minor ginsenoside Rd. TLC and HPLC analysis showed that with increase in incubation time the conversion of Rb1 to Rd also increased. The 16s rDNA sequence was determined and the bacteria showed 93% sequence ...

  20. Microbial conversion of major ginsenoside Rb1 to minor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... minor ginsenoside Rd by Indian fermented food bacteria. Kalaiselvi ... South Korea. Accepted 17 April, 2009. Ginsenoside Rb1 is the predominant secondary metabolite (saponin) in Panax ginseng. Hydrolysis of the sugar .... culture and 200 µl of major ginsenoside Rb1. The reaction mixture was incubated ...

  1. Ginsenoside Rb1 Reduces Nitric Oxide Production via Inhibition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect and the potential mechanisms of ginsenoside Rb1 on nitric oxide. (NO) production in chondrocytes. Methods: SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells were stimulated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the presence of. 20, 40, 80 µM ginsenoside Rb1. NO concentration was assessed by the Griess ...

  2. Splicing aberrations caused by constitutional RB1 gene mutations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Analysis of RB1 mRNA from blood leukocytes of patients with retinoblastoma identified the effects of mutations involving consensus splice site, .... bilateral Rb. Genomic DNA analysis from peripheral blood was as described by Parsam .... the patterns are not always the same in different studies (Klutz et al. 2002; Taylor et al.

  3. Heterotrimeric G-proteins facilitate resistance to plant pathogenic viruses in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenya, Eric; Trusov, Yuri; Dietzgen, Ralf Georg; Botella, José Ramón

    2016-08-02

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins, consisting of Gα, Gβ and Gγ subunits, are important signal transducers in eukaryotes. In plants, G-protein-mediated signaling contributes to defense against a range of fungal and bacterial pathogens. Here we studied response of G-protein-deficient mutants to ssRNA viruses representing 2 different families: Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) (Bromoviridae) and Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) (Potyviridae). We found that development of spreading necrosis on infected plants was suppressed in the Gβ-deficient mutant (agb1-2) compared to wild type and Gα-deficient mutant (gpa1-4). In accordance, ion leakage caused by viral infection was also significantly reduced in agb1-2 compared to wild type and gpa1-4. Nevertheless, both viruses replicated better in agb1-2 plants, while gpa1-4 was similar to wild type. Analysis of pathogenesis-related genes showed that Gβ negatively regulated salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and abscisic acid marker genes during CMV and TuMV infections. Interestingly, analysis of salicylic acid deficient transgenic plants indicated that salicylic acid did not affect resistance against these viruses and did not influence the Gβ-mediated defense response. We conclude that heterotrimeric G-proteins play a positive role in defense against viral pathogens probably by promoting cell death.

  4. Short-lived isomers in 94Rb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsekhanovich, I.; Dare, J. A.; Smith, A. G.; Varley, B. J.; Simpson, G. S.; Urban, W.; Soldner, T.; Jolie, J.; Linnemann, A.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, J. F.; Scherillo, A.; Rzaca-Urban, T.; Zlomaniec, A.; Dorvaux, O.; Gall, B. J. P.; Roux, B.

    2008-01-01

    The medium-spin structure of the neutron-rich, odd-odd nucleus 94 Rb was studied by means of γ-ray spectroscopy. Excited levels were populated in the neutron-induced fission of 235 U and in the spontaneous fission of 252 Cf and 248 Cm. Two isomeric states were found at 1485.2 and 2074.8 keV with half-lives of 18 and 107 ns, respectively. The probable structures of the two isomers involve the fully aligned, proton-neutron configurations [π(g 9/2 ) x ν(g 7/2 )] 8 + and [π(g 9/2 ) x ν(h 11/2 )] 10 - , respectively. These new data give information on the single-particle energies in the region

  5. Effects of Insect Protein Supplementation during Resistance Training on Changes in Muscle Mass and Strength in Young Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangsoe, Mathias T; Joergensen, Malte S; Heckmann, Lars-Henrik L; Hansen, Mette

    2018-03-10

    During prolonged resistance training, protein supplementation is known to promote morphological changes; however, no previous training studies have tested the effect of insect protein isolate in a human trial. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effect of insect protein as a dietary supplement to increase muscle hypertrophy and strength gains during prolonged resistance training in young men. Eighteen healthy young men performed resistance training four day/week for eight weeks. Subjects were block randomized into two groups consuming either an insect protein isolate or isocaloric carbohydrate supplementation within 1 h after training and pre-sleep on training days. Strength and body composition were measured before and after intervention to detect adaptions to the resistance training. Three-day weighed dietary records were completed before and during intervention. Fat- and bone- free mass (FBFM) improved significantly in both groups (Mean (95% confidence interval (CI))), control group (Con): (2.5 kg (1.5, 3.5) p supplementation did not improve adaptations to eight weeks of resistance training in comparison to carbohydrate supplementation. A high habitual protein intake in both Con and Pro may partly explain our observation of no superior effect of insect protein supplementation.

  6. Increased chitin biosynthesis contributes to the resistance of Penicillium polonicum against the antifungal protein PgAFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Josué; Owens, Rebecca A; Doyle, Sean; Asensio, Miguel A; Núñez, Félix

    2016-01-01

    Antifungal proteins from molds have been proposed as a valuable tool against unwanted molds, but the resistance of some fungi limits their use. Resistance to antimicrobial peptides has been suggested to be due to lack of interaction with the mold or to a successful response. The antifungal protein PgAFP produced by Penicillium chrysogenum inhibits the growth of various ascomycetes, but not Penicillium polonicum. To study the basis for resistance to this antifungal protein, localization of PgAFP and metabolic, structural, and morphological changes were investigated in P. polonicum. PgAFP bound the outer layer of P. polonicum but not regenerated chitin, suggesting an interaction with specific molecules. Comparative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and comparative quantitative proteomics revealed changes in the relative abundance of several proteins from ribosome, spliceosome, metabolic, and biosynthesis of secondary metabolite pathways. The proteome changes and an altered permeability reveal an active reaction of P. polonicum to PgAFP. The successful response of the resistant mold seems to be based on the higher abundance of protein Rho GTPase Rho1 that would lead to the increased chitin deposition via cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway. Thus, combined treatment with chitinases could provide a complementary means to combat resistance to antifungal proteins.

  7. HAGRID/ VANDLE spectroscopy of Rb decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Thomas; Grzywacz, Robert; Taylor, Steven; Paulauskas, Stanley; Smith, Karl; Vandle Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Many neutron-rich isotopes that contribute in both decay heat production and r-process nucleosynthesis have substantial beta-delayed neutron branching ratios. Beta-delayed neutron emission is a relatively complicated mechanism which can leave the daughter in an gamma-emitting excited state. A comprehensive understanding of their energy output and decay strength, S_beta, therefore requires the detection of both neutrons and gamma rays in coincidence. A series of measurements of delayed neutron precursors were performed at the On-Line Test Facility (OLTF) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratories using chemically selective ion sources and an enhanced VANDLE array. The main goal of this experiment was to revisit the decays of IAEA-marked priority precursors, including bromine, rubidium, cesium, and iodine, that are required to model the global properties in the fission of 238U.The unique data set, with neutron and gamma ray coincidences, benefited from the addition of a high-efficiency gamma-ray array, consisting of 16 LaBr3 crystals (HAGRiD), and a set of large volume NaI detectors to the VANDLE array. Characterization of and preliminary results from the new gamma-ray array for the decays of 94Rb and 97Rb will be presented. National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through DOE Award No. DE-NA0002132 and the Office of Nuclear Physics, U.S. Department of Energy under Award No. DE-FG02-96ER40983.

  8. Analysis list: RB1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available RB1 Prostate,Uterus + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/R...B1.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/RB1.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/...kyushu-u/hg19/target/RB1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/RB1.Prostate.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/RB1.Uterus.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Prostate.gml,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Uterus.gml ...

  9. Overexpression of HDAC1 induces cellular senescence by Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Jian-Ying [Department of Pharmacology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hung, Jan-Jong, E-mail: petehung@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Pharmacology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Bioinformatics and Biosignal Transduction, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 induces Sp1 deacetylation and raises Sp1/p300 complex formation to bind to PP2Ac promoter. {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 strongly inhibits the phosphorylation of pRb through up-regulation of PP2A. {yields} Overexpressed HDAC1 restrains cell proliferaction and induces cell senescence though a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway. -- Abstract: Senescence is associated with decreased activities of DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cellular division, which can result in deterioration of cellular functions. Herein, we report that the growth and division of tumor cells were significantly repressed by overexpression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 with the Tet-off induced system or transient transfection. In addition, HDAC1 overexpression led to senescence through both an accumulation of hypophosphorylated active retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and an increase in the protein level of protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). HDAC1 overexpression also increased the level of Sp1 deacetylation and elevated the interaction between Sp1 and p300, and subsequently that Sp1/p300 complex bound to the promoter of PP2Ac, thus leading to induction of PP2Ac expression. Similar results were obtained in the HDAC1-Tet-off stable clone. Taken together, these results indicate that HDAC1 overexpression restrained cell proliferation and induced premature senescence in cervical cancer cells through a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway.

  10. Surgical resection and radiofrequency ablation initiate cancer in cytokeratin-19(+)- liver cells deficient for p53 and Rb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matondo, Ramadhan B.; Toussaint, Mathilda J. M.; Govaert, Klaas M.; van Vuuren, Luciel D.; Nantasanti, Sathidpak; Nijkamp, Maarten W.; Pandit, Shusil K.; Tooten, Peter C. J.; Koster, Mirjam H.; Holleman, Kaylee; Schot, Arend; Gu, Guoqiang; Spee, Bart; Roskams, Tania; Rinkes, Inne Borel; Schotanus, Baukje; Kranenburg, Onno; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The long term prognosis of liver cancer patients remains unsatisfactory because of cancer recurrence after surgical interventions, particularly in patients with viral infections. Since hepatitis B and C viral proteins lead to inactivation of the tumor suppressors p53 and Retinoblastoma ( Rb), we

  11. Overexpression of HDAC1 induces cellular senescence by Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Jian-Ying; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Overexpression of HDAC1 induces Sp1 deacetylation and raises Sp1/p300 complex formation to bind to PP2Ac promoter. → Overexpression of HDAC1 strongly inhibits the phosphorylation of pRb through up-regulation of PP2A. → Overexpressed HDAC1 restrains cell proliferaction and induces cell senescence though a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway. -- Abstract: Senescence is associated with decreased activities of DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cellular division, which can result in deterioration of cellular functions. Herein, we report that the growth and division of tumor cells were significantly repressed by overexpression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 with the Tet-off induced system or transient transfection. In addition, HDAC1 overexpression led to senescence through both an accumulation of hypophosphorylated active retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and an increase in the protein level of protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). HDAC1 overexpression also increased the level of Sp1 deacetylation and elevated the interaction between Sp1 and p300, and subsequently that Sp1/p300 complex bound to the promoter of PP2Ac, thus leading to induction of PP2Ac expression. Similar results were obtained in the HDAC1-Tet-off stable clone. Taken together, these results indicate that HDAC1 overexpression restrained cell proliferation and induced premature senescence in cervical cancer cells through a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway.

  12. Correlation between uptake of 99TcM-MIBI and multidrug resistant proteins of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xuemei; Wu Hua

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the correlation between 99 Tc m -MIBI uptake and the expression level of multidrug resistant proteins of breast cancer. Methods: Thirty patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma were enrolled in this study. 99Tcm-MIBI scintigraphy were performed at 15 min and 90 min after injecting the tracer. The uptake of 99Tcm-MIBI were evaluated as tumor over background ratio with region of interest technique. Such indexes as early uptake ratio (EUR), delay uptake ratio (DUR) and retention index (RI) were calculated respectively. P-gp (P-glycoprotein) and MRP (multidrug resistant-associated protein) expression in surgically resected tumors were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry HPIAS-1000 image analysis system was used to determined the level of P-gp and MRP expression. The difference of P-gp and MRP level in the group with RI ≥ 0 and the group with RI 99 Tc m -MIBI on delayed scans in breast cancer. The uptake of 99 Tc m -MIBI may be not related to the levels of MRP expression. Thus 99 Tc m -MIBI scintigraphy may predict the MDR development which associated with P-gp expression in breast carcinoma. (authors)

  13. Multidrug Resistance Protein-4 Influences Aspirin Toxicity in Human Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Massimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of efflux transporters, in human cells, is a mechanism of resistance to drug and also to chemotherapy. We found that multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4 overexpression has a role in reducing aspirin action in patients after bypass surgery and, very recently, we found that aspirin enhances platelet MRP4 levels through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα. In the present paper, we verified whether exposure of human embryonic kidney-293 cells (Hek-293 to aspirin modifies MRP4 gene expression and its correlation with drug elimination and cell toxicity. We first investigated the effect of high-dose aspirin in Hek-293 and we showed that aspirin is able to increase cell toxicity dose-dependently. Furthermore, aspirin effects, induced at low dose, already enhance MRP4 gene expression. Based on these findings, we compared cell viability in Hek-293, after high-dose aspirin treatment, in MRP4 overexpressing cells, either after aspirin pretreatment or in MRP4 transfected cells; in both cases, a decrease of selective aspirin cell growth inhibition was observed, in comparison with the control cultures. Altogether, these data suggest that exposing cells to low nontoxic aspirin dosages can induce gene expression alterations that may lead to the efflux transporter protein overexpression, thus increasing cellular detoxification of aspirin.

  14. Daily Overfeeding from Protein and/or Carbohydrate Supplementation for Eight Weeks in Conjunction with Resistance Training Does not Improve Body Composition and Muscle Strength or Increase Markers Indicative of Muscle Protein Synthesis and Myogenesis in Resistance-Trained Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Spillane, Darryn S. Willoughby

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the effects of heavy resistance training and daily overfeeding with carbohydrate and/or protein on blood and skeletal muscle markers of protein synthesis (MPS, myogenesis, body composition, and muscle performance. Twenty one resistance-trained males were randomly assigned to either a protein + carbohydrate [HPC (n = 11] or a carbohydrate [HC (n = 10] supplement group in a double-blind fashion. Body composition and muscle performance were assessed, and venous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after eight weeks of resistance training and supplementation. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05. Total body mass, body water, and fat mass were significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training, but not supplementation (p 0.05. Muscle total DNA, total protein, and c-Met were not significantly affected (p > 0.05. In conjunction with resistance training, the peri-exercise and daily overfeeding of protein and/or carbohydrate did not preferentially improve body composition, muscle performance, and markers indicative of MPS and myogenic activation.

  15. Effects of Milk Proteins Supplementation in Older Adults Undergoing Resistance Training: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Control Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, K; Chen, G-C; Wang, Y; Zhang, Z; Dai, X; Szeto, I M Y; Qin, L-Q

    2018-01-01

    Older adults experience age-related physiological changes that affect body weight and body composition. In general, nutrition and exercise have been identified as potent stimulators of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Milk proteins are excellent sources of all the essential amino acids and may represent an ideal protein source to promote muscle anabolism in older adults undergoing resistance training. However, several randomized control trials (RCTs) have yielded mixed results on the effects of milk proteins supplementation in combination with resistance training on body weight and composition. PubMed, Web of Science and Cochrane databases were searched for literature that evaluated the effects of milk proteins supplementation on body weight and composition among older adults (age ≥ 60 years) undergoing resistance training up to September 2016. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of effect sizes. The final analysis included 10 RCTs involving 574 participants (mean age range from 60 to 80.8 years). Overall, the combination of milk proteins supplementation and resistance training did not have significant effect on fat mass (0.30, 95% CI -0.25, 0.86 kg) or body weight (1.02, 95% CI: -0.01, 2.04 kg). However, a positive effect of milk proteins supplementation paired with resistance training on fat-free mass was observed (0.74, 95% CI 0.30, 1.17 kg). Greater fat-free mass gains were observed in studies that included more than 55 participants (0.73, 95% CI 0.30, 1.16 kg), and in studies that enrolled participants with aging-related medical conditions (1.60, 95% CI 0.92, 2.28 kg). There was no statistical evidence of publication bias among the studies. Our findings provide evidence that supplementation of milk protein, in combination with resistance training, is effective to elicit fat-free mass gain in older adults.

  16. A G-protein-coupled receptor regulation pathway in cytochrome P450-mediated permethrin-resistance in mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Cao, Chuanwang; Yang, Ting; Zhang, Lee; He, Lin; Xi, Zhiyong; Bian, Guowu; Liu, Nannan

    2015-12-10

    Rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to be involved in the GPCR signal transduction system and regulate many essential physiological processes in organisms. This study, for the first time, revealed that knockdown of the rhodopsin-like GPCR gene in resistant mosquitoes resulted in a reduction of mosquitoes' resistance to permethrin, simultaneously reducing the expression of two cAMP-dependent protein kinase A genes (PKAs) and four resistance related cytochrome P450 genes. The function of rhodopsin-like GPCR was further confirmed using transgenic lines of Drosophila melanogaster, in which the tolerance to permethrin and the expression of Drosophila resistance P450 genes were both increased. The roles of GPCR signaling pathway second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and downstream effectors PKAs in resistance were investigated using cAMP production inhibitor Bupivacaine HCl and the RNAi technique. Inhibition of cAMP production led to significant decreases in both the expression of four resistance P450 genes and two PKA genes and mosquito resistance to permethrin. Knockdown of the PKA genes had shown the similar effects on permethrin resistance and P450 gene expression. Taken together, our studies revealed, for the first time, the role of the GPCR/cAMP/PKA-mediated regulatory pathway governing P450 gene expression and P450-mediated resistance in Culex mosquitoes.

