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Sample records for resistance kdr frequencies

  1. Overcoming super-knock down resistance (super-kdr) mediated resistance: multi-halogenated benzyl pyrethroids are more toxic to super-kdr than kdr house flies.

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    Sun, H; Tong, K P; Kasai, S; Scott, J G

    2016-04-01

    Target site insensitivity because of mutations in the voltage-sensitive sodium channel gene (Vssc) is a major mechanism of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in the house fly, Musca domestica. There are three known Vssc alleles that confer resistance to pyrethroids in the house fly: knock down resistance (kdr; L1014F), super-kdr (M918T + L1014F) and kdr-his (L1014H), but there has been no side-by-side comparison of the resistance levels that they confer. We compared the levels of resistance conferred by the three Vssc alleles in congenic strains to 19 structurally diverse pyrethroids, and compared the full-length Vssc cDNA sequences from each strain. Generally, the levels of resistance conferred were kdr-his pyrethroids. We also examined the levels of resistance in heterozygotes. Resistance in each of the hybrids was generally inherited as an incompletely recessive trait, except for the kdr-his/kdr hybrids, which showed incompletely to completely dominant resistance (ie had resistance levels comparable to kdr homozygotes). The importance of these results to understanding the frequencies of these resistance alleles in natural populations, the evolution of insecticide resistance and resistance management strategies are discussed. © 2015 The Royal Entomological Society.

  2. Insecticide resistance patterns in Uganda and the effect of indoor residual spraying with bendiocarb on kdr L1014S frequencies in Anopheles gambiae s.s.

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    Abeku, Tarekegn A; Helinski, Michelle E H; Kirby, Matthew J; Ssekitooleko, James; Bass, Chris; Kyomuhangi, Irene; Okia, Michael; Magumba, Godfrey; Meek, Sylvia R

    2017-04-20

    Resistance of malaria vectors to pyrethroid insecticides has been attributed to selection pressure from long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs), indoor residual spraying (IRS), and the use of chemicals in agriculture. The use of different classes of insecticides in combination or by rotation has been recommended for resistance management. The aim of this study was to understand the role of IRS with a carbamate insecticide in management of pyrethroid resistance. Anopheles mosquitoes were collected from multiple sites in nine districts of Uganda (up to five sites per district). Three districts had been sprayed with bendiocarb. Phenotypic resistance was determined using standard susceptibility tests. Molecular assays were used to determine the frequency of resistance mutations. The kdr L1014S homozygote frequency in Anopheles gambiae s.s. was used as the outcome measure to test the effects of various factors using a logistic regression model. Bendiocarb coverage, annual rainfall, altitude, mosquito collection method, LLIN use, LLINs distributed in the previous 5 years, household use of agricultural pesticides, and malaria prevalence in children 2-9 years old were entered as explanatory variables. Tests with pyrethroid insecticides showed resistance and suspected resistance levels in all districts except Apac (a sprayed district). Bendiocarb resistance was not detected in sprayed sites, but was confirmed in one unsprayed site (Soroti). Anopheles gambiae s.s. collected from areas sprayed with bendiocarb had significantly less kdr homozygosity than those collected from unsprayed areas. Mosquitoes collected indoors as adults had significantly higher frequency of kdr homozygotes than mosquitoes collected as larvae, possibly indicating selective sampling of resistant adults, presumably due to exposure to insecticides inside houses that would disproportionately affect susceptible mosquitoes. The effect of LLIN use on kdr homozygosity was significantly modified by annual

  3. Assessing the effects of Aedes aegypti kdr mutations on pyrethroid resistance and its fitness cost.

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    Luiz Paulo Brito

    Full Text Available Pyrethroids are the most used insecticide class worldwide. They target the voltage gated sodium channel (NaV, inducing the knockdown effect. In Aedes aegypti, the main dengue vector, the AaNaV substitutions Val1016Ile and Phe1534Cys are the most important knockdown resistance (kdr mutations. We evaluated the fitness cost of these kdr mutations related to distinct aspects of development and reproduction, in the absence of any other major resistance mechanism. To accomplish this, we initially set up 68 crosses with mosquitoes from a natural population. Allele-specific PCR revealed that one couple, the one originating the CIT-32 strain, had both parents homozygous for both kdr mutations. However, this pyrethroid resistant strain also presented high levels of detoxifying enzymes, which synergistically account for resistance, as revealed by biological and biochemical assays. Therefore, we carried out backcrosses between CIT-32 and Rockefeller (an insecticide susceptible strain for eight generations in order to bring the kdr mutation into a susceptible genetic background. This new strain, named Rock-kdr, was highly resistant to pyrethroid and presented reduced alteration of detoxifying activity. Fitness of the Rock-kdr was then evaluated in comparison with Rockefeller. In this strain, larval development took longer, adults had an increased locomotor activity, fewer females laid eggs, and produced a lower number of eggs. Under an inter-strain competition scenario, the Rock-kdr larvae developed even slower. Moreover, when Rockefeller and Rock-kdr were reared together in population cage experiments during 15 generations in absence of insecticide, the mutant allele decreased in frequency. These results strongly suggest that the Ae. aegypti kdr mutations have a high fitness cost. Therefore, enhanced surveillance for resistance should be priority in localities where the kdr mutation is found before new adaptive alleles can be selected for diminishing the

  4. Diversity and frequency of kdr mutations within Anopheles sinensis populations from Guangxi, China.

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    Yang, Chan; Feng, Xiangyang; Huang, Zushi; Li, Mei; Qiu, Xinghui

    2016-08-15

    Anopheles sinensis is a major vector of malaria in China and its control is under great threat as the development of insecticide resistance. Voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of several classes of insecticides. Genetic mutations of VGSC have been documented to confer knockdown resistance (kdr) to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and pyrethroids in mosquitoes. To control this vector efficiently, it is important to know the resistance-associated genetic mutations, their distribution frequencies and genealogical relations. Three hundreds and thirteen (313) adults of An. sinensis collected from nine locations across Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region were used. The partial sequence of the An. sinensis voltage gated sodium channel gene (AS-VGSC) containing codon 1014 was sequenced. PHASE2.1 was used to construct the haplotypes of each individual, and the accuracy of haplotypes was further confirmed by clone sequencing. The genealogical relations of kdr mutations in AS-VGSC was analysed using TCS 2.1 and Network 5.0. Sixteen AS-VGSC haplotypes including seven haplotypes carrying non-synonymous mutations at codon 1014, and fifty-five AS-VGSC genotypes were identified from 313 mosquitoes collected from nine geographical locations across Guangxi. The number of haplotypes in each of the nine populations ranged from 5 to 13. The frequency of haplotypes carrying kdr mutations ranged from 2.7 to 80.0 % within the nine populations, of which 1014C was unexpectedly high in the northeast of Guangxi. Genealogical analysis suggested multiple origins of kdr mutations in An. sinensis. Diverse haplotypes of AS-VGSC are distributed in Guangxi. The presence of haplotypes carrying mutations at codon 1014 indicates a risk of pyrethroid and DDT resistance. The kdr mutations show differential distribution geographically, with high frequencies occurred in the northeast of Guangxi. Genealogical analysis suggests multiple origins of kdr mutations in An. sinensis populations

  5. A comparison of DNA sequencing and the hydrolysis probe analysis (TaqMan assay for knockdown resistance (kdr mutations in Anopheles gambiae from the Republic of the Congo

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    Coetzee Maureen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knockdown resistance (kdr caused by a single base pair mutation in the sodium channel gene is strongly associated with pyrethroid insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae in West-Central Africa. Recently, various molecular techniques have been developed to screen for the presence of the kdr mutations in vector populations with varying levels of accuracy. In this study, the results of the hydrolysis probe analysis for detecting the kdr mutations in An. gambiae s.s. from the Republic of the Congo were compared with DNA sequence analysis. Methods A total of 52 pyrethroid and DDT resistant An. gambiae from Pointe-Noire (Congo-Brazzaville were tested for detection of the two kdr mutations (kdr-e and kdr-w that are known to occur in this species. Results from the hydrolysis probe analysis were compared to DNA sequencing to verify the accuracy of the probe analysis for this vector population. Results Fifty-one specimens were found to be An. gambiae S-form and one was a M/S hybrid. DNA sequencing revealed that more than half of the specimens (55.8% carried both the kdr-e and kdr-w resistance mutations, seven specimens (13.5% were homozygous for the kdr-e mutation, and 14 specimens (26.9% were homozygous for the kdr-w mutation. A single individual was genotyped as heterozygous kdr-e mutation (1.9% only and another as heterozygous kdr-w mutation (1.9% only. Analysis using hydrolysis probe analysis, without adjustment of the allelic discrimination axes on the scatter plots, revealed six specimens (11.5% carrying both mutations, 30 specimens (57.8% as homozygous kdr-w, six specimens (11.5% homozygous for the kdr-e mutation, one specimen (1.9% heterozygous for the kdr-w mutation and one specimen (1.9% present in wild type form. Eight of the specimens (15.4% could not be identified using unadjusted hydrolysis probe analysis values. No heterozygous kdr-e mutations were scored when adjustment for the allelic discrimination axes was

  6. Multiple origins of kdr-type resistance in the house fly, Musca domestica.

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    Frank D Rinkevich

    Full Text Available Insecticide resistance is a model phenotype that can be used to investigate evolutionary processes underlying the spread of alleles across a global landscape, while offering valuable insights into solving the problems that resistant pests present to human health and agriculture. Pyrethroids are one of the most widely used classes of insecticides world-wide and they exert their toxic effects through interactions with the voltage-sensitive sodium channel (Vssc. Specific mutations in Vssc (kdr, kdr-his and super-kdr are known to cause resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in house flies. In order to determine the number of evolutionary origins of kdr, kdr-his and super-kdr, we sequenced a region of Vssc from house flies collected in the USA, Turkey and China. Our phylogenetic analysis of Vssc unequivocally supports the hypothesis of multiple independent origins of kdr, super-kdr and kdr-his on an unprecedented geographic scale. The implications of these evolutionary processes on pest management are discussed.

  7. Pyrethroid-resistance and presence of two knockdown resistance (kdr) mutations, F1534C and a novel mutation T1520I, in Indian Aedes aegypti.

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    Kushwah, Raja Babu S; Dykes, Cherry L; Kapoor, Neera; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2015-01-01

    Control of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever, is a challenging task. Pyrethroid insecticides have emerged as a preferred choice for vector control but are threatened by the emergence of resistance. The present study reports a focus of pyrethroid resistance and presence of two kdr mutations--F1534C and a novel mutation T1520I, in Ae. aegypti from Delhi, India. Insecticide susceptibility status of adult-female Ae. aegypti against DDT (4%), deltamethrin (0.05%) and permethrin (0.75%) was determined using WHO's standard insecticide susceptibility kit, which revealed resistance to DDT, deltamethrin and permethrin with corrected mortalities of 35%, 72% and 76% respectively. Mosquitoes were screened for the presence of kdr mutations including those reported earlier (I1011V/M, V1016G/I, F1534C, D1794Y and S989P), which revealed the presence of F1534C and a novel mutation T1520I. Highly specific PCR-RFLP assays were developed for genotyping of these two mutations. Genotyping using allele specific PCR and new PCR-RFLP assays revealed a high frequency of F1534C (0.41-0.79) and low frequency of novel mutation T1520I (0.13). The latter was observed to be tightly linked with F1534C and possibly serve as a compensatory mutation. A positive association of F1534C mutation with DDT and deltamethrin resistance in Ae. aegypti was established. However, F1534C-kdr did not show significant protection against permethrin. The Aedes aegypti population of Delhi is resistant to DDT, deltamethrin and permethrin. Two kdr mutations, F1534C and a novel mutation T1520I, were identified in this population. This is the first report of kdr mutations being present in the Indian Ae. aegypti population. Highly specific PCR-RFLP assays were developed for discrimination of alleles at both kdr loci. A positive association of F1534C mutation with DDT and deltamethrin resistance was confirmed.

  8. Investigating knockdown resistance (kdr) mechanism against pyrethroids/DDT in the malaria vector Anopheles funestus across Africa.

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    Irving, Helen; Wondji, Charles S

    2017-08-09

    Understanding the molecular basis of insecticide resistance is key to improve the surveillance and monitoring of malaria vector populations under control. In the major malaria vector Anopheles funestus, little is currently known about the role of the knockdown resistance (kdr) mechanism. Here, we investigated the presence and contribution of knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids/DDT resistance observed in Anopheles funestus across Africa. Pyrosequencing genotyping and sequencing of the voltage gated sodium channel (VGSC) gene did not detect the common L1014F mutation in field collected An. funestus across Africa. Amplification and cloning of the full-length of the sodium channel gene in pyrethroid resistant mosquitoes revealed evidences of alternative splicing events with three transcripts of 2092, 2061 and 2117 amino acids (93% average similarity to An. gambiae). Several amino acid changes were detected close to the domain II of the protein such as L928R, F938 W, I939S, L802S and T1008 M. However, all these mutations are found at low frequency and their role in pyrethroid resistance could not be established. The presence of the exclusive alternative splicing at exon 19 was not associated with resistance phenotype. Analysis of patterns of genetic diversity of the VGSC gene revealed a high polymorphism level of this gene across Africa with no evidence of directional selection suggesting a limited role for knockdown resistance in pyrethroid resistance in An. funestus. Patterns of genetic differentiation correlate with previous observations of the existence of barriers to gene flow Africa-wide with southern population significantly differentiated from other regions. Despite an apparent limited role of knockdown resistance in An. funestus, it is necessary to continue to monitor the contribution of the mutations detected here as increasing selection from insecticide-based interventions may change the dynamic in field populations as previously observed in other

  9. Association of the kdr and superkdr sodium channel mutations with resistance to pyrethroids in Louisiana populations of the horn fly, Haematobia irritans irritans (L.).

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    Foil, L D; Guerrero, F; Alison, M W; Kimball, M D

    2005-04-20

    Pyrethroid resistance in three horn fly populations in Louisiana was monitored by weekly fly counts, filter paper bioassays, and diagnostic PCR assays for the presence of pyrethroid resistance-associated mutations in the sodium channel gene coding region. The PCR assay for the knockdown resistance (kdr) and superkdr sodium channel mutations was used to determine the frequency of the target site insensitivity mechanism in the populations of horn flies, which possessed varying degrees of insecticide resistance. The bioassays and frequency of homozygous-resistant (RR) kdr genotypes were relative predictors of the fly control subsequently observed. Flies exposed to filter paper impregnated with a discriminating concentration of one of four different insecticides were collected when 50% mortality was estimated. Genotypes for the dead flies and the survivors were determined by the PCR assay. The results of the PCR assays indicated that the genotype at the kdr locus of the flies exposed to the two pyrethroids had an effect upon whether the flies were considered to be alive or dead at the time of collection. The kdr genotype of flies exposed to either diazinon or doramectin was unrelated to whether the flies were considered to be alive or dead, except for a single comparison of flies exposed to diazinon. When possible interactions of the kdr and superkdr mutations were compared, we found that there were no associations with the response to diazinon and doramectin. For one location, there were no survivors of the 75 flies with the SS-SS (superkdr-kdr) homozygous susceptible wild type genotype exposed to pyrethroids, while there were survivors in all of the other five genotypes. The SS-RR genotype flies were more susceptible to the pyrethroids than the SR-RR flies, but that was not the case for exposure to diazinon or doramectin. In the St. Joseph population, there were an adequate number of flies to demonstrate that the SS-SR genotype was more susceptible to pyrethroids

  10. Contrasting patterns of insecticide resistance and knockdown resistance (kdr) in the dengue vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus from Malaysia.

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    Ishak, Intan H; Jaal, Zairi; Ranson, Hilary; Wondji, Charles S

    2015-03-25

    Knowledge on the extent, distribution and mechanisms of insecticide resistance is essential for successful insecticide-based dengue control interventions. Here, we report an extensive resistance profiling of the dengue vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus across Malaysia and establish the contribution of knockdown resistance mechanism revealing significant contrast between both species. Aedes mosquitoes were collected from four states in Malaysia in 2010 using ovitraps and tested against six major insecticides using WHO bioassays. Knockdown resistance (kdr) was investigated in both species. A moderate resistance to temephos was detected from samples collected in 2010 in Penang, Kuala Lumpur, Johor Bharu and Kota Bharu (1.5 Malaysia but neither of these mutations were found in Ae. albopictus. Additionally, signatures of selection were detected on the Voltage-gated sodium channel gene in Ae. aegypti but not in Ae. albopictus. The presence of the 1534C allele was significantly associated with pyrethroid resistance and an additive effect to pyrethroid resistance was observed in individuals containing both kdr alleles. Findings from this study will help to design and implement successful insecticide-based interventions against Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus to improve dengue control across Malaysia.

  11. A simplified high-throughput method for pyrethroid knock-down resistance (kdr detection in Anopheles gambiae

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    Walker Edward D

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A single base pair mutation in the sodium channel confers knock-down resistance to pyrethroids in many insect species. Its occurrence in Anopheles mosquitoes may have important implications for malaria vector control especially considering the current trend for large scale pyrethroid-treated bednet programmes. Screening Anopheles gambiae populations for the kdr mutation has become one of the mainstays of programmes that monitor the development of insecticide resistance. The screening is commonly performed using a multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR which, since it is reliant on a single nucleotide polymorphism, can be unreliable. Here we present a reliable and potentially high throughput method for screening An. gambiae for the kdr mutation. Methods A Hot Ligation Oligonucleotide Assay (HOLA was developed to detect both the East and West African kdr alleles in the homozygous and heterozygous states, and was optimized for use in low-tech developing world laboratories. Results from the HOLA were compared to results from the multiplex PCR for field and laboratory mosquito specimens to provide verification of the robustness and sensitivity of the technique. Results and Discussion The HOLA assay, developed for detection of the kdr mutation, gives a bright blue colouration for a positive result whilst negative reactions remain colourless. The results are apparent within a few minutes of adding the final substrate and can be scored by eye. Heterozygotes are scored when a sample gives a positive reaction to the susceptible probe and the kdr probe. The technique uses only basic laboratory equipment and skills and can be carried out by anyone familiar with the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA technique. A comparison to the multiplex PCR method showed that the HOLA assay was more reliable, and scoring of the plates was less ambiguous. Conclusion The method is capable of detecting both the East and West African kdr alleles

  12. Kdr mutations in Triatoma infestans from the Gran Chaco are distributed in two differentiated foci: Implications for pyrethroid resistance management.

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    Sierra, Ivana; Capriotti, Natalia; Fronza, Georgina; Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Ons, Sheila

    2016-06-01

    Point mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel, the primary target of pyrethroid insecticides, have been associated with the resistance in Triatoma infestans, an important vector of Chagas' disease. Hence, the sustainability of vector control programs requires the implementation of resistance management strategies. We determined the sensitivity of the molecular assays previously designed for early resistance detection to be used in pooled samples from a wide area of the endemic region, and validated them for their routine use in control campaigns for the monitoring of insecticide resistance in T. infestans. Consequently, we used these methods to examine the distribution of resistance-associated mutations in the sodium channel gene in populations of T. infestans from the Argentinean and Bolivian Gran Chaco. The PASA and REA assays tested proved sensitive enough to detect kdr SNPs in pooled samples, indicating these assays are suitable for routine screening in insecticide resistance surveillance. Two geographically differentiated foci were detected in T. infestans populations from the Argentinean and Bolivian Gran Chaco, with populations on the Bolivian-Argentinean border carrying L1014F mutation, and those from the Argentinean Chaco carrying L925I mutation. In all highly resistant populations analyzed, one of both kdr mutations was present, and toxicological assays determined that all pyrethroid resistant populations analyzed herein were sensitive to fenitrothion. The principal cause of pyrethroid resistance in T. infestans from the Gran Chaco ecoregion is kdr mutations in the sodium channel. Different levels of resistance occur in different populations carrying identical mutation, suggesting the existence of contributory mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Knockdown resistance (kdr) of the voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Aedes aegypti population in Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia.

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    Hamid, Penny Humaidah; Prastowo, Joko; Widyasari, Anis; Taubert, Anja; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2017-06-05

    Aedes aegypti is the main vector of several arthropod-borne viral infections in the tropics profoundly affecting humans, such as dengue fever (DF), West Nile (WN), chikungunya and more recently Zika. Eradication of Aedes still largely depends on insecticides, which is the most cost-effective strategy, and often inefficient due to resistance development in exposed Aedes populations. We here conducted a study of Ae. aegypti resistance towards several insecticides regularly used in the city of Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia. Aedes aegypti egg samples were collected with ovitraps and thereafter hatched in the insectary of the Gadjah Mada University. The F0 generation was used for all bioassay-related experiments and knockdown resistance (kdr) assays. Results clearly showed resistance development of Ae. aegypti against tested insecticides. Mortalities of Ae. aegypti were less than 90% with highest resistance observed against 0.75% permethrin. Mosquitoes from the southern parts of Denpasar presented high level of resistance pattern in comparison to those from the western and northern parts of Denpasar. Kdr analysis of voltage-gated sodium channel (Vgsc) gene showed significant association to S989P and V1016G mutations linked to resistance phenotypes against 0.75% permethrin. Conversely, Ae. aegypti F1534C gene mutation did not result in any significant correlation to resistance development. Periodically surveillance of insecticide resistances in Ae. aegypti mosquitoes will help local public health authorities to set better goals and allow proper evaluation of on-going mosquito control strategies. Initial detection of insecticide resistance will contribute to conduct proper actions in delaying mosquito resistance development such as insecticide rotation or combination of compounds in order to prolong chemical efficacy in combating Ae. aegypti vectors in Indonesia.

  14. Distribution and Frequency of kdr Mutations within Anopheles gambiae s.l. Populations and First Report of the Ace.1G119S Mutation in Anopheles arabiensis from Burkina Faso (West Africa)

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    Dabiré, Roch K.; Namountougou, Moussa; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Soma, Dieudonné D.; Bado, Joseph; Toé, Hyacinthe K.; Bass, Chris; Combary, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    An entomological survey was carried out at 15 sites dispersed throughout the three eco-climatic regions of Burkina Faso (West Africa) in order to assess the current distribution and frequency of mutations that confer resistance to insecticides in An. gambiae s.l. populations in the country. Both knockdown (kdr) resistance mutation variants (L1014F and L1014S), that confer resistance to pyrethroid insecticides, were identified concomitant with the ace-1 G119S mutation confirming the presence of multiple resistance mechanisms in the An. gambiae complex in Burkina Faso. Compared to the last survey, the frequency of the L1014F kdr mutation appears to have remained largely stable and relatively high in all species. In contrast, the distribution and frequency of the L1014S mutation has increased significantly in An. gambiae s.l. across much of the country. Furthermore we report, for the first time, the identification of the ace.1 G116S mutation in An. arabiensis populations collected at 8 sites. This mutation, which confers resistance to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, has been reported previously only in the An. gambiae S and M molecular forms. This finding is significant as organophosphates and carbamates are used in indoor residual sprays (IRS) to control malaria vectors as complementary strategies to the use of pyrethroid impregnated bednets. The occurrence of the three target-site resistance mutations in both An. gambiae molecular forms and now An. arabiensis has significant implications for the control of malaria vector populations in Burkina Faso and for resistance management strategies based on the rotation of insecticides with different modes of action. PMID:25077792

  15. Detection of knockdown resistance (kdr mutations in Anopheles gambiae: a comparison of two new high-throughput assays with existing methods

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    Ball Amanda

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knockdown resistance (kdr is a well-characterized mechanism of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in many insect species and is caused by point mutations of the pyrethroid target site the para-type sodium channel. The presence of kdr mutations in Anopheles gambiae, the most important malaria vector in Africa, has been monitored using a variety of molecular techniques. However, there are few reports comparing the performance of these different assays. In this study, two new high-throughput assays were developed and compared with four established techniques. Methods Fluorescence-based assays based on 1 TaqMan probes and 2 high resolution melt (HRM analysis were developed to detect kdr alleles in An. gambiae. Four previously reported techniques for kdr detection, Allele Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (AS-PCR, Heated Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay (HOLA, Sequence Specific Oligonucleotide Probe – Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (SSOP-ELISA and PCR-Dot Blot were also optimized. The sensitivity and specificity of all six assays was then compared in a blind genotyping trial of 96 single insect samples that included a variety of kdr genotypes and African Anopheline species. The relative merits of each assay was assessed based on the performance in the genotyping trial, the length/difficulty of each protocol, cost (both capital outlay and consumable cost, and safety (requirement for hazardous chemicals. Results The real-time TaqMan assay was both the most sensitive (with the lowest number of failed reactions and the most specific (with the lowest number of incorrect scores. Adapting the TaqMan assay to use a PCR machine and endpoint measurement with a fluorimeter showed a slight reduction in sensitivity and specificity. HRM initially gave promising results but was more sensitive to both DNA quality and quantity and consequently showed a higher rate of failure and incorrect scores. The sensitivity and specificity of AS

  16. PCR-based methods for the detection of L1014 kdr mutation in Anopheles culicifacies sensu lato

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    Dash Aditya P

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles culicifacies s.l., a major malaria vector in India, has developed widespread resistance to DDT and is becoming resistant to pyrethroids–the only insecticide class recommended for the impregnation of bed nets. Knock-down resistance due to a point mutation in the voltage gated sodium channel at L1014 residue (kdr is a common mechanism of resistance to DDT and pyrethroids. The selection of this resistance may pose a serious threat to the success of the pyrethroid-impregnated bed net programme. This study reports the presence of kdr mutation (L1014F in a field population of An. culicifacies s.l. and three new PCR-based methods for kdr genotyping. Methods The IIS4-IIS5 linker to IIS6 segments of the para type voltage gated sodium channel gene of DDT and pyrethroid resistant An. culicifacies s.l. population from the Surat district of India was sequenced. This revealed the presence of an A-to-T substitution at position 1014 leading to a leucine-phenylalanine mutation (L1014F in a few individuals. Three molecular methods viz. Allele Specific PCR (AS-PCR, an Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS and Primer Introduced Restriction Analysis-PCR (PIRA-PCR were developed and tested for kdr genotyping. The specificity of the three assays was validated following DNA sequencing of the samples genotyped. Results The genotyping of this An. culicifacies s.l. population by the three PCR based assays provided consistent result and were in agreement with DNA sequencing result. A low frequency of the kdr allele mostly in heterozygous condition was observed in the resistant population. Frequencies of the different genotypes were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Conclusion The Leu-Phe mutation, which generates the kdr phenotype in many insects, was detected in a pyrethroid and DDT resistant An. culicifacies s.l. population. Three PCR-based methods were developed for kdr genotyping. All the three assays were specific. The ARMS method

  17. First report of L1014F-kdr mutation in Culex pipiens complex from Morocco.

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    Bkhache, Meriem; Tmimi, Fatim-Zohra; Charafeddine, Omar; Faraj, Chafika; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Sarih, M'hammed

    2016-12-16

    Mosquitoes of the Culex pipiens complex, competent vectors for West Nile virus (WNV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) are widely targeted by insecticide treatments. The intensive application of chemical insecticides led to the development of resistance in many insects including Culex pipiens mosquitoes. The absence of data on resistance mechanisms in Morocco allow us to assess the levels of lambda-cyhalothrin resistance and the frequency of the mutated gene L1014F kdr in different forms of Cx. pipiens complex from three regions of Morocco. Mosquito adults were reared from immature stages collected in three different regions in Morocco (Tangier, Casablanca and Marrakech). Standard WHO insecticide susceptibility tests were conducted on adults emerged from collected larvae. Specimens were identified as belonging to the Culex pipiens complex using a multiplex PCR assay with diagnostic primers designed from the flanking region of microsatellite CQ11. Identified mosquitoes were then tested for the presence of the L1014F kdr mutation using PCR assay. Our results showed that 21% of the tested population has a resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin. The molecular identification of survivors shows that 43% belonged to the Cx. pipiens pipiens and only 9.5% to the Cx. pipiens molestus form. On the other hand, 416 specimens were screened for the L1014F kdr mutation. L1014F mutation was detected in different forms of Cx. pipiens in different sites. The frequency of L1014F mutation was similar between the Cx. pipiens pipiens form and hybrid form, while it was lower in the Cx. pipiens molestus form. The presence of the L1014F kdr allele was significantly associated with resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin in Cx. pipiens pipiens (P < 0.0001) and hybrid form (P < 0.0001). Resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin of Cx. pipiens populations appears to be largely due to the L1014F kdr mutation. To our knowledge, the frequencies of L1014F kdr mutation are examined for the first time in

  18. Survey of resistance to permethrin and diazinon and the use of a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay to detect resistance alleles in the horn fly, Haematobia irritans irritans (L.).

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    Li, Andrew Y; Guerrero, Felix D; Almazán Garcia, Consuelo; George, John E

    2003-11-01

    A field survey was conducted in 2001 to evaluate resistance to pyrethroid and organophosphate (OP) insecticides on horn flies, Hematobia irritans irritans (L.), from seven ranches in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico, and from three locations in central Texas. Filter papers impregnated with either technical permethrin or diazinon were used to measure the levels of resistance to pyrethroids and OPs. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used on individual horn flies from these field populations to detect the presence of the kdr and super-kdr alleles associated with pyrethroid resistance, and a mutated alphaE7 esterase allele associated with OP resistance. Relative to a susceptible laboratory (Kerrville) strain, horn flies from Mexico exhibited 5.1- to 28.3-fold resistance to permethrin at the LC50, and 23.8- to 136-fold resistance at the LC90. Horn flies from Texas ranches exhibited only two- to five-fold resistance. All field populations of the horn fly were highly susceptible to diazinon, and no mutant alphaE7 esterase alleles were detected. The super-kdr allele was found only in a single fly from a ranch in Mexico. Results of PCR assays showed that the kdr allele was present at various frequencies in field populations of horn flies. A gender-related bias in distribution of kdr genotypes was found in horn flies from Mexico, but not in horn flies from Texas. The overall kdr allelic frequencies in horn flies from Mexico were 23.2-37.8% higher in females than in males. Regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between kdr allelic frequencies and the levels of knockdown resistance to permethrin among the horn fly populations studied. The results validate the role of the PCR-based molecular assay as a diagnostic tool in monitoring resistance to pyrethroids and also provide useful information on population genetics of horn fly resistance to pyrethroids and OPs.

  19. First Detection of the Kdr Mutation T929I in Head Lice (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae) in Schoolchildren of the Metropolitan Area of Nuevo Leon and Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Garcia, Gustavo; Villanueva-Segura, Karina; Trujillo-Rodriguez, Gerardo; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Iram P; Lopez-Monroy, Beatriz; Flores, Adriana E

    2017-07-01

    The head louse Pediculus humanus capitis (De Geer) is a hematophagous ectoparasite that inhabits the human scalp. Infestations by this insect are commonly known as pediculosis, which is more common in younger groups. These infestations are asymptomatic; however, skin irritation from scratching occasionally may cause secondary bacterial infections. In recent years, the prevalence of pediculosis has increased in children; this increase has been attributed to louse resistance to the insecticides used as a control measure for infestation. The aim of the present study was to determine the presence and frequency of the knockdown resistance mutation (kdr) T929I in 468 head lice collected from 32 elementary schools in the metropolitan area of Nuevo Leon (24) and Yucatan (8), Mexico. This is the first report of a knockdown resistance (kdr) mechanism in head lice from Mexico. The T929I mutation was present in all of the sampled schools, with variability observed in its allelic and genotypic frequencies. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The role of VEGF and KDR polymorphisms in moyamoya disease and collateral revascularization.

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    Young Seok Park

    Full Text Available We conducted a case-control study to investigate whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF -2578, -1154, -634, and 936 and kinase insert domain containing receptor (KDR -604, 1192, and 1719 polymorphisms are associated with moyamoya disease. Korean patients with moyamoya disease (n = 107, mean age, 20.9±15.9 years; 66.4% female and 243 healthy control subjects (mean age, 23.0±16.1 years; 56.8% female were included. The subjects were divided into pediatric and adult groups. Among the 64 surgical patients, we evaluated collateral vessel formation after 2 years and divided patients into good (collateral grade A or poor (collateral grade B and C groups. The frequencies and distributions of four VEGF (-2578, -1154, -634, and 936 and KDR (-604, 1192, and 1719 polymorphisms were assessed from patients with moyamoya disease and compared to the control group. No differences were observed in VEGF -2578, -1154, -634, and 936 or KDR -604, 1192, and 1719 polymorphisms between the control group and moyamoya disease group. However, we found the -634CC genotype occurred less frequently in the pediatric moyamoya group (p = 0.040 whereas the KDR -604C/1192A/1719T haplotype increased the risk of pediatric moyamoya (p = 0.024. Patients with the CC genotype of VEGF -634 had better collateral vessel formation after surgery. Our results suggest that the VEGF -634G allele is associated with pediatric moyamoya disease and poor collateral vessel formation.

  1. Knockdown resistance in Anopheles vagus, An. sinensis, An. paraliae and An. peditaeniatus populations of the Mekong region

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    Keokenchanh Kalouna

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Mekong region (Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos, a large investigation was conducted to assess the susceptibility of Anopheles species against DDT and pyrethroids. In this study, the resistance status of the potential malaria vectors An. vagus, An. sinensis, An. paraliae and An. peditaeniatus was assessed. Methods Bioassays were performed on field collected unfed female mosquitoes using the standard WHO susceptibility tests. In addition, the DIIS6 region of the para-type sodium channel gene was amplified and sequenced and four allele-specific PCR assays were developed to assess the kdr frequencies. Results In Southern Vietnam all species were DDT and pyrethroid resistant, which might suggest the presence of a kdr resistance mechanism. Sequence-analysis of the DIIS6 region of the para-type sodium channel gene revealed the presence of a L1014S kdr mutation in An. vagus, An. sinensis and An. paraliae. In An. peditaeniatus, a low frequency L1014S kdr mutation was found in combination with a high frequency L1014F kdr mutation. For pyrethroids and DDT, no genotypic differentiation was found between survivors and non-survivors for any of these species. In the two widespread species, An. vagus and An. sinensis, kdr was found only in southern Vietnam and in Cambodia near the Vietnamese border. Conclusions Different levels of resistance were measured in Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. The kdr mutation in different Anopheles species seems to occur in the same geographical area. These species breed in open agricultural lands where malaria endemicity is low or absent and vector control programs less intensive. It is therefore likely that the selection pressure occurred on the larval stages by insecticides used for agricultural purposes.

  2. Effects of mid-season avermectin treatments on pyrethroid resistance in horn fly (Diptera: Muscidae) populations at three locations in Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremus, G; Guerrero, F D; Alison, M W; Kimball, M M; Kim, J H; Foil, L D

    2006-10-10

    Between 1999 and 2002, the effect of mid-season doramectin treatments on the level of resistance in pyrethroid-resistant horn fly populations was examined at three separate Louisiana State University Agricultural Center research stations. The cattle were treated with pyrethroid ear tags in all years at all farms, and each farm received a mid-season doramectin treatment in 1 year. The number of weeks of control at Red River was 11 weeks higher in the year following the mid-season treatment of doramectin. At Macon Ridge, the number of weeks of control was 2 weeks higher in the year following the doramectin treatment. No change was observed at St. Joseph. The LC50s for fly populations tested at Macon Ridge and St. Joseph were found to increase for pyrethroids from the spring populations to the fall populations between 2000 and 2002. The LC50s for fly populations at Red River followed the same trends except in 2000, the year when the doramectin treatment was administered. Flies collected pre and post-treatment each year from St. Joseph and Red River were assayed for two alleles (kdr and skdr) associated with target site resistance to pyrethroids. Flies collected pretreatment at Macon Ridge in 1999 also were assayed for the kdr and skdr, and this population of flies had a frequency of 85.6% R-kdr alleles. At St. Joseph and Red River there was a general decline in the frequency of homozygous susceptible skdr (SS-skdr) and homozygous susceptible kdr (SS-kdr) individuals, as well as a general increase in homozygous resistant skdr (RR-skdr) and homozygous resistant kdr (RR-kdr) individuals, during the 4-year study. At both sites, the frequency of R-kdr alleles increased significantly in flies collected in the fall compared to flies collected in the spring with the exception of Red River in 2000, when dormacetin was applied. The frequency of the R-kdr alleles was significantly higher in flies collected in the fall compared to flies collected in the spring in the following

  3. Knockdown resistance in pyrethroid-resistant horn fly (Diptera: Muscidae populations in Brazil Resistência Knockdown em populações de mosca-dos-chifres do Brasil resistentes aos piretróides

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    Gustavo A. Sabatini

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the kdr (knockdown resistance resistance-associated gene mutation and determine its frequency in pyrethroid-resistant horn fly (Haematobia irritans populations, a total of 1,804 horn flies of 37 different populations from all Brazilian regions (North, Northeast, Central-West, Southeast, and South were molecular screened through polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The kdr gene was not detected in 87.08% of the flies. However, the gene was amplified in 12.92% of the flies, of which 11.70% were resistant heterozygous and 1.22% were resistant homozygous. Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE was found only in 1 ranch with an excess of heterozygous. When populations were grouped by region, three metapopulations showed significant deviations of HWE (Central-West population, South population and Southeast population. This indicates that populations are isolated one from another and kdr occurrence seems to be an independent effect probably reflecting the insecticide strategy used by each ranch. Although resistance to pyrethroids is disseminated throughout Brazil, only 48% of resistant populations had kdr flies, and the frequency of kdr individuals in each of these resistant populations was quite low. But this study shows that, with the apparent exception of the Northeast region, the kdr mechanism associated with pyrethroid resistance occurs all over Brazil.Com o objetivo de verificar a ocorrência e determinar a frequência da mutação kdr (knock down resistance em populações de Haematobia irritans (mosca-dos-chifres resistentes aos piretróides, foram analisados 1.804 indivíduos de 37 populações de todas as Regiões do Brasil. Com exceção da Região Nordeste, o kdr (knock down resistance gene foi encontrado em populações de todas as regiões. A mutação não foi detectada em 87,08% dos indivíduos. Entretanto, o gene foi amplificado de 12,92% das moscas, das quais 11,70% se mostraram heterozigotas resistentes e 1

  4. Trends in DDT and pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae s.s. populations from urban and agro-industrial settings in southern Cameroon

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    Kerah-Hinzoumbé Clément

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used for insect pest control in Cameroon. In certain insect species, particularly the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, resistance to this class of insecticides is a source of great concern and needs to be monitored in order to sustain the efficacy of vector control operations in the fields. This study highlights trends in DDT and pyrethroid resistance in wild An. gambiae populations from South Cameroon. Methods Mosquitoes were collected between 2001 and 2007 in four sites in South Cameroon, where insecticides are used for agricultural or personal protection purposes. Insecticide use was documented in each site by interviewing residents. Batches of 2-4 days old adult female mosquitoes reared from larval collections were tested for susceptibility to DDT, permethrin and deltamethrin using standard WHO procedures. Control, dead and survivors mosquitoes from bioassays were identified by PCR-RFLP and characterized for the kdr mutations using either the AS-PCR or the HOLA method. Results Four chemical insecticide groups were cited in the study sites: organochlorines, organophosphates, carbamates and pyrethroids. These chemicals were used for personal, crop or wood protection. In the four An. gambiae populations tested, significant variation in resistance levels, molecular forms composition and kdr frequencies were recorded in the time span of the study. Increases in DDT and pyrethroid resistance, as observed in most areas, were generally associated with an increase in the relative frequency of the S molecular form carrying the kdr mutations at higher frequencies. In Mangoum, however, where only the S form was present, a significant increase in the frequency of kdr alleles between 2003 to 2007 diverged with a decrease of the level of resistance to DDT and pyrethroids. Analyses of the kdr frequencies in dead and surviving mosquitoes showed partial correlation between the kdr genotypes and resistance

  5. Presence and impact of allelic variations of two alternative s-kdr mutations, M918T and M918L, in the voltage-gated sodium channel of the green peach aphid Myzus persicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panini, Michela; Anaclerio, Matteo; Puggioni, Vincenzo; Stagnati, Lorenzo; Nauen, Ralf; Mazzoni, Emanuele

    2015-06-01

    Pyrethroids have been widely employed in order to control several agricultural pests, including Myzus persicae. Target-site resistance is the main mechanism that confers insensitivity to this class of compounds, and the most common amino acid substitutions are kdr (L1014F) and s-kdr (M918T), but recently another mutation in the s-kdr locus (M918L) has been described in French and Korean populations of M. persicae. Molecular analysis of several Italian populations of M. persicae by pyrosequencing revealed the presence of the new s-kdr mutation (M918L) in different forms. It was found in two different nucleotide polymorphisms (a/t or a/c substitution), in heterozygous or homozygous status, and also in combination with the classic kdr and s-kdr. Bioassays on populations carrying the M918L mutation show that it strongly affects pyrethroid efficacy, particularly of type II pyrethroids such as lambda-cyhalothrin, while it has no effect against DDT. This work provides more information about the new s-kdr M918L mutation in M. persicae, describing a more complicated situation arising from the possible combination with the classic L1014F and M918T. Our data open new questions concerning the origin of these new genotypes with different combinations of target-site mutations, and also their possible influence on control strategies. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Multiple origins of knockdown resistance mutations in the Afrotropical mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae.

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    João Pinto

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available How often insecticide resistance mutations arise in natural insect populations is a fundamental question for understanding the evolution of resistance and also for modeling its spread. Moreover, the development of resistance is regarded as a favored model to study the molecular evolution of adaptive traits. In the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae two point mutations (L1014F and L1014S in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene, that confer knockdown resistance (kdr to DDT and pyrethroid insecticides, have been described. In order to determine whether resistance alleles result from single or multiple mutation events, genotyping of the kdr locus and partial sequencing of the upstream intron-1 was performed on a total of 288 A. gambiae S-form collected from 28 localities in 15 countries. Knockdown resistance alleles were found to be widespread in West Africa with co-occurrence of both 1014S and 1014F in West-Central localities. Differences in intron-1 haplotype composition suggest that kdr alleles may have arisen from at least four independent mutation events. Neutrality tests provided evidence for a selective sweep acting on this genomic region, particularly in West Africa. The frequency and distribution of these kdr haplotypes varied geographically, being influenced by an interplay between different mutational occurrences, gene flow and local selection. This has important practical implications for the management and sustainability of malaria vector control programs.

  7. Temporal frequency of knockdown resistance mutations, F1534C and V1016G, in Aedes aegypti in Chiang Mai city, Thailand and the impact of the mutations on the efficiency of thermal fogging spray with pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plernsub, Suriya; Saingamsook, Jassada; Yanola, Jintana; Lumjuan, Nongkran; Tippawangkosol, Pongsri; Walton, Catherine; Somboon, Pradya

    2016-10-01

    In Thailand, control of dengue outbreaks is currently attained by the use of space sprays, particularly thermal fogging using pyrethroids, with the aim of killing infected Aedes mosquito vectors in epidemic areas. However, the principal dengue vector, Aedes aegypti, is resistant to pyrethroids conferred mainly by mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene, F1534C and V1016G, termed knockdown resistance (kdr). The objectives of this study were to determine the temporal frequencies of F1534C and V1016G in Ae. aegypti populations in relation to pyrethroid resistance in Chiang Mai city, and to evaluate the impact of the mutations on the efficacy of thermal fogging with the pyrethroid deltamethrin. Larvae and pupae were collected from several areas around Chiang Mai city during 2011-2015 and reared to adulthood for bioassays for deltamethrin susceptibility. These revealed no trend of increasing deltamethrin resistance during the study period (mortality 58.0-69.5%, average 62.8%). This corresponded to no overall change in the frequencies of the C1534 allele (0.55-0.66, average 0.62) and G1016 allele (0.34-0.45, average 0.38), determined using allele specific amplification. Only three genotypes of kdr mutations were detected: C1534 homozygous (VV/CC); G1016/C1534 double heterozygous (VG/FC); and G1016 homozygous (GG/FF) indicating that the F1534C and V1016G mutations occurred on separate haplotypic backgrounds and a lack of recombination between them to date. The F1 progeny females were used to evaluate the efficacy of thermal fogging spray with Damthrin-SP(®) (deltamethrin+S-bioallethrin+piperonyl butoxide) using a caged mosquito bioassay. The thermal fogging spray killed 100% and 61.3% of caged mosquito bioassay placed indoors and outdoors, respectively. The outdoor spray had greater killing effect on C1534 homozygous and had partially effect on double heterozygous mosquitoes, but did not kill any G1016 homozygous mutants living outdoors. As this selection

  8. Characterizing Fracture Property Using Resistivity Measured at Different Frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horne, Roland N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Li, Kewen [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The objective was to develop geophysical approaches to detecting and evaluating the fractures created or existing in EGS and other geothermal reservoirs by measuring the resistivity at different frequencies. This project has been divided into two phases: Phase I (first year): Proof of Concept – develop the resistivity approach and verify the effect of frequency on the resistivity in rocks with artificial or natural fractures over a wide range of frequencies. Phase II: Prototyping Part 1 (second year): measure the resistivity in rocks with fractures of different apertures, different length, and different configurations at different frequencies. Part 2 (third year): develop mathematical models and the resistivity method; infer the fracture properties using the measured resistivity data.

  9. Identification of a mutation associated with permethrin resistance in the para-type sodium channel of the stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafson, Pia U; Pitzer, Jimmy B; Kaufman, Phillip E

    2011-02-01

    The insect sodium channel is of particular interest for evaluating resistance to pyrethroids because it is the target molecule for this major class of neurotoxic insecticides. The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), sodium channel coding sequence representing domains IS6 through IVS6 was isolated, and the sequence encoding domain II was compared among individuals of a laboratory strain selected for resistance to permethrin and the unselected, parental generation. A point mutation resulting in a leucine-to-histidine amino acid change was identified (Leul014His), and its location corresponded with that observed for knockdown resistance (kdr) mutations in other insects. As a result, the allele was designated kdr-his. A molecular assay was developed to assess the frequency of this mutation in genomic DNA of individual stable flies from the laboratory selections, which provided further evidence that the kdr-his allele accounts for the observed level ofpermethrin resistance in the selected strain. The assay was then used to evaluate the frequency of the mutation from five field-collected populations originating from three horse farms near Ocala, FL; one horse farm near Gainesville, FL; and one dairy farm near Hague, FL. Frequency of the kdr-his allele ranged from 0.46 to 0.78, supporting further investigation of allele prevalence throughout the stable fly season and in response to field insecticide application.

  10. Association of kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR gene polymorphism/ haplotypes with recurrent spontaneous abortion and genetic structure

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    Shiva Shahsavari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent spontaneous abortion is one of the diseases that can lead to physical, psychological, and, economical problems for both individuals and society. Recently a few numbers of genetic polymorphisms in kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR gene are examined that can endanger the life of the fetus in pregnant women. Objective: The risk of KDR gene polymorphisms was investigated in Iranian women with idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA. Materials and Methods: A case controlled study was performed. One hundred idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion patients with at least two consecutive pregnancy losses before 20 weeks of gestational age with normal karyotypes were included in the study. Also, 100 healthy women with at least one natural pregnancy were studied as control group. Two functional SNPs located in KDR gene; rs1870377 (Q472H, and rs2305948 (V297I as well as one tag SNP in the intron region (rs6838752 were genotyped by using PCR based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique. Haplotype frequency was determined for these three SNPs’ genotypes. Analysis of genetic STRUCTURE and K means clustering were performed to study genetic variation. Results: Functional SNP (rs1870377 was highly linked to tag SNP (rs6838752 (D´ value=0. 214; χ2 = 16.44, p<0. 001. K means clustering showed that k = 8 as the best fit for the optimal number of genetic subgroups in our studied materials. This result was in agreement with Neighbor Joining cluster analysis. Conclusion: In our study, the allele and genotype frequencies were not associated with RSA between patient and control individuals. Inconsistent results in different populations with different allele frequencies among RSA patients and controls may be due to ethnic variation and used sample size.

  11. Kapitza thermal resistance studied by high-frequency photothermal radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horny, Nicolas; Chirtoc, Mihai; Hamaoui, Georges; Fleming, Austin; Ban, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Kapitza thermal resistance is determined using high-frequency photothermal radiometry (PTR) extended for modulation up to 10 MHz. Interfaces between 50 nm thick titanium coatings and silicon or stainless steel substrates are studied. In the used configuration, the PTR signal is not sensitive to the thermal conductivity of the film nor to its optical absorption coefficient, thus the Kapitza resistance is directly determined from single thermal parameter fits. Results of thermal resistances show the significant influence of the nature of the substrate, as well as of the presence of free electrons at the interface.

  12. Diversity of knockdown resistance alleles in a single house fly population facilitates adaptation to pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, S; Sun, H; Scott, J G

    2017-02-01

    Insecticide use exerts a tremendous selection force on house fly populations, but the frequencies of the initial resistance mutations may not reach high levels if they have a significant fitness cost in the absence of insecticides. However, with the continued use of the same (or similar) insecticides, it is expected that new mutations (conferring equal or greater resistance, but less of a fitness cost) will evolve. Pyrethroid insecticides target the insect voltage sensitive sodium channel (VSSC) and have been widely used for control of house flies at animal production facilities for more than three decades. There are three Vssc mutations known that cause resistance to pyrethroids in house flies: knockdown resistance (kdr, L1014F), kdr-his (L1014H) and super-kdr (M918T + L1014F). Whether or not there are any new mutations in house fly populations has not been examined for decades. We collected house flies from a dairy in Kansas (USA) and selected this population for three generations. We discovered multiple new Vssc alleles, including two that give very high levels of resistance to most pyrethroids. The importance of these findings to understanding the evolution of insecticide resistance, designing appropriate resistance monitoring and management schemes, and the future of pyrethroids for house fly control are discussed. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  13. Frequency and antimicrobial resistance of aerobic bacteria isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to evaluate the frequency of occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of aerobic bacteria isolated from surgical sites in human and animal patients in Nsukka, southeast Nigeria. Wound swabs from 132 patients (96 humans and 36 animals) were cultured for bacterial isolation. Antimicrobial ...

  14. KDR gene silencing inhibits proliferation of A549 cells and enhances their sensitivity to docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, R; Zang, J-P

    2015-11-23

    We investigated the effects of kinase-domain insert containing receptor (KDR) gene silencing on the proliferation of A549 cells and their sensitivity to docetaxel. After designing and synthesizing the KDR siRNA sequence, the sequence was transfected into A549 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. The expression of KDR mRNA and protein after KDR gene silencing was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting; A549 cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. An MTT assay and colony formation was performed to determine the sensitivity of A549 cells to docetaxel after KDR gene silencing. After 48-h KDR gene silencing, KDR gene and protein expression significantly decreased (P A549 cell cycle was significantly arrested in G0/G1 phase, and the number of cells in S phase was reduced; the difference was statistically significant (P A549 cells to docetaxel showed a significant enhancement (P A549 cells, inhibit the proliferation of A549 cells, and enhance their sensitivity to docetaxel.

  15. Characterization and comparison of embryonic stem cell-derived KDR+ cells with endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuan; Cheng, Lamei; Duan, Huaxin; Lin, Ge; Lu, Guangxiu

    2012-09-01

    Growing interest in utilizing endothelial cells (ECs) for therapeutic purposes has led to the exploration of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a potential source for endothelial progenitors. In this study, ECs were induced from hESC lines and their biological characteristics were analyzed and compared with both cord blood endothelial progenitor cells (CBEPCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. The results showed that isolated embryonic KDR+ cells (EC-KDR+) display characteristics that were similar to CBEPCs and HUVECs. EC-KDR+, CBEPCs and HUVECs all expressed CD31 and CD144, incorporated DiI-Ac-LDL, bound UEA1 lectin, and were able to form tube-like structures on Matrigel. Compared with CBEPCs and HUVECs, the expression level of endothelial progenitor cell markers such as CD133 and KDR in EC-KDR+ was significantly higher, while the mature endothelial marker vWF was lowly expressed in EC-KDR+. In summary, the study showed that EC-KDR+ are primitive endothelial-like progenitors and might be a potential source for therapeutic vascular regeneration and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Detecting the presence of target-site resistance to neonicotinoids and pyrethroids in Italian populations of Myzus persicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panini, Michela; Dradi, Davide; Marani, Gabriele; Butturini, Alda; Mazzoni, Emanuele

    2014-06-01

    Myzus persicae is a key pest of peach, which in commercial orchards is mainly controlled by chemical treatments. Neonicotinoids represent the main control strategy, but resistance monitoring programmes in Southern Europe have shown the widespread presence of populations highly resistant to this insecticide class in peach orchards. Moreover, in Italy reports of neonicotinoid application failures are increasing. This work describes the status of the main target-site mutations associated with neonicotinoid and pyrethroid resistance in Italian populations collected in 2012. R81T mutation linked with neonicotinoid resistance was found in 65% of analysed aphids (35.5% with a homozygous resistant genotype). For the first time, R81T was found in samples collected from herbaceous hosts. Bioassays on a few genotyped populations also revealed the involvement of P450-based metabolic resistance. Only a few individuals without kdr (L1014F) and s-kdr (M918T) target-site mutations were collected. A new single nucleotide polymorphism in the s-kdr locus producing M918L substitution was found. Target-site resistance to neonicotinoids is common in specialised peach-growing areas, and it is spreading in other Italian regions and on herbaceous hosts. The high frequency of target-site mutations and data obtained from bioassays confirm the presence of multiple resistance mechanisms and suggest the importance of coordinated control strategies. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Multiple-Insecticide Resistance and Classic Gene Mutations to Japanese Encephalitis Vector Culex tritaeniorhynchus from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-Ming; Chu, Hong-Liang; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Guo, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Ying-Mei; Xing, Dan; Yan, Ting; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Dong, Yan-De; Li, Chun-Xiao; Zhao, Tong-Yan

    2016-06-01

    Widespread resistance of insect pests to insecticides has been widely reported in China and there is consequently an urgent need to adjust pest management strategies appropriately. This requires detailed information on the extent and causes of resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate levels of resistance to 5 insecticides among 12 strains of Culex tritaeniorhynchus, a major vector of Japanese encephalitis in China. Resistance to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, permethrin, dichlorvos, and propoxur were measured using larval bioassays. The allelic frequency of knockdown resistance (kdr) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) mutations were determined in all strains. Larval bioassay results indicated that the field strains collected from different sites were resistant to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, permethrin, dichlorvos, and propoxur, with resistance ratio values ranging from 1.70- to 71.98-fold, 7.83- to 43.07-fold, 3.54- to 40.03-fold, 291.85- to 530.89-fold, and 51.32- to 108.83-fold, respectively. A polymerase chain reaction amplification of specific alleles method for individual was developed to detect genotypes of the AChE gene mutation F455W in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus. The frequency of the AChE gene mutation F455W was 100.00% in all strains, making this mutation of no value as a marker of resistance to organophosphorous and carbamate pesticides in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus in China. The kdr allele was present in all strains at frequencies of 10.00-29.55%. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between kdr allele frequencies and levels of resistance to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, and permethrin. These results highlight the need to monitor and map insecticide resistance in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and to adjust pesticide use to minimize the development of resistance in these mosquitoes.

  18. Insecticide resistance status in Anopheles gambiae in southern Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbel Vincent

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae has become a serious concern to the future success of malaria control. In Benin, the National Malaria Control Programme has recently planned to scaling up long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs and indoor residual spraying (IRS for malaria prevention. It is, therefore, crucial to monitor the level and type of insecticide resistance in An. gambiae, particularly in southern Benin where reduced efficacy of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs and IRS has previously been reported. Methods The protocol was based on mosquito collection during both dry and rainy seasons across forty districts selected in southern Benin. Bioassay were performed on adults collected from the field to assess the susceptibility of malaria vectors to insecticide-impregnated papers (permethrin 0.75%, delthamethrin 0.05%, DDT 4%, and bendiocarb 0.1% following WHOPES guidelines. The species within An. gambiae complex, molecular form and presence of kdr and ace-1 mutations were determined by PCR. Results Strong resistance to permethrin and DDT was found in An. gambiae populations from southern Benin, except in Aglangandan where mosquitoes were fully susceptible (mortality 100% to all insecticides tested. PCR showed the presence of two sub-species of An. gambiae, namely An. gambiae s.s, and Anopheles melas, with a predominance for An. gambiae s.s (98%. The molecular M form of An. gambiae was predominant in southern Benin (97%. The kdr mutation was detected in all districts at various frequency (1% to 95% whereas the Ace-1 mutation was found at a very low frequency (≤ 5%. Conclusion This study showed a widespread resistance to permethrin in An. gambiae populations from southern Benin, with a significant increase of kdr frequency compared to what was observed previously in Benin. The low frequency of Ace-1 recorded in all populations is encouraging for the use of bendiocarb as an alternative insecticide to

  19. Insecticide resistance status of Myzus persicae in Greece: long-term surveys and new diagnostics for resistance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voudouris, Costas Ch; Kati, Amalia N; Sadikoglou, Eldem; Williamson, Martin; Skouras, Panagiotis J; Dimotsiou, Ourania; Georgiou, Stella; Fenton, Brian; Skavdis, George; Margaritopoulos, John T

    2016-04-01

    Myzus persicae nicotianae is an important pest in Greece, controlled mainly by neonicotinoids. Monitoring of the aphid populations for resistance mechanisms is essential for effective control. Two new RFLP-based diagnostics for the detection of the M918T (super-kdr pyrethroid resistance) and nAChR R81T (neonicotinoid resistance) mutations were applied, along with other established assays, on 131 nicotianae multilocus genotypes (MLGs) collected from tobacco and peach in Greece in 2012-2013. Furthermore, we present resistance data from aphid clones (>500, mainly nicotianae) collected in 2006-2007. About half of the clones tested with a diagnostic dose of imidacloprid were tolerant. The R81T mutation was not found in the 131 MLGs and 152 clones examined. Over half (58.6%) of a subset of 29 clones showed a 9-36-fold overexpression of CYP6CY3. M918T was found at low to moderate frequencies. The kdr and MACE mechanisms and carboxylesterase-based resistance were found at high frequency in all years. The aphid retains costly resistance mechanisms even in the absence of pressure from certain insecticides, which could be attributed to factors related to climate and genetic properties of the populations. The indication of build-up of resistance/tolerance to neonicotinoids, related to CYP6CY3 overexpression, is a matter of concern. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Optimization and validation of molecular diagnosis of pyrethroid pesticide resistance in Brazilian populations of horn flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroid resistance is a serious problem to cattle producers in Brazil. There are specific resistance-associated mutations, known as kdr and super-kdr, in the region of DNA that codes for the target of pyrethroids, the sodium channel protein. The presence of these mutations in the sodium channel c...

  1. Widespread pyrethroid resistance in Australian diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), is related to multiple mutations in the para sodium channel gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endersby, N M; Viduka, K; Baxter, S W; Saw, J; Heckel, D G; McKechnie, S W

    2011-08-01

    Populations of Plutella xylostella, extending over 3800 km in southern Australia, show no genetic structure as assessed by microsatellite markers; yet outbreaks of pyrethroid resistance occur sporadically in cropping areas. Since mutations in the para voltage-gated sodium channel gene have been implicated in pyrethroid resistance, we looked for DNA sequence variation at this target among Australian moths. We found two resistance mutations previously reported for this species (L1014F and T929I), as well as a novel substitution (F1020S). Of the eight possible haplotypes formed by combinations of these three biallelic polymorphisms, only four were found in Australian populations: the wild-type allele (w), the kdr mutation allele (kdr) with only L1014F, the super-kdr-like combination of L1014F and T929I (skdrl), and the crashdown allele with only F1020S (cdr). Comparison of genotype frequencies among survivors of permethrin assays with those from untreated controls identified three resistant genotypes: skdrl homozygotes, cdr homozygotes and the corresponding heterozygote, cdr/skrdl - the heterozygote being at least as resistant as either homozygote. Spatial heterogeneity of allele frequencies was conspicuous, both across the continent and among local collections, consistent with reported spatial heterogeneity of pyrethroid resistance. Further, high resistance samples were sometimes associated with high frequency of cdr, sometimes high frequency of skdrl, or sometimes with a high combined cdr+skdrl frequency. The skdrl and cdr alleles explain a high proportion of the Australia-wide resistance variation. These data add to evidence that nerve insensitivity by mutations in the para-sodium channel gene is a common pyrethroid resistance mechanism in P. xylostella.

  2. Inhibition of c-Kit, VEGFR-2 (KDR), and ABCG2 by analogues of OSI-930.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jay P; Kuang, Ye-Hong; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Korlipara, Vijaya L

    2011-11-01

    The quinoline domain of OSI-930, a dual inhibitor of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) c-Kit and KDR, was modified in an effort to further understand the SAR of OSI-930, and the binding site characteristics of c-Kit and KDR. A series of 16 compounds with heteroatom substituted pyridyl and phenyl ring systems was synthesized and evaluated against a panel of kinases including c-Kit and KDR. Aminopyridyl derivative 6 was found to be the most active member of the series with 91% and 57% inhibition of c-Kit at 10μM and 1μM, respectively and 88% and 50% inhibition of KDR at 10μM and 1μM, respectively. The target compounds were also tested for their ability to inhibit efflux of mitoxantrone through inhibition of ATP dependent ABCG2 pump. Nitropyridyl derivative 5 and o-nitrophenyl derivative 7 exhibited complete inhibition of the ABCG2 pump with IC(50) values of 13.67μM and 16.67μM, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. High levels of insecticide resistance in introduced horn fly (Diptera: Muscidae) populations and implications for management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún, M P; Li, A Y; Figueroa, C C

    2011-02-01

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), was introduced to Chile in the beginning of the 1990s. Since its introduction, farmers have controlled this pest almost exclusively with insecticides. To understand the consequences of different control strategies on the development of insecticide resistance and their persistence, a field survey was conducted at eight farms in the south of Chile to characterize insecticide resistance in field populations and resistance mechanisms. Horn fly samples were assayed to determine levels of resistance to pyrethroids and diazinon, genotyped for kdr and HialphaE7 mutations, and tested for general esterase activity. All field populations, including ones that were not treated with insecticides for the past 5 yr, showed high levels of cypermethrin resistance and high frequencies of the kdr mutation. None of the fly populations demonstrated resistance to diazinon and the HialphaE7 mutation was not detected in any of the fly samples. Esterase activities in all populations were comparable to those found in the susceptible reference strain. The findings of high frequencies of homozygous resistant and heterozygous individuals both in insecticide treated horn fly populations and in the untreated fly populations suggests complex interactions among field populations of the horn fly in Chile.

  4. Effects of kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) gene silencing on the sensitivity of A549 cells to erlotinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W L; Liu, Y H

    2015-11-25

    We investigated the effects of kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) gene silencing on the proliferation of A549 cells and their sensitivity to erlotinib. A KDR small interfering RNA (siRNA) sequence was designed and synthesized; then, it was transfected into A549 cells using Lipofectamine(TM) 2000. KDR mRNA and protein expression after KDR gene silencing was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting; the A549 cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and colony formation assay were performed to determine the sensitivity of A549 cells to erlotinib after KDR gene silencing. After 48h of KDR gene silencing, there was a significant decrease in KDR gene and protein expression (P A549 cell cycle was arrested at the G0/G1 phase, and the number of cells in the S phase decreased; the difference was statistically significant (P A549 cells to erlotinib was significantly enhanced (P A549 cells, inhibit the proliferation of A549 cells, and enhance their sensitivity to erlotinib.

  5. Multiple resistances and complex mechanisms of Anopheles sinensis mosquito: a major obstacle to mosquito-borne diseases control and elimination in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelian Chang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria, dengue fever, and filariasis are three of the most common mosquito-borne diseases worldwide. Malaria and lymphatic filariasis can occur as concomitant human infections while also sharing common mosquito vectors. The overall prevalence and health significance of malaria and filariasis have made them top priorities for global elimination and control programmes. Pyrethroid resistance in anopheline mosquito vectors represents a highly significant problem to malaria control worldwide. Several methods have been proposed to mitigate insecticide resistance, including rotational use of insecticides with different modes of action. Anopheles sinensis, an important malaria and filariasis vector in Southeast Asia, represents an interesting mosquito species for examining the consequences of long-term insecticide rotation use on resistance. We examined insecticide resistance in two An. Sinensis populations from central and southern China against pyrethroids, organochlorines, organophosphates, and carbamates, which are the major classes of insecticides recommended for indoor residual spray. We found that the mosquito populations were highly resistant to the four classes of insecticides. High frequency of kdr mutation was revealed in the central population, whereas no kdr mutation was detected in the southern population. The frequency of G119S mutation in the ace-1 gene was moderate in both populations. The classification and regression trees (CART statistical analysis found that metabolic detoxification was the most important resistance mechanism, whereas target site insensitivity of L1014 kdr mutation played a less important role. Our results indicate that metabolic detoxification was the dominant mechanism of resistance compared to target site insensitivity, and suggests that long-term rotational use of various insecticides has led An. sinensis to evolve a high insecticide resistance. This study highlights the complex network of mechanisms conferring

  6. Circumsporozoite protein rates, blood-feeding pattern and frequency of knockdown resistance mutations in Anopheles spp. in two ecological zones of Mauritania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekweiry, Khadijetou Mint; Salem, Mohamed Salem Ould Ahmedou; Cotteaux-Lautard, Christelle; Jarjaval, Fanny; Marin-Jauffre, Adeline; Bogreau, Hervé; Basco, Leonardo; Briolant, Sébastien; Boukhary, Ali Ould Mohamed Salem; Brahim, Khyarhoum Ould; Pagès, Frédéric

    2016-05-05

    Mosquitoes belonging to Anopheles gambiae species complex are the main malaria vector in Mauritania but data on their vector capacities, feeding habits and insecticide susceptibility are still scanty. The objectives of this study were to fill this gap. Adult Anopheles spp. mosquitoes were collected using pyrethrum spray catch method from two ecological zones of Mauritania: Nouakchott (Saharan zone) and Hodh Elgharbi region (Sahelian zone). Circumsporozoite proteins (CSP) for P. falciparum, P. vivax VK210 and P. vivax VK247 were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) from the female anopheline mosquitoes. To confirm CSP-ELISA results, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was also performed. Blood meal identification was performed in all engorged females by partial sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Molecular assessments of pyrethroid knockdown resistance (kdr) and insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistance (ace-1) were conducted. In Nouakchott, the only species of Anopheles identified during the survey was Anopheles arabiensis (356 specimens). In Hodh Elgharbi, 1016 specimens of Anopheles were collected, including 578 (56.9%) Anopheles rufipes, 410 (40.35%) An. arabiensis, 20 (1.96%) An. gambiae, 5 (0.5%) An. pharoensis and 3 (0.3 %) An. funestus. Three of 186 female An. arabiensis collected in Nouakchott and tested by ELISA were found positive for Plasmodium vivax VK210, corresponding to a sporozoite rate of 1.6%; however PCR confirmed infection by P. vivax sporozoite in only one of these. In Hodh Elgharbi, no mosquito was found positive for Plasmodium spp. infection. There was a statistically significant difference in the percentage of human blood-fed Anopheles spp. between Nouakchott (58.7%, 47 of 80 blood-engorged An. arabiensis females) and Hodh Elgharbi (11.1%, 2 of 18 blood-engorged mosquitoes). Analysis of the kdr polymorphisms showed 48.2% (70/145) of East African kdr mutation (L1014S) in Nouakchott compared to 10% (4/40) in Hodh

  7. Survey of Permethrin and Malathion Resistance in Human Head Lice Populations from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael; Knorr, Mette; Rasmussen, Anne-Marie

    2006-01-01

    at the discriminating dose. The connection between permethrin resistance and kdr-like mutations is confirmed by our findings. The frequency of the double mutation T929I-L932 F in the voltage-sensitive sodium channel gene associated with permethrin resistance was 0.95 in Danish head lice populations.......Head lice, Pediculis capitis De Geer, populations were investigated for permethrin and malathion resistance after initial establishment of a discriminating dose of topical application bioassay with body lice, Pediculus humanus L. For both insecticides, 2 times the lethal dose (LD)95 at 4 h...... attached to a vacuum cleaner. A resistance survey covers head lice collected from 208 of 1,441 persons combed. The frequency of permethrin- and malathion-resistant head lice is high in Danish head lice populations. In 17 of 24 samples tested for permethrin resistance, all head lice survived...

