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Sample records for resistance mutations drms

  1. Distribution of Glut1 in detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) and non-DRM domains: effect of treatment with azide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Darrell; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz

    2003-08-01

    We have previously shown that the acute stimulation of glucose transport in Clone 9 cells in response to azide is mediated by activation of Glut1 and that stomatin, a Glut1-binding protein, appears to inhibit Glut1 function. In Clone 9 cells under basal conditions, approximately 38% of Glut1, approximately 70% of stomatin, and the bulk of caveolin-1 was localized in the detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) fraction; a significant fraction of Glut1 is also present in DRMs of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and human red blood cells (RBCs). Acute exposure to azide resulted in 40 and 50% decreases in the content of Glut1 in DRMs of Clone 9 cells and 3T3-L1 fibroblasts, respectively, whereas the distribution of stomatin and caveolin-1 in Clone 9 cells remained unchanged. In addition, treatment of Clone 9 cells with azide resulted in a approximately 50% decrease in the content of Glut1 in the DRM fraction of plasma membranes. We conclude that 1) a significant fraction of Glut1 is localized in DRMs, and 2) treatment of cells with azide results in a partial redistribution of Glut1 out of the DRM fraction.

  2. Development of elvitegravir resistance and linkage of integrase inhibitor mutations with protease and reverse transcriptase resistance mutations.

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    Mark A Winters

    Full Text Available Failure of antiretroviral regimens containing elvitegravir (EVG and raltegravir (RAL can result in the appearance of integrase inhibitor (INI drug-resistance mutations (DRMs. While several INI DRMs have been identified, the evolution of EVG DRMs and the linkage of these DRMs with protease inhibitor (PI and reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI DRMs have not been studied at the clonal level. We examined the development of INI DRMs in 10 patients failing EVG-containing regimens over time, and the linkage of INI DRMs with PI and RTI DRMs in these patients plus 6 RAL-treated patients. A one-step RT-nested PCR protocol was used to generate a 2.7 kB amplicon that included the PR, RT, and IN coding region, and standard cloning and sequencing techniques were used to determine DRMs in 1,277 clones (mean 21 clones per time point. Results showed all patients had multiple PI, NRTI, and/or NNRTI DRMs at baseline, but no primary INI DRM. EVG-treated patients developed from 2 to 6 strains with different primary INI DRMs as early as 2 weeks after initiation of treatment, predominantly as single mutations. The prevalence of these strains fluctuated and new strains, and/or strains with new combinations of INI DRMs, developed over time. Final failure samples (weeks 14 to 48 typically showed a dominant strain with multiple mutations or N155H alone. Single N155H or multiple mutations were also observed in RAL-treated patients at virologic failure. All patient strains showed evidence of INI DRM co-located with single or multiple PI and/or RTI DRMs on the same viral strand. Our study shows that EVG treatment can select for a number of distinct INI-resistant strains whose prevalence fluctuates over time. Continued appearance of new INI DRMs after initial INI failure suggests a potent, highly dynamic selection of INI resistant strains that is unaffected by co-location with PI and RTI DRMs.

  3. Reverse Transcriptase drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 Subtype C infected patients on ART in Karonga District, Malawi

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bansode, Vijay B

    2011-10-13

    Abstract Background Drug resistance testing before initiation of, or during, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is not routinely performed in resource-limited settings. High levels of viral resistance circulating within the population will have impact on treatment programs by increasing the chances of transmission of resistant strains and treatment failure. Here, we investigate Drug Resistance Mutations (DRMs) from blood samples obtained at regular intervals from patients on ART (Baseline-22 months) in Karonga District, Malawi. One hundred and forty nine reverse transcriptase (RT) consensus sequences were obtained via nested PCR and automated sequencing from blood samples collected at three-month intervals from 75 HIV-1 subtype C infected individuals in the ART programme. Results Fifteen individuals showed DRMs, and in ten individuals DRMs were seen from baseline samples (reported to be ART naïve). Three individuals in whom no DRMs were observed at baseline showed the emergence of DRMs during ART exposure. Four individuals who did show DRMs at baseline showed additional DRMs at subsequent time points, while two individuals showed evidence of DRMs at baseline and either no DRMs, or different DRMs, at later timepoints. Three individuals had immune failure but none appeared to be failing clinically. Conclusion Despite the presence of DRMs to drugs included in the current regimen in some individuals, and immune failure in three, no signs of clinical failure were seen during this study. This cohort will continue to be monitored as part of the Karonga Prevention Study so that the long-term impact of these mutations can be assessed. Documenting proviral population is also important in monitoring the emergence of drug resistance as selective pressure provided by ART compromises the current plasma population, archived viruses can re-emerge

  4. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing.

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    Soo-Yon Rhee

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs. This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy.

  5. Distinctive Drug-resistant Mutation Profiles and Interpretations of HIV-1 Proviral DNA Revealed by Deep Sequencing in Reverse Transcriptase.

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    Yin, Qian Qian; Li, Zhen Peng; Zhao, Hai; Pan, Dong; Wang, Yan; Xu, Wei Si; Xing, Hui; Feng, Yi; Jiang, Shi Bo; Shao, Yi Ming; Ma, Li Ying

    2016-04-01

    To investigate distinctive features in drug-resistant mutations (DRMs) and interpretations for reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) between proviral DNA and paired viral RNA in HIV-1-infected patients. Forty-three HIV-1-infected individuals receiving first-line antiretroviral therapy were recruited to participate in a multicenter AIDS Cohort Study in Anhui and Henan Provinces in China in 2004. Drug resistance genotyping was performed by bulk sequencing and deep sequencing on the plasma and whole blood of 77 samples, respectively. Drug-resistance interpretation was compared between viral RNA and paired proviral DNA. Compared with bulk sequencing, deep sequencing could detect more DRMs and samples with DRMs in both viral RNA and proviral DNA. The mutations M184I and M230I were more prevalent in proviral DNA than in viral RNA (Fisher's exact test, PDNA, and 5 of these samples with different DRMs between proviral DNA and paired viral RNA showed a higher level of drug resistance to the first-line drugs. Considering 'minority resistant variants', 22 samples (28.57%) were associated with a higher level of drug resistance to the tested RTIs for proviral DNA when compared with paired viral RNA. Compared with viral RNA, the distinctive information of DRMs and drug resistance interpretations for proviral DNA could be obtained by deep sequencing, which could provide more detailed and precise information for drug resistance monitoring and the rational design of optimal antiretroviral therapy regimens. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterizing the emergence and persistence of drug resistant mutations in HIV-1 subtype C infections using 454 ultra deep pyrosequencing

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    Bansode Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of HIV-1 RNA in the emergence of resistance to antiretroviral therapies (ARTs is well documented while less is known about the role of historical viruses stored in the proviral DNA. The primary focus of this work was to characterize the genetic diversity and evolution of HIV drug resistant variants in an individual’s provirus during antiretroviral therapy using next generation sequencing. Methods Blood samples were collected prior to antiretroviral therapy exposure and during the course of treatment from five patients in whom drug resistance mutations had previously been identified using consensus sequencing. The spectrum of viral variants present in the provirus at each sampling time-point were characterized using 454 pyrosequencing from multiple combined PCR products. The prevalence of viral variants containing drug resistant mutations (DRMs was characterized at each time-point. Results Low abundance drug resistant viruses were identified in 14 of 15 sampling time-points from the five patients. In all individuals DRMs against current therapy were identified at one or more of the sampling time-points. In two of the five individuals studied these DRMs were present prior to treatment exposure and were present at high prevalence within the amplified and sequenced viral population. DRMs to drugs other than those being currently used were identified in four of the five individuals. Conclusion The presence of DRMs in the provirus, regardless of their observed prevalence did not appear to have an effect on clinical outcomes in the short term suggesting that the drug resistant viral variants present in the proviral DNA do not appear to play a role in the short term in facilitating the emergence of drug resistance.

  7. The infection staging and profile of genotypic distribution and drug resistance mutation among the human immunodeficiency virus-1 infected blood donors from five Chinese blood centers, 2012-2014.

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    Peibin Zeng

    Full Text Available The increasing complexity and diversity of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 infections challenge the disease control and anti-retrovirus treatment in China. The infection stages and molecular characteristics of HIV-1 from infected Chinese blood donors were examined to shed light on the HIV genotype distribution and the status of drug resistance mutations (DRMs in the changing HIV epidemic in China. Western blot (WB confirmed HIV-1 positive plasma samples were collected from blood donors at five Chinese blood centers from April 16, 2012, through June 30, 2014. The HIV infection stages were determined using the Lag-avidity assay. HIV Pol regions including whole protease and partial reverse transcriptase (RT were amplified and sequenced to establish the profile of genotype distribution and drug resistance mutations (DRMs. Viral loads were determined using the ROCHE COBAS system. Of the 259 HIV-1 positive samples tested by the Lag-avidity assay, 23.6% (61/259 were identified as recent infections. A total of 205 amplified sequences displayed the following genotype distributions: circulating recombinant form (CRF 07_BC (61.5%, CRF08_BC (8.3%, CRF01_AE (20%, B (6.3%, and 01B (3.9%. There was no significant difference in genotype distribution between recent and long-term infections. 31 DRMs were identified from 27 samples including four protease inhibitors (PIs accessory DRMs, two PIs major DRMs (M46I, two nucleoside RT inhibitors DRMs (K219R and K70Q, and 23 nonnucleoside RT inhibitors DRMs. 27 samples had DRMs, yielding a drug resistance prevalence of 13.2% (27/205. Our findings provide important information for developing strategies for comprehensive HIV control and improving anti-retroviral treatment in China.

  8. Virologic failures on initial boosted-PI regimen infrequently possess low-level variants with major PI resistance mutations by ultra-deep sequencing.

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    Max Lataillade

    Full Text Available It is unknown whether HIV-positive patients experiencing virologic failure (VF on boosted-PI (PI/r regimens without drug resistant mutations (DRM by standard genotyping harbor low-level PI resistant variants. CASTLE compared the efficacy of atazanavir/ritonavir (ATV/r with lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r, each in combination with TVD in ARV-naïve subjects.To determine if VF on an initial PI/r-based regimen possess low-level resistant variants that may affect a subsequent PI-containing regimen.Patients experiencing VF on a Tenofovir/Emtricitabine+PI/r regimen were evaluated by ultra deep sequencing (UDS for mutations classified/weighted by Stanford HIVdb. Samples were evaluated for variants to 0.4% levels. 36 VF subjects were evaluated by UDS; 24 had UDS for PI and RT DRMs. Of these 24, 19 (79.2% had any DRM by UDS. The most common UDS-detected DRM were NRTI in 18 subjects: M184V/I (11, TAMs(7 & K65R(4; PI DRMs were detected in 9 subjects: M46I/V(5, F53L(2, I50V(1, D30N(1, and N88S(1. The remaining 12 subjects, all with VLs12 for ATV or LPV: N88S (at 0.43% level-mutational load 1,828 in 1 subject on ATV; I50V (0.44%-mutational load 110 and L76V (0.52%-mutational load 20 in 1 subject each, both on LPV. All VF samples remained phenotypically susceptible to the treatment PI/r.Among persons experiencing VF without PI DRMs with standard genotyping on an initial PI/r regimen, low-level variants possessing major PI DRMs were present in a minority of cases, occurred in isolation, and did not result in phenotypic resistance. NRTI DRMs were detected in a high proportion of subjects. These data suggest that PIs may remain effective in subjects experiencing VF on a PI/r-based regimen when PI DRMs are not detected by standard or UDS genotyping.

  9. HIV Drug Resistance-Associated Mutations in Antiretroviral Naïve HIV-1-Infected Latin American Children

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    Luis E. Soto-Ramirez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Our goal was to describe the presence of HIV drug resistance among HIV-1-infected, antiretroviral (ARV naïve children and adolescents in Latin America and to examine resistance in these children in relation to drug exposure in the mother. Genotyping was performed on plasma samples obtained at baseline from HIV-1-infected participants in a prospective cohort study in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico (NISDI Pediatric Study. Of 713 HIV-infected children enrolled, 69 were ARV naïve and eligible for the analysis. At enrollment, mean age was 7.3 years; 81.2% were infected with HIV perinatally. Drug resistance mutations (DRMs were detected in 6 (8.7%; 95% confidence interval 3.1–18.2% ARV-naïve subjects; none of the mothers of these 6 received ARVs during their pregnancies and none of the children received ARV prophylaxis. Reverse transcriptase mutations K70R and K70E were detected in 3 and 2 subjects, respectively; protease mutation I50 V was detected in 1 subject. Three of the 6 children with DRMs initiated ARV therapy during followup, with a good response in 2. The overall rate of primary drug resistance in this pediatric HIV-infected population was low, and no subjects had more than 1 DRM. Mutations associated with resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were the most prevalent.

  10. A uniquely prevalent nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutation in Russian subtype A HIV-1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeets, Anna N; Varghese, Vici; Lemey, Philippe; Bobkova, Marina R; Shafer, Robert W

    2014-11-13

    The subtype A variant in the Former Soviet Union (A(FSU)) causes most of Russia's HIV-1 infections. However, the spectrum of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs) in antiretroviral experienced patients with this variant has not been studied. Between 2010 and 2013, genotypic resistance testing was performed on plasma samples from 366 antiretroviral-experienced patients in Siberia. Three-hundred patients (82%) had subtype A(FSU) and 55 (15%) had CRF02_AG viruses. The pattern of DRMs was consistent with patient antiretroviral history with one exception. G190S was the most common nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance mutation, occurring in 55 (33%) subtype A(FSU) viruses from 167 NNRTI-experienced patients compared with none of 37 CRF02_AG viruses from NNRTI-experienced patients (P viruses. Wild-type glycine (G) at position 190 is encoded by GGC in more than 99% of published A(FSU) strains. By contrast, G190 is encoded by GGA or GGG in 97% of other subtypes and in subtype A strains outside of the FSU. Therefore, G190S results from a single G→A transition: G (GGC) → S (AGC) almost exclusively in subtype A(FSU) viruses. The predisposition of subtype A(FSU) to G190S is concerning because G→A is the most common HIV-1 mutation and because G190S causes higher levels of nevirapine and efavirenz resistance than K103N. This study exemplifies the need for characterizing the genetic mechanisms of resistance in diverse populations and warrants studies to verify that NRTI/NNRTI regimens are as efficacious in treating subtype A(FSU) as viruses belonging to other subtypes.

  11. Drug resistance-related mutations T369V/I in the connection subdomain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase severely impair viral fitness.

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    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Junli; Li, Fan; Ji, Xiaolin; Liao, Lingjie; Ma, Liying; Xing, Hui; Feng, Yi; Li, Dan; Shao, Yiming

    2017-04-02

    Fitness is a key parameter in the measurement of transmission capacity of individual drug-resistant HIV. Drug-resistance related mutations (DRMs) T369V/I and A371V in the connection subdomain (CN) of reverse transcriptase (RT) occur at higher frequencies in the individuals experiencing antiretroviral therapy failure. Here, we evaluated the effects of T369V/I and A371V on viral fitness, in the presence or in the absence of thymidine analogue resistance-associated mutations (TAMs) and assessed the effect of potential RT structure-related mechanism on change in viral fitness. Mutations T369V/I, A371V, alone or in combination with TAMs were introduced into a modified HIV-1 infectious clone AT1 by site-directed mutagenesis. Then, experiments on mutant and wild-type virus AT2 were performed separately using a growth-competition assay, and then the relative fitness was calculated. Structural analysis of RT was conducted using Pymol software. Results showed that T369V/I severely impaired the relative virus fitness, and A371V compensated for the viral fitness reduction caused by TAMs. Structural modeling of RT suggests that T369V/I substitutions disrupt powerful hydrogen bonds formed by T369 and V365 in p51 and p66. This study indicates that the secondary DRMs within CN might efficiently damage viral fitness, and provides valuable information for clinical surveillance and prevention of HIV-1 strains carrying these DRMs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Resistance mutations and CTL epitopes in archived HIV-1 DNA of patients on antiviral treatment: toward a new concept of vaccine.

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    Jennifer Papuchon

    Full Text Available Eleven patients responding successfully to first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART were investigated for proviral drug resistance mutations (DRMs in RT by ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS. After molecular typing of the class I alleles A and B, the CTL epitopes in the Gag, Nef and Pol regions of the provirus were sequenced and compared to the reference HXB2 HIV-1 epitopes. They were then matched with the HLA alleles with determination of theoretical affinity (TA. For 3 patients, the results could be compared with an RNA sample of the circulating virus at initiation of therapy. Five out of 11 patients exhibited DRMs by UDPS. The issue is whether a therapeutic switch is relevant in these patients by taking into account the identity of the archived resistance mutations. When the archived CTL epitopes were determined on the basis of the HLA alleles, different patterns were observed. Some epitopes were identical to those reported for the reference with the same TA, while others were mutated with a decrease in TA. In 2 cases, an epitope was observed as a combination of subpopulations at entry and was retrieved as a single population with lower TA at success. With regard to immunological stimulation and given the variability of the archived CTL epitopes, we propose a new concept of curative vaccine based on identification of HIV-1 CTL epitopes after prior sequencing of proviral DNA and matching with HLA class I alleles.

  13. Decreased emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations in a cohort of Ugandan women initiating option B+ for PMTCT.

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    Patrycja Machnowska

    Full Text Available Since 2012, WHO guidelines for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT of HIV-1 in resource-limited settings recommend the initiation of lifelong antiretroviral combination therapy (cART for all pregnant HIV-1 positive women independent of CD4 count and WHO clinical stage (Option B+. However, long-term outcomes regarding development of drug resistance are lacking until now. Therefore, we analysed the emergence of drug resistance mutations (DRMs in women initiating Option B+ in Fort Portal, Uganda, at 12 and 18 months postpartum (ppm.124 HIV-1 positive pregnant women were enrolled within antenatal care services in Fort Portal, Uganda. Blood samples were collected at the first visit prior starting Option B+ and postpartum at week six, month six, 12 and 18. Viral load was determined by real-time RT-PCR. An RT-PCR covering resistance associated positions in the protease and reverse transcriptase HIV-1 genomic region was performed. PCR-positive samples at 12/18 ppm and respective baseline samples were analysed by next generation sequencing regarding HIV-1 drug resistant variants including low-frequency variants. Furthermore, vertical transmission of HIV-1 was analysed. 49/124 (39.5% women were included into the DRM analysis. Virological failure, defined as >1000 copies HIV-1 RNA/ml, was observed in three and seven women at 12 and 18 ppm, respectively. Sequences were obtained for three and six of these. In total, DRMs were detected in 3/49 (6.1% women. Two women displayed dual-class resistance against all recommended first-line regimen drugs. Of 49 mother-infant-pairs no infant was HIV-1 positive at 12 or 18 ppm.Our findings suggest that the WHO-recommended Option B+ for PMTCT is effective in a cohort of Ugandan HIV-1 positive pregnant women with regard to the low selection rate of DRMs and vertical transmission. Therefore, these results are encouraging for other countries considering the implementation of lifelong cART for all pregnant

  14. Drug resistance mutations and genetic diversity in adults treated for HIV type 1 infection in Mauritania.

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    Fall-Malick, F-Zahra; Tchiakpé, Edmond; Ould Soufiane, Sid'Ahmed; Diop-Ndiaye, Halimatou; Mouhamedoune Baye, Abderrahmane; Ould Horma Babana, Abdallah; Touré Kane, Coumba; Lo, Baidy; Mboup, Souleymane

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the drug resistance mutationprofile observed in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy with virological failure and to document the HIV-1 genetic diversity in Mauritania. Eighty-six subjects were included and 65 samples were amplified successfully and sequenced. HIV-1 genotyping was performed using the Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA AC11 resistance procedure. The median treatment duration was 32 months (range: 6-88) and the median viral load, 5 log10 copies/ml (range: 3.13-7). Fifty-nine patients (90.8%) were on first line regimens including 32.0% (19/59) on triomune fixed-dose and six on second-line therapy with NonNucleoside Reverse Transcriptase plus a protease inhibitor. Forty-seven patients (72.3%) had at least one drug resistance mutation including 73.0% (43/59) on first-line therapy. For the second-line, one out of six patients presented resistance mutations and only one presented PI DRM. Overall, the most common DRMs detected were M184V/I (n = 32; 49.2%), K103N (n = 28; 43%), and Y181C (n = 13; 20%). Thymidine Analog Mutations (TAMs) were found in 26.0% (n = 17) of strains and the most common was T215Y (n = 11, 16.9%). Phylogenetic analysis revealed 17 HIV-1 variants with the predominance of CRF02_AG (n = 42; 64.6%). A high rate of DRM was found in this study and shows the potential need for a structured virological surveillance including viral load quantification and genotyping. Further studies may also be needed in regards to the great variability of HIV-1 strains in Mauritania. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Accumulation of HIV-1 drug resistance after continued virological failure on first-line ART in adults and children in sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boender, T. Sonia; Kityo, Cissy M.; Boerma, Ragna S.; Hamers, Raph L.; Ondoa, Pascale; Wellington, Maureen; Siwale, Margaret; Nankya, Immaculate; Kaudha, Elizabeth; Akanmu, Alani Sulaimon; Botes, Mariette E.; Steegen, Kim; Calis, Job C. J.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Sigaloff, Kim C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Limited availability of viral load (VL) monitoring in HIV treatment programmes in sub-Saharan Africa can delay switching to second-line ART, leading to the accumulation of drug resistance mutations (DRMs). The objective of this study was to evaluate the accumulation of resistance to reverse

  16. Patterns of HIV-1 Drug Resistance After First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Failure in 6 Sub-Saharan African Countries: Implications for Second-Line ART Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, Raph L.; Sigaloff, Kim C. E.; Wensing, Annemarie M.; Wallis, Carole L.; Kityo, Cissy; Siwale, Margaret; Mandaliya, Kishor; Ive, Prudence; Botes, Mariette E.; Wellington, Maureen; Osibogun, Akin; Stevens, Wendy S.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Schuurman, Rob; Siwale, M.; Njovu, C.; Labib, M.; Menke, J.; Botes, M. E.; Conradie, F.; Ive, P.; Sanne, I.; Wallis, C. L.; Letsoalo, E.; Stevens, W. S.; Hardman, M.; Wellington, M.; Luthy, R.; Mandaliya, K.; Abdallah, S.; Jao, I.; Dolan, M.; Namayanja, G.; Nakatudde, L.; Nankya, I.; Kiconco, M.; Abwola, M.; Mugyenyi, P.; Osibogun, A.; Akanmu, S.; Schuurman, R.; Wensing, A. M.; Straatsma, E.; Wit, F. W.; Dekker, J.; van Vugt, M.; Lange, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance may limit the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART). This cohort study examined patterns of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs) in individuals with virological failure on first-line ART at 13 clinical sites in 6 African

  17. Virological failure and HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among naive and antiretroviral pre-treated patients entering the ESTHER program of Calmette Hospital in Cambodia.

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    Hubert Barennes

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In resource limited settings, patients entering an antiretroviral therapy (ART program comprise ART naive and ART pre-treated patients who may show differential virological outcomes. METHODS: This retrospective study, conducted in 2010-2012 in the HIV clinic of Calmette Hospital located in Phnom Penh (Cambodia assessed virological failure (VF rates and patterns of drug resistance of naive and pre-treated patients. Naive and ART pre-treated patients were included when a Viral Load (VL was performed during the first year of ART for naive subjects or at the first consultation for pre-treated individuals. Patients showing Virological failure (VF (>1,000 copies/ml underwent HIV DR genotyping testing. Interpretation of drug resistance mutations was done according to 2013 version 23 ANRS algorithms. RESULTS: On a total of 209 patients, 164 (78.4% were naive and 45 (21.5% were ART pre-treated. Their median initial CD4 counts were 74 cells/mm3 (IQR: 30-194 and 279 cells/mm3 (IQR: 103-455 (p<0.001, respectively. Twenty seven patients (12.9% exhibited VF (95% CI: 8.6-18.2%, including 10 naive (10/164, 6.0% and 17 pre-treated (17/45, 37.8% patients (p<0.001. Among these viremic patients, twenty-two (81.4% were sequenced in reverse transcriptase and protease coding regions. Overall, 19 (86.3% harbored ≥1 drug resistance mutations (DRMs whereas 3 (all belonging to pre-treated patients harbored wild-types viruses. The most frequent DRMs were M184V (86.3%, K103N (45.5% and thymidine analog mutations (TAMs (40.9%. Two (13.3% pre-treated patients harbored viruses that showed a multi-nucleos(tide resistance including Q151M, K65R, E33A/D, E44A/D mutations. CONCLUSION: In Cambodia, VF rates were low for naive patients but the emergence of DRMs to NNRTI and 3TC occurred relatively quickly in this subgroup. In pre-treated patients, VF rates were much higher and TAMs were relatively common. HIV genotypic assays before ART initiation and for ART pre

  18. Antifolate drug resistance: Novel mutations and haplotype ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N P Sarmah

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... Malaria is a major public health concern in Northeast India with a preponderance of drug-resistant strains. Until recently the partner drug for artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) was sulphadoxine pyrimethamine (SP). Antifolate drug resistance has been associated with the mutations at dihydropteroate ...

  19. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  20. Simulation Study for Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance via Mutator Subpopulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Kirsten Riber; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    Evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations is an increasing problem having fatal consequences for treatment of diseases. Therefore it is very important to understand this evolution. Traditionally evolution is considered to happen by single point mutations, where each mutant must...... have a growth advantage over the parent strain and grow to a sufficient number before a second mutation can occur. However, when multiple mutations are necessary for development of resistance, single mutations occurring with a normal mutation rate can not always explain the observed resistance. We...... introduce an alternative hypothesis by which a subpopulation of mutators drives the evolution process. Resistance is acquired by a subpoplution of mutators, for which the mutation rate is much higher than the wild-type. If the resistance is located on a transferable plasmid it can subsequently...

  1. Induction of die-back resistant mutation in mulberry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Koitsu; Wada, Minoru; Nakajima, Kenji; Hazama, Kazuo; Fujita, Haruhiko.

    1980-01-01

    Two kinds of work for the induction of die-back resistant mutation were conducted. The first is mutation induction by chronic gamma irradiation using four varieties. Four resistant mutants were obtained from variety Kenmochi through the screening test for die-back resistance in heavy snowfall region. The second is mutation induction by colchicine treatments with variety Kenmochi. The mutants showing tetraploidy in inner layers, such as 2-4-4-4 and 4-4-4-4, were resistant as compared with those tetraploidy only in the outest layer. Gamma-rays and colchicine considered to be useful tools for induction of die-back resistant mulberry mutations. (author)

  2. Induced mutation for tungro resistance in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, R.; Yumol, R.R.; Taura, S.

    2001-01-01

    Tungro is the most serious virus disease of rice in South and Southeast Asia. It is a composite disease of two kinds of viruses, rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) and rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV). Damage to the plant is mostly caused by RTBV, while RTSV acts to facilitate RTBV acquisition and transmission by insect vector. Both viruses are transmitted mainly by green leafhopper (GLH). Resistance to GLH is common in rice germplasm but extremely rare for the two viruses. To induce mutations for tungro resistance, a susceptible variety IR22 was treated with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNH) following the procedure of Satoh and Omura. The panicles of rice variety 'IR22' were soaked in 1 mM MNH solution for 45 minutes at 16 to 18 hours after flowering. Two thousand six hundred and forty fertile M 1 plants were produced. From these plants M 2 lines with 10 or more seedlings were planted in the field to evaluate their reaction against tungro under natural conditions in the 1990 dry season on the IRRI central research farm, Los Banos, the Philippines. Of these, 124 M 2 lines were selected by visual evaluation. Five plants were harvested individually from each selected line. A bulk was also made from all the remaining plants in the line. In the M 3 generation, each family consisted of five sister lines and one bulked line. One line (M 3 -723) showed no tungro symptoms and its related bulk segregated for resistance but all other M 3 lines from the same family were susceptible to tungro. The resistant line, M 3 -723, showed low infection with RTBV and RTSV when leaves were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to diagnose tungro infection. All M 4 lines from M 3 -723 showed uniform resistance in the field. They were not infected with RTBV and were resistant to RTSV infection

  3. Herpes viruses and HIV-1 drug resistance mutations influence the virologic and immunologic milieu of the male genital tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianella, Sara; Morris, Sheldon R; Anderson, Christy; Spina, Celsa A; Vargas, Milenka V; Young, Jason A; Richman, Douglas D; Little, Susan J; Smith, Davey M

    2013-01-02

    To further understand the role that chronic viral infections of the male genital tract play on HIV-1 dynamics and replication. Retrospective, observational study including 236 paired semen and blood samples collected from 115 recently HIV-1 infected antiretroviral naive men who have sex with men. In this study, we evaluated the association of seminal HIV-1 shedding to coinfections with seven herpes viruses, blood plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, CD4 T-cell counts, presence of transmitted drug resistance mutations (DRMs) in HIV-1 pol, participants' age and stage of HIV-infection using multivariate generalized estimating equation methods. Associations between herpes virus shedding, seminal HIV-1 levels, number and immune activation of seminal T-cells was also investigated (Mann-Whitney). Seminal herpes virus shedding was observed in 75.7% of individuals. Blood HIV-1 RNA levels (P herpes virus (HHV)-8 levels (P herpes viruses seminal shedding in our cohort. Shedding of CMV, EBV and HHV-8 and absence of DRM were associated with increased frequency of HIV-1 shedding and/or higher levels of HIV-1 RNA in semen, which are likely important cofactors for HIV-1 transmission.

  4. Induced mutations for soybean rust resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smutkupt, S.; Wongpiyasatid, A.; Lamseejan, S.

    1983-01-01

    Soybean mutation experiments for inducing rust resistance in the cultivars G 8375, Wakashima mutant number 10, Taichung N, S.J.2, S.J.4, BM 50, BM 98, G 8377, G 8586 and G 8587 have been carried out since 1979. Six pods from each of 4438 control and 43,907 M 1 plants were randomly harvested. M 2 seeds of each cultivar of different doses were bulked (M 2 bulk). In addition, 270 good M 1 plants were selected and threshed singly (M 2 single). M 2 -bulk and M 2 -single seeds were advanced to M 3 . Both, M 3 -bulk and M 3 -single plants, together with the remaining M 2 -bulk seeds were screened for rust resistance in the rainy season of 1980 in Nong Hoi Valley (altitude about 1000 m above sea level) and at Mae Joe Station, both in Chiang Mai Province (latitude 18 deg. 31'-19 deg. N). Based on the IWGSR rating system, soybean plants with slow growth of rust were selected from both locations. The results were as follows: Six plants were selected from a total of 2802 control plants, and 115 from a total of 28,834 M 2 and M 3 plants. Further evaluation of these selections for rust resistance will be carried out in the rainy season of 1981 in Nong Hoi Valley, Chiang Mai. (author)

  5. Multiple mutations and mutation combinations in the sodium channel of permethrin resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Lee; Reid, William R.; Xu, Qiang; Dong, Ke; Liu, Nannan

    2012-10-01

    A previous study identified 3 nonsynonymous and 6 synonymous mutations in the entire mosquito sodium channel of Culex quinquefasciatus, the prevalence of which were strongly correlated with levels of resistance and increased dramatically following insecticide selection. However, it is unclear whether this is unique to this specific resistant population or is a common mechanism in field mosquito populations in response to insecticide pressure. The current study therefore further characterized these mutations and their combinations in other field and permethrin selected Culex mosquitoes, finding that the co-existence of all 9 mutations was indeed correlated with the high levels of permethrin resistance in mosquitoes. Comparison of mutation combinations revealed several common mutation combinations presented across different field and permethrin selected populations in response to high levels of insecticide resistance, demonstrating that the co-existence of multiple mutations is a common event in response to insecticide resistance across different Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquito populations.

  6. Mutation breeding of rice for bacterial leaf-blight resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, H.; Goto, M.

    1977-01-01

    Seedlings of controls and of M 2 generation originating from the irradiation treatment of seeds of four rice varieties with thermal neutrons, 60 Co gamme-ray, ethylene-imine (EI), were inoculated with some isolates of Xanthomonas oryzae. The variability of the disease reaction in the populations arising from irradiation and chemical treatment increased both resistance and susceptibility compared with the control average, irrespective of chlorophyll mutations in M 2 . The increased variability was assumed to be due to polygenic mutations giving both germ types more resistance and more susceptibility to bacterial leaf blight. The value of the induced polygenic mutations in resistance breeding for bacterial leaf blight is briefly discussed. (author)

  7. Repair-resistant mutation in Neurospora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, D.; Macleod, H.; Loo, M.

    1987-01-01

    Chronic UV treatment produces severalfold fewer mutations in Neurospora conidia than does the same total dose of acute UV. Experiments were designed to determine the conditions required for chronic UV mutagenesis. Measurement of the coincidence frequency for two independent mutations revealed the existence of a subset of cells which are mutable by chronic UV. Analysis of forward mutation at the mtr locus showed that the genetic alterations produced by chronic UV were virtually all point mutants, even though the assay system could detect alterations or deletions extending into neighboring genes. A significant fraction of the mutants produced by acute UV were multigenic deletions. The size of the dose-rate effect (acute UV mutation frequency divided by chronic UV mutation frequency) was compared for several different mutation assay systems. Forward mutations (recessive lethals and mtr) gave values ranging from four to nine. For events which were restricted to specific molecular sites (specific reversions and nonsense suppressor mutations), there was a wider range of dose-rate ratios. This suggests that chronic UV mutation may be restricted to certain molecular sequences or configurations

  8. 2017 update of the drug resistance mutations in HIV-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, Annemarie M.; Calvez, Vincent; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Johnson, Victoria A.; Paredes, Roger; Pillay, Deenan; Shafer, Robert W.; Richman, Douglas D.

    2016-01-01

    The 2017 edition of the IAS–USA drug resistance mutations list updates the figures last published in November 2015. The mutations listed are those that have been identified by specific criteria for evidence and drugs described. The figures are designed to assist practitioners in identifying key

  9. Drug resistance mutations for surveillance of transmitted HIV-1 drug-resistance: 2009 update.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane E Bennett

    Full Text Available Programs that monitor local, national, and regional levels of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance inform treatment guidelines and provide feedback on the success of HIV-1 treatment and prevention programs. To accurately compare transmitted drug resistance rates across geographic regions and times, the World Health Organization has recommended the adoption of a consensus genotypic definition of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance. In January 2007, we outlined criteria for developing a list of mutations for drug-resistance surveillance and compiled a list of 80 RT and protease mutations meeting these criteria (surveillance drug resistance mutations; SDRMs. Since January 2007, several new drugs have been approved and several new drug-resistance mutations have been identified. In this paper, we follow the same procedures described previously to develop an updated list of SDRMs that are likely to be useful for ongoing and future studies of transmitted drug resistance. The updated SDRM list has 93 mutations including 34 NRTI-resistance mutations at 15 RT positions, 19 NNRTI-resistance mutations at 10 RT positions, and 40 PI-resistance mutations at 18 protease positions.

  10. Mutation supply and the repeatability of selection for antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Thomas; Hwang, Sungmin; Krug, Joachim; de Visser, J. Arjan G. M.; Zwart, Mark P.

    2017-10-01

    Whether evolution can be predicted is a key question in evolutionary biology. Here we set out to better understand the repeatability of evolution, which is a necessary condition for predictability. We explored experimentally the effect of mutation supply and the strength of selective pressure on the repeatability of selection from standing genetic variation. Different sizes of mutant libraries of antibiotic resistance gene TEM-1 β-lactamase in Escherichia coli, generated by error-prone PCR, were subjected to different antibiotic concentrations. We determined whether populations went extinct or survived, and sequenced the TEM gene of the surviving populations. The distribution of mutations per allele in our mutant libraries followed a Poisson distribution. Extinction patterns could be explained by a simple stochastic model that assumed the sampling of beneficial mutations was key for survival. In most surviving populations, alleles containing at least one known large-effect beneficial mutation were present. These genotype data also support a model which only invokes sampling effects to describe the occurrence of alleles containing large-effect driver mutations. Hence, evolution is largely predictable given cursory knowledge of mutational fitness effects, the mutation rate and population size. There were no clear trends in the repeatability of selected mutants when we considered all mutations present. However, when only known large-effect mutations were considered, the outcome of selection is less repeatable for large libraries, in contrast to expectations. We show experimentally that alleles carrying multiple mutations selected from large libraries confer higher resistance levels relative to alleles with only a known large-effect mutation, suggesting that the scarcity of high-resistance alleles carrying multiple mutations may contribute to the decrease in repeatability at large library sizes.

  11. Sodium Channel Mutations and Pyrethroid Resistance in Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhe Du

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insect pests and human disease vectors. Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary targets of pyrethroid insecticides. Mutations in the sodium channel have been shown to be responsible for pyrethroid resistance, known as knockdown resistance (kdr, in various insects including mosquitoes. In Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the principal urban vectors of dengue, zika, and yellow fever viruses, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in the sodium channel gene have been found in pyrethroid-resistant populations and some of them have been functionally confirmed to be responsible for kdr in an in vitro expression system, Xenopus oocytes. This mini-review aims to provide an update on the identification and functional characterization of pyrethroid resistance-associated sodium channel mutations from Aedes aegypti. The collection of kdr mutations not only helped us develop molecular markers for resistance monitoring, but also provided valuable information for computational molecular modeling of pyrethroid receptor sites on the sodium channel.

  12. Detection of cytomegalovirus drug resistance mutations in solid organ transplant recipients with suspected resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Aladid, Rubén; Guiu, Alba; Sanclemente, Gemma; López-Medrano, Francisco; Cofán, Frederic; Mosquera, M Mar; Torre-Cisneros, Julián; Vidal, Elisa; Moreno, Asunción; Aguado, Jose Maria; Cordero, Elisa; Martin-Gandul, Cecilia; Pérez-Romero, Pilar; Carratalá, Jordi; Sabé, Nuria; Niubó, Jordi; Cervera, Carlos; Cervilla, Anna; Bodro, Marta; Muñoz, Patricia; Fariñas, Carmen; Codina, M Gemma; Aranzamendi, Maitane; Montejo, Miguel; Len, Oscar; Marcos, M Angeles

    2017-05-01

    Current guidelines recommend that treatment of resistant cytomegalovirus (CMV) in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients must be based on genotypic analysis. However, this recommendation is not systematically followed. To assess the presence of mutations associated with CMV resistance in SOT recipients with suspected resistance, their associated risk factors and the clinical impact of resistance. Using Sanger sequencing we prospectively assessed the presence of resistance mutations in a nation-wide prospective study between September 2013-August 2015. Of 39 patients studied, 9 (23%) showed resistance mutations. All had one mutation in the UL 97 gene and two also had one mutation in the UL54 gene. Resistance mutations were more frequent in lung transplant recipients (44% p=0.0068) and in patients receiving prophylaxis ≥6 months (57% vs. 17%, p=0.0180). The mean time between transplantation and suspicion of resistance was longer in patients with mutations (239 vs. 100days, respectively, p=0.0046) as was the median treatment duration before suspicion (45 vs. 16days, p=0.0081). There were no significant differences according to the treatment strategies or the mean CMV load at the time of suspicion. Of note, resistance-associated mutations appeared in one patient during CMV prophylaxis and also in a seropositive organ recipient. Incomplete suppression of CMV was more frequent in patients with confirmed resistance. Our study confirms the need to assess CMV resistance mutations in any patient with criteria of suspected clinical resistance. Early confirmation of the presence of resistance mutations is essential to optimize the management of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Whole genome analysis of linezolid resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals resistance and compensatory mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Légaré Danielle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mutations were present in the genome of Streptococcus pneumoniae linezolid-resistant strains but the role of several of these mutations had not been experimentally tested. To analyze the role of these mutations, we reconstituted resistance by serial whole genome transformation of a novel resistant isolate into two strains with sensitive background. We sequenced the parent mutant and two independent transformants exhibiting similar minimum inhibitory concentration to linezolid. Results Comparative genomic analyses revealed that transformants acquired G2576T transversions in every gene copy of 23S rRNA and that the number of altered copies correlated with the level of linezolid resistance and cross-resistance to florfenicol and chloramphenicol. One of the transformants also acquired a mutation present in the parent mutant leading to the overexpression of an ABC transporter (spr1021. The acquisition of these mutations conferred a fitness cost however, which was further enhanced by the acquisition of a mutation in a RNA methyltransferase implicated in resistance. Interestingly, the fitness of the transformants could be restored in part by the acquisition of altered copies of the L3 and L16 ribosomal proteins and by mutations leading to the overexpression of the spr1887 ABC transporter that were present in the original linezolid-resistant mutant. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the usefulness of whole genome approaches at detecting major determinants of resistance as well as compensatory mutations that alleviate the fitness cost associated with resistance.

  14. parC Mutations in Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Borrelia burgdorferi

    OpenAIRE

    Galbraith, Kendal M.; Ng, Amanda C.; Eggers, Betsy J.; Kuchel, Craig R.; Eggers, Christian H.; Samuels, D. Scott

    2005-01-01

    We have isolated in vitro fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants of the Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi. Mutations in parC, which encodes a subunit of topoisomerase IV, were associated with loss of susceptibility to sparfloxacin, moxifloxacin, and Bay-Y3118, but not ciprofloxacin. This is the first description of fluoroquinolone resistance in the spirochete phylum.

  15. Antifolate drug resistance: Novel mutations and haplotype ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A total of 249 fever cases from Arunachal Pradesh, NEIndia, were screened for malaria, and of these, 75 were found to be positive for Plasmodium falciparum. Samples weresequenced and analysed with the help of BioEdit and ClustalW. Three novel point mutations were found in the dhps genewith 10 haplotypes along ...

  16. Mutational paths towards increased fluoroquinolone resistance in Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahmoud, Iyad; Kay, Elisabeth; Schneider, Dominique; Maurin, Max

    2009-08-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance has been poorly studied in Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen responsible for legionellosis. Our goal was to further characterize molecular mechanisms involved in fluoroquinolone resistance in this species. Eight independent lineages were founded from a common fluoroquinolone-susceptible L. pneumophila ancestor and propagated by serial passages in moxifloxacin-containing culture medium. We identified the substituted mutations that affected the DNA topoisomerase II-encoding genes, determined the order of substitution of the mutations leading to the stepwise MIC increases of moxifloxacin over evolutionary time and demonstrated their direct involvement in the resistance process. Adaptation occurred through parallel stepwise increases in the moxifloxacin MICs up to 512-fold the MIC for the parental strain. Mutations affected the topoisomerase II-encoding genes gyrA, parC and gyrB, reflecting a high degree of genetic parallelism across the independent lineages. During evolution, the T83I change in GyrA occurred first, followed by G78D or S80R in ParC and D87N in GyrA, or S464Y or D426N in GyrB. By constructing isogenic strains, we showed that the progressive increase in resistance was linked to a precise order of mutation substitution, but also to the co-existence of several subpopulations of bacteria bearing different mutations. Specific mutational trajectories were identified, strongly suggesting that intermolecular epistatic interactions between DNA topoisomerases underlie the mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in L. pneumophila. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila has strong potential to become resistant to fluoroquinolone compounds and warrant further investigation of resistance in clinical and environmental strains of this pathogen.

  17. Induced mutations for resistance to leaf rust in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borojevic, K.

    1983-01-01

    Problems related to the induction of mutations for disease resistance were investigated under several aspects, using the wheat/leaf rust system. Previously selected mutant lines, tested in M 11 and M 13 , were found to differ with regard to infection type and disease severity from the original varieties. To verify the induced-mutation origin, these mutants were examined further using test crosses with carriers of known genes for leaf rust resistance and electrophoresis. A separate experiment to induce mutations for leaf rust resistance in the wheat varieties Sava, Aurora and Siete Cerros, using gamma rays, fast neutrons and EMS, yielded mutants with different disease reaction in the varieties Sava and Aurora at a frequency of about 1x10 - 3 per M 1 plant progenies. (author)

  18. Rilpivirine resistance mutation E138K in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase predisposed by prevalent polymorphic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Tsunefusa; Hachiya, Atsuko; Ode, Hirotaka; Nishijima, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Kiyoto; Sugiura, Wataru; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Oka, Shinichi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Rilpivirine is listed as a recommended or alternative key drug in the current ART guidelines. E138K in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a primary mutation in resistance to rilpivirine, although in vitro experiments showed it confers only E138K. The objective of this study was to reveal the mechanism amplifying rilpivirine resistance conferred by E138K. HIV-1 RT sequences were compared in patients who failed rilpivirine-containing ART virologically. The effects of mutations commonly identified with E138K on rilpivirine susceptibility were analysed by using recombinant HIV-1 variants. Rilpivirine-containing ART was introduced in 162 HIV-1-infected patients at the outpatient clinic of the AIDS Clinical Center (National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan) between May 2012 and June 2015. Virological treatment failure occurred in six of these patients. E138K emerged in three patients while other rilpivirine resistance mutations emerged in the other three patients. I135T/L were identified in only three patients with E138K and existed before the introduction of rilpivirine-containing ART. Analysis of recombinant HIV-1 variants indicated that E138K conferred low-level rilpivirine resistance and that coexistence of I135T/L with E138K amplified the resistance. I135T/L, escape mutations from HLA-B*51/52-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which are prevalent in Japan, may predispose HIV-1 to harbour E138K upon failure of rilpivirine-containing ART. The mutation patterns of drug resistance may vary due to baseline polymorphic mutations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Association of streptomycin resistance mutations with level of drug resistance and Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhu, N T Q; Lan, N T N; Phuong, N T N; Chau, N van V; Farrar, J; Caws, M

    2012-04-01

    To determine 1) the relationship between specific streptomycin (SM) resistance mutations and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and 2) whether these mutations are preferentially associated with the Beijing genotype in Viet Nam. A total of 131 consecutive Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates resistant to either isoniazid (INH) or rifampicin (RMP), collected previously, were tested for SM resistance, spoligotyped and sequenced in the rpsL, rrs and gidB genes. The MIC for 50 mutants was also determined. Overall, 116/131 isolates were SM-resistant. The three most frequently occurring mutation sites in rpsL and rrs were at codon 43 of rpsL (72/116, 62.1%), rpsL88 (22/116, 18.9%) and rrs514 (8/116, 6.9%). Mutations in the rrs910 region were found in two isolates (1.7%), and three isolates had mutations in both rpsL and rrs (2.6%). gidB mutations were found in both resistant and susceptible strains. Among SM-resistant isolates resistant to INH/RMP, the Beijing genotype was strongly associated with rpsL43 mutation (aOR 23.6, 95%CI 2.9-193.4, P = 0.002). The median MIC for each mutation was as follows: rpsL43 = 256 μg/ml, rpsL88 = 16 μg/ml, 515 loop = 4 μg/ml, 910 region = 8 μg/ml, and double mutation = 256 μg/ml. We found a strong association between rpsL43 and high drug resistance levels, with all rpsL43 mutants having an MIC >256 μg/ml (P < 0.001).

  20. Resistance-associated point mutations in insecticide-insensitive acetylcholinesterase.

    OpenAIRE

    Mutero, A; Pralavorio, M; Bride, J M; Fournier, D

    1994-01-01

    Extensive utilization of pesticides against insects provides us with a good model for studying the adaptation of a eukaryotic genome to a strong selective pressure. One mechanism of resistance is the alteration of acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7), the molecular target for organophosphates and carbamates. Here, we report the sequence analysis of the Ace gene in several resistant field strains of Drosophila melanogaster. This analysis resulted in the identification of five point mutations asso...

  1. Induced mutations of rust resistance genes in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Induced mutations are being used as a tool to study genes for resistance in wheat. It was found that Pm1 can be separated from Lr20 and Sr15, but these two react like a single pleiotropic gene. Mutants were further examined in crosses and backmutations have been attempted. (author)

  2. Strategies for Overcoming Resistance in Tumours Harboring BRAF Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourah Mohammad Obaid

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of resistance to previously effective treatments has been a challenge for health care providers and a fear for patients undergoing cancer therapy. This is an unfortunately frequent occurrence for patients undergoing targeted therapy for tumours harboring the activating V600E mutation of the BRAF gene. Since the initial identification of the BRAF mutation in 2002, a series of small molecular inhibitors that target the BRAFV600E have been developed, but intrinsic and acquired resistance to these drugs has presented an ongoing challenge. More recently, improvements in therapy have been achieved by combining the use of BRAF inhibitors with other drugs, such as inhibitors of the downstream effector mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK/extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK kinase (MEK. Despite improved success in response rates and in delaying resistance using combination therapy, ultimately, the acquisition of resistance remains a concern. Recent research articles have shed light on some of the underlying mechanisms of this resistance and have proposed numerous strategies that might be employed to overcome or avoid resistance to targeted therapies. This review will explore some of the resistance mechanisms, compare what is known in melanoma cancer to colorectal cancer, and discuss strategies under development to manage the development of resistance.

  3. High level of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations in patients with unsuppressed viral loads in rural northern South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etta, Elizabeth M; Mavhandu, Lufuno; Manhaeve, Cecile; McGonigle, Keanan; Jackson, Patrick; Rekosh, David; Hammarskjold, Marie-Louise; Bessong, Pascal O; Tebit, Denis M

    2017-07-27

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has significantly reduced HIV morbidity and mortality in both developed and developing countries. However, the sustainability of cART may be compromised by the emergence of viral drug resistance mutations (DRM) and the cellular persistence of proviruses carrying these DRM. This is potentially a more serious problem in resource limited settings. DRM were evaluated in individuals with unsuppressed viral loads after first or multiple lines of cART at two sites in rural Limpopo, South Africa. Seventy-two patients with viral loads of >1000 copies/ml were recruited between March 2014 and December 2015. Complete protease (PR) and partial Reverse Transcriptase (RT) sequences were amplified from both plasma RNA and paired proviral DNA from 35 of these subjects. Amplicons were directly sequenced to determine subtype and DRM using the Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Interpretation algorithm. Among the 72 samples, 69 could be PCR amplified from RNA and 35 from both RNA and DNA. Sixty-five (94.2%) viruses were subtype C, while one was subtype B (1.4%), one recombinant K/C, one recombinant C/B and one unclassified. Fifty-eight (84%) sequences carried at least one DRM, while 11 (15.9%) displayed no DRM. DRM prevalence according to drug class was: NRTI 60.8% NNRTI 65.2%, and PI 5.8%. The most common DRMs were; M184V (51.7%), K103N (50%), V106M (20.6%), D67N (13.3%), K65R (12%). The frequency of the DRM tracked well with the frequency of use of medications to which the mutations were predicted to confer resistance. Interestingly, a significant number of subjects showed predicted resistance to the newer NNRTIs, etravirine (33%) and rilpivirine (42%), both of which are not yet available in this setting. The proportion of DRM in RNA and DNA were mostly similar with the exception of the thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) D67N, K70R, K219QE; and K103N which were slightly more prevalent in DNA than RNA. Subjects who had received cART for at least

  4. Patterns of HIV-1 drug resistance after first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure in 6 sub-Saharan African countries: implications for second-line ART strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Raph L; Sigaloff, Kim C E; Wensing, Annemarie M; Wallis, Carole L; Kityo, Cissy; Siwale, Margaret; Mandaliya, Kishor; Ive, Prudence; Botes, Mariette E; Wellington, Maureen; Osibogun, Akin; Stevens, Wendy S; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Schuurman, Rob

    2012-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance may limit the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART). This cohort study examined patterns of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs) in individuals with virological failure on first-line ART at 13 clinical sites in 6 African countries and predicted their impact on second-line drug susceptibility. A total of 2588 antiretroviral-naive individuals initiated ART consisting of different nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) backbones (zidovudine, stavudine, tenofovir, or abacavir, plus lamivudine or emtricitabine) with either efavirenz or nevirapine. Population sequencing after 12 months of ART was retrospectively performed if HIV RNA was >1000 copies/mL. The 2010 International Antiviral Society-USA list was used to score major DRMs. The Stanford algorithm was used to predict drug susceptibility. HIV-1 sequences were generated for 142 participants who virologically failed ART, of whom 70% carried ≥1 DRM and 49% had dual-class resistance, with an average of 2.4 DRMs per sequence (range, 1-8). The most common DRMs were M184V (53.5%), K103N (28.9%), Y181C (15.5%), and G190A (14.1%). Thymidine analogue mutations were present in 8.5%. K65R was frequently selected by stavudine (15.0%) or tenofovir (27.7%). Among participants with ≥1 DRM, HIV-1 susceptibility was reduced in 93% for efavirenz/nevirapine, in 81% for lamivudine/emtricitabine, in 59% for etravirine/rilpivirine, in 27% for tenofovir, in 18% for stavudine, and in 10% for zidovudine. Early failure detection limited the accumulation of resistance. After stavudine failure in African populations, zidovudine rather than tenofovir may be preferred in second-line ART. Strategies to prevent HIV-1 resistance are a global priority.

  5. Resistance mutations against dolutegravir in HIV integrase impair the emergence of resistance against reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maureen; Mesplède, Thibault; Quashie, Peter K; Moïsi, Daniela; Wainberg, Mark A

    2014-03-27

    Among 1222 antiretroviral-naive patients who received dolutegravir (DTG) as part of first-line therapy, none has developed resistance against this compound after 48-96 weeks of follow-up. Moreover, only four occurrences of virological failure with resistance mutations have been documented in previously drug-experienced patients who received DTG as a first time integrase inhibitor as a component of a second-line regimen. The R263K integrase resistance mutation was observed in two of these individuals who received suboptimal background regimens. We have previously selected mutations at position R263K, G118R, H51Y, and E138K as being associated with low-level resistance to DTG. Now, we sought to investigate the facility with which resistance on the part of R263K-containing viruses might develop. We tested the ability of DTG-resistant viruses containing either the R263K or G118R and/or H51Y mutations to develop further resistance against several reverse transcriptase inhibitors during in-vitro selection experiments. Our results show that DTG-resistant viruses are impaired in their ability to acquire further resistance to each of nevirapine and lamivudine as a consequence of their relative inability to develop resistance mutations associated with these two compounds. Our findings provide an explanation for the fact that no individual has yet progressed to virological failure with resistance mutations associated with dolutegravir in clinical trials in which patients received dolutegravir together with an optimized background regimen.

  6. Identification of mutations conferring streptomycin resistance in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Li; Liu, Hai-Can; Sun, Qing; Xiao, Tong-Yang; Zhao, Xiu-Qin; Li, Gui-Lian; Zeng, Chun-Yan; Wan, Kang-Lin

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the spectrum and frequency of mutations in rpsL, rrs, and gidB among 140 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) clinical isolates from China. The association between mutations and different genotypes was also analyzed. Our data revealed that 65.7% of MDR-TB were resistant to streptomycin (STR), and 90.2% of STR-resistant isolates were Beijing strains. STR resistance was correlated with Beijing family (P=0.00). Compared with phenotypic data, detection of mutations for the combination of these 3 genes exhibited 94.6% sensitivity, 91.7% specificity, and 93.6% accuracy. The most common mutations in STR-resistant isolates were rpsL128, 262, and rrs514, of which rpsL128 showed association with Beijing lineage (P=0.00). A combination of these 3 mutations can serve as the reliable predictors for STR resistance, showing the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 85.9%, 97.9%, and 90.0%, respectively. Furthermore, gidBA276C, not A615G, was Beijing lineage specific. These findings are useful to develop rapid molecular diagnostic methods for STR resistance in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. IMPDH1 promoter mutations in a patient exhibiting azathioprine resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R L; Gearry, R B; Barclay, M L; Kennedy, M A

    2007-10-01

    Around 9% of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients are resistant to azathioprine. We hypothesized that these patients may carry mutations within inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). To test this hypothesis, we screened 20 azathioprine-resistant patients for variations in the two IMPDH genes (IMPDH1 and IMPDH2) using dHPLC and DNA sequencing. A 9 bp insertion within the IMPDH1 P3 promoter was found in a patient exhibiting severe azathioprine resistance. The insertion is predicted to abolish a cAMP-response element (CRE) and was found to significantly reduce IMPDH1 P3 promoter activity in a luciferase reporter gene assay (P-value resistance observed in this patient. The absence of functional variants within the other patients indicates that if IMPDH genetic variability contributes to azathioprine resistance it does so infrequently.

  8. Dihydropteroate synthase gene mutations in Pneumocystis and sulfa resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Laurence; Crothers, Kristina; Atzori, Chiara

    2004-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) remains a major cause of illness and death in HIV-infected persons. Sulfa drugs, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and dapsone are mainstays of PCP treatment and prophylaxis. While prophylaxis has reduced the incidence of PCP, its use has raised concerns about d...... for PCP treatment remains unclear. We review studies of DHPS mutations in P. jirovecii and summarize the evidence for resistance to sulfamethoxazole and dapsone....

  9. Ribosome slowed by mutation to streptomycin resistance. [Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galas, D.J.; Branscomb, E.W.

    1976-08-12

    The effect of mutation to streptomycin resistance on the speed of polypeptide elongation in Escherichia coli was investigated. Translation speed was determined by measuring the time required for the first newly synthesized ..beta..-galactosidase molecules to appear after induction of the lactose operon. The results showed that ribosome speed is not a fixed parameter inherent to the protein synthetic apparatus, but a variable determined by the kinetics of translation and ultimately by the structure of the ribosome. (HLW)

  10. Studies on induction of blast-resistant mutation in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Sachihiko; Kawai, Takeshi; Yamasaki, Yoshito; Niizeki, Hiroo; Kiyosawa, Shigehisa.

    1980-01-01

    The mutation frequency of blast resistance in rice and that of increased pathogenicity of blast fungi were examined, using the rice variety, Norin 8, which is susceptible to all races of blast fungi in Japan, and a fungus strain, Ina 168, which carries 6 virulent genes, respectively. Four different inoculation methods were employed for screening blast resistant mutants, i.e., spraying spore suspensions in growth chambers, in a greenhouse and in a field nursery, and injecting spore suspensions into newly developed tillers. The number of lesions and their types were used as the criteria of blast resistance. For screening the fungus mutants with increased pathogenicity, the spore suspensions of the fungi to be tested were sprayed on the seedlings of the blast resistant varieties, and when susceptible-type lesions were formed, single spores were isolated from these lesions, and the change in its pathogenicity was confirmed. When seeds were irradiated with gamma ray and treated with chemicals (EMS or EI), the frequency of the mutants with high resistance to blast was 5/4,575 and 4/5,851 respectively, in the M 2 generation. The frequency of dominant blast resistant mutations following gamma-ray irradiation at the pre-embryo stage of growing plants was 3/60,101 in the M 1 generation. When the spore suspensions of blast fungi were treated with X-ray, the frequency of the mutants with increased pathogenicity was about 0.5%. Thus, the mutants highly resistant against blast of rice induced by radiation or chemicals would eventually become susceptible varieties because blast fungus mutants occurred more frequently with increased pathogenicity. (Kaihara, S.)

  11. Screening for Stress Resistance Mutations in the Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace S Chick

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Longevity is correlated with stress resistance in many animal models. However, previous efforts through the boosting of the antioxidant defense system did not extend life span, suggesting that longevity related stress resistance is mediated by other uncharacterized pathways. We have developed a high-throughput platform for screening and rapid identification of novel genetic mutants in the mouse that are stress-resistant. Selection for resistance to stressors occurs in mutagenized mouse embryonic stem (ES cells, which are carefully treated so as to maintain pluripotency for mouse production. Initial characterization of these mutant ES cells revealed mutations in Pigl, Tiam1, and Rffl, among others. These genes are implicated in glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis, NADPH oxidase function, and inflammation. These mutants: (1 are resistant to two different oxidative stressors, paraquat and the omission of 2-mercaptoethanol, (2 have reduced levels of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS, (3 are capable of generating live mice, and (4 transmit the stress resistance phenotype to the mice. This strategy offers an efficient way to select for new mutants expressing a stress resistance phenotype, to rapidly identify the causative genes, and to develop mice for in vivo studies.

  12. A double EPSPS gene mutation endowing glyphosate resistance shows a remarkably high resistance cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heping; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Jalaludin, Adam; Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2017-12-01

    A novel glyphosate resistance double point mutation (T102I/P106S, TIPS) in the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene has been recently identified for the first time only in the weed species Eleusine indica. Quantification of plant resistance cost associated with the TIPS and the often reported glyphosate resistance single P106S mutation was performed. A significant resistance cost (50% in seed number currency) associated with the homozygous TIPS but not the homozygous P106S EPSPS variant was identified in E. indica plants. The resistance cost associated with the TIPS mutation escalated to 85% in plants under resource competition with rice crops. The resistance cost was not detected in nonhomozygous TIPS plants denoting the recessive nature of the cost associated with the TIPS allele. An excess of 11-fold more shikimate and sixfold more quinate in the shikimate pathway was detected in TIPS plants in the absence of glyphosate treatment compared to wild type, whereas no changes in these compounds were observed in P106S plants when compared to wild type. TIPS plants show altered metabolite levels in several other metabolic pathways that may account for the expression of the observed resistance cost. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Induced mutations in beans and peas for resistance to rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadl, F.A.M.

    1983-01-01

    Gamma rays and ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) were applied in a mutation-induction programme for rust resistance in bean and pea. Bean and pea seeds were pre-soaked 2 hours before irradiation with 9, 10 and 12 krad. For chemical mutagen treatments bean and pea seeds were pre-soaked for 8 hours and treated with 0.5 and 1.5% EMS for four hours. M 2 seeds of beans and peas were planted in 1979. Resistant M 2 plants were selected for their rust resistance and other morphological characters. M 3 seeds of selected plants were planted in 1980. In 1980 more seeds of the same varieties of beans and peas were treated with 0.1 and 0.3% EMS with the aim to produce rust-resistant mutants. Seed germination was reduced by gamma rays or EMS. Dwarf, malformed and abnormal plants were noticed. Some resistant M 2 plants selected gave high grain yields. Some were different in morphological characters. In the M 3 of selected plants various other mutant characters appeared, such as different height of plants, early and late flowering, resistance to powdery mildew in peas, altered grain yield, thickness of stem, pod shape and flower colour. (author)

  14. Topoisomerase Mutations in Fluoroquinolone-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible and -Resistant Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Kaatz, Glenn W.; Seo, Susan M.

    1998-01-01

    The incidence of the various mutations in the genes encoding topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase in fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus is not known. Using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing, we found that in fluoroquinolone- and methicillin-resistant strains, mutations in grlA and gyrA are quite likely to be present together. For fluoroquinolone-resistant but methicillin-susceptible strains, mutations in grlA alone are more common.

  15. Resistance of human erythrocyte membranes to Triton X-100 and C12E8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaldi Domingues, Cleyton; Ciana, Annarita; Buttafava, Armando; Balduini, Cesare; de Paula, Eneida; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts are microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids that contain specific membrane proteins. The resistance of domains to extraction by nonionic detergents at 4 degrees C is the commonly used method to characterize these structures that are operationally defined as detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs). Because the selectivity of different detergents in defining membrane rafts has been questioned, we have compared DRMs from human erythrocytes prepared with two detergents: Triton X-100 and C12E8. The DRMs obtained presented a cholesterol/protein mass ratio three times higher than in the whole membrane. Flotillin-2 was revealed in trace amounts in DRMs obtained with C12E8, but it was almost completely confined within the DRM fraction with Triton X-100. Differently, stomatin was found distributed in DRM and non-DRM fractions for both detergents. We have also measured the order parameter (S) of nitroxide spin labels inserted into DRMs by means of electron paramagnetic resonance. The 5- and 16-stearic acid spin label revealed significantly higher S values for DRMs obtained with either Triton X-100 or C12E8 in comparison to intact cells, while the difference in the S values between Triton X-100 and C12E8 DRMs was not statistically significant. Our results suggest that although the acyl chain packing is similar in DRMs prepared with either Triton X-100 or C12E8 detergent, protein content is dissimilar, with flotillin-2 being selectively enriched in Triton X-100 DRMs.

  16. Gyrase Mutations Are Associated with Variable Levels of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Maha R; Jacobson, Karen R; Franke, Molly F; Kaur, Devinder; Sloutsky, Alex; Mitnick, Carole D; Murray, Megan

    2016-03-01

    Molecular diagnostics that rapidly and accurately predict resistance to fluoroquinolone drugs and especially later-generation agents promise to improve treatment outcomes for patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and prevent the spread of disease. Mutations in the gyr genes are known to confer most fluoroquinolone resistance, but knowledge about the effects of gyr mutations on susceptibility to early- versus later-generation fluoroquinolones and about the role of mutation-mutation interactions is limited. Here, we sequenced the full gyrA and gyrB open reading frames in 240 multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis strains and quantified their ofloxacin and moxifloxacin MIC by testing growth at six concentrations for each drug. We constructed a multivariate regression model to assess both the individual mutation effects and interactions on the drug MICs. We found that gyrB mutations contribute to fluoroquinolone resistance both individually and through interactions with gyrA mutations. These effects were statistically significant. In these clinical isolates, several gyrA and gyrB mutations conferred different levels of resistance to ofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Consideration of gyr mutation combinations during the interpretation of molecular test results may improve the accuracy of predicting the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype. Further, the differential effects of gyr mutations on the activity of early- and later-generation fluoroquinolones requires further investigation and could inform the selection of a fluoroquinolone for treatment. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Induced mutations for disease resistance in wheat and field beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Hak, T.M.; Kamel, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    Wheat disease in Egypt is reviewed and results of mutation breeding by γ irradiation for disease resistance in wheat and field beans are described. Wheat mutants of the variety Giza 155 resistant to leaf rust, Giza 156 resistant to both leaf and yellow rusts, and Tosson with a reasonable level of combined resistance to the three rusts in addition to mutants of the tetraploid variety Dakar 52 with a good level of stem and yellow rust resistance are required. Their seeds were subjected to 10, 15 and 20 krad. Of 3000-3700 M 2 plants from each variety and dosage, 22 plants from both Giza 155 and Giza 156, although susceptible, showed a lower level of disease development. In 1975, M 3 families of these selected plants and 6000 plants from bulked material were grown from each variety and dosage at two locations. Simultaneously, an additional population consisting of 3000 mutagen-treated seeds was grown to have a reasonable chance of detecting mutants; 2 heads from each plant were harvested. These will be grown next season (1976) to make a population of 25,000-30,000 M 2 plants and screened to composite cultures of specific rusts. Vicia faba seeds of field bean varieties Giza 1, Giza 2 and Rebaya 40, equally susceptible to rust and chocolate spot, were subjected to 3, 5 and 7 krad of 60 Co gamma radiation and 800 M 1 plants were grown in 1972 per variety and dose. Up to this later growing season (M 3 ) no resistance was detected in M 3 plank

  18. Mutation breeding for disease resistance in wheat and field beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Hak, T.M.; Kamel, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    Wheat and broad-bean diseases cause considerable losses under Egyptian conditions; therefore, an attempt was made to induce useful mutations in both crops resistant to diseases which may be of direct or indirect use in breeding programmes. The methodology of artificial inoculation, evaluation, selection, radiation levels used are reported, in addition to the economic importance of the varieties used. This work passed through two phases, the first started in the 1972/73 crop season with a small population, while the second in 1974/75 with a larger one to have a better chance of detecting resistant mutants. In the first phase, a total of 3563M 1 wheat plants was grown in addition to approximately 3600-44,000M 2 and 77,646M 3 plants. Twenty-two M 2 plants were selected as showing lower level of leaf rust development, but further tests showed these plants are not true mutants since they rusted at the same level of their parent varieties. Out of the M 3 plants none showed good resistance. In the second phase, 36,000, 277,080 and 289,492 plants of M 1 , M 2 and M 3 , respectively, were grown and 73M 2 plants were selected as showing complete resistance to leaf and stem rusts. In field beans out of the first phase, a total of 5760, 37,200 and 33,240M 1 , M 2 and M 3 plants, respectively, was grown and none showed a good level of disease resistance although some were less diseased. These were further tested and proved not true mutants for reduced disease development. In the second phase, 8747, 203,520 and 90,285 plants of M 1 , M 2 and M 3 , respectively, were grown and 27M 2 plants were selected as showing a lower level of chocolate spot and rust development. The paper also discusses the use of single versus composite cultures in mutation breeding for disease resistance. (author)

  19. Mutations of the Helicobacter pylori Genes rdxA and pbp1 Cause Resistance against Metronidazole and Amoxicillin

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Ralf; Postius, Stefan; Melchers, Klaus; Schäfer, Klaus P.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate amoxicillin and metronidazole resistance of Helicobacter pylori, we compared putative resistance genes between resistant strains obtained in vitro and their sensitive parent strain. All metronidazole-resistant strains had rdxA mutations, and an amoxicillin-resistant strain had pbp1 and pbp2 mutations. By transforming PCR products of these mutated genes into antibiotic-sensitive strains, we showed that rdxA null mutations were sufficient for metronidazole resistance, while pbp1 ...