  17. A G-protein-coupled receptor regulation pathway in cytochrome P450-mediated permethrin-resistance in mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Cao, Chuanwang; Yang, Ting; Zhang, Lee; He, Lin; Xi, Zhiyong; Bian, Guowu; Liu, Nannan

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to be involved in the GPCR signal transduction system and regulate many essential physiological processes in organisms. This study, for the first time, revealed that knockdown of the rhodopsin-like GPCR gene in resistant mosquitoes resulted in a reduction of mosquitoes’ resistance to permethrin, simultaneously reducing the expression of two cAMP-dependent protein kinase A genes (PKAs) and four resistance related cytochrome P450 genes. The function of rhodopsin-like GPCR was further confirmed using transgenic lines of Drosophila melanogaster, in which the tolerance to permethrin and the expression of Drosophila resistance P450 genes were both increased. The roles of GPCR signaling pathway second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and downstream effectors PKAs in resistance were investigated using cAMP production inhibitor Bupivacaine HCl and the RNAi technique. Inhibition of cAMP production led to significant decreases in both the expression of four resistance P450 genes and two PKA genes and mosquito resistance to permethrin. Knockdown of the PKA genes had shown the similar effects on permethrin resistance and P450 gene expression. Taken together, our studies revealed, for the first time, the role of the GPCR/cAMP/PKA-mediated regulatory pathway governing P450 gene expression and P450-mediated resistance in Culex mosquitoes. PMID:26656663

  18. Development of Conformation Independent Computational Models for the Early Recognition of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantner, Melisa Edith; Di Ianni, Mauricio Emiliano; Ruiz, María Esperanza; Bruno-Blanch, Luis E.

    2013-01-01

    ABC efflux transporters are polyspecific members of the ABC superfamily that, acting as drug and metabolite carriers, provide a biochemical barrier against drug penetration and contribute to detoxification. Their overexpression is linked to multidrug resistance issues in a diversity of diseases. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is the most expressed ABC efflux transporter throughout the intestine and the blood-brain barrier, limiting oral absorption and brain bioavailability of its substrates. Early recognition of BCRP substrates is thus essential to optimize oral drug absorption, design of novel therapeutics for central nervous system conditions, and overcome BCRP-mediated cross-resistance issues. We present the development of an ensemble of ligand-based machine learning algorithms for the early recognition of BCRP substrates, from a database of 262 substrates and nonsubstrates compiled from the literature. Such dataset was rationally partitioned into training and test sets by application of a 2-step clustering procedure. The models were developed through application of linear discriminant analysis to random subsamples of Dragon molecular descriptors. Simple data fusion and statistical comparison of partial areas under the curve of ROC curves were applied to obtain the best 2-model combination, which presented 82% and 74.5% of overall accuracy in the training and test set, respectively. PMID:23984415

  19. The Protein Elicitor PevD1 Enhances Resistance to Pathogens and Promotes Growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengjie; Khan, Najeeb Ullah; Wang, Ningbo; Yang, Xiufen; Qiu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    The protein elicitor PevD1, isolated from Verticillium dahlia, could enhance resistance to TMV in tobacco and Verticillium wilt in cotton. Here, the pevd1 gene was over-expressed in wild type (WT) Arabidopsis, and its biological functions were investigated. Our results showed that the transgenic lines were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 than the WT line was. In transgenic plants, both the germination time and bolting time required were significantly shorter and fresh weights and plant heights were significantly higher than those in the WT line. A transcriptomics study using digital gene expression profiling (DGE) was performed in transgenic and WT Arabidopsis. One hundred and thirty-six differentially expressed genes were identified. In transgenic Arabidopsis, three critical regulators of JA biosynthesis were up-regulated and JA levels were slightly increased. Three important repressors of the ABA-responsive pathway were up-regulated, indicating that ABA signal transduction may be suppressed. One CML and two WRKY TFs involved in Ca(2+)-responsive pathways were up-regulated, indicating that this pathway may have been triggered. In conclusion, we show that PevD1 is involved in regulating several plant endogenous signal transduction pathways and regulatory networks to enhance resistance and promote growth and development in Arabidopsis.

  20. Development of Conformation Independent Computational Models for the Early Recognition of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Substrates

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    Melisa Edith Gantner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABC efflux transporters are polyspecific members of the ABC superfamily that, acting as drug and metabolite carriers, provide a biochemical barrier against drug penetration and contribute to detoxification. Their overexpression is linked to multidrug resistance issues in a diversity of diseases. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP is the most expressed ABC efflux transporter throughout the intestine and the blood-brain barrier, limiting oral absorption and brain bioavailability of its substrates. Early recognition of BCRP substrates is thus essential to optimize oral drug absorption, design of novel therapeutics for central nervous system conditions, and overcome BCRP-mediated cross-resistance issues. We present the development of an ensemble of ligand-based machine learning algorithms for the early recognition of BCRP substrates, from a database of 262 substrates and nonsubstrates compiled from the literature. Such dataset was rationally partitioned into training and test sets by application of a 2-step clustering procedure. The models were developed through application of linear discriminant analysis to random subsamples of Dragon molecular descriptors. Simple data fusion and statistical comparison of partial areas under the curve of ROC curves were applied to obtain the best 2-model combination, which presented 82% and 74.5% of overall accuracy in the training and test set, respectively.

  1. Association between insulin resistance and c-reactive protein among Peruvian adults

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    Gelaye Bizu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Insulin resistance (IR, a reduced physiological response of peripheral tissues to the action of insulin, is one of the major causes of type 2 diabetes. We sought to evaluate the relationship between serum C-reactive protein (CRP, a marker of systemic inflammation, and prevalence of IR among Peruvian adults. Methods This population based study of 1,525 individuals (569 men and 956 women; mean age 39 years old was conducted among residents in Lima and Callao, Peru. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and CRP concentrations were measured using standard approaches. Insulin resistance was assessed using the homeostasis model (HOMA-IR. Categories of CRP were defined by the following tertiles: 2.53 mg/l. Logistic regression procedures were employed to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI. Results Elevated CRP were significantly associated with increased mean fasting insulin and mean HOMA-IR concentrations (p 2.53 mg/l (upper tertile had a 2.18-fold increased risk of IR (OR = 2.18 95% CI 1.51-3.16 as compared with those in the lowest tertile ( Conclusion Our observations among Peruvians suggest that chronic systemic inflammation, as evidenced by elevated CRP, may be of etiologic importance in insulin resistance and diabetes.

  2. Detection and characterisation of multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MRP-1) in human mitochondria.

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    Roundhill, E A; Burchill, S A

    2012-03-13

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MRP-1) can lead to multidrug resistance. In this study, we describe for the first time the expression of mitochondrial MRP-1 in untreated human normal and cancer cells and tissues. MRP-1 expression and subcellular localisation in normal and cancer cells and tissues was examined by differential centrifugation and western blotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy. Viable mitochondria were isolated and MRP-1 efflux activity measured using the calcein-AM functional assay. MRP-1 expression was increased using retroviral infection and specific overexpression confirmed by RNA array. Cell viability was determined by trypan blue exclusion and annexin V-propidium iodide labelling of cells. MRP-1 was detected in the mitochondria of cancer and normal cells and tissues. The efflux activity of mitochondrial MRP-1 was more efficient (55-64%) than that of plasma membrane MRP-1 (11-22%; PMRP-1 expression resulted in a preferential increase in mitochondrial MRP-1, suggesting selective targeting to this organelle. Treatment with a non-lethal concentration of doxorubicin (0.85 nM, 8 h) increased mitochondrial and plasma membrane MRP-1, increasing resistance to MRP-1 substrates. For the first time, we have identified MRP-1 with efflux activity in human mitochondria. Mitochondrial MRP-1 may be an exciting new therapeutic target where historically MRP-1 inhibitor strategies have limited clinical success.

  3. Outer membrane proteomics of kanamycin-resistant Escherichia coli identified MipA as a novel antibiotic resistance-related protein.

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    Li, Hui; Zhang, Dan-feng; Lin, Xiang-min; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2015-06-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a great threat to human health and food safety and there is an urgent need to understand the mechanisms of resistance for combating these bacteria. In the current study, comparative proteomic methodologies were applied to identify Escherichia coli K-12 outer membrane (OM) proteins related to kanamycin resistance. Mass spectrometry and western blotting results revealed that OM proteins TolC, Tsx and OstA were up-regulated, whereas MipA, OmpA, FadL and OmpW were down-regulated in kanamycin-resistant E. coli K-12 strain. Genetic deletion of tolC (ΔtolC-Km) led to a 2-fold decrease in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of kanamycin and deletion of mipA (ΔmipA-Km) resulted in a 4-fold increase in the MIC of kanamycin. Changes in the MICs for genetically modified strains could be completely recovered by gene complementation. Compared with the wild-type strain, the survival capability of ΔompA-Km was significantly increased and that of Δtsx-Km was significantly decreased. We further evaluated the role and expression of MipA in response to four other antibiotics including nalidixic acid, streptomycin, chloramphenicol and aureomycin, which suggested that MipA was a novel OM protein related to antibiotic resistance. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Daily Overfeeding from Protein and/or Carbohydrate Supplementation for Eight Weeks in Conjunction with Resistance Training Does not Improve Body Composition and Muscle Strength or Increase Markers Indicative of Muscle Protein Synthesis and Myogenesis in Resistance-Trained Males.

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    Spillane, Mike; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2016-03-01

    This study determined the effects of heavy resistance training and daily overfeeding with carbohydrate and/or protein on blood and skeletal muscle markers of protein synthesis (MPS), myogenesis, body composition, and muscle performance. Twenty one resistance-trained males were randomly assigned to either a protein + carbohydrate [HPC (n = 11)] or a carbohydrate [HC (n = 10)] supplement group in a double-blind fashion. Body composition and muscle performance were assessed, and venous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after eight weeks of resistance training and supplementation. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). Total body mass, body water, and fat mass were significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training, but not supplementation (p 0.05). Muscle total DNA, total protein, and c-Met were not significantly affected (p > 0.05). In conjunction with resistance training, the peri-exercise and daily overfeeding of protein and/or carbohydrate did not preferentially improve body composition, muscle performance, and markers indicative of MPS and myogenic activation. Key pointsIn response to 56 days of heavy resistance training and HC or HPC supplementation, similar increases in muscle mass and strength in both groups occurred; however, the increases were not different between supplement groups.The supplementation of HPC had no preferential effect on augmenting serum IGF-1 GH, or HGF.The supplementation of HPC had no preferential effect on augmenting increases in total muscle protein content or the myogenic markers, total DNA and muscle cMet content.In response to 56 days of a daily supplemental dose of 94 g of protein and 196 g of carbohydrate, the HPC group was no more effective than 312 g of carbohydrate in the HC group in increasing muscle strength and mass due to its ability to elevate serum anabolic hormones and growth factors and markers of myogenic activation of satellite cells.

  5. Involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in acquired gemcitabine-resistant human urothelial carcinoma sublines

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    Yu-Ting Kao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs is one of the major challenges in the treatment of cancer. A better understanding of how resistance arises and what molecular alterations correlate with resistance is the key to developing novel effective therapeutic strategies. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of gemcitabine (Gem resistance and provide possible therapeutic options, three Gem-resistant urothelial carcinoma sublines were established (NG0.6, NG0.8, and NG1.0. These cells were cross-resistant to arabinofuranosyl cytidine and cisplatin, but sensitive to 5-fluorouracil. The resistant cells expressed lower values of [hENT1 × dCK/RRM1 × RRM2] mRNA ratio. Two adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette proteins ABCD1 as well as multidrug resistance protein 1 were elevated. Moreover, cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinases 2 and 4 were upregulated, whereas extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activity were repressed significantly. Administration of p38 MAPK inhibitor significantly reduced the Gem sensitivity in NTUB1 cells, whereas that of an extracellular signal-regulated kinase MAPK inhibitor did not. Furthermore, the Gem-resistant sublines also exhibited higher migration ability. Forced expression of p38 MAPK impaired the cell migration activity and augmented Gem sensitivity in NG1.0 cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that complex mechanisms were merged in acquiring Gem resistance and provide information that can be important for developing therapeutic targets for treating Gem-resistant tumors.

  6. Pea proteins oral supplementation promotes muscle thickness gains during resistance training: a double-blind, randomized, Placebo-controlled clinical trial vs. Whey protein.

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    Babault, Nicolas; Païzis, Christos; Deley, Gaëlle; Guérin-Deremaux, Laetitia; Saniez, Marie-Hélène; Lefranc-Millot, Catherine; Allaert, François A

    2015-01-01

    The effects of protein supplementation on muscle thickness and strength seem largely dependent on its composition. The current study aimed at comparing the impact of an oral supplementation with vegetable Pea protein (NUTRALYS®) vs. Whey protein and Placebo on biceps brachii muscle thickness and strength after a 12-week resistance training program. One hundred and sixty one males, aged 18 to 35 years were enrolled in the study and underwent 12 weeks of resistance training on upper limb muscles. According to randomization, they were included in the Pea protein (n = 53), Whey protein (n = 54) or Placebo (n = 54) group. All had to take 25 g of the proteins or placebo twice a day during the 12-week training period. Tests were performed on biceps muscles at inclusion (D0), mid (D42) and post training (D84). Muscle thickness was evaluated using ultrasonography, and strength was measured on an isokinetic dynamometer. Results showed a significant time effect for biceps brachii muscle thickness (P supplementation with pea protein promoted a greater increase of muscle thickness as compared to Placebo and especially for people starting or returning to a muscular strengthening. Since no difference was obtained between the two protein groups, vegetable pea proteins could be used as an alternative to Whey-based dietary products. The present trial has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02128516).

  7. Anti-Restriction Protein, KlcAHS, Promotes Dissemination of Carbapenem Resistance

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    Xiaofei Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC has emerged and spread throughout the world. A retrospective analysis was performed on carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae isolated at our teaching hospital during the period 2009–2010, when the initial outbreak occurred. To determine the mechanism(s that underlies the increased infectivity exhibited by KPC, Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST was conducted. A series of plasmids was also extracted, sequenced and analyzed. Concurrently, the complete sequences of blaKPC−2-harboring plasmids deposited in GenBank were summarized and aligned. The blaKPC−2 and KlcAHS genes in the carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates were examined. E. coli strains, carrying different Type I Restriction and Modification (RM systems, were selected to study the interaction between RM systems, anti-RM systems and horizontal gene transfer (HGT. The ST11 clone predominated among 102 carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates, all harbored the blaKPC−2 gene; 98% contained the KlcAHS gene. KlcAHS was one of the core genes in the backbone region of most blaKPC−2 carrying plasmids. Type I RM systems in the host bacteria reduced the rate of pHS10842 plasmid transformation by 30- to 40-fold. Presence of the anti-restriction protein, KlcAHS, on the other hand, increased transformation efficiency by 3- to 6-fold. These results indicate that RM systems can significantly restrict HGT. In contrast, KlcAHS can disrupt the RM systems and promote HGT by transformation. These findings suggest that the anti-restriction protein, KlcAHS, represents a novel mechanism that facilitates the increased transfer of blaKPC-2 and KlcAHS-carrying plasmids among K. pneumoniae strains.

  8. Bodipy-FL-Verapamil: A Fluorescent Probe for the Study of Multidrug Resistance Proteins

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    Anna Rosati

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the substances used as fluorescent probes to study drug transport and the effect of efflux blockers in multidrug resistant cells have many drawbacks, such as toxicity, unspecific background, accumulation in mitochondria. New fluorescent compounds, among which Bodipy‐FL‐verapamil (BV, have been therefore proposed as more useful tools. The uptake of BV has been evaluated by cytofluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy using cell lines that overexpress P‐glycoprotein (P388/ADR and LLC‐PK1/ADR or MRP (multidrug resistance‐related protein (PANC‐1 and clinical specimens from patients. The effect of specific inhibitors for P‐glycoprotein (verapamil and vinblastine or MRP (MK571 and probenecid has been also studied. BV intracellular concentrations were significantly lower in the two P‐glycoprotein overexpressing cell lines in comparison with the parental lines. In addition, verapamil and vinblastine increased the intracellular concentrations of the dye; MK571 and probenecid, two MRP inhibitors, increased BV levels in PANC‐1 cells, that express this protein. These findings were confirmed in clinical specimens from patients. Fluorescence microscopy revealed a faint fluorescence emission in P‐glycoprotein or MRP expressing cell lines; however, treatment with specific inhibitors significantly increased the fluorescence. BV is a useful tool for studying multidrug resistance proteins with different techniques such as cytofluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy, but does not discriminate between P‐glycoprotein and MRP. In comparison with other classic fluorescent probes, the assay with this dye is extremely rapid, simple, not toxic for cells, devoid of fluorescent background, and can be useful in the clinical settings.