  8. Distribution of knock-down resistance mutations in Anopheles gambiae molecular forms in west and west-central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caccone Adalgisa

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knock-down resistance (kdr to DDT and pyrethroids in the major Afrotropical vector species, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, is associated with two alternative point mutations at amino acid position 1014 of the voltage-gated sodium channel gene, resulting in either a leucine-phenylalanine (L1014F, or a leucine-serine (L1014S substitution. In An. gambiae S-form populations, the former mutation appears to be widespread in west Africa and has been recently reported from Uganda, while the latter, originally recorded in Kenya, has been recently found in Gabon, Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea. In M-form populations surveyed to date, only the L1014F mutation has been found, although less widespread and at lower frequencies than in sympatric S-form populations. Methods Anopheles gambiae M- and S-form specimens from 19 sites from 11 west and west-central African countries were identified to molecular form and genotyped at the kdr locus either by Hot Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay (HOLA or allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR. Results The kdr genotype was determined for about 1,000 An. gambiae specimens. The L1014F allele was found at frequencies ranging from 6% to 100% in all S-form samples (N = 628, with the exception of two samples from Angola, where it was absent, and coexisted with the L1014S allele in samples from Cameroon, Gabon and north-western Angola. The L1014F allele was present in M-form samples (N = 354 from Benin, Nigeria, and Cameroon, where both M- and S-forms were sympatric. Conclusion The results represent the most comprehensive effort to analyse the overall distribution of the L1014F and L1014S mutations in An. gambiae molecular forms, and will serve as baseline data for resistance monitoring. The overall picture shows that the emergence and spread of kdr alleles in An. gambiae is a dynamic process and that there is marked intra- and inter-form heterogeneity in resistance allele frequencies. Further studies are needed to

  9. Chronic hypoxia attenuates VEGF signaling and angiogenic responses by downregulation of KDR in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewska-Pazdrak, Barbara; Hein, Travis W; Olszewska, Paulina; Carney, Darrell H

    2009-05-01

    Coronary artery disease results in progressive vascular stenosis associated with chronic myocardial ischemia. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates endothelial cell angiogenic responses to revascularize ischemic tissues; however, the effect of chronic hypoxia on the responsiveness of endothelial cells to VEGF remains unclear. We, therefore, investigated whether hypoxia alters VEGF-stimulated signaling and angiogenic responses in primary human coronary artery endothelial (HCAE) cells. Exposure of HCAE cells to hypoxia (1% O(2)) for 24 h decreased VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell migration ( approximately 82%), proliferation ( approximately 30%), and tube formation. Hypoxia attenuated VEGF-stimulated activation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) ( approximately 72%) and reduced NO production in VEGF-stimulated cells from 237 +/- 38.8 to 61.3 +/- 28.4 nmol/l. Moreover, hypoxia also decreased the ratio of phosphorylated eNOS to total eNOS in VEGF-stimulated cells by approximately 50%. This effect was not observed in thrombin-stimulated cells, suggesting that hypoxia specifically inhibited VEGF signaling upstream of eNOS phosphorylation. VEGF-induced activation of Akt, ERK1/2, p38, p70S6 kinases, and S6 ribosomal protein was also attenuated in hypoxic cells. Moreover, VEGF-stimulated phosphorylation of VEGF receptor-2 (KDR) at Y996 and Y1175 was decreased by hypoxia. This decrease correlated with a 70 +/- 12% decrease in KDR protein expression. Analysis of mRNA from these cells showed that hypoxia reduced steady-state levels of KDR mRNA by 52 +/- 16% and decreased mRNA stability relative to normoxic cells. Our findings demonstrate that chronic hypoxia attenuates VEGF-stimulated signaling in HCAE cells by specific downregulation of KDR expression. These data provide a novel explanation for the impaired angiogenic responses to VEGF in endothelial cells exposed to chronic hypoxia.

  10. Interleukin-6 triggers human cerebral endothelial cells proliferation and migration: The role for KDR and MMP-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Jianhua S.; Zhai Wenwu; Young, William L.; Yang Guoyuan

    2006-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is involved in angiogenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Using human cerebral endothelial cell (HCEC), we report for First time that IL-6 triggers HCEC proliferation and migration in a dose-dependent manner, specifically associated with enhancement of VEGF expression, up-regulated and phosphorylated VEGF receptor-2 (KDR), and stimulated MMP-9 secretion. We investigated the signal pathway of IL-6/IL-6R responsible for KDR's regulation. Pharmacological inhibitor of PI3K failed to inhibit IL-6-mediated VEGF overexpression, while blocking ERK1/2 with PD98059 could abolish IL-6-induced KDR overexpression. Further, neutralizing endogenous VEGF attenuated KDR expression and phosphorylation, suggesting that IL-6-induced KDR activation is independent of VEGF stimulation. MMP-9 inhibitor GM6001 significantly decreases HCEC proliferation and migration (p < 0.05), indicating the crucial function of MMP-9 in promoting angiogenic changes in HCECs. We conclude that IL-6 triggers VEGF-induced angiogenic activity through increasing VEGF release, up-regulates KDR expression and phosphorylation through activating ERK1/2 signaling, and stimulates MMP-9 overexpression

  11. Peak effect in surface resistance at microwave frequencies in Dy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... susceptibility measurements [3,4] at frequencies rang- ing from few tens of Hz to few MHz have been extensively carried out to study the PE phenomenon. Recently we have reported the observation of PE at microwave frequencies. [5] and explained the scenario using Gittleman and Rosenblum [6] vortex motion equation.

  12. Mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance inHaematobia irritans (Muscidae from Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Thadeu Medeiros Barros

    Full Text Available Horn fly resistance to pyrethroid insecticides occurs throughout Brazil, but knowledge about the involved mechanisms is still in an incipient stage. This survey was aimed to identify the mechanisms of horn fly resistance to cypermethrin in Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil. Impregnated filter paper bioassays using cypermethrin, synergized or not with piperonyl butoxide (PBO and triphenyl phosphate (TPP, were conducted from March 2004 to June 2005 in horn fly populations (n = 33 from all over the state. All populations were highly resistant to cypermethrin, with resistance factors (RF ranging from 89.4 to 1,020.6. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays to detect the knockdown resistance (kdr mutation also were performed in 16 samples. The kdr mutation was found in 75% of the tested populations, mostly with relatively low frequencies (<20%, and was absent in some highly resistant populations. Addition of TPP did not significantly reduce the LC50 in any population. However, PBO reduced LC50s above 40-fold in all tested populations, resulting in RFs ≤ 10 in most cases. Horn fly resistance to cypermethrin is widespread in the state, being primarily caused by an enhanced activity of P450 mono-oxygenases and secondarily by reduced target site sensitivity.

  13. Frequency of Cry1F resistance alleles in Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Juliano R; Andow, David A; Horikoshi, Renato J; Bernardi, Daniel; Ribeiro, Rebeca da S; Nascimento, Antonio Rb do; Santos, Antonio C Dos; Omoto, Celso

    2016-12-01

    The frequency of resistance alleles is a major factor influencing the rate of resistance evolution. Here, we adapted the F 2 screen procedure for Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) with a discriminating concentration assay, and extended associated statistical methods to estimate the frequency of resistance to Cry1F protein in S. frugiperda in Brazil when resistance was not rare. We show that F 2 screen is efficient even when the resistance frequency is 0.250. It was possible to screen 517 isoparental lines from 12 populations sampled in five states of Brazil during the first half of 2012. Western Bahia had the highest allele frequency of Cry1F resistance, 0.192, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) between 0.163 and 0.220. All other states had a similar and lower frequency varying from 0.042 in Paraná to 0.080 in Mato Grosso do Sul. The high frequency in western Bahia may be related to year-round availability of maize, the high population density of S. frugiperda, the lack of refuges and the high adoption rate of Cry1F maize. Cry1F resistance alleles were not rare and occurred at frequencies that have already compromised the useful life of TC1507 maize in western Bahia. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Detection of low frequency multi-drug resistance and novel putative maribavir resistance in immunocompromised paediatric patients with cytomegalovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Jane Houldcroft

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a significant pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, with the potential to cause fatal pneumonitis and colitis, as well as increasing the risk of organ rejection in transplant patients. With the advent of new anti-HCMV drugs there is therefore considerable interest in using virus sequence data to monitor emerging resistance to antiviral drugs in HCMV viraemia and disease, including the identification of putative new mutations. We used target-enrichment to deep sequence HCMV DNA from 11 immunosuppressed paediatric patients receiving single or combination anti-HCMV treatment, serially sampled over 1-27 weeks. Changes in consensus sequence and resistance mutations were analysed for three ORFs targeted by anti-HCMV drugs and the frequencies of drug resistance mutations monitored. Targeted-enriched sequencing of clinical material detected mutations occurring at frequencies of 2%. Seven patients showed no evidence of drug resistance mutations. Four patients developed drug resistance mutations a mean of 16 weeks after starting treatment. In two patients, multiple resistance mutations accumulated at frequencies of 20% or less, including putative maribavir and ganciclovir resistance mutations P522Q (UL54 and C480F (UL97. In one patient, resistance was detected 14 days earlier than by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis suggested recombination or superinfection in one patient. Deep sequencing of HCMV enriched from clinical samples excluded resistance in 7 of eleven subjects and identified resistance mutations earlier than conventional PCR-based resistance testing in 2 patients. Detection of multiple low level resistance mutations was associated with poor outcome.

  15. Seasonal dynamics of insecticide resistance, multiple resistance, and morphometric variation in field populations of Culex pipiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Belgin Gocmen; Dogaroglu, Taylan; Kilic, Sercan; Dogac, Ersin; Taskin, Vatan

    2016-05-01

    Resistance to insecticides that impairs nervous transmission has been widely investigated in mosquito populations as insecticides are crucial to effective insect control. The development of insecticide resistance is also of special interest to evolutionary biologists since it represents the opportunity to observe the genetic consequences of a well-characterized alteration in the environment. Although the frequencies of resistance alleles in Culex pipiens populations against different groups of insecticides have been reported, no detailed information is available on the relative change in these allele frequencies over time. In this study, we collected mosquitoes of the Cx. pipiens complex from six locations in three seasons in the Aegean region of Turkey and examined the i) seasonal variations in resistance to four different chemical classes of insecticides, ii) seasonal fluctuations in frequencies of resistance-associated target-site mutations of the three genes (ace-1, kdr, and Rdl), and iii) potential seasonal variations in wing morphometric characters that may be modified in resistant mosquitoes. Our bioassay results indicated the presence of different levels of resistance to all tested insecticides for all three seasons in all locations. The results of the PCR-based molecular analysis revealed low frequencies of mutations in ace-1 and Rdl that are associated with resistance to malathion, bendiocarb, and dieldrin and no obvious seasonal changes. In contrast, we detected high frequencies and striking seasonal changes for two kdr mutations associated with resistance to DDT and pyrethroids. In addition, the evaluation of the field populations from all seasons in terms of the combinations of polymorphisms at four resistance-associated mutations did not reveal the presence of insects that are resistant to all pesticides. Results from the morphological analysis displayed a similar pattern for both wings and did not show a clear separation among the samples from the

  16. Peak effect in surface resistance at microwave frequencies in Dy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the measurements at both frequencies the induced microwave current was always less than the critical current of the films. The reason for observation of this peak effect in these films has been explained in our earlier publication [5]. Comparing figures 1 and 2, it is observed that the peaks in sample S1 are broader and.

  17. The Frequency of Antibiotic Resistant Coliforms Isolated from Sewage of Qom City, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaye Nikoogoftar Ranjbar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Antibiotics are among the most effective drugs used to treat humans. These materials enter in different ways into sewage and known as important biological contaminants in aquatic and agricultural environment. The availability of conditions for antibiotic resistance gene transfer to sewage bacteria, converted human environmental wastes to an important source of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Considering the spread of antibiotic resistant strains in treatment centers of Qom province, the aim of this study is to investigate the frequency and antibiotic resistance pattern in coliform bacteria isolated from wastewater treatment system of Qom city in different seasons. Methods: This study was carried out on 120 samples of municipal wastewater treatment plant (incoming and outgoing in Qom. After sampling, transport of samples to the laboratory, isolation and phenotypic identification of bacteria, and Determination of antibiotic resistance pattern, were performed according to CLSI standards. The frequency of bacteria was determined using most probable number (MPN method. Results: In this study, of 384 strains of bacteria (isolated in spring, summer, and winter, Escherichia coli (50%, Citrobacter (30%, Enterobacter (11%, Klebsiella (1% and non-coliform bacteria (Proteus sp. 8%, were identified. The most antibiotic resistance was observed in Citrobacter and Enterobacter bacteria (isolated in summer to penicillin G with a frequency of 94%. Conclusion: Due to the high frequency of antibiotic resistance in Citrobacter and Enterobacter strains in the sewage treatment plant in Qom province, especially in the summer, this ecosystem can be reported as an important source of spread of antibiotic-resistant strains.

  18. Mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance in Haematobia irritans (Muscidae from Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil Mecanismos de resistência da Haematobia irritans (Muscidae a piretróides em Mato Grosso do Sul, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Thadeu Medeiros Barros

    Full Text Available Horn fly resistance to pyrethroid insecticides occurs throughout Brazil, but knowledge about the involved mechanisms is still in an incipient stage. This survey was aimed to identify the mechanisms of horn fly resistance to cypermethrin in Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil. Impregnated filter paper bioassays using cypermethrin, synergized or not with piperonyl butoxide (PBO and triphenyl phosphate (TPP, were conducted from March 2004 to June 2005 in horn fly populations (n = 33 from all over the state. All populations were highly resistant to cypermethrin, with resistance factors (RF ranging from 89.4 to 1,020.6. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays to detect the knockdown resistance (kdr mutation also were performed in 16 samples. The kdr mutation was found in 75% of the tested populations, mostly with relatively low frequencies (Resistência da mosca-dos-chifres a inseticidas piretróides ocorre em todo o país, entretanto, o conhecimento sobre os mecanismos envolvidos é ainda incipiente. Este estudo objetivou identificar os mecanismos de resistência desta mosca à cipermetrina em Mato Grosso do Sul. Bioensaios utilizando papéis impregnados com cipermetrina, isoladamente ou sinergizada por butóxido de piperonila (PBO ou trifenil fosfato (TPP, foram realizados de março∕2004 a junho∕2005 em 33 populações. Todas as populações apresentaram elevada resistência à cipermetrina, com fatores de resistência (FR variando de 89,4 a 1.020,6. Ensaios de reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR visando a detecção de kdr (“knockdown resistance” foram realizados em 16 amostras. A mutação kdr foi detectada em 75% das populações, geralmente em baixas frequências (<20% e ausente em algumas populações resistentes. A adição de TPP não reduziu significativamente a CL50 em nenhuma população. Entretanto, o PBO reduziu em mais de 40 vezes a CL50 de todas as populações testadas, resultando em FR ≤ 10 na maioria dos casos. Resist

  19. Presence of two alternative kdr-like mutations, L1014F and L1014S, and a novel mutation, V1010L, in the voltage gated Na+ channel of Anopheles culicifacies from Orissa, India

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatt Rajendra M; Pradhan Sabyasachi; Das Manoj K; Dykes Cherry L; Singh Om P; Agrawal Om P; Adak Tridibes

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Knockdown resistance in insects resulting from mutation(s) in the voltage gated Na+ channel (VGSC) is one of the mechanisms of resistance against DDT and pyrethroids. Recently a point mutation leading to Leu-to-Phe substitution in the VGSC at residue 1014, a most common kdr mutation in insects, was reported in Anopheles culicifacies-a major malaria vector in the Indian subcontinent. This study reports the presence of two additional amino acid substitutions in the VGSC of a...

  20. Evidence of carbamate resistance in urban populations of Anopheles gambiae s.s. mosquitoes resistant to DDT and deltamethrin insecticides in Lagos, South-Western Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oduola Adedayo O

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resistance monitoring is essential in ensuring the success of insecticide based vector control programmes. This study was carried out to assess the susceptibility status of urban populations of Anopheles gambiae to carbamate insecticide being considered for vector control in mosquito populations previously reported to be resistant to DDT and permethrin. Methods Two – three day old adult female Anopheles mosquitoes reared from larval collections in 11 study sites from Local Government Areas of Lagos were exposed to test papers impregnated with DDT 4%, deltamethrin 0.05% and propoxur 0.1% insecticides. Additional tests were carried out to determine the susceptibility status of the Anopheles gambiae population to bendiocarb insecticide. Members of the A. gambiae complex, the molecular forms, were identified by PCR assays. The involvement of metabolic enzymes in carbamate resistance was assessed using Piperonyl butoxide (PBO synergist assays. The presence of kdr-w/e and ace-1R point mutations responsible for DDT-pyrethroid and carbamate resistance mechanisms was also investigated by PCR. Results Propoxur resistance was found in 10 out of the 11 study sites. Resistance to three classes of insecticides was observed in five urban localities. Mortality rates in mosquitoes exposed to deltamethrin and propoxur did not show any significant difference (P > 0.05 but was significantly higher (P A. gambiae s.s (M form. The kdr -w point mutation at allelic frequencies between 45%-77% was identified as one of the resistant mechanisms responsible for DDT and pyrethroid resistance. Ace-1R point mutation was absent in the carbamate resistant population. However, the possible involvement of metabolic resistance was confirmed by synergistic assays conducted. Conclusion Evidence of carbamate resistance in A. gambiae populations already harbouring resistance to DDT and permethrin is a clear indication that calls for the implementation of

  1. The Resistance-Amplitude-Frequency Effect of In-Liquid Quartz Crystal Microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianhe; Bai, Qingsong; Zhou, Qi; Hu, Jianguo

    2017-06-22

    Due to the influence of liquid load, the equivalent resistance of in-liquid quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) increases sharply, and the quality factor and resonant frequency decreases. We found that the change in the resonant frequency of in-liquid QCM consisted of two parts: besides the frequency changes due to the mass and viscous load (which could be equivalent to motional inductance), the second part of frequency change was caused by the increase of motional resistance. The theoretical calculation and simulation proved that the increases of QCM motional resistance may indeed cause the decreases of resonant frequency, and revealed that the existence of static capacitance was the root cause of this frequency change. The second part of frequency change (due to the increases of motional resistance) was difficult to measure accurately, and may cause great error for in-liquid QCM applications. A technical method to reduce the interference caused by this effect is presented. The study contributes to the accurate determination of the frequency and amplitude change of in-liquid QCM caused by liquid load, which is significant for the QCM applications in the liquid phase.

  2. Knockdown resistance, Rdl alleles, and the annual entomological Inoculation rate of wild mosquito populations from Lower Moshi, Northern Tanzania

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    Aneth M Mahande

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Understanding vector behavioral response due to ecological factors is important in the control of disease vectors. This study was conducted to determine the knockdown resistance (kdr alleles, dieldrin resistance alleles, and entomological inoculation rates (EIRs of malaria vectors in lower Moshi irrigation schemes for the mitigation of disease transmission. Materials and Methods: The study was longitudinal design conducted for 14 months. Mosquitoes were collected fortnightly by using a CDC miniature light trap in 20 houses. Mosquitoes were identified morphologically in the field, of which 10% of this population was identified to species level by using molecular techniques. Samples from this study population were taken for kdr and resistance to dieldrin (rdl genes detection. Results: A total of 6220 mosquitoes were collected by using a light trap, of which 86.0% (n=5350 were Anopheles gambiae sensu lato and 14.0% (n=870 were Culex quinquefasciatus. Ten percent of the An. gambiae s.l. (n=535 collected were taken for species identification, of which 99.8% (n=534 were identified as An. arabiensis while 0.2% (n=1 were An. gambiae sensu stricto. Of the selected mosquitoes, 3.5% (n=19 were sporozoite positive. None of the mosquitoes tested had the kdr gene. The rdl resistant allele was detected at a frequency of 0.48 throughout the year. EIR was determined to be 0.54 ib/trap/year. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that the homozygous and the heterozygous resistance present in rdl genes demonstrated the effect of pesticide residues on resistance selection pressure in mosquitoes. A better insecticide usage protocol needs to be developed for farmers to use in order to avoid excessive use of pesticides. Key words: An. arabiensis, EIR, Knockdown mutation, Moshi, rdl locus, Tanzania

  3. Frequency of colistin and fosfomycin resistance in carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae from a tertiary care hospital in Karachi

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    Qamar S

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Salima Qamar, Najma Shaheen, Sadia Shakoor, Joveria Farooqi, Kauser Jabeen, Rumina Hasan Clinical Microbiology, Department of Pathology And Laboratory Medicine, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan Introduction: Management of infections with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE is challenging. In recent times, agents such as colistin and fosfomycin have been used in combination with other antibiotics to treat such infections. In this study, we aim to seek frequency of colistin and fosfomycin resistance in CRE from Pakistan.Methods: This study was conducted at clinical laboratories, Aga Khan University Hospital. In total, 251 CRE were included in the study. Colistin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs were performed using broth microdilution (BMD method and VITEK® 2 system, whereas fosfomycin susceptibility was performed using Kirby–Bauer method. MIC50 and MIC90 were calculated for colistin and agreement between VITEK and BMD was also calculated.Results: Out of 251 strains colistin MIC of ≥4 µg/mL was seen in 40 (15.9%. Of these strains 20 (50% were Klebsiella pneumoniae. Colistin MIC50 and MIC90 were found to be 0.5 and 16 µg/mL, respectively. BMD and VITEK 2 showed 100% categorical agreement. Essential agreement was 88.5% with kappa score 0.733 indicating strong agreement between VITEK and BMD. 31 out of 251 (12.3% CREs were resistant to fosfomycin.Conclusion: Study shows frequency of colistin and fosfomycin resistance to be 15.9% and 12.3%, respectively. In countries where rate of CREs is high, emerging resistance against these last resort antibiotics is alarming as it leaves clinicians with almost no options to manage such multidrug resistant and extensively drug resistant infections. Keywords: emerging drug resistance, colistin resistance, fosfomycin resistance, carbapenam resistant enterobacteriaceae, salvage antibiotics 

  4. Src Kinase becomes preferentially associated with the VEGFR, KDR/Flk-1, following VEGF stimulation of vascular endothelial cells

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    Wang Jing

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase, Src, has been found to play a crucial role in VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor – dependent vascular permeability involved in angiogenesis. The two main VEGFRs present on vascular endothelial cells are KDR/Flk-1 (kinase insert domain-containing receptor/fetal liver kinase-1 and Flt-1 (Fms-like tyrosine kinase-1. However, to date, it has not been determined which VEGF receptor (VEGFR is involved in binding to and activating Src kinase following VEGF stimulation of the receptors. Results In this report, we demonstrate that Src preferentially associates with KDR/Flk-1 rather than Flt-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, and that VEGF stimulation resulted in an increase of Src activity associated with activated KDR/Flk-1. These findings were determined through immunoprecipitation-kinase experiments and coimmunoprecipitation studies, and were further confirmed by GST-pull-down assays and Far Western studies. However, Fyn and Yes, unlike Src, were found to associate preferentially with Flt-1. Conclusions Thus, Src preferentially associates with KDR/Flk-1, rather than with Flt-1, upon VEGF stimulation in endothelial cells. Our findings further highlight the potential significance of upregulated KDR/Flk-1-associated Src activity in the process of angiogenesis, and help to elucidate more clearly the specific roles and mechanisms involving Src family tyrosine kinase in VEGF-stimulated signal transduction events.

  5. Predicting the impact of selection for scrapie resistance on PRNP genotype frequencies in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Paola; Rasero, Roberto; Ru, Giuseppe; Aiassa, Eleonora; Colussi, Silvia; Ingravalle, Francesco; Peletto, Simone; Perrotta, Maria Gabriella; Sartore, Stefano; Soglia, Dominga; Acutis, Pierluigi

    2018-03-06

    The European Union has implemented breeding programmes to increase scrapie resistance in sheep. A similar approach can be applied also in goats since the K222 allele provides a level of resistance equivalent to that of ARR in sheep. The European Food Safety Authority stated that breeding for resistance could be offered as an option for Member States to control classical scrapie in goats. We assessed the impact of different breeding strategies on PRNP genotype frequencies using a mathematical model that describes in detail the evolution of K222 in two goat breeds, Chamois Coloured and Saanen. Different patterns of age structure and replacement rate were modelled as factors affecting response to selection. Breeding for scrapie resistance can be implemented in goats, even though the initial K222 frequencies in these breeds are not particularly favourable and the rate at which the resistant animals increase, both breeding and slaughtered for meat production, is slow. If the goal is not to achieve the fixation of resistance allele, it is advisable to carry out selection only until a desired frequency of K222-carriers has been attained. Nucleus selection vs. selection on the overall populations is less expensive but takes longer to reach the desired output. The programme performed on the two goat breeds serves as a model of the response the selection could have in other breeds that show different initial frequencies and population structure. In this respect, the model has a general applicability.

  6. Three years of insecticide resistance monitoring in Anopheles gambiae in Burkina Faso: resistance on the rise?

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    Badolo Athanase

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and methods A longitudinal Anopheles gambiae s.l. insecticide-resistance monitoring programme was established in four sentinel sites in Burkina Faso. For three years, between 2008 and 2010, WHO diagnostic dose assays were used to measure the prevalence of resistance to all the major classes of insecticides at the beginning and end of the malaria transmission season. Species identification and genotyping for target site mutations was also performed and the sporozoite rate in adults determined. Results At the onset of the study, resistance to DDT and pyrethroids was already prevalent in An. gambiae s.l. from the south-west of the country but mosquitoes from the two sites in central Burkina Faso were largely susceptible. Within three years, DDT and permethrin resistance was established in all four sites. Carbamate and organophosphate resistance remains relatively rare and largely confined to the south-western areas although a small number of bendiocarb survivors were found in all sites by the final round of monitoring. The ace-1R target site resistance allele was present in all localities and its frequency exceeded 20% in 2010 in two of the sites. The frequency of the 1014F kdr mutation increased throughout the three years and by 2010, the frequency of 1014F in all sites combined was 0.02 in Anopheles arabiensis, 0.56 in An. gambiae M form and 0.96 in An. gambiae S form. This frequency did not differ significantly between the sites. The 1014S kdr allele was only found in An. arabiensis but its frequency increased significantly throughout the study (P = 0.0003 and in 2010 the 1014S allele frequency was 0.08 in An. arabiensis. Maximum sporozoite rates (12% were observed in Soumousso in 2009 and the difference between sites is significant for each year. Conclusion Pyrethroid and DDT resistance is now established in An. gambiae s.l. throughout Burkina Faso. Results from diagnostic dose assays are highly variable within and

  7. New Introductions, Spread of Existing Matrilines, and High Rates of Pyrethroid Resistance Result in Chronic Infestations of Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius L. in Lower-Income Housing.

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    Ronald W Raab

    Full Text Available Infestations of the common bed bug (Cimex lectularius L. have increased substantially in the United States in the past 10-15 years. The housing authority in Harrisonburg, Virginia, conducts heat-treatments after bed bugs are detected in a lower-income housing complex, by treating each infested unit at 60°C for 4-6 hours. However, a high frequency of recurrent infestations called into question the efficacy of this strategy. Genetic analysis using Bayesian clustering of polymorphic microsatellite loci from 123 bed bugs collected from 23 units from May 2012 to April 2013 in one building indicated that (a 16/21 (73% infestations were genetically similar, suggesting ineffective heat-treatments or reintroductions from within the building or from a common external source, followed by local spread of existing populations; and (b up to 5 of the infestations represented new genotypes, indicating that 5 new populations were introduced into this building in one year, assuming they were not missed in earlier screens. There was little to no gene flow among the 8 genetic clusters identified in the building. Bed bugs in the U.S. often possess one or both point mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel, termed knockdown resistance (kdr, from valine to leucine (V419L and leucine to isoleucine (L925I that confer target-site resistance against pyrethroid insecticides. We found that 48/121 (40% bed bugs were homozygous for both kdr mutations (L419/I925, and a further 59% possessed at least one of the kdr mutations. We conclude that ineffective heat treatments, new introductions, reintroductions and local spread, and an exceptionally high frequency of pyrethroid resistance are responsible for chronic infestations in lower-income housing. Because heat treatments fail to protect from reintroductions, and pesticide use has not decreased the frequency of infestations, preventing new introductions and early detection are the most effective strategies to avoid bed bug

  8. Relationship between knockdown resistance, metabolic detoxification and organismal resistance to pyrethroids in Anopheles sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Daibin; Chang, Xuelian; Zhou, Guofa; He, Zhengbo; Fu, Fengyang; Yan, Zhentian; Zhu, Guoding; Xu, Tielong; Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Wang, Mei-Hui; Cui, Liwang; Zheng, Bin; Chen, Bin; Yan, Guiyun

    2013-01-01

    Anopheles sinensis is the most important vector of malaria in Southeast Asia, including China. Currently, the most effective measure to prevent malaria transmission relies on vector control through the use of insecticides, primarily pyrethroids. Extensive use of insecticides poses strong selection pressure on mosquito populations for resistance. Resistance to insecticides can arise due to mutations in the insecticide target site (target site resistance), which in the case of pyrethroids is the para-type sodium channel gene, and/or the catabolism of the insecticide by detoxification enzymes before it reaches its target (metabolic detoxification resistance). In this study, we examined deltamethrin resistance in An. sinensis from China and investigated the relative importance of target site versus metabolic detoxification mechanisms in resistance. A high frequency (>85%) of nonsynonymous mutations in the para gene was found in populations from central China, but not in populations from southern China. Metabolic detoxification as measured by the activity of monooxygenases and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) was detected in populations from both central and southern China. Monooxygenase activity levels were significantly higher in the resistant than the susceptible mosquitoes, independently of their geographic origin. Stepwise multiple regression analyses in mosquito populations from central China found that both knockdown resistance (kdr) mutations and monooxygenase activity were significantly associated with deltamethrin resistance, with monooxygenase activity playing a stronger role. These results demonstrate the importance of metabolic detoxification in pyrethroid resistance in An. sinensis, and suggest that different mechanisms of resistance could evolve in geographically different populations.

  9. Status of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae s. s. M form prior to the scaling up of Long Lasting Insecticidal Nets (LLINs in Adzopé, Eastern Côte d’Ivoire

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    Ahoua Alou Ludovic P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing development of pyrethroid resistance constitutes a serious threat to malaria control programmes and if measures are not taken in time, resistance may compromise control efforts in the foreseeable future. Prior to Long Lasting Insecticidal Nets (LLINs distribution in Eastern Cote d’Ivoire, we conducted bioassays to inform the National Malaria Control Programme of the resistance status of the main malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae s. s. and the need for close surveillance of resistance. Methods Larvae of An. gambiae s. s. were collected in two areas of Adzopé (Port-Bouët and Tsassodji and reared to adults. WHO susceptibility tests with impregnated filter papers were carried out to detect resistance to three pyrethroids commonly used to develop LLINs: permethrin 1%, deltamethrin 0.05% and lambda-cyhalothrin 0.05%. Molecular assays were conducted to detect M and S forms and the L1014F kdr allele in individual mosquitoes. Results Resistance, at various degrees was detected in both areas of Adzopé. Overall, populations of An. gambiae at both sites surveyed showed equivalent frequency of the L1014F kdr allele (0.67 but for all tested pyrethroids, there were significantly higher survival rates for mosquitoes from Tsassodji (32–58% than those from Port-Bouët (3–32% (p kdr alone. During the survey period (May–June in this forested area of Côte d’Ivoire, An. gambiae s. s. found were exclusively of the M form and were apparently selected for pyrethroid resistance through agricultural and household usage of insecticides. Conclusion Prior to LLINs scaling up in Eastern Côte d’Ivoire, resistance was largely present at various levels in An. gambiae. Underlying mechanisms included the high frequency of the L1014F kdr mutation and other unidentified components, probably metabolic detoxifiers. Their impact on the efficacy of the planned strategy (LLINs in the area should be investigated alongside careful

  10. Impact of three years of large scale Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS and Insecticide Treated Nets (ITNs interventions on insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae s.l. in Benin

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    Padonou Gil

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Benin, Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS and long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs are the cornerstones of malaria prevention. In the context of high resistance of Anopheles gambiae to pyrethroids, The National Malaria Control Program (NMCP has undertaken a full coverage of IRS in a no-flood zone in the Oueme region, coupled with the distribution of LLINs in a flood zone. We assessed the impact of this campaign on phenotypic resistance, kdr (knock-down resistance and ace-1R (insensitive acetylcholinesterase mutations. Methods Insecticides used for malaria vector control interventions were bendiocarb WP (0.4 g/m2 and deltamethrin (55 mg/m2, respectively for IRS and LLINs. Susceptibility status of An. gambiae was assessed using World Health Organization bioassay tests to DDT, permethrin, deltamethrin and bendiocarb in the Oueme region before intervention (2007 and after interventions in 2008 and 2010. An. gambiae specimens were screened for identification of species, molecular M and S forms and for the detection of the West African kdr (L1014F as well as ace-1R mutations using PCR techniques. Results The univariate logistic regression performed showed that kdr frequency has increased significantly during the three years in the intervention area and in the control area. Several factors (LLINs, IRS, mosquito coils, aerosols, use of pesticides for crop protection could explain the selection of individual resistant An. gambiae. The Kdr resistance gene could not be the only mechanism of resistance observed in the Oueme region. The high susceptibility to bendiocarb is in agreement with a previous study conducted in Benin. However, the occurrence of ace-1R heterozygous individuals even on sites far from IRS areas, suggests other factors may contribute to the selection of resistance other than those exerted by the vector control program. Conclusion The results of this study have confirmed that An.gambiae have maintained and developed

  11. Review of the evolution of insecticide resistance in main malaria vectors in Cameroon from 1990 to 2017.

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    Antonio-Nkondjio, Christophe; Sonhafouo-Chiana, N; Ngadjeu, C S; Doumbe-Belisse, P; Talipouo, A; Djamouko-Djonkam, L; Kopya, E; Bamou, R; Awono-Ambene, P; Wondji, Charles S

    2017-10-10

    Malaria remains a major public health threat in Cameroon and disease prevention is facing strong challenges due to the rapid expansion of insecticide resistance in vector populations. The present review presents an overview of published data on insecticide resistance in the main malaria vectors in Cameroon to assist in the elaboration of future and sustainable resistance management strategies. A systematic search on mosquito susceptibility to insecticides and insecticide resistance in malaria vectors in Cameroon was conducted using online bibliographic databases including PubMed, Google and Google Scholar. From each peer-reviewed paper, information on the year of the study, mosquito species, susceptibility levels, location, insecticides, data source and resistance mechanisms were extracted and inserted in a Microsoft Excel datasheet. The data collected were then analysed for assessing insecticide resistance evolution. Thirty-three scientific publications were selected for the analysis. The rapid evolution of insecticide resistance across the country was reported from 2000 onward. Insecticide resistance was highly prevalent in both An. gambiae (s.l.) and An. funestus. DDT, permethrin, deltamethrin and bendiocarb appeared as the most affected compounds by resistance. From 2000 to 2017 a steady increase in the prevalence of kdr allele frequency was noted in almost all sites in An. gambiae (s.l.), with the L1014F kdr allele being the most prevalent. Several detoxification genes (particularly P450 monooxygenase) were associated with DDT, pyrethroids and bendiocarb resistance. In An. funestus, resistance to DDT and pyrethroids was mainly attributed to the 119F-GSTe2 metabolic resistance marker and over-expression of P450 genes whereas the 296S-RDL mutation was detected in dieldrin-resistant An. funestus. The review provides an update of insecticide resistance status in malaria vector populations in Cameroon and stresses the need for further actions to reinforce malaria

  12. Presence of two alternative kdr-like mutations, L1014F and L1014S, and a novel mutation, V1010L, in the voltage gated Na+ channel of Anopheles culicifacies from Orissa, India

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    Bhatt Rajendra M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knockdown resistance in insects resulting from mutation(s in the voltage gated Na+ channel (VGSC is one of the mechanisms of resistance against DDT and pyrethroids. Recently a point mutation leading to Leu-to-Phe substitution in the VGSC at residue 1014, a most common kdr mutation in insects, was reported in Anopheles culicifacies-a major malaria vector in the Indian subcontinent. This study reports the presence of two additional amino acid substitutions in the VGSC of an An. culicifacies population from Malkangiri district of Orissa, India. Methods Anopheles culicifacies sensu lato (s.l. samples, collected from a population of Malkangiri district of Orissa (India, were sequenced for part of the second transmembrane segment of VGSC and analyzed for the presence of non-synonymous mutations. A new primer introduced restriction analysis-PCR (PIRA-PCR was developed for the detection of the new mutation L1014S. The An. culicifacies population was genotyped for the presence of L1014F substitution by an amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS and for L1014S substitutions by using a new PIRA-PCR developed in this study. The results were validated through DNA sequencing. Results DNA sequencing of An. culicifacies individuals collected from district Malkangiri revealed the presence of three amino acid substitutions in the IIS6 transmembrane segments of VGSC, each one resulting from a single point mutation. Two alternative point mutations, 3042A>T transversion or 3041T>C transition, were found at residue L1014 leading to Leu (TTA-to-Phe (TTT or -Ser (TCA changes, respectively. A third and novel substitution, Val (GTG-to-Leu (TTG or CTG, was identified at residue V1010 resulting from either of the two transversions–3028G>T or 3028G>C. The L1014S substitution co-existed with V1010L in all the samples analyzed irrespective of the type of point mutation associated with the latter. The PIRA-PCR strategy developed for the

  13. Insecticide resistance status of Anopheles gambiae s.s population from M'Bé: a WHOPES-labelled experimental hut station, 10 years after the political crisis in Côte d'Ivoire.

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    Koffi, Alphonsine A; Ahoua Alou, Ludovic P; Adja, Maurice A; Chandre, Fabrice; Pennetier, Cédric

    2013-05-04

    An experimental hut station built at M'Bé in 1998 was used for many years for the evaluation of insecticidal product for public health until the civil war broke out in 2002. Breeding sites of mosquitoes and selection pressure in the area were maintained by local farming practices and the West African Rice Development Association (WARDA, actually AfricaRice) in a large rice growing area. Ten years after the crisis, bioassays, molecular and biochemical analyses were conducted to update the resistance status and study the evolution of resistance mechanisms of Anopheles gambiae s.s population. Anopheles gambiae s.s larvae from M'Bé were collected in breeding sites and reared until emergence. Resistance status of this population to conventional insecticides was assessed using WHO bioassay test kits for adult mosquitoes, with 10 insecticides belonging to pyrethroids, pseudo-pyrethroid, organochlorides, carbamates and organophosphates with and without the inhibitor piperonyl butoxyde (PBO). Molecular and biochemical assays were carried out to identify the L1014F kdr, L1014S kdr and ace-1(R) alleles in individual mosquitoes and to detect potential increase in mixed function oxidases (MFO) level, non-specific esterases (NSE) and glutathione S-transferases (GST) activities. Anopheles gambiae s.s from M'Bé exerted high resistance levels to organochlorides, pyrethroids, and carbamates. Mortalities ranged from 3% to 21% for organochlorides, from 50% to 75% for pyrethroids, 34% for etofenprox, the pseudo-pyrethroid, and from 7% to 80% for carbamates. Tolerance to organophosphates was observed with mortalities ranging from 95% to 98%. Bioassays run with a pre-exposition of mosquitoes to PBO induced very high levels of mortalities compared to the bioassays without PBO, suggesting that the resistance to pyrethroid and carbamate relied largely on detoxifying enzymes' activities. The L1014F kdr allelic frequency was 0.33 in 2012 compared to 0.05 before the crisis in 2002. Neither

  14. Allocation, not male resistance, increases male frequency during epidemics: a case study in facultatively sexual hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hite, Jessica L; Penczykowski, Rachel M; Shocket, Marta S; Griebel, Katherine A; Strauss, Alexander T; Duffy, Meghan A; Cáceres, Carla E; Hall, Spencer R

    2017-11-01

    Why do natural populations vary in the frequency of sexual reproduction? Virulent parasites may help explain why sex is favored during disease epidemics. To illustrate, we show a higher frequency of males and sexually produced offspring in natural populations of a facultative parthenogenetic host during fungal epidemics. In a multi-year survey of 32 lakes, the frequency of males (an index of sex) was higher in populations of zooplankton hosts with larger epidemics. A lake mesocosm experiment established causality: experimental epidemics produced a higher frequency of males relative to disease-free controls. One common explanation for such a pattern involves Red Queen (RQ) dynamics. However, this particular system lacks key genetic specificity mechanisms required for the RQ, so we evaluated two other hypotheses. First, individual females, when stressed by infection, could increase production of male offspring vs. female offspring (a tenant of the "Abandon Ship" theory). Data from a life table experiment supports this mechanism. Second, higher male frequency during epidemics could reflect a purely demographic process (illustrated with a demographic model): males could resist infection more than females (via size-based differences in resistance and mortality). However, we found no support for this resistance mechanism. A size-based model of resistance, parameterized with data, revealed why: higher male susceptibility negated the lower exposure (a size-based advantage) of males. These results suggest that parasite-mediated increases in allocation to sex by individual females, rather than male resistance, increased the frequency of sex during larger disease epidemics. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  15. Antimicrobial sensitivity and frequency of DRUG resistance among bacterial strains isolated from cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faiz, M.; Bashir, T.

    2004-01-01

    Blood stream infections (bacteremia) is potentially life threatening. Concomitant with a change in the incidence and epidemiology of infecting organisms, there has been an increase in resistance to many antibiotic compounds. The widespread emergence of resistance among bacterial pathogens has an impact on our ability to treat patients effectively. The changing spectrum of microbial pathogens and widespread emergence of microbial resistance to antibiotic drugs has emphasized the need to monitor the prevalence of resistance in these strains. In the present study frequency of isolation of clinically significant bacteria and their susceptibility and resistance pattern against a wide range of antimicrobial drugs from positive blood cultures collected during 2001-2003 was studied. A total of 102 consecutive isolates were found with 63% gram positive and 44% gram negative strains. The dominating pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus (51%), Streptococci (31%), Pseudomonas (40%), Proteus (13%), Klebsiella (13%). The isolated strains were tested against a wide range of antibiotics belonging to cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and quinolone derivative group by disk diffusion method. It has been observed that isolated strains among gram positive and negative strains showed different level of resistance against aminoglycosides and cephalosporin group of antibiotics with gram positives showing highest number and frequency of resistance against aminoglycosides (40-50%) and cephalosporins.(35-45%) whereas cephalosporins were found to be more effective against gram negatives with low frequency of resistant strains. Cabapenem and quinolone derivative drugs were found to be most effective among other groups in both gram positive and negative strains with 23-41% strains found sensitive to these two drugs. The frequency of sensitive strains against aminoglycoside and cephalosporin in gram negative and gram positive strains were found to be decreasing yearwise with a trend towards an

  16. Study of the low-frequency dispersion of permittivity and resistivity in tight rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongqi; Jie, Tian; Li, Bo; Youming, Deng; Chunning, Qiu

    2017-08-01

    The road to understanding the frequency dispersion (relaxation) of permittivity and resistivity in tight rocks remains relatively uncharted. Our team from Da'anzhai Group, Jurassic formation, Sichuan Basin carried out practical research to explore this phenomenon. The research was conducted under laboratory conditions for a selection of low frequencies, with ranges between 0.1 Hz to 1 kHz. Our research has shown that, although both the permittivity and resistivity decrease as the frequency increases, the two individual metrics display different behaviours when compared with each other. While the degree of resistivity variation is minimal, to the point that it is redundant, the permittivity, on the other hand, demonstrates something that is scientifically noteworthy. Permittivity has a distinctive dispersion degree across the entire sample of frequencies and the difference between the minimum and maximum frequencies is several orders of magnitude. An additional, and unexpected, learning from our research is that the level of frequency dispersion increases as the water saturation and concentration increases. In this paper, a collection of equations has been formulated to describe this relationship. These equations particularly shed light on the areas of rock porosity and saturation. They also show that the degree of frequency dispersion of permittivity or resistivity can be used as a function of water saturation and concentration. Two new variables are introduced here, DR and DC, to demonstrate the relaxation law quantitatively. In our practical research, we have characterised the relationship between the saturation and concentration with dielectric relaxation, using three different concentrations of DR and DC and five different saturations of NaCl solution. In difference to conventional Archie's multiple experimental parameters, we have established a new formula to derive the saturation from Rp and Cp, or from DR and DC directly. Two important frequencies were also

  17. Carriage frequency, diversity and methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus in Danish small ruminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Jacob; Gongora, Carmen Espinosa; Stamphøj, Inga

    2013-01-01

    The ecology of Staphylococcus aureus in animals has recently gained attention by the research community due to the emergence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). We investigated carriage frequency and clonal diversity of S. aureus in 179 sheep and 17 goats in Denmark using...

  18. Research surface resistance of copper normal and abnormal skin-effects depending on the frequency of electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutovyi, V.A.; Komir, A.I.

    2013-01-01

    The results of the frequency dependence of surface resistance of copper in diffuse and specular reflection of electrons from the conductive surface of the high-frequency resonance of the system depending on the frequency of the electromagnetic field in the normal and anomalous skin effect. Found, the surface resistance of copper is reduced by more than 10 times at the temperature of liquid helium, as compared with a surface resistivity at room temperature, at frequencies f ≤ 173 MHz, for diffuse reflection of conduction electrons from the surface of the conductive layer, and the specular reflection - at frequencies f ≤ 346 MHz

  19. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Augments Arginine Transport and Nitric Oxide Generation via a KDR Receptor Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshe Shashar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is an endothelium-specific peptide that stimulates angiogenesis via two receptor tyrosine kinases, Flt-1 and KDR. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS plays a major role in VEGF signaling. Delivery of arginine to membrane bound eNOS by the cationic amino acid transporter-1 (CAT-1 has been shown to modulate eNOS activity. The current studies were designed to test the hypothesis that VEGF enhances eNOS activity via modulation of arginine transport by CAT-1. Methods: Using radio-labeled arginine, {[3H] L-arginine} uptake was determined in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC following incubation with VEGF with and without silencing the VEGF receptors Flt-1 or KDR. Subsequently, western blotting for CAT-1, PKCα, ERK 1/2, JNK, and their phosphorylated forms were performed. NO generation was measured by the Griess reaction. Results: VEGF (50 and 100 ng/ml significantly augmented endothelial arginine transport in a time dependent manner, an effect which was prevented by Sunitinib (2 µM, a multi targeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The increase in arginine transport velocities by VEGF was not affected by silencing Flt-1 while silencing KDR abrogated VEGF effect. Furthermore, incubating cells with 50 and 100 ng of VEGF for 30 minutes significantly augmented CAT-1 abundance. The expression of PKC-α, JNK, and ERK1/2 and their phosphorylated forms were unchanged following incubation of HUVEC with VEGF. The concentration of NO2/NO3 following incubation with VEGF was significantly higher than from untreated cells. This increase was significantly attenuated by silencing KDR. Conclusions: VEGF increases arginine transport via modulation of CAT-1 in endothelial cells. This effect is exclusively dependent on KDR rather than Flt-1.

  20. Frequency and Distribution of Tuberculosis Resistance-Associated Mutations between Mumbai, Moldova, and Eastern Cape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georghiou, S B; Seifert, M; Catanzaro, D; Garfein, R S; Valafar, F; Crudu, V; Rodrigues, C; Victor, T C; Catanzaro, A; Rodwell, T C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular diagnostic assays, with their ability to rapidly detect resistance-associated mutations in bacterial genes, are promising technologies to control the spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB). Sequencing assays provide detailed information for specific gene regions and can help diagnostic assay developers prioritize mutations for inclusion in their assays. We performed pyrosequencing of seven Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene regions (katG, inhA, ahpC, rpoB, gyrA, rrs, and eis) for 1,128 clinical specimens from India, Moldova, and South Africa. We determined the frequencies of each mutation among drug-resistant and -susceptible specimens based on phenotypic drug susceptibility testing results and examined mutation distributions by country. The most common mutation among isoniazid-resistant (INH(r)) specimens was the katG 315ACC mutation (87%). However, in the Eastern Cape, INH(r) specimens had a lower frequency of katG mutations (44%) and higher frequencies of inhA (47%) and ahpC (10%) promoter mutations. The most common mutation among rifampin-resistant (RIF(r)) specimens was the rpoB 531TTG mutation (80%). The mutation was common in RIF(r) specimens in Mumbai (83%) and Moldova (84%) but not the Eastern Cape (17%), where the 516GTC mutation appeared more frequently (57%). The most common mutation among fluoroquinolone-resistant specimens was the gyrA 94GGC mutation (44%). The rrs 1401G mutation was found in 84%, 84%, and 50% of amikacin-resistant, capreomycin-resistant, and kanamycin (KAN)-resistant (KAN(r)) specimens, respectively. The eis promoter mutation -12T was found in 26% of KAN(r) and 4% of KAN-susceptible (KAN(s)) specimens. Inclusion of the ahpC and eis promoter gene regions was critical for optimal test sensitivity for the detection of INH resistance in the Eastern Cape and KAN resistance in Moldova. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT02170441.). Copyright © 2016, American Society for

  1. Sodium Channel Mutations and Pyrethroid Resistance in Aedes aegypti

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    Yuzhe Du

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insect pests and human disease vectors. Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary targets of pyrethroid insecticides. Mutations in the sodium channel have been shown to be responsible for pyrethroid resistance, known as knockdown resistance (kdr, in various insects including mosquitoes. In Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the principal urban vectors of dengue, zika, and yellow fever viruses, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in the sodium channel gene have been found in pyrethroid-resistant populations and some of them have been functionally confirmed to be responsible for kdr in an in vitro expression system, Xenopus oocytes. This mini-review aims to provide an update on the identification and functional characterization of pyrethroid resistance-associated sodium channel mutations from Aedes aegypti. The collection of kdr mutations not only helped us develop molecular markers for resistance monitoring, but also provided valuable information for computational molecular modeling of pyrethroid receptor sites on the sodium channel.

  2. Advancement in the Understanding of the Field and Frequency Dependent Microwave Surface Resistance of Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, M. [Fermilab; Aderhold, S. [Fermilab; Chandrasekaran, S. K. [Fermilab; Checchin, M. [Fermilab; Grassellino, A. [Fermilab; Melnychuk, O. [Fermilab; Posen, S. [Fermilab; Romanenko, A. [Fermilab; Sergatskov, D. A. [Fermilab

    2017-07-24

    The radio-frequency surface resistance of niobium resonators is incredibly reduced when nitrogen impurities are dissolved as interstitial in the material, conferring ultra-high Q-factors at medium values of accelerating field. This effect has been observed in both high and low temperature nitrogen treatments. As a matter of fact, the peculiar anti Q-slope observed in nitrogen doped cavities, i.e. the decreasing of the Q-factor with the increasing of the radio-frequency field, come from the decreasing of the BCS surface resistance component as a function of the field. Such peculiar behavior has been considered consequence of the interstitial nitrogen present in the niobium lattice after the doping treatment. The study here presented show the field dependence of the BCS surface resistance of cavities with different resonant frequencies, such as: 650 MHz, 1.3 GHz, 2.6 GHz and 3.9 GHz, and processed with different state-of-the-art surface treatments. These findings show for the first time that the anti Q-slope might be seen at high frequency even for clean Niobium cavities, revealing useful suggestion on the physics underneath the anti Q-slope effect.

  3. A multiplex PCR for detection of knockdown resistance mutations, V1016G and F1534C, in pyrethroid-resistant Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saingamsook, Jassada; Saeung, Atiporn; Yanola, Jintana; Lumjuan, Nongkran; Walton, Catherine; Somboon, Pradya

    2017-10-10

    Mutation of the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) gene, or knockdown resistance (kdr) gene, is an important resistance mechanism of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti mosquitoes against pyrethroids. In many countries in Asia, a valine to glycine substitution (V1016G) and a phenylalanine to cysteine substitution (F1534C) are common in Ae. aegypti populations. The G1016 and C1534 allele frequencies have been increasing in recent years, and hence there is a need to have a simple and inexpensive tool to monitor the alleles in large scale. A multiplex PCR to detect V1016G and F1534C mutations has been developed in the current study. This study utilized primers from previous studies for detecting the mutation at position 1016 and newly designed primers to detect variants at position 1534. The PCR conditions were validated and compared with DNA sequencing using known kdr mutant laboratory strains and field collected mosquitoes. The efficacy of this method was also compared with allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR). The results of our multiplex PCR were in complete agreement with sequencing data and better than the AS-PCR. In addition, the efficiency of two non-toxic DNA staining dyes, Ultrapower™ and RedSafe™, were evaluated by comparing with ethidium bromide (EtBr) and the results were satisfactory. Our multiplex PCR method is highly reliable and useful for implementing vector surveillance in locations where the two alleles co-occur.

  4. Frequency, Antimicrobial Resistance and Genetic Diversity of Klebsiella pneumoniae in Food Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Guo

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the frequency of Klebsiella pneumoniae in food samples and to detect antibiotic resistance phenotypes, antimicrobial resistance genes and the molecular subtypes of the recovered isolates. A total of 998 food samples were collected, and 99 (9.9% K. pneumoniae strains were isolated; the frequencies were 8.2% (4/49 in fresh raw seafood, 13.8% (26/188 in fresh raw chicken, 11.4% (34/297 in frozen raw food and 7.5% (35/464 in cooked food samples. Antimicrobial resistance was observed against 16 antimicrobials. The highest resistance rate was observed for ampicillin (92.3%, followed by tetracycline (31.3%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (18.2%, and chloramphenicol (10.1%. Two K. pneumoniae strains were identified as extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-one strain had three beta-lactamases genes (blaSHV, blaCTX-M-1, and blaCTX-M-10 and one had only the blaSHV gene. Nineteen multidrug-resistant (MDR strains were detected; the percentage of MDR strains in fresh raw chicken samples was significantly higher than in other sample types (P<0.05. Six of the 18 trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant strains carried the folate pathway inhibitor gene (dhfr. Four isolates were screened by PCR for quinolone resistance genes; aac(6'-Ib-cr, qnrB, qnrA and qnrS were detected. In addition, gyrA gene mutations such as T247A (Ser83Ile, C248T (Ser83Phe, and A260C (Asp87Ala and a parC C240T (Ser80Ile mutation were identified. Five isolates were screened for aminoglycosides resistance genes; aacA4, aacC2, and aadA1 were detected. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis-based subtyping identified 91 different patterns. Our results indicate that food, especially fresh raw chicken, is a reservoir of antimicrobial-resistant K. pneumoniae, and the potential health risks posed by such strains should not be underestimated. Our results demonstrated high prevalence, antibiotic resistance rate and genetic diversity of K. pneumoniae in food in China. Improved

  5. Effect of insecticidal fusion proteins containing spider toxins targeting sodium and calcium ion channels on pyrethroid-resistant strains of peach-potato aphid (Myzus persicae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng; Fitches, Elaine; Pyati, Prashant; Gatehouse, John A

    2015-07-01

    The recombinant fusion proteins Pl1a/GNA and Hv1a/GNA contain the spider venom peptides δ-amaurobitoxin-PI1a or ω-hexatoxin-Hv1a respectively, linked to snowdrop lectin (GNA). Pl1a targets receptor site 4 of insect voltage-gated sodium channels (NaCh), while Hv1a targets voltage-gated calcium channels. Insecticide-resistant strains of peach-potato aphid (Myzus persicae) contain mutations in NaCh. The pyrethroid-resistant kdr (794J) and super-kdr (UKO) strains contain mutations at residues L1014 and M918 in the channel α-subunit respectively, while the kdr + super-kdr strain (4824J), insensitive to pyrethroids, contains mutations at both L1014 and M918. Pl1a/GNA and Hv1a/GNA fusion proteins have estimated LC50 values of 0.35 and 0.19 mg mL(-1) when fed to wild-type M. persicae. For insecticide-resistant aphids, LC50 for the Pl1a/GNA fusion protein increased by 2-6-fold, correlating with pyrethroid resistance (wild type < kdr < super-kdr < kdr + super-kdr strains). In contrast, LC50 for the Hv1a/GNA fusion protein showed limited correlation with pyrethroid resistance. Mutations in the sodium channel in pyrethroid-resistant aphids also protect against a fusion protein containing a sodium-channel-specific toxin, in spite of differences in ligand-channel interactions, but do not confer resistance to a fusion protein targeting calcium channels. The use of fusion proteins with differing targets could play a role in managing pesticide resistance. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Frequency and Antibiogram of Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babar, N.; Usman, J.; Munir, T.; Gill, M. M.; Anjum, R.; Gilani, M.; Latif, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus (VRE) in a tertiary care hospital of Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Study Design: Observational, cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from May 2011 to May 2012. Methodology: Vancomycin resistant Enterococcus isolated from the clinical specimens including blood, pus, double lumen tip, ascitic fluid, tracheal aspirate, non-directed bronchial lavage (NBL), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), high vaginal swab (HVS) and catheter tips were cultured on blood agar and MacConkey agar, while the urine samples were grown on cystine lactose electrolyte deficient agar. Later the antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the isolates was carried out using the modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method on Mueller Hinton agar. Results: A total of 190 enterococci were isolated. Of these, 22 (11.57%) were found to be resistant to vancomycin. The antimicrobial sensitivity pattern revealed maximum resistance against ampicillin (86.36%) followed by erythromycin (81.81%) and gentamicin (68.18%) while all the isolates were 100% susceptible to chloramphenicol and linezolid. Conclusion: The frequency of VRE was 11.57% with the highest susceptibility to linezolid and chloramphenicol. (author)

  7. Effects of Cetuximab Combined with Celecoxib on Apoptosis and KDR and AQP1 
Expression in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honggang XIA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is a new development in the treatment of lung cancer. In recent years, cetuximab and celecoxib have been commonly used in this procedure. This study aims to explore the effect of cetuximab combined with celecoxib on apoptosis and KDR and AQP1 expression in lung cancer A549 cells. Method The cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 and then divided into four groups: control group, 1 nmol/L cetuximab group, 25 µmol/L celecoxib group, and 1 nmol/L cetuximab+25 µmol/L celecoxib group. The treatment time was 48 h. The mRNA and protein expression levels of KDR and AQP1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. The apoptosis, proliferation, and invasive ability of A549 cells before and after transfection were examined using flow cytometry, MTT, and transwell methods. Results Cetuximab and celecoxib inhibited the growth of A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Their combination produced a greater growth inhibition than when either was used alone (P<0.01. Cetuximab and celecoxib both induced the apoptosis of A549 cells, and their combination produced a higher apoptosis rate (P<0.01. Cetuximab in combination with celecoxib also induced G1 phase arrest and downregulated the expression of KDR and AQP1 in A549 cells (P<0.05. As a result, the invasion ability of the A549 cells was significantly decreased. Conclusion Cetuximab in combination with celecoxib can synergistically inhibit the growth of A549 cells and downregulate the expression of KDR and AQP1 in A549 cells. The combination of cetuximab and celecoxib is a potential strategy for lung cancer therapy.

  8. Frequency-domain analysis of intrinsic neuronal properties using high-resistant electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rössert

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic cellular properties of neurons in culture or slices are usually studied by the whole cell clamp method using low-resistant patch pipettes. These electrodes allow detailed analyses with standard electrophysiological methods such as current- or voltage-clamp. However, in these preparations large parts of the network and dendritic structures may be removed, thus preventing an adequate study of synaptic signal processing. Therefore, intact in vivo preparations or isolated in vitro whole brains have been used in which intracellular recordings are usually made with sharp, high-resistant electrodes to optimize the impalement of neurons. The general non-linear resistance properties of these electrodes, however, severely limit accurate quantitative studies of membrane dynamics especially needed for precise modelling. Therefore, we have developed a frequency-domain analysis of membrane properties that uses a Piece-wise Non-linear Electrode Compensation (PNEC method. The technique was tested in second-order vestibular neurons and abducens motoneurons of isolated frog whole brain preparations using sharp potassium chloride- or potassium acetate-filled electrodes. All recordings were performed without online electrode compensation. The properties of each electrode were determined separately after the neuronal recordings and were used in the frequency-domain analysis of the combined measurement of electrode and cell. This allowed detailed analysis of membrane properties in the frequency-domain with high-resistant electrodes and provided quantitative data that can be further used to model channel kinetics. Thus, sharp electrodes can be used for the characterization of intrinsic properties and synaptic inputs of neurons in intact brains.

  9. Training Volume, Not Frequency, Indicative of Maximal Strength Adaptations to Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquhoun, Ryan J; Gai, Christopher M; Aguilar, Danielle; Bove, Daniel; Dolan, Jeffrey; Vargas, Andres; Couvillion, Kaylee; Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Campbell, Bill I

    2018-01-05

    To compare the effects of a high- versus a moderate-training frequency on maximal strength and body composition. 28 young, healthy resistance-trained males were randomly assigned to either: 3x/week (3x; n=16) or 6x/week (6x; n=12). Dependent variables (DVs) assessed at baseline and after the 6-week training intervention included: squat 1RM (SQ1RM), bench press 1RM (BP1RM), deadlift 1RM (DL1RM), powerlifting total (PLT), Wilk's coefficient (WC), fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM). Data for each DV was analyzed via a 2x2 between-within factorial repeated measures ANOVA. There was a main effect for time (p < 0.001) for SQ1RM (3x: + 16.8 kg; 6x: + 16.7 kg), BP1RM (3x: + 7.8 kg; 6x: + 8.8 kg), DL1RM (3x: + 19 kg; 6x: + 21 kg), PLT (3x: + 43.6 kg; 6x: + 46.5 kg), WC (3x: + 27; 6x: + 27.1), and FFM (3x: + 1.7 kg; 6x: + 2.6 kg). There were no group x time interactions or main effects for group. The primary finding was that 6-weeks of resistance training lead to significant increases in maximal strength and fat-free mass. Additionally, it appears that increased training frequency does not lead to additional strength improvements when volume and intensity are equated. Practical Application: High frequency (6x/wk) resistance training does not appear to offer additional strength and hypertrophy benefits over lower frequency (3x/wk), when volume and intensity are equated. Coaches and practitioners can therefore expect similar increases in strength and lean body mass with both 3- and 6-weekly sessions.

  10. Low warfarin resistance frequency in Norway rats in two cities in China after 30 years usage of anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Ning; Liu, Lan; Tian, Lin; Luo, Chan; Cong, Lin; Feng, Zhiyong; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Song, Ying

    2018-04-17

    Anticoagulant rodenticides have been widely used in rodent control in China for over 30 years and resistant Norway rats have been reported. Mutations in the vitamin K epoxide reductase complex, subunit 1 (Vkorc1) gene can cause anticoagulant resistance in rodents. In this study, we analyzed the Vkorc1 polymorphisms of 681 Norway rats collected in Zhanjiang and Harbin City in China from 2008 to 2015 and evaluated the warfarin resistance frequency. Analysis revealed 4 mutations including 3 not previously reported. Two new synonymous mutations His68His and Leu105Leu are not associated with warfarin resistance. One new nonsynonymous mutation Ala140Thr was found in Zhanjiang rat samples collected in 3 years with low frequencies (3.3%-4.0%) and is likely associated with warfarin resistance. Laboratory resistance tests suggested low warfarin resistance frequencies in rats from Zhanjiang (4.9%-17.1%) and Harbin City (0-2.5%). Both genetic analysis and laboratory resistance tests suggested low warfarin resistance frequencies in rats from Zhanjiang and Harbin City. The alternative usage of FGARs and SGARs might represent an effective strategy against the development of warfarin resistance in Norway rats in China. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. An evolutionary model to predict the frequency of antibiotic resistance under seasonal antibiotic use, and an application to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquart, François; Lehtinen, Sonja; Fraser, Christophe

    2017-05-31

    The frequency of resistance to antibiotics in Streptococcus pneumoniae has been stable over recent decades. For example, penicillin non-susceptibility in Europe has fluctuated between 12% and 16% without any major time trend. In spite of long-term stability, resistance fluctuates over short time scales, presumably in part due to seasonal fluctuations in antibiotic prescriptions. Here, we develop a model that describes the evolution of antibiotic resistance under selection by multiple antibiotics prescribed at seasonally changing rates. This model was inspired by, and fitted to, published data on monthly antibiotics prescriptions and frequency of resistance in two communities in Israel over 5 years. Seasonal fluctuations in antibiotic usage translate into small fluctuations of the frequency of resistance around the average value. We describe these dynamics using a perturbation approach that encapsulates all ecological and evolutionary forces into a generic model, whose parameters quantify a force stabilizing the frequency of resistance around the equilibrium and the sensitivity of the population to antibiotic selection. Fitting the model to the data revealed a strong stabilizing force, typically two to five times stronger than direct selection due to antibiotics. The strong stabilizing force explains that resistance fluctuates in phase with usage, as antibiotic selection alone would result in resistance fluctuating behind usage with a lag of three months when antibiotic use is seasonal. While most antibiotics selected for increased resistance, intriguingly, cephalosporins selected for decreased resistance to penicillins and macrolides, an effect consistent in the two communities. One extra monthly prescription of cephalosporins per 1000 children decreased the frequency of penicillin-resistant strains by 1.7%. This model emerges under minimal assumptions, quantifies the forces acting on resistance and explains up to 43% of the temporal variation in resistance.