  20. Drug resistance. K13-propeller mutations confer artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straimer, Judith; Gnädig, Nina F; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Duru, Valentine; Ramadani, Arba Pramundita; Dacheux, Mélanie; Khim, Nimol; Zhang, Lei; Lam, Stephen; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Fairhurst, Rick M; Ménard, Didier; Fidock, David A

    2015-01-23

    The emergence of artemisinin resistance in Southeast Asia imperils efforts to reduce the global malaria burden. We genetically modified the Plasmodium falciparum K13 locus using zinc-finger nucleases and measured ring-stage survival rates after drug exposure in vitro; these rates correlate with parasite clearance half-lives in artemisinin-treated patients. With isolates from Cambodia, where resistance first emerged, survival rates decreased from 13 to 49% to 0.3 to 2.4% after the removal of K13 mutations. Conversely, survival rates in wild-type parasites increased from ≤0.6% to 2 to 29% after the insertion of K13 mutations. These mutations conferred elevated resistance to recent Cambodian isolates compared with that of reference lines, suggesting a contemporary contribution of additional genetic factors. Our data provide a conclusive rationale for worldwide K13-propeller sequencing to identify and eliminate artemisinin-resistant parasites. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. The role of compensatory mutations in the emergence of drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Handel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens that evolve resistance to drugs usually have reduced fitness. However, mutations that largely compensate for this reduction in fitness often arise. We investigate how these compensatory mutations affect population-wide resistance emergence as a function of drug treatment. Using a model of gonorrhea transmission dynamics, we obtain generally applicable, qualitative results that show how compensatory mutations lead to more likely and faster resistance emergence. We further show that resistance emergence depends on the level of drug use in a strongly nonlinear fashion. We also discuss what data need to be obtained to allow future quantitative predictions of resistance emergence.

  2. Screening for streptomycin resistance conferring mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Faranak; Haeili, Mehri; Imani Fooladi, Abbasali; Azari Garmjan, Gholam Ali; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2017-02-01

    Point mutations in the rpsL and rrs genes can lead to development of streptomycin (STR) resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of mutations in STR resistant M. tuberculosis isolates in Iran and to analyze the possible relationship between bacterial genotype and STR resistance. Twenty-three M. tuberculosis samples comprising 9 multidrug-resistant (MDR) and 14 non-MDR isolates, recovered from TB patients in four regions: Tehran (n = 14), Isfahan (n = 2), Zahedan (n = 2), and Khorasan (n = 5), were analysed. Mutational profiling was performed by sequencing of the rrs and rpsL genes and spoligotyping method was used for genotyping. Nineteen isolates were resistant to STR, among them 7 exhibited mutations in the rpsL gene and 7 had mutations in the rrs gene. The remaining 5 STR resistant as well as all susceptible isolates lacked any mutation in both genes. Beijing genotype was associated with both MDR and STR resistance in which all mutations occurred at codon 43 of the rpsL gene. There was an association between mutations in the rpsL and rrs genes and STR resistance. We also found a correlation between Beijing genotype and STR resistance.

  3. Contributions of the combined effects of topoisomerase mutations toward fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Linnell, Sonia K; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2007-11-01

    In defined, isogenic strains, at least three mutations, two of which must be in gyrA, were required to exceed the CLSI breakpoint for fluoroquinolone resistance. Strains with double mutations in both gyrA and parC had even higher MICs of fluoroquinolones than strains with totals of three mutations.

  4. Contributions of the Combined Effects of Topoisomerase Mutations toward Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Escherichia coli▿

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan-Linnell, Sonia K.; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    In defined, isogenic strains, at least three mutations, two of which must be in gyrA, were required to exceed the CLSI breakpoint for fluoroquinolone resistance. Strains with double mutations in both gyrA and parC had even higher MICs of fluoroquinolones than strains with totals of three mutations.

  5. Contributions of the Combined Effects of Topoisomerase Mutations toward Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Escherichia coli▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Linnell, Sonia K.; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    In defined, isogenic strains, at least three mutations, two of which must be in gyrA, were required to exceed the CLSI breakpoint for fluoroquinolone resistance. Strains with double mutations in both gyrA and parC had even higher MICs of fluoroquinolones than strains with totals of three mutations. PMID:17682104

  6. Significance of Coexisting Mutations on Determination of the Degree of Isoniazid Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, Galbokka Hewage Roshanthi Eranga; Wijesundera, Sandhya Sulochana; Vidanagama, Dhammika; Adikaram, Chamila Priyangani; Perera, Jennifer

    2018-04-23

    The emergence and spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) pose a threat to TB control in Sri Lanka. Isoniazid (INH) is a key element of the first-line anti-TB treatment regimen. Resistance to INH is mainly associated with point mutations in katG, inhA, and ahpC genes. The objective of this study was to determine mutations of these three genes in INH-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) strains in Sri Lanka. Complete nucleotide sequence of the three genes was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and subjected to DNA sequencing. Point mutations in the katG gene were identified in 93% isolates, of which the majority (78.6%) were at codon 315. Mutations at codons 212 and 293 of the katG gene have not been reported previously. Novel mutations were recognized in the promoter region of the inhA gene (C deletion at -34), fabG1 gene (codon 27), and ahpC gene (codon 39). Single S315T mutation in the katG gene led to a high level of resistance, while a low level of resistance with high frequency (41%) was observed when katG codon 315 coexisted with the mutation at codon 463. Since most of the observed mutations of all three genes coexisted with the katG315 mutation, screening of katG315 mutations will be a useful marker for molecular detection of INH resistance of MTb in Sri Lanka.

  7. Low pesticide rates may hasten the evolution of resistance by increasing mutation frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressel, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    At very low pesticide rates, a certain low proportion of pests may receive a sublethal dose, are highly stressed by the pesticide and yet survive. Stress is a general enhancer of mutation rates. Thus, the survivors are likely to have more than normal mutations, which might include mutations leading to pesticide resistance, both for multifactorial (polygenic, gene amplification, sequential allelic mutations) and for major gene resistance. Management strategies should consider how to eliminate the subpopulation of pests with the high mutation rates, but the best strategy is probably to avoid too low application rates of pesticides from the outset. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Adaptive and Mutational Resistance: Role of Porins and Efflux Pumps in Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The substantial use of antibiotics in the clinic, combined with a dearth of new antibiotic classes, has led to a gradual increase in the resistance of bacterial pathogens to these compounds. Among the various mechanisms by which bacteria endure the action of antibiotics, those affecting influx and efflux are of particular importance, as they limit the interaction of the drug with its intracellular targets and, consequently, its deleterious effects on the cell. This review evaluates the impact of porins and efflux pumps on two major types of resistance, namely, mutational and adaptive types of resistance, both of which are regarded as key phenomena in the global rise of antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. In particular, we explain how adaptive and mutational events can dramatically influence the outcome of antibiotic therapy by altering the mechanisms of influx and efflux of antibiotics. The identification of porins and pumps as major resistance markers has opened new possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic strategies directed specifically against these mechanisms. PMID:23034325

  9. Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum Cyclic Amine Resistance Locus (PfCARL Confer Multidrug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory LaMonte

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum cyclic amine resistance locus (PfCARL are associated with parasite resistance to the imidazolopiperazines, a potent class of novel antimalarial compounds that display both prophylactic and transmission-blocking activity, in addition to activity against blood-stage parasites. Here, we show that pfcarl encodes a protein, with a predicted molecular weight of 153 kDa, that localizes to the cis-Golgi apparatus of the parasite in both asexual and sexual blood stages. Utilizing clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR-mediated gene introduction of 5 variants (L830V, S1076N/I, V1103L, and I1139K, we demonstrate that mutations in pfcarl are sufficient to generate resistance against the imidazolopiperazines in both asexual and sexual blood-stage parasites. We further determined that the mutant PfCARL protein confers resistance to several structurally unrelated compounds. These data suggest that PfCARL modulates the levels of small-molecule inhibitors that affect Golgi-related processes, such as protein sorting or membrane trafficking, and is therefore an important mechanism of resistance in malaria parasites.

  10. Effects of raltegravir or elvitegravir resistance signature mutations on the barrier to dolutegravir resistance in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Takahiro; Suyama-Kagitani, Akemi; Kawauchi-Miki, Shinobu; Miki, Shigeru; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Akihisa, Erika; Nakahara, Koichiro; Kobayashi, Masanori; Underwood, Mark R; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu

    2015-05-01

    The recently approved HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) dolutegravir (DTG) (S/GSK1349572) has overall advantageous activity when tested in vitro against HIV-1 with raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG) resistance signature mutations. We conducted an in vitro resistance selection study using wild-type HIV-1 and mutants with the E92Q, Y143C, Y143R, Q148H, Q148K, Q148R, and N155H substitutions to assess the DTG in vitro barrier to resistance. No viral replication was observed at concentrations of ≥ 32 nM DTG, whereas viral replication was observed at 160 nM RAL or EVG in the mutants. In the Q148H, Q148K, or Q148R mutants, G140S/Q148H, E138K/Q148K, E138K/Q148R, and G140S/Q148R secondary mutations were identified with each INSTI and showed high resistance to RAL or EVG but limited resistance to DTG. E138K and G140S, as secondary substitutions to Q148H, Q148K, or Q148R, were associated with partial recovery in viral infectivity and/or INSTI resistance. In the E92Q, Y143C, Y143R, and N155H mutants, no secondary substitutions were associated with DTG. These in vitro results suggest that DTG has a high barrier to the development of resistance in the presence of RAL or EVG signature mutations other than Q148. One explanation for this high barrier to resistance is that no additional secondary substitution of E92Q, Y143C, Y143R, or N155H simultaneously increased the fold change in 50% effective concentration (EC50) to DTG and infectivity. Although increased DTG resistance via the Q148 pathway and secondary substitutions occurs at low concentrations, a higher starting concentration may reduce or eliminate the development of DTG resistance in this pathway in vitro. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Epistasis between antibiotic resistance mutations and genetic background shape the fitness effect of resistance across species of Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogwill, T; Kojadinovic, M; MacLean, R C

    2016-05-11

    Antibiotic resistance often evolves by mutations at conserved sites in essential genes, resulting in parallel molecular evolution between divergent bacterial strains and species. Whether these resistance mutations are having parallel effects on fitness across bacterial taxa, however, is unclear. This is an important point to address, because the fitness effects of resistance mutations play a key role in the spread and maintenance of resistance in pathogen populations. We address this idea by measuring the fitness effect of a collection of rifampicin resistance mutations in the β subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) across eight strains that span the diversity of the genus Pseudomonas We find that almost 50% of rpoB mutations have background-dependent fitness costs, demonstrating that epistatic interactions between rpoB and the rest of the genome are common. Moreover, epistasis is typically strong, and it is the dominant genetic determinant of the cost of resistance mutations. To investigate the functional basis of epistasis, and because rpoB plays a central role in transcription, we measured the effects of common rpoB mutations on transcriptional efficiency across three strains of Pseudomonas Transcriptional efficiency correlates strongly to fitness across strains, and epistasis arises because individual rpoB mutations have differential effects on transcriptional efficiency in different genetic backgrounds. © 2016 The Authors.

  12. Epistasis between antibiotic resistance mutations and genetic background shape the fitness effect of resistance across species of Pseudomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojadinovic, M.; MacLean, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance often evolves by mutations at conserved sites in essential genes, resulting in parallel molecular evolution between divergent bacterial strains and species. Whether these resistance mutations are having parallel effects on fitness across bacterial taxa, however, is unclear. This is an important point to address, because the fitness effects of resistance mutations play a key role in the spread and maintenance of resistance in pathogen populations. We address this idea by measuring the fitness effect of a collection of rifampicin resistance mutations in the β subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) across eight strains that span the diversity of the genus Pseudomonas. We find that almost 50% of rpoB mutations have background-dependent fitness costs, demonstrating that epistatic interactions between rpoB and the rest of the genome are common. Moreover, epistasis is typically strong, and it is the dominant genetic determinant of the cost of resistance mutations. To investigate the functional basis of epistasis, and because rpoB plays a central role in transcription, we measured the effects of common rpoB mutations on transcriptional efficiency across three strains of Pseudomonas. Transcriptional efficiency correlates strongly to fitness across strains, and epistasis arises because individual rpoB mutations have differential effects on transcriptional efficiency in different genetic backgrounds. PMID:27170722

  13. Mutations in rpoB and katG genes of multidrug resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Tuberculosis remains the leading causes of death worldwide with frequencies of mutations in rifampicin and isoniazid resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates varying according to geographical location. There is limited information in Zimbabwe on specific antibiotic resistance gene mutation patterns in ...

  14. Effects of gyrA and parC Mutations in Quinolones Resistant Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most important of fluoroquinolones resistance mechanisms is the accumulation of mutations in the bacterial enzymes targeted by fluoroquinolones; DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV. The effect of gyrase and Topoisomerase IV enzymes mutations on quinolones resistance in clinical Gram negative bacteria in ...

  15. Multiple Antimicrobial Resistance and Novel Point Mutation in Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolates from Mangalore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Kogaluru Shivakumaraswamy; Deekshit, Vijaya Kumar; Venugopal, Moleyuru Nagarajappa; Karunasagar, Iddya; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2017-12-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in bacteria is usually associated with mutations in the topoisomerase regions. We report a novel point mutation in fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strains. E. coli isolated from the environment in and around Mangalore, India, were examined for their antimicrobial resistance profile to 12 antibiotics and for the antibiotic resistance genes by polymerase chain reaction. Of the 67 E. coli isolated, 24 (35.8%) were sensitive to all antibiotics and 43 (64.2%) showed resistance to at least one of the 12 antibiotics used in the study. One isolate (EC10) was resistant to nine of the 12 antibiotics used. Resistance to nalidixic acid was the most common (34.32%), followed by nitrofurantoin (26.86%), tetracycline (22.38%), ampicillin (20.89%), cotrimoxazole (13.43%), ciprofloxacin (11.94%), gentamicin (10.44%), piperacillin/tazobactam (7.46%), chloramphenicol (7.46%), and cefotaxime (4.47%). Least resistance was observed for meropenem (1.49%) and none of the isolates showed resistance to imipenem. All the isolates harbored resistance genes corresponding to their antimicrobial resistance. Few quinolone-resistant isolates carried single point mutation (ser83Leu) and some had double point mutation (Ser83Leu and Asp87Asn) in gyrA. A third novel point mutation was also observed at position 50 with the change in the amino acid from tyrosine to cysteine (Tyr50Cys) in gyrA region. The study throws light on a novel point mutation in fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. While the study helps to understand the risk and occurrence of antibiotic resistance among gram-negative bacteria from the environment, the alarming rate of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a cause of concern in addressing infections.

  16. Reaching consensus on drug resistance conferring mutations (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela M Cirillo

    2016-01-01

    A user-friendly interface designed for nonexpert or expert operability.A standardized and validated analysis pipeline for variant analyses of M. tuberculosis next-generation sequencing (NGS data.Access to data beyond the published literature with dynamic and iterative updates of new data generated by global surveillance and clinical trials.A well-developed legal structure to ensure intellectual property rights and data ownership remain with contributors.A structured data-sharing architecture to restrict access to sensitive or unpublished data sets.Metadata standardization using CDISC: supports global, platform-independent data standards that enable information system interoperability.An emphasis on data quality and rigorous, expert curation with multiple quality control checks for whole-genome sequencing and other metadata.Validation of NGS analysis output by an expert committee with grading of resistance conferring mutations based on rigorous statistical standards.Regulatory-compliant analysis pipeline and database architecture. Successful execution of such an extensive database platform requires substantial collaboration from scientists investigating the genetic basis for drug resistance worldwide, and from developers with expertise in database design and implementation.

  17. Frequency and Distribution of Tuberculosis Resistance-Associated Mutations between Mumbai, Moldova, and Eastern Cape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georghiou, S B; Seifert, M; Catanzaro, D; Garfein, R S; Valafar, F; Crudu, V; Rodrigues, C; Victor, T C; Catanzaro, A; Rodwell, T C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular diagnostic assays, with their ability to rapidly detect resistance-associated mutations in bacterial genes, are promising technologies to control the spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB). Sequencing assays provide detailed information for specific gene regions and can help diagnostic assay developers prioritize mutations for inclusion in their assays. We performed pyrosequencing of seven Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene regions (katG, inhA, ahpC, rpoB, gyrA, rrs, and eis) for 1,128 clinical specimens from India, Moldova, and South Africa. We determined the frequencies of each mutation among drug-resistant and -susceptible specimens based on phenotypic drug susceptibility testing results and examined mutation distributions by country. The most common mutation among isoniazid-resistant (INH(r)) specimens was the katG 315ACC mutation (87%). However, in the Eastern Cape, INH(r) specimens had a lower frequency of katG mutations (44%) and higher frequencies of inhA (47%) and ahpC (10%) promoter mutations. The most common mutation among rifampin-resistant (RIF(r)) specimens was the rpoB 531TTG mutation (80%). The mutation was common in RIF(r) specimens in Mumbai (83%) and Moldova (84%) but not the Eastern Cape (17%), where the 516GTC mutation appeared more frequently (57%). The most common mutation among fluoroquinolone-resistant specimens was the gyrA 94GGC mutation (44%). The rrs 1401G mutation was found in 84%, 84%, and 50% of amikacin-resistant, capreomycin-resistant, and kanamycin (KAN)-resistant (KAN(r)) specimens, respectively. The eis promoter mutation -12T was found in 26% of KAN(r) and 4% of KAN-susceptible (KAN(s)) specimens. Inclusion of the ahpC and eis promoter gene regions was critical for optimal test sensitivity for the detection of INH resistance in the Eastern Cape and KAN resistance in Moldova. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT02170441.). Copyright © 2016, American Society for

  18. Mutations of the Helicobacter pylori Genes rdxA and pbp1 Cause Resistance against Metronidazole and Amoxicillin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ralf; Postius, Stefan; Melchers, Klaus; Schäfer, Klaus P.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate amoxicillin and metronidazole resistance of Helicobacter pylori, we compared putative resistance genes between resistant strains obtained in vitro and their sensitive parent strain. All metronidazole-resistant strains had rdxA mutations, and an amoxicillin-resistant strain had pbp1 and pbp2 mutations. By transforming PCR products of these mutated genes into antibiotic-sensitive strains, we showed that rdxA null mutations were sufficient for metronidazole resistance, while pbp1 mutations contributed to amoxicillin resistance of H. pylori. PMID:11181392

  19. Mutations inside rifampicin-resistance determining region of rpoB gene associated with rifampicin-resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaw, Myo T; Emran, Nor A; Lin, Zaw

    2018-04-26

    Rifampicin (RIF) plays a pivotal role in the treatment of tuberculosis due to its bactericidal effects. Because the action of RIF is on rpoB gene encoding RNA polymerase β subunit, 95% of RIF resistant mutations are present in rpoB gene. The majority of the mutations in rpoB gene are found within an 81bp RIF-resistance determining region (RRDR). Literatures on RIF resistant mutations published between 2010 and 2016 were thoroughly reviewed. The most commonly mutated codons in RRDR of rpoB gene are 531, 526 and 516. The possibilities of absence of mutation in RRDR of rpoB gene in MDR-TB isolates in few studies was due to existence of other rare rpoB mutations outside RRDR or different mechanism of rifampicin resistance. Molecular methods which can identify extensive mutations associated with multiple anti-tuberculous drugs are in urgent need so that the research on drug resistant mutations should be extended. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of mutations causing rifampicin and isoniazid resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madania, Ammar; Habous, Maya; Zarzour, Hana; Ghoury, Ifad; Hebbo, Barea

    2012-01-01

    In order to characterize mutations causing rifampicin and isoniazid resistance of M. tuberculosis in Syria, 69 rifampicin resistant (Rif(r)) and 72 isoniazid resistant (Inh(r)) isolates were screened for point mutations in hot spots of the rpoB, katG and inhA genes by DNA sequencing and real time PCR. Of 69 Rif(r) isolates, 62 (90%) had mutations in the rifampin resistance determining region (RRDR) of the rpoB gene, with codons 531 (61%), 526 (13%), and 516 (8.7%) being the most commonly mutated. We found two new mutations (Asp516Thr and Ser531Gly) described for the first time in the rpoB-RRDR in association with rifampicin resistance. Only one mutation (Ile572Phe) was found outside the rpoB-RRDR. Of 72 Inh(r) strains, 30 (41.6%) had a mutation in katGcodon315 (with Ser315Thr being the predominant alteration), and 23 (32%) harbored the inhA(-15C-->T) mutation. While the general pattern of rpoB-RRDR and katG mutations reflected those found worldwide, the prevalence of the inhA(-15C-->T mutation was above the value found in most other countries, emphasizing the great importance of testing the inhA(-15C-->T) mutation for prediction of isoniazid resistance in Syria. Sensitivity of a rapid test using real time PCR and 3'-Minor groove binder (MGB) probes in detecting Rif(r) and Inh(r) isolates was 90% and 69.4%, respectively. This demonstrates that a small set of MGB-probes can be used in real time PCR in order to detect most mutations causing resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid.

  1. Mutations in the rpsL gene are involved in streptomycin resistance in Campylobacter coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkkola, Satu; Juntunen, Pekka; Heiska, Helmi; Hyytiäinen, Heidi; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

    2010-06-01

    To characterize the mechanisms of streptomycin (STR) resistance in Campylobacter coli, we chose 17 isolates that were resistant to STR, erythromycin (ERY), or both, and the putative STR resistance target genes rpsL, rrs, and gidB were analyzed for mutations. The presence of the aadE gene encoding aminoglycoside 6-adenylyltransferase was also evaluated. To reveal putative connection between ERY and STR resistance mechanisms, 13 C. coli isolates initially susceptible to STR and ERY were exposed to STR, and resistant variants were characterized. We also assessed the development of ERY resistance with a similar method. Finally, the effect of the putative CmeABC efflux pump inhibitor phenyl-arginine-beta-naphthylamine on STR resistance was tested. Our studies showed an association between mutations in the rpsL gene and STR resistance in C. coli. Further, mutations obtained in vitro were more diverse than those occurring in vivo. However, we observed no resistance associated mutations in the other genes studied, and selection with STR did not result in variants resistant to ERY and vice versa. None of the isolates harbored the aadE gene, and no differences in STR minimum inhibitory concentration levels were detected in the presence or absence of phenyl-arginine-beta-naphthylamine. In conclusion, we found that STR resistance was associated with mutations in the rpsL gene, but no obvious association between STR and ERY resistance mechanisms was found in C. coli.

  2. Mutations in wheat exhibiting growth-stage-specific resistance to biotrophic fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Phil H; Howie, John A; Worland, Anthony J; Stratford, Rebecca; Boyd, Lesley A

    2004-11-01

    Two mutants were isolated in wheat that showed enhanced resistance towards Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, the fungal causal agent of yellow rust. The altered phenotype of I3-48 is due to a minimum of two mutation events, each showing a partial, additive effect, with one mutation segregating with a deletion on the long arm of chromosome 4D. In the case of I3-54, the enhanced resistance is due to a single, dominant mutation. In both mutants, the expression of the enhanced resistance is growth-stage specific. With I3-54, the full resistance phenotype is apparent from the third seedling leaf onwards, while with I3-48, a full resistance phenotype is only seen on the tenth and subsequent leaves. In addition to the enhanced resistance towards yellow rust, I3-48 also shows enhanced resistance towards brown rust, and I3-54 shows enhanced resistance to powdery mildew.

  3. Mutations in the bacterial ribosomal protein l3 and their association with antibiotic resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Rasmus N; Ntokou, Eleni; Nørgaard, Katrine

    2015-01-01

    Different groups of antibiotics bind to the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) in the large subunit of the bacterial ribosome. Resistance to these groups of antibiotics has often been linked with mutations or methylations of the 23S rRNA. In recent years, there has been a rise in the number...... of studies where mutations have been found in the ribosomal protein L3 in bacterial strains resistant to PTC-targeting antibiotics but there is often no evidence that these mutations actually confer antibiotic resistance. In this study, a plasmid exchange system was used to replace plasmid-carried wild...... background. Ten plasmid-carried mutated L3 genes were constructed, and their effect on growth and antibiotic susceptibility was investigated. Additionally, computational modeling of the impact of L3 mutations in E. coli was used to assess changes in 50S structure and antibiotic binding. All mutations...

  4. Pyrethroid-resistance and presence of two knockdown resistance (kdr) mutations, F1534C and a novel mutation T1520I, in Indian Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwah, Raja Babu S; Dykes, Cherry L; Kapoor, Neera; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2015-01-01

    Control of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever, is a challenging task. Pyrethroid insecticides have emerged as a preferred choice for vector control but are threatened by the emergence of resistance. The present study reports a focus of pyrethroid resistance and presence of two kdr mutations--F1534C and a novel mutation T1520I, in Ae. aegypti from Delhi, India. Insecticide susceptibility status of adult-female Ae. aegypti against DDT (4%), deltamethrin (0.05%) and permethrin (0.75%) was determined using WHO's standard insecticide susceptibility kit, which revealed resistance to DDT, deltamethrin and permethrin with corrected mortalities of 35%, 72% and 76% respectively. Mosquitoes were screened for the presence of kdr mutations including those reported earlier (I1011V/M, V1016G/I, F1534C, D1794Y and S989P), which revealed the presence of F1534C and a novel mutation T1520I. Highly specific PCR-RFLP assays were developed for genotyping of these two mutations. Genotyping using allele specific PCR and new PCR-RFLP assays revealed a high frequency of F1534C (0.41-0.79) and low frequency of novel mutation T1520I (0.13). The latter was observed to be tightly linked with F1534C and possibly serve as a compensatory mutation. A positive association of F1534C mutation with DDT and deltamethrin resistance in Ae. aegypti was established. However, F1534C-kdr did not show significant protection against permethrin. The Aedes aegypti population of Delhi is resistant to DDT, deltamethrin and permethrin. Two kdr mutations, F1534C and a novel mutation T1520I, were identified in this population. This is the first report of kdr mutations being present in the Indian Ae. aegypti population. Highly specific PCR-RFLP assays were developed for discrimination of alleles at both kdr loci. A positive association of F1534C mutation with DDT and deltamethrin resistance was confirmed.

  5. Epidemiology of Isoniazid Resistance Mutations and Their Effect on Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyen, Mai N. T.; Cobelens, Frank G. J.; Buu, Tran N.; Lan, Nguyen T. N.; Dung, Nguyen H.; Kremer, Kristin; Tiemersma, Edine W.

    2013-01-01

    Isoniazid resistance is highly prevalent in Vietnam. We investigated the molecular and epidemiological characteristics and the association with first-line treatment outcomes of the main isoniazid resistance mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis in codon 315 of the katG and in the promoter region of the inhA gene. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains with phenotypic resistance to isoniazid from consecutively diagnosed smear-positive tuberculosis patients in rural Vietnam were subjected to Genotype MTBDRplus testing to identify katG and inhA mutations. Treatment failure and relapse were determined by sputum culture. In total, 227 of 251 isoniazid-resistant strains (90.4%) had detectable mutations: 75.3% in katG codon 315 (katG315) and 28.2% in the inhA promoter region. katG315 mutations were significantly associated with pretreatment resistance to streptomycin, rifampin, and ethambutol but not with the Beijing genotype and predicted both unfavorable treatment outcome (treatment failure or death) and relapse; inhA promoter region mutations were only associated with resistance to streptomycin and relapse. In tuberculosis patients, M. tuberculosis katG315 mutations but not inhA mutations are associated with unfavorable treatment outcome. inhA mutations do, however, increase the risk of relapse, at least with treatment regimens that contain only isoniazid and ethambutol in the continuation phase. PMID:23689727

  6. Mitochondrial DNA exhibits resistance to induced point and deletion mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, William J.; Ericson, Nolan G.; Long, Alexandra S.; White, Paul A.; Marchetti, Francesco; Bielas, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations contributes to the pathogenesis of human disease. Currently, mitochondrial mutations are largely considered results of inaccurate processing of its heavily damaged genome. However, mainly from a lack of methods to monitor mtDNA mutations with sufficient sensitivity and accuracy, a link between mtDNA damage and mutation has not been established. To test the hypothesis that mtDNA-damaging agents induce mtDNA mutations, we exposed MutaTMMouse mice to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), daily for 28 consecutive days, and quantified mtDNA point and deletion mutations in bone marrow and liver using our newly developed Digital Random Mutation Capture (dRMC) and Digital Deletion Detection (3D) assays. Surprisingly, our results demonstrate mutagen treatment did not increase mitochondrial point or deletion mutation frequencies, despite evidence both compounds increase nuclear DNA mutations and demonstrated B[a]P adduct formation in mtDNA. These findings contradict models of mtDNA mutagenesis that assert the elevated rate of mtDNA mutation stems from damage sensitivity and abridged repair capacity. Rather, our results demonstrate induced mtDNA damage does not readily convert into mutation. These findings suggest robust mitochondrial damage responses repress induced mutations after mutagen exposure. PMID:27550180

  7. Fluoroquinolone resistance in Helicobacter pylori: role of mutations at position 87 and 91 of GyrA on the level of resistance and identification of a resistance conferring mutation in GyrB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbara, Emiko; Noguchi, Norihisa; Kawai, Takashi; Sasatsu, Masanori

    2012-02-01

    Fluoroquinolone-containing regimens have been suggested as an alternate to standard triple therapy for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections. To determine the relationship between fluoroquinolone resistance and mutations of GyrA and GyrB in H. pylori, we exchanged the mutations at positions 87 and 91 of GyrA among fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates. GyrB of a strain with no mutations in GyrA was also analyzed to identify mechanisms of resistance to norfloxacin. Natural transformation was performed using the amplified fragment of the gyrA and gyrB gene as donor DNA. The amino acid sequences of GyrA and GyrB were determined by DNA sequencing of the gyrA and gyrB genes. Norfloxacin-resistant strains which had mutations at position 87 and 91 became susceptible when the mutations were converted to the wild type. When the mutation from Asp to Asn at position 91 was exchanged to the mutation from Asn to Lys at position 87, the MIC to levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, and sitafloxacin increased. Norfloxacin-resistant strain TS132 with no mutations in GyrA but had a mutation at position 463 in GyrB. Transformants obtained by natural transformation using gyrB DNA of TS132 had a mutation at position 463 of GyrB and revealed resistant to norfloxacin and levofloxacin. Mutation from Asn to Lys at position 87 of GyrA confers higher resistance to levofloxacin and gatifloxacin than does mutation from Asp to Asn at position 91. We propose that mutation at position 463 in GyrB as a novel mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in H. pylori. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo de; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-12-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosa isolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed.

  9. Effect of cholesterol depletion and temperature on the isolation of detergent-resistant membranes from human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Cleyton C; Ciana, Annarita; Buttafava, Armando; Casadei, Bruna Renata; Balduini, Cesare; de Paula, Eneida; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2010-04-01

    Transient lateral microdomains or lipid rafts play important roles in many physiological membrane-mediated cell processes. Detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) are good models for the study of lipid rafts. Here we report that DRMs can be obtained by treating human erythrocytes with the nonionic detergents Triton X-100 or octaethylene glycol monododecyl ether (C(12)E(8)) at 37 degrees C, and by treatment at 4 degrees C of cholesterol-depleted erythrocytes. Electron paramagnetic resonance with spin labels inserted at different membrane depths (5- and 16-doxyl stearic acids, 5-SASL and 16-SASL) were used to measure the order parameter (S) of the cell membranes and DRMs. We previously reported significantly higher S values in DRMs with respect to intact erythrocyte membranes. Here we show that higher S values were still measurable in DRMs prepared from intact erythrocytes at 37 degrees C, or from cholesterol-depleted cells at 4 degrees C, for both detergents. For 5-SASL only, increased S values were measured in 4 degrees C DRMs obtained from cholesterol-depleted versus intact erythrocytes. Flotillin-2, a protein marker of lipid rafts, was found in DRMs from intact cells in trace amounts but it was sensitively increased in C(12)E(8) DRMs prepared at 4 degrees C from cholesterol-depleted erythrocytes, while the membrane-skeletal proteins spectrin and actin were excluded from both Triton X-100 and C(12)E(8) DRMs. However, contrary to the 4 degrees C treatment results, flotillin-2 and stomatin were not resistant to Triton X-100 and C(12)E(8) treatment at physiological temperature. The role of cholesterol in DRMs formation is discussed and the results presented provide further support for the use of C(12)E(8) to the study of DRMs.

  10. Drug resistance mutation of HIV-1 in HIV/AIDS patients infected by blood transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-li LU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To study the characteristic of HIV-1 gene mutation in HIV/AIDS patients infected by blood transfusion, and analyze the resistance to anti-HIV drugs. Methods  Plasma samples were collected from 37 HIV/AIDS patients infected by blood transfusion for extraction of HIV-1 RNA. The gene fragments of HIV pol domain were amplified by RT-PCR and nested-PCR , and the electrophoresis positive products were sequenced. The sequencing result was landed to the website http:// HIV-1db.stanford.edu to analyze the drug resistance mutations. Results  Drug resistance mutations were found in 20 patients, including 19 cases of virological or immunological failure. Mutation of gene locus V32AV of protease inhibitors (PIs occurred in 3 patients during the treatment, but it did not cause the drug resistance of PIs. Mutation of the coding regions of reverse transcriptase was found in 23 patients, including M184V, TAMs, Q151M complexus, K103N, Y181C and so on. Of the 23 patients mentioned above, the HIV-1 gene mutation induced the resistance to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs in 20 patients, and the mutation rate of RTIs was 54.05% (20/37. Conclusion  The drug resistance rate of HIV-1 in patients infected by blood transfusion may be high for antiviral therapy, so the drug resistance of HIV-1 should be monitored and treatment plan should be adjusted timely.

  11. [Mutations of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV in clinical isolates of fluoroquinolone-resistant Proteus mirabilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ryoichi; Sato, Kenya; Kumita, Wakako; Inami, Natsuko; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Noboru; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2006-02-01

    The presence of fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations within the quinolone resistance-determining region of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV was investigated genetically in clinical isolates of Proteus mirabilis recovered from patients with urinay tract infections. Two isolates of fluoroquinolone-resistant P. mirabilis possessed the mutations in GyrA (Ser-83 --> Arg or Ile), GyrB (Ser-464 --> Tyr or Phe) and ParC (Ser-80 --> Ile). A novel mutation with Glu-87 --> Lys in GyrA, where suggested to be responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance, was identified. These results demonstrate that the presence of an additional mutation at Glu-87 in GyrA may contribute to high-level fluoroquinolone resistance, too.

  12. Artemisinin resistance without pfkelch13 mutations in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Angana; Bopp, Selina; Magistrado, Pamela; Wong, Wesley; Daniels, Rachel; Demas, Allison; Schaffner, Stephen; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Lim, Pharath; Dhorda, Mehul; Miotto, Olivo; Woodrow, Charles; Ashley, Elizabeth A; Dondorp, Arjen M; White, Nicholas J; Wirth, Dyann; Fairhurst, Rick; Volkman, Sarah K

    2017-05-12

    Artemisinin resistance is associated with delayed parasite clearance half-life in vivo and correlates with ring-stage survival under dihydroartemisinin in vitro. Both phenotypes are associated with mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 pfkelch13 gene. Recent spread of artemisinin resistance and emerging piperaquine resistance in Southeast Asia show that artemisinin combination therapy, such as dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, are losing clinical effectiveness, prompting investigation of drug resistance mechanisms and development of strategies to surmount emerging anti-malarial resistance. Sixty-eight parasites isolates with in vivo clearance data were obtained from two Tracking Resistance to Artemisinin Collaboration study sites in Cambodia, culture-adapted, and genotyped for pfkelch13 and other mutations including pfmdr1 copy number; and the RSA 0-3h survival rates and response to antimalarial drugs in vitro were measured for 36 of these isolates. Among these 36 parasites one isolate demonstrated increased ring-stage survival for a PfKelch13 mutation (D584V, RSA 0-3h  = 8%), previously associated with slow clearance but not yet tested in vitro. Several parasites exhibited increased ring-stage survival, yet lack pfkelch13 mutations, and one isolate showed evidence for piperaquine resistance. This study of 68 culture-adapted Plasmodium falciparum clinical isolates from Cambodia with known clearance values, associated the D584V PfKelch13 mutation with increased ring-stage survival and identified parasites that lack pfkelch13 mutations yet exhibit increased ring-stage survival. These data suggest mutations other than those found in pfkelch13 may be involved in conferring artemisinin resistance in P. falciparum. Piperaquine resistance was also detected among the same Cambodian samples, consistent with reports of emerging piperaquine resistance in the field. These culture-adapted parasites permit further investigation of mechanisms of both artemisinin and piperaquine

  13. NPHS2 mutations in children with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otukesh, Hasan; Ghazanfari, Behzad; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Bakhshayesh, Masoomeh; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Hoseini, Rozita; Chalian, Majid; Salami, Arezoo; Mehdipor, Leila; Rahiminia, Aysan

    2009-04-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome may be caused by mutations in NPHS1 and NPHS2, which encode nephrin and podocin, respectively. Since the identification of the NPHS2 gene, various investigators have demonstrated that its mutation is an important cause of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. We aimed to evaluate frequency and spectrum of podocin mutations in the Iranian children with steroid-resistant nephritic syndrome. We examined 20 children with steroid-resistant nephritic syndrome referred to Ali Asghar Children's Hospital, in Tehran, Iran. Mutations in the 5th and 7th exons of NPHS2 were assessed. The mutational analysis of NPHS2 was performed by DNA sequencing. The mean age at the onset of proteinuria was 6.4 +/- 3.6 years. None of the children had mutations in the exons 5 or 7. Our study suggests that NPHS2 mutations in exons 5 and 7 are not seen in our children. Therefore, we cannot recommend NPHS2 (exons 5 and 7) mutation for screening in Iranian children with steroid-resistant nephritic syndrome. Other exons of podocin or other podocyte proteins in Iranian children may play a role in pathogenesis of steroid-resistant nephritic syndrome.

  14. Identification and characterization of mutations in housefly (Musca domestica) acetylcholinesterase involved in insecticide resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Sinead B.; Dolden, Tracey A.; Moores, Graham D.

    2001-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) insensitive to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides has been identified as a major resistance mechanism in numerous arthropod species. However, the associated genetic changes have been reported in the AChE genes from only three insect species; their role......, Phe-327 Tyr and Gly-365 Ala) in the AChE gene of this species that, either singly or in combination, confer different spectra of insecticide resistance. The baculovirus expression of wild-type and mutated housefly AChE proteins has confirmed that the mutations each confer relatively modest levels...... of insecticide insensitivity except the novel Gly-262 Val mutation, which results in much stronger resistance (up to 100-fold) to certain compounds. In all cases the effects of mutation combinations are additive. The mutations introduce amino acid substitutions that are larger than the corresponding wild...

  15. Contribution of Type II Topoisomerase Mutations to Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Enterococcus faecium from Japanese Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urushibara, Noriko; Suzaki, Keisuke; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Aung, Meiji Soe; Shinagawa, Masaaki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    High-level fluoroquinolone resistance is conferred by the mutation of conserved serine and acidic amino acids in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of the A subunits of the type II topoisomerases, DNA gyrase (GyrA) and topoisomerase IV (ParC). In Japan, fluoroquinolone-resistant Enterococcus faecium continues to emerge in clinical settings. We analyzed 131 Japanese E. faecium clinical isolates for susceptibility to levofloxacin (LVFX), and QRDR mutational status. The bacterial collection had a high percentage of resistance (79%) and showed elevated drug minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Eighty-three isolates had single or combined mutations in gyrA and/or parC; all were resistant to LVFX. A strong correlation was evident between log-transformed MICs and the total number of QRDR mutations (r = 0.7899), confirming the involvement of QRDR mutations in drug resistance, as previously described. Three-dimensional modeling indicated that the amino acid change(s) in QRDR could disrupt the interaction between the enzymes and drugs: the most common cause of quinolone resistance. Interestingly, eight isolates had a single mutation on gyrA and exhibited significantly reduced susceptibility. These data imply that either DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV can be the primary target of fluoroquinolones, although topoisomerase IV is commonly thought to be the primary target in gram-positive bacteria.

  16. Phenotypic Suppression of Streptomycin Resistance by Mutations in Multiple Components of the Translation Apparatus

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Jennifer F.; Lee, Hannah J.; Jaspers, Joshua B.; Dahlberg, Albert E.; Jogl, Gerwald; Gregory, Steven T.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial ribosome and its associated translation factors are frequent targets of antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance mutations have been found in a number of these components. Such mutations can potentially interact with one another in unpredictable ways, including the phenotypic suppression of one mutation by another. These phenotypic interactions can provide evidence of long-range functional interactions throughout the ribosome and its functional complexes and potentially give insig...

  17. Special contribution 2015 update of the drug resistance mutations in HIV-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, Annemarie M.; Calvez, Vincent; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Johnson, Victoria A.; Paredes, Roger; Pillay, Deenan; Shafer, Robert W.; Richman, Douglas D.

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 edition of the IAS–USA drug resistance mutations list updates the figures last published in July 2014. The mutations listed are those that have been identified by specific criteria for evidence and drugs described. The figures are designed to assist practitioners in identifying key

  18. Mechanisms of Streptomycin Resistance: Selection of Mutations in the 16S rRNA Gene Conferring Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Burkhard; Kidan, Yishak G.; Prammananan, Therdsak; Ellrott, Kerstin; Böttger, Erik C.; Sander, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Chromosomally acquired streptomycin resistance is frequently due to mutations in the gene encoding the ribosomal protein S12, rpsL. The presence of several rRNA operons (rrn) and a single rpsL gene in most bacterial genomes prohibits the isolation of streptomycin-resistant mutants in which resistance is mediated by mutations in the 16S rRNA gene (rrs). Three strains were constructed in this investigation: Mycobacterium smegmatis rrnB, M. smegmatis rpsL3+, and M. smegmatis rrnB rpsL3+. M. smegmatis rrnB carries a single functional rrn operon, i.e., rrnA (comprised of 16S, 23S, and 5S rRNA genes) and a single rpsL+ gene; M. smegmatis rpsL3+ is characterized by the presence of two rrn operons (rrnA and rrnB) and three rpsL+ genes; and M. smegmatis rrnB rpsL3+ carries a single functional rrn operon (rrnA) and three rpsL+ genes. By genetically altering the number of rpsL and rrs alleles in the bacterial genome, mutations in rrs conferring streptomycin resistance could be selected, as revealed by analysis of streptomycin-resistant derivatives of M. smegmatis rrnB rpsL3+. Besides mutations well known to confer streptomycin resistance, novel streptomycin resistance conferring mutations were isolated. Most of the mutations were found to map to a functional pseudoknot structure within the 530 loop region of the 16S rRNA. One of the mutations observed, i.e., 524G→C, severely distorts the interaction between nucleotides 524G and 507C, a Watson-Crick interaction which has been thought to be essential for ribosome function. The use of the single rRNA allelic M. smegmatis strain should help to elucidate the principles of ribosome-drug interactions. PMID:11557484

  19. Isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis in Denmark: mutations, transmission and treatment outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Didi; Andersen, Peter Henrik; Andersen, Ase Bengaard

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective study on isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis (TB) was conducted in the low-burden country, Denmark (DK). The aim was to describe treatment outcome and transmission and to evaluate a mutation analysis for high- and low-level isoniazid resistance detection.......A retrospective study on isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis (TB) was conducted in the low-burden country, Denmark (DK). The aim was to describe treatment outcome and transmission and to evaluate a mutation analysis for high- and low-level isoniazid resistance detection....

  20. A fluoroquinolone resistance associated mutation in gyrA affects DNA supercoiling in Campylobacter jejuni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eHan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fluoroquinolone (FQ-resistant Campylobacter has become a concern for public health. To facilitate the control of FQ-resistant Campylobacter, it is necessary to understand the impact of FQ resistance on the fitness of Campylobacter in its natural hosts as understanding fitness will help to determine and predict the persistence of FQ-resistant Campylobacter. Previously it was shown that acquisition of resistance to FQ antimicrobials enhanced the in vivo fitness of FQ-resistant Campylobacter. In this study, we confirmed the role of the Thr-86-Ile mutation in GyrA in modulating Campylobacter fitness by reverting the mutation to the wild-type allele, which resulted in the loss of the fitness advantage. Additionally, we determined if the resistance-conferring GyrA mutations alter the enzymatic function of the DNA gyrase. Recombinant wild-type gyrase and mutant gyrases with three different types of mutations (Thr-86-Ile, Thr-86-Lys, and Asp-90-Asn, which are associated with FQ resistance in Campylobacter, were generated in E. coli and compared for their supercoiling activities using an in vitro assay. The mutant gyrase with the Thr-86-Ile change showed a greatly reduced supercoiling activity compared with the wild-type gyrase, while other mutant gyrases did not show an altered supercoiling. Furthermore, we measured DNA supercoiling within Campylobacter cells using a reporter plasmid. Consistent with the results from the in vitro supercoiling assay, the FQ-resistant mutant carrying the Thr-86-Ile change in GyrA showed much less DNA supercoiling than the wild-type strain and the mutant strains carrying other mutations. Together, these results indicate that the Thr-86-Ile mutation, which is predominant in clinical FQ-resistant Campylobacter, modulates DNA supercoiling homeostasis in FQ-resistant Campylobacter.

  1. Amdinocillin (Mecillinam) Resistance Mutations in Clinical Isolates and Laboratory-Selected Mutants of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulin, Elisabeth; Sundqvist, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Amdinocillin (mecillinam) is a β-lactam antibiotic that is used mainly for the treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections. The objectives of this study were to identify mutations that confer amdinocillin resistance on laboratory-isolated mutants and clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and to determine why amdinocillin resistance remains rare clinically even though resistance is easily selected in the laboratory. Under laboratory selection, frequencies of mutation to amdinocillin resistance varied from 8 × 10−8 to 2 × 10−5 per cell, depending on the concentration of amdinocillin used during selection. Several genes have been demonstrated to give amdinocillin resistance, but here eight novel genes previously unknown to be involved in amdinocillin resistance were identified. These genes encode functions involved in the respiratory chain, the ribosome, cysteine biosynthesis, tRNA synthesis, and pyrophosphate metabolism. The clinical isolates exhibited significantly greater fitness than the laboratory-isolated mutants and a different mutation spectrum. The cysB gene was mutated (inactivated) in all of the clinical isolates, in contrast to the laboratory-isolated mutants, where mainly other types of more costly mutations were found. Our results suggest that the frequency of mutation to amdinocillin resistance is high because of the large mutational target (at least 38 genes). However, the majority of these resistant mutants have a low growth rate, reducing the probability that they are stably maintained in the bladder. Inactivation of the cysB gene and a resulting loss of cysteine biosynthesis are the major mechanism of amdinocillin resistance in clinical isolates of E. coli. PMID:25583718

  2. Temporal interplay between efflux pumps and target mutations in development of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Renu; Swick, Michelle C; Ledesma, Kimberly R; Yang, Zhen; Hu, Ming; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Tam, Vincent H

    2012-04-01

    The emergence of resistance presents a debilitating change in the management of infectious diseases. Currently, the temporal relationship and interplay between various mechanisms of drug resistance are not well understood. A thorough understanding of the resistance development process is needed to facilitate rational design of countermeasure strategies. Using an in vitro hollow-fiber infection model that simulates human drug treatment, we examined the appearance of efflux pump (acrAB) overexpression and target topoisomerase gene (gyrA and parC) mutations over time in the emergence of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli. Drug-resistant isolates recovered early (24 h) had 2- to 8-fold elevation in the MIC due to acrAB overexpression, but no point mutations were noted. In contrast, high-level (≥ 64× MIC) resistant isolates with target site mutations (gyrA S83L with or without parC E84K) were selected more readily after 120 h, and regression of acrAB overexpression was observed at 240 h. Using a similar dosing selection pressure, the emergence of levofloxacin resistance was delayed in a strain with acrAB deleted compared to the isogenic parent. The role of efflux pumps in bacterial resistance development may have been underappreciated. Our data revealed the interplay between two mechanisms of quinolone resistance and provided a new mechanistic framework in the development of high-level resistance. Early low-level levofloxacin resistance conferred by acrAB overexpression preceded and facilitated high-level resistance development mediated by target site mutation(s). If this interpretation is correct, then these findings represent a paradigm shift in the way quinolone resistance is thought to develop.

  3. rrs and rpsL mutations in streptomycin-resistant isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas-Córdoba, Betzaida; Cuellar-Sánchez, Aremy; Pasissi-Crivelli, Aurora; Santana-Álvarez, Carlos Armando; Hernández-Illezcas, Javier; Zenteno-Cuevas, Roberto

    2013-02-01

    Mutations in rpsL and rrs genes are associated with resistance to streptomycin in tuberculosis, but important geographical variation exists in these mutations. The goal of this study was to characterize these mutations in isolates of streptomycin-resistant mycobacteria originating from southeast Mexico. Mycobacteria were isolated from patients with suspected drug-resistant tuberculosis. Susceptibility tests were carried out using the fluorometric method, and rrs and rpsL DNA sequencing was performed by capillary electrophoresis. Some 136 drug-resistant isolates were recovered, of which 91(67%) exhibited resistance to streptomycin. Mutations in rpsL were observed in 18 isolates (19%) in codons 43 (A→G, K/R, n = 12) and 88 (A→G, K/R, n = 4; A→C, K/Q, n = 2). Mutations in rrs were observed in 26 isolates (28%). These were at nucleotides 513 (A→C, n = 8) and 516 (C→T, n = 6), and six novel mutations at nucleotides 483 (A→T, n = 2), 485 (A→G, n = 2), 496 (G→A, n = 2), 795 (C→T, n = 6), 870 (C→T, n = 3), and 907 (A→C, n = 3), with some isolates showing more than one mutation. Finally, 47 (52%) of the isolates showed no mutation. The variety and presence or absence of the mutations found suggest the circulation of an important diversity of strains and the existence of additional mechanisms contributing to streptomycin resistance in the region. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Analysis of topoisomerase mutations in fluoroquinolone-resistant and -susceptible Campylobacter jejuni strains isolated in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinana, Alfred Dieudonné; Cardinale, Eric; Bahsoun, Ibrahim; Tall, Fatou; Sire, Jean-Marie; Garin, Benoit; Boye, Cheikh Saad-Bouh; Dromigny, Jacques-Albert; Perrier-Gros-Claude, Jean-David

    2007-04-01

    In this study, topoisomerase mutations in ciprofloxacin-resistant and -susceptible Campylobacter jejuni were analysed by DNA sequencing. In certain ciprofloxacin-resistant C. jejuni, the mechanism of resistance was complex. The Thr86-Ala substitution in the GyrA protein appears to play a role in increasing the minimum inhibitory concentration of nalidixic acid only. In addition, isolates with this amino acid change and those resistant to quinolones but lacking a mutation in the GyrA quinolone resistance-determining region could be derived from two different clones. Based on gyrA and gyrB polymorphisms, C. jejuni isolates from the Dakar region of Senegal appeared to be less diverse than those from other countries. Moreover, C. jejuni isolates in Senegal appeared to differ from European isolates by lack of a silent mutation at codon 120 of the gyrA gene.

  5. Change of point mutations in Helicobacter pylori rRNA associated with clarithromycin resistance in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Francesco, Vincenzo; Zullo, Angelo; Giorgio, Floriana; Saracino, Ilaria; Zaccaro, Cristina; Hassan, Cesare; Ierardi, Enzo; Di Leo, Alfredo; Fiorini, Giulia; Castelli, Valentina; Lo Re, Giovanna; Vaira, Dino

    2014-03-01

    Primary clarithromycin resistance is the main factor affecting the efficacy of Helicobacter pylori therapy. This study aimed: (i) to assess the concordance between phenotypic (culture) and genotypic (real-time PCR) tests in resistant strains; (ii) to search, in the case of disagreement between the methods, for point mutations other than those reported as the most frequent in Europe; and (iii) to compare the MICs associated with the single point mutations. In order to perform real-time PCR, we retrieved biopsies from patients in whom H. pylori infection was successful diagnosed by bacterial culture and clarithromycin resistance was assessed using the Etest. Only patients who had never been previously treated, and with H. pylori strains that were either resistant exclusively to clarithromycin or without any resistance, were included. Biopsies from 82 infected patients were analysed, including 42 strains that were clarithromycin resistant and 40 that were clarithromycin susceptible on culture. On genotypic analysis, at least one of the three most frequently reported point mutations (A2142C, A2142G and A2143G) was detected in only 23 cases (54.8%), with a concordance between the two methods of 0.67. Novel point mutations (A2115G, G2141A and A2144T) were detected in a further 14 out of 19 discordant cases, increasing the resistance detection rate of PCR to 88% (Presistance; and (iii) none of the tested point mutations is associated with significantly higher MIC values than the others.

  6. Long-term foscarnet therapy remodels thymidine analogue mutations and alters resistance to zidovudine and lamivudine in HIV-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Sofie; Dam, Elisabeth; Roge, Birgit

    2007-01-01

    viruses from seven patients at baseline and during treatment with PFA. The phenotypic effects of mutations suspected to be associated with PFA resistance were evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis of wild-type or thymidine analogue mutations (TAM)-carrying pNL4-3. Reversion of single mutations......) induced PFA resistance and decreased zidovudine resistance 3-13-fold. These mutants exhibited high-level lamivudine resistance (>20-fold) without mutation M184V. Reversion of K70G --> R and K219R --> E in a patient-derived clone confirmed the contribution of individual mutations and the negative...

  7. An ABC transporter mutation is correlated with insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Gahan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Transgenic crops producing insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt are commercially successful in reducing pest damage, yet knowledge of resistance mechanisms that threaten their sustainability is incomplete. Insect resistance to the pore-forming Cry1Ac toxin is correlated with the loss of high-affinity, irreversible binding to the mid-gut membrane, but the genetic factors responsible for this change have been elusive. Mutations in a 12-cadherin-domain protein confer some Cry1Ac resistance but do not block this toxin binding in in vitro assays. We sought to identify mutations in other genes that might be responsible for the loss of binding. We employed a map-based cloning approach using a series of backcrosses with 1,060 progeny to identify a resistance gene in the cotton pest Heliothis virescens that segregated independently from the cadherin mutation. We found an inactivating mutation of the ABC transporter ABCC2 that is genetically linked to Cry1Ac resistance and is correlated with loss of Cry1Ac binding to membrane vesicles. ABC proteins are integral membrane proteins with many functions, including export of toxic molecules from the cell, but have not been implicated in the mode of action of Bt toxins before. The reduction in toxin binding due to the inactivating mutation suggests that ABCC2 is involved in membrane integration of the toxin pore. Our findings suggest that ABC proteins may play a key role in the mode of action of Bt toxins and that ABC protein mutations can confer high levels of resistance that could threaten the continued utilization of Bt-expressing crops. However, such mutations may impose a physiological cost on resistant insects, by reducing export of other toxins such as plant secondary compounds from the cell. This weakness could be exploited to manage this mechanism of Bt resistance in the field.

  8. An ABC transporter mutation is correlated with insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahan, Linda J; Pauchet, Yannick; Vogel, Heiko; Heckel, David G

    2010-12-16

    Transgenic crops producing insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are commercially successful in reducing pest damage, yet knowledge of resistance mechanisms that threaten their sustainability is incomplete. Insect resistance to the pore-forming Cry1Ac toxin is correlated with the loss of high-affinity, irreversible binding to the mid-gut membrane, but the genetic factors responsible for this change have been elusive. Mutations in a 12-cadherin-domain protein confer some Cry1Ac resistance but do not block this toxin binding in in vitro assays. We sought to identify mutations in other genes that might be responsible for the loss of binding. We employed a map-based cloning approach using a series of backcrosses with 1,060 progeny to identify a resistance gene in the cotton pest Heliothis virescens that segregated independently from the cadherin mutation. We found an inactivating mutation of the ABC transporter ABCC2 that is genetically linked to Cry1Ac resistance and is correlated with loss of Cry1Ac binding to membrane vesicles. ABC proteins are integral membrane proteins with many functions, including export of toxic molecules from the cell, but have not been implicated in the mode of action of Bt toxins before. The reduction in toxin binding due to the inactivating mutation suggests that ABCC2 is involved in membrane integration of the toxin pore. Our findings suggest that ABC proteins may play a key role in the mode of action of Bt toxins and that ABC protein mutations can confer high levels of resistance that could threaten the continued utilization of Bt-expressing crops. However, such mutations may impose a physiological cost on resistant insects, by reducing export of other toxins such as plant secondary compounds from the cell. This weakness could be exploited to manage this mechanism of Bt resistance in the field.

  9. Characterization of mutations in streptomycin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Sichuan, China and the association between Beijing-lineage and dual-mutation in gidB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Honghu; Zhang, Congcong; Xiang, Ling; Pi, Rui; Guo, Zhen; Zheng, Chao; Li, Song; Zhao, Yuding; Tang, Ke; Luo, Mei; Rastogi, Nalin; Li, Yuqing; Sun, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in rpsL, rrs, and gidB are well linked to streptomycin (STR) resistance, some of which are suggested to be potentially associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypic lineages in certain geographic regions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mutation characteristics of streptomycin resistance and the relationship between the polymorphism of drug-resistant genes and the lineage of M. tuberculosis isolates in Sichuan, China. A total of 227 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates, including 180 STR-resistant and 47 pan-susceptible isolates, were analyzed for presence of mutations in the rpsL, rrs and gidB loci. Mutation K43R in rpsL was strongly associated with high-level streptomycin resistance (P resistance (P resistance and Beijing genotype, however, in STR-resistant strains, Beijing genotype was significantly correlated with high-level STR resistance, as well as the rpsL mutation K43R (P streptomycin pressure. Notably, in all isolates of Beijing genotype, a dual mutation E92D (a276c) and A205A (a615g) in gidB was detected, suggesting a highly significant association between this dual mutation and Beijing genotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Antimicrobial Resistance and Fitness under Low and High Mutation Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabot, Gabriel; Zamorano, Laura; Moyà, Bartolomé; Juan, Carlos; Navas, Alfonso; Blázquez, Jesús; Oliver, Antonio

    2016-01-04

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major cause of nosocomial and chronic infections, is considered a paradigm of antimicrobial resistance development. However, the evolutionary trajectories of antimicrobial resistance and the impact of mutator phenotypes remain mostly unexplored. Therefore, whole-genome sequencing (WGS) was performed in lineages of wild-type and mutator (ΔmutS) strains exposed to increasing concentrations of relevant antipseudomonal agents. WGS provided a privileged perspective of the dramatic effect of mutator phenotypes on the accumulation of random mutations, most of which were transitions, as expected. Moreover, a frameshift mutagenic signature, consistent with error-prone DNA polymerase activity as a consequence of SOS system induction, was also seen. This effect was evidenced for all antibiotics tested, but it was higher for fluoroquinolones than for cephalosporins or carbapenems. Analysis of genotype versus phenotype confirmed expected resistance evolution trajectories but also revealed new pathways. Classical mechanisms included multiple mutations leading to AmpC overexpression (ceftazidime), quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) mutations (ciprofloxacin), oprD inactivation (meropenem), and efflux pump overexpression (ciprofloxacin and meropenem). Groundbreaking findings included gain-of-function mutations leading to the structural modification of AmpC (ceftazidime), novel DNA gyrase (GyrA) modification (ciprofloxacin), and the alteration of the β-lactam binding site of penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) (meropenem). A further striking finding was seen in the evolution of meropenem resistance, selecting for specific extremely large (>250 kb) genomic deletions providing a growth advantage in the presence of the antibiotic. Finally, fitness and virulence varied within and across evolved antibiotic-resistant populations, but mutator lineages showed a lower biological cost for some antibiotics. Copyright © 2016, American Society for

  11. Mutations in gidB confer low-level streptomycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sharon Y; Lee, Jong Seok; Kwak, Hyun Kyung; Via, Laura E; Boshoff, Helena I M; Barry, Clifton E

    2011-06-01

    The global threat posed by drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis demands a greater understanding of the genetic basis and molecular mechanisms that govern how such strains develop resistance against various antituberculous drugs. In this report, we examine a new genetic basis for resistance to one of the oldest and most widely used second-line drugs employed in tuberculosis therapy, streptomycin (SM). This marker for SM resistance was first discovered on the basis of genomic data obtained from drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains collected in Japan, wherein an association was observed between SM resistance and a mutation in gidB, a putative 16S rRNA methyltransferase. By evaluating an isogenic ΔgidB mutant strain constructed from strain H37Rv, we demonstrate the causal role of gidB in conferring a low-level SM-resistant phenotype in M. tuberculosis with a 16-fold increase in the MIC over the parent strain. Among clinical isolates, the modest increase in SM resistance conferred by a gidB mutation leads to an MIC distribution of gidB mutation-containing strains that spans the recommended SM breakpoint concentration currently used in drug susceptibility testing protocols. As such, some gidB mutation-containing isolates are found to be SM sensitive, while others are SM resistant. On the basis of a pharmacodynamic analysis and Monte Carlo simulation, those isolates that are found to be SM sensitive should still respond favorably to SM treatment, while nearly half of those found to be SM resistant will likely respond poorly. This report provides the first microbiological evidence for the contribution of gidB in streptomycin resistance and examines the clinical implications of mutations in the gidB gene.

  12. Mutations in gidB Confer Low-Level Streptomycin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sharon Y.; Lee, Jong Seok; Kwak, Hyun Kyung; Via, Laura E.; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Barry, Clifton E.

    2011-01-01

    The global threat posed by drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis demands a greater understanding of the genetic basis and molecular mechanisms that govern how such strains develop resistance against various antituberculous drugs. In this report, we examine a new genetic basis for resistance to one of the oldest and most widely used second-line drugs employed in tuberculosis therapy, streptomycin (SM). This marker for SM resistance was first discovered on the basis of genomic data obtained from drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains collected in Japan, wherein an association was observed between SM resistance and a mutation in gidB, a putative 16S rRNA methyltransferase. By evaluating an isogenic ΔgidB mutant strain constructed from strain H37Rv, we demonstrate the causal role of gidB in conferring a low-level SM-resistant phenotype in M. tuberculosis with a 16-fold increase in the MIC over the parent strain. Among clinical isolates, the modest increase in SM resistance conferred by a gidB mutation leads to an MIC distribution of gidB mutation-containing strains that spans the recommended SM breakpoint concentration currently used in drug susceptibility testing protocols. As such, some gidB mutation-containing isolates are found to be SM sensitive, while others are SM resistant. On the basis of a pharmacodynamic analysis and Monte Carlo simulation, those isolates that are found to be SM sensitive should still respond favorably to SM treatment, while nearly half of those found to be SM resistant will likely respond poorly. This report provides the first microbiological evidence for the contribution of gidB in streptomycin resistance and examines the clinical implications of mutations in the gidB gene. PMID:21444711

  13. Epidemiology of isoniazid resistance mutations and their effect on tuberculosis treatment outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyen, Mai N. T.; Cobelens, Frank G. J.; Buu, Tran N.; Lan, Nguyen T. N.; Dung, Nguyen H.; Kremer, Kristin; Tiemersma, Edine W.; van Soolingen, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Isoniazid resistance is highly prevalent in Vietnam. We investigated the molecular and epidemiological characteristics and the association with first-line treatment outcomes of the main isoniazid resistance mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis in codon 315 of the katG and in the promoter region

  14. Protease Inhibitors Drug Resistance Mutations in Turkish Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Sargin Altunok

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: We are of the opinion that drug resistance analyses can be beneficial and necessary in revealing which variants are responsible for pre-treatment natural resistance and which mutations are responsible for the viral breakthrough that may develop during the treatment.

  15. Epidemiology of isoniazid resistance mutations and their effect on tuberculosis treatment outcomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyen, M.N.; Cobelens, F.G.; Buu, T.N.; Lan, N.T.; Dung, N.H.; Kremer, K.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Soolingen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    Isoniazid resistance is highly prevalent in Vietnam. We investigated the molecular and epidemiological characteristics and the association with first-line treatment outcomes of the main isoniazid resistance mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis in codon 315 of the katG and in the promoter region

  16. Multiple origins of knockdown resistance mutations in the Afrotropical mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Pinto

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available How often insecticide resistance mutations arise in natural insect populations is a fundamental question for understanding the evolution of resistance and also for modeling its spread. Moreover, the development of resistance is regarded as a favored model to study the molecular evolution of adaptive traits. In the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae two point mutations (L1014F and L1014S in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene, that confer knockdown resistance (kdr to DDT and pyrethroid insecticides, have been described. In order to determine whether resistance alleles result from single or multiple mutation events, genotyping of the kdr locus and partial sequencing of the upstream intron-1 was performed on a total of 288 A. gambiae S-form collected from 28 localities in 15 countries. Knockdown resistance alleles were found to be widespread in West Africa with co-occurrence of both 1014S and 1014F in West-Central localities. Differences in intron-1 haplotype composition suggest that kdr alleles may have arisen from at least four independent mutation events. Neutrality tests provided evidence for a selective sweep acting on this genomic region, particularly in West Africa. The frequency and distribution of these kdr haplotypes varied geographically, being influenced by an interplay between different mutational occurrences, gene flow and local selection. This has important practical implications for the management and sustainability of malaria vector control programs.

  17. DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV mutations in an in vitro fluoroquinolone-resistant Coxiella burnetii strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranakis, Iosif; Sandalakis, Vassilios; Chochlakis, Dimosthenis; Tselentis, Yannis; Psaroulaki, Anna

    2010-06-01

    The etiological agent of Q fever, Coxiella burnetii, is an obligate intracellular bacterium that multiplies within a vacuole with lysosomal characteristics. Quinolones have been used as an alternative therapy for Q fever. In this study, quinolone-resistance-determining regions of the genes coding for DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV were analyzed by DNA sequencing from an in vitro fluoroquinolone-resistant C. burnetii strain (Q212). Sequencing and aligning of DNA gyrase encoding genes (gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV genes (parC and parE) revealed one gyrA mutation leading to the amino acid substitution Asp87Gly (Escherichia coli numbering), two gyrB mutations leading to the amino acid substitutions Ser431Pro and Met518Ile, and three parC mutations leading to the amino acid substitutions Asp69Asn, Thr80Ile, and Gly104Ser. The corresponding alignment of the C. burnetii Q212 reference strain, the in vitro developed fluoroquinolone-resistant C. burnetii Q212 strain, and E. coli resulted in the identification of several other naturally occurring mutations within and outside the quinolone-resistance-determining regions of C. burnetii providing indications of possible natural resistance to fluoroquinolones. The present study adds additional potential mutations in the DNA topoisomerases that may be involved in fluoroquinolone resistance in C. burnetii due to their previous characterization in other bacterial species.