  9. Transport proteins determine drug sensitivity and resistance in a protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei

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    Jane Claire Munday

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance in pathogenic protozoa is very often caused by changes to the ‘transportome’ of the parasites. In Trypanosoma brucei, several transporters have been implicated in uptake of the main classes of drugs, diamidines and melaminophenyl arsenicals. The resistance mechanism had been thought to be due to loss of a transporter known to carry both types of agents: the aminopurine transporter P2, encoded by the gene TbAT1. However, although loss of P2 activity is well-documented as the cause of resistance to the veterinary diamidine diminazene aceturate (Berenil®, cross-resistance between the human-use arsenical melarsoprol and the diamidine pentamidine (MPXR is the result of loss of a separate High Affinity Pentamidine Transporter (HAPT1. A genome-wide RNAi library screen for resistance to pentamidine, published in 2012, gave the key to the genetic identity of HAPT1 by linking the phenomenon to a locus that contains the closely related T. brucei aquaglyceroporin genes TbAQP2 and TbAQP3. Further analysis determined that knockdown of only one pore, TbAQP2, produced the MPXR phenotype. TbAQP2 is an unconventional aquaglyceroporin with unique residues in the selectivity region of the pore, and it was found that in several MPXR lab strains the WT gene was either absent or replaced by a chimeric protein, recombined with parts of TbAQP3. Importantly, wild-type AQP2 was also absent in field isolates of T. b. gambiense, correlating with the outcome of melarsoprol treatment. Expression of a wild-type copy of TbAQP2 in even the most resistant strain completely reversed MPXR and re-introduced HAPT1 function and transport kinetics. Expression of TbAQP2 in Leishmania mexicana introduced a pentamidine transport activity indistinguishable from HAPT1. Although TbAQP2 has been shown to function as a classical aquaglyceroporin it is now clear that it is also a high affinity drug transporter, HAPT1. We discuss here a possible structural rationale for this

  10. Reduced expression of Jak-1 and Tyk-2 proteins leads to interferon resistance in Hepatitis C virus replicon

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    Luftig Ronald

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha interferon in combination with ribavirin is the standard therapy for hepatitis C virus infection. Unfortunately, a significant number of patients fail to eradicate their infection with this regimen. The mechanisms of IFN-resistance are unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of host cell factors to the mechanisms of interferon resistance using replicon cell lines. Results HCV replicons with high and low activation of the IFN-promoter were cultured for a prolonged period of time in the presence of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha2b. Stable replicon cell lines with resistant phenotype were isolated and characterized by their ability to continue viral replication in the presence of IFN-alpha. Interferon resistant cell colonies developed only in replicons having lower activation of the IFN promoter and no resistant colonies arose from replicons that exhibit higher activation of the IFN promoter. Individual cell clones were isolated and nine IFN resistant cell lines were established. HCV RNA and protein levels in these cells were not altered by IFN- alpha2b. Reduced signaling and IFN-resistant phenotype was found in all Huh-7 cell lines even after eliminating HCV, suggesting that cellular factors are involved. Resistant phenotype in the replicons is not due to lack of interferon receptor expression. All the cell lines show defect in the JAK-STAT signaling and phosphorylation of STAT 1 and STAT 2 proteins were strongly inhibited due to reduced expression of Tyk2 and Jak-1 protein. Conclusion This in vitro study provides evidence that altered expression of the Jak-Stat signaling proteins can cause IFN resistance using HCV replicon cell clones.

  11. An ELISA for the evaluation of gamma interferon production in cattle vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittarelli, Manuela; De Massis, Fabrizio; Bonfini, Barbara; Di Ventura, Mauro; Scacchia, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    The results of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) implemented for the detection of gamma interferon (gamma interferon) production in cattle vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 are presented. A purified protein fraction derived from RB51 (RB51 brucellin) has been used as antigenic stimulus for whole blood. The test was evaluated for 300 days in ten heifers vaccinated at calfhood with 10 x 10(9) colony-forming units of RB51 and in five control heifers. All animals came from officially brucellosis-free herds. Vaccinated animals started to give positive results from day 17 post vaccination (pv) until day 239 pv. All vaccinated animals gave a positive reaction at least once (with a stimulation index exceeding 2.5). Nevertheless, if sampling on day 20 pv is excluded (90% of vaccinated animals gave positive results), the sensitivity of the test varies from 20% to 70%, with a 40% average. A stimulation index over 2.5 was also recorded in three control animals. The results suggest that the gamma-interferon test is not suitable for the detection of cattle vaccinated with RB51, either at the individual or at the herd level.

  12. An ELISA for the evaluation of gamma interferon production in cattle vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51

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    Manuela Tittarelli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA implemented for the detection of gamma interferon (g-interferon production in cattle vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 are presented. A purified protein fraction derived from RB51 (RB51 brucellin has been used as antigenic stimulus for whole blood. The test was evaluated for 300 days in ten heifers vaccinated at calfhood with 10 × 109 colony-forming units of RB51 and in five control heifers. All animals came from officially brucellosis-free herds. Vaccinated animals started to give positive results from day 17 post vaccination (pv until day 239 pv. All vaccinated animals gave a positive reaction at least once (with a stimulation index exceeding 2.5. Nevertheless, if sampling on day 20 pv is excluded (90% of vaccinated animals gave positive results, the sensitivity of the test varies from 20% to 70%, with a 40% average. A stimulation index over 2.5 was also recorded in three control animals. The results suggest that the g-interferon test is not suitable for the detection of cattle vaccinated with RB51, either at the individual or at the herd level.

  13. Enhanced resistance in Theobroma cacao against oomycete and fungal pathogens by secretion of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, Emily E; Vega-Arreguín, Julio; Shi, Zi; Bailey, Bryan; Xiao, Shunyuan; Maximova, Siela N; Tyler, Brett M; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2016-03-01

    The internalization of some oomycete and fungal pathogen effectors into host plant cells has been reported to be blocked by proteins that bind to the effectors' cell entry receptor, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P). This finding suggested a novel strategy for disease control by engineering plants to secrete PI3P-binding proteins. In this study, we tested this strategy using the chocolate tree Theobroma cacao. Transient expression and secretion of four different PI3P-binding proteins in detached leaves of T. cacao greatly reduced infection by two oomycete pathogens, Phytophthora tropicalis and Phytophthora palmivora, which cause black pod disease. Lesion size and pathogen growth were reduced by up to 85%. Resistance was not conferred by proteins lacking a secretory leader, by proteins with mutations in their PI3P-binding site, or by a secreted PI4P-binding protein. Stably transformed, transgenic T. cacao plants expressing two different PI3P-binding proteins showed substantially enhanced resistance to both P. tropicalis and P. palmivora, as well as to the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum theobromicola. These results demonstrate that secretion of PI3P-binding proteins is an effective way to increase disease resistance in T. cacao, and potentially in other plants, against a broad spectrum of pathogens. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The Plasmin-Sensitive Protein Pls in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Is a Glycoprotein.

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    Bleiziffer, Isabelle; Eikmeier, Julian; Pohlentz, Gottfried; McAulay, Kathryn; Xia, Guoqing; Hussain, Muzaffar; Peschel, Andreas; Foster, Simon; Peters, Georg; Heilmann, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Most bacterial glycoproteins identified to date are virulence factors of pathogenic bacteria, i.e. adhesins and invasins. However, the impact of protein glycosylation on the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus remains incompletely understood. To study protein glycosylation in staphylococci, we analyzed lysostaphin lysates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains by SDS-PAGE and subsequent periodic acid-Schiff's staining. We detected four (>300, ∼250, ∼165, and ∼120 kDa) and two (>300 and ∼175 kDa) glycosylated surface proteins with strain COL and strain 1061, respectively. The ∼250, ∼165, and ∼175 kDa proteins were identified as plasmin-sensitive protein (Pls) by mass spectrometry. Previously, Pls has been demonstrated to be a virulence factor in a mouse septic arthritis model. The pls gene is encoded by the staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC)mec type I in MRSA that also encodes the methicillin resistance-conferring mecA and further genes. In a search for glycosyltransferases, we identified two open reading frames encoded downstream of pls on the SCCmec element, which we termed gtfC and gtfD. Expression and deletion analysis revealed that both gtfC and gtfD mediate glycosylation of Pls. Additionally, the recently reported glycosyltransferases SdgA and SdgB are involved in Pls glycosylation. Glycosylation occurs at serine residues in the Pls SD-repeat region and modifying carbohydrates are N-acetylhexosaminyl residues. Functional characterization revealed that Pls can confer increased biofilm formation, which seems to involve two distinct mechanisms. The first mechanism depends on glycosylation of the SD-repeat region by GtfC/GtfD and probably also involves eDNA, while the second seems to be independent of glycosylation as well as eDNA and may involve the centrally located G5 domains. Other previously known Pls properties are not related to the sugar modifications. In conclusion, Pls is a glycoprotein and Pls glycosyl

  15. Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S protein is necessary for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and cell-cell fusion but not interaction with M protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, Corrin E.; Machamer, Carolyn E.

    2010-01-01

    Coronaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that generally cause mild disease in humans. However, the recently emerged coronavirus that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) is the most pathogenic human coronavirus discovered to date. The SARS-CoV spike (S) protein mediates virus entry by binding cellular receptors and inducing fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane. Coronavirus S proteins are palmitoylated, which may affect function. Here, we created a non-palmitoylated SARS-CoV S protein by mutating all nine cytoplasmic cysteine residues. Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S was required for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and for cell-cell fusion. Surprisingly, however, palmitoylation of S was not required for interaction with SARS-CoV M protein. This contrasts with the requirement for palmitoylation of mouse hepatitis virus S protein for interaction with M protein and may point to important differences in assembly and infectivity of these two coronaviruses.

  16. Characterization of recombinant B. abortus strain RB51SOD towards understanding the uncorrelated innate and adaptive immune responses induced by RB51SOD compared to its parent vaccine strain RB51

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    Jianguo eZhu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular pathogen for several mammals, including humans. Live attenuated B. abortus strain RB51 is currently the official vaccine used against bovine brucellosis in the United States and several other countries. Overexpression of protective B. abortus antigen Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD in a recombinant strain of RB51 (strain RB51SOD significantly increases its vaccine efficacy against virulent B. abortus challenge in a mouse model. An attempt has been made to better understand the mechanism of the enhanced protective immunity of RB51SOD compared to its parent strain RB51. We previously reported that RB51SOD stimulated enhanced Th1 immune response. In this study, we further found that T effector cells derived from RB51SOD-immunized mice exhibited significantly higher cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL activity than T effector cells derived from RB51-immunized mice against virulent B. abortus-infected target cells. Meanwhile, the macrophage responses to these two strains were also studied. Compared to RB51, RB51SOD cells had a lower survival rate in macrophages and induced lower levels of macrophage apoptosis and necrosis. The decreased survival of RB51SOD cells correlates with the higher sensitivity of RB51SOD, compared to RB51, to the bactericidal action of either Polymyxin B or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS. Furthermore, a physical damage to the outer membrane of RB51SOD was observed by electron microscopy. Possibly due to the physical damage, overexpressed Cu/Zn SOD in RB51SOD was found to be released into the bacterial cell culture medium. Therefore, the stronger adaptive immunity induced by RB51SOD did not correlate with the low level of innate immunity induced by RB51SOD compared to RB51. This unique and apparently contradictory profile is likely associated with the differences in outer membrane integrity and Cu/Zn SOD release.

  17. Characterization of recombinant B. abortus strain RB51SOD toward understanding the uncorrelated innate and adaptive immune responses induced by RB51SOD compared to its parent vaccine strain RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianguo; Larson, Charles B; Ramaker, Megan Ann; Quandt, Kimberly; Wendte, Jered M; Ku, Kimberly P; Chen, Fang; Jourdian, George W; Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Schurig, Gerhardt G; He, Yongqun

    2011-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular pathogen for several mammals, including humans. Live attenuated B. abortus strain RB51 is currently the official vaccine used against bovine brucellosis in the United States and several other countries. Overexpression of protective B. abortus antigen Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) in a recombinant strain of RB51 (strain RB51SOD) significantly increases its vaccine efficacy against virulent B. abortus challenge in a mouse model. An attempt has been made to better understand the mechanism of the enhanced protective immunity of RB51SOD compared to its parent strain RB51. We previously reported that RB51SOD stimulated enhanced Th1 immune response. In this study, we further found that T effector cells derived from RB51SOD-immunized mice exhibited significantly higher cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity than T effector cells derived from RB51-immunized mice against virulent B. abortus-infected target cells. Meanwhile, the macrophage responses to these two strains were also studied. Compared to RB51, RB51SOD cells had a lower survival rate in macrophages and induced lower levels of macrophage apoptosis and necrosis. The decreased survival of RB51SOD cells correlates with the higher sensitivity of RB51SOD, compared to RB51, to the bactericidal action of either Polymyxin B or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Furthermore, a physical damage to the outer membrane of RB51SOD was observed by electron microscopy. Possibly due to the physical damage, overexpressed Cu/Zn SOD in RB51SOD was found to be released into the bacterial cell culture medium. Therefore, the stronger adaptive immunity induced by RB51SOD did not correlate with the low level of innate immunity induced by RB51SOD compared to RB51. This unique and apparently contradictory profile is likely associated with the differences in outer membrane integrity and Cu/Zn SOD release.

  18. Effect of resistance exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on members of the STARS signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissing, Kristian; Rahbek, Stine K; Lamon, Severine; Farup, Jean; Stefanetti, Renae J; Wallace, Marita A; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Russell, Aaron

    2013-08-01

    The striated muscle activator of Rho signalling (STARS) pathway is suggested to provide a link between external stress responses and transcriptional regulation in muscle. However, the sensitivity of STARS signalling to different mechanical stresses has not been investigated. In a comparative study, we examined the regulation of the STARS signalling pathway in response to unilateral resistance exercise performed as either eccentric (ECC) or concentric (CONC) contractions as well as prolonged training; with and without whey protein supplementation. Skeletal muscle STARS, myocardian-related transcription factor-A (MRTF-A) and serum response factor (SRF) mRNA and protein, as well as muscle cross-sectional area and maximal voluntary contraction, were measured. A single-bout of exercise produced increases in STARS and SRF mRNA and decreases in MRTF-A mRNA with both ECC and CONC exercise, but with an enhanced response occurring following ECC exercise. A 31% increase in STARS protein was observed exclusively after CONC exercise (P STARS pathway that is contraction mode dependent. The responses to acute exercise were more pronounced than responses to accumulated training, suggesting that STARS signalling is primarily involved in the initial phase of exercise-induced muscle adaptations.

  19. Over-Expression of Cysteine Leucine Rich Protein Is Related to SAG Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Leishmania donovani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sanchita; Shah, Priyanka; Tandon, Rati; Yadav, Narendra Kumar; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A; Sundar, Shyam; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Dube, Anuradha

    2015-08-01

    Resistance emergence against antileishmanial drugs, particularly Sodium Antimony Gluconate (SAG) has severely hampered the therapeutic strategy against visceral leishmaniasis, the mechanism of resistance being indistinguishable. Cysteine leucine rich protein (CLrP), was recognized as one of the overexpressed proteins in resistant isolates, as observed in differential proteomics between sensitive and resistant isolates of L. donovani. The present study deals with the characterization of CLrP and for its possible connection with SAG resistance. In pursuance of deciphering the role of CLrP in SAG resistance, gene was cloned, over-expressed in E. coli system and thereafter antibody was raised. The expression profile of CLrP and was found to be over-expressed in SAG resistant clinical isolates of L. donovani as compared to SAG sensitive ones when investigated by real-time PCR and western blotting. CLrP has been characterized through bioinformatics, immunoblotting and immunolocalization analysis, which reveals its post-translational modification along with its dual existence in the nucleus as well as in the membrane of the parasite. Further investigation using a ChIP assay confirmed its DNA binding potential. Over-expression of CLrP in sensitive isolate of L. donovani significantly decreased its responsiveness to SAG (SbV and SbIII) and a shift towards the resistant mode was observed. Further, a significant increase in its infectivity in murine macrophages has been observed. The study reports the differential expression of CLrP in SAG sensitive and resistant isolates of L. donovani. Functional intricacy of CLrP increases with dual localization, glycosylation and DNA binding potential of the protein. Further over-expressing CLrP in sensitive isolate of L. donovani shows significantly decreased sensitivity towards SAG and increased infectivity as well, thus assisting the parasite in securing a safe niche. Results indicates the possible contribution of CLrP to antimonial

  20. Inducible resistance to maize streak virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Dionne N; Dugdale, Benjamin; Martin, Darren P; Varsani, Arvind; Lakay, Francisco M; Bezuidenhout, Marion E; Monjane, Adérito L; Thomson, Jennifer A; Dale, James; Rybicki, Edward P

    2014-01-01

    Maize streak virus (MSV), which causes maize streak disease (MSD), is the major viral pathogenic constraint on maize production in Africa. Type member of the Mastrevirus genus in the family Geminiviridae, MSV has a 2.7 kb, single-stranded circular DNA genome encoding a coat protein, movement protein, and the two replication-associated proteins Rep and RepA. While we have previously developed MSV-resistant transgenic maize lines constitutively expressing "dominant negative mutant" versions of the MSV Rep, the only transgenes we could use were those that caused no developmental defects during the regeneration of plants in tissue culture. A better transgene expression system would be an inducible one, where resistance-conferring transgenes are expressed only in MSV-infected cells. However, most known inducible transgene expression systems are hampered by background or "leaky" expression in the absence of the inducer. Here we describe an adaptation of the recently developed INPACT system to express MSV-derived resistance genes in cell culture. Split gene cassette constructs (SGCs) were developed containing three different transgenes in combination with three different promoter sequences. In each SGC, the transgene was split such that it would be translatable only in the presence of an infecting MSV's replication associated protein. We used a quantitative real-time PCR assay to show that one of these SGCs (pSPLITrepIII-Rb-Ubi) inducibly inhibits MSV replication as efficiently as does a constitutively expressed transgene that has previously proven effective in protecting transgenic maize from MSV. In addition, in our cell-culture based assay pSPLITrepIII-Rb-Ubi inhibited replication of diverse MSV strains, and even, albeit to a lesser extent, of a different mastrevirus species. The application of this new technology to MSV resistance in maize could allow a better, more acceptable product.

