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Sample records for resistance genes identified

  1. Characterizing and identifying black spot resistance genes in polyploid roses

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ornamental quality of outdoor grown roses (Rosa hybrida) is under constant threat from foliar diseases, such as black spot caused by Diplocarpon rosae. Fungicides are primarily used to manage black spot; however, there is a high consumer demand for disease resistant roses which eliminate the nee...

  2. Identifying resistance gene analogs associated with resistances to different pathogens in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Camilo E; Acosta, Iván F; Jara, Carlos; Pedraza, Fabio; Gaitán-Solís, Eliana; Gallego, Gerardo; Beebe, Steve; Tohme, Joe

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT A polymerase chain reaction approach using degenerate primers that targeted the conserved domains of cloned plant disease resistance genes (R genes) was used to isolate a set of 15 resistance gene analogs (RGAs) from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Eight different classes of RGAs were obtained from nucleotide binding site (NBS)-based primers and seven from not previously described Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor-like (TIR)-based primers. Putative amino acid sequences of RGAs were significantly similar to R genes and contained additional conserved motifs. The NBS-type RGAs were classified in two subgroups according to the expected final residue in the kinase-2 motif. Eleven RGAs were mapped at 19 loci on eight linkage groups of the common bean genetic map constructed at Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical. Genetic linkage was shown for eight RGAs with partial resistance to anthracnose, angular leaf spot (ALS) and Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV). RGA1 and RGA2 were associated with resistance loci to anthracnose and BGYMV and were part of two clusters of R genes previously described. A new major cluster was detected by RGA7 and explained up to 63.9% of resistance to ALS and has a putative contribution to anthracnose resistance. These results show the usefulness of RGAs as candidate genes to detect and eventually isolate numerous R genes in common bean.

  3. Characterization of novel antibiotic resistance genes identified by functional metagenomics on soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Cortés, Gloria; Millán, Vicenta; Ramírez-Saad, Hugo C; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael; Toro, Nicolás; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco

    2011-04-01

    The soil microbial community is highly complex and contains a high density of antibiotic-producing bacteria, making it a likely source of diverse antibiotic resistance determinants. We used functional metagenomics to search for antibiotic resistance genes in libraries generated from three different soil samples, containing 3.6 Gb of DNA in total. We identified 11 new antibiotic resistance genes: 3 conferring resistance to ampicillin, 2 to gentamicin, 2 to chloramphenicol and 4 to trimethoprim. One of the clones identified was a new trimethoprim resistance gene encoding a 26.8 kDa protein closely resembling unassigned reductases of the dihydrofolate reductase group. This protein, Tm8-3, conferred trimethoprim resistance in Escherichia coli and Sinorhizobium meliloti (γ- and α-proteobacteria respectively). We demonstrated that this gene encoded an enzyme with dihydrofolate reductase activity, with kinetic constants similar to other type I and II dihydrofolate reductases (K(m) of 8.9 µM for NADPH and 3.7 µM for dihydrofolate and IC(50) of 20 µM for trimethoprim). This is the first description of a new type of reductase conferring resistance to trimethoprim. Our results indicate that soil bacteria display a high level of genetic diversity and are a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes, supporting the use of this approach for the discovery of novel enzymes with unexpected activities unpredictable from their amino acid sequences. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Tetracycline Resistance Genes Identified from Distinct Soil Environments in China by Functional Metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaochen; Gao, Xia; Gao, Yuejiao; Li, Yanqing; Cao, Mingming; Xi, Zhenhua; Zhao, Lixing; Feng, Zhiyang

    2017-01-01

    Soil microbiota represents one of the ancient evolutionary origins of antibiotic resistance and has been increasingly recognized as a potentially vast unstudied reservoir of resistance genes with possibilities to exchange with pathogens. Tetracycline resistance is one of the most abundant antibiotic resistances that may transfer among clinical and commensal microorganisms. To investigate tetracycline resistance genes from soil bacteria in different habitats, we performed functional analysis of three metagenomic libraries derived from soil samples collected from Yunnan, Sichuan, and Tibet, respectively, in China. We found efflux transporter genes form all the libraries, including 21 major facilitator superfamily efflux pump genes and one multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporter gene. Interestingly, we also identified two tetracycline destructase genes, belonging to a newly described family of tetracycline-inactivating enzymes that scarcely observed in clinical pathogens, from the Tibet library. The inactivation activity of the putative enzyme was confirmed in vitro by biochemical analysis. Our results indicated that efflux pumps distributed predominantly across habitats. Meanwhile, the mechanism of enzymatic inactivation for tetracycline resistance should not be neglected and merits further investigation.

  5. Tetracycline Resistance Genes Identified from Distinct Soil Environments in China by Functional Metagenomics

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    Shaochen Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil microbiota represents one of the ancient evolutionary origins of antibiotic resistance and has been increasingly recognized as a potentially vast unstudied reservoir of resistance genes with possibilities to exchange with pathogens. Tetracycline resistance is one of the most abundant antibiotic resistances that may transfer among clinical and commensal microorganisms. To investigate tetracycline resistance genes from soil bacteria in different habitats, we performed functional analysis of three metagenomic libraries derived from soil samples collected from Yunnan, Sichuan, and Tibet, respectively, in China. We found efflux transporter genes form all the libraries, including 21 major facilitator superfamily efflux pump genes and one multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE transporter gene. Interestingly, we also identified two tetracycline destructase genes, belonging to a newly described family of tetracycline-inactivating enzymes that scarcely observed in clinical pathogens, from the Tibet library. The inactivation activity of the putative enzyme was confirmed in vitro by biochemical analysis. Our results indicated that efflux pumps distributed predominantly across habitats. Meanwhile, the mechanism of enzymatic inactivation for tetracycline resistance should not be neglected and merits further investigation.

  6. Candidate Gene Sequence Analyses toward Identifying Rsv3-Type Resistance to Soybean Mosaic Virus

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    N. R. Redekar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available is one of three genetic loci conferring strain-specific resistance to (SMV. The locus has been mapped to a 154-kb region on chromosome 14, containing a cluster of five nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR resistance genes. High sequence similarity between the candidate genes challenges fine mapping of the locus. Among the five, Glyma14g38533 showed the highest transcript abundance in 1 to 3 h of SMV-G7 inoculation. Comparative sequence analyses were conducted with the five candidate NB-LRR genes from susceptible (-type soybean [ (L. Merr.] cultivar Williams 82, resistant (-type cultivar Hwangkeum, and resistant lines L29 and RRR. Sequence comparisons revealed that Glyma14g38533 had far more polymorphisms than the other candidate genes. Interestingly, Glyma14g38533 gene from -type lines exhibited 150 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and six insertion–deletion (InDel markers relative to -type line, Furthermore, the polymorphisms identified in three -type lines were highly conserved. Several polymorphisms were validated in 18 -type resistant and six -type susceptible lines and were found associated with their disease response. The majority of the polymorphisms were located in LRR domain encoding region, which is involved in pathogen recognition via protein–protein interactions. These findings associating Glyma14g38533 with -type resistance to SMV suggest it is the most likely candidate gene for .