  18. Effect of raltegravir resistance mutations in HIV-1 integrase on viral fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zixin; Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2010-10-01

    Raltegravir resistance is conferred by mutations at integrase codons 143, 148, and 155 together with associated secondary mutations. The N155H mutants emerge first, and are eventually replaced by Q148H mutants, usually in combination with G140S. These mutations have different effects on susceptibility and replication capacity, but data on the relative fitness of RAL-resistant viruses are limited. To understand the impact of the different RAL resistance pathways on viral fitness, mutations at integrase codons 74, 92, 138, 140, 148, 155, and/or 163 were introduced into HIV-1NL4-3 by site-directed mutagenesis and expressed in recombinant viruses. Relative fitness and drug susceptibility were determined in the absence or presence of RAL. In the absence of drug, RAL-resistant mutants were less fit than wild type, and the Q148H mutant was significantly less fit than the N155H mutant. Fitness was partially restored by the presence of additional RAL resistance mutations at positions G140S and E92Q or E138K, respectively. In the presence of RAL, the N155H mutant remained fitter than the Q148H mutant, but the G140S/Q148H double mutant was fitter than single mutants or the E92Q/N155H double mutant. These findings correspond well with the clinical trials data and help explain the temporal pattern of RAL resistance evolution.

  19. A molecular dynamics investigation on the crizotinib resistance mechanism of C1156Y mutation in ALK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Hui-Yong; Ji, Feng-Qin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The study revealed the detailed resistance mechanism of the non-active mutation C1156Y in ALK. ► C1156Y leads to crizotinib displacement and conformational changes in the binding cavity. ► The conformations cause a decline in the vdW and electrostatic energy between crizotinib and ALK. -- Abstract: Crizotinib is an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor that has recently been approved in the US for the treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Despite its outstanding safety and efficacy, several resistant mutations against crizotinib have been detected in the treatment of NSCLC. However, in contrast to the widely accepted mechanism of steric hindrance by mutations at the active site, the mechanism by which the C1156Y non-active site mutation confers resistance against crizotinib remains unclear. In the present study, the resistance mechanism of C1156Y in ALK was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest that despite the non-active site mutation, C1156Y causes the dislocation of crizotinib as well as the indirect conformational changes in the binding cavity, which results in a marked decrease in the van der Waals and electrostatic interactions between crizotinib and ALK. The obtained results provide a detailed explanation of the resistance caused by C1156Y and may give a vital clue for the design of drugs to combat crizotinib resistance.

  20. A study on the stomata mutation of peanut leaves and its relationship with drought resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Qingshu; Li Zhengchao; Hu Wenguang; Wu Lanrong

    1999-12-01

    Stomata mutation of leaves and its relationship with drought resistance were studied with four peanut mutants as well as original variety Baisha 1016. Results showed that irradiation was able to cause peanut leaf stoma to mutate. By comparing with original variety Baisha 1016, some of the mutants have more stomas, and some have less ones; some mutants have bigger stomas, some have smaller ones. The stomata numbers of peanut leaf have close relation to the drought resistance, while the stomata size seems to have no relation to it. It's possible that more drought-resistant variety or line could be elected among peanut mutants

  1. Conjugation between quinolone-susceptible bacteria can generate mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region, inducing quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitondo-Silva, André; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Silva, Carolina Fávero da; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2015-02-01

    Quinolones are an important group of antibacterial agents that can inhibit DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV activity. DNA gyrase is responsible for maintaining bacteria in a negatively supercoiled state, being composed of subunits A and B. Topoisomerase IV is a homologue of DNA gyrase and consists of two subunits codified by the parC and parE genes. Mutations in gyrA and gyrB of DNA gyrase may confer resistance to quinolones, and the majority of resistant strains show mutations between positions 67 and 106 of gyrA, a region denoted the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR). The most frequent substitutions occur at positions 83 and 87, but little is known about the mechanisms promoting appearance of mutations in the QRDR. The present study proposes that some mutations in the QRDR could be generated as a result of the natural mechanism of conjugation between bacteria in their natural habitat. This event was observed following conjugation in vitro of two different isolates of quinolone-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which transferred plasmids of different molecular weights to a recipient strain of Escherichia coli (HB101), also quinolone-susceptible, generating two different transconjugants that presented mutations in DNA gyrase and acquisition of resistance to all quinolones tested. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  2. Screening for streptomycin resistance-conferring mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielski, Tomasz; Ignatowska, Helena; Bakuła, Zofia; Dziewit, Łukasz; Napiórkowska, Agnieszka; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa; Zwolska, Zofia; Bielecki, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Currently, mutations in three genes, namely rrs, rpsL, and gidB, encoding 16S rRNA, ribosomal protein S12, and 16S rRNA-specific methyltransferase, respectively, are considered to be involved in conferring resistance to streptomycin (STR) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the spectrum and frequency of these mutations in M. tuberculosis clinical isolates, both resistant and susceptible to STR. Sixty-four M. tuberculosis isolates recovered from as many TB patients from Poland in 2004 were included in the study. Within the sample were 50 multidrug-resistant (32 STR-resistant and 18 STR-susceptible) and 14 pan-susceptible isolates. Preliminary testing for STR resistance was performed with the 1% proportion method. The MICs of STR were determined by the Etest method. Mutation profiling was carried out by amplifying and sequencing the entire rrs, rpsL, and gidB genes. Non-synonymous mutations in either rrs or rpsL gene were detected in 23 (71.9%) of the STR-resistant and none of the STR-susceptible isolates. Mutations in the gidB gene were distributed among 12 (37.5%) STR-resistant and 13 (40.6%) STR-susceptible isolates. Four (12.5%) STR-resistant isolates were wild-type at all three loci examined. None of the rrs, rpsL or gidB mutations could be linked to low, intermediate or high level of STR resistance. In accordance with previous findings, the gidB 47T→G (L16R) mutation was associated with the Latin American-Mediterranean genotype family, whereas 276A→C (E92D) and 615A→G (A205A) mutations of the gidB gene were associated with the Beijing lineage. The study underlines the usefulness of rrs and rpsL mutations as molecular markers for STR resistance yet not indicative of its level. The gidB polymorphisms can serve as phylogenetic markers.

  3. A secondary RET mutation in the activation loop conferring resistance to vandetanib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoku, Takashi; Kohno, Takashi; Araki, Mitsugu; Niho, Seiji; Chauhan, Rakhee; Knowles, Phillip P; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Shingo; Shimada, Yoko; Mimaki, Sachiyo; Ishii, Genichiro; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Okuno, Yasushi; Yoh, Kiyotaka; McDonald, Neil Q; Goto, Koichi

    2018-02-12

    Resistance to vandetanib, a type I RET kinase inhibitor, developed in a patient with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma harboring a CCDC6-RET fusion that initially exhibited a response to treatment. The resistant tumor acquired a secondary mutation resulting in a serine-to-phenylalanine substitution at codon 904 in the activation loop of the RET kinase domain. The S904F mutation confers resistance to vandetanib by increasing the ATP affinity and autophosphorylation activity of RET kinase. A reduced interaction with the drug is also observed in vitro for the S904F mutant by thermal shift assay. A crystal structure of the S904F mutant reveals a small hydrophobic core around F904 likely to enhance basal kinase activity by stabilizing an active conformer. Our findings indicate that missense mutations in the activation loop of the kinase domain are able to increase kinase activity and confer drug resistance through allosteric effects.

  4. Phenotypic Suppression of Streptomycin Resistance by Mutations in Multiple Components of the Translation Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Jennifer F; Lee, Hannah J; Jaspers, Joshua B; Dahlberg, Albert E; Jogl, Gerwald; Gregory, Steven T

    2015-09-01

    The bacterial ribosome and its associated translation factors are frequent targets of antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance mutations have been found in a number of these components. Such mutations can potentially interact with one another in unpredictable ways, including the phenotypic suppression of one mutation by another. These phenotypic interactions can provide evidence of long-range functional interactions throughout the ribosome and its functional complexes and potentially give insights into antibiotic resistance mechanisms. In this study, we used genetics and experimental evolution of the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus to examine the ability of mutations in various components of the protein synthesis apparatus to suppress the streptomycin resistance phenotypes of mutations in ribosomal protein S12, specifically those located distant from the streptomycin binding site. With genetic selections and strain constructions, we identified suppressor mutations in EF-Tu or in ribosomal protein L11. Using experimental evolution, we identified amino acid substitutions in EF-Tu or in ribosomal proteins S4, S5, L14, or L19, some of which were found to also relieve streptomycin resistance. The wide dispersal of these mutations is consistent with long-range functional interactions among components of the translational machinery and indicates that streptomycin resistance can result from the modulation of long-range conformational signals. The thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus has become a model system for high-resolution structural studies of macromolecular complexes, such as the ribosome, while its natural competence for transformation facilitates genetic approaches. Genetic studies of T. thermophilus ribosomes can take advantage of existing high-resolution crystallographic information to allow a structural interpretation of phenotypic interactions among mutations. Using a combination of genetic selections, strain constructions, and experimental

  5. Non-Target Gene Mutations in the Development of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, W. V.; Oethinger, M.; Jellen-Ritter, A. S.; Levy, S. B.

    2000-01-01

    Mutations in loci other than genes for the target topoisomerases of fluoroquinolones, gyrA and parC, may play a role in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli. A series of mutants with increasing resistance to ofloxacin was obtained from an E. coli K-12 strain and five clinical isolates. First-step mutants acquired a gyrA mutation. Second-step mutants reproducibly acquired a phenotype of multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) and organic solvent tolerance and showed enhanced fluoroquinolone efflux. None of the second-step mutants showed additional topoisomerase mutations. All second-step mutants showed constitutive expression of marA and/or overexpressed soxS. In some third-step mutants, fluoroquinolone efflux was further enhanced compared to that for second-step mutants, even when the mutant had acquired additional topoisomerase mutations. Attempts to circumvent the second-step Mar mutation by induction of the mar locus with sodium salicylate and thus to select for pure topoisomerase mutants at the second step were not successful. At least in vitro, non-target gene mutations accumulate in second- and third-step mutants upon exposure to a fluoroquinolone and typically include, but do not appear to be limited to, mutations in the mar or sox regulons with consequent increased drug efflux. PMID:10722475

  6. HIV drug resistance mutations in proviral DNA from a community treatment program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Derache

    Full Text Available Drug resistance mutations archived in resting memory CD4+ cells may persist despite suppression of HIV RNA to <50 copies/ml. We sequenced pol gene from proviral DNA among viremic and suppressed patients to identify drug resistance mutations.The Peninsula AIDS Research Cohort study enrolled and followed over 2 years 120 HIV infected patients from San Mateo and San Francisco Counties. HIV-1 pol genotyping by bulk sequencing was performed on 38 DNA and RNA from viremic patients and DNA only among 82 suppressed patients at baseline. Antiretroviral susceptibility was predicted by HIVDB.stanford.edu.Among 120 subjects, 81% were on antiretroviral therapy and had been treated for a median time of 7 years. Thirty-two viremic patients showed concordant RNA and DNA genotypes (84%; the discordant profiles were mainly observed in patients with low-level viremia. Among suppressed patients, 21 had drug resistance mutations in proviral DNA (26% with potential resistance to one, two or three ARV classes in 16, 4 and 1 samples respectively.The high level of genotype concordance between DNA and RNA in viremic patients suggested that DNA genotyping might be used to assess drug resistance in resource-limited settings, and further investigation of extracted DNA from dried blood spots is needed. Drug resistance mutations in proviral DNA in 26% of subjects with less than 50 copies/ml pose a risk for the transmission of drug resistant virus with virologic failure, treatment interruption or decreased adherence.

  7. Effect of multidrug resistance-conferring mutations on the fitness and virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelraouf, Kamilia; Kabbara, Samer; Ledesma, Kimberly R; Poole, Keith; Tam, Vincent H

    2011-06-01

    Multidrug resistance has become a quandary in the treatment of bacterial infections. The effect of resistance mutations and the fitness cost on the pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is not well established. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of multidrug resistance on the fitness and virulence of P. aeruginosa. Fourteen P. aeruginosa strains with various resistance mechanisms were used. In vitro growth of these isolates was investigated in full-strength and 0.25-strength Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB). Exponential growth rates were estimated from serial bacterial burden over 24 h. In vitro growth of two multidrug-resistant strains (PAO1ΔmexRΔoprD and PA9019) was studied when each was grown in co-culture with wild-type strain PAO1. In vivo growth was compared between PAO1 and PAO1ΔmexRΔopD using a murine pneumonia model; virulence over 10 days was studied in six isolates. Significant reduction in growth rate was observed in selected mutants (P resistance mutations were associated with fitness cost in P. aeruginosa, and accumulation of such mutations was associated with a reduction in virulence. However, it was difficult to predict the impact in clinical isolates. Knowledge of multidrug resistance mechanisms and compensatory mutations would likely be helpful.

  8. Positive selection pressure introduces secondary mutations at Gag cleavage sites in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 harboring major protease resistance mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banke, S.; Lillemark, M.R.; Gerstoft, J.

    2009-01-01

    mutations). Additional sequences from 13 patients were included for longitudinal analysis. We assessed positive selection pressure on the gag/protease region using a test for the overall influence of positive selection and a total of five tests to identify positively selected single codons. We found...... that positive selection pressure was the driving evolutionary force for the gag region in all three patient groups. An increase in positive selection was observed in gag cleavage site regions p7/p1/p6 only after the acquisition of major PI mutations, suggesting that amino acids in gag cleavage sites under...... positive selection pressure could function as compensatory mutations for major PI mutations in the protease region. Isolated gag mutations did not appear to confer PI resistance, but mutations in the gag cleavage sites could substitute for minor PI resistance mutations in the protease region Udgivelsesdato...

  9. Mutations in Streptomycin Resistance Genes and Their Relationship to Streptomycin Resistance and Lineage ofMycobacterium tuberculosisThai Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlaing, Yin Moe; Tongtawe, Pongsri; Tapchaisri, Pramuan; Thanongsaksrikul, Jeeraphong; Thawornwan, Unchana; Archanachan, Buppa; Srimanote, Potjanee

    2017-04-01

    Streptomycin (SM) is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a part of standard regimens for retreating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases. The incidence of MDR-TB in retreatment cases was 19% in Thailand. To date, information on SM resistance (SMR) gene mutations correlated to the SMR of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Thai isolates is limited. In this study, the mutations in rpsL , rrs , gidB , and whiB7 were investigated and their association to SMR and the lineage of M. tuberculosis were explored. The lineages of 287 M. tuberculosis collected from 2007 to 2011 were identified by spoligotyping. Drug susceptibility profiles were evaluated by the absolute concentration method. Mutations in SMR genes of 46 SM-resistant and 55 SM-susceptible isolates were examined by DNA sequencing. Three rpsL (Lys43Arg, Lys88Arg, and Lys88Thr) and two gidB (Trp45Ter and Gly69Asp) mutations were present exclusively in the SM resistant M. tuberculosis . Lys43Arg rpsL was the most predominant SMR mutations (69.6%) and prevailed among Beijing isolates (presistant isolates lacking rpsL and rrs mutations. The significance of the three gidB mutations, 276A>C, 615A>G, and 330G>T, as lineage signatures for Beijing and EAI were underscored. This study identified 423G>A gidB as a novel sub-lineage marker for EAI6-BGD1. Our study suggested that the majority of SMR in M. tuberculosis Thai isolates were responsible by rpsL and gidB polymorphisms constantly providing the novel lineage specific makers.

  10. Dynamics of Mutations during Development of Resistance by Pseudomonas aeruginosa against Five Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yanfang; Jonker, Martijs J; Moustakas, Ioannis; Brul, Stanley; Ter Kuile, Benno H

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes considerable morbidity and mortality, specifically during intensive care. Antibiotic-resistant variants of this organism are more difficult to treat and cause substantial extra costs compared to susceptible strains. In the laboratory, P. aeruginosa rapidly developed resistance to five medically relevant antibiotics upon exposure to stepwise increasing concentrations. At several time points during the acquisition of resistance, samples were taken for whole-genome sequencing. The increase in the MIC of ciprofloxacin was linked to specific mutations in gyrA, parC, and gyrB, appearing sequentially. In the case of tobramycin, mutations in fusA, HP02880, rplB, and capD were induced. The MICs of the beta-lactam compounds meropenem and ceftazidime and the combination of piperacillin and tazobactam correlated linearly with beta-lactamase activity but not always with individual mutations. The genes that were mutated during the development of beta-lactam resistance differed for each antibiotic. A quantitative relationship between the frequency of mutations and the increase in resistance could not be established for any of the antibiotics. When the adapted strains are grown in the absence of the antibiotic, some mutations remained and others were reversed, but this reversal did not necessarily lower the MIC. The increased MIC came at the cost of moderately reduced cellular functions or a somewhat lower growth rate. In all cases except ciprofloxacin, the increase in resistance seems to be the result of complex interactions among several cellular systems rather than individual mutations. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Environmental variation alters the fitness effects of rifampicin resistance mutations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Danna R; Moss, Ethan; MacLean, R Craig

    2016-03-01

    The fitness effects of antibiotic resistance mutations in antibiotic-free conditions play a key role in determining the long-term maintenance of resistance. Although resistance is usually associated with a cost, the impact of environmental variation on the cost of resistance is poorly understood. Here, we test the impact of heterogeneity in temperature and resource availability on the fitness effects of antibiotic resistance using strains of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa carrying clinically important rifampicin resistance mutations. Although the rank order of fitness was generally maintained across environments, fitness effects relative to the wild type differed significantly. Changes in temperature had a profound impact on the fitness effects of resistance, whereas changes in carbon substrate had only a weak impact. This suggests that environmental heterogeneity may influence whether the costs of resistance are likely to be ameliorated by second-site compensatory mutations or by reversion to wild-type rpoB. Our results highlight the need to consider environmental heterogeneity and genotype-by-environment interactions for fitness in models of resistance evolution. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Analytical profiling of mutations in quinolone resistance determining region of gyrA gene among UPEC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley R Varughese

    Full Text Available Mutations in gyrA are the primary cause of quinolone resistance encountered in gram-negative clinical isolates. The prospect of this work was to analyze the role of gyrA mutations in eliciting high quinolone resistance in uropathogenic E.coli (UPEC through molecular docking studies. Quinolone susceptibility testing of 18 E.coli strains isolated from UTI patients revealed unusually high resistance level to all the quinolones used; especially norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin. The QRDR of gyrA was amplified and sequenced. Mutations identified in gyrA of E.coli included Ser83Leu, Asp87Asn and Ala93Gly/Glu. Contrasting previous reports, we found Ser83Leu substitution in sensitive strains. Strains with S83L, D87N and A93E (A15 and A26 demonstrated norfloxacin MICs ≥1024mg/L which could be proof that Asp87Asn is necessary for resistance phenotype. Resistance to levofloxacin was comparatively lower in all the isolates. Docking of 4 quinolones (ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and norfloxacin to normal and mutated E.coli gyrase A protein demonstrated lower binding energies for the latter, with significant displacement of norfloxacin in the mutated GyrA complex and least displacement in case of levofloxacin.

  13. Analytical profiling of mutations in quinolone resistance determining region of gyrA gene among UPEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Lesley R; Rajpoot, Meenakshi; Goyal, Soniya; Mehra, Ravinder; Chhokar, Vinod; Beniwal, Vikas

    2018-01-01

    Mutations in gyrA are the primary cause of quinolone resistance encountered in gram-negative clinical isolates. The prospect of this work was to analyze the role of gyrA mutations in eliciting high quinolone resistance in uropathogenic E.coli (UPEC) through molecular docking studies. Quinolone susceptibility testing of 18 E.coli strains isolated from UTI patients revealed unusually high resistance level to all the quinolones used; especially norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin. The QRDR of gyrA was amplified and sequenced. Mutations identified in gyrA of E.coli included Ser83Leu, Asp87Asn and Ala93Gly/Glu. Contrasting previous reports, we found Ser83Leu substitution in sensitive strains. Strains with S83L, D87N and A93E (A15 and A26) demonstrated norfloxacin MICs ≥1024mg/L which could be proof that Asp87Asn is necessary for resistance phenotype. Resistance to levofloxacin was comparatively lower in all the isolates. Docking of 4 quinolones (ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and norfloxacin) to normal and mutated E.coli gyrase A protein demonstrated lower binding energies for the latter, with significant displacement of norfloxacin in the mutated GyrA complex and least displacement in case of levofloxacin.

  14. Mutation supply and the repeatability of selection for antibiotic resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van Thijs; Hwang, Sungmin; Krug, Joachim; Visser, de Arjan; Zwart, Mark P.

    2017-01-01

    Whether evolution can be predicted is a key question in evolutionary biology. Here we set out to better understand the repeatability of evolution, which is a necessary condition for predictability. We explored experimentally the effect of mutation supply and the strength of selective pressure on

  15. MSH6 mutations arise in glioblastomas during temozolomide therapy and mediate temozolomide resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Stephen; Miao, Jiangyong; Cahill, Daniel P.; Iafrate, A. John; Aldape, Ken; Nutt, Catherine L.; Louis, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Over the past few years, the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) has become the standard-of-care therapy for patients with glioblastoma, the most common brain tumor. Recently, large-scale cancer genome sequencing efforts have identified a hypermutation phenotype and inactivating MSH6 mismatch repair gene mutations in recurrent, post-TMZ glioblastomas, particularly those growing more rapidly during TMZ treatment. This study aimed to clarify the timing and role of MSH6 mutations in mediating glioblastoma TMZ resistance. Experimental Design MSH6 sequence and microsatellite instability (MSI) status were determined in matched pre- and post-chemotherapy glioblastomas identified by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) as having post-treatment MSH6 mutations. TMZ-resistant lines were derived in vitro via selective growth under TMZ and the MSH6 gene was sequenced in resistant clones. The role of MSH6 inactivation in mediating resistance was explored using lentiviral shRNA knockdown and MSH6 reconstitution. Results MSH6 mutations were confirmed in post-treatment TCGA glioblastomas but absent in matched pre-treatment tumors. The post-treatment hypermutation phenotype displayed a signature bias toward CpC transitions and was not associated with MSI. In vitro modeling via exposure of an MSH6-wildtype glioblastoma line to TMZ resulted in resistant clones; one clone showed an MSH6 mutation, Thr1219Ile, that had been independently noted in two treated TCGA glioblastomas. Knockdown of MSH6 in the glioblastoma line U251 increased resistance to TMZ cytotoxicity and reconstitution restored cytotoxicity in MSH6-null glioma cells. Conclusions MSH6 mutations are selected for in glioblastomas during TMZ therapy both in vitro and in vivo, and are causally associated with TMZ resistance. PMID:19584161

  16. Characterization of mutations in streptomycin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in the area of Barcelona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudó, Griselda; Rey, Emma; Borrell, Sònia; Alcaide, Fernando; Codina, Gemma; Coll, Pere; Martín-Casabona, Núria; Montemayor, Michel; Moure, Raquel; Orcau, Angels; Salvadó, Margarita; Vicente, Eva; González-Martín, Julià

    2010-11-01

    To determine the proportion and type of mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates resistant to streptomycin, and their relationship with the level of resistance and with the epidemiological molecular pattern of the isolates. Sixty-nine streptomycin-resistant isolates from a M. tuberculosis strain collection (1995-2005) from Barcelona were studied. The MIC of streptomycin for each isolate was determined using the proportions method with Middlebrook 7H11 medium. The entire rpsL gene and two specific fragments of the rrs gene (the 530 loop and the 912 region) were sequenced. IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism and spoligotyping were performed in each isolate. Twenty-six (26/69, 37.7%) streptomycin-resistant isolates presented a mutation in either the rpsL gene and/or the rrs530 loop, with no mutation in the rrs912 region. Seventeen (24.6%) isolates showed rpsL mutations (codons 43 and 88) associated with high MIC levels. Nine (13.0%) isolates had alterations in the rrs gene (A513T, A513C and C516T). Nineteen isolates (19/64, 29.7%) were classified into seven clusters (containing 2-5 isolates per cluster). Nineteen different spoligotype patterns were found. All the LAM3 spoligotype isolates (10/67, 14.9%) were associated with a C491T change in the rrs gene, being also observed in all LAM3 streptomycin-susceptible isolates. Mutations in the rpsL and rrs genes were detected in 37.7% of streptomycin-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates. High-level resistance was associated with mutations in the rpsL gene, whereas wild-type isolates showed low MIC levels. The presence of the C491T substitution in the rrs gene in streptomycin-susceptible and -resistant isolates demonstrates that this change is an epidemiological marker associated with LAM3 sublineage.

  17. Multiple-Insecticide Resistance and Classic Gene Mutations to Japanese Encephalitis Vector Culex tritaeniorhynchus from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-Ming; Chu, Hong-Liang; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Guo, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Ying-Mei; Xing, Dan; Yan, Ting; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Dong, Yan-De; Li, Chun-Xiao; Zhao, Tong-Yan

    2016-06-01

    Widespread resistance of insect pests to insecticides has been widely reported in China and there is consequently an urgent need to adjust pest management strategies appropriately. This requires detailed information on the extent and causes of resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate levels of resistance to 5 insecticides among 12 strains of Culex tritaeniorhynchus, a major vector of Japanese encephalitis in China. Resistance to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, permethrin, dichlorvos, and propoxur were measured using larval bioassays. The allelic frequency of knockdown resistance (kdr) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) mutations were determined in all strains. Larval bioassay results indicated that the field strains collected from different sites were resistant to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, permethrin, dichlorvos, and propoxur, with resistance ratio values ranging from 1.70- to 71.98-fold, 7.83- to 43.07-fold, 3.54- to 40.03-fold, 291.85- to 530.89-fold, and 51.32- to 108.83-fold, respectively. A polymerase chain reaction amplification of specific alleles method for individual was developed to detect genotypes of the AChE gene mutation F455W in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus. The frequency of the AChE gene mutation F455W was 100.00% in all strains, making this mutation of no value as a marker of resistance to organophosphorous and carbamate pesticides in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus in China. The kdr allele was present in all strains at frequencies of 10.00-29.55%. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between kdr allele frequencies and levels of resistance to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, and permethrin. These results highlight the need to monitor and map insecticide resistance in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and to adjust pesticide use to minimize the development of resistance in these mosquitoes.

  18. Detection of mutations in quinolone-resistant determining regions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-16

    Jan 16, 2012 ... Since the use of fluoroquinolone antibiotic in clinical practice was introduced about two decades ago, quinolone-resistant E. coli strains .... containing dehydrated antibiotics (Merlin Diagnostika, Germany) in two–fold dilution. .... alterations in parC play fundamental role in developing high level of resistance ...

  19. Detection of mutations in quinolone-resistant determining regions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the use of fluoroquinolone antibiotic in clinical practice was introduced about two decades ago, quinolone-resistant E. coli strains are being isolated with increasing frequency. This study devotes to determine the resistance rate of fluoroquinolones for 112 Escherichia coli isolates from Prince Salman Hospital, Riyadh ...

  20. Induced mutations in cucumber for resistance to nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udalov, V.B.; Prikhod'ko, V.F.

    1989-01-01

    Full text: Seeds were treated with EI and selection was carried out over 5 years. In the susceptible cv. ''M15'' treated with 0.05% EI for 21 h 7.6% of plants were found resistant, 72% only slightly susceptible. Mutants were used in crosses and hybrids showed 57-89% resistance over 6 generations. (author)

  1. Non-DNA binding, dominant-negative, human PPARγ mutations cause lipodystrophic insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Agostini, Maura; Schoenmakers, Erik; Mitchell, Catherine; Szatmari, Istvan; Savage, David; Smith, Aaron; Rajanayagam, Odelia; Semple, Robert; Luan, Jian'an; Bath, Louise; Zalin, Anthony; Labib, Mourad; Kumar, Sudhesh; Simpson, Helen; Blom, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    PPARgamma is essential for adipogenesis and metabolic homeostasis. We describe mutations in the DNA and ligand binding domains of human PPARgamma in lipodystrophic, severe insulin resistance. These receptor mutants lack DNA binding and transcriptional activity but can translocate to the nucleus, interact with PPARgamma coactivators and inhibit coexpressed wild-type receptor. Expression of PPARgamma target genes is markedly attenuated in mutation-containing versus receptor haploinsufficent pri...

  2. Target enzyme mutations are the molecular basis for resistance towards pharmacological inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe H; Petersen, Jakob G; Garten, Antje

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhibitors of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) are promising cancer drugs currently in clinical trials in oncology, including APO866, CHS-828 and the CHS-828 prodrug EB1627/GMX1777, but cancer cell resistance to these drugs has not been studied in detail. METHODS: Here, we...... introduce an analogue of CHS-828 called TP201565 with increased potency in cellular assays. Further, we describe and characterize a panel of cell lines with acquired stable resistance towards several NAMPT inhibitors of 18 to 20,000 fold compared to their parental cell lines. RESULTS: We find that 4 out...... of 5 of the resistant sublines display mutations of NAMPT located in the vicinity of the active site or in the dimer interface of NAMPT. Furthermore, we show that these mutations are responsible for the resistance observed. All the resistant cell lines formed xenograft tumours in vivo. Also, we confirm...

  3. Hfq mutation confers increased cephalosporin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xinran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae, is an opportunistic pathogen raising significant public health concerns owing to its multi-drug resistance. Hfq, one of the main RNA-binding proteins, is a key post-transcriptional regulator. This protein is closely related to virulence and resistance in various pathogenic bacteria. Although the role of hfq in K pneumoniae virulence has been explored, its influence on resistance remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of hfq in the resistance of K. pneumoniae to cephalosporins. An hfq mutant was constructed, and its resistance to cephalosporins was investigated. The hfq mutant exhibited over 16-fold higher cephalosporin resistance than that exhibited by the wild type. Time-kill curve analysis showed that the hfq mutant could survive under higher concentrations of cephalosporins than the wild-type strain could. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that expression levels for 8 out of the 9 penicillin-binding proteins, which are the targets of cephalosporins, were downregulated in the hfq mutant. Taken together, contrary to its role in many other bacteria, hfq is involved in a negative regulation of K. pneumoniae resistance to cephalosporins by downregulating the expression of penicillin-binding proteins.

  4. Systematic review of allelic exchange experiments aimed at identifying mutations that confer drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebenzahl-Guimaraes, Hanna; Jacobson, Karen R; Farhat, Maha R; Murray, Megan B

    2014-02-01

    Improving our understanding of the relationship between the genotype and the drug resistance phenotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis will aid the development of more accurate molecular diagnostics for drug-resistant tuberculosis. Studies that use direct genetic manipulation to identify the mutations that cause M. tuberculosis drug resistance are superior to associational studies in elucidating an individual mutation's contribution to the drug resistance phenotype. We systematically reviewed the literature for publications reporting allelic exchange experiments in any of the resistance-associated M. tuberculosis genes. We included studies that introduced single point mutations using specialized linkage transduction or site-directed/in vitro mutagenesis and documented a change in the resistance phenotype. We summarize evidence supporting the causal relationship of 54 different mutations in eight genes (katG, inhA, kasA, embB, embC, rpoB, gyrA and gyrB) and one intergenic region (furA-katG) with resistance to isoniazid, the rifamycins, ethambutol and fluoroquinolones. We observed a significant role for the strain genomic background in modulating the resistance phenotype of 21 of these mutations and found examples of where the same drug resistance mutations caused varying levels of resistance to different members of the same drug class. This systematic review highlights those mutations that have been shown to causally change phenotypic resistance in M. tuberculosis and brings attention to a notable lack of allelic exchange data for several of the genes known to be associated with drug resistance.

  5. Detection of mutation in isoniazid-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from tuberculosis patients in Belarus

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    Bostanabad S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency, location and type of katG mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from patients in Belarus. Forty two isoniazid-resistant isolates were identified from sputum of 163 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Drug susceptibility testing was determined by using CDC standard conventional proportional method and BACTEC system. Standard PCR method for detection of isoniazid resistance associated mutations was performed by katG gene amplification and DNA sequencing. Most mutations were found in katG gene codons 315, 316 and 309. Four types of mutations were identified in codon 315: AGC→ACC ( n = 36 85%, AGC→AGG ( n = 1 2.3%, AGC→AAC ( n = 2 4.7%, AGC→GGC ( n = 1 2.3%. One type of mutation was found in codon 316: GGC→AGC ( n = 1841.4%, four types of mutations were detected in codon 309: GGT→GGT ( n = 716.1%, GGT→GCT ( n = 49.2%, GGT→GTC ( n = 36.9%, GGT→GGG ( n = 12.7%. The highest frequency of mutations sharing between primary and secondary infections was found in codon 315.

  6. Induced mutations for bacterial leaf blight resistance in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, P.; Padmanabhan, S.Y.; Misra, S.N.

    1975-01-01

    Attempts were made for induction of resistance to bacterial leaf blight in some high yielding varieties through physical and chemical mutagens. Positive results could be obtained in Padma through NMU treatments. Further studies on the induction of bacterial leaf blight resistance in the varieties Sona and Vijaya indicated that it was possible to enhance the spectrum of variability in disease reaction by mutagenic treatments. The use of genotypes, possible enhancement of recombination frequencies through treatment of hybrids in the early generation, the choice of mutagen and the screening procedures for bacterial leaf blight resistance in rice are discussed. (author)

  7. Alternaria resistance of Brassicae campestris L. improved by induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, M.L.; Rahman, A.

    1989-01-01

    Full text: Seeds of 'YS 52', a cultivar susceptible to Alternaria brassicae (Berk.) Sacc., were exposed to gamma rays (30-90 kR). Eight more resistant mutants were selected in M3 and subjected to further field evaluation. The best mutant '17-5-83' appeared resistant and gave 44% higher yield than the parent, mutant '70-7-82' was found to be moderately resistant and gave a yield 21% higher than the parent. The yield increases seem to be connected with plant architecture changes. (author)

  8. Assessing the effects of Aedes aegypti kdr mutations on pyrethroid resistance and its fitness cost.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Paulo Brito

    Full Text Available Pyrethroids are the most used insecticide class worldwide. They target the voltage gated sodium channel (NaV, inducing the knockdown effect. In Aedes aegypti, the main dengue vector, the AaNaV substitutions Val1016Ile and Phe1534Cys are the most important knockdown resistance (kdr mutations. We evaluated the fitness cost of these kdr mutations related to distinct aspects of development and reproduction, in the absence of any other major resistance mechanism. To accomplish this, we initially set up 68 crosses with mosquitoes from a natural population. Allele-specific PCR revealed that one couple, the one originating the CIT-32 strain, had both parents homozygous for both kdr mutations. However, this pyrethroid resistant strain also presented high levels of detoxifying enzymes, which synergistically account for resistance, as revealed by biological and biochemical assays. Therefore, we carried out backcrosses between CIT-32 and Rockefeller (an insecticide susceptible strain for eight generations in order to bring the kdr mutation into a susceptible genetic background. This new strain, named Rock-kdr, was highly resistant to pyrethroid and presented reduced alteration of detoxifying activity. Fitness of the Rock-kdr was then evaluated in comparison with Rockefeller. In this strain, larval development took longer, adults had an increased locomotor activity, fewer females laid eggs, and produced a lower number of eggs. Under an inter-strain competition scenario, the Rock-kdr larvae developed even slower. Moreover, when Rockefeller and Rock-kdr were reared together in population cage experiments during 15 generations in absence of insecticide, the mutant allele decreased in frequency. These results strongly suggest that the Ae. aegypti kdr mutations have a high fitness cost. Therefore, enhanced surveillance for resistance should be priority in localities where the kdr mutation is found before new adaptive alleles can be selected for diminishing the

  9. Global distribution and origin of target site insecticide resistance mutations in Tetranychus urticae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilias, A; Vontas, J; Tsagkarakou, A

    2014-05-01

    The control of Tetranychus urticae, a worldwide agricultural pest, is largely dependent on pesticides. However, their efficacy is often compromised by the development of resistance. Recent molecular studies identified a number of target site resistance mutations, such as G119S, A201S, T280A, G328A, F331W in the acetylcholinesterase gene, L1024V, A1215D, F1538I in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene, G314D and G326E in glutamate-gated chloride channel genes, G126S, I136T, S141F, D161G, P262T in the cytochrome b and the I1017F in the chitin synthase 1 gene. We examined their distribution, by sequencing the relevant gene fragments in a large number of T. urticae collections from a wide geographic range. Our study revealed that most of the resistance mutations are spread worldwide, with remarkably variable frequencies. Furthermore, we analyzed the variability of the ace locus, which has been subjected to longer periods of selection pressure historically, to investigate the evolutionary origin of ace resistant alleles and determine whether they resulted from single or multiple mutation events. By sequencing a 1540 bp ace fragment, encompassing the resistance mutations and downstream introns in 139 T. urticae individuals from 27 countries, we identified 6 susceptible and 31 resistant alleles which have arisen from at least three independent mutation events. The frequency and distribution of these ace haplotypes varied geographically, suggesting an interplay between different mutational events, gene flow and local selection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutations That Enhance the Ciprofloxacin Resistance of Escherichia coli with qnrA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinué, Laura; Corcoran, Marian A; Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-12-28

    Plasmid-mediated qnr genes provide only a modest decrease in quinolone susceptibility but facilitate the selection of higher-level resistance. In Escherichia coli strain J53 without qnr, ciprofloxacin resistance often involves mutations in the GyrA subunit of DNA gyrase. Mutations in gyrA were absent, however, when 43 mutants with decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility were selected from J53(pMG252) with qnrA1. Instead, in 13 mutants, individual and whole-genome sequencing identified mutations in marR and soxR associated with increased expression of marA and soxS and, through them, increased expression of the AcrAB pump, which effluxes quinolones. Nine mutants had increased expression of the MdtE efflux pump, and six demonstrated increased expression of the ydhE pump gene. Many efflux mutants also had increased resistance to novobiocin, another pump substrate, but other mutants were novobiocin hypersusceptible. Mutations in rfaD and rfaE in the pathway for inner core lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis were identified in five such strains. Many of the pump and LPS mutants had decreased expression of OmpF, the major porin channel for ciprofloxacin entry. Three mutants had increased expression of qnrA that persisted when pMG252 from these strains was outcrossed. gyrA mutations were also rare when mutants with decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility were selected from E. coli J53 with aac(6')-Ib-cr or qepA. We suggest that multiple genes conferring low-level resistance contribute to enhanced ciprofloxacin resistance selected from an E. coli strain carrying qnrA1, aac(6')-Ib-cr, or qepA because these determinants decrease the effective ciprofloxacin concentration and allow more common but lower-resistance mutations than those in gyrA to predominate. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Mutations in penicillin-binding proteins 1, 2 and 3 are responsible for amoxicillin resistance in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbara, Emiko; Noguchi, Norihisa; Kawai, Takashi; Sasatsu, Masanori

    2008-05-01

    To elucidate the relationship between the mutations of penicillin-binding protein (PBP)1, PBP2 and PBP3 and amoxicillin resistance in Helicobacter pylori. The mutations detected only in clinical amoxicillin-resistant strains were determined by comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of PBP1(HP0597), PBP2(HP1556) and PBP3(HP1565) encoded by the pbp1, ftsI and pbp2 genes, respectively, in 13 clinical H. pylori strains and three ATCC strains. The contribution of the mutations in PBPs was analysed by the natural transformation of the amoxicillin-susceptible strain ATCC 700392 with various combinations of the pbp1, ftsI and pbp2 genes from the amoxicillin-resistant strain TH743 (MIC of amoxicillin: 8 mg/L). We initially identified six, four and two mutations of PBP1, PBP2 and PBP3, respectively, which were detected only in amoxicillin-resistant strains. By the natural transformation of an amoxicillin-susceptible strain ATCC 700392, we found that mutations in PBP1 and PBP3 conferred higher resistance to amoxicillin than mutations in PBP1 and PBP2, or mutations only in PBP1. Furthermore, mutations in PBP1, PBP2 and PBP3 conferred a 256-fold higher amoxicillin resistance when compared with ATCC 700392. Multiple mutations in PBP2 and PBP3, in addition to mutations in PBP1, confer higher amoxicillin resistance in H. pylori.

  12. Emergence of polymyxin B resistance influences pathogenicity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulman, Zackery P; Sutton, Mark D; Ly, Neang S; Bulitta, Jurgen B; Holden, Patricia N; Nation, Roger L; Li, Jian; Tsuji, Brian T

    2015-07-01

    The interplay between polymyxin B pharmacodynamics and pathogenicity was examined in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and isogenic DNA repair-deficient mutators (mutM and mutS strains). Against mutS mutators, polymyxin B initial killing was concentration dependent, with >99.9% bacterial reduction at 2 h followed by regrowth and resistance. The pre- versus postexposed strains were inoculated real time into Galleria mellonella waxworms, resulting in increased median survival times from 20 h to 23 h (P resistance in mutS P. aeruginosa resulted in attenuation of virulence. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Induced mutations to develop sources of resistance to rice blast, Pyricularia grisea Sacc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa-Victoria, F.J.

    2001-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Pyricularia grisea is the most important disease limiting yields worldwide. The pathogen has many virulent forms or pathotypes, hence durable blast resistance is lacking. Studies on strategy to develop durable blast resistance based on defining the genetic structure of the population, using DNA-fingerprinting, and virulence diversity are described. This strategy is leading to the identification of resistance genes/sources against all isolates within a genetic family of the pathogen. Combinations of genes showing complementary resistance to different genetic families of the fungus exclude any compatible interaction with a blast isolate. Identification of complementary resistance genes is based on detecting those virulence factors whose combinations in individual isolates within the pathogen population have a frequency near zero. Identifying and combining resistance genes to which combinations of corresponding virulence genes are absent in the pathogen population should confer more durable resistance than that previously obtained. The use of induced mutations in the development of resistance was limited, since in most cases single gene changes were responsible for the induced resistance against all the pathogen population. The main objective here is to develop many mutants, each with a gene resistant to just one or a few families of the blast pathogen; and crossing them can accumulate the different resistance genes. A total of 201 Latin American commercial cultivars, including Cuban, Brazilian and Venezuelan were analyzed with different genetic families of the blast pathogen to identify potential sources of resistance to blast and identify complementary resistance sources. Characterization of the resistance of 37 mutants of the Colombian rice cultivar Oryzica 1 was conducted in collaboration with the INEA in Colombia. Results suggested that mutations for resistance to genetic families to which Oryzica 1 is susceptible were induced, although one

  14. Mutational and transcriptomic changes involved in the development of macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Haihong; Yuan, Zonghui; Shen, Zhangqi; Han, Jing; Sahin, Orhan; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Qijing

    2013-03-01

    Macrolide antibiotics are important for clinical treatment of infections caused by Campylobacter jejuni. Development of resistance to this class of antibiotics in Campylobacter is a complex process, and the dynamic molecular changes involved in this process remain poorly defined. Multiple lineages of macrolide-resistant mutants were selected by stepwise exposure of C. jejuni to escalating doses of erythromycin or tylosin. Mutations in target genes were determined by DNA sequencing, and the dynamic changes in the expression of antibiotic efflux transporters and the transcriptome of C. jejuni were examined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, immunoblotting, and DNA microarray analysis. Multiple types of mutations in ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 occurred early during stepwise selection. On the contrary, the mutations in the 23S rRNA gene, mediating high resistance to macrolides, were observed only in the late-stage mutants. Upregulation of antibiotic efflux genes was observed in the intermediately resistant mutants, and the magnitude of upregulation declined with the occurrence of mutations in the 23S rRNA gene. DNA microarray analysis revealed the differential expression of 265 genes, most of which occurred in the intermediate mutant, including the upregulation of genes encoding ribosomal proteins and the downregulation of genes involved in energy metabolism and motility. These results indicate (i) that mutations in L4 and L22 along with temporal overexpression of antibiotic efflux genes precede and may facilitate the development of high-level macrolide resistance and (ii) that the development of macrolide resistance affects the pathways important for physiology and metabolism in C. jejuni, providing an explanation for the reduced fitness of macrolide-resistant Campylobacter.

  15. Mutations in 23S rRNA confer resistance against azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Søndergaard, Mette S R; Damkiær, Søren; Høiby, Niels; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Molin, Søren; Jelsbak, Lars

    2012-08-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important concern in the treatment of long-term airway infections in cystic fibrosis patients. In this study, we report the occurrence of azithromycin resistance among clinical P. aeruginosa DK2 isolates. We demonstrate that resistance is associated with specific mutations (A2058G, A2059G, and C2611T in Escherichia coli numbering) in domain V of 23S rRNA and that introduction of A2058G and C2611T into strain PAO1 results in azithromycin resistance.

  16. Mutation breeding for disease resistance in wheat and field beans in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Hak, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Seeds of three varieties of hexaploid wheat and of one variety of tetraploid wheat were treated with gamma rays in order to obtain mutants with improved resistance to stem rust, leaf rust and stripe rust. Mutants with resistance to prevailing races of rusts were selected; however, the race spectrum shifted and made the mutants useless for the time being. Induction of mutations for resistance to chocolate spot and rusts was attempted in Vicia faba. No resistant mutant was found but some mutants with lower levels of infection were. (author)

  17. Mutations in 23S rRNA Confer Resistance against Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Søndergaard, Mette S. R.; Pedersen, Søren Damkiær

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important concern in the treatment of long-term airway infections in cystic fibrosis patients. In this study, we report the occurrence of azithromycin resistance among clinical P. aeruginosa DK2 isolates. We demonstrate...... that resistance is associated with specific mutations (A2058G, A2059G, and C2611T in Escherichia coli numbering) in domain V of 23S rRNA and that introduction of A2058G and C2611T into strain PAO1 results in azithromycin resistance....

  18. The effect of colistin resistance-associated mutations on the fitness of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinli Mu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii had emerged as an important nosocomial and opportunistic pathogen worldwide. To determine the evolutionary pathway of colistin resistance in A. baumannii and its influence on bacterial fitness, five independent colonies of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 were exposed to colistin in agar (4/5 and liquid media (1/5 with increasing and constant concentrations. Stable resistance isolates were sent for whole genome sequencing. All strains were colistin resistant after exposure to colistin. In addition to the previously reported lpxCAD and pmrAB mutations, we detected four novel putative colistin resistance genes: A1S_1983, hepA, A1S_3026, and rsfS. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS loss mutants exhibited higher fitness costs than the pmrB mutant in nutrient-rich medium. The colistin-resistant mutants showed higher inhibition ratio in the serum growth experiment than the wild type strain in 100% serum. The MIC results showed that the LPS-deficient but not the pmrB mutant altered the antibiotic resistance profile. The compensatory mutations partially or completely recovered the LPS-deficient’s fitness, suggesting that compensatory mutations played an important role in the emergence and spread of colistin resistant A. baumannii.

  19. Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mechanisms in an Escherichia coli Isolate, HUE1, Without Quinolone Resistance-Determining Region Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyotaka eSato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolone resistance can cause major clinical problems. Here, we investigated fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms in a clinical Escherichia coli isolate, HUE1, which had no mutations quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. HUE1 demonstrated MICs that exceeded the breakpoints for ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and norfloxacin. HUE1 harbored oqxAB and qnrS1 on distinct plasmids. In addition, it exhibited lower intracellular ciprofloxacin concentrations and higher mRNA expression levels of efflux pumps and their global activators than did reference strains. The genes encoding AcrR (local AcrAB repressor and MarR (MarA repressor were disrupted by insertion of the transposon IS3-IS629 and a frameshift mutation, respectively. A series of mutants derived from HUE1 were obtained by plasmid curing and gene knockout using homologous recombination. Compared to the MICs of the parent strain HUE1, the fluoroquinolone MICs of these mutants indicated that qnrS1, oqxAB, acrAB, acrF, acrD, mdtK, mdfA, and tolC contributed to the reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolone in HUE1. Therefore, fluoroquinolone resistance in HUE1 is caused by concomitant acquisition of QnrS1 and OqxAB and overexpression of AcrAB−TolC and other chromosome-encoded efflux pumps. Thus, we have demonstrated that QRDR mutations are not absolutely necessary for acquiring fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli.

  20. Macrolide resistance conferred by rRNA mutations in field isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders S; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen Roger

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine how resistance to macrolides is conferred in field isolates of Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica that lack previously identified resistance determinants for rRNA methylation, efflux and macrolide-modifying enzymes. METHODS: Isolates of P. multocida and M...... by genome sequencing and primer extension on the rRNAs. RESULTS: Macrolide resistance in one M. haemolytica isolate was conferred by the 23S rRNA mutation A2058G; resistance in three P. multocida isolates were caused by mutations at the neighbouring nucleotide A2059G. In each strain, all six copies...... of the rrn operons encoded the respective mutations. There were no mutations in the ribosomal protein genes rplD or rplV, and no other macrolide resistance mechanism was evident. CONCLUSIONS: High-level macrolide resistance can arise from 23S rRNA mutations in P. multocida and M. haemolytica despite...

  1. TREAT Asia Quality Assessment Scheme (TAQAS) to standardize the outcome of HIV genotypic resistance testing in a group of Asian laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Sally; Cunningham, Philip; Zhou, Jialun; Frost, Kevin; Katzenstein, David; Kantor, Rami; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur; Oka, Shinichi; DeLong, Allison; Sayer, David; Smith, Jeffery; Dax, Elizabeth M.; Law, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    The TREAT Asia (Therapeutics, Research, Education, and AIDS Training in Asia) Network is building capacity for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1) drug resistance testing in the region. The objective of the TREAT Asia Quality Assessment Scheme – designated TAQAS – is to standardize HIV-1 genotypic resistance testing (HIV genotyping) among laboratories to permit rigorous comparison of results from different clinics and testing centres. TAQAS has evaluated three panels of HIV-1-positive plasma from clinical material or low-passage, culture supernatant for up to 10 Asian laboratories. Laboratory participants used their standard protocols to perform HIV genotyping. Assessment was in comparison to a target genotype derived from all participants and the reference laboratory’s result. Agreement between most participants at the edited nucleotide sequence level was high (>98%). Most participants performed to the reference laboratory standard in detection of drug resistance mutations (DRMs). However, there was variation in the detection of nucleotide mixtures (0–83%) and a significant correlation with the detection of DRMs (p 90% agreement with a common interpretation system, within the Stanford University Drug Resistance Database. Using the principles of external quality assessment and a reference laboratory, TAQAS has demonstrated high quality HIV genotyping results from Asian laboratories. PMID:19490972

  2. OSPREY Predicts Resistance Mutations Using Positive and Negative Computational Protein Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojewole, Adegoke; Lowegard, Anna; Gainza, Pablo; Reeve, Stephanie M; Georgiev, Ivelin; Anderson, Amy C; Donald, Bruce R

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance in protein targets is an increasingly common phenomenon that reduces the efficacy of both existing and new antibiotics. However, knowledge of future resistance mutations during pre-clinical phases of drug development would enable the design of novel antibiotics that are robust against not only known resistant mutants, but also against those that have not yet been clinically observed. Computational structure-based protein design (CSPD) is a transformative field that enables the prediction of protein sequences with desired biochemical properties such as binding affinity and specificity to a target. The use of CSPD to predict previously unseen resistance mutations represents one of the frontiers of computational protein design. In a recent study (Reeve et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112(3):749-754, 2015), we used our OSPREY (Open Source Protein REdesign for You) suite of CSPD algorithms to prospectively predict resistance mutations that arise in the active site of the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SaDHFR) in response to selective pressure from an experimental competitive inhibitor. We demonstrated that our top predicted candidates are indeed viable resistant mutants. Since that study, we have significantly enhanced the capabilities of OSPREY with not only improved modeling of backbone flexibility, but also efficient multi-state design, fast sparse approximations, partitioned continuous rotamers for more accurate energy bounds, and a computationally efficient representation of molecular-mechanics and quantum-mechanical energy functions. Here, using SaDHFR as an example, we present a protocol for resistance prediction using the latest version of OSPREY. Specifically, we show how to use a combination of positive and negative design to predict active site escape mutations that maintain the enzyme's catalytic function but selectively ablate binding of an inhibitor.

  3. Gene expression noise facilitates adaptation and drug resistance independently of mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlebois, Daniel A; Abdennur, Nezar; Kaern, Mads

    2011-11-18

    We show that the effect of stress on the reproductive fitness of noisy cell populations can be modeled as a first-passage time problem, and demonstrate that even relatively short-lived fluctuations in gene expression can ensure the long-term survival of a drug-resistant population. We examine how this effect contributes to the development of drug-resistant cancer cells, and demonstrate that permanent immunity can arise independently of mutations.

  4. Mutation breeding for disease resistance in food bean and cowpea in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses Onim, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Progress is being reported on a project aiming at genetic improvement of cowpea and Phaseolus bean for better disease resistance using induced mutations. The diseases of concern are anthracnose, angular leaf spot, halo blight and bean rust. Selection was effective in M 3 and M 4 generations and provided some lines with different resistance and yield levels, which will have to be examined further. (author)

  5. Mutation analysis of the Mycobacterium leprae folP1 gene and dapsone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Noboru; Kai, Masanori; Makino, Masahiko

    2011-02-01

    Diaminodiphenylsulfone (dapsone) has long been used as a first-line drug worldwide for the treatment of leprosy. Diagnosis for dapsone resistance of Mycobacterium leprae by DNA tests would be of great clinical value, but the relationship between the nucleotide substitutions and susceptibility to dapsone must be clarified before use. In this study, we constructed recombinant strains of cultivable Mycobacterium smegmatis carrying the M. leprae folP1 gene with or without a point mutation, disrupting their own folP gene on the chromosome. Dapsone susceptibilities of the recombinant bacteria were measured to examine influence of the mutations. Dapsone MICs for most of the strains with mutations at codon 53 or 55 of M. leprae folP1 were 2 to 16 times as high as the MIC for the strain with the wild-type folP1 sequence, but mutations that changed Thr to Ser at codon 53 showed somewhat lower MIC values than the wild-type sequence. Strains with mutations at codon 48 or 54 showed levels of susceptibility to dapsone comparable to the susceptibility of the strain with the wild-type sequence. This study confirmed that point mutations at codon 53 or 55 of the M. leprae folP1 gene result in dapsone resistance.

  6. Herbicide resistance-endowing ACCase gene mutations in hexaploid wild oat (Avena fatua): insights into resistance evolution in a hexaploid species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q; Ahmad-Hamdani, M S; Han, H; Christoffers, M J; Powles, S B

    2013-01-01

    Many herbicide-resistant weed species are polyploids, but far too little about the evolution of resistance mutations in polyploids is understood. Hexaploid wild oat (Avena fatua) is a global crop weed and many populations have evolved herbicide resistance. We studied plastidic acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase)-inhibiting herbicide resistance in hexaploid wild oat and revealed that resistant individuals can express one, two or three different plastidic ACCase gene resistance mutations (Ile-1781-Leu, Asp-2078-Gly and Cys-2088-Arg). Using ACCase resistance mutations as molecular markers, combined with genetic, molecular and biochemical approaches, we found in individual resistant wild-oat plants that (1) up to three unlinked ACCase gene loci assort independently following Mendelian laws for disomic inheritance, (2) all three of these homoeologous ACCase genes were transcribed, with each able to carry its own mutation and (3) in a hexaploid background, each individual ACCase resistance mutation confers relatively low-level herbicide resistance, in contrast to high-level resistance conferred by the same mutations in unrelated diploid weed species of the Poaceae (grass) family. Low resistance conferred by individual ACCase resistance mutations is likely due to a dilution effect by susceptible ACCase expressed by homoeologs in hexaploid wild oat and/or differential expression of homoeologous ACCase gene copies. Thus, polyploidy in hexaploid wild oat may slow resistance evolution. Evidence of coexisting non-target-site resistance mechanisms among wild-oat populations was also revealed. In all, these results demonstrate that herbicide resistance and its evolution can be more complex in hexaploid wild oat than in unrelated diploid grass weeds. Our data provide a starting point for the daunting task of understanding resistance evolution in polyploids. PMID:23047200

  7. Herbicide resistance-endowing ACCase gene mutations in hexaploid wild oat (Avena fatua): insights into resistance evolution in a hexaploid species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q; Ahmad-Hamdani, M S; Han, H; Christoffers, M J; Powles, S B

    2013-03-01

    Many herbicide-resistant weed species are polyploids, but far too little about the evolution of resistance mutations in polyploids is understood. Hexaploid wild oat (Avena fatua) is a global crop weed and many populations have evolved herbicide resistance. We studied plastidic acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase)-inhibiting herbicide resistance in hexaploid wild oat and revealed that resistant individuals can express one, two or three different plastidic ACCase gene resistance mutations (Ile-1781-Leu, Asp-2078-Gly and Cys-2088-Arg). Using ACCase resistance mutations as molecular markers, combined with genetic, molecular and biochemical approaches, we found in individual resistant wild-oat plants that (1) up to three unlinked ACCase gene loci assort independently following Mendelian laws for disomic inheritance, (2) all three of these homoeologous ACCase genes were transcribed, with each able to carry its own mutation and (3) in a hexaploid background, each individual ACCase resistance mutation confers relatively low-level herbicide resistance, in contrast to high-level resistance conferred by the same mutations in unrelated diploid weed species of the Poaceae (grass) family. Low resistance conferred by individual ACCase resistance mutations is likely due to a dilution effect by susceptible ACCase expressed by homoeologs in hexaploid wild oat and/or differential expression of homoeologous ACCase gene copies. Thus, polyploidy in hexaploid wild oat may slow resistance evolution. Evidence of coexisting non-target-site resistance mechanisms among wild-oat populations was also revealed. In all, these results demonstrate that herbicide resistance and its evolution can be more complex in hexaploid wild oat than in unrelated diploid grass weeds. Our data provide a starting point for the daunting task of understanding resistance evolution in polyploids.

  8. Effect on HIV-1 viral replication capacity of DTG-resistance mutations in NRTI/NNRTI resistant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hanh T; Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A

    2016-04-30

    Recommended regimens for HIV-positive individuals include the co-administration of dolutegravir (DTG) with two reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs). Although rare, emerging resistance against DTG is often associated with the R263K substitution in integrase. In-vitro-selected R263K was associated with impaired viral replication capacity, DNA integration, and integrase strand-transfer activity, especially when accompanied by the secondary mutation H51Y. Given the reduced fitness of RTI-resistant viruses, we investigated potential impacts on viral replication of combining R263K and H51Y/R263K with major RTI-resistance substitutions including K65R, L74V, K103N, E138K, and M184I/V. We combined the R263K or H51Y/R263K with RTI-resistance mutations into the proviral plasmid pNL4.3 and measured the resulting viral infectiousness, replication capacity, and ability to integrate viral DNA into host cells. Infectiousness was determined by luciferase assay in TZM-bl cells. Replicative capacity was monitored over 7 days and viral DNA integration was studied by real-time Alu-qPCR in PM1 cells. We found that viral infectiousness, replication capacities and integration levels were greatly reduced in triple mutants, i.e. H51Y/R263K plus a RT mutation, and moderately reduced in double mutants, i.e. R263K plus a RT mutation, compared to wild-type and single RT-mutant viruses. Our findings help to explain the absence of RTI mutations in individuals who experienced DTG-treatment failure.

  9. Resistance of Francisella novicida to Fosmidomycin Associated with Mutations in the Glycerol-3-Phosphate Transporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan S Mackie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The methylerythritol phosphate (MEP pathway is essential in most prokaryotes and some lower eukaryotes but absent from human cells, and is a validated target for antimicrobial drug development. The formation of MEP is catalyzed by 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR. MEP pathway genes have been identified in many Category A and B biothreat agents, including Francisella tularensis, which causes the zoonosis tularemia. Fosmidomycin inhibits purified Francisella DXR. This compound also inhibits the growth of F. tularensis NIH B38, F. novicida and F. tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS bacteria. Related compounds such as FR900098 and lipophilic prodrugs of FR900098 have been developed to improve the bioavailability of these DXR inhibitors. In disc-inhibition assays with these compounds, we observed breakthrough colonies of F. novicida in the presence of fosmidomycin, suggesting spontaneous development of fosmidomycin resistance (FosR. FosR bacteria had decreased sensitivity to both fosmidomycin and FR900098. The two most likely targets for the development of mutants would be the DXR enzyme or the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT that allows entry of fosmidomycin into the bacteria. Sensitivity of FosR F. novicida bacteria to compound 1 was not abated suggesting that spontaneous resistance is not due to mutation of DXR. We thus predicted that the glpT transporter may be mutated leading to this resistant phenotype. Supporting this, transposon insertion mutants at the glpT locus were also found to be resistant to fosmidomycin. DNA sequencing of four different spontaneous FosR colonies demonstrated a variety of deletions in the glpT coding region. The overall frequency of FosR mutations in F. novicida was determined to be 6.3 x 10-8. Thus we conclude that one mechanism of resistance of F. novicida to fosmidomycin is caused by mutations in GlpT. This is the first description of mutations in Francisella leading to fosmidomycin

  10. Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors Drug Resistance Mutations in Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the extent of HIV-1 drug resistance among drug naïve Kenyan individuals. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Kenya Medical Research Institute HIV laboratory Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects: A total of seventy eight HIV-1 positive drug naïve subjects randomised from five Kenyan provincial hospitals ...

  11. reverse transcriptase inhibitors drug resistance mutations in drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-01

    Jan 1, 2011 ... through put drug resistance testing for the increasing number of infected individuals in order to effectively manage those initiating ART. ACKNoWLEdGEMENTs. To the patient who participated in the study, the Kenya. Medical Research Institute, Centre for Virus HIV. Laboratory division staff for their support.

  12. Target enzyme mutations are the molecular basis for resistance towards pharmacological inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Mette K

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibitors of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT are promising cancer drugs currently in clinical trials in oncology, including APO866, CHS-828 and the CHS-828 prodrug EB1627/GMX1777, but cancer cell resistance to these drugs has not been studied in detail. Methods Here, we introduce an analogue of CHS-828 called TP201565 with increased potency in cellular assays. Further, we describe and characterize a panel of cell lines with acquired stable resistance towards several NAMPT inhibitors of 18 to 20,000 fold compared to their parental cell lines. Results We find that 4 out of 5 of the resistant sublines display mutations of NAMPT located in the vicinity of the active site or in the dimer interface of NAMPT. Furthermore, we show that these mutations are responsible for the resistance observed. All the resistant cell lines formed xenograft tumours in vivo. Also, we confirm CHS-828 and TP201565 as competitive inhibitors of NAMPT through docking studies and by NAMPT precipitation from cellular lysate by an analogue of TP201565 linked to sepharose. The NAMPT precipitation could be inhibited by addition of APO866. Conclusion We found that CHS-828 and TP201565 are competitive inhibitors of NAMPT and that acquired resistance towards NAMPT inhibitors can be expected primarily to be caused by mutations in NAMPT.

  13. Mycoplasma genitalium infection: current treatment options, therapeutic failure, and resistance-associated mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couldwell, Deborah L; Lewis, David A

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is an important cause of non-gonococcal urethritis, cervicitis, and related upper genital tract infections. The efficacy of doxycycline, used extensively to treat non-gonococcal urethritis in the past, is relatively poor for M. genitalium infection; azithromycin has been the preferred treatment for several years. Research on the efficacy of azithromycin has primarily focused on the 1 g single-dose regimen, but some studies have also evaluated higher doses and longer courses, particularly the extended 1.5 g regimen. This extended regimen is thought to be more efficacious than the 1 g single-dose regimen, although the regimens have not been directly compared in clinical trials. Azithromycin treatment failure was first reported in Australia and has subsequently been documented in several continents. Recent reports indicate an upward trend in the prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. genitalium infections (transmitted resistance), and cases of induced resistance following azithromycin therapy have also been documented. Emergence of antimicrobial-resistant M. genitalium, driven by suboptimal macrolide dosage, now threatens the continued provision of effective and convenient treatments. Advances in techniques to detect resistance mutations in DNA extracts have facilitated correlation of clinical outcomes with genotypic resistance. A strong and consistent association exists between presence of 23S rRNA gene mutations and azithromycin treatment failure. Fluoroquinolones such as moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, and sitafloxacin remain highly active against most macrolide-resistant M. genitalium. However, the first clinical cases of moxifloxacin treatment failure, due to bacteria with coexistent macrolide-associated and fluoroquinolone-associated resistance mutations, were recently published by Australian investigators. Pristinamycin and solithromycin may be of clinical benefit for such multidrug-resistant infections. Further clinical studies are required to

  14. NUP107 mutations in children with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eujin; Ahn, Yo Han; Kang, Hee Gyung; Miyake, Noriko; Tsukaguchi, Hiroyasu; Cheong, Hae Il

    2017-06-01

    NUP107 is a novel gene associated with autosomal recessive steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) in children. The frequency of NUP107 mutations in children with SR-FSGS remains unknown. Nine families with two siblings affected by childhood-onset SRNS or proteinuria were recruited. FSGS was confirmed by a kidney biopsy in at least one affected sibling in all families. Additionally, 69 sporadic pediatric cases with biopsy-proven SR-FSGS who had not responded to any treatment were included. All coding exons with flanking introns of the NUP107 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced. Biallelic NUP107 mutations were detected in four pairs (44.4%) of siblings from the familial cases and three (4.3%) sporadic cases. All affected patients harbored the p.Asp831Ala mutation in one allele and a truncating or abnormal splicing mutation in the other allele. NUP107 mutation-positive patients showed an earlier onset age (39.4 ± 13.1 versus 76.8 ± 50.0 months, P= 0.027) and more rapid progression to end-stage renal disease (at the ages of 58.9 ± 23.4 versus 123.1 ± 62.7 months, P < 0.001) compared with mutation-negative patients. None of the eight mutation-positive cases, who underwent kidney transplantation, showed recurrence of FSGS in the graft kidney, while 35.3% of mutation-negative cases showed recurrence of FSGS. An unexpectedly high incidence of NUP107 mutations was observed in Korean children with SR-FSGS. Initial genetic screening of children with SR-FSGS should include the NUP107 gene, at least in Korea. Further studies are necessary to determine the incidences of NUP107 mutations in other countries. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  15. A systematic review of gyrase mutations associated with fluoroquinolone-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and a proposed gyrase numbering system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruri, Fernanda; Sterling, Timothy R.; Kaiga, Anne W.; Blackman, Amondrea; van der Heijden, Yuri F.; Mayer, Claudine; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Aubry, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has become increasingly important. A review of mutations in DNA gyrase, the fluoroquinolone target, is needed to improve the molecular detection of resistance. We performed a systematic review of studies reporting mutations in DNA gyrase genes in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. From 42 studies that met inclusion criteria, 1220 fluoroquinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates underwent sequencing of the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of gyrA; 780 (64%) had mutations. The QRDR of gyrB was sequenced in 534 resistant isolates; 17 (3%) had mutations. Mutations at gyrA codons 90, 91 or 94 were present in 654/1220 (54%) resistant isolates. Four different GyrB numbering systems were reported, resulting in mutation location discrepancies. We propose a consensus numbering system. Most fluoroquinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates had mutations in DNA gyrase, but a substantial proportion did not. The proposed consensus numbering system can improve molecular detection of resistance and identification of novel mutations. PMID:22279180

  16. Prevalence of drug resistance mutations and non-B subtypes in newly diagnosed HIV-1 patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise B; Christensen, Marianne B; Gerstoft, Jan

    2003-01-01

    S mutation was found in 1 additional patient. The subtype distribution was subtype B 59%, C 18%, A 8%, CRF02_AG 5%, CRF01_AE 4%, D 3% and G 2%. We found 2 patients (2%) with mutations associated with resistance in the RT-gene and none in the protease gene indicating a low prevalence of resistant HIV...

  17. Identification of mutations related to streptomycin resistance in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and possible involvement of efflux mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Fernanda S; da Silva, Pedro E Almeida; Ribeiro, Marta O; Rossetti, Maria Lucia; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2008-08-01

    The MIC for streptomycin in the presence of efflux pump (EP) inhibitors and the sequencing of rpsL, rrs, and gidB genes provided evidence for the possible participation of EP in low-level streptomycin (STR) resistance of some isolates without mutations. Mutation in the gidB gene and an EP could act synergistically to confer low STR resistance.

  18. Detection of resistance mutations and CD4 slopes in individuals experiencing sustained virological failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultze, Anna; Paredes, Roger; Sabin, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    mutations on CD4 slopes in patients undergoing episodes of viral failure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients from the EuroSIDA and UK CHIC cohorts undergoing at least one episode of virological failure (>3 consecutive RNA measurements >500 on ART) with at least three CD4 measurements and a resistance test...