  1. Inducible resistance to maize streak virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionne N Shepherd

    Full Text Available Maize streak virus (MSV, which causes maize streak disease (MSD, is the major viral pathogenic constraint on maize production in Africa. Type member of the Mastrevirus genus in the family Geminiviridae, MSV has a 2.7 kb, single-stranded circular DNA genome encoding a coat protein, movement protein, and the two replication-associated proteins Rep and RepA. While we have previously developed MSV-resistant transgenic maize lines constitutively expressing "dominant negative mutant" versions of the MSV Rep, the only transgenes we could use were those that caused no developmental defects during the regeneration of plants in tissue culture. A better transgene expression system would be an inducible one, where resistance-conferring transgenes are expressed only in MSV-infected cells. However, most known inducible transgene expression systems are hampered by background or "leaky" expression in the absence of the inducer. Here we describe an adaptation of the recently developed INPACT system to express MSV-derived resistance genes in cell culture. Split gene cassette constructs (SGCs were developed containing three different transgenes in combination with three different promoter sequences. In each SGC, the transgene was split such that it would be translatable only in the presence of an infecting MSV's replication associated protein. We used a quantitative real-time PCR assay to show that one of these SGCs (pSPLITrepIII-Rb-Ubi inducibly inhibits MSV replication as efficiently as does a constitutively expressed transgene that has previously proven effective in protecting transgenic maize from MSV. In addition, in our cell-culture based assay pSPLITrepIII-Rb-Ubi inhibited replication of diverse MSV strains, and even, albeit to a lesser extent, of a different mastrevirus species. The application of this new technology to MSV resistance in maize could allow a better, more acceptable product.

  2. The Vat locus encodes for a CC-NBS-LRR protein that confers resistance to Aphis gossypii infestation and A. gossypii-mediated virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogimont, Catherine; Chovelon, Veronique; Pauquet, Jerome; Boualem, Adnane; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid

    2014-12-01

    Aphis gossypii is a polyphagous sucking aphid and a vector for many viruses. In Cucumis melo, a dominant locus, Vat, confers a high level of resistance to Aphis gossypii infestation and to viruses transmitted by this vector. To investigate the mechanism underlying this double resistance, we first genetically dissected the Vat locus. We delimited the double resistance to a single gene that encodes for a coiled-coil-nucleotide-binding-site-leucine-rich repeat (CC-NBS-LRR) protein type. To validate the genetic data, transgenic lines expressing the Vat gene were generated and assessed for the double resistance. In this analysis, Vat-transgenic plants were resistant to A. gossypii infestation as well as A. gossypii-mediated virus transmission. When the plants were infected mechanically, virus infection occurred on both transgenic and non-transgenic control plants. These results confirmed that the cloned CC-NBS-LRR gene mediates both resistance to aphid infestation and virus infection using A. gossypii as a vector. This resistance also invokes a separate recognition and response phases in which the recognition phase involves the interaction of an elicitor molecule from the aphid and Vat from the plant. The response phase is not specific and blocks both aphid infestation and virus infection. Sequence analysis of Vat alleles suggests a major role of an unusual conserved LRR repeat in the recognition of A. gossypii. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Chirped fields for Rb+Cs photoassociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, A.; Roberts, G.

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents model numerical simulations of photoassociation and ionization of cold Rb+Cs atoms steered by broadband optical pulses operating within the weak-field limit over a picosecond time scale. The primary focus of the work is on generation of RbCs molecules in bound levels of the (1)0+ (XΣ+1) electronic ground state through a sequence of pump-dump transitions between (1)0+ and (4)0+ states driven by a field centered at 811nm with different phase modulations. It is found that chirped fields generate substantially bound oscillator levels of the XΣ+1 state by avoiding promotion of amplitude to vibrational levels in the upper state whose Franck-Condon factors for stimulated emission to levels in the XΣ+1 state are detrimentally low, but which otherwise come into play when the driving field is transform limited. Optimal generation of molecules in the electronic ground state irrespective of vibrational level selectivity is calculated to occur when the temporal phase of the driving field is modulated by the classical energy difference for promotion of (4)0+←(1)0+ photon absorption. Conversely, generation of deeply bound vibrational eigenlevels of the XΣ+1 state is optimally promoted by a field whose temporal phase enhances (4)0+→(1)0+ stimulated emission. Driving fields phase modulated by the classical difference potential or linearly down-chirped enhance molecule formation vis-à-vis the thermal collision; fields whose temporal phase is modulated according to the shape of the (1)0+ potential energy curve or which are linearly up-chirped suppress molecule formation relative to the thermal probability, but generate deeply bound XΣ+1 vibrational levels. Application of a bichromatic field comprising temporally overlapped components centered 811 and 622nm also improves the probability of generating deeply bound vibrational levels, but at the expense of increased ionization. Model calculations of transition probabilities between neutral and ionic states

  4. Prevention of vertical transmission of Neospora caninum in C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 expressing N. caninum protective antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Sheela; Sanakkayala, Neelima; Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Jain, Neeta; Lindsay, David S; Schurig, Gerhardt S; Boyle, Stephen M; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar

    2007-11-01

    Bovine abortions caused by the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum have been responsible for severe economic losses to the cattle industry. Infected cows either experience abortion or transmit the parasite transplacentally at a rate of up to 95%. Neospora caninum vaccines that can prevent vertical transmission and ensure disruption in the life cycle of the parasite greatly aid in the management of neosporosis in the cattle industry. Brucella abortus strain RB51, a commercially available vaccine for bovine brucellosis, can also be used as a vector to express plasmid-encoded proteins from other pathogens. Neospora caninum protective antigens MIC1, MIC3, GRA2, GRA6 and SRS2 were expressed in strain RB51. Female C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with a recombinant strain RB51 expressing N. caninum antigen or irradiated tachyzoites, boosted 4 weeks later and then bred. Antigen-specific IgG, IFN-gamma and IL-10 were detected in vaccinated pregnant mice. Vaccinated mice were challenged with 5 x 10(6)N. caninum tachyzoites between days 11-13 of pregnancy. Brain tissue was collected from pups 3 weeks after birth and examined for the presence of N. caninum by real-time PCR. The RB51-MIC3, RB51-GRA6, irradiated tachyzoite vaccine, pooled strain RB51-Neospora vaccine, RB51-MIC1 and RB51-SRS2 vaccines elicited approximately 6-38% protection against vertical transmission. However, the differences in parasite burden in brain tissue of pups from the control and vaccinated groups were highly significant for all groups. Thus, B. abortus strain RB51 expressing the specific N. caninum antigens induced substantial protection against vertical transmission of N. caninum in mice.

  5. Genomic distribution of the small multidrug resistance protein EmrE over 29 Escherichia coli strains reveals two forms of the protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolbusz, Magdalena A.; Slotboom, Dirk J.; Lolkema, Juke S.

    Analysis of the genomes of 29 Escherichia coli strains revealed two different versions of the EmrE protein, a member of the small multidrug resistance family. The versions are different in length and contain 110 residues (EMRE110) and 165 residues (EMRE165). The N-terminal extension found in the

  6. Identification of distinct specificity determinants in resistance protein Cf-4 allows construction of a Cf-9 mutant that confers recognition of avirulence protein AVR4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, Van der R.A.L.; Roth, R.; Wit, De P.J.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    The tomato resistance genes Cf-4 and Cf-9 confer specific, hypersensitive response-associated recognition of Cladosporium carrying the avirulence genes Avr4 and Avr9, respectively. Cf-4 and Cf-9 encode type I transmembrane proteins with extracellular leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). Compared with Cf-9,

  7. Two seven-transmembrane domain MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O proteins cofunction in Arabidopsis root thigmomorphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongying; Noir, Sandra; Kwaaitaal, Mark; Hartmann, H Andreas; Wu, Ming-Jing; Mudgil, Yashwanti; Sukumar, Poornima; Muday, Gloria; Panstruga, Ralph; Jones, Alan M

    2009-07-01

    Directional root expansion is governed by nutrient gradients, positive gravitropism and hydrotropism, negative phototropism and thigmotropism, as well as endogenous oscillations in the growth trajectory (circumnutation). Null mutations in phylogenetically related Arabidopsis thaliana genes MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O 4 (MLO4) and MLO11, encoding heptahelical, plasma membrane-localized proteins predominantly expressed in the root tip, result in aberrant root thigmomorphogenesis. mlo4 and mlo11 mutant plants show anisotropic, chiral root expansion manifesting as tightly curled root patterns upon contact with solid surfaces. The defect in mlo4 and mlo11 mutants is nonadditive and dependent on light and nutrients. Genetic epistasis experiments demonstrate that the mutant phenotype is independently modulated by the Gbeta subunit of the heterotrimeric G-protein complex. Analysis of expressed chimeric MLO4/MLO2 proteins revealed that the C-terminal domain of MLO4 is necessary but not sufficient for MLO4 action in root thigmomorphogenesis. The expression of the auxin efflux carrier fusion, PIN1-green fluorescent protein, the pattern of auxin-induced gene expression, and acropetal as well as basipetal auxin transport are altered at the root tip of mlo4 mutant seedlings. Moreover, addition of auxin transport inhibitors or the loss of EIR1/AGR1/PIN2 function abolishes root curling of mlo4, mlo11, and wild-type seedlings. These results demonstrate that the exaggerated root curling phenotypes of the mlo4 and mlo11 mutants depend on auxin gradients and suggest that MLO4 and MLO11 cofunction as modulators of touch-induced root tropism.

  8. Role of the Outer Membrane Protein OprD2 in Carbapenem-Resistance Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilu Shen

    Full Text Available We investigated the relationship between the outer membrane protein OprD2 and carbapenem-resistance in 141 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa collected between January and December 2013 from the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University in China. Agar dilution methods were employed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of meropenem (MEM and imipenem (IMP for P. aeruginosa. The gene encoding OprD2 was amplified from141 P. aeruginosa isolates and analyzed by PCR and DNA sequencing. Differences between the effects of IMPR and IMPS groups on the resistance of the P. aeruginosa were observed by SDS-poly acrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. Three resistance types were classified in the 141 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (CRPA isolates tested, namely IMPRMEMR (66.7%, IMPRMEMS (32.6%, and IMPRMEMS (0.7%. DNA sequencing revealed significant diverse gene mutations in the OprD2-encoding gene in these strains. Thirty-four strains had large fragment deletions in the OprD2gene, in 6 strains the gene contained fragment inserts, and in 96 resistant strains, the gene featured small fragment deletions or multi-site mutations. Only 4 metallo-β-lactamase strains and 1 imipenem-sensitive (meropenem-resistant strain showed a normal OprD2 gene. Using SDS-PAGE to detect the outer membrane protein in 16 CRPA isolates, it was found that 10 IMPRMEMR strains and 5 IMPRMEMS strains had lost the OprD2 protein, while the IMPSMEMR strain contained a normal 46-kDa protein. In conclusion, mutation or loss of the OprD2-encoding gene caused the loss of OprD2, which further led to carbapenem-resistance of P. aeruginosa. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism of carbapenem resistance in P. aeruginosa.

  9. Role of the Outer Membrane Protein OprD2 in Carbapenem-Resistance Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jilu; Pan, Yaping; Fang, Yaping

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the outer membrane protein OprD2 and carbapenem-resistance in 141 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa collected between January and December 2013 from the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University in China. Agar dilution methods were employed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of meropenem (MEM) and imipenem (IMP) for P. aeruginosa. The gene encoding OprD2 was amplified from141 P. aeruginosa isolates and analyzed by PCR and DNA sequencing. Differences between the effects of IMPR and IMPS groups on the resistance of the P. aeruginosa were observed by SDS-poly acrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Three resistance types were classified in the 141 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (CRPA) isolates tested, namely IMPRMEMR (66.7%), IMPRMEMS (32.6%), and IMPRMEMS (0.7%). DNA sequencing revealed significant diverse gene mutations in the OprD2-encoding gene in these strains. Thirty-four strains had large fragment deletions in the OprD2gene, in 6 strains the gene contained fragment inserts, and in 96 resistant strains, the gene featured small fragment deletions or multi-site mutations. Only 4 metallo-β-lactamase strains and 1 imipenem-sensitive (meropenem-resistant) strain showed a normal OprD2 gene. Using SDS-PAGE to detect the outer membrane protein in 16 CRPA isolates, it was found that 10 IMPRMEMR strains and 5 IMPRMEMS strains had lost the OprD2 protein, while the IMPSMEMR strain contained a normal 46-kDa protein. In conclusion, mutation or loss of the OprD2-encoding gene caused the loss of OprD2, which further led to carbapenem-resistance of P. aeruginosa. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism of carbapenem resistance in P. aeruginosa.

  10. Plasmid-Mediated Resistance to Thrombin-Induced Platelet Microbicidal Protein in Staphylococci: Role of the qacA Locus

    OpenAIRE

    Kupferwasser, Leon Iri; Skurray, Ronald A.; Brown, Melissa H.; Firth, Neville; Yeaman, Michael R.; Bayer, Arnold S.

    1999-01-01

    Thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein 1 (tPMP-1) is a small, cationic peptide released from rabbit platelets following thrombin stimulation. In vitro resistance to this peptide among strains of Staphylococcus aureus correlates with the survival advantage of such strains at sites of endothelial damage in humans as well as in experimental endovascular infections. The mechanisms involved in the phenotypic resistance of S. aureus to tPMP-1 are not fully delineated. The plasmid-encoded st...

  11. Contribution of Specific Amino Acid Changes in Penicillin Binding Protein 1 to Amoxicillin Resistance in Clinical Helicobacter pylori isolates ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Nadia N.; Morikis, Dimitrios; Schiller, Neal L.

    2010-01-01

    Amoxicillin is commonly used to treat Helicobacter pylori, a major cause of peptic ulcers, stomach cancer, and B-cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Amoxicillin resistance in H. pylori is increasing steadily, especially in developing countries, leading to treatment failures. In this study, we characterize the mechanism of amoxicillin resistance in the U.S. clinical isolate B258. Transformation of amoxicillin-susceptible strain 26695 with the penicillin binding protein 1 gene (pbp...

  12. Pronounced energy restriction with elevated protein intake results in no change in proteolysis and reductions in skeletal muscle protein synthesis that are mitigated by resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector, Amy J; McGlory, Chris; Damas, Felipe; Mazara, Nicole; Baker, Steven K; Phillips, Stuart M

    2018-01-01

    Preservation of lean body mass (LBM) may be important during dietary energy restriction (ER) and requires equal rates of muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle protein breakdown (MPB). Currently, the relative contribution of MPS and MPB to the loss of LBM during ER in humans is unknown. We aimed to determine the impact of dietary protein intake and resistance exercise on MPS and MPB during a controlled short-term energy deficit. Adult men (body mass index, 28.6 ± 0.6 kg/m 2 ; age 22 ± 1 yr) underwent 10 d of 40%-reduced energy intake while performing unilateral resistance exercise and consuming lower protein (1.2 g/kg/d, n = 12) or higher protein (2.4 g/kg/d, n = 12). Pre- and postintervention testing included dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, primed constant infusion of ring -[ 13 C 6 ]phenylalanine, and 15 [N]phenylalanine to measure acute postabsorptive MPS and MPB; D 2 O to measure integrated MPS; and gene and protein expression. There was a decrease in acute MPS after ER (higher protein, 0.059 ± 0.006 to 0.051 ± 0.009%/h; lower protein, 0.061 ± 0.005 to 0.045 ± 0.006%/h; P resistance exercise (higher protein, 0.067 ± 0.01%/h; lower protein, 0.061 ± 0.006%/h), and integrated MPS followed a similar pattern. There was no change in MPB (energy balance, 0.080 ± 0.01%/hr; ER rested legs, 0.078 ± 0.008%/hr; ER exercised legs, 0.079 ± 0.006%/hr). We conclude that a reduction in MPS is the main mechanism that underpins LBM loss early in ER in adult men.-Hector, A. J., McGlory, C., Damas, F., Mazara, N., Baker, S. K., Phillips, S. M. Pronounced energy restriction with elevated protein intake results in no change in proteolysis and reductions in skeletal muscle protein synthesis that are mitigated by resistance exercise. © FASEB.