  12. Feeding frequency affects stress, innate immunity and disease resistance of juvenile blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Fei; Tian, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Ding-Dong; Jiang, Guang-Zhen; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of feeding frequency on stress, innate immunity and disease resistance of juvenile blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala (average weight: 9.92 ± 0.06 g). Fish were randomly assigned to one of six feeding frequencies (1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 times/day) following the same ration size for 8 weeks. After the feeding trial, fish were challenged by Aeromonas hydrophila and cumulative mortality was recorded for the next 10 days. Daily gain index of fish fed 3-5 times/day was significantly higher than that of the other groups. High feeding frequencies induced significantly elevated plasma levels of both cortisol and lactate. Fish fed 3-4 times/day exhibited relatively low liver catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities as well as malondialdehyde contents, but obtained significantly higher reduced glutathione levels and post-challenged haemato-immunological parameters (include blood leukocyte and erythrocyte counts as well as plasma lysozyme, alternative complement, acid phosphatase and myeloperoxidase activities) compared with that of the other groups. After challenge, the lowest mortality was observed in fish fed 4 times/day. It was significantly lower than that of fish fed 1-3 times/day, but exhibited no statistical difference with that of the other groups. In conclusion, both low and high feeding frequencies could cause oxidative stress of juvenile M. amblycephala, as might consequently lead to the depressed immunity and reduced resistance to A. hydrophila infection. The optimal feeding frequency to enhance growth and boost immunity of this species at juvenile stage is 4 times/day. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF CERAMIC TILE FROST RESISTANCE BY MEANS OF THE FREQUENCY INSPECTION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICHAL MATYSÍK

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some results of our experimental analysis of ceramic cladding element frost resistance, particular attention being paid to the application of the frequency inspection method. Three different sets of ceramic tiles of the Ia class to EN 14 411 B standard made by various manufacturers have been analyzed. The ceramic tiles under investigation have been subjected to freeze-thaw-cycle-based degradation in compliance with the relevant ČSN EN ISO 10545-12 standard. Furthermore, accelerated degradation procedure has been applied to selected test specimens, consisting in reducing the temperature of water soaked ceramic tiles in the course of the degradation cycles down –70°C. To verify the correctness of the frequency inspection results, additional physical properties of the ceramic tiles under test have been measured, such as, the ceramic tile strength limit, modulus of elasticity and modulus of deformability, resulting from the flexural tensile strength tests, integrity defect and surface micro-geometry tracking. It has been proved that the acoustic method of frequency inspection is a sensitive indicator of the structure condition and can be applied to the ceramic cladding element frost resistance and service life prediction assessment.

  14. An MRI-Compatible High Frequency AC Resistive Heating System for Homeothermic Maintenance in Small Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Stuart; Gomes, Ana L; Kinchesh, Paul; Kersemans, Veerle; Allen, Philip D; Smart, Sean C

    2016-01-01

    To develop an MRI-compatible resistive heater, using high frequency alternating current (AC), for temperature maintenance of anaesthetised animals. An MRI-compatible resistive electrical heater was formed from narrow gauge wire connected to a high frequency (10-100 kHz) AC power source. Multiple gradient echo images covering a range of echo times, and pulse-acquire spectra were acquired with the wire heater powered using high frequency AC or DC power sources and without any current flowing in order to assess the sensitivity of the MRI acquisitions to the presence of current flow through the heater wire. The efficacy of temperature maintenance using the AC heater was assessed by measuring rectal temperature immediately following induction of general anaesthesia for a period of 30 minutes in three different mice. Images and spectra acquired in the presence and absence of 50-100 kHz AC through the wire heater were indistinguishable, whereas DC power created field shifts and lineshape distortions. Temperature lost during induction of anaesthesia was recovered within approximately 20 minutes and a stable temperature was reached as the mouse's temperature approached the set target. The AC-powered wire heater maintains adequate heat input to the animal to maintain body temperature, and does not compromise image quality.

  15. An MRI-Compatible High Frequency AC Resistive Heating System for Homeothermic Maintenance in Small Animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Gilchrist

    Full Text Available To develop an MRI-compatible resistive heater, using high frequency alternating current (AC, for temperature maintenance of anaesthetised animals.An MRI-compatible resistive electrical heater was formed from narrow gauge wire connected to a high frequency (10-100 kHz AC power source. Multiple gradient echo images covering a range of echo times, and pulse-acquire spectra were acquired with the wire heater powered using high frequency AC or DC power sources and without any current flowing in order to assess the sensitivity of the MRI acquisitions to the presence of current flow through the heater wire. The efficacy of temperature maintenance using the AC heater was assessed by measuring rectal temperature immediately following induction of general anaesthesia for a period of 30 minutes in three different mice.Images and spectra acquired in the presence and absence of 50-100 kHz AC through the wire heater were indistinguishable, whereas DC power created field shifts and lineshape distortions. Temperature lost during induction of anaesthesia was recovered within approximately 20 minutes and a stable temperature was reached as the mouse's temperature approached the set target.The AC-powered wire heater maintains adequate heat input to the animal to maintain body temperature, and does not compromise image quality.

  16. RNA-seq analyses of changes in the Anopheles gambiae transcriptome associated with resistance to pyrethroids in Kenya: identification of candidate-resistance genes and candidate-resistance SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Ochomo, Eric; Dunn, William Augustine; Britton, Monica; Afrane, Yaw; Zhou, Guofa; Hartsel, Joshua; Lee, Ming-Chieh; Xu, Jiabao; Githeko, Andrew; Fass, Joseph; Yan, Guiyun

    2015-09-17

    The extensive use of pyrethroids for control of malaria vectors, driven by their cost, efficacy and safety, has led to widespread resistance. To favor their sustainable use, the World Health Organization (WHO) formulated an insecticide resistance management plan, which includes the identification of the mechanisms of resistance and resistance surveillance. Recognized physiological mechanisms of resistance include target site mutations in the para voltage-gated sodium channel, metabolic detoxification and penetration resistance. Such understanding of resistance mechanisms has allowed the development of resistance monitoring tools, including genotyping of the kdr mutation L1014F/S in the para gene. The sequence-based technique RNA-seq was applied to study changes in the transcriptome of deltamethrin-resistant and -susceptible Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes from the Western Province of Kenya. The resulting gene expression profiles were compared to data in the most recent literature to derive a list of candidate resistance genes. RNA-seq data were analyzed also to identify sequence polymorphisms linked to resistance. A total of five candidate-resistance genes (AGAP04177, AGAP004572, AGAP008840, AGAP007530 and AGAP013036) were identified with altered expression between resistant and susceptible mosquitoes from West and East Africa. A change from G to C at position 36043997 of chromosome 3R resulting in A101G of the sulfotransferase gene AGAP009551 was significantly associated with the resistance phenotype (odds ratio: 5.10). The kdr L1014S mutation was detected at similar frequencies in both phenotypically resistant and susceptible mosquitoes, suggesting it is no longer fully predictive of the resistant phenotype. Overall, these results support the conclusion that resistance to pyrethroids is a complex and evolving phenotype, dependent on multiple gene functions including, but not limited to, metabolic detoxification. Functional convergence among metabolic detoxification

  17. Host population structure and treatment frequency maintain balancing selection on drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskerville, Edward B.; Colijn, Caroline; Hanage, William; Fraser, Christophe; Lipsitch, Marc

    2017-01-01

    It is a truism that antimicrobial drugs select for resistance, but explaining pathogen- and population-specific variation in patterns of resistance remains an open problem. Like other common commensals, Streptococcus pneumoniae has demonstrated persistent coexistence of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains. Theoretically, this outcome is unlikely. We modelled the dynamics of competing strains of S. pneumoniae to investigate the impact of transmission dynamics and treatment-induced selective pressures on the probability of stable coexistence. We find that the outcome of competition is extremely sensitive to structure in the host population, although coexistence can arise from age-assortative transmission models with age-varying rates of antibiotic use. Moreover, we find that the selective pressure from antibiotics arises not so much from the rate of antibiotic use per se but from the frequency of treatment: frequent antibiotic therapy disproportionately impacts the fitness of sensitive strains. This same phenomenon explains why serotypes with longer durations of carriage tend to be more resistant. These dynamics may apply to other potentially pathogenic, microbial commensals and highlight how population structure, which is often omitted from models, can have a large impact. PMID:28835542

  18. Frequency of Cutaneous Fungal Infections and Azole Resistance of the Isolates in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Raiesi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic patients are more susceptible to cutaneous fungal infections. The higher blood sugar levels cause increasing the cutaneous fungal infections in these patients. The main objective of this study was to find the frequency of fungal infections among cutaneous lesions of diabetic patients and to investigate azole antifungal agent susceptibility of the isolates. Materials and Methods: In this study, type 1diabetes (n = 78 and type 2 diabetes (n = 44 comprised 47 cases (38.5% with diabetic foot ulcers and 75 cases (61.5% with skin and nail lesions were studied. Fungal infection was confirmed by direct examination and culture methods. Antifungal susceptibility testing by broth microdilution method was performed according to the CLSI M27-A and M38-A references. Results: Out of 122 diabetic patients, thirty (24.5% were affected with fungal infections. Frequency of fungal infection was 19.1% in patients with diabetic foot ulcer and 28% of patients with skin and nail lesions. Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus were the most common species isolated from thirty patients with fungal infection, respectively. Susceptibility testing carried out on 18 representative isolates (13 C. albicans, five C. glabrata revealed that 12 isolates (10 C. albicans and two C. glabrata isolates (66.6% were resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥64 mg/ml to fluconazole (FCZ. Likewise, eight isolates (80% of Aspergillus spp. were resistant (MIC ≥4 mg/ml, to itraconazole. Conclusion: Our finding expands current knowledge about the frequency of fungal infections in diabetic patients. We noted the high prevalence of FCZ-resistant Candida spp., particularly in diabetic foot ulcers. More attention is important in diabetic centers about this neglected issue.

  19. Fitness evaluation of two Brazilian Aedes aegypti field populations with distinct levels of resistance to the organophosphate temephos

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    Thiago Affonso Belinato

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, decades of dengue vector control using organophosphates and pyrethroids have led to dissemination of resistance. Although these insecticides have been employed for decades against Aedes aegypti in the country, knowledge of the impact of temephos resistance on vector viability is limited. We evaluated several fitness parameters in two Brazilian Ae. aegypti populations, both classified as deltamethrin resistant but with distinct resistant ratios (RR for temephos. The insecticide-susceptible Rockefeller strain was used as an experimental control. The population presenting the higher temephos resistance level, Aparecida de Goiânia, state of Goiás (RR95 of 19.2, exhibited deficiency in the following four parameters: blood meal acceptance, amount of ingested blood, number of eggs and frequency of inseminated females. Mosquitoes from Boa Vista, state of Roraima, the population with lower temephos resistance level (RR95 of 7.4, presented impairment in only two parameters, blood meal acceptance and frequency of inseminated females. These results indicate that the overall fitness handicap was proportional to temephos resistance levels. However, it is unlikely that these disabilities can be attributed solely to temephos resistance, since both populations are also resistant to deltamethrin and harbour the kdr allele, which indicates resistance to pyrethroids. The effects of reduced fitness in resistant populations are discussed.

  20. The frequency of resistance to antibiotics of most frequently isolated bacteria from blood cultures during the period 1997-2002

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    Mirović Veljko

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of resistance to antibiotics of the most frequently isolated bacteria from blood cultures of hospitalized patients during the period 1997-2002. The resistance to antibiotics was determined by disk diffusion method according to National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards procedures. The majority of staphylococci isolates were resistant to methicillin, and the proportion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was stable (76.8-81.6%, during the follow-up period. None of the staphylococci isolates were resistant to vancomycin, but there was a very high incidence of high-level resistance of enterococci to aminoglycosides (47.2-72.2%. In 1998, only one strain among enterococci was resistant to vancomycin (Enterococcus faecium, VanA fenotype. Enterococcus spp isolates expressed variable frequency of resistance to ampicillin (15-40.1% during the follow-up period. Among Enterobacteriaceae there were no isolates resistant to imipenem, but dramatic increase of the resistance to ceftriaxone was found from 35.9% in 1997 to 95.9% in 2002 (p<0.001. Extended spectrum beta-lactamases production was found in all the species of enterobacteria isolates. Resistance to imipenem was observed in Acinetobacter spp isolates in 2002 for the first time. Pseudomonas spp isolates expressed high and very variable resistance to all antibiotics tested during the follow-up period.

  1. Relations between acoustic cavitation and skin resistance during intermediate- and high-frequency sonophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Kyle T; Hoerig, Cameron L; Rao, Marepalli B; Mast, T Douglas

    2014-11-28

    Enhanced skin permeability is known to be achieved during sonophoresis due to ultrasound-induced cavitation. However, the mechanistic role of cavitation during sonophoresis has been extensively investigated only for low-frequency (LFS, sonophoresis (HFS, >1 MHz). The electrical resistance of skin, a surrogate measure of the permeability of skin to a variety of compounds, was measured to quantify the reduction and subsequent recovery of the skin barrier during and after exposure to pulsed (1 second pulse, 20% duty cycle) 0.41 and 2.0 MHz ultrasound over a range of acoustic powers (0-21.7 W) for 30 min. During IFS, significant skin resistance reductions and acoustic emissions from cavitation were measured exclusively when cavitation was isolated outside of the skin. Time-dependent skin resistance reductions measured during IFS correlated significantly with subharmonic and broadband emission levels. During HFS, significant skin resistance reductions were accompanied by significant acoustic emissions from cavitation measured during trials that isolated cavitation activity either outside of skin or within skin. Time-dependent skin resistance reductions measured during HFS correlated significantly greater with subharmonic than with broadband emission levels. The reduction of the skin barrier due to sonophoresis was reversible in all trials; however, effects incurred during IFS recovered more slowly and persisted over a longer period of time than HFS. These results quantitatively demonstrate the significance of cavitation during sonophoresis and suggest that the mechanisms and post-treatment longevity of permeability enhancement due to IFS and HFS treatments are different. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Analytical and numerical calculations of resistive wall impedances for thin beam pipe structures at low frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedermayer, U., E-mail: u.niedermayer@gsi.de [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Schlossgartenstrasse 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Boine-Frankenheim, O. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Schlossgartenstrasse 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-09-21

    The resistive wall impedance is one of the main sources for beam instabilities in synchrotrons and storage rings. The fast ramped SIS18 synchrotron at GSI and the projected SIS100 synchrotron for FAIR both employ thin (0.3 mm) stainless steel beam pipes in order to reduce eddy current effects. The lowest betatron sidebands are at about 100 kHz, which demands accurate impedance predictions in the low frequency (LF) range where the beam pipe and possibly also the structures behind the pipe are the dominating impedance sources. The longitudinal and transverse resistive wall impedances of a circular multi-layer pipe are calculated analytically using the field matching technique. We compare the impedances obtained from a radial wave model, which corresponds to the setup used in bench measurements, with the axial wave model, which corresponds to an actual beam moving with relativistic velocity. For thin beam pipes the induced wall current and the corresponding shielding properties of the pipe are important. In both models the wall current is obtained analytically. The characteristic frequencies for the onset of the wall current are calculated from equivalent lumped element circuits corresponding to the radial model. For more complex structures, like the SIS100 beam pipe, we use a numerical method, in which the impedance is obtained from the total power loss. The method is validated by the analytic expressions for circular beam pipes.

  3. Frequency of serovars and antimicrobial resistance in Shigella spp. from Brazil

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    Gisele Peirano

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available A total of 296 Shigella spp. were received from State Public Health Laboratories, during the period from 1999 to 2004, by National Reference Laboratory for Cholera and Enteric Diseases (NRLCED - IOC/Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The frequency of Shigella spp. was: S. flexneri (52.7%, S. sonnei (44.2%, S. boydii (2.3%, and S. dysenteriae (0.6%. The most frequent S. flexneri serovars were 2a and 1b. The highest incidence rates of Shigella isolation were observed in the Southeast (39% and Northeast (34% regions and the lowest rate in the South (3% of Brazil. Strains were further analyzed for antimicrobial susceptibility by disk diffusion method as part of a surveillance program on antimicrobial resistance. The highest rates of antimicrobial resistance were to trimethoprim-sulfamethozaxole (90%, tetracycline (88%, ampicillin (56%, and chloramphenicol (35%. The patterns of antimicrobial resistance among Shigella isolates pose a major difficulty in the determination of an appropriate drug for shigellosis treatment. Continuous monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibilities of Shigella spp. through a surveillance system is thus essential for effective therapy and control measures against shigellosis.

  4. Three-Dimensional Resistive Metamaterial Absorber Loaded with Metallic Resonators for the Enhancement of Lower-Frequency Absorption

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    Yang Shen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistive patch array incorporating with metallic backplane provided an effective way to achieve broadband metamaterial absorbers (MAs in microwave frequency, and the outstanding construction contributed more flexible and diversified broadband absorption. In this paper, we attempted to load metallic resonators (MRs to three-dimensional resistive MA to further enhance the lower-frequency absorption performance. Simulation showed that the partial absorption peak was separated to the lower frequency, while the rest of broadband absorption was unaffected. Meanwhile, after combining multi-unit of the proposed MAs, the stair-stepping broadband absorption was also achieved. Finally, three samples were fabricated. The agreements between simulations and experimental results demonstrated that resistive MA loaded with MRs provided an effective way for further enhancement of lower-frequency absorption with almost no change of the absorbing structure and lightweight characteristic. Thus, it was worthy to expect a wide range of applications to emerge inspired from the proposed attempt.

  5. Additional selection for insecticide resistance in urban malaria vectors: DDT resistance in Anopheles arabiensis from Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.

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    Christopher M Jones

    Full Text Available In the city of Bobo-Dioulasso in Burkina Faso, Anopheles arabiensis has superseded Anopheles gambiae s.s. as the major malaria vector and the larvae are found in highly polluted habitats normally considered unsuitable for Anopheles mosquitoes. Here we show that An. gambiae s.l. adults emerging from a highly polluted site in the city centre (Dioulassoba have a high prevalence of DDT resistance (percentage mortality after exposure to diagnostic dose=65.8% in the dry season and 70.4% in the rainy season, respectively. An investigation into the mechanisms responsible found an unexpectedly high frequency of the 1014S kdr mutation (allele frequency=0.4, which is found at very low frequencies in An. arabiensis in the surrounding rural areas, and an increase in transcript levels of several detoxification genes, notably from the glutathione transferase and cytochrome P450 gene families. A number of ABC transporter genes were also expressed at elevated levels in the DDT resistant An. arabiensis. Unplanned urbanisation provides numerous breeding grounds for mosquitoes. The finding that Anopheles mosquitoes adapted to these urban breeding sites have a high prevalence of insecticide resistance has important implications for our understanding of the selective forces responsible for the rapid spread of insecticide resistant populations of malaria vectors in Africa.

  6. Alarmingly High Segregation Frequencies of Quinolone Resistance Alleles within Human and Animal Microbiomes Are Not Explained by Direct Clinical Antibiotic Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Wesley; Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance poses a major threat to human health. It is therefore important to characterize the frequency of resistance within natural bacterial environments. Many studies have focused on characterizing the frequencies with which horizontally acquired resistance genes segregate within natural bacterial populations. Yet, very little is currently understood regarding the frequency of segregation of resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics. We surveyed a large number of metagenomic datasets extracted from a large variety of host-associated and non host-associated environments for such alleles conferring resistance to three groups of broad spectrum antibiotics: streptomycin, rifamycins, and quinolones. We find notable segregation frequencies of resistance alleles occurring within the target genes of each of the three antibiotics, with quinolone resistance alleles being the most frequent and rifamycin resistance alleles being the least frequent. Resistance allele frequencies varied greatly between different phyla and as a function of environment. The frequency of quinolone resistance alleles was especially high within host-associated environments, where it averaged an alarming ∼40%. Within host-associated environments, resistance to quinolones was most often conferred by a specific resistance allele. High frequencies of quinolone resistance alleles were also found within hosts that were not directly treated with antibiotics. Therefore, the high segregation frequency of quinolone resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics in host-associated environments does not seem to be the sole result of clinical antibiotic usage. PMID:26019163

  7. An ultrathin wide-band planar metamaterial absorber based on a fractal frequency selective surface and resistive film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Yue-Nong; Cheng Yong-Zhi; Nie Yan; Wang Xian; Gong Rong-Zhou

    2013-01-01

    We propose an ultrathin wide-band metamaterial absorber (MA) based on a Minkowski (MIK) fractal frequency selective surface and resistive film. This absorber consists of a periodic arrangement of dielectric substrates sandwiched with an MIK fractal loop structure electric resonator and a resistive film. The finite element method is used to simulate and analyze the absorption of the MA. Compared with the MA-backed copper film, the designed MA-backed resistive film exhibits an absorption of 90% at a frequency region of 2 GHz–20 GHz. The power loss density distribution of the MA is further illustrated to explain the mechanism of the proposed MA. Simulated absorptions at different incidence cases indicate that this absorber is polarization-insensitive and wide-angled. Finally, further simulated results indicate that the surface resistance of the resistive film and the dielectric constant of the substrate can affect the absorbing property of the MA. This absorber may be used in many military fields

  8. A YAC contig spanning a cluster of human type III receptor protein tyrosine kinase genes (PDGFRA-KIT-KDR) in chromosome segment 4q12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spritz, R.A.; Strunk, K.M.; Lee, S.T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-15

    The authors have mapped five genes encoding protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) to the pericentromeric region of human chromosome 4. PTK4 and TYRO4, which encode nonreceptor intracellular PTKs, are located at 4p12 and 4q13, respectively. The other three genes, PDGFRA, KIT, and KDR, encode type III transmembrane receptor PTKs for known ligands. The authors have developed a contig of 29 yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) spanning approximately 2 Mb of DNA at 4q12 that includes PDGFRA, KIT, and KDR, and have used this YAC contig to map 12 different sequence-tagged sites in this region. PDGFRA, KIT, and KDR thus constitute a cluster of genes at 4q12 encoding closely related type III receptor PTKs. Mutations of the human KIT gene result in piebaldism, an autosomal dominant disorder of melanocyte development. 42 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Resistivity and low-frequency noise characteristics of epoxy-carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    PralgauskaitÄ--, Sandra; Matukas, Jonas; Tretjak, Marina; Macutkevic, Jan; Banys, Juras; Selskis, Algirdas; Cataldo, Antonino; Micciulla, Federico; Bellucci, Stefano; Fierro, Vanessa; Celzard, Alain

    2017-03-01

    Noise and electrical transport properties of composites based on epoxy resin filled with various carbon inclusions (single-walled carbon nanotubes, high surface area carbon black, and exfoliated graphite) were investigated in depth. The temperature dependence of resistivity shows that Mott's hopping and tunneling between conductive carbon particles dominate the charge carrier transport at low temperature, whereas a positive temperature coefficient effect occurs at higher temperature. Low-frequency noise spectra of the investigated materials comprise 1/fα type components. The noise level is the highest for composites close to the percolation threshold. The percolation threshold value of the system also strongly impacts both the temperature dependence of the noise level and the resistivity. Close to the percolation threshold, the noise level increases due to the carrier tunneling throughout the polymer matrix and decreases due to the rapid expansion of the polymer matrix. In contrast, the latter has almost no influence on the noise level far above the percolation threshold, and the small kink in the temperature dependence of the noise level indicates a crossover between tunneling and thermally activated electron transport mechanisms.

  10. Frequency and Treatment of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Obstetric and Gynaecological Sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, I.J.; Khan, S.; Bhutta, S.; Butt, S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To perform culture and sensitivity for pathogens causing puerperal and postoperative wound sepsis and determine the frequency of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in such infections. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Obstetrics and Gynaecology Ward, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from December 2008 to May 2010. Methodology: All patients presenting with puerperal sepsis or postoperative wound infection were enrolled. Pus was collected for culture and sensitivity using standard technique. Two samples were taken from each patient; one before starting the treatment and one at the end of treatment. Ames transport medium was used. Empirical treatment with triple regimen (Ampicillin, Metronidazole and Gentamicin) was started immediately to cover Gram positive as well as negative bacteria in addition to anaerobic infection. After receiving the sensitivity report, antimicrobial agent were changed accordingly. Samples from ward and theater staff and environment were also taken to look for possible mode of transmission. Data was recorded on a proforma. Discrete variables are expressed as percentages. Results: Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent organism isolated in 34.6% cases. Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was seen in 20% cases and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was seen in 14.6%. Out of these 14.6% MRSA, (17) 77% was associated with puerperal sepsis and rest (5) 23% was associated with postoperative wound infection. It showed best sensitivity to vancomycin. Conclusion: Staphylococcus aureus and E. coli were common causative agent of postoperative infections and puerperal sepsis. (author)

  11. Anopheles gambiae distribution and insecticide resistance in the cities of Douala and Yaoundé (Cameroon): influence of urban agriculture and pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio-Nkondjio, Christophe; Fossog, Billy Tene; Ndo, Cyrille; Djantio, Benjamin Menze; Togouet, Serge Zebaze; Awono-Ambene, Parfait; Costantini, Carlo; Wondji, Charles S; Ranson, Hilary

    2011-06-08

    Urban malaria is becoming a major health priority across Africa. A study was undertaken to assess the importance of urban pollution and agriculture practice on the distribution and susceptibility to insecticide of malaria vectors in the two main cities in Cameroon. Anopheline larval breeding sites were surveyed and water samples analysed monthly from October 2009 to December 2010. Parameters analysed included turbidity, pH, temperature, conductivity, sulfates, phosphates, nitrates, nitrites, ammonia, aluminium, alkalinity, iron, potassium, manganese, magnesium, magnesium hardness and total hardness. Characteristics of water bodies in urban areas were compared to rural areas and between urban sites. The level of susceptibility of Anopheles gambiae to 4% DDT, 0.75% permethrin, 0.05% deltamethrin, 0.1% bendiocarb and 5% malathion were compared between mosquitoes collected from polluted, non polluted and cultivated areas. A total of 1,546 breeding sites, 690 in Yaoundé and 856 in Douala, were sampled in the course of the study. Almost all measured parameters had a concentration of 2- to 100-fold higher in urban compare to rural breeding sites. No resistance to malathion was detected, but bendiocarb resistance was present in Yaounde. Very low mortality rates were observed following DDT or permethrin exposure, associated with high kdr frequencies. Mosquitoes collected in cultivated areas, exhibited the highest resistant levels. There was little difference in insecticide resistance or kdr allele frequency in mosquitoes collected from polluted versus non-polluted sites. The data confirm high selection pressure on mosquitoes originating from urban areas and suggest urban agriculture rather than pollution as the major factor driving resistance to insecticide.

  12. Malaria Vectors Insecticides Resistance in Different Agroecosystems in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjala, Christine Ludwin; Kweka, Eliningaya J

    2018-01-01

    Malaria vector control efforts have taken malaria related cases down to appreciable number per annum after large scale of intervention tools. Insecticides-based tools remain the major control option for malaria vectors in Kenya and, therefore, the potential of such programs to be compromised by the reported insecticide resistance is of major concern. The objective of this study was to evaluate the status of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors in different agro ecosystems from western Kenya. The study was carried out in the lowlands and highlands of western Kenya namely; Ahero, Kisian, Chulaimbo, Emutete, Emakakha, Iguhu, and Kabula. World Health Organization tube bioassays was conducted using standard diagnostic dosages of Lambdacyhalothrin, Deltamethrin, Permethrin, DDT, Bendiocarb, and Malathion tested on Anopheles mosquitoes collected from seven sites; Ahero, Kisian, Chulaimbo, Emutete, Emakakha, Iguhu, and Kabula. Biochemical assays, where the enzymatic activity of three enzymes (monooxygenases, esterases, and glutathione S -transferases) were performed on susceptible and resistant mosquito populations. Wild mosquito populations were identified to species level using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The species of the wild mosquito populations were identified to species level using PCR. Real-time PCR was performed on the susceptible and resistant mosquitoes after the WHO tube bioassays to determine the presence of knockdown resistance ( kdr ) allele. WHO susceptibility tests indicated that Anopheles gambiae showed resistance to Pyrethroids and DDT in all the study sites, to Bendiocarb in Iguhu and Kabula and susceptible to Malathion (100% mortality) in all the study sites. There was an elevation of monooxygenases and esterases enzymatic activities in resistant An. gambiae mosquito populations exposed to Lambdacyhalothrin, Permethrin, Deltamethrin and DDT but no elevation in glutathione S -transferases. A high frequency of L1014S allele was detected in An

  13. Incidence, Spread and Mechanisms of Pyrethroid Resistance in European Populations of the Cabbage Stem Flea Beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorte H Højland

    Full Text Available Cabbage stem flea beetle (CSFB, Psylliodes chrysocephala L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae is a major early season pest of oilseed rape throughout Europe. Pyrethroids have been used for controlling this pest by foliar application, but in recent years control failures have occurred, particularly in Germany due to the evolution of knock-down resistance (kdr. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence and spread of pyrethroid resistance in CSFB collected in Germany, Denmark and the United Kingdom during 2014. The level of pyrethroid resistance was measured in adult vial tests and linked to the presence of kdr genotypes.Although kdr (L1014F genotypes are present in all three countries, marked differences in pyrethroid efficacy were found in adult vial tests. Whereas Danish CSFB samples were in general susceptible to recommended label rates, those collected in the UK mostly resist such rates to some extent. Moderately resistant and susceptible samples were found in Germany. Interestingly, some of the resistant samples from the UK did not carry the kdr allele, which is in contrast to German CSFB. Pre-treatment with PBO, prior to exposure to λ-cyhalothrin suggested involvement of metabolic resistance in UK samples.Danish samples were mostly susceptible with very low resistance ratios, while most other samples showed reduced sensitivity in varying degrees. Likewise, there was a clear difference in the presence of the kdr mutation between the three countries. In the UK, the presence of kdr genotypes did not always correlate well with resistant phenotypes. This appears to be primarily conferred by a yet undisclosed, metabolic-based mechanism. Nevertheless our survey disclosed an alarming trend concerning the incidence and spread of CSFB resistance to pyrethroids, which is likely to have negative impacts on oilseed production in affected regions due to the lack of alternative modes of action for resistance management purposes.

  14. Radio-frequency surface resistance of tunmgsten in weak magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojko, V.V.; Toniya, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    The surface impedance of single crystal tungsten specimens under anomalous skin effect in a magnetic field H is investigated experimentally. It is found that in magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 1 kOe the surface resistance R of tungsten varies in a nonmonotonous manner and experiences several extrema. The position of the latter with respect to magnetic field strength depends on the conduction electron mean free path l, on the roughness of the specimen surface and frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic wave. It is found that such behavior of R(H) is due to variation of the nature of the conduction electron scattering at the metal-external medium interface with increasing H. The geometrical dimensions of the surface roughnesses are determined at which diffuse scattering of the current occurs. The results are compared with the theoretical calculations, and a number of contradictions between the theory and experiments are noted. The effect of the magnetic field of the electromagnetic wave H ∼ on the conductivity of tungsten in the absence of H is studied

  15. Transition Frequencies and Negative Resistance of Inductively Terminated CMOS Buffer Cell and Application in MMW LC VCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Rezaul Hasan

    2010-01-01

    looking into the source of the buffer cell changes sign. Possible limiting frequencies of oscillation are determined based on resonators formed by a grounded gate inductor and a parasitic capacitance at the gate of the negative resistance buffer cell. The range of frequencies of oscillation of this negative resistance buffer cell for variations in the different circuit parameters/elements is explored. Following this, a millimeter wave (MMW oscillator is simulated using the IBM 130 nm CMOS process technology which can operate at 70 GHz. High-frequency MOSFET model was used for these simulations. The cell had an extremely low power dissipation of under 3 mW. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were carried out for manufacturability analysis considering up to 50% variation in process and geometrical parameters, supply voltage, and ambient temperature. Noise analysis and a simulated estimate of the phase noise in an MMW LC VCO application is also reported.

  16. Amino substituted nitrogen heterocycle ureas as kinase insert domain containing receptor (KDR inhibitors: Performance of structure–activity relationship approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayriye Yilmaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR study was performed on a set of amino-substituted nitrogen heterocyclic urea derivatives. Two novel approaches were applied: (1 the simplified molecular input-line entry systems (SMILES based optimal descriptors approach; and (2 the fragment-based simplex representation of molecular structure (SiRMS approach. Comparison with the classic scheme of building up the model and balance of correlation (BC for optimal descriptors approach shows that the BC scheme provides more robust predictions than the classic scheme for the considered pIC50 of the heterocyclic urea derivatives. Comparison of the SMILES-based optimal descriptors and SiRMS approaches has confirmed good performance of both techniques in prediction of kinase insert domain containing receptor (KDR inhibitory activity, expressed as a logarithm of inhibitory concentration (pIC50 of studied compounds.

  17. Characterization of pyrethroid resistance and susceptibility to coumaphos in Mexican Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R J; Davey, R B; George, J E

    1999-09-01

    Two patterns of pyrethroid resistance were characterized from Boophilus microplus (Canestrini) collected in Mexico. One was characteristic of a kdr mutation and the other involved esterase and cytochrome P450 enzyme systems. Very high resistance to permethrin, cypermethrin, and flumethrin, not synergized by TPP and PBO and high resistance to DDT, characterized the kdr-like pattern found in the Corrales and San Felipe strains. Esterase and cytochrome P450-dependent resistance was found in the Coatzacoalcos strain. It was characterized by resistance to permethrin, cypermethrin, and flumethrin, synergized by TPP and PBO, but no resistance to DDT. The Coatzacoalcos strain also showed 3.6-fold resistance to the organophosphate coumaphos. This factor appeared to be independent of pyrethroid resistance. Pyrethroid resistance patterns found in Mexico were similar to those found earlier in Australia. The significance of pyrethroid and coumaphos resistance to the U.S. cattle fever tick quarantine is discussed.

  18. Development of a Teacher Scale to Measure Presence and Frequency of Students' Resistance Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Mediha

    2018-01-01

    Student resistance, which can briefly be defined as the tendency to resist teaching activities, is student's reacting to the teaching-learning activities, teachers, or administrators knowingly and wilfully, many times intentionally in various ways. Resistance behaviours, which could be considered as the outpouring of the anger created by the…

  19. Frequency of resistance in obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from dogs, cats, and horses to antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawhon, S D; Taylor, A; Fajt, V R

    2013-11-01

    Clinical specimens from dogs, cats, and horses were examined for the presence of obligate anaerobic bacteria. Of 4,018 specimens cultured, 368 yielded 606 isolates of obligate anaerobic bacteria (248 from dogs, 50 from cats, and 308 from horses). There were 100 specimens from 94 animals from which only anaerobes were isolated (25 dogs, 8 cats, and 61 horses). The most common sites tested were abdominal fluid (dogs and cats) and intestinal contents (horses). The most common microorganism isolated from dogs, cats, and horses was Clostridium perfringens (75, 13, and101 isolates, respectively). The MICs of amoxicillin with clavulanate, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, metronidazole, and penicillin were determined using a gradient endpoint method for anaerobes. Isolates collected at necropsy were not tested for antimicrobial susceptibility unless so requested by the clinician. There were 1/145 isolates tested that were resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanate (resistance breakpoint ≥ 16/8 μg/ml), 7/77 isolates tested were resistant to ampicillin (resistance breakpoint ≥ 2 μg/ml), 4/242 isolates tested were resistant to chloramphenicol (resistance breakpoint ≥ 32 μg/ml), 12/158 isolates tested were resistant to clindamycin (resistance breakpoint ≥ 8 μg/ml), 10/247 isolates tested were resistant to metronidazole (resistance breakpoint ≥ 32 μg/ml), and 54/243 isolates tested were resistant to penicillin (resistance breakpoint ≥ 2 μg/ml). These data suggest that anaerobes are generally susceptible to antimicrobial drugs in vitro.

  20. High frequency of resistance, lack of clinical benefit, and poor outcomes in capreomycin treated South African patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elize Pietersen

    Full Text Available There are limited data about the epidemiology and treatment-related outcomes associated with capreomycin resistance in patients with XDR-TB. Capreomycin achieves high serum concentrations relative to MIC but whether capreomycin has therapeutic benefit despite microbiological resistance remains unclear.We reviewed the susceptibility profiles and outcomes associated with capreomycin usage in patients diagnosed with XDR-TB between August 2002 and October 2012 in two provinces of South Africa. Patients whose isolates were genotypically tested for capreomycin resistance were included in the analysis.Of 178 XDR-TB patients 41% were HIV-infected. 87% (154/178 isolates contained a capreomycin resistance-conferring mutation [80% (143/178 rrs A1401G and 6% (11/178 were heteroresistant (containing both the rrs A1401G mutation and wild-type sequences]. Previous MDR-TB treatment, prior usage of kanamycin, or strain type was not associated with capreomycin resistance. 92% (163/178 of XDR-TB patients were empirically treated with capreomycin. Capreomycin resistance decreased the odds of sputum culture conversion. In capreomycin sensitive and resistant persons combined weight at diagnosis was the only independent predictor for survival (p=<0.001. By contrast, HIV status and use of co-amoxicillin/clavulanic acid were independent predictors of mortality (p=<0.05. Capreomycin usage was not associated with survival or culture conversion when the analysis was restricted to those whose isolates were resistant to capreomycin.In South Africa the frequency of capreomycin conferring mutations was extremely high in XDR-TB isolates. In those with capreomycin resistance there appeared to be no therapeutic benefit of using capreomycin. These data inform susceptibility testing and the design of treatment regimens for XDR-TB in TB endemic settings.

  1. Mapping insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae (s.l.) from Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Soromane; Koffi, Alphonsine A; Ahoua Alou, Ludovic P; Koffi, Kouakou; Kabran, Jean-Paul K; Koné, Aboubacar; Koffi, Mathieu F; N'Guessan, Raphaël; Pennetier, Cédric

    2018-01-08

    Insecticide resistance in malaria vectors is an increasing threat to vector control tools currently deployed in endemic countries. Resistance management must be an integral part of National Malaria Control Programmes' (NMCPs) next strategic plans to alleviate the risk of control failure. This obviously will require a clear database on insecticide resistance to support the development of such a plan. The present work gathers original data on insecticide resistance between 2009 and 2015 across Côte d'Ivoire in West Africa. Two approaches were adopted to build or update the resistance data in the country. Resistance monitoring was conducted between 2013 and 2015 in 35 sentinel sites across the country using the WHO standard procedure of susceptibility test on adult mosquitoes. Four insecticide families (pyrethroids, organochlorides, carbamates and organophosphates) were tested. In addition to this survey, we also reviewed the literature to assemble existing data on resistance between 2009 and 2015. High resistance levels to pyrethroids, organochlorides and carbamates were widespread in all study sites whereas some Anopheles populations remained susceptible to organophosphates. Three resistance mechanisms were identified, involving high allelic frequencies of kdr L1014F mutation (range = 0.46-1), relatively low frequencies of ace-1 R (below 0.5) and elevated activity of insecticide detoxifying enzymes, mainly mixed function oxidases (MFO), esterase and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in almost all study sites. This detailed map of resistance highlights the urgent need to develop new vector control tools to complement current long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) although it is yet unclear whether these resistance mechanisms will impact malaria transmission control. Researchers, industry, WHO and stakeholders must urgently join forces to develop alternative tools. By then, NMCPs must strive to develop effective tactics or plans to manage resistance keeping in mind

  2. Frequency pressure transducer with a sensitivity of mem capacitor on the basis of transistor structure with negative resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchuk, Oleksandr V.; Osadchuk, Iaroslav O.; Suleimenov, Batyrbek; Zyska, Tomasz; Arman, Abenov; Tleshova, Akmaral; GrÄ dz, Å.»aklin

    2017-08-01

    In the article the pressure transducer with frequency output based on the structure of the bipolar-field transistors with negative resistance and tenso sensitive MEMS capacitor has been considered. A mathematical model of the frequency pressure transducer in dynamic regime has been developed that allowed to determine the voltage or current in the circuit at any given moment in time when acting this pressure. Analytical expressions of the conversion function and sensitivity equation has been received. The sensitivity of the developed device is between 0,95kHz/kPa to 1,65kHz/kPa.

  3. Frequency of powdery mildew resistances in winter barley cultivars tested in domestic variety trials

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    Antonín Dreiseitl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2006–2010, resistance to the powdery mildew pathogen was studied in 225 winter barley cultivars of which 86 two-rowed and 139 six-rowed. The examined set included 59 cultivars tested in the official variety trials and 166 cultivars in variety trials conducted by domestic breeding stations in that period. Thirteen known resistances were identified (Ar, Bw, Dr2, Ha, HH, IM9, La, Ly, Ra, Ru, Sp, St and We. No resistance was found in one cultivar only. The most frequent resistance was Ra detected in 114 cultivars (= 50.7%. The resistance Bw was found in 54 cultivars (24.0%. Resistances typical for spring barley cultivars (Ly, Sp, Ru and We were also frequent (4.0% to 23.6%. Unknown resistances were found in 20 cultivars, in nine of which they were effective to all used pathotypes of the pathogen. Thirty-six cultivars (16.0% exhibited heterogeneity in the examined trait, i.e. they were mostly composed of lines with different resistances. Research on cultivars possessing unknown resistances continues.

  4. Tick resistance and heat tolerance characteristics in cattle. II. Rectal temperature and respiratory frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília José Veríssimo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The heat and Rhipicephalus microplus tick infestation are limiting factors to the livestock production in the tropics. Therefore, in a tropical sustainable livestock, cattle should be tick resistant and heat tolerant. The relationship between the Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus tick infestation and heat characteristics like rectal temperature and respiratory frequency was studied in 6 Nellore and 4 Holstein, seven-month-old steers. They were submitted to an artificial infestation (a.i. with 10,000 larvae (Holstein and 20,000 larvae (Nellore of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus tick in 16/Apr/2011. Females ticks bigger than 4.0 mm were counted in the left side from day 19 to 27 after the artificial infestation. The infestation rate was calculated by summing and multiplying by two the number of ticks counted, assuming that females are half of infesting larvae (5,000 for Holstein and 10,000 for Nellore. In days 20, 23 and 24 after the infestation, the 10 bigger females ticks found in whole animal were weighed and put in a chamber (27 oC and 80% RH, weighing the egg mass of each female fourteen days after. The rectal temperature (RT, measured by a digital thermometer in the animal’s rectum and respiratory frequency (RF, respiratory movements per minute were measured on days 14/Apr (2 days before the a.i. and on day 05/May (19 days after the a.i.. The RT and RF were measured in the morning and in the afternoon, after they had been exposed to noon sun. The experimental design was a non-probability sample restricted to the 10 available animals. Analyses of variance for the random variables RT and RF to evaluate the effects of period of day, date and breed were performed using the SPSS 12.0. The RF was greater in the afternoon (64.82 ± 2.44 mov/min versus 38.42 ± 2.44 mov/min in the morning, P<0.001 and did not varied between dates; Nellore cattle had lower RF (41.50 ± 2.20 mov/min than Holstein (61.75 ± 2.70 mov/min, P<0.001. About RT, breed

  5. Insecticidal and repellent activities of pyrethroids to the three major pyrethroid-resistant malaria vectors in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Hitoshi; Ohashi, Kazunori; Dida, Gabriel O; Sonye, George; Njenga, Sammy M; Mwandawiro, Charles; Minakawa, Noboru

    2014-05-02

    The dramatic success of insecticide treated nets (ITNs) and long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) in African countries has been countered by the rapid development of pyrethroid resistance in vector mosquitoes over the past decade. One advantage of the use of pyrethroids in ITNs is their excito-repellency. Use of the excito-repellency of pyrethroids might be biorational, since such repellency will not induce or delay the development of any physiological resistance. However, little is known about the relationship between the mode of insecticide resistance and excito-repellency in pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes. Differences in the reactions of 3 major malaria vectors in western Kenya to pyrethroids were compared in laboratory tests. Adult susceptibility tests were performed using World Health Organization (WHO) test tube kits for F1 progenies of field-collected An. gambiae s.s., An. arabiensis, and An. funestus s.s., and laboratory colonies of An. gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis. The contact repellency to pyrethroids or permethrin-impregnated LLINs (Olyset® Nets) was evaluated with a simple choice test modified by WHO test tubes and with the test modified by the WHO cone bioassay test. Field-collected An. gambiae s.s., An. arabiensis, and An. funestus s.s. showed high resistance to both permethrin and deltamethrin. The allelic frequency of the point mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel (L1014S) in An. gambiae s.s. was 99.3-100%, while no point mutations were detected in the other 2 species. The frequency of takeoffs from the pyrethroid-treated surface and the flying times without contacting the surface increased significantly in pyrethroid-susceptible An. gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis colonies and wild An. arabiensis and An. funestus s.s. colonies, while there was no significant increase in the frequency of takeoffs or flying time in the An. gambiae s.s. wild colony. A different repellent reaction was observed in the field-collected An. gambiae s.s. than

  6. Molecular evidence for historical presence of knock-down resistance in Anopheles albimanus, a key malaria vector in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lol, Juan C; Castellanos, María E; Liebman, Kelly A; Lenhart, Audrey; Pennington, Pamela M; Padilla, Norma R

    2013-09-18

    Anopheles albimanus is a key malaria vector in the northern neotropics. Current vector control measures in the region are based on mass distributions of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and focal indoor residual spraying (IRS) with pyrethroids. Resistance to pyrethroid insecticides can be mediated by increased esterase and/or multi-function oxidase activity and/or mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene. The aim of this work was to characterize the homologous kdr region of the voltage-gated sodium channel gene in An. albimanus and to conduct a preliminary retrospective analysis of field samples collected in the 1990's, coinciding with a time of intense pyrethroid application related to agricultural and public health insect control in the region. Degenerate primers were designed to amplify the homologous kdr region in a pyrethroid-susceptible laboratory strain (Sanarate) of An. albimanus. Subsequently, a more specific primer pair was used to amplify and sequence the region that contains the 1014 codon associated with pyrethroid resistance in other Anopheles spp. (L1014F, L1014S or L1014C). Direct sequencing of the PCR products confirmed the presence of the susceptible kdr allele in the Sanarate strain (L1014) and the presence of homozygous-resistant kdr alleles in field-collected individuals from Mexico (L1014F), Nicaragua (L1014C) and Costa Rica (L1014C). For the first time, the kdr region in An. albimanus is described. Furthermore, molecular evidence suggests the presence of kdr-type resistance in field-collected An. albimanus in Mesoamerica in the 1990s. Further research is needed to conclusively determine an association between the genotypes and resistant phenotypes, and to what extent they may compromise current vector control efforts.

  7. High frequency induction of RNA-mediated resistance against Cucumber mosaic virus using inverted repeat constructs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.K.; Lohuis, H.; Goldbach, R.W.; Prins, M.W.

    2004-01-01

    The application of RNA-mediated resistance against Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) by using single transgene constructs generally results in only a small portion of resistant individuals. Inverted repeat constructs encoding self-complementary double-stranded RNA have been demonstrated a potential way to

  8. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with increased mutation frequency due to inactivation of the DNA oxidative repair system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandsberg, L F; Ciofu, O; Kirkby, N; Christiansen, L E; Poulsen, H E; Høiby, N

    2009-06-01

    The chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is characterized by the biofilm mode of growth and chronic inflammation dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). A high percentage of P. aeruginosa strains show high frequencies of mutations (hypermutators [HP]). P. aeruginosa is exposed to oxygen radicals, both those generated by its own metabolism and especially those released by a large number of PMNs in response to the chronic CF lung infection. Our work therefore focused on the role of the DNA oxidative repair system in the development of HP and antibiotic resistance. We have constructed and characterized mutT, mutY, and mutM mutants in P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. The mutT and mutY mutants showed 28- and 7.5-fold increases in mutation frequencies, respectively, over that for PAO1. These mutators had more oxidative DNA damage (higher levels of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine) than PAO1 after exposure to PMNs, and they developed resistance to antibiotics more frequently. The mechanisms of resistance were increased beta-lactamase production and overexpression of the MexCD-OprJ efflux-pump. Mutations in either the mutT or the mutY gene were found in resistant HP clinical isolates from patients with CF, and complementation with wild-type genes reverted the phenotype. In conclusion, oxidative stress might be involved in the development of resistance to antibiotics. We therefore suggest the possible use of antioxidants for CF patients to prevent the development of antibiotic resistance.

  9. Effect of Resistance Training Frequency on Gains in Muscular Strength: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgic, Jozo; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Davies, Timothy B; Lazinica, Bruno; Krieger, James W; Pedisic, Zeljko

    2018-02-22

    Current recommendations on resistance training (RT) frequency for gains in muscular strength are based on extrapolations from limited evidence on the topic, and thus their practical applicability remains questionable. To elucidate this issue, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the studies that compared muscular strength outcomes with different RT frequencies. To carry out this review, English-language literature searches of the PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, and SPORTDiscus databases were conducted. The meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model. The meta-analysis models were generated with RT frequencies classified as a categorical variable as either 1, 2, 3, or 4+ times/week, or, if there were insufficient data in subgroup analyses, the training frequencies were categorized as 1, 2, or 3 times/week. Subgroup analyses were performed for potential moderators, including (1) training volume; (2) exercise selection for the 1 repetition maximum (RM) test (for both multi-joint and single-joint exercises); (3) upper and lower body strength gains; (4) training to muscular failure (for studies involving and not involving training to muscular failure); (5) age (for both middle-aged/older adults and young adults); and (6) sex (for men and for women). The methodological quality of studies was appraised using the modified Downs and Black checklist. A total of 22 studies were found to meet the inclusion criteria. The average score on the Downs and Black checklist was 18 (range 13-22 points). Four studies were classified as being of good methodological quality, while the rest were classified as being of moderate methodological quality. Results of the meta-analysis showed a significant effect (p = 0.003) of RT frequency on muscular strength gains. Effect sizes increased in magnitude from 0.74, 0.82, 0.93, and 1.08 for training 1, 2, 3, and 4+ times per week, respectively. A subgroup analysis of volume-equated studies showed no significant effect (p

  10. Hydrogen-dependent low frequency noise and its physical mechanism of HfO2 resistance change random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. Q.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.; Peng, C.; Fang, W. X.; En, Y. F.; Huang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of hydrogen on low frequency noise characteristics of HfO2 resistance change random access memories (RRAMs) was investigated in this paper. The experimental results show that HfO2 RRAMs after hydrogen treatment take on the better uniformity of switch characteristics and the conduction enhancement behavior. Furthermore, it was found that the low frequency noise characteristics of the HfO2 RRAMs was significantly impacted by the hydrogen treatment, and at three kinds of typical resistance states, the low frequency noises of the HfO2 RRAMs after hydrogen treatment are larger than those of the fresh HfO2 RRAMs. The mechanism could be attributed to H induced oxygen vacancies, which serve as the additional traps for conduction due to the trap-assisted tunneling process. This will result in more random trap/detrap processes in the conducting filament, which gives rise to the larger low frequency noise in the HfO2 RRAMs. The results of this study may be useful in the design and application of HfO2 RRAMs.

  11. Mutagenic and epigenetic influence of caffeine on the frequencies of UV-induced ouabain-resistant Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chia-Cheng; Philipps, C.; Trosko, J.E.; Hart, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Caffeine, given as a post-treatment to UV-irradiated Chinese hamster cells in vitro, modified the frequency of induced mutations at the ouabain resistance locus. Mutation frequencies were increased when caffeine was added only for the DNA repair and mutation fixation period. When caffeine was added after the DNA repair and mutation fixation period, or immediately after DNA damage and for the entire repair and selection period, mutation frequencies were reduced. A hypothesis, given to explain both results, is that caffeine, by blocking a constitutive 'error-free' postreplication repair process, allows an 'error-prone' DNA repair process to produce many mutations. Moreover, caffeine, possibly by modifying C-AMP metabolism, causes a repression of induced mutations which, in effect, explains its anti-mutagenic and anti-carcinogenic properties

  12. Different frequencies of drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 subtypes circulating in China: a comprehensive study.

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    Hongshuai Sui

    Full Text Available The rapid spreading of HIV drug resistance is threatening the overall success of free HAART in China. Much work has been done on drug-resistant mutations, however, most of which were based on subtype B. Due to different genetic background, subtypes difference would have an effect on the development of drug-resistant mutations, which has already been proved by more and more studies. In China, the main epidemic subtypes are CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC, Thai B and CRF01_AE. The depiction of drug resistance mutations in those subtypes will be helpful for the selection of regimens for Chinese. In this study, the distributions difference of amino acids at sites related to HIV drug resistance were compared among subtype B, CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and CRF08_BC strains prevalent in China. The amino acid composition of sequences belonging to different subtypes, which were obtained from untreated and treated individuals separately, were also compared. The amino acids proportions of 19 sites in RT among subtype B, CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC have significant difference in drug resistance groups (chi-square test, p<0.05. Genetic barriers analysis revealed that sites 69, 138, 181, 215 and 238 were significantly different among subtypes (Kruskal Wallis test, p<0.05. All subtypes shared three highest prevalent drug resistance sites 103, 181 and 184 in common. Many drug resistant sites in protease show surprising high proportions in almost all subtypes in drug-naïve patients. This is the first comprehensive study in China on different development of drug resistance among different subtypes. The detailed data will lay a foundation for HIV treatment regimens design and improve HIV therapy in China.

  13. High frequency of resistance to the drugs isoniazid and rifampicin among tuberculosis cases in the city of Cabo de Santo Agostinho, an urban area in Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliza, Marcilio; Bach, Artur Henrique; Queiroz, Gabriel Lobo de; Melo, Inês Cardoso; Carneiro, Maria Madileuza; Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima Pessoa Militão de; Suffys, Philip; Rodrigues, Laura; Ximenes, Ricardo; Lucena-Silva, Norma

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the frequency and risk factors for developing multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Cabo de Santo Agostinho, PE. This was a prospective study conducted from 2000 to 2003, in which suspected cases were investigated using bacilloscopy and culturing. Out of 232 confirmed cases of tuberculosis, culturing and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed on 174. Thirty-five of the 174 cultures showed resistance to all drugs. The frequencies of primary and acquired resistance to any drug were 14% and 50% respectively, while the frequencies of primary and acquired multidrug resistance were 8.3% and 40%. Previous tuberculosis treatment and abandonment of treatment were risk factors for drug resistance. The high levels of primary and acquired resistance to the combination of isoniazid and rifampicin contributed towards the difficulties in controlling tuberculosis transmission in the city.

  14. A reliable extraction method for source and drain series resistances in silicon nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs) based on radio-frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Jae Hwa; Yoon, Young Jun; Lee, Hwan Gi; Yoo, Gwan Min; Cho, Eou-Sik; Cho, Seongjae; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kang, In Man

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a new extraction method for source and drain (S/D) series resistances of silicon nanowire (SNW) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) based on small-signal radio-frequency (RF) analysis. The proposed method can be applied to the extraction of S/D series resistances for SNW MOSFETs with finite off-state channel resistance as well as gate bias-dependent on-state resistive components realized by 3-dimensional (3-D) device simulation. The series resistances as a function of frequency and gate voltage are presented and compared with the results obtained by an existing method with infinite off-state channel resistance model. The accuracy of the newly proposed parameter extraction method has been successfully verified by Z22- and Y-parameters up to 100 GHz operation frequency.

  15. Frequency of Carbapenem, Colistin and Tigecycline Resistant Enterobacteriacae in Medical ICU of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Karachi

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    Shobha Luxmi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resistance to antibiotics among Enterobacteriacae represents a serious therapeutic and infection control challenge. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of carbapenem, colistin and tigecycline resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates obtained from patients admitted in medical intensive care unit (ICU of a tertiary care hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. METHODS: This was a descriptive cross sectional study that was conducted at Liaquat National Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, Pakistan during December 2015 to May 2016. Patients admitted in the medical ICU with systemic inflammatory response syndrome were included. The culture positive samples were analyzed for further identification and antimicrobial sensitivity was performed according to clinical laboratory standard institute (CLSI 2014 guidelines. RESULTS: Of the 748 samples, 177 were positive for Enterobactericae. Most samples were taken from blood 75(42.2% or tracheal secretions 67(37.9%. Most common organism isolated were Klebsiella pneumoniae 77(43.5% and Escherichia coli 71(40.1%. Out of these 10.7% organisms were resistant to meropenem, while 2.8% and 20.3% were resistant to colistin and tigecycline respectively. CONCLUSION: Increasing spread of drug resistance among Enterobacteriacae reflects an important problem that can be controlled with effective policies of infection control, surveillance and antimicrobial stewardship.

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae: low frequency of penicillin resistance and high resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in nasopharyngeal isolates from children in a rural area in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda Novales, M G; Solorzano Santos, F; Guiscafre Gallardo, H; Leaños Miranda, B; Echaniz Aviles, G; Carnalla Barajas, M N; Palafox Torres, M; Muñoz Hernandez, O

    1997-01-01

    Due to the changes in the frequency of penicillin-resistant strains of S. pneumoniae, it is necessary to perform surveillance studies of bacterial resistance. Isolates from the upper respiratory tract of asymptomatic children have been useful. There is no information about the difference between isolates from children with and without upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). The objective of the authors in this paper is to establish the prevalence of carrier-state, serotype and antimicrobial resistance of S. pneumoniae isolates from children with and without acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in a rural area in Mexico. A cross-sectional comparative study was performed in Tlaxcala, Mexico. Children from one month 5 years of age were included. Nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained. Identification was done by international microbiology standards. Serotyping was done by the capsular Quellung test. The susceptibility testing was performed by the agar dilution method. Four-hundred and fifty patients were included. S. pneumoniae was isolated in 134 children (29.7%). Frequency of carriers was greater in patients with URTI (107/323) than without URTI (27/127) (33.1% vs. 21.1% p = 0.012, OR 1.84, IC 95% 1.1-3.08). The six most frequent serotypes were: 6B (16.4%); 19F (11.9%); 19A (6.7%); 14, 23F, and 35 (5.2% each), with no difference among the groups. Only 3% of the strains had high level resistance to penicillin, and 12.6% had intermediate resistance, and for ampicillin 4%, amoxicillin 4%, amoxicillin-clavulanate 4%, ceftriaxone 3%, cefotaxime 1.5%, erythromycin 6%, miocamycin 3%, chloramphenicol 4%, and vancomycin 0%. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance was very high (42%). In conclusion, colonization is higher in children with URTI. Five of the most frequent serotypes identified in this study were the same as those identified in patients with S. pneumoniae invasive diseases in Mexico City. In Tlaxcala, Mexico, beta-lactams could be the drug of choice for

  17. Genetic variation in target-site resistance to pyrethroids and pirimicarb in Tunisian populations of the peach potato aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charaabi, Kamel; Boukhris-Bouhachem, Sonia; Makni, Mohamed; Fenton, Brian; Denholm, Ian

    2016-12-01

    We used molecular assays to diagnose resistance to pyrethroids and pirimicarb in samples of Myzus persicae from field crops or an insect suction trap in Tunisia. Genotypes for resistance loci were related to ones for polymorphic microsatellite loci in order to investigate breeding systems and patterns of genetic diversity, and to inform resistance management tactics. The kdr mutation L1014F conferring pyrethroid resistance was found in all samples. The M918T s-kdr mutation also occurred in most samples, but only in conjunction with kdr. We discovered a previously unreported genotype heterozygous for L1014F but homozygous for M918T. Samples with modified acetylcholinesterase (MACE) conferring resistance to pirimicarb were less common but widespread. 16% of samples contained both the kdr and MACE mutations. Many unique microsatellite genotypes were found, suggesting that M. persicae is holocyclic in Tunisia. There were no consistent associations between resistance and microsatellite markers. This first study of insecticide resistance in M. persicae in North Africa showed genetic variation in insecticide resistance within microsatellite multilocus genotypes (MLG M s) and the same resistance mechanisms to be present in different MLG M s. This contrasts with variation in northern Europe where M. persicae is fully anholocyclic. Implications for selection and control strategies are discussed. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. High frequency of silver resistance genes in invasive isolates of Enterobacter and Klebsiella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sütterlin, S; Dahlö, M; Tellgren-Roth, C; Schaal, W; Melhus, Å

    2017-07-01

    Silver-based products have been marketed as an alternative to antibiotics, and their consumption has increased. Bacteria may, however, develop resistance to silver. To study the presence of genes encoding silver resistance (silE, silP, silS) over time in three clinically important Enterobacteriaceae genera. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 752 bloodstream isolates from the years 1990-2010 were investigated. Age, gender, and ward of patients were registered, and the susceptibility to antibiotics and silver nitrate was tested. Clonality and single nucleotide polymorphism were assessed with repetitive element sequence-based PCR, multi-locus sequence typing, and whole-genome sequencing. Genes encoding silver resistance were detected most frequently in Enterobacter spp. (48%), followed by Klebsiella spp. (41%) and Escherichia coli 4%. Phenotypical resistance to silver nitrate was found in Enterobacter (13%) and Klebsiella (3%) isolates. The lowest carriage rate of sil genes was observed in blood isolates from the neonatology ward (24%), and the highest in blood isolates from the oncology/haematology wards (66%). Presence of sil genes was observed in international high-risk clones. Sequences of the sil and pco clusters indicated that a single mutational event in the silS gene could have caused the phenotypic resistance. Despite a restricted consumption of silver-based products in Swedish health care, silver resistance genes are widely represented in clinical isolates of Enterobacter and Klebsiella species. To avoid further selection and spread of silver-resistant bacteria with a high potential for healthcare-associated infections, the use of silver-based products needs to be controlled and the silver resistance monitored. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Frequency of resistance to penicillin and erythromycin of pneumococcal strains that caused ottis media

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    Jovanović Luka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important human pathogen and the most common cause of acute otitis media (AOM, especially in children. It is also a common cause of community acquired pneumonia, sepsis and bacterial meningitis. Drug of choice in the treatment of these disease are beta lactam antibiotics, and the first alternative are macrolides. The increasing prevalence of resistance to penicillin and macrolides, among pneumococci, has considerably complicated the treatment. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine susceptibility of pneumococcal isolates from pediatric AOM in Serbia to antibiotics. Material and methods: Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 61 pneumococcal AOM was performed, collected from December 2014 to December 2015, using disk diffusion method and E test. Macrolide resistance profile was determined by double disk diffusion test. Results: In our study, 40 strains (65.6% showed reduced sensitivity to penicillin and erythromycin. There were 9 (14.8% high resistant isolates to penicillin, while 31 (50.8% showed reduced susceptibility. The most frequent resistance phenotype was cMLS. Co-resistance to penicillin and macrolides was found in 14.8% strains. Conclusion: Our results showed high resistance rate of S. pneumoniae, which causes AOM among children, to penicillin and macrolides. Further active surveillance of pneumococcal susceptibility to antibiotics is necessary, and use of these medications in empirical therapy should be limited.

  20. Numerical modelling of complex resistivity effects on a homogeneous half-space at low frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Baumgartner, François

    2006-01-01

    half-space with CR effects and study some aspects of the complex coupling function. We advocate the use of the CR based coupling function in the interpretation process, in order to obtain a better understanding of the physical processes involved in CR effects. Application of the model to real field...... that the use of a second Cole-Cole model to describe EM coupling may corrupt the interpretation of the low frequency dispersion, even when only the normal range of frequencies (...

  1. Analysis of earth resistivity frequency dependence: Test method and its practical application

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    Kostić Vojin I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The first step in planning and designing of the proper grounding system, is the earth resistivity measurement. Measurements are carried out before the construction of the power facility. However, it is not an uncommon situation that during construction, subsequent leveling and raising of the ground level is performed. For this purpose, it is customary to use the land from the locations far away. Delivered soil has largely different electromagnetic characteristics (electric conductivity, permittivity and dielectric constant in relation to the soil on which the previous measurement of the earth resistivity was conducted. Since the value of the earth resistivity directly affects the grounding system electrical parameters - grounding system impedance, touch and step voltages - additional measurements are required and according to this appropriate corrections of the grounding system In this paper, we propose a practical method for earth resistivity measurement. The method is applicable in the design phase, and also for the revision of the installed grounding system. A practical example of a power facility (RP 400 kV Mladost, Elektromreža Srbije, based on laboratory measurements of the soil samples earth resistivity and grounding system impedance measurement, clearly shows what consequences might occur by leveling and raising of the ground level using ash coal dump.

  2. Molecular survey of pyrethroid resistance mechanisms in Mexican field populations of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susceptibility to synthetic pyrethroids (SP´s) and the role of two major resistance mechanisms were evaluated in Mexican Rhipicephalus microplus tick populations. Larval packet test (LPT), knock-down (kdr) PCR allele-specific assay (PASA) and esterase activity assays were conducted in tick populatio...

  3. Frequency of isolation and antibiotic resistance patterns of bacterial isolates from wound infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović-Radić, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Six hundred and thirteen bacterial strains were isolated from wound swabs and the isolates were identified on the basis of growth on differential and selective media. In order to test the sensitivity of isolated strains to different antibiotics, the disc diffusion method, according to EUCAST protocol v 5.0 was used. The most common species isolated from wound swabs was Staphylococcus epidermidis (18.4%, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis (16.8%, 12.7% and 10.4%, respectively. The maximum resistance of Gram-positive cocci was observed to penicillin and the lowest to linezolid. Gram-negative bacteria showed the highest resistance to tetracyclines, while the same strains demonstrated the highest sensitivity to polypeptide antibiotics. Comparison of the resistance patterns of Gramnegative and Gram-positive bacterial strains showed significant difference in the tetracycline efficiency.

  4. Frequency, serotyping and antimicrobial resistance pattern of Salmonella from feces and lymph nodes of pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João B.P. Guerra Filho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Salmonellosis is a foodborne disease caused by bacteria of the genus Salmonella, being pigs and pork-products potentially important for its occurrence. In recent decades, some serovars of Salmonella have shown increase of resistance to conventional antimicrobials used in human and animal therapy, with serious risks for public health. The aim of this study was to evaluate feces (n=50, mediastinal (n=50, mesenteric (n=50 and mandibular (n=50 lymph nodes obtained from slaughter houses for Salmonella spp. Positive samples were serotyped and subjected to an in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility test, including the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL production. Salmonella species were identified in 10% (20/200 of total samples. From these, 20% (10/50 were identified in the submandibular lymph nodes, 18% (9/50 in the mesenteric lymph nodes, 2% (1/50 in feces and 0% (0/50 in the mediastinal lymph nodes. The serotypes found were Salonella Typhimurium (55%, S. enterica subsp. enterica 4,5,12: i: - (35%, S. Brandenburg and S. Derby with 5% (5% each. All strains showed resistance to at least one antimicrobial; 90% were resistant to four or more antimicrobials, and 15% were multidrug-resistant. Resistance to ciprofloxacin, tetracycline and nalidixic acid was particularly prevalent amongst the tested serovars. Here, we highlighted the impact of pigs in the epidemiological chain of salmonellosis in domestic animals and humans, as well as the high antimicrobial resistance rates of Salmonella strains, reinforcing the necessity for responsible use of antimicrobials for animals as an emergent One Health issue, and to keep these drugs for human therapy approaches.