  7. Transcriptomic analysis of colistin-susceptible and colistin-resistant isolates identifies genes associated with colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y K; Lee, J-Y; Ko, K S

    2015-08-01

    The emergence of colistin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii is concerning, as colistin is often regarded as the last option for treating multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii infections. Using mRNA sequencing, we compared whole transcriptomes of colistin-susceptible and colistin-resistant A. baumannii strains, with the aim of identifying genes involved in colistin resistance. A clinical colistin-susceptible strain (06AC-179) and a colistin-resistant strain (07AC-052) were analysed in this study. In addition, a colistin-resistant mutant (06AC-179-R1) derived from 06AC-179 was also included in this study. High throughput mRNA sequencing was performed with an Illumina HiSeq TM 2000. In total, six genes were identified as associated with colistin resistance in A. baumannii. These six genes encode PmrAB two-component regulatory enzymes, PmrC (a lipid A phosphoethanolamine transferase), a glycosyltransferase, a poly-β-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase, and a putative membrane protein. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry revealed that all three colistin-resistant strains used in this study had modified lipid A structure by addition of phosphoethanolamine. As genes found in our results are all associated with either lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis or electrostatic changes in the bacterial cell membrane, lipopolysaccharide modification might be one of the principal modes of acquisition of colistin resistance in some A. baumannii strains. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Current Status and Challenges in Identifying Disease Resistance Genes in Brassica napus

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    Ting Xiang Neik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Brassica napus is an economically important crop across different continents including temperate and subtropical regions in Europe, Canada, South Asia, China and Australia. Its widespread cultivation also brings setbacks as it plays host to fungal, oomycete and chytrid pathogens that can lead to serious yield loss. For sustainable crop production, identification of resistance (R genes in B. napus has become of critical importance. In this review, we discuss four key pathogens affecting Brassica crops: Clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae, Blackleg (Leptosphaeria maculans and L. biglobosa, Sclerotinia Stem Rot (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Downy Mildew (Hyaloperonospora parasitica. We first review current studies covering prevalence of these pathogens on Brassica crops and highlight the R genes and QTL that have been identified from Brassica species against these pathogens. Insights into the relationships between the pathogen and its Brassica host, the unique host resistance mechanisms and how these affect resistance outcomes is also presented. We discuss challenges in identification and deployment of R genes in B. napus in relation to highly specific genetic interactions between host subpopulations and pathogen pathotypes and emphasize the need for common or shared techniques and research materials or tighter collaboration between researchers to reconcile the inconsistencies in the research outcomes. Using current genomics tools, we provide examples of how characterization and cloning of R genes in B. napus can be carried out more effectively. Lastly, we put forward strategies to breed resistant cultivars through introgressions supported by genomic approaches and suggest prospects that can be implemented in the future for a better, pathogen-resistant B. napus.

  9. Current Status and Challenges in Identifying Disease Resistance Genes in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neik, Ting Xiang; Barbetti, Martin J.; Batley, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Brassica napus is an economically important crop across different continents including temperate and subtropical regions in Europe, Canada, South Asia, China and Australia. Its widespread cultivation also brings setbacks as it plays host to fungal, oomycete and chytrid pathogens that can lead to serious yield loss. For sustainable crop production, identification of resistance (R) genes in B. napus has become of critical importance. In this review, we discuss four key pathogens affecting Brassica crops: Clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae), Blackleg (Leptosphaeria maculans and L. biglobosa), Sclerotinia Stem Rot (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum), and Downy Mildew (Hyaloperonospora parasitica). We first review current studies covering prevalence of these pathogens on Brassica crops and highlight the R genes and QTL that have been identified from Brassica species against these pathogens. Insights into the relationships between the pathogen and its Brassica host, the unique host resistance mechanisms and how these affect resistance outcomes is also presented. We discuss challenges in identification and deployment of R genes in B. napus in relation to highly specific genetic interactions between host subpopulations and pathogen pathotypes and emphasize the need for common or shared techniques and research materials or tighter collaboration between researchers to reconcile the inconsistencies in the research outcomes. Using current genomics tools, we provide examples of how characterization and cloning of R genes in B. napus can be carried out more effectively. Lastly, we put forward strategies to breed resistant cultivars through introgressions supported by genomic approaches and suggest prospects that can be implemented in the future for a better, pathogen-resistant B. napus. PMID:29163558

  10. Comparative genomics identifies candidate genes for infectious salmon anemia (ISA) resistance in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

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    Li, Jieying; Boroevich, Keith A; Koop, Ben F; Davidson, William S

    2011-04-01

    Infectious salmon anemia (ISA) has been described as the hoof and mouth disease of salmon farming. ISA is caused by a lethal and highly communicable virus, which can have a major impact on salmon aquaculture, as demonstrated by an outbreak in Chile in 2007. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) for ISA resistance has been mapped to three microsatellite markers on linkage group (LG) 8 (Chr 15) on the Atlantic salmon genetic map. We identified bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones and three fingerprint contigs from the Atlantic salmon physical map that contains these markers. We made use of the extensive BAC end sequence database to extend these contigs by chromosome walking and identified additional two markers in this region. The BAC end sequences were used to search for conserved synteny between this segment of LG8 and the fish genomes that have been sequenced. An examination of the genes in the syntenic segments of the tetraodon and medaka genomes identified candidates for association with ISA resistance in Atlantic salmon based on differential expression profiles from ISA challenges or on the putative biological functions of the proteins they encode. One gene in particular, HIV-EP2/MBP-2, caught our attention as it may influence the expression of several genes that have been implicated in the response to infection by infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV). Therefore, we suggest that HIV-EP2/MBP-2 is a very strong candidate for the gene associated with the ISAV resistance QTL in Atlantic salmon and is worthy of further study.