  13. Coexistence of protease sensitive and resistant prion protein in 129VV homozygous sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Martínez Ana B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The coexistence of different molecular types of classical protease-resistant prion protein in the same individual have been described, however, the simultaneous finding of these with the recently described protease-sensitive variant or variably protease-sensitive prionopathy has, to the best of our knowledge, not yet been reported. Case presentation A 74-year-old Caucasian woman showed a sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease clinical phenotype with reactive depression, followed by cognitive impairment, akinetic-rigid Parkinsonism with pseudobulbar syndrome and gait impairment with motor apraxia, visuospatial disorientation, and evident frontal dysfunction features such as grasping, palmomental reflex and brisk perioral reflexes. She died at age 77. Neuropathological findings showed: spongiform change in the patient’s cerebral cortex, striatum, thalamus and molecular layer of the cerebellum with proteinase K-sensitive synaptic-like, dot-like or target-like prion protein deposition in the cortex, thalamus and striatum; proteinase K-resistant prion protein in the same regions; and elongated plaque-like proteinase K-resistant prion protein in the molecular layer of the cerebellum. Molecular analysis of prion protein after proteinase K digestion revealed decreased signal intensity in immunoblot, a ladder-like protein pattern, and a 71% reduction of PrPSc signal relative to non-digested material. Her cerebellum showed a 2A prion protein type largely resistant to proteinase K. Genotype of polymorphism at codon 129 was valine homozygous. Conclusion Molecular typing of prion protein along with clinical and neuropathological data revealed, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of the coexistence of different protease-sensitive prion proteins in the same patient in a rare case that did not fulfill the current clinical diagnostic criteria for either probable or possible sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. This highlights the

  14. Involvement of miR-326 in chemotherapy resistance of breast cancer through modulating expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhongxing; Wu, Hui; Xia, James; Li, Yuhua; Zhang, Yawei; Huang, Ke; Wagar, Nicholas; Yoon, Younghyoun; Cho, Heidi T; Scala, Stefania; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2010-03-15

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP-1/ABCC1) transports a wide range of therapeutic agents and may play a critical role in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells. However, the regulation of MRP-1 remains controversial. To explore whether miRNAs are involved in the regulation of MRP-1 expression and modulate the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents, we analyzed miRNA expression levels in VP-16-resistant MDR cell line, MCF-7/VP, in comparison with its parent cell line, MCF-7, using a miRNA microarray. MCF-7/VP overexpressed MRP-1 mRNA and protein not MDR-1 and BCRP. miR-326 was downregulated in MCF-7/VP compared to MCF-7. Additionally, miR-326 was downregulated in a panel of advanced breast cancer tissues and consistent reversely with expression levels of MRP-1. Furthermore, the elevated levels of miR-326 in the mimics-transfected VP-16-resistant cell line, MCF-7/VP, downregulated MRP-1 expression and sensitized these cells to VP-16 and doxorubicin. These findings demonstrate for the first time the involvement of miRNAs in multidrug resistance mediated by MRP-1 and suggest that miR-326 may be an efficient agent for preventing and reversing MDR in tumor cells. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Initial infection of roots and leaves reveals different resistance phenotypes associated with coat protein gene-mediated resistance to Potato mop-top virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germundsson, Anna; Sandgren, Maria; Barker, Hugh; Savenkov, Eugene I; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2002-05-01

    Resistance to the pomovirus Potato mop-top virus (PMTV) was studied in potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Saturna) and Nicotiana benthamiana transformed with the coat protein (CP) gene of PMTV. The incidence of PMTV infections was reduced in tubers of the CP-transgenic potatoes grown in the field in soil infested with the viruliferous vector, Spongospora subterranea. However, in those tubers that were infected, all three virus RNAs were detected and virus titres were high. The CP-transgenic N. benthamiana plants were inoculated with PMTV using two methods. Following mechanical inoculation of leaves, no RNA 3 (the CP-encoding RNA homologous to the transgene) was detected in leaves, but in some plants low amounts of RNA 3 were detected in roots; RNA 2 was readily detected in leaves and roots of several plants. Inoculation of roots using viruliferous S. subterranea resulted in infection of roots in all plants and the three PMTV RNAs were detected. However, no systemic movement of PMTV from roots to the above-ground parts was observed, indicating a novel expression of resistance. These data indicate that the CP gene-mediated resistance to PMTV specifically restricts accumulation of PMTV RNA 3, and is more effective in leaves than roots. Furthermore, expression of resistance is different depending on whether leaves or roots are inoculated. Data do not exclude the possibility that both a protein-mediated and an RNA-mediated resistance mechanism are involved.

  16. Acute and long-term effects of resistance exercise with or without protein ingestion on muscle hypertrophy and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulmi, Juha J; Kovanen, Vuokko; Selänne, Harri; Kraemer, William J; Häkkinen, Keijo; Mero, Antti A

    2009-07-01

    The effects of timed ingestion of high-quality protein before and after resistance exercise are not well known. In this study, young men were randomized to protein (n = 11), placebo (n = 10) and control (n = 10) groups. Muscle cross-sectional area by MRI and muscle forces were analyzed before and after 21 weeks of either heavy resistance training (RT) or control period. Muscle biopsies were taken before, and 1 and 48 h after 5 x 10 repetition leg press exercise (RE) as well as 21 weeks after RT. Protein (15 g of whey both before and after exercise) or non-energetic placebo were provided to subjects in the context of both single RE bout (acute responses) as well as each RE workout twice a week throughout the 21-week-RT. Protein intake increased (P protein supplementation. Moreover, protein intake seemed to prevent 1 h post-RE decrease in myostatin and myogenin mRNA expression but did not affect activin receptor IIb, p21, FLRG, MAFbx or MyoD expression. In conclusion, protein intake close to resistance exercise workout may alter mRNA expression in a manner advantageous for muscle hypertrophy.

  17. An improved algorithm for activated protein C resistance and factor V Leiden screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskovits, Adrianna Z; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Lemire, Susan J; Lindeman, Neal I; Dorfman, David M

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the performance of a Russell viper venom-based activated protein C resistance (APCR) screening test relative to DNA analysis for the factor V Leiden mutation. We evaluated the concordance between Pefakit APCR screening results and DNA analysis for 435 patients homozygous (n = 11), heterozygous (n = 310), or wild-type (n =114) for the G1691A allele. Using receiver operating characteristic analysis, we found that a cutoff of 1.89 for the APCR ratio yields a sensitivity and specificity of 99.1%. In patients with discrepant genotype-phenotype correlation, their APCR may provide a more clinically relevant result. We compared several strategies for employing reflex testing and found that performing initial APCR screening followed by confirmatory molecular analysis on a subset of cases in the borderline regions between the diagnostic groups can reduce unnecessary testing by approximately 80% without compromising diagnostic accuracy.

  18. Influence of 3 Months Resistance Training on C-Reactive Protein Serum Levels and Muscle Hypertrophy in Elderly Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Saremi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Sarcopenia is the decline of muscle mass and strength with age. Evidence suggests that inflammation play important roles in age-related muscle atrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 3 months resistance training on skeletal muscle mass and C-reactive protein levels in elderly men. Methods & Materials: In this quasi – experimental study with pretest–posttest design, twenty-five middle-age men (age: 64.10±3.40 yr, body mass index: 28.29±2.38 kg/m 2 were randomly assigned to resistance training (n=13 and control (n=12 groups. Resistance training program was performed 50-60 min/d, 3d/wk, for 3 months. Serum C-reactive protein levels and body composition (DEXA were measured before and after the intervention. Results: After resistance training, leg press (lower body strength index, bench press (upper body strength index, and skeletal muscle mass were significantly increased (P0.05. Concurrently, C-reactive protein levels were significantly decreased in training group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Three months resistance training caused an improvement in muscle mass and strength in elderly men, and this improvement were accompanied by decreases in C-reactive protein serum levels.

  19. Muscle strength and hypertrophy occur independently of protein supplementation during short-term resistance training in untrained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Carleigh H; Stout, Jeffrey R; Beyer, Kyle S; Fukuda, David H; Hoffman, Jay R

    2015-08-01

    Short-term resistance training has consistently demonstrated gains in muscular strength, but not hypertrophy. Post-resistance training protein ingestion is posited to augment the acute anabolic stimulus, thus potentially accelerating changes in muscle size and strength. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of 4 weeks of resistance training with protein supplementation on strength and muscle morphology changes in untrained men. Participants (mean ± SD; N = 18; age, 22.0 ± 2.5 years; body mass index, 25.1 ± 5.4 kg · m(-2)) were randomly assigned to a resistance training + protein group (n = 9; whey (17 g) + colostrum (3 g) + leucine (2 g)) or a resistance training + placebo group (n = 9). One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength in the leg press (LP) and leg extension (LE) exercises, maximal isometric knee extensor strength (MVIC), and muscle morphology (thickness (MT), cross-sectional area (CSA), pennation angle) of the dominant rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) was assessed before and after training. Participants performed LP and LE exercises (3 × 8-10; at 80% 1RM) 3 days/week for 4 weeks. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Four weeks of resistance training resulted in significant increases in LP (p supplementation.

  20. An autoactive mutant of the M flax rust resistance protein has a preference for binding ATP, whereas wild-type M protein binds ADP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Simon J; Sornaraj, Pradeep; deCourcy-Ireland, Emma; Menz, R Ian; Kobe, Bostjan; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Dodds, Peter N; Anderson, Peter A

    2011-08-01

    Resistance (R) proteins are key regulators of the plant innate immune system and are capable of pathogen detection and activation of the hypersensitive cell death immune response. To understand the molecular mechanism of R protein activation, we undertook a phenotypic and biochemical study of the flax nucleotide binding (NB)-ARC leucine-rich repeat protein, M. Using Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression in flax cotyledons, site-directed mutations of key residues within the P-loop, kinase 2, and MHD motifs within the NB-ARC domain of M were shown to affect R protein function. When purified using a yeast expression system and assayed for ATP and ADP, these mutated proteins exhibited marked differences in the quantity and identity of the bound nucleotide. ADP was bound to recombinant wild-type M protein, while the nonfunctional P-loop mutant did not have any nucleotides bound. In contrast, ATP was bound to an autoactive M protein mutated in the highly conserved MHD motif. These data provide direct evidence supporting a model of R protein function in which the "off" R protein binds ADP and activation of R protein defense signaling involves the exchange of ADP for ATP.

  1. Modulation of proteolytic polyprotein processing by coxsackievirus mutants resistant to inhibitors targeting phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase IIIβ or oxysterol binding protein

    OpenAIRE

    Lyoo, Heyrhyoung; Dorobantu, Cristina M; van der Schaar, Hilde M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2017-01-01

    Enteroviruses (e.g. poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and rhinovirus) require several host factors for genome replication. Among these host factors are phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase IIIβ (PI4KB) and oxysterol binding protein (OSBP). Enterovirus mutants resistant to inhibitors of PI4KB and OSBP were previously isolated, which demonstrated a role of single substitutions in the non-structural 3A protein in conferring resistance. Besides the 3A substitutions (i.e., 3A-I54F and 3A-H57Y) in coxsackieviru...

  2. Suppression among alleles encoding nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat resistance proteins interferes with resistance in F1 hybrid and allele-pyramided wheat plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnweis, Daniel; Milani, Samira D; Brunner, Susanne; Herren, Gerhard; Buchmann, Gabriele; Peditto, David; Jordan, Tina; Keller, Beat

    2014-09-01

    The development of high-yielding varieties with broad-spectrum durable disease resistance is the ultimate goal of crop breeding. In plants, immune receptors of the nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) class mediate race-specific resistance against pathogen attack. When employed in agriculture this type of resistance is often rapidly overcome by newly adapted pathogen races. The stacking of different resistance genes or alleles in F1 hybrids or in pyramided lines is a promising strategy for achieving more durable resistance. Here, we identify a molecular mechanism which can negatively interfere with the allele-pyramiding approach. We show that pairwise combinations of different alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3 in F1 hybrids and stacked transgenic wheat lines can result in suppression of Pm3-based resistance. This effect is independent of the genetic background and solely dependent on the Pm3 alleles. Suppression occurs at the post-translational level, as levels of RNA and protein in the suppressed alleles are unaffected. Using a transient expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana, the LRR domain was identified as the domain conferring suppression. The results of this study suggest that the expression of closely related NB-LRR resistance genes or alleles in the same genotype can lead to dominant-negative interactions. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the frequently observed ineffectiveness of resistance genes introduced from the secondary gene pool into polyploid crop species and mark an important step in overcoming this limitation. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Nrf2 pathway regulates multidrug-resistance-associated protein 1 in small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Ji

    Full Text Available Although multidrug-resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1 is a major contributor to multi-drug resistance (MDR, the regulatory mechanism of Mrp1 still remains unclear. Nrf2 is a transcription factor that regulates cellular defense response through antioxidant response elements (AREs in normal tissues. Recently, Nrf2 has emerged as an important contributor to chemo-resistance in tumor tissues. In the present study, the role of Nrf2-ARE pathway on regulation of Mrp1 was investigated. Compared with H69 lung cancer cells, H69AR cells with MDR showed significantly higher Nrf2-ARE pathway activity and expression of Mrp1 as well. When Nrf2 was knocked down in H69AR cells, MRP1's expression decreased accordingly. Moreover, those H69AR cells with reduced Nrf2 level restored sensitivity to chemo-drugs. To explore how Nrf2-ARE pathway regulates Mrp1, the promoter of Mrp1 gene was searched, and two putative AREs--ARE1 and ARE2--were found. Using reporter gene and ChIP assay, both ARE1 and ARE2 showed response to and interaction with Nrf2. In 40 cases of cancer tissues, the expression of Nrf2 and MRP1 was measured by immunohistochemistry (IHC. As the quantitive data of IHC indicated, both Nrf2 and MRP1 showed significantly higher expression in tumor tissue than adjacent non-tumor tissue. And more important, the correlation analysis of the two genes proved that their expression was correlative. Taken together, theses data suggested that Nrf2-ARE pathway is required for the regulatory expression of Mrp1 and implicated Nrf2 as a new therapeutic target for MDR.

  4. Lignans and norlignans inhibit multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1)-mediated transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Anna; Eklund, Patrik; Bobrowska-Hägerstrand, Malgorzata; Hägerstrand, Henry

    2010-11-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is one of the drug efflux pumps mediating multidrug resistance in several cancer types. Efficient nontoxic inhibitors of MRP1-mediated transport are sought to potentially sensitise cancer cells to anticancer drugs. This study examined the potency of a series of plant lignans and norlignans of various structures to inhibit MRP1-mediated transport from human erythrocytes. The occurrence of MRP1 in the human erythrocyte membrane makes this cell a useful model in searching for efficient MRP1inhibitors. The inhibition of 2',7'-bis-(carboxypropyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCPCF) transport from human erythrocytes was measured fluorymetrically. In order to study possible membrane-perturbing effects of lignans and norlignans, the potency of these compounds to induce haemolysis, erythrocyte shape change, and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure in the external layer of the erythrocyte membrane was examined. Nine compounds (six norlignans and three lignans) of the fourteen that were tested inhibited BCPCF transport from human erythrocytes. The most efficient inhibitor, the norlignan coded L1, had IC(50)=50 μM. Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that the strongest inhibitors were found among lignans and norlignans bearing a carbonyl function at position C-9. The highly oxidised structures and the presence of an ionisable group such as the carboxylic acid function enhance activity. All compounds that significantly decreased BCPCF transport were non-haemolytic, did not cause PS exposure and did not have any effect on erythrocyte shapes up to 200 μM. Lignans and norlignans can inhibit MRP1-mediated transport from human erythrocytes and should be further investigated as possible agents reversing multidrug resistance.

  5. Soybean dwarf virus-resistant transgenic soybeans with the sense coat protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougou, Makoto; Yamagishi, Noriko; Furutani, Noriyuki; Shizukawa, Yoshiaki; Takahata, Yoshihito; Hidaka, Soh

    2007-11-01

    We transformed a construct containing the sense coat protein (CP) gene of Soybean dwarf virus (SbDV) into soybean somatic embryos via microprojectile bombardment to acquire SbDV-resistant soybean plants. Six independent T(0) plants were obtained. One of these transgenic lines was subjected to further extensive analysis. Three different insertion patterns of Southern blot hybridization analysis in T(1) plants suggested that these insertions introduced in T(0) plants were segregated from each other or co-inherited in T(1) progenies. These insertions were classified into two types, which overexpressed SbDV-CP mRNA and accumulated SbDV-CP-specific short interfering RNA (siRNA), or repressed accumulation of SbDV-CP mRNA and siRNA by RNA analysis prior to SbDV inoculation. After inoculation of SbDV by the aphids, most T(2) plants of this transgenic line remained symptomless, contained little SbDV-specific RNA by RNA dot-blot hybridization analysis and exhibited SbDV-CP-specific siRNA. We discuss here the possible mechanisms of the achieved resistance, including the RNA silencing.

  6. The Escherichia coli BtuE protein functions as a resistance determinant against reactive oxygen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe A Arenas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work shows that the recently described Escherichia coli BtuE peroxidase protects the bacterium against oxidative stress that is generated by tellurite and by other reactive oxygen species elicitors (ROS. Cells lacking btuE (ΔbtuE displayed higher sensitivity to K(2TeO(3 and other oxidative stress-generating agents than did the isogenic, parental, wild-type strain. They also exhibited increased levels of cytoplasmic reactive oxygen species, oxidized proteins, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and lipoperoxides. E. coli ΔbtuE that was exposed to tellurite or H(2O(2 did not show growth changes relative to wild type cells either in aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Nevertheless, the elimination of btuE from cells deficient in catalases/peroxidases (Hpx(- resulted in impaired growth and resistance to these toxicants only in aerobic conditions, suggesting that BtuE is involved in the defense against oxidative damage. Genetic complementation of E. coli ΔbtuE restored toxicant resistance to levels exhibited by the wild type strain. As expected, btuE overexpression resulted in decreased amounts of oxidative damage products as well as in lower transcriptional levels of the oxidative stress-induced genes ibpA, soxS and katG.

  7. Overcoming chemotherapy drug resistance by targeting inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Rama; McCallum, Jennifer E; Varghese, Elizabeth; Florea, Ana-Maria; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2017-07-01

    Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) are a family of proteins that play a significant role in the control of programmed cell death (PCD). PCD is essential to maintain healthy cell turnover within tissue but also to fight disease or infection. Uninhibited, IAPs can suppress apoptosis and promote cell cycle progression. Therefore, it is unsurprising that cancer cells demonstrate significantly elevated expression levels of IAPs, resulting in improved cell survival, enhanced tumor growth and subsequent metastasis. Therapies to target IAPs in cancer has garnered substantial scientific interest and as resistance to anti-cancer agents becomes more prevalent, targeting IAPs has become an increasingly attractive strategy to re-sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapies, antibody based-therapies and TRAIL therapy. Antagonism strategies to modulate the actions of XIAP, cIAP1/2 and survivin are the central focus of current research and this review highlights advances within this field with particular emphasis upon the development and specificity of second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (SMAC) mimetics (synthetic analogs of endogenously expressed inhibitors of IAPs SMAC/DIABLO). While we highlight the potential of SMAC mimetics as effective single agent or combinatory therapies to treat cancer we also discuss the likely clinical implications of resistance to SMAC mimetic therapy, occasionally observed in cancer cell lines.