  5. Low pesticide rates may hasten the evolution of resistance by increasing mutation frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressel, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    At very low pesticide rates, a certain low proportion of pests may receive a sublethal dose, are highly stressed by the pesticide and yet survive. Stress is a general enhancer of mutation rates. Thus, the survivors are likely to have more than normal mutations, which might include mutations leading to pesticide resistance, both for multifactorial (polygenic, gene amplification, sequential allelic mutations) and for major gene resistance. Management strategies should consider how to eliminate the subpopulation of pests with the high mutation rates, but the best strategy is probably to avoid too low application rates of pesticides from the outset. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Pathogen frequency and resistance patterns in Brazilian hospitals: summary of results from three years of the SENTRY antimicrobial surveillance program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio S. Sader

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pathogen frequency and resistance patterns may vary significantly from country to country and also in different hospitals within a country. Thus, regional surveillance programs are essential to guide empirical therapy and infection control measures. METHODS: Rank order of occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogenic species causing bloodstream infections (BSI, lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI, wound or skin and soft tissue infections (WSSTI, and urinary tract infections (UTI in hospitalized patients were determined by collecting consecutive isolates over a specified period of time, as part of the SENTRY Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Program (SENTRY. All isolates were tested by reference broth microdilution. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A total of 3,728 bacterial strains were obtained from January, 1997, to December, 1999, from 12 Brazilian hospitals located in 4 states. The largest number of isolates were obtained from patients with BSI (2,008, followed by LRTI (822 cases, UTI (468 cases, and WSSTI (430 cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated pathogen in general (22.8% - 852 isolates, followed by E. coli (13.8% - 516 cases and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13.3% - 496 cases. Staphylococcus aureus was also the most common species isolated from BSI (23.6% and WSSTI (45.8%, and P. aeruginosa was the most frequent species isolated from patients with LRTI (29.4%. The main bacterial resistance problems found in this study were: imipenem resistance among P. aeruginosa (69.8% susceptibility and Acinetobacter spp. (88.1% susceptibility; ESBL production among K. pneumoniae (48.4% and E. coli (8.9%; resistance to third generation cephalosporins among Enterobacter spp. (68.1% susceptible to ceftazidime and oxacillin resistance among S. aureus (34.0% and coagulase negative staphylococci (80.1%. Only the carbapenems (88.1% to 89.3% susceptibility showed reasonable activity against the Acinetobacter spp

  7. Pathogen frequency and resistance patterns in Brazilian hospitals: summary of results from three years of the SENTRY antimicrobial surveillance program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sader Helio S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pathogen frequency and resistance patterns may vary significantly from country to country and also in different hospitals within a country. Thus, regional surveillance programs are essential to guide empirical therapy and infection control measures. METHODS: Rank order of occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogenic species causing bloodstream infections (BSI, lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI, wound or skin and soft tissue infections (WSSTI, and urinary tract infections (UTI in hospitalized patients were determined by collecting consecutive isolates over a specified period of time, as part of the SENTRY Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Program (SENTRY. All isolates were tested by reference broth microdilution. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A total of 3,728 bacterial strains were obtained from January, 1997, to December, 1999, from 12 Brazilian hospitals located in 4 states. The largest number of isolates were obtained from patients with BSI (2,008, followed by LRTI (822 cases, UTI (468 cases, and WSSTI (430 cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated pathogen in general (22.8% - 852 isolates, followed by E. coli (13.8% - 516 cases and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13.3% - 496 cases. Staphylococcus aureus was also the most common species isolated from BSI (23.6% and WSSTI (45.8%, and P. aeruginosa was the most frequent species isolated from patients with LRTI (29.4%. The main bacterial resistance problems found in this study were: imipenem resistance among P. aeruginosa (69.8% susceptibility and Acinetobacter spp. (88.1% susceptibility; ESBL production among K. pneumoniae (48.4% and E. coli (8.9%; resistance to third generation cephalosporins among Enterobacter spp. (68.1% susceptible to ceftazidime and oxacillin resistance among S. aureus (34.0% and coagulase negative staphylococci (80.1%. Only the carbapenems (88.1% to 89.3% susceptibility showed reasonable activity against the Acinetobacter spp

  8. Levels of insecticide resistance to deltamethrin, malathion, and temephos, and associated mechanisms in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes from the Guadeloupe and Saint Martin islands (French West Indies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goindin, Daniella; Delannay, Christelle; Gelasse, Andric; Ramdini, Cédric; Gaude, Thierry; Faucon, Frédéric; David, Jean-Philippe; Gustave, Joël; Vega-Rua, Anubis; Fouque, Florence

    2017-02-10

    In the Guadeloupe and Saint Martin islands, Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are the only recognized vectors of dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses. For around 40 years, malathion was used as a mosquito adulticide and temephos as a larvicide. Since the European Union banned the use of these two insecticide molecules in the first decade of the 21st century, deltamethrin and Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis are the remaining adulticide and larvicide, respectively, used in Guadeloupe. In order to improve the management of vector control activities in Guadeloupe and Saint Martin, we investigated Ae. aegypti resistance to and mechanisms associated with deltamethrin, malathion, and temephos. Ae. aegypti mosquitoes were collected from six different localities of Guadeloupe and Saint Martin. Larvae were used for malathion and temephos bioassays, and adult mosquitoes for deltamethrin bioassays, following World Health Organization recommendations. Knockdown resistance (Kdr) genotyping for V1016I and F1534C mutations, and expression levels of eight enzymes involved in detoxification mechanisms were examined in comparison with the susceptible reference Bora Bora strain. Resistance ratios (RR 50 ) calculated for Ae. aegypti larvae showed high resistance levels to temephos (from 8.9 to 33.1-fold) and low resistance levels to malathion (from 1.7 to 4.4-fold). Adult females displayed moderate resistance levels to deltamethrin regarding the time necessary to affect 50% of individuals, varying from 8.0 to 28.1-fold. Molecular investigations on adult mosquitoes showed high resistant allele frequencies for V1016I and F1534C (from 85 to 96% and from 90 to 98%, respectively), as well as an overexpression of the glutathione S-transferase gene, GSTe2, the carboxylesterase CCEae3a, and the cytochrome genes 014614, CYP6BB2, CYP6M11, and CYP9J23. Ae. aegypti populations from Guadeloupe and Saint Martin exhibit multiple resistance to organophosphates (temephos and malathion), and

  9. Delineation of Gold Mineralization Zone using Resistivity and Very Low Frequency Electromagnetic Methods around, North Singhbhum Mobile Belt, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, A.; Panda, K. P.; Singh, A.; Sharma, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    The results of electrical resistivity and VLF electromagnetic surveys are presented in this study to delineate the suitable geological structure associated with gold mineralization near Lawa Village (Seraikela-Kharsawan, Jharkhand), India. The area under observation lies in North Singhbhum Mobile Belt (NSMB) which is bounded by Chotanagpur Gneiss Complex in north and Archean Singhbhum Craton in the south. Shear zone of the study area, trending E-W, is mainly associated with Cu-U mineralization which is also associated with gold. Previous geological studies have revealed that this region can be a potential site for gold prospects within NSMB. A comprehensive electrical resistivity imaging and very low frequency surveys have been performed around Lawa village to outline appropriate conducting zones, with their lateral extension and depth extent, which may be associated with gold mineralization. Resistivity survey done using Dipole-Dipole multi-electrode array reveals multiple zones of mineralization separated by variable distances. The VLF data in the current study was tainted by non-stationary and non-linear noises which cannot be eliminated by standard filtering techniques. Therefore to restore signals with significant geologic information empirical mode decomposition (EMD) technique was used. The noise free data obtained was then processed using Fast Imaging technique to obtain apparent current density pseudo-sections for interpretation. Interpretation and analysis of results from each investigating survey demonstrate a steeply dipping conductor with E-W strike direction along the shear zone. These conductive zones are characterized by low resistivity and high current density values.

  10. Inspiratory high frequency airway oscillation attenuates resistive loaded dyspnea and modulates respiratory function in young healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Theresa; Sumners, David Paul; Green, David Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Direct chest-wall percussion can reduce breathlessness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and respiratory function may be improved, in health and disease, by respiratory muscle training (RMT). We tested whether high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO), a novel form of airflow oscillation generation can modulate induced dyspnoea and respiratory strength and/or patterns following 5 weeks of HFAO training (n = 20) compared to a SHAM-RMT (conventional flow-resistive RMT) device (n = 15) in healthy volunteers (13 males; aged 20-36 yrs). HFAO causes oscillations with peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm H2O, whereas the SHAM-RMT device was identical but created no pressure oscillation. Respiratory function, dyspnoea and ventilation during 3 minutes of spontaneous resting ventilation, 1 minute of maximal voluntary hyperventilation and 1 minute breathing against a moderate inspiratory resistance, were compared PRE and POST 5-weeks of training (2 × 30 breaths at 70% peak flow, 5 days a week). Training significantly reduced NRS dyspnoea scores during resistive loaded ventilation, both in the HFAO (p = 0.003) and SHAM-RMT (p = 0.005) groups. Maximum inspiratory static pressure (cm H2O) was significantly increased by HFAO training (vs. PRE; prespiratory manoeuvre performance in excess of flow-resistive IMT (SHAM-RMT) in healthy individuals without the respiratory discomfort associated with RMT.

  11. The survey of shigellosis frequency and determination of antibiotic resistance profile of isolated strains from infected children in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Abbaspour

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shigellosis is endemic throughout the world and it is among the most common causes of bacterial diarrheal diseases. Antibiotic resistance of Shigella is becoming a progressive problem in world. The aim of this study was the survey of shigellosis frequency and determination of antibiotic resistance profile of isolated strains from infected children in Tehran. Material and Methods: This study conducted on 9131 patients with acute diarrheal disease. For isolation of Shigella spp. from stool samples, culture performed on different selective and differential media. After confirmation of bacteria by biochemical tests, susceptibility testing was done by disc diffusion method according to clinical and laboratory standards (CLSI recomendations. Results: Among 9131 stool samples, Shigella spp. was isolated from 90 cases. Shigella sonnei was the most common isolated species. 92/2 % of isolates were resistant to cotrimoxazole. In contrast, most of the Shigella spp. was founded to be sensitive to ciprofloxacin, imipenem and third-generation cephalosporins. Conclusion: Surveillance programs on antimicrobial resistance not only identify pathogenic bacterial species, by reporting data like serotyping, microorganisms incidence rates, and susceptibility to the antimicrobial agents currently used for treatment, but also contribute to monitoring the intervention strategies including removing organism from reservoirs.

  12. High frequencies of antibiotic resistance genes in infants’ meconium and early fecal samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosalbes, M. J.; Vallès, Y.; Jiménez-Hernández, N.

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) microbiota has been identified as an important reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) that can be horizontally transferred to pathogenic species. Maternal GIT microbes can be transmitted to the offspring, and recent work indicates that such transfer start...

  13. Resistance to Change and Frequency of Response-Dependent Stimuli Uncorrelated with Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Ward, Ryan D.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2009-01-01

    Stimuli uncorrelated with reinforcement have been shown to enhance response rates and resistance to disruption; however, the effects of different rates of stimulus presentations have not been assessed. In two experiments, we assessed the effects of adding different rates of response-dependent brief stimuli uncorrelated with primary reinforcement…

  14. Mycoplasma genitalium in Spain: prevalence of genital infection and frequency of resistance to macrolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo, Alejandra; Kusters, Johannes G; Severs, Tim T; Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium infection and the resistance to macrolides within a general population in Madrid in 2015. We collected 359 urine samples from a general population with symptoms of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). All samples underwent a real-time PCR. For the detection of macrolide resistance, a 283bp fragment of region V of the 23S rRNA gene of M. genitalium was amplified and sequenced. We found a prevalence of 3.34% of M. genitalium and a macrolide resistance rate of 20%. In males, the prevalence was 6.62% and in women 0.96%, being significantly higher in males. The prevalence obtained shows that it is a pathogen to consider in our environment. These findings stress the need for routine testing of M. genitalium infections and would seem to suggest the advisability of resistance testing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. Frequency and antibiotic resistance patterns of isolated bacteria from positive blood culture of hospitalized patients

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    Azadeh Vahedi

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: The most prevalent bacterial isolate among the blood cultures of patients was Pseudomonas. The patients more than 50 years were more susceptible to blood stream infections. The most bacteria were isolated from the internal medicine department of hospital. The antibiotic resistance was also increasing especially in Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus coagulase negative, Escherichia coil and Klebsiella

  16. Microbial resistance and frequency of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL in isolated from blood cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Carlos Gomes da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The emergence and spread of isolated carriers of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL have complicated the treatment of nosocomial infections, since its production is not easily identified by the sensitivity tests, routinely performed in clinical laboratories, leading to difficulties in the hospital control of resistant microorganisms and antibiotics misuse.Objective:The objective of this study was to analyze the resistance profile and the frequency of ESBL in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from blood cultures. A hundred bacterial samples from blood cultures of adult patients were analyzed, which were phenotypically identified by biochemical tests of carbohydrates fermentation and submitted to determination of the resistance profile by disc diffusion test and ESBL screening by disc approximation and disc replacement methods.Results:Among the bacterial samples tested, 30 were identified as Gram-negative bacteria, predominantly by Proteus mirabilis, Pantoea agglomerans, and Escherichia coli. Of these, 73.33% were positive for the detection of ESBL by phenotypic tests, and was found mainly in Pantoea agglomerans, Proteus mirabilis, and Enterobacter cloacae.Conclusion:The increase in the occurrence of ESBL in different Enterobacteriaceae shows the importance of the amplification of detection in other species than Escherichia coli or Klebsiella sp., so that the assistance to the patient is not restrained, since these resistant bacteria cannot be detected by the laboratories. Considering the frequency of ESBL in this study, we highlight the importance of its detection, aiming to its contribution to the development of improvements in the health care policies of hospitals.

  17. High frequency of first-line anti-tuberculosis drug resistance among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The burden of MDR-TB is unknown in areas that do not have drug susceptibility testing (DST), but its frequency is expected to be higher in previously treated cases. Where DST is not available the WHO recommended standardized retreatment (Category II) regimen is given to previously treated TB patients

  18. Experimental hut evaluation of bednets treated with an organophosphate (chlorpyrifos-methyl or a pyrethroid (lambdacyhalothrin alone and in combination against insecticide-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbel Vincent

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrethroid resistant mosquitoes are becoming increasingly common in parts of Africa. It is important to identify alternative insecticides which, if necessary, could be used to replace or supplement the pyrethroids for use on treated nets. Certain compounds of an earlier generation of insecticides, the organophosphates may have potential as net treatments. Methods Comparative studies of chlorpyrifos-methyl (CM, an organophosphate with low mammalian toxicity, and lambdacyhalothrin (L, a pyrethroid, were conducted in experimental huts in Côte d'Ivoire, West Africa. Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes from the area are resistant to pyrethroids and organophosphates (kdr and insensitive acetylcholinesterase Ace.1R. Several treatments and application rates on intact or holed nets were evaluated, including single treatments, mixtures, and differential wall/ceiling treatments. Results and Conclusion All of the treatments were effective in reducing blood feeding from sleepers under the nets and in killing both species of mosquito, despite the presence of the kdr and Ace.1R genes at high frequency. In most cases, the effects of the various treatments did not differ significantly. Five washes of the nets in soap solution did not reduce the impact of the insecticides on A. gambiae mortality, but did lead to an increase in blood feeding. The three combinations performed no differently from the single insecticide treatments, but the low dose mixture performed encouragingly well indicating that such combinations might be used for controlling insecticide resistant mosquitoes. Mortality of mosquitoes that carried both Ace.1R and Ace.1S genes did not differ significantly from mosquitoes that carried only Ace.1S genes on any of the treated nets, indicating that the Ace.1R allele does not confer effective resistance to chlorpyrifos-methyl under the realistic conditions of an experimental hut.

  19. Frequency, virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance of Listeria spp. isolated from bovine clinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Hossein; Radmehr, Behrad

    2013-11-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence, characteristics and antimicrobial resistance of Listeria spp. isolated from bovine clinical mastitis in Iran. Listeria spp. were detected in 21/207 bovine mastitic milk samples from dairy farms in Iran, comprising L. monocytogenes (n=17), L. innocua (n=3) and L. ivanovii (n=1). L. monocytogenes isolates were grouped into serogroups '4b, 4d, 4e', '1/2a, 3a', '1/2b, 3b, 7' and '1/2c, 3c'; all harboured inlA, inlC and inlJ virulence genes. Listeria spp. were most frequently resistant to penicillin G (14/21 isolates, 66.7%) and tetracyclines (11/21 isolates, 52.4%). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Studies on [5,6]-Fused Bicyclic Scaffolds Derivatives as Potent Dual B-RafV600E/KDR Inhibitors Using Docking and 3D-QSAR Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Chun; Tang, San-Zhi; Lu, Shuai; Ran, Ting; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Yan-Min; Xu, An-Yang; Lu, Tao; Chen, Ya-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Research and development of multi-target inhibitors has attracted increasing attention as anticancer therapeutics. B-RafV600E synergistically works with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (KDR) to promote the occurrence and progression of cancers, and the development of dual-target drugs simultaneously against these two kinds of kinase may offer a better treatment advantage. In this paper, docking and three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies were performed on a series of dual B-Raf/KDR inhibitors with a novel hinge-binding group, [5,6]-fused bicyclic scaffold. Docking studies revealed optimal binding conformations of these compounds interacting with both B-Raf and KDR. Based on these conformations, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) 3D-QSAR models were constructed, and the best CoMFA (q2 = 0.542, r2 = 0.989 for B-Raf; q2 = 0.768, r2 = 0.991 for KDR) and CoMSIA models (q2 = 0.519, r2 = 0.992 for B-Raf; q2 = 0.849, r2 = 0.993 for KDR) were generated. Further external validations confirmed their predictability, yielding satisfactory correlation coefficients (r2pred = 0.764 (CoMFA), r2pred = 0.841 (CoMSIA) for B-Raf, r2pred = 0.912 (CoMFA), r2pred = 0.846 (CoMSIA) for KDR, respectively). Through graphical analysis and comparison on docking results and 3D-QSAR contour maps, key amino acids that affect the ligand-receptor interactions were identified and structural features influencing the activities were discussed. New potent derivatives were designed, and subjected to preliminary pharmacological evaluation. The study may offer useful references for the modification and development of novel dual B-Raf/KDR inhibitors. PMID:26501259

  1. Increased frequency of pink bollworm resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wan

    Full Text Available Transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt kill some key insect pests, but evolution of resistance by pests can reduce their efficacy. The main approach for delaying pest adaptation to Bt crops uses non-Bt host plants as "refuges" to increase survival of susceptible pests. To delay evolution of pest resistance to transgenic cotton producing Bt toxin Cry1Ac, the United States and some other countries have required refuges of non-Bt cotton, while farmers in China have relied on "natural" refuges of non-Bt host plants other than cotton. The "natural" refuge strategy focuses on cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera, the primary target of Bt cotton in China that attacks many crops, but it does not apply to another major pest, pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella, which feeds almost entirely on cotton in China. Here we report data showing field-evolved resistance to Cry1Ac by pink bollworm in the Yangtze River Valley of China. Laboratory bioassay data from 51 field-derived strains show that the susceptibility to Cry1Ac was significantly lower during 2008 to 2010 than 2005 to 2007. The percentage of field populations yielding one or more survivors at a diagnostic concentration of Cry1Ac increased from 0% in 2005-2007 to 56% in 2008-2010. However, the median survival at the diagnostic concentration was only 1.6% from 2008 to 2010 and failure of Bt cotton to control pink bollworm has not been reported in China. The early detection of resistance reported here may promote proactive countermeasures, such as a switch to transgenic cotton producing toxins distinct from Cry1A toxins, increased planting of non-Bt cotton, and integration of other management tactics together with Bt cotton.

  2. Inspiratory High Frequency Airway Oscillation Attenuates Resistive Loaded Dyspnea and Modulates Respiratory Function in Young Healthy Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Theresa; Sumners, David Paul; Green, David Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Direct chest-wall percussion can reduce breathlessness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and respiratory function may be improved, in health and disease, by respiratory muscle training (RMT). We tested whether high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO), a novel form of airflow oscillation generation can modulate induced dyspnoea and respiratory strength and/or patterns following 5 weeks of HFAO training (n = 20) compared to a SHAM-RMT (conventional flow-resistive RMT) device (n = 15) in healthy volunteers (13 males; aged 20–36 yrs). HFAO causes oscillations with peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm H2O, whereas the SHAM-RMT device was identical but created no pressure oscillation. Respiratory function, dyspnoea and ventilation during 3 minutes of spontaneous resting ventilation, 1 minute of maximal voluntary hyperventilation and 1 minute breathing against a moderate inspiratory resistance, were compared PRE and POST 5-weeks of training (2×30 breaths at 70% peak flow, 5 days a week). Training significantly reduced NRS dyspnoea scores during resistive loaded ventilation, both in the HFAO (p = 0.003) and SHAM-RMT (p = 0.005) groups. Maximum inspiratory static pressure (cm H2O) was significantly increased by HFAO training (vs. PRE; pinspiratory dynamic pressure was increased by training in both the HFAO (vs. PRE; pinspiratory flow rate (L.s−1) achieved during the maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure manoeuvre increased significantly POST (vs. PRE; p = 0.001) in the HFAO group only. HFAO reduced inspiratory resistive loading–induced dyspnoea and augments static and dynamic maximal respiratory manoeuvre performance in excess of flow-resistive IMT (SHAM-RMT) in healthy individuals without the respiratory discomfort associated with RMT. PMID:24651392

  3. Inspiratory high frequency airway oscillation attenuates resistive loaded dyspnea and modulates respiratory function in young healthy individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Morris

    Full Text Available Direct chest-wall percussion can reduce breathlessness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and respiratory function may be improved, in health and disease, by respiratory muscle training (RMT. We tested whether high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO, a novel form of airflow oscillation generation can modulate induced dyspnoea and respiratory strength and/or patterns following 5 weeks of HFAO training (n = 20 compared to a SHAM-RMT (conventional flow-resistive RMT device (n = 15 in healthy volunteers (13 males; aged 20-36 yrs. HFAO causes oscillations with peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm H2O, whereas the SHAM-RMT device was identical but created no pressure oscillation. Respiratory function, dyspnoea and ventilation during 3 minutes of spontaneous resting ventilation, 1 minute of maximal voluntary hyperventilation and 1 minute breathing against a moderate inspiratory resistance, were compared PRE and POST 5-weeks of training (2 × 30 breaths at 70% peak flow, 5 days a week. Training significantly reduced NRS dyspnoea scores during resistive loaded ventilation, both in the HFAO (p = 0.003 and SHAM-RMT (p = 0.005 groups. Maximum inspiratory static pressure (cm H2O was significantly increased by HFAO training (vs. PRE; p<0.001. Maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure was increased by training in both the HFAO (vs. PRE; p<0.001 and SHAM-RMT (vs. PRE; p = 0.021 groups. Peak inspiratory flow rate (L.s(-1 achieved during the maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure manoeuvre increased significantly POST (vs. PRE; p = 0.001 in the HFAO group only. HFAO reduced inspiratory resistive loading-induced dyspnoea and augments static and dynamic maximal respiratory manoeuvre performance in excess of flow-resistive IMT (SHAM-RMT in healthy individuals without the respiratory discomfort associated with RMT.

  4. Fluoroquinolone Enhances the Mutation Frequency for Meropenem-Selected Carbapenem Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but Use of the High-Potency Drug Doripenem Inhibits Mutant Formation▿

    OpenAIRE

    Tanimoto, Koichi; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Fujimoto, Shuhei; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Ike, Yasuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    The mutation frequency for carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains that were selected with carbapenems was enhanced in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of fluoroquinolones. The mutants showed either a loss of OprD activity or increased mexAB-oprM expression. The highest mutant isolation frequency was obtained by selection with meropenem, while doripenem inhibited mutant growth.

  5. Fluoroquinolone enhances the mutation frequency for meropenem-selected carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but use of the high-potency drug doripenem inhibits mutant formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Koichi; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Fujimoto, Shuhei; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Ike, Yasuyoshi

    2008-10-01

    The mutation frequency for carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains that were selected with carbapenems was enhanced in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of fluoroquinolones. The mutants showed either a loss of OprD activity or increased mexAB-oprM expression. The highest mutant isolation frequency was obtained by selection with meropenem, while doripenem inhibited mutant growth.

  6. Frequency and Circadian Timing of Eating May Influence Biomarkers of Inflammation and Insulin Resistance Associated with Breast Cancer Risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine R Marinac

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that there is interplay between the frequency and circadian timing of eating and metabolic health. We examined the associations of eating frequency and timing with metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers putatively associated with breast cancer risk in women participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination 2009-2010 Survey. Eating frequency and timing variables were calculated from 24-hour food records and included (1 proportion of calories consumed in the evening (5 pm-midnight, (2 number of eating episodes per day, and (3 nighttime fasting duration. Linear regression models examined each eating frequency and timing exposure variable with C-reactive protein (CRP concentrations and the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR. Each 10 percent increase in the proportion of calories consumed in the evening was associated with a 3 percent increase in CRP. Conversely, eating one additional meal or snack per day was associated with an 8 percent reduction in CRP. There was a significant interaction between proportion of calories consumed in the evening and fasting duration with CRP (p = 0.02. A longer nighttime fasting duration was associated with an 8 percent lower CRP only among women who ate less than 30% of their total daily calories in the evening (p = 0.01. None of the eating frequency and timing variables were significantly associated with HOMA-IR. These findings suggest that eating more frequently, reducing evening energy intake, and fasting for longer nightly intervals may lower systemic inflammation and subsequently reduce breast cancer risk. Randomized trials are needed to validate these associations.

  7. Frequency and Circadian Timing of Eating May Influence Biomarkers of Inflammation and Insulin Resistance Associated with Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinac, Catherine R; Sears, Dorothy D; Natarajan, Loki; Gallo, Linda C; Breen, Caitlin I; Patterson, Ruth E

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that there is interplay between the frequency and circadian timing of eating and metabolic health. We examined the associations of eating frequency and timing with metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers putatively associated with breast cancer risk in women participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination 2009-2010 Survey. Eating frequency and timing variables were calculated from 24-hour food records and included (1) proportion of calories consumed in the evening (5 pm-midnight), (2) number of eating episodes per day, and (3) nighttime fasting duration. Linear regression models examined each eating frequency and timing exposure variable with C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations and the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). Each 10 percent increase in the proportion of calories consumed in the evening was associated with a 3 percent increase in CRP. Conversely, eating one additional meal or snack per day was associated with an 8 percent reduction in CRP. There was a significant interaction between proportion of calories consumed in the evening and fasting duration with CRP (p = 0.02). A longer nighttime fasting duration was associated with an 8 percent lower CRP only among women who ate less than 30% of their total daily calories in the evening (p = 0.01). None of the eating frequency and timing variables were significantly associated with HOMA-IR. These findings suggest that eating more frequently, reducing evening energy intake, and fasting for longer nightly intervals may lower systemic inflammation and subsequently reduce breast cancer risk. Randomized trials are needed to validate these associations.

  8. Frequency of antimicrobial resistance and integron gene cassettes in Escherichia coli isolated from giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wencheng; Li, Caiwu; Yang, Xin; Wang, Yongxiang; Cheng, Guangyang; Zeng, Jinxin; Zhang, Xiuzhong; Chen, Yanpeng; Cai, Run; Huang, Qianru; Feng, Lan; Wang, Hongning; Li, Desheng; Zhang, Guiquan; Chen, Yanxi; Zhang, Zhizhong; Zhang, Heming

    2018-03-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is considered as a common opportunistic pathogen, which causes seriously intestinal infections to giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and other animals. The aim of this investigation was to characterize the antimicrobial resistance and integron gene cassettes in E. coli isolated from the faeces of giant pandas in China. A total of 89 E. coli were isolated, after diagnosis of isolates and genomes were extracted. All the isolates were screened for the presence of related drug-resistance genes and integron gene cassettes through the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and sequencing. In addition, antimicrobial resistance testing was performed according to the standard disk diffusion method (CLSI 2013). The results demonstrated that all the isolates were multi-drug resistance (MDR). High resistance proportions of the E. coli isolates were to streptomycin (93%), cefazolin (90%), amikacin (75%), tetracycline (65%), ampicillin (62%), cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (54%, each). With respect to the various resistance genes; bla CTX-M , sul1, ant (3')-Ia, tetA, qnrB, tetE, floR, aac (6')-Ib, sul2, rmtA, cmlA, rmtB and tetC were identified with the respective frequencies of 44%, 45%, 38%, 37%, 35%, 27%, 26%, 20%, 18%, 15%, 10%, 7% and 4%. None of the isolates was positive for qnrA and cfr genes. Moreover, a further investigation of integron revealed that the emergence of class 1 and 2 integrons were in 47% and 8% isolates, respectively. While class 3 integron was not screened. Six types of containing in class 1 integron specific gene cassettes (dfrA12-orfF-aadA2, dfrA17-aadA5, aadA1, aadA5, dfrA1 and dfrA7) were identified. However, only one gene cassette (dfrA1-sat2-aadA1) was detected in class 2 integron. These finding emphasize that a high level of E. coli isolates harbored antibiotics resistance and integron gene cassettes, which may bring so many potential threats to the health of giant pandas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All

  9. Experimental Determination of Effect of Variable Resistance on Lead ZirconateTitanate (PZT-5A4Eunder various Thermal and Frequency Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Elahi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A specially designed apparatus and circuit working on the principle of inverse piezoelectricity due to the effect of polarization was used to find the relationship between resistance and peak to peak voltage of Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT-5A4E by shocking it at variable frequencies and at variable resistances under various thermal conditions within Curie temperature limit using equivalent circuit method. It was found that by increasing temperature, peak to peak voltage increases and similarly by increasing frequency, peak to peak voltage decreases and with the increase in resistance peak to peak voltage decreases.

  10. Simplified formulae for the estimation of the positive-sequence resistance and reactance of three-phase cables for different frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da

    2015-01-01

    The installation of HVAC underground cables became more common in recent years, a trend expected to continue in the future. Underground cables are more complex than overhead lines and the calculation of their resistance and reactance can be challenging and time consuming for frequencies that are ......The installation of HVAC underground cables became more common in recent years, a trend expected to continue in the future. Underground cables are more complex than overhead lines and the calculation of their resistance and reactance can be challenging and time consuming for frequencies...... that are not power frequency. Software packages capable of performing exact calculations of these two parameters exist, but simple equations able to estimate the reactance and resistance of an underground cable for the frequencies associated to a transient or a resonance phenomenon would be helpful. This paper...

  11. The Frequency and Antibiotic Resistance of Chromate Tolerating Microorganisms in Qom Industrial wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Zolfaghary

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Chromium is one of the major sources of environmental pollution and a potent occupational carcinogen. The hexavalent chromium compounds are more toxic than those of trivalent. Recent studies have suggested that reduction of Cr(VI to its lower oxidation states and related free radical reactions play an important role in carcinogenic, genotoxic and immunotoxic effects in human and animals.

     This paper reports occurrence of chromium tolerant and antibiotic resistant organism of four industrial wastewaters including electroplating, textile, galvanization, and dye manufacturing in Qom.

     

    Methods: In this study 241 isolates including 23 gram positive coccus, 3 gram negative bacilli and 215 gram positive bacilli were obtained by using of LB Agar plus determined concentration of potassium chromate.

     

    Results: A gram positive coccus, chromate reducing bacteria strain isolated from effluent of chromo plaiting could tolerate up to 760mM concentration in 34°c and pH=7 within 24h and showed resistance to some antibiotics. Biochemical, physiological, morphological and 16SrRNA tests showed this bacteria belongs to staphylococcus arlettae strain R1-7A.

     

    Conclusion: the result indicates that the indigenous microbial isolates can be useful for hexavalent chromium detoxification of chromium contamination environment and reduction of its pathogenicity and carcinogenicity, on the other hand the control of these bacteria is important from the medical view.

     

  12. Multimodal pyrethroid resistance in malaria vectors, Anopheles gambiae s.s., Anopheles arabiensis, and Anopheles funestus s.s. in western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Kawada

    Full Text Available Anopheles gambiae s.s., Anopheles arabiensis, and Anopheles funestus s.s. are the most important species for malaria transmission. Pyrethroid resistance of these vector mosquitoes is one of the main obstacles against effective vector control. The objective of the present study was to monitor the pyrethroid susceptibility in the 3 major malaria vectors in a highly malaria endemic area in western Kenya and to elucidate the mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance in these species. Gembe East and West, Mbita Division, and 4 main western islands in the Suba district of the Nyanza province in western Kenya were used as the study area. Larval and adult collection and bioassay were conducted, as well as the detection of point mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel (1014L by using direct DNA sequencing. A high level of pyrethroid resistance caused by the high frequency of point mutations (L1014S was detected in An. gambiae s.s. In contrast, P450-related pyrethroid resistance seemed to be widespread in both An. arabiensis and An. funestus s.s. Not a single L1014S mutation was detected in these 2 species. A lack of cross-resistance between DDT and permethrin was also found in An. arabiensis and An. funestus s.s., while An. gambiae s.s. was resistant to both insecticides. It is noteworthy that the above species in the same area are found to be resistant to pyrethroids by their unique resistance mechanisms. Furthermore, it is interesting that 2 different resistance mechanisms have developed in the 2 sibling species in the same area individually. The cross resistance between permethrin and DDT in An. gambiae s.s. may be attributed to the high frequency of kdr mutation, which might be selected by the frequent exposure to ITNs. Similarly, the metabolic pyrethroid resistance in An. arabiensis and An. funestus s.s. is thought to develop without strong selection by DDT.

  13. Indirect evidence that agricultural pesticides select for insecticide resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Djogbénou S; Benoit, Assogba; Laurette, Djossou; Michel, Makoutode

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the possible relationship between the agricultural use of insecticides and the emergence of insecticide resistance. Bioassays were conducted using simulated mosquito larval habitats and well known Anopheles gambiae strains. Soil samples were collected from vegetable production areas in Benin, including one site with insecticide use, one site where insecticides had not been used for two months, and a third where insecticides had not been used. Pupation and emergence rates were very low in pyrethroid-susceptible strains when exposed to soil that had been recently exposed to insecticides. Pupation and emergence rates in strains with the kdr mutation alone or both the kdr and Ace-1 mutations were much higher. Overall, strains with the kdr mutation survived at higher rates compared to that without kdr mutation. Although this study is observational, we provide indirect evidence indicating that soils from agricultural areas contain insecticide residues that can play a role in the emergence of insecticide resistance in Anopheles. This aspect should be taken into account to better utilize the insecticide in the context of integrated pest management programs. © 2016 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  14. Comparison between Laboratory Measurements, Simulations and Analytical Predictions of the Resistive Wall Transverse Beam Impedance at low frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Roncarolo, F; Kroyer, T; Métral, E; Salvant, B

    2008-01-01

    The prediction of the resistive wall transverse beam impedance at the first unstable betatron line (8 kHz) of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is of paramount importance for understanding and controlling the related coupled-bunch instability. Until now only novel analytical formulas were available at this frequency. Recently, laboratory measurements and numerical simulations were performed to crosscheck the analytical predictions. The experimental results based on the measurement of the variation of a probe coil inductance in the presence of i) sample graphite plates, ii) stand-alone LHC collimator jaws and iii) a full LHC collimator assembly are presented in detail. The measurement results are compared to both analytical theories and simulations. In addition, the consequences for the understanding of the LHC impedance are discussed.

  15. The Frequency of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase Gene Polymorphism in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hend M. Abdulghany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study aimed to use Coagulase gene polymorphism to identify methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA subtypes isolated from nasal carriers in Minia governorate, Egypt, evaluate the efficiency of these methods in discriminating variable strains, and compare these subtypes with antibiotypes. A total of 400 specimens were collected from nasal carriers in Minia governorate, Egypt, between March 2012 and April 2013. Fifty-eight strains (14.5% were isolated and identified by standard microbiological methods as MRSA. The identified isolates were tested by Coagulase gene RFLP typing. Out of 58 MRSA isolates 15 coa types were classified, and the amplification products showed multiple bands (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 bands. Coagulase gene PCR-RFLPs exhibited 10 patterns that ranged from 1 to 8 fragments with AluI digestion. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing with a panel of 8 antimicrobial agents showed 6 different antibiotypes. Antibiotype 1 was the most common phenotype with 82.7%. The results have demonstrated that many new variants of the coa gene are present in Minia, Egypt, different from those reported in the previous studies. So surveillance of MRSA should be continued.

  16. Insecticide resistance alleles affect vector competence of Anopheles gambiae s.s. for Plasmodium falciparum field isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoues Alout

    Full Text Available The widespread insecticide resistance raises concerns for vector control implementation and sustainability particularly for the control of the main vector of human malaria, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto. However, the extent to which insecticide resistance mechanisms interfere with the development of the malignant malaria parasite in its vector and their impact on overall malaria transmission remains unknown. We explore the impact of insecticide resistance on the outcome of Plasmodium falciparum infection in its natural vector using three An. gambiae strains sharing a common genetic background, one susceptible to insecticides and two resistant, one homozygous for the ace-1(R mutation and one for the kdr mutation. Experimental infections of the three strains were conducted in parallel with field isolates of P. falciparum from Burkina Faso (West Africa by direct membrane feeding assays. Both insecticide resistant mutations influence the outcome of malaria infection by increasing the prevalence of infection. In contrast, the kdr resistant allele is associated with reduced parasite burden in infected individuals at the oocyst stage, when compared to the susceptible strain, while the ace-1 (R resistant allele showing no such association. Thus insecticide resistance, which is particularly problematic for malaria control efforts, impacts vector competence towards P. falciparum and probably parasite transmission through increased sporozoite prevalence in kdr resistant mosquitoes. These results are of great concern for the epidemiology of malaria considering the widespread pyrethroid resistance currently observed in Sub-Saharan Africa and the efforts deployed to control the disease.

  17. High Voltage Resistive Divider Based on Cast Microwire in Glass Insulation on 6–24 kV Alternating Current of Commercial Frequency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juravleov A.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available It is presented the analysis and description of the construction of the high voltage resistive divider on the base of cast microwire in glass insulation on 6–24 kV alternating current of commercial frequency. It is presented the procedure of compensation of frequency error during the process of fabrication of divides and results of tests of the sample model of the divider as well.

  18. Frequency and geographic distribution of gyrA and gyrB mutations associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, Elisea; Catanzaro, Donald; Catanzaro, Antonino; Ganiats, Theodore; Brodine, Stephanie; Alcaraz, John; Rodwell, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    The detection of mutations in the gyrA and gyrB genes in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome that have been demonstrated to confer phenotypic resistance to fluoroquinolones is the most promising technology for rapid diagnosis of fluoroquinolone resistance. In order to characterize the diversity and frequency of gyrA and gyrB mutations and to describe the global distribution of these mutations, we conducted a systematic review, from May 1996 to April 2013, of all published studies evaluating Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutations associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones. The overall goal of the study was to determine the potential utility and reliability of these mutations as diagnostic markers to detect phenotypic fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to describe their geographic distribution. Forty-six studies, covering four continents and 18 countries, provided mutation data for 3,846 unique clinical isolates with phenotypic resistance profiles to fluoroquinolones. The gyrA mutations occurring most frequently in fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates, ranged from 21-32% for D94G and 13-20% for A90V, by drug. Eighty seven percent of all strains that were phenotypically resistant to moxifloxacin and 83% of ofloxacin resistant isolates contained mutations in gyrA. Additionally we found that 83% and 80% of moxifloxacin and ofloxacin resistant strains respectively, were observed to have mutations in the gyrA codons interrogated by the existing MTBDRsl line probe assay. In China and Russia, 83% and 84% of fluoroquinolone resistant strains respectively, were observed to have gyrA mutations in the gene regions covered by the MTBDRsl assay. Molecular diagnostics, specifically the Genotype MTBDRsl assay, focusing on codons 88-94 should have moderate to high sensitivity in most countries. While we did observe geographic differences in the frequencies of single gyrA mutations across countries, molecular diagnostics based on detection of all gyr

  19. Frequency of resistance to methicillin and other antimicrobial agents among Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from pigs and their human handlers in Trinidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Gordon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has emerged recently worldwide in production animals, particularly pigs and veal calves, which act as reservoirs for MRSA strains for human infection. The study determined the prevalence of MRSA and other resistant strains of S. aureus isolated from the anterior nares of pigs and human handlers on pig farms in Trinidad. Methods: Isolation of S. aureus was done by concurrently inoculating Baird-Parker agar (BPA and Chromagar MRSA (CHROM with swab samples and isolates were identified using standard methods. Suspect MRSA isolates from Chromagar and BPA were subjected to confirmatory test using Oxoid PBP2 latex agglutination test. The disc diffusion method was used to determine resistance to antimicrobial agents. Results: The frequency of isolation of MRSA was 2.1% (15 of 723 for pigs but 0.0% (0 of 72 for humans. Generally, for isolates of S. aureus from humans there was a high frequency of resistance compared with those from pigs, which had moderate resistance to the following antimicrobials: penicillin G (54.5%, 51.5%, ampicillin (59.1%, 49.5%, and streptomycin (59.1%, 37.1%, respectively. There was moderate resistance to tetracycline (36.4%, 41.2% and gentamycin (27.2%, 23.7% for human and pig S. aureus isolates, respectively, and low resistance to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (4.5%, 6.2% and norfloxacin (9.1%, 12.4%, respectively. The frequency of resistance to oxacillin by the disc method was 36.4 and 34.0% from S. aureus isolates from humans and pigs, respectively. Out of a total of 78 isolates of S. aureus from both human and pig sources that were resistant to oxacillin by the disc diffusion method, only 15 (19.2% were confirmed as MRSA by the PBP'2 latex test kit. Conclusions: The detection of MRSA strains in pigs, albeit at a low frequency, coupled with a high frequency of resistance to commonly used antimicrobial agents in pig and humans could have zoonotic and therapeutic

  20. Moving towards high-power, high-frequency and low-resistance CNT supercapacitors by tuning the CNT length, axial deformation and contact resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiricò, L.; Lanzara, G.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper it is shown that the electrochemical behaviour of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube (VANT) supercapacitors is influenced by the VANTs’ length (electrode thickness), by their axial compression and by their interface with the current collector. It is found that the VANTs, which can be interpreted as a dense array of nanochannels, have an active area available to ions that is strongly affected by the electrode’s thickness and compressional state. Consequently, the tested thinner electrodes, compressed electrodes or a combination of the two were found to be characterized by a significant improvement in terms of power density (up to 1246%), knee frequency (58 822% working up to 10 kHz), equivalent series resistance (ESR, up to 67%) and capacitance (up to 21%) when compared with thicker and/or uncompressed electrodes. These values are significantly higher than those reported in the literature where long VANTs with no control on compression are typically used. It is also shown that the ESR can be reduced not only by using shorter and compressed VANTs that have a higher conductance or by improving the electrode/collector electrical contact by changing the contact morphology at the nanoscale through compression, but also by depositing a thin platinum layer on the VANT tips in contact with the current collector (73% ESR decrease).

  1. Very-low-frequency resistivity, self-potential and ground temperature surveys on Taal volcano (Philippines): Implications for future activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnicki, J.; Vargemezis, G.; Johnston, M. J. S.; Sasai, Y.; Reniva, P.; Alanis, P.

    2017-06-01

    Taal volcano is one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the Philippines. Thirty-three eruptions have occurred through historical time with several exhibiting cataclysmic phases. Most recent eruptions are confined to Volcano Island located within the prehistoric Taal collapse caldera that is now filled by Taal Lake. The last eruptive activity from 1965 to 1977 took place from Mt. Tabaro, about 2 km to the southwest of the Main Crater center. Since this time, episodes of seismic activity, ground deformation, gas release, surface fissuring, fumarole activity and temperature changes are recorded periodically around the main crater, but no major eruption has occurred. This period of quiescence is the third longest period without eruptive activity since 1572. In March 2010, a campaign based on Very-Low-Frequency (VLF) resistivity surveys together with repeated surveys of self-potential, ground temperature and fissure activity was intensified and the results compared to a large-scale Electrical Resistivity Tomography experiment. This work fortunately occurred before, within and after a new seismovolcanic crisis from late April 2010 to March 2011. The joint analysis of these new data, together with results from previous magnetotelluric soundings, allows a better description of the electrical resistivity and crustal structure beneath the Main Crater down to a depth of several kilometers. No indication of growth of the two geothermal areas located on both sides of the northern crater rim was apparent from 2005 to March 2010. These areas appear controlled by active fissures, opened during the 1992 and 1994 crises, that dip downward towards the core of the hydrothermal system located at about 2.5 km depth beneath the crater. Older mineralized fissures at lower elevations to the North of the geothermal areas also dip downward under the crater. Repeated self-potential and ground temperature surveys completed between 2005 and 2015 show new geothermal and hydrothermal activity in

  2. Insecticide resistance in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti from Martinique: distribution, mechanisms and relations with environmental factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Marcombe

    Full Text Available Dengue is an important mosquito borne viral disease in Martinique Island (French West Indies. The viruses responsible for dengue are transmitted by Aedes aegypti, an indoor day-biting mosquito. The most effective proven method for disease prevention has been by vector control by various chemical or biological means. Unfortunately insecticide resistance has already been observed on the Island and recently showed to significantly reduce the efficacy of vector control interventions. In this study, we investigated the distribution of resistance and the underlying mechanisms in nine Ae. aegypti populations. Statistical multifactorial approach was used to investigate the correlations between insecticide resistance levels, associated mechanisms and environmental factors characterizing the mosquito populations. Bioassays revealed high levels of resistance to temephos and deltamethrin and susceptibility to Bti in the 9 populations tested. Biochemical assays showed elevated detoxification enzyme activities of monooxygenases, carboxylesterases and glutathione S-tranferases in most of the populations. Molecular screening for common insecticide target-site mutations, revealed the presence of the "knock-down resistance" V1016I Kdr mutation at high frequency (>87%. Real time quantitative RT-PCR showed the potential involvement of several candidate detoxification genes in insecticide resistance. Principal Component Analysis (PCA performed with variables characterizing Ae. aegypti from Martinique permitted to underline potential links existing between resistance distribution and other variables such as agriculture practices, vector control interventions and urbanization. Insecticide resistance is widespread but not homogeneously distributed across Martinique. The influence of environmental and operational factors on the evolution of the resistance and mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Effect of swift heavy ion irradiation on surface resistance of DyBa2Cu3O7−δ thin films at microwave frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ail, Ujwala; Banerjee, Tamalika; Bhangale, A.R.; Kanjilal, D.

    2002-01-01

    We report the observation of a pronounced peak in surface resistance at microwave frequencies of 4.88 GHz and 9.55 GHz and its disappearance after irradiation with swift ions in laser ablated DyBa2Cu3O7−δ (DBCO) thin films. The measurements were carried out in zero field as well as in the presence

  4. Compensation of a Primary Transducer Resistance Alteration by Changing the Amplitude-Frequency Characteristics of a Noise-Thermometer Input Circle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan STADNYK

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Method of compensation for the influence of a primary transducer resistance temperature alteration upon the determination of a noise-voltage square mean value, proportional to the measured temperature, by changing the Amplitude-Frequency Characteristics (AFCh of a noise-thermometer input circle.

  5. On the Frequency and Voltage-Dependent Profiles of the Surface States and Series Resistance of Au/ZnO/n-Si Structures in a Wide Range of Frequency and Voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikravan, Afsoun; Badali, Yosef; Altındal, Şemsettin; Uslu, İbrahim; Orak, İkram

    2017-10-01

    In order to interpret the electrical characteristics of fabricated Au/ZnO/n-Si structures as a function of frequency and voltage well, their capacitance-voltage ( C- V) and conductance-voltage ( G/ ω- V) measurements were carried out in a wide range of frequencies (0.7 kHz-2 MHz) and voltages (± 6 V) by 50 mV steps at room temperature. Both the C- V and G/ ω- V plots have reverse, depletion, and accumulation regions such as a metal-insulator/oxide semiconductor (MIS or MOS) structures. The values of doped-donor atoms ( N D), Fermi energy level ( E F), barrier height (ΦB), and series resistance ( R s) of the structure were obtained as a function of frequency and voltage. While the value of N D decreases with increasing frequency almost as exponentially, the value of depletion width ( W D) increases. The values of C and G/ ω increase with decreasing frequency because the surface states ( N ss) are able to follow the alternating current (AC) signal, resulting in excess capacitance ( C ex) and conductance ( G ex/ ω), which depends on their relaxation time and the frequency of the AC signal. The voltage-dependent profiles of N ss were obtained from both the high-low frequency capacitance and Hill-Colleman methods. The other important parameter R s of the structure was also obtained from the Nicollian and Brews methods as a function of voltage.

  6. Imaging targeted at tumor with 188Re-labeled VEGF189 exon 6-encoded peptide and effects of the transfecting truncated KDR gene in tumor-bearing nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Zhexue; Li Qianwei; Liu Guangyuan; Luo Chaoxue; Xie Ganfeng; Zheng Lei; Huang Dingde

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Planar imaging of 188 Re-labeled vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 189 exon 6-encoded peptide (QKRKRKKSRYKS) with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in tumor-bearing nude mice and effects of the transfecting truncated KDR gene on its imaging were investigated, so as to provide a basis for further applying the peptide to tumor-targeted radionuclide treatment. Methods: QKRKRKKSRYKS, coupling with mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG 3 ) chelator was labeled with 188 Re; then in vivo distribution, planar imaging with SPECT and blocking experiment in tumor-bearing nude mice were analyzed. Recombinant adenovirus vectors carrying the truncated KDR gene were constructed to transfect tumor tissues to evaluate the effects of truncated KDR on the in vivo distribution and tumor planar imaging of 188 Re-MAG 3 -QKRKRKKSRYKS in tumor-bearing nude mice. Results: The labeled peptide exhibited a sound receptor binding activity. Planar imaging with SPECT demonstrated significant radioactivity accumulation in tumor 1 h after injection of the labeled peptide and disappearance of radioactivity 3 h later. Significant radioactivity accumulation was also observed in the liver, intestines and kidneys but was not obvious in other tissues. An hour after injection of the labeled peptide, the percentage of the injected radioactive dose per gram (%ID/g) of tumor and tumor/contralateral muscle tissues ratio were 1.98±0.38 and 2.53±0.33, respectively, and increased to 3.08±0.84 and 3.61±0.59 in the group transfected with the truncated KDR gene, respectively, and radioactivity accumulation in tumor with planar imaging also increased significantly in the transfection group. Conclusion: 188 Re-MAG 3 -QKRKRKKSRYKS can accumulate in tumor tissues, which could be increased by the transfection of truncated KDR gene. This study provides a basis for further applying the peptide to tumor targeted radionuclide imaging and treatment.

  7. Molecular Biology of Insect Sodium Channels and Pyrethroid Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ke; Du, Yuzhe; Rinkevich, Frank; Nomura, Yoshiko; Xu, Peng; Wang, Lingxin; Silver, Kristopher; Zhorov, Boris S.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the initiation and propagation of the action potential in neurons and other excitable cells. Because of their critical roles in electrical signaling, sodium channels are targets of a variety of naturally occurring and synthetic neurotoxins, including several classes of insecticides. This review is intended to provide an update on the molecular biology of insect sodium channels and the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Although mammalian and insect sodium channels share fundamental topological and functional properties, most insect species carry only one sodium channel gene, compared to multiple sodium channel genes found in each mammalian species. Recent studies showed that two posttranscriptional mechanisms, alternative splicing and RNA editing, are involved in generating functional diversity of sodium channels in insects. More than 50 sodium channel mutations have been identified to be responsible for or associated with knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids in various arthropod pests and disease vectors. Elucidation of molecular mechanism of kdr led to the identification of dual receptor sites of pyrethroids on insect sodium channels. Most of the kdr mutations appear to be located within or close to the two receptor sites. The accumulating knowledge of insect sodium channels and their interactions with insecticides provides a foundation for understanding the neurophysiology of sodium channels in vivo and the development of new and safer insecticides for effective control of arthropod pests and human disease vectors. PMID:24704279

  8. Insecticide resistance in malaria vector mosquitoes at four localities in Ghana, West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser Maria L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria vector control programmes that rely on insecticide-based interventions such as indoor house spraying with residual insecticides or insecticide treated bed nets, need to base their decision-making process on sound baseline data. More and more commercial entities in Africa, such as mining companies, are realising the value to staff productivity of controlling malaria transmission in their areas of operation. This paper presents baseline entomological data obtained during surveys conducted for four mining operations in Ghana, West Africa. Results The vast majority of the samples were identified as Anopheles gambiae S form with only a few M form specimens being identified from Tarkwa. Plasmodium falciparum infection rates ranged from 4.5 to 8.6% in An. gambiae and 1.81 to 8.06% in An. funestus. High survival rates on standard WHO bioassay tests were recorded for all insecticide classes except the organophosphates that showed reasonable mortality at all locations (i.e. > 90%. The West African kdr mutation was detected and showed high frequencies in all populations. Conclusions The data highlight the complexity of the situation prevailing in southern Ghana and the challenges facing the malaria vector control programmes in this region. Vector control programmes in Ghana need to carefully consider the resistance profiles of the local mosquito populations in order to base their resistance management strategies on sound scientific data.

  9. Insecticide resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus from Zanzibar: implications for vector control programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Zanzibar has a long history of lymphatic filariasis (LF) caused by the filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti, and transmitted by the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus Say. The LF Programme in Zanzibar has successfully implemented mass drug administration (MDA) to interrupt transmission, and is now in the elimination phase. Monitoring infections in mosquitoes, and assessing the potential role of interventions such as vector control, is important in case the disease re-emerges as a public health problem. Here, we examine Culex mosquito species from the two main islands to detect W. bancrofti infection and to determine levels of susceptibility to the insecticides used for vector control. Methods Culex mosquitoes collected during routine catches in Vitongoji, Pemba Island, and Makadara, Unguja Island were tested for W. bancrofti infection using PCR. Insecticide bioassays on Culex mosquitoes were performed to determine susceptibility to permethrin, deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, DDT and bendiocarb. Additional synergism assays with piperonyl butoxide (PBO) were used for lambda-cyhalothrin. Pyrosequencing was used to determine the kdr genotype and sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) subunit performed to identify ambiguous Culex species. Results None of the wild-caught Culex mosquitoes analysed were found to be positive for W. bancrofti. High frequencies of resistance to all insecticides were found in Wete, Pemba Island, whereas Culex from the nearby site of Tibirinzi (Pemba) and in Kilimani, Unguja Island remained relatively susceptible. Species identification confirmed that mosquitoes from Wete were Culex quinquefasciatus. The majority of the Culex collected from Tibirinzi and all from Kilimani could not be identified to species by molecular assays. Two alternative kdr alleles, both resulting in a L1014F substitution were detected in Cx. quinquefasciatus from Wete with no homozygote susceptible detected. Metabolic resistance to

  10. Insecticide resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus from Zanzibar: implications for vector control programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher M; Machin, Camille; Mohammed, Khalfan; Majambere, Silas; Ali, Abdullah S; Khatib, Bakari O; McHa, Juma; Ranson, Hilary; Kelly-Hope, Louise A

    2012-04-21

    Zanzibar has a long history of lymphatic filariasis (LF) caused by the filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti, and transmitted by the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus Say. The LF Programme in Zanzibar has successfully implemented mass drug administration (MDA) to interrupt transmission, and is now in the elimination phase. Monitoring infections in mosquitoes, and assessing the potential role of interventions such as vector control, is important in case the disease re-emerges as a public health problem. Here, we examine Culex mosquito species from the two main islands to detect W. bancrofti infection and to determine levels of susceptibility to the insecticides used for vector control. Culex mosquitoes collected during routine catches in Vitongoji, Pemba Island, and Makadara, Unguja Island were tested for W. bancrofti infection using PCR. Insecticide bioassays on Culex mosquitoes were performed to determine susceptibility to permethrin, deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, DDT and bendiocarb. Additional synergism assays with piperonyl butoxide (PBO) were used for lambda-cyhalothrin. Pyrosequencing was used to determine the kdr genotype and sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) subunit performed to identify ambiguous Culex species. None of the wild-caught Culex mosquitoes analysed were found to be positive for W. bancrofti. High frequencies of resistance to all insecticides were found in Wete, Pemba Island, whereas Culex from the nearby site of Tibirinzi (Pemba) and in Kilimani, Unguja Island remained relatively susceptible. Species identification confirmed that mosquitoes from Wete were Culex quinquefasciatus. The majority of the Culex collected from Tibirinzi and all from Kilimani could not be identified to species by molecular assays. Two alternative kdr alleles, both resulting in a L1014F substitution were detected in Cx. quinquefasciatus from Wete with no homozygote susceptible detected. Metabolic resistance to pyrethroids was also implicated

  11. Frequency of bap and cpaA virulence genes in drug resistant clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii and their role in biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Fallah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Acinetobacter baumannii has a high propensity to form biofilm and frequently causes medical device-related infections with multiple-drug-resistance in hospitals. The aim of this work is to study antimicrobial resistance and the role of bap and cpaA genes in biofilm formation by A. baumannii to understand how this pathogen persists in the hospital environment. Materials and Methods: Theantibiotic resistance profile and in vitro biofilm-forming ability of one hundred clinical isolates of A. baumannii was evaluated by disc diffusion and crystal-violet staining methods, respectively. Isolates were tested for the presence of bap and cpaA genes. Results: The isolates were highly resistant to cefepime, third-generation cephalosporins, ciprofloxacin, cotrimoxazole, aminoglycosides and carbapenems. Moreover, four isolates were resistant to colistin. Quantification of biofilm showed that 43% of the isolates were strong biofilm-producer. Furthermore, 32% of the isolates exhibited moderate biofilm-formation and showed initial binding activity. Frequency of bap and cpaA were determined 92% and 36%, respectively. Conclusion: There was strong association between the presence of bap gene and biofilm formation by A. baumannii isolates (P=0.003. In addition, multidrug resistant isolates produced stronger biofilm than other isolates (P=0.0001. These results indicate importance of biofilm in resistance of isolates and effect of presence of bap gene in biofilm formation by A. baumannii strains.

  12. Increased frequency of drug-resistant bacteria and fecal coliforms in an Indiana Creek adjacent to farmland amended with treated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaratnam, Shivi; Kunberger, J David

    2004-08-01

    Many studies indicate the presence of human pathogens and drug-resistant bacteria in treated sewage sludge. Since one of the main methods of treated sewage disposal is by application to agricultural land, the presence of these organisms is of concern to human health. The goal of this study was to determine whether the frequency of drug-resistant and indicator bacteria in Sugar Creek, which is used for recreational purposes, was influenced by proximity to a farmland routinely amended with treated sludge (site E). Surface water from 3 sites along Sugar Creek (site E, 1 upstream site (site C) and 1 downstream site (site K)) were tested for the presence of ampicillin-resistant (Amp(R)) bacteria, fecal and total coliforms over a period of 40 d. Site E consistently had higher frequencies of Amp(R) bacteria and fecal coliforms compared with the other 2 sites. All of the tested Amp(R) isolates were resistant to at least 1 other antibiotic. However, no isolate was resistant to more than 4 classes of antimicrobials. These results suggest that surface runoff from the farmland is strongly correlated with higher incidence of Amp(R) and fecal coliforms at site E.

  13. Co-occurrence and distribution of East (L1014S) and West (L1014F) African knock-down resistance in Anopheles gambiae sensu lato population of Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabula, Bilali; Kisinza, William; Tungu, Patrick; Ndege, Chacha; Batengana, Benard; Kollo, Douglas; Malima, Robert; Kafuko, Jessica; Mohamed, Mahdi; Magesa, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Objective Insecticide resistance molecular markers can provide sensitive indicators of resistance development in Anopheles vector populations. Assaying these makers is of paramount importance in the resistance monitoring programme. We investigated the presence and distribution of knock-down resistance (kdr) mutations in Anopheles gambiae s.l. in Tanzania. Methods Indoor-resting Anopheles mosquitoes were collected from 10 sites and tested for insecticide resistance using the standard WHO protocol. Polymerase chain reaction-based molecular diagnostics were used to genotype mosquitoes and detect kdr mutations. Results The An. gambiae tested were resistance to lambdacyhalothrin in Muheza, Arumeru and Muleba. Out of 350 An. gambiae s.l. genotyped, 35% were An. gambiae s.s. and 65% An. arabiensis. L1014S and L1014F mutations were detected in both An. gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis. L1014S point mutation was found at the allelic frequency of 4–33%, while L1014F was at the allelic frequency 6–41%. The L1014S mutation was much associated with An. gambiae s.s. (χ2 = 23.41; P protocolo estándar de la OMS. Mediante un diagnóstico molecular basado en la PCR se genotiparon los mosquitos y se detectaron los genotipos kdr. Resultados Los An. gambiae evaluados eran resistentes a lambdacialotrina en Muheza, Arumeru y Muleba. De 350 An. gambiae s.l. genotipados, 35% eran An. gambiae s.s. y 65% eran An. arabiensis. Se detectaron mutaciones L1014S y L1014F tanto en An. gambiae s.s. como en An. arabiensis. La mutación puntual L1014S se encontró con una frecuencia alélica de 4-33%, mientras que L1014F tenía una frecuencia alélica de 6-14%. La mutación L1014S estaba ampliamente asociada a An. gambiae s.s. (Chi-Cuadrado = 23.41; P < 0.0001) y la L1014F estaba asociada con An. arabiensis (Chi-Square = 11.21; P = 0.0008). El alelo L1014S estaba significativamente asociado con mosquitos resistentes a la lambdacialotrina (P < 0.001). Conclusión La

  14. Frequency of the cancer-resistant phenotype in SR/CR mice and the effect of litter seriation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Janne; Boschian, Anna; Hau, Jann

    2008-01-01

    /CR phenotype was recorded. The phenotype frequency in the first-born litters was similar to that recorded in the founder colony in the US. There was no significant difference in the frequency of the SR/CR phenotype between the two genders, but the overall frequency of the SR/CR phenotype was significantly...

  15. Frequency of ABL gene mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant to imatinib and results of treatment switch to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcé, Silvia; Zamora, Lurdes; Cabezón, Marta; Xicoy, Blanca; Boqué, Concha; Fernández, Cristalina; Grau, Javier; Navarro, José-Tomás; Fernández de Sevilla, Alberto; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Feliu, Evarist; Millá, Fuensanta

    2013-08-04

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have improved the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, a significant proportion of patients do not achieve the optimal response or are resistant to TKI. ABL kinase domain mutations have been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of TKI resistance. Treatment with second-generation TKI has produced high rates of hematologic and cytogenetic responses in mutated ABL patients. The aim of this study was to determine the type and frequency of ABL mutations in patients who were resistant to imatinib or had lost the response, and to analyze the effect of second-generation TKI on their outcome. The presence of ABL mutations in 45 CML patients resistant to imatinib was evaluated by direct sequencing and was correlated with the results of the cytogenetic study (performed in 39 cases). The outcome of these patients after therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib was analyzed. ABL mutations were detected in 14 out of 45 resistant patients. Patients with clonal cytogenetic evolution tended to develop mutations more frequently than those without clonal evolution. Nine out of the 15 patients with ABL mutation responded to a treatment switch to nilotinib (n=4), dasatinib (n=2), interferon (n=1) or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (n=2). The frequency of ABL mutations in CML patients resistant to imatinib is high and is more frequent among those with clonal cytogenetic evolution. The change to second-generation TKI can overcome imatinib resistance in most of the mutated patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Frequency and Distribution of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms within mprF in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates and Their Role in Cross-Resistance to Daptomycin and Host Defense Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Arnold S; Mishra, Nagendra N; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Rubio, Aileen; Yang, Soo-Jin

    2015-08-01

    MprF is responsible for the lysinylation of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) to synthesize the positively charged phospholipid (PL) species, lysyl-PG (L-PG). It has been proposed that the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the mprF open reading frame (ORF) are associated with a gain-in-function phenotype in terms of daptomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. (Note that although the official term is daptomycin nonsusceptibility, we use the term daptomycin resistance in this paper for ease of presentation.) Using 22 daptomycin-susceptible (DAP(s))/daptomycin-resistant (DAP(r)) clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain pairs, we assessed (i) the frequencies and distribution of putative mprF gain-in-function SNPs, (ii) the relationships of the SNPs to both daptomycin resistance and cross-resistance to the prototypical endovascular host defense peptide (HDP) thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein (tPMP), and (iii) the impact of mprF SNPs on positive surface charge phenotype and modifications of membrane PL profiles. Most of the mprF SNPs identified in our DAP(r) strains were clustered within the two MprF loci, (i) the central bifunctional domain and (ii) the C-terminal synthase domain. Moreover, we were able to correlate the presence and location of mprF SNPs in DAP(r) strains with HDP cross-resistance, positive surface charge, and L-PG profiles. Although DAP(r) strains with mprF SNPs in the bifunctional domain showed higher resistance to tPMPs than DAP(r) strains with SNPs in the synthase domain, this relationship was not observed in positive surface charge assays. These results demonstrated that both charge-mediated and -unrelated mechanisms are involved in DAP resistance and HDP cross-resistance in S. aureus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Costs and benefits of multiple resistance to insecticides for Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weill Mylène

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary dynamics of xenobiotic resistance depends on how resistance mutations influence the fitness of their bearers, both in the presence and absence of xenobiotic selection pressure. In cases of multiple resistance, these dynamics will also depend on how individual resistance mutations interact with one another, and on the xenobiotics applied against them. We compared Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes harbouring two resistance alleles ace-1R and KdrR (conferring resistance to carbamate and pyrethroid insecticides, respectively to mosquitoes bearing only one of the alleles, or neither allele. Comparisons were made in environments where both, only one, or neither type of insecticide was present. Results Each resistance allele was associated with fitness costs (survival to adulthood in an insecticide-free environment, with the costs of ace-1R being greater than for KdrR. However, there was a notable interaction in that the costs of harbouring both alleles were significantly less than for harbouring ace-1R alone. The two insecticides combined in an additive, synergistic and antagonistic manner depending on a mosquito's resistance status, but were not predictable based on the presence/absence of either, or both mutations. Conclusion Insecticide resistance mutations interacted to positively or negatively influence a mosquito's fitness, both in the presence or absence of insecticides. In particular, the presence of the KdrR mutation compensated for the costs of the ace-1R mutation in an insecticide-free environment, suggesting the strength of selection in untreated areas would be less against mosquitoes resistant to both insecticides than for those resistant to carbamates alone. Additional interactions suggest the dynamics of resistance will be difficult to predict in populations where multiple resistance mutations are present or that are subject to treatment by different xenobiotics.