  11. Allele characterization of genes required for rpg4-mediated wheat stem rust resistance identifies Rpg5 as the R gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, D; Gross, T; Brueggeman, R

    2013-11-01

    A highly virulent form of the wheat stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK is virulent on both wheat and barley, presenting a major threat to world food security. The recessive and temperature-sensitive rpg4 gene is the only effective source of resistance identified in barley (Hordeum vulgare) against P. graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK. Efforts to position clone rpg4 localized resistance to a small interval on barley chromosome 5HL, tightly linked to the rye stem rust (P. graminis f. sp. secalis) resistance (R) gene Rpg5. High-resolution genetic analysis and post-transcriptional gene silencing of the genes at the rpg4/Rpg5 locus determined that three tightly linked genes (Rpg5, HvRga1, and HvAdf3) are required together for rpg4-mediated wheat stem rust resistance. Alleles of the three genes were analyzed from a diverse set of 14 domesticated barley lines (H. vulgare) and 8 wild barley accessions (H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum) to characterize diversity that may determine incompatibility (resistance). The analysis determined that HvAdf3 and HvRga1 code for predicted functional proteins that do not appear to contain polymorphisms determining the compatible (susceptible) interactions with the wheat stem rust pathogen and were expressed at the transcriptional level from both resistant and susceptible barley lines. The HvAdf3 alleles shared 100% amino acid identity among all 22 genotypes examined. The P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ-susceptible barley lines with HvRga1 alleles containing the limited amino acid substitutions unique to the susceptible varieties also contained predicted nonfunctional rpg5 alleles. Thus, susceptibility in these lines is likely due to the nonfunctional RPG5 proteins. The Rpg5 allele analysis determined that 9 of the 13 P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ-susceptible barley lines contain alleles that either code for predicted truncated proteins as the result of a single nucleotide substitution, resulting in a

  12. Transcriptome analyses and virus induced gene silencing identify genes in the Rpp4-mediated Asian soybean rust resistance pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rpp4 (Resistance to Phakopsora pachyrhizi 4) confers resistance to P. pachyrhizi, the causal agent of Asian soybean rust (ASR). By combining expression profiling and virus induced gene silencing (VIGS), we are developing a genetic framework for Rpp4-mediated resistance. We measured gene expression i...

  13. A Genome-Wide Knockout Screen to Identify Genes Involved in Acquired Carboplatin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    result in resistance is demonstrated by the fact that mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1 or MSH2 produce resistance due to failure of the...cancer. Genes Dev 2010;24(8):837-52. 18. Fink D, Nebel S, Aebi S, Zheng H, Cenni B, Nehme A, et al. The role of DNA mismatch repair in platinum drug...CBDCA and cDDP, but it remains uncertain whether increased DNA repair capacity is the basis for resistance (17). That the loss of a single gene can

  14. Transcriptome analysis of the Brassica napus-Leptosphaeria maculans pathosystem identifies receptor, signaling and structural genes underlying plant resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Michael G; Zhang, Xuehua; Walker, Philip L; Wan, Joey C; Millar, Jenna L; Khan, Deirdre; Granger, Matthew J; Cavers, Jacob D; Chan, Ainsley C; Fernando, Dilantha W G; Belmonte, Mark F

    2017-05-01

    The hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans is the causal agent of blackleg disease in Brassica napus (canola, oilseed rape) and causes significant loss of yield worldwide. While genetic resistance has been used to mitigate the disease by means of traditional breeding strategies, there is little knowledge about the genes that contribute to blackleg resistance. RNA sequencing and a streamlined bioinformatics pipeline identified unique genes and plant defense pathways specific to plant resistance in the B. napus-L. maculans LepR1-AvrLepR1 interaction over time. We complemented our temporal analyses by monitoring gene activity directly at the infection site using laser microdissection coupled to quantitative PCR. Finally, we characterized genes involved in plant resistance to blackleg in the Arabidopsis-L. maculans model pathosystem. Data reveal an accelerated activation of the plant transcriptome in resistant host cotyledons associated with transcripts coding for extracellular receptors and phytohormone signaling molecules. Functional characterization provides direct support for transcriptome data and positively identifies resistance regulators in the Brassicaceae. Spatial gradients of gene activity were identified in response to L. maculans proximal to the site of infection. This dataset provides unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution of the genes required for blackleg resistance and serves as a valuable resource for those interested in host-pathogen interactions. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Transcriptome profiling identifies genes/pathways associated with experimental resistance to paromomycin in Leishmania donovani

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    Aditya Verma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Widespread resistance towards antimony and reports of relapses following miltefosine treatment has severely affected the management of visceral leishmaniasis (VL in the Indian subcontinent. Paromomycin (PMM, an aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been licensed for VL treatment in India in 2007. Although its use is still restricted in the field, unraveling the molecular mechanism of resistance towards PMM is the key to preserve the drug. In this study, PMM resistant lines were selected up to 100 μM of PMM in three distinct field isolates of Leishmania donovani at promastigote stage. The resistance induced at promastigote level was also evident in amastigotes which showed 6 fold decreases in PMM susceptibility. Comparative transcriptome profiling of PMM resistant (PMM-R and the corresponding PMM sensitive (PMM-S parasites revealed modulated expression of 500 genes (1.5 fold cut off in PMM-R parasites. Selected genes were validated for their modulated expression by quantitative real-time PCR. Functional classification and pathway analysis of modulated genes indicated probable adaptations in drug resistant lines which included a reduced oxidative phosphorylation; b increased glycosomal succinate fermentation and substrate level phosphorylation; c dependency on lipids and amino acids for energy generation; d reduced DNA synthesis and increased DNA damage repair and e decreased protein synthesis and degradation. Interestingly, PMM-R parasites showed a marked increase in PMM susceptibility in presence of verapamil and amlodipine, antagonists of Ca2+ channel that are also modulators of ABC transporters. Moreover, infection of macrophages by PMM-R parasites led to modulated nitric oxide (NO levels while reactive oxygen species (ROS level remained unaltered. The present study highlights the putative mechanisms of PMM resistance in Leishmania. Keywords: Leishmania donovani, Drug resistance, Paromomycin, Transcriptome, ABC transporters, Nitric oxide

  16. Genome Comparison of Erythromycin Resistant Campylobacter from Turkeys Identifies Hosts and Pathways for Horizontal Spread of erm(B Genes

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    Diego Florez-Cuadrado

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens in the genus Campylobacter are the most common cause of food-borne bacterial gastro-enteritis. Campylobacteriosis, caused principally by Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, is transmitted to humans by food of animal origin, especially poultry. As for many pathogens, antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter is increasing at an alarming rate. Erythromycin prescription is the treatment of choice for clinical cases requiring antimicrobial therapy but this is compromised by mobility of the erythromycin resistance gene erm(B between strains. Here, we evaluate resistance to six antimicrobials in 170 Campylobacter isolates (133 C. coli and 37 C. jejuni from turkeys. Erythromycin resistant isolates (n = 85; 81 C. coli and 4 C. jejuni were screened for the presence of the erm(B gene, that has not previously been identified in isolates from turkeys. The genomes of two positive C. coli isolates were sequenced and in both isolates the erm(B gene clustered with resistance determinants against aminoglycosides plus tetracycline, including aad9, aadE, aph(2″-IIIa, aph(3′-IIIa, and tet(O genes. Comparative genomic analysis identified identical erm(B sequences among Campylobacter from turkeys, Streptococcus suis from pigs and Enterococcus faecium and Clostridium difficile from humans. This is consistent with multiple horizontal transfer events among different bacterial species colonizing turkeys. This example highlights the potential for dissemination of antimicrobial resistance across bacterial species boundaries which may compromise their effectiveness in antimicrobial therapy.