  19. Thyroid hormone resistance syndrome due to mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor alpha gene (THRA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tylki-Szymanska, A.; Acuna Hidalgo, R.; Krajewska-Walasek, M.; Lecka-Ambroziak, A.; Steehouwer, M.; Gilissen, C.F.; Brunner, H.G.; Jurecka, A.; Rozdzynska-Swiatkowska, A.; Hoischen, A.; Chrzanowska, K.H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resistance to thyroid hormone is characterised by a lack of response of peripheral tissues to the active form of thyroid hormone (triiodothyronine, T3). In about 85% of cases, a mutation in THRB, the gene coding for thyroid receptor beta (TRbeta), is the cause of this disorder. Recently,

  20. A truncating mutation of HDAC2 in human cancers confers resistance to histone deacetylase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropero, S; Fraga, MF; Ballestar, E

    2006-01-01

    arising in individuals with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome. The presence of the HDAC2 frameshift mutation causes a loss of HDAC2 protein expression and enzymatic activity and renders these cells more resistant to the usual antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of histone...

  1. Prevalence of TMC278 (rilpivirine) associated mutations in the Frankfurt Resistance Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinheimer, Claudia; Doerr, Hans W; Stürmer, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Analysis of the 3D structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase led to the development of TMC278 (rilpivirine), a next-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), which proved to be effective against wild-type HIV-1 strains and NNRTI-resistant mutants emerging after failure of NNRTI-containing therapy regimens. Recently, rilpivirine associated mutations (e.g. at positions 138, 181 or 101) have been described in vitro and in vivo; however, some of these mutations have also been observed in the past. Objective of our investigation was to determine the prevalence of mutations E138K, Y181I/V, and K101E/P before the approval of rilpivirine. The Frankfurt Resistance Database consists of 7295 samples which have been sent for resistance testing since 1995. The E138K, Y181I/V, and the K101E mutations were found in 0.4%, 0.9%, and 2.4% of the patients, respectively. Based on these findings we do not expect a broad cross-resistance to rilpivirine due to previous treatment failures of NNRTI-containing regimens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Double-Serine Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mutations Advance Major International Clones and Lineages of Various Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklos Fuzi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The major international sequence types/lineages of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and ESBL-producing E. coli were demonstrated to have been advanced by favorable fitness balance associated with high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones. The paper shows that favorable fitness in the major STs/lineages of these pathogens was principally attained by the capacity of evolving mutations in the fluoroquinolone-binding serine residues of both the DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV enzymes. The available information on fitness balance incurred by individual and various combinations of mutations in the enzymes is reviewed in multiple species. Moreover, strong circumstantial evidence is presented that major STs/lineages of other multi-drug resistant bacteria, primarily vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE, emerged by a similar mechanism. The reason(s why the major ST/lineage strains of various pathogens proved more adept at evolving favorable mutations than most isolates of the same species remains to be elucidated.

  3. Double-Serine Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mutations Advance Major International Clones and Lineages of Various Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzi, Miklos; Szabo, Dora; Csercsik, Rita

    2017-01-01

    The major international sequence types/lineages of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and ESBL-producing E. coli were demonstrated to have been advanced by favorable fitness balance associated with high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones. The paper shows that favorable fitness in the major STs/lineages of these pathogens was principally attained by the capacity of evolving mutations in the fluoroquinolone-binding serine residues of both the DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV enzymes. The available information on fitness balance incurred by individual and various combinations of mutations in the enzymes is reviewed in multiple species. Moreover, strong circumstantial evidence is presented that major STs/lineages of other multi-drug resistant bacteria, primarily vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE), emerged by a similar mechanism. The reason(s) why the major ST/lineage strains of various pathogens proved more adept at evolving favorable mutations than most isolates of the same species remains to be elucidated. PMID:29250038

  4. TERT promoter mutations and long telomere length predict poor survival and radiotherapy resistance in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ke; Li, Gang; Qu, Yiping; Wang, Maode; Cui, Bo; Ji, Meiju; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2016-02-23

    Increasing evidences have implicated somatic gain-of-function mutations at the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter as one of the major mechanisms that promote transcriptional activation of TERT and subsequently maintain telomere length in human cancers including glioma. To investigate the prognostic value of these mutations and telomere length, individually and their coexistence, in gliomas, we analyzed two somatic mutations C228T and C250T in the TERT promoter, relative telomere length (RTL), IDH1 mutation and MGMT methylation in 389 glioma patients, and explored their associations with patient characteristics and clinical outcomes. Our data showed that C228T and C250T mutations were found in 17.0% (66 of 389) and 11.8% (46 of 389) of gliomas, respectively, and these two mutations were mutually exclusive in this cancer. Moreover, they were significantly associated with WHO grade. We also found that the RTL was significant longer in gliomas than in meningiomas and normal brain tissues (Median, 0.89 vs. 0.44 and 0.50; P radiotherapy. Collectively, TERT promoter mutations and long RTL are not only prognostic factors for poor clinical outcomes, but also the predictors of radiotherapy resistance in gliomas.

  5. Mutation Breeding of Dendrobium Orchids For Insect Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaiton Ahmad; Sakinah Ariffin; Ros Anita Ahmad Ramli; Mohd Nazir Basiran; Affrida Abu Hassan

    2010-01-01

    This project was a collaborative FNCA project involving Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia and Japan. The objective was to jointly produce new orchid mutants that resistant/tolerant to insect infestation. It focused on commercial hybrids or species of Dendrobium orchids; namely Dendrobium Sonia 17 Red from Thailand, Dendrobium jayakarta from Indonesia and Dendrobium mirbellianum from Malaysia. In this project, tissue culture orchid materials (proto corm-like-bodies or PLBs) were exchanged among the participated countries early in the project. The Malaysian research team had irradiated these PLBs with two ionizing mutagens; gamma rays and ion beams (JAEA). Following irradiation, regenerated plant lets were randomly selected from each dose and subjected to in vitro infestation with mites and thrips, to analyse their resistance towards these pests. The main aim of in vitro infestation was to pre-select potential mutants for secondary screening at flowering stage. Potential insect resistant orchid mutants were then selected and subsequently planted in the glass house. Secondary screenings were carried out at flowering stage by challenge-infestation with the target insects. This project, which was completed in December 2009, has successfully generated two D. jayakarta mutants tolerant to thrips, and one D. mirbellianum tolerant to both mite and thrips. (author)

  6. A novel mutation in pmrB mediates colistin resistance during therapy of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdouh, Elias; Gómez-Gil, Rosa; Sanz, Sonia; González-Zorn, Bruno; Daoud, Ziad; Mingorance, Jesús; Suárez, Monica

    2017-06-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a highly versatile nosocomial pathogen. Multidrug resistance among A. baumannii isolates led to the use of colistin, subsequently giving rise to colistin-resistant strains. In this study, the genetic and phenotypic profiles of two colistin-resistant A. baumannii isolates were investigated. Two A. baumannii isolates were obtained from Patient 1 (C071 and C440) and three isolates were obtained from Patient 2 (C080, C314 and C428). Susceptibility profiles were determined by VITEK ® 2 and Etest. Clonality was determined by RAPD analysis and trilocus multiplex PCR. The pmrCAB operon was sequenced and common carbapenemase genes were screened for by PCR. Doubling times, haemolysis, surface motility, biofilm formation, siderophore production and proteolytic activity were phenotypically determined. Finally, whole-genome sequencing was performed for all five isolates. Isolates C440 and C428 were resistant to colistin and were clonally identical to their sensitive counterparts. The cause of colistin resistance was traced to the previously described P233S mutation in pmrB of C440 and to a novel ΔI19 mutation in pmrB of C428. bla OXA-58-like and bla GES-5 from the strains of Patients 1 and 2, respectively, were also detected. C440 had attenuated proteolytic activity and was positive for siderophore production compared with C071. No difference in in vitro virulence was detected between isolates C080, C314 and C428. In conclusion, one common and one novel mutation were encountered in pmrB from two distinct colistin-resistant A. baumannii isolates. These mutations caused colistin resistance during therapy in two distinct clones, and only one of them had altered in vitro virulence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  7. Plant breeding for resistance to insect pests: Considerations about the use of induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The Panel was intended to stimulate proposals on specific plant breeding objectives, for immediate and long term solution. Nine papers considered the host plant resistance to particular insect pests in a variety of cases. The desirability of achieving some measure of pest control via the development of disease-resistant mutants was discussed. In its conclusions, the Panel stressed the need to consider host plant resistance as one of the primary lines of defense in all pest management programmes. Consequently, resistance to insects was recommended to become an integral part of plant breeding programmes. Preference might need to be given to developing insect resistance in those crop plants for which practical control is lacking or where current methods of pest control present critical environmental hazards. The roles of the IAEA and FAO in such projects is outlined. Guidelines and recommendations on mutation breeding for resistance to insects are given in an appendix

  8. Different frequencies of drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 subtypes circulating in China: a comprehensive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongshuai Sui

    Full Text Available The rapid spreading of HIV drug resistance is threatening the overall success of free HAART in China. Much work has been done on drug-resistant mutations, however, most of which were based on subtype B. Due to different genetic background, subtypes difference would have an effect on the development of drug-resistant mutations, which has already been proved by more and more studies. In China, the main epidemic subtypes are CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC, Thai B and CRF01_AE. The depiction of drug resistance mutations in those subtypes will be helpful for the selection of regimens for Chinese. In this study, the distributions difference of amino acids at sites related to HIV drug resistance were compared among subtype B, CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and CRF08_BC strains prevalent in China. The amino acid composition of sequences belonging to different subtypes, which were obtained from untreated and treated individuals separately, were also compared. The amino acids proportions of 19 sites in RT among subtype B, CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC have significant difference in drug resistance groups (chi-square test, p<0.05. Genetic barriers analysis revealed that sites 69, 138, 181, 215 and 238 were significantly different among subtypes (Kruskal Wallis test, p<0.05. All subtypes shared three highest prevalent drug resistance sites 103, 181 and 184 in common. Many drug resistant sites in protease show surprising high proportions in almost all subtypes in drug-naïve patients. This is the first comprehensive study in China on different development of drug resistance among different subtypes. The detailed data will lay a foundation for HIV treatment regimens design and improve HIV therapy in China.

  9. Molecular diagnostics for detecting pyrethroid and abamectin resistance mutations in Tetranychus urticae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilias, Aris; Vassiliou, Vassilis A; Vontas, John; Tsagkarakou, Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    Avermectin and pyrethroid resistance mutations (the G314D and the G326E in the glutamate gated chloride channels, and the F1538I in the voltage gated sodium channel) have been reported in the spider mite Tetranychus urticae, one of the most devastating pests of protected and open field crops worldwide. We developed three TaqMan molecular diagnostic assays for monitoring the presence and frequency of these mutations in T. urticae field populations. The TaqMan assays were validated against known genotypes and subsequently used to monitor the frequency of the resistance mutations in eleven T. urticae populations from Greece and Cyprus, with variable history of avermectin and pyrethroids applications. The frequency of the F1538I pyrethroid resistance mutation largely varied among samples, with highest frequencies (75%-97%) detected in four populations derived from protected and open field crops from Crete and Peloponnesus, low frequencies in three populations (2.5%-11%) from Attiki, Cyprus and Crete and not detected in four populations from Crete, Peloponnesus and Cyprus. The frequency of the abamectin resistance mutations G314D and G326E also varied across populations (from 0 to 100%), showing fixation in two populations (>97.5% for the G314D and 100% for the G326E), originating from rose greenhouses from Greece, low frequencies in three populations (5%-12.5%) also originating from rose greenhouses (Crete, Peloponnesus and Cyprus) and not detected in six populations from protected and open field vegetable crops. The TaqMan diagnostics showed higher resolution in detecting specific alleles in low frequency, compared to massive quantitative sequencing approaches previously employed. They can be used, together with classical bioassays, to support evidence - based insecticide resistance management strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. RDL mutations predict multiple insecticide resistance in Anopheles sinensis in Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chan; Huang, Zushi; Li, Mei; Feng, Xiangyang; Qiu, Xinghui

    2017-11-28

    Anopheles sinensis is a major vector of malaria in China. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channel, encoded by the RDL (Resistant to dieldrin) gene, is the important target for insecticides of widely varied structures. The use of various insecticides in agriculture and vector control has inevitably led to the development of insecticide resistance, which may reduce the control effectiveness. Therefore, it is important to investigate the presence and distribution frequency of the resistance related mutation(s) in An. sinensis RDL to predict resistance to both the withdrawn cyclodienes (e.g. dieldrin) and currently used insecticides, such as fipronil. Two hundred and forty adults of An. sinensis collected from nine locations across Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region were used. Two fragments of An. sinensis RDL (AsRDL) gene, covering the putative insecticide resistance related sites, were sequenced respectively. The haplotypes of each individual were reconstructed by the PHASE2.1 software, and confirmed by clone sequencing. The phylogenetic tree was built using maximum-likelihood and Bayesian inference methods. Genealogical relations among different haplotypes were also analysed using Network 5.0. The coding region of AsRDL gene was 1674 bp long, encoding a protein of 557 amino acids. AsRDL had 98.0% amino acid identity to that from Anopheles funestus, and shared common structural features of Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels. Three resistance-related amino acid substitutions (A296S, V327I and T345S) were detected in all the nine populations of An. sinensis in Guangxi, with the 296S mutation being the most abundant (77-100%), followed by 345S (22-47%) and 327I (8-60%). 38 AsRDL haplotypes were identified from 240 individuals at frequencies ranging from 0.2 to 34.8%. Genealogical analysis suggested multiple origins of the 345S mutation in AsRDL. The near fixation of the 296S mutation and the occurrence of the 327I and 345S mutations in addition to 296S

  11. Positive selection pressure introduces secondary mutations at Gag cleavage sites in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 harboring major protease resistance mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banke, S.; Lillemark, M.R.; Gerstoft, J.

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors (PIs) specifically target the HIV-1 protease enzyme. Mutations in the enzyme can result in PI resistance (termed PI mutations); however, mutations in the HIV-1 gag region, the substrate for the protease enzyme, might also lead to PI...... resistance. We analyzed gag and pol sequence data from the following 313 HIV-1-infected patients: 160 treatment-naive patients, 93 patients failing antiretroviral treatment that included a PI (with no major PI mutations), and 60 patients failing antiretroviral treatment that included a PI (with major PI...... that positive selection pressure was the driving evolutionary force for the gag region in all three patient groups. An increase in positive selection was observed in gag cleavage site regions p7/p1/p6 only after the acquisition of major PI mutations, suggesting that amino acids in gag cleavage sites under...

  12. Progressive Development of PTH Resistance in Patients With Inactivating Mutations on the Maternal Allele of GNAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usardi, Alessia; Mamoune, Asmaa; Nattes, Elodie; Carel, Jean-Claude; Rothenbuhler, Anya; Linglart, Agnès

    2017-06-01

    Parathormone (PTH) resistance is characterized by hypocalcaemia, hyperphosphatemia, and elevated PTH in the absence of vitamin D deficiency. Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1A [PHP1A, or inactivating parathormone (PTH)/PTHrp signaling disorder 2, according to the new classification (iPPSD2)], is caused by mutations in the maternal GNAS allele. To assess PTH resistance over time in 20 patients affected by iPPSD2 (PHP1A), diagnosed because of family history, ectopic ossification, or short stature, and carrying a GNAS mutation. We gathered retrospective data for calcium, phosphate, thyrotropin (TSH), and PTH levels at regular intervals. PTH infusion testing (teriparatide) was performed in 1 patient. Patients were diagnosed at a mean age of 3.9 years and had a mean follow-up of 2 years. TSH resistance was already present at diagnosis in all patients (TSH, 13.3 ± 9.0 mIU/L). Over time, PTH levels increased (179 to 306 pg/mL; P PTH infusion, similar to that of controls, at 7 months of age, but an impaired response at 4 years of age. In patients with iPPSD2 (PHP1A), PTH resistance and hypocalcemia develop over time. These findings highlight the importance of screening for maternal GNAS mutations in the presence of ectopic ossifications or family history, even in the absence of PTH resistance and hypocalcemia. The follow-up of these patients should include regular assessments of calcium, phosphate, and PTH levels. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  13. Pleiotropic Antibiotic Resistance Mutations Associated with Ribosomes and Ribosomal Subunits in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Masuda, Kunitsugu; Shoji, Ko; Hori, Mitsuo

    1974-01-01

    Viomycin-resistant strains isolated from Mycobacterium smegmatis demonstrated pleiotropic resistance to tuberactinomycin-N, capreomycin, streptomycin, and kanamycin as a result of mutational alteration of ribosomes, even though they were selected for resistance to a single antibiotic. The pleiotropic drug resistance of three mutants isolated by stepwise selection for resistance to viomycin was due to alteration of the 30S ribosomal subunit. One mutant, strain A, isolated independently by multiple-step selection to viomycin resistance, was resistant to viomycin, tuberactinomycin-N, and capreomycin through an alteration of the 50S ribosomal subunit, whereas it was sensitive to kanamycin but resistant to streptomycin through an alteration of the 30S ribosomal subunit. Three streptomycin-resistant strains, which were isolated by one-step selection at a high concentration of streptomycin, did not show significant co-resistance to any other antibiotics tested in culture and cell-free systems; streptomycin resistance in these mutants was localized on the 30S ribosomal subunit. PMID:15828170

  14. Studies on in vitro induction mutation for wheat mutant of resistance to root rot and its resistance mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Guangzu

    1992-06-01

    The screening wheat mutant which has the resistance to root rot was completed in 37 varieties by in vitro induction mutation method. The effect of irradiation on in vitro culture of different wheat explants and the effectiveness of screening rude toxin were studied. Two wheat mutants, RB500 and RB501, which have the resistance to root rot, were obtained. Changes of the ultrastructure and defensive enzymes (SOD, ROD and PAL) were investigated by using mutants and parent under the action of rude toxin. The results showed that the rude toxin could induce changes of enzyme activity, isoenzyme pattern and ultrastructure of the mitochondria and chloroplast. These change correspond to their ability of resistance to disease. The mutant under the action of toxin has the ability to increase the defensive enzyme activity and to reduce the damage of cell membrane system that would result in resistance increasing

  15. Antiherpetic properties of acyclovir 5'-hydrogenphosphonate and the mutation analysis of herpes virus resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kova, Anna A; Skoblov, Mikhail Yu; Korovina, Anna N; Yasko, Maxim V; Karpenko, Inna L; Kukhanova, Marina K; Andronova, Valeria L; Galegov, George A; Skoblov, Yuri S

    2009-10-01

    In this study, we continued to study antiherpetic properties of acyclovir 5'-hydrogenphosphonate (Hp-ACV) in cell cultures and animal models. Hp-ACV was shown to inhibit the development of herpetic infection in mice induced by the HSV-1/L(2) strain. The compound suppressed replication of both ACV-sensitive HSV-1/L(2) and ACV-resistant HSV-1/L(2)/R strains in Vero cell culture. Viral population resistant to Hp-ACV (HSV-1/L(2)/R(Hp-ACV)) was developed much slower than ACV-resistant population. The analysis of Hp-ACV-resistant clones isolated from the HSV-1/L(2)/R(Hp-ACV) population demonstrated their partial cross-resistance to ACV. The mutations determining the resistance of HSV-1 clones to Hp-ACV were partly overlapped with mutations defining ACV resistance but did not always coincide. HSV-1/L(2)/R(Hp-ACV) herpes virus thymidine kinase is shortened from the C-terminus by 100 amino acid residues in length.

  16. Sterol 14α-demethylase mutation leads to amphotericin B resistance in Leishmania mexicana.

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    Roy Mwenechanya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amphotericin B has emerged as the therapy of choice for use against the leishmaniases. Administration of the drug in its liposomal formulation as a single injection is being promoted in a campaign to bring the leishmaniases under control. Understanding the risks and mechanisms of resistance is therefore of great importance. Here we select amphotericin B-resistant Leishmania mexicana parasites with relative ease. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated that ergosterol, the sterol known to bind the drug, is prevalent in wild-type cells, but diminished in the resistant line, where alternative sterols become prevalent. This indicates that the resistance phenotype is related to loss of drug binding. Comparing sequences of the parasites' genomes revealed a plethora of single nucleotide polymorphisms that distinguish wild-type and resistant cells, but only one of these was found to be homozygous and associated with a gene encoding an enzyme in the sterol biosynthetic pathway, sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51. The mutation, N176I, is found outside of the enzyme's active site, consistent with the fact that the resistant line continues to produce the enzyme's product. Expression of wild-type sterol 14α-demethylase in the resistant cells caused reversion to drug sensitivity and a restoration of ergosterol synthesis, showing that the mutation is indeed responsible for resistance. The amphotericin B resistant parasites become hypersensitive to pentamidine and also agents that induce oxidative stress. This work reveals the power of combining polyomics approaches, to discover the mechanism underlying drug resistance as well as offering novel insights into the selection of resistance to amphotericin B itself.

  17. High Prevalence of HIV Drug Resistance Among Newly Diagnosed Infants Aged <18 Months: Results From a Nationwide Surveillance in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzaule, Seth C; Osi, Samuels J; Akinbiyi, Gbenga; Emeka, Asadu; Khamofu, Hadiza; Mpazanje, Rex; Ilesanmi, Oluwafunke; Ndembi, Nicaise; Odafe, Solomon; Sigaloff, Kim C E; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Akanmu, Sulaimon

    2018-01-01

    WHO recommends protease-inhibitor-based first-line regimen in infants because of risk of drug resistance from failed prophylaxis used in prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT). However, cost and logistics impede implementation in sub-Saharan Africa, and >75% of children still receive nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based regimen (NNRTI) used in PMTCT. We assessed the national pretreatment drug resistance prevalence of HIV-infected children aged resistance surveillance protocol. We used remnant dried blood spots collected between June 2014 and July 2015 from 15 early infant diagnosis facilities spread across all the 6 geopolitical regions of Nigeria. Sampling was through a probability proportional-to-size approach. HIV drug resistance was determined by population-based sequencing. Overall, in 48% of infants (205 of 430) drug resistance mutations (DRM) were detected, conferring resistance to predominantly NNRTIs (45%). NRTI and multiclass NRTI/NNRTI resistance were present at 22% and 20%, respectively, while resistance to protease inhibitors was at 2%. Among 204 infants with exposure to drugs for PMTCT, 57% had DRMs, conferring NNRTI resistance in 54% and multiclass NRTI/NNRTI resistance in 29%. DRMs were also detected in 34% of 132 PMTCT unexposed infants. A high frequency of PDR, mainly NNRTI-associated, was observed in a nationwide surveillance among newly diagnosed HIV-infected children in Nigeria. PDR prevalence was equally high in PMTCT-unexposed infants. Our results support the use of protease inhibitor-based first-line regimens in HIV-infected young children regardless of PMTCT history and underscore the need to accelerate implementation of the newly disseminated guideline in Nigeria.

  18. The resistance of Micrococcus radiodurans to killing and mutation by agents which damage DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, D.M.; Moseley, B.E.B.

    1976-01-01

    The resistance of Micrococcus radiodurans to the lethal and mutagenic action of ultraviolet (UV) light, ionising (γ) radiation, mitomycin C (MTC), nitrous acid (NA), hydroxylamine (HA), N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NG), ethylmethanesulphonate (EMS) and β-propiolactone (βPL) has been compared with that of Escherichia coli B/r. M. radiodurans was much more resistant than E. coli B/r to the lethal effects of UV light (by a factor of 33), γ-radiation (55), NG (15) and NA (62), showed intermediate resistance to MTC (4) and HA (7), but was sensitive to EMS (1) and βPL (2). M. radiodurans was very resistant to mutagens producing damage which can be repaired by a recombination system, indicating that it possesses an extremely efficient recombination repair mechanism. Both species were equally sensitive to mutation to trimethoprim resistance by NG, but M. radiodurans was more resistant than E. coli B/r to the other mutagens tested, being non-mutable by UV light, γ-radiation, MTC and HA, and only slightly sensitive to mutation by NA, EMS, and βPL. The resistance of M. radiodurans to mutation by UV light, γ-radiation and MTC is consistent with an hypothesis that recombination repair in M. radiodurans is accurate since these mutagens may depend on an 'error-prone' recombination system for their mutagenic effect in E. coli B/r. However, because M. radiodurans is also resistant to mutagens such as HA and EMS, which are mutagenic in E. coli in the absence of an 'error-prone' system, we propose that all the mutagens tested may have a common mode of action in E. coli B/r, but that this mutagenic pathway is missing in M. radiodurans

  19. Detection of genetic mutations associated with macrolide resistance of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

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    Chi Eun Oh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The aim of this study was to identify mutations associated with macrolide resistance in Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP and to establish a cultural method to determine antimicrobial susceptibility. Methods : Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs were collected from 62 children diagnosed with MP pneumonia by a serologic method or polymerase chain reaction. The 23S rRNA and L4 ribosomal protein genes of MP were amplified and sequenced. To identify mutations in these 2 genes, their nucleotide sequences were compared to those of the reference strain M129. MP cultivation was carried out for 32 (28 frozen and 5 refrigerated NPAs and M129 strain using Chanock’s glucose broth and agar plate in a 5% CO2 incubator at 37?#608;and examined at 2-3 day intervals for 6 weeks. Results : Among the 62 specimens, 17 had M144V mutations in ribosomal protein L4. The A2064G mutation was observed in 1 specimen; its 23S rRNA gene was successfully sequenced. Culture for MP was successful from the M129 strain and 2 of the 5 NPAs that were refrigerated for no longer than 3 days. However, MP did not grow from the 28 NPAs that were kept frozen at -80?#608;since 2003. Conclusion : We found the M144V mutation of L4 protein to be common and that of domain V of 23S rRNA gene was relatively rare among MP. Studies on the prevalence of macrolide-resistant MP and the relationship between the mutations of 23S rRNA gene and ribosomal protein L4 will aid in understanding the mechanism of macrolide resistance in MP.

  20. Influence of mutations in some structural genes of heat-shock proteins on radiation resistance of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbenko, V.N.; Kuznetsova, L.V.; Bikineeva, E.G.; Kalinin, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lethal effects of γ-irradiation were studied in Escherichia coli strains with normal repair genotype and in radiation-resistant Gam r strains, both carrying additional mutations in the structural genes dnaK, grpE, groES or groEL. The null mutation ΔdnaK52::Cm r enhanced radiation sensitivity of wild-type cells and abolished the effect of heat induced rediation-resistance (ETIRR) and elevated radiation resistance of the Gam r strains

  1. Novel mutations in the antifolate drug resistance marker genes among Plasmodium vivax isolates exhibiting severe manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Shilpi; Saxena, Vishal; Lumb, Vanshika; Pakalapati, Deepak; Boopathi, P A; Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Chowdhury, Shibasish; Kochar, Sanjay K; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Sharma, Y D; Das, Ashis

    2012-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the predominant species of the human malaria parasite present in the Indian subcontinent. There have been recent reports on Chloroquine (CQ) resistance and severe manifestations shown by P. vivax from different regions of the world including India. This study focuses on Bikaner, India where during the last few years there have been continuous reports of severe manifestations by both Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax. This region has a widespread use of Chloroquine and Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine for the treatment of malaria, but the resistance profiles of these drugs are not available. We report here the profile of mutations in marker genes associated with Chloroquine and antifolate drug resistance among the P. vivax parasites obtained from patients with severe (n=30) and non-severe (n=48) manifestations from this region. Most isolates showed the wild type alleles for both the Chloroquine and antifolate resistance markers (Presistance has been reported from this region. However, the single isolate with a mutation in Pvmdr-1 may suggest the beginning of the trend towards decreased susceptibility to Chloroquine. The frequency of PvDHFR-PvDHPS two locus mutations was higher among the patients showing severe manifestations than the patient group with non-severe (uncomplicated) malaria (Pexhibiting severe complications. Preliminary homology modeling and molecular docking studies predicted that these mutations apparently do not have any effect on the binding of the drug molecule to the enzyme. However, the presence of novel mutations in the PvDHPS gene indicate a degree of polymorphism of this molecule which is in contrast to available published information. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel polymorphisms and lack of mutations in the ACD gene in patients with ACTH resistance syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Catherine E; Hutz, Janna E; Krause, Andrea S; Koehler, Katrin; Metherell, Louise A; Boikos, Sosipatros; Stergiopoulos, Sotirios; Clark, Adrian J L; Stratakis, Constantine A; Huebner, Angela; Hammer, Gary D

    2007-08-01

    ACTH resistance is a feature of several human syndromes with known genetic causes, including familial glucocorticoid deficiency (types 1 and 2) and triple A syndrome. However, many patients with ACTH resistance lack an identifiable genetic aetiology. The human homolog of the Acd gene, mutated in a mouse model of adrenal insufficiency, was sequenced in 25 patients with a clinical diagnosis of familial glucocorticoid deficiency or triple A syndrome. A 3.4 kilobase genomic fragment containing the entire ACD gene was analysed for mutations in all 25 patients. Samples were obtained by three investigators from different institutions. The primary cohort consisted of 25 unrelated patients, primarily of European or Middle Eastern descent, with a clinical diagnosis of either familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD) or triple A syndrome. Patients lacked mutations in other genes known to cause ACTH resistance, including AAAS for patients diagnosed with triple A syndrome and MC2R and MRAP for patients diagnosed with familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Thirty-five additional patients with adrenal disease phenotypes were added to form an expanded cohort of 60 patients. Identification of DNA sequence changes in the ACD gene in the primary cohort and analysis of putative ACD haplotypes in the expanded cohort. No disease-causing mutations were found, but several novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and two putative haplotypes were identified. The overall frequency of SNPs in ACD is low compared to other gene families. No mutations were identified in ACD in this collection of patients with ACTH resistance phenotypes. However, the newly identified SNPs in ACD should be more closely examined for possible links to disease.

  3. Point mutations in the sodium channel gene conferring tau-fluvalinate resistance in Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Jan; Nesvorna, Marta; Kamler, Martin; Kopecky, Jan; Tyl, Jan; Titera, Dalibor; Stara, Jitka

    2014-06-01

    Sodium channels (SCs) in mites and insects are target sites for pesticides, including pyrethroids. Point mutations in the SC gene have been reported to change the structural conformation of the protein and its sensitivity to pesticides. To find mutations in the SC gene of the mite Varroa destructor (VmNa), the authors analysed the VmNa gene sequences available in GenBank and prepared specific primers for the amplification of two fragments containing the regions coding for (i) the domain II S4-S6 region (bp 2805-3337) and (ii) the domain III S4-3' terminus region (bp 4737-6500), as determined according to the VmNa cDNA sequence AY259834. Sensitive and resistant mite populations did not differ in the amino acid sequences of the III S4-3' terminus VmNa region. However, differences were found in the IIS4-IIS6 fragment. In the resistant population, the mutation C(3004) → G resulted in the substitution L(1002) → V (codon ctg → gtg) at the position equivalent to that of the housefly L925 in the domain II S5 helix. Additionally, the mutation F(1052) → L (codon ttc → ctc) at the position equivalent to that of the housefly F975 in the domain II P-loop connecting segments S5 and S6 was detected in both the resistant and sensitive populations. All individuals that survived the tau-fluvalinate treatment in the bioassay harboured the L(1002) → V mutation combined with the F(1052), while dead individuals from both the sensitive and resistant populations harboured mostly the L(1002) residue and either of the two residues at position 1052. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Non-DNA binding, dominant-negative, human PPARγ mutations cause lipodystrophic insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Maura; Schoenmakers, Erik; Mitchell, Catherine; Szatmari, Istvan; Savage, David; Smith, Aaron; Rajanayagam, Odelia; Semple, Robert; Luan, Jian'an; Bath, Louise; Zalin, Anthony; Labib, Mourad; Kumar, Sudhesh; Simpson, Helen; Blom, Dirk; Marais, David; Schwabe, John; Barroso, Inês; Trembath, Richard; Wareham, Nicholas; Nagy, Laszlo; Gurnell, Mark; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2006-01-01

    Summary PPARγ is essential for adipogenesis and metabolic homeostasis. We describe mutations in the DNA and ligand binding domains of human PPARγ in lipodystrophic, severe insulin resistance. These receptor mutants lack DNA binding and transcriptional activity but can translocate to the nucleus, interact with PPARγ coactivators and inhibit coexpressed wild-type receptor. Expression of PPARγ target genes is markedly attenuated in mutation-containing versus receptor haploinsufficent primary cells, indicating that such dominant-negative inhibition operates in vivo. Our observations suggest that these mutants restrict wild-type PPARγ action via a non-DNA binding, transcriptional interference mechanism, which may involve sequestration of functionally limiting coactivators. PMID:17011503

  5. A Mutator Phenotype Promoting the Emergence of Spontaneous Oxidative Stress-Resistant Mutants in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Sahin, Orhan; Tang, Yizhi; Zhang, Qijing

    2017-12-15

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of foodborne illnesses worldwide. As a microaerophilic organism, C. jejuni must be able to defend against oxidative stress encountered both in the host and in the environment. How Campylobacter utilizes a mutation-based mechanism for adaptation to oxidative stress is still unknown. Here we present a previously undescribed phenotypic and genetic mechanism that promotes the emergence of oxidative stress-resistant mutants. Specifically, we showed that a naturally occurring mutator phenotype, resulting from a loss of function mutation in the DNA repair enzyme MutY, increased oxidative stress resistance (OX R ) in C. jejuni We further demonstrated that MutY malfunction did not directly contribute to the OX R phenotype but increased the spontaneous mutation rate in the peroxide regulator gene perR , which functions as a repressor for multiple genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Mutations in PerR resulted in loss of its DNA binding function and derepression of PerR-controlled oxidative stress defense genes, thereby conferring an OX R phenotype and facilitating Campylobacter survival under oxidative stress. These findings reveal a new mechanism that promotes the emergence of spontaneous OX R mutants in bacterial organisms. IMPORTANCE Although a mutator phenotype has been shown to promote antibiotic resistance in many bacterial species, little is known about its contribution to the emergence of OX R mutants. This work describes the link between a mutator phenotype and the enhanced emergence of OX R mutants as well as its underlying mechanism involving DNA repair and mutations in PerR. Since DNA repair systems and PerR are well conserved in many bacterial species, especially in Gram positives, the same mechanism may operate in multiple bacterial species. Additionally, we developed a novel method that allows for rapid quantification of spontaneous OX R mutants in a bacterial population. This method represents a technical

  6. Combating mutations in genetic disease and drug resistance: understanding molecular mechanisms to guide drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanaz, Amanda T S; Rodrigues, Carlos H M; Pires, Douglas E V; Ascher, David B

    2017-06-01

    Mutations introduce diversity into genomes, leading to selective changes and driving evolution. These changes have contributed to the emergence of many of the current major health concerns of the 21st century, from the development of genetic diseases and cancers to the rise and spread of drug resistance. The experimental systematic testing of all mutations in a system of interest is impractical and not cost-effective, which has created interest in the development of computational tools to understand the molecular consequences of mutations to aid and guide rational experimentation. Areas covered: Here, the authors discuss the recent development of computational methods to understand the effects of coding mutations to protein function and interactions, particularly in the context of the 3D structure of the protein. Expert opinion: While significant progress has been made in terms of innovative tools to understand and quantify the different range of effects in which a mutation or a set of mutations can give rise to a phenotype, a great gap still exists when integrating these predictions and drawing causality conclusions linking variants. This often requires a detailed understanding of the system being perturbed. However, as part of the drug development process it can be used preemptively in a similar fashion to pharmacokinetics predictions, to guide development of therapeutics to help guide the design and analysis of clinical trials, patient treatment and public health policy strategies.

  7. Acquired resistance of lung adenocarcinomas to gefitinib or erlotinib is associated with a second mutation in the EGFR kinase domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Pao

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung adenocarcinomas from patients who respond to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib (Iressa or erlotinib (Tarceva usually harbor somatic gain-of-function mutations in exons encoding the kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Despite initial responses, patients eventually progress by unknown mechanisms of "acquired" resistance.We show that in two of five patients with acquired resistance to gefitinib or erlotinib, progressing tumors contain, in addition to a primary drug-sensitive mutation in EGFR, a secondary mutation in exon 20, which leads to substitution of methionine for threonine at position 790 (T790M in the kinase domain. Tumor cells from a sixth patient with a drug-sensitive EGFR mutation whose tumor progressed on adjuvant gefitinib after complete resection also contained the T790M mutation. This mutation was not detected in untreated tumor samples. Moreover, no tumors with acquired resistance had KRAS mutations, which have been associated with primary resistance to these drugs. Biochemical analyses of transfected cells and growth inhibition studies with lung cancer cell lines demonstrate that the T790M mutation confers resistance to EGFR mutants usually sensitive to either gefitinib or erlotinib. Interestingly, a mutation analogous to T790M has been observed in other kinases with acquired resistance to another kinase inhibitor, imatinib (Gleevec.In patients with tumors bearing gefitinib- or erlotinib-sensitive EGFR mutations, resistant subclones containing an additional EGFR mutation emerge in the presence of drug. This observation should help guide the search for more effective therapy against a specific subset of lung cancers.

  8. Linking system-wide impacts of RNA polymerase mutations to the fitness cost of rifampin resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qin; Preston, Gail M; MacLean, R Craig

    2014-12-09

    Fitness costs play a key role in the evolutionary dynamics of antibiotic resistance in bacteria by generating selection against resistance in the absence of antibiotics. Although the genetic basis of antibiotic resistance is well understood, the precise molecular mechanisms linking the genetic basis of resistance to its fitness cost remain poorly characterized. Here, we examine how the system-wide impacts of mutations in the RNA polymerase (RNAP) gene rpoB shape the fitness cost of rifampin resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Rifampin resistance mutations reduce transcriptional efficiency, and this explains 76% of the variation in fitness among rpoB mutants. The pleiotropic consequence of rpoB mutations is that mutants show altered relative transcript levels of essential genes. We find no evidence that global transcriptional responses have an impact on the fitness cost of rifampin resistance as revealed by transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq). Global changes in the transcriptional profiles of rpoB mutants compared to the transcriptional profile of the rifampin-sensitive ancestral strain are subtle, demonstrating that the transcriptional regulatory network of P. aeruginosa is robust to the decreased transcriptional efficiency associated with rpoB mutations. On a smaller scale, we find that rifampin resistance mutations increase the expression of RNAP due to decreased termination at an attenuator upstream from rpoB, and we argue that this helps to minimize the cost of rifampin resistance by buffering against reduced RNAP activity. In summary, our study shows that it is possible to dissect the molecular mechanisms underpinning variation in the cost of rifampin resistance and highlights the importance of genome-wide buffering of relative transcript levels in providing robustness against resistance mutations. Antibiotic resistance mutations carry fitness costs. Relative to the characteristics of their antibiotic-sensitive ancestors, resistant mutants show reduced growth

  9. A Molecular Modeling Study of the Hydroxyflutamide Resistance Mechanism Induced by Androgen Receptor Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Li Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyflutamide (HF, an active metabolite of the first generation antiandrogen flutamide, was used in clinic to treat prostate cancer targeting androgen receptor (AR. However, a drug resistance problem appears after about one year’s treatment. AR T877A is the first mutation that was found to cause a resistance problem. Then W741C_T877A and F876L_T877A mutations were also reported to cause resistance to HF, while W741C and F876L single mutations cannot. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD simulations combined with the molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA method have been carried out to analyze the interaction mechanism between HF and wild-type (WT/mutant ARs. The obtained results indicate that AR helix 12 (H12 plays a pivotal role in the resistance of HF. It can affect the coactivator binding site at the activation function 2 domain (AF2, surrounded by H3, H4, and H12. When H12 closes to the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD like a lid, the coactivator binding site can be formed to promote transcription. However, once H12 is opened to expose LBD, the coactivator binding site will be distorted, leading to invalid transcription. Moreover, per-residue free energy decomposition analyses indicate that N705, T877, and M895 are vital residues in the agonist/antagonist mechanism of HF.

  10. Concomitant BCORL1 and BRAF Mutations in Vemurafenib-Resistant Melanoma Cells

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    Luca Mologni

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available BRAF is the most frequently mutated gene in melanoma. Constitutive activation of mutant BRAFV600E leads to aberrant Ras-independent MAPK signaling and cell transformation. Inhibition of mutant BRAF is a current frontline therapy for such cases, with improved survival compared with chemotherapy. Unfortunately, reactivation of MAPK signaling by several mechanisms has been shown to cause drug resistance and disease recurrence. In this work, we describe the co-occurrence of an in-frame deletion within an amplified BRAFV600E locus and a missense point mutation of the transcriptional repressor BCORL1 in vemurafenib-resistant A375 melanoma cells. Functional data confirmed that truncated p47BRAFV600E and mutant BCORL1Q1076H both contribute to resistance. Interestingly, either endogenous BCORL1 silencing or ectopic BCORL1Q1076H expression mimicked the effects of a CRISPR/Cas9-edited BCORL1Q1076H locus, suggesting a complex mixture of loss- and gain-of-function effects caused by the mutation. Transcriptomic data confirmed this hypothesis. Finally, we show that the pan-RAF inhibitor sorafenib is not affected by expression of BRAF deletion variant and effectively synergizes with vemurafenib to block resistant cells, suggesting a possible intervention for this class of mutants.

  11. Novel α-Tubulin Mutations Conferring Resistance to Dinitroaniline Herbicides in Lolium rigidum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhizhan Chu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The dinitroaniline herbicides (particularly trifluralin have been globally used in many crops for selective grass weed control. Consequently, trifluralin resistance has been documented in several important crop weed species and has recently reached a level of concern in Australian Lolium rigidum populations. Here, we report novel mutations in the L. rigidum α-tubulin gene which confer resistance to trifluralin and other dinitroaniline herbicides. Nucleotide mutations at the highly conserved codon Arg-243 resulted in amino acid substitutions of Met or Lys. Rice calli transformed with the mutant 243-Met or 243-Lys α-tubulin genes were 4- to 8-fold more resistant to trifluralin and other dinitroaniline herbicides (e.g., ethalfluralin and pendimethalin compared to calli transformed with the wild type α-tubulin gene from L. rigidum. Comprehensive modeling of molecular docking predicts that Arg-243 is close to the trifluralin binding site on the α-tubulin surface and that replacement of Arg-243 by Met/Lys-243 results in a spatial shift of the trifluralin binding domain, reduction of trifluralin-tubulin contacts, and unfavorable interactions. The major effect of these substitutions is a significant rise of free interaction energy between α-tubulin and trifluralin, as well as between trifluralin and its whole molecular environment. These results demonstrate that the Arg-243 residue in α-tubulin is a determinant for trifluralin sensitivity, and the novel Arg-243-Met/Lys mutations may confer trifluralin resistance in L. rigidum.

  12. A compensatory mutation provides resistance to disparate HIV fusion inhibitor peptides and enhances membrane fusion.

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    Matthew P Wood

    Full Text Available Fusion inhibitors are a class of antiretroviral drugs used to prevent entry of HIV into host cells. Many of the fusion inhibitors being developed, including the drug enfuvirtide, are peptides designed to competitively inhibit the viral fusion protein gp41. With the emergence of drug resistance, there is an increased need for effective and unique alternatives within this class of antivirals. One such alternative is a class of cyclic, cationic, antimicrobial peptides known as θ-defensins, which are produced by many non-human primates and exhibit broad-spectrum antiviral and antibacterial activity. Currently, the θ-defensin analog RC-101 is being developed as a microbicide due to its specific antiviral activity, lack of toxicity to cells and tissues, and safety in animals. Understanding potential RC-101 resistance, and how resistance to other fusion inhibitors affects RC-101 susceptibility, is critical for future development. In previous studies, we identified a mutant, R5-tropic virus that had evolved partial resistance to RC-101 during in vitro selection. Here, we report that a secondary mutation in gp41 was found to restore replicative fitness, membrane fusion, and the rate of viral entry, which were compromised by an initial mutation providing partial RC-101 resistance. Interestingly, we show that RC-101 is effective against two enfuvirtide-resistant mutants, demonstrating the clinical importance of RC-101 as a unique fusion inhibitor. These findings both expand our understanding of HIV drug-resistance to diverse peptide fusion inhibitors and emphasize the significance of compensatory gp41 mutations.

  13. Development of Multiplex-Mismatch Amplification Mutation-PCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Mutation in gyrA Gene Related to Fluoroquinolone Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Mingquan; Wu, Chenbin; Zhang, Peng; Wu, Congming

    2016-11-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, a foodborne pathogen, is the major cause of enteritis in humans worldwide, however, its increasing resistance to fluoroquinolones reported recently is of a major concern. In the present study, multiplex-mismatch amplification mutation assay-polymerase chain reaction (MMAMA-PCR) was developed for the first time with the aim to quickly identify C. jejuni and to detect the single nucleotide mutation (C-257 to T) frequently observed in gyrA gene, associated with the acquisition of resistance to fluoroquinolones. In this assay, mismatch amplification mutation primers for the detection of gyrA mutation in C. jejuni were coupled with primers for the hip gene encoding for hippuricase and 16S rRNA gene of C. jejuni, respectively, in the multiplex PCR assay. The specificity and accuracy of this method were analyzed by the use of 78 C. jejuni strains with previously confirmed resistance phenotypes and the mutation (C-257 to T) in gyrA gene, as well as 107 clinical isolates of various bacterial species, including 29 C. jejuni isolates. This study indicates that MMAMA-PCR is a promising assay for the rapid identification of C. jejuni with a specific mutation in gyrA gene, responsible for the resistance to fluoroquinolones.

  14. Magnitude of gene mutations conferring drug resistance in mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from lymph node aspirates in ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biadglegne, Fantahun; Tessema, Belay; Rodloff, Arne C; Sack, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to drugs is due to particular genomic mutations in the specific genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Timely genetic characterization will allow identification of resistance mutations that will optimize an effective antibiotic treatment regimen. We determine the magnitude of gene mutations conferring resistance to isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP) and ethambutol (EMB) among tuberculosis (TB) lymphadenitis patients. A cross sectional prospective study was conducted among 226 M.tuberculosis isolates from culture positive lymph node aspirates collected from TB lymphadenitis patients between April 2012 and May 2012. Detection of mutations conferring resistance to drugs was carried out using GenoType(®) MTBDRplus and GenoType® MTBDRsl assay. Out of the 226 strains, mutations conferring resistance to INH, RMP, multidrug resistance tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and EMB were 8, 3, 2 and 2 isolates, respectively. There was no isolated strain that showed mutation in the inhA promoter region gene. All INH resistant strains had mutations in the katG gene at codon 315 with amino acid change of S315T1. Among rifampicin resistant strains, two isolates displayed mutations at codon 531 in the rpoB gene with amino acid change of S531L and one isolate was by omission of wild type probes at Q513L. According to mutations associated with ethambutol resistance, all of the isolates had mutations in the embB gene with aminoacid change of M306I. All isolates resistant to INH, RMP and MDR using BacT/AlerT 3D system were correctly identified by GenoType® MTBDRplus assay. We observed mutations conferring resistance to INH at S315T1 of the katG gene, RMP at S531L and Q513L in the rpoB genes and EMB at M306I of the embB gene. In the absence of conventional drug susceptibility testing, the effort to develop easy, rapid and cost effective molecular assays for drug resistance TB monitoring is definitely desirable and the GenoType® MTBDRplus assay was found to be a useful method for diagnosis

  15. The dolutegravir R263K resistance mutation in HIV-1 integrase is incompatible with the emergence of resistance against raltegravir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maureen; Mesplède, Thibault; Moïsi, Daniela; Ibanescu, Ruxandra-Ilinca; Brenner, Bluma; Wainberg, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    Although the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (DTG) has demonstrated greater resilience than other antiretroviral drugs at withstanding the emergence of HIV-1 resistance mutations, such substitutions can develop, albeit rarely, in treatment-experienced integrase inhibitor-naïve individuals. The most common substitution in integrase under those circumstances is R263K whereas another substitution that was selected against DTG in tissue culture was G118R. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of these DTG-specific resistance substitutions on the ability of HIV-1 to become resistant against either of two other integrase inhibitors, raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG). We performed tissue culture selection experiments using DTG-resistant viruses containing integrase substitutions at positions R263K, H51Y/R263K, E138K/R263K, G118R and H51Y/G118R in the presence of increasing concentrations of either RAL or EVG. Changes in integrase sequences were monitored by genotyping. The presence of the R263K substitution delayed the emergence of resistance against RAL whereas the simultaneous presence of either the H51Y or E138K secondary substitutions in combination with R263K somewhat mitigated this inhibitory effect. In contrast, resistance against EVG appeared earlier than in wild-type virus in viruses containing the R263K and E138K/R263K DTG-associated resistance substitutions. The DTG-resistant R263K substitution antagonized the development of HIV-1 resistance against RAL while partially facilitating the occurrence of resistance against EVG.

  16. Macrolide resistance conferred by rRNA mutations in field isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Anders S; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    To determine how resistance to macrolides is conferred in field isolates of Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica that lack previously identified resistance determinants for rRNA methylation, efflux and macrolide-modifying enzymes. Isolates of P. multocida and M. haemolytica identified as being highly resistant (MICs >64 mg/L) to the macrolides erythromycin, gamithromycin, tilmicosin, tildipirosin and tulathromycin were screened by multiplex PCR for the previously identified resistance genes erm(42), msr(E) and mph(E). Strains lacking these determinants were analysed by genome sequencing and primer extension on the rRNAs. Macrolide resistance in one M. haemolytica isolate was conferred by the 23S rRNA mutation A2058G; resistance in three P. multocida isolates were caused by mutations at the neighbouring nucleotide A2059G. In each strain, all six copies of the rrn operons encoded the respective mutations. There were no mutations in the ribosomal protein genes rplD or rplV, and no other macrolide resistance mechanism was evident. High-level macrolide resistance can arise from 23S rRNA mutations in P. multocida and M. haemolytica despite their multiple copies of rrn. Selective pressures from exposure to different macrolide or lincosamide drugs presumably resulted in consolidation of either the A2058G or the A2059G mutation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Detection of HIV drug resistance mutations in pregnant women receiving single dose Nevirapine in south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mini S Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single dose of Nevirapine to prevent mother to child transmission of HIV is the commonest preventive regimen in resource-limited countries. Objectives: The objective of this study was to detect drug-resistant virus after single dose of Nevirapine (sdNVP provided to delivering HIV seropositive (HIV+ve women and to evaluate the time taken for its decay. Results: Of the 36 consenting HIV+ve pregnant women enrolled into the study, the mean hemoglobin and total lymphocyte counts were 10.8 g/dl and 1843 cells/mm 3 , respectively. Mean CD4 counts in 64% of women was 363 cells/mm 3 and mean viral load for 16/36 women was 28,143 copies/ml of plasma. Nevirapine-resistance mutations were detected in 28% of women at delivery; using OLA (Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay. K103N mutations were seen in 19.4% of women while the Y181C mutation was seen in 5%. Both the mutations were detected in 2.7% of women. Sequential blood samples collected at delivery, 7-10 days, 6 weeks, 4 months, 6 months and one year postpartum showed that 81% of K103N mutations and 66.7% of Y181C mutations were detected at 6 weeks postpartum . Wild-type virus had replaced the mutants by one year postpartum in all women except one. Conclusion : These observations are relevant for future treatment with antiretroviral therapy in these women for their HIV disease.

  18. Detection of mutations in mtrR gene in quinolone resistant strains of N.gonorrhoeae isolated from India

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    S V Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Emergence of multi-drug resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae resulting from new genetic mutation is a serious threat in controlling gonorrhea. This study was undertaken to identify and characterise mutations in the mtrR genes in N.gonorrhoeae isolates resistant to six different antibiotics in the quinolone group. Materials and Methods: The Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of five quinolones for 64 N.gonorrhoeae isolates isolated during Jan 2007-Jun 2009 were determined by E-test method. Mutations in MtrR loci were examined by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequencing. Results: The proportion of N.gonorrhoeae strains resistant to anti-microbials was 98.4% for norfloxacin and ofloxacin, 96.8% for enoxacin and ciprofloxacin, 95.3% for lomefloxacin. Thirty-one (48.4% strains showed mutation (single/multiple in mtrR gene. Ten different mutations were observed and Gly-45 → Asp, Tyr-105 → His being the most common observed mutation. Conclusion: This is the first report from India on quinolone resistance mutations in MtrRCDE efflux system in N.gonorrhoeae. In conclusion, the high level of resistance to quinolone and single or multiple mutations in mtrR gene could limit the drug choices for gonorrhoea.

  19. Clinical Determinants of HIV-1B Between-Host Evolution and their Association with Drug Resistance in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagán, Israel; Rojas, Patricia; Ramos, José Tomás; Holguín, África

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors that modulate the evolution of virus populations is essential to design efficient control strategies. Mathematical models predict that factors affecting viral within-host evolution may also determine that at the between-host level. Although HIV-1 within-host evolution has been associated with clinical factors used to monitor AIDS progression, such as patient age, CD4 cells count, viral load, and antiretroviral experience, little is known about the role of these clinical factors in determining between-host HIV-1 evolution. Moreover, whether the relative importance of such factors in HIV-1 evolution vary in adult and children patients, in which the course of infection is different, has seldom been analysed. To address these questions, HIV-1 subtype B (HIV-1B) pol sequences of 163 infected children and 450 adults of Madrid, Spain, were used to estimate genetic diversity, rates of synonymous and non-synonymous mutations, selection pressures and frequency of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). The role and relative importance of patient age, %CD4, CD4/mm3, viral load, and antiretroviral experience in HIV-1B evolution was analysed. In the pediatric HIV-1B population, three clinical factors were primary predictors of virus evolution: Higher HIV-1B genetic diversity was observed with increasing children age, decreasing CD4/mm3 and upon antiretroviral experience. This was mostly due to higher rates of non-synonymous mutations, which were associated with higher frequency of DRMs. Using this data, we have also constructed a simple multivariate model explaining between 55% and 66% of the variance in HIV-1B evolutionary parameters in pediatric populations. On the other hand, the analysed clinical factors had little effect in adult-infecting HIV-1B evolution. These findings highlight the different evolutionary dynamics of HIV-1B in children and adults, and contribute to understand the factors shaping HIV-1B evolution and the appearance of drug-resistance

  20. Clinical Determinants of HIV-1B Between-Host Evolution and their Association with Drug Resistance in Pediatric Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Pagán

    Full Text Available Understanding the factors that modulate the evolution of virus populations is essential to design efficient control strategies. Mathematical models predict that factors affecting viral within-host evolution may also determine that at the between-host level. Although HIV-1 within-host evolution has been associated with clinical factors used to monitor AIDS progression, such as patient age, CD4 cells count, viral load, and antiretroviral experience, little is known about the role of these clinical factors in determining between-host HIV-1 evolution. Moreover, whether the relative importance of such factors in HIV-1 evolution vary in adult and children patients, in which the course of infection is different, has seldom been analysed. To address these questions, HIV-1 subtype B (HIV-1B pol sequences of 163 infected children and 450 adults of Madrid, Spain, were used to estimate genetic diversity, rates of synonymous and non-synonymous mutations, selection pressures and frequency of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs. The role and relative importance of patient age, %CD4, CD4/mm3, viral load, and antiretroviral experience in HIV-1B evolution was analysed. In the pediatric HIV-1B population, three clinical factors were primary predictors of virus evolution: Higher HIV-1B genetic diversity was observed with increasing children age, decreasing CD4/mm3 and upon antiretroviral experience. This was mostly due to higher rates of non-synonymous mutations, which were associated with higher frequency of DRMs. Using this data, we have also constructed a simple multivariate model explaining between 55% and 66% of the variance in HIV-1B evolutionary parameters in pediatric populations. On the other hand, the analysed clinical factors had little effect in adult-infecting HIV-1B evolution. These findings highlight the different evolutionary dynamics of HIV-1B in children and adults, and contribute to understand the factors shaping HIV-1B evolution and the appearance

  1. Mycoplasma genitalium infection: current treatment options, therapeutic failure, and resistance-associated mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couldwell DL

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Deborah L Couldwell,1,2 David A Lewis1,21Western Sydney Sexual Health Centre, Parramatta, 2Centre for Infectious Diseases and Microbiology and Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, Westmead Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Mycoplasma genitalium is an important cause of non-gonococcal urethritis, cervicitis, and related upper genital tract infections. The efficacy of doxycycline, used extensively to treat non-gonococcal urethritis in the past, is relatively poor for M. genitalium infection; azithromycin has been the preferred treatment for several years. Research on the efficacy of azithromycin has primarily focused on the 1 g single-dose regimen, but some studies have also evaluated higher doses and longer courses, particularly the extended 1.5 g regimen. This extended regimen is thought to be more efficacious than the 1 g single-dose regimen, although the regimens have not been directly compared in clinical trials. Azithromycin treatment failure was first reported in Australia and has subsequently been documented in several continents. Recent reports indicate an upward trend in the prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. genitalium infections (transmitted resistance, and cases of induced resistance following azithromycin therapy have also been documented. Emergence of antimicrobial-resistant M. genitalium, driven by suboptimal macrolide dosage, now threatens the continued provision of effective and convenient treatments. Advances in techniques to detect resistance mutations in DNA extracts have facilitated correlation of clinical outcomes with genotypic resistance. A strong and consistent association exists between presence of 23S rRNA gene mutations and azithromycin treatment failure. Fluoroquinolones such as moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, and sitafloxacin remain highly active against most macrolide-resistant M. genitalium. However, the first clinical cases of moxifloxacin treatment

  2. Quick Detection of FKS1 Mutations Responsible for Clinical Echinocandin Resistance in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudiuk, Catiana; Gamarra, Soledad; Jimenez-Ortigosa, Cristina; Leonardelli, Florencia; Macedo, Daiana; Perlin, David S; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2015-07-01

    A rapid molecular-based assay for the detection of the Candida albicans FKS1 gene mutations responsible for resistance to echinocandin drugs was designed and evaluated. The assay consisted of a multiplexed PCR set of 5 tubes able to detect the most commonly described resistance mechanism, including FKS1 hot spot 1 and hot spot 2 mutations. The performance and specificity of the assay was evaluated using a double-blinded panel of 50 C. albicans strains. The assay showed a sensitivity of 96% and was able to detect all homozygous mutants included in the collection of strains, demonstrating that it is a robust, quick, and labor-saving method that is suitable for a routine clinical diagnostic laboratory. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Investigating BRCA Mutations: A Breakthrough in Precision Medicine of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Alessandra; Iacovelli, Roberto; Scarpa, Aldo; Brunelli, Matteo; Ciccarese, Chiara; Fantinel, Emanuela; Bimbatti, Davide; Massari, Francesco; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2016-10-01

    Despite the development of novel effective therapeutic strategies, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) remains a disease with a lethal course and a high biological and molecular heterogeneity. To date, germline mutations in the BRCA gene represent one of the main risk factors for developing prostate cancer, with a strong association with aggressive phenotype and poor clinical outcomes. A better understanding of the genomic landscape of prostate cancer has strengthened the idea that "synthetic lethality" of this disease might be useful in cancer-drug discovery, focusing on agents such as platinum compounds and poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi). In this review, we summarize the main data available on BRCA mutations and discuss the clinical implications of these genomic aberrations in the management of prostate cancer, stressing the need to identify prognostic and predictive biomarkers and to deeply understand the mechanisms of treatment resistance, in order to maximize personalized medicine protocols and therefore clinical benefit.

  4. Exploring the cause of drug resistance by the detrimental missense mutations in KIT receptor: computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, R; Sethumadhavan, Rao

    2010-08-01

    In this work, we computationally identified the most detrimental missense mutations of KIT receptor causing gastrointestinal stromal tumors and analyzed the drug resistance of these missense mutations. Out of 31 missense mutations, 19 variants were commonly found less stable, deleterious and damaging by I-Mutant 2.0, SIFT and PolyPhen programs, respectively. Subsequently, we performed modeling of these 19 variants to understand their change in conformations with respect to native KIT receptor by computing their RMSD. Further, the native and 19 mutants were docked with the drug 'Imatinib' to explain the drug resistance of these detrimental missense mutations. Among the 19 mutants, we found by docking studies that 12 mutants, namely, F584C, F584L, V654A, L656P, T670I, R804W, D816F, D816V, D816Y, N822K, Y823D and E839K had less binding affinity with Imatinib than the native type. Finally, we analyzed that the loss of binding affinity of these 12 mutants, was due to altered flexibility in their binding amino acids with Imatinib as compared with native type by normal mode analysis. In our work, we found the novel data that the majority of the drug-binding amino acids in those 12 mutants had encountered loss of flexibility, which could be the theoretical basis for the cause of drug insensitivity.

  5. Characterization of drug resistance mutations in ART-naïve HIV-1 infected children in Northern Vietnam

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    Thuy Thi Bich Phung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the profile of drug resistance-associated mutations in pol gene of antiretroviral therapy-naïve HIV-1 infected children enrolled in National Hospital Pediatrics in Northern Vietnam. Methods: Genotyping was performed on 134 antiretroviral therapy-naïve plasma samples from HIV-1 infected children. HIV-1 pol gene was amplified using primers for protease and reverse transcriptase and sequenced using the BigDye chemistry. The mutations were analyzed based on the Stanford University HIV-1 Drug Resistance Database and ISA-USA list. Results: All the children were infected with HIV-1 CRF01_AE subtype. Major protease inhibitor resistance mutations were found in 2 children (2.3% and reverse-transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations were found in 5 children (7.7%. The protease inhibitor mutations were observed M46L and L90M and reverse-transcriptase inhibitor mutations were M184I, K65R, Q151M, T69N, L210W, Y181C, M230L and K101E. Conclusions: This is the first study reporting the prevalence of drug resistance-associated mutation in naïve HIV-1 infected children in Northern Vietnam. These data also emphasize the importance of genotypic resistance testing of HIV-1 infected children before initiating treatment in order to achieve better clinical outcome.

  6. Detection of the Acetylcholinesterase Insecticide Resistance Mutation (G328A) in Natural Populations of Ceratitis capitata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfekih, Samia; Shannon, Matthew; Haran, Julien; Vogler, Alfried P

    2014-10-01

    Wild Mediterranean fruit fly specimens collected from various regions worldwide were screened for the glycine to alanine (Gly->Ala) point mutation (G328A) in the acetylcholinesterase enzyme, presumably causing resistance to organophosphates. We found that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) responsible for this amino acid change is located at the beginning of exon 6 of the Ccace2 gene. The identification of the exact location of the SNP permitted PCR primer design around this site and direct sequencing of the corresponding genomic region. We detected the resistance allele in natural Mediterranean fruit fly populations from Brazil and Spain, but not from other sites in four continents. The known treatment history of sites suggests that the resistance buildup is linked to organophosphate application in the field. The PCR-based detection provides a screening method useful for monitoring Mediterranean fruit fly insecticide resistance in local populations and improving pest management strategies accordingly. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  7. Design of Potent and Selective Inhibitors to Overcome Clinical Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Mutations Resistant to Crizotinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qinhua; Johnson, Ted W.; Bailey, Simon; Brooun, Alexei; Bunker, Kevin D.; Burke, Benjamin J.; Collins, Michael R.; Cook, Andrew S.; Cui, J.Jean; Dack, Kevin N.; Deal, Judith G.; Deng, Ya-Li; Dinh, Dac; Engstrom, Lars D.; He, Mingying; Hoffman, Jacqui; Hoffman, Robert L.; Johnson, Patrick S.; Kania, Robert S.; Lam, Hieu; Lam, Justine L.; Le, Phuong T.; Li, Qiuhua; Lingardo, Laura; Liu, Wei; Lu, Melissa West; McTigue, Michele; Palmer, Cynthia L.; Richardson, Paul F.; Sach, Neal W.; Shen, Hong; Smeal, Tod; Smith, Graham L.; Stewart, Albert E.; Timofeevski, Sergei; Tsaparikos, Konstantinos; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Huichun; Zhu, Jinjiang; Zou, Helen Y.; Edwards, Martin P. (Pfizer)

    2014-02-27

    Crizotinib (1), an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2011, is efficacious in ALK and ROS positive patients. Under pressure of crizotinib treatment, point mutations arise in the kinase domain of ALK, resulting in resistance and progressive disease. The successful application of both structure-based and lipophilic-efficiency-focused drug design resulted in aminopyridine 8e, which was potent across a broad panel of engineered ALK mutant cell lines and showed suitable preclinical pharmacokinetics and robust tumor growth inhibition in a crizotinib-resistant cell line (H3122-L1196M).

  8. Evolution of high yielding chickpea varieties, having improved plant type and disease resistance, through induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, M.; Hussan, M.; Haq, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The breeding programme on the use of induced mutations, in chickpea for genetic variability for better plant type, grain yield and disease resistance has been started. The chickpea mutant variety is one of the leading varieties being extensively grown throughout Pakistan and has played its role in stabilizing the chickpea production in the country. Four chickpea varieties were treated, each with two dosed of gamma rays. The main purpose of the mutagenic treatment of these varieties/cultivars, was induce multiple resistance. (A.B.)

  9. HIV-1 diversity and drug-resistant mutations in infected individuals in Changchun, China.

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    Ming Yan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection has been detected in all provinces of China. Although epidemiological and phylogenetic studies have been conducted in many regions, such analyses are lacking from Jilin province in northeastern China. METHOD: Epidemiological and phylogenetic analyses, as well as detection of drug-resistant mutations, were conducted on 57 HIV-1 infected patients from Changchun city identified and confirmed through annual surveillance by local Centers for Disease Control in Jilin province of northeastern China in 2012. RESULTS: Sexual contact was determined to be the major pathway for HIV-1 transmission in Jilin, where hetero- and homosexual activities contributed almost equally. Phylogenetic analyses detected multiple subtypes of HIV-1 including subtype G circulating in Jilin, with multiple origins for each of them. Both subtype B and CRF01_AE were dominant, and evidence of subtype B transmitting between different high-risk groups was observed. Mutations in the viral protease at position 71 indicated the presence of a selective pressure. Several drug-resistant mutations were detected, although they were predicted with low-level resistance to antiviral treatments. CONCLUSIONS: Information from this study fills the gap in knowledge of HIV-1 transmission in Changchun city, Jilin province, China. By revealing the origin and evolutionary status of local HIV-1 strains, this work contributes to ongoing efforts in the control and prevention of AIDS.

  10. Characterization of a Sodium Channel Mutation in Permethrin-Resistant Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Nicholas S G; Kaufman, Phillip E; Weeks, Emma N I; Rowland, Jessica; Tidwell, Jason; Miller, Robert J

    2017-11-07

    The brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latrielle) sensu lato, is an important ectoparasite of dogs and occasionally humans, capable of transmitting several pathogens, such as Rickettsia and Ehrlichia, which are of veterinary and medical importance. The brown dog tick is distributed worldwide and has an affinity for human habitations in much of its range. In some populations, lack of integrated pest management plans and overuse of pyrethroid pesticides and other sodium channel inhibitors has resulted in high levels of resistance to permethrin. Recently, a highly conserved region of the R. sanguineus sodium channel was sequenced, indicating that a single nucleotide polymorphism of thymine to cytosine on domain III segment VI of the sodium channel could confer resistance. A molecular assay targeting a point mutation in the sodium channel was developed and optimized to separate ticks expressing permethrin resistance from those from a susceptible colony. Thereafter, multiple field-collected phenotypically permethrin-resistant populations were evaluated using this molecular assay to determine genotype. As confirmed by DNA sequencing, a point mutation was present at a high rate in phenotypically resistant tick populations that was not present in the susceptible strain. These data suggest an additional permethrin resistance mechanism to metabolic resistance, which has been reported for this tick species, and confirm its association with phenotypic resistance. The results of this study further emphasize the need to preserve acaricide chemistry through rotation of active ingredients used to control ectoparasites. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Point mutations associated with organophosphate and carbamate resistance in Chinese strains of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Zhao

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase resistance has been well documented in many insects, including several mosquito species. We tested the resistance of five wild, Chinese strains of the mosquito Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus to two kinds of pesticides, dichlorvos and propoxur. An acetylcholinesterase gene (ace1 was cloned and sequenced from a pooled sample of mosquitoes from these five strains and the amino acids of five positions were found to vary (V185M, G247S, A328S, A391T, and T682A. Analysis of the correlation between mutation frequencies and resistance levels (LC50 suggests that two point mutations, G247S (r2 = 0.732, P = 0.065 and A328S (r2 = 0.891, P = 0.016, are associated with resistance to propoxur but not to dichlorvos. Although the V185M mutation was not associated with either dichlorvos or propoxur resistance, its RS genotype frequency was correlated with propoxur resistance (r2 = 0.815, P = 0.036. And the HWE test showed the A328S mutation is linked with V185M, also with G247S mutation. This suggested that these three mutations may contribute synergistically to propoxur resistance. The T682A mutation was negatively correlated with propoxur (r2 = 0.788, P = 0.045 resistance. Knowledge of these mutations may help design strategies for managing pesticide resistance in wild mosquito populations.