  18. Combination of restriction endonuclease digestion with the ΔΔCt method in real-time PCR to monitor etoxazole resistance allele frequency in the two-spotted spider mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakabe, Masahiro; Imamura, Tsuyoshi; Nakano, Ryohei; Kamikawa, Satoshi; Tadatsu, Misono; Kunimoto, Yoshinori; Doi, Makoto

    2017-06-01

    Monitoring resistance allele frequency at the early stage of resistance development is important for the successful acaricide resistance management. Etoxazole is a mite growth inhibitor to which resistance is conferred by an amino acid substitution in the chitin synthase 1 (CHS1; I1017F) in T. urticae. If the susceptible allele can be specifically digested by restriction endonuclease, the ΔΔCt method using real-time PCR for genomic DNA (RED-ΔΔCt method) may be available for monitoring the resistance allele frequency. We tested whether the etoxazole resistance allele frequency in a pooled sample was accurately measured by the RED-ΔΔCt method and validated whether the resistance variant frequency was correlated with etoxazole resistance phenotype in a bioassay. Finally, we performed a pilot test using field populations. Strong linearity of the measures by the RED-ΔΔCt method with practical resistance allele frequencies; resistance allele frequency in the range between 0.5% to at least 0.75% was strictly represented. The strong linear relationship between hatchability of haploid male eggs after the etoxazole treatments (phenotype) and resistance allele frequencies in their mothers provided direct evidence that I1017F is a primary resistance factor to etoxazole in the strains used for experiments. The pilot test revealed a significant correlation between egg hatchability (including both diploid female eggs and haploid male eggs) and estimators in field populations. Consequently, we concluded that the RED-ΔΔCt method is a powerful tool for monitoring a resistance allele in a pooled sample. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Electromagnetic fields created by a beam in an axisymmetric infinitely thick single-layer resistive pipe: general formulas and low frequency approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Mounet, Nicolas Frank; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    This note provides general and approximate formulas for the electromagnetic fields created by a passing beam in an axisymmetric infinitely thick resistive pipe made of a single homogeneous layer. The full derivations and their resulting approximate expressions at low and intermediate frequencies are given here, as well as the conditions under which those approximations are valid. Beam-coupling impedances are also computed, and examples are shown.

  20. Renormalized phonon frequencies and electric resistivity along the c-axis in single-plane high-temperature superconductors: A double-well analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, M; Polyanski, I; Petrova, P T; Tsintsarska, S; Gochev, A

    2001-01-01

    We consider the dynamic interlayer charge transfer across apex oxygens between CuO sub 2 planes in single-layered high-T sub c superconductors. Phonon-coupled axial transfer rates are derived by means of the reaction-rate method. They lead straightforwardly to temperature dependences for the axial resistivity. Doping and temperature dependences are also derived for the renormalized frequencies of phonon modes coupled to the interlayer charge transfer. Our results are compared with experimentally observed dependences. (author)

  1. Frequency and Circadian Timing of Eating May Influence Biomarkers of Inflammation and Insulin Resistance Associated with Breast Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Marinac, Catherine R.; Sears, Dorothy D.; Natarajan, Loki; Gallo, Linda C.; Breen, Caitlin I.; Patterson, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that there is interplay between the frequency and circadian timing of eating and metabolic health. We examined the associations of eating frequency and timing with metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers putatively associated with breast cancer risk in women participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination 2009-2010 Survey. Eating frequency and timing variables were calculated from 24-hour food records and included (1) proportion of calories consumed in ...

  2. Frequency of Cry1F Non-Recessive Resistance Alleles in North Carolina Field Populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoping Li

    Full Text Available Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, is a target species of transgenic corn (Zea mays L. that expresses single and pyramided Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxin. In 2014, S. frugiperda were collected from a light trap in North Carolina, and a total of 212 F1/F2 isofemale lines of S. frugiperda were screened for resistance to Bt and non-Bt corn. All of the 212 isolines were susceptible to corn tissue expressing Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, Cry1F + Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, and Cry1F + Cry1Ab + Vip3Aa20. Growth rate bioassays were performed to isolate non-recessive Bt resistance alleles. Seven individuals out of the 212 isofemale lines carried major non-recessive alleles conferring resistance to Cry1F. A pooled colony was created from the seven individuals. This colony was 151.21 times more resistant to Cry1F than a known-susceptible population and was also resistant to Cry1A.105, but was not resistant to Cry2Ab and Vip3Aa20. The results demonstrate that field populations of S. frugiperda collected from North Carolina are generally susceptible to Cry1F, but that some individuals carry resistant alleles. The data generated in this study can be used as baseline data for resistance monitoring.

  3. Frequency of Cry1F Non-Recessive Resistance Alleles in North Carolina Field Populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoping; Reisig, Dominic; Miao, Jin; Gould, Fred; Huang, Fangneng; Feng, Hongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a target species of transgenic corn (Zea mays L.) that expresses single and pyramided Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin. In 2014, S. frugiperda were collected from a light trap in North Carolina, and a total of 212 F1/F2 isofemale lines of S. frugiperda were screened for resistance to Bt and non-Bt corn. All of the 212 isolines were susceptible to corn tissue expressing Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, Cry1F + Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, and Cry1F + Cry1Ab + Vip3Aa20. Growth rate bioassays were performed to isolate non-recessive Bt resistance alleles. Seven individuals out of the 212 isofemale lines carried major non-recessive alleles conferring resistance to Cry1F. A pooled colony was created from the seven individuals. This colony was 151.21 times more resistant to Cry1F than a known-susceptible population and was also resistant to Cry1A.105, but was not resistant to Cry2Ab and Vip3Aa20. The results demonstrate that field populations of S. frugiperda collected from North Carolina are generally susceptible to Cry1F, but that some individuals carry resistant alleles. The data generated in this study can be used as baseline data for resistance monitoring. PMID:27119741

  4. Combining the FtsZ-Targeting Prodrug TXA709 and the Cephalosporin Cefdinir Confers Synergy and Reduces the Frequency of Resistance in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Malvika; Mark, Lilly; Parhi, Ajit K; LaVoie, Edmond J; Pilch, Daniel S

    2016-07-01

    Combination therapy of bacterial infections with synergistic drug partners offers distinct advantages over monotherapy. Among these advantages are (i) a reduction of the drug dose required for efficacy, (ii) a reduced potential for drug-induced toxicity, and (iii) a reduced potential for the emergence of resistance. Here, we describe the synergistic actions of the third-generation oral cephalosporin cefdinir and TXA709, a new, FtsZ-targeting prodrug that we have developed with improved pharmacokinetics and enhanced in vivo efficacy against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) relative to earlier agents. We show that the active product of TXA709 (TXA707) acts synergistically with cefdinir in vitro against clinical isolates of MRSA, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA), and linezolid-resistant S. aureus (LRSA). In addition, relative to TXA707 alone, the combination of TXA707 and cefdinir significantly reduces or eliminates the detectable emergence of resistance. We also demonstrate synergy in vivo with oral administration of the prodrug TXA709 and cefdinir in mouse models of both systemic and tissue (thigh) infections with MRSA. This synergy reduces the dose of TXA709 required for efficacy 3-fold. Viewed as a whole, our results highlight the potential of TXA709 and cefdinir as a promising combination for the treatment of drug-resistant staphylococcal infections. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. High frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with SCCmec type III and spa type t030 in Karaj's teaching hospitals, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Bahareh; Zade, Masoumeh Hallaj; Mansouri, Samaneh; Kalantar, Enayat; Kabir, Kourosh; Zahmatkesh, Ehsan; Sepehr, Mohammad Noori; Naseri, Mohammmad Hassan; Darban-Sarokhalil, Davood

    2017-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been one of the most important antibiotic-resistant pathogen in many parts of the world over the past decades. This cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate MRSA isolated between July 2013 and July 2014 in Karaj, Iran. All tested isolates were collected in teaching hospitals from personnel, patients, and surfaces and each MRSA was analyzed by SCCmec and spa typing. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was accomplished by disk diffusion method. Out of 49 MRSA isolates from the Karaj's teaching hospitals, 82%, 10%, and 6% of the isolates were SCCmec types III, II, and I, respectively. The main spa type in this study was spa t030 with frequency as high as 75.5% from intensive care unit (ICU) of the hospitals and high rate of resistance to rifampicin (53%) was found in MRSA isolates. In conclusion, high frequency of spa t030 with SCCmec type III and MRSA phenotype illustrated circulating of one of the antibiotic-resistant strains in ICU of Karaj's teaching hospitals and emphasizes the need for ongoing molecular surveillance, antibiotic susceptibility monitoring, and infection control.

  6. Broadband 120 MHz Impedance Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM with Calibrated Resistance and Quantitative Dissipation for Biosensing Measurements at Higher Harmonic Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Kasper

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We developed an impedance quartz crystal microbalance (QCM approach with the ability to simultaneously record mass changes and calibrated energy dissipation with high sensitivity using an impedance analyzer. This impedance QCM measures frequency shifts and resistance changes of sensing quartz crystals very stable, accurately, and calibrated, thus yielding quantitative information on mass changes and dissipation. Resistance changes below 0.3 Ω were measured with corresponding dissipation values of 0.01 µU (micro dissipation units. The broadband impedance capabilities allow measurements between 20 Hz and 120 MHz including higher harmonic modes of up to 11th order for a 10 MHz fundamental resonance frequency quartz crystal. We demonstrate the adsorbed mass, calibrated resistance, and quantitative dissipation measurements on two biological systems including the high affinity based avidin-biotin interaction and nano-assemblies of polyelectrolyte layers. The binding affinity of a protein-antibody interaction was determined. The impedance QCM is a versatile and simple method for accurate and calibrated resistance and dissipation measurements with broadband measurement capabilities for higher harmonics measurements.

  7. Broadband 120 MHz Impedance Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) with Calibrated Resistance and Quantitative Dissipation for Biosensing Measurements at Higher Harmonic Frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Manuel; Traxler, Lukas; Salopek, Jasmina; Grabmayr, Herwig; Ebner, Andreas; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-05-25

    We developed an impedance quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) approach with the ability to simultaneously record mass changes and calibrated energy dissipation with high sensitivity using an impedance analyzer. This impedance QCM measures frequency shifts and resistance changes of sensing quartz crystals very stable, accurately, and calibrated, thus yielding quantitative information on mass changes and dissipation. Resistance changes below 0.3 Ω were measured with corresponding dissipation values of 0.01 µU (micro dissipation units). The broadband impedance capabilities allow measurements between 20 Hz and 120 MHz including higher harmonic modes of up to 11th order for a 10 MHz fundamental resonance frequency quartz crystal. We demonstrate the adsorbed mass, calibrated resistance, and quantitative dissipation measurements on two biological systems including the high affinity based avidin-biotin interaction and nano-assemblies of polyelectrolyte layers. The binding affinity of a protein-antibody interaction was determined. The impedance QCM is a versatile and simple method for accurate and calibrated resistance and dissipation measurements with broadband measurement capabilities for higher harmonics measurements.

  8. Analysis of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori in Pakistan reveals high degrees of pathogenicity and high frequencies of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Faisal; Campbell, Barry James; Alfizah, Hanafiah; Varro, Andrea; Zahra, Rabaab; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Pritchard, David Mark

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori contributes to failure in eradicating the infection and is most often due to point and missense mutations in a few key genes. The antibiotic susceptibility profiles of H. pylori isolates from 46 Pakistani patients were determined by Etest. Resistance and pathogenicity genes were amplified, and sequences were analyzed to determine the presence of mutations. A high percentage of isolates (73.9%) were resistant to metronidazole (MTZ), with considerable resistance to clarithromycin (CLR; 47.8%) and amoxicillin (AML; 54.3%) also observed. Relatively few isolates were resistant to tetracycline (TET; 4.3%) or to ciprofloxacin (CIP; 13%). However, most isolates (n = 43) exhibited resistance to one or more antibiotics. MTZ-resistant isolates contained missense mutations in oxygen-independent NADPH nitroreductase (RdxA; 8 mutations found) and NADH flavin oxidoreductase (FrxA; 4 mutations found). In the 23S rRNA gene, responsible for CLR resistance, a new point mutation (A2181G) and 4 previously reported mutations were identified. Pathogenicity genes cagA, dupA, and vacA s1a/m1 were detected frequently in isolates which were also found to be resistant to MTZ, CLR, and AML. A high percentage of CagA and VacA seropositivity was also observed in these patients. Phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences showed uniform distribution of the 3' region of cagA throughout the tree. We have identified H. pylori isolates in Pakistan which harbor pathogenicity genes and worrying antibiotic resistance profiles as a result of having acquired multiple point and missense mutations. H. pylori eradication regimens should therefore be reevaluated in this setting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Frequency of escherichia coli in patients with community acquired urinary tract infection and their resistance pattern against some commonly used anti bacterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, W.; Jamshed, F.; Ahmad, W.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a very common health problem and Escherichia coli (E coli) are the most common organisms associated with community acquired UTI. Unfortunately these bacteria have developed extensive resistance against most of the commonly used anti-bacterials. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and resistance pattern of E coli in patients of community acquired UTI in an area in northern part of Pakistan. Methods: Urine specimens were collected from patients who were clinically diagnosed as community acquired UTI. Urine routine examination (Urine RE) was done and samples positive for UTI (Pus cells >10/High Power Field) were included in the study. These samples were inoculated on Eosin Methylene Blue (EMB) agar plates and incubated at 37 degree C for 36 hours. Suspected colonies were then inoculated further on EMB plates for pure cultures of E coli characterized by certain morphological characteristics. IMViC was applied for the confirmation of E coli. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility tests of E coli were performed with standardized commercial susceptibility discs (OXOID). Results: Out of 50 specimens, positive for UTI by urine RE, 20 showed pure growth of E coli on culture (40%). The majority of the isolates (28%; n=14) were from women while only 12% (n=6) were from men. Escherichia coli showed a high rate of resistance towards Ampicillin (90%), Tetracycline (70%), Erythromycin (70%) and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (55%). Sparfloxacin showed better results (45%) than ciprofloxacin (50%). Out of 20 E coli isolates, two (10%) were resistant to all the antibacterials except chloramphenicol, eight isolates (40%) showed resistance to six or more than six while 14 (70%) were resistant to four or more than four drugs. Conclusion: Rate of resistance of E coli against commonly used antibacterials was quite high and majority of the strains showed multidrug resistance. (author)

  10. Allele frequency and gene expression of a putative carboxylesterase-encoding gene in a pyrethroid resistant strain of the tick Boophilus microplus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, R; Guerrero, F D; George, J E; Wagner, G G

    2002-09-01

    We utilized RNA Northern blot analysis and ribonuclease protection assays (RPA) to study the mRNA expression level of a putative carboxylesterase-encoding gene from several strains of Boophilus microplus (Canestrini). Both the Northern analysis and RPAs indicated that an esterase transcript was more abundant in the pyrethroid resistant strain, Coatzacoalcos (Cz), compared to a susceptible control strain and a resistant strain whose pyrethroid resistance is mediated through a target site insensitivity mechanism. A PCR-based assay was designed to identify the presence of a previously reported point mutation in this B. microplus esterase gene. The reported G-->A substitution at nucleotide 1120 creates an EcoR I site in the mutant allele which can be detected by EcoR I digestion of the amplification products. The PCR assays showed that the frequency of the mutant allele was highest in the Cz-resistant strain, which has been shown to have an esterase-mediated resistance mechanism. The PCR assay can be performed either on individual tick larvae or hemolymph from adults.

  11. High frequency of antiviral drug resistance and non-b subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing antiviral therapy in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Pérez, Lissette; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Alvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vinken, Lore; Limia, Celia; Soto, Yudira; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance may limit the sustained benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in settings with limited laboratory monitoring and drug options. The objective is to implement the surveillance of drug resistance and subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing ART in Cuba. This study compiled clinical and genotypic drug resistance data 588 ART-experienced HIV-1 patients attending a clinical center in Havana in 2009-2013. Drug resistance testing was performed as part of routine clinical care. Drug resistance mutations and levels were determined using Rega version 8.0.2. Eighty-three percent received solely ART containing at least three drugs. Patients from 2009 to 2010 were longer treated (median: 4.9 vs 2.7 years) and exposed to more ART regimens (median: 4 vs 2 regimens) compared to patients from 2011-2013. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI) and PI mutations were present in 83.5, 77.4 and 52.0%. Full-class resistance (FCR) to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and multidrug resistance (MDR) were detected in 25.0, 33.7, 11.4 and 6.3%. FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and MDR were present in 12.8, 28.7, 0 and 0% after first-line failure (164 patients) and in 23.1, 34.6, 3.8 and 3.1% after second-line failure (130 patients). Subtype B (32.5%), BG recombinants (19.6%) and CRF19_cpx (16.2%) were the most prevalent genetic forms. Subtype distribution did not change significantly between 2009-2010 and 2011-2013, except for BG recombinants that increased from 12.2 to 21.3% (p=0.002). Our study found a high prevalence of drug resistance and supports the need for appropriate laboratory monitoring in clinical practice and access to drug options in case of virological failure.

  12. Low-Frequency Drug Resistance in HIV-Infected Ugandans on Antiretroviral Treatment Is Associated with Regimen Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kyeyune, Fred; Gibson, Richard M.; Nankya, Immaculate; Venner, Colin; Metha, Samar; Akao, Juliet; Ndashimye, Emmanuel; Kityo, Cissy M.; Salata, Robert A.; Mugyenyi, Peter; Arts, Eric J.; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E.

    2016-01-01

    Most patients failing antiretroviral treatment in Uganda continue to fail their treatment regimen even if a dominant drug-resistant HIV-1 genotype is not detected. In a recent retrospective study, we observed that approximately 30% of HIV-infected individuals in the Joint Clinical Research Centre (Kampala, Uganda) experienced virologic failure with a susceptible HIV-1 genotype based on standard Sanger sequencing. Selection of minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants (not detectable by Sanger se...

  13. Frequency of Antiseptic Resistance Among Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci Isolated From a University Hospital in Central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nona Taheri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Reduced biocide susceptibility in Staphylococci is associated with various antiseptic resistance genes encoding efflux systems. Our aim was to determine the susceptibility to three disinfectant agents, including benzalkonium chloride (BAC, benzethonium chloride (BZT, and chlorhexidine digluconate (CHDG among clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS. Methods: The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 60 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, 54 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA and 51 CoNS isolates from a single hospital to three biocidal agents (BAC, BZT, and CHDG was determined. Biocide resistance genes (qacA/B, smr, qacG, qacH, qacJ, and norA were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction assay. Results: All isolates had MICs for BAC and BZT from 0.25 to 8 µg/mL, and for CHDG from 0.5 to 64 µg/mL. qacA/B was the most common biocide resistance gene among all 165 Staphylococcus isolates (76; 46%, which comprised 38 (63.3% MRSA, 14 (25.9% MSSA, and 24 (47% CoNS. Eleven (6.7% and 24 (14.5% isolates among the 165 Staphylococci carried smr and norA genes, respectively. In contrast, other resistance genes such as qacG, qacH, and qacJ were absent in all Staphylococci studied. The qacA/B and smr genes were detected concomitantly in 3% of isolates, and 23.6% strains of the total 165 Staphylococcus isolates were negative for each studied gene. Conclusions: The carriage of several biocide resistance genes, including qacA/B, smr, and norA, alone or concurrently, is associated with reduced susceptibility. Use of antiseptics may select for antibiotic-resistant strains and assist their survival in the healthcare environment.

  14. Frequency of Antiseptic Resistance AmongStaphylococcus aureusand Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci Isolated From a University Hospital in Central Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Nona; Ardebili, Abdollah; Amouzandeh-Nobaveh, Alireza; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah

    2016-11-01

    Reduced biocide susceptibility in Staphylococci is associated with various antiseptic resistance genes encoding efflux systems. Our aim was to determine the susceptibility to three disinfectant agents, including benzalkonium chloride (BAC), benzethonium chloride (BZT), and chlorhexidine digluconate (CHDG) among clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 60 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), 54 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and 51 CoNS isolates from a single hospital to three biocidal agents (BAC, BZT, and CHDG) was determined. Biocide resistance genes ( qacA/B, smr, qacG, qacH, qacJ, and norA ) were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction assay. All isolates had MICs for BAC and BZT from 0.25 to 8 µg/mL, and for CHDG from 0.5 to 64 µg/mL. qacA/B was the most common biocide resistance gene among all 165 Staphylococcus isolates (76; 46%), which comprised 38 (63.3%) MRSA, 14 (25.9%) MSSA, and 24 (47%) CoNS. Eleven (6.7%) and 24 (14.5%) isolates among the 165 Staphylococci carried smr and norA genes, respectively. In contrast, other resistance genes such as qacG , qacH , and qacJ were absent in all Staphylococci studied. The qacA/B and smr genes were detected concomitantly in 3% of isolates, and 23.6% strains of the total 165 Staphylococcus isolates were negative for each studied gene. The carriage of several biocide resistance genes, including qacA/B , smr , and norA , alone or concurrently, is associated with reduced susceptibility. Use of antiseptics may select for antibiotic-resistant strains and assist their survival in the healthcare environment.

  15. Development of multifunctional metabolic synergists to suppress the evolution of resistance against pyrethroids in insects that blood feed on humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardstone, Melissa C; Strycharz, Joseph P; Kim, Junheon; Park, Il-Kwon; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Ahn, Young Joon; Harrington, Laura C; Lee, Si Hyeock; Clark, J Marshall

    2015-06-01

    Pyrethroids are the insecticides of choice when exposure to humans is likely, such as occurs in vector and public-health-related control programs. Unfortunately, the pyrethroids share a common resistance mechanism with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), knockdown resistance (kdr), and prior extensive use of DDT has predisposed the pyrethroids to cross-resistance via kdr. Given the widespread occurrence of kdr, the use of synergists with pyrethroids is considered to be prudent to guard against the selection of multiply resistant insects. 3-Phenoxybenzyl hexanoate (PBH) was synthesized as a multifunctional pyrethroid synergist that, besides being a surrogate substrate for sequestration/hydrolytic carboxylesterases, now also functions as a substrate for oxidative xenobiotic metabolism. The addition of PBH to permethrin-treated females of the ISOP450 strain of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus resulted in a threefold increase in synergism, as judged by the synergistic ratio. Similarly, PBH synergized the action of deltamethrin sixfold on females of the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, and was 2.8-fold more synergistic than piperonyl butoxide (PBO). PBH synergized the action of both type I and type II pyrethroids in a mosquito vector (Cx. p. quinquefasciatus) and in a public-health pest, C. lectularius, respectively, indicating a broad spectrum of action on blood-feeding insects. PBH appears to have residual properties similar to permethrin and is itself non-toxic, unlike PBO, and therefore should be compatible with existing pyrethroid formulations used for insecticide-treated nets and home/residential sprays. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Impact of Manure Fertilization on the Abundance of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria and Frequency of Detection of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Soil and on Vegetables at Harvest

    OpenAIRE

    Marti, Romain; Scott, Andrew; Tien, Yuan-Ching; Murray, Roger; Sabourin, Lyne; Zhang, Yun; Topp, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of vegetables represents a route of direct human exposure to bacteria found in soil. The present study evaluated the complement of bacteria resistant to various antibiotics on vegetables often eaten raw (tomato, cucumber, pepper, carrot, radish, lettuce) and how this might vary with growth in soil fertilized inorganically or with dairy or swine manure. Vegetables were sown into field plots immediately following fertilization and harvested when of marketable quality. Vegetable and ...

  17. Frequency and distribution of the brown rust resistance gene Bru1 and implications for the Louisiana sugarcane breeding programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia melanocephala, is an important disease of sugarcane posing an increasing threat to sugarcane industries worldwide. A major gene, Bru1, has been shown to contribute a significant proportion of brown rust resistance in multiple sugarcane industries. The recent...

  18. Distribution and frequency of Bru1, a major brown rust resistance gene, in the sugarcane world collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown rust, caused by Puccinia melanocephala, is an important disease of sugarcane worldwide. Molecular markers for a major brown rust resistance gene, Bru1, were used to screen a total of 1,282 clones in the World Collection of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) to determine the distribution and...

  19. Structural and high-frequency resistive characteristics of MgB2 in the range 0-110 MHz at 5-300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, V.M.; Prentslau, N.N.; Baumer, V.N.; Galtsov, N.N.; Ishchenko, L.A.; Prokhvatilov, A.I.; Strzhemechnyj, M.A.; Terekhov, A.V.; Bykov, A.I.; Lyashenko, V.I.; Paderno, Yu.B.; Paderno, V.N.

    2004-01-01

    The structure and electrical resistivity of polycrystalline MgB 2 are investigated in the interval 5-300 K. Its impedance is investigated in the same temperature range in the frequency region 9-110 MHz. It is shown that the lattice type and the superconducting-phase symmetry of MgB 2 are invariant in the whole temperature interval. In the region of superconducting transition temperature T c = 39.5 K, a structural instability is observed, which is accompanied by a scatter in the lattice parameters measured. It is suggested that the crystal deformation with varying temperature is significantly anisotropic. The measurements of the temperature and frequency dependences of the surface resistance R s (T, f) in the superconducting state have revealed a transition from the Pippard nonlocal limit at T c to a London local one near Tc. At T/Tc s (T) is well described by the exponential dependence exp (- Δ (T) / k T) in accordance with the BCS theory

  20. Rare Mutations of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma: Frequencies and Relationship with Insulin Resistance and Diabetes Risk in the Mixed Ancestry Population from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vergotine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Genetic variants in the nuclear transcription receptor, PPARG, are associated with cardiometabolic traits, but reports remain conflicting. We determined the frequency and the clinical relevance of PPARG SNPs in an African mixed ancestry population. Methods. In a cross-sectional study, 820 participants were genotyped for rs1800571, rs72551362, rs72551363, rs72551364, and rs3856806, using allele-specific TaqMan technology. The homeostatic model assessment of insulin (HOMA-IR, β-cells function (HOMA-B%, fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI, and the quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index (QUICKI were calculated. Results. No sequence variants were found except for the rs3856806. The frequency of the PPARG-His447His variant was 23.8% in the overall population group, with no difference by diabetes status (P=0.215. The His447His allele T was associated with none of the markers of insulin resistance overall and by diabetes status. In models adjusted for 2-hour insulin, the T allele was associated with lower prevalent diabetes risk (odds ratio 0.56 (95% CI 0.31–0.95. Conclusion. Our study confirms the almost zero occurrences of known rare PPARG SNPs and has shown for the first time in an African population that one of the common SNPs, His447His, may be protective against type 2 diabetes.

  1. Increased cortical excitability with prefrontal high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in adolescents with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croarkin, Paul E; Wall, Christopher A; Nakonezny, Paul A; Buyukdura, Jeylan S; Husain, Mustafa M; Sampson, Shirlene M; Emslie, Graham J; Kozel, F Andrew

    2012-02-01

    To examine changes in motor cortical excitability in adolescent subjects receiving 30 sessions of high-frequency prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Eight adolescents with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD) enrolled in an open augmentation trial of 10 Hz rTMS. Resting motor thresholds were obtained by the visualization of movement method with a maximum likelihood threshold hunting computer algorithm at baseline and after every five sessions of rTMS. Motor threshold was recorded as the percentage of total machine output at each measurement. Motor threshold data from baseline, weeks 2, 4, and 5 were included in a mixed model repeated measure analysis to examine a change in least square mean effect over time. The omnibus effect did not reach statistical significance (F=1.25, p=0.32). However, multiple comparisons from the overall model demonstrated a decrease in the least square mean motor threshold. The mean contrast from baseline to week 5 approached significance (p=0.07). Moreover, a post-hoc analysis with a Wilcoxon signed ranks test demonstrated a significant decrease at week 5 (p=0.03). This suggests that high-frequency rTMS may increase cortical excitability in adolescents with treatment-resistant MDD.

  2. Frequencies distribution of dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthetase mutant alleles associated with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum population from Hadhramout Governorate, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamaga, Omar A A; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2015-12-22

    Malaria in Yemen is mainly caused by Plasmodium falciparum and 25% of the population is at high risk. Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) had been used as monotherapy against P. falciparum. Emergence of chloroquine resistance led to the shift in anti-malarial treatment policy in Yemen to artemisinin-based combination therapy, that is artesunate (AS) plus SP as first-line therapy for uncomplicated malaria and artemether-lumefantrine as second-line treatment. This study aimed to screen mutations in the dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthetase (dhps) genes associated with SP resistance among P. falciparum population in Hadhramout governorate, Yemen. Genomic DNA was extracted from dried blood spots of 137 P. falciparum isolates collected from a community-based study. DNA was amplified using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequently sequenced for Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes. Sequences were analysed for mutations in Pfdhfr gene codons 51, 59, 108, and 164 and in Pfdhps gene codons 436, 437, and 540. A total of 128 and 114 P. falciparum isolates were successfully sequenced for Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes, respectively. Each Pfdhfr mutant allele (I51 and N108) in P. falciparum population had a frequency of 84%. Pfdhfr R59 mutant allele was detected in one isolate. Mutation at codon 437 (G437) in the Pfdhps gene was detected in 44.7% of falciparum malaria isolates. Frequencies of Pfdhfr double mutant genotype (I51C59N108I164) and Pfdhfr/Pfdhps triple mutant genotype (I51C59N108I164-S436G437K540) were 82.8 and 39.3%, respectively. One isolate harboured Pfdhfr triple mutant genotype (I51, R59, N108, I164) and Pfdhfr/Pfdhps quadruple mutant genotype (I51R59N108I164-S436G437K540). High frequencies of Pfdhfr and Pfdhps mutant alleles and genotypes in P. falciparum population in Hadhramout, Yemen, highlight the risk of developing resistance for SP, the partner drug of AS, which subsequently will expose the parasite to AS monotherapy increasing then the

  3. Botrytis fragariae, a New Species Causing Gray Mold on Strawberries, Shows High Frequencies of Specific and Efflux-Based Fungicide Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Sabrina; Plesken, Cecilia; Rumsey, Sibylle; Dowling, Madeline; Schnabel, Guido; Weber, Roland W. S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Botrytis cinerea causes pre- and postharvest decay of many fruit and vegetable crops. A survey of German strawberry fields revealed Botrytis strains that differed from B. cinerea in diagnostic PCR markers and growth appearance. Phylogenetic analyses showed that these strains belong to an undescribed species in Botrytis clade 2, named Botrytis fragariae sp. nov. Isolates of B. fragariae were detected in strawberry fields throughout Germany, sometimes at frequencies similar to those of B. cinerea, and in the southeastern United States. B. fragariae was isolated from overwintering strawberry tissue but not from freshly infected fruit. B. fragariae invaded strawberry tissues with an efficiency similar to or lower than that of B. cinerea but showed poor colonization of inoculated nonhost plant tissues. These data and the exclusive occurrence of this fungus on strawberry plants indicate that B. fragariae is host specific and has a tissue preference different from that of B. cinerea. Various fungicide resistance patterns were observed in B. fragariae populations. Many B. fragariae strains showed resistance to one or several chemical classes of fungicides and an efflux-based multidrug resistance (MDR1) phenotype previously described in B. cinerea. Resistance-related mutations in B. fragariae were identical or similar to those of B. cinerea for carbendazim (E198A mutation in tubA), azoxystrobin (G143A in cytB), iprodione (G367A+V368F in bos1), and MDR1 (gain-of-function mutations in the transcription factor mrr1 gene and overexpression of the drug efflux transporter gene atrB). The widespread occurrence of B. fragariae indicates that this species is adapted to fungicide-treated strawberry fields and may be of local importance as a gray mold pathogen alongside B. cinerea. IMPORTANCE Gray mold is the most important fruit rot on strawberries worldwide and requires fungicide treatments for control. For a long time, it was believed to be caused only by Botrytis cinerea

  4. Botrytis fragariae, a New Species Causing Gray Mold on Strawberries, Shows High Frequencies of Specific and Efflux-Based Fungicide Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Sabrina; Plesken, Cecilia; Rumsey, Sibylle; Dowling, Madeline; Schnabel, Guido; Weber, Roland W S; Hahn, Matthias

    2017-05-01

    Botrytis cinerea causes pre- and postharvest decay of many fruit and vegetable crops. A survey of German strawberry fields revealed Botrytis strains that differed from B. cinerea in diagnostic PCR markers and growth appearance. Phylogenetic analyses showed that these strains belong to an undescribed species in Botrytis clade 2, named Botrytis fragariae sp. nov. Isolates of B fragariae were detected in strawberry fields throughout Germany, sometimes at frequencies similar to those of B. cinerea , and in the southeastern United States. B fragariae was isolated from overwintering strawberry tissue but not from freshly infected fruit. B fragariae invaded strawberry tissues with an efficiency similar to or lower than that of B. cinerea but showed poor colonization of inoculated nonhost plant tissues. These data and the exclusive occurrence of this fungus on strawberry plants indicate that B fragariae is host specific and has a tissue preference different from that of B. cinerea Various fungicide resistance patterns were observed in B fragariae populations. Many B fragariae strains showed resistance to one or several chemical classes of fungicides and an efflux-based multidrug resistance (MDR1) phenotype previously described in B. cinerea Resistance-related mutations in B fragariae were identical or similar to those of B. cinerea for carbendazim (E198A mutation in tubA ), azoxystrobin (G143A in cytB ), iprodione (G367A+V368F in bos1 ), and MDR1 (gain-of-function mutations in the transcription factor mrr1 gene and overexpression of the drug efflux transporter gene atrB ). The widespread occurrence of B fragariae indicates that this species is adapted to fungicide-treated strawberry fields and may be of local importance as a gray mold pathogen alongside B. cinerea IMPORTANCE Gray mold is the most important fruit rot on strawberries worldwide and requires fungicide treatments for control. For a long time, it was believed to be caused only by Botrytis cinerea , a ubiquitous

  5. Cotton pest management practices and the selection of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae population in Northern Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadouleton Anges

    2011-04-01

    An. gambiae from BP areas gave a high level of susceptibility to permethrin with an average mortality of 94%. Molecular analysis identified An. gambiae s.s, and An. arabiensis with a high predominance of An. gambiae s.s (90%. The two molecular forms, M and S, were also determined with a high frequency of the S form (96%. The Kdr gene seemed the main target- site resistance mechanism detected in CCP, TICP, and BP areas at the rates ranging from 32 to 78%. The frequency of ace-1R gene was very low ( The presence of inhibiting factors in soil samples under insecticide treatments were found and affected negatively in delaying the development of An. gambiae larval populations. Conclusions This research shows that Kdr has spread widely in An. gambiae, mainly in CCP and TICP areas where pyrethroids are extensively used. To reduce the negative impact of pesticides use in cotton crop protection, the application of BP-like programs, which do not appear to select for vector resistance would be useful. These results could serve as scientific evidence of the spread of resistance due to a massive agricultural use of insecticides and contribute to the management of pesticides usage on cotton crops hence reducing the selection pressure of insecticides on An. gambiae populations.

  6. I. Low frequency noise in metal films at the superconducting transition. II. Resistance of superconductor - normal metal- superconductor sandwiches and the quasiparticle relaxation time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiang, T.Y.

    1977-07-01

    Measurements of the noise power spectra of tin and lead films at the superconducting transition in the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 5k Hz are reported. Two types of samples were made. Type A were evaporated directly onto glass substrate, while Type B were evaporated onto glass or sapphire substrate with a 50A aluminum underlay. The results were consistent with a thermal diffusion model which attributes the noise to the intrinsic temperature fluctuation in the metal film driven with a random energy flux source. In both types of metal films, the noise power was found to be proportional to (V-bar)/sup 2/ ..beta../sup 2//..cap omega.., where V-bar was the mean voltage across the sample, ..beta.. was the temperature coefficient of resistance and ..cap omega.. was the volume of the sample. Correlation of noises in two regions of the metal film a distance d apart was detected at frequencies less than or = D/..pi..d/sup 2/. A possible explanation of the noises using quantitative boundary conditions and implications of this work for device applications are discussed. Theoretical and experimental investigation are reported on the resistance of superconductor-normal metal-superconductor sandwiches near T/sub c/. The increase in SNS resistance is attributed to the penetration of normal electric current in the superconductor. It is proved from first principles that an electric field can exist inside the superconductor when quasiparticles are not equally populated on the two branches of the excitation spectrum, and such is the case in a current biased SNS junction. The electric field inside S decays according to a diffusion law. The diffusion length is determined by the quasiparticle ''branch-crossing'' relaxation time. The branch-crossing relaxation times were measured. Impurity-doping of tin was found to decrease this relaxation time.

  7. Monitoring groundwater-surface water interaction using time-series and time-frequency analysis of transient three-dimensional electrical resistivity changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Slater, Lee D.; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Elwaseif, Mehrez

    2012-01-01

    Time-lapse resistivity imaging is increasingly used to monitor hydrologic processes. Compared to conventional hydrologic measurements, surface time-lapse resistivity provides superior spatial coverage in two or three dimensions, potentially high-resolution information in time, and information in the absence of wells. However, interpretation of time-lapse electrical tomograms is complicated by the ever-increasing size and complexity of long-term, three-dimensional (3-D) time series conductivity data sets. Here we use 3-D surface time-lapse electrical imaging to monitor subsurface electrical conductivity variations associated with stage-driven groundwater-surface water interactions along a stretch of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 near Richland, Washington, USA. We reduce the resulting 3-D conductivity time series using both time-series and time-frequency analyses to isolate a paleochannel causing enhanced groundwater-surface water interactions. Correlation analysis on the time-lapse imaging results concisely represents enhanced groundwater-surface water interactions within the paleochannel, and provides information concerning groundwater flow velocities. Time-frequency analysis using the Stockwell (S) transform provides additional information by identifying the stage periodicities driving groundwater-surface water interactions due to upstream dam operations, and identifying segments in time-frequency space when these interactions are most active. These results provide new insight into the distribution and timing of river water intrusion into the Hanford 300 Area, which has a governing influence on the behavior of a uranium plume left over from historical nuclear fuel processing operations.

  8. High-frequency CSMT (HFCSMT) survey system for fine resistivity structures in the shallow subsurface; Hyoso hiteiko seimitsu sokutei sochi (HFCSMT) no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handa, S. [Saga University, Saga (Japan); Kinoshita, T.; Kozato, T. [Construction Project Consultant Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    HFCSMT system has been developed to enhance resolution in CSMT technology. The system covers a frequency band of 1.4kHz-106kHz for transmission, and measurement is performed using 16 frequencies. The transmitter power amplifier operating on a 12V cell is capable of a maximum output of approximately 3A, and the signals can be received at points several 100s of meters away. As for the selection of frequencies, synchronization is ensured for the receiver set no matter what instant the measuring process is commenced, the process being fully automated including the gain control. Phase and amplification values obtained for the electric and magnetic fields are subjected to A/D conversion. The data are stored in the microcomputer memory as apparent resistivity and phase data, and are forwarded to the host computer upon termination of the measuring process. Since both analog processing and digital processing are used, the measurement process is over in approximately 96 seconds. This system is being tested in various fields of technology. 1 fig.

  9. A case-control study of skin conductance biofeedback on seizure frequency and emotion regulation in drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwas, Iliana; McGonigal, Aileen; Khalfa, Stéphanie; Bastien-Toniazzo, Mireille; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the physiological basis of effects of skin conductance biofeedback on anxiety disorders, depressive disorders and stress in drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). This method presents an interest in seizure reduction and improvement in psychiatric comorbidities frequently associated with TLE. Our goal was to better understand the impact of biofeedback on seizure control and on emotional regulation. Fifteen patients with TLE were treated with 12 skin conductance biofeedback sessions and compared with 15 control TLE patients on a waiting list. They were evaluated in terms of seizure frequency, clinical evaluations of anxiety and depression and skin conductance responses (SCR) to five emotions: fear, disgust, sadness, happiness and peacefulness induced by short films. Biofeedback training significantly reduced seizure frequency with a mean reduction of -47.42% in the biofeedback group, while the control group did not differ at the two time measures. A significant improvement was found for depression and trait-anxiety in the biofeedback group but not in the control group. There were no differences on SCR on any emotion after biofeedback treatment. A correlation was found between mean change in SCR over the biofeedback treatment and the reduction of seizure frequency, but not between SCR changes and scores on psychiatric comorbidities. These results show independent effect of biofeedback on mood and seizure control. Improvements in anxiety and depressive symptoms were not related to SCR, whereas improved seizure control was, suggesting differential mechanisms underlying these two phenomena. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A significant reduction in the frequency of HIV-1 drug resistance in Québec from 2001 to 2011 is associated with a decrease in the monitored viral load.

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    Hugues Charest

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV drug resistance represents a major threat for effective treatment. We assessed the trends in the frequency of drug resistance mutations and the monitored viral load (VL in treatment-naïve (TN and treatment-experienced (TE individuals infected with HIV-1 in Québec, Canada, between 2001 and 2011. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Resistance data were obtained from 4,105 and 5,086 genotypic tests performed on TN and TE patients, respectively. Concomitantly, 274,161 VL tests were carried out in the Province. Changes over time in drug resistance frequency and in different categories of VL were assessed using univariate logistic regression. Multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between the rates of certain mutations and antiretroviral prescriptions. From 2001 to 2011, the proportion of undetectable VL test results continually increased, from 42.1% to 75.9%, while a significant decrease in the frequency of resistance mutations associated with protease inhibitors [PI (from 54% to 16%], nucleoside [NRTI (from 78% to 37% and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors [NNRTI (from 44% to 31%] was observed in TE patients. In TN individuals, the overall frequency of transmitted drug resistance was 13.1%. A multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the introduction of co-formulated emtricitabine/tenofovir or emtricitabine/tenofovir/efavirenz was positively associated with the decrease of the frequency of the M184I/V mutations observed overtime (p = 0.0004. CONCLUSIONS: We observed a significant decrease in the frequency of drug resistance mutations in TE patients, concomitant with a decrease in the proportion of patients with detectable viremia. These findings may be related to both the increased potencies and adherence to therapy associated with newer antiretroviral regimens. Nevertheless, our data demonstrate that broad use of antiretrovirals does not increase the level of circulating drug resistant

  11. Association mapping of insecticide resistance in wild Anopheles gambiae populations: major variants identified in a low-linkage disequilbrium genome.

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    David Weetman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Association studies are a promising way to uncover the genetic basis of complex traits in wild populations. Data on population stratification, linkage disequilibrium and distribution of variant effect-sizes for different trait-types are required to predict study success but are lacking for most taxa. We quantified and investigated the impacts of these key variables in a large-scale association study of a strongly selected trait of medical importance: pyrethroid resistance in the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.We genotyped ≈1500 resistance-phenotyped wild mosquitoes from Ghana and Cameroon using a 1536-SNP array enriched for candidate insecticide resistance gene SNPs. Three factors greatly impacted study power. (1 Population stratification, which was attributable to co-occurrence of molecular forms (M and S, and cryptic within-form stratification necessitating both a partitioned analysis and genomic control. (2 All SNPs of substantial effect (odds ratio, OR>2 were rare (minor allele frequency, MAF<0.05. (3 Linkage disequilibrium (LD was very low throughout most of the genome. Nevertheless, locally high LD, consistent with a recent selective sweep, and uniformly high ORs in each subsample facilitated significant direct and indirect detection of the known insecticide target site mutation kdr L1014F (OR≈6; P<10(-6, but with resistance level modified by local haplotypic background.Primarily as a result of very low LD in wild A. Gambiae, LD-based association mapping is challenging, but is feasible at least for major effect variants, especially where LD is enhanced by selective sweeps. Such variants will be of greatest importance for predictive diagnostic screening.

  12. Resistance training status and effectiveness of low frequency resistance training on upper-body strength and power in highly trained soccer players.

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    Hertzog, Maxime; Rumpf, Michael Clemens; Hader, Karim

    2017-08-26

    Soccer is classified as a contact/collision sport with many player-to-player duels. Winning these duels, shielding the ball or fending off an opponent requires upper-body strength and power. Therefore this study aimed, a) to examine the time-related effect of an upper-body RT on maximal strength and power changes in highly trained soccer players, b) to investigate if the resistance-training (RT) status influences these changes throughout a competitive season. Twenty-eight soccer players participated in this study and were divided into an untrained (UG) and a trained (TG) group, according to their RT status. Both groups performed the same upper-body RT once a week, over 30 weeks. Maximal strength (1RM) and maximal power (MP) were assessed before, during and after the competitive season. Both groups significantly improved 1RM and MP over the entire competitive season, with a moderate (TG, 13%) to very large (UG, 21%) magnitude in 1RM and with a small (TG, 8%) to moderate (UG, 13%) magnitude in MP. After the initial 10 weeks of RT, UG presented significant and slightly (1RM) to moderately (MP) greater improvements than TG. For all other time intervals, the between-groups changes in 1RM were rated as similar. For the last 20 weeks of the RT, the change in MP was significantly lower for UG compared to TG. One upper-body RT-session per week will provide sufficient stimulus to enable an almost certain improvement in strength and power throughout a competitive season for all players disregarding their initial RT status.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: freqüência de resistência a múltiplos fármacos e resistência cruzada entre antimicrobianos no Recife/PE Pseudomonas aeruginosa: frequency of resistance to multiple drugs and cross-resistance between antimicrobials in Recife/PE

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    Eduardo Andrada Pessoa de Figueiredo

    2007-12-01

    OBJECTIVES: The frequency of multiple-antibiotic resistant bacteria has been increasing in recent years. Among the gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa shows a great propensity for the development of multidrug resistance mechanisms. The objective of this study was to identify the profile of susceptibility to antibiotics, the frequency of multidrug resistance and the cross-resistance between drugs of P. aeruginosa strains in two tertiary hospitals in Recife, Pernambuco. METHODS: The study was carried out between September 2004 and January 2006. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed in 304 strains of P. aeruginosa by the disc diffusion method in accordance with National Committee for Clinical and Laboratory Standards (NCCLS guidelines. RESULTS: The most frequent materials were urine (26.7% and respiratory tract secretion (26.1% The antibiotics tested and their respective susceptibilities were as follows: piperacillin-tazobactam (66.2%; aztreonam (59.8%; amikacin (59.4%; meropenem (58.2%; imipenem (57.7%; ciprofloxacin (49.7%; gentamicin and cefepime (48.6%; ceftazidime (30% and cefotaxime (6.8%. A high prevalence of multi-resistance was detected. Half (49.7% the strains showed resistance to three or more antibiotics and 28% were resistant to six antimicrobials or more. Also, cross-resistance between the beta-lactams (carbapenems and piperacilin/tazobactam and aminoglicosides and quinolones was between 22.9% and 38.1%. These drugs are commonly combined in the treatment of severe infections caused by Pseudomonas, which reflects the difficulty in choosing the appropriate option for combination therapy. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of multidrug-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa in this study was similar to other hospitals in Brazil and higher than in other countries. In order to reduce the frequency of these multiresistant clones, epidemiologic surveillance and the rational use of antibiotic protocols need to be urgently implemented.

  14. Combined use of frequency-domain electromagnetic and electrical resistivity surveys to delineate near-lake groundwater flow in the semi-arid Nebraska Sand Hills, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, John B.; Lane, John W.; Zlotnik, Vitaly A.; Halihan, Todd; White, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    A frequency-domain electromagnetic (FDEM) survey can be used to select locations for the more quantitative and labor-intensive electrical resistivity surveys. The FDEM survey rapidly characterized the groundwater-flow directions and configured the saline plumes caused by evaporation from several groundwater-dominated lakes in the Nebraska Sand Hills, USA. The FDEM instrument was mounted on a fiberglass cart and towed by an all-terrain vehicle, covering about 25 km/day. Around the saline lakes, areas with high electrical conductivity are consistent with the regional and local groundwater flow directions. The efficacy of this geophysical approach is attributed to: the high contrast in electrical conductivity between various groundwater zones; the shallow location of the saline zones; minimal cultural interference; and relative homogeneity of the aquifer materials.

  15. Acute Frontal Lobe Dysfunction Following Prefrontal Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in a Patient with Treatment-Resistant Depression

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    Guilhem Carle

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to treat numerous neurological and psychiatric disorders has been thoroughly studied for the last two decades. Here, we report for the first time, the case of a 65-year-old woman suffering from treatment-resistant depression who developed an acute frontal lobe syndrome following eight sessions of low-frequency rTMS (LF-rTMS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex while also treated with sertraline and mianserin. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying such an unexpected acute frontal lobe dysfunction are discussed in relation to the therapeutic use of LF-rTMS in combination with pharmacotherapy in depressed patients.

  16. Frecuencia de aislamiento de Staphylococcus spp meticilina resistentes y Enterococcus spp vancomicina resistentes en hospitales de Cuba Frequency of methicilline-resistant Staphylococcus spp and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp isolates in Cuban hospitals

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    Leonora González Mesa

    2005-12-01

    Cuba , there was no updated data either on the rate of infection by methicilline-resistant Staphylococcus spp or on the circulation of this germ in the community; neither are there reports on vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp presence. In this study, 774 strains collected from hospitals in the country were analyzed. The mechanism of resistance was determined by the methods suggested in the NCCLS guidelines. The 9.3 % (23 and 4.0 % (7 of S. aureus isolates from the hospitals and the community respectively were methicilline-resistant carriers of mecA gen whereas 69.9 %(72 of negative Staphylococcus coagulase isolates showed resistance to oxacillin. Also, a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp-carrying strain was detected. Our results revealed that in Cuba the methicilline-resistant S. aureus is not a problem neither at hospitals nor at the community setting. Despite the fact that the circulation of these germs in the community setting and also the circulation of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp at hospital setting have been reported for the first time, their frequency is very low as a consequence of the advances in the implementation of policies aimed at a more rational use and consumption of antibiotics.

  17. Arc and resistance welding and tumours of the endocrine glands: a Swedish case-control study with focus on extremely low frequency magnetic fields.

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    Håkansson, N; Stenlund, C; Gustavsson, P; Johansen, C; Floderus, B

    2005-05-01

    Mechanisms for potential effects of extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields on carcinogenesis have not been identified. A potential pathway could be an interaction with the endocrine system. To analyse occupational exposure to ELF magnetic fields from welding, and tumours of the endocrine glands. This case-control study was based on a cohort with an increased prevalence of high exposed individuals. A total of 174 incident cases of tumours of the endocrine glands, 1985-94, were identified and data were obtained from 140 (80%) of these cases; 1692 controls frequency matched on sex and age were selected, and information on 1306 (77%) individuals was obtained. A short questionnaire was sent to a work administrator at the workplaces of the cases and controls. The exposure assessment was based on questions about job tasks, exposure to different types of welding, and exposure to solvents. There was an overall increased risk for all tumours of the endocrine glands for individuals who had been welding sometime during the follow up. The increased risk was attributable to arc welding; for resistance welding there was no clear evidence of an association. We found an increased risk for the adrenal glands in relation to arc welding, and for the parathyroid glands in relation to both arc welding and resistance welding. An imprecise increase in risk was also noted for tumours of the pituitary gland for arc welding. No confounding effect was found for solvent exposure, and there was no sign of biological interaction. The increased risks of endocrine gland tumours related to welding might be explained by exposure to high levels of ELF magnetic fields.

  18. Resistance of mixed subalpine forest to fire frequency changes: the ecological function of dwarf pine (Pinus mugo ssp. mugo)

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    Leys, Bérangère; Carcaillet, Christopher; Blarquez, Olivier; Lami, Andrea; Musazzi, Simona; Trevisan, Renata

    2014-04-01

    The availability of fuel and climate are major factors responsible for forest fire activity over time. Here, we tested the hypothesis that forest ecosystems containing a high shrub biomass, which constitutes a fuel load, and affected by a warmer climate, which is associated with drier conditions and a longer fire season, are more prone to fire. Fire occurrence and woody vegetation histories were reconstructed for a subalpine site (Lago di Colbricon Inferiore) in the Dolomites, part of the eastern Italian Alps, for the past 13,000 years. The modern wet climate prevents fire in this area, in spite of the warm summers and an abundant biomass of dwarf pine (Pinus mugo) and three other conifer tree species (Pinus cembra, Picea abies, and Larix decidua). Past fire history reconstructed from sedimentary charcoal showed a median fire return interval of 140 years (30-735 yr fire-1), with a high variability (SD ± 170 years) throughout the Holocene, suggesting that the past environment was more favourable to fire than the modern one, probably due to a drier climate or to different fuel availability. The subalpine community containing P. mugo remained stable for the past 9000 years, despite the variability of the fire return interval. Interestingly, the fire frequency is higher at Lago di Colbricon than at sites in the western Alps that lack P. mugo, suggesting that this species tolerates fire disturbance. In fact, it probably favours the spread of fire due to its flammable biomass, prostrated form, and dense layering canopy, thus offsetting the influence of the wet climate. Since the 19th century, the removal of dwarf pine to promote subalpine grasslands may have suppressed fires in this region.

  19. Insecticide resistance status of malaria vectors in Lao PDR.

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    Sébastien Marcombe

    Full Text Available Knowledge on insecticide resistance in Anopheles species is a basic requirement to guide malaria vector control programs. In Lao PDR, vector control relies on insecticide residual spraying (IRS and impregnated bed-nets (ITNs with the use of pyrethroids. Here, the susceptibility of Anopheles species, including several malaria vectors (An. maculatus and An. minimus, to various insecticides was investigated in ten provinces of Lao PDR through a north-south transect. Bioassays were performed on field caught female mosquitoes using the standard WHO susceptibility tests with DDT (4%, deltamethrin (0.05% and permethrin (0.75%. In addition, the DIIS6 region of the para-type sodium channel gene was amplified and sequenced to identify knockdown resistance mutations (kdr. Resistance to DDT and permethrin was detected in suspected malaria vectors, such as An. nivipes and An. philippinensis in Lao PDR. Resistance to the formerly used DDT was found in a population of An. maculatus s.l. from Luang Prabang province. No resistance to pyrethroids was found in primary vectors, indicating that these insecticides are still adequate for malaria vector control. However, high resistance levels to pyrethroids was found in-vector species and reduced susceptibility to permethrin in An. minimus and An. maculatus was reported in specific localities which raises concerns for pyrethroid-based control in the future. No kdr mutation was found in any of the resistant populations tested hence suggesting a probable role detoxification enzymes in resistance. This study highlights the necessity to continue the monitoring of insecticide susceptibility to early detect potential occurrence and/or migration of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors in Lao PDR.

  20. High frequency of a single nucleotide substitution (c.-6-180T>G) of the canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene associated with phenobarbital-resistant idiopathic epilepsy in Border Collie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Yabuki, Akira; Chang, Hye-Sook; Uddin, Mohammad Mejbah; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubur; Kushida, Kazuya; Kohyama, Moeko; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    A single nucleotide substitution (c.-6-180T>G) associated with resistance to phenobarbital therapy has been found in the canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene in Border Collies with idiopathic epilepsy. In the present study, a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was developed for genotyping this mutation, and a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of 472 Border Collies in Japan to determine the current allele frequency. The survey demonstrated the frequencies of the T/T wild type, T/G heterozygote, and G/G mutant homozygote to be 60.0%, 30.3%, and 9.8%, respectively, indicating that the frequency of the mutant G allele is extremely high (24.9%) in Border Collies. The results suggest that this high mutation frequency of the mutation is likely to cause a high prevalence of phenobarbital-resistant epilepsy in Border Collies.

  1. High Frequency of a Single Nucleotide Substitution (c.-6-180T>G of the Canine MDR1/ABCB1 Gene Associated with Phenobarbital-Resistant Idiopathic Epilepsy in Border Collie Dogs

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    Keijiro Mizukami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A single nucleotide substitution (c.-6-180T>G associated with resistance to phenobarbital therapy has been found in the canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene in Border Collies with idiopathic epilepsy. In the present study, a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was developed for genotyping this mutation, and a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of 472 Border Collies in Japan to determine the current allele frequency. The survey demonstrated the frequencies of the T/T wild type, T/G heterozygote, and G/G mutant homozygote to be 60.0%, 30.3%, and 9.8%, respectively, indicating that the frequency of the mutant G allele is extremely high (24.9% in Border Collies. The results suggest that this high mutation frequency of the mutation is likely to cause a high prevalence of phenobarbital-resistant epilepsy in Border Collies.

  2. Targeted application of an organophosphate-based paint applied on windows and doors against Anopheles coluzzii resistant to pyrethroids under real life conditions in Vallée du Kou, Burkina Faso (West Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poda, Serge B; Soma, Dieudonné D; Hien, Aristide; Namountougou, Moussa; Gnankiné, Olivier; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Fournet, Florence; Baldet, Thierry; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Mosqueira, Beatriz; Dabiré, Roch K

    2018-04-02

    A novel strategy applying an organophosphate-based insecticide paint on doors and windows in combination with long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLINs) was tested for the control of pyrethroid-resistant malaria vectors in a village setting in Vallée du Kou, a rice-growing area west of Burkina Faso. Insecticide Paint Inesfly 5A IGR™, comprised of two organophosphates and an insect growth regulator, was applied to doors and windows and tested in combination with pyrethroid-treated LLINs. The killing effect was monitored for 5 months by early morning collections of anophelines and other culicids. The residual efficacy was evaluated monthly by WHO bioassays using Anopheles gambiae 'Kisumu' and local populations of Anopheles coluzzii resistant to pyrethroids. The spatial mortality efficacy (SME) at distances of 1 m was also assessed against pyrethroid-susceptible and -resistant malaria vectors. The frequency of L1014F kdr and Ace-1 R G119S mutations was, respectively, reported throughout the study. The Insecticide Paint Inesfly 5A IGR had been tested in past studies yielding a long-term mortality rate of 80% over 12 months against An. coluzzii, the local pyrethroid-resistant malaria vector. The purpose of the present study is to test if treating smaller, targeted surfaces (e.g. doors and windows) was also efficient in killing malaria vectors. Treating windows and doors alone yielded a killing efficacy of 100% for 1 month against An. coluzzii resistant to pyrethroids, but efficacy reduced quickly afterwards. Likewise, WHO cone bioassays yielded mortalities of 80-100% for 2 months but declined to 90 and 40% 2 and 3 months after treatment, respectively. Mosquitoes exposed to insecticide paint-treated surfaces at distances of 1 m, yielded mortality rates of about 90-80% against local pyrethroids-resistant An. coluzzii during the first 2 months, but decreased to 30% afterwards. Anopheles coluzzii was reported to be exclusively the local malaria vector and

  3. Insecticide resistance may enhance the response to a host-plant volatile kairomone for the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauphanor, Benoît; Franck, Pierre; Lasnier, Thérèse; Toubon, Jean-François; Beslay, Dominique; Boivin, Thomas; Bouvier, Jean-Charles; Renou, Michel

    2007-06-01

    The behavioral and electroantennographic responses of Cydia pomonella (L.) to the ripe pear volatile ethyl (2 E,4 Z)-2,4-decadienoate (Et- E, Z-DD), were compared in insecticide-susceptible and -resistant populations originating from southern France. A dose-response relationship to this kairomonal attractant was established for antennal activity and did not reveal differences between susceptible and resistant strains. Conversely, males of the laboratory strains expressing metabolic [cytochrome P450-dependent mixed-function oxidases (mfo)] or physiological (kdr-type mutation of the sodium-channel gene) resistance mechanisms exhibited a significantly higher response to Et- E, Z-DD than those of the susceptible strain in a wind tunnel experiment. No response of the females to this kairomone could be obtained in our wind-tunnel conditions. In apple orchards, mfo-resistant male moths were captured at significantly higher rates in kairomone-baited traps than in traps baited with the sex pheromone of C. pomonella. Such a differential phenomenon was not verified for the kdr-resistant insects, which exhibited a similar response to both the sex pheromone and the kairomonal attractant in apple orchards. Considering the widespread distribution of metabolic resistance in European populations of C. pomonella and the enhanced behavioral response to Et- E, Z-DD in resistant moths, the development of control measures based on this kairomonal compound would be of great interest for the management of insecticide resistance in this species.

  4. Exploring the molecular basis of insecticide resistance in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti: a case study in Martinique Island (French West Indies

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    Yébakima André

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti is a major vector of dengue and hemorrhagic fevers, causing up to 100 million dengue infections every year. As there is still no medicine and efficient vaccine available, vector control largely based on insecticide treatments remains the only method to reduce dengue virus transmission. Unfortunately, vector control programs are facing operational challenges with mosquitoes becoming resistant to commonly used insecticides. Resistance of Ae. aegypti to chemical insecticides has been reported worldwide and the underlying molecular mechanisms, including the identification of enzymes involved in insecticide detoxification are not completely understood. Results The present paper investigates the molecular basis of insecticide resistance in a population of Ae. aegypti collected in Martinique (French West Indies. Bioassays with insecticides on adults and larvae revealed high levels of resistance to organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides. Molecular screening for common insecticide target-site mutations showed a high frequency (71% of the sodium channel 'knock down resistance' (kdr mutation. Exposing mosquitoes to detoxification enzymes inhibitors prior to bioassays induced a significant increased susceptibility of mosquitoes to insecticides, revealing the presence of metabolic-based resistance mechanisms. This trend was biochemically confirmed by significant elevated activities of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, glutathione S-transferases and carboxylesterases at both larval and adult stages. Utilization of the microarray Aedes Detox Chip containing probes for all members of detoxification and other insecticide resistance-related enzymes revealed the significant constitutive over-transcription of multiple detoxification genes at both larval and adult stages. The over-transcription of detoxification genes in the resistant strain was confirmed by using real-time quantitative RT

  5. Effects of the different frequencies and loads of ultrasonic surface rolling on surface mechanical properties and fretting wear resistance of HIP Ti–6Al–4V alloy

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    Li, G., E-mail: ligang_scut@outlook.com; Qu, S.G., E-mail: qusg@scut.edu.cn; Pan, Y.X.; Li, X.Q.

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Effects of MUSR frequency and load on surface properties of HIP Ti-6Al-4V investigated. • The grains in surface-modified layer were refined and appeared twins and many dense dislocations. • The hardened layer depth and surface residual stress of MUSR- treated samples were significantly improved. • MUSR- treated samples showed the good fretting friction and wear resistance. • The best microstructure and properties of surface-modified layer obtained by sample treated by 30 kHz and 900 N. - Abstract: The main purpose of this paper was to investigate the effects of the different frequencies and loads of multi-pass ultrasonic surface rolling (MUSR) on surface layer mechanical properties, microstructure and fretting friction and wear characteristics of HIP (hot isostatic pressing) Ti–6Al–4 V alloy. Some microscopic analysis methods (SEM, TEM and EDS) were used to characterize the modified surface layer of material after MUSR treatment. The results indicated that the material in sample surface layer experienced a certain extent plastic deformation, and accompanied by some dense dislocations and twins generation. Moreover surface microhardness and residual stress of samples treated by MUSR were also greatly improved compared with the untreated. The fretting friction and wear properties of samples treated by MUSR in different conditions are tested at 10 and 15 N in dry friction conditions. It could be found that friction coefficient and wear volume loss were significantly declined in the optimal result. The main wear mechanism of MUSR-treated samples included abrasive wear, adhesion and spalling.

  6. Insecticide Resistance Mechanisms in the Green Peach Aphid Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) I: A Transcriptomic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Andrea X.; Jander, Georg; Samaniego, Horacio; Ramsey, John S; Figueroa, Christian C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Insecticide resistance is one of the best examples of rapid micro-evolution found in nature. Since the development of the first synthetic insecticide in 1939, humans have invested considerable effort to stay ahead of resistance phenotypes that repeatedly develop in insects. Aphids are a group of insects that have become global pests in agriculture and frequently exhibit insecticide resistance. The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, has developed resistance to at least seventy different synthetic compounds, and different insecticide resistance mechanisms have been reported worldwide. Methodology/Principal Findings To further characterize this resistance, we analyzed genome-wide transcriptional responses in three genotypes of M. persicae, each exhibiting different resistance mechanisms, in response to an anti-cholinesterase insecticide. The sensitive genotype (exhibiting no resistance mechanism) responded to the insecticide by up-regulating 183 genes primarily ones related to energy metabolism, detoxifying enzymes, proteins of extracellular transport, peptidases and cuticular proteins. The second genotype (resistant through a kdr sodium channel mutation), up-regulated 17 genes coding for detoxifying enzymes, peptidase and cuticular proteins. Finally, a multiply resistant genotype (carrying kdr and a modified acetylcholinesterase), up-regulated only 7 genes, appears not to require induced insecticide detoxification, and instead down-regulated many genes. Conclusions/Significance This study suggests strongly that insecticide resistance in M. persicae is more complex that has been described, with the participation of a broad array of resistance mechanisms. The sensitive genotype exhibited the highest transcriptional plasticity, accounting for the wide range of potential adaptations to insecticides that this species can evolve. In contrast, the multiply resistant genotype exhibited a low transcriptional plasticity, even for the expression of genes encoding

  7. Frequency of alleles conferring resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in Australian populations of Helicoverpa punctigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) from 2002 to 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, S; Parker, T L; Mahon, R J

    2009-04-01

    Helicoverpa punctigera and Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) are important pests of field and horticultural crops in Australia. The former is endemic to the continent, whereas the latter is also distributed in Africa and Asia. Although H. armigera rapidly developed resistance to virtually every group of insecticide used against it, there is only one report of resistance to an insecticide in H. punctigera. In 1996 the Australian cotton industry adopted Ingard, which expresses the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin gene cry1Ac. In 2004/2005, Bollgard II (which expresses Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab) replaced Ingard and has subsequently been grown on 80% of the area planted to cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. From 2002/2003 to 2006/2007, F2 screens were used to detect resistance to Cry1Ac or Cry2Ab. We detected no alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac; the frequency was < 0.0005 (n = 2,180 alleles), with a 95% credibility interval between 0 and 0.0014. However, during the same period, we detected alleles that confer resistance to Cry2Ab at a frequency of 0.0018 (n = 2,192 alleles), with a 95% credibility interval between 0.0005 and 0.0040. For both toxins, the experiment-wise detection probability was 94%, i.e., if there actually was a resistance allele in any tested lines, we would have detected it 94% of the time. The first isolation of Cry2Ab resistance in H. punctigera was before the widespread deployment of Bollgard II. This finding supports our published notion for H. armigera that alleles conferring resistance to Cry2Ab may be present at detectable frequencies in populations before selection by transgenic crops.