  17. APRIL is a novel clinical chemo-resistance biomarker in colorectal adenocarcinoma identified by gene expression profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, Russell D; Wang, Weiguang; Gilbert, Fiona; Semple, Scot; Collie-Duguid, Elaina SR; Samuel, Leslie M; Murray, Graeme I; MacDonald, Graham; O'Kelly, Terrence; Loudon, Malcolm; Binnie, Norman; Aly, Emad; McKinlay, Aileen

    2009-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil(5FU) and oral analogues, such as capecitabine, remain one of the most useful agents for the treatment of colorectal adenocarcinoma. Low toxicity and convenience of administration facilitate use, however clinical resistance is a major limitation. Investigation has failed to fully explain the molecular mechanisms of resistance and no clinically useful predictive biomarkers for 5FU resistance have been identified. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of clinical 5FU resistance in colorectal adenocarcinoma patients in a prospective biomarker discovery project utilising gene expression profiling. The aim was to identify novel 5FU resistance mechanisms and qualify these as candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Putative treatment specific gene expression changes were identified in a transcriptomics study of rectal adenocarcinomas, biopsied and profiled before and after pre-operative short-course radiotherapy or 5FU based chemo-radiotherapy, using microarrays. Tumour from untreated controls at diagnosis and resection identified treatment-independent gene expression changes. Candidate 5FU chemo-resistant genes were identified by comparison of gene expression data sets from these clinical specimens with gene expression signatures from our previous studies of colorectal cancer cell lines, where parental and daughter lines resistant to 5FU were compared. A colorectal adenocarcinoma tissue microarray (n = 234, resected tumours) was used as an independent set to qualify candidates thus identified. APRIL/TNFSF13 mRNA was significantly upregulated following 5FU based concurrent chemo-radiotherapy and in 5FU resistant colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines but not in radiotherapy alone treated colorectal adenocarcinomas. Consistent withAPRIL's known function as an autocrine or paracrine secreted molecule, stromal but not tumour cell protein expression by immunohistochemistry was correlated with poor prognosis (p = 0.019) in the independent set

  18. New eight genes identified at the clinical multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii DMS06669 strain in a Vietnam hospital

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    Nguyen Si-Tuan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that can develop multidrug resistance. In this study, we characterized the genome of the A. baumannii strain DMS06669 (isolated from the sputum of a male patient with hospital-acquired pneumonia and focused on identification of genes relevant to antibiotic resistance. Methods Whole genome analysis of A. baumannii DMS06669 from hospital-acquired pneumonia patients included de novo assembly; gene prediction; functional annotation to public databases; phylogenetics tree construction and antibiotics genes identification. Results After sequencing the A. baumannii DMS06669 genome and performing quality control, de novo genome assembly was carried out, producing 24 scaffolds. Public databases were used for gene prediction and functional annotation to construct a phylogenetic tree of the DMS06669 strain with 21 other A. baumannii strains. A total of 18 possible antibiotic resistance genes, conferring resistance to eight distinct classes of antibiotics, were identified. Eight of these genes have not previously been reported to occur in A. baumannii. Conclusions Our results provide important information regarding mechanisms that may contribute to antibiotic resistance in the DMS06669 strain, and have implications for treatment of patients infected with A. baumannii.

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study with Sequence Variants Identifies Candidate Genes for Mastitis Resistance in Dairy Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahana, Goutam; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Bendixen, Christian

    component in a linear mixed model. A total of 90 bulls’ whole genomes were sequenced with a coverage > 10X. Sequence reads were aligned to the cattle reference genome and polymorphisms in candidate regions were identified when one or more samples differed from the reference sequence. The polymorphisms...... Factor Receptor Alpha (LIFR) emerged as a strong candidate gene for mastitis resistance. The LIFR gene is involved in acute phase response and is expressed in saliva and mammary gland....

  20. Improved Acetic Acid Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Overexpression of the WHI2 Gene Identified through Inverse Metabolic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingying; Stabryla, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Development of acetic acid-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for economically viable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, but the goal remains a critical challenge due to limited information on effective genetic perturbation targets for improving acetic acid resistance in the yeast. This study employed a genomic-library-based inverse metabolic engineering approach to successfully identify a novel gene target, WHI2 (encoding a cytoplasmatic globular scaffold protein), which elicited improved acetic acid resistance in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of WHI2 significantly improved glucose and/or xylose fermentation under acetic acid stress in engineered yeast. The WHI2-overexpressing strain had 5-times-higher specific ethanol productivity than the control in glucose fermentation with acetic acid. Analysis of the expression of WHI2 gene products (including protein and transcript) determined that acetic acid induced endogenous expression of Whi2 in S. cerevisiae. Meanwhile, the whi2Δ mutant strain had substantially higher susceptibility to acetic acid than the wild type, suggesting the important role of Whi2 in the acetic acid response in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, overexpression of WHI2 and of a cognate phosphatase gene, PSR1, had a synergistic effect in improving acetic acid resistance, suggesting that Whi2 might function in combination with Psr1 to elicit the acetic acid resistance mechanism. These results improve our understanding of the yeast response to acetic acid stress and provide a new strategy to breed acetic acid-resistant yeast strains for renewable biofuel production. PMID:26826231

  1. QTL Mapping and CRISPR/Cas9 Editing to Identify a Drug Resistance Gene in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bang; Powell, Robin H; Behnke, Michael S

    2017-06-22

    Scientific knowledge is intrinsically linked to available technologies and methods. This article will present two methods that allowed for the identification and verification of a drug resistance gene in the Apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the method of Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) mapping using a Whole Genome Sequence (WGS) -based genetic map and the method of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 -based gene editing. The approach of QTL mapping allows one to test if there is a correlation between a genomic region(s) and a phenotype. Two datasets are required to run a QTL scan, a genetic map based on the progeny of a recombinant cross and a quantifiable phenotype assessed in each of the progeny of that cross. These datasets are then formatted to be compatible with R/qtl software that generates a QTL scan to identify significant loci correlated with the phenotype. Although this can greatly narrow the search window of possible candidates, QTLs span regions containing a number of genes from which the causal gene needs to be identified. Having WGS of the progeny was critical to identify the causal drug resistance mutation at the gene level. Once identified, the candidate mutation can be verified by genetic manipulation of drug sensitive parasites. The most facile and efficient method to genetically modify T. gondii is the CRISPR/Cas9 system. This system comprised of just 2 components both encoded on a single plasmid, a single guide RNA (gRNA) containing a 20 bp sequence complementary to the genomic target and the Cas9 endonuclease that generates a double-strand DNA break (DSB) at the target, repair of which allows for insertion or deletion of sequences around the break site. This article provides detailed protocols to use CRISPR/Cas9 based genome editing tools to verify the gene responsible for sinefungin resistance and to construct transgenic parasites.