  12. Point mutations associated with organophosphate and carbamate resistance in Chinese strains of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minghui; Dong, Yande; Ran, Xin; Wu, Zhiming; Guo, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Yingmei; Xing, Dan; Yan, Ting; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Hengduan; Li, Chunxiao; Zhao, Tongyan

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase resistance has been well documented in many insects, including several mosquito species. We tested the resistance of five wild, Chinese strains of the mosquito Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus to two kinds of pesticides, dichlorvos and propoxur. An acetylcholinesterase gene (ace1) was cloned and sequenced from a pooled sample of mosquitoes from these five strains and the amino acids of five positions were found to vary (V185M, G247S, A328S, A391T, and T682A). Analysis of the correlation between mutation frequencies and resistance levels (LC50) suggests that two point mutations, G247S (r2 = 0.732, P = 0.065) and A328S (r2 = 0.891, P = 0.016), are associated with resistance to propoxur but not to dichlorvos. Although the V185M mutation was not associated with either dichlorvos or propoxur resistance, its RS genotype frequency was correlated with propoxur resistance (r2 = 0.815, P = 0.036). And the HWE test showed the A328S mutation is linked with V185M, also with G247S mutation. This suggested that these three mutations may contribute synergistically to propoxur resistance. The T682A mutation was negatively correlated with propoxur (r2 = 0.788, P = 0.045) resistance. Knowledge of these mutations may help design strategies for managing pesticide resistance in wild mosquito populations.

  13. Confirmation of emergence of mutations associated with atovaquone-proguanil resistance in unexposed Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Happi, Christian T; Gbotosho, Grace O; Folarin, Onikepe A; Milner, Danny; Sarr, Ousmane; Sowunmi, Akintunde; Kyle, Dennis E; Milhous, Wilbur K; Wirth, Dyann F; Oduola, Ayoade MJ

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background In vitro and in vivo resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to atovaquone or atovaquone-proguanil hydrochloride combination has been associated to two point mutations in the parasite cytochrome b (cytb) gene (Tyr268Ser and Tyr268Asn). However, little is known about the prevalence of codon-268 mutations in natural populations of P. falciparum without previous exposure to the drug in Africa. Methods The prevalence of codon-268 mutations in the cytb gene of African P. falciparum...

  14. A Mutation in the Intracellular Loop III/IV of Mosquito Sodium Channel Synergizes the Effect of Mutations in Helix IIS6 on Pyrethroid Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingxin; Nomura, Yoshiko; Du, Yuzhe; Liu, Nannan; Zhorov, Boris S.

    2015-01-01

    Activation and inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels are critical for proper electrical signaling in excitable cells. Pyrethroid insecticides promote activation and inhibit inactivation of sodium channels, resulting in prolonged opening of sodium channels. They preferably bind to the open state of the sodium channel by interacting with two distinct receptor sites, pyrethroid receptor sites PyR1 and PyR2, formed by the interfaces of domains II/III and I/II, respectively. Specific mutations in PyR1 or PyR2 confer pyrethroid resistance in various arthropod pests and disease vectors. Recently, a unique mutation, N1575Y, in the cytoplasmic loop linking domains III and IV (LIII/IV) was found to coexist with a PyR2 mutation, L1014F in IIS6, in pyrethroid-resistant populations of Anopheles gambiae. To examine the role of this mutation in pyrethroid resistance, N1575Y alone or N1575Y + L1014F were introduced into an Aedes aegypti sodium channel, AaNav1-1, and the mutants were functionally examined in Xenopus oocytes. N1575Y did not alter AaNav1-1 sensitivity to pyrethroids. However, the N1575Y + L1014F double mutant was more resistant to pyrethroids than the L1014F mutant channel. Further mutational analysis showed that N1575Y could also synergize the effect of L1014S/W, but not L1014G or other pyrethroid-resistant mutations in IS6 or IIS6. Computer modeling predicts that N1575Y allosterically alters PyR2 via a small shift of IIS6. Our findings provide the molecular basis for the coexistence of N1575Y with L1014F in pyrethroid resistance, and suggest an allosteric interaction between IIS6 and LIII/IV in the sodium channel. PMID:25523031

  15. Two mutations associated with macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum: increasing prevalence and correlation with molecular strain type in Seattle, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Matthew; Sahi, Sharon K; Godornes, B Charmie; Tantalo, Lauren C; Roberts, Neal; Bostick, David; Marra, Christina M; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2012-12-01

    Although azithromycin promised to be a safe and effective single-dose oral treatment of early syphilis, azithromycin treatment failure has been documented and is associated with mutations in the 23S rDNA of corresponding Treponema pallidum strains. The prevalence of strains harboring these mutations varies throughout the United States and the world. We examined T. pallidum strains circulating in Seattle, Washington, from 2001 to 2010 to determine the prevalence of 2 mutations associated with macrolide resistance and to determine whether these mutations were associated with certain T. pallidum strain types. Subjects were enrolled in a separate ongoing study of cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities in patients with syphilis. T. pallidum DNA purified from blood and T. pallidum strains isolated from blood or cerebrospinal fluid were analyzed for two 23S rDNA mutations and for the molecular targets used in an enhanced molecular stain typing system. Nine molecular strain types of T. pallidum were identified in Seattle from 2001 to 2010. Both macrolide resistance mutations were identified in Seattle strains, and the prevalence of resistant T. pallidum exceeded 80% in 2005 and increased through 2010. Resistance mutations were associated with discrete molecular strain types of T. pallidum. Macrolide-resistant T. pallidum strains are highly prevalent in Seattle, and each mutation is associated with discrete strain types. Macrolides should not be considered for treatment of syphilis in regions where prevalence of the mutations is high. Combining the resistance mutations with molecular strain typing permits a finer analysis of the epidemiology of syphilis in a community.

  16. Distinct resistance patterns to etravirine and rilpivirine in viruses containing nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations at baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahchop, Eugene L; Wainberg, Mark A; Oliveira, Maureen; Xu, Hongtao; Brenner, Bluma G; Moisi, Daniela; Ibanescu, Ilinca R; Tremblay, Cecile

    2013-03-27

    The current in-vitro study examined HIV-1 drug resistance patterns following etravirine (ETR) and rilpivirine (RPV) drug pressure in viruses containing baseline nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance mutations. Several baseline mutations were introduced into NL-4.3 (subtype B clone) by site-directed mutagenesis. This virus, together with two subtype C clinical isolates containing baseline mutations, was passaged in increasing drug pressure of NNRTIs in cord blood mononuclear cells. Genotypic analysis was performed at different weeks. Phenotypic resistance for ETR, RPV, and efavirenz (EFV) and the replication capacity of several mutations and combinations were tested. In wild-type viruses and viruses containing K103N alone at baseline, E138K or E138G mutations were observed following pressure with either ETR or RPV prior to the appearance of other NNRTI resistance mutations. These changes were observed regardless of viral subtype. However, subtype B viruses containing Y181C generated V179I/F or A62V/A but not E138K following exposure to ETR or RPV, respectively, whereas subtype C viruses containing Y181C developed E138V together with Y188H and V179I under ETR pressure. The addition of mutations at position 138 to Y181C did not significantly enhance levels of resistance to ETR or RPV. The replicative capacity of viruses containing Y181C and either E138K or E138A was similar to that of viruses containing either E138K or E138A alone. These results demonstrate that ETR and RPV are likely to select for E138K as a major resistance mutation if no or very few other resistance mutations are present and that Y181C may be antagonistic to E138K.

  17. Combined Effect of the Cfr Methyltransferase and Ribosomal Protein L3 Mutations on Resistance to Ribosome-Targeting Antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakula, Kevin K; Hansen, Lykke H; Vester, Birte

    2017-01-01

    Several groups of antibiotics inhibit bacterial growth by binding to bacterial ribosomes. Mutations in ribosomal protein L3 have been associated with resistance to linezolid and tiamulin, which both bind at the peptidyl transferase center in the ribosome. Resistance to these and other antibiotics....... The presence of Cfr has a very minor influence on the growth rate. The resistance of the transformants to linezolid, tiamulin, florfenicol, and Synercid (a combination of quinupristin and dalfopristin [Q-D]) was measured by MIC assays. The resistance from Cfr was, in all cases, stronger than the effects...... of the L3 mutations, but various effects were obtained with the combinations of Cfr and L3 mutations ranging from a synergistic to an antagonistic effect. Linezolid and tiamulin susceptibility varied greatly among the L3 mutations, while no significant effects on florfenicol and Q-D susceptibility were...

  18. Efflux pump regulatory genes mutations in multidrug resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from wound infections in Isfahan hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Vaez

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: P. aeruginosa isolates with mutation in efflux pump regulatory genes such as mexR and nfxB could be a main factor contributed to antibiotic resistance and must be considered in antibiotic treatment.

  19. Patients with Philadelphia-positive leukemia with Y253H or F359V mutation have a high risk of developing new mutations in the setting of dasatinib resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qian; Qin, Ya-Zhen; Lai, Yue-Yun; Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jing; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-07-01

    The treatment outcome and development of new mutations in patients with imatinib- and/or nilotinib-failure Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) leukemia with highly nilotinib-resistant mutations (Y253H, E255K/V and F359V/C) were assessed on dasatinib therapy. A total of 111 patients with Ph+ leukemia were grouped into three cohorts by baseline BCR-ABL kinase domain mutation status: no mutation (n = 44), non-nilotinib-resistant mutations (n = 26) or nilotinib-resistant mutations (n = 41). The frequencies of hematological, cytogenetic and molecular responses and clinical resistance to dasatinib were similar among the three cohorts during dasatinib therapy. In dasatinib-resistant patients, new mutations were most frequently observed in the cohort with nilotinib-resistant mutations (p = 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that advanced disease and harboring Y253H or F359V mutation before dasatinib were independent predictors of developing new mutations. We conclude that patients with Ph+ leukemia with Y253H or F359V mutation have a high likelihood of developing new mutations in the setting of dasatinib resistance.

  20. Kdr mutations in Triatoma infestans from the Gran Chaco are distributed in two differentiated foci: Implications for pyrethroid resistance management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Ivana; Capriotti, Natalia; Fronza, Georgina; Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Ons, Sheila

    2016-06-01

    Point mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel, the primary target of pyrethroid insecticides, have been associated with the resistance in Triatoma infestans, an important vector of Chagas' disease. Hence, the sustainability of vector control programs requires the implementation of resistance management strategies. We determined the sensitivity of the molecular assays previously designed for early resistance detection to be used in pooled samples from a wide area of the endemic region, and validated them for their routine use in control campaigns for the monitoring of insecticide resistance in T. infestans. Consequently, we used these methods to examine the distribution of resistance-associated mutations in the sodium channel gene in populations of T. infestans from the Argentinean and Bolivian Gran Chaco. The PASA and REA assays tested proved sensitive enough to detect kdr SNPs in pooled samples, indicating these assays are suitable for routine screening in insecticide resistance surveillance. Two geographically differentiated foci were detected in T. infestans populations from the Argentinean and Bolivian Gran Chaco, with populations on the Bolivian-Argentinean border carrying L1014F mutation, and those from the Argentinean Chaco carrying L925I mutation. In all highly resistant populations analyzed, one of both kdr mutations was present, and toxicological assays determined that all pyrethroid resistant populations analyzed herein were sensitive to fenitrothion. The principal cause of pyrethroid resistance in T. infestans from the Gran Chaco ecoregion is kdr mutations in the sodium channel. Different levels of resistance occur in different populations carrying identical mutation, suggesting the existence of contributory mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Introgression of resistance-conferring ALS mutations in herbicide-resistant weedy rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedy red rice (Oryza sativa) competes aggressively with rice, reducing yields and grain quality. Clearfield™ rice, a nontransgenic, herbicide-resistant (HR) rice introduced in 2002 to control weedy rice, has resulted in some ALS-resistant weedy rice apparently due to gene flow. Studies were conduct...

  2. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R.; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; van Zyl, Gert U.; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Wallis, Carole L.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; de Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E.; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in

  3. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations : Potential applications for point-of-care Genotypic resistance testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhee, Soo Yon; Jordan, Michael R.; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zy, Gert U.; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L.; De Wit, Tobias F Rinke; Wallis, Carole L.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Gallant, Joel E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E.; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in

  4. Drug resistance mutations for surveillance of transmitted HIV-1 drug-resistance: 2009 update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Bennett (Diane); R.J. Camacho (Ricardo Jorge); D. Otelea (Dan); D.R. Kuritzkes (Daniel); H. Fleury (Hervé); M. Kiuchi (Mark); W. Heneine (Walid); R. Kantor (Rami); M.R. Jordan (Michael); J.M. Schapiro (Jonathan); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); P. Sandstrom (Paul); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); S.Y. Rhee (Soo Yoon); T.F. Liu (Tommy); D. Pillay (Deenan); R.W. Shafer (Robert)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPrograms that monitor local, national, and regional levels of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance inform treatment guidelines and provide feedback on the success of HIV-1 treatment and prevention programs. To accurately compare transmitted drug resistance rates across geographic regions

  5. Multiple origins of resistance-conferring mutations in Plasmodium vivax dihydrofolate reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Neil Michael T

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to maximize the useful therapeutic life of antimalarial drugs, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms by which parasites resistant to antimalarial drugs are selected and spread in natural populations. Recent work has demonstrated that pyrimethamine-resistance conferring mutations in Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr have arisen rarely de novo, but spread widely in Asia and Africa. The origin and spread of mutations in Plasmodium vivax dhfr were assessed by constructing haplotypes based on sequencing dhfr and its flanking regions. Methods The P. vivax dhfr coding region, 792 bp upstream and 683 bp downstream were amplified and sequenced from 137 contemporary patient isolates from Colombia, India, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vanuatu. A repeat motif located 2.6 kb upstream of dhfr was also sequenced from 75 of 137 patient isolates, and mutational relationships among the haplotypes were visualized using the programme Network. Results Synonymous and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the dhfr coding region were identified, as was the well-documented in-frame insertion/deletion (indel. SNPs were also identified upstream and downstream of dhfr, with an indel and a highly polymorphic repeat region identified upstream of dhfr. The regions flanking dhfr were highly variable. The double mutant (58R/117N dhfr allele has evolved from several origins, because the 58R is encoded by at least 3 different codons. The triple (58R/61M/117T and quadruple (57L/61M/117T/173F, 57I/58R/61M/117T and 57L/58R/61M/117T mutant alleles had at least three independent origins in Thailand, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea/Vanuatu. Conclusion It was found that the P. vivax dhfr coding region and its flanking intergenic regions are highly polymorphic and that mutations in P. vivax dhfr that confer antifolate resistance have arisen several times in the Asian region. This contrasts

  6. Frequent topoisomerase IV mutations associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in Ureaplasma species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jingjuan; Qiao, Yingli; Kong, Yingying; Ruan, Zhi; Huang, Jun; Song, Tiejun; Zhang, Jun; Xie, Xinyou

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of DNA gyrase (encoded by gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV (encoded by parC and parE) associated with fluoroquinolone resistance. A total of 114 Ureaplasma spp. strains, isolated from clinical female patients with symptomatic infection, were tested for species distribution and susceptibility to four fluoroquinolones. Moreover, we analysed the QRDRs and compared these with 14 ATCC reference strains of Ureaplasma spp. serovars to identify mutations that caused antimicrobial resistance. Our study indicated that moxifloxacin was the most effective fluoroquinolone against Ureaplasma spp. (MIC range: 0.125-32 μg ml⁻¹). However, extremely high MICs were estimated for ciprofloxacin (MIC range: 1-256 μg ml⁻¹) and ofloxacin (MIC range: 0.5-128 μg ml⁻¹), followed by levofloxacin (MIC range: 0.5-64 μg ml⁻¹). Seven amino acid substitutions were discovered in GyrB, ParC and ParE, but not in GyrA. Ser-83 → Leu/Trp (C248T/G) in ParC and Arg-448 → Lys (G1343A) in ParE, which were potentially responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance, were observed in 89 (77.2 %) and three (2.6 %) strains, respectively. Pro-462 → Ser (C1384T), Asn-481 → Ser (A1442G) and Ala-493 → Val (C1478T) in GyrB and Met-105 → Ile (G315T) in ParC seemed to be neutral polymorphisms, and were observed and occurred along with the amino acid change of Ser-83 → Leu (C248T) in ParC. Interestingly, two novel mutations of ParC and ParE were independently found in four strains. These observations suggest that amino acid mutation in topoisomerase IV appears to be the leading cause of fluoroquinolone resistance, especially the mutation of Ser-83 → Leu (C248T) in ParC. Moxifloxacin had the best activity against strains with Ser-83 → Leu mutation.

  7. Mutational activation of the AmgRS two-component system in aminoglycoside-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Fraud, Sebastien; Jones, Marcus; Peterson, Scott N; Poole, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The amgRS operon encodes a presumed membrane stress-responsive two-component system linked to intrinsic aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Genome sequencing of a lab isolate showing modest pan-aminoglycoside resistance, strain K2979, revealed a number of mutations, including a substitution in amgS that produced an R182C change in the AmgS sensor kinase product of this gene. Introduction of this mutation into an otherwise wild-type strain recapitulated the resistance phenotype, while correcting the mutation in the resistant mutant abrogated the resistant phenotype, confirming that the amgS mutation is responsible for the aminoglycoside resistance of strain K2979. The amgSR182 mutation promoted an AmgR-dependent, 2- to 3-fold increase in expression of the AmgRS target genes htpX and PA5528, mirroring the impact of aminoglycoside exposure of wild-type cells on htpX and PA5528 expression. This suggests that amgSR182 is a gain-of-function mutation that activates AmgS and the AmgRS two-component system in promoting modest resistance to aminoglycosides. Screening of several pan-aminoglycoside-resistant clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa revealed three that showed elevated htpX and PA5528 expression and harbored single amino acid-altering mutations in amgS (V121G or D106N) and no mutations in amgR. Introduction of the amgSV121G mutation into wild-type P. aeruginosa generated a resistance phenotype reminiscent of the amgSR182 mutant and produced a 2- to 3-fold increase in htpX and PA5528 expression, confirming that it, too, is a gain-of-function aminoglycoside resistance-promoting mutation. These results highlight the contribution of amgS mutations and activation of the AmgRS two-component system to acquired aminoglycoside resistance in lab and clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa.

  8. V280G Mutation, Potential Role in Imatinib Resistance: First Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana P Azevedo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The identification of BCR-ABL expression as the defining leukemogenic event in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and the introduction of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors in 2001 have revolutionized disease management, leading to a reduction in mortality rates and accordingly an increase in the estimated prevalence of CML. Case report: Based on medical records and clinical follow-up, the authors present the case of a Philadelphia chromosome–positive CML patient who developed resistance to imatinib. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction testing revealed a V280G BCR-ABL mutation. Discussion and conclusions: This is the first report describing a new BCR-ABL kinase domain mutation—V280G—that might be associated with resistance to imatinib. Approximately 15% to 30% of patients treated with imatinib discontinue treatment due to resistance or intolerance. More than 90 BCR-ABL mutations were detected so far, conferring variable degrees of drug resistance, with consequent clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic impact.

  9. Prevalence of macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance-mediating mutations in Mycoplasma genitalium in five cities in Russia and Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipitsyna, Elena; Rumyantseva, Tatiana; Golparian, Daniel; Khayrullina, Guzel; Lagos, Amaya C; Edelstein, Inna; Joers, Kai; Jensen, Jörgen S; Savicheva, Alevtina; Rudneva, Natalia; Sukhanova, Larisa; Kozlov, Roman; Guschin, Alexander; Unemo, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Resistance in the sexually transmitted bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium to all recommended therapeutic antimicrobials have rapidly emerged. However, to date, internationally reported resistance surveillance data for M. genitalium strains circulating in Eastern Europe are entirely lacking. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations in M. genitalium in four cities in Russia and one in Estonia, 2013-2016. Consecutive urogenital samples found positive for M. genitalium during diagnostic testing were retrospectively analyzed for resistance-associated mutations in the 23S rRNA and parC genes using pyrosequencing and conventional Sanger sequencing, respectively. In total, 867 M. genitalium positive samples from 2013-2016 were analyzed. Macrolide resistance-associated mutations were detected in 4.6% of the samples from Russia (0.7-6.8% in different cities) and in 10% of the samples from Estonia. The mutations A2059G and A2058G were highly predominating in both Russia and Estonia, accounting together for 90.9% of the cases positive for nucleotide substitutions in the 23S rRNA gene. The rates of possible fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations were 6.2% in Russia (2.5-7.6% in different cities) and 5% in Estonia. The mutations S83I and S83N were the most frequent ones in Russia (24.4% each), whereas D87N highly predominated in Estonia (83.3% of all fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations). Approximately 1% of the samples in both countries harbored both macrolide and possible fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations, with A2058G and S83I being the most frequent combination (37.5%). The prevalence of macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations in M. genitalium was 4.6% and 6.2%, respectively, in Russia, and 10% and 5%, respectively, in Estonia. Despite the relatively low rates of macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance in these countries, antimicrobial resistance

  10. [NPHS2 Mutation analysis study in children with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azocar, Marta; Vega, Álvaro; Farfán, Mauricio; Cano, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Podocin is a protein located in the glomerular slit diaphragm where it takes part in the regulation of glomerular filtration. Mutations of the NPHS2 gene that codes podocin are the main cause of autosomal recessive steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). To identify the NPHS2 mutations in Chilean children with SRNS, and to determine the prevalence of the most common variants in a group of healthy adults. Mutation analysis of NPHS2 in 34 Chilean children with SRNS. Once the two most common variants of NPHS2 were identified, screening for these mutations was performed on 233 healthy adults. The mutation analysis was performed by the direct sequencing of the eight coding exons by polymerase chain reaction amplification. The DNA sequencing was performed using a fluorometric method, and then evaluated with SeqPilot software. The relationship between the presence of NPHS2 variants and SRNS was calculated by comparing the allele frequency between patients with SRNS and those of the healthy volunteers using the exact Fisher test. A P<.05 was considered significant. Pathogenic NPHS2 mutations were detected in 7 (21%) of the 34 patients studied, of which 6 were heterozygotes for p.R229Q and p.A284V. The presence of p.R229Q was 2.46% in the healthy volunteers. This study shows that p.R229Q and p.A284V are the most frequent variants in Chilean children with SRNS. It is the first time that this relationship has been reported in Chilean children. Based on this, a screening strategy is proposed for the genetic study in patients with SRNS and their families. A parallel or sequential search strategy for p.R229Q and p.A284V in these patients is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular characterization of Als1, an acetohydroxyacid synthase mutation conferring resistance to sulfonylurea herbicides in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghio, Cecilia; Ramos, María Laura; Altieri, Emiliano; Bulos, Mariano; Sala, Carlos A

    2013-12-01

    The AHAS gene family in soybean was characterized. The locus Als1 for sulfonylurea resistance was mapped and the resistant allele was characterized at the molecular level. Sulfonylurea (SU) resistance in soybean is controlled by Als1, a semi-dominant allele obtained by EMS mutagenesis over the cultivar Williams 82. The overall objective of this research was to map Als1 in the soybean genome and to determine the nucleotidic changes conferring resistance to SU. Four nucleotide sequences (GmAhas1-4) showing high homology with the Arabidopsis thaliana acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS, EC 4.1.3.18) gene sequence were identified by in silico analysis, PCR-amplified from the SU-resistant line BTK323STS and sequenced. Expression analysis showed that GmAhas1, located on chromosome 4 by in silico analysis, is the most expressed sequence in true leaves. F2:3 families derived from the cross between susceptible and resistant lines were evaluated for SU resistance. Mapping results indicate that the locus als1 is located on chromosome 4. Sequence comparison of GmAhas1 between BTK323STS and Williams 82 showed a single nucleotide change from cytosine to thymine at position 532. This transversion generates an amino acid change from proline to serine at position 197 (A. thaliana nomenclature) of the AHAS catalytic subunit. An allele-specific marker developed for the GmAhas1 mutant sequence cosegregated with SU resistance in the F2 population. Taking together, the mapping, expression and sequencing results indicate that the GmAhas1 sequence corresponds to the Als1 gene sequence controlling SU resistance in soybean. The molecular breeding tools described herein create the basis to speed up the identification of new mutations in soybean AHAS leading to enhanced levels of resistance to SU or to other families of AHAS inhibitor herbicides.

  12. Target site insensitivity mutations in the AChE enzyme confer resistance to organophosphorous insecticides in Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekmohammadi, M; Galehdari, H

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we demonstrated the use and optimization of the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR procedure to detect and analyze the frequency of the R30K and I392T mutations in resistant field populations of CPB. The R30K mutation was detected in 72%, 84%, 52% and 64% of Bahar, Dehpiaz, Aliabad and Yengijeh populations, respectively. Overall frequencies of the I392T mutation were 12%, 8% and 16% of Bahar, Aliabad and Yengijeh populations, respectively. No I392T point mutation was found among samples from Dehpiaz field population. Moreover, only 31% and 2% of samples from the resistant field populations were homozygous for R30K and I392T mutations, respectively. No individual simultaneously had both I392T and S291G/R30K point mutations. The incidence of individuals with both S291G and R30K point mutations in the samples from Bahar, Dehpiaz, Aliabad, and Yengijeh populations were 31.5%, 44.7%, 41.6%, and 27.3% respectively. Genotypes determined by the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR method were consistent with those determined by PCR sequencing. There was no significant correlation between the mutation frequencies and resistance levels in the resistant populations, indicating that other mutations may contribute to this variation. Polymorphism in the partial L. decemlineata cDNA AChE gene Ldace2 of four field populations was identified by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. Among 45 novel mutations detected in this study, T29P mutation was found across all four field populations that likely contribute to the AChE insensitivity. Site-directed mutagenesis and protein expression experiments are needed for a more complete evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mutation breeding through in vitro culture techniques for resistance to cocoa swollen shoot virus disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adu Ampomah, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The Cocoa Swollen Shoot Virus (CSSV) disease is epidemic in cocoa (Theobroma cacao) in Ghana, but there is no resistant material in the genetic resources available. In order to widen the genetic variability in this crop, efforts were made to apply conventional mutation breeding and in combination with in vitro culture technique. Gamma irradiation with doses less than 100 Gy were applied to pollen, beans and vegetative buds, and more than 1,000 M 2 /F 1 or M 1 V 3 plants for each experiments were screened for CSSV resistance by patch grafting method. The results indicated that it is feasible to use vegetative buds and in vitro culture to generate the desired variation. Some promising CSSV resistant clones are under further testing. In vitro culture conditions are also reported. (author). 7 refs, 7 tabs

  14. Induced mutations for horizontal resistance. A model study using leaf rust resistance in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, V.L.; Sawhney, R.N.; Kumar, R.

    1983-01-01

    A mutant with seemingly non-specific resistance to leaf rust was obtained some time ago from the wheat variety Kharchia Local treated with NMH. This mutant is being studied genetically and in its disease reaction by laboratories in Australia, Canada and India in co-operation. The mutant showed a dominant inheritance of resistance in F 1 , but different segregation in F 2 and F 3 . This peculiar genetic behaviour has so far not been explained. (author)

  15. Novel ribosomal mutations affecting translational accuracy, antibiotic resistance and virulence of Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, J; Samuelsson, P; Andersson, D I; Hughes, D

    1999-01-01

    Many mutations in rpsL cause resistance to, or dependence on, streptomycin and are restrictive (hyperaccurate) in translation. Dependence on streptomycin and hyperaccuracy can each be reversed phenotypically by mutations in either rpsD or rpsE. Such compensatory mutations have been shown to have a ram phenotype (ribosomal ambiguity), increasing the level of translational errors. We have shown recently that restrictive rpsL alleles are also associated with a loss of virulence in Salmonella typhimurium. To test whether ram mutants could reverse this loss of virulence, we have isolated a set of rpsD alleles in Salmonella typhimurium. We found that the rpsD alleles restore the virulence of strains carrying restrictive rpsL alleles to a level close to that of the wild type. Unexpectedly, three out of seven mutant rpsD alleles tested have phenotypes typical of restrictive alleles of rpsL, being resistant to streptomycin and restrictive (hyperaccurate) in translation. These phenotypes have not been previously associated with the ribosomal protein S4. Furthermore, all seven rpsD alleles (four ram and three restrictive) can phenotypically reverse the hyperaccuracy associated with restrictive alleles of rpsL. This is the first demonstration that such compensations do not require that the compensating rpsD allele has a ribosomal ambiguity (ram) phenotype.

  16. A multiple genome analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals specific novel genes and mutations associated with pyrazinamide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, Patricia; Requena, David; Gushiken, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H; Antiparra, Ricardo; Lucero, Bryan; Lizárraga, Pilar; Cieza, Basilio; Roncal, Elisa; Grandjean, Louis; Pain, Arnab; McNerney, Ruth; Clark, Taane G; Moore, David; Zimic, Mirko

    2017-10-11

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem and drug resistance compromises the efforts to control this disease. Pyrazinamide (PZA) is an important drug used in both first and second line treatment regimes. However, its complete mechanism of action and resistance remains unclear. We genotyped and sequenced the complete genomes of 68 M. tuberculosis strains isolated from unrelated TB patients in Peru. No clustering pattern of the strains was verified based on spoligotyping. We analyzed the association between PZA resistance with non-synonymous mutations and specific genes. We found mutations in pncA and novel genes significantly associated with PZA resistance in strains without pncA mutations. These included genes related to transportation of metal ions, pH regulation and immune system evasion. These results suggest potential alternate mechanisms of PZA resistance that have not been found in other populations, supporting that the antibacterial activity of PZA may hit multiple targets.

  17. A multiple genome analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals specific novel genes and mutations associated with pyrazinamide resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Sheen, Patricia

    2017-10-11

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem and drug resistance compromises the efforts to control this disease. Pyrazinamide (PZA) is an important drug used in both first and second line treatment regimes. However, its complete mechanism of action and resistance remains unclear.We genotyped and sequenced the complete genomes of 68 M. tuberculosis strains isolated from unrelated TB patients in Peru. No clustering pattern of the strains was verified based on spoligotyping. We analyzed the association between PZA resistance with non-synonymous mutations and specific genes. We found mutations in pncA and novel genes significantly associated with PZA resistance in strains without pncA mutations. These included genes related to transportation of metal ions, pH regulation and immune system evasion.These results suggest potential alternate mechanisms of PZA resistance that have not been found in other populations, supporting that the antibacterial activity of PZA may hit multiple targets.

  18. MAMA-PCR assay for the detection of point mutations associated with high-level erythromycin resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Mateo, Estibaliz; Churruca, Estibaliz; Martinez, Irati; Girbau, Cecilia; Fernández-Astorga, Aurora

    2005-10-01

    Twenty Campylobacter jejuni and 16 Campylobacter coli strains isolated from humans and food/animals, including 17 isolates resistant to erythromycin, were analyzed. A combined mismatch amplification mutation assay-PCR technique was developed to detect the mutations A 2074 C and A 2075 G in the 23S rRNA gene associated with erythromycin resistance. All high-level erythromycin-resistant strains examined by DNA sequencing carried the transition mutation A 2075 G, whereas no isolate carried the A 2074 C mutation. No mutations were found among the susceptible and low-level erythromycin-resistant strains.

  19. Identification of a novel mutation at the primary dimer interface of GyrA conferring fluoroquinolone resistance in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Aogáin, Micheál; Kilkenny, Shauna; Walsh, Claire; Lindsay, Sinéad; Moloney, Geraldine; Morris, Trefor; Jones, Sophie; Rogers, Thomas R

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether alternative resistance mechanisms, other than mutation in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of DNA gyrase, could confer fluoroquinolone resistance in Clostridium difficile. An in vitro-generated C. difficile mutant exhibiting increased fluoroquinolone resistance was isolated through antibiotic selection on ciprofloxacin. The QRDR of this mutant was investigated by chain-termination sequencing and was found to be devoid of mutation. To determine the nature of the non-QRDR resistance mechanism in this strain, the genomes of the mutant and wild-type strains were sequenced. The gyrBA region from a collection of clinical isolates exhibiting variable fluoroquinolone resistance levels was also sequenced and was compared with that present in 918 publicly available C. difficile genomic data sets. Whole-genome sequence analysis of the fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant revealed a single non-synonymous substitution (Ala384Asp) at the predicted primary dimer interface of GyrA, far beyond the classically defined QRDR. This novel mutation caused increased resistance to ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin while conferring hypersusceptibility to novobiocin. Several novel extra-QRDR polymorphisms in C. difficile DNA gyrase were identified among clinical isolates, whilst observed fluoroquinolone resistance in strains devoid of gyrBA mutations confirmed the existence of DNA gyrase-independent resistance mechanisms in this species. In conclusion, we report the first non-QRDR mutation to confer fluoroquinolone resistance in C. difficile. Although the Ala384Asp substitution was not detected in clinical isolates, this study revealed a diversity of alternative extra-QRDR polymorphisms in DNA gyrase whose association with fluoroquinolone resistance warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sodium channel point mutations associated with pyrethroid resistance in Chinese strains of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minghui; Dong, Yande; Ran, Xin; Guo, Xiaoxia; Xing, Dan; Zhang, Yingmei; Yan, Ting; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Su, Jianxin; Zhang, Hengduan; Wang, Gang; Hou, Wenjun; Wu, Zhiming; Li, Chunxiao; Zhao, Tongyan

    2014-08-15

    Pesticide resistance due to sodium channel point mutations has been well documented in many mosquito species. We tested the resistance of six, wild, Chinese populations of the mosquito Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus to deltamethrin and cyhalothrin. The full length of the sodium channel gene was cloned and sequenced from a pooled sample of mosquitoes from each population. Seven amino acid alterations were found (V250M, R436K, M943V, I973T, L1035F, L1035S and E1901D). Correlation between the frequencies of these mutations and the level of pesticide resistance (LC50) associated with them indicates that those at position L1035 (corresponding to position L1014F in the house fly, Musca domestica; GenBank Accession No.: X96668) are associated with resistance to deltamethrin and cyhalothrin. The frequency of the L1035F mutation was significantly correlated with resistance to deltamethrin (R2 = 0.536, P = 0.049) and cyhalothrin (R2 = 0.626, P = 0.030), and the combined frequency of the L1035F and L1035S mutations was significantly correlated with resistance to both deltamethrin (R2 = 0.661, P = 0.025), and cyhalothrin (R2 = 0.803, P = 0.008). None of the other mutations were correlated with either deltamethrin or cyhalothrin resistance. Interestingly, an HWE test indicated significant linkage between the M943V and I973T mutations (P mutations may be of practical benefit to the development of pesticide resistance management programs.

  1. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing and mutational profile for multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis surveillance in Portugal: a 3-year period overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carla; Perdigão, João; Jordão, Luísa; Portugal, Isabel

    2014-12-01

    Multidrug tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) cases constitute a serious health problem in Portugal, of which the majority of isolates belong to the Lisboa family and the Q1 cluster, highly related to the Lisboa family. Here we sought to investigate the molecular basis of resistant TB as well as to determine the prevalence of specific drug resistance mutations and their association with MDR-TB and/or XDR-TB. In total, 74 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates collected in Lisbon Health Region were genotyped by 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR), and the mutational profile associated with first- and second-line drug resistance was studied. Seven new mutations were found, whilst the remaining 28 mutations had been previously associated with drug resistance. None of the mutations was specifically associated with MDR-TB. The mutational patterns observed among isolates belonging to Lisboa3 and Q1 clusters were also observed in isolates with unique MIRU-VNTR patterns but closely related to these strains. Such data suggest that the genotyping technique employed discriminates isolates with the same mutational profile. To establish the most adequate genotyping technique, the discriminatory power of three different MIRU-VNTR sets was analysed. The 15-loci MIRU-VNTR set showed adequate discriminatory power, comparable with the 24-loci set, allowing clustering of 60% and 86% of the MDR-TB and XDR-TB isolates, respectively, the majority of which belonged to the Lisboa3 and Q1 clusters. From an epidemiological standpoint, this study suggests combined mutational and genotyping analysis as a valuable tool for drug resistance surveillance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  2. Diphtheria toxin resistance in human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts in the in vivo somatic cell mutation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkins, D.J.; Wei, L.; Laurie, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    It has been shown that circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes can be used for the enumeration of 6-thioguanine-resistant cells that presumably arise by mutation in vivo. This somatic cell mutation test has been studied in lymphocytes from human populations exposed to known mutagens and/or carcinogens. The sensitivity of the test could be further enhanced by including other gene markers, since there is evidence for locus-specific differences in response to mutagens. Resistance to diphtheria toxin (Dip/sup r/) seemed like a potential marker to incorporate into the test because the mutation acts codominantly, can readily be selected in human diploid fibroblasts and Chinese hamster cells with no evidence for cell density or cross-feeding effects, and can be assayed for in nondividing cells by measuring protein synthesis inhibition. Blood samples were collected from seven individuals, and fresh, cryopreserved, or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphocytes were tested for continued DNA synthesis ( 3 H-thymidine, autoradiography) or protein synthesis ( 35 S-methionine, scintillation counting). Both fresh and cryopreserved lymphocytes, stimulated to divide with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), continued to synthesize DNA in the presence of high doses of diphtheria toxin (DT). Similarly, both dividing (PHA-stimulated) and nondividing fresh lymphocytes carried on significant levels of protein synthesis even 68 hr after exposure to 100 flocculating units (LF)/ml DT. The results suggest that human T and B lymphocytes may not be as sensitive to DT protein synthesis inhibition as human fibroblast and Chinese hamster cells. For this reason, Dip/sup r/ may not be a suitable marker for the somatic cell mutation test

  3. Integration of published information into a resistance-associated mutation database for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Hugh; Yamaguchi, Ken D; Cirillo, Daniela M; Miotto, Paolo; Schito, Marco; Posey, James; Starks, Angela M; Niemann, Stefan; Alland, David; Hanna, Debra; Aviles, Enrique; Perkins, Mark D; Dolinger, David L

    2015-04-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major global public health challenge. Although incidence is decreasing, the proportion of drug-resistant cases is increasing. Technical and operational complexities prevent Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug susceptibility phenotyping in the vast majority of new and retreatment cases. The advent of molecular technologies provides an opportunity to obtain results rapidly as compared to phenotypic culture. However, correlations between genetic mutations and resistance to multiple drugs have not been systematically evaluated. Molecular testing of M. tuberculosis sampled from a typical patient continues to provide a partial picture of drug resistance. A database of phenotypic and genotypic testing results, especially where prospectively collected, could document statistically significant associations and may reveal new, predictive molecular patterns. We examine the feasibility of integrating existing molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility data to identify associations observed across multiple studies and demonstrate potential for well-integrated M. tuberculosis mutation data to reveal actionable findings. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Interplay between mutational and horizontally acquired resistance mechanisms and its association with carbapenem resistance amongst extensively drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (XDR-PA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jwu-Ching; Chia, Ju-Hsin; Siu, Leung-Kei; Kuo, An-Jing; Huang, Shu-Huan; Su, Lin-Hui; Wu, Tsu-Lan

    2012-03-01

    Between 2003 and 2009, the prevalence of extensively drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (XDR-PA) increased significantly in northern Taiwan from 1.0% to 2.1%. Molecular methods were used to investigate the genetic relatedness and carbapenem resistance mechanisms of a collection of 203 non-repetitive XDR-PA isolates available for study. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), 52 genotypes were observed; one predominant genotype (pulsotype 1) was found in 57.6% of the isolates. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequencing and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses demonstrated that one horizontally acquired mechanism [metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) genes] and two mutational mechanisms (efflux and porins) accounted for the carbapenem resistance. The most predominant horizontally acquired mechanism was carriage of bla(VIM-3), which was found in 61.1% of isolates. Decreased expression of oprD was the most prevalent mutational mechanism and was found in 70.0% of the XDR-PA isolates, whereas overexpression of mexA was found in 27.6% of the isolates. The highlight of this study was the discovery of statistically significant relationships between certain horizontally acquired and mutational resistance mechanisms and their contribution to carbapenem susceptibility. MBL-producers expressed significantly lower MexAB and higher OprD than non-MBL-producers. Amongst isolates without an acquired β-lactamase gene, oprD expression was significantly reduced, whilst expression of efflux pumps was increased. Reduced OprD expression alone or the production of VIM-type MBLs showed similar contributions to a low to intermediate MIC(50) (minimum inhibitory concentration for 50% of the organisms) for carbapenems. Isolates with reduced OprD expression that simultaneously harboured bla(VIM) exhibited high levels of resistance to carbapenems, which implied that these two mechanisms had a synergistic effect on the MICs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International

  5. Analysis of mutations in DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Ureaplasma parvum serovars resistant to fluoroquinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinelli, Giorgio; Gargiulo, Franco; Biscaro, Valeria; Caccuri, Francesca; Caruso, Arnaldo; De Francesco, Maria Antonia

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to determine the prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance of Ureaplasma biovars and serovars isolated from urogenital clinical samples and determine the underlying molecular mechanism for quinolone resistance for all resistant isolates. Of 105 samples confirmed as positive for U. urealyticum/U. parvum, 85 were resistant to quinolones by the Mycoplasma-IST2 kit. However, only 43 out of 85 quinolone resistant isolates had amino acid substitutions in GyrA, GyrB, ParC and ParE proteins underlining that this assay have mis-identified as fluoroquinolone resistant 42 isolates. The known ParC E87K and ParC S83L mutations were found in 1 and 10 isolates, respectively. An original mutation of ureaplasmal ParC (E87Q, 1 isolate) was found. Furthermore, we found a ParE R448K mutation in one isolate, already described. Among the additional alterations detected, the most prevalent mutation found was L176F in GyrA protein in 18 isolates with single infection and in 3 isolates with mixed ureaplasma infections. Mutations in GyrB (E502Q, 4 isolates), ParE (Q412K, Q412P, Q412T, 3 independent isolates), whose role is unknown, were also found. Other sporadic mutations in the four genes were identified. This investigation is the result of monitoring the data for molecular fluoroquinone resistance in Ureaplasma spp. in Italy. Resulting that this acquired resistance is high and that continued local epidemiological studies are essential to monitor and document their antimicrobial resistance trends. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A common mechanism of clinical HIV-1 resistance to the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc despite divergent resistance levels and lack of common gp120 resistance mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michael; Salimi, Hamid; Duncan, Renee; Wilkinson, Brendan L; Chikere, Kelechi; Moore, Miranda S; Webb, Nicholas E; Zappi, Helena; Sterjovski, Jasminka; Flynn, Jacqueline K; Ellett, Anne; Gray, Lachlan R; Lee, Benhur; Jubb, Becky; Westby, Mike; Ramsland, Paul A; Lewin, Sharon R; Payne, Richard J; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2013-04-20

    The CCR5 antagonist maraviroc (MVC) inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry by altering the CCR5 extracellular loops (ECL), such that the gp120 envelope glycoproteins (Env) no longer recognize CCR5. The mechanisms of HIV-1 resistance to MVC, the only CCR5 antagonist licensed for clinical use are poorly understood, with insights into MVC resistance almost exclusively limited to knowledge obtained from in vitro studies or from studies of resistance to other CCR5 antagonists. To more precisely understand mechanisms of resistance to MVC in vivo, we characterized Envs isolated from 2 subjects who experienced virologic failure on MVC. Envs were cloned from subjects 17 and 24 before commencement of MVC (17-Sens and 24-Sens) and after virologic failure (17-Res and 24-Res). The Envs cloned during virologic failure showed broad divergence in resistance levels, with 17-Res Env exhibiting a relatively high maximal percent inhibition (MPI) of ~90% in NP2-CD4/CCR5 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and 24-Res Env exhibiting a very low MPI of ~0 to 12% in both cell types, indicating relatively "weak" and "strong" resistance, respectively. Resistance mutations were strain-specific and mapped to the gp120 V3 loop. Affinity profiling by the 293-Affinofile assay and mathematical modeling using VERSA (Viral Entry Receptor Sensitivity Analysis) metrics revealed that 17-Res and 24-Res Envs engaged MVC-bound CCR5 inefficiently or very efficiently, respectively. Despite highly divergent phenotypes, and a lack of common gp120 resistance mutations, both resistant Envs exhibited an almost superimposable pattern of dramatically increased reliance on sulfated tyrosine residues in the CCR5 N-terminus, and on histidine residues in the CCR5 ECLs. This altered mechanism of CCR5 engagement rendered both the resistant Envs susceptible to neutralization by a sulfated peptide fragment of the CCR5 N-terminus. Clinical resistance to MVC may involve divergent Env

  7. The connection domain mutation N348I in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase enhances resistance to etravirine and rilpivirine but restricts the emergence of the E138K resistance mutation by diminishing viral replication capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong-Tao; Colby-Germinario, Susan P; Oliveira, Maureen; Han, Yingshan; Quan, Yudong; Zanichelli, Veronica; Wainberg, Mark A

    2014-02-01

    Clinical resistance to rilpivirine (RPV), a novel nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NNRTI), is associated an E-to-K mutation at position 138 (E138K) in RT together with an M184I/V mutation that confers resistance against emtricitabine (FTC), a nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) that is given together with RPV in therapy. These two mutations can compensate for each other in regard to fitness deficits conferred by each mutation alone, raising the question of why E138K did not arise spontaneously in the clinic following lamivudine (3TC) use, which also selects for the M184I/V mutations. In this context, we have investigated the role of a N348I connection domain mutation that is prevalent in treatment-experienced patients. N348I confers resistance to both the NRTI zidovudine (ZDV) and the NNRTI nevirapine (NVP) and was also found to be associated with M184V and to compensate for deficits associated with the latter mutation. Now, we show that both N348I alone and N348I/M184V can prevent or delay the emergence of E138K under pressure with RPV or a related NNRTI, termed etravirine (ETR). N348I also enhanced levels of resistance conferred by E138K against RPV and ETR by 2.2- and 2.3-fold, respectively. The presence of the N348I or M184V/N348I mutation decreased the replication capacity of E138K virus, and biochemical assays confirmed that N348I, in a background of E138K, impaired RT catalytic efficiency and RNase H activity. These findings help to explain the low viral replication capacity of viruses containing the E138K/N348I mutations and how N348I delayed or prevented the emergence of E138K in patients with M184V-containing viruses.

  8. Characterization of DNA topoisomerase I in three SN-38 resistant human colon cancer cell lines reveals a new pair of resistance-associated mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Frank; Agama, Keli; Roy, Amit

    2016-01-01

    gene copy gain and a loss of chromosome 20, respectively. One resistant cell line harbored a pair of yet unreported TOP1 mutations (R364K and G717R) in close proximity to the drug binding site. Mutant TOP1 was expressed at a markedly higher level than wild-type TOP1. None or very small reductions were...... mechanisms for Top1-targeting chemotherapeutic drugs. Importantly, two yet unreported TOP1 mutations were identified, and it was underlined that cross-resistance to the new indenoisoquinoline drugs depends on the specific underlying molecular mechanism of resistance to SN-38....

  9. Quinolone resistance mutations in the gyrA gene of clinical isolates of Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouabdesselam, S; Tankovic, J; Soussy, C J

    1996-01-01

    S. typhimurium AlhR, S. enteritidis OulR, and S. hadar GueR resistant to fluoroquinolones (QR), ciprofloxacin MICs, 0.25 to 1 microgram/ml; norfloxacin MICs, 0.5 to 4 micrograms/ml; nalidixic acid MIC, 256 micrograms/ml were isolated from urinary tract infections (AlhR and OulR) during FQ therapy in immunocompromised patients infected by the parent FQ-susceptible strains (AlhS and OulS) (ciprofloxacin MICs, 0.032-0.063; norfloxacin MICs, 0.125-0.25; nalidixic acid MICs, 4-8) or from intestinal infection (GueR). Transformation of AlhR, OulR, and GueR by plasmid pJSW101 carrying the wild-type gyrA gene of Escherichia coli resulted in complementation (nalidixic acid MICs, 4 to 8), proving that these strains had a gyrA mutation. A 800-bp fragment of gyrA from the five strains was amplified by PCR. Direct DNA sequencing of 252-bp region of this fragment identified a single point mutation leading to a substitution Ser-83 to Tyr in AlhR and to a substitution Ser-83 to Phe in OulR and in GueR. These results emphasize the potential risk of selection of FQ-resistant Salmonella during FQ therapy in immunocompromised patients and suggest that these strains differ from the parent strains at least by one mutation in the gyrA gene. They also confirm the role of substitutions in position 83 of gyrA in FQ-resistant clinical isolates of Salmonella.

  10. Targeted next-generation sequencing identification of mutations in disease resistance gene anologs (RGAs) in wild and cultivated beets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance gene analogs (RGAs) were searched bioinformatically in the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) genome as potential candidates for improving resistance against different diseases. In the present study, Ion Torrent sequencing technology was used to identify mutations in 21 RGAs. The DNA samples o...

  11. Molecular and biochemical characterization of an induced mutation conferring imidazolinone resistance in sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Carlos A; Bulos, Mariano; Echarte, Mariel; Whitt, Sherry R; Ascenzi, Robert

    2008-12-01

    A partially dominant nuclear gene conferring resistance to the imidazolinone herbicides was previously identified in the cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) line CLHA-Plus developed by seed mutagenesis. The objective of this study was to characterize this resistant gene at the phenotypic, biochemical and molecular levels. CLHA-Plus showed a complete susceptibility to sulfonylureas (metsulfuron, tribenuron and chlorsulfuron) but, on the other hand, it showed a complete resistance to imidazolinones (imazamox, imazapyr and imazapic) at two rates of herbicide application. This pattern was in close association with the AHAS-inhibition kinetics of protein extracts of CLHA-Plus challenged with different doses of imazamox and chlorsulfuron. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence comparisons between resistant and susceptible lines indicated that the imidazolinone-resistant AHAS of CLHA-Plus has a threonine codon (ACG) at position 122 (relative to the Arabidopsis thaliana AHAS sequence), whereas the herbicide-susceptible enzyme from BTK47 has an alanine residue (GCG) at this position. Since the resistance genes to AHAS-inhibiting herbicides so far characterized in sunflower code for the catalytic (large) subunit of AHAS, we propose to redesignate the wild type allele as ahasl1 and the incomplete dominant resistant alleles as Ahasl1-1 (previously Imr1 or Ar ( pur )), Ahasl1-2 (previously Ar ( kan )) and Ahasl1-3 (for the allele present in CLHA-Plus). The higher tolerance level to imidazolinones and the lack of cross-resistance to other AHAS-inhibiting herbicides of Ahasl1-3 indicate that this induced mutation can be used to develop commercial hybrids with superior levels of tolerance and, at the same time, to assist weed management where control of weedy common sunflower is necessary.

  12. Combined Effect of the Cfr Methyltransferase and Ribosomal Protein L3 Mutations on Resistance to Ribosome-Targeting Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakula, Kevin K; Hansen, Lykke H; Vester, Birte

    2017-09-01

    Several groups of antibiotics inhibit bacterial growth by binding to bacterial ribosomes. Mutations in ribosomal protein L3 have been associated with resistance to linezolid and tiamulin, which both bind at the peptidyl transferase center in the ribosome. Resistance to these and other antibiotics also occurs through methylation of 23S rRNA at position A2503 by the methyltransferase Cfr. The mutations in L3 and the cfr gene have been found together in clinical isolates, raising the question of whether they have a combined effect on antibiotic resistance or growth. We transformed a plasmid-borne cfr gene into a uL3-depleted Escherichia coli strain containing either wild-type L3 or L3 with one of seven mutations, G147R, Q148F, N149S, N149D, N149R, Q150L, or T151P, expressed from plasmid-carried rplC genes. The L3 mutations are well tolerated, with small to moderate growth rate decreases. The presence of Cfr has a very minor influence on the growth rate. The resistance of the transformants to linezolid, tiamulin, florfenicol, and Synercid (a combination of quinupristin and dalfopristin [Q-D]) was measured by MIC assays. The resistance from Cfr was, in all cases, stronger than the effects of the L3 mutations, but various effects were obtained with the combinations of Cfr and L3 mutations ranging from a synergistic to an antagonistic effect. Linezolid and tiamulin susceptibility varied greatly among the L3 mutations, while no significant effects on florfenicol and Q-D susceptibility were seen. This study underscores the complex interplay between various resistance mechanisms and cross-resistance, even from antibiotics with overlapping binding sites. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Mutation in ribosomal protein S5 leads to spectinomycin resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eIlina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Spectinomycin remains a useful reserve option for therapy of gonorrhea. The emergence of multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains with decreased susceptibility to cefixime and to ceftriaxone makes it the only medicine still effective for treatment of gonorrhea infection in analogous cases. However, adoption of spectinomycin as a routinely used drug of choice was soon followed by reports of spectinomycin resistance. The main molecular mechanism of spectinomycin resistance in N. gonorrhoeae was C1192T substitution in 16S rRNA genes. Here we reported a Thr-24→Pro mutation in ribosomal protein S5 found in spectinomycin resistant clinical N. gonorrhoeae strain, which carried no changes in 16S rRNA. In a series of experiments, the transfer of rpsE gene allele encoding the mutant ribosomal protein S5 to the recipient N. gonorrhoeae strains was analyzed. The relatively high rate of transformation (ca. 10-5 CFUs indicates the possibility of spread of spectinonycin resistance within gonococcal population due to the horizontal gene transfer.

  14. Type II topoisomerase mutations in Bacillus anthracis associated with high-level fluoroquinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bast, Darrin J; Athamna, Abed; Duncan, Carla L; de Azavedo, Joyce C S; Low, Donald E; Rahav, Galia; Farrell, David; Rubinstein, Ethan

    2004-07-01

    To identify and characterize the mechanisms of high-level fluoroquinolone resistance in two strains of Bacillus anthracis following serial passage in increasing concentrations of fluoroquinolones. Fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates of the Sterne and Russian Anthrax Vaccine STi strains were obtained following serial passage in the presence of increasing concentrations of four different fluoroquinolones. The quinolone-resistance-determining regions of the type II topoisomerase genes from the resistant strains were amplified by PCR and characterized by DNA sequence analysis. The MICs in the presence and absence of reserpine were determined using broth microdilution as a means of detecting active efflux. Single and double amino acid substitutions in the GyrA (Ser-85-Leu; Glu-89-Arg/Gly/Lys) and GrlA (Ser-81-Tyr; Val-96-Ala; Asn-70-Lys) were most common. A single amino acid substitution in GyrB (Asp-430-Asn) was also identified. Efflux only applied to isolates selected for by either levofloxacin or ofloxacin. Specific amino acid substitutions in the type II topoisomerase enzymes significantly contributed to the development of high-level fluoroquinolone resistance in B. anthracis. However, notable differences between the strains and the drugs tested were identified including the role of efflux and the numbers and types of mutations identified.

  15. Progressive increase in point mutations associates chloroquine resistance: Even after withdrawal of chloroquine use in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabyasachi Das

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chloroquine (CQ is highly effective against P. vivax, due to the rapid spread of CQ resistance in P. falciparum parasites; it is no longer the drug of choice against P. falciparum. This study elucidates the scenario of chloroquine efficacy at times that coincided with a new drug policy and especially assessed the chloroquine resistant molecular markers after withdrawal of chloroquine in Kolkata and Purulia, two malaria endemic zones of West Bengal, India. In vitro CQ susceptibility was tested in 781 patients with P. falciparum mono infections between 2008 and 2013, of which 338 patients had received CQ in 2008–2009. Genotyping of the pfcrt and the pfmdr1 gene was carried out in all isolates. Early treatment failure was detected in 114 patients {43 (31·39% from Kolkata and 71 (35·32% from Purulia} while recrudescence was identified in 13 (9.49% and 17 (8.46% patients from Kolkata and Purulia respectively. In vivo chloroquine resistance was strongly associated with CVMNT-YYSNY (p < 0.01 and SVMNT-YYSNY (p < 0.05 allele in Kolkata. In Purulia chloroquine resistance was associated with CVMNK-YYSNY (P < 0.005, SVMNT-YYSNY (P < 0.01 allele. The proportion of in vitro chloroquine resistance increased in subsequent years to 87.23% and 93·10% in 2013, in Kolkata and Purulia, respectively. Isolates with SVMNT-YFSND, SVMNT-YFSNY, CVIET-YFSND and CVIET-YYSNY haplotypes increased gradually (p < 0.05 from 2010 to 2013, leading to a rise in IC50 (p < 0.05 of chloroquine. An increase in in vitro chloroquine resistance and candidate gene mutations even after five years of chloroquine withdrawal against P. falciparum calls for synchronized research surveillance and proper containment strategies. Keywords: Plasmodium falciparum, ChloroQuine resistance in India, pfcrt polymorphism, pfmdr1 mutation, In vitro chloroquine resistance

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ceftolozane-tazobactam resistance development requires multiple mutations leading to overexpression and structural modification of AmpC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabot, Gabriel; Bruchmann, Sebastian; Mulet, Xavier; Zamorano, Laura; Moyà, Bartolomé; Juan, Carlos; Haussler, Susanne; Oliver, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    We compared the dynamics and mechanisms of resistance development to ceftazidime, meropenem, ciprofloxacin, and ceftolozane-tazobactam in wild-type (PAO1) and mutator (PAOMS, ΔmutS) P. aeruginosa. The strains were incubated for 24 h with 0.5 to 64× MICs of each antibiotic in triplicate experiments. The tubes from the highest antibiotic concentration showing growth were reinoculated in fresh medium containing concentrations up to 64× MIC for 7 consecutive days. The susceptibility profiles and resistance mechanisms were assessed in two isolated colonies from each step, antibiotic, and strain. Ceftolozane-tazobactam-resistant mutants were further characterized by whole-genome analysis through RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). The development of high-level resistance was fastest for ceftazidime, followed by meropenem and ciprofloxacin. None of the mutants selected with these antibiotics showed cross-resistance to ceftolozane-tazobactam. On the other hand, ceftolozane-tazobactam resistance development was much slower, and high-level resistance was observed for the mutator strain only. PAO1 derivatives that were moderately resistant (MICs, 4 to 8 μg/ml) to ceftolozane-tazobactam showed only 2 to 4 mutations, which determined global pleiotropic effects associated with a severe fitness cost. High-level-resistant (MICs, 32 to 128 μg/ml) PAOMS derivatives showed 45 to 53 mutations. Major changes in the global gene expression profiles were detected in all mutants, but only PAOMS mutants showed ampC overexpression, which was caused by dacB or ampR mutations. Moreover, all PAOMS mutants contained 1 to 4 mutations in the conserved residues of AmpC (F147L, Q157R, G183D, E247K, or V356I). Complementation studies revealed that these mutations greatly increased ceftolozane-tazobactam and ceftazidime MICs but reduced those of piperacillin-tazobactam and imipenem, compared to those in wild-type ampC. Therefore, the development of high-level resistance to ceftolozane-tazobactam appears to

  17. Inverse relationship between viral load and genotypic resistance mutations in Korean patients with primary HIV type 1 infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Bum Sik; Choi, Juyeon; Nam, Jeong-Gu; Kee, Mee Kyung; Suh, Soon Deok; Choi, Jin Young; Chu, Chaeshin; Kim, Sung Soon

    2006-11-01

    The transmission of antiretroviral-resistant HIV-1 strains is associated with suboptimal virological responses to initial antiretroviral therapy. However, certain types of resistance mutations are known to be associated with decreased viral fitness, which confers a lower replication capacity than that of the wild-type virus in the absence of antiretroviral drugs. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between antiretroviral resistance mutations and viral replication in the primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) period. From January 2002 to March 2005, 52 PHI patients were identified in the Republic of Korea. HIV-1 RNA genotyping was performed, and the resistance mutation score was obtained from the HIV Drug Resistance Database of Stanford University. We defined the sum of the average resistance mutation scores (SARMS) for each antiretroviral drug class as a measure of the degree of resistance of any specific strain. The overall mean SARMS was 2.00 +/- 2.74, and the annual mean did not change significantly during the study period. No critical resistance mutation gene was identified in the study group. The SARMS showed a weak negative correlation with the viral load log10 during PHI, but without statistical significance (r = -0.274, p = 0.051). But the mean SARMS of patients with a viral load exceeding 100,000 copies/ml was significantly lower than that of patients with a viral load of less than 100,000 copies/ml (p = 0.03). Evaluation of the potency of antiretroviral resistance revealed a weak negative correlation with viral replication in the PHI period. This could be one reason why the transmission of resistant strains in PHI patients is not increasing significantly despite the widespread use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).

  18. Evaluation of rifampicin resistance and 81-bp rifampicin resistant determinant region of rpoB gene mutations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis detected with XpertMTB/Rif in Cross River State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest A Ochang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: In our setting, 6.0% of tuberculosis isolates are rifampicin resistant. Mutations associated with probe E commonly due to codon 531 are the most predominant cause of rifampicin resistance. Mutations at probe C (codons 518–523 were uncommon. A change in mutation may have occurred in one of the patients.

  19. Mutation in elongation factor G confers resistance to the antibiotic argyrin in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecki, Piotr; Lukat, Peer; Hüsecken, Kristina; Dötsch, Andreas; Steinmetz, Heinrich; Hartmann, Rolf W; Müller, Rolf; Häussler, Susanne

    2012-11-05

    The natural myxobacterial product argyrin is a cyclic peptide exhibiting immunosuppressive activity as well as antibacterial activity directed against the highly intrinsically resistant opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we used whole-genome sequencing technology as a powerful tool to determine the mode of action of argyrin. Sequencing of argyrin-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates selected in vitro uncovered six point mutations that distinguished the resistant mutants from their susceptible parental strain. All six mutations were localized within one gene: fusA1, which encodes for the elongation factor EF-G. After the reintroduction of selected mutations into the susceptible wild type, the strain became resistant to argyrin. Surface plasmon resonance experiments confirmed the interaction of argyrin A with FusA1. Interestingly, EF-G has been previously shown to be the target of the anti-Staphylococcus antibiotic fusidic acid. Mapping of the mutations onto a structural model of EF-G revealed that the mutations conveying resistance against argyrin were clustered within domain III on the side opposite to that involved in fusidic acid binding, thus indicating that argyrin exhibits a new mode of protein synthesis inhibition. Although no mutations causing argyrin resistance have been found in other genes of P. aeruginosa, analysis of the sequence identity in EF-G and its correlation with argyrin resistance in different bacteria imply that additional factors such as uptake of argyrin play a role in the argyrin resistance of other organisms. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A single mutation in the GSTe2 gene allows tracking of metabolically based insecticide resistance in a major malaria vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveron, Jacob M; Yunta, Cristina; Ibrahim, Sulaiman S; Djouaka, Rousseau; Irving, Helen; Menze, Benjamin D; Ismail, Hanafy M; Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Albert, Armando; Wondji, Charles S

    2014-02-25

    Metabolic resistance to insecticides is the biggest threat to the continued effectiveness of malaria vector control. However, its underlying molecular basis, crucial for successful resistance management, remains poorly characterized. Here, we demonstrate that the single amino acid change L119F in an upregulated glutathione S-transferase gene, GSTe2, confers high levels of metabolic resistance to DDT in the malaria vector Anopheles funestus. Genome-wide transcription analysis revealed that GSTe2 was the most over-expressed detoxification gene in DDT and permethrin-resistant mosquitoes from Benin. Transgenic expression of GSTe2 in Drosophila melanogaster demonstrated that over-transcription of this gene alone confers DDT resistance and cross-resistance to pyrethroids. Analysis of GSTe2 polymorphism established that the point mutation is tightly associated with metabolic resistance to DDT and its geographical distribution strongly correlates with DDT resistance patterns across Africa. Functional characterization of recombinant GSTe2 further supports the role of the L119F mutation, with the resistant allele being more efficient at metabolizing DDT than the susceptible one. Importantly, we also show that GSTe2 directly metabolizes the pyrethroid permethrin. Structural analysis reveals that the mutation confers resistance by enlarging the GSTe2 DDT-binding cavity, leading to increased DDT access and metabolism. Furthermore, we show that GSTe2 is under strong directional selection in resistant populations, and a restriction of gene flow is observed between African regions, enabling the prediction of the future spread of this resistance. This first DNA-based metabolic resistance marker in mosquitoes provides an essential tool to track the evolution of resistance and to design suitable resistance management strategies.