  8. Extremely Low-Frequency Magnetic Fields and Redox-Responsive Pathways Linked to Cancer Drug Resistance: Insights from Co-Exposure-Based In Vitro Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Falone

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Electrical devices currently used in clinical practice and common household equipments generate extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF that were classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as “possible carcinogenic.” Assuming that ELF-MF plays a role in the carcinogenic process without inducing direct genomic alterations, ELF-MF may be involved in the promotion or progression of cancers. In particular, ELF-MF-induced responses are suspected to activate redox-responsive intracellular signaling or detoxification scavenging systems. In fact, improved protection against oxidative stress and redox-active xenobiotics is thought to provide critical proliferative and survival advantage in tumors. On this basis, an ever-growing research activity worldwide is attempting to establish whether tumor cells may develop multidrug resistance through the activation of essential cytoprotective networks in the presence of ELF fields, and how this might trigger relevant changes in tumor phenotype. This review builds a framework around how the activity of redox-responsive mediators may be controlled by co-exposure to ELF-MF and reactive oxygen species-generating agents in tumor and cancer cells, in order to clarify whether and how such potential molecular targets could help to minimize or neutralize the functional interaction between ELF-MF and malignancies.

  9. Effects of Different Concurrent Resistance and Aerobic Training Frequencies on Muscle Power and Muscle Quality in Trained Elderly Men: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Rodrigo; Fuchs, Sandra C; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Pinto, Ronei Silveira; Radaelli, Régis; Schoenell, Maira; Izquierdo, Mikel; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Umpierre, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Muscle power is a strong predictor of functional status in the elderly population and is required to perform different daily activities. To compare the effects of different weekly training frequencies on muscle power and muscle quality induced by concurrent training (resistance + aerobic) in previously trained elderly men. Twenty-four trained elderly men (65 ± 4 years), previously engaged in a regular concurrent training program, three times per week, for the previous five months, were randomly allocated to concurrent training programs in which training was performed either twice a week (2·week -1 , n = 12) or three times per week (3·week -1 , n = 12). The groups trained with an identical exercise intensity and volume per session for 10 weeks. Before and after the exercise training, we examined muscle power, as estimated by countermovement jump height; knee extensor isokinetic peak torque at 60 and 180 o. s -1 ; and muscle quality, a quotient between the one-repetition maximum of the knee extensors and the sum of quadriceps femoris muscle thickness determined by ultrasonography. Additionally, as secondary outcomes, blood pressure and reactive hyperemia were evaluated. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures were used and statistical significance was set at α = 0.05. Muscular power (2·week -1 : 7%, and 3·week -1 : 10%) and muscle quality (2·week -1 : 15%, and 3·week -1 : 8%) improved with the concurrent exercise training ( p concurrent training. Concurrent training performed twice a week promotes similar adaptations in muscular power and muscle quality when compared with the same program performed three times per week in previously trained elderly men.

  10. Increased frequency of the DI genotype of the angiotensin-I converting enzyme and association of the II genotype with insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koika, Vasiliki; Georgopoulos, Neoklis A; Piouka, Athanasia; Roupas, Nikolaos D; Karela, Anastasia; Armeni, Anastasia K; Katsantoni, Eleni; Panidis, Dimitrios

    2012-04-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common and complex disease with unclear pattern of inheritance, characterized by an androgen excess, while hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance (IR) are common features of the syndrome. The angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) insertion (I)/deletion (D) gene polymorphism was proved to be involved in many pathophysiological conditions, including hypertension and IR. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the involvement of the ACE gene polymorphism in the pathogenesis of PCOS. In a case-control association study involving 801 PCOS women and 266 healthy controls, hormonal determinations and ACE polymorphism genotyping were performed. The PCOS women were classified into three groups: Group A presented biochemical hyperandrogenism, combined with anovulation and polycystic ovarian morphology; Group B, clinical hyperandrogenism combined with anovulation and polycystic ovarian morphology; and Group C, chronic anovulation and polycystic ovarian morphology. A significant increase in the frequency of the DI genotype of the ACE polymorphism was detected in PCOS women as a whole (P=0.035), in PCOS Group A (P=0.039) and Group B (P=0.010), while there was no difference in Group C (P=0.939). Significant difference was also observed in hyperandrogenic PCOS women as a whole (Group A+B) (P=0.017). The II genotype was positively correlated with HOMA-IR and QUICKI and with fasting insulin and glucose/insulin ratio in these groups. The association study of the ACE I/D polymorphism in PCOS women demonstrates an increase in the DI genotype incidence and an association of the II genotype with IR.

  11. Moderate temperature-dependent surface and volume resistivity and low-frequency dielectric constant measurements of pure and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) doped polyvinyl alcohol thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Matthew; Guggilla, Padmaja; Reedy, Angela; Ijaz, Quratulann; Janen, Afef; Uba, Samuel; Curley, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Previously, we have reported measurements of temperature-dependent surface resistivity of pure and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNCT) doped amorphous Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) thin films. In the temperature range from 22 °C to 40 °C with humidity-controlled environment, we found the surface resistivity to decrease initially, but to rise steadily as the temperature continued to increase. Moreover, electric surface current density (Js) was measured on the surface of pure and MWCNT doped PVA thin films. In this regard, the surface current density and electric field relationship follow Ohm's law at low electric fields. Unlike Ohmic conduction in metals where free electrons exist, selected captive electrons are freed or provided from impurities and dopants to become conduction electrons from increased thermal vibration of constituent atoms in amorphous thin films. Additionally, a mechanism exists that seemingly decreases the surface resistivity at higher temperatures, suggesting a blocking effect for conducting electrons. Volume resistivity measurements also follow Ohm's law at low voltages (low electric fields), and they continue to decrease as temperatures increase in this temperature range, differing from surface resistivity behavior. Moreover, we report measurements of dielectric constant and dielectric loss as a function of temperature and frequency. Both the dielectric constant and dielectric loss were observed to be highest for MWCNT doped PVA compared to pure PVA and commercial paper, and with frequency and temperature for all samples.

  12. Target-site resistance to pyrethroids in European populations of pollen beetle, Meligethes aeneus F

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauen, Ralf; Zimmer, Christoph T; Andrews, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    detected a single nucleotide change that results in an amino acid substitution (L1014F) within the domain IIS6 region of the channel protein. The L1014F mutation, often termed kdr, has been found in several other insect pests and is known to confer moderate levels of resistance to pyrethroids. We developed......Pollen beetle, Meligethes aeneus F. (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) is a major univoltine pest of oilseed rape in many European countries. Winter oilseed rape is cultivated on several million hectares in Europe and the continuous use of pyrethroid insecticides to control pollen beetle populations has...... resulted in high selection pressure and subsequent development of resistance. Resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in this pest is now widespread and the levels of resistance are often sufficient to result in field control failures at recommended application rates. Recently, metabolic resistance mediated...

  13. Resistance mechanisms to chlorpyrifos and F392W mutation frequencies in the acetylcholine esterase ace1 allele of field populations of the tobacco whitefly, Bemisia tabaci in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning-ning; Liu, Cai-feng; Yang, Fang; Dong, Shuang-lin; Han, Zhao-jun

    2012-01-01

    The tobacco whitefly B-biotype Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a worldwide pest of many crops. In China, chlorpyrifos has been used to control this insect for many years and is still being used despite the fact that some resistance has been reported. To combat resistance and maintain good control efficiency of chlorpyrifos, it is essential to understand resistance mechanisms. A chlorpyrifos resistant tobacco whitefly strain (NJ-R) and a susceptible strain (NJ-S) were derived from a field-collected population in Nanjing, China, and the resistance mechanisms were investigated. More than 30-fold resistance was achieved after selected by chlorpyrifos for 13 generations in the laboratory. However, the resistance dropped significantly to about 18-fold in only 4 generations without selection pressure. Biochemical assays indicated that increased esterase activity was responsible for this resistance, while acetylcholine esterase, glutathione S-transferase, and microsomal-O-demethylase played little or no role. F392W mutations in acel were prevalent in NJ-S and NJ-R strains and 6 field-collected populations of both B and Q-biotype from locations that cover a wide geographical area of China. These findings provide important information about tobacco whitefly chlorpyrifos resistance mechanisms and guidance to combat resistance and optimize use patterns of chlorpyrifos and other organophosphate and carbamate insecticides.

  14. High Frequency of a Single Nucleotide Substitution (c.-6-180T>G) of the Canine MDR1/ABCB1 Gene Associated with Phenobarbital-Resistant Idiopathic Epilepsy in Border Collie Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Yabuki, Akira; Chang, Hye-Sook; Uddin, Mohammad Mejbah; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubur; Kushida, Kazuya; Kohyama, Moeko; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    A single nucleotide substitution (c.-6-180T>G) associated with resistance to phenobarbital therapy has been found in the canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene in Border Collies with idiopathic epilepsy. In the present study, a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was developed for genotyping this mutation, and a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of 472 Border Collies in Japan to determine the current allele frequency. The survey demonstrated the frequencies of the T/T wild type...

  15. High frequency of Plasmodium falciparum CICNI/SGEAA and CVIET haplotypes without association with resistance to sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine and chloroquine combination in the Daraweesh area, in Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A-Elbasit, I E; Khalil, I F; Elbashir, M I

    2008-01-01

    Estimation of the prevalence of the molecular markers of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) and chloroquine (CQ) resistance and validation of the association of mutations with resistance in different settings is needed for local policy guidance and for contributing to a global map for anti-malarial d...... molecular markers needed before the deployment of SP/artesunate combination therapy in the Sudan....

  16. Current status of insecticide resistance among malaria vectors in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondeto, Benyl M; Nyundo, Christopher; Kamau, Luna; Muriu, Simon M; Mwangangi, Joseph M; Njagi, Kiambo; Mathenge, Evan M; Ochanda, Horace; Mbogo, Charles M

    2017-09-19

    Insecticide resistance has emerged as one of the major challenges facing National Malaria Control Programmes in Africa. A well-coordinated national database on insecticide resistance (IRBase) can facilitate the development of effective strategies for managing insecticide resistance and sustaining the effectiveness of chemical-based vector control measures. The aim of this study was to assemble a database on the current status of insecticide resistance among malaria vectors in Kenya. Data was obtained from published literature through PubMed, HINARI and Google Scholar searches and unpublished literature from government reports, research institutions reports and malaria control programme reports. Each data source was assigned a unique identification code and entered into Microsoft Excel 2010 datasheets. Base maps on the distribution of insecticide resistance and resistance mechanisms among malaria vectors in Kenya were generated using ArcGIS Desktop 10.1 (ESRI, Redlands, CA, USA). Insecticide resistance status among the major malaria vectors in Kenya was reported in all the four classes of insecticides including pyrethroids, carbamates, organochlorines and organophosphates. Resistance to pyrethroids has been detected in Anopheles gambiae (s.s.), An. arabiensis and An. funestus (s.s.) while resistance to carbamates was limited to An. gambiae (s.s.) and An. arabiensis. Resistance to the organochlorine was reported in An. gambiae (s.s.) and An. funestus (s.s.) while resistance to organophosphates was reported in An. gambiae (s.l.) only. The mechanisms of insecticide resistance among malaria vectors reported include the kdr mutations (L 1014S and L 1014F) and elevated activity in carboxylesterase, glutathione S-transferases (GST) and monooxygenases. The kdr mutations L 1014S and L 1014F were detected in An. gambiae (s.s.) and An. arabiensis populations. Elevated activity of monooxygenases has been detected in both An. arabiensis and An. gambiae (s.s.) populations while

  17. Molecular Analysis of Gene Frequencies of TEM, CTX-M and SHV in Beta-Lactam Antibiotic-Resistant Strains of E. Coli Isolated from Urinary Tract Infections in Yasuj Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Mortezavi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Urinary tract infections is one of the most common infectious diseases which many factors are involved, but bacteria such as E.coli is the most important agent of urinary tract infections. Antibiotic resistance as a major problem in the treatment and control of these infections is considered. The aim of this study was to determine the genes that cause resistance to beta-lactam family of antibiotics on E.coli isolated from urinary tract infections in Yasuj city. Methods: In the present Cross-sectional study which was conducted over a period of seven months in 2013, 123 samples of E.coli were collected from Yasuj hospitals for molecular analysis of TEM, SHV CTX-M genes, causing antibiotic resistance by (PCR method.Data were analyzed using SPSS statistical test. Results: PCR showed that the gene frequency of TEM (50.94%, SHV (47.16%, CTX-M-9 (35.84%, and CTX-M-10, (32.07% and the highest and lowest prevalent of genes were related to TEM and CTX-M10 in E.coli isolated from urinary tract infections respectively. Conclusion: According to the high prevalence of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, the current study showed that the noted genes play an important role in facilitating the spread of antimicrobial resistance in this region.

  18. The Influence of Insecticide Resistance, Age, Sex, and Blood Feeding Frequency on Thermal Tolerance of Wild and Laboratory Phenotypes of Anopheles funestus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, C L; Oliver, S V; Hunt, R H; Coetzee, M

    2016-03-01

    Resistance to insecticides is a global phenomenon and is increasing at an unprecedented rate. How resistant and susceptible strains of malaria vectors might differ in terms of life history and basic biology is often overlooked, despite the potential importance of such information in light of changing climates. Here, we investigated the upper thermal limits (ULT50) of wild and laboratory strains of Anopheles funestus Giles mosquitoes, including resistance status, sex, age, and blood feeding status as potential factors influencing ULT50. No significant differences in ULT50 were observed between strains displaying different resistance patterns, nor was there a significant difference between wild and laboratory strains. In some instances, strains showed a senescence response, displaying decreased ULT50 with an increase in age, and differences between males and females (females displaying higher ULT50 than males). Blood feeding did not seem to influence ULT50 in any way. For An. funestus, it seems evident that there is no cost to resistance despite what is displayed in other anopheline species. This could have significant impacts for vector control, with resistant populations of An. funestus performing just as well, if not better, than susceptible strains, especially under changing environmental conditions such as those expected to occur with climate change.

  19. Insecticide resistance in malaria vectors along the Thailand-Myanmar border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaumeau, Victor; Cerqueira, Dominique; Zadrozny, John; Kittiphanakun, Praphan; Andolina, Chiara; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap; Nosten, François; Corbel, Vincent

    2017-03-31

    There is a paucity of data about the susceptibility status of malaria vectors to Public Health insecticides along the Thailand-Myanmar border. This lack of data is a limitation to guide malaria vector-control in this region. The aim of this study was to assess the susceptibility status of malaria vectors to deltamethrin, permethrin and DDT and to validate a simple molecular assay for the detection of knock-down resistance (kdr) mutations in the study area. Anopheles mosquitoes were collected in four sentinel villages during August and November 2014 and July 2015 using human landing catch and cow bait collection methods. WHO susceptibility tests were carried out to measure the mortality and knock-down rates of female mosquitoes to deltamethrin (0.05%), permethrin (0.75%) and DDT (4%). DNA sequencing of a fragment of the voltage-gated sodium channel gene was carried out to identify knock-down resistance (kdr) mutations at position 1014 in mosquitoes surviving exposure to insecticides. A total of 6295 Anopheles belonging to ten different species were bioassayed. Resistance or suspected resistance to pyrethroids was detected in An. barbirostris (s.l.) (72 and 84% mortality to deltamethrin (n = 504) and permethrin (n = 493) respectively), An. hyrcanus (s.l.) (33 and 48% mortality to deltamethrin (n = 172) and permethrin (n = 154), respectively), An. jamesii (87% mortality to deltamethrin, n = 111), An. maculatus (s.l.) (85 and 97% mortality to deltamethrin (n = 280) and permethrin (n = 264), respectively), An. minimus (s.l.) (92% mortality, n = 370) and An. vagus (75 and 95% mortality to deltamethrin (n =148) and permethrin (n = 178), respectively). Resistance or suspected resistance to DDT was detected in An. barbirostris (s.l.) (74% mortality, n = 435), An. hyrcanus (s.l.) (57% mortality, n = 91) and An. vagus (97% mortality, n = 133). The L1014S kdr mutation at both heterozygous and homozygous state was detected only in

  20. High Frequency of Class 2 and 3 Integrons Related to Drug-Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Diarrheagenic E. coli in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Mohammadalipour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Integrons are mobile genetic elements able to obtain the antibiotic resistance gene cassettes. The prevalence of integrons in the Enterobacteriaceae family has been varied and played an important role in the development of the drug resistant bacteria. The present study aimed to investigate the contribution of class 2 and 3 integrons in drug resistant Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains.Materials and Methods: The 164 Diarrheagenic E. coli collected from feces samples of children in the Yasuj –Iran and all isolates were identified by standard biochemical tests. The antimicrobial susceptibility for 14 antibiotics, which are used conventionally was determined by disk diffusion. The presence of class 2 and 3 integrons in all isolates was investigated by PCR.Results: Of 164 E. coli isolates from children, 80.49% carried class 2 integron and the length of the amplicons ranged from 800 bp to 2 kb. Class 3 integrons were identified among 24 E. coli isolates. All the E.coli isolates were susceptible to imipenem and the greatest resistance was correspondent to nalidixic acid. A significant correlation was revealed between Class 2 integron and resistance to kanamycin, amikacin, gentamicin, ceftazidime, chloramphenicol and cephalexin. The presence of class 3 integron was significantly associated with resistance to ampicillin, gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin, tetracycline and trimetoprime-sulfametoxazol.Conclusion: The results indicated that integrons are widespread in Diarrheagenic E. coli and its carriage contributed significantly to the emergence of resistance among Diarrheagenic E. coli. However, factors leading to the wide spread of integrons are still to be determined. 

  1. Molecular characterization of DDT resistance in Anopheles gambiae from Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djègbè, Innocent; Agossa, Fiacre R; Jones, Christopher M; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Cornelie, Sylvie; Akogbéto, Martin; Ranson, Hilary; Corbel, Vincent

    2014-08-29

    Insecticide resistance in the mosquito vector is the one of the main obstacles against effective malaria control. In order to implement insecticide resistance management strategies, it is important to understand the genetic factors involved. In this context, we investigated the molecular basis of DDT resistance in the main malaria vector from Benin. Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes were collected from four sites across Benin and identified to species/molecular form. Mosquitoes from Cotonou (M-form), Tori-Bossito (S-form) and Bohicon (S-form) were exposed to DDT 4% at a range of exposure times (30 min to 300 min). Another batch of mosquitoes from Cotonou and Malanville were exposed to DDT for 1 hour and the survivors 48 hours post exposure were used to quantify metabolic gene expression. Quantitative PCR assays were used to quantify mRNA levels of metabolic enzymes: GSTE2, GSTD3, CYP6P3 and CYP6M2. Expression (fold-change) was calculated using the ∆∆Ct method and compared to susceptible strains. Detection of target-site mutations (L1014F, L1014S and N1575Y) was performed using allelic discrimination TaqMan assays. DDT resistance was extremely high in all populations, regardless of molecular form, with no observed mortality after 300 min exposure. In both DDT-survivors and non-exposed mosquitoes, GSTE2 and GSTD3 were over-expressed in the M form at 4.4-fold and 3.5-fold in Cotonou and 1.5-fold and 2.5-fold in Malanville respectively, when compared to the susceptible strain. The CYP6M2 and CYP6P3 were over-expressed at 4.6-fold and 3.8-fold in Cotonou and 1.2-fold and 2.5-fold in Malanville respectively. In contrast, no differences in GSTE2 and CYP6M2 were observed between S form mosquitoes from Tori-Bossito and Bohicon compared to susceptible strain. The 1014 F allele was fixed in the S-form and at high frequency in the M-form (0.7-0.914). The frequency of 1575Y allele was 0.29-0.36 in the S-form and nil in the M-form. The 1014S allele was detected in the S

  2. Genetic diversity, anti-microbial resistance, plasmid profile and frequency of the Vi antigen in Salmonella Dublin strains isolated in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, F P; Frazão, M R; Rodrigues, D P; Costa, R G; Casas, M R T; Fernandes, S A; Falcão, J P; Campioni, F

    2018-02-01

    Salmonella Dublin is strongly adapted to cattle causing enteritis and/or systemic disease with high rates of mortality. However, it can be sporadically isolated from humans, usually causing serious disease, especially in patients with underlying chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to molecularly type S. Dublin strains isolated from humans and animals in Brazil to verify the diversity of these strains as well as to ascertain possible differences between strains isolated from humans and animals. Moreover, the presence of the capsular antigen Vi and the plasmid profile was characterized in addition to the anti-microbial resistance against 15 drugs. For this reason, 113 S. Dublin strains isolated between 1983 and 2016 from humans (83) and animals (30) in Brazil were typed by PFGE and MLVA. The presence of the capsular antigen Vi was verified by PCR, and the phenotypic expression of the capsular antigen was determined serologically. Also, a plasmid analysis for each strain was carried out. The strains studied were divided into 35 different PFGE types and 89 MLVA-types with a similarity of ≥80% and ≥17.5%, respectively. The plasmid sizes found ranged from 2 to >150 kb and none of the strains studied presented the capsular antigen Vi. Resistance or intermediate resistance was found in 23 strains (20.3%) that were resistant to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, imipenem, nalidixic acid, piperacillin, streptomycin and/or tetracycline. The majority of the S. Dublin strains studied and isolated over a 33-year period may descend from a common subtype that has been contaminating humans and animals in Brazil and able to cause invasive disease even in the absence of the capsular antigen. The higher diversity of resistance phenotypes in human isolates, as compared with animal strains, may be a reflection of the different anti-microbial treatments used to control S. Dublin infections in humans in Brazil. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Effect of Ciprofloxacin Concentration on the Frequency and Nature of Resistant Mutants Selected from Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutS and mutT Hypermutators▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morero, Natalia R.; Monti, Mariela R.; Argaraña, Carlos E.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid emergence of drug resistance upon treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections with fluoroquinolones is a serious concern. In this study, we report the effect of hypermutability on the mutant selection window for ciprofloxacin (CIP) by comparing the hypermutator MPAO1 mutS and mutT strains with the wild-type strain. The mutant selection window was shifted to higher CIP concentrations for both hypermutators, presenting the mutS strain with a broader selection window in comparison to the wild-type strain. The mutation prevention concentrations (MPC) determined for mutT and mutS strains were increased 2- and 4-fold over the wild-type level, respectively. In addition, we analyzed the molecular bases for resistance in the bacterial subpopulations selected at different points in the window. At the top of the window, the resistant clones isolated were mainly mutated in GyrA and ParC topoisomerase subunits, while at the bottom of the window, resistance was associated with the overexpression of MexCD-OprJ and MexAB-OprM efflux pumps. Accordingly, a greater proportion of multidrug-resistant clones were found among the subpopulations isolated at the lower CIP concentrations. Furthermore, we found that the exposure to CIP subinhibitory concentrations favors the accumulation of cells overexpressing MexCD-OprJ (due to mutations in the transcriptional repressor NfxB) and MexAB-OprM efflux pumps. We discuss these results in the context of the possible participation of this antibiotic in a mutagenic process. PMID:21646492

  4. Effect of ciprofloxacin concentration on the frequency and nature of resistant mutants selected from Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutS and mutT hypermutators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morero, Natalia R; Monti, Mariela R; Argaraña, Carlos E

    2011-08-01

    The rapid emergence of drug resistance upon treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections with fluoroquinolones is a serious concern. In this study, we report the effect of hypermutability on the mutant selection window for ciprofloxacin (CIP) by comparing the hypermutator MPAO1 mutS and mutT strains with the wild-type strain. The mutant selection window was shifted to higher CIP concentrations for both hypermutators, presenting the mutS strain with a broader selection window in comparison to the wild-type strain. The mutation prevention concentrations (MPC) determined for mutT and mutS strains were increased 2- and 4-fold over the wild-type level, respectively. In addition, we analyzed the molecular bases for resistance in the bacterial subpopulations selected at different points in the window. At the top of the window, the resistant clones isolated were mainly mutated in GyrA and ParC topoisomerase subunits, while at the bottom of the window, resistance was associated with the overexpression of MexCD-OprJ and MexAB-OprM efflux pumps. Accordingly, a greater proportion of multidrug-resistant clones were found among the subpopulations isolated at the lower CIP concentrations. Furthermore, we found that the exposure to CIP subinhibitory concentrations favors the accumulation of cells overexpressing MexCD-OprJ (due to mutations in the transcriptional repressor NfxB) and MexAB-OprM efflux pumps. We discuss these results in the context of the possible participation of this antibiotic in a mutagenic process.

  5. Determination of optimal whole body vibration amplitude and frequency parameters with plyometric exercise and its influence on closed-chain lower extremity acute power output and EMG activity in resistance trained males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Nikki J.

    The optimal combination of Whole body vibration (WBV) amplitude and frequency has not been established. Purpose. To determine optimal combination of WBV amplitude and frequency that will enhance acute mean and peak power (MP and PP) output EMG activity in the lower extremity muscles. Methods. Resistance trained males (n = 13) completed the following testing sessions: On day 1, power spectrum testing of bilateral leg press (BLP) movement was performed on the OMNI. Days 2 and 3 consisted of WBV testing with either average (5.8 mm) or high (9.8 mm) amplitude combined with either 0 (sham control), 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Hz frequency. Bipolar surface electrodes were placed on the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), bicep femoris (BF) and gastrocnemius (GA) muscles for EMG analysis. MP and PP output and EMG activity of the lower extremity were assessed pre-, post-WBV treatments and after sham-controls on the OMNI while participants performed one set of five repetitions of BLP at the optimal resistance determined on Day 1. Results. No significant differences were found between pre- and sham-control on MP and PP output and on EMG activity in RF, VL, BF and GA. Completely randomized one-way ANOVA with repeated measures demonstrated no significant interaction of WBV amplitude and frequency on MP and PP output and peak and mean EMGrms amplitude and EMG rms area under the curve. RF and VL EMGrms area under the curve significantly decreased (p plyometric exercise does not induce alterations in subsequent MP and PP output and EMGrms activity of the lower extremity. Future studies need to address the time of WBV exposure and magnitude of external loads that will maximize strength and/or power output.

  6. Low frequency of the scrapile resistance-associated allele and presence of lysine-171 allele of the prion protein gene in Italian Biellese ovine breed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acutis, P.L.; Sbaiz, L.; Verburg, F.J.; Riina, M.V.; Ru, G.; Moda, G.; Caramelli, M.; Bossers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Frequencies of polymorphisms at codons 136, 154 and 171 of the prion protein (PrP) gene were studied in 1207 pure-bred and cross-bred Italian Biellese rams, a small ovine breed of about 65 000 head in Italy. Aside from the five most common alleles (VRQ, ARQ, ARR, AHQ and ARH), the rare ARK allele

  7. High frequency of methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in children under 1 year old with skin and soft tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Ospina, Lorena; Jiménez, Judy Natalia

    2017-09-21

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a large number of infections in pediatric population; however, information about the behavior of such infections in this population is limited. The aim of the study was to describe the clinical, epidemiological, and molecular characteristics of infections caused by methicillin-susceptible and resistant S. aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in a pediatric population. A cross-sectional descriptive study in patients from birth to 14 years of age from three high-complexity institutions was conducted (2008-2010). All patients infected with methicillin-resistant S. aureus and a representative sample of patients infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus were included. Clinical and epidemiological information was obtained from medical records and molecular characterization included spa typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). In addition, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and virulence factor genes were detected. A total of 182 patients, 65 with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus infections and 117 with methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections, were included in the study; 41.4% of the patients being under 1 year. The most frequent infections were of the skin and soft tissues. Backgrounds such as having stayed in day care centers and previous use of antibiotics were more common in patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections (p≤0.05). Sixteen clonal complexes were identified and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strains were more diverse. The most common cassette was staphylococcal cassette chromosomemec IVc (70.8%), which was linked to Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl). In contrast with other locations, a prevalence of infections in children under 1 year of age in the city could be observed; this emphasizes the importance of epidemiological knowledge at the local level. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights

  8. Evidence that agricultural use of pesticides selects pyrethroid resistance within Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations from cotton growing areas in Burkina Faso, West Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristide Sawdetuo Hien

    Full Text Available Many studies have shown the role of agriculture in the selection and spread of resistance of Anopheles gambiae s.l. to insecticides. However, no study has directly demonstrated the presence of insecticides in breeding sources as a source of selection for this resistance. It is in this context that we investigated the presence of pesticide residues in breeding habitats and their formal involvement in vector resistance to insecticides in areas of West Africa with intensive farming. This study was carried out from June to November 2013 in Dano, southwest Burkina Faso in areas of conventional (CC and biological cotton (BC growing. Water and sediment samples collected from breeding sites located near BC and CC fields were submitted for chromatographic analysis to research and titrate the residual insecticide content found there. Larvae were also collected in these breeding sites and used in toxicity tests to compare their mortality to those of the susceptible strain, Anopheles gambiae Kisumu. All tested mosquitoes (living and dead were analyzed by PCR for species identification and characterization of resistance genes. The toxicity analysis of water from breeding sites showed significantly lower mortality rates in breeding site water from biological cotton (WBC growing sites compared to that from conventional cotton (WCC sites respective to both An. gambiae Kisumu (WBC: 80.75% vs WCC: 92.75% and a wild-type strain (49.75% vs 66.5%. The allele frequencies L1014F, L1014S kdr, and G116S ace -1R mutations conferring resistance, respectively, to pyrethroids and carbamates / organophosphates were 0.95, 0.4 and 0.12. Deltamethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin were identified in the water samples taken in October/November from mosquitoes breeding in the CC growing area. The concentrations obtained were respectively 0.0147ug/L and 1.49 ug/L to deltamethrin and lambdacyhalothrin. Our results provided evidence by direct analysis (biological and chromatographic tests

  9. Evidence that agricultural use of pesticides selects pyrethroid resistance within Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations from cotton growing areas in Burkina Faso, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hien, Aristide Sawdetuo; Soma, Dieudonné Diloma; Hema, Omer; Bayili, Bazoma; Namountougou, Moussa; Gnankiné, Olivier; Baldet, Thierry; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Dabiré, Kounbobr Roch

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have shown the role of agriculture in the selection and spread of resistance of Anopheles gambiae s.l. to insecticides. However, no study has directly demonstrated the presence of insecticides in breeding sources as a source of selection for this resistance. It is in this context that we investigated the presence of pesticide residues in breeding habitats and their formal involvement in vector resistance to insecticides in areas of West Africa with intensive farming. This study was carried out from June to November 2013 in Dano, southwest Burkina Faso in areas of conventional (CC) and biological cotton (BC) growing. Water and sediment samples collected from breeding sites located near BC and CC fields were submitted for chromatographic analysis to research and titrate the residual insecticide content found there. Larvae were also collected in these breeding sites and used in toxicity tests to compare their mortality to those of the susceptible strain, Anopheles gambiae Kisumu. All tested mosquitoes (living and dead) were analyzed by PCR for species identification and characterization of resistance genes. The toxicity analysis of water from breeding sites showed significantly lower mortality rates in breeding site water from biological cotton (WBC) growing sites compared to that from conventional cotton (WCC) sites respective to both An. gambiae Kisumu (WBC: 80.75% vs WCC: 92.75%) and a wild-type strain (49.75% vs 66.5%). The allele frequencies L1014F, L1014S kdr, and G116S ace -1R mutations conferring resistance, respectively, to pyrethroids and carbamates / organophosphates were 0.95, 0.4 and 0.12. Deltamethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin were identified in the water samples taken in October/November from mosquitoes breeding in the CC growing area. The concentrations obtained were respectively 0.0147ug/L and 1.49 ug/L to deltamethrin and lambdacyhalothrin. Our results provided evidence by direct analysis (biological and chromatographic tests) of the role

  10. Correlation between frequencies of blood monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, regulatory T cells and negative prognostic markers in patients with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; Køllgaard, Tania; Kongsted, Per

    2014-01-01

    in establishing an immune suppressive environment in patients with PC. Moreover, correlation of M-MDSC frequency with known prognostic markers and the observed impact on OS could reflect a possible role in tumor progression. Further insight into the generation and function of MDSC and their interplay with Tregs......Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are believed to play a role in immune suppression and subsequent failure of T cells to mount an efficient anti-tumor response, by employing both direct T-cell inhibition as well as induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Investigating the frequency...... with known negative prognostic markers in patients with PC including elevated levels of lactate dehydrogenase and prostate-specific antigen. Accordingly, high levels of M-MDSC were associated with a shorter median overall survival. Our data strongly suggest that M-MDSC, possibly along with Tregs, play a role...

  11. Cultivation of Staphylococcus epidermidis in the Human Spaceflight Environment Leads to Alterations in the Frequency and Spectrum of Spontaneous Rifampicin-Resistance Mutations in the rpoB Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus are persistent inhabitants of human spaceflight habitats and represent potential opportunistic pathogens. The effect of the human spaceflight environment on the growth and the frequency of mutations to antibiotic resistance in the model organism Staphylococcus epidermidis strain ATCC12228 was investigated. Six cultures of the test organism were cultivated in biological research in canisters-Petri dish fixation units for 122 h on orbit in the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the SpaceX-3 resupply mission. Asynchronous ground controls (GCs) consisted of identical sets of cultures cultivated for 122 h in the ISS Environmental Simulator at Kennedy Space Center. S. epidermidis exhibited significantly lower viable counts but significantly higher frequencies of mutation to rifampicin (Rif) resistance in space vs. GC cultures. The spectrum of mutations in the rpoB gene leading to Rif(R) was altered in S. epidermidis isolates cultivated in the ISS compared to GCs. The results suggest that the human spaceflight environment induces unique physiologic stresses on growing bacterial cells leading to changes in mutagenic potential.

  12. Frecuencia de portadores nasales de Staphylococcus aureus resistente a meticilina en personal de salud de hospitales de Nicaragua Frequency of nasal carriers of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among health workers in Nicaraguan hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Cáceres

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Conocer la frecuencia de portadores nasales de cepas de Staphylococcus aureus resistentes a meticilina (SARM y el patrón de resistencia antimicrobiana de esas cepas obtenidas de trabajadores de la salud de cuatro hospitales de Nicaragua. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, transversal, en el período del 1 de junio de 2009 al 30 de septiembre de 2010. Los hisopados nasales de los trabajadores de la salud que aceptaron voluntariamente participar en el estudio fueron cultivados en medio agar base de detección de resistencia a oxacilina (ORSAB. La identificación de los aislados de S. aureus se realizó por métodos cotidianos y la resistencia a meticilina se determinó por la presencia del gen mecA con la técnica de reacción en cadena de polimerasa. El patrón de resistencia antimicrobiana se detectó por difusión en disco. Cada participante firmó un consentimiento informado con anterioridad a la toma de la muestra. RESULTADOS: Participaron en el estudio 569 trabajadores de la salud, de los cuales 208 eran del hospital de León, 155 de dos hospitales de Chinandega y 206 del de Managua. La frecuencia de portadores nasales de SARM fue de 9,6% en León, 11,6% en Chinandega y 6,7% en Managua. El perfil de resistencia de las cepas SARM fue similar en los cuatro hospitales y todas las cepas fueron sensibles a vancomicina. Del total de cepas SARM aisladas, 15% fueron multirre-sistentes. El porcentaje de resistencia a eritromicina fue el más alto, seguido del de clindamicina. CONCLUSIONES: Los resultados del estudio se pueden considerar una advertencia sobre la circulación de cepas SARM entre el personal de salud de los hospitales participantes y aportan información relevante en relación al perfil de resistencia de las cepas SARM.OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of nasal carriers of strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and the antimicrobial resistance pattern of these strains, obtained from health

  13. Permethrin resistance variation and susceptible reference line isolation in a field population of the mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Liu, Nannan

    2014-10-01

    This study examines the genetic variations and mechanisms involved in the development of permethrin resistance in individual mosquitoes from a field population of Culex quinquefasciatus, HAmCq(G0) , and characterizes susceptible reference lines of mosquitoes with a similar genetic background to the field HAmCq(G0) strain. Six upregulated cytochrome P450 genes, CYP9M10, CYP9J34, CYP6P14, CYP9J40, CYP6AA7, and CYP4C52v1, previously identified as being upregulated in the larvae of resistant HAmCq(G8) mosquitoes were examined in the larvae of 3 strains (susceptible S-Lab, parental HAmCq(G0) and permethrin-selected highly resistant HAmCq(G8) ) and 8 HAmCq(G0) single-egg raft colonies, covering a range of levels of susceptibility/resistance to permethrin and exhibiting different variations in the expression of A and/or T alleles at the L-to-F kdr locus of the sodium channel. The 2 lines with the lowest tolerance to permethrin and bearing solely the susceptible A allele at the L-to-F kdr locus of the sodium channels, from colonies Cx_SERC5 and Cx_SERC8, showed lower or similar levels of all 6 of the P450 genes tested compared with the S-Lab strain, suggesting that these 2 lines could be used as the reference mosquitoes in future studies characterizing insecticide resistance in HAmCq mosquitoes. This study also provides a detailed investigation of the mechanisms involved in insecticide resistance in individuals within a population: individuals with elevated levels of resistance to permethrin all displayed one or more potential resistance mechanisms-either elevated levels of P450 gene expression, or L-to-F mutations in the sodium channel, or both. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  14. High frequency of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with SCCmec type III and Spa types t037 and t631 isolated from burn patients in southwest of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhizgari, Najmeh; Khoramrooz, Seyed Sajjad; Malek Hosseini, Seyed Ali Asghar; Marashifard, Masoud; Yazdanpanah, Mahboobeh; Emaneini, Mohammad; Gharibpour, Farzaneh; Mirzaii, Mehdi; Darban-Sarokhalil, Davood; Moein, Masoud; Naraki, Mahmood

    2016-03-01

    Methicilin resistance Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are the major challenges in hospitals, especially in the burn units. The use of molecular typing methods is essential for tracking the spread of S. aureus infection and epidemiological investigations. The aim of this study was to find the profile of the spa types and also the prevalence of each SCCmec type of S. aureus strains in a central burn hospital in southwest of Iran. A total of 81 non-duplicate S. aureus were isolated from burn patients between April 2011 and February 2012. The susceptibility of the isolates against 13 different antibiotics was tested by disk agar diffusion (DAD) method. MRSA strains were identified by amplification of mecA gene. Multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to determine the SCCmec types of MRSA strains and all the S. aureus isolates were typed by spa typing method. Detection of mecA gene showed that 70 (86.4%) of the isolates were MRSA. The highest rate of resistance was observed for penicillin (97.5%) and erythromycin (77.8%). None of the isolates were resistant to vancomycin. Sixty-seven of the 70 MRSA isolates harbored only SCCmec type III and three untypeable isolates. Five different spa types were detected. The most common spa types were t037 (42.5%) and t631 (34.5%) and were only found in MRSA isolates. Only SCCmec type III was found in burn patients which emphasizes the HA-MRSA origin of these strains. Only five different spa types identified in this study are in accordance with one SCCmec type which indicates that a limited number of bacterial colons are circulated in the burn unit in this hospital. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Frequency and antimicrobial resistance patterns of bacteria implicated in community urinary tract infections: a ten-year surveillance study (2000–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhares Inês

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common infectious diseases at the community level. In order to assess the adequacy of the empirical therapy, the prevalence and the resistance pattern of the main bacteria responsible for UTI in the community (in Aveiro, Portugal was evaluated throughout a ten-year period. Methods In this retrospective study, all urine samples from patients of the District of Aveiro, in ambulatory regime, collected at the Clinical Analysis Laboratory Avelab during the period 2000–2009 were analysed. Samples with more than 105 CFU/mL bacteria were considered positive and, for these samples, the bacteria were identified and the profile of antibiotic susceptibility was characterized. Results From the 155597 samples analysed, 18797 (12.1% were positive for bacterial infection. UTI was more frequent in women (78.5% and its incidence varied with age, affecting more the elderly patients (38.6%. Although E. coli was, as usual, the most common pathogen implicated in UTI, it were observed differences related to the other bacteria more implicated in UTI relatively to previous studies. The bacteria implicated in the UTI varied with the sex of the patient, being P. aeruginosa a more important cause of infection in men than in women. The incidence of the main bacteria changed over the study period (P. aeruginosa, Klebsiella spp and Providencia spp increased and Enterobacter spp decreased. Although E. coli was responsible for more than an half of UTI, its resistance to antibiotics was low when compared with other pathogens implicated in UTI, showing also the lowest percentage of multidrug resistant (MDR isolates (17%. Bacteria isolated from females were less resistant than those isolated from males and this difference increased with the patient age. Conclusions The differences in sex and age must be taken into account at the moment of empirical prescription of antimicrobials. From the recommended

  16. Insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae from south-western Chad, Central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etang Josiane

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indoor residual spraying and insecticide-treated nets (ITN are essential components of malaria vector control in Africa. Pyrethroids are the only recommended compounds for nets treatment because they are fast-acting insecticides with low mammalian toxicity. However, there is growing concern that pyrethroid resistance may threaten the sustainability of ITN scaling-up programmes. Here, insecticide susceptibility was investigated in Anopheles gambiae sensu lato from an area of large scale ITN distribution programme in south-western Chad. Methods Susceptibility to 4% DDT, 0.05% deltamethrin, 0.75% permethrin, 0.1% bendiocarb and 5% malathion was assessed using the WHO standard procedures for adult mosquitoes. Tests were carried out with two to four days-old, non-engorged female mosquitoes. The An. gambiae Kisumu strain was used as a reference. Knockdown effect was recorded every 5 min and mortality scored 24 h after exposure. Mosquitoes were identified to species and molecular form by PCR-RFLP and genotypes at the kdr locus were determined in surviving specimens by Hot Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay (HOLA. Results During this survey, full susceptibility to malathion was recorded in all samples. Reduced susceptibility to bendiocarb (mortality rate of 96.1% was found in one sample out of nine assayed. Increased tolerance to pyrethroids was detected in most samples (8/9 with mortality rates ranging from 70.2 to 96.6% for deltamethrin and from 26.7 to 96.3% for permethrin. Pyrethroid tolerance was not associated with a significant increase of knock-down times. Anopheles arabiensis was the predominant species of the An. gambiae complex in the study area, representing 75 to 100% of the samples. Screening for kdr mutations detected the L1014F mutation in 88.6% (N = 35 of surviving An. gambiae sensu stricto S form mosquitoes. All surviving An. arabiensis (N = 49 and M form An. gambiae s.s. (N = 1 carried the susceptible allele

  17. Rise of multiple insecticide resistance in Anopheles funestus in Malawi: a major concern for malaria vector control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveron, Jacob M; Chiumia, Martin; Menze, Benjamin D; Barnes, Kayla G; Irving, Helen; Ibrahim, Sulaiman S; Weedall, Gareth D; Mzilahowa, Themba; Wondji, Charles S

    2015-09-15

    Deciphering the dynamics and evolution of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors is crucial for successful vector control. This study reports an increase of resistance intensity and a rise of multiple insecticide resistance in Anopheles funestus in Malawi leading to reduced bed net efficacy. Anopheles funestus group mosquitoes were collected in southern Malawi and the species composition, Plasmodium infection rate, susceptibility to insecticides and molecular bases of the resistance were analysed. Mosquito collection revealed a predominance of An. funestus group mosquitoes with a high hybrid rate (12.2 %) suggesting extensive species hybridization. An. funestus sensu stricto was the main Plasmodium vector (4.8 % infection). Consistently high levels of resistance to pyrethroid and carbamate insecticides were recorded and had increased between 2009 and 2014. Furthermore, the 2014 collection exhibited multiple insecticide resistance, notably to DDT, contrary to 2009. Increased pyrethroid resistance correlates with reduced efficacy of bed nets (change in resistance dynamics is mirrored by prevalent resistance mechanisms, firstly with increased over-expression of key pyrethroid resistance genes (CYP6Pa/b and CYP6M7) in 2014 and secondly, detection of the A296S-RDL dieldrin resistance mutation for the first time. However, the L119F-GSTe2 and kdr mutations were absent. Such increased resistance levels and rise of multiple resistance highlight the need to rapidly implement resistance management strategies to preserve the effectiveness of existing insecticide-based control interventions.

  18. Patterns of hepatitis B virus infection in Brazilian human immunodeficiency virus infected patients: high prevalence of occult infection and low frequency of lamivudine resistant mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel VF Sucupira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV molecular profiles were determined for 44 patients who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 and had antibodies to the hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc, with and without other HBV serological markers. In this population, 70% of the patients were under lamivudine treatment as a component of antiretroviral therapy. HBV DNA was detected in 14 (32% patients. Eight out of 12 (67% HBsAg positive samples, 3/10 (30% anti-HBc only samples, and 3/22 (14% anti-HBs positive samples were HBV DNA positive. HBV DNA loads, measured by real time polymerase chain reaction, were much higher in the HBsAg positive patients (mean, 2.5 × 10(9 copies/ml than in the negative ones (HBV occult infection; mean, 2.7 × 10(5 copies/ml. Nine out of the 14 HBV DNA positive patients were under lamivudine treatment. Lamivudine resistant mutations in the polymerase gene were detected in only three patients, all of them belonging to the subgroup of five HBsAg positive, HBV DNA positive patients. A low mean HBV load (2.7 × 10(5 copies/ml and an absence of lamivudine resistant mutations were observed among the cases of HBV occult infection.

  19. Characteristics of low-resistivity aluminum-doped zinc oxide films deposited at room temperature by off-axis radio-frequency sputtering on flexible plastic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Min; Wang, Chih-Yi; Jheng, Ciao-Ren; Wu, Syu-Jhan; Sai, Chen-Kai; Lee, Ya-Ju; Chiang, Ching-Yu; Shew, Bor-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    The crystalline structure, morphology, composition, electrical transport, and optical properties of aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films are studied for applications in transparent electronics and optoelectronic devices. AZO thin films of c-axis-oriented growth and with different thickness were deposited on PET flexible plastic substrates at room temperature by rf magnetron sputtering. A larger grain size with a decreased strain ɛ value is observed in a thicker film, while changes in composition for films with different thicknesses are insignificant. Moreover, the resistivity of film decreases with increasing thickness, and the low-temperature electrical transport properties can be described by the scenario of quantum corrections to conductivity. With the room-temperature growth conditions, the resistivity of 4.5 × 10-4 Ω cm, carrier concentration of 6.4 × 1020 cm-3, and transmittance of 80 % for the 1100-nm-thick film are obtained. In addition, the optical bandgap energy decreases with increasing film thickness, which can be attributed to the bandgap renormalization and crystallite size effects.

  20. Analysis of population structure and insecticide resistance in mosquitoes of the genus Culex, Anopheles and Aedes from different environments of Greece with a history of mosquito borne disease transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotakis, Emmanouil A; Chaskopoulou, Alexandra; Grigoraki, Linda; Tsiamantas, Alexandros; Kounadi, Stella; Georgiou, Loukas; Vontas, John

    2017-10-01

    Greece has been recently affected by several mosquito borne diseases with the West Nile Virus (WNV) outbreak in 2010 being one of the largest reported in Europe. Currently at the epicenter of an economic and refugee crisis and visited by over 16 million tourists a year the integrated management of diseases transmitted by mosquitoes is a public health and economic priority. Vector control programs rely mainly on insecticides, however data on insecticide resistance and the mosquito fauna is essential for successful applications. We determined the mosquito species composition and population dynamics in areas of increased vulnerability to vector borne disease transmission, as well as investigated the resistance status of major nuisance and disease vectors to insecticides. High mosquito densities were recorded in Thessaloniki and Evros, with Aedes caspius, a nuisance species, Culex pipiens, a known vector of WNV and Anopheles hyrcanus a potential vector of malaria being among the most prevalent species. Both vector species populations reached their peak in late summer. Aedes albopictus was recorded at high densities in Thessaloniki, but not in Evros. Notably, Cx. pipiens hybrids, which show an opportunistic biting behavior and are suspected to be involved in the transmission of the WNV, were recorded in considerable numbers in Thessaloniki and Attica. Culex pipiens and An. hyrcanus, but not Ae. caspius mosquitoes, showed moderate levels of resistance to deltamethrin. The presence of resistance in areas not exposed to vector control indicates that other factors could be selecting for resistance, i.e. pesticide applications for agriculture. Both L1014F and L101C kdr mutations were detected in Cx. pipiens populations. Anopheles hyrcanus resistance was not associated with mutations at the L1014 site. The Ace-1 mutations conferring insensitivity to organophosphates and carbamates were detected at low frequencies in all Cx. pipiens populations. Increased activity of P450s and

  1. Susceptibility Status and Resistance Mechanisms in Permethrin-Selected, Laboratory Susceptible and Field-Collected Aedes aegypti from Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosilawati Rasli

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is intended to provide a comprehensive characterization of the resistance mechanisms in the permethrin-selected (IMR-PSS and laboratory susceptible (IMR-LS Aedes aegypti strain from Malaysia. Both IMR-PSS and IMR-LS provide a standard model for use in assessing the pyrethroid resistance in field-collected strains collected from three dengue hotspots: the Taman Seri Bayu (TSB, the Flat Camar (FC, and the Taman Dahlia (TD. Two established methods for determining the resistance mechanisms of the pyrethroid are the quantification of detoxification enzymes via enzyme microassay and the nucleotide sequencing of the domain 2 region from segment 1 to 6 via classical polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification—were employed. Enzyme activities in IMR-LS served as the resistance threshold reference, providing a significant standard for comparison with IMR-PSS and other field-collected strains. The amino acids in the domain 2 region of voltage-gated sodium channel (Vgsc of IMR-LS were served as the reference for detection of any changes of the knockdown resistance (kdr alleles in IMR-PSS and field-collected strains. Studies clearly indicated that the IMR-LS was highly susceptible to insecticides, whilst the IMR-PSS was highly resistant to pyrethroids and conferred with two resistance mechanisms: the elevated oxidase enzyme activity and the altered target-site mutations. Mutations of V1023G alone, and the combination mutations of V1023G with S996P in IMR-PSS, as well as the in field-collected Aedes aegypti strain, indicate the spread of the (kdr gene in Aedes aegypti, particularly in dengue-endemic areas in Malaysia.

  2. Frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Riehle, Fritz

    2006-01-01

    Of all measurement units, frequency is the one that may be determined with the highest degree of accuracy. It equally allows precise measurements of other physical and technical quantities, whenever they can be measured in terms of frequency.This volume covers the central methods and techniques relevant for frequency standards developed in physics, electronics, quantum electronics, and statistics. After a review of the basic principles, the book looks at the realisation of commonly used components. It then continues with the description and characterisation of important frequency standards

  3. A mutation (L1014F) in the voltage-gated sodium channel of the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae, is associated with resistance to pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Stephen P; Paul, Verity L; Slater, Russell; Warren, Anne; Denholm, Ian; Field, Linda M; Williamson, Martin S

    2014-08-01

    The grain aphid, Sitobion avenae Fabricius (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is an important pest of cereal crops. Pesticides are the main method for control but carry the risk of selecting for resistance. In response to reports of reduced efficacy of pyrethroid sprays applied to S. avenae, field samples were collected and screened for mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel, the primary target site for pyrethroids. Aphid mobility and mortality to lambda-cyhalothrin were measured in coated glass vial bioassays. A single amino acid substitution (L1014F) was identified in the domain IIS6 segment of the sodium channel from the S. avenae samples exhibiting reduced pyrethroid efficacy. Bioassays on aphids heterozygous for the kdr mutation (SR) or homozygous for the wild-type allele (SS) showed that those carrying the mutation had significantly lower susceptibility to lambda-cyhalothrin. The L1014F (kdr) mutation, known to confer pyrethroid resistance in many insect pests, has been identified for the first time in S. avenae. Clonal lines heterozygous for the mutation showed 35-40-fold resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin in laboratory bioassays, consistent with the reported effect of this mutation on pyrethroid sensitivity in other aphid species. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. DDT and pyrethroid resistance status and laboratory evaluation of bio-efficacy of long lasting insecticide treated nets against Culex quinquefasciatus and Culex decens in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudom, Andreas A; Mensah, Ben A; Froeschl, Guenter; Rinder, Heinz; Boakye, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Nuisance from Culex mosquitoes in Ghana has a serious negative impact on the standard of living in many urban communities. In addition, a perceived lack of efficacy of long lasting insecticide treated nets (LLINs) against nuisance mosquitoes contributes to their discontinued use. This again compromises malaria control, even if Anopheles species themselves would still be susceptible to the insecticides used. Control strategies involve pyrethroid insecticides but information on Culex mosquito susceptibility to these insecticides is limited. A nationwide survey was conducted to address this problem. In adults, susceptibility to permethrin, deltamethrin and DDT as well as enzyme activity and kdr mutation were determined. Cone and tunnel bioassay were also carried out to determine the efficacy of LLINs against the mosquitoes. Culex quinquefasciatus and Culex decens were identified in the study area. Higher deltamethrin and DDT resistance and relatively low permethrin resistance were observed in both species. High enzyme activities and kdr mutations were observed in C. quinquefasciatus but not in C. decens. However, reduced efficacy of LLINs was observed in both mosquito species. This adds up to the evidence of the spread of pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes and its negative impact on control strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. High-frequency measurement of depressive severity in a patient treated for severe treatment-resistant depression with deep-brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, S; Busnello, J; Kochanski, R; Cohen, Y; Gibbons, R D

    2017-08-15

    Although there have been previous studies of deep-brain stimulation (DBS), we present, to our knowledge, the first example of high-frequency depressive severity measurement-based DBS treatment in particular and psychiatric treatment in general. Daily post-surgical e-mail prompts for a period of 6 months resulted in 93 administrations of a computerized adaptive test (CAT) of depression severity (CAT-Depression Inventory or CAT-DI) via the internet. There was an average of 3.37 weekly measurements with an average separation of 2.12 days. No additional incentive was provided to the patient for completing the adaptive tests. The patient is a 55-year-old female with six psychiatric hospitalizations for depression, two suicide attempts, marginal response to eight electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) treatments and 35 psychotropic medications. We report results after high-frequency stimulation of the superolateral branch of the medial forebrain bundle. The CAT-DI was used for daily assessments before, during and after (remotely in response to an e-mail prompt) the DBS procedure. Two follow-up Hamilton Depression Scales (HAM-Ds) were also collected. Response to treatment varied markedly, with a decrease from severe (>75) to mild (60), which is three times the size of the uncertainty level. Although the HAM-D scores decreased, they missed the more complete temporal pattern identified by CAT-DI daily monitoring. We demonstrated feasibility of daily depressive severity measurement at high levels of precision and compliance. Clinician ratings confirm the general pattern of treatment benefit, but mask the marked variability in mood and more marked periods of benefit and decline.

  6. High frequency of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance marker (pfcrt T76 mutation) in Yemen: an urgent need to re-examine malaria drug policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Azazy, Ahmed A; Fong, Mun Yik

    2011-05-27

    Malaria remains a significant health problem in Yemen with Plasmodium falciparum being the predominant species which is responsible for 90% of the malaria cases. Despite serious concerns regarding increasing drug resistance, chloroquine is still used for the prevention and treatment of malaria in Yemen. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of choloroquine resistance (CQR) of P. falciparum isolated from Yemen based on the pfcrt T76 mutation. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 511 participants from four governorates in Yemen. Blood samples were screened using microscopic and species-specific nested PCR based on the 18S rRNA gene to detect and identify Plasmodium species. Blood samples positive for P. falciparum were used for detecting the pfcrt T76 mutation using nested-PCR. The prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation was 81.5% (66 of 81 isolates). Coastal areas/foothills had higher prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation compared to highland areas (90.5% vs 71.8%) (p = 0.031). The pfcrt T76 mutation had a significant association with parasitaemia (p = 0.045). Univariate analysis shows a significant association of pfcrt T76 mutation with people aged > 10 years (OR = 9, 95% CI = 2.3 - 36.2, p = 0.001), low household income (OR = 5, 95% CI = 1.3 - 19.5, p = 0.027), no insecticide spray (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.16 - 11.86, p = 0.025) and not sleeping under insecticide treated nets (ITNs) (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.38 - 16.78, p = 0.01). Logistic regression model confirmed age > 10 years and low household income as predictors of pfcrt T76 mutation in Yemen P. falciparum isolates. The high prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation in Yemen could be a predictive marker for the prevalence of P. falciparum CQR. This finding shows the necessity for an in-vivo therapeutic efficacy test for CQ. P. falciparum CQR should be addressed in the national strategy to control malaria.

  7. Frequency Synthesiser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drago, Salvatore; Sebastiano, Fabio; Leenaerts, Dominicus M.W.; Breems, Lucien J.; Nauta, Bram

    2016-01-01

    A low power frequency synthesiser circuit (30) for a radio transceiver, the synthesiser circuit comprising: a digital controlled oscillator configured to generate an output signal having a frequency controlled by an input digital control word (DCW); a feedback loop connected between an output and an

  8. Frequency synthesiser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drago, S.; Sebastiano, Fabio; Leenaerts, Dominicus Martinus Wilhelmus; Breems, Lucien Johannes; Nauta, Bram

    2010-01-01

    A low power frequency synthesiser circuit (30) for a radio transceiver, the synthesiser circuit comprising: a digital controlled oscillator configured to generate an output signal having a frequency controlled by an input digital control word (DCW); a feedback loop connected between an output and an

  9. Evidence of carbamate resistance in urban populations of Anopheles gambiae s.s. mosquitoes resistant to DDT and deltamethrin insecticides in Lagos, South-Western Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Resistance monitoring is essential in ensuring the success of insecticide based vector control programmes. This study was carried out to assess the susceptibility status of urban populations of Anopheles gambiae to carbamate insecticide being considered for vector control in mosquito populations previously reported to be resistant to DDT and permethrin. Methods Two – three day old adult female Anopheles mosquitoes reared from larval collections in 11 study sites from Local Government Areas of Lagos were exposed to test papers impregnated with DDT 4%, deltamethrin 0.05% and propoxur 0.1% insecticides. Additional tests were carried out to determine the susceptibility status of the Anopheles gambiae population to bendiocarb insecticide. Members of the A. gambiae complex, the molecular forms, were identified by PCR assays. The involvement of metabolic enzymes in carbamate resistance was assessed using Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) synergist assays. The presence of kdr-w/e and ace-1R point mutations responsible for DDT-pyrethroid and carbamate resistance mechanisms was also investigated by PCR. Results Propoxur resistance was found in 10 out of the 11 study sites. Resistance to three classes of insecticides was observed in five urban localities. Mortality rates in mosquitoes exposed to deltamethrin and propoxur did not show any significant difference (P > 0.05) but was significantly higher (P insecticide resistance management strategies to combat the multiple resistance identified. PMID:22686575

  10. Effect of low current density and low frequency on oxidation resistant and coating activity of coated FeCrAl substrate by γ-Al2O3 powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, A. M.; Feriyanto, Dafit; Zakaria, Supaat; Sebayang, D.; Rahman, Fakhrurrazi; Jajuli, Afiqah

    2017-09-01

    High oxidation resistant is the needed material properties for material that operates in high temperature such as catalytic converter material. FeCrAl alloy acts as metallic material and is used as substrate material that is coated by ceramic material i.e. γ-Al2O3. The main purpose of this research is to increase oxidation resistant of metallic material as it will help improve the life time of metallic catalytic converter. Ultrasonic technique (UB) and Nickel electroplating technique (EL) were used to achieve the objective. UB was carried out using various time of 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3 h, in low frequency of 35 kHz and ethanol as the electrolyte. Meanwhile, EL was conducted using various times of 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 minutes, DC power supply was 1.28A and sulphamate type as the solution. The characterization and analysis were carried out using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and box furnace at various temperature of 1000, 1100 and 1200 °C. SEM analysis shows the surface morphology of treated and untreated samples. Untreated samples shows finer surface structure as compared to UB and EL samples. It was caused by γ-Al2O3 which was embedded during UB and EL process on the surface of FeCrAl substrate to develop protective oxide layer. The layer was used to protect the substrate from extreme environment condition and temperature operation. Oxidation resistant analysis shows that treated samples had lower mass change as compared to untreated samples. Lowest mass change of treated samples were located at UB 1.5 h and EL at 30 minute with 0.00475 g and 0.00243 g for temperature of 1000 °C, 0.00495 g and 000284 g for temperature of 1100 °C and 0.00519 g and 0.00304 g for temperature 1200 °C, Based on the overall results, it can be concluded that EL 30 minute samples was the appropriate parameter to coat FeCrAl by γ-Al2O3 to develop metallic catalytic converter that is high oxidation resistant in high temperature operation.

  11. Elevated Plasmodium infection rates and high pyrethroid resistance in major malaria vectors in a forested area of Cameroon highlight challenges of malaria control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndo, Cyrille; Kopya, Edmond; Donbou, Marie Agathe; Njiokou, Flobert; Awono-Ambene, Parfait; Wondji, Charles

    2018-03-08

    High coverage of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) is the cornerstone of the malaria control strategy of the national malaria control program (NMCP) in Cameroon, with a target of reducing malaria transmission to less than 10% by 2035. To this end, more than 20 million LLINs have been distributed to populations countrywide since 2011. The present study evaluated entomological indices and Anopheles susceptibility to pyrethroids in a rural forested area of south Cameroon with high coverage of LLINs. The study was conducted between July 2014 and May 2016 in Obout, a village located in a rural forested area in south Cameroon. Resting mosquitoes were collected using electric aspirators and were identified to species using morphological criteria and PCR tools. Mosquito feeding preferences and infection status to Plasmodium falciparum were determined by ELISA and using TaqMan assays. The susceptibility of wild F1 adults to pyrethroids was monitored using WHO insecticide susceptibility bioassays. During the study period, 5,993 Anopheles mosquitoes were collected indoors both in rooms with and without nets. Two main vector species, namely An. funestus and An. gambiae, were identified in the locality, with An. funestus being by far the most abundant (89.68%). ELISA analysis revealed high percentage of blood meal taken exclusively on human (97.65-98.95%) supporting the high antropohilic behaviour of both species. Plasmodium falciparum infection rate detected by ELISA was high throughout the study period and varied between 3.28-14.04% (mean: 10.40%) in An. funestus, and between 5.55-22.22% (mean: 13.87%) in An. gambiae. This trend was confirmed by TaqMan assays, with P. falciparum infection prevalence of 23.33% in An. funestus. Significant decrease of mortality associated with high frequency of kdr mutation was observed in An. gambiae (deltamethrin: 36.6-56.45%; permethrin: 6-18.65%) indicating high level of resistance to pyrethroids. For An. funestus, resistance was

  12. Indoor Use of Plastic Sheeting Impregnated with Carbamate Combined with Long-Lasting Insecticidal Mosquito Nets for the Control of Pyrethroid-Resistant Malaria Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djènontin, Armel; Chandre, Fabrice; Dabiré, K. Roch; Chabi, Joseph; N'Guessan, Raphael; Baldet, Thierry; Akogbéto, Martin; Corbel, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    The combined efficacy of a long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN) and a carbamate-treated plastic sheeting (CTPS) or indoor residual spraying (IRS) for control of insecticide-resistant mosquitoes was evaluated in experimental huts in Burkina Faso. Anopheles gambiae from the area is resistant to pyrethroids and to a lesser extent, carbamates. Relatively low mortality rates were observed with the LLIN (44%), IRS (42%), and CTPS (52%), whereas both combinations killed significantly more mosquitoes (~70% for LLIN + CTPS and LLIN + IRS). Blood feeding by An. gambiae was uninhibited by IRS and CTPS compared with LLIN (43%), LLIN + CTPS (58%), and LLIN + IRS (56%). No evidence for selection of the kdr and ace-1R alleles was observed with the combinations, whereas a survival advantage of mosquitoes bearing the ace-1R mutation was observed with IRS and CTPS. The results suggest that the combination of the two interventions constitutes a potential tool for vector-resistance management. PMID:20682865

  13. The dynamics of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles arabiensis from Zanzibar and an assessment of the underlying genetic basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher M; Haji, Khamis A; Khatib, Bakari O; Bagi, Judit; Mcha, Juma; Devine, Gregor J; Daley, Matthew; Kabula, Bilali; Ali, Abdullah S; Majambere, Silas; Ranson, Hilary

    2013-12-06

    The emergence of pyrethroid resistance in the malaria vector, Anopheles arabiensis, threatens to undermine the considerable gains made towards eliminating malaria on Zanzibar. Previously, resistance was restricted to the island of Pemba while mosquitoes from Unguja, the larger of the two islands of Zanzibar, were susceptible. Here, we characterised the mechanism(s) responsible for resistance on Zanzibar using a combination of gene expression and target-site mutation assays. WHO resistance bioassays were conducted using 1-5d old adult Anopheles gambiae s.l. collected between 2011 and 2013 across the archipelago. Synergist assays with the P450 inhibitor piperonyl-butoxide were performed in 2013. Members of the An. gambiae complex were PCR-identified and screened for target-site mutations (kdr and Ace-1). Gene expression in pyrethroid resistant An. arabiensis from Pemba was analysed using whole-genome microarrays. Pyrethroid resistance is now present across the entire Zanzibar archipelago. Survival to the pyrethroid lambda-cyhalothrin in bioassays conducted in 2013 was 23.5-54.3% on Unguja and 32.9-81.7% on Pemba. We present evidence that resistance is mediated, in part at least, by elevated P450 monoxygenases. Whole-genome microarray scans showed that the most enriched gene terms in resistant An. arabiensis from Pemba were associated with P450 activity and synergist assays with PBO completely restored susceptibility to pyrethroids in both islands. CYP4G16 was the most consistently over-expressed gene in resistant mosquitoes compared with two susceptible strains from Unguja and Dar es Salaam. Expression of this P450 is enriched in the abdomen and it is thought to play a role in hydrocarbon synthesis. Microarray and qPCR detected several additional genes putatively involved in this pathway enriched in the Pemba pyrethroid resistant population and we hypothesise that resistance may be, in part, related to alterations in the structure of the mosquito cuticle. None of the

  14. Control of Microstructures and the Practical Properties of API X80 Grade Heavy-Wall High-Frequency Electric Resistance-Welded Pipe with Excellent Low-Temperature Toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Sota; Nakata, Hiroshi; Toyoda, Shunsuke; Okabe, Takatoshi; Inoue, Tomohiro

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes development of heavy-walled API X80 grade high-frequency electric resistance-welded (HFW) line pipes and conductor-casing pipes with wall thicknesses up to 20.6 mm. A fine bainitic-ferrite microstructure, which is preferable for low-temperature toughness, was obtained by optimizing the carbon content and applying the thermomechanical controlled hot-rolling process. As a result, the Charpy ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was well below 227 K (-46 °C) in the base metal of the HFW line pipe. When the controlled hot-rolling ratio (CR) was increased from 23 to 48 pct, the area average grain size decreased from 15 to 8 μm. The dependence of CTOD properties on CR was caused by the largest grain which is represented by the area average grain size. No texture development due to the increase of CR from 23 to 48 pct was observed. In addition, because controlled in-line heat treatment of the longitudinal weld seam also produced the fine bainitic-ferrite microstructure at the weld seam, DBTT was lower than 227 K (-46 °C) at the weld portion. The developed pipes showed good girth weldability without preheat treatment, and fracture in the tensile test initiated from the base metal in all cases.