  2. Next-generation sequencing to identify candidate genes and develop diagnostic markers for a novel Phytophthora resistance gene, RpsHC18, in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chao; Sun, Suli; Li, Yinping; Duan, Canxing; Zhu, Zhendong

    2018-03-01

    A novel Phytophthora sojae resistance gene RpsHC18 was identified and finely mapped on soybean chromosome 3. Two NBS-LRR candidate genes were identified and two diagnostic markers of RpsHC18 were developed. Phytophthora root rot caused by Phytophthora sojae is a destructive disease of soybean. The most effective disease-control strategy is to deploy resistant cultivars carrying Phytophthora-resistant Rps genes. The soybean cultivar Huachun 18 has a broad and distinct resistance spectrum to 12 P. sojae isolates. Quantitative trait loci sequencing (QTL-seq), based on the whole-genome resequencing (WGRS) of two extreme resistant and susceptible phenotype bulks from an F 2:3 population, was performed, and one 767-kb genomic region with ΔSNP-index ≥ 0.9 on chromosome 3 was identified as the RpsHC18 candidate region in Huachun 18. The candidate region was reduced to a 146-kb region by fine mapping. Nonsynonymous SNP and haplotype analyses were carried out in the 146-kb region among ten soybean genotypes using WGRS. Four specific nonsynonymous SNPs were identified in two nucleotide-binding sites-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) genes, RpsHC18-NBL1 and RpsHC18-NBL2, which were considered to be the candidate genes. Finally, one specific SNP marker in each candidate gene was successfully developed using a tetra-primer ARMS-PCR assay, and the two markers were verified to be specific for RpsHC18 and to effectively distinguish other known Rps genes. In this study, we applied an integrated genomic-based strategy combining WGRS with traditional genetic mapping to identify RpsHC18 candidate genes and develop diagnostic markers. These results suggest that next-generation sequencing is a precise, rapid and cost-effective way to identify candidate genes and develop diagnostic markers, and it can accelerate Rps gene cloning and marker-assisted selection for breeding of P. sojae-resistant soybean cultivars.

  3. Identifying leaf rust resistance gene Lr19 in durum wheat using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina Eriks., is an important disease affecting durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum) worldwide, particularly in the Mediterranean region. The disease can be controlled through the use of plant host resistance. Based on seedling resistance tests of 103 durum genotypes against a bulk of ...

  4. Next generation sequencing of Apis mellifera syriaca identifies genes for Varroa resistance and beneficial bee keeping traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Nizar; Mahmud Batainh, Ahmed; Suleiman Migdadi, Osama; Saini, Deepti; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; Parameswaran, Sriram; Alhamuri, Zaid

    2016-08-01

    Apis mellifera syriaca exhibits a high degree of tolerance to pests and pathogens including varroa mites. This native honey bee subspecies of Jordan expresses behavioral adaptations to high temperature and dry seasons typical of the region. However, persistent honey bee imports of commercial breeder lines are endangering local honey bee population. This study reports the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to study the A. m. syriaca genome and to identify genetic factors possibly contributing toward mite resistance and other favorable traits. We obtained a total of 46.2 million raw reads by applying the NGS to sequence A. m. syriaca and used extensive bioinformatics approach to identify several candidate genes for Varroa mite resistance, behavioral and immune responses characteristic for these bees. As a part of characterizing the functional regulation of molecular genetic pathway, we have mapped the pathway genes potentially involved using information from Drosophila melanogaster and present possible functional changes implicated in responses to Varroa destructor mite infestation toward this. We performed in-depth functional annotation methods to identify ∼600 candidates that are relevant, genes involved in pathways such as microbial recognition and phagocytosis, peptidoglycan recognition protein family, Gram negative binding protein family, phagocytosis receptors, serpins, Toll signaling pathway, Imd pathway, Tnf, JAK-STAT and MAPK pathway, heamatopioesis and cellular response pathways, antiviral, RNAi pathway, stress factors, etc. were selected. Finally, we have cataloged function-specific polymorphisms between A. mellifera and A. m. syriaca that could give better understanding of varroa mite resistance mechanisms and assist in breeding. We have identified immune related embryonic development (Cactus, Relish, dorsal, Ank2, baz), Varroa hygiene (NorpA2, Zasp, LanA, gasp, impl3) and Varroa resistance (Pug, pcmt, elk, elf3-s10, Dscam2, Dhc64C, gro

  5. Functional genomics in Campylobacter coli identified a novel streptomycin resistance gene located in a hypervariable genomic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkkola, Satu; Culebro, Alejandra; Juntunen, Pekka; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa; Rossi, Mirko

    2016-07-01

    Numerous aminoglycoside resistance genes have been reported in Campylobacter spp. often resembling those from Gram-positive bacterial species and located in transferable genetic elements with other resistance genes. We discovered a new streptomycin (STR) resistance gene in Campylobactercoli showing 27-34 % amino acid identity to aminoglycoside 6-nucleotidyl-transferases described previously in Campylobacter. STR resistance was verified by gene expression and insertional inactivation. This ant-like gene differs from the previously described aminoglycoside resistance genes in Campylobacter spp. in several aspects. It does not appear to originate from Gram-positive bacteria and is located in a region corresponding to a previously described hypervariable region 14 of C. jejuni with no other known resistance genes detected in close proximity. Finally, it does not belong to a multiple drug resistance plasmid or transposon. This novel ant-like gene appears widely spread among C. coli as it is found in strains originating both from Europe and the United States and from several, apparently unrelated, hosts and environmental sources. The closest homologue (60 % amino acid identity) was found in certain C. jejuni and C. coli strains in a similar genomic location, but an association with STR resistance was not detected. Based on the findings presented here, we hypothesize that Campylobacter ant-like gene A has originated from a common ancestral proto-resistance element in Campylobacter spp., possibly encoding a protein with a different function. In conclusion, whole genome sequencing allowed us to fill in a knowledge gap concerning STR resistance in C. coli by revealing a novel STR resistance gene possibly inherent to Campylobacter.

  6. Using RNA-sequencing and in silico subtraction to identify resistance gene analog markers for Lr16 in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina Eriks., is one of the most widespread diseases of wheat worldwide and breeding for resistance is one of the most effective methods of control. Lr16 is a wheat leaf rust resistance gene that provides resistance at both the seedling and adult stages. Simple s...