  1. A single mutation in the GSTe2 gene allows tracking of metabolically based insecticide resistance in a major malaria vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic resistance to insecticides is the biggest threat to the continued effectiveness of malaria vector control. However, its underlying molecular basis, crucial for successful resistance management, remains poorly characterized. Results Here, we demonstrate that the single amino acid change L119F in an upregulated glutathione S-transferase gene, GSTe2, confers high levels of metabolic resistance to DDT in the malaria vector Anopheles funestus. Genome-wide transcription analysis revealed that GSTe2 was the most over-expressed detoxification gene in DDT and permethrin-resistant mosquitoes from Benin. Transgenic expression of GSTe2 in Drosophila melanogaster demonstrated that over-transcription of this gene alone confers DDT resistance and cross-resistance to pyrethroids. Analysis of GSTe2 polymorphism established that the point mutation is tightly associated with metabolic resistance to DDT and its geographical distribution strongly correlates with DDT resistance patterns across Africa. Functional characterization of recombinant GSTe2 further supports the role of the L119F mutation, with the resistant allele being more efficient at metabolizing DDT than the susceptible one. Importantly, we also show that GSTe2 directly metabolizes the pyrethroid permethrin. Structural analysis reveals that the mutation confers resistance by enlarging the GSTe2 DDT-binding cavity, leading to increased DDT access and metabolism. Furthermore, we show that GSTe2 is under strong directional selection in resistant populations, and a restriction of gene flow is observed between African regions, enabling the prediction of the future spread of this resistance. Conclusions This first DNA-based metabolic resistance marker in mosquitoes provides an essential tool to track the evolution of resistance and to design suitable resistance management strategies. PMID:24565444

  2. The First Characterization of HIV-1 Subtypes and Drug Resistance Mutations among Antiretrovirally Treated Patients in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohammadi, Reza; Baesi, Kazem; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Farrokhi, Molood; McFarland, Willi; Parsamajd, Shahryar

    2017-01-01

    Insufficient therapy during HIV-1 replication can promote the emergence of drug-resistant strains, reduce the effectiveness of antiretroviral treatment (ART), and increase the likelihood of the onward transmission of drug-resistant viruses. We characterized, for the first time, the prevalence of HIV-1 subtypes and drug resistance mutations in a western region of Iran. This study was conducted among 122 patients on ART at a major referral center in Kermanshah, Iran. Nested PCR was performed using RT gene-specific primers from the pol gene. Sequencing was followed by amplification and purification of the desired sequence. Subtypes and mutations were determined using the Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database. Most patients (92.6%) had subtype CRF 35-AD; 7.4% had subtype B. In total, 36.1% of the patients had at least 1 mutation associated with resistance RT inhibitors. The greatest rates of high-level resistance were observed for nevirapine (21.3%) and efavirenz (19.7%). Our results showed a high prevalence of drug resistance mutations in strains isolated from patients on treatment. At our center, we therefore recommend that genotyping be performed. This would allow the physician to prescribe appropriate drugs, reduce treatment costs, and increase the longevity and quality of life of patients. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Differences in selective pressure on dhps and dhfr drug resistant mutations in western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCollum Andrea M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the origin and spread of mutations associated with drug resistance, especially in the context of combination therapy, will help guide strategies to halt and prevent the emergence of resistance. Unfortunately, studies have assessed these complex processes when resistance is already highly prevalent. Even further, information on the evolutionary dynamics leading to multidrug-resistant parasites is scattered and limited to areas with low or seasonal malaria transmission. This study describes the dynamics of strong selection for mutations conferring resistance against sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP, a combination therapy, in western Kenya between 1992 and 1999, just before SP became first-line therapy (1999. Importantly, the study is based on longitudinal data, which allows for a comprehensive analysis that contrasts with previous cross-sectional studies carried out in other endemic regions. Methods This study used 236 blood samples collected between 1992 and 1999 in the Asembo Bay area of Kenya. Pyrosequencing was used to determine the alleles of dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr and dihydropterote synthase (dhps genes. Microsatellite alleles spanning 138 kb around dhfr and dhps, as well as, neutral markers spanning approximately 100 kb on chromosomes 2 and 3 were characterized. Results By 1992, the South-Asian dhfr triple mutant was already spreading, albeit in low frequency, in this holoendemic Kenyan population, prior to the use of SP as a first-line therapy. Additionally, dhfr triple mutant alleles that originated independently from the predominant Southeast Asian lineage were present in the sample set. Likewise, dhps double mutants were already present as early as 1992. There is evidence for soft selective sweeps of two dhfr mutant alleles and the possible emergence of a selective sweep of double mutant dhps alleles between 1992 and 1997. The longitudinal structure of the dataset allowed estimation of selection

  4. Rilpivirine resistance mutations in HIV patients failing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anta, Lourdes; Llibre, Josep M; Poveda, Eva; Blanco, José L; Alvarez, Marta; Pérez-Elías, María J; Aguilera, Antonio; Caballero, Estrella; Soriano, Vicente; de Mendoza, Carmen

    2013-01-02

    Rilpivirine (RPV) is the latest approved nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI). It displays in-vitro activity extending over other NNRTI-resistant HIV strains. There is scarce information about the rate of RPV resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) in patients failing other NNRTIs. RPV RAMs were examined in plasma samples collected from HIV patients that had recently failed NNRTI-based regimens at 22 clinics in Spain. Resistance tests from a total of 1064 patients failing efavirenz (EFV) (54.5%), nevirapine (NVP) (40%) or etravirine (ETR) (5.5%) were examined. The prevalence of RPV RAMs was K101E (9.1%), K101P (1.4%), E138A (3.9%), E138G (0.3%), E138K (0.3%), E138Q (0.8%), V179L (0.2%), Y181C (21.8%), Y181I (0.5%), Y181V (0.2%), H221Y (8.3%), F227C (0.1%) and M230L (1.5%). K101E/M184I was seen in 1%. E138K/M184I were absent. Mutations L100I and V108I were significantly more frequent in patients failing EFV than NVP (7.9 vs. 0.2 and 12.2 vs. 7.3%, respectively). Conversely, Y181C, Y181I, V106A, H221Y and F227L were more prevalent following NVP than EFV failures. Using the Spanish resistance interpretation algorithm, 206 genotypes (19.3%) from patients failing NNRTI (NVP 52%, EFV 40.8% and ETR 7.8%) were considered as RPV resistant. In patients with ETR failure, cross-resistance to RPV was seen in 27.6%, mainly as result of Y181C (81.3%), V179I (43.8%), V90I (31.3%) and V108I (18.8%). RPV resistance is overall recognized in nearly 20% of patients failing other NNRTIs. It is more common following ETR (27.6%) or NVP (25%) failures than EFV (14.5%). E138 mutants are rarely seen in this context.

  5. PmrB mutations promote polymyxin resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from colistin-treated cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Samuel M; Brannon, Mark K; Dasgupta, Nandini; Pier, Miyuki; Sgambati, Nicole; Miller, Amanda K; Selgrade, Sara E; Miller, Samuel I; Denton, Miles; Conway, Steven P; Johansen, Helle K; Høiby, Niels

    2012-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can develop resistance to polymyxin and other cationic antimicrobial peptides. Previous work has shown that mutations in the PmrAB and PhoPQ regulatory systems can confer low to moderate levels of colistin (polymyxin E) resistance in laboratory strains and clinical isolates of this organism (MICs of 8 to 64 mg/liter). To explore the role of PmrAB in high-level clinical polymyxin resistance, P. aeruginosa isolates from chronically colistin-treated cystic fibrosis patients, most with colistin MICs of >512 mg/liter, were analyzed. These cystic fibrosis isolates contained probable gain-of-function pmrB alleles that conferred polymyxin resistance to strains with a wild-type or pmrAB deletion background. Double mutant pmrB alleles that contained mutations in both the periplasmic and dimerization-phosphotransferase domains markedly augmented polymyxin resistance. Expression of mutant pmrB alleles induced transcription from the promoter of the arnB operon and stimulated addition of 4-amino-l-arabinose to lipid A, consistent with the known role of this lipid A modification in polymyxin resistance. For some highly polymyxin-resistant clinical isolates, repeated passage without antibiotic selection pressure resulted in loss of resistance, suggesting that secondary suppressors occur at a relatively high frequency and account for the instability of this phenotype. These results indicate that pmrB gain-of-function mutations can contribute to high-level polymyxin resistance in clinical strains of P. aeruginosa.

  6. Tribenuron-methyl resistance and mutation diversity of Pro197 in flixweed (Descurainia Sophia L.) accessions from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Liu, Ming Jie; Yang, Qian; Mei, Yu; Li, Xue Feng; Zheng, Ming Qi

    2015-01-01

    Flixweed (Descurainia Sophia L.) is a problematic weed in winter wheat fields in China, which causes great loss of wheat yield. A total of 46 flixweed accessions from winter wheat-planting areas were collected and used for the survey of resistance to tribenuron-methyl and Pro197 mutation diversity. According to the "R" resistance rating system, 16 flixweed accessions have evolved resistance to tribenuron-methyl, 13 accessions have high risk of developing resistance to this herbicide and 17 accessions are susceptible. The mutation of Pro197 codon (CCT) changed proline (Pro) into leucine (Leu) (homozygous, RR), serine (Ser, RR), histidine (His, RR), threonine (Thr, RR), Pro/Leu (heterozygous, RS), Pro/Ser (RS), Pro/His, Pro/Thr (RS) and Pro/Tyr (RS). Among these amino acid changes, a Pro197-Pro/Tyr (heterozygous, RS) substitution caused by the mutation of two successive nucleotides was identified for the first time in resistant weed species. In addition, the Pro197-His and Pro197-Pro/His mutations have not been reported previously in flixweed. Finally, a CPAS marker was developed to identify flixweed plants with or without Pro197 mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding the mechanism of atovaquone drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum cytochrome b mutation Y268S using computational methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir A Akhoon

    Full Text Available The rapid appearance of resistant malarial parasites after introduction of atovaquone (ATQ drug has prompted the search for new drugs as even single point mutations in the active site of Cytochrome b protein can rapidly render ATQ ineffective. The presence of Y268 mutations in the Cytochrome b (Cyt b protein is previously suggested to be responsible for the ATQ resistance in Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum. In this study, we examined the resistance mechanism against ATQ in P. falciparum through computational methods. Here, we reported a reliable protein model of Cyt bc1 complex containing Cyt b and the Iron-Sulphur Protein (ISP of P. falciparum using composite modeling method by combining threading, ab initio modeling and atomic-level structure refinement approaches. The molecular dynamics simulations suggest that Y268S mutation causes ATQ resistance by reducing hydrophobic interactions between Cyt bc1 protein complex and ATQ. Moreover, the important histidine contact of ATQ with the ISP chain is also lost due to Y268S mutation. We noticed the induced mutation alters the arrangement of active site residues in a fashion that enforces ATQ to find its new stable binding site far away from the wild-type binding pocket. The MM-PBSA calculations also shows that the binding affinity of ATQ with Cyt bc1 complex is enough to hold it at this new site that ultimately leads to the ATQ resistance.

  8. Secondary mutations in viruses resistant to HIV-1 integrase inhibitors that restore viral infectivity and replication kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Koichiro; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Kobayashi, Masanori; Miki, Shigeru; Noshi, Takeshi; Seki, Takahiro; Kanamori-Koyama, Mikiko; Kawauchi, Shinobu; Suyama, Akemi; Fujishita, Toshio; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Garvey, Edward P; Johns, Brian A; Foster, Scott A; Underwood, Mark R; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2009-02-01

    Passage of HIV-1 in the presence of integrase inhibitors (INIs) generates resistant viruses that have mutations in the integrase region. Integrase-resistant mutations Q148K and Q148R were identified as primary mutations with the passage of HIV-1 IIIB in the presence of INIs S-1360 or S/GSK-364735, respectively. Secondary amino acid substitutions E138K or G140S were observed when passage with INI was continued. The role of these mutations was investigated with molecular clones. Relative to Q148K alone, Q148K/E138K had 2- and >6-fold increases in resistance to S-1360 and S/GSK-364735, respectively, and the double mutant had slightly better infectivity and replication kinetics. In contrast, Q148K/G140S and Q148R/E138K had nearly equivalent or slightly reduced fold resistance to the INI compared with their respective Q148 primary mutants, and had increases in infectivity and replication kinetics. Recovery of these surrogates of viral fitness coincided with the recovery of integration efficiency of viral DNA into the host cell chromosome for these double mutants. These data show that recovery of viral integration efficiency can be an important factor for the emergence and maintenance of INI-resistant mutations.

  9. Association of a Novel Mutation in the Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter With Decreased Piperaquine Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Sonia; Moser, Kara A; Morton, Lindsay; Cummings, Michael P; Parihar, Ankita; Dwivedi, Ankit; Shetty, Amol C; Drabek, Elliott F; Jacob, Christopher G; Henrich, Philipp P; Parobek, Christian M; Jongsakul, Krisada; Huy, Rekol; Spring, Michele D; Lanteri, Charlotte A; Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Lon, Chanthap; Fukuda, Mark M; Saunders, David L; Fidock, David A; Lin, Jessica T; Juliano, Jonathan J; Plowe, Christopher V; Silva, Joana C; Takala-Harrison, Shannon

    2017-08-15

    Amplified copy number in the plasmepsin II/III genes within Plasmodium falciparum has been associated with decreased sensitivity to piperaquine. To examine this association and test whether additional loci might also contribute, we performed a genome-wide association study of ex vivo P. falciparum susceptibility to piperaquine. Plasmodium falciparum DNA from 183 samples collected primarily from Cambodia was genotyped at 33716 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Linear mixed models and random forests were used to estimate associations between parasite genotypes and piperaquine susceptibility. Candidate polymorphisms were evaluated for their association with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine treatment outcomes in an independent dataset. Single nucleotide polymorphisms on multiple chromosomes were associated with piperaquine 90% inhibitory concentrations (IC90) in a genome-wide analysis. Fine-mapping of genomic regions implicated in genome-wide analyses identified multiple SNPs in linkage disequilibrium with each other that were significantly associated with piperaquine IC90, including a novel mutation within the gene encoding the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT. This mutation (F145I) was associated with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine treatment failure after adjusting for the presence of amplified plasmepsin II/III, which was also associated with decreased piperaquine sensitivity. Our data suggest that, in addition to plasmepsin II/III copy number, other loci, including pfcrt, may also be involved in piperaquine resistance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Mutation breeding for disease resistance using in-vitro culture techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    Breeding for disease resistance is a major aspect of plant breeding, which may take at least 20% of a plant breeder's time, effort and budget. Nevertheless, numerous resistance problems remain unsolved and present major constraints to the production of food, feed, fiber and industrial commodities. The application of novel biotechnology and genetic engineering will extend the possibilities of conventional plant breeding. Therefore a meeting of experts in plant protection, plant breeding and in-vitro culture technology was convened by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division in Vienna. The experts were asked to discuss and give advice on prospects of biotechnology, especially plant in-vitro cultures, to contribute towards improved chances of success in mutation breeding for disease resistance. The plant breeder, in searching for resistance to a particular pathogen, like for any other desirable character, needs genetic variation to begin with. In addition he needs an appropriate screening method to detect the desired character. Science has developed so fast that it is now time to apply the existing knowledge of biotechnology to practical problems in agriculture, also in developing countries. In the near future this may be true also for novel techniques of genetic engineering. The usefulness and feasibility of the application of in-vitro techniques for these purposes varies with crops and pathogens, but also depends on the strength of plant breeding and plant pathology and the facilities available in a particular country. The members of the Advisory Group attempted to discuss the various aspects and to reach sound conclusions

  11. A forward mutation assay using ampicillin-resistance in Escherichia coli designed for investigating the mutagenicity of biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, D; Crofton-Sleigh, C; Venitt, S

    1987-11-01

    The development of a bacterial mutation assay using forward mutation to ampicillin-resistance is described. It is a technically simple assay using Escherichia coli D494uvrB transformed with a multi-copy mutator plasmid pGW1700. Mutation is detected by an increase in the frequency of ampicillin-resistant colonies following treatment of bacteria with the test material during logarithmic growth. The determination of viable counts allows a correction factor to be applied to compensate for the effects of sample-induced growth enhancement or toxicity on the bacterial population. The assay has been tested with a range of reference mutagens. It is particularly sensitive to base-pair substitution mutagens, detecting these at doses equal to or less than those detected in the Salmonella/microsome assay or the SOS Chromotest. The assay also detects frameshift mutagens but with lower sensitivity than the Salmonella/microsome assay.

  12. Dominant mutations confer resistance to the immunosuppressant, rapamycin, in variants of a T cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, F J; Staruch, M J; Grammer, T; Blenis, J; Kastner, C A; Rupprecht, K M

    1995-06-01

    Rapamycin (RAP) disrupts signaling events implicated in cytokine-dependent proliferation of lymphocytes and other cells. This action is known to involve the formation of molecular complexes between the drug and intracellular binding proteins, termed FKBPs. However, the biochemical target(s) for the effector RAP-FKBP complexes remain uncharacterized. As an approach to explore the mechanism of action of RAP, we have isolated three independent sets of somatic mutants of the YAC-1 murine T cell line with markedly reduced sensitivity to the drug's inhibitory effects on proliferation and on IL-1-induced IFN-gamma production. These mutants were still fully sensitive to FK-506, an immunosuppressant structurally related to RAP whose mode of action also involves an interaction with FKBPs. Furthermore, the 12-kDa FKBP, FKBP12, was detectable in immunoblots from cytosolic extracts and eluates from RAP-affinity matrix in the mutants as in wild-type cells, suggesting that the resistance to RAP in the mutants is not due to a lack of FKBP12 expression. Cell fusion experiments were conducted to further define the nature of the alterations imparting RAP resistance in these mutants. Clones deficient in either thymidine kinase or hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase, suitable as fusion partners for aminopterin-based selection of hybrids were generated from the wild-type or mutant lines. In most instances, the hybrids derived from the fusion between RAP-sensitive clones and RAP-resistant clones exhibited a RAP-resistant phenotype. Similar results were obtained with hybrids between RAP-resistant YAC-1 clones and the RAP-sensitive EL-4 cell line. Therefore, the mutations that confer resistance to RAP in the present system are dominant. Altogether, our observations are consistent with a model where pharmacologically relevant targets for the RAP-FKBP complex, rather than FKBP, might be altered in the mutants such that the inactivation of these targets by the effector complex is

  13. Emergence of Ceftazidime-Avibactam Resistance Due to Plasmid-BorneblaKPC-3Mutations during Treatment of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Ryan K; Chen, Liang; Cheng, Shaoji; Chavda, Kalyan D; Press, Ellen G; Snyder, Avin; Pandey, Ruchi; Doi, Yohei; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Nguyen, M Hong; Clancy, Cornelius J

    2017-03-01

    Ceftazidime-avibactam is a novel β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor with activity against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) that produce Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC). We report the first cases of ceftazidime-avibactam resistance to develop during treatment of CRE infections and identify resistance mechanisms. Ceftazidime-avibactam-resistant K. pneumoniae emerged in three patients after ceftazidime-avibactam treatment for 10 to 19 days. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of longitudinal ceftazidime-avibactam-susceptible and -resistant K. pneumoniae isolates was used to identify potential resistance mechanisms. WGS identified mutations in plasmid-borne bla KPC-3 , which were not present in baseline isolates. bla KPC-3 mutations emerged independently in isolates of a novel sequence type 258 sublineage and resulted in variant KPC-3 enzymes. The mutations were validated as resistance determinants by measuring MICs of ceftazidime-avibactam and other agents following targeted gene disruption in K. pneumoniae , plasmid transfer, and bla KPC cloning into competent Escherichia coli In rank order, the impact of KPC-3 variants on ceftazidime-avibactam MICs was as follows: D179Y/T243M double substitution > D179Y > V240G. Remarkably, mutations reduced meropenem MICs ≥4-fold from baseline, restoring susceptibility in K. pneumoniae from two patients. Cefepime and ceftriaxone MICs were also reduced ≥4-fold against D179Y/T243M and D179Y variant isolates, but susceptibility was not restored. Reverse transcription-PCR revealed that expression of bla KPC-3 encoding D179Y/T243M and D179Y variants was diminished compared to bla KPC-3 expression in baseline isolates. In conclusion, the development of resistance-conferring bla KPC-3 mutations in K. pneumoniae within 10 to 19 days of ceftazidime-avibactam exposure is troubling, but clinical impact may be ameliorated if carbapenem susceptibility is restored in certain isolates. Copyright © 2017 American Society for

  14. Directly administered antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected drug users does not have an impact on antiretroviral resistance: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, Duncan Smith-Rohrberg; Kozal, Michael J; Bruce, R Douglas; Springer, Sandra A; Altice, Frederick L

    2007-12-15

    Directly administered antiretroviral therapy (DAART) is an effective intervention that improves clinical outcomes among HIV-infected drug users. Its effects on antiretroviral drug resistance, however, are unknown. We conducted a community-based, prospective, randomized controlled trial of DAART compared with self-administered therapy (SAT). We performed a modified intention-to-treat analysis among 115 subjects who provided serum samples for HIV genotypic resistance testing at baseline and at follow-up. The main outcomes measures included total genotypic sensitivity score, future drug options, number of new drug resistance mutations (DRMs), and number of new major International AIDS Society (IAS) mutations. The adjusted probability of developing at least 1 new DRM did not differ between the 2 arms (SAT: 0.41 per person-year [PPY], DAART: 0.49 PPY; adjusted relative risk [RR] = 1.04; P = 0.90), nor did the number of new mutations (SAT: 0.76 PPY, DAART: 0.83 PPY; adjusted RR = 0.99; P = 0.99) or the probability of developing new major IAS new drug mutations (SAT: 0.30 PPY, DAART: 0.33 PPY; adjusted RR = 1.12; P = 0.78). On measures of GSS and FDO, the 2 arms also did not differ. In this trial, DAART provided on-treatment virologic benefit for HIV-infected drug users without affecting the rate of development of antiretroviral medication resistance.

  15. A new point mutation in the iron-sulfur subunit of succinate dehydrogenase confers resistance to boscalid in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Duan, Yabing; Wang, Jianxin; Zhou, Mingguo

    2015-09-01

    Research has established that mutations in highly conserved amino acids of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex in various fungi confer SDH inhibitor (SDHI) resistance. For Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, a necrotrophic fungus with a broad host range and a worldwide distribution, boscalid resistance has been attributed to the mutation H132R in the highly conserved SdhD subunit protein of the SDH complex. In our previous study, however, only one point mutation, A11V in SdhB (GCA to GTA change in SdhB), was detected in S. sclerotiorum boscalid-resistant (BR) mutants. In the current study, replacement of the SdhB gene in a boscalid-sensitive (BS) S. sclerotiorum strain with the mutant SdhB gene conferred resistance. Compared with wild-type strains, BR and GSM (SdhB gene in the wild-type strain replaced by the mutant SdhB gene) mutants were more sensitive to osmotic stress, lacked the ability to produce sclerotia and exhibited lower expression of the pac1 gene. Importantly, the point mutation was not located in the highly conserved sequence of the iron-sulfur subunit of SDH. These results suggest that resistance based on non-conserved vs. conserved protein domains differs in mechanism. In addition to increasing our understanding of boscalid resistance in S. sclerotiorum, the new information will be useful for the development of alternative antifungal drugs. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  16. PmrB Mutations Promote Polymyxin Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Colistin-Treated Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moskowitz, Samuel M; Brannon, Mark K; Dasgupta, Nandini

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can develop resistance to polymyxin and other cationic antimicrobial peptides. Previous work has shown that mutations in the PmrAB and PhoPQ regulatory systems can confer low to moderate levels of colistin (polymyxin E) resistance in laboratory strains and clinical isolates...... of this organism (MICs of 8 to 64 mg/liter). To explore the role of PmrAB in high-level clinical polymyxin resistance, P. aeruginosa isolates from chronically colistin-treated cystic fibrosis patients, most with colistin MICs of >512 mg/liter, were analyzed. These cystic fibrosis isolates contained probable gain......-of-function pmrB alleles that conferred polymyxin resistance to strains with a wild-type or pmrAB deletion background. Double mutant pmrB alleles that contained mutations in both the periplasmic and dimerization-phosphotransferase domains markedly augmented polymyxin resistance. Expression of mutant pmrB alleles...

  17. Menoctone Resistance in Malaria Parasites Is Conferred by M133I Mutations in Cytochrome b That Are Transmissible through Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Lynn D; Johnson, Myles E; Siegel, Sasha V; McQueen, Adonis; Iyamu, Iredia D; Shaikh, Abdul Kadar; Shultis, Michael W; Manetsch, Roman; Kyle, Dennis E

    2017-08-01

    Malaria-related mortality has slowly decreased over the past decade; however, eradication of malaria requires the development of new antimalarial chemotherapies that target liver stages of the parasite and combat the emergence of drug resistance. The diminishing arsenal of anti-liver-stage compounds sparked our interest in reviving the old and previously abandoned compound menoctone. In support of these studies, we developed a new convergent synthesis method that was facile, required fewer steps, produced better yields, and utilized less expensive reagents than the previously published method. Menoctone proved to be highly potent against liver stages of Plasmodium berghei (50 percent inhibitory concentration [IC 50 ] = 0.41 nM) and erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum (113 nM). We selected for resistance to menoctone and found M133I mutations in cytochrome b of both P. falciparum and P. berghei The same mutation has been observed previously in atovaquone resistance, and we confirmed cross-resistance between menoctone and atovaquone in vitro (for P. falciparum ) and in vivo (for P. berghei ). Finally, we assessed the transmission potential of menoctone-resistant P. berghei and found that the M133I mutant parasites were readily transmitted from mouse to mosquitoes and back to mice. In each step, the M133I mutation in cytochrome b , inducing menoctone resistance, was confirmed. In summary, this study is the first to show the mechanism of resistance to menoctone and that menoctone and atovaquone resistance is transmissible through mosquitoes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Frequency and geographic distribution of gyrA and gyrB mutations associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, Elisea; Catanzaro, Donald; Catanzaro, Antonino; Ganiats, Theodore; Brodine, Stephanie; Alcaraz, John; Rodwell, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    The detection of mutations in the gyrA and gyrB genes in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome that have been demonstrated to confer phenotypic resistance to fluoroquinolones is the most promising technology for rapid diagnosis of fluoroquinolone resistance. In order to characterize the diversity and frequency of gyrA and gyrB mutations and to describe the global distribution of these mutations, we conducted a systematic review, from May 1996 to April 2013, of all published studies evaluating Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutations associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones. The overall goal of the study was to determine the potential utility and reliability of these mutations as diagnostic markers to detect phenotypic fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to describe their geographic distribution. Forty-six studies, covering four continents and 18 countries, provided mutation data for 3,846 unique clinical isolates with phenotypic resistance profiles to fluoroquinolones. The gyrA mutations occurring most frequently in fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates, ranged from 21-32% for D94G and 13-20% for A90V, by drug. Eighty seven percent of all strains that were phenotypically resistant to moxifloxacin and 83% of ofloxacin resistant isolates contained mutations in gyrA. Additionally we found that 83% and 80% of moxifloxacin and ofloxacin resistant strains respectively, were observed to have mutations in the gyrA codons interrogated by the existing MTBDRsl line probe assay. In China and Russia, 83% and 84% of fluoroquinolone resistant strains respectively, were observed to have gyrA mutations in the gene regions covered by the MTBDRsl assay. Molecular diagnostics, specifically the Genotype MTBDRsl assay, focusing on codons 88-94 should have moderate to high sensitivity in most countries. While we did observe geographic differences in the frequencies of single gyrA mutations across countries, molecular diagnostics based on detection of all gyr

  19. GidB mutation as a phylogenetic marker for Q1 cluster Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates and intermediate-level streptomycin resistance determinant in Lisbon, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, J; Macedo, R; Machado, D; Silva, C; Jordão, L; Couto, I; Viveiros, M; Portugal, I

    2014-05-01

    Development of streptomycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is usually associated with mutations in rpsL and rrs genes, although up to 50% of clinical streptomycin-resistant isolates may present no mutation in either of these genes. In the present report we investigate the role of gidB gene mutations in streptomycin resistance. We have analyzed 52 streptomycin-resistant and 30 streptomycin-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates by sequencing and endonuclease analysis of the gidB and rpsL genes. All clinical isolates were genotyped by 12-loci MIRU-VNTR. The gidB gene of 18 streptomycin-resistant isolates was sequenced and four missense mutations were found: F12L (1/18), L16R (18/18), A80P (4/18) and S100F (18/18). The remaining isolates were screened by endonuclease analysis for mutations A80P in the gidB gene and K43R in the rpsL gene. Overall, mutation A80P in the gidB gene was found in eight streptomycin-resistant isolates and 11 streptomycin-susceptible multidrug-resistant isolates. Also noteworthy, is the fact that gidB mutations were only present in isolates without rpsL and rrs mutations, all from genetic cluster Q1. Streptomycin quantitative drug susceptibility testing showed that isolates carrying the gidB A80P mutation were streptomycin intermediate-level resistant and that standard drug susceptibility testing yielded inconsistent results, probably due to borderline resistance. We conclude that gidB mutations may explain the high number of streptomycin-resistant strains with no mutation in rpsL or rrs. These mutations might occasionally confer low-level streptomycin resistance that will go undetected in standard susceptibility testing. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  20. Costs of insensitive acetylcholinesterase insecticide resistance for the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae homozygous for the G119S mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The G119S mutation responsible for insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistance to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides has recently been reported from natural populations of Anopheles gambiae in West Africa. These reports suggest there are costs of resistance associated with this mutation for An. gambiae, especially for homozygous individuals, and these costs could be influential in determining the frequency of carbamate resistance in these populations. Methods Life-history traits of the AcerKis and Kisumu strains of An. gambiae were compared following the manipulation of larval food availability in three separate experiments conducted in an insecticide-free laboratory environment. These two strains share the same genetic background, but differ in being homozygous for the presence or absence of the G119S mutation at the ace-1 locus, respectively. Results Pupae of the resistant strain were significantly more likely to die during pupation than those of the susceptible strain. Ages at pupation were significantly earlier for the resistant strain and their dry starved weights were significantly lighter; this difference in weight remained when the two strains were matched for ages at pupation. Conclusions The main cost of resistance found for An. gambiae mosquitoes homozygous for the G119S mutation was that they were significantly more likely to die during pupation than their susceptible counterparts, and they did so across a range of larval food conditions. Comparing the frequency of G119S in fourth instar larvae and adults emerging from the same populations would provide a way to test whether this cost of resistance is being expressed in natural populations of An. gambiae and influencing the dynamics of this resistance mutation.

  1. Cloning of Two Acetylcholinesterase Genes and Analysis of Point Mutations Putatively Associated with Triazophos Resistance in Chilo auricilius (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guang-Hua; Li, Xiao-Huan; Zhang, Zhi-Chun; Liu, Bao-Sheng; Huang, Shui-Jin; Fang, Ji-Chao

    2015-06-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the target of organophosphate (OP) and carbamate insecticides. Mutations in the AChE gene (ace) leading to decreased insecticide susceptibility is the main resistance mechanism in insects. In this study, two Chilo auricilius acetylcholinesterase genes, designated as Caace1 and Caace2, were cloned using RT-PCR and RACE. Caace1 cDNA is 2534 bp, with ORF of 2082 bp, and it encodes an acetylcholinesterase 1 (CaAChE1) protein comprising a calculated 693 amino acid (aa) residues. Caace2 cDNA contains 2280 bp, with a full-length ORF of 1917 bp, encoding acetylcholinesterase 2 (CaAChE2) comprising a calculated 638 aa residues. At the aa level, CaAChE1 displays the highest similarity (97%) with the Chilo suppressalis AChE1, and CaAChE2 shows the highest similarity with the C. suppressalis AChE2 (99%). From the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) PCR (RFLP-PCR) analysis, one mutation in Caace1, similar to the ace1 mutation associated with triazophos resistance in C. suppressalis, was detected. Detailed examination of field populations of C. auricilius indicated this resistance mutation in C. auricilius is still quite infrequent. Based on the assay of AChE activity and RFLP-PCR testing, an individual that contains resistance mutation has lower AChE activities, while the individual that does not contain the resistance mutation has higher AChE activities. This study provides a basis for future investigations into the mechanism of OP resistance in C. auricilius, as well as a guidance for C. auricilius control with reasonable choice of pesticides. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Clonal dissemination, emergence of mutator lineages and antibiotic resistance evolution in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis chronic lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Causapé, Carla; Rojo-Molinero, Estrella; Mulet, Xavier; Cabot, Gabriel; Moyà, Bartolomé; Figuerola, Joan; Togores, Bernat; Pérez, José L; Oliver, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Chronic respiratory infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF). We investigated the interplay between three key microbiological aspects of these infections: the occurrence of transmissible and persistent strains, the emergence of variants with enhanced mutation rates (mutators) and the evolution of antibiotic resistance. For this purpose, 10 sequential isolates, covering up to an 8-year period, from each of 10 CF patients were studied. As anticipated, resistance significantly accumulated overtime, and occurred more frequently among mutator variants detected in 6 of the patients. Nevertheless, highest resistance was documented for the nonmutator CF epidemic strain LES-1 (ST-146) detected for the first time in Spain. A correlation between resistance profiles and resistance mechanisms evaluated [efflux pump (mexB, mexD, mexF, and mexY) and ampC overexpression and OprD production] was not always obvious and hypersusceptibility to certain antibiotics (such as aztreonam or meropenem) was frequently observed. The analysis of whole genome macrorestriction fragments through Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed that a single genotype (clone FQSE-A) produced persistent infections in 4 of the patients. Multilocus Sequence typing (MLST) identified clone FQSE-A as the CF epidemic clone ST-274, but striking discrepancies between PFGE and MLST profiles were evidenced. While PFGE macrorestriction patterns remained stable, a new sequence type (ST-1089) was detected in two of the patients, differing from ST-274 by only two point mutations in two of the genes, each leading to a nonpreviously described allele. Moreover, detailed genetic analyses revealed that the new ST-1089 is a mutS deficient mutator lineage that evolved from the epidemic strain ST-274, acquired specific resistance mechanisms, and underwent further interpatient spread. Thus, presented results provide the first evidence of interpatient dissemination of mutator

  3. Clonal dissemination, emergence of mutator lineages and antibiotic resistance evolution in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis chronic lung infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla López-Causapé

    Full Text Available Chronic respiratory infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF. We investigated the interplay between three key microbiological aspects of these infections: the occurrence of transmissible and persistent strains, the emergence of variants with enhanced mutation rates (mutators and the evolution of antibiotic resistance. For this purpose, 10 sequential isolates, covering up to an 8-year period, from each of 10 CF patients were studied. As anticipated, resistance significantly accumulated overtime, and occurred more frequently among mutator variants detected in 6 of the patients. Nevertheless, highest resistance was documented for the nonmutator CF epidemic strain LES-1 (ST-146 detected for the first time in Spain. A correlation between resistance profiles and resistance mechanisms evaluated [efflux pump (mexB, mexD, mexF, and mexY and ampC overexpression and OprD production] was not always obvious and hypersusceptibility to certain antibiotics (such as aztreonam or meropenem was frequently observed. The analysis of whole genome macrorestriction fragments through Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE revealed that a single genotype (clone FQSE-A produced persistent infections in 4 of the patients. Multilocus Sequence typing (MLST identified clone FQSE-A as the CF epidemic clone ST-274, but striking discrepancies between PFGE and MLST profiles were evidenced. While PFGE macrorestriction patterns remained stable, a new sequence type (ST-1089 was detected in two of the patients, differing from ST-274 by only two point mutations in two of the genes, each leading to a nonpreviously described allele. Moreover, detailed genetic analyses revealed that the new ST-1089 is a mutS deficient mutator lineage that evolved from the epidemic strain ST-274, acquired specific resistance mechanisms, and underwent further interpatient spread. Thus, presented results provide the first evidence of interpatient dissemination

  4. The HIVToolbox 2 web system integrates sequence, structure, function and mutation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Sargeant

    Full Text Available There is enormous interest in studying HIV pathogenesis for improving the treatment of patients with HIV infection. HIV infection has become one of the best-studied systems for understanding how a virus can hijack a cell. To help facilitate discovery, we previously built HIVToolbox, a web system for visual data mining. The original HIVToolbox integrated information for HIV protein sequence, structure, functional sites, and sequence conservation. This web system has been used for almost 40,000 searches. We report improvements to HIVToolbox including new functions and workflows, data updates, and updates for ease of use. HIVToolbox2, is an improvement over HIVToolbox with new functions. HIVToolbox2 has new functionalities focused on HIV pathogenesis including drug-binding sites, drug-resistance mutations, and immune epitopes. The integrated, interactive view enables visual mining to generate hypotheses that are not readily revealed by other approaches. Most HIV proteins form multimers, and there are posttranslational modification and protein-protein interaction sites at many of these multimerization interfaces. Analysis of protease drug binding sites reveals an anatomy of drug resistance with different types of drug-resistance mutations regionally localized on the surface of protease. Some of these drug-resistance mutations have a high prevalence in specific HIV-1 M subtypes. Finally, consolidation of Tat functional sites reveals a hotspot region where there appear to be 30 interactions or posttranslational modifications. A cursory analysis with HIVToolbox2 has helped to identify several global patterns for HIV proteins. An initial analysis with this tool identifies homomultimerization of almost all HIV proteins, functional sites that overlap with multimerization sites, a global drug resistance anatomy for HIV protease, and specific distributions of some DRMs in specific HIV M subtypes. HIVToolbox2 is an open-access web application available at

  5. Minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants in treatment naïve East-African and Caucasian patients detected by allele-specific real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halime Ekici

    Full Text Available To assess the presence of two major non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI drug resistance mutations (DRMs, Y181C and K103N, in minor viral quasispecies of treatment naïve HIV-1 infected East-African and Swedish patients by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR.Treatment naïve adults (n=191 with three epidemiological backgrounds were included: 92 Ethiopians living in Ethiopia; 55 East-Africans who had migrated to Sweden; and 44 Caucasians living in Sweden. The pol gene was analysed by standard population sequencing and by AS-PCR for the detection of Y181C and K103N.The Y181C was detected in the minority quasispecies of six Ethiopians (6.5%, in two Caucasians (4.5%, and in one East-African (1.8%. The K103N was detected in one East- African (1.8%, by both methods. The proportion of mutants ranged from 0.25% to 17.5%. Additional DRMs were found in all three treatment naïve patient groups by population sequencing.Major NNRTI mutations can be found by AS-PCR in minor quasispecies of treatment naïve HIV-1 infected Ethiopians living in Ethiopia, in East-African and Caucasian patients living in Sweden in whom population sequencing reveal wild-type virus only. Surveys with standard sequencing are likely to underestimate transmitted drug resistance and the presence of resistant minor quasispecies in treatment naïve patients should be topic for future large scale studies.

  6. A single residue mutation of 5-enoylpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase in Pseudomonas stutzeri enhances resistance to the herbicide glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Aimin; Sha, Jiying; Lu, Wei; Chen, Ming; Li, Liang; Jin, Dan; Yan, Yongliang; Wang, Jin; Ping, Shuzhen; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yiding; Lin, Min

    2008-08-01

    A novel class II 5-enoylpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) was identified from Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 by complementation of an Escherichia coli auxotrophic aroA mutant. The single amino acid substitution of serine (Ser) for asparagine (Asn)-130 of the A1501 EPSPS enhanced resistance to 200 mM glyphosate. The mutated EPSPS had a 2.5-fold increase for IC(50) [glyphosate] value, a 2-fold increase for K (i) [glyphosate] value, but a K (m) [PEP] value similar to that of wild type. The effect of the single residue mutation on glyphosate resistance was also analyzed using a computer-based three-dimensional model.

  7. Effect of Walker A mutation (K86M) on oligomerization and surface targeting of the multidrug resistance transporter ABCG2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ulla Birk; Gether, Ulrik; Litman, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) known to be critical for ATP binding and/or hydrolysis in ABC transporters. The mutant (ABCG2-K86M) was inactive as expected but was expressed at similar levels as the wild-type (wt) protein. The mutation did not affect the predicted oligomerization properties......The ATP binding cassette (ABC) half-transporter ABCG2 (MXR/BCRP/ABCP) is associated with mitoxantrone resistance accompanied by cross-resistance to a broad spectrum of cytotoxic drugs. Here we investigate the functional consequences of mutating a highly conserved lysine in the Walker A motif...... of the NBDs in assisting proper surface targeting of ABC transporters....

  8. Inheritance and stability of mevinphos-resistance in Plutella xylostella (L.), with special reference to mutations of acetylcholinesterase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Li; Yeh, Shih-Chia; Feng, Hai-Tung; Dai, Shu-Mei

    2017-09-01

    Diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella L.) causes enormous damage on cruciferous vegetables and can rapidly develop resistance to all kinds of insecticides. To effectively manage the insecticide resistance of P. xylostella, an understanding of its inheritance and stability is essential. Here we investigated the phenotypic and genotypic basis of mevinphos resistance by crossing two genetically pure lines of P. xylostella, an SH ggt wild-type strain and an SHM TCN resistant strain carrying 892T/T, 971C/C, and 1156T/G (TCN) mutations of the acetylcholinesterase 1 gene (Pxace1). Similar median lethal concentrations and degrees of dominance in the reciprocal cross progeny, and no plateau on the log concentration-probit line of F1 backcross and self-cross progeny, suggest that the mevinphos-resistance in P. xylostella is inherited as an autosomal and incomplete dominant trait governed by more than one gene. In the absence of mevinphos exposure, the resistance ratio and Pxace1 mutation frequency declined concomitantly in the SHM TCN strain. After 20-generation relaxation, the mevinphos resistance decreased from 52- to 6-fold and the Pxace1 mutation frequency of the TCN haplotype pair decreased from 100% to 0%. A good correlation was found between the resistance ratio and TCN frequency within the range of 12.5- to 25-fold resistance. Since there was no TCN haplotype pair detected below a resistance level of 12.5-fold, we speculate that resistance mechanisms other than target site insensitivity may exist. These observations are important for the prediction and management of mevinphos and related organophosphate resistance in field populations of P. xylostella. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Molecular characterization of mutations associated with resistance to second-line tuberculosis drug among multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients from high prevalence tuberculosis city in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudghiri, Amal; Karimi, Hind; Chetioui, Fouad; Zakham, Fathiah; Bourkadi, Jamal Eddine; Elmessaoudi, My Driss; Laglaoui, Amin; Chaoui, Imane; El Mzibri, Mohammed

    2018-02-27

    The emergence of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has raised public health concern for global TB control. Although multi drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR- TB) prevalence and associated genetic mutations in Morocco are well documented, scarce information on XDR TB is available. Hence, the evaluation of pre-XDR and XDR prevalence, as well as the mutation status of gyrA, gyrB, rrs, tlyA genes and eis promoter region, associated with resistance to second line drugs, is of great value for better management of M/XDR TB in Morocco. To evaluate pre-XDR and XDR prevalence, as well as the mutation status of gyrA, gyrB, rrs, tlyA genes and eis promoter region, associated with resistance to second line drug resistance, in 703 clinical isolates from TB patients recruited in Casablanca, and to assess the usefulness of molecular tools in clinical laboratories for better management of M/XDR TB in Morocco. Drug susceptibility testing (DST) was performed by the proportional method for first line drugs, and then the selected MDR isolates were tested for second line drugs (Ofloxacin, Kanamycin, Amikacin and Capreomycin). Along with DST, all samples were subjected to rpoB, katG and p-inhA mutation analysis by PCR and DNA sequencing. MDR isolates as well as 30 pan-susceptible strains were subjected to PCR and DNA sequencing of gyrA, gyrB, rrs, tlyA genes and eis promoter, associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones and injectable drugs. Among the 703 analysed strains, 12.8% were MDR; Ser531Leu and Ser315Thr being the most common recorded mutations within rpoB and katG genes associated with RIF and INH resistance respectively. Drug susceptibility testing for second line drugs showed that among the 90 MDR strains, 22.2% (20/90) were resistant to OFX, 2.22% (2/90) to KAN, 3.33% (3/90) to AMK and 1.11% (1/90) to CAP. Genotypic analysis revealed that 19 MDR strains harbored mutations in the gyrA gene; the most recorded mutation being Asp91Ala accounting for 47.6% (10

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a hydropathic facility: diversity, susceptibility and imipenem resistance mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, S G; Paixão, J; Leitão, R; Cardoso, O

    2011-11-01

    To detect Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water and treatment equipment biofilms of a thermae hydropathic facility and to study antibiotic susceptibility and genetic diversity. One hundred and fifty-four planktonic isolates were obtained from 2220 water samples during 4 years. Seventy-two biofilm isolates were obtained from 23 samples of inner parts of three inhalation equipments. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by disc diffusion. All isolates were susceptible to tested antimicrobials, except two biofilm isolates and one planktonic isolate. Twenty-one resistant mutants were observed (nine from biofilms), mostly with imipenem (IP) resistance (81%), by diminished expression of OprD porin, as it was observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Random amplification polymorphic DNA showed a genetically heterogeneous population that is spread through the entire system and persistent in time. IP resistance mutation ability was spread through the population. The permanent assessment of Ps. aeruginosa is necessary not only in water, as expressed in official programmes, but also in equipments where biofilms are evident. Ps. aeruginosa was more prevalent in biofilm populations and presented higher ability to adapt to antibiotic pressure. Twenty-one million people use thermae in Europe. Official microbiological quality control programmes only consider water surveillance. Present study proves the need of a review on current official programmes. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Mutations in PMR5 result in powdery mildew resistance and altered cell wall composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, John P; Raab, Theodore K; Somerville, Chris R; Somerville, Shauna C

    2004-12-01

    Powdery mildews and other obligate biotrophic pathogens are highly adapted to their hosts and often show limited host ranges. One facet of such host specialization is likely to be penetration of the host cell wall, a major barrier to infection. A mutation in the pmr5 gene rendered Arabidopsis resistant to the powdery mildew species Erysiphe cichoracearum and Erysiphe orontii, but not to the unrelated pathogens Pseudomonas syringae or Peronospora parasitica. PMR5 belongs to a large family of plant-specific genes of unknown function. pmr5-mediated resistance did not require signaling through either the salicylic acid or jasmonic acid/ethylene defense pathways, suggesting resistance in this mutant may be due either to the loss of a susceptibility factor or to the activation of a novel form of defense. Based on Fourier transform infrared analysis, the pmr5 cell walls were enriched in pectin and exhibited a reduced degree of pectin modification relative to wild-type cell walls. In addition, the mutant had smaller cells, suggesting a defect in cell expansion. A double mutant with pmr6 (defective in a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored pectate lyase-like gene) exhibited a strong increase in total uronic acid content and a more severe reduction in size, relative to the single mutants, suggesting that the two genes affect pectin composition, either directly or indirectly, via different mechanisms. These two mutants highlight the importance of the host cell wall in plant-microbe interactions.

  12. Contribution of Topoisomerase IV and DNA Gyrase Mutations in Streptococcus pneumoniae to Resistance to Novel Fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestova, Ekaterina; Beyer, Rebecca; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Noskin, Gary A.; Peterson, Lance R.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the activity of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, and trovafloxacin against clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae that were resistant to the less-recently developed fluoroquinolones by using defined amino acid substitutions in DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. The molecular basis for resistance was assessed by using mutants selected with trovafloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin in vitro. This demonstrated that the primary target of trovafloxacin in S. pneumoniae is the ParC subunit of DNA topoisomerase IV, similar to most other fluoroquinolones. However, first-step mutants bearing the Ser79→Phe/Tyr substitution in topoisomerase IV subunit ParC were susceptible to trovafloxacin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.25 μg/ml, and mutations in the structural genes for both topoisomerase IV subunit ParC (parC) and the DNA gyrase subunit (gyrA) were required to achieve levels of resistance above the breakpoint. The data also suggest that enhanced activity of trovafloxacin against pneumococci is due to a combination of factors that may include reduced efflux of this agent and an enhanced activity against both DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. PMID:10428926

  13. Identification and distribution of a GABA receptor mutation conferring dieldrin resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles funestus in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondji, Charles S; Dabire, Roch K; Tukur, Zainab; Irving, Helen; Djouaka, Rousseau; Morgan, John C

    2011-07-01

    Growing problems of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles funestus have intensified efforts to identify alternative insecticides. Many agrochemicals target the GABA receptors, but cross-resistance from dieldrin resistance may preclude their introduction. Dieldrin resistance was detected in An. funestus populations from West (Burkina Faso) and central (Cameroon) Africa, but populations from East (Uganda) and Southern Africa (Mozambique and Malawi) were fully susceptible to this insecticide. Partial sequencing of the dieldrin target site, the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor, identified two amino acid substitutions, A296S and V327I. The A296S mutation has been associated with dieldrin resistance in other species. The V327I mutations was detected in the resistant sample from Burkina Faso and Cameroon and consistently associated with the A296S substitution. The full-length of the An. funestus GABA-receptor gene, amplified by RT-PCR, generated a sequence of 1674 bp encoding 557 amino acid of the protein in An. funestus with 98% similarity to that of Anopheles gambiae. Two diagnostic assays were developed to genotype the A296S mutation (pyrosequencing and PCR-RFLP), and use of these assays revealed high frequency of the resistant allele in Burkina Faso (60%) and Cameroon (82%), moderate level in Benin (16%) while low frequency or absence of the mutation was observed respectively in Uganda (7.5%) or 0% in Malawi and Mozambique. The distribution of the Rdl(R) mutation in An. funestus populations in Africa suggests extensive barriers to gene flow between populations from different regions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The acquisition of full fluoroquinolone resistance in Salmonella Typhi by accumulation of point mutations in the topoisomerase targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Arthur K; Nair, Satheesh; Wain, John

    2006-10-01

    To determine the contribution to fluoroquinolone resistance of point mutations in the gyrA and parC genes of Salmonella Typhi. Point mutations that result in Ser-83-->Phe, Ser-83-->Tyr and Asp-87-->Asn amino acid substitutions in GyrA and Glu-84-->Lys in ParC were introduced into a quinolone-susceptible, attenuated strain of Salmonella Typhi using suicide vector technology. This is the first time that this approach has been used in Salmonella and abrogates the need for selection with quinolone antibacterials in the investigation of resistance mutations. A panel of mutants was created using this methodology and tested for quinolone resistance. The ParC substitution alone made no difference to quinolone susceptibility. Any single GyrA substitution resulted in resistance to nalidixic acid (MIC >or= 512 mg/L) and increased by up to 23-fold the MIC of the fluoroquinolones ofloxacin (MIC Phe or Tyr and Asp-87-->Asn in GyrA with Glu-84-->Lys in ParC) showed high levels of resistance to all the fluoroquinolones tested (MICs: gatifloxacin, 3-4 mg/L; ofloxacin, 32 mg/L; ciprofloxacin, 32-64 mg/L). In Salmonella Typhi the fluoroquinolones tested act on GyrA and, at higher concentrations, on ParC. The point mutations conferred reduced susceptibility to ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin, and also reduced susceptibility to gatifloxacin. Three mutations conferred resistance to ofloxacin (32 mg/L), ciprofloxacin (32 mg/L) and to the more active fluoroquinolone gatifloxacin (MIC >or= 3 mg/L). These results predict that the use of ofloxacin or ciprofloxacin will select for resistance to gatifloxacin in nature.

  15. Mutations in the Hco-mptl-1 gene in a field-derived monepantel-resistant isolate of Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnall, Neil H; Ruffell, Angela; Raza, Ali; Elliott, Timothy P; Lamb, Jane; Hunt, Peter W; Kotze, Andrew C

    2017-08-01

    Resistance to the anthelmintic drug monepantel (Zolvix ® ) has emerged in parasitic worms infecting sheep and goats. The mechanism of resistance in these cases is unknown. The drug targets nicotinic acetylcholine receptors belonging to the nematode-specific DEG-3 subfamily. We examined the receptor gene, Hco-mptl-1, in a highly Zolvix ® -resistant and a -susceptible isolate of the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. cDNA coding for the full length receptor protein (Hco-MPTL-1) was present in all clones prepared from a pool of susceptible larvae (21/21 clones) and approximately 50% of those from the resistant isolate (17/33). On the other hand, the remaining clones from the resistant isolate showed various mutations that resulted in truncated predicted proteins, missing at least one transmembrane domain. The most common mutation (11/33 clones) resulted in the retention of intron 15, a premature stop codon, and a truncated protein. Sequencing of intron 15 genomic DNA showed very few SNPs in susceptible larvae and in 12/18 clones from resistant larvae, alongside the presence of at least 17 SNPs in the remaining resistant clones. The present study shows that the highly resistant isolate has a number of mutations in the drug target gene that would most-likely result in a non-functional receptor, thus rendering the larvae insensitive to the drug. The presence of many wild-type sequences in this highly-resistant population suggests that there was a significant presence of heterozygotes in the survivors of the field drench treatment from which the isolate was derived, and hence that at least some of the mutations may be dominant. Alternatively, their presence may be due to the additional influence of mutations at another locus contributing to the resistance phenotype. The presence of multiple separate mutations in the Hco-mptl-1 gene in this viable field-derived worm isolate may at least partly explain why resistance to Zolvix ® has arisen rapidly in the field

  16. High-resolution melting facilitates mutation screening of rpsL gene associated with streptomycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feifei; Shen, Hongbo; Guan, Ming; Wang, Ying; Feng, Yun; Weng, Xinhua; Wang, Honghai; Zhang, Wenhong

    2011-02-20

    Drug resistance remains a serious threat to tuberculosis control worldwide. As one of the important first-line antitubercular agents, resistance to streptomycin (SM) and its derivatives has increased in recent years and has become one of the characteristics of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB). A novel rapid assay to screen for rpsL gene mutations associated with SM resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), was developed using high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. The HRM results of 134 SM-resistant clinical isolates and 20 SM-susceptible clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis for rpsL gene mutations were perfectly matched with those of DNA sequencing. SM resistance was highly associated with rpsL mutations in M. tuberculosis. HRM technique represented an inexpensive, highly sensitive and high-throughput method to facilitate the screening of large numbers of clinical samples for epidemiological studies of drug-resistance of M. tuberculosis, especially in developing countries. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Differences in reversion of resistance mutations to wild-type under structured treatment interruption and related increase in replication capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes C Paquet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The CPCRA 064 study examined the effect of structured treatment interruption (STI of up to 4 months followed by salvage treatment in patients failing therapy with multi-drug resistant HIV. We examined the relationship between the reversion rate of major reverse transcriptase (RT resistance-associated mutations and change in viral replication capacity (RC. The dataset included 90 patients with RC and genotypic data from virus samples collected at 0 (baseline, 2 and 4 months of STI.Rapid shift towards wild-type RC was observed during the first 2 months of STI. Median RC increased from 47.5% at baseline to 86.0% at 2 months and to 97.5% at 4 months. Between baseline and 2 months of STI, T215F had the fastest rate of reversion (41% and the reversion of E44D and T69D was associated with the largest changes in RC. Among the most prevalent RT mutations, M184V had the fastest rate of reversion from baseline to 2 months (40%, and its reversion was associated with the largest increase in RC. Most rates of reversion increased between 2 months and 4 months, but the change in RC was more limited as it was already close to 100%. The highest frequency of concurrent reversion was found for L100I and K103N. Mutagenesis tree models showed that M184V, when present, was overall the first mutation to revert among all the RT mutations reported in the study.Longitudinal analysis of combined phenotypic and genotypic data during STI showed a large amount of variability in prevalence and reversion rates to wild-type codons among the RT resistance-associated mutations. The rate of reversion of these mutations may depend on the extent of RC increase as well as the co-occurring reversion of other mutations belonging to the same mutational pathway.

  18. Mutations to the cardiotonic steroid binding site of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase are associated with high level of resistance to gamabufotalin in a natricine snake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Shabnam; Brodie, Edmund D; Neuman-Lee, Lorin A; Savitzky, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Although toads are defended by bufadienolide toxins, some snakes have evolved resistance to bufadienolides and feed heavily on toads. We compared resistance in Nerodia rhombifer, which possesses mutations that confer target-site resistance, to Pituophis catenifer, which lacks those mutations. Even at the highest dosage tested, Nerodia showed no effects, whereas the lowest dose was lethal to Pituophis. Our results demonstrate a striking level of resistance to bufadienolides in a species possessing the mutations for resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid preparation of nuclei-depleted detergent-resistant membrane fractions suitable for proteomics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhopadhyay Nishit K

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts have been implicated in diverse physiologic processes including lipid transport and signal transduction. Lipid rafts were originally defined as detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs due to their relative insolubility in cold non-ionic detergents. Recent findings suggest that, although DRMs are not equivalent to lipid rafts, the presence of a given protein within DRMs strongly suggests its potential for raft association in vivo. Therefore, isolation of DRMs represents a useful starting point for biochemical analysis of lipid rafts. The physicochemical properties of DRMs present unique challenges to analysis of their protein composition. Existing methods of isolating DRM-enriched fractions involve flotation of cell extracts in a sucrose density gradient, which, although successful, can be labor intensive, time consuming and results in dilute sucrose-containing fractions with limited utility for direct proteomic analysis. In addition, several studies describing the proteomic characterization of DRMs using this and other approaches have reported the presence of nuclear proteins in such fractions. It is unclear whether these results reflect trafficking of nuclear proteins to DRMs or whether they arise from nuclear contamination during isolation. To address these issues, we have modified a published differential detergent extraction method to enable rapid DRM isolation that minimizes nuclear contamination and yields fractions compatible with mass spectrometry. Results DRM-enriched fractions isolated using the conventional or modified extraction methods displayed comparable profiles of known DRM-associated proteins, including flotillins, GPI-anchored proteins and heterotrimeric G-protein subunits. Thus, the modified procedure yielded fractions consistent with those isolated by existing methods. However, we observed a marked reduction in the percentage of nuclear proteins

  20. Survey of chloroquine-resistant mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum pfcrt and pfmdr-1 genes in Hadhramout, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamaga, Omar A A; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2015-09-01

    Malaria is still a major public health problem in Yemen. More than 95% of the malaria cases are due to Plasmodium ‎falciparum‎. Recently in Yemen, the antimalarial treatment policy was changed from chloroquine (CQ) to artemisinin combination therapy (ACTs). However, CQ is still available and prescribed in the Yemeni market. The persistence of CQ resistance will be prolonged if the shift to ACT and the simultaneous withdrawal of CQ are not rigorously implemented. The aim of the current survey is to detect chloroquine-resistant mutations in P. falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multi-drug resistance-1 (pfmdr1) genes. These data will be important for future monitoring and assessment of antimalarial drug policy in Yemen. Blood specimens were collected from 735 individuals from different districts of the Hadhramout province, Yemen by house-to-house visit. Mutation-specific nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods were used to investigate the mutations in the pfmdr1(codons 86 and 1246) and pfcrt (codons 76, 271, 326, 356 and 371) genes. The overall prevalence of pfcrt mutations at codons 76, 271, 326 and 371 were 50.4%, 58.7%, 54.3% and 44.9%, respectively. All isolates had wild-type pfcrt 356 allele. The majority of pfmdr1 86 alleles (83.3%) and all pfmdr1 1246 alleles were wild type. There was no association between pfcrt mutations and symptomatology, gender and age groups. In conclusion, point mutations in codons 76, 271, 326 and 371 of pfcrt of P. falciparum are high suggesting a sustained high CQ resistance even after 4 years of shifting to ACTs. These findings warrant complete withdrawal of CQ use from the Yemeni market for P. falciparum and careful usage of CQ for treating Plasmodium vivax. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Macrolide Resistance in Treponema pallidum Correlates With 23S rDNA Mutations in Recently Isolated Clinical Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molini, Barbara J; Tantalo, Lauren C; Sahi, Sharon K; Rodriguez, Veronica I; Brandt, Stephanie L; Fernandez, Mark C; Godornes, Charmie B; Marra, Christina M; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2016-09-01

    High rates of 23S rDNA mutations implicated in macrolide resistance have been identified in Treponema pallidum samples from syphilis patients in many countries. Nonetheless, some clinicians have been reluctant to abandon azithromycin as a treatment for syphilis, citing the lack of a causal association between these mutations and clinical evidence of drug resistance. Although azithromycin resistance has been demonstrated in vivo for the historical Street 14 strain, no recent T. pallidum isolates have been tested. We used the well-established rabbit model of syphilis to determine the in vivo efficacy of azithromycin against 23S rDNA mutant strains collected in 2004 to 2005 from patients with syphilis in Seattle, Wash. Groups of 9 rabbits were each infected with a strain containing 23S rDNA mutation A2058G (strains UW074B, UW189B, UW391B) or A2059G (strains UW228B, UW254B, and UW330B), or with 1 wild type strain (Chicago, Bal 3, and Mexico A). After documentation of infection, 3 animals per strain were treated with azithromycin, 3 were treated with benzathine penicillin G, and 3 served as untreated control groups. Treatment efficacy was documented by darkfield microscopic evidence of T. pallidum, serological response, and rabbit infectivity test. Azithromycin uniformly failed to cure rabbits infected with strains harboring either 23S rDNA mutation, although benzathine penicillin G was effective. Infections caused by wild type strains were successfully treated by either azithromycin or benzathine penicillin G. A macrolide resistant phenotype was demonstrated for all strains harboring a 23S rDNA mutation, demonstrating that either A2058G or A2059G mutation confers in vivo drug resistance.

  2. Influence of Drug Resistance Mutations on the Activity of HIV-1 Subtypes A and B Integrases: a Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadrina, O A; Zatsepin, T S; Agapkina, Yu Yu; Isaguliants, M G; Gottikh, M B

    2015-01-01

    Integration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) DNA into the genome of an infected cell is one of the key steps in the viral replication cycle. The viral enzyme integrase (IN), which catalyzes the integration, is an attractive target for the development of new antiviral drugs. However, the HIV-1 therapy often results in the IN gene mutations inducing viral resistance to integration inhibitors. To assess the impact of drug resistance mutations on the activity of IN of HIV-1 subtype A strain FSU-A, which is dominant in Russia, variants of the consensus IN of this subtype containing the primary resistance mutations G118R and Q148K and secondary compensatory substitutions E138K and G140S were prepared and characterized. Comparative study of these enzymes with the corresponding mutants of IN of HIV-1 subtype B strains HXB-2 was performed. The mutation Q148K almost equally reduced the activity of integrases of both subtypes. Its negative effect was partially compensated by the secondary mutations E138K and G140S. Primary substitution G118R had different influence on the activity of proteins of the subtypes A and B, and the compensatory effect of the secondary substitution E138K also depended on the viral subtype. Comparison of the mutants resistance to the known strand transfer inhibitors raltegravir and elvitegravir, and a new inhibitor XZ-259 (a dihydro-1H-isoindol derivative), showed that integrases of both subtypes with the Q148K mutation were insensitive to raltegravir and elvitegravir but were effectively inhibited by XZ-259. The substitution G118R slightly reduced the efficiency of IN inhibition by raltegravir and elvitegravir and caused no resistance to XZ_259.

  3. A Mutation in the Decoding Center of Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA Suggests a Novel Mechanism of Streptomycin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Steven T.; Carr, Jennifer F.; Dahlberg, Albert E.

    2005-01-01

    A spontaneous kanamycin resistance and capreomycin resistance mutation, A1408G, in the decoding center of 16S rRNA, was identified in the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus. Unexpectedly, this mutation also confers resistance to streptomycin. We propose a novel mechanism of streptomycin resistance by which A1408G influences conformational changes in 16S rRNA during tRNA selection. PMID:15743969

  4. Thyroid Hormone Receptor Mutations in Cancer and Resistance to Thyroid Hormone: Perspective and Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan D. Rosen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone, operating through its receptors, plays crucial roles in the control of normal human physiology and development; deviations from the norm can give rise to disease. Clinical endocrinologists often must confront and correct the consequences of inappropriately high or low thyroid hormone synthesis. Although more rare, disruptions in thyroid hormone endocrinology due to aberrations in the receptor also have severe medical consequences. This review will focus on the afflictions that are caused by, or are closely associated with, mutated thyroid hormone receptors. These include Resistance to Thyroid Hormone Syndrome, erythroleukemia, hepatocellular carcinoma, renal clear cell carcinoma, and thyroid cancer. We will describe current views on the molecular bases of these diseases, and what distinguishes the neoplastic from the non-neoplastic. We will also touch on studies that implicate alterations in receptor expression, and thyroid hormone levels, in certain oncogenic processes.

  5. Adenocarcinoma of the lung with EGFR gene mutation and subsequent resistance mechanisms exploration: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu L

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Li Xu,1,2 Qian Z Wang,1,2 Lin Wu1,2 1Department of the Second Chest Medicine, Hunan Cancer Hospital, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of the Second Chest Medicine, The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The treatment of lung cancer has made paradigm-shift advancements in the past decade with the development of therapies directed at specific genetic alterations, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Here, we present a rare case of lung adenocarcinoma harboring EGFR activating mutation and ALK overexpression. During the EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment, next-generation sequencing revealed phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway amplifications in tumor specimen and subsequent T790M mutation via plasma circulating tumor DNA. In conclusion, this case illustrates the existence of concomitant resistance mechanisms and demonstrates that circulating tumor DNA can reflect tumor heterogeneity. Keywords: epidermal growth factor receptor, PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, T790M, next-generation sequencing, circulating tumor DNA

  6. Dynamics of Mutator and Antibiotic-Resistant Populations in a Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macià, María D.; Pérez, José L.; Molin, Søren

    2011-01-01

    tagged PAO1 and PAOMS (mutator [mutS] derivative) strains. Two-day-old biofilms were treated with ciprofloxacin (CIP) for 4 days (t4) at 2 µg/ml, which correlated with the mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and provided an AUC/MIC ratio of 384 that should predict therapeutic success. Biofilms were...... monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and the numbers of viable cells and resistant mutants (4- and 16-fold MICs) were determined. Despite optimized pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameters, CIP treatment did not suppress resistance development in P. aeruginosa biofilms. One.......01 proportion, took over the whole biofilm after only 2 days of CIP treatment outnumbering PAO1 by 3 log at t4. Our results show that mutational mechanisms play a major role in biofilm antibiotic resistance and that theoretically optimized PK/PD parameters fail to suppress resistance development, suggesting...

  7. The N550K/H Mutations in FGFR2 Confer Differential Resistance to PD173074, Dovitinib, and Ponatinib ATP-Competitive Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara A Byron

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We sought to identify fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2 kinase domain mutations that confer resistance to the pan-FGFR inhibitor, dovitinib, and explore the mechanism of action of the drug-resistant mutations. We cultured BaF3 cells overexpressing FGFR2 in high concentrations of dovitinib and identified 14 dovitinib-resistant mutations, including the N550K mutation observed in 25% of FGFR2mutant endometrial cancers (ECs. Structural and biochemical in vitro kinase analyses, together with BaF3 proliferation assays, showed that the resistance mutations elevate the intrinsic kinase activity of FGFR2. BaF3 lines were used to assess the ability of each mutation to confer cross-resistance to PD173074 and ponatinib. Unlike PD173074, ponatinib effectively inhibited all the dovitinib-resistant FGFR2 mutants except the V565I gatekeeper mutation, suggesting ponatinib but not dovitinib targets the active conformation of FGFR2 kinase. EC cell lines expressing wild-type FGFR2 were relatively resistant to all inhibitors, whereas EC cell lines expressing mutated FGFR2 showed differential sensitivity. Within the FGFR2mutant cell lines, three of seven showed marked resistance to PD173074 and relative resistance to dovitinib and ponatinib. This suggests that alternative mechanisms distinct from kinase domain mutations are responsible for intrinsic resistance in these three EC lines. Finally, overexpression of FGFR2N550K in JHUEM-2 cells (FGFR2C383R conferred resistance (about five-fold to PD173074, providing independent data that FGFR2N550K can be associated with drug resistance. Biochemical in vitro kinase analyses also show that ponatinib is more effective than dovitinib at inhibiting FGFR2N550K. We propose that tumors harboring mutationally activated FGFRs should be treated with FGFR inhibitors that specifically bind the active kinase.

  8. Target-site mutations conferring resistance to glyphosate in feathertop Rhodes grass (Chloris virgata) populations in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, The D; Krishnan, Mahima; Boutsalis, Peter; Gill, Gurjeet; Preston, Christopher

    2018-05-01

    Chloris virgata is a warm-season, C 4 , annual grass weed affecting field crops in northern Australia that has become an emerging weed in southern Australia. Four populations with suspected resistance to glyphosate were collected in South Australia, Queensland and New South Wales, Australia, and compared with one susceptible (S) population to confirm glyphosate resistance and elucidate possible mechanisms of resistance. Based on the rate of glyphosate required to kill 50% of treated plants (LD 50 ), glyphosate resistance (GR) was confirmed in four populations of C. virgata (V12, V14.2, V14.16 and V15). GR plants were 2-9.7-fold more resistant and accumulated less shikimate after glyphosate treatment than S plants. GR and S plants did not differ in glyphosate absorption and translocation. Target-site EPSPS mutations corresponding to Pro-106-Leu (V14.2) and Pro-106-Ser (V15, V14.16 and V12) substitutions were found in GR populations. The population with Pro-106-Leu substitution was 2.9-4.9-fold more resistant than the three other populations with Pro-106-Ser substitution. This report confirms glyphosate resistance in C. virgata and shows that target-site EPSPS mutations confer resistance to glyphosate in this species. The evolution of glyphosate resistance in C. virgata highlights the need to identify alternative control tactics. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Evolution of Acinetobacter baumannii In Vivo: International Clone II, More Resistance to Ceftazidime, Mutation in ptk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoting Hua

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen worldwide. A more comprehensive understanding of the within-host genomic evolution of A. baumannii would provide a molecule basis for improving treatment of A. baumannii infection. To understand the evolutionary mechanism facilitating A. baumannii survived in human body, we here reported the genomic analysis of A. baumannii isolated sampled from Chinese patients. We used whole-genome sequence of A. baumannii isolates from the same patient to determine single-nucleotide variants, insertion sequence mapping, and gene change. The MICs for 10 antimicrobial agents were determined. Motility assay and microscopy were performed on the isolated pairs harboring ptk mutations. The gene ptk encoded a putative protein tyrosine kinase involved in the production of capsular polysaccharide. Approximately half (39/86 of the strains isolated from the same patient harbored the same MLST patterns, and during the replacement of international clonal lineage II (ICL-II and non-ICL-II strains, most of the alteration was that non-ICL-II strain was replaced by ICL-II strain (10/12. A. baumannii was resistant to major antimicrobial agents, whereas the strains were more resistant to ceftazidime, azithromycin, and sulfonamides after within-host evolution. Isolates from the ICL-II lineage displayed greater resistance to antimicrobial agents than non-ICL-II isolates. Isolates from ICL-II harbored more resistance genes and mobile elements than non-ICL-II strains. Several lineages evolved a more mucoid phenotype. Genome sequencing revealed that the phenotype was achieved by genetic changes in the ptk gene. ICL-II (especially ST195 and ST208 was the terminal destination for bacteria after within-host evolution. These results indicate that the molecular basis and the treatment for ICL-II strains needed further investigation.