  8. Enhanced disease resistance and drought tolerance in transgenic rice plants overexpressing protein elicitors from Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenzhen; Han, Qiang; Zi, Qian; Lv, Shun; Qiu, Dewen; Zeng, Hongmei

    2017-01-01

    Exogenous application of the protein elicitors MoHrip1 and MoHrip2, which were isolated from the pathogenic fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (M. oryzae), was previously shown to induce a hypersensitive response in tobacco and to enhance resistance to rice blast. In this work, we successfully transformed rice with the mohrip1 and mohrip2 genes separately. The MoHrip1 and MoHrip2 transgenic rice plants displayed higher resistance to rice blast and stronger tolerance to drought stress than wild-type (WT) rice and the vector-control pCXUN rice. The expression of salicylic acid (SA)- and abscisic acid (ABA)-related genes was also increased, suggesting that these two elicitors may trigger SA signaling to protect the rice from damage during pathogen infection and regulate the ABA content to increase drought tolerance in transgenic rice. Trypan blue staining indicated that expressing MoHrip1 and MoHrip2 in rice plants inhibited hyphal growth of the rice blast fungus. Relative water content (RWC), water usage efficiency (WUE) and water loss rate (WLR) were measured to confirm the high capacity for water retention in transgenic rice. The MoHrip1 and MoHrip2 transgenic rice also exhibited enhanced agronomic traits such as increased plant height and tiller number.

  9. Protein-inspired antibiotics active against vancomycin- and daptomycin-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaskovich, Mark A T; Hansford, Karl A; Gong, Yujing; Butler, Mark S; Muldoon, Craig; Huang, Johnny X; Ramu, Soumya; Silva, Alberto B; Cheng, Mu; Kavanagh, Angela M; Ziora, Zyta; Premraj, Rajaratnam; Lindahl, Fredrik; Bradford, Tanya A; Lee, June C; Karoli, Tomislav; Pelingon, Ruby; Edwards, David J; Amado, Maite; Elliott, Alysha G; Phetsang, Wanida; Daud, Noor Huda; Deecke, Johan E; Sidjabat, Hanna E; Ramaologa, Sefetogi; Zuegg, Johannes; Betley, Jason R; Beevers, Andrew P G; Smith, Richard A G; Roberts, Jason A; Paterson, David L; Cooper, Matthew A

    2018-01-02

    The public health threat posed by a looming 'post-antibiotic' era necessitates new approaches to antibiotic discovery. Drug development has typically avoided exploitation of membrane-binding properties, in contrast to nature's control of biological pathways via modulation of membrane-associated proteins and membrane lipid composition. Here, we describe the rejuvenation of the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin via selective targeting of bacterial membranes. Peptide libraries based on positively charged electrostatic effector sequences are ligated to N-terminal lipophilic membrane-insertive elements and then conjugated to vancomycin. These modified lipoglycopeptides, the 'vancapticins', possess enhanced membrane affinity and activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other Gram-positive bacteria, and retain activity against glycopeptide-resistant strains. Optimised antibiotics show in vivo efficacy in multiple models of bacterial infection. This membrane-targeting strategy has potential to 'revitalise' antibiotics that have lost effectiveness against recalcitrant bacteria, or enhance the activity of other intravenous-administered drugs that target membrane-associated receptors.

  10. Deficiency of a glycogen synthase-associated protein, Epm2aip1, causes decreased glycogen synthesis and hepatic insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Julie; Tiberia, Erica; Pereira, Sandra; Zhao, Xiaochu; Pencea, Nela; Wheeler, Anne L; Yu, Wen Qin; Ivovic, Alexander; Naranian, Taline; Israelian, Nyrie; Draginov, Arman; Piliguian, Mark; Frankland, Paul W; Wang, Peixiang; Ackerley, Cameron A; Giacca, Adria; Minassian, Berge A

    2013-11-29

    Glycogen synthesis is a major component of the insulin response, and defective glycogen synthesis is a major portion of insulin resistance. Insulin regulates glycogen synthase (GS) through incompletely defined pathways that activate the enzyme through dephosphorylation and, more potently, allosteric activation. We identify Epm2aip1 as a GS-associated protein. We show that the absence of Epm2aip1 in mice impairs allosteric activation of GS by glucose 6-phosphate, decreases hepatic glycogen synthesis, increases liver fat, causes hepatic insulin resistance, and protects against age-related obesity. Our work identifies a novel GS-associated GS activity-modulating component of insulin resistance.

  11. Assessing Proteinase K Resistance of Fish Prion Proteins in a Scrapie-Infected Mouse Neuroblastoma Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Salta

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The key event in prion pathogenesis is the structural conversion of the normal cellular protein, PrPC, into an aberrant and partially proteinase K resistant isoform, PrPSc. Since the minimum requirement for a prion disease phenotype is the expression of endogenous PrP in the host, species carrying orthologue prion genes, such as fish, could in theory support prion pathogenesis. Our previous work has demonstrated the development of abnormal protein deposition in sea bream brain, following oral challenge of the fish with natural prion infectious material. In this study, we used a prion-infected mouse neuroblastoma cell line for the expression of three different mature fish PrP proteins and the evaluation of the resistance of the exogenously expressed proteins to proteinase K treatment (PK, as an indicator of a possible prion conversion. No evidence of resistance to PK was detected for any of the studied recombinant proteins. Although not indicative of an absolute inability of the fish PrPs to structurally convert to pathogenic isoforms, the absence of PK-resistance may be due to supramolecular and conformational differences between the mammalian and piscine PrPs.

  12. Recent Perspectives Regarding the Role of Dietary Protein for the Promotion of Muscle Hypertrophy with Resistance Exercise Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner Stokes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle supports locomotion and serves as the largest site of postprandial glucose disposal; thus it is a critical organ for physical and metabolic health. Skeletal muscle mass is regulated by the processes of muscle protein synthesis (MPS and muscle protein breakdown (MPB, both of which are sensitive to external loading and aminoacidemia. Hyperaminoacidemia results in a robust but transient increase in rates of MPS and a mild suppression of MPB. Resistance exercise potentiates the aminoacidemia-induced rise in MPS that, when repeated over time, results in gradual radial growth of skeletal muscle (i.e., hypertrophy. Factors that affect MPS include both quantity and composition of the amino acid source. Specifically, MPS is stimulated in a dose-responsive manner and the primary amino acid agonist of this process is leucine. MPB also appears to be regulated in part by protein intake, which can exert a suppressive effect on MPB. At high protein doses the suppression of MPB may interfere with skeletal muscle adaptation following resistance exercise. In this review, we examine recent advancements in our understanding of how protein ingestion impacts skeletal muscle growth following resistance exercise in young adults during energy balance and energy restriction. We also provide practical recommendations for exercisers who wish to maximize the hypertrophic response of skeletal muscle during resistance exercise training.

  13. Immune responses and protection against experimental challenge after vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51 or RB51 overexpressing superoxide dismutase and glycosyltransferase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, S C; Boyle, S M; Schurig, G G; Sriranganathan, N N

    2009-04-01

    Vaccination is a tool that could be beneficial in managing the high prevalence of brucellosis in free-ranging bison in Yellowstone National Park. In this study, we characterized immunologic responses and protection against experimental challenge after vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) or a recombinant RB51 strain overexpressing superoxide dismutase (sodC) and glycosyltransferase (wboA) genes (RB51+sodC,wboA). Bison were vaccinated with saline only or with 4.6 x 10(10) CFU of RB51 or 7.4 x 10(10) CFU of RB51+sodC,wboA (n = eight animals/treatment). Bison vaccinated with RB51 or RB51+sodC,wboA had greater (P RB51 after vaccination than did nonvaccinates. However, bison vaccinated with RB51+sodC,wboA cleared the vaccine strain from draining lymph nodes faster than bison vaccinated with the parental RB51 strain. Immunologic responses of bison vaccinated with RB51+sodC,wboA were similar to responses of bison vaccinated with RB51. Pregnant bison were intraconjunctivally challenged in midgestation with 10(7) CFU of B. abortus strain 2308. Bison vaccinated with RB51, but not RB51+sodC,wboA vaccinates, had greater protection from abortion, fetal/uterine, mammary, or maternal infection than nonvaccinates. Our data suggest that the RB51+sodC,wboA strain is less efficacious as a calfhood vaccine for bison than the parental RB51 strain. Our data also suggest that the RB51 vaccine is a currently available management tool that could be utilized to help reduce brucellosis in free-ranging bison.

  14. Ginsenoside Rb1 Reduces Nitric Oxide Production via Inhibition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ginsenoside Rb1 Reduces Nitric Oxide Production via Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-κB Activation in Interleukin-1β- Stimulated SW1353 Chondrosarcoma Cells. P Jia, G Chen, R Li, X Rong, G Zhou, Y Zhong ...

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum-quality control chaperones facilitate the biogenesis of cf receptor-like proteins involved in pathogen resistance of tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebrand, T.W.H.; Smit, P.; Abd-El-Haliem, A.; Jonge, de R.; Cordewener, J.H.G.; America, A.H.P.; Sklenar, J.; Jones, A.M.; Robatzek, S.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.; Tameling, W.I.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Cf proteins are receptor-like proteins (RLPs) that mediate resistance of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to the foliar pathogen Cladosporium fulvum. These transmembrane immune receptors, which carry extracellular leucine-rich repeats that are subjected to posttranslational glycosylation, perceive

  16. Effects of protein supplementation in older adults undergoing resistance training: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Débora; Goltz, Fernanda Reistenbach; Umpierre, Daniel; Meyer, Elisabeth; Rosa, Luis Henrique Telles; Schneider, Cláudia Dornelles

    2015-02-01

    Older individuals present reductions in muscle mass and physical function, as well as a blunted muscle protein synthesis response to amino acid administration and physical activity. Although resistance training is an effective intervention to slow down muscle impairments in the elderly, there is no consensus whether a combination with protein supplementation could offer additional benefits to an older population. We aimed to systematically summarize and quantify whether protein supplementation could optimize the effects of resistance training on muscle mass and strength in an aged population. A structured literature search was conducted on MEDLINE (PubMed), Cochrane, EMBASE and LILACS databases. The search had no period or language restrictions. Inclusion criteria comprised study design (randomized controlled trials-RCTs), sample mean age (60 years and over) and intervention (a resistance training program for a period of 6 weeks or longer combined with protein or amino acids supplementation). Two independent reviewers performed the study selection and data extraction. Continuous data on fat-free mass, muscle mass and muscle strength were pooled using a random-effects model. Of the 540 articles reviewed, 29 eligible articles underwent full-text evaluation. Nine RCTs (462 subjects) met the inclusion criteria and were included in the study. The mean age of the participants ranged from 61 to 79 years old. Protein supplementation protocols varied widely throughout the studies. Three studies used quantities related to the body mass of the participants and the other six trials provided supplements in daily amounts, independently of subjects' body masses. Overall, protein supplementation in combination with resistance training was associated with gains in fat-free mass, resulting in a standardized mean difference (SMD) of 0.23 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.05-0.42]. However, protein supplementation was not associated with changes in muscle mass (0.14, 95% CI -0.05 to 0

  17. Outer Membrane Protein D Gene in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and its Role in Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Neda Motaghi; Sohrab Najafipour

    2016-01-01

    Background & Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of nosocomial infection. OprD protein is a specific protein regulating the uptake of carbapenem antibiotic. Loss of OprD is the main mechanism of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa resistance to carbapenem. In this study, the presence of OprD gene is investigated in isolated Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in burn patients of Ghotboddin hospital in Shiraz. Material & Methods: 66 Pseudomonas Aeruginosa were isolated from wound specimens of 250 b...

  18. The synthesis and protein resistance of amphiphilic PDMS-b-(PDMS-g-cysteine) copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yufeng; Lin, Yaling; Zhang, Anqiang

    2017-10-01

    Zwitterionic polymers have been used to cope with nonspecific protein adsorption and bio-fouling problems for a wide range of materials, including biomedical devices, marine coatings and membrane separation. However, direct surface modification with highly water-soluble zwitterionic polymers is rather difficult due to their poor attachment to hydrophobic solid surfaces. In this work, we utilize the hydrophobic interaction to anchor zwitterionic polysiloxanes grafted with cysteine onto surfaces by adding an hydrophobic block of polydimethylsiloxanes, referred as PDMS-b-(PDMS-g-Cys)s. The synthesis involves only three steps of reactions, and the structures of each product were characterized using GPC, FT-IR and 1H NMR. The adsorption and protein resistance of PDMS-b-(PDMS-g-Cys)s on a gold surface are investigated with QCM-D. The results show that the hydrophobic interaction moieties of the additional PDMS blocks help the hydrophilic cysteine-grafted blocks stably attach and then function on the sensor. These findings suggest that the addition of hydrophobic moieties provides an effective approach to construct anti-fouling interfaces with zwitterionic polymers in aqueous solution.

  19. Clinical significance of acquired activated protein C resistance in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Rodríguez, F J; Reverter, J C; Font, J; Tàssies, D; Espinosa, G; Cervera, R; Carmona, F; Balsch, J; Ingelmo, M; Ordinas, A

    2002-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) may induce acquired activated protein C resistance (acquired APCR). The role of acquired APCR in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is not well known. To evaluate the prevalence of acquired APCR and its association with clinical manifestations we studied 103 consecutive SLE patients and 103 matched controls. APCR in the undiluted test and after dilution in factor V deficient plasma, factor V Leiden, protein C and S, lupus anticoagulant, and anti-cardiolipin, anti-beta2-glycoprotein I and anti-prothrombin antibodies were determined. Factor V Leiden was found in 4% in both patients and controls. The prevalence of acquired APCR was 22% for the undiluted assay and 17% in the diluted test. In SLE patients, acquired APCR was associated with aPL (39 vs 13% in undiluted assay, P = 0.007; and 33 vs 7% in the diluted test, P = 0.001). Arterial thromboses were found in 24% of patients with acquired APCR and in 6% of patients without (P = 0.04). However, no relationship was found with venous thrombosis. Acquired APCR was also associated with pregnancy losses: miscarriages in 70% of women with acquired APCR vs 32% in those without (P=0.03). Thus, in SLE patients acquired APCR seems to be associated with increased prevalence of arterial thrombosis and pregnancy losses.

  20. Histone acetylation and CREB binding protein are required for neuronal resistance against ischemic injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferah Yildirim

    Full Text Available Epigenetic transcriptional regulation by histone acetylation depends on the balance between histone acetyltransferase (HAT and deacetylase activities (HDAC. Inhibition of HDAC activity provides neuroprotection, indicating that the outcome of cerebral ischemia depends crucially on the acetylation status of histones. In the present study, we characterized the changes in histone acetylation levels in ischemia models of focal cerebral ischemia and identified cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB-binding protein (CBP as a crucial factor in the susceptibility of neurons to ischemic stress. Both neuron-specific RNA interference and neurons derived from CBP heterozygous knockout mice showed increased damage after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ischemic preconditioning by a short (5 min subthreshold occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA, followed 24 h afterwards by a 30 min occlusion of the MCA, increased histone acetylation levels in vivo. Ischemic preconditioning enhanced CBP recruitment and histone acetylation at the promoter of the neuroprotective gene gelsolin leading to increased gelsolin expression in neurons. Inhibition of CBP's HAT activity attenuated neuronal ischemic preconditioning. Taken together, our findings suggest that the levels of CBP and histone acetylation determine stroke outcome and are crucially associated with the induction of an ischemia-resistant state in neurons.

  1. Maximal COX-2 and ppRb expression in neurons occurs during early Braak stages prior to the maximal activation of astrocytes and microglia in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arendt Thomas

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuronal expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and cell cycle proteins is suggested to contribute to neurodegeneration during Alzheimer's disease (AD. The stimulus that induces COX-2 and cell cycle protein expression in AD is still elusive. Activated glia cells are shown to secrete substances that can induce expression of COX-2 and cell cycle proteins in vitro. Using post mortem brain tissue we have investigated whether activation of microglia and astrocytes in AD brain can be correlated with the expression of COX-2 and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (ppRb. The highest levels of neuronal COX-2 and ppRb immunoreactivity are observed in the first stages of AD pathology (Braak 0–II, Braak A. No significant difference in COX-2 or ppRb neuronal immunoreactivity is observed between Braak stage 0 and later Braak stages for neurofibrillary changes or amyloid plaques. The mean number of COX-2 or ppRb immunoreactive neurons is significantly decreased in Braak stage C compared to Braak stage A for amyloid deposits. Immunoreactivity for glial markers KP1, CR3/43 and GFAP appears in the later Braak stages and is significantly increased in Braak stage V-VI compared to Braak stage 0 for neurofibrillary changes. In addition, a significant negative correlation is observed between the presence of KP1, CR3/43 and GFAP immunoreactivity and the presence of neuronal immunoreactivity for COX-2 and ppRb. These data show that maximal COX-2 and ppRb immunoreactivity in neurons occurs during early Braak stages prior to the maximal activation of astrocytes and microglia. In contrast to in vitro studies, post mortem data do not support a causal relation between the activation of microglia and astrocytes and the expression of neuronal COX-2 and ppRb in the pathological cascade of AD.

  2. Investigation of the RbCa molecule: Experiment and theory

    OpenAIRE

    Pototschnig, Johann V.; Krois, G?nter; Lackner, Florian; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a thorough theoretical and experimental study of the electronic structure of RbCa. The mixed alkali?alkaline earth molecule RbCa was formed on superfluid helium nanodroplets. Excited states of the molecule in the range of 13?000?23?000?cm?1 were recorded by resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization time-of-flight spectroscopy. The experiment is accompanied by high level ab initio calculations of ground and excited state properties, utilizing a multireference configuration interact...

  3. The Re-evaluation of 84Rb decay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xiaolong; Zhou Chunmei

    1996-01-01

    The 84 Rb is an important radionuclide and its decay data are fundamental data in nuclear applications. The decay data for 84 Rb were re-evaluated. The energies and intensities of γ rays and their internal conversion coefficients, energies and intensities of Auger electrons, conversion electrons and x-rays, were recommended. The decay scheme was also given. The balance of radiation rays intensities and energies was checked. (9 tabs., 2 figs.)