  7. Gene Networks in the Wild: Identifying Transcriptional Modules that Mediate Coral Resistance to Experimental Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Noah H; Seneca, Francois O; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2015-12-28

    Organisms respond to environmental variation partly through changes in gene expression, which underlie both homeostatic and acclimatory responses to environmental stress. In some cases, so many genes change in expression in response to different influences that understanding expression patterns for all these individual genes becomes difficult. To reduce this problem, we use a systems genetics approach to show that variation in the expression of thousands of genes of reef-building corals can be explained as variation in the expression of a small number of coexpressed "modules." Modules were often enriched for specific cellular functions and varied predictably among individuals, experimental treatments, and physiological state. We describe two transcriptional modules for which expression levels immediately after heat stress predict bleaching a day later. One of these early "bleaching modules" is enriched for sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins, particularly E26 transformation-specific (ETS)-family transcription factors. The other module is enriched for extracellular matrix proteins. These classes of bleaching response genes are clear in the modular gene expression analysis we conduct but are much more difficult to discern in single gene analyses. Furthermore, the ETS-family module shows repeated differences in expression among coral colonies grown in the same common garden environment, suggesting a heritable genetic or epigenetic basis for these expression polymorphisms. This finding suggests that these corals harbor high levels of gene-network variation, which could facilitate rapid evolution in the face of environmental change. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  8. Studies to identify genes and their expression for resistance to blast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aps

    2013-06-26

    Jun 26, 2013 ... Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is the staple food for more than half of the world population of Asia. Also, the genetic and functional syntenies observed among cereal crops over ..... action for the leaf rust of wheat. Sandhu et al. (2003) suggested a polygenic control for blast resistance. Naqvi and Chattoo (1996) also ...

  9. De novo transcriptome sequencing in Frankliniella occidentalis to identify genes involved in plant virus transmission and insecticide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Zhang, Pengjun; Li, Weidi; Zhang, Jinming; Huang, Fang; Yang, Jian; Bei, Yawei; Lu, Yaobin

    2013-05-01

    The western flower thrips (WFT), Frankliniella occidentalis, a world-wide invasive insect, causes agricultural damage by directly feeding and by indirectly vectoring Tospoviruses, such as Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). We characterized the transcriptome of WFT and analyzed global gene expression of WFT response to TSWV infection using Illumina sequencing platform. We compiled 59,932 unigenes, and identified 36,339 unigenes by similarity analysis against public databases, most of which were annotated using gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis. Within these annotated transcripts, we collected 278 sequences related to insecticide resistance. GO and KEGG analysis of different expression genes between TSWV-infected and non-infected WFT population revealed that TSWV can regulate cellular process and immune response, which might lead to low virus titers in thrips cells and no detrimental effects on F. occidentalis. This data-set not only enriches genomic resource for WFT, but also benefits research into its molecular genetics and functional genomics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Three-dimensional culture system identifies a new mode of cetuximab resistance and disease-relevant genes in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cunxi; Singh, Bhuminder; Graves-Deal, Ramona; Ma, Haiting; Starchenko, Alina; Fry, William H; Lu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yang; Bogatcheva, Galina; Khan, Mohseen P; Milne, Ginger L; Zhao, Shilin; Ayers, Gregory Daniel; Li, Nenggan; Hu, Huaying; Washington, Mary Kay; Yeatman, Timothy J; McDonald, Oliver G; Liu, Qi; Coffey, Robert J

    2017-04-04

    We previously reported that single cells from a human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell line (HCA-7) formed either hollow single-layered polarized cysts or solid spiky masses when plated in 3D in type-I collagen. To begin in-depth analyses into whether clonal cysts and spiky masses possessed divergent properties, individual colonies of each morphology were isolated and expanded. The lines thus derived faithfully retained their parental cystic and spiky morphologies and were termed CC (cystic) and SC (spiky), respectively. Although both CC and SC expressed EGF receptor (EGFR), the EGFR-neutralizing monoclonal antibody, cetuximab, strongly inhibited growth of CC, whereas SC was resistant to growth inhibition, and this was coupled to increased tyrosine phosphorylation of MET and RON. Addition of the dual MET/RON tyrosine kinase inhibitor, crizotinib, restored cetuximab sensitivity in SC. To further characterize these two lines, we performed comprehensive genomic and transcriptomic analysis of CC and SC in 3D. One of the most up-regulated genes in CC was the tumor suppressor 15-PGDH/HPGD , and the most up-regulated gene in SC was versican ( VCAN ) in 3D and xenografts. Analysis of a CRC tissue microarray showed that epithelial, but not stromal, VCAN staining strongly correlated with reduced survival, and combined epithelial VCAN and absent HPGD staining portended a poorer prognosis. Thus, with this 3D system, we have identified a mode of cetuximab resistance and a potential prognostic marker in CRC. As such, this represents a potentially powerful system to identify additional therapeutic strategies and disease-relevant genes in CRC and possibly other solid tumors.

  11. Comparative Genome Analysis of Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals Genes Within Newly Identified High Variability Regions Associated With Drug Resistance Development

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Hsun-Cheng; Khatun, Jainab; Kanavy, Dona M.; Giddings, Morgan C.

    2013-01-01

    The alarming rise of ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been reported in several clinical studies. Though the mutation of resistance genes and their role in drug resistance has been researched, the process by which the bacterium acquires high-level resistance is still not well understood. How does the genomic evolution of P. aeruginosa affect resistance development? Could the exposure of antibiotics to the bacteria enrich genomic variants that lead to the development of resist...

  12. Comparative genome analysis of ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals genes within newly identified high variability regions associated with drug resistance development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hsun-Cheng; Khatun, Jainab; Kanavy, Dona M; Giddings, Morgan C

    2013-12-01

    The alarming rise of ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been reported in several clinical studies. Though the mutation of resistance genes and their role in drug resistance has been researched, the process by which the bacterium acquires high-level resistance is still not well understood. How does the genomic evolution of P. aeruginosa affect resistance development? Could the exposure of antibiotics to the bacteria enrich genomic variants that lead to the development of resistance, and if so, how are these variants distributed through the genome? To answer these questions, we performed 454 pyrosequencing and a whole genome analysis both before and after exposure to ciprofloxacin. The comparative sequence data revealed 93 unique resistance strain variation sites, which included a mutation in the DNA gyrase subunit A gene. We generated variation-distribution maps comparing the wild and resistant types, and isolated 19 candidates from three discrete resistance-associated high variability regions that had available transposon mutants, to perform a ciprofloxacin exposure assay. Of these region candidates with transposon disruptions, 79% (15/19) showed a reduction in the ability to gain high-level resistance, suggesting that genes within these high variability regions might enrich for certain functions associated with resistance development.