  10. Mutation in the Sodium Channel Gene Corresponds With Phenotypic Resistance of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Acari: Ixodidae) to Pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klafke, G M; Miller, R J; Tidwell, J; Barreto, R; Guerrero, F D; Kaufman, P E; Pérez de León, A A

    2017-11-07

    The brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Latreille), is a cosmopolitan ectoparasite and vector of pathogens that kill humans and animals. Pyrethroids represent a class of synthetic acaricides that have been used intensely to try to control the brown dog tick and mitigate the risk of tick-borne disease transmission. However, acaricide resistance is an emerging problem in the management of the brown dog tick. Understanding the mechanism of resistance to acaricides, including pyrethroids, is important to adapt brown dog tick control strategies. The main objective of this study was to determine if target-site mutations associated with pyrethroid resistance in other pests could be associated with phenotypic resistance detected in a brown dog tick population from Florida. We amplified segment 6 of the domain III of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel protein, using cDNAs synthesized from pyrethroid-susceptible and pyrethroid-resistant tick strains. A single nucleotide point mutation (SNP) identified in a highly conserved region of domain III S6 in the resistant ticks resulted in an amino acid change from phenylalanine to leucine. This mutation is characteristic of resistance phenotypes in other tick species, and is the first report of this mutation in R. sanguineus. Molecular assays based on this knowledge could be developed to diagnose the risk for pyrethroid resistance, and to inform decisions on integrated brown dog tick management practices. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Detection of First-Line Drug Resistance Mutations and Drug-Protein Interaction Dynamics from Tuberculosis Patients in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachappa, Somanna Ajjamada; Neelambike, Sumana M; Amruthavalli, Chokkanna; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2017-08-16

    Diagnosis of drug-resistant tuberculosis predominantly relies on culture-based drug susceptibility testing, which take weeks to produce a result and a more time-efficient alternative method is multiplex allele-specific PCR (MAS-PCR). Also, understanding the role of mutations in causing resistance helps better drug designing. To evaluate the ability of MAS-PCR in the detection of drug resistance and to understand the mechanism of interaction of drugs with mutant proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Detection of drug-resistant mutations using MAS-PCR and validation through DNA sequencing. MAS-PCR targeted five loci on three genes, katG 315 and inhA -15 for the drug isoniazid (INH), and rpoB 516, 526, and 531 for rifampicin (RIF). Furthermore, the sequence data were analyzed to study the effect on interaction of the anti-TB drug molecule with the target protein using in silico docking. We identified drug-resistant mutations in 8 out of 114 isolates with 2 of them as multidrug-resistant TB using MAS-PCR. DNA sequencing confirmed only six of these, recording a sensitivity of 85.7% and specificity of 99.3% for MAS-PCR. Molecular docking showed estimated free energy of binding (ΔG) being higher for RIF binding with RpoB S531L mutant. Codon 315 in KatG does not directly interact with INH but blocks the drug access to active site. We propose DNA sequencing-based drug resistance detection for TB, which is more accurate than MAS-PCR. Understanding the action of resistant mutations in disrupting the normal drug-protein interaction aids in designing effective drug alternatives.

  12. Emergence of Mycoplasma genitalium strains showing mutations associated with macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance in the region Dresden, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumke, Roger; Thürmer, Alexander; Jacobs, Enno

    2016-10-01

    Among 323 specimens from male patients with symptoms of non-gonococcal urethritis, Mycoplasma genitalium was detected in 19 samples by real-time PCR. Mutations of 23S rRNA gene associated with macrolide resistance were confirmed in 10 strains. Amino acid changes at positions 81 and 83 of ParC protein were demonstrated indicating quinolone resistance of two strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Association of mutator activity with UV sensitivity in an aphidicolin-resistant mutant of Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.K.; Chang, C.; Trosko, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The spontaneous mutation rates of an ultraviolet light (UV)-sensitive aphidicolin-resistant mutant (aphsup(r)-4-2) and its revertants have been determined by 2 techniques. By using the fluctuation analysis, the mutant and its thymidine (TdR)-prototrophic 'revertant' were found to exhibit elevated spontaneous mutation rates at the 6-thioguanine- and diphtheria-toxin-resistant loci. In contrast, the TdR-auxotrophic 'revertant' did not show this property. Similar results were obtained by the multiple replating technique. From these comparative studies and other previous characterizations, it appears that a single gene mutation is responsible for the following pleiotropic phenotype: slow growth, UV sensitivity, high UV-induced mutability, high frequency of site-specific bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-dependent chromosome breaks and enhanced spontaneous mutation rate. Recent studies indicate that the mutation may be on the gene for DNA polymerase α. The results further indicate that thymidine auxotrophy or imbalance in nucleotide pools is not necessarily associated with the mutator activity in mammalian cells. (orig.)

  14. Characterization of ultraviolet light-induced diphtheria toxin-resistant mutations in normal and Xeroderma pigmentosum human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative mutagenesis studies in human cells have been severely limited by the lack of reliable genetic markers. Experiments were therefore performed to develop and characterize a better quantitative mutation assay for human cells. The uv-induction of diphtheria toxin resistant (DT/sup r/) mutations in normal and excision repair defective xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts has been quantitatively characterized. A concentration of diphtheria toxin to use in the selection of resistant mutants was determined whereby DT/sup r/ cells are cross-resistant to Pseudomonas aeurginosa exotoxin A, indicating mutants have altered elongation factor-2 (EF-2) which is not susceptible to ADP-ribosylation by either toxin. Results of this study indicate that XP fibroblasts have higher uv-induced mutation frequencies per unit uv-dose but similar frequencies per unit survival compared to normal cells as measured using a new genetic marker for quantitative mutagenesis. Furthermore, these results support a prediction of the mutation theory of cancer, namely, that cells from individuals with certain human syndromes that predispose the individual to cancer will have higher induced mutation frequencies than cells from non-susceptible individuals. This newly characterized genetic marker should be useful in quantitative mutagenesis studies in human cells

  15. Potent antiviral agents fail to elicit genetically-stable resistance mutations in either enterovirus 71 or Coxsackievirus A16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, James T; De Colibus, Luigi; Elliott, Lauren; Fry, Elizabeth E; Stuart, David I; Rowlands, David J; Stonehouse, Nicola J

    2015-12-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) are the two major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), for which there are currently no licenced treatments. Here, the acquisition of resistance towards two novel capsid-binding compounds, NLD and ALD, was studied and compared to the analogous compound GPP3. During serial passage, EV71 rapidly became resistant to each compound and mutations at residues I113 and V123 in VP1 were identified. A mutation at residue 113 was also identified in CVA16 after passage with GPP3. The mutations were associated with reduced thermostability and were rapidly lost in the absence of inhibitors. In silico modelling suggested that the mutations prevented the compounds from binding the VP1 pocket in the capsid. Although both viruses developed resistance to these potent pocket-binding compounds, the acquired mutations were associated with large fitness costs and reverted to WT phenotype and sequence rapidly in the absence of inhibitors. The most effective inhibitor, NLD, had a very large selectivity index, showing interesting pharmacological properties as a novel anti-EV71 agent. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The detection of pfcrt and pfmdr1 point mutations as molecular markers of chloroquine drug resistance, Pahang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atroosh, Wahib M; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Surin, Johari

    2012-08-01

    Malaria is still a public health problem in Malaysia with chloroquine (CQ) being the first-line drug in the treatment policy of uncomplicated malaria. There is a scarcity in information about the magnitude of Plasmodium falciparum CQ resistance. This study aims to investigate the presence of single point mutations in the P. falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) at codons 76, 271, 326, 356 and 371 and in P. falciparum multi-drug resistance-1 gene (pfmdr1) at codons 86 and 1246, as molecular markers of CQ resistance. A total of 75 P. falciparum blood samples were collected from different districts of Pahang state, Malaysia. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in pfcrt gene (codons 76, 271, 326, 356 and 371) and pfmdr1 gene (codons 86 and 1246) were analysed by using mutation-specific nested PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods. Mutations of pfcrt K76T and pfcrt R371I were the most prevalent among pfcrt gene mutations reported by this study; 52% and 77%, respectively. Other codons of the pfcrt gene and the positions 86 and 1246 of the pfmdr1 gene were found mostly of wild type. Significant associations of pfcrt K76T, pfcrt N326S and pfcrt I356T mutations with parasitaemia were also reported. The high existence of mutant pfcrt T76 may indicate the low susceptibility of P. falciparum isolates to CQ in Peninsular Malaysia. The findings of this study establish baseline data on the molecular markers of P. falciparum CQ resistance, which may help in the surveillance of drug resistance in Peninsular Malaysia.

  17. Impairing methylations at ribosome RNA, a point mutation-dependent strategy for aminoglycoside resistance: the rsmG case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Cárdenas-Brito, Sonia; Corredor, Mauricio; Villarroya, Magda; Armengod, María Eugenia

    2014-04-01

    Aminoglycosides like streptomycin are well-known for binding at specific regions of ribosome RNA and then acting as translation inhibitors. Nowadays, several pathogens have been detected to acquire an undefined strategy involving mutation at non structural ribosome genes like those acting as RNA methylases. rsmG is one of those genes which encodes an AdoMet-dependent methyltransferase responsible for the synthesis of m 7 G527 in the 530 loop of bacterial 16S rRNA. This loop is universally conserved, plays a key role in ribosomal accuracy, and is a target for streptomycin binding. Loss of the m 7 G527 modification confers low-level streptomycin resistance and may affect ribosomal functioning. After taking into account genetic information indicating that some clinical isolates of human pathogens show streptomycin resistance associated with mutations at rsmG , we decided to explore new hot spots for mutation capable of impairing the RsmG in vivo function and of promoting low-level streptomycin resistance. To gain insights into the molecular and genetic mechanism of acquiring this aminoglycoside resistance phenotype and the emergence of high-level streptomycin resistance in rsmG mutants, we mutated Escherichia coli rsmG and also performed a genotyping study on rpsL from several isolates showing the ability to grow at higher streptomycin concentrations than parental strains. We found that the mutations at rpsL were preferentially present in these mutants, and we observed a clear synergy between rsmG and rpsL genes to induce streptomycin resistance. We contribute to understand a common mechanism that is probably transferable to other ribosome RNA methylase genes responsible for modifications at central sites for ribosome function.

  18. Trends of drug-resistance-associated mutations in the reverse transcriptase gene of HIV type 1 isolates from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Mohd; Malik, Abida; Rizvi, Meher; Rai, Arvind

    2014-04-01

    A major cause of failure of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the presence of drug-resistance-associated mutations in the polymerase gene of HIV-1. The paucity of data regarding potential drug resistance to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) prompted us to carry out this study. This information will shed light on the extent of drug resistance already present in HIV strains and will give future directions in patient treatment and in drug design. Drug resistance genotyping of a partial reverse transcriptase gene was done in 103 HIV-1-infected patients, including the ART-naive and ART-experienced population. The drug resistance pattern was analyzed using the Stanford HIV-DR database, the IAS-USA mutation list and the REGA algorithm-v8.0. Subtyping was done using the REGA HIV-1 subtyping tool-v2.01. The majority of our sequences (96 %) were found to be subtype C, and four (3.8 %) were subtype A1. Significant prevalence of DR mutations (28 %) was observed in the RT gene. Major amino acid substitutions were seen at positions 41, 90, 98, 103, 106, 108, 138, 181, 184, 190, 215, and 219, which confer high/intermediate levels of resistance to most RTIs, independently or together. Our results show that there is an urgent need to tailor ART drug regimens to the individual to achieve optimum therapeutic outcome in North India.

  19. Oxazolidinone resistance mutations in 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli reveal the central region of domain V as the primary site of drug action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, L; Kloss, P; Douthwaite, S

    2000-01-01

    , we selected Escherichia coli oxazolidinone-resistant mutants, which contained a randomly mutagenized plasmid-borne rRNA operon. The same mutation, G2032 to A, was identified in the 23S rRNA genes of several independent resistant isolates. Engineering of this mutation by site-directed mutagenesis...

  20. Cross-resistance patterns to acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides of flixweed (Descurainia sophia L.) conferred by different combinations of ALS isozymes with a Pro-197-Thr mutation or a novel Trp-574-Leu mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Yang, Qian; Zhang, Yongzhi; Jiao, Hongtao; Mei, Yu; Li, Xuefeng; Zheng, Mingqi

    2017-03-01

    Acetolactate synthase (ALS) is the common target of ALS-inhibiting herbicides, and target-site ALS mutations are the main mechanism of resistance to ALS-inhibiting herbicides. In this study, ALS1 and ALS2 genes with full lengths of 2004bp and 1998bp respectively were cloned in individual plants of susceptible (S) or resistant (R) flixweed (Descurainia sophia L.) populations. Two ALS mutations of Pro-197-Thr and/or Trp-574-Leu were identified in plants of three R biotypes (HB24, HB30 and HB42). In order to investigate the function of ALS isozymes in ALS-inhibiting herbicide resistance, pHB24 (a Pro-197-Thr mutation in ALS1 and a wild type ALS2), pHB42 (a Trp-574-Leu mutation in ALS1 and a wild type ALS2) and pHB30 (a Trp-574-Leu mutation in ALS1 and a Pro-197-Thr mutation in ALS2) subpopulations individually homozygous for different ALS mutations were generated. Individuals of pHB30 had mutations in each isozyme of ALS and had higher resistance than pHB24 and pHB42 populations containing mutations in only one ALS isozyme. Moreover, the pHB24 had resistance to SU, TP and SCT herbicides, whereas pHB24 and pHB42 had resistance to these classes of herbicides as well as IMI and PTB herbicides. The sensitivity of isolated ALS enzyme to inhibition by herbicides in these populations correlated with whole plant resistance levels. Therefore, reduced ALS sensitivity resulting from the mutations in ALS was responsible for resistance to ALS-inhibiting herbicides in flixweed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Are Present in Six Percent of Persons Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Lusaka, Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, Raph L.; Siwale, Margaret; Wallis, Carole L.; Labib, Moheb; van Hasselt, Robbert; Stevens, Wendy S.; Schuurman, Rob; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; van Vugt, Michèle; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the mutational patterns and factors associated with baseline drug-resistant HIV-1 present at initiation of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) at 3 sites in Lusaka, Zambia, in 2007-2008. Methods: Population sequencing of the HIV-1 pol gene was performed in the PharmAccess

  2. Correlation of oxidative stress in patients with HBV-induced liver disease with HBV genotypes and drug resistance mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianyu, Jianbo; Feng, Jiafu; Yang, Yuwei; Tang, Jie; Xie, Gang; Fan, Lingying

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to explore the correlation of oxidative stress (OxS) in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and the disease severity with HBV genotypes and drug resistance mutations. A total of 296 patients with CHB were enrolled into the study. PCR-reverse dot-blot hybridization was used to detect the HBV genotypes (B, C, and D) and the drug resistance-causing HBV mutant genes. In addition, the total oxidative stress (TOS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) were determined, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated and compared. Serum levels of TOS and OSI, the B/C ratio, and drug resistance mutation rate were increased along with the elevated disease severity degree (CHBHBV mutation had higher serum TOS and OSI levels, while lower serum TAS levels (P HBV-induced liver disease, and the damage degree is correlated with the HBV genotype and drug resistance mutation. Oxidative stress might be a useful indicator of the progression of HBV-induced liver disease in patients. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel González-Cabrera

    Full Text Available The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes.

  4. Development of drug resistance mutations in patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy: does competitive advantage drive evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolber, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    Most physicians that treat individuals with HIV-1 disease are able to successfully suppress viral replication with the pharmacologic armamentarium available today. For the majority of patients this results in immune reconstitution and improved quality of life. However, a large fraction of these patients have transient elevations in their viral burden and even persistence of low-level viremia. In fact, many individuals whose viral load is suppressed to < 50 c/ml have evidence of low-level viral replication. The impact of low-level viremia and persistent viral replication is an area of significant study and interest owing to the potential for the development of drug resistance mutations. Here the fundamental question is whether and perhaps what factors provide a venue for the development of resistant virus. The concern is clearly the eventual progression of disease with the exhaustion of treatment options. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current literature regarding the effect of low-level viremia on the development of drug resistance mutations. Herein, we discuss the impact of different levels of viral suppression on the development of mutations. In addition, we look at the role that resistance and fitness play in determining the survival of a breakthrough mutation within the background of drug.

  5. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cabrera, Joel; Rodríguez-Vargas, Sonia; Davies, T. G. Emyr; Field, Linda M.; Schmehl, Daniel; Ellis, James D.; Krieger, Klemens; Williamson, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V) of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes. PMID:27191597

  6. Identification of novel mutations responsible for resistance to MK-2048, a second-generation HIV-1 integrase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Magen, Tamara; Sloan, Richard D; Donahue, Daniel A; Kuhl, Björn D; Zabeida, Alexandra; Xu, Hongtao; Oliveira, Maureen; Hazuda, Daria J; Wainberg, Mark A

    2010-09-01

    MK-2048 represents a prototype second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) developed with the goal of retaining activity against viruses containing mutations associated with resistance to first-generation INSTIs, raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG). Here, we report the identification of mutations (G118R and E138K) which confer resistance to MK-2048 and not to RAL or EVG. These mutations were selected in vitro and confirmed by site-specific mutagenesis. G118R, which appeared first in cell culture, conferred low levels of resistance to MK-2048. G118R also reduced viral replication capacity to approximately 1% that of the isogenic wild-type (wt) virus. The subsequent selection of E138K partially restored replication capacity to approximately 13% of wt levels and increased resistance to MK-2048 to approximately 8-fold. Viruses containing G118R and E138K remained largely susceptible to both RAL and EVG, suggesting a unique interaction between this second-generation INSTI and the enzyme may be defined by these residues as a potential basis for the increased intrinsic affinity and longer "off" rate of MK-2048. In silico structural analysis suggests that the introduction of a positively charged arginine at position 118, near the catalytic amino acid 116, might decrease Mg(2+) binding, compromising enzyme function and thus leading to the significant reduction in both integration and viral replication capacity observed with these mutations.

  7. Identification of Novel Mutations Responsible for Resistance to MK-2048, a Second-Generation HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Magen, Tamara; Sloan, Richard D.; Donahue, Daniel A.; Kuhl, Björn D.; Zabeida, Alexandra; Xu, Hongtao; Oliveira, Maureen; Hazuda, Daria J.; Wainberg, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    MK-2048 represents a prototype second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) developed with the goal of retaining activity against viruses containing mutations associated with resistance to first-generation INSTIs, raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG). Here, we report the identification of mutations (G118R and E138K) which confer resistance to MK-2048 and not to RAL or EVG. These mutations were selected in vitro and confirmed by site-specific mutagenesis. G118R, which appeared first in cell culture, conferred low levels of resistance to MK-2048. G118R also reduced viral replication capacity to approximately 1% that of the isogenic wild-type (wt) virus. The subsequent selection of E138K partially restored replication capacity to ≈13% of wt levels and increased resistance to MK-2048 to ≈8-fold. Viruses containing G118R and E138K remained largely susceptible to both RAL and EVG, suggesting a unique interaction between this second-generation INSTI and the enzyme may be defined by these residues as a potential basis for the increased intrinsic affinity and longer “off” rate of MK-2048. In silico structural analysis suggests that the introduction of a positively charged arginine at position 118, near the catalytic amino acid 116, might decrease Mg2+ binding, compromising enzyme function and thus leading to the significant reduction in both integration and viral replication capacity observed with these mutations. PMID:20610719

  8. Gag mutations strongly contribute to HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors in highly drug-experienced patients besides compensating for fitness loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeth Dam; Romina Quercia; Bärbel Glass; Diane Descamps; Odile Launay; Xavier Duval; Hans-Georg Kräusslich; Allan J Hance; François Clavel

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) resistance to protease inhibitors (PI) results from mutations in the viral protease (PR) that reduce PI binding but also decrease viral replicative capacity (RC). Additional mutations compensating for the RC loss subsequently accumulate within PR and in Gag substrate cleavage sites. We examined the respective contribution of mutations in PR and Gag to PI resistance and RC and their interdependence using a panel of HIV-1 molecular clones carrying dif...

  9. A deletion mutation in nfxB of in vitro-induced moxifloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa confers multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Van Chi; Pham, Hoang Vy; Nguyen, Duc Nhat Minh; Lambert, Peter; Nguyen, Thi Thu Hoai

    2017-09-01

    The modulation of efflux pump functions under fluoroquinolone (FQ) exposure is of great concern as it could result in occurrence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial strains. In this study, MDR mechanism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced via moxifloxacin (MOX) pressure was investigated. After serial MOX [concentration of 0.5 × the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)] exposure, the fully susceptible P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027 strain has increased its MIC not only toward MOX (1→128 mg/L) but also to other antibiotics. Furthermore, this MOX-exposed strain did not revert to antibiotic-sensitive phenotype when being cultured in antibiotic-free medium for 12 days. No mutation was observed for FQ-target (gyrA and parC) or most investigated efflux regulatory genes (mexT, mexR, and nalC) except nfxB in which a 100-bp deletion was found. This associated with the elevated expression of multidrug efflux pump operon (mexCD-oprJ) which could directly result in MDR phenotype.

  10. Non-recessive Bt toxin resistance conferred by an intracellular cadherin mutation in field-selected populations of cotton bollworm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haonan Zhang

    Full Text Available Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxins have been planted widely to control insect pests, yet evolution of resistance by the pests can reduce the benefits of this approach. Recessive mutations in the extracellular domain of toxin-binding cadherin proteins that confer resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac by disrupting toxin binding have been reported previously in three major lepidopteran pests, including the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Here we report a novel allele from cotton bollworm with a deletion in the intracellular domain of cadherin that is genetically linked with non-recessive resistance to Cry1Ac. We discovered this allele in each of three field-selected populations we screened from northern China where Bt cotton producing Cry1Ac has been grown intensively. We expressed four types of cadherin alleles in heterologous cell cultures: susceptible, resistant with the intracellular domain mutation, and two complementary chimeric alleles with and without the mutation. Cells transfected with each of the four cadherin alleles bound Cry1Ac and were killed by Cry1Ac. However, relative to cells transfected with either the susceptible allele or the chimeric allele lacking the intracellular domain mutation, cells transfected with the resistant allele or the chimeric allele containing the intracellular domain mutation were less susceptible to Cry1Ac. These results suggest that the intracellular domain of cadherin is involved in post-binding events that affect toxicity of Cry1Ac. This evidence is consistent with the vital role of the intracellular region of cadherin proposed by the cell signaling model of the mode of action of Bt toxins. Considered together with previously reported data, the results suggest that both pore formation and cell signaling pathways contribute to the efficacy of Bt toxins.

  11. Mutations of the Transporter Proteins GlpT and UhpT Confer Fosfomycin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Xu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus worldwide, fosfomycin has begun to be used more often, either alone or in combination with other antibiotics, for treating methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections, resulting in the emergence of fosfomycin-resistant strains. Fosfomycin resistance is reported to be mediated by fosfomycin-modifying enzymes (FosA, FosB, FosC, and FosX and mutations of the target enzyme MurA or the membrane transporter proteins UhpT and GlpT. Our previous studies indicated that the fos genes might not the major fosfomycin resistance mechanism in S. aureus, whereas mutations of glpT and uhpT seemed to be more related to fosfomycin resistance. However, the precise role of these two genes in S. aureus fosfomycin resistance remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of glpT and uhpT in S. aureus fosfomycin resistance. Homologous recombination was used to knockout the uhpT and glpT genes in S. aureus Newman. Gene complementation was generated by the plasmid pRB473 carrying these two genes. The fosfomycin minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of the strains was measured by the E-test to observe the influence of gene deletion on antibiotic susceptibility. In addition, growth curves were constructed to determine whether the mutations have a significant influence on bacterial growth. Deletion of uhpT, glpT, and both of them led to increased fosfomycin MIC 0.5 μg/ml to 32 μg/ml, 4 μg/ml, and >1024 μg/ml, respectively. By complementing uhpT and glpT into the deletion mutants, the fosfomycin MIC decreased from 32 to 0.5 μg/ml and from 4 to 0.25 μg/ml, respectively. Moreover, the transporter gene-deleted strains showed no obvious difference in growth curves compared to the parental strain. In summary, our study strongly suggests that mutations of uhpT and glpT lead to fosfomycin resistance in S. aureus, and that uhpT mutation may play a more important role. The high

  12. Emergence of a new mutation and its accumulation in the topoisomerase IV gene confers high levels of resistance to fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Dong Chan; Seol, Sung Yong; Gurung, Mamata; Jin, Jong Sook; Choi, Chul Hee; Kim, Jungmin; Lee, Yoo Chul; Cho, Dong Taek; Lee, Je Chul

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes are the main mechanisms of resistance to quinolones. In this study, we determined mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE among 57 ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from a South Korean hospital and analysed the relationship between the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of fluoroquinolones and mutations in the topoisomerase IV gene. All ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli isolates carried double mutations in gyrA and at least a single mutation in parC; some isolates also carried a single mutation in parE. The most common mutations were S83L and D87N in gyrA, S80I in parC and S458A in parE, which accounted for 25% of isolates. Single mutations in parE at L445I, S458P and S458W were identified for the first time. Double mutations in parC and a combination of single mutations in parC and parE significantly increased the MIC values of fluoroquinolones. In vitro induction of resistance to ciprofloxacin showed that double mutations in gyrA were a prerequisite to conferring a resistant phenotype to fluoroquinolones, and an additional mutation in the topoisomerase IV gene increased the MIC values of ciprofloxacin. In conclusion, emergence of a new mutation in parC and parE and its accumulation induces high levels of resistance to fluoroquinolones in E. coli.

  13. Published sequences do not support transfer of oseltamivir resistance mutations from avian to human influenza A virus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Peter; Lindh, Magnus; Olofsson, Sigvard

    2015-03-28

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir phosphate ester, OE) is a widely used antiviral active against influenza A virus. Its active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate (OC), is chemically stable and secreted into wastewater treatment plants. OC contamination of natural habitats of waterfowl might induce OC resistance in influenza viruses persistently infecting waterfowl, and lead to transfer of OC-resistance from avian to human influenza. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether such has occurred. A genomics approach including phylogenetic analysis and probability calculations for homologous recombination was applied on altogether 19,755 neuraminidase (N1 and N2) genes from virus sampled in humans and birds, with and without resistance mutations. No evidence for transfer of OE resistance mutations from avian to human N genes was obtained, and events suggesting recombination between human and avian influenza virus variants could not be traced in the sequence material studied. The results indicate that resistance in influenza viruses infecting humans is due to the selection pressure posed by the global OE administration in humans rather than transfer from avian influenza A virus strains carrying mutations induced by environmental exposure to OC.

  14. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor transmembrane point mutation (G275E) associated with resistance to spinosad in Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puinean, Alin M; Lansdell, Stuart J; Collins, Toby; Bielza, Pablo; Millar, Neil S

    2013-03-01

    High levels of resistance to spinosad, a macrocyclic lactone insecticide, have been reported previously in western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, an economically important insect pest of vegetables, fruit and ornamental crops. We have cloned the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α6 subunit from F. occidentalis (Foα6) and compared the nucleotide sequence of Foα6 from susceptible and spinosad-resistant insect populations (MLFOM and R1S respectively). A single nucleotide change has been identified in Foα6, resulting in the replacement of a glycine (G) residue in susceptible insects with a glutamic acid (E) in resistant insects. The resistance-associated mutation (G275E) is predicted to lie at the top of the third α-helical transmembrane domain of Foα6. Although there is no direct evidence identifying the location of the spinosad binding site, the analogous amino acid in the C. elegans glutamate-gated chloride channel lies in close proximity (4.4 Å) to the known binding site of ivermectin, another macrocyclic lactone pesticide. The functional consequences of the resistance-associated mutation have been examined in the human nAChR α7 subunit. Introduction of an analogous (A272E) mutation in α7 abolishes the modulatory effects of spinosad whilst having no significant effect upon activation by acetylcholine, consistent with spinosad having an allosteric mechanism of action. © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  15. Rifampicin-Resistance Mutations in the rpoB Gene in Bacillus velezensis CC09 have Pleiotropic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xun-Chao; Xi, Huan; Liang, Li; Liu, Jia-Dong; Liu, Chang-Hong; Xue, Ya-Rong; Yu, Xiang-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Rifampicin resistance (Rif r ) mutations in the RNA polymerase β subunit ( rpoB ) gene exhibit pleiotropic phenotypes as a result of their effects on the transcription machinery in prokaryotes. However, the differences in the effects of the mutations on the physiology and metabolism of the bacteria remain unknown. In this study, we isolated seven Rif r mutations in rpoB , including six single point mutations (H485Y, H485C, H485D, H485R, Q472R, and S490L) and one double point mutation (S490L/S617F) from vegetative cells of an endophytic strain, Bacillus velezensis CC09. Compared to the wild-type (WT) strain (CC09), the H485R and H485D mutants exhibited a higher degree of inhibition of Aspergillus niger spore germination, while the H485Y, S490L, Q472R, and S490L/S617F mutants exhibited a lower degree of inhibition due to their lower production of the antibiotic iturin A. These mutants all exhibited defective phenotypes in terms of pellicle formation, sporulation, and swarming motility. A hierarchical clustering analysis of the observed phenotypes indicated that the four mutations involving amino acid substitutions at H485 in RpoB belonged to the same cluster. In contrast, the S490L and Q472R mutations, as well as the WT strain, were in another cluster, indicating a functional connection between the mutations in B. velezensis and phenotypic changes. Our data suggest that Rif r mutations cannot only be used to study transcriptional regulation mechanisms, but can also serve as a tool to increase the production of bioactive metabolites in B. velezensis .

  16. Using next-generation sequencing to detect mutations endowing resistance to pesticides: application to acetolactate-synthase (ALS)-based resistance in barnyard grass, a polyploid grass weed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Délye, Christophe; Causse, Romain; Gautier, Véronique; Poncet, Charles; Michel, Séverine

    2015-05-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies offer tremendous possibilities for accurate detection of mutations endowing pesticide resistance, yet their use for this purpose has not emerged in crop protection. This study aims at promoting NGS use for pesticide resistance diagnosis. It describes a simple procedure accessible to virtually any scientist and implementing freely accessible programs for the analysis of NGS data. Three PCR amplicons encompassing seven codons of the acetolactate-synthase gene crucial for herbicide resistance were sequenced using non-quantified pools of crude DNA extracts from 40 plants in each of 28 field populations of barnyard grass, a polyploid weed. A total of 63,959 quality NGS sequence runs were obtained using the 454 technology. Three herbicide-resistance-endowing mutations (Pro-197-Ser, Pro-197-Leu and/or Trp-574-Leu) were identified in seven populations. The NGS results were confirmed by individual plant Sanger sequencing. This work demonstrated the feasibility of NGS-based detection of pesticide resistance, and the advantages of NGS compared with other molecular biology techniques for analysing large numbers of individuals. NGS-based resistance diagnosis has the potential to play a substantial role in monitoring resistance, maintaining pesticide efficacy and optimising pesticide applications. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants and mutations in gyrase and topoisomerase in Salmonella enterica isolates with resistance and reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Monique Ribeiro Tiba; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Soares, Flávia Barrosa; da Silveira, Wanderley Dias; Fernandes, Sueli Aparecida

    2016-05-01

    In recent decades, the emergence and spread of resistance to nalidixic acid are usually associated with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin among Salmonella serotypes. The aims of this study were to investigate the mechanisms associated with resistance to fluoroquinolone and the clonal relatedness of Salmonella strains isolated from human and nonhuman origins, in a 5-year period in São Paulo, Brazil. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Salmonella isolates was performed. PCR and DNA sequencing were accomplished to identify mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the topoisomerase genes and to determine the fluoroquinolone determinants. The strains presented MIC to ciprofloxacin ranging from 0.125 to 8.0 mg/L (all nonsusceptible). From these, 16 strains (17.5%) were resistant to ciprofloxacin (MIC ≥1 mg/L) and belonging to serotypes Typhimurium, I. 4,5,12:i:-, Enteritidis, and Heidelberg. Amplification and DNA sequencing of topoisomerases genes identified multiple amino acid substitutions in GyrA and ParC. No mutations were identified in GyrB, and 1 amino acid substitution was identified in ParE. Among the 16 Salmonella strains resistant to ciprofloxacin, 8 S. I. 4,5,12:i:- presenting mutations in gyrA and parE genes were grouped into the same pulsotype. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants: qnrB, aac(6')-lb-cr, and oqxA/B were detected among 13 strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to report Salmonella isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin in Brazil. Indeed, this is the first detection of PMQR determinants in Salmonella strains from Sao Paulo State. These findings alert for the potential spread of quinolone resistance of Salmonella strains, particularly in S. I. 4,5,12:i:-, a prevalent serotype implicated in human disease and foodborne outbreaks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence of mutation and phenotypic expression associated with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakai, Haytham A; Khan, Wajihullah; Asma, Umme

    2013-09-01

    Therapeutic efficacy of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), which is commonly used to treat falciparum malaria, was assessed in isolates of Plasmodium falciparum (Welch, 1897) and Plasmodium vivax (Grassi et Feletti, 1890) ofAligarh, Uttar Pradesh, North India and Taif, Saudi Arabia during 2011-2012. Both the species showed mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) enzyme as they have common biochemical drug targets. Mutation rate for pfdhfr was higher compared to pvdhfr because the drug was mainly given to treat falciparum malaria. Since both the species coexist, P. vivax was also exposed to SP due to faulty species diagnosis or medication without specific diagnosis. Low level of mutations against SP in P. falciparum of Saudi isolates indicates that the SP combination is still effective for the treatment of falciparum malaria. Since SP is used as first-line of treatment because of high level of resistance against chloroquine (CQ), it may result in spread of higher level of mutations resulting in drug resistance and treatment failure in near future. Therefore, to avoid further higher mutations in the parasite, use of better treatment regimens such as artesunate combination therapy must be introduced against SP combination.

  19. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with increased mutation frequency due to inactivation of the DNA oxidative repair system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandsberg, L F; Ciofu, O; Kirkby, N; Christiansen, L E; Poulsen, H E; Høiby, N

    2009-06-01

    The chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is characterized by the biofilm mode of growth and chronic inflammation dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). A high percentage of P. aeruginosa strains show high frequencies of mutations (hypermutators [HP]). P. aeruginosa is exposed to oxygen radicals, both those generated by its own metabolism and especially those released by a large number of PMNs in response to the chronic CF lung infection. Our work therefore focused on the role of the DNA oxidative repair system in the development of HP and antibiotic resistance. We have constructed and characterized mutT, mutY, and mutM mutants in P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. The mutT and mutY mutants showed 28- and 7.5-fold increases in mutation frequencies, respectively, over that for PAO1. These mutators had more oxidative DNA damage (higher levels of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine) than PAO1 after exposure to PMNs, and they developed resistance to antibiotics more frequently. The mechanisms of resistance were increased beta-lactamase production and overexpression of the MexCD-OprJ efflux-pump. Mutations in either the mutT or the mutY gene were found in resistant HP clinical isolates from patients with CF, and complementation with wild-type genes reverted the phenotype. In conclusion, oxidative stress might be involved in the development of resistance to antibiotics. We therefore suggest the possible use of antioxidants for CF patients to prevent the development of antibiotic resistance.

  20. Emergence of Tetracycline Resistance in Helicobacter pylori: Multiple Mutational Changes in 16S Ribosomal DNA and Other Genetic Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailidiene, Daiva; Bertoli, M. Teresita; Miciuleviciene, Jolanta; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Dailide, Giedrius; Pascasio, Mario Alberto; Kupcinskas, Limas; Berg, Douglas E.

    2002-01-01

    Tetracycline is useful in combination therapies against the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. We found 6 tetracycline-resistant (Tetr) strains among 159 clinical isolates (from El Salvador, Lithuania, and India) and obtained the following four results: (i) 5 of 6 Tetr isolates contained one or two nucleotide substitutions in one part of the primary tetracycline binding site in 16S rRNA (AGA965-967 [Escherichia coli coordinates] changed to gGA, AGc, guA, or gGc [lowercase letters are used to represent the base changes]), whereas the sixth (isolate Ind75) retained AGA965-967; (ii) PCR products containing mutant 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) alleles transformed recipient strains to Tetr phenotypes, but transformants containing alleles with single substitutions (gGA and AGc) were less resistant than their Tetr parents; (iii) each of 10 Tetr mutants of reference strain 26695 (in which mutations were induced with metronidazole, a mutagenic anti-H. pylori agent) contained the normal AGA965-967 sequence; and (iv) transformant derivatives of Ind75 and of one of the Tetr 26695 mutants that had acquired mutant rDNA alleles were resistant to tetracycline at levels higher than those to which either parent strain was resistant. Thus, tetracycline resistance in H. pylori results from an accumulation of changes that may affect tetracycline-ribosome affinity and/or other functions (perhaps porins or efflux pumps). We suggest that the rarity of tetracycline resistance among clinical isolates reflects this need for multiple mutations and perhaps also the deleterious effects of such mutations on fitness. Formally equivalent mutations with small but additive effects are postulated to contribute importantly to traits such as host specificity and virulence and to H. pylori's great genetic diversity. PMID:12435699

  1. Error-prone PCR mutation of Ls-EPSPS gene from Liriope spicata conferring to its enhanced glyphosate-resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chanjuan; Xie, Hongjie; Chen, Shiguo; Valverde, Bernal E; Qiang, Sheng

    2017-09-01

    Liriope spicata (Thunb.) Lour has a unique LsEPSPS structure contributing to the highest-ever-recognized natural glyphosate tolerance. The transformed LsEPSPS confers increased glyphosate resistance to E. coli and A. thaliana. However, the increased glyphosate-resistance level is not high enough to be of commercial value. Therefore, LsEPSPS was subjected to error-prone PCR to screen mutant EPSPS genes capable of endowing higher resistance levels. A mutant designated as ELs-EPSPS having five mutated amino acids (37Val, 67Asn, 277Ser, 351Gly and 422Gly) was selected for its ability to confer improved resistance to glyphosate. Expression of ELs-EPSPS in recombinant E. coli BL21 (DE3) strains enhanced resistance to glyphosate in comparison to both the LsEPSPS-transformed and -untransformed controls. Furthermore, transgenic ELs-EPSPS A. thaliana was about 5.4 fold and 2-fold resistance to glyphosate compared with the wild-type and the Ls-EPSPS-transgenic plants, respectively. Therefore, the mutated ELs-EPSPS gene has potential value for has potential for the development of glyphosate-resistant crops. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of gyrA and parC mutations in fluoroquinolones-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Roghayeh; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Hasani, Alka; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad

    The aim of this study was to examine mutations in the quinolone-resistance-determining region (QRDR) of gyrA and parC genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. A total of 100 clinical P. aeruginosa isolates were collected from different university-affiliated hospitals in Tabriz, Iran. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin were evaluated by agar dilution assay. DNA sequences of the QRDR of gyrA and parC were determined by the dideoxy chain termination method. Of the total 100 isolates, 64 were resistant to ciprofloxacin. No amino acid alterations were detected in gyrA or parC genes of the ciprofloxacin susceptible or ciprofloxacin intermediate isolates. Thr-83 → Ile substitution in gyrA was found in all 64 ciprofloxacin resistant isolates. Forty-four (68.75%) of them had additional substitution in parC. A correlation was found between the number of the amino acid alterations in the QRDR of gyrA and parC and the level of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin resistance of the P. aeruginosa isolates. Ala-88 → Pro alteration in parC was generally found in high level ciprofloxacin resistant isolates, which were suggested to be responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance. These findings showed that in P. aeruginosa, gyrA was the primary target for fluoroquinolone and additional mutation in parC led to highly resistant isolates. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Combinations against combinations: associations of anti-HIV 1 reverse transcriptase drugs challenged by constellations of drug resistance mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Giovanni; Spadari, Silvio

    2002-02-01

    The reverse transcriptase inhibitors still represent the majority of the clinically used anti-HIV drugs and constitute the main backbone of currently employed combinatorial regimens. A major obstacle to successfull chemotherapic eradication of HIV is the emergence of viral strains resistant to the drugs in use. Counteracting the emergence of resistance necessitates alternating the panel of agents employed. In order to rationally design alternative drug combinations, physicians not only must know the genotype of the emerging viral strains, but should also be able to correlate it with its resistant phenotype. However, resistant viral strains usually carry multiple mutations, whose reciprocal influences on the overall level of resistance are largely unknown. Moreover, the choice of agents to be combined must take in account drug-drug interactions and adverse metabolic effects. This review will outline the main pharmacological and clinical features of the currently utilised anti-reverse transcriptase drugs, as well as the correspondent resistance profiles selected during therapy. A major focus will be on the reciprocal influence of drug associations on their own metabolism as well as on the interacting effects of the selected combinations of drug resistance mutations.

  4. The role of gyrA and parC mutations in fluoroquinolones-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayeh Nouri

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to examine mutations in the quinolone-resistance-determining region (QRDR of gyrA and parC genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. A total of 100 clinical P. aeruginosa isolates were collected from different university-affiliated hospitals in Tabriz, Iran. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin were evaluated by agar dilution assay. DNA sequences of the QRDR of gyrA and parC were determined by the dideoxy chain termination method. Of the total 100 isolates, 64 were resistant to ciprofloxacin. No amino acid alterations were detected in gyrA or parC genes of the ciprofloxacin susceptible or ciprofloxacin intermediate isolates. Thr-83 → Ile substitution in gyrA was found in all 64 ciprofloxacin resistant isolates. Forty-four (68.75% of them had additional substitution in parC. A correlation was found between the number of the amino acid alterations in the QRDR of gyrA and parC and the level of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin resistance of the P. aeruginosa isolates. Ala-88 → Pro alteration in parC was generally found in high level ciprofloxacin resistant isolates, which were suggested to be responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance. These findings showed that in P. aeruginosa, gyrA was the primary target for fluoroquinolone and additional mutation in parC led to highly resistant isolates.

  5. First report of Ser653Asn mutation endowing high-level resistance to imazamox in downy brome (Bromus tectorum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vipan; Jha, Prashant

    2017-12-01

    Bromus tectorum L. is one of the most troublesome grass weed species in cropland and non-cropland areas of the northwestern USA. In summer 2016, a B. tectroum accession (R) that survived imazamox at the field-use rate (44 g ha -1 ) in an imidazolinone-tolerant (IMI-tolerant or Clearfield™) winter wheat field was collected from a wheat field in Carter County, MT, USA. The aim of this study was to determine the resistance profile of the B. tectroum R accession to imazamox and other ALS inhibitors, and investigate the mechanism of resistance to imazamox. The R B. tectorum accession had a high-level resistance (110.1-fold) to imazamox (IMI) and low to moderate-levels cross-resistance to pyroxsulam (TP) (4.6-fold) and propoxycarbazone (SCT) (13.9-fold). The R accession was susceptible to sulfosulfuron (SU) and quizalofop and clethodim (ACCase inhibitors), paraquat (PS I inhibitor), glyphosate (EPSPS inhibitor) and glufosinate (GS inhibitor). Sequence analysis of the ALS gene revealed a single, target-site Ser653Asn mutation in R plants. Pretreatment of malathion followed by imazamox at 44 or 88 g ha -1 did not reverse the resistance phenotype. This is the first report of evolution of cross-resistance to ALS-inhibiting herbicides in B. tectorum. A single-point mutation, Ser653Asn, was identified, conferring the high-level resistance to imazamox. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Detergent resistant membrane-associated IDE in brain tissue and cultured cells: Relevance to Aβ and insulin degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castaño Eduardo M

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE is implicated in the regulation of amyloid β (Aβ steady-state levels in the brain, and its deficient expression and/or activity may be a risk factor in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although IDE sub-cellular localization has been well studied, the compartments relevant to Aβ degradation remain to be determined. Results Our results of live immunofluorescence, immuno gold electron-microscopy and gradient fractionation concurred to the demonstration that endogenous IDE from brain tissues and cell cultures is, in addition to its other localizations, a detergent-resistant membrane (DRM-associated metallopeptidase. Our pulse chase experiments were in accordance with the existence of two pools of IDE: the cytosolic one with a longer half-life and the membrane-IDE with a faster turn-over. DRMs-associated IDE co-localized with Aβ and its distribution (DRMs vs. non-DRMs and activity was sensitive to manipulation of lipid composition in vitro and in vivo. When IDE was mis-located from DRMs by treating cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, endogenous Aβ accumulated in the extracellular space and exogenous Aβ proteolysis was impaired. We detected a reduced amount of IDE in DRMs of membranes isolated from mice brain with endogenous reduced levels of cholesterol (Chol due to targeted deletion of one seladin-1 allele. We confirmed that a moderate shift of IDE from DRMs induced a substantial decrement on IDE-mediated insulin and Aβ degradation in vitro. Conclusion Our results support the notion that optimal substrate degradation by IDE may require its association with organized-DRMs. Alternatively, DRMs but not other plasma membrane regions, may act as platforms where Aβ accumulates, due to its hydrophobic properties, reaching local concentration close to its Km for IDE facilitating its clearance. Structural integrity of DRMs may also be required to tightly retain insulin receptor and IDE for

  7. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis linked with a cadherin transmembrane mutation affecting cellular trafficking in pink bollworm from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Ma, Yuemin; Wan, Peng; Liu, Kaiyu; Xiao, Yutao; Wang, Jintao; Cong, Shengbo; Xu, Dong; Wu, Kongming; Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Li, Xianchun; Tabashnik, Bruce E

    2018-03-01

    Evolution of pest resistance reduces the efficacy of insecticidal proteins from the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) used widely in sprays and transgenic crops. In some previously studied strains of three major lepidopteran pests, resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac is associated with mutations disrupting the extracellular or cytoplasmic domains of cadherin proteins that bind Cry1Ac in the midgut of susceptible larvae. Here we report the first case of a cadherin transmembrane mutation associated with insect resistance to Bt. We discovered this mutation in a strain of the devastating global cotton pest, the pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella), derived from a field population in the Yangtze River Valley of China. The mutant allele analyzed here has a 207 base pair deletion and encodes a cadherin protein lacking its transmembrane domain. Relative to a susceptible strain, a strain homozygous for this allele had 220-fold resistance to Cry1Ac and 2.1-fold cross-resistance to Cry2Ab. On transgenic cotton plants producing Cry1Ac, no susceptible larvae survived, but the resistant strain completed its life cycle. Inheritance of resistance to Cry1Ac was autosomal, recessive and tightly linked with the cadherin gene. Transportation of cadherin protein to the cell membrane and susceptibility to Cry1Ac occurred in transfected insect cells expressing the wild type cadherin allele, but not in transfected insect cells expressing the mutant cadherin allele. The results imply that the mutant allele analyzed here confers resistance to Cry1Ac by disrupting cellular trafficking of cadherin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mutations in β-Lactamase AmpC Increase Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates to Antipseudomonal Cephalosporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrazeg, M; Jeannot, K; Ntsogo Enguéné, Véronique Yvette; Broutin, I; Loeffert, S; Fournier, D; Plésiat, P

    2015-10-01

    Mutation-dependent overproduction of intrinsic β-lactamase AmpC is considered the main cause of resistance of clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antipseudomonal penicillins and cephalosporins. Analysis of 31 AmpC-overproducing clinical isolates exhibiting a greater resistance to ceftazidime than to piperacillin-tazobactam revealed the presence of 17 mutations in the β-lactamase, combined with various polymorphic amino acid substitutions. When overexpressed in AmpC-deficient P. aeruginosa 4098, the genes coding for 20/23 of these AmpC variants were found to confer a higher (2-fold to >64-fold) resistance to ceftazidime and ceftolozane-tazobactam than did the gene from reference strain PAO1. The mutations had variable effects on the MICs of ticarcillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, aztreonam, and cefepime. Depending on their location in the AmpC structure and their impact on β-lactam MICs, they could be assigned to 4 distinct groups. Most of the mutations affecting the omega loop, the R2 domain, and the C-terminal end of the protein were shared with extended-spectrum AmpCs (ESACs) from other Gram-negative species. Interestingly, two new mutations (F121L and P154L) were predicted to enlarge the substrate binding pocket by disrupting the stacking between residues F121 and P154. We also found that the reported ESACs emerged locally in a variety of clones, some of which are epidemic and did not require hypermutability. Taken together, our results show that P. aeruginosa is able to adapt to efficacious β-lactams, including the newer cephalosporin ceftolozane, through a variety of mutations affecting its intrinsic β-lactamase, AmpC. Data suggest that the rates of ESAC-producing mutants are ≥1.5% in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Confirmation of emergence of mutations associated with atovaquone-proguanil resistance in unexposed Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Dennis E

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vitro and in vivo resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to atovaquone or atovaquone-proguanil hydrochloride combination has been associated to two point mutations in the parasite cytochrome b (cytb gene (Tyr268Ser and Tyr268Asn. However, little is known about the prevalence of codon-268 mutations in natural populations of P. falciparum without previous exposure to the drug in Africa. Methods The prevalence of codon-268 mutations in the cytb gene of African P. falciparum isolates from Nigeria, Malawi and Senegal, where atovaquone-proguanil has not been introduced for treatment of malaria was assessed. Genotyping of the cytb gene in isolates of P. falciparum was performed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and confirmed by sequencing. Results 295 samples from Nigeria (111, Malawi (91 and Senegal (93 were successfully analyzed for detection of either mutant Tyr268Ser or Tyr268Asn. No case of Ser268 or Asn268 was detected in cytb gene of parasites from Malawi or Senegal. However, Asn268 was detected in five out of 111 (4.5% unexposed P. falciparum isolates from Nigeria. In addition, one out of these five mutant Asn268 isolates showed an additional cytb mutation leading to a Pro266Thr substitution inside the ubiquinone reduction site. Conclusion No Tyr268Ser mutation is found in cytb of P. falciparum isolates from Nigeria, Malawi or Senegal. This study reports for the first time cytb Tyr268Asn mutation in unexposed P. falciparum isolates from Nigeria. The emergence in Africa of P. falciparum isolates with cytb Tyr268Asn mutation is a matter of serious concern. Continuous monitoring of atovaquone-proguanil resistant P. falciparum in Africa is warranted for the rational use of this new antimalarial drug, especially in non-immune travelers.

  10. Confirmation of emergence of mutations associated with atovaquone-proguanil resistance in unexposed Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happi, Christian T; Gbotosho, Grace O; Folarin, Onikepe A; Milner, Danny; Sarr, Ousmane; Sowunmi, Akintunde; Kyle, Dennis E; Milhous, Wilbur K; Wirth, Dyann F; Oduola, Ayoade M J

    2006-10-04

    In vitro and in vivo resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to atovaquone or atovaquone-proguanil hydrochloride combination has been associated to two point mutations in the parasite cytochrome b (cytb) gene (Tyr268Ser and Tyr268Asn). However, little is known about the prevalence of codon-268 mutations in natural populations of P. falciparum without previous exposure to the drug in Africa. The prevalence of codon-268 mutations in the cytb gene of African P. falciparum isolates from Nigeria, Malawi and Senegal, where atovaquone-proguanil has not been introduced for treatment of malaria was assessed. Genotyping of the cytb gene in isolates of P. falciparum was performed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and confirmed by sequencing. 295 samples from Nigeria (111), Malawi (91) and Senegal (93) were successfully analyzed for detection of either mutant Tyr268Ser or Tyr268Asn. No case of Ser268 or Asn268 was detected in cytb gene of parasites from Malawi or Senegal. However, Asn268 was detected in five out of 111 (4.5%) unexposed P. falciparum isolates from Nigeria. In addition, one out of these five mutant Asn268 isolates showed an additional cytb mutation leading to a Pro266Thr substitution inside the ubiquinone reduction site. No Tyr268Ser mutation is found in cytb of P. falciparum isolates from Nigeria, Malawi or Senegal. This study reports for the first time cytb Tyr268Asn mutation in unexposed P. falciparum isolates from Nigeria. The emergence in Africa of P. falciparum isolates with cytb Tyr268Asn mutation is a matter of serious concern. Continuous monitoring of atovaquone-proguanil resistant P. falciparum in Africa is warranted for the rational use of this new antimalarial drug, especially in non-immune travelers.

  11. A mutation in the 530 loop of Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA causes resistance to streptomycin.

    OpenAIRE

    Melançon, P; Lemieux, C; Brakier-Gingras, L

    1988-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis was used to introduce an A to C transversion at position 523 in the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of Escherichia coli rrnB operon cloned in plasmid pKK3535. E. coli cells transformed with the mutated plasmid were resistant to streptomycin. The mutated ribosomes isolated from these cells were not stimulated by streptomycin to misread the message in a poly(U)-directed assay. They were also restrictive to the stimulation of misreading by other error-promoting relate...

  12. Heterogeneous resistance mechanisms in an EGFR exon 19-mutated non-small cell lung cancer patient treated with erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Grauslund, Morten; Melchior, Linea C

    2017-01-01

    Patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene-mutated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) obtain substantial clinical benefit from EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs), but will ultimately develop TKI-resistance resulting in median progression-free survival of 9-15 months during first-line...... an alternative pathway to EGFR-signaling. The patient received first-line erlotinib but after only 7 weeks showed metastatic pleural effusion, in which transformation to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) that retained the EGFR- and FGFR3-mutations was identified. Consequently, standard carboplatin-etoposide regimen...

  13. Pairwise and higher-order correlations among drug-resistance mutations in HIV-1 subtype B protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morozov Alexandre V

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reaction of HIV protease to inhibitor therapy is characterized by the emergence of complex mutational patterns which confer drug resistance. The response of HIV protease to drugs often involves both primary mutations that directly inhibit the action of the drug, and a host of accessory resistance mutations that may occur far from the active site but may contribute to restoring the fitness or stability of the enzyme. Here we develop a probabilistic approach based on connected information that allows us to study residue, pair level and higher-order correlations within the same framework. Results We apply our methodology to a database of approximately 13,000 sequences which have been annotated by the treatment history of the patients from which the samples were obtained. We show that including pair interactions is essential for agreement with the mutational data, since neglect of these interactions results in order-of-magnitude errors in the probabilities of the simultaneous occurence of many mutations. The magnitude of these pair correlations changes dramatically between sequences obtained from patients that were or were not exposed to drugs. Higher-order effects make a contribution of as much as 10% for residues taken three at a time, but increase to more than twice that for 10 to 15-residue groups. The sequence data is insufficient to determine the higher-order effects for larger groups. We find that higher-order interactions have a significant effect on the predicted frequencies of sequences with large numbers of mutations. While relatively rare, such sequences are more prevalent after multi-drug therapy. The relative importance of these higher-order interactions increases with the number of drugs the patient had been exposed to. Conclusion Correlations are critical for the understanding of mutation patterns in HIV protease. Pair interactions have substantial qualitative effects, while higher-order interactions are

  14. Genotypic evaluation of etravirine sensitivity of clinical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates carrying resistance mutations to nevirapine and efavirenz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumar, A A; Jnaoui, K; Kabamba-Mukadi, B; Yombi, J C; Vandercam, B; Goubau, P; Ruelle, J

    2010-01-01

    Etravirine is a second-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) with a pattern of resistance mutations quite distinct from the current NNRTIs. We collected all routine samples of HIV-1 patients followed in the AIDS reference laboratory of UCLouvain (in 2006 and 2007) carrying resistance-associated mutations to nevirapine (NVP) or efavirenz (EFV). The sensitivity to Etravirine was estimated using three different drug resistance algorithms: ANRS (July 2008), IAS (December 2008) and Stanford (November 2008). We also verified whether the mutations described as resistance mutations are not due to virus polymorphisms by the study of 58 genotypes of NNRTI-naive patients. Sixty one samples harboured resistance to NVP and EFV: 41/61 had at least one resistance mutation to Etravirine according to ANRS-IAS algorithms; 42/61 samples had at least one resistance mutation to Etravirine according to the Stanford algorithm. 48 and 53 cases were fully sensitive to Etravirine according to ANRS-IAS and Stanford algorithms, respectively. Three cases harboured more than three mutations and presented a pattern of high-degree resistance to Etravirine according to ANRS-IAS algorithm, while one case harboured more than three mutations and presented high degree resistance to Etravirine according to the Stanford algorithm. The V1061 and V179D mutations were more frequent in the ARV-naive group than in the NNRTI-experienced one. According to the currently available algorithms, Etravirine can still be used in the majority of patients with virus showing resistance to NVP and/or EFV, if a combination of other active drugs is included.

  15. MILDEW LOCUS O Mutation Does Not Affect Resistance to Grain Infections with Fusarium spp. and Ramularia collo-cygni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Katharina; Linkmeyer, Andrea; Textor, Katharina; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Hess, Michael

    2015-09-01

    MILDEW LOCUS O defines a major susceptibility gene for powdery mildew, and recessive mlo resistance alleles are widely used in breeding for powdery mildew resistance in spring barley. Barley powdery mildew resistance, which is conferred by mlo genes, is considered to be costly in terms of spontaneous defense reactions and enhanced susceptibility to cell-death-inducing pathogens. We assessed fungal infestation of barley (Hordeum vulgare) grain by measuring fungal DNA after natural infection with Fusarium spp. and Ramularia collo-cygni or after inoculation with Fusarium spp. in the field. Powdery-mildew-resistant mlo5 genotypes did not show enhanced Fusarium spp. or R. collo-cygni DNA content of grain over four consecutive years. Data add to our understanding of pleiotropic effects of mlo-mediated powdery mildew resistance and contributes to the discussion of whether or not application of barley mlo mutations may support pathogenesis of cell-death-inducing fungal pathogens under field conditions.

  16. New combinations of mutations in VanD-Type vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus avium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depardieu, F; Foucault, M-L; Bell, J; Dubouix, A; Guibert, M; Lavigne, J-P; Levast, M; Courvalin, P

    2009-05-01

    We studied the clinical isolates Enterococcus faecium NEF1, resistant to high levels of vancomycin (MIC, 512 microg/ml) and teicoplanin (MIC, 64 microg/ml); Enterococcus faecium BM4653 and BM4656 and Enterococcus avium BM4655, resistant to moderate levels of vancomycin (MIC, 32 microg/ml) and to low levels of teicoplanin (MIC, 4 microg/ml); and Enterococcus faecalis BM4654, moderately resistant to vancomycin (MIC, 16 microg/ml) but susceptible to teicoplanin (MIC, 0.5 microg/ml). The strains were distinct, were constitutively resistant via the synthesis of peptidoglycan precursors ending in D-alanyl-D-lactate, and harbored a chromosomal vanD gene cluster that was not transferable. New mutations were found in conserved domains of VanS(D): at T(170)I near the phosphorylation site in NEF1, at V(67)A at the membrane surface in BM4653, at G(340)S in the G2 ATP-binding domain in BM4655, in the F domain in BM4656 (a 6-bp insertion), and in the G1 and G2 domains of BM4654 (three mutations). The mutations resulted in constitutivity, presumably through the loss of the phosphatase activity of the sensor. The chromosomal Ddl D-Ala:D-Ala ligase had an IS19 copy in NEF1, a mutation in the serine (S(185)F) or near the arginine (T(289)P) involved in D-Ala1 binding in BM4653 or BM4655, respectively, and a mutation next to the lysine (P(180)S) involved in D-Ala2 binding in BM4654, leading to the production of an impaired enzyme. In BM4653 vanY(D), a new insertion sequence, ISEfa9, belonging to the IS3 family, resulted in the absence of D,D-carboxypeptidase activity. Strain BM4656 had a functional D-Ala:D-Ala ligase, associated with high levels of both VanX(D) and VanY(D) activities, and is the first example of a VanD-type strain with a functional Ddl enzyme. Study of these five clinical isolates, displaying various assortments of mutations, confirms that all VanD-type strains isolated so far have undergone mutations in the vanS(D) or vanR(D) gene, leading to constitutive resistance

  17. Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab Is Conferred by Mutations in an ABC Transporter Subfamily A Protein.

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    Wee Tek Tay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of conventional chemical insecticides and bacterial toxins to control lepidopteran pests of global agriculture has imposed significant selection pressure leading to the rapid evolution of insecticide resistance. Transgenic crops (e.g., cotton expressing the Bt Cry toxins are now used world wide to control these pests, including the highly polyphagous and invasive cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera. Since 2004, the Cry2Ab toxin has become widely used for controlling H. armigera, often used in combination with Cry1Ac to delay resistance evolution. Isolation of H. armigera and H. punctigera individuals heterozygous for Cry2Ab resistance in 2002 and 2004, respectively, allowed aspects of Cry2Ab resistance (level, fitness costs, genetic dominance, complementation tests to be characterised in both species. However, the gene identity and genetic changes conferring this resistance were unknown, as was the detailed Cry2Ab mode of action. No cross-resistance to Cry1Ac was observed in mutant lines. Biphasic linkage analysis of a Cry2Ab-resistant H. armigera family followed by exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC marker mapping and candidate gene sequencing identified three independent resistance-associated INDEL mutations in an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC transporter gene we named HaABCA2. A deletion mutation was also identified in the H. punctigera homolog from the resistant line. All mutations truncate the ABCA2 protein. Isolation of further Cry2Ab resistance alleles in the same gene from field H. armigera populations indicates unequal resistance allele frequencies and the potential for Bt resistance evolution. Identification of the gene involved in resistance as an ABC transporter of the A subfamily adds to the body of evidence on the crucial role this gene family plays in the mode of action of the Bt Cry toxins. The structural differences between the ABCA2, and that of the C subfamily required for Cry1Ac toxicity, indicate differences in the

  18. A Novel Environmental Azole Resistance Mutation in Aspergillus fumigatus and a Possible Role of Sexual Reproduction in Its Emergence

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    Jianhua Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the dynamics of Aspergillus fumigatus azole-resistant phenotypes in two compost heaps with contrasting azole exposures: azole free and azole exposed. After heat shock, to which sexual but not asexual spores are highly resistant, the azole-free compost yielded 98% (49/50 wild-type and 2% (1/50 azole-resistant isolates, whereas the azole-containing compost yielded 9% (4/45 wild-type and 91% (41/45 resistant isolates. From the latter compost, 80% (36/45 of the isolates contained the TR46/Y121F/T289A genotype, 2% (1/45 harbored the TR46/Y121F/M172I/T289A/G448S genotype, and 9% (4/45 had a novel pan-triazole-resistant mutation (TR463/Y121F/M172I/T289A/G448S with a triple 46-bp promoter repeat. Subsequent screening of a representative set of clinical A. fumigatus isolates showed that the novel TR463 mutant was already present in samples from three Dutch medical centers collected since 2012. Furthermore, a second new resistance mutation was found in this set that harbored four TR46 repeats. Importantly, in the laboratory, we recovered the TR463 mutation from a sexual cross between two TR46 isolates from the same azole-containing compost, possibly through unequal crossing over between the double tandem repeats (TRs during meiosis. This possible role of sexual reproduction in the emergence of the mutation was further implicated by the high level of genetic diversity of STR genotypes in the azole-containing compost. Our study confirms that azole resistance mutations continue to emerge in the environment and indicates compost containing azole residues as a possible hot spot. Better insight into the biology of environmental resistance selection is needed to retain the azole class for use in food production and treatment of Aspergillus diseases.

  19. Epidemiological Surveillance of HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance in Spain in 2004-2012: Relevance of Transmission Clusters in the Propagation of Resistance Mutations.

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    Yolanda Vega

    Full Text Available Our objectives were to carry out an epidemiological surveillance study on transmitted drug resistance (TDR among individuals newly diagnosed of HIV-1 infection during a nine year period in Spain and to assess the role of transmission clusters (TC in the propagation of resistant strains. An overall of 1614 newly diagnosed individuals were included in the study from January 2004 through December 2012. Individuals come from two different Spanish regions: Galicia and the Basque Country. Resistance mutations to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI and protease inhibitors (PI were analyzed according to mutations included in the surveillance drug-resistance mutations list updated in 2009. TC were defined as those comprising viruses from five or more individuals whose sequences clustered in maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees with a bootstrap value ≥90%. The overall prevalence of TDR to any drug was 9.9%: 4.9% to nucleoside RTIs (NRTIs, 3.6% to non-nucleoside RTIs (NNRTIs, and 2.7% to PIs. A significant decrease of TDR to NRTIs over time was observed [from 10% in 2004 to 2% in 2012 (p=0.01]. Sixty eight (42.2% of 161 sequences with TDR were included in 25 TC composed of 5 or more individuals. Of them, 9 clusters harbored TDR associated with high level resistance to antiretroviral drugs. T215D revertant mutation was transmitted in a large cluster comprising 25 individuals. The impact of epidemiological networks on TDR frequency may explain its persistence in newly diagnosed individuals. The knowledge of the populations involved in TC would facilitate the design of prevention programs and public health interventions.

  20. ''In vitro'' mutation breeding methodology for Fusarium wilt resistance in banana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulmann Neto, A.; Domingues, E.T.; Mendes, B.M.J.; Ando, A.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Besides ''in vivo'' methods, the Radiation Genetics Section of CENA/USP is also using ''in vitro'' methods for mutation breeding to obtain resistance to Panama disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense in the banana cultivar ''Maca''. A protocol has been established for the ''in vitro'' development of shoot tips, obtained from plants in the field or already cultivated under i n vitro'' conditions. For both cases, only one culture medium was used during all steps of ''in vitro'' cultivation. New buds were formed and these buds grew and developed to form roots. The medium was composed of macro and micro nutrients, with added Morel vitamines, BAP (5 mg/l), saccharose (30 g/l) and agar (6.5 g/l), at pH 5.7. Cultures were allowed to grow in a controlled environment at 27 deg. C and 16 h illumination. Shoot tips which originated from ''in vitro'' plantlets, were cut longitudinally down the middle. This was done to avoid a tendency of regeneration of the original tissue instead of the formation of new lateral buds. To resolve the chimerism resulting when mutagenic treatment is applied to shoot tips, there is a need of vegetative propagation of new lateral buds. Selection can then be done at M 1 V 4 generation. Once the protocol was established, the gamma ray sensitivity was determined. The dose that produced a 50% decrease in the number of new lateral buds was around 40 Gy and this dose will be utilised. The methodology was completed by soil inoculation with Fusarium of young plants 15 cm in height, obtained from ''in vitro'' cultures. After 3 weeks all inoculated plants showed symptoms of wilt, demonstrating the possibility of screening. The method is now being utilised on a large scale in an attempt to induce a resistant mutant. (author)

  1. Mutation spectrum of genes associated with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Dang, Xiqiang; He, Qingnan; Zhen, Yan; He, Xiaoxie; Yi, Zhuwen; Zhu, Kuichun

    2017-08-20

    Approximately 20% of children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome do not respond to steroid therapy. More than 30 genes have been identified as disease-causing genes for the steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). Few reports were from the Chinese population. The coding regions of genes commonly associated with SRNS were analyzed to characterize the gene mutation spectrum in children with SRNS in central China. The first phase study involved 38 children with five genes (NPHS1, NPHS2, PLCE1, WT1, and TRPC6) by Sanger sequencing. The second phase study involved 33 children with 17 genes by next generation DNA sequencing (NGS. 22 new patients, and 11 patients from first phase study but without positive findings). Overall deleterious or putatively deleterious gene variants were identified in 19 patients (31.7%), including four NPHS1 variants among five patients and three PLCE1 variants among four other patients. Variants in COL4A3, COL4A4, or COL4A5 were found in six patients. Eight novel variants were identified, including two in NPHS1, two in PLCE1, one in NPHS2, LAMB2, COL4A3, and COL4A4, respectively. 55.6% of the children with variants failed to respond to immunosuppressive agent therapy, while the resistance rate in children without variants was 44.4%. Our results show that screening for deleterious variants in some common genes in children clinically suspected with SRNS might be helpful for disease diagnosis as well as prediction of treatment efficacy and prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Evolution of multidrug resistance during Staphylococcus aureus infection involves mutation of the essential two component regulator WalKR.