  15. Conversion frequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauteret, C.

    1987-03-01

    The experimental evidence of short wavelength for laser inertial confinement has strongly increased the interest in high efficiency harmonic conversion of powerful Nd: glass lasers. This work describes our high power harmonic conversion experiments performed using the same laser apparatus for doubling, tripling the three high power 1064 nm P102, OCTAL and PHEBUS lasers. In addition to the understanding the physics of harmonic conversion, this work includes the basic concepts allows us to improve the technique such as non colinear schemes, to extend this method to other frequencies (fourth generation) and to predict some physical limits [fr

  16. Detection of target site resistance to pyrethroids and organophosphates in the horn fly using multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foil, L D; Guerrero, F D; Bendele, K G

    2010-09-01

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans L., is an obligate blood-feeding fly and the primary insect pest parasitizing cattle in the United States. Pesticide resistance has become a substantial problem for cattle producers, and although several mechanisms of resistance are possible, target site resistance is the most important mechanism preventing control of this fly in the United States and possibly other countries. We developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay to detect the known target site, pyrethroid resistance-associated mutation in the horn fly and a recently reported G262A mutation in the horn fly acetylcholinesterase, the target site for organophosphates. As expected, the pyrethroid resistance target site mutation was found in fly populations from Texas, Louisiana, Washington, Georgia, Mexico, and Brazil. This mutation was found to have a gender bias as it was more prevalent in females than males. The G262A acetylcholinesterase mutation was found in Texas, Louisiana, Washington, Georgia, and Mexico, but not Brazil. There was no gender bias in the occurrence of this mutation, and there was no correlation between the occurrence of the kdr and the G262A mutations. Unlike the case with the pyrethroid target site mutation, the presence of G262A did not appear to exclusively provide the level of resistance required to account for bioassay results. It is likely an additional mutation(s) occurs in the target site and/or a metabolic resistance mechanism exists in organophosphate-resistant horn fly populations.

  17. Detection and Distribution of V1016Ikdr Mutation in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Gene in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Populations From Sergipe State, Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolabella, S S; Santos, R L C; Silva, M C N; Steffler, L M; Ribolla, P E M; Cavalcanti, S C H; Jain, S; Martins, A J

    2016-07-01

    Aedes aegypti (L.) resistance to pyrethroids was recorded in Brazil few years after its introduction as the adulticide in the National Dengue Control Program campaigns. Altered susceptibility to pyrethroids had been reported in the state of Sergipe, northeast Brazil, through biological assays, even before its use against Ae. aegypti in the state. Metabolic and target-site resistance mechanisms were also revealed in samples from Aracaju, the capital of Sergipe. Herein, we investigated the presence and distribution of the kdr mutation V1016I kdr in Ae. aegypti populations from different municipalities of the state. Aedes aegypti eggs were collected from seven municipalities located in areas showing different climatic types and infestation levels. Approximately 20 Ae. aegypti females from each municipality (total of 135 subjects) were individually submitted to allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) for the 1016 site of the voltage-gated sodium channel (Na V ). The V1016I kdr mutation was found in subjects from all the municipalities under study with a high frequency of heterozygotes in several locations. Homozygous recessive subjects (resistant kdr genotype) were found only in one municipality. The results suggest a wide distribution of the V1016I kdr mutation in the northeast Brazil, which indicates urgent need for monitoring the effectiveness of the pyrethroids currently used for vector control. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The occurrence and frequency of genomic mutations that mediate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence and frequency of genomic mutations that mediate Isoniazid and Rifampicin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from untreated pulmonary Tuberculosis cases in urban Blantyre, Malawi.

  19. Insecticide resistance status of three malaria vectors, Anopheles gambiae (s.l.), An. funestus and An. mascarensis, from the south, central and east coasts of Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotoson, Jean-Desire; Fornadel, Christen M; Belemvire, Allison; Norris, Laura C; George, Kristen; Caranci, Angela; Lucas, Bradford; Dengela, Dereje

    2017-08-23

    Insecticide-based vector control, which comprises use of insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS), is the key method to malaria control in Madagascar. However, its effectiveness is threatened as vectors become resistant to insecticides. This study investigated the resistance status of malaria vectors in Madagascar to various insecticides recommended for use in ITNs and/or IRS. WHO tube and CDC bottle bioassays were performed on populations of Anopheles gambiae (s.l.), An. funestus and An. mascarensis. Adult female An. gambiae (s.l.) mosquitoes reared from field-collected larvae and pupae were tested for their resistance to DDT, permethrin, deltamethrin, alpha-cypermethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, bendiocarb and pirimiphos-methyl. Resting An. funestus and An. mascarensis female mosquitoes collected from unsprayed surfaces were tested against permethrin, deltamethrin and pirimiphos-methyl. The effect on insecticide resistance of pre-exposure to the synergists piperonyl-butoxide (PBO) and S,S,S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate (DEF) also was assessed. Molecular analyses were done to identify species and determine the presence of knock-down resistance (kdr) and acetylcholinesterase resistance (ace-1 R ) gene mutations. Anopheles funestus and An. mascarensis were fully susceptible to permethrin, deltamethrin and pirimiphos-methyl. Anopheles gambiae (s.l.) was fully susceptible to bendiocarb and pirimiphos-methyl. Among the 17 An. gambiae (s.l.) populations tested for deltamethrin, no confirmed resistance was recorded, but suspected resistance was observed in two sites. Anopheles gambiae (s.l.) was resistant to permethrin in four out of 18 sites (mortality 68-89%) and to alpha-cypermethrin (89% mortality) and lambda-cyhalothrin (80% and 85%) in one of 17 sites, using one or both assay methods. Pre-exposure to PBO restored full susceptibility to all pyrethroids tested except in one site where only partial restoration to permethrin was observed. DEF

  20. Survey of Antibiotic Resistance and Frequency of blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-24 Oxacillinase in Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated from Tracheal Tube Specimens of Patients Hospitalized in Intensive Care Units in Isfahan city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ghalebi

    2017-04-01

    chi-square tests. Results: All isolates were found resistant to ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, meropenem and imipenem and the lowest resistance were seen against colistin (0% and tigecycline (10%, respectively. All isolates were resistant to imipenem using Etest method with MIC ≥ 32 μg / ml. blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-24 genes were detected in 87.5% and 25% of isolates, respectively. Conclusion: Due to the results, treatment of A. baumannii isolates by carbapenems is ineffective and tigecycline or colistin could be used for treatment. Other studies for detection of other mechanisms for carbapenem resistance are recommended.

  1. Multilocus sequence typing of carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen that exhibits multiple drug resistance with increasing frequency, especially to carbapenems making patient treatment difficult. Carbapenem-resistance may be caused by porin gene mutations, active drug efflux, and carbapenemase production.

  2. Infestation by pyrethroids resistant bed bugs in the suburb of Paris, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durand R.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Bed bugs are hematophagous insects responsible for a re-emerging and challenging indoor pest in many countries. Bed bugs infestations may have health consequences including nuisance biting, cutaneous and systemic reactions. This resurgence can probably be attributed to factors such as increased international travel and development of resistance against insecticides. Resistance against pyrethroids has been reported several times from the USA and rarely in Europe. In France, very few data on bed bugs are available. The present study aimed to assess the infestation by bed bugs of a complex of two high-rise apartment buildings in the suburb of Paris and to evaluate their susceptibility to pyrethroid insecticides. We inspected for bed bugs 192 out of 198 apartments units (97% and interviewed their residents. 76 (39.6% apartments were infested. Among the 97 residents living in infested apartments, 53 (54.6% reported bed bug bites. A total of 564 bed bugs were collected in the infested units. Bioassays showed that 54 out of 143 bed bugs were resistant to pyrethroids (37.8%; 95% confidence interval: 29.9-45.7%. DNA sequencing showed that all bed bugs tested (n = 124 had homozygous L925I kdr-like gene mutation. The level of pyrethroid resistance found indicates that this phenomenon was already established in the site and prompts the need to reevaluate the wide use of pyrethroids to control bed bugs.

  3. Expression of the cytochrome P450s, CYP6P3 and CYP6M2 are significantly elevated in multiple pyrethroid resistant populations of Anopheles gambiae s.s. from Southern Benin and Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranson Hilary

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insecticide resistance in Anopheles mosquitoes is threatening the success of malaria control programmes. This is particularly true in Benin where pyrethroid resistance has been linked to the failure of insecticide treated bed nets. The role of mutations in the insecticide target sites in conferring resistance has been clearly established. In this study, the contribution of other potential resistance mechanisms was investigated in Anopheles gambiae s.s. from a number of localities in Southern Benin and Nigeria. The mosquitoes were sampled from a variety of breeding sites in a preliminary attempt to investigate the role of contamination of mosquito breeding sites in selecting for resistance in adult mosquitoes. Results All mosquitoes sampled belonged to the M form of An. gambiae s.s. There were high levels of permethrin resistance in an agricultural area (Akron and an urban area (Gbedjromede, low levels of resistance in mosquito samples from an oil contaminated site (Ojoo and complete susceptibility in the rural Orogun location. The target site mutation kdrW was detected at high levels in two of the populations (Akron f = 0.86 and Gbedjromede f = 0.84 but was not detected in Ojoo or Orogun. Microarray analysis using the Anopheles gambiae detox chip identified two P450s, CYP6P3 and CYP6M2 up regulated in all three populations, the former was expressed at particularly high levels in the Akron (12.4-fold and Ojoo (7.4-fold populations compared to the susceptible population. Additional detoxification and redox genes were also over expressed in one or more populations including two cuticular pre-cursor genes which were elevated in two of the three resistant populations. Conclusion Multiple resistance mechanisms incurred in the different breeding sites contribute to resistance to permethrin in Benin. The cytochrome P450 genes, CYP6P3 and CYP6M2 are upregulated in all three resistant populations analysed. Several additional potential

  4. Pyrethroid resistance in an Anopheles funestus population from Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Morgan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility status of Anopheles funestus to insecticides remains largely unknown in most parts of Africa because of the difficulty in rearing field-caught mosquitoes of this malaria vector. Here we report the susceptibility status of the An. funestus population from Tororo district in Uganda and a preliminary characterisation of the putative resistance mechanisms involved.A new forced egg laying technique used in this study significantly increased the numbers of field-caught females laying eggs and generated more than 4000 F1 adults. WHO bioassays indicated that An. funestus in Tororo is resistant to pyrethroids (62% mortality after 1 h exposure to 0.75% permethrin and 28% mortality to 0.05% deltamethrin. Suspected DDT resistance was also observed with 82% mortality. However this population is fully susceptible to bendiocarb (carbamate, malathion (organophosphate and dieldrin with 100% mortality observed after exposure to each of these insecticides. Sequencing of a fragment of the sodium channel gene containing the 1014 codon conferring pyrethroid/DDT resistance in An. gambiae did not detect the L1014F kdr mutation but a correlation between haplotypes and resistance phenotype was observed indicating that mutations in other exons may be conferring the knockdown resistance in this species. Biochemical assays suggest that resistance in this population is mediated by metabolic resistance with elevated level of GSTs, P450s and pNPA compared to a susceptible strain of Anopheles gambiae. RT-PCR further confirmed the involvement of P450s with a 12-fold over-expression of CYP6P9b in the Tororo population compared to the fully susceptible laboratory colony FANG.This study represents the first report of pyrethroid/DDT resistance in An. funestus from East Africa. With resistance already reported in southern and West Africa, this indicates that resistance in An. funestus may be more widespread than previously assumed and therefore this should be taken

  5. Deltamethrin Resistance Mechanisms in Aedes aegypti Populations from Three French Overseas Territories Worldwide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Dusfour

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is a cosmopolite mosquito, vector of arboviruses. The worldwide studies of its insecticide resistance have demonstrated a strong loss of susceptibility to pyrethroids, the major class of insecticide used for vector control. French overseas territories such as French Guiana (South America, Guadeloupe islands (Lesser Antilles as well as New Caledonia (Pacific Ocean, have encountered such resistance.We initiated a research program on the pyrethroid resistance in French Guiana, Guadeloupe and New Caledonia. Aedes aegypti populations were tested for their deltamethrin resistance level then screened by an improved microarray developed to specifically study metabolic resistance mechanisms. Cytochrome P450 genes were implicated in conferring resistance. CYP6BB2, CYP6M11, CYP6N12, CYP9J9, CYP9J10 and CCE3 genes were upregulated in the resistant populations and were common to other populations at a regional scale. The implication of these genes in resistance phenomenon is therefore strongly suggested. Other genes from detoxification pathways were also differentially regulated. Screening for target site mutations on the voltage-gated sodium channel gene demonstrated the presence of I1016 and C1534.This study highlighted the presence of a common set of differentially up-regulated detoxifying genes, mainly cytochrome P450 genes in all three populations. GUA and GUY populations shared a higher number of those genes compared to CAL. Two kdr mutations well known to be associated to pyrethroid resistance were also detected in those two populations but not in CAL. Different selective pressures and genetic backgrounds can explain such differences. These results are also compared with those obtained from other parts of the world and are discussed in the context of integrative research on vector competence.

  6. Deltamethrin Resistance Mechanisms in Aedes aegypti Populations from Three French Overseas Territories Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusfour, Isabelle; Zorrilla, Pilar; Guidez, Amandine; Issaly, Jean; Girod, Romain; Guillaumot, Laurent; Robello, Carlos; Strode, Clare

    2015-11-01

    Aedes aegypti is a cosmopolite mosquito, vector of arboviruses. The worldwide studies of its insecticide resistance have demonstrated a strong loss of susceptibility to pyrethroids, the major class of insecticide used for vector control. French overseas territories such as French Guiana (South America), Guadeloupe islands (Lesser Antilles) as well as New Caledonia (Pacific Ocean), have encountered such resistance. We initiated a research program on the pyrethroid resistance in French Guiana, Guadeloupe and New Caledonia. Aedes aegypti populations were tested for their deltamethrin resistance level then screened by an improved microarray developed to specifically study metabolic resistance mechanisms. Cytochrome P450 genes were implicated in conferring resistance. CYP6BB2, CYP6M11, CYP6N12, CYP9J9, CYP9J10 and CCE3 genes were upregulated in the resistant populations and were common to other populations at a regional scale. The implication of these genes in resistance phenomenon is therefore strongly suggested. Other genes from detoxification pathways were also differentially regulated. Screening for target site mutations on the voltage-gated sodium channel gene demonstrated the presence of I1016 and C1534. This study highlighted the presence of a common set of differentially up-regulated detoxifying genes, mainly cytochrome P450 genes in all three populations. GUA and GUY populations shared a higher number of those genes compared to CAL. Two kdr mutations well known to be associated to pyrethroid resistance were also detected in those two populations but not in CAL. Different selective pressures and genetic backgrounds can explain such differences. These results are also compared with those obtained from other parts of the world and are discussed in the context of integrative research on vector competence.

  7. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The attack of the clones: tracking the movement of insecticide-resistant peach-potato aphids Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, B; Malloch, G; Woodford, J A T; Foster, S P; Anstead, J; Denholm, I; King, L; Pickup, J

    2005-10-01

    Myzus persicae (Sulzer) collected in Scotland were characterized for four microsatellite loci, intergenic spacer fingerprints and the resistance mechanisms modified acetylcholinesterase (MACE), overproduced carboxylesterase and knockdown resistance (kdr). Microsatellite polymorphisms were used to define a limited number of clones that were either fully susceptible to insecticides or possessed characteristic combinations of resistance mechanisms. Within these clones, intergenic spacer fingerprints could either be very consistent or variable, with the latter indicating ongoing evolution within lineages, most likely derived from the same zygote. Two clones (termed A and B) possessed all three resistance mechanisms and predominated at sites treated with insecticides. Their appearance on seed potatoes and oilseed rape in Scotland in 2001 coincided with extensive insecticide use and severe control failures. Clones C, I and J, with no or fewer resistance mechanisms, were found in samples from 1995 and were dominant at untreated sites in 2001. A comparison of Scottish collections with those from other UK and non-UK sites provides insight into the likely origins, distribution and dynamics of M. persicae clones in a region where asexual (anholocyclic) reproduction predominates, but is vulnerable to migration by novel genotypes from areas of Europe where sexual (holocyclic) reproduction occurs.

  9. Frequency noise in frequency swept fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    This Letter presents a measurement of the spectral content of frequency shifted pulses generated by a lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper. We found that each pulse is shifted in frequency with very high accuracy. We also discovered that noise originating from light leaking through the acousto...

  10. Frequency, antimicrobial susceptibility and clonal distribution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in canine clinical samples submitted to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory in Italy: A 3-year retrospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventrella, G.; Moodley, A.; Grandolfo, E.

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade there has been a rapid global spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) clones displaying multidrug resistance in dogs. We investigated prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility and clonal distribution of MRSP isolated from clinical canine samples...... frequently to clindamycin, ciprofloxacin and doxycycline than methicillin-susceptible isolates. Gentamicin was the only antibiotic showing good in vitro activity on all MRSP with 20 of the 21 isolates being susceptible. Results confirm a high prevalence of MRSP amongst clinical samples in Italy, revealing...

  11. [Insulin resistance in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stąpor, Natalia; Beń-Skowronek, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the state of reduced tissue sensitivity to insulin. The frequency of this occurrence is increasing dramatically in developed countries. Both, environmental and genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Sedentary lifestyle and the excessive calorie intake cause the substantial increase of the fat issue, leading to overweight and obesity. Insulin resistance occurs physiologically during puberty, but it is also a pathological condition predisposing children to develop abnormal glucose tolerance, diabetes, hypertension and polycystic ovary syndrome among girls. More frequent occurrence of metabolic syndrome can be observed among children born small for gestational age (SGA). The article presents the current views on risk factors, etiology, diagnosis and consequences insulin resistance and disorders of glucose tolerance. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  12. Multiple Frequency Parametric Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    300003 1 MULTIPLE FREQUENCY PARAMETRIC SONAR STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and...a method for increasing the bandwidth of a parametric sonar system by using multiple primary frequencies rather than only two primary frequencies...2) Description of Prior Art [0004] Parametric sonar generates narrow beams at low frequencies by projecting sound at two distinct primary

  13. Multi-frequency excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-03-10

    Embodiments of multi-frequency excitation are described. In various embodiments, a natural frequency of a device may be determined. In turn, a first voltage amplitude and first fixed frequency of a first source of excitation can be selected for the device based on the natural frequency. Additionally, a second voltage amplitude of a second source of excitation can be selected for the device, and the first and second sources of excitation can be applied to the device. After applying the first and second sources of excitation, a frequency of the second source of excitation can be swept. Using the methods of multi- frequency excitation described herein, new operating frequencies, operating frequency ranges, resonance frequencies, resonance frequency ranges, and/or resonance responses can be achieved for devices and systems.

  14. Frequency selectivity at very low centre frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Carlos Andrés Jurado; Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Marquardt, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    measurements based on OAE suppression techniques and notched-noise masking data psychophysically measured for centre frequencies in the range 50-125 Hz, this study examines how individual differences in frequency selectivity, as well as in masking, may occur at very low CFs due to individual differences...

  15. Insecticide resistance in Aedes aegypti populations from Ceará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goulart Marilia OF

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organophosphates and pyrethroids are used widely in Brazil to control Aedes aegypti, the main vector of dengue viruses, under the auspices of the National Programme for Dengue Control. Resistance to these insecticides is widespread throughout Brazil. In Ceará the vector is present in 98% of districts and resistance to temephos has been reported previously. Here we measure resistance to temephos and the pyrethroid cypermethrin in three populations from Ceará and use biochemical and molecular assays to characterise resistance mechanisms. Results Resistance to temephos varied widely across the three studied populations, with resistance ratios (RR95 of 7.2, 30 and 192.7 in Juazeiro do Norte, Barbalha and Crato respectively. The high levels of resistance detected in Barbalha and Crato (RR95 ≥ 30 imply a reduction of temephos efficacy, and indeed in simulated field tests reduced effectiveness was observed for the Barbalha population. Two populations (Crato and Barbalha were also resistant to cypermethrin, whilst Juazeiro do Norte showed only an altered susceptibility. The Ile1011Met kdr mutation was detected in all three populations and Val1016Ile in Crato and Juazeiro do Norte. 1011Met was significantly associated with resistance to cypermethrin in the Crato population. Biochemical tests showed that only the activity of esterases and GSTs, among the tested detoxification enzymes, was altered in these populations when compared with the Rockefeller strain. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that two A. aegypti populations from Ceará are under strong selection pressure by temephos, compromising the field effectiveness of this organophosphate. Our results also provide evidence that the process of reducing resistance to this larvicide in the field is difficult and slow and may require more than seven years for reversal. In addition, we show resistance to cypermethrin in two of the three populations studied, and for the first time

  16. Expression and localization of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and its two receptors (VEGFR1/FLT1 and VEGFR2/FLK1/KDR) in the canine corpus luteum and utero-placental compartments during pregnancy and at normal and induced parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram, Aykut; Hoffmann, Bernd; Boos, Alois; Kowalewski, Mariusz P

    2015-11-01

    VEGFA is one of the most potent known inducers of angiogenesis. However, the function of angiogenic factors in the canine corpus luteum (CL) of pregnancy and in the pregnant uterus and placenta has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, here we investigated the expression and localization of VEGFA and its receptors (VEGFR1/FLT1 and VEGFR2/FLK1/KDR) in the canine CL and utero-placental compartments (ut-pl) throughout pregnancy until prepartum luteolysis. Antigestagen-mediated effects on expression of VEGF system in ut-pl were elucidated in mid-pregnant dogs. While displaying high individual variation, the luteal VEGFA was elevated during pre-implantation and post-implantation, followed by a decrease during mid-gestation, which was more pronounced at the mRNA level, and showed constant expression afterwards. Within the uterus, it increased following implantation and during mid-gestation in ut-pl compartments, but was downregulated at prepartum luteolysis. Luteal VEGFR1 expression resembled that of VEGFA; VEGFR2 remained unaffected throughout pregnancy. In ut-pl compartments, both receptors increased gradually towards mid-gestation; a prepartum decrease was observed for VEGFR1. Antigestagen-treatment resulted in decreased expression of ut-pl VEGFR1. In the CL, VEGFA stained in luteal cells. Uterine signals of VEGFA and its two receptors were observed in epithelial and vascular compartments, and in myometrium. In placental labyrinth, additionally, trophoblast stained positively. Luteal VEGFR1 was localized to the luteal cells and tunica media of blood vessels, whereas VEGFR2 stained only in capillary endothelial cells. The upregulation of luteal and the ut-pl VEGF system during early gestational stages supports the increased vascularization rate during this time. The diminishing effects of the prepartum endocrine milieu on VEGFA function seem to be more pronounced in the ut-pl units. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... least 10 countries (Australia, Austria, Canada, France, Japan, Norway, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden and the United Kingdom ... plan Global report on surveillance Country situation analysis Policy to combat antimicrobial resistance More on antimicrobial resistance ...

  18. Frequency dependence of sonophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezel, A; Sens, A; Tuchscherer, J; Mitragotri, S

    2001-12-01

    Application of low-frequency ultrasound has been shown to increase skin permeability, thereby facilitating delivery of macromolecules (low-frequency sonophoresis). In this study, we sought to determine the dependence of low-frequency sonophoresis on ultrasound frequency, intensity and energy density. Pig skin was exposed to low-frequency ultrasound over a range of ultrasound frequency and intensity conditions. The degree of skin permeabilization was measured using its conductivity. Imaging experiments were also carried out to visualize the transport pathways created by ultrasound. The data showed that for each frequency (in the range of 19.6-93.4 kHz), there exists a threshold intensity below which no detectable conductivity enhancement was observed. The threshold intensity increased with frequency. It is feasible to achieve the desired conductivity (permeability) enhancement regardless of the choice of frequency, although the necessary energy density is higher at higher frequencies. Low frequencies (approximately 20 kHz) induced localized transport compared to a more dispersed effect seen with higher frequencies (approximately 58.9 kHz). This study provides a quantitative understanding of the effects of low-frequency ultrasound on skin permeability.

  19. Lunch frequency among adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Trine Pagh; Holstein, Bjørn E; Krølner, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate: (i) how lunch frequency of adolescents varies between schools and between classes within schools; (ii) the associations between frequency of lunch and individual sociodemographic factors and school characteristics; and (iii) if any observed associations between lunch...

  20. Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infected with a drug-resistant strain of HIV. Drug-resistance testing results are used to decide which HIV medicines to include in a person’s first HIV regimen. After treatment is started, drug-resistance testing is repeated if ...

  1. Modeling Frequency Comb Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Feng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Frequency comb sources have revolutionized metrology and spectroscopy and found applications in many fields. Stable, low-cost, high-quality frequency comb sources are important to these applications. Modeling of the frequency comb sources will help the understanding of the operation mechanism and optimization of the design of such sources. In this paper,we review the theoretical models used and recent progress of the modeling of frequency comb sources.

  2. Frequency reference in VSAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Jonathon Y. C.

    1994-02-01

    A low cost technique of frequency reference distribution within a VSAT network is discussed. This technique allows the use of a modestly frequency stable oscillator as the master frequency reference in the hub of a star-connected VSAT network. The need for extremely frequency stable OCXOs in VSATs is completely avoided. This technique was successfully incorporated in the early commercial VSAT networks. It contributes partially to the low cost nature of some of the VSAT networks available today.

  3. Static electromagnetic frequency changers

    CERN Document Server

    Rozhanskii, L L

    1963-01-01

    Static Electromagnetic Frequency Changers is about the theory, design, construction, and applications of static electromagnetic frequency changers, devices that used for multiplication or division of alternating current frequency. It is originally published in the Russian language. This book is organized into five chapters. The first three chapters introduce the readers to the principles of operation, the construction, and the potential applications of static electromagnetic frequency changers and to the principles of their design. The two concluding chapters use some hitherto unpublished work

  4. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D' Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  5. Making Sense of Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane

    2002-01-01

    Responds to Ellis (2002), which focuses on frequency in language processing, language use, and language acquisition. Contextualizes the frequency factor in terms of the evolution of second language acquisition (SLA) research. Suggests that although relevant and important, the frequency factor requires greater definition and qualification.…

  6. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian

    of antimicrobial resistance: (1) adaptive mutations and (2) horizontal acquisition of resistance genes from antibiotic gene reservoirs. By studying the geno- and phenotypic changes of E. coli in response to single and drug-pair exposures, I uncover the evolutionary trajectories leading to adaptive resistance. I......Bacteria can avoid extinction during antimicrobial exposure by becoming resistant. They achieve this either via adaptive mutations or horizontally acquired resistance genes. If resistance emerges in clinical relevant species, it can lead to treatment failure and ultimately result in increasing...... morbidity and mortality as well as an increase in the cost of treatment. Understanding how bacteria respond to antibiotic exposure gives the foundations for a rational approach to counteract antimicrobial resistance. In the work presented in this thesis, I explore the two fundamental sources...

  7. Isolation of chlorhexidine-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from clinical lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakahara, H; Kozukue, H

    1982-01-01

    The chlorhexidine resistance of 317 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from hospital patients was determined. The distribution pattern of their susceptibility to chlorhexidine clearly revealed two peaks, and the frequency of resistance to chlorhexidine was 84.2%.

  8. (VLF-EM) and electrical resistivity survey for evaluation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ENSEMBLES

    2016-05-26

    May 26, 2016 ... Very Low Frequency Electromagnetic (VLF-EM) and electrical resistivity surveys were conducted at. Modomo/Eleweran ... Key words: Weathered layer, geological fissures, aquifer, electrical resistivity, geoelectric section, electromagnetic. ..... 1745 Meyerside drive, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. Naghibi SA ...

  9. [First report of the F1534C mutation associated with cross-resistance to DDT and pyrethroids in Aedes aegypti from Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atencia, María Claudia; Pérez, María De Jesús; Jaramillo, María Cristina; Caldera, Sandy Milena; Cochero, Suljey; Bejarano, Eduar Elías

    2016-09-01

    The main strategy for the control of Aedes aegypti, vector of dengue, chikungunya and Zika viruses, is based on the use of insecticides to reduce its populations. However, their use has led to insect resistance to these chemicals. Objective: To determine the presence of the F1534C mutation associated with cross-resistance to DDT and pyrethroids in A. aegypti in Sincelejo, Colombia. Materials and methods: We studied nine specimens of A. aegypti that showed resistance to lambdacyhalothrin in bioassays developed by the Secretaría de Salud de Sucre. We used a semi-nested PCR as previously described by Harris, et al., to amplify exon 31 of the para gene of the voltage-dependent sodium channel of A. aegypti. We sequenced, edited, and analyzed PCR products with the MEGA 5 software. Results: We detected the wild and mutant alleles of exon 31 in all of the nine mosquitoes tested, and observed the substitution of thymine for guanine in the nucleotide sequence of the mutant allele, producing a change to UGC in the UUC codon, which led to the replacement of phenylalanine by cysteine in residue 1534 of the protein. Conclusion: The nine mosquitoes analyzed presented a heterozygote genotype for the F1534C mutation, whose phenotypic effect is knockdown resistance (kdr) to DDT and pyrethroids.

  10. Camptothecin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brangi, M; Litman, Thomas; Ciotti, M

    1999-01-01

    The mitoxantrone resistance (MXR) gene encodes a recently characterized ATP-binding cassette half-transporter that confers multidrug resistance. We studied resistance to the camptothecins in two sublines expressing high levels of MXR: S1-M1-80 cells derived from parental S1 colon cancer cells...... and MCF-7 AdVp3,000 isolated from parental MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Both cell lines were 400- to 1,000-fold more resistant to topotecan, 9-amino-20(S)-camptothecin, and the active metabolite of irinotecan, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38), than their parental cell lines. The cell lines...... demonstrated much less resistance to camptothecin and to several camptothecin analogues. Reduced accumulation and energy-dependent efflux of topotecan was demonstrated by confocal microscopy. A significant reduction in cleavable complexes in the resistant cells could be observed after SN-38 treatment...

  11. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  12. Waveform frequency notching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Andrews, John

    2017-05-09

    The various technologies presented herein relate to incorporating one or more notches into a radar spectrum, whereby the notches relate to one or more frequencies for which no radar transmission is to occur. An instantaneous frequency is monitored and if the frequency is determined to be of a restricted frequency, then a radar signal can be modified. Modification can include replacing the signal with a signal having a different instantaneous amplitude, a different instantaneous phase, etc. The modification can occur in a WFS prior to a DAC, as well as prior to a sin ROM component and/or a cos ROM component. Further, the notch can be dithered to enable formation of a deep notch. The notch can also undergo signal transitioning to enable formation of a deep notch. The restricted frequencies can be stored in a LUT against which an instantaneous frequency can be compared.

  13. LOW FREQUENCY DAMPER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu BOGATEANU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The low frequency damper is an autonomous equipment for damping vibrations with the 1-20Hz range.Its autonomy enables the equipment to be located in various mechanical systems, without requiring special hydraulic installations.The low frequency damper was designed for damping the low frequency oscillations occurring in the circuit controls of the upgraded IAR-99 Aircraft.The low frequency damper is a novelty in the aerospace field ,with applicability in several areas as it can be built up in an appropriate range of dimensions meeting the requirements of different beneficiaries. On this line an equipment able to damp an extended frequency range was performed for damping oscillations in the pipes of the nuclear power plants.This damper, tested in INCAS laboratories matched the requirements of the beneficiary.The low frequency damper is patented – the patent no. 114583C1/2000 is held by INCAS.

  14. Wide Frequency Band Active Damping Strategy for DFIG System High Frequency Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yipeng; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    As a popular renewable power generation solution, the Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) based wind power system may suffer from High Frequency Resonance (HFR) caused by the impedance interaction between the DFIG system and the parallel compensated weak network. A wide frequency band active...... damping strategy for DFIG system HFR, including a high-pass filter and a virtual resistance, is proposed in this paper. The advantages of this active damping strategy are, 1) no resonance frequency detection unit is required, thus the control complexity can be decreased; 2) no active damping parameters...

  15. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etingov, Pavel V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kosterev, Dmitry [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dai, T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  16. Nonlinear Frequency Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollie, Susan; Glista, Danielle; Seelisch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Frequency lowering technologies offer an alternative amplification solution for severe to profound high frequency hearing losses. While frequency lowering technologies may improve audibility of high frequency sounds, the very nature of this processing can affect the perceived sound quality. This article reports the results from two studies that investigated the impact of a nonlinear frequency compression (NFC) algorithm on perceived sound quality. In the first study, the cutoff frequency and compression ratio parameters of the NFC algorithm were varied, and their effect on the speech quality was measured subjectively with 12 normal hearing adults, 12 normal hearing children, 13 hearing impaired adults, and 9 hearing impaired children. In the second study, 12 normal hearing and 8 hearing impaired adult listeners rated the quality of speech in quiet, speech in noise, and music after processing with a different set of NFC parameters. Results showed that the cutoff frequency parameter had more impact on sound quality ratings than the compression ratio, and that the hearing impaired adults were more tolerant to increased frequency compression than normal hearing adults. No statistically significant differences were found in the sound quality ratings of speech-in-noise and music stimuli processed through various NFC settings by hearing impaired listeners. These findings suggest that there may be an acceptable range of NFC settings for hearing impaired individuals where sound quality is not adversely affected. These results may assist an Audiologist in clinical NFC hearing aid fittings for achieving a balance between high frequency audibility and sound quality. PMID:23539261

  17. Frequency Selective Reflector Antenna

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Frequency Selective Surfaces (FSS) are an electromagnetic structure where a relatively thin, periodic, conductive material is designed as a spatial filter of...

  18. Frequency Dependent Losses in Transmission Cable Conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Holbøll, Joachim; Guðmundsdóttir, Unnur Stella

    2011-01-01

    , such as thermal conditions in and around the cable, as well as the heat generated in conductors, screens, armours etc., taking into account proximity and skin effects. The work performed and presented in this paper is concerned with an improved determination of the losses generated in the conductor, by means...... of better calculation of the AC resistance of transmission cable conductors, in particular regarding higher frequencies. In this way, also losses under harmonics can be covered. Furthermore, the model is suitable for modelling of transient attenuation in high voltage cables. The AC resistance is calculated...

  19. Frequency Mapping for the Operational Frequency Manager

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    and stationary computers. 1990s Late in the decade, Virtual Private Networks ( VPNs ) based on the Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) and IPSEC ...L2TP – Layer Two Tunnel Protocol LBNL – Lawrence Berkeley National Lab MHZ – Megahertz MIO – Maritime Interdiction Operations NOC – Network...Vehicle UHF – Ultra-High Frequency VPN – Virtual Private Network xvii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS First and foremost, we would like to thank our spouses Fatima

  20. Resistant Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroszko, Adrian; Janus, Agnieszka; Szahidewicz-Krupska, Ewa; Mazur, Grzegorz; Derkacz, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is a severe medical condition which is estimated to appear in 9-18% of hypertensive patients. Due to higher cardiovascular risk, this disorder requires special diagnosis and treatment. The heterogeneous etiology, risk factors and comorbidities of resistant hypertension stand in need of sophisticated evaluation to confirm the diagnosis and select the best therapeutic options, which should consider lifestyle modifications as well as pharmacological and interventional treatment. After having excluded pseudohypertension, inappropriate blood pressure measurement and control as well as the white coat effect, suspicion of resistant hypertension requires an analysis of drugs which the hypertensive patient is treated with. According to one definition - ineffective treatment with 3 or more antihypertensive drugs including diuretics makes it possible to diagnose resistant hypertension. A multidrug therapy including angiotensin - converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta blockers, diuretics, long-acting calcium channel blockers and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists has been demonstrated to be effective in resistant hypertension treatment. Nevertheless, optional, innovative therapies, e.g. a renal denervation or baroreflex activation, may create a novel pathway of blood pressure lowering procedures. The right diagnosis of this disease needs to eliminate the secondary causes of resistant hypertension e.g. obstructive sleep apnea, atherosclerosis and renal or hormonal disorders. This paper briefly summarizes the identification of the causes of resistant hypertension and therapeutic strategies, which may contribute to the proper diagnosis and an improvement of the long term management of resistant hypertension.

  1. Managing Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maag, John W.

    2000-01-01

    This article presents some considerations and ideas for managing students' resistance. They are organized around four topics: the impact of context on behavior, the importance of being comprehensive and nonrestrictive in behavior, the adaptive function of resistant behavior, and the benefit of joining children in their frame of reference.…

  2. Fast fundamental frequency estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Kjær; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Jensen, Jesper Rindom

    2017-01-01

    Modelling signals as being periodic is common in many applications. Such periodic signals can be represented by a weighted sum of sinusoids with frequencies being an integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. Due to its widespread use, numerous methods have been proposed to estimate the funda...

  3. Electrothermal frequency reference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makinwa, K.A.A.; Kashmiri, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    An electrothermal frequency-locked loop (EFLL) circuit is described. This EFLL circuit includes an oscillator in a feedback loop. A drive circuit in the EFLL circuit generates a first signal having a fundamental frequency, and an electrothermal filter (ETF) in the EFLL circuit provides a second

  4. Single frequency intracavity SRO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Buchhave, Preben

    2000-01-01

    Summary form only given. A single resonance optical parametric oscillator (SRO) is inserted intracavity to a CW high power, single frequency, and ring Nd:YVO4 laser. We obtain a stable single frequency CW SRO with output at 1.7-1.9 μm (idler) and a resonating signal at 2.3-2.6 μm. The behavior...

  5. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  6. Pyrethroids and DDT tolerance of Anopheles gambiae s.l. from Sengerema District, an area of intensive pesticide usage in north-western Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbert, Anitha; Lyantagaye, Sylvester Leonard; Pradel, Gabriele; Ngwa, Che Julius; Nkwengulila, Gamba

    2017-04-01

    To assess the susceptibility status of malaria vectors to pyrethroids and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), characterise the mechanisms underlying resistance and evaluate the role of agro-chemical use in resistance selection among malaria vectors in Sengerema agro-ecosystem zone, Tanzania. Mosquito larvae were collected from farms and reared to obtain adults. The susceptibility status of An. gambiae s.l. was assessed using WHO bioassay tests to permethrin, deltamethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, etofenprox, cyfluthrin and DDT. Resistant specimens were screened for knock-down resistance gene (kdr), followed by sequencing both Western and Eastern African variants. A gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometer (GC-MS) was used to determine pesticide residues in soil and sediments from mosquitoes' breeding habitats. Anopheles gambiae s.l. was resistant to all the insecticides tested. The population of Anopheles gambiae s.l was composed of Anopheles arabiensis by 91%. The East African kdr (L1014S) allele was found in 13 of 305 specimens that survived insecticide exposure, with an allele frequency from 0.9% to 50%. DDTs residues were found in soils at a concentration up to 9.90 ng/g (dry weight). The observed high resistance levels of An. gambiae s.l., the detection of kdr mutations and pesticide residues in mosquito breeding habitats demonstrate vector resistance mediated by pesticide usage. An integrated intervention through collaboration of agricultural, livestock and vector control units is vital. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Radio frequency-assisted fast superconducting switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav; Li, Qiang

    2017-12-05

    A radio frequency-assisted fast superconducting switch is described. A superconductor is closely coupled to a radio frequency (RF) coil. To turn the switch "off," i.e., to induce a transition to the normal, resistive state in the superconductor, a voltage burst is applied to the RF coil. This voltage burst is sufficient to induce a current in the coupled superconductor. The combination of the induced current with any other direct current flowing through the superconductor is sufficient to exceed the critical current of the superconductor at the operating temperature, inducing a transition to the normal, resistive state. A by-pass MOSFET may be configured in parallel with the superconductor to act as a current shunt, allowing the voltage across the superconductor to drop below a certain value, at which time the superconductor undergoes a transition to the superconducting state and the switch is reset.

  8. Optical transducers with frequency output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchuk, Oleksandr V.; Osadchuk, Volodymyr S.; Osadchuk, Iaroslav O.; Kolimoldayev, Maksat; Komada, Paweł; Mussabekov, Kanat

    2017-08-01

    In this work the characteristics research of microelectronic transducers of optical radiation with a frequency output signal on the basis of a hybrid integrated circuit consisting of a bipolar and a field-effect transistor with a Schottky barrier is presented. The connection of an external inductance to electrodes a collector - drain allows to implement the auto generating device. The frequency of the device generation depends on power of optical radiation falling on photosensing elements as a photoresistor, photodiode and photosensing transistors switched on in a circuit of the self-excited oscillator. The impedance on electrodes the collector - drain of bipolar and field transistors has capacitive reactive part and negative active resistance, which compensates power losses in a tuning circuit of the device. On the base of a nonlinear equivalent circuit of the transducer on an alternating current the analytical expressions of function of transformation and equation of sensitivity are obtained. The sensitivity of optical transducers lays in a range from 25 kHz/μWt/cm2 up to 150 kHz/μWt/cm2.

  9. Polymerase Chain Reaction To Determine Frequency Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PCR amplification of the DHFR-TS could be used to determine frequency of pyrimethamine resistant P. falciparum strains in malaria blood. Plasmodium falciparum résistant dans ... Les mutations étaient identifiées directement dans les prélèvement de sang obtenus de malades qui visitent les hôpitaux pour les services de ...

  10. Understanding evolutionary paradigm of knockdown resistance in mosquitoes by analyzing DNA sequence polymorphisms in voltage-gated sodium channel in Culex quinquefasciatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manas Sarkar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Voltage Gated Sodium Channel (VGSC is critical for binding of different insecticides and plays a key role in insecticide resistance. The insect sodium channel consists of four homologous domains (I to IV, each containing six transmembrane segments (S1 to S6. An important mechanism of resistance to DDT and pyrethroids is termed knockdown resistance (kdr, caused by a single nucleotide polymorphism in IIS6 domain of sodium channels. We analyzed the polymorphisms, nucleotide diversity, and phylogenies in VGSC-IIS6 gene in Culex quinquefasciatus from India. We analyzed the neutral model / hypothesis to infer if natural selection is acting upon the analyzed vgsc gene. Tajima’s D, Fu and Li’s D* and F* and Fu’s Fs test were performed to determine whether the distribution of nucleotide variation within the samples was consistent with neutral model. We theorized that the evolutionary pattern of intra-population distribution of variability in vgsc gene is consistent with the neutral expectation.

  11. Breakfast frequency among adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Trine Pagh; Holstein, Bjørn E; Damsgaard, Mogens Trab

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate (i) associations between adolescents' frequency of breakfast and family functioning (close relations to parents, quality of family communication and family support) and (ii) if any observed associations between breakfast frequency and family functioning vary by sociodemo......OBJECTIVE: To investigate (i) associations between adolescents' frequency of breakfast and family functioning (close relations to parents, quality of family communication and family support) and (ii) if any observed associations between breakfast frequency and family functioning vary...... by sociodemographic factors. DESIGN: School-based cross-sectional study. Students completed a web-based questionnaire. Associations were estimated by multilevel multivariate logistic regression. SETTING: Danish arm of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study, 2014. SUBJECTS: Adolescents aged 13 and 15 years...... (n 3054) from a random sample of forty-one schools. RESULTS: Nearly one-quarter of the adolescents had low breakfast frequency. Low breakfast frequency was associated with low family functioning measured by three dimensions. The OR (95 % CI) of low breakfast frequency was 1·81 (1·40, 2...

  12. Frequency comb swept lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C; Fujimoto, James G

    2009-11-09

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a approximately -1.2dB sensitivity roll off over approximately 3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have -10dB and -5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 0-3mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed.

  13. Antimicrobial resistance patterns and plasmid profiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to various antimicrobial agents, and the relationship between antimicrobial resistance of the isolates and carriage of plasmids. Design: A random sampling of milk and meat samples was carried out. Setting: Milk was collected from various dairy ...

  14. Observations on resistive wall modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerwin, R.A.; Finn, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Several results on resistive wall modes and their application to tokamaks are presented. First, it is observed that in the presence of collisional parallel dynamics there is an exact cancellation to lowest order of the dissipative and sound wave effects for an ideal Ohm's law. This is easily traced to the fact that the parallel dynamics occurs along the perturbed magnetic field lines for such electromagnetic modes. Such a cancellation does not occur in the resistive layer of a tearing-like mode. The relevance to models for resistive wall modes using an electrostatic Hammett-Perkins type operator to model Landau damping will be discussed. Second, we observe that with an ideal Ohm's law, resistive wall modes can be destabilized by rotation in that part of parameter space in which the ideal MHD modes are stable with the wall at infinity. This effect can easily be explained by interpreting the resistive wall instability in terms of mode coupling between the backward stable MHD mode and a stable mode locked into the wall. Such an effect can occur for very small rotation for tearing-resistive wall modes in which inertia dominates viscosity in the layer, but the mode is stabilized by further rotation. For modes for which viscosity dominates in the layer, rotation is purely stabilizing. For both tearing models, a somewhat higher rotation frequency gives stability essentially whenever the tearing mode is stable with a perfectly conducting wall. These tearing/resistive wall results axe also simply explained in terms of mode coupling. It has been shown that resonant external ideal modes can be stabilized in the presence of resistive wall and resistive plasma with rotation of order the nominal tearing mode growth rate. We show that these modes behave as resistive wall tearing modes in the sense above. This strengthens the suggestion that rotational stabilization of the external kink with a resistive wall is due to the presence of resistive layers, even for ideal modes

  15. Drug resistance and BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia from the imatinib to the second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor era: The main changes are in the type of mutations, but not in the frequency of mutation involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soverini, Simona; De Benedittis, Caterina; Papayannidis, Cristina; Paolini, Stefania; Venturi, Claudia; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Luppi, Mario; Bresciani, Paola; Salvucci, Marzia; Russo, Domenico; Sica, Simona; Orlandi, Ester; Intermesoli, Tamara; Gozzini, Antonella; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Rigolin, Gian Matteo; Pane, Fabrizio; Baccarani, Michele; Cavo, Michele; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    Patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) frequently relapse on imatinib with acquisition of BCR-ABL kinase domain (KD) mutations. To analyze the changes that second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have brought in mutation frequency and type, a database review was undertaken of the results of all the BCR-ABL KD mutation analyses performed in the authors' laboratory from January 2004 to January 2013. Interrogation of the database retrieved 450 mutation analyses in 272 patients with Ph+ ALL. Prescreening of samples was performed with denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (D-HPLC), followed by direct sequencing of D-HPLC-positive cases. BCR-ABL KD mutations were detected in 70% of imatinib-resistant patients, with T315I, E255K, and Y253H mutations accounting for 75% of cases. Seventy-eight percent of the patients reported to be resistant to second-generation TKIs after imatinib failure were positive for mutations, and 58% of them had multiple mutations. Analysis of patients relapsing on dasatinib revealed a newly acquired T315I mutation in almost two-thirds of the cases. Direct sequencing detected no mutations at diagnosis, even in patients who relapsed after a few months. Second-generation TKIs ensure a more rapid debulking of the leukemic clone and have much fewer insensitive mutations, but long-term disease control remains a problem, and the T315I mutation is revealed to be an even more frequent enemy. BCR-ABL KD mutation screening of patients with Ph+ ALL who are receiving imatinib or second-generation TKIs would be a precious ally for timely treatment optimization. In contrast, the clinical usefulness of conventional direct sequencing at diagnosis seems to be very low. American Cancer Society. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  16. Single frequency semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Zujie; Chen, Gaoting; Qu, Ronghui

    2017-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the single frequency semiconductor laser, which is widely used in many vital advanced technologies, such as the laser cooling of atoms and atomic clock, high-precision measurements and spectroscopy, coherent optical communications, and advanced optical sensors. It presents both the fundamentals and characteristics of semiconductor lasers, including basic F-P structure and monolithic integrated structures; interprets laser noises and their measurements; and explains mechanisms and technologies relating to the main aspects of single frequency lasers, including external cavity lasers, frequency stabilization technologies, frequency sweeping, optical phase locked loops, and so on. It paints a clear, physical picture of related technologies and reviews new developments in the field as well. It will be a useful reference to graduate students, researchers, and engineers in the field.

  17. Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... life-threatening infections – to a last resort treatment (carbapenem antibiotics) has spread to all regions of the ... unit patients. In some countries, because of resistance, carbapenem antibiotics do not work in more than half ...

  18. Susceptibility profile and metabolic mechanisms involved in Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus resistant to DDT and deltamethrin in the Central African Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Ngoagouni

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus are the main epidemic vectors of dengue, chikungunya and Zika viruses worldwide. Their control during epidemics relies mainly on control of larvae and adults with insecticides. Unfortunately, loss of susceptibility of both species to several insecticide classes limits the efficacy of interventions. In Africa, where Aedes-borne viruses are of growing concern, few data are available on resistance to insecticides. To fill this gap, we assessed the susceptibility to insecticides of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus populations in the Central African Republic (CAR and studied the mechanisms of resistance. Methods Immature stages were sampled between June and September 2014 in six locations in Bangui (the capital of CAR for larval and adult bioassays according to WHO standard procedures. We also characterized DDT- and pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes molecularly and biochemically, including tests for the activities of nonspecific esterases (α and β, mixed-function oxidases, insensitive acetylcholinesterase and glutathione S-transferases. Results Larval bioassays, carried out to determine the lethal concentrations (LC50 and LC95 and resistance ratios (RR50 and RR95, suggested that both vector species were susceptible to Bacillus thuringiensis var. israeliensis and to temephos. Bioassays of adults showed susceptibility to propoxur and fenitrothion, except for one Ae. albopictus population that was suspected to be resistant to fenithrothion. None of the Ae. aegypti populations was fully susceptible to DDT. Ae. albopictus presented a similar profile to Ae. aegypti but with a lower mortality rate (41%. Possible resistance to deltamethrin was observed among Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, although some were susceptible. No kdr mutations were detected in either species; however, the activity of detoxifying enzymes was higher in most populations than in the susceptible Ae. aegypti strain, confirming decreased

  19. Spectral inversion of frequency-domain IP data obtained in Haenam, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B.; Nam, M. J.; Son, J. S.

    2017-12-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) method using a range of source frequencies have been performed for not only exploring minerals resources, but also engineering or environmental application. SIP interpretation first makes inversion of individual frequency data to obtain complex resistivity structures, which will further analyzed employing Cole-Cole model to explain the frequency-dependent characteristics. However, due to the difficulty in fitting Cole-Cole model, there is a movement to interpret complex resistivity structure inverted only from a single frequency data: that is so-called "complex resistivity survey". Further, simultaneous inversion of multi-frequency SIP data, rather than making a single frequency SIP data, has been studied to improve ambiguity and artefacts of independent single frequency inversion in obtaining a complex resistivity structure, even though the dispersion characteristics of complex resistivity with respect to source frequency. Employing the simultaneous inversion method, this study makes inversion of field SIP data obtained over epithermal mineralized area, Haenam, in the southernmost tip of South Korea. The area has a polarizable structure because of extensive hydrothermal alteration, gold-silver deposits. After the inversion, we compare between inversion results considering multi-frequency data and single frequency data set to evaluate the performance of simultaneous inversion of multi-frequency SIP data.

  20. Inducible clindamycin resistance in Staphylococcus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afridi, Faisal Iqbal; Zeb, Mubarak; Hussain, Arif; Farooqi, Badar Jahan; Murtuza, Ghulam

    2014-07-01

    To determine the frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species by phenotypic D-test. Observational study. Ziauddin University Hospital, Karachi, from July to December 2011. Consecutive clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species were collected and identified by conventional microbiological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and inducible clindamycin resistance was carried out by performing D-test using CLSI criteria. Methicillin resistance was detected by using Cefoxitin disk as a surrogate marker. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS version-17. A total of 667 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species were obtained during the study period. In these isolates, 177 (26.5%) were Staphylococcus aureus, and 490 (73.5%) were coagulase negative Staphylococci. The total frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among isolates of Staphylococcus species was 120/667 (18%). Frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among coagulase negative Staphylococci group and Staphylococcus aureus group were 18.57% and 16.38% respectively. Median age of patients in D-test positive group was 19.5 (1 - 54) years. The frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among Staphylococcus species may differ in different hospital setup. Clinical microbiology laboratories should implement testing simple and effective D-test on all Staphylococcus species. D-test positive isolates should be reported clindamycin resistant to decrease treatment failure.

  1. Inducible Clindamycin Resistance in Staphylococcus Species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afridi, F. I.; Zeb, M.; Farooqi, B. J.; Murtaza, G.; Hussain, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species by phenotypic D-test. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Ziauddin University Hospital, Karachi, from July to December 2011. Methodology: Consecutive clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species were collected and identified by conventional microbiological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and inducible clindamycin resistance was carried out by performing D-test using CLSI criteria. Methicillin resistance was detected by using Cefoxitin disk as a surrogate marker. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS version-17. Results: A total of 667 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species were obtained during the study period. In these isolates, 177 (26.5%) were Staphylococcus aureus, and 490 (73.5%) were coagulase negative Staphylococci. The total frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among isolates of Staphylococcus species was 120/667 (18%). Frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among coagulase negative Staphylococci group and Staphylococcus aureus group were 18.57% and 16.38% respectively. Median age of patients in D-test positive group was 19.5 (1 - 54) years. Conclusion: The frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among Staphylococcus species may differ in different hospital setup. Clinical microbiology laboratories should implement testing simple and effective D-test on all Staphylococcus species. D-test positive isolates should be reported clindamycin resistant to decrease treatment failure. (author)

  2. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  3. Treatment of resistant idiopathic hiccups with pulse radio frequency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hiccups affect life quality, career and family life when they become persistent. We present here a 54-year-old man who worked as a mason and ... He used escitalopram and chlorpromazine for a short time and quit because they negatively affected his sleeping. As he did not have any relief from medications, he refused any ...

  4. Peak effect in surface resistance at microwave frequencies in Dy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    - superconducting thin films in magnetic fields (parallel to -axis) in the range 2 ... Electronics Department, K.C. College, Mumbai 400 020, India; Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India; School of ...

  5. Hg(+) Frequency Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we review the development of Hg(+) microwave frequency standards for use in high reliability and continuous operation applications. In recent work we have demonstrated short-term frequency stability of 3 x 10(exp -14)/nu(sub tau) when a cryogenic oscillator of stability 2-3 x 10(exp 15) was used a the local oscillator. The trapped ion frequency standard employs a Hg-202 discharge lamp to optically pump the trapped Hg(+)-199 clock ions and a helium buffer gas to cool the ions to near room temperature. We describe a small Hg(+) ion trap based frequency standard with an extended linear ion trap (LITE) architecture which separates the optical state selection region from the clock resonance region. This separation allows the use of novel trap configurations in the resonance region since no optical pumping is carried out there. A method for measuring the size of an ion cloud inside a linear trap with a 12-rod trap is currently being investigated. At approx. 10(exp -12), the 2nd order Doppler shift for trapped mercury ion frequency standards is one of the largest frequency offsets and its measurement to the 1% level would represent an advance in insuring the very long-term stability of these standards to the 10(exp -14) or better level. Finally, we describe atomic clock comparison experiments that can probe for a time variation of the fine structure constant, alpha = e(exp 2)/2(pi)hc, at the level of 10(exp -20)/year as predicted in some Grand Unified String Theories.

  6. Anticoagulant Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte

    Although sewer rat control is carried out in more than 80 % of all Danish municipalities, with usage of large amounts of anticoagulant rodenticides, knowledge on anticoagulant resistance among rats living in the sewers is limited. As rat problems in urban areas are believed to be related to sewer...... problems (70-90 % in UK and DK) unawareness of resistance amongst these populations of Brown rats may constitute a future control problem and knowledge on this issue has become crucial. Rats were captured in sewers from seven different locations in the suburban area of Copenhagen. Locations was chosen...... to represent different sewer rat management strategies i) no anticoagulants for approx. 20 years ii) no anticoagulants for the last 5 years and iii) continuous control for many years. Animals were tested for resistance to bromadiolone by Blood-Clotting Response test, as bromadiolone is the most frequently used...

  7. Reducing Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindell, Johanna

    care may influence decisions on antibiotic use. Based on video-and audio recordings of physician-patient consultations it is investigated how treatment recommendations are presented, can be changed, are forecast and explained, and finally, how they seemingly meet resistance and how this resistance......Antibiotic resistance is a growing public health problem both nationally and internationally, and efficient strategies are needed to reduce unnecessary use. This dissertation presents four research studies, which examine how communication between general practitioners and patients in Danish primary...... is responded to.The first study in the dissertation suggests that treatment recommendations on antibiotics are often done in a way that encourages patient acceptance. In extension of this, the second study of the dissertation examines a case, where acceptance of such a recommendation is changed into a shared...

  8. Frequency control modelling - basics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anca Daniela; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Zeni, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an introduction on how the system balance in an island system can be maintained by controlling the frequency. The power balance differential equation, which is fundamental in understanding the effect on the system frequency of the unbalance between...... generation and consumption, is addressed. Basic topics on the main components of a generating unit, such generators, prime movers and governors are presented. A simple dynamic model for an island power system, containing realistic dynamic representations of generators, loads, prime movers, governors...

  9. Analytical method for establishing indentation rolling resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gładysiewicz, Lech; Konieczna, Martyna

    2018-01-01

    Belt conveyors are highly reliable machines able to work in special operating conditions. Harsh environment, long distance of transporting and great mass of transported martials are cause of high energy usage. That is why research in the field of belt conveyor transportation nowadays focuses on reducing the power consumption without lowering their efficiency. In this paper, previous methods for testing rolling resistance are described, and new method designed by authors was presented. New method of testing rolling resistance is quite simple and inexpensive. Moreover it allows to conduct the experimental tests of the impact of different parameters on the value of indentation rolling resistance such as core design, cover thickness, ambient temperature, idler travel frequency, or load value as well. Finally results of tests of relationship between rolling resistance and idler travel frequency and between rolling resistance and idler travel speed was presented.

  10. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Resistance to the Max

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism. Resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobials (multidrug resistance) in particular is increasingly common in P. aeruginosa, with a number of reports of pan-resistant isolates treatable with a single agent, colistin. Acquired resistance in this organism is multifactorial and attributable to chromosomal mutations and the acquisition of resistance genes via horizontal gene transfer. Mutational changes impacting resistance include upregulation of multidrug efflux systems to promote antimicrobial expulsion, derepression of ampC, AmpC alterations that expand the enzyme's substrate specificity (i.e., extended-spectrum AmpC), alterations to outer membrane permeability to limit antimicrobial entry and alterations to antimicrobial targets. Acquired mechanisms contributing to resistance in P. aeruginosa include β-lactamases, notably the extended-spectrum β-lactamases and the carbapenemases that hydrolyze most β-lactams, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, and 16S rRNA methylases that provide high-level pan-aminoglycoside resistance. The organism's propensity to grow in vivo as antimicrobial-tolerant biofilms and the occurrence of hypermutator strains that yield antimicrobial resistant mutants at higher frequency also compromise anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy. With limited therapeutic options and increasing resistance will the untreatable P. aeruginosa infection soon be upon us? PMID:21747788

  11. Low frequency radioastronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarka, Philippe; Cecconi, Baptiste; Tagger, Michel; Torchinsky, Steve; Picard, Philippe; Pezzani, Jacques; Cognard, Ismael; Boone, Frederic; Woan, Graham; Weber, Rodolphe; Gousset, Thierry; Lautridou, Pascal; Dallier, Richard

    2011-07-01

    Low frequency radioastronomy deals with the direct detection (below 100 MHz) and heterodyne detection (up to few GHz) of electromagnetic waves (phase and amplitude) followed by a time or spectral analysis. The 30. Goutelas school covered several aspects of radioastronomy involving various aspects of physics: non-thermal phenomena in plasmas and physics of magnetized plasmas, atomic and molecular physics, and particle physics. These proceedings comprise 17 lectures dealing with: 1 - Low-Frequency Radioastronomy Basics (P. Zarka); 2 - Radioastronomy Historical Highlights (S. A. Torchinsky); 3 - Antennas (P. Picard, J. Pezzani); 4 - Receptors (P. Picard, J. Pezzani); 5 - Pulsars chronometry: metrology in radioastronomy (I. Cognard); 6 - Interferometry as imaging technique (F. Boone); 7 - Radio propagation and scintillation (G. Woan); 8 - Square Kilometer Array (S. A. Torchinsky); 9 - Techniques against radio-electrical interferences in low-frequency radioastronomy (R. Weber); 10 - Introduction to poly-phase filtering (R. Weber); 11 - Three decades of Jupiter's radio-emission studies: from the Nancay deca-meter network to LOFAR (P. Zarka); 12 - Atmospheric showers and their radio counterpart (T. Gousset); 13 - From cosmic rays radio-detection to pulse radioastronomy (P. Lautridou, R. Dallier); 14 - The CODALEMA project (R. Dallier, P. Lautridou); 15 - Space-based radio measurements: Gonio-polarimetry (B. Cecconi); 16 - Radio astronomy from space (G. Woan); 17 - LOFAR: the Low Frequency Array and the French FLOW consortium (M. Tagger, P. Zarka)

  12. Frequency and turmoil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    level of popular unrest focused on 'service delivery protests', but in recent years the broader conception of ... Drawing on the Centre for Social Change's archive of media reports, the largest database of its kind, and by comparing its data with .... impact on frequencies. The variation evident in the table is not accidental but is ...

  13. Radio Frequency Identification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) has been around sinceearly 2000. Its use has currently become commonplace as thecost of RFID tags has rapidly decreased. RFID tags have alsobecome more 'intelligent' with the incorporation of processorsand sensors in them. They are widely used now in manyinnovative ways.

  14. Radio Frequency Identification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    collection and accounting daily, London commuter system uses the data gathered by the central computer to optimize scheduling of trains and buses. With millions of cards in use, the cost of an oyster card with an RFID tag is amortized by the fare collected. The system is a near-field system using low-frequency tags. 3.

  15. High frequency electromagnetic dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Hernández, David A

    2009-01-01

    Along with the growth of RF and microwave technology applications, there is a mounting concern about the possible adverse effects over human health from electromagnetic radiation. Addressing this issue and putting it into perspective, this groundbreaking resource provides critical details on the latest advances in high frequency electromagnetic dosimetry.

  16. Metamaterial for Radar Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    capacitive coupling with adjacent patches, as shown in Figure 3. The via provides inductance to ground. Figure 3. (a) Planar LH distributed periodic...After [20]). The capacitance in the structure balances out the inductance present when the cylinder is placed in a square array. The metallic... RADAR FREQUENCIES by Szu Hau Tan September 2012 Thesis Advisor: David C. Jenn Second Reader: James Calusdian

  17. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...

  18. Drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, J.A.; Potschka, H.; Noebels, J.L.; Avoli, M.; Rogawski, M.A.; Olsen, R.W.; Delgado-Escueta, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance remains to be one of the major challenges in epilepsy therapy. Identification of factors that contribute to therapeutic failure is crucial for future development of novel therapeutic strategies for difficult-to-treat epilepsies. Several clinical studies have shown that high seizure

  19. Food frequency questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Rodrigo, Carmen; Aranceta, Javier; Salvador, Gemma; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2015-02-26

    Food Frequency Questionnaires are dietary assessment tools widely used in epidemiological studies investigating the relationship between dietary intake and disease or risk factors since the early '90s. The three main components of these questionnaires are the list of foods, frequency of consumption and the portion size consumed. The food list should reflect the food habits of the study population at the time the data is collected. The frequency of consumption may be asked by open ended questions or by presenting frequency categories. Qualitative Food Frequency Questionnaires do not ask about the consumed portions; semi-quantitative include standard portions and quantitative questionnaires ask respondents to estimate the portion size consumed either in household measures or grams. The latter implies a greater participant burden. Some versions include only close-ended questions in a standardized format, while others add an open section with questions about some specific food habits and practices and admit additions to the food list for foods and beverages consumed which are not included. The method can be self-administered, on paper or web-based, or interview administered either face-to-face or by telephone. Due to the standard format, especially closed-ended versions, and method of administration, FFQs are highly cost-effective thus encouraging its widespread use in large scale epidemiological cohort studies and also in other study designs. Coding and processing data collected is also less costly and requires less nutrition expertise compared to other dietary intake assessment methods. However, the main limitations are systematic errors and biases in estimates. Important efforts are being developed to improve the quality of the information. It has been recommended the use of FFQs with other methods thus enabling the adjustments required. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2015. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  20. Single-phase frequency converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baciu, I.; Cunţan, C. D.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a continuous voltage inverter - AC (12V / 230V) made with IGBT and two-stage voltage transformer. The sequence control transistors is achieved using a ring counter whose clock signal is obtained with a monostable circuit LM 555. The frequency of the clock signal can be adjustment with a potentiometer that modifies the charging current of the capacitor which causes constant monostable circuit time. Command sequence consists of 8 intervals of which 6 are assigned to command four transistors and two for the period break at the beginning and end of the sequence control. To obtain an alternation consisting of two different voltage level, two transistors will be comanded, connected to different windings of the transformer and the one connected to the winding providing lower voltage must be comanded twice. The output of the numerator goes through an inverter type MOS and a current amplifier with bipolar transistor.To achieve galvanic separation, an optocoupler will be used for each IGBT transistor, while protection is achieved with resistance and diode circuit. At the end there is connected an LC filter for smoothing voltage variations.

  1. Quantum inductance and negative electrochemical capacitance at finite frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J.; Wang, B. G.; Guo, H.

    2007-01-01

    We report on theoretical investigations of frequency dependent quantum capacitance. It is found that at finite frequency a quantum capacitor can be characterized by a classical RLC circuit with three parameters: a static electrochemical capacitance, a charge relaxation resistance, and a quantum inductance. The quantum inductance is proportional to the characteristic time scale of electron dynamics and due to its existence, the time dependent current can accumulate a phase delay and becomes la...