  13. Population structure of the NPGS Senegalese sorghum collection and its evaluation to identify new disease resistant genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo E Cuevas

    Full Text Available Sorghum germplasm from West and Central Africa is cultivated in rainy and high humidity regions and is an important source of resistance genes to fungal diseases. Mold and anthracnose are two important biotic constraints to sorghum production in wet areas worldwide. Here, 158 National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS accessions from Senegal were evaluated for agronomic traits, anthracnose, and grain mold resistance at two locations, and genetically characterized according to 20 simple sequence repeat markers. A total of 221 alleles were amplified with an average of 11 alleles per locus. Each accession had a unique genetic profile (i.e., no duplicates, and the average genetic distance between accessions was 0.42. Population structure and cluster analysis separated the collection into four populations with pairwise FST values >0.15. Three of the populations were composed of Guinea-race sorghum germplasm, and one included multiple races. Anthracnose resistant accessions were present at high frequency and evenly distributed among the three Guinea-race populations. Fourteen accessions showed resistance to grain mold, and eight were resistant to both diseases. These results indicated that the NPGS of Senegal is a genetically diverse collection with a high frequency of disease resistant accessions. Nevertheless, its population structure suggests the presence of few sources of resistance to both grain mold and anthracnose, which are fixed in the germplasm. The phenotypic and genotypic information for these accessions provides a valuable resource for its correct use to broaden the genetic base of breeding programs.

  14. Population structure of the NPGS Senegalese sorghum collection and its evaluation to identify new disease resistant genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Hugo E; Prom, Louis K; Rosa-Valentin, Giseiry

    2018-01-01

    Sorghum germplasm from West and Central Africa is cultivated in rainy and high humidity regions and is an important source of resistance genes to fungal diseases. Mold and anthracnose are two important biotic constraints to sorghum production in wet areas worldwide. Here, 158 National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) accessions from Senegal were evaluated for agronomic traits, anthracnose, and grain mold resistance at two locations, and genetically characterized according to 20 simple sequence repeat markers. A total of 221 alleles were amplified with an average of 11 alleles per locus. Each accession had a unique genetic profile (i.e., no duplicates), and the average genetic distance between accessions was 0.42. Population structure and cluster analysis separated the collection into four populations with pairwise FST values >0.15. Three of the populations were composed of Guinea-race sorghum germplasm, and one included multiple races. Anthracnose resistant accessions were present at high frequency and evenly distributed among the three Guinea-race populations. Fourteen accessions showed resistance to grain mold, and eight were resistant to both diseases. These results indicated that the NPGS of Senegal is a genetically diverse collection with a high frequency of disease resistant accessions. Nevertheless, its population structure suggests the presence of few sources of resistance to both grain mold and anthracnose, which are fixed in the germplasm. The phenotypic and genotypic information for these accessions provides a valuable resource for its correct use to broaden the genetic base of breeding programs.

  15. Transcriptome Analysis Identifies a 140 kb Region of Chromosome 3B Containing Genes Specific to Fusarium Head Blight Resistance in Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Li; Shengfu Zhong; Wanquan Chen; Syeda Akash Fatima; Qianglan Huang; Qing Li; Feiquan Tan; Peigao Luo

    2018-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), mainly caused by Fusarium graminearum, is one of the most destructive fungal diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Because of the quantitative nature of FHB resistance, its mechanism is poorly understood. We conducted a comparative transcriptome analysis to identify genes that are differentially expressed in FHB-resistant and FHB-susceptible wheat lines grown under field conditions for various periods after F. graminearum infection and determined the chromosoma...

  16. Biomphalaria glabrata transcriptome: cDNA microarray profiling identifies resistant- and susceptible-specific gene expression in haemocytes from snail strains exposed to Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rollinson David

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomphalaria glabrata is an intermediate snail host for Schistosoma mansoni, one of the important schistosomes infecting man. B. glabrata/S. mansoni provides a useful model system for investigating the intimate interactions between host and parasite. Examining differential gene expression between S. mansoni-exposed schistosome-resistant and susceptible snail lines will identify genes and pathways that may be involved in snail defences. Results We have developed a 2053 element cDNA microarray for B. glabrata containing clones from ORESTES (Open Reading frame ESTs libraries, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH libraries and clones identified in previous expression studies. Snail haemocyte RNA, extracted from parasite-challenged resistant and susceptible snails, 2 to 24 h post-exposure to S. mansoni, was hybridized to the custom made cDNA microarray and 98 differentially expressed genes or gene clusters were identified, 94 resistant-associated and 4 susceptible-associated. Quantitative PCR analysis verified the cDNA microarray results for representative transcripts. Differentially expressed genes were annotated and clustered using gene ontology (GO terminology and Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analysis. 61% of the identified differentially expressed genes have no known function including the 4 susceptible strain-specific transcripts. Resistant strain-specific expression of genes implicated in innate immunity of invertebrates was identified, including hydrolytic enzymes such as cathepsin L, a cysteine proteinase involved in lysis of phagocytosed particles; metabolic enzymes such as ornithine decarboxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of polyamines, important in inflammation and infection processes, as well as scavenging damaging free radicals produced during production of reactive oxygen species; stress response genes such as HSP70; proteins involved in signalling, such as importin 7

  17. Biomphalaria glabrata transcriptome: cDNA microarray profiling identifies resistant- and susceptible-specific gene expression in haemocytes from snail strains exposed to Schistosoma mansoni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Anne E; Spinks, Jenny; Kane, Richard A; Hoffmann, Karl F; Fitzpatrick, Jennifer M; Rollinson, David; Noble, Leslie R; Jones, Catherine S

    2008-01-01

    Background Biomphalaria glabrata is an intermediate snail host for Schistosoma mansoni, one of the important schistosomes infecting man. B. glabrata/S. mansoni provides a useful model system for investigating the intimate interactions between host and parasite. Examining differential gene expression between S. mansoni-exposed schistosome-resistant and susceptible snail lines will identify genes and pathways that may be involved in snail defences. Results We have developed a 2053 element cDNA microarray for B. glabrata containing clones from ORESTES (Open Reading frame ESTs) libraries, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries and clones identified in previous expression studies. Snail haemocyte RNA, extracted from parasite-challenged resistant and susceptible snails, 2 to 24 h post-exposure to S. mansoni, was hybridized to the custom made cDNA microarray and 98 differentially expressed genes or gene clusters were identified, 94 resistant-associated and 4 susceptible-associated. Quantitative PCR analysis verified the cDNA microarray results for representative transcripts. Differentially expressed genes were annotated and clustered using gene ontology (GO) terminology and Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. 61% of the identified differentially expressed genes have no known function including the 4 susceptible strain-specific transcripts. Resistant strain-specific expression of genes implicated in innate immunity of invertebrates was identified, including hydrolytic enzymes such as cathepsin L, a cysteine proteinase involved in lysis of phagocytosed particles; metabolic enzymes such as ornithine decarboxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of polyamines, important in inflammation and infection processes, as well as scavenging damaging free radicals produced during production of reactive oxygen species; stress response genes such as HSP70; proteins involved in signalling, such as importin 7 and copine 1

  18. Treponema pallidum Strain Types and Association with Macrolide Resistance in Sydney, Australia: New TP0548 Gene Types Identified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Phillip; Tagg, Kaitlin A; Jeoffreys, Neisha; Guy, Rebecca J; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Donovan, Basil