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    Benjamin P Howden

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is a major public health threat, compounded by emergence of strains with resistance to vancomycin and daptomycin, both last line antimicrobials. Here we have performed high throughput DNA sequencing and comparative genomics for five clinical pairs of vancomycin-susceptible (VSSA and vancomycin-intermediate ST239 S. aureus (VISA; each pair isolated before and after vancomycin treatment failure. These comparisons revealed a frequent pattern of mutation among the VISA strains within the essential walKR two-component regulatory locus involved in control of cell wall metabolism. We then conducted bi-directional allelic exchange experiments in our clinical VSSA and VISA strains and showed that single nucleotide substitutions within either walK or walR lead to co-resistance to vancomycin and daptomycin, and caused the typical cell wall thickening observed in resistant clinical isolates. Ion Torrent genome sequencing confirmed no additional regulatory mutations had been introduced into either the walR or walK VISA mutants during the allelic exchange process. However, two potential compensatory mutations were detected within putative transport genes for the walK mutant. The minimal genetic changes in either walK or walR also attenuated virulence, reduced biofilm formation, and led to consistent transcriptional changes that suggest an important role for this regulator in control of central metabolism. This study highlights the dramatic impacts of single mutations that arise during persistent S. aureus infections and demonstrates the role played by walKR to increase drug resistance, control metabolism and alter the virulence potential of this pathogen.

  3. Assessing the cost-benefit effect of a Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance mutation on parasite growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröberg, Gabrielle; Ferreira, Pedro Eduardo; Mårtensson, Andreas; Ali, Abdullah; Björkman, Anders; Gil, José Pedro

    2013-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum mutations associated with antimalarial resistance may be beneficial for parasites under drug pressure, although they may also cause a fitness cost. We herein present an in vitro model showing how this combined effect on parasite growth varies with the drug concentration and suggest a calculated drug-specific cost-benefit index, indicating the possible advantage for mutated parasites. We specifically studied the D-to-Y change at position 1246 encoded by the pfmdr1 gene (pfmdr1 D1246Y) in relation to amodiaquine resistance. Susceptibilities to amodiaquine, desethylamodiaquine, and chloroquine, as well as relative fitness, were determined for two modified isogenic P. falciparum clones differing only in the pfmdr1 1246 position. Data were used to create a new comparative graph of relative growth in relation to the drug concentration and to calculate the ratio between the benefit of resistance and the fitness cost. Results were related to an in vivo allele selection analysis after amodiaquine or artesunate-amodiaquine treatment. pfmdr1 1246Y was associated with decreased susceptibility to amodiaquine and desethylamodiaquine but at a growth fitness cost of 11%. Mutated parasites grew less in low drug concentrations due to a predominating fitness cost, but beyond a breakpoint concentration they grew more due to a predominating benefit of increased resistance. The cost-benefit indexes indicated that pfmdr1 1246Y was most advantageous for amodiaquine-exposed parasites. In vivo, a first drug selection of mutant parasites followed by a fitness selection of wild-type parasites supported the in vitro data. This cost-benefit model may predict the risk for selection of drug resistance mutations in different malaria transmission settings.

  4. Breeding sesame for diseases and shatter resistant high yielding varieties with induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, C.W.

    2001-01-01

    ''Suwon 144'', derived from the cross between ''Danbaeckkae'' and mutant MY-74-2 and in spite of its higher yield and quality compared to the check variety, did not pass the nomination to the Committee of Main Crops New Varieties under the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, due to the decision of the committee to limit the number of new varieties in sesame as a minor crop in Korea. ''Suwon 144'' will be released again for a fifth year to RYT in 1998. 5,282 cross combinations and 4,341 lines including 1,388 crossings of F 1 were crossed and released to the experimental field of NCES in 1997. Mutants and their cross combinations were released and constituted more than half among them. Seeds of ''Suwon 152'' were treated with NaN 3 and tested for germinability. The other seeds were released and harvested in the experimental field and 419 mutant lines were selected among all the mutant lines. Mutants or materials from cross breeding with mutants occupied 71% (675) among a total of 952 promising lines in yield trials of OYT, PYT, AYT and RYT. For variability of NaN 3 induced genetic male sterile (GMS) mutants and development of restorer/s of GMS, GMS lines were planted, and male sterility (MS) expression evaluated on each line. The selected 4 MS lines with 50% MS were crossed in 22 combinations with 7 recommended varieties. For development of genic-cytoplasmic MS (GCMS) using NaN 3 induced GMS mutants, 40 recommended local Korean and introduced cultivars were crossed in 57 combinations with 4 selected GMS lines expressing 50% male sterility. Various and many sources of unique characteristics have been continuously created through induced mutations, such as determinate; dwarf, lodging,- Phytophthora blight- and shatter- resistant; indehiscent, seamless, taller, stronger thick stems, dense capsule bearing type, semi-dwarf, better maturity, male sterility, smaller seeds, pure white seed coat color and high yields. Lines with these induced desirable characteristics were

  5. Proposal for a unified nomenclature for target-site mutations associated with resistance to fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Wesley; Lopez-Ruiz, Francisco; Stammler, Gerd; Clark, William; Burnett, Fiona; Hollomon, Derek; Ishii, Hideo; Thind, Tarlochan S; Brown, James Km; Fraaije, Bart; Cools, Hans; Shaw, Michael; Fillinger, Sabine; Walker, Anne-Sophie; Mellado, Emilia; Schnabel, Guido; Mehl, Andreas; Oliver, Richard P

    2016-08-01

    Evolved resistance to fungicides is a major problem limiting our ability to control agricultural, medical and veterinary pathogens and is frequently associated with substitutions in the amino acid sequence of the target protein. The convention for describing amino acid substitutions is to cite the wild-type amino acid, the codon number and the new amino acid, using the one-letter amino acid code. It has frequently been observed that orthologous amino acid mutations have been selected in different species by fungicides from the same mode of action class, but the amino acids have different numbers. These differences in numbering arise from the different lengths of the proteins in each species. The purpose of the present paper is to propose a system for unifying the labelling of amino acids in fungicide target proteins. To do this we have produced alignments between fungicide target proteins of relevant species fitted to a well-studied 'archetype' species. Orthologous amino acids in all species are then assigned numerical 'labels' based on the position of the amino acid in the archetype protein. © 2016 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Development of disease-resistant lines of grain legumes through mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo, A.

    1983-01-01

    Mutation breeding has been attempted for developing genotypes that may contain resistance to: (a) a necrotic strain of common mosaic virus in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.); (b) soil fungi causing wilt in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.); (c) the fungus Uromyces fabae that causes rust in lentil (Lens culinaris). Seeds of these three species were treated with gamma rays and planted in October 1979. Mature M 1 plants were harvested individually in March 1980. M 2 seeds were sown as single-row plant progenies in the fall (June) and spring (September) of 1980. Chickpea and lentil were planted in a soil naturally infested with soil-borne fungi (Fusarium sp. and Phytophthora sp.). Lentil plants were sprayed with a suspension of spores of the rust fungus on two occasions. Bean plants were sprayed with a suspension of virus particles mixed with carborundum. Symptomless plants were selected and harvested. There were 47 such plants of lentils and 246 of chickpea. Progenies of these plants will be tested again in replicated rows. None of the bean plants was free of virus symptoms. The least severely damaged ones were harvested. Some chickpea materials appear fairly promising. (author)

  7. Accumulation of mutations in DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes contributes to fluoroquinolone resistance in Vibrio cholerae O139 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanyan; Yu, Li; Li, Jie; Zhang, Lijuan; Tong, Ying; Kan, Biao

    2013-07-01

    High resistance rates to nalidixic acid (NAL) in Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 strains have been found, and ciprofloxacin (CIP) resistance is also observed. In this study, mutations within the quinolone-resistance determining regions (QRDRs) of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from NAL-resistant O139 strains were analysed. The predominant mutation profile was S83I in GyrA in combination with S85L in ParC. In addition, the combination substitutions of D87N in GyrA and D420N in ParE in combination with S83I in GyrA and S85L in ParC as well as D87N in GyrA and P439S in ParE in combination with S83I in GyrA and S85L in ParC were found in the CIP-resistant strains. A series of site-directed mutants comprising D87 in GyrA, D420 in ParE and P439 in ParE were constructed from a wild-type V. cholerae O139 strain carrying the common mutations S83I in GyrA and S85L in ParC. Introduction of the mutation D87N in GyrA increased the CIP minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the mutant strain by nearly 4-fold compared with the initial strain. The second introduction of D420N in ParE further significantly increased the CIP MIC to ca. 23-fold compared with the initial strain. A second introduction of P439S in ParE also increased the CIP MIC by 17-fold. Therefore, it is concluded that the emergence of D87N in GyrA and D420N or P439S in ParE dramatically induces resistance to fluoroquinolones in V. cholerae O139, and the accumulation of multiple mutations in the QRDRs confers significant resistance to fluoroquinolones in V. cholerae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. Mutational analysis of primary and metastatic colorectal cancer samples underlying the resistance to cetuximab-based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemecek R

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Radim Nemecek,1 Jitka Berkovcova,2 Lenka Radova,3 Tomas Kazda,4 Jitka Mlcochova,3 Petra Vychytilova-Faltejskova,1,3 Ondrej Slaby,1,3 Marek Svoboda1 1Department of Comprehensive Cancer Care, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; 2Department of Oncological and Experimental Pathology, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Brno, Czech Republic; 3Central European Institute of Technology, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic Purpose: Although several molecular markers predicting resistance to cetuximab- or panitumumab-based therapy of metastatic colorectal cancer were described, mutations in RAS proto-oncogenes remain the only predictors being used in daily clinical practice. However, 35%–45% of wild-type RAS patients still do not respond to this anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody-based therapy, and therefore the definition of other predictors forms an important clinical need. The aim of the present retrospective single-institutional study was to evaluate potential genes responsible for resistance to anti-EGFR therapy in relation to mutational analysis of primary versus metastatic lesions. Patients and methods: Twenty-four paired primary and corresponding metastatic tissue samples from eight nonresponding and four responding metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with cetuximab-based therapy were sequenced using a next-generation sequencing panel of 26 genes involved in EGFR signaling pathway and colorectal carcinogenesis. Results: Mutational status of primary tumors and metastatic lesions was highly concordant in TP53, APC, CTNNB1, KRAS, PIK3CA, PTEN, and FBXW7 genes. Metastatic samples harbor significantly more mutations than primary tumors. Potentially negative predictive value of FBXW7 mutations in relationship to anti-EGFR treatment outcomes was confirmed

  9. Enhanced resistance to fluoroquinolones in laboratory-grown mutants & clinical isolates of Shigella due to synergism between efflux pump expression & mutations in quinolone resistance determining region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Neelam; Mishra, Arti; Kumar, Ajay; Verma, Garima; Sharma, Meera

    2015-01-01

    There is a worldwide emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella species. To understand the molecular mechanisms associated with fluoroquinolone resistance, naturally occurring fluoroquinolone-resistant strains and laboratory-induced spontaneous mutants of Shigella spp. were used and the relative contributions of acrAB-tolC efflux pumps, gyrase and topoisomerase target gene mutations towards fluoroquinolone resistance were determined. Eight Shigella flexneri and six S. dysenteriae clinical isolates were studied. Three consecutive mutants resistant to ciprofloxacin for S. flexneri SFM1 (≥ 0.25 µg/ml), SFM2 (≥ 4 µg/ml) and SFM3 (≥ 32 µg/ml) were selected in 15 steps from susceptible isolates by serial exposure to increasing concentrations of nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Similarly, two mutants for S. dysenteriae SDM1 (≥ 0.25 µg/ml) and SDM2 (≥ 4 µg/ml) were selected in eight steps. After PCR amplification sequence analyses of gyrase and topoisomerase target genes were performed. Expression of efflux genes acrA, acrB, acrR and tolC was measured using real-time PCR. Mutations were observed in gyrA Ser [83]→Leu, Asp [87]→Asn/Gly, Val [196]→Ala and in parC Phe [93]→Val, Ser [80]→Ile, Asp [101]→Glu and Asp [110]→Glu. Overall, acrA and acrB overexpression was associated with fluoroquinolone resistance ( p0 Shigella spp. is the end product of either a single or a combination of mutations in QRDRs and/ or efflux activity. Novel polymorphisms were observed at Val [196]→Ala in gyrA in clinical isolates and Phe [93]→Val, Asp [101]→Glu, Asp [110]→Glu and in parC in majority of laboratory-grown mutants.

  10. Emergence of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci resistant to linezolid with rRNA gene C2190T and G2603T mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cidral, Thiago André; Carvalho, Maria Cícera; Figueiredo, Agnes Marie Sá; de Melo, Maria Celeste Nunes

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this article were to determinate the mechanism of linezolid resistance in coagulase-negative methicillin-resistant staphylococci from hospitals in the northeast of Brazil. We identified the isolates using VITEK(®) 2 and MALDI-TOF. Susceptibility to antibiotics was measured by the disk-diffusion method and by Etest(®) . Extraction of the whole genome DNA was performed, followed by screening of all the strains for the presence of mecA and cfr genes. The domain V region of 23S rRNA gene was sequenced and then aligned with a linezolid-susceptible reference strain. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) macro-restriction analysis was performed. Three linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus hominis and two linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis strains were analyzed. The isolates showed two point mutations in the V region of the 23S rRNA gene (C2190T and G2603T). We did not detect the cfr gene in any isolate by PCR. The S. hominis showed the same pulsotype, while the S. epidermidis did not present any genetic relation to each other. In conclusion, this study revealed three S. hominis and two S. epidermidis strains with resistance to linezolid due to a double mutation (C2190T and G2603T) in the domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. For the first time, the mutation of C2190T in S. epidermidis is described. This study also revealed the clonal spread of a S. hominis pulsotype between three public hospitals in the city of Natal, Brazil. These findings highlight the importance of continued vigilance of linezolid resistance in staphylococci. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Prevalence of integrase inhibitor resistance mutations in Austrian patients recently diagnosed with HIV from 2008 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoufaly, A; Kraft, C; Schmidbauer, C; Puchhammer-Stoeckl, E

    2017-04-01

    Treatment guidelines often do not advocate testing for integrase inhibitor resistance associated mutations (IRAM) before initiation of first line ART given the extremely low prevalence of mutations found in older surveillance studies. We aimed to describe the prevalence of IRAM in Austrian patients recently diagnosed with HIV in the 5 years following introduction of integrase inhibitors and to analyse trends and factors associated with their detection. Samples of antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve patients recently diagnosed with HIV in Austria between 2008 and 2013 were analysed for the existence of IRAM and drug penalty scores were calculated to estimate response to drugs. Demographic and virological data were extracted from a database. Descriptive and comparative statistics were used. A total of 303 samples were analysed. 78 % were male and mean age was 38 years. Overall prevalence of IRAM was 2.3 %. Six percent had at least potentially low-level resistance to raltegravir or elvitegravir, versus 1 % for dolutegravir. One primary mutation was observed (F121Y) in a patient sample from 2012 leading to 5-10-fold reduced susceptibility to raltegravir and elvitegravir. Two patients carried the accessory mutations E138K and G140A, respectively, where both lie on the Q148 pathway. No temporal trend of IRAM prevalence was observed (p = 0.16). Primary IRAM are still rarely found despite the increasing use of INSTI in Austria, but there is a potential for reduced susceptibility to these drugs in selected patients. Routine resistance testing seems prudent to avoid the consequences including accumulation of further mutations and therapeutic failure.

  12. Gag mutations strongly contribute to HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors in highly drug-experienced patients besides compensating for fitness loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Elisabeth; Quercia, Romina; Glass, Bärbel; Descamps, Diane; Launay, Odile; Duval, Xavier; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Hance, Allan J; Clavel, François

    2009-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) resistance to protease inhibitors (PI) results from mutations in the viral protease (PR) that reduce PI binding but also decrease viral replicative capacity (RC). Additional mutations compensating for the RC loss subsequently accumulate within PR and in Gag substrate cleavage sites. We examined the respective contribution of mutations in PR and Gag to PI resistance and RC and their interdependence using a panel of HIV-1 molecular clones carrying different sequences from six patients who had failed multiple lines of treatment. Mutations in Gag strongly and directly contributed to PI resistance besides compensating for fitness loss. This effect was essentially carried by the C-terminal region of Gag (containing NC-SP2-p6) with little or no contribution from MA, CA, and SP1. The effect of Gag on resistance depended on the presence of cleavage site mutations A431V or I437V in NC-SP2-p6 and correlated with processing of the NC/SP2 cleavage site. By contrast, reverting the A431V or I437V mutation in these highly evolved sequences had little effect on RC. Mutations in the NC-SP2-p6 region of Gag can be dually selected as compensatory and as direct PI resistance mutations, with cleavage at the NC-SP2 site behaving as a rate-limiting step in PI resistance. Further compensatory mutations render viral RC independent of the A431V or I437V mutations while their effect on resistance persists.

  13. Gag mutations strongly contribute to HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors in highly drug-experienced patients besides compensating for fitness loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Dam

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors (PI results from mutations in the viral protease (PR that reduce PI binding but also decrease viral replicative capacity (RC. Additional mutations compensating for the RC loss subsequently accumulate within PR and in Gag substrate cleavage sites. We examined the respective contribution of mutations in PR and Gag to PI resistance and RC and their interdependence using a panel of HIV-1 molecular clones carrying different sequences from six patients who had failed multiple lines of treatment. Mutations in Gag strongly and directly contributed to PI resistance besides compensating for fitness loss. This effect was essentially carried by the C-terminal region of Gag (containing NC-SP2-p6 with little or no contribution from MA, CA, and SP1. The effect of Gag on resistance depended on the presence of cleavage site mutations A431V or I437V in NC-SP2-p6 and correlated with processing of the NC/SP2 cleavage site. By contrast, reverting the A431V or I437V mutation in these highly evolved sequences had little effect on RC. Mutations in the NC-SP2-p6 region of Gag can be dually selected as compensatory and as direct PI resistance mutations, with cleavage at the NC-SP2 site behaving as a rate-limiting step in PI resistance. Further compensatory mutations render viral RC independent of the A431V or I437V mutations while their effect on resistance persists.

  14. Impact of human leukocyte antigen-B*51-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte pressure on mutation patterns of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Ode, Hirotaka; Hachiya, Atsuko; Hayashida, Tsunefusa; Sato, Hironori; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Oka, Shinichi

    2010-03-13

    The objective of this study is to determine the impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*51-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) pressure on the development of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance. The prevalence of HIV-1 harboring an escape mutation, I135X, in a major epitope of HLA-B*51-restricted CTL located in reverse transcriptase is increasing worldwide. We analyzed the effects of escape mutations on the emerging mutation patterns of NNRTI resistance. Monoclonal HIV-1 sequences harboring each of the escape mutations, including I135L (HIV-1I135L), I135V (HIV-1I135V), I135T (HIV-1I135T), and I135R (HIV-1I135R) in reverse transcriptase, and a wild-type monoclonal HIV-1 (HIV-1WT) were cultured in the presence of increasing concentrations of efavirenz. Induced mutations during culture passages of the culture were analyzed. E138K emerged during the cultural passages of HIV-1I135V, HIV-1I135T, and HIV-1I135R, but not during the passages of HIV-1WT. The combination of I135T, the most frequent escape mutation, and E138K (HIV-1I135T/E138K) conferred significant resistance to efavirenz, nevirapine, and etravirine. The HIV-1I135L/E138K and HIV-1I135R/E138K were significantly resistant to nevirapine and etravirine, respectively, though each solo of escape mutations and E138K did not confer significant resistance to NNRTI. Computational analysis indicated that I135T and E138K cooperatively extend the gap between the binding site of reverse transcriptase and NNRTI. HLA-B*51-restricted CTL can induce novel mutation patterns of NNRTI resistance by selecting escape mutations. The spread of CTL escape variants may alter the mutation patterns of drug resistance.

  15. Mutations in DNA repair genes are associated with the Haarlem lineage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis independently of their antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olano, Juanita; López, Beatriz; Reyes, Alejandro; Lemos, María del Pilar; Correa, Nidia; Del Portillo, Patricia; Barrera, Lucia; Robledo, Jaime; Ritacco, Viviana; Zambrano, María Mercedes

    2007-11-01

    The analysis of the DNA repair genes ogt and ung was carried out in 117 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Argentina and Colombia in order to explore correlation between mutations in these genes and multi-drug resistance. With the exception of two Beijing family isolates, the rest of the strains harbored either two wild-type or two mutant alleles with identical single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in each gene (ogt44 and ung501). These ogt44 and ung501 mutations were not associated with multi-drug resistance and occurred simultaneously in circulating Haarlem genotype M. tuberculosis strains. We therefore propose the use of these markers as tools in phylogenetic and epidemiologic studies.

  16. The mathematics of random mutation and natural selection for multiple simultaneous selection pressures and the evolution of antimicrobial drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Alan

    2016-12-20

    The random mutation and natural selection phenomenon act in a mathematically predictable behavior, which when understood leads to approaches to reduce and prevent the failure of the use of these selection pressures when treating infections and cancers. The underlying principle to impair the random mutation and natural selection phenomenon is to use combination therapy, which forces the population to evolve to multiple selection pressures simultaneously that invoke the multiplication rule of probabilities simultaneously as well. Recently, it has been seen that combination therapy for the treatment of malaria has failed to prevent the emergence of drug-resistant variants. Using this empirical example and the principles of probability theory, the derivation of the equations describing this treatment failure is carried out. These equations give guidance as to how to use combination therapy for the treatment of cancers and infectious diseases and prevent the emergence of drug resistance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Mutations in the NOT Genes or in the Translation Machinery Similarly Display Increased Resistance to Histidine Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine A. Collart

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The NOT genes encode subunits of the conserved Ccr4-Not complex, a global regulator of gene expression, and in particular of mRNA metabolism. They were originally identified in a selection for increased resistance to histidine starvation in the yeast S. cerevisiae. Recent work indicated that the Not5 subunit, ortholog of mammalian CNOT3, determines global translation levels by defining binding of the Ccr4-Not scaffold protein Not1 to ribosomal mRNAs during transcription. This is needed for optimal translation of ribosomal proteins. In this work we searched for mutations in budding yeast that were resistant to histidine starvation using the same selection that originally led to the isolation of the NOT genes. We thereby isolated mutations in ribosome-related genes. This common phenotype of ribosome mutants and not mutants is in good agreement with the positive role of the Not proteins for translation. In this regard, it is interesting that frequent mutations in RPL5 and RPL10 or in CNOT3 have been observed to accumulate in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL. This suggests that in metazoans a common function implicating ribosome subunits and CNOT3 plays a role in the development of cancer. In this perspective we suggest that the Ccr4-Not complex, according to translation levels and fidelity, could itself be involved in the regulation of amino acid biosynthesis levels. We discuss how this could explain why mutations have been identified in many cancers.

  18. Thermodynamic and structural analysis of HIV protease resistance to darunavir - analysis of heavily mutated patient- derived HIV-1 proteases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kožíšek, Milan; Lepšík, Martin; Grantz Šašková, Klára; Brynda, Jiří; Konvalinka, Jan; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 281, č. 7 (2014), s. 1834-1847 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/11/1798 Grant - others:OPPC(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : enthropic contribution * HIV protease inhibitors * isothermal titration calorimetry * resistance mutation * X-ray crystallography Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.001, year: 2014

  19. Mutation of the glucosinolate biosynthesis enzyme cytochrome P450 83A1 monooxygenase increases camalexin accumulation and powdery mildew resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Simu eLiu; Lisa M. Bartnikas; Sigrid M. Volko; Sigrid M. Volko; Frederick M. Ausubel; Frederick M. Ausubel; Dingzhong eTang

    2016-01-01

    Small secondary metabolites, including glucosinolates and the major phytoalexin camalexin, play important roles in immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana. We isolated an Arabidopsis mutant with increased resistance to the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum and identified a mutation in the gene encoding cytochrome P450 83A1 monooxygenase (CYP83A1), which functions in glucosinolate biosynthesis. The cyp83a1-3 mutant exhibited enhanced defense responses to G. cichoracearum and double mu...

  20. Mutation of the Glucosinolate Biosynthesis Enzyme Cytochrome P450 83A1 Monooxygenase Increases Camalexin Accumulation and Powdery Mildew Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Simu; Bartnikas, Lisa M.; Volko, Sigrid M.; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Tang, Dingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Small secondary metabolites, including glucosinolates and the major phytoalexin camalexin, play important roles in immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana. We isolated an Arabidopsis mutant with increased resistance to the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum and identified a mutation in the gene encoding cytochrome P450 83A1 monooxygenase (CYP83A1), which functions in glucosinolate biosynthesis. The cyp83a1-3 mutant exhibited enhanced defense responses to G. cichoracearum and double mu...

  1. Role of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV mutations in fluoroquinolone resistance of Capnocytophaga spp. clinical isolates and laboratory mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Elodie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Fosse, Thierry

    2017-08-01

    Capnocytophaga spp. are often reported to cause bacteraemia and extra-oral infections and are characterized by their significant contribution to resistance to β-lactam and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin antibiotics in the human oral microbiota. The implication of mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of DNA gyrase A and B ( gyrA and gyrB ) and topoisomerase IV ( parC and parE ) of fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant Capnocytophaga spp., hitherto unknown, was explored in this study. Two reference strains ( Capnocytophaga gingivalis ATCC 33624 and Capnocytophaga sputigena ATCC 33612) and four Capnocytophaga spp. isolated from clinical samples were studied. Nine in vitro FQ-resistant mutants, derived from two reference strains and one FQ-susceptible clinical isolate, were selected by successive inoculations onto medium containing levofloxacin. MICs of ofloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin were determined. The presumed QRDRs of GyrA, GyrB, ParC and ParE from Capnocytophaga spp. were determined by sequence homology to Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli . PCR primers were designed to amplify the presumed QRDR genetic region of Capnocytophaga spp. and sequence analyses were performed using the BLAST program at the National Center for Biotechnology Information. gyrA mutations leading to a substitution from amino acid position 80 to 86 were systematically detected in Capnocytophaga spp. with ciprofloxacin MIC >1 mg/L and considered as the primary target of FQs. No mutational alteration in the QRDR of gyrB was detected. Other mutations in parC and parE led to spontaneous amino acid substitutions of DNA topoisomerase IV subunit B with no alteration in FQ susceptibility. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Mutation of the Glucosinolate Biosynthesis Enzyme Cytochrome P450 83A1 Monooxygenase Increases Camalexin Accumulation and Powdery Mildew Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Simu; Bartnikas, Lisa M; Volko, Sigrid M; Ausubel, Frederick M; Tang, Dingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Small secondary metabolites, including glucosinolates and the major phytoalexin camalexin, play important roles in immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana. We isolated an Arabidopsis mutant with increased resistance to the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum and identified a mutation in the gene encoding cytochrome P450 83A1 monooxygenase (CYP83A1), which functions in glucosinolate biosynthesis. The cyp83a1-3 mutant exhibited enhanced defense responses to G. cichoracearum and double mutant analysis showed that this enhanced resistance requires NPR1, EDS1, and PAD4, but not SID2 or EDS5. In cyp83a1-3 mutants, the expression of genes related to camalexin synthesis increased upon G. cichoracearum infection. Significantly, the cyp83a1-3 mutant also accumulated higher levels of camalexin. Decreasing camalexin levels by mutation of the camalexin synthetase gene PAD3 or the camalexin synthesis regulator AtWRKY33 compromised the powdery mildew resistance in these mutants. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of PAD3 increased camalexin levels and enhanced resistance to G. cichoracearum. Taken together, our data indicate that accumulation of higher levels of camalexin contributes to increased resistance to powdery mildew.

  3. Mutation of the glucosinolate biosynthesis enzyme cytochrome P450 83A1 monooxygenase increases camalexin accumulation and powdery mildew resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simu eLiu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Small secondary metabolites, including glucosinolates and the major phytoalexin camalexin, play important roles in immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana. We isolated an Arabidopsis mutant with increased resistance to the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum and identified a mutation in the gene encoding cytochrome P450 83A1 monooxygenase (CYP83A1, which functions in glucosinolate biosynthesis. The cyp83a1-3 mutant exhibited enhanced defense responses to G. cichoracearum and double mutant analysis showed that this enhanced resistance requires NPR1, EDS1, and PAD4, but not SID2 or EDS5. In cyp83a1-3 mutants, the expression of genes related to camalexin synthesis increased upon G. cichoracearum infection. Significantly, the cyp83a1-3 mutant also accumulated higher levels of camalexin. Decreasing camalexin levels by mutation of the camalexin synthetase gene PAD3 or the camalexin synthesis regulator AtWRKY33 compromised the powdery mildew resistance in these mutants. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of PAD3 increased camalexin levels and enhanced resistance to G. cichoracearum. Taken together, our data indicate that accumulation of higher levels of camalexin contributes to increased resistance to powdery mildew.

  4. Genetic mutation in Egyptian children with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal Micheal Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study concludes that mutations of NPHS2 gene are common among Egyptian children with SRNS. We support a model where ethnicity plays an important role in specific NPHS2 mutations, since a novel mutation was found in one patient in this study. Future study on a large number of Egyptian patients with SRNS is warranted to identify the actual genetic contribution of this gene in the development of SRNS in our population, which might help in patients' prognosis and management.

  5. First Report of the 23S rRNA Gene A2058G Point Mutation Associated With Macrolide Resistance in Treponema pallidum From Syphilis Patients in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Angel A; Matos, Nelvis; Blanco, Orestes; Rodríguez, Islay; Stamm, Lola Virginia

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the presence of macrolide-resistant Treponema pallidum subtypes in Havana, Cuba. Samples from 41 syphilis patients were tested for T. pallidum 23S rRNA gene mutations. Twenty-five patients (61%) harbored T. pallidum with the A2058G mutation, which was present in all 8 subtypes that were identified. The A2059G mutation was not detected.

  6. Glesatinib Exhibits Antitumor Activity in Lung Cancer Models and Patients HarboringMETExon 14 Mutations and Overcomes Mutation-mediated Resistance to Type I MET Inhibitors in Nonclinical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, Lars D; Aranda, Ruth; Lee, Matthew; Tovar, Elizabeth A; Essenburg, Curt J; Madaj, Zachary; Chiang, Harrah; Briere, David; Hallin, Jill; Lopez-Casas, Pedro P; Baños, Natalia; Menendez, Camino; Hidalgo, Manuel; Tassell, Vanessa; Chao, Richard; Chudova, Darya I; Lanman, Richard B; Olson, Peter; Bazhenova, Lyudmilla; Patel, Sandip Pravin; Graveel, Carrie; Nishino, Mizuki; Shapiro, Geoffrey I; Peled, Nir; Awad, Mark M; Jänne, Pasi A; Christensen, James G

    2017-11-01

    Purpose: MET exon 14 deletion ( MET ex14 del) mutations represent a novel class of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) driver mutations. We evaluated glesatinib, a spectrum-selective MET inhibitor exhibiting a type II binding mode, in MET ex14 del-positive nonclinical models and NSCLC patients and assessed its ability to overcome resistance to type I MET inhibitors. Experimental Design: As most MET inhibitors in clinical development bind the active site with a type I binding mode, we investigated mechanisms of acquired resistance to each MET inhibitor class utilizing in vitro and in vivo models and in glesatinib clinical trials. Results: Glesatinib inhibited MET signaling, demonstrated marked regression of MET ex14 del-driven patient-derived xenografts, and demonstrated a durable RECIST partial response in a MET ex14 del mutation-positive patient enrolled on a glesatinib clinical trial. Prolonged treatment of nonclinical models with selected MET inhibitors resulted in differences in resistance kinetics and mutations within the MET activation loop (i.e., D1228N, Y1230C/H) that conferred resistance to type I MET inhibitors, but remained sensitive to glesatinib. In vivo models exhibiting MET ex14 del/A-loop double mutations and resistance to type I inhibitors exhibited a marked response to glesatinib. Finally, a MET ex14 del mutation-positive NSCLC patient who responded to crizotinib but later relapsed, demonstrated a mixed response to glesatinib including reduction in size of a MET Y1230H mutation-positive liver metastasis and concurrent loss of detection of this mutation in plasma DNA. Conclusions: Together, these data demonstrate that glesatinib exhibits a distinct mechanism of target inhibition and can overcome resistance to type I MET inhibitors. Clin Cancer Res; 23(21); 6661-72. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Structural Insights into HIV Reverse Transcriptase Mutations Q151M and Q151M Complex That Confer Multinucleoside Drug Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Kalyan; Martinez, Sergio E.; Arnold, Eddy

    2017-04-10

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is targeted by multiple drugs. RT mutations that confer resistance to nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) emerge during clinical use. Q151M and four associated mutations, A62V, V75I, F77L, and F116Y, were detected in patients failing therapies with dideoxynucleosides (didanosine [ddI], zalcitabine [ddC]) and/or zidovudine (AZT). The cluster of the five mutations is referred to as the Q151M complex (Q151Mc), and an RT or virus containing Q151Mc exhibits resistance to multiple NRTIs. To understand the structural basis for Q151M and Q151Mc resistance, we systematically determined the crystal structures of the wild-type RT/double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)/dATP (complex I), wild-type RT/dsDNA/ddATP (complex II), Q151M RT/dsDNA/dATP (complex III), Q151Mc RT/dsDNA/dATP (complex IV), and Q151Mc RT/dsDNA/ddATP (complex V) ternary complexes. The structures revealed that the deoxyribose rings of dATP and ddATP have 3'-endo and 3'-exo conformations, respectively. The single mutation Q151M introduces conformational perturbation at the deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP)-binding pocket, and the mutated pocket may exist in multiple conformations. The compensatory set of mutations in Q151Mc, particularly F116Y, restricts the side chain flexibility of M151 and helps restore the DNA polymerization efficiency of the enzyme. The altered dNTP-binding pocket in Q151Mc RT has the Q151-R72 hydrogen bond removed and has a switched conformation for the key conserved residue R72 compared to that in wild-type RT. On the basis of a modeled structure of hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase, the residues R72, Y116, M151, and M184 in Q151Mc HIV-1 RT are conserved in wild-type HBV polymerase as residues R41, Y89, M171, and M204, respectively; functionally, both Q151Mc HIV-1 and wild-type HBV are resistant to dideoxynucleoside analogs.

  8. Altered viral fitness and drug susceptibility in HIV-1 carrying mutations that confer resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase and integrase strand transfer inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zixin; Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2014-08-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTI) and integrase (IN) strand transfer inhibitors (INSTI) are key components of antiretroviral regimens. To explore potential interactions between NNRTI and INSTI resistance mutations, we investigated the combined effects of these mutations on drug susceptibility and fitness of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In the absence of drug, single-mutant viruses were less fit than the wild type; viruses carrying multiple mutations were less fit than single-mutant viruses. These findings were explained in part by the observation that mutant viruses carrying NNRTI plus INSTI resistance mutations had reduced amounts of virion-associated RT and/or IN protein. In the presence of efavirenz (EFV), a virus carrying RT-K103N together with IN-G140S and IN-Q148H (here termed IN-G140S/Q148H) mutations was fitter than a virus with a RT-K103N mutation alone. Similarly, in the presence of EFV, the RT-E138K plus IN-G140S/Q148H mutant virus was fitter than one with the RT-E138K mutation alone. No effect of INSTI resistance mutations on the fitness of RT-Y181C mutant viruses was observed. Conversely, RT-E138K and -Y181C mutations improved the fitness of the IN-G140S/Q148H mutant virus in the presence of raltegravir (RAL); the RT-K103N mutation had no effect. The NNRTI resistance mutations had no effect on RAL susceptibility. Likewise, the IN-G140S/Q148H mutations had no effect on EFV or RPV susceptibility. However, both the RT-K103N plus IN-G140S/Q148H and the RT-E138K plus IN-G140S/Q148H mutant viruses had significantly greater fold increases in 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of EFV than viruses carrying a single NNRTI mutation. Likewise, the RT-E138K plus IN-G140S/Q148H mutant virus had significantly greater fold increases in RAL IC50 than that of the IN-G140S/Q148H mutant virus. These results suggest that interactions between RT and IN mutations are important for NNRTI and INSTI resistance and viral fitness

  9. In vitro resistance selection with doravirine (MK-1439), a novel nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor with distinct mutation development pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Meizhen; Wang, Deping; Grobler, Jay A; Hazuda, Daria J; Miller, Michael D; Lai, Ming-Tain

    2015-01-01

    Doravirine (DOR, formerly known as MK-1439) is a human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1) nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) that is currently in phase 2b clinical trials. In vitro resistance selection of subtype B virus (MT4-green fluorescent protein [GFP] cells), as well as subtype A and C viruses (MT4-GFP/CCR5 cells) was conducted with DOR, rilpivirine (RPV), and efavirine (EFV) under low-multiplicity-of-infection conditions in a 96-well format. Resistance selection was performed with escalating concentrations of the NNRTIs ranging from the 95% effective concentration (1 × EC(95)) to 1,000 × EC(95) in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum. In the resistance selection of subtype B virus with DOR, a V106A mutant virus led to two mutation pathways, followed by the emergence separately of either F227L or L234I. In the resistance selection of subtype A and C viruses, similar mutation development pathways were detected, in which a V106A or V106M mutant was also the starting virus in the pathways. Mutations that are commonly associated with RPV and EFV in clinical settings were also identified in subtype B viruses such as the E138K and K103N mutants, respectively, in this in vitro resistance selection study. The susceptibility of subtype B mutant viruses selected by DOR, RPV, and EFV to NNRTIs was evaluated. Results suggest that mutant viruses selected by DOR are susceptible to RPV and EFV and mutants selected by RPV and EFV are susceptible to DOR. When the replication capacity of the V106A mutant was compared with that of the wild-type (WT) virus, the mutant virus was 4-fold less fit than the WT virus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. A novel somatic mutation in ACD induces telomere lengthening and apoptosis resistance in leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinella, Jean-François; Cassart, Pauline; Garnier, Nicolas; Rousseau, Philippe; Drullion, Claire; Richer, Chantal; Ouimet, Manon; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Autexier, Chantal; Sinnett, Daniel

    2015-09-07

    The identification of oncogenic driver mutations has largely relied on the assumption that genes that exhibit more mutations than expected by chance are more likely to play an active role in tumorigenesis. Major cancer sequencing initiatives have therefore focused on recurrent mutations that are more likely to be drivers. However, in specific genetic contexts, low frequency mutations may also be capable of participating in oncogenic processes. Reliable strategies for identifying these rare or even patient-specific (private) mutations are needed in order to elucidate more personalized approaches to cancer diagnosis and treatment. Here we performed whole-exome sequencing on three cases of childhood pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (cALL), representing three cytogenetically-defined subgroups (high hyperdiploid, t(12;21) translocation, and cytogenetically normal). We applied a data reduction strategy to identify both common and rare/private somatic events with high functional potential. Top-ranked candidate mutations were subsequently validated at high sequencing depth on an independent platform and in vitro expression assays were performed to evaluate the impact of identified mutations on cell growth and survival. We identified 6 putatively damaging non-synonymous somatic mutations among the three cALL patients. Three of these mutations were well-characterized common cALL mutations involved in constitutive activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (FLT3 p.D835Y, NRAS p.G13D, BRAF p.G466A). The remaining three patient-specific mutations (ACD p.G223V, DOT1L p.V114F, HCFC1 p.Y103H) were novel mutations previously undescribed in public cancer databases. Cytotoxicity assays demonstrated a protective effect of the ACD p.G223V mutation against apoptosis in leukemia cells. ACD plays a key role in protecting telomeres and recruiting telomerase. Using a telomere restriction fragment assay, we also showed that this novel mutation in ACD leads to increased

  11. Improving Peanut Productivity and Resistance to Aspergillus flavus L Through mutation Induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragab, A.I; Korani, W.A.A.; Rashed, M.A.; Salam, M.A

    2008-01-01

    The present study was conducted to improve peanut productivity and resistance to Aspergillus flavus that caused aflatoxin formation in peanut seeds . To achieve these goals , dry seeds of the two local varieties (Giza 4 and Giza5) were irradiated with gamma ray doses of 0 , 50 , 100 , 150 , 200 , 250 , 300 Gy. The irradiated seeds were sown to get the M1 and M2 generations. Six high yielding mutants were selected in M2 from irradiated populations of 150 Gy and 200 Gy for Giza 4 and Giza 5 respectively. These mutants were evaluated in M3 generation for yield and yield components , quality traits (protein and oil content) and the resistance to Aspergillus flavus infection. The obtained results revealed that analysis of variance for Giza 4 selected mutants showed significant differences between genotypes for different studied characters except for plant height and no. of branches /plant .However, for Giza5 selected mutants, significant differences between genotypes were only obtained for plant height , no of pods/plant, weight of pods/plant, weight of seeds/plant, and weight of 100 seeds. Different M3 mutants that selected from irradiated populations of both two peanut cultivars Giza4 and Giza5 shod marked improvement for yield and yield components, and quality traits in comparison with their mother varieties.The results of M3 progeny test indicated that most selected mutants retained the features of their M2 selectors, suggesting that they were considered true breeding materials. For Giza 4 selected mutants, aflatoxin concentrations ranged from 31.11 μg for mutant 1 to 188.46 μ g for mutant3 in comparison with 42.76 μg for the mother variety Giza 4. The lowest yielding progenies of mutant1 (1 ) showed the lowest aflatoxin concentrations as compared with the mother variety Giza 4 and other mutants, therefore the use of induced mutations for peanut improvement may be led to the development of improved varieties .However, for Giza 5 selected mutants aflatoxin

  12. Frequency of ABL gene mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant to imatinib and results of treatment switch to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcé, Silvia; Zamora, Lurdes; Cabezón, Marta; Xicoy, Blanca; Boqué, Concha; Fernández, Cristalina; Grau, Javier; Navarro, José-Tomás; Fernández de Sevilla, Alberto; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Feliu, Evarist; Millá, Fuensanta

    2013-08-04

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have improved the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, a significant proportion of patients do not achieve the optimal response or are resistant to TKI. ABL kinase domain mutations have been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of TKI resistance. Treatment with second-generation TKI has produced high rates of hematologic and cytogenetic responses in mutated ABL patients. The aim of this study was to determine the type and frequency of ABL mutations in patients who were resistant to imatinib or had lost the response, and to analyze the effect of second-generation TKI on their outcome. The presence of ABL mutations in 45 CML patients resistant to imatinib was evaluated by direct sequencing and was correlated with the results of the cytogenetic study (performed in 39 cases). The outcome of these patients after therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib was analyzed. ABL mutations were detected in 14 out of 45 resistant patients. Patients with clonal cytogenetic evolution tended to develop mutations more frequently than those without clonal evolution. Nine out of the 15 patients with ABL mutation responded to a treatment switch to nilotinib (n=4), dasatinib (n=2), interferon (n=1) or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (n=2). The frequency of ABL mutations in CML patients resistant to imatinib is high and is more frequent among those with clonal cytogenetic evolution. The change to second-generation TKI can overcome imatinib resistance in most of the mutated patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of I1171N resistance mutation in ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer tumor sample and circulating tumor DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alison C; Dô, Pascal; Richard, Nicolas; Dubos, Catherine; Michels, Jean Jacques; Bonneau, Jessica; Gervais, Radj

    2016-09-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is sensitive to ALK inhibitor therapy, but resistance invariably develops and can be mediated by certain secondary mutations. The detection of these mutations is useful to guide treatment decisions, but tumors are not always easily accessible to re-biopsy. We report the case of a patient with ALK-rearranged NSCLC who presented acquired resistance to crizotinib and then alectinib. Sequencing analyses of DNA from a liver metastasis biopsy sample and circulating tumor DNA both found the same I1171N ALK kinase domain mutation, known to confer resistance to certain ALK inhibitors. However, the patient then received ceritinib, a 2nd generation ALK inhibitor, and achieved another partial response. This case underlines how ALK resistance mutation detection in peripheral blood could be a reliable, safer, and less invasive alternative to tissue-based samples in NSCLC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The BCR-ABLT315I mutation compromises survival in chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, in a matched pair analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck E; Ibrahim, Amr R; Soverini, Simona

    2013-01-01

    The BCR-ABL T315I mutation confers resistance to currently licensed tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic myelogenous leukemia. However, the impact of this mutation on survival in early stages of disease, in chronic phase, has never been detailed. Using matched pair analysis, a cohort of 64...

  15. The BRCA1-Δ11q Alternative Splice Isoform Bypasses Germline Mutations and Promotes Therapeutic Resistance to PARP Inhibition and Cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yifan; Bernhardy, Andrea J; Cruz, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Breast and ovarian cancer patients harboring BRCA1/2 germline mutations have clinically benefitted from therapy with PARP inhibitor (PARPi) or platinum compounds, but acquired resistance limits clinical impact. In this study, we investigated the impact of mutations on BRCA1 isoform expression and...

  16. Adaptation of cancer cells from different entities to the MDM2 inhibitor nutlin-3 results in the emergence of p53-mutated multi-drug-resistant cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michaelis, M.; Rothweiler, F.; Barth, S.; Cinatl, J.; van Rikxoort, M.; Loeschmann, N.; Voges, Y.; Breitling, R.; von Deimling, A.; Roedel, F.; Weber, K.; Fehse, B.; Mack, E.; Stiewe, T.; Doerr, H. W.; Speidel, D.; Cinatl, J.; Cinatl jr., J.; Stephanou, A.

    2011-01-01

    Six p53 wild-type cancer cell lines from infrequently p53-mutated entities (neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and melanoma) were continuously exposed to increasing concentrations of the murine double minute 2 inhibitor nutlin-3, resulting in the emergence of nutlin-3-resistant, p53-mutated sublines

  17. Analysis of Clinical HIV-1 Strains with Resistance to Maraviroc Reveals Strain-Specific Resistance Mutations, Variable Degrees of Resistance, and Minimal Cross-Resistance to Other CCR5 Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Ellenberg, Paula; Duncan, Renee; Ellett, Anne; Zhou, Jingling; Sterjovski, Jasminka; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Gray, Lachlan R; Lewis, Marilyn; Jubb, Becky; Westby, Mike; Lee, Benhur; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa; Roche, Michael; Gorry, Paul R

    2017-12-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) is an allosteric inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry, and is the only CCR5 antagonist licensed for use as an anti-HIV-1 therapeutic. It acts by altering the conformation of the CCR5 extracellular loops, rendering CCR5 unrecognizable by the HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoproteins. This study aimed to understand the mechanisms underlying the development of MVC resistance in HIV-1-infected patients. To do this, we obtained longitudinal plasma samples from eight subjects who experienced treatment failure with phenotypically verified, CCR5-tropic MVC resistance. We then cloned and characterized HIV-1 Envs (n = 77) from plasma of pretreatment (n = 36) and treatment failure (n = 41) samples. Our results showed variation in the magnitude of MVC resistance as measured by reductions in maximal percent inhibition of Env-pseudotyped viruses, which was more pronounced in 293-Affinofile cells compared to other cells with similar levels of CCR5 expression. Amino acid determinants of MVC resistance localized to the V3 Env region and were strain specific. We also observed minimal cross-resistance to other CCR5 antagonists by MVC-resistant strains. We conclude that 293-Affinofile cells are highly sensitive for detecting and measuring MVC resistance through a mechanism that is CCR5-dependent yet independent of CCR5 expression levels. The strain-specific nature of resistance mutations suggests that sequence-based diagnostics and prognostics will need to be more sophisticated than simple position scoring to be useful for managing resistance in subjects taking MVC. Finally, the minimal levels of cross-resistance suggests that recognition of the MVC-modified form of CCR5 does not necessarily lead to recognition of other antagonist-modified forms of CCR5.

  18. Human cytomegalovirus resistance to deoxyribosylindole nucleosides maps to a transversion mutation in the terminase subunit-encoding gene UL89.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Brian G; Phan, Quang; Hall, Ellie D; Breitenbach, Julie M; Borysko, Katherine Z; Kamil, Jeremy P; Townsend, Leroy B; Drach, John C

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection can cause severe illnesses, including encephalopathy and mental retardation, in immunocompromised and immunologically immature patients. Current pharmacotherapies for treating systemic HCMV infections include ganciclovir, cidofovir, and foscarnet. However, long-term administration of these agents can result in serious adverse effects (myelosuppression and/or nephrotoxicity) and the development of viral strains with reduced susceptibility to drugs. The deoxyribosylindole (indole) nucleosides demonstrate a 20-fold greater activity in vitro (the drug concentration at which 50% of the number of plaques was reduced with the presence of drug compared to the number in the absence of drug [EC50] = 0.34 μM) than ganciclovir (EC50 = 7.4 μM) without any observed increase in cytotoxicity. Based on structural similarity to the benzimidazole nucleosides, we hypothesize that the indole nucleosides target the HCMV terminase, an enzyme responsible for packaging viral DNA into capsids and cleaving the DNA into genome-length units. To test this hypothesis, an indole nucleoside-resistant HCMV strain was isolated, the open reading frames of the genes that encode the viral terminase were sequenced, and a G766C mutation in exon 1 of UL89 was identified; this mutation resulted in an E256Q change in the amino acid sequence of the corresponding protein. An HCMV wild-type strain, engineered with this mutation to confirm resistance, demonstrated an 18-fold decrease in susceptibility to the indole nucleosides (EC50 = 3.1 ± 0.7 μM) compared to that of wild-type virus (EC50 = 0.17 ± 0.04 μM). Interestingly, this mutation did not confer resistance to the benzimidazole nucleosides (EC50 for wild-type HCMV = 0.25 ± 0.04 μM, EC50 for HCMV pUL89 E256Q = 0.23 ± 0.04 μM). We conclude, therefore, that the G766C mutation that results in the E256Q substitution is unique for indole nucleoside resistance and distinct from previously discovered substitutions

  19. A trade-off between oxidative stress resistance and DNA repair plays a role in the evolution of elevated mutation rates in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Barceló, Clara; Cabot, Gabriel; Oliver, Antonio; Buckling, Angus; MacLean, R. Craig

    2013-01-01

    The dominant paradigm for the evolution of mutator alleles in bacterial populations is that they spread by indirect selection for linked beneficial mutations when bacteria are poorly adapted. In this paper, we challenge the ubiquity of this paradigm by demonstrating that a clinically important stressor, hydrogen peroxide, generates direct selection for an elevated mutation rate in the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a consequence of a trade-off between the fidelity of DNA repair and hydrogen peroxide resistance. We demonstrate that the biochemical mechanism underlying this trade-off in the case of mutS is the elevated secretion of catalase by the mutator strain. Our results provide, to our knowledge, the first experimental evidence that direct selection can favour mutator alleles in bacterial populations, and pave the way for future studies to understand how mutation and DNA repair are linked to stress responses and how this affects the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. PMID:23446530

  20. The R263K mutation in HIV integrase that is selected by dolutegravir may actually prevent clinically relevant resistance to this compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainberg, Mark; Anstett, Kaitlin; Mesplede, Thibault; Quashie, Peter; Han, Yingshan; Oliveira, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance against dolutegravir (DTG) or the nucleosides with which it has been co-administered has never been observed in patients receiving this drug in first-line therapy. In contrast, a R263K mutation that confers low-level resistance (3-4 fold) to DTG has been selected by DTG in culture. Our group has ascribed the absence of resistance to DTG to the high fitness cost exacted by the R263K mutation and an inability of HIV to generate compensatory mutations. We generated recombinant integrase enzymes and viruses containing various combinations of mutations and studied these enzymatically and in culture. We also selected for resistance against raltegravir (RAL) using viruses containing the R263K mutation. The R263K mutation alone conferred an approximate 3-fold level of resistance to DTG and a 40% loss in viral replicative capacity and recombinant integrase activity. Secondary mutations selected at positions H51Y or E138K did not individually affect either enzyme activity or DTG resistance, but the combination of R263K together with H51Y or E138K increased DTG resistance to about 7-fold accompanied by a ≈75% loss in each of viral replication capacity, and both in vitro and in vivo integrase activity. Conversely, combinations of R263K together with multiple resistance mutations for RAL and/or EVG at positions 92,143, 148 and 155 resulted in even further diminished enzymatic activity that may be incompatible with viral survival. Modelling of the 3-dimensional structure of integrase suggests that R263K is located in a region that may not permit further mutagenesis if secondary mutations at H51Y or E138K are also present. Moreover, integrase that contains R263K together with substitutions at positions 92, 143, 148 and 155 may be enzymatically inactive. The use of the R263K-containing virus to select for resistance to RAL led to the appearance of RAL-containing mutations but the loss of R263K. Secondary mutations to R263K following selection with DTG have all

  1. Critical biophysical properties in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux gene regulator MexR are targeted by mutations conferring multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrésen, Cecilia; Jalal, Shah; Aili, Daniel; Wang, Yi; Islam, Sohidul; Jarl, Anngelica; Liedberg, Bo; Wretlind, Bengt; Mårtensson, Lars-Göran; Sunnerhagen, Maria

    2010-04-01

    The self-assembling MexA-MexB-OprM efflux pump system, encoded by the mexO operon, contributes to facile resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by actively extruding multiple antimicrobials. MexR negatively regulates the mexO operon, comprising two adjacent MexR binding sites, and is as such highly targeted by mutations that confer multidrug resistance (MDR). To understand how MDR mutations impair MexR function, we studied MexR-wt as well as a selected set of MDR single mutants distant from the proposed DNA-binding helix. Although DNA affinity and MexA-MexB-OprM repression were both drastically impaired in the selected MexR-MDR mutants, MexR-wt bound its two binding sites in the mexO with high affinity as a dimer. In the MexR-MDR mutants, secondary structure content and oligomerization properties were very similar to MexR-wt despite their lack of DNA binding. Despite this, the MexR-MDR mutants showed highly varying stabilities compared with MexR-wt, suggesting disturbed critical interdomain contacts, because mutations in the DNA-binding domains affected the stability of the dimer region and vice versa. Furthermore, significant ANS binding to MexR-wt in both free and DNA-bound states, together with increased ANS binding in all studied mutants, suggest that a hydrophobic cavity in the dimer region already shown to be involved in regulatory binding is enlarged by MDR mutations. Taken together, we propose that the biophysical MexR properties that are targeted by MDR mutations-stability, domain interactions, and internal hydrophobic surfaces-are also critical for the regulation of MexR DNA binding.

  2. Discovery of the Rdl mutation in association with a cyclodiene resistant population of horn flies, Haematobia irritans (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Luísa N; Guerrero, Felix D; Becker, Michael E; Alison, Montgomery W; Foil, Lane D

    2013-11-15

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans irritans, is an obligate blood-feeding parasite of cattle that causes significant economic impact in many countries. We investigated the resistance of a horn fly population from Louisiana/USA to endosulfan, a cyclodiene insecticide. Bioassays were performed in 2010 and 2011 in order to determine the resistance ratio of the population to endosulfan and a PCR assay was developed to detect the Rdl mutation which is the replacement of an alanine with a serine at the GABA receptor locus that has been associated with resistance to cyclodienes in other insect species. Endosulfan tags had provided 8 weeks of effective control in 2010 but only 1 week in 2011. After only one summer (June-September/2010) of exposure to the endosulfan tagged cattle, there was a significant increase in the resistance ratio for endosulfan in the fly population. Most flies surveyed by the PCR diagnostic assay were homozygous susceptible at the Rdl locus, the resistant (R) allele was mainly present in the heterozygous state and there was no difference in the frequency of the R allele between female and male flies. After the first year's exposure of the horn flies to the endosulfan tags, the frequency of the R allele increased significantly. However, after one year without endosulfan treatment (2011-2012), the frequency of the R allele significantly dropped. These results indicate that target site resistance was responsible, at least in part, for the resistance and that a fitness cost is possibly associated with the Rdl mutation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. gyrA and parC mutations in quinolone-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Nini Hospital in north Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, Rayan; Dabboussi, Fouad; Kassaa, Imad; Khudary, Rami; Hamze, Monzer

    2013-02-01

    The problem of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistance to fluoroquinolones is of growing concern in hospitals. The major mechanism of the resistance of this bacterium to fluoroquinolones is the modification of type II topoisomerases (DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV). In this study, we examined, using the technique of DNA pyrosequencing, mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the gyrA and parC genes of 38 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa that were non-susceptible to at least one of the three fluoroquinolones tested. The most common origin of the isolates was sputum (44.7 %), followed by wounds (11 %), urine (5 %), and ear discharge (5 %). Serotypes O:11 (21 %), O:2 (18.4 %), and O:6 (7.8 %), were the most predominant. Among these 38 isolates, 11 were susceptible, 22 were resistant, and 5 were intermediate-resistant to ciprofloxacin. We found that 19 (50 %) of these strains had a mutation in the gyrA gene (Thr 83 Ile), one of them presented a new mutation (His 80 Arg), 8 (21.05 %) strains had an additional mutation in the parC gene (Ser 80 Leu), and one of these strains had two new mutations not previously reported (Gln 84 Asp, Ala 85 Gly). The ciprofloxacin-sensitive strains had no mutations in the sequence area examined. We found that 81.8 % of the isolates that were resistant to ciprofloxacin had a mutation in the gyrA gene. Some of these resistant strains also had a mutation in the parC gene. The results of this study suggest that pyrosequencing is a reliable technique for the determination of the antibiotic resistance pattern of a given bacterial strain.

  4. The Molecular Mechanism Behind Resistance of the G1202R-Mutated Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase to the Approved Drug Ceritinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaohong; He, Zhifeng; Xie, Deyao; Zheng, Liangcheng; Zhao, Tianhao; Zhang, Xinbo; Cheng, Dezhi

    2018-04-12

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been regarded as an essential target for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the emergence of G1202R solvent front mutation that confer resistance to the drugs were reported for the first as well as the second generation ALK inhibitors. It was supposed that the G1202R solvent front mutation might hinder the drug binding. In this study, a different fact could be clarified by multiple molecular modeling methodologies through a structural analogue of ceritinib (compound 10, Cpd-10) that is reported to be a potent inhibitor against the G1202R mutation. Herein, molecular docking, accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations in conjunction with principal component analysis (PCA) and free energy map calculations were used to produce reasonable and representative initial conformations for the conventional MD simulations. Compared with Cpd-10, the binding specificity of ceritinib between ALK wild type (ALK WT ) and ALK G1202R (ALK G1202R ) are primarily controlled by conformational change of the P-loop and A-loop induced energetic re-distributions, and the variation is non-polar interactions as indicated by conventional MD simulations, PCA, dynamic cross-correlation map (DCCM) analysis and free energy calculations. Furthermore, the umbrella sampling (US) simulations were carried out to make clear the principle of the dissociation processes of ceritinib and Cpd-10 towards ALKWT and ALK G1202R . The calculation results suggest that Cpd-10 has similar dissociation processes from both ALK WT and ALK G1202R , but ceritinib is more easily dissociate from ALK G1202R than from ALK WT , thus less residence time is responsible for the ceritinib resistance. Our results suggest both of the binding specificity and the drug residence time should be emphasized in rational drug design to overcome the G1202R solvent front mutation of ALK resistance.

  5. Drug resistance mutations after the first 12 months on antiretroviral therapy and determinants of virological failure in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndahimana, Jean d'Amour; Riedel, David J; Mwumvaneza, Mutagoma; Sebuhoro, Dieudone; Uwimbabazi, Jean Claude; Kubwimana, Marthe; Mugabo, Jules; Mulindabigwi, Augustin; Kirk, Catherine; Kanters, Steve; Forrest, Jamie I; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Peel, Sheila A; Ribakare, Muhayimpundu; Redfield, Robert R; Nsanzimana, Sabin

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) and determinants of virological failure in a large cohort of patients receiving first-line tenofovir-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens. A nationwide retrospective cohort from 42 health facilities was assessed for virological failure and development of HIVDR mutations. Data were collected at ART initiation and at 12 months of ART on patients with available HIV-1 viral load (VL) and ART adherence measurements. HIV resistance genotyping was performed on patients with VL ≥1000 copies/ml. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with treatment failure. Of 828 patients, 66% were women, and the median age was 37 years. Of the 597 patients from whom blood samples were collected, 86.9% were virologically suppressed, while 11.9% were not. Virological failure was strongly associated with age CD4 counts <200 cells/μl (aOR 3.4; 95% CI: 1.9-6.2). Overall, 9.1% of all patients on ART had drug resistance mutations after 1 year of ART; 27% of the patients who failed treatment had no evidence of HIVDR mutations. HIVDR mutations were not observed in patients on the recommended second-line ART regimen in Rwanda. The last step of the UNAIDS 90-90-90 target appears within grasp, with some viral failures still due to non-adherence. Nonetheless, youth and late initiators are at higher risk of virological failure. Youth-focused programmes could help prevent further drug HIVDR development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Mechanisms associated with HIV-1 resistance to acyclovir by the V75I mutation in reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchesnokov, Egor P; Obikhod, Aleksandr; Massud, Ivana; Lisco, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Brichacek, Beda; Balzarini, Jan; McGuigan, Christopher; Derudas, Marco; Margolis, Leonid; Schinazi, Raymond F; Götte, Matthias

    2009-08-07

    It has recently been demonstrated that the anti-herpetic drug acyclovir (ACV) also displays antiviral activity against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The triphosphate form of ACV is accepted by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), and subsequent incorporation leads to classical chain termination. Like all approved nucleoside analogue RT inhibitors (NRTIs), the selective pressure of ACV is associated with the emergence of resistance. The V75I mutation in HIV-1 RT appears to be dominant in this regard. By itself, this mutation is usually not associated with resistance to currently approved NRTIs. Here we studied the underlying biochemical mechanism. We demonstrate that V75I is also selected under the selective pressure of a monophosphorylated prodrug that was designed to bypass the bottleneck in drug activation to the triphosphate form (ACV-TP). Pre-steady-state kinetics reveal that V75I discriminates against the inhibitor at the level of catalysis, whereas binding of the inhibitor remains largely unaffected. The incorporated ACV-monophosphate (ACV-MP) is vulnerable to excision in the presence of the pyrophosphate donor ATP. V75I compromises binding of the next nucleotide that can otherwise provide a certain degree of protection from excision. Collectively, the results of this study suggest that ACV is sensitive to two different resistance pathways, which warrants further investigation regarding the detailed resistance profile of ACV. Such studies will be crucial in assessing the potential clinical utility of ACV and its derivatives in combination with established NRTIs.

  7. Mechanism of Drug Resistance Revealed by the Crystal Structure of the Unliganded HIV-1 Protease with F53L Mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fengling; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Louis, John M.; Boross, Peter I.; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T. (GSU); (NIH)

    2010-12-03

    Mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR) that produce resistance to antiviral PR inhibitors are a major problem in AIDS therapy. The mutation F53L arising from antiretroviral therapy was introduced into the flexible flap region of the wild-type PR to study its effect and potential role in developing drug resistance. Compared to wild-type PR, PR{sub F53L} showed lower (15%) catalytic efficiency, 20-fold weaker inhibition by the clinical drug indinavir, and reduced dimer stability, while the inhibition constants of two peptide analog inhibitors were slightly lower than those for PR. The crystal structure of PR{sub F53L} was determined in the unliganded form at 1.35 {angstrom} resolution in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The tips of the flaps in PR{sub F53L} had a wider separation than in unliganded wild-type PR, probably due to the absence of hydrophobic interactions of the side-chains of Phe53 and Ile50{prime}. The changes in interactions between the flaps agreed with the reduced stability of PR{sub F53L} relative to wild-type PR. The altered flap interactions in the unliganded form of PR{sub F53L} suggest a distinct mechanism for drug resistance, which has not been observed in other common drug-resistant mutants.

  8. Variability and resistance mutations in the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease in patients not treated with protease inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Bonome Zeminian

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of treatment of chronic hepatitis C is to achieve a sustained virological response, which is defined as exhibiting undetectable hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA levels in serum following therapy for at least six months. However, the current treatment is only effective in 50% of patients infected with HCV genotype 1, the most prevalent genotype in Brazil. Inhibitors of the serine protease non-structural protein 3 (NS3 have therefore been developed to improve the responses of HCV-infected patients. However, the emergence of drug-resistant variants has been the major obstacle to therapeutic success. The goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of resistance mutations and genetic polymorphisms in the NS3 genomic region of HCV from 37 patients infected with HCV genotype 1 had not been treated with protease inhibitors. Plasma viral RNA was used to amplify and sequence the HCV NS3 gene. The results indicate that the catalytic triad is conserved. A large number of substitutions were observed in codons 153, 40 and 91; the resistant variants T54A, T54S, V55A, R155K and A156T were also detected. This study shows that resistance mutations and genetic polymorphisms are present in the NS3 region of HCV in patients who have not been treated with protease inhibitors, data that are important in determining the efficiency of this new class of drugs in Brazil.

  9. Detection of mutations related to drug resistance in M. tuberculosis by dot blot hybridization and spoligotyping using specific radiolabelled probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Maghraby, T.K.; Abdelazeim, O.

    2002-01-01

    The present work has been conducted to determine the mutations related to drug resistance in M. tuberculosis in 63 Egyptian isolates using dot blot hybridization and spoligotyping. The PCR was done for amplification rpoB and katG genes in isolates. Dot blot hybridization were done to PCR products by using specific radiolabelled probes. Moreover, spoligotyping was done to know about the different strains found in Egypt. The results revealed that 58% from isolates had drug resistance to one or more of antituberculosis drugs. The results of spoligotyping have revealed that some Egyptian isolates are identical with the international code while the rest has not been identified yet. DNA sequencing was done to identify the mutation that not clear in dot blot hybridization. Early diagnosis of geno typing resistance to antituberculosis drugs is important as well as allow appropriate early patients management with few days of TB diagnosis. Using such strategy for early diagnosis of TB drug resistance allow and fast and potent patient's management

  10. Effect of mutations at position E138 in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and their interactions with the M184I mutation on defining patterns of resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors rilpivirine and etravirine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong-Tao; Colby-Germinario, Susan P; Asahchop, Eugene L; Oliveira, Maureen; McCallum, Matthew; Schader, Susan M; Han, Yingshan; Quan, Yudong; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Wainberg, Mark A

    2013-07-01

    Impacts of mutations at position E138 (A/G/K/Q/R/V) alone or in combination with M184I in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) were investigated. We also determined why E138K is the most prevalent nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation in patients failing rilpivirine (RPV) therapy. Recombinant RT enzymes and viruses containing each of the above-mentioned mutations were generated, and drug susceptibility was assayed. Each of the E138A/G/K/Q/R mutations, alone or in combination with M184I, resulted in decreased susceptibility to RPV and etravirine (ETR). The maximum decrease in susceptibility to RPV was observed for E138/R/Q/G by both recombinant RT assay and cell-based assays. E138Q/R-containing enzymes and viruses also showed the most marked decrease in susceptibility to ETR by both assays. The addition of M184I to the E138 mutations did not significantly change the levels of diminution in drug susceptibility. These findings indicate that E138R caused the highest level of loss of susceptibility to both RPV and ETR, and, accordingly, E138R should be recognized as an ETR resistance-associated mutation. The E138K/Q/R mutations can compensate for M184I in regard to both enzymatic fitness and viral replication capacity. The favored emergence of E138K over other mutations at position E138, together with M184I, is not due to an advantage in either the level of drug resistance or viral replication capacity but may reflect the fact that E138R and E138Q require two distinct mutations to occur, one of which is a disfavorable G-to-C mutation, whereas E138K requires only a single favorable G-to-A hypermutation. Of course, other factors may also affect the concept of barrier to resistance.

  11. A multiplex PCR for detection of knockdown resistance mutations, V1016G and F1534C, in pyrethroid-resistant Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saingamsook, Jassada; Saeung, Atiporn; Yanola, Jintana; Lumjuan, Nongkran; Walton, Catherine; Somboon, Pradya

    2017-10-10

    Mutation of the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) gene, or knockdown resistance (kdr) gene, is an important resistance mechanism of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti mosquitoes against pyrethroids. In many countries in Asia, a valine to glycine substitution (V1016G) and a phenylalanine to cysteine substitution (F1534C) are common in Ae. aegypti populations. The G1016 and C1534 allele frequencies have been increasing in rece