  4. Coupled fast-thermal system at the 'RB' nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the analyses of the possibility of the coupled fast-thermal system (CFTS) design at the 'RB' nuclear reactor are shown. As the proof of the theoretical analyses the first stage CFTS-1 has been designed, realized, and tested. The excellent agreement between the results of the CFTS-1 studies and the theoretical predictions opens a straight way to the second, the final stage - realization of the designed CFST at the 'RB' nuclear reactor. (author)

  5. Coupled fast-thermal system at the 'RB' nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    1987-04-01

    The results of the analyses of the possibility of the coupled fast-thermal system (CFTS) design at the 'RB' nuclear reactor are shown. As the proof of the theoretical analyses the first stage CFTS-1 has been designed, realized, and tested. The excellent agreement between the results of the CFTS-1 studies and the theoretical predictions opens a straight way to the second, the final stage - realization of the designed CFST at the 'RB' nuclear reactor. (author)

  6. Molecular modification of Protein A to improve the elution pH and alkali resistance in affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hai-Feng; Liang, Zhen-Dong; Wang, Sha-Li; Wu, Pu-Qiang; Jin, Xiong-Hua

    2014-04-01

    Protein A of Staphylococcus aureus has been widely used as an affinity ligand for the purification of immunoglobulin. However, the low elution pH and the sensitivity to alkaline condition restricted the large-scale application of antibody purification. To overcome these disadvantages, the B domain was selected and mutated to Z domain and the recombinant Protein A was reconstructed by linking five Z domains. First, a section of six glycines was inserted into the second loop of Z domain, Z (6G). This increased the elution pH to 4.0-5.0. Then, the site-specific mutagenesis was conducted by replacing the 23rd asparagines to threonine and 30th phenylalanine to alanine, Z (N23T, F30A). These mutations made the recombinant Protein A shown a higher alkaline resistance than the nature Protein A. The work confirmed the modification of Protein A and exhibited the characteristics of recombinant Staphylococcal Protein A for antibody purification.

  7. Multidrug resistance protein 1 localization in lipid raft domains and prostasomes in prostate cancer cell lines

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    Gomà A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alba Gomà,1,* Roser Mir,1–3,* Fina Martínez-Soler,1,4 Avelina Tortosa,4 August Vidal,5,6 Enric Condom,5,6 Ricardo Pérez–Tomás,6 Pepita Giménez-Bonafé1 1Departament de Ciències Fisiològiques II, Faculty of Medicine, Campus of Health Sciences of Bellvitge, Universitat de Barcelona, IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain; 2División de Investigación Básica, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México DF, Mexico; 3Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM, México DF, Mexico; 4Department of Basic Nursing, School of Nursing of the Health Campus of Bellvitge, Universitat de Barcelona, 5Department of Pathology, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, 6Department of Pathology and Experimental Therapeutics, Universitat de Barcelona, IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain*These authors contributed equally to this work Background: One of the problems in prostate cancer (CaP treatment is the appearance of the multidrug resistance phenotype, in which ATP-binding cassette transporters such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1 play a role. Different localizations of the transporter have been reported, some of them related to the chemoresistant phenotype.Aim: This study aimed to compare the localization of MRP1 in three prostate cell lines (normal, androgen-sensitive, and androgen-independent in order to understand its possible role in CaP chemoresistance.Methods: MRP1 and caveolae protein markers were detected using confocal microscopy, performing colocalization techniques. Lipid raft isolation made it possible to detect these proteins by Western blot analysis. Caveolae and prostasomes were identified by electron microscopy.Results: We show that MRP1 is found in lipid raft fractions of tumor cells and that the number of caveolae increases with malignancy acquisition. MRP1 is found not only in the plasma membrane associated with lipid rafts but also in cytoplasmic accumulations colocalizing with the prostasome markers Caveolin-1 and CD59

  8. Profiling of gender-specific rat plasma proteins associated with susceptibility or resistance to diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Won; Liu, Hao; Choi, Duk Kwon; Oh, Tae Seok; Mukherjee, Rajib; Yun, Jong Won

    2012-02-02

    Obesity-prone (OP) and obesity-resistant (OR) rats with different responses to development of obesity in spite of the same genetic background are useful animal models for searching for markers during the development of obesity. Here, we investigated whether plasma proteins of OP and OR rats may behave in a different way in males and females. We performed a comparative proteomic analysis using 2-DE combined with MALDI-TOF/MS on proteins from OP and OR male and female rats to discover gender-specific rat plasma proteins associated with susceptibility or resistance to diet-induced obesity. A total of 29 proteins showing differential expression between the groups were identified by MALDI-TOF/MS and database searches. These proteins were classified into 4 groups according to their regulation patterns in response to diet and gender. 22 proteins showed significant differences between OP and OR rats in males and/or females (Group I, II, and III) and 7 proteins exhibited only a high fat diet (HFD)-responsive difference in male or female rats (Group IV). In conclusion, the proteins negatively (ITIH3, FGG, TUBB5, and ZAG) or positively (Hp, ITIH4, and RBP) correlated with obesity found in this study could be used for selection of new targets for gender specific-medical treatment of obesity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Post-streptococcal auto-antibodies inhibit protein disulfide isomerase and are associated with insulin resistance.

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    Adi Aran

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-streptococcal autoimmunity affects millions worldwide, targeting multiple organs including the heart, brain, and kidneys. To explore the post-streptococcal autoimmunity spectrum, we used western blot analyses, to screen 310 sera from healthy subjects with (33% and without (67% markers of recent streptococcal infections [anti-Streptolysin O (ASLO or anti-DNAse B (ADB]. A 58 KDa protein, reacting strongly with post-streptococcal sera, was identified as Protein Disulfide Isomerase (PDI, an abundant protein with pleiotropic metabolic, immunologic, and thrombotic effects. Anti-PDI autoantibodies, purified from human sera, targeted similar epitopes in Streptolysin O (SLO, P51-61 and PDI (P328-338. The correlation between post-streptococcal status and anti-human PDI auto-immunity was further confirmed in a total of 2987 samples (13.6% in 530 ASLO positive versus 5.6% in 2457 ASLO negative samples, p<0.0001. Finally, anti-PDI auto-antibodies inhibited PDI-mediated insulin degradation in vitro (n = 90, p<0.001, and correlated with higher serum insulin (14.1 iu/ml vs. 12.2 iu/ml, n = 1215, p = 0.039 and insulin resistance (Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA 4.1 vs. 3.1, n = 1215, p = 0.004, in a population-based cohort. These results identify PDI as a major target of post-streptococcal autoimmunity, and establish a new link between infection, autoimmunity, and metabolic disturbances.

  10. Multidrug resistance protein MdtM adds to the repertoire of antiporters involved in alkaline pH homeostasis in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In neutralophilic bacteria, monovalent metal cation/H+ antiporters play a key role in pH homeostasis. In Escherichia coli, only four antiporters (NhaA, NhaB, MdfA and ChaA) are identified to function in maintenance of a stable cytoplasmic pH under conditions of alkaline stress. We hypothesised that the multidrug resistance protein MdtM, a recently characterised homologue of MdfA and a member of the major facilitator superfamily, also functions in alkaline pH homeostasis. Results Assays that compared the growth of an E. coli ΔmdtM deletion mutant transformed with a plasmid encoding wild-type MdtM or the dysfunctional MdtM D22A mutant at different external alkaline pH values (ranging from pH 8.5 to 10) revealed a potential contribution by MdtM to alkaline pH tolerance, but only when millimolar concentrations of sodium or potassium was present in the growth medium. Fluorescence-based activity assays using inverted vesicles generated from transformants of antiporter-deficient (ΔnhaA, ΔnhaB, ΔchaA) E. coli TO114 cells defined MdtM as a low-affinity antiporter that catalysed electrogenic exchange of Na+, K+, Rb+ or Li+ for H+. The K+/H+ antiport reaction had a pH optimum at 9.0, whereas the Na+/H+ exchange activity was optimum at pH 9.25. Measurement of internal cellular pH confirmed MdtM as contributing to maintenance of a stable cytoplasmic pH, acid relative to the external pH, under conditions of alkaline stress. Conclusions Taken together, the results support a role for MdtM in alkaline pH tolerance. MdtM can therefore be added to the currently limited list of antiporters known to function in pH homeostasis in the model organism E. coli. PMID:23701827

  11. Detection of First-Line Drug Resistance Mutations and Drug-Protein Interaction Dynamics from Tuberculosis Patients in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachappa, Somanna Ajjamada; Neelambike, Sumana M; Amruthavalli, Chokkanna; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2017-08-16

    Diagnosis of drug-resistant tuberculosis predominantly relies on culture-based drug susceptibility testing, which take weeks to produce a result and a more time-efficient alternative method is multiplex allele-specific PCR (MAS-PCR). Also, understanding the role of mutations in causing resistance helps better drug designing. To evaluate the ability of MAS-PCR in the detection of drug resistance and to understand the mechanism of interaction of drugs with mutant proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Detection of drug-resistant mutations using MAS-PCR and validation through DNA sequencing. MAS-PCR targeted five loci on three genes, katG 315 and inhA -15 for the drug isoniazid (INH), and rpoB 516, 526, and 531 for rifampicin (RIF). Furthermore, the sequence data were analyzed to study the effect on interaction of the anti-TB drug molecule with the target protein using in silico docking. We identified drug-resistant mutations in 8 out of 114 isolates with 2 of them as multidrug-resistant TB using MAS-PCR. DNA sequencing confirmed only six of these, recording a sensitivity of 85.7% and specificity of 99.3% for MAS-PCR. Molecular docking showed estimated free energy of binding (ΔG) being higher for RIF binding with RpoB S531L mutant. Codon 315 in KatG does not directly interact with INH but blocks the drug access to active site. We propose DNA sequencing-based drug resistance detection for TB, which is more accurate than MAS-PCR. Understanding the action of resistant mutations in disrupting the normal drug-protein interaction aids in designing effective drug alternatives.

  12. The CC domain structure from the wheat stem rust resistance protein Sr33 challenges paradigms for dimerization in plant NLR proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Lachlan W; Lavrencic, Peter; Bentham, Adam R; Cesari, Stella; Ericsson, Daniel J; Croll, Tristan; Turk, Dušan; Anderson, Peter A; Mark, Alan E; Dodds, Peter N; Mobli, Mehdi; Kobe, Bostjan; Williams, Simon J

    2016-10-17

    Plants use intracellular immunity receptors, known as nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs), to recognize specific pathogen effector proteins and induce immune responses. These proteins provide resistance to many of the world's most destructive plant pathogens, yet we have a limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms that lead to defense signaling. We examined the wheat NLR protein, Sr33, which is responsible for strain-specific resistance to the wheat stem rust pathogen, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici We present the solution structure of a coiled-coil (CC) fragment from Sr33, which adopts a four-helix bundle conformation. Unexpectedly, this structure differs from the published dimeric crystal structure of the equivalent region from the orthologous barley powdery mildew resistance protein, MLA10, but is similar to the structure of the distantly related potato NLR protein, Rx. We demonstrate that these regions are, in fact, largely monomeric and adopt similar folds in solution in all three proteins, suggesting that the CC domains from plant NLRs adopt a conserved fold. However, larger C-terminal fragments of Sr33 and MLA10 can self-associate both in vitro and in planta, and this self-association correlates with their cell death signaling activity. The minimal region of the CC domain required for both cell death signaling and self-association extends to amino acid 142, thus including 22 residues absent from previous biochemical and structural protein studies. These data suggest that self-association of the minimal CC domain is necessary for signaling but is likely to involve a different structural basis than previously suggested by the MLA10 crystallographic dimer.

  13. Rapid growth reduces cold resistance: evidence from latitudinal variation in growth rate, cold resistance and stress proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoks, Robby; De Block, Marjan

    2011-02-24

    Physiological costs of rapid growth may contribute to the observation that organisms typically grow at submaximal rates. Although, it has been hypothesized that faster growing individuals would do worse in dealing with suboptimal temperatures, this type of cost has never been explored empirically. Furthermore, the mechanistic basis of the physiological costs of rapid growth is largely unexplored. Larvae of the damselfly Ischnura elegans from two univoltine northern and two multivoltine southern populations were reared at three temperatures and after emergence given a cold shock. Cold resistance, measured by chill coma recovery times in the adult stage, was lower in the southern populations. The faster larval growth rates in the southern populations contributed to this latitudinal pattern in cold resistance. In accordance with their assumed role in cold resistance, Hsp70 levels were lower in the southern populations, and faster growing larvae had lower Hsp70 levels. Yet, individual variation in Hsp70 levels did not explain variation in cold resistance. WE PROVIDE EVIDENCE FOR A NOVEL COST OF RAPID GROWTH: reduced cold resistance. Our results indicate that the reduced cold resistance in southern populations of animals that change voltinism along the latitudinal gradient may not entirely be explained by thermal selection per se but also by the costs of time constraint-induced higher growth rates. This also illustrates that stressors imposed in the larval stage may carry over and shape fitness in the adult stage and highlights the importance of physiological costs in the evolution of life-histories at macro-scales.

  14. Involvement of the Eukaryote-Like Kinase-Phosphatase System and a Protein That Interacts with Penicillin-Binding Protein 5 in Emergence of Cephalosporin Resistance in Cephalosporin-Sensitive Class A Penicillin-Binding Protein Mutants in Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbonnet, Charlene; Tait-Kamradt, Amelia; Garcia-Solache, Monica; Dunman, Paul; Coleman, Jeffrey; Arthur, Michel; Rice, Louis B

    2016-04-05

    The intrinsic resistance of Enterococcus faecium to ceftriaxone and cefepime (here referred to as "cephalosporins") is reliant on the presence of class A penicillin-binding proteins (Pbps) PbpF and PonA. Mutants lacking these Pbps exhibit cephalosporin susceptibility that is reversible by exposure to penicillin and by selection on cephalosporin-containing medium. We selected two cephalosporin-resistant mutants (Cro1 and Cro2) of class A Pbp-deficient E. faecium CV598. Genome analysis revealed changes in the serine-threonine kinase Stk in Cro1 and a truncation in the associated phosphatase StpA in Cro2 whose respective involvements in resistance were confirmed in separate complementation experiments. In an additional effort to identify proteins linked to cephalosporin resistance, we performed tandem affinity purification using Pbp5 as bait in penicillin-exposed E. faecium; these experiments yielded a protein designated Pbp5-associated protein (P5AP). Transcription of the P5AP gene was increased after exposure to penicillin in wild-type strains and in Cro2 and suppressed in Cro2 complemented with the wild-type stpA Transformation of class A Pbp-deficient strains with the plasmid-carried P5AP gene conferred cephalosporin resistance. These data suggest that Pbp5-associated cephalosporin resistance in E. faecium devoid of typical class A Pbps is related to the presence of P5AP, whose expression is influenced by the activity of the serine-threonine phosphatase/kinase system. β-Lactam antibiotics remain our most effective therapies against susceptible Gram-positive bacteria. The intrinsic resistance of Enterococcus faecium to β-lactams, particularly to cephalosporins, therefore represents a major limitation of therapy. Although the primary mechanism of resistance to β-lactams in E. faecium is the presence of low-affinity monofunctional transpeptidase (class B) penicillin-binding protein Pbp5, the interaction of Pbp5 with other proteins is fundamental to maintain a

  15. Study on expressions of heat shock 27-associated protein 1 and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 5 in drug-resistant epilepsy

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    CHEN Yun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the expressions of heat shock 27-associated protein 1 (HSPBAP1 and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 5 (EML5 in cerebrospinal fluid of drug-resistant epilepsy, and to explore the value in early diagnosis of epilepsy. Methods According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 79 patients admitted in Department of Neurology, Hubei Xinhua Hospital and the First and Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University were divided into drug-resistant epilepsy group (n = 39 and non-epileptic control group (n = 40. Cerebrospinal fluid (every sample 4 ml were collected by lumbar puncture specimens, and HSPBAP1 and EML5 were detected by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. SPSS 13.0 software was used for statistical analysis, and P ≤ 0.05 indicated significant differences. Results The expressions of HSPBAP1 and EML5 were 0.17 ± 0.03 and 0.13 ± 0.02 in drug-resistant epilepsy group, while were 0.10 ± 0.03 and 0.08 ± 0.02 in non-epileptic control group. There was significant difference between 2 groups (t = 3.239, P = 0.002; t = 3.294, P = 0.002, respectively. Conclusion The expressions of HSPBAP1 and EML5 were increased in drug-resistant epilepsy patients. This provides a new way for early diagnosis of drug-resistant epilepsy.

  16. RACK1 downregulates levels of the pro-apoptotic protein Fem1b in apoptosis-resistant colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subauste, M Cecilia; Ventura-Holman, Tereza; Du, Liqin; Subauste, Jose S; Chan, Shing-Leng; Yu, Victor C; Maher, Joseph F

    2009-12-01

    Evasion of apoptosis plays an important role in colon cancer progression. Following loss of the Apc tumor suppressor gene in mice, the gene encoding Fem1b is upregulated early in neoplastic intestinal epithelium. Fem1b is a pro-apoptotic protein that interacts with Fas, TNFR1 and Apaf-1, and increased expression of Fem1b induces apoptosis of cancer cells. Fem1b is a homolog of FEM-1, a protein in Caenorhabditis elegans that is negatively regulated by ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. To study Fem1b regulation in colon cancer progression, we used apoptotis-sensitive SW480 cells, derived from a primary colon cancer, and their isogenic, apoptosis-resistant counterparts SW620 cells, derived from a subsequent metastatic lesion in the same patient. Treatment with proteasome inhibitor increased Fem1b protein levels in SW620 cells, but not in SW480 cells. In SW620 cells we found that endogenous Fem1b co-immunoprecipitates in complexes with RACK1, a protein known to mediate ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of other pro-apoptotic proteins and to be upregulated in colon cancer. Full-length Fem1b, or the N-terminal region of Fem1b, associated with RACK1 when co-expressed in HEK293T cells, and RACK1 stimulated ubiquitination of Fem1b. RACK1 overexpression in SW620 cells led to downregulation of Fem1b protein levels. Conversely, downregulation of RACK1 led to upregulation of Fem1b protein levels, associated with induction of apoptosis, and this apoptosis was inhibited by blocking Fem1b protein upregulation. In conclusion, RACK1 downregulates levels of the pro-apoptotic protein Fem1b in metastatic, apoptosis-resistant colon cancer cells, which may promote apoptosis-resistance during progression of colon cancer.