  2. Staphylococcus aureus: resistance pattern and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Naghavi-Behzad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has emerged as a nosocomial pathogen of major worldwide importance and is an increasingly frequent cause of community-acquired infections. In this study, different risk factors and MRSA resistance pattern were investigated. Methods: In a 24 months period, all of the patients who were confined to bed in the surgery ward were included in the study. Then they were assessed to find out as if they had MRSA infection when hospitalized and once when they were discharged. Almost 48 h after admission, when patients were discharged, social and medical histories were acquired. Acquired samples were examined. Results: During the present study of 475 patients, 108 patients (22.8% had S. aureus. About frequency of antibiotic resistance among collected S. aureus colonies, erythromycin resistance, was the most frequent antibiotic resistance, also resistance to vancomycin was 0.4% that was the least. Only hospitalization duration had statistically significant correlation with antibiotic resistance, also resistance to erythromycin had statistically significant relation with history of surgery and alcohol consumption. Of all 34 MRSA species, 22 (64.7% samples were resistant to erythromycin, 17 (50.0% resistant to cefoxitin, 5 (14.7% resistant to mupirocin, 1 (2.9% resistant to vancomycin and 1 (2.9% resistant to linezolid. Conclusion: The results of the current study show that among hospitalized patients, there is resistance against methicillin. Since based on results of the study there is resistance against oxacillin and erythromycin in most cases, administering appropriate antibiotics have an important role in minimizing the resistance burden among bacterial species.

  3. Performance of new polymeric materials with high radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.J.T.; O'Donnell, J.H.; Pomery, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The resistance to radiation of polymeric materials with high modulus and strength, high service temperatures, high resistance to thermal oxidation, and high chemical resistance is evaluated. Different methods of assessment are considered, which require radiation doses from 0.01 to 10 MGy. It is demonstrated that the resistance of high performance polymers to radiation depends on the nature and frequency of occurence of aromatic and non-aromatic components of the molecular structure. 3 refs., 2 figs

  4. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... video) Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (text version) Arabic Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Chinese Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance French Translation of ...

  5. Radio frequency ion source

    CERN Document Server

    Shen Guan Ren; Gao Fu; LiuNaiYi

    2001-01-01

    The study on Radio Frequency Ion Source is mainly introduced, which is used for CIAE 600kV ns Pulse Neutron Generator; and obtained result is also presented. The RF ion source consists of a diameter phi 25 mm, length 200 mm, coefficient of expansion =3.5 mA, beam current on target >=1.5 mA, beam spot =100 h.

  6. Contact Bioassays with Phenoxybenzyl and Tetrafluorobenzyl Pyrethroids against Target-Site and Metabolic Resistant Mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Horstmann

    Full Text Available Mosquito strains that exhibit increased tolerance to the chemical class of compounds with a sodium channel modulator mode of action (pyrethroids and pyrethrins are typically described as "pyrethroid resistant". Resistance to pyrethroids is an increasingly important challenge in the control of mosquito-borne diseases, such as malaria or dengue, because one of the main interventions (the distribution of large numbers of long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets currently relies entirely on long-lasting pyrethroids. Increasing tolerance of target insects against this class of insecticides lowers their impact in vector control. The current study suggests that the level of metabolic resistance depends on the structure of the molecule and that structurally different compounds may still be effective because detoxifying enzymes are unable to bind to these uncommon structures.Treated surface contact bioassays were performed on susceptible Aedes aegypti, East African knockdown resistance (kdr Anopheles gambiae (strain RSP-H and metabolically resistant Anopheles funestus (strain FUMOZ-R with different pyrethroids, such as cypermethrin, ß-cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, permethrin and transfluthrin (alone and in combination with the synergist piperonyl butoxide. The nonfluorinated form of transfluthrin was also assessed as a single agent and in combination with piperonyl butoxide.Although the dosages for pyrethroids containing a phenoxybenzyl moiety have exhibited differences in terms of effectiveness among the three tested mosquito species, the structurally different transfluthrin with a polyfluorobenzyl moiety remained active in mosquitoes with upregulated P450 levels. In trials with transfluthrin mixed with piperonyl butoxide, the added synergist exhibited no efficacy-enhancing effect.The results of this study suggest that transfluthrin has the potential to control P450-mediated metabolically resistant mosquitoes because the structural formula of

  7. Contact Bioassays with Phenoxybenzyl and Tetrafluorobenzyl Pyrethroids against Target-Site and Metabolic Resistant Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Sebastian; Sonneck, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Mosquito strains that exhibit increased tolerance to the chemical class of compounds with a sodium channel modulator mode of action (pyrethroids and pyrethrins) are typically described as "pyrethroid resistant". Resistance to pyrethroids is an increasingly important challenge in the control of mosquito-borne diseases, such as malaria or dengue, because one of the main interventions (the distribution of large numbers of long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets) currently relies entirely on long-lasting pyrethroids. Increasing tolerance of target insects against this class of insecticides lowers their impact in vector control. The current study suggests that the level of metabolic resistance depends on the structure of the molecule and that structurally different compounds may still be effective because detoxifying enzymes are unable to bind to these uncommon structures. Treated surface contact bioassays were performed on susceptible Aedes aegypti, East African knockdown resistance (kdr) Anopheles gambiae (strain RSP-H) and metabolically resistant Anopheles funestus (strain FUMOZ-R) with different pyrethroids, such as cypermethrin, ß-cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, permethrin and transfluthrin (alone and in combination with the synergist piperonyl butoxide). The nonfluorinated form of transfluthrin was also assessed as a single agent and in combination with piperonyl butoxide. Although the dosages for pyrethroids containing a phenoxybenzyl moiety have exhibited differences in terms of effectiveness among the three tested mosquito species, the structurally different transfluthrin with a polyfluorobenzyl moiety remained active in mosquitoes with upregulated P450 levels. In trials with transfluthrin mixed with piperonyl butoxide, the added synergist exhibited no efficacy-enhancing effect. The results of this study suggest that transfluthrin has the potential to control P450-mediated metabolically resistant mosquitoes because the structural formula of transfluthrin differs

  8. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Hoffmann, Tammy C; McCullough, Amanda R

    2015-01-01

    Numerous opportunities are available in primary care for alleviating the crisis of increasing antibiotic resistance. Preventing patients from developing an acute respiratory infection (ARI) will obviate any need for antibiotic use downstream. Hygiene measures such as physical barriers and hand...... will greatly improve the use of antibiotics for ARIs. However, used in concert, combinations are likely to enable clinicians and health care systems to implement the strategies that will reduce antimicrobial resistance in the future....... antibiotic prescribing are a major factor in the prescribing for ARIs. Professional interventions with educational components are effective, although they have modest effects, and are expensive. GPs' perceptions - that mistakenly assume as a default that patients want antibiotics for their ARIs - are often...

  9. Antimicrobial resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global public health challenge, which has accelerated by the overuse of antibiotics worldwide. Increased antimicrobial resistance is the cause of severe infections, complications, longer hospital stays and increased mortality. Overprescribing of antibiotics......-the-counter sale of antibiotics, the use of antimicrobial stewardship programmes, the active participation of clinicians in audits, the utilization of valid rapid point-of-care tests, the promotion of delayed antibiotic prescribing strategies, the enhancement of communication skills with patients with the aid...... is associated with an increased risk of adverse effects, more frequent re-attendance and increased medicalization of self-limiting conditions. Antibiotic overprescribing is a particular problem in primary care, where viruses cause most infections. About 90% of all antibiotic prescriptions are issued by general...

  10. Resisting dehumanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Inger Marie

    2018-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the influx of asylum-seekers in Scandinavia, and in Denmark this has led to ever-tighter immigration control. This article discusses emerging practices of refugee solidarity and resistance to hegemonic migration policy in Danish civil society in the wake of w...... 2015) and appraisal analysis of the incident in focus. Keywords: immigration, discursive discrimination, populism, solidarity, governmentality, topoi, appraisal...

  11. Pyrethroid resistance persists after ten years without usage against Aedes aegypti in governmental campaigns: Lessons from São Paulo State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macoris, Maria de Lourdes; Martins, Ademir Jesus; Andrighetti, Maria Teresa Macoris; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Valle, Denise

    2018-03-01

    Aedes aegypti, vector of dengue, chikungunya and Zika viruses, is found at high densities in tropical urban areas. The dissemination of this vector is partially the consequence of failures in current vector control methods, still mainly relying upon insecticides. In the State of São Paulo (SP), Brazil, public health managers employed pyrethroids against Ae. aegypti adults from 1989 to 2000, when a robust insecticide resistance monitoring system detected resistance to pyrethroids in several Ae. aegypti populations. However, pyrethroids are also the preferred compounds engaged in household applications due to their rapid knockdown effect, lower toxicity to mammals and less irritating smell. We evaluated pyrethroid resistance in Ae. aegypti populations over the course of a decade, from 2004 to 2015, after interruption of pyrethroid public applications in SP. Qualitative bioassays with papers impregnated with a deltamethrin diagnostic dose (DD) performed with insects from seven SP municipalities and evaluated yearly from 2006 to 2014, detected resistance in most of the cases. Quantitative bioassays were also carried out with four populations in 2011, suggesting a positive correlation between resistance level and survivorship in the DD bioassays. Biochemical tests conducted with seven insect populations in 2006 and 2015, detected increasing metabolic alterations of all major classes of detoxifying enzymes, mostly of mixed function oxidases. Genotyping of the voltage-gated sodium channel (AaNaV, the pyrethroid target-site) with a TaqMan real time PCR based technique was performed from 2004 to 2014 in all seven localities. The two kdr mutations, Val1016Ile and Phe1534Cys, known to be spread throughout Brazil, were always present with a severe decrease of the susceptible allele over time. These results are discussed in the context of public and domestic insecticide use, the necessity of implementation of a strong integrated vector control strategy and the conceptual

  12. In vitro selection of resistant Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, C E; Nix, D E; Schentag, J J

    1990-09-01

    Four strains of Helicobacter pylori were subjected to an in vitro serial passage technique to compare the propensity of the organisms to develop resistance to seven classes of antibacterial agents. The passages were made on serially doubling concentrations of antibacterial agents incorporated into agar starting at one-half the base-line MIC. The frequency of spontaneous resistance was also determined for each strain at four and eight times the MIC of each antibacterial agent. Strains resistant to ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, erythromycin, and tobramycin were isolated. The experiments failed to select organisms resistant to bismuth subsalicylate, furazolidone, or amoxicillin, although the MIC of amoxicillin was increased 4- to 16-fold. With the exception of erythromycin, organisms with the selected resistance were stable after at least three passages on antibacterial agent-free medium. Spontaneous resistance rates were generally of a low magnitude and were not predictive of the serial passage results.

  13. Frequency dependence of the active impedance component of silicon thin-film resistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belogurov, S.V.; Gostilo, V.V.; Yurov, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    A high-resistant resistor on the silicon thin-film substrate considerably superior in noise and frequency performance than commercial resistors is described. The frequency dependence of the active impedance component is tested for determining noise and frequency dependences of silicon thin-film resistors. The obtained results permit to calculate the energy equivalent of resistor noise in nuclear radiation detection units at any temperature according to its frequency characteristic at room temperature

  14. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Work Contact Us ABOUT THE ISSUE What is Antibiotic Resistance? General Background Science of Resistance Glossary References ... for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance Reservoirs of Antibiotic Resistance Project (ROAR) INTERNATIONAL CHAPTERS APUA Chapter Network ...

  15. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance More in Antimicrobial ... Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated ...

  16. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance More in Antimicrobial ... Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated ...

  17. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the normal range. What happens with insulin resistance? In insulin resistance, muscle, fat, and liver cells do not ... they do not usually test specifically for insulin resistance. Insulin resistance can be assessed by measuring the level ...

  18. Resonance frequency analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv K Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Initial stability at the placement and development of osseointegration are two major issues for implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon which is related to the local bone quality and quantity, type of implant, and placement technique used. The application of a simple, clinically applicable, non-invasive test to assess implant stability and osseointegration is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA is one of such techniques which is most frequently used now days. The aim of this paper was to review and analyze critically the current available literature in the field of RFA, and to also discuss based on scientific evidence, the prognostic value of RFA to detect implants at risk of failure. A search was made using the PubMed database to find all the literature published on "Resonance frequency analysis for implant stability" till date. Articles discussed in vivo or in vitro studies comparing RFA with other methods of implant stability measurement and articles discussing its reliability were thoroughly reviewed and discussed. A limited number of clinical reports were found. Various studies have demonstrated the feasibility and predictability of the technique. However, most of these articles are based on retrospective data or uncontrolled cases. Randomized, prospective, parallel-armed longitudinal human trials are based on short-term results and long-term follow up are still scarce in this field. Nonetheless, from available literature, it may be concluded that RFA technique evaluates implant stability as a function of stiffness of the implant bone interface and is influenced by factors such as bone type, exposed implant height above the alveolar crest. Resonance frequency analysis could serve as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for detecting the implant stability of dental implants during the healing stages and in subsequent routine follow up care after treatment. Future studies, preferably randomized

  19. Vibro-Shock Dynamics Analysis of a Tandem Low Frequency Resonator—High Frequency Piezoelectric Energy Harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius Žižys

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Frequency up-conversion is a promising technique for energy harvesting in low frequency environments. In this approach, abundantly available environmental motion energy is absorbed by a Low Frequency Resonator (LFR which transfers it to a high frequency Piezoelectric Vibration Energy Harvester (PVEH via impact or magnetic coupling. As a result, a decaying alternating output signal is produced, that can later be collected using a battery or be transferred directly to the electric load. The paper reports an impact-coupled frequency up-converting tandem setup with different LFR to PVEH natural frequency ratios and varying contact point location along the length of the harvester. RMS power output of different frequency up-converting tandems with optimal resistive values was found from the transient analysis revealing a strong relation between power output and LFR-PVEH natural frequency ratio as well as impact point location. Simulations revealed that higher power output is obtained from a higher natural frequency ratio between LFR and PVEH, an increase of power output by one order of magnitude for a doubled natural frequency ratio and up to 150% difference in power output from different impact point locations. The theoretical results were experimentally verified.

  20. Radio frequency pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1988-12-01

    High gradients require peak powers. One possible way to generate high peak powers is to generate a relatively long pulse at a relatively low power and compress it into a shorter pulse with higher peak power. It is possible to compress before dc to rf conversion as is done for the relativistic klystron or after dc to rf conversion as is done with SLED. In this note only radio frequency pulse compression (RFPC) is considered. Three methods of RFPC will be discussed: SLED, BEC, and REC. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  1. Low-frequency noise in Josephson junctions for superconducting qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eroms, J.; Van Schaarenburg, L.C.; Driessen, E.F.C.; Plantenberg, J.H.; Huizinga, C.M.; Schouten, R.N.; Verbruggen, A.H.; Harmans, C.J.P.M.; Mooij, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    The authors have studied low-frequency resistance fluctuations in shadow-evaporated Al/AlOx/Al tunnel junctions. Between 300 and 5?K the spectral density follows a 1/f law. Below 5?K, individual defects distort the 1/f shape of the spectrum. The spectral density decreases linearly with temperature

  2. Frequency of cancer testis antigens in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mendoza-Salas

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Detection of CTA genes by molecular biology techniques is important due to their use as biomarkers in LMC, in the monitoring of disease progression and in patients who are resistant to chemotherapy. The frequency of CTA expression in treated and de novo differs significantly.

  3. Understanding Inertial and Frequency Response of Wind Power Plants: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyze and quantify the inertia and frequency responses of wind power plants with different wind turbine technologies (particularly those of fixed speed, variable slip with rotor-resistance controls, and variable speed with vector controls).

  4. Frequency Windows of Absolute Negative Conductance in Josephson Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Machura, L.; Kostur, M.; Talkner, P.; Hanggi, P.; Luczka, J.

    2007-01-01

    We report on anomalous conductance in a resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson junction which is simultaneously driven by ac and dc currents. The dependence of the voltage across the junction on the frequency of the ac current shows windows of absolute negative conductance regimes, i.e. for a positive (negative) dc current, the voltage is negative (positive).

  5. Approximate relationship between frequency-dependent skin depth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    over the layered earth and thus, can be linked to the direct current earth response functions as an aid for estimating .... penetration resolved from direct current resistivity measurements at the frequency of the alternating current source. The reason for the possibility of ..... State, southern Nigeria, around the Gulf of Guinea; Int.

  6. Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    Insulin resistance (IR) is escalating with alarming pace and is no longer restricted to westernized countries. As a forerunner for some of the most serious threats to human health including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2-diabetes, the need for new treatment modalities...... interventions. We further show that improving the inflammatory toning, using fish oil as fat source, protects mice against diet induced obesity and -inflammation while preserving insulin sensitivity, even in the absence of free fatty acid receptor 4. Conversely, HFD-induced intestinal dysbiosis is associated...

  7. Behavioral estimates of human frequency selectivity at low frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Carlos Andrés Jurado

    on physical sound measurements. In this PhD thesis a detailed description of frequency selectivity at low frequencies is given. Different experiments have been performed to determine the properties of human auditory filters. Besides, loudness perception of low-frequency sinusoidal signals has been evaluated...

  8. Resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armario, P; Oliveras, A; de la Sierra, A

    2013-11-01

    A 53 year old woman with hypercholesterolemia treated with statins, with no history of cardiovascular disease, was referred to the Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit for management of hypertension resistant to 4 antihypertensive agents at full doses. The patient had obesity, with a body mass index of 36.3kg/m(2) and office blood pressure 162/102mm Hg. Physical examination showed no data of interest. glucose 120mg/dl, glycated Hb: 6.4%, albuminuria 68mg/g, kidney function and study of the renin angiotensin system and other biochemical parameters were normal. Echocardiography: left ventricular mass, 131g/m(2) (normal, <110g/m(2)). True resistant hypertension was confirmed by ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure during 24h (153/89mm Hg). Spironolactone treatment (25mg/day) was added and was well tolerated, with no change in renal function and kaliemia within normal (4.1mmol/l) following the treatment. After 8 weeks, blood pressure was well controlled: office blood pressure 132/86mm Hg and 24h-ambulatory blood pressure: 128/79mm Hg. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Frequency effects and structural change - the Afrikaans preterite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanita Kirsten

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available According to emergent grammar and exemplar theory in cognitive linguistics, the frequency of an item affects its behaviour in terms of structural change. In this article, I illustrate how high frequency items, such as preterital modal auxiliaries and copulas in Afrikaans, resist regularising with the rest of the Afrikaans verbal system. Items with a moderately high frequency can resist change for a time, but succumb to it eventually, such as mog (“might” and wis (“knew”. While the course of change can also be affected by other factors, such as het (“have” and had (“had”, and dink (“think” and gedink/dag/dog (“thought” show, the data in diachronic Afrikaans corpora from 1911 to 2010 confirm that high frequency items resist structural change to a large extent, while low frequency items do not. This links with the cognitive representation of language and language processing, and illustrates how the use of language shapes the structure of language.

  10. Frequency agile solar radiotelescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Tim S.

    2003-02-01

    The Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope (FASR) is a solar-dedicated, ground based, interferometric array optimized to perform broadband imaging spectroscopy from ~ 0.1-30+ GHz. It will do so with the angular, spectral, and temporal resolution required to exploit radio emission from the Sun as a diagnostic of the wide variety of astrophysical processes that occur there. FASR represents a major advance over existing radioheliographs, and is expected to remain the world's premier solar radio instrument for two decades or more after completion. FASR will be a versatile and powerful instrument, providing unique data to a broad users community. Solar, solar-terrestrial, and space physicists will exploit FASR to attack a broad science program, including problems of fundamental interest: coronal magnetography, solar flares and particle acceleration, drivers of space weather, and the thermal structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere. A design study and implementation planning are underway. Recent progress is reviewed here.

  11. Frequency scanning microstrip antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Magnus; Jørgensen, Rolf

    1979-01-01

    The principles of using radiating microstrip resonators as elements in a frequency scanning antenna array are described. The resonators are cascade-coupled. This gives a scan of the main lobe due to the phase-shift in the resonator in addition to that created by the transmission line phase......-shift. Experimental results inX-band, in good agreement with the theory, show that it is possible to scan the main lobe an angle ofpm30degby a variation of the frequencypm300MHz, and where the 3 dB beamwidth is less than10deg. The directivity was 14.7 dB, while the gain was 8.1 dB. The efficiency might be improved...

  12. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haibing [Houston, TX; Zettl, Alexander K [Kensington, TX

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  13. High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AC Bryan

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency oscillatory (HFO ventilation using low tidal volume and peak airway pressures is extremely efficient at eliminating carbon dioxide and raising pH in the newborn infant with acute respiratory failure. Improvement in oxygenation requires a strategy of sustained or repetitive inflations to 25 to 30 cm H2O in order to place the lung on the deflation limb of the pressure-volume curve. This strategy has also been shown to decrease the amount of secondary lung injury in animal models. Experience of the use of HFO ventilation as a rescue therapy as well as several published controlled trials have shown improved outcomes and a decrease in the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation when it has been used in newborns.

  14. Frequency doubling crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Francis; Velsko, Stephan P.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic approach to the production of frequency conversion crystals is described in which a chiral molecule has attached to it a "harmonic generating unit" which contributes to the noncentrosymmetry of the molecule. Certain preferred embodiments of such harmonic generating units include carboxylate, guanadyly and imidazolyl units. Certain preferred crystals include L-arginine fluoride, deuterated L-arginine fluoride, L-arginine chloride monohydrate, L-arginine acetate, dithallium tartrate, ammonium N-acetyl valine, N-acetyl tyrosine and N-acetyl hydroxyproline. Chemical modifications of the chiral molecule, such as deuteration, halogenation and controlled counterion substitution are available to adapt the dispersive properties of a crystal in a particular wavelength region.

  15. Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, T.; Chen, X.; Mohan, P.; Lao, B. Q.

    2017-09-01

    The observational facilities of radio astronomy keep constant upgrades and developments to achieve better capabilities including increasing the time of the data recording and frequency resolutions, and increasing the receiving and recording bandwidth. However in contrast, only a limited spectrum resource has been allocated to radio astronomy by the International Telecommunication Union, resulting in that the radio observational instrumentations are inevitably exposed to undesirable radio frequency interference (RFI) signals which originate mainly from the terrestrial human activity and are becoming stronger with time. RFIs degrade the quality of data and even lead to invalid data. The impact of RFIs on scientific outcome becomes more and more serious. In this article, the requirement for RFI mitigation is motivated, and the RFI characteristics, mitigation techniques, and strategies are reviewed. The mitigation strategies adopted at some representative observatories, telescopes, and arrays are also introduced. The advantages and shortcomings of the four classes of RFI mitigation strategies are discussed and presented, applicable at the connected causal stages: preventive, pre-detection, pre-correlation, and post-correlation. The proper identification and flagging of RFI is the key to the reduction of data loss and improvement in data quality, and is also the ultimate goal of developing RFI mitigation technique. This can be achieved through a strategy involving a combination of the discussed techniques in stages. The recent advances in the high speed digital signal processing and high performance computing allow for performing RFI excision of the large data volumes generated from large telescopes or arrays in both real time and offline modes, aiding the proposed strategy.

  16. Frequency Responses of Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex E Hadjinicolaou

    Full Text Available There are 15-20 different types of retinal ganglion cells (RGC in the mammalian retina, each encoding different aspects of the visual scene. The mechanism by which post-synaptic signals from the retinal network generate spikes is determined by each cell's intrinsic electrical properties. Here we investigate the frequency responses of morphologically identified rat RGCs using intracellular injection of sinusoidal current waveforms, to assess their intrinsic capabilities with minimal contributions from the retinal network. Recorded cells were classified according to their morphological characteristics (A, B, C or D-type and their stratification (inner (i, outer (o or bistratified in the inner plexiform layer (IPL. Most cell types had low- or band-pass frequency responses. A2, C1 and C4o cells were band-pass with peaks of 15-30 Hz and low-pass cutoffs above 56 Hz (A2 cells and ~42 Hz (C1 and C4o cells. A1 and C2i/o cells were low-pass with peaks of 10-15 Hz (cutoffs 19-25 Hz. Bistratified D1 and D2 cells were also low-pass with peaks of 5-10 Hz (cutoffs ~16 Hz. The least responsive cells were the B2 and C3 types (peaks: 2-5 Hz, cutoffs: 8-11 Hz. We found no difference between cells stratifying in the inner and outer IPL (i.e., ON and OFF cells or between cells with large and small somas or dendritic fields. Intrinsic physiological properties (input resistance, spike width and sag had little impact on frequency response at low frequencies, but account for 30-40% of response variability at frequencies >30 Hz.

  17. Development of vegetable farming: a cause of the emergence of insecticide resistance in populations of Anopheles gambiae in urban areas of Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadouleton, Anges William M; Asidi, Alex; Djouaka, Rousseau F; Braïma, James; Agossou, Christian D; Akogbeto, Martin C

    2009-01-01

    Background A fast development of urban agriculture has recently taken place in many areas in the Republic of Benin. This study aims to assess the rapid expansion of urban agriculture especially, its contribution to the emergence of insecticide resistance in populations of Anopheles gambiae. Methods The protocol was based on the collection of sociological data by interviewing vegetable farmers regarding various agricultural practices and the types of pesticides used. Bioassay tests were performed to assess the susceptibility of malaria vectors to various agricultural insecticides and biochemical analysis were done to characterize molecular status of population of An. gambiae. Results This research showed that: (1) The rapid development of urban agriculture is related to unemployment observed in cities, rural exodus and the search for a balanced diet by urban populations; (2) Urban agriculture increases the farmers' household income and their living standard; (3) At a molecular level, PCR revealed the presence of three sub-species of An. gambiae (An. gambiae s.s., Anopheles melas and Anopheles arabiensis) and two molecular forms (M and S). The kdr west mutation recorded in samples from the three sites and more specifically on the M forms seems to be one of the major resistance mechanisms found in An. gambiae from agricultural areas. Insecticide susceptibility tests conducted during this research revealed a clear pattern of resistance to permethrin (76% mortality rate at Parakou; 23.5% at Porto-Novo and 17% at Cotonou). Conclusion This study confirmed an increase activity of the vegetable farming in urban areas of Benin. This has led to the use of insecticide in an improper manner to control vegetable pests, thus exerting a huge selection pressure on mosquito larval population, which resulted to the emergence of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors. PMID:19442297

  18. Robust power system frequency control

    CERN Document Server

    Bevrani, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    This updated edition of the industry standard reference on power system frequency control provides practical, systematic and flexible algorithms for regulating load frequency, offering new solutions to the technical challenges introduced by the escalating role of distributed generation and renewable energy sources in smart electric grids. The author emphasizes the physical constraints and practical engineering issues related to frequency in a deregulated environment, while fostering a conceptual understanding of frequency regulation and robust control techniques. The resulting control strategi

  19. Frequency effects in compound production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bien, H.; Levelt, W.J.M.; Baayen, R.H.

    2005-01-01

    Four experiments investigated the role of frequency information in compound production by independently varying the frequencies of the first and second constituent as well as the frequency of the compound itself. Pairs of Dutch noun-noun compounds were selected such that there was a maximal contrast

  20. Resisting dehumanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Inger Marie

    2018-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the influx of asylum-seekers in Scandinavia, and in Denmark this has led to ever-tighter immigration control. This article discusses emerging practices of refugee solidarity and resistance to hegemonic migration policy in Danish civil society in the wake...... of an incident from September 2015, when a member of a Danish City Council offered private shelter to immigrants who were on their way to Norway. The incident led to legal proceedings in August 2016 for what the defendant referred to as ‘the offense of helping fellow human beings in need’. The study is informed...... 2015) and appraisal analysis of the incident in focus. Keywords: immigration, discursive discrimination, populism, solidarity, governmentality, topoi, appraisal...

  1. OSI-930 analogues as novel reversal agents for ABCG2-mediated multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Ye-Hong; Patel, Jay P; Sodani, Kamlesh; Wu, Chung-Pu; Liao, Li-Qiu; Patel, Atish; Tiwari, Amit K; Dai, Chun-Ling; Chen, Xiang; Fu, Li-Wu; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Korlipara, Vijaya L; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-09-15

    OSI-930, a dual c-Kit and KDR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is reported to have undergone a Phase I dose escalation study in patients with advanced solid tumors. A series of fifteen pyridyl and phenyl analogues of OSI-930 were designed and synthesized. Extensive screening of these compounds led to the discovery that nitropyridyl and ortho-nitrophenyl analogues, VKJP1 and VKJP3, were effective in reversing ABC subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) transporter-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR). VKJP1 and VKJP3 significantly sensitized ABCG2-expressing cells to established substrates of ABCG2 including mitoxantrone, SN-38, and doxorubicin in a concentration-dependent manner, but not to the non-ABCG2 substrate cisplatin. However, they were unable to reverse ABCB1- or ABCC1-mediated MDR indicating their selectivity for ABCG2. Western blotting analysis was performed to evaluate ABCG2 expression and it was found that neither VKJP1 nor VKJP3 significantly altered ABCG2 protein expression for up to 72 h. [(3)H]-mitoxantrone accumulation study demonstrated that VKJP1 and VKJP3 increased the intracellular accumulation of [(3)H]-mitoxantrone, a substrate of ABCG2. VKJP1 and VKJP3 also remarkably inhibited the transport of [(3)H]-methotrexate by ABCG2 membrane vesicles. Importantly, both VKJP1 and VKJP3 were efficacious in stimulating the activity of ATPase of ABCG2 and inhibited the photoaffinity labeling of this transporter by its substrate [(125)I]-iodoarylazidoprazosin. The results suggested that VKJP1 and VKJP3, specifically inhibit the function of ABCG2 through direct interaction with its substrate binding site(s). Thus VKJP1 and VKJP3 represent a new class of drugs for reducing MDR in ABCG2 over-expressing tumors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A new low-frequency power unit based on principle of converting phase condenser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lianye; Zhu Yulong

    1988-02-01

    While a magnetic reluctance motor is used for driving a reactor control rod, it needs a low-frequency power unit. In this case it's phase sequence can be positive or negative. In a project this power unit is a frequency converter based on principle of converting phase resistance from a alternative current frequency to another one controlled by silicon controlled rectifier. But in practical use, it often broke down due to fusing of fuses or malfunction of silicon controlled rectifiers and converting phase resistances and so on. A new low-frequency power unit based on principle of converting phase condenser instead of converting phase resistance is described. It stood up to all tests of laboratory and actual application, it is proved that the new low-frequency power unit has the advantage over the old one in many sides, such as simpler circuit, smaller heat generating, higher lifting power of drive mechanism, and increased reliability

  3. Antibiotic failure mediated by a resistant subpopulation in Enterobacter cloacae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, Victor I; Crispell, Emily K; Napier, Brooke A; Herrera, Carmen M; Tharp, Greg K; Vavikolanu, Kranthi; Pohl, Jan; Read, Timothy D; Bosinger, Steven E; Trent, M Stephen; Burd, Eileen M; Weiss, David S

    2016-05-09

    Antibiotic resistance is a major public health threat, further complicated by unexplained treatment failures caused by bacteria that appear antibiotic susceptible. We describe an Enterobacter cloacae isolate harbouring a minor subpopulation that is highly resistant to the last-line antibiotic colistin. This subpopulation was distinct from persisters, became predominant in colistin, returned to baseline after colistin removal and was dependent on the histidine kinase PhoQ. During murine infection, but in the absence of colistin, innate immune defences led to an increased frequency of the resistant subpopulation, leading to inefficacy of subsequent colistin therapy. An isolate with a lower-frequency colistin-resistant subpopulation similarly caused treatment failure but was misclassified as susceptible by current diagnostics once cultured outside the host. These data demonstrate the ability of low-frequency bacterial subpopulations to contribute to clinically relevant antibiotic resistance, elucidating an enigmatic cause of antibiotic treatment failure and highlighting the critical need for more sensitive diagnostics.

  4. Antibiotic failure mediated by a resistant subpopulation in Enterobacter cloacae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, Victor I.; Crispell, Emily K.; Napier, Brooke A.; Herrera, Carmen M.; Tharp, Greg K.; Vavikolanu, Kranthi; Pohl, Jan; Read, Timothy D.; Bosinger, Steven E.; Trent, M. Stephen; Burd, Eileen M.; Weiss, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major public health threat, further complicated by unexplained treatment failures caused by bacteria that appear antibiotic susceptible. We describe an Enterobacter cloacae isolate harbouring a minor subpopulation that is highly resistant to the last-line antibiotic colistin. This subpopulation was distinct from persisters, became predominant in colistin, returned to baseline after colistin removal and was dependent on the histidine kinase PhoQ. During murine infection, but in the absence of colistin, innate immune defences led to an increased frequency of the resistant subpopulation, leading to inefficacy of subsequent colistin therapy. An isolate with a lower-frequency colistin-resistant subpopulation similarly caused treatment failure but was misclassified as susceptible by current diagnostics once cultured outside the host. These data demonstrate the ability of low-frequency bacterial subpopulations to contribute to clinically relevant antibiotic resistance, elucidating an enigmatic cause of antibiotic treatment failure and highlighting the critical need for more sensitive diagnostics. PMID:27572838

  5. Heating systems with PLC and frequency control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, S.; Abu-Malouh, R. [Applied Science Univ., Amman (Jordan). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Heat treatment involves the controlled heating and cooling of metals to alter their physical and mechanical properties without changing the product shape. Heat treatment is frequently associated with increasing the strength of material, but it can also be utilized to alter certain manufacturability objectives such as improve machining, improve formability, and restoring ductility after a cold working operation. Heat treatment is an enabling process that can help other manufacturing processes, as well as improve product performance by increasing strength or other desirable characteristics. This paper discussed the design and construction of a medium capacity controlled heating system. The programming method of control of the heating process was achieved using an integrated programmable logic controller (PLC) and frequency inverter. An experimental study was performed to investigate the effect of temperature and tempering time on hardness and fatigue resistance of 0.4 per cent carbon steel. The paper discussed the heating system design and control and provided a mathematical description of the frequency controlled heating system. The modeling of the frequency converter and of the furnace was explained. It was concluded that increasing the tempering temperature above 550 degrees Celsius or tempering time decreased the hardness of the material. 26 refs., 16 figs.

  6. Preventing drug resistance in severe influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolny, Hana; Deecke, Lucas

    2015-03-01

    Severe, long-lasting influenza infections are often caused by new strains of influenza. The long duration of these infections leads to an increased opportunity for the emergence of drug resistant mutants. This is particularly problematic for new strains of influenza since there is often no vaccine, so drug treatment is the first line of defense. One strategy for trying to minimize drug resistance is to apply periodic treatment. During treatment the wild-type virus decreases, but resistant virus might increase; when there is no treatment, wild-type virus will hopefully out-compete the resistant virus, driving down the number of resistant virus. We combine a mathematical model of severe influenza with a model of drug resistance to study emergence of drug resistance during a long-lasting infection. We apply periodic treatment with two types of antivirals: neuraminidase inhibitors, which block release of virions; and adamantanes, which block replication of virions. We compare the efficacy of the two drugs in reducing emergence of drug resistant mutants and examine the effect of treatment frequency on the emergence of drug resistant mutants.

  7. Dominant mechanisms of primary resistance differ from dominant mechanisms of secondary resistance to targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asić, Ksenija

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of targeted therapies is currently limited, as almost all patients eventually acquire resistance within year/year and a half from therapy initiation and a small subset of a patients fail to respond at all, demonstrating intrinsic resistance. The aim of this review was to determine the potential common features and differences between the mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired resistance to targeted therapies by analyzing established resistance-generating alterations for ten FDA-approved targeted drugs. The frequency of alterations underlying intrinsic and acquired resistance shows distinctive pattern, where dominant mechanisms of intrinsic resistance include aberrations of signals downstream or upstream of the targeted protein and dominant mechanisms of acquired resistance refer to lesions in the target itself or alterations of signals at target-level that can mimic or compensate for target function. It appears that during the evolution of acquired resistance, the tumor cell is inclined to preserve the same oncogene addiction on a targeted protein it had prior to drug administration. On the other hand, intrinsic resistance develops early in tumorogenesis and is based on randomly selected mutated signals between targeted and non-targeted signaling pathways, leading to the acquisition of cancer hallmarks. In general, there is an overlap between the mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired resistance, but the occurrence frequency and distribution of alterations underlying intrinsic and acquired resistance to targeted therapies are significantly different. Focus should be placed on different group of genes in pursuing predictive markers for intrinsic and acquired resistance to targeted therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Integrated VLF - Electromagnetic And Electrical Resistivity Survey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Very Low Frequency Electromagnetic (VLF-EM) and Electrical Resistivity (ER) methods were integrated in a feasibility study of a basement complex area for groundwater development. Linear features, suspected to be basement fractures, inferred from the VLF - EM anomaly curves, were confirmed by subsurface geoelectric ...

  9. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, ...

  10. HIV Resistance Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 14, 2016 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 126 HIV Resistance Testing WHAT IS RESISTANCE? HOW DOES RESISTANCE ... ARVs. If you miss doses of your medications, HIV will multiply more easily. More mutations will occur. ...

  11. Combating Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Farm Animals FDA: Cutting-Edge Technology Sheds Light on Antibiotic Resistance For More Information Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Antimicrobial Resistance Information for Consumers and Health Professionals CDC: Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work More in Consumer Updates ...

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (video) Animation of Antimicrobial ...

  13. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Antimicrobial Resistance More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated Report Data Meetings and Publications Resources Judicious Use of Antimicrobials Page Last Updated: ...

  14. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, ...

  15. Resistance of Uropathogens in Asymptomatic Urinary Tract Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Worldwide the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance among urinary tract pathogens is useful to determine the important trend and geographical variation of uropathogens. The study evaluated the pathogen frequency, resistance rate and pattern among HIV-infected Nigerians. Midstream urine samples taken for culture ...

  16. Detection of mutations in quinolone-resistant determining regions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the use of fluoroquinolone antibiotic in clinical practice was introduced about two decades ago, quinolone-resistant E. coli strains are being isolated with increasing frequency. This study devotes to determine the resistance rate of fluoroquinolones for 112 Escherichia coli isolates from Prince Salman Hospital, Riyadh ...

  17. Different responses of soybean cyst nematode resistance between ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-12-02

    Dec 2, 2016 ... SCN race 1 (HG types 2.5.7), while 7605 is highly susceptible. Chi-square test of frequency distribution of families' female index (FI) showed that resistance to SCN was significantly different between NJ(RN)P7 and JN(RN)P7 popula- tions. Three recessive genes conditioned the inheritance of resistance to ...

  18. Low frequency mechanical resonance of the vocal tract in vocal exercises that apply tubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Jaromír; Radolf, Vojtěch; Laukkanen, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 37, August (2017), s. 39-49 ISSN 1746-8094 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-01246S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : biomechanics of voice * vocal tract acoustics * phonation into tubes * water resistance voice therapy * bubbling frequency * formant frequencies Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics OBOR OECD: Acoustics Impact factor: 2.214, year: 2016

  19. The Resistance–Amplitude–Frequency Effect of In–Liquid Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianhe Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the influence of liquid load, the equivalent resistance of in-liquid quartz crystal microbalance (QCM increases sharply, and the quality factor and resonant frequency decreases. We found that the change in the resonant frequency of in-liquid QCM consisted of two parts: besides the frequency changes due to the mass and viscous load (which could be equivalent to motional inductance, the second part of frequency change was caused by the increase of motional resistance. The theoretical calculation and simulation proved that the increases of QCM motional resistance may indeed cause the decreases of resonant frequency, and revealed that the existence of static capacitance was the root cause of this frequency change. The second part of frequency change (due to the increases of motional resistance was difficult to measure accurately, and may cause great error for in-liquid QCM applications. A technical method to reduce the interference caused by this effect is presented. The study contributes to the accurate determination of the frequency and amplitude change of in-liquid QCM caused by liquid load, which is significant for the QCM applications in the liquid phase.

  20. Induced resistance: an enhancement of basal resistance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M. de; Robben, C.; Pelt, J.A. van; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Upon primary pathogen attack, plants activate resistance mechanisms at the site of infection. Besides this so-called basal resistance, plants have also the ability to enhance their defensive capacity against future pathogen attack. There are at least two types of biologically induced resistance.

  1. Transfer of resistance plasmids from Staphylococcus epidermidis to Staphylococcus aureus: evidence for conjugative exchange of resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, B A; Schaberg, D R

    1983-01-01

    The ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis to transfer antimicrobial resistance to Staphylococcus aureus was tested by mixed culture on filter membranes. Two of six clinical isolates examined were able to transfer resistance to S. aureus strains 879R4RF, RN450RF, and UM1385RF. Subsequent S.aureus transconjugants resulting from matings with S. epidermidis donors were able to serve as donors to other S. aureus strains at similar frequencies. Cell-free and mitomycin C-induced filtrates of donors ...

  2. Selective breeding for scrapie resistance in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Santos Sotomaior

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the susceptibility of sheep to scrapie is determined by the host’s prion protein gene (PRNP. PRNP polymorphisms at codons 136 (alanine, A/valine, V, 154 (histidine, H/arginine, R and 171 (glutamine, Q/histidine, H/arginine, R are the main determinants of sheep susceptibility/resistance to classical scrapie. There are four major variants of the wild-type ARQ allele: VRQ, AHQ, ARH and ARR. Breeding programs have been developed in the European Union and the USA to increase the frequency of the resistant ARR allele while decreasing the frequency of the susceptible VRQ allele in sheep populations. In Brazil, little PRNP genotyping data are available for sheep, and thus far, no controlled breeding scheme for scrapie has been implemented. This review will focus on important epidemiological aspects of scrapie and the use of genetic resistance as a tool in breeding programs to control the disease.

  3. Effective switching frequency multiplier inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Gui-Jia; Peng, Fang Z.

    2007-08-07

    A switching frequency multiplier inverter for low inductance machines that uses parallel connection of switches and each switch is independently controlled according to a pulse width modulation scheme. The effective switching frequency is multiplied by the number of switches connected in parallel while each individual switch operates within its limit of switching frequency. This technique can also be used for other power converters such as DC/DC, AC/DC converters.

  4. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated Report Data Meetings and Publications Resources Judicious Use of ...

  5. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System ... If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  6. Inkjet Printed Radio Frequency Passive Components

    KAUST Repository

    McKerricher, Garret

    2015-12-01

    density capacitors of 400 pF/mm2 with self-resonant frequencies into the GHz regime is developed in this thesis. A multilayer fully printed process is demonstrated using PVP dielectric and dissolving type vias, giving better than 0.1 ohm resistance. In the multilayer process, capacitors and inductors have self-resonant frequencies around 1GHz. These fully printed devices have quality factors less than 10. Finally, 3D inkjet-printed UV-cured material is utilized with a novel silver organo-complex ink at 80oC providing conductivity of 1x107 S/m. A lumped element filter is demonstrated with an insertion loss of only 0.8 dB at 1GHz. The combination of inkjet printing 3D polymer and conductive metal together allows for complex shapes. A fully printed antenna with 81% radiation efficiency is shown. With these promising results and future advances in conductive inks and low-loss dielectrics, the performance of inkjet passives could one day overcome conventional fabrication methods.

  7. Binaural beats at high frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, D; Pasanen, E G

    1975-10-24

    Binaural beats have long been believed to be audible only at low frequencies, but an interaction reminiscent of a binaural beat can sometimes be heard when different two-tone complexes of high frequency are presented to the two ears. The primary requirement is that the frequency separation in the complex at one ear be slightly different from that in the other--that is, that there be a small interaural difference in the envelope periodicities. This finding is in accord with other recent demonstrations that the auditory system is not deaf to interaural time differences at high frequencies.

  8. Radio Frequency Anechoic Chamber Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports the design, manufacture, and test of antenna systems. The facility is also used as an electromagnetic compatibility/radio frequency interference...

  9. A graphene based frequency quadrupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chuantong; Huang, Beiju; Mao, Xurui; Zhang, Zanyun; Zhang, Zan; Geng, Zhaoxin; Xue, Ping; Chen, Hongda

    2017-04-01

    Benefit from exceptional electrical transport properties, graphene receives worldwide attentions, especially in the domain of high frequency electronics. Due to absence of effective bandgap causing off-state the device, graphene material is extraordinarily suitable for analog circuits rather than digital applications. With this unique ambipolar behavior, graphene can be exploited and utilized to achieve high performance for frequency multipliers. Here, dual-gated graphene field-effect transistors have been firstly used to achieve frequency quadrupling. Two Dirac points in the transfer curves of the designed GFETs can be observed by tuning top-gate voltages, which is essential to generate the fourth harmonic. By applying 200 kHz sinusoid input, arround 50% of the output signal radio frequency power is concentrated at the desired frequency of 800 kHz. Additionally, in suitable operation areas, our devices can work as high performance frequency doublers and frequency triplers. Considered both simple device structure and potential superhigh carrier mobility of graphene material, graphene-based frequency quadruplers may have lots of superiorities in regards to ultrahigh frequency electronic applications in near future. Moreover, versatility of carbon material system is far-reaching for realization of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible electrically active devices.

  10. Low frequency noise in resonant Josephson soliton oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Holst, T.; Wellstood, Frederick C.

    1991-01-01

    The noise in the resonant soliton mode of long and narrow Josephson tunnel junctions (Josephson transmission lines or JTLs) have been measured in the frequency range from 0.1 Hz to 25 kHz by means of a DC SQUID. The measured white noise was found, to within a factor of two, to be equal...... to the Nyquist voltage noise in a resistance equal to the dynamic resistance RD of the current-voltage characteristic of the bias point. In contrast, measurements of the linewidth of the microwave radiation from the same JTL showed that the spectral density of the underlying noise voltage scaled as R D2/RS where...

  11. Optimization study on inductive-resistive circuit for broadband piezoelectric energy harvesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Tan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The performance of cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvester is usually analyzed with pure resistive circuit. The optimal performance of such a vibration-based energy harvesting system is limited by narrow bandwidth around its modified natural frequency. For broadband piezoelectric energy harvesting, series and parallel inductive-resistive circuits are introduced. The electromechanical coupled distributed parameter models for such systems under harmonic base excitations are decoupled with modified natural frequency and electrical damping to consider the coupling effect. Analytical solutions of the harvested power and tip displacement for the electromechanical decoupled model are confirmed with numerical solutions for the coupled model. The optimal performance of piezoelectric energy harvesting with inductive-resistive circuits is revealed theoretically as constant maximal power at any excitation frequency. This is achieved by the scenarios of matching the modified natural frequency with the excitation frequency and equating the electrical damping to the mechanical damping. The inductance and load resistance should be simultaneously tuned to their optimal values, which may not be applicable for very high electromechanical coupling systems when the excitation frequency is higher than their natural frequencies. With identical optimal performance, the series inductive-resistive circuit is recommended for relatively small load resistance, while the parallel inductive-resistive circuit is suggested for relatively large load resistance. This study provides a simplified optimization method for broadband piezoelectric energy harvesters with inductive-resistive circuits.

  12. Optimization study on inductive-resistive circuit for broadband piezoelectric energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ting; Yan, Zhimiao

    2017-03-01

    The performance of cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvester is usually analyzed with pure resistive circuit. The optimal performance of such a vibration-based energy harvesting system is limited by narrow bandwidth around its modified natural frequency. For broadband piezoelectric energy harvesting, series and parallel inductive-resistive circuits are introduced. The electromechanical coupled distributed parameter models for such systems under harmonic base excitations are decoupled with modified natural frequency and electrical damping to consider the coupling effect. Analytical solutions of the harvested power and tip displacement for the electromechanical decoupled model are confirmed with numerical solutions for the coupled model. The optimal performance of piezoelectric energy harvesting with inductive-resistive circuits is revealed theoretically as constant maximal power at any excitation frequency. This is achieved by the scenarios of matching the modified natural frequency with the excitation frequency and equating the electrical damping to the mechanical damping. The inductance and load resistance should be simultaneously tuned to their optimal values, which may not be applicable for very high electromechanical coupling systems when the excitation frequency is higher than their natural frequencies. With identical optimal performance, the series inductive-resistive circuit is recommended for relatively small load resistance, while the parallel inductive-resistive circuit is suggested for relatively large load resistance. This study provides a simplified optimization method for broadband piezoelectric energy harvesters with inductive-resistive circuits.

  13. Tha AGS Booster high frequency rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, R.; Cameron, P.; Damn, R.

    1988-01-01

    A high level rf system, including a power amplifier and cavity has been designed for the AGS Booster. It covers a frequency range of 2.4 to 4.2 Mhz and will be used to accelerate high intensity proton, and low intensity polarized proton beams to 1.5 GeV and heavy ions to 0.35 GeV per nucleon. A total accelerating voltage of up to 90kV will be provided by two cavities, each having two gaps. The internally cross-coupled, pushpull cavities are driven by an adjacently located power amplifier. In order to accommodate the high beam intensity, up to 0.75 /times/ 10 13 protons per bunch, a low plate resistance power tetrode is used. The tube anode is magnetically coupled to one of the cavity's two paralleled cells. The amplifier is a grounded cathode configuration driven by a remotely located solid state amplifier

  14. The AGS booster high frequency rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, R.; Cameron, P.; Kamn, R.; Goldman, M.; Jablonski, E.; Keane, J.; McNerney, A.; Meth, M.; Plotkin, M.; Puglisi, M.; Ratti, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on a high level RF system, which includes a power amplifier and cavity designed for the AGS Booster. It covers a frequency range of 2.4 to 4.2 MHz and will be used to accelerate high intensity proton, and low intensity polarized proton beams to 1.5 GeV and heavy ions to 0.35 GeV per nucleon. A total accelerating voltage of up to 90kV will be provided by two cavities, each having two gaps. The internally cross-coupled, pushpull cavities are driven by an adjacently located power amplifier. In order to accommodate the high beam intensity, up to 0.75 x 10 13 protons per bunch, a low plate resistance power tetrode is used. The tube anode is magnetically coupled to one of the cavity's two paralleled cells. The amplifier is a grounded cathode configuration driven by a remotely located solid state amplifier

  15. Impedance of the single-electron transistor at radio-frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, C; Ferguson, A J

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally characterize the impedance of a single-electron transistor (SET) at an excitation frequency comparable to the electron tunnel rate. In contrast to usual radio-frequency-SET operations, the excitation signal is applied to the gate of the device. At zero source-drain bias, the SET displays both resistive (Sisyphus resistance) and reactive (tunnelling capacitance) components to its impedance. We study the bias dependence of the complex impedance, investigating its response as the electron tunnel rate becomes large with respect to the driving frequency. The experimental data are compared with values calculated from a master equation model.

  16. Impedance of the single-electron transistor at radio-frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, C.; Ferguson, A. J.

    2011-09-01

    We experimentally characterize the impedance of a single-electron transistor (SET) at an excitation frequency comparable to the electron tunnel rate. In contrast to usual radio-frequency-SET operations, the excitation signal is applied to the gate of the device. At zero source-drain bias, the SET displays both resistive (Sisyphus resistance) and reactive (tunnelling capacitance) components to its impedance. We study the bias dependence of the complex impedance, investigating its response as the electron tunnel rate becomes large with respect to the driving frequency. The experimental data are compared with values calculated from a master equation model.

  17. Impedance of the single-electron transistor at radio-frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciccarelli, C; Ferguson, A J, E-mail: cc538@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: ajf1006@cam.ac.uk [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    We experimentally characterize the impedance of a single-electron transistor (SET) at an excitation frequency comparable to the electron tunnel rate. In contrast to usual radio-frequency-SET operations, the excitation signal is applied to the gate of the device. At zero source-drain bias, the SET displays both resistive (Sisyphus resistance) and reactive (tunnelling capacitance) components to its impedance. We study the bias dependence of the complex impedance, investigating its response as the electron tunnel rate becomes large with respect to the driving frequency. The experimental data are compared with values calculated from a master equation model.

  18. Low-frequency noise in single electron tunneling transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavkhelidze, A.N.; Mygind, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    The noise in current biased aluminium single electron tunneling (SET) transistors has been investigated in the frequency range of 5 mHz shielding including resistive coaxial lines, that prevents spurious electromagnetic radiation and especially high energy......, we find the same input charge noise, typically QN = 5 × 10–4 e/Hz1/2 at 10 Hz, with and without the HF shielding. At lower frequencies, the noise is due to charge trapping, and the voltage noise pattern superimposed on the V(Vg) curve (voltage across transistor versus gate voltage) strongly depends...

  19. Discrete frequency slice wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhonghong; Tao, Ting; Jiang, Zhongwei; Wang, Haibin

    2017-11-01

    This paper introduces a new kind of Time-Frequency Representation (TFR) method called Discrete Frequency Slice Wavelet Transform (DFSWT). It is an improved version of Frequency Slice Wavelet Transform (FSWT). The previous researches on FSWT show that it is a new efficient TFR in an easy way without strict limitation as traditional wavelet theory. DFSWT as well as FSWT are defined directly in frequency domain, and still keep its properties in time-frequency domain as FSWT decomposition, reconstruction and filter design, etc. However, the original signal is decomposed and reconstructed on a Chosen Frequency Domains (CFD) as need of application. CFD means that the decomposition and reconstruction are not completed on all frequency components. At first, it is important to discuss the necessary condition of CFD to reconstruct the original signal. And then based on norm l2, an optimization algorithm is introduced to reconstruct the original signal even accurately. Finally, for a test example, the TFR analysis of a real life signal is shown. Some conclusions are drawn that the concept of CFD is very useful to application, and the DFSWT can become a simple and easy tool of TFR method, and also provide a new idea of low speed sampling of high frequency signal in applications.

  20. Low-frequency-noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    From 203 cases of low-frequency complaints a random selection of twenty-one cases were investigated. The main aim of the investigation was to answer the question whether the annoyance is caused by an external physical sound or by a physically non-existing sound, i.e. low-frequency tinnitus. Noise...... of the complainants are annoyed by a physical sound (20-180 Hz), while others suffer from low-frequency tinnitus (perceived frequency 40-100 Hz). Physical sound at frequencies below 20 Hz (infrasound) is not responsible for the annoyance - or at all audible - in any of the investigated cases, and none...... of the complainants has extraordinary hearing sensitivity at low frequencies. For comparable cases of low-frequency noise complaints in general, it is anticipated that physical sound is responsible in a substantial part of the cases, while low-frequency tinnitus is responsible in another substantial part of the cases....

  1. Low frequency electromagnetic field sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Min; Zhou Yan; He Yicheng; Zheng Zhenxing; Liu Sunkun

    2000-01-01

    The measurement technique of low frequency electromagnetic field is reported. According to this principle, the authors have designed a sensor, which is used to measure the natural electromagnetic field, SLEMP and electromagnetic signals generated by some explosions. The frequency band of this sensor is from 0.08 Hz to 2 MHz

  2. Lexical Frequency in Sign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Measures of lexical frequency presuppose the existence of corpora, but true machine-readable corpora of sign languages (SLs) are only now being created. Lexical frequency ratings for SLs are needed because there has been a heavy reliance on the interpretation of results of psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic experiments in the SL research…

  3. Gaming Frequency and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Barry; Jacobs, Gabriel; Watkins, Alan

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous claims that playing computer and video games may be educationally beneficial, but there has been little formal investigation into whether or not the frequency of exposure to such games actually affects academic performance. This paper explores the issue by analysing the relationships between gaming frequency--measured as the…

  4. Micronuclei Frequency in Radiation Worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudprasert, Wanwisa; Jungtanasombut, Amornrat; Pakkong, Pannee

    2009-07-01

    Full text: The purpose of this study is to determine the micronuclei (MN) frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 31 individuals occupationally exposed to radiation compared to 24 controls. The effect of donor gender, age, alcoholic consumption, tea/coffee consumption and radiation burden on MN frequency was studied. The results showed that MN frequencies observed for exposed employees were significantly higher than in controls (p = 0.000). The average MN frequency in control was 39.1 ± 3.7 MN/1000 BN while those of exposed group were 60.9 ± 12.3, 61.6 ± 13.0 and 62.6 ± 11.8 MN/1000 BN for the range of accumulative doses at 0.01-3.00, 3.01-6.00 and 6.01-9.00 mSv, respectively. Moreover, MN frequency showed a positive trend with increased accumulative doses as a linear-quadratic relation (R 2 = 0.4754). No correlation of MN frequency with gender, age and alcoholic consumption could be observed in both exposed and control groups. However, the effect of tea/coffee consumption on MN frequency was clearly observed in the exposed individuals (t-test = -2.018, sig. (2-tailed) = 0.030). These results indicate that the increased MN frequency, an indicator of chromosomal aberration, is associated with occupational exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation

  5. Newly developed electrical steel for high-frequency use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsubara, M.; Sadahiro, K.; Kondo, O.; Takamiya, T.; Honda, A.

    2002-04-01

    For high-frequency appliances, a new magnetic material was developed, and its properties were investigated and compared with conventional electrical steel and 6.5% Si steel. The new material has extremely low iron loss at high frequencies over 5 kHz as well as 6.5% Si steel, which was obtained by increasing electric resistivity, or by reducing its eddy current loss. Generally, increasing resistivity makes steels brittle and deteriorates their workability. However, the developed material showed a good workability with the effect of Cr addition. This material has a good property of pulse response, and also showed an excellent performance for power electronics device using an active filter operated at 15 kHz.

  6. Peripheral Circulatory Features during High-Frequency Jet Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Kontorovich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the results of a study of peripheral circulatory features during high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV. The main specific features of peripheral circulation and oxygen transport during HFJV are formulated on the basis of a study of cardiac output (impedance cardiography, peripheral vascular resistance, peripheral vascular blood filling (photoplethysmogram analysis, adaptive peripheral blood flow reactions (spectral analysis of peripheral vascular pulsation. HFJV gives rise to the peculiar pattern of peripheral hemodynamics and tissue gas exchange, which is characterized by higher oxygen uptake without a decrease in mixed venous blood saturation, with normal extraction coefficient and preserved low peripheral vascular resistance. During HFJV, unlike traditional ventilation, the main peripheral hemodynamic feature is the increased capillary bed blood volume caused by the blood flow involvement of reserve capillaries under control of volume (parasympathetic regulation of adaptive peripheral hemodynamic reactions. Key words: high-frequency jet ventilation, oxygen transport, peripheral hemodynamics.

  7. Multi-frequency bioimpedance in human muscle assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Else Marie; Sørensen, Emma Rudbæk; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2015-01-01

    Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) is a well-known and tested method for body mass and muscular health assessment. Multi-frequency BIA (mfBIA) equipment now makes it possible to assess a particular muscle as a whole, as well as looking at a muscle at the fiber level. The aim of this study was to test...... the hypothesis that mfBIA can be used to assess the anatomical, physiological, and metabolic state of skeletal muscles. mfBIA measurements focusing on impedance, resistance, reactance, phase angle, center frequency, membrane capacitance, and both extracellular and intracellular resistance were carried out. Eight...... healthy human control subjects and three selected cases were examined to demonstrate the extent to which this method may be used clinically, and in relation to training in sport. The electrode setup is shown to affect the mfBIA parameters recorded. Our recommendation is the use of noble metal electrodes...

  8. A theoretical analysis of low-frequency sonophoresis: dependence of transdermal transport pathways on frequency and energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezel, Ahmet; Sens, Ashley; Mitragotri, Samir

    2002-12-01

    Application of low-frequency ultrasound has been shown to increase skin permeability, thereby facilitating delivery of macromolecules (low-frequency sonophoresis). In this study, we seek to determine the dependence of transport pathways during low-frequency sonophoresis on ultrasound parameters. Pig skin is exposed to low-frequency ultrasound over a range of frequencies to achieve different skin resistivities. The porous pathway model is used to study the dependence of average pore size, porosity, and tortuosity on ultrasound parameters. Imaging experiments are also carried out to visualize the transport pathways created by ultrasound. The data show that the average pore size, determined from the porous pathway model, does not depend on application frequency. Both in the presence and absence of ultrasound the average pore size determined from mannitol delivery is the same (28 +/- 12 A). With the application of ultrasound the skin porosity could be increased by up to 1700-fold. The effect of ultrasound on skin is heterogeneous thereby creating localized transport pathways (LTP). The porosity of these transport pathways is of the same order of magnitude as that of the dermis. With this study it is shown that low-frequency ultrasound increases skin permeability by increasing skin porosity rather than by increasing the size of the pores that are responsible for permeant delivery.

  9. Molecular Scree ning of Blast Resistance Genes in Rice Germplasms Resistant to Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular screening of major rice blast resistance genes was determined with molecular markers, which showed close-set linkage to 11 major rice blast resistance genes (Pi-d2, Pi-z, Piz-t, Pi-9, Pi-36, Pi-37, Pi5, Pi-b, Pik-p, Pik-h and Pi-ta2, in a collection of 32 accessions resistant to Magnaporthe oryzae. Out of the 32 accessions, the Pi-d2 and Pi-z appeared to be omnipresent and gave positive express. As the second dominant, Pi-b and Piz-t gene frequencies were 96.9% and 87.5%. And Pik-h and Pik-p gene frequencies were 43.8% and 28.1%, respectively. The molecular marker linkage to Pi-ta2 produced positive bands in eleven accessions, while the molecular marker linkage to Pi-36 and Pi-37 in only three and four accessions, respectively. The natural field evaluation analysis showed that 30 of the 32 accessions were resistant, one was moderately resistant and one was susceptible. Infection types were negatively correlated with the genotype scores of Pi-9, Pi5, Pi-b, Pi-ta2 and Pik-p, although the correlation coefficients were very little. These results are useful in identification and incorporation of functional resistance genes from these germplasms into elite cultivars through marker-assisted selection for improved blast resistance in China and worldwide.

  10. Limited fitness costs of herbicide-resistance traits in Amaranthus tuberculatus facilitate resistance evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chenxi; Davis, Adam S; Tranel, Patrick J

    2018-02-01

    The fitness cost of herbicide resistance (HR) in the absence of herbicide selection plays a key role in HR evolution. Quantifying the fitness cost of resistance, however, is challenging, and there exists a knowledge gap in this area. A synthetic (artificially generated) Amaranthus tuberculatus population segregating for five types of HR was subjected to competitive growth conditions in the absence of herbicide selection for six generations. Fitness costs were quantified by using a combination of phenotyping and genotyping to monitor HR frequency changes over generations. In the absence of herbicide selection, a significant fitness cost was observed for resistance to acetolactate synthase-inhibiting herbicides, but not for resistances to atrazine (non-target-site resistance mechanism), protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitors, 4-hydroxyphenylpryuvate dioxygenase inhibitors or glyphosate. Glyphosate resistance was conferred by multiple mechanisms in the synthetic population, and further analysis revealed that one mechanism, amplification of the 5-enolypyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase gene, did decrease in frequency. Our results indicate that herbicide-resistance mitigation strategies (e.g. herbicide rotation) that rely on the existence of fitness costs in the absence of herbicide selection likely will be largely ineffective in many cases. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. The induction of streptomycin resistance in tomato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, D.E.; Snel, E.A.M.; Akerboom, M.; HiIle, J.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: The aim of the research is to investigate cytoplasmic genetics. For the analysis of organelle transfer and segregation in cybrids the presence of selectable and easily screenable genetic markers on organelles is indispensable. Streptomycin resistance is the best characterised cytoplasmic marker. The resistance is dominant and can be induced by a single basepair change in the chloroplast DNA. Protoplasts were treated with several MNU concentrations directly after isolation. Three months after the protoplast mutagenesis about 600 green colonies were isolated from 28x10 6 treated protoplasts. These colonies were retested several times on streptomycin containing media and approximately 150 colonies remained. We distinguished four classes of streptomycin resistance. Experiments were also done without the use of MNU. By somaclonal variation, only a small quantity of streptomycin resistant colonies was isolated at a 50 fold lower frequency. (author)

  12. Effect of Asymmetrical Edge Disconnection on Equivalent Series Resistance of Metalized Polypropylene Capacitors

    OpenAIRE

    J. Sivakumar; S. Usa; M.A. Panneerselvam

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of asymmetrical partial edge disconnection on the Equivalent Series Resistance (ESR) of Metalized polypropylene capacitors an experimental study has been made. Theoretical analysis made using PSPICE simulation package reveals that electrode resistance of individual turn rises from 10 to 30% depending on the location of the turn. This rise is not measureable at all the frequencies as ESR is frequency dependent and it includes resistance due to electrodes and ...

  13. Peak effect at microwave frequencies in swift heavy ion irradiated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The vortex dynamics at microwave frequencies in YBa2Cu3O7- (YBCO) films have been studied. We observe a peak in the microwave (4.88 and 9.55 GHz) surface resistance in some films in magnetic fields up to 0.8 T. This is associated with the `peak-effect' phenomenon and reflects the order–disorder transformation of ...

  14. On the evolution of pesticide resistance in Phytophthora infestans : an experimental evolution approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, S.

    2009-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents is a serious problem for both medicine and agriculture. The initial success of such toxins is due to absence of resistant genotypes in pathogen populations before treatment. The initial low frequency of resistance may be explained by negative pleiotropic effects of

  15. Antimicrobial Drug-Resistant Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Infections, Michigan, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sanjana; Mosci, Rebekah E; Anderson, Chase M; Snyder, Brian A; Collins, James; Rudrik, James T; Manning, Shannon D

    2017-09-01

    High frequencies of antimicrobial drug resistance were observed in O157 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strains recovered from patients in Michigan during 2010-2014. Resistance was more common in non-O157 strains and independently associated with hospitalization, indicating that resistance could contribute to more severe disease outcomes.

  16. On the natural and laboratory evolution of an antibiotic resistance gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salverda, M.L.M.

    2008-01-01

    TEM-1 ß-lactamase is one of the most notorious antibiotic resistance enzymes around. It exists at high frequencies in antibiotic-resistant bacteria around the world and confers resistance to ß-lactam antibiotics, including penicillins (e.g. ampicillin) and cephalosporins. The enzyme displays a

  17. Selection and Transmission of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Dan I; Hughes, Diarmaid

    2017-07-01

    Ever since antibiotics were introduced into human and veterinary medicine to treat and prevent bacterial infections there has been a steady selection and increase in the frequency of antibiotic resistant bacteria. To be able to reduce the rate of resistance evolution, we need to understand how various biotic and abiotic factors interact to drive the complex processes of resistance emergence and transmission. We describe several of the fundamental factors that underlay resistance evolution, including rates and niches of emergence and persistence of resistant bacteria, time- and space-gradients of various selective agents, and rates and routes of transmission of resistant bacteria between humans, animals and other environments. Furthermore, we discuss the options available to reduce the rate of resistance evolution and/ or transmission and their advantages and disadvantages.