    2016-08-01

    Strain typing of Treponema pallidum, using the three-target enhanced classification scheme, was performed with 191 samples obtained between 2004 and 2011 in Sydney, Australia. The most common strain type was 14d/g (92/191 samples [48%]). Two new TP0548 gene types were detected (m and n). Strain type was associated with macrolide resistance and possible acquisition outside Australia. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Transcriptomic characterization of two major Fusarium resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs), Fhb1 and Qfhs.ifa-5A, identifies novel candidate genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Wolfgang; Steiner, Barbara; Ametz, Christian; Siegwart, Gerald; Wiesenberger, Gerlinde; Berthiller, Franz; Lemmens, Marc; Jia, Haiyan; Adam, Gerhard; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Kreil, David P; Buerstmayr, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a devastating disease of wheat. We developed near-isogenic lines (NILs) differing in the two strongest known F. graminearum resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs), Qfhs.ndsu-3BS (also known as resistance gene Fhb1) and Qfhs.ifa-5A, which are located on the short arm of chromosome 3B and on chromosome 5A, respectively. These NILs showing different levels of resistance were used to identify transcripts that are changed significantly in a QTL-specific manner in response to the pathogen and between mock-inoculated samples. After inoculation with F. graminearum spores, 16 transcripts showed a significantly different response for Fhb1 and 352 for Qfhs.ifa-5A. Notably, we identified a lipid transfer protein which is constitutively at least 50-fold more abundant in plants carrying the resistant allele of Qfhs.ifa-5A. In addition to this candidate gene associated with Qfhs.ifa-5A, we identified a uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glycosyltransferase gene, designated TaUGT12887, exhibiting a positive difference in response to the pathogen in lines harbouring both QTLs relative to lines carrying only the Qfhs.ifa-5A resistance allele, suggesting Fhb1 dependence of this transcript. Yet, this dependence was observed only in the NIL with already higher basal resistance. The complete cDNA of TaUGT12887 was reconstituted from available wheat genomic sequences, and a synthetic recoded gene was expressed in a toxin-sensitive strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This gene conferred deoxynivalenol resistance, albeit much weaker than that observed with the previously characterized barley HvUGT13248. PMID:23738863

  20. Estrogen induces apoptosis in estrogen deprivation-resistant breast cancer through stress responses as identified by global gene expression across time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariazi, Eric A; Cunliffe, Heather E; Lewis-Wambi, Joan S; Slifker, Michael J; Willis, Amanda L; Ramos, Pilar; Tapia, Coya; Kim, Helen R; Yerrum, Smitha; Sharma, Catherine G N; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Ross, Eric A; Jordan, V Craig

    2011-11-22

    In laboratory studies, acquired resistance to long-term antihormonal therapy in breast cancer evolves through two phases over 5 y. Phase I develops within 1 y, and tumor growth occurs with either 17β-estradiol (E(2)) or tamoxifen. Phase II resistance develops after 5 y of therapy, and tamoxifen still stimulates growth; however, E(2) paradoxically induces apoptosis. This finding is the basis for the clinical use of estrogen to treat advanced antihormone-resistant breast cancer. We interrogated E(2)-induced apoptosis by analysis of gene expression across time (2-96 h) in MCF-7 cell variants that were estrogen-dependent (WS8) or resistant to estrogen deprivation and refractory (2A) or sensitive (5C) to E(2)-induced apoptosis. We developed a method termed differential area under the curve analysis that identified genes uniquely regulated by E(2) in 5C cells compared with both WS8 and 2A cells and hence, were associated with E(2)-induced apoptosis. Estrogen signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), and inflammatory response genes were overrepresented among the 5C-specific genes. The identified ERS genes indicated that E(2) inhibited protein folding, translation, and fatty acid synthesis. Meanwhile, the ERS-associated apoptotic genes Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death (BIM; BCL2L11) and caspase-4 (CASP4), among others, were induced. Evaluation of a caspase peptide inhibitor panel showed that the CASP4 inhibitor z-LEVD-fmk was the most active at blocking E(2)-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, z-LEVD-fmk completely prevented poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, E(2)-inhibited growth, and apoptotic morphology. The up-regulated proinflammatory genes included IL, IFN, and arachidonic acid-related genes. Functional testing showed that arachidonic acid and E(2) interacted to superadditively induce apoptosis. Therefore, these data indicate that E(2) induced apoptosis through ERS and inflammatory responses in advanced antihormone-resistant breast cancer.

  1. Deriving isolates of powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis DC. f.sp. avenae Em. Marchal. in common oat (Avena sativa L. and using them to identify selected resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Okoń

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew in common oat is caused by Blumeria graminis DC. f.sp. avenae Em. Marchal. Host-pathogen tests are commonly used to identify and locate resistance genes to powdery mildew in cereals. The aim of the study was to determine the virulence of powdery mildew isolates obtained from powdery mildew populations harvested in Poland and to identify OMR1, OMR2 and OMR3 resistance genes to powdery mildew in F2 populations of inter-cultivar hybrids of common oat: Bruno × Fuchs, Jumbo × Fuchs and Mostyn × Fuchs. On the basis of the analysis conducted, isolates enabling division of the studied populations into groups of resistant and susceptible plants were selected. M10 and M14 isolates were chosen for the population which was obtained from crossbreeding of ‘Bruno’ with ‘Fuchs’; these isolates demonstrated avirulence to Bruno cultivar containing OMR1 gene. In order to divide population obtained from crossbreeding of ‘Jumbo’ with ‘Fuchs’, M13 and M16 isolates were chosen; they demonstrated avirulence to the cultivar Jumbo containing the OMR2 gene. On the basis of the tests conducted, it was impossible to select isolates characterised by avirulence to the OMR3 gene. In the F2 population of Bruno × Fuchs and Jumbo × Fuchs hybrids, a division was made into resistant and susceptible plants. The obtained results were verified by the 2 test; the proportion in the dispersion matching model was found to be 3 resistant plants: 1 sensitive plant both in the Bruno × Fuchs and Jumbo × Fuchs populations. Such dispersion indicated that the resistance to powdery mildew in the studied cultivars Bruno and Jumbo was conditioned by single dominant genes.

  2. Gene expression profiling identifies FYN as an important molecule in tamoxifen resistance and a predictor of early recurrence in patients treated with endocrine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, D; (Hansen) Vever, Henriette; Lænkholm, A-V

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer, we performed gene array analyses and identified 366 genes with altered expression in four unique tamoxifen-resistant (TamR) cell lines vs the parental tamoxifen-sensitive MCF-7/S0.5 cell line. Most of these genes were...... functionally linked to cell proliferation, death and control of gene expression, and include FYN, PRKCA, ITPR1, DPYD, DACH1, LYN, GBP1 and PRLR. Treatment with FYN-