  17. Neutralization-resistant variants of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus have altered virulence and tissue tropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C.H.; Winton, J.R.; Leong, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a rhabdovirus that causes an acute disease in salmon and trout. In this study, a correlation between changes in tissue tropism and specific changes in the virus genome appeared to be made by examining four IHNV neutralization-resistant variants (RB-1, RB-2, RB-3, and RB-4) that had been selected with the glycoprotein (G)-specific monoclonal antibody RB/B5. These variants were compared with the parental strain (RB-76) for their virulence and pathogenicity in rainbow trout after waterborne challenge. Variants RB-2, RB-3, and RB-4 were only slightly attenuated and showed distributions of viral antigen in the livers and hematopoietic tissues of infected fish similar to those of the parental strain. Variant RB-1, however, was highly attenuated and the tissue distribution of viral antigen in RB-1-infected fish was markedly different, with more viral antigen in brain tissue. The sequences of the G genes of all four variants and RB-76 were determined. No significant changes were found for the slightly attenuated variants, but RB-1 G had two changes at amino acids 78 and 218 that dramatically altered its predicted secondary structure. These changes are thought to be responsible for the altered tissue tropism of the virus. Thus, IHNV G, like that of rabies virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, plays an integral part in the pathogenesis of viral infection.

  18. Immune Response of Calves Vaccinated with Brucella abortus S19 or RB51 and Revaccinated with RB51.

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    Elaine M S Dorneles

    Full Text Available Brucella abortus S19 and RB51 strains have been successfully used to control bovine brucellosis worldwide; however, currently, most of our understanding of the protective immune response induced by vaccination comes from studies in mice. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare the immune responses induced in cattle prime-immunized with B. abortus S19 or RB51 and revaccinated with RB51. Female calves, aged 4 to 8 months, were vaccinated with either vaccine S19 (0.6-1.2 x 1011 CFU or RB51 (1.3 x 1010 CFU on day 0, and revaccinated with RB51 (1.3 x 1010 CFU on day 365 of the experiment. Characterization of the immune response was performed using serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 28, 210, 365, 393 and 575 post-immunization. Results showed that S19 and RB51 vaccination induced an immune response characterized by proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells; IFN-ɣ and IL-17A production by CD4+ T-cells; cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells; IL-6 secretion; CD4+ and CD8+ memory cells; antibodies of IgG1 class; and expression of the phenotypes of activation in T-cells. However, the immune response stimulated by S19 compared to RB51 showed higher persistency of IFN-ɣ and CD4+ memory cells, induction of CD21+ memory cells and higher secretion of IL-6. After RB51 revaccination, the immune response was chiefly characterized by increase in IFN-ɣ expression, proliferation of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells and decrease of IL-6 production in both groups. Nevertheless, a different polarization of the immune response, CD4+- or CD8+-dominant, was observed after the booster with RB51 for S19 and RB51 prime-vaccinated animals, respectively. Our results indicate that after prime vaccination both vaccine strains induce a strong and complex Th1 immune response, although after RB51 revaccination the differences between immune profiles induced by prime-vaccination become accentuated.

  19. Immune Response of Calves Vaccinated with Brucella abortus S19 or RB51 and Revaccinated with RB51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorneles, Elaine M S; Lima, Graciela K; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Araújo, Márcio S S; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Al Qublan, Hamzeh; Heinemann, Marcos B; Lage, Andrey P

    2015-01-01

    Brucella abortus S19 and RB51 strains have been successfully used to control bovine brucellosis worldwide; however, currently, most of our understanding of the protective immune response induced by vaccination comes from studies in mice. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare the immune responses induced in cattle prime-immunized with B. abortus S19 or RB51 and revaccinated with RB51. Female calves, aged 4 to 8 months, were vaccinated with either vaccine S19 (0.6-1.2 x 1011 CFU) or RB51 (1.3 x 1010 CFU) on day 0, and revaccinated with RB51 (1.3 x 1010 CFU) on day 365 of the experiment. Characterization of the immune response was performed using serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 28, 210, 365, 393 and 575 post-immunization. Results showed that S19 and RB51 vaccination induced an immune response characterized by proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells; IFN-ɣ and IL-17A production by CD4+ T-cells; cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells; IL-6 secretion; CD4+ and CD8+ memory cells; antibodies of IgG1 class; and expression of the phenotypes of activation in T-cells. However, the immune response stimulated by S19 compared to RB51 showed higher persistency of IFN-ɣ and CD4+ memory cells, induction of CD21+ memory cells and higher secretion of IL-6. After RB51 revaccination, the immune response was chiefly characterized by increase in IFN-ɣ expression, proliferation of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells and decrease of IL-6 production in both groups. Nevertheless, a different polarization of the immune response, CD4+- or CD8+-dominant, was observed after the booster with RB51 for S19 and RB51 prime-vaccinated animals, respectively. Our results indicate that after prime vaccination both vaccine strains induce a strong and complex Th1 immune response, although after RB51 revaccination the differences between immune profiles induced by prime-vaccination become accentuated.

  20. The stem rust resistance gene Rpg5 encodes a protein with nucleotide-binding-site, leucine-rich, and protein kinase domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggeman, R; Druka, A; Nirmala, J; Cavileer, T; Drader, T; Rostoks, N; Mirlohi, A; Bennypaul, H; Gill, U; Kudrna, D; Whitelaw, C; Kilian, A; Han, F; Sun, Y; Gill, K; Steffenson, B; Kleinhofs, A

    2008-09-30

    We isolated the barley stem rust resistance genes Rpg5 and rpg4 by map-based cloning. These genes are colocalized on a 70-kb genomic region that was delimited by recombination. The Rpg5 gene consists of an unusual structure encoding three typical plant disease resistance protein domains: nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich repeat, and serine threonine protein kinase. The predicted RPG5 protein has two putative transmembrane sites possibly involved in membrane binding. The gene is expressed at low but detectable levels. Posttranscriptional gene silencing using VIGS resulted in a compatible reaction with a normally incompatible stem rust pathogen. Allele sequencing also validated the candidate Rpg5 gene. Allele and recombinant sequencing suggested that the probable rpg4 gene encoded an actin depolymerizing factor-like protein. Involvement of actin depolymerizing factor genes in nonhost resistance has been documented, but discovery of their role in gene-for-gene interaction would be novel and needs to be further substantiated.

  1. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein activity is independently determined by obesity and insulin resistance in non-diabetic subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Rindert; Kappelle, Paul J. W. H.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is an emerging cardio-metabolic risk factor which is intricately involved in lipoprotein metabolism. Elevated plasma PLTP activity levels are reported in obesity and diabetes mellitus, but the relative contributions of obesity and insulin resistance to plasma

  2. Decreased PARP and procaspase-2 protein levels are associated with cellular drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Holleman (Amy); M.L. den Boer (Monique); K.M. Kazemier (Karin); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); A.R.M. von Bergh (Anne); G.E. Janka-Schaub (Gritta); R. Pieters (Rob)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractDrug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with impaired ability to induce apoptosis. To elucidate causes of apoptotic defects, we studied the protein expression of Apaf-1, procaspases-2, -3, -6, -7,

  3. The breast cancer resistance protein transporter ABCG2 is expressed in the human kidney proximal tubule apical membrane.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, M.; Brown, C.D.; Windass, A.S.; Sayer, R.; Heuvel, J.J.M.W. van den; Heemskerk, S.; Russel, F.G.M.; Masereeuw, R.

    2008-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is a transporter restricting absorption and enhancing excretion of many compounds including anticancer drugs. This transporter is highly expressed in many tissues; however, in human kidney, only the mRNA was found in contrast to the mouse kidney,

  4. Physiological quality and gene expression related to heat-resistant proteins at different stages of development of maize seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, T; Von Pinho, E V R; Von Pinho, R G; Oliveira, G E; Andrade, V; Fernandes, J S

    2013-09-13

    We quantified and characterized the expression of heat-resistant proteins during seed development of maize lines with distinct levels of tolerance to high drying temperature. A corn field was planted for multiplication of seeds of different lines, two tolerant and two non-tolerant to high drying temperatures. Harvest of the seeds was carried out at various stages of development and they were then subjected to tests of moisture content, germination, first count of germination, accelerated aging, and cold test. The seeds were stored in a freezer for later analysis of expression of heat-resistant proteins by means of real-time PCR, electrophoresis, and spectrophotometry. We observed that heat-resistant proteins are expressed in a differential manner in seeds from different lines and at different stages of development. The expression of heat-resistant proteins was earlier in lines tolerant to high drying temperatures. Greater germination and vigor values was found for seeds collected at the last stage of development.

  5. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein activity is independently determined by obesity and insulin resistance in non-diabetic subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Rindert; Kappelle, Paul J.W.H.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    Background: Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is an emerging cardio-metabolic risk factor which is intricately involved in lipoprotein metabolism. Elevated plasma PLTP activity levels are reported in obesity and diabetes mellitus, but the relative contributions of obesity and insulin resistance

  6. Low-dose oral contraceptives and acquired resistance to activated protein C: a randomised cross-over study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosing, J.; Middeldorp, S.; Curvers, J.; Christella, M.; Thomassen, L. G.; Nicolaes, G. A.; Meijers, J. C.; Bouma, B. N.; Büller, H. R.; Prins, M. H.; Tans, G.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have reported previously that, compared with use of second-generation oral contraceptives, the use of third-generation oral contraceptives is associated with increased resistance to the anticoagulant action of activated protein C (APC). Owing to the cross-sectional design of that

  7. Tomato Cf resistance proteins mediate recognition of cognate homologous effectors from fungi pathogenic on diots and monocots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stergiopoulos, I.; Burg, van den H.A.; Ökmen, B.; Beenen, H.G.; Liere, van S.; Kema, G.H.J.; Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Most fungal effectors characterized so far are species-specific and facilitate virulence on a particular host plant. During infection of its host tomato, Cladosporium fulvum secretes effectors that function as virulence factors in the absence of cognate Cf resistance proteins and induce

  8. Modulation of proteolytic polyprotein processing by coxsackievirus mutants resistant to inhibitors targeting phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase IIIβ or oxysterol binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyoo, Heyrhyoung; Dorobantu, Cristina M; van der Schaar, Hilde M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2017-01-01

    Enteroviruses (e.g. poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and rhinovirus) require several host factors for genome replication. Among these host factors are phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase IIIβ (PI4KB) and oxysterol binding protein (OSBP). Enterovirus mutants resistant to inhibitors of PI4KB and OSBP were

  9. Influence of coat protein transgene copy number on resistance in transgenic line 63-1 against Papaya ringspot virus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, M.T.; Níckel, O.; Gonsalves, D.

    2005-01-01

    Line 63-1 is a 'Sunset'-derived transgenic papaya expressing the coat protein (CP) gene from a mild mutant of a Hawaiian isolate of Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). Previous work showed that line 63-1 R, plants exhibited a range of resistance to severe PRSV isolates from Hawaii (HA), Jamaica (JA),

  10. Soy-dairy protein blend and whey protein ingestion after resistance exercise increases amino acid transport and transporter expression in human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, P. T.; Walker, D. K.; Dickinson, J. M.; Gundermann, D. M.; Drummond, M. J.; Timmerman, K. L.; Cope, M. B.; Mukherjea, R.; Jennings, K.; Volpi, E.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing amino acid availability (via infusion or ingestion) at rest or postexercise enhances amino acid transport into human skeletal muscle. It is unknown whether alterations in amino acid availability, from ingesting different dietary proteins, can enhance amino acid transport rates and amino acid transporter (AAT) mRNA expression. We hypothesized that the prolonged hyperaminoacidemia from ingesting a blend of proteins with different digestion rates postexercise would enhance amino acid transport into muscle and AAT expression compared with the ingestion of a rapidly digested protein. In a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, we studied 16 young adults at rest and after acute resistance exercise coupled with postexercise (1 h) ingestion of either a (soy-dairy) protein blend or whey protein. Phenylalanine net balance and transport rate into skeletal muscle were measured using stable isotopic methods in combination with femoral arteriovenous blood sampling and muscle biopsies obtained at rest and 3 and 5 h postexercise. Phenylalanine transport into muscle and mRNA expression of select AATs [system L amino acid transporter 1/solute-linked carrier (SLC) 7A5, CD98/SLC3A2, system A amino acid transporter 2/SLC38A2, proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1/SLC36A1, cationic amino acid transporter 1/SLC7A1] increased to a similar extent in both groups (P protein blend resulted in a prolonged and positive net phenylalanine balance during postexercise recovery compared with whey protein (P protein synthesis increased similarly between groups. We conclude that, while both protein sources enhanced postexercise AAT expression, transport into muscle, and myofibrillar protein synthesis, postexercise ingestion of a protein blend results in a slightly prolonged net amino acid balance across the leg compared with whey protein. PMID:24699854

  11. Plasmid-mediated resistance to thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein in staphylococci: role of the qacA locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupferwasser, L I; Skurray, R A; Brown, M H; Firth, N; Yeaman, M R; Bayer, A S

    1999-10-01

    Thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein 1 (tPMP-1) is a small, cationic peptide released from rabbit platelets following thrombin stimulation. In vitro resistance to this peptide among strains of Staphylococcus aureus correlates with the survival advantage of such strains at sites of endothelial damage in humans as well as in experimental endovascular infections. The mechanisms involved in the phenotypic resistance of S. aureus to tPMP-1 are not fully delineated. The plasmid-encoded staphylococcal gene qacA mediates multidrug resistance to multiple organic cations via a proton motive force-dependent efflux pump. We studied whether the qacA gene might also confer resistance to cationic tPMP-1. Staphylococcal plasmids encoding qacA were found to confer resistance to tPMP-1 in an otherwise susceptible parental strain. Deletions which removed the region containing the qacA gene in the S. aureus multiresistance plasmid pSK1 abolished tPMP-1 resistance. Resistance to tPMP-1 in the qacA-bearing strains was inoculum independent but peptide concentration dependent, with the level of resistance decreasing at higher peptide concentrations for a given inoculum. There was no apparent cross-resistance in qacA-bearing strains to other endogenous cationic antimicrobial peptides which are structurally distinct from tPMP-1, including human neutrophil defensin 1, protamine, or the staphylococcal lantibiotics pep5 and nisin. These data demonstrate that the staphylococcal multidrug resistance gene qacA also mediates in vitro resistance to cationic tPMP-1.

  12. Protein cross-linking, peroxidase and beta-1,3-endoglucanase involved in resistance of pea against Orobanche crenata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-de-Luque, Alejandro; González-Verdejo, Clara I; Lozano, M Dolores; Dita, Miguel A; Cubero, José I; González-Melendi, Pablo; Risueño, María C; Rubiales, Diego

    2006-01-01

    Root holoparasitic angiosperms, like Orobanche spp, completely lack chlorophyll and totally depend on their host for their supply of nutrients. O. crenata is a severe constraint to the cultivation of legumes and breeding for resistance remains the most economical, feasible, and environmentally friendly method of control. Due to the lack of resistance in commercial pea cultivars, the use of wild relatives for breeding is necessary, and an understanding of the mechanisms underlying host resistance is needed in order to improve screening for resistance in breeding programmes. Compatible and incompatible interactions between O. crenata and pea have been studied using cytochemical procedures. The parasite was stopped in the host cortex before reaching the central cylinder, and accumulation of H2O2, peroxidases, and callose were detected in neighbouring cells. Protein cross-linking in the host cell walls appears as the mechanism of defence, halting penetration of the parasite. In situ hybridization studies have also shown that a peroxidase and a beta-glucanase are differently expressed in cells of the resistant host (Pf651) near the penetration point. The role of these proteins in the resistance to O. crenata is discussed.

  13. Supplementary Material for: Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole genome sequencing and protein structure modelling provides insights into anti-tuberculosis drug resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Phelan, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Combating the spread of drug resistant tuberculosis is a global health priority. Whole genome association studies are being applied to identify genetic determinants of resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Protein structure and interaction modelling are used to understand the functional effects of putative mutations and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms leading to resistance. Methods To investigate the potential utility of these approaches, we analysed the genomes of 144 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) collection sourced from 20 countries in four continents. A genome-wide approach was applied to 127 isolates to identify polymorphisms associated with minimum inhibitory concentrations for first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. In addition, the effect of identified candidate mutations on protein stability and interactions was assessed quantitatively with well-established computational methods. Results The analysis revealed that mutations in the genes rpoB (rifampicin), katG (isoniazid), inhA-promoter (isoniazid), rpsL (streptomycin) and embB (ethambutol) were responsible for the majority of resistance observed. A subset of the mutations identified in rpoB and katG were predicted to affect protein stability. Further, a strong direct correlation was observed between the minimum inhibitory concentration values and the distance of the mutated residues in the three-dimensional structures of rpoB and katG to their respective drugs binding sites. Conclusions Using the TDR resource, we demonstrate the usefulness of whole genome association and convergent evolution approaches to detect known and potentially novel mutations associated with drug resistance. Further, protein structural modelling could provide a means of predicting the impact of polymorphisms on drug efficacy in the absence of phenotypic data. These approaches could ultimately lead to novel

  14. Cytosolic activation of cell death and stem rust resistance by cereal MLA-family CC–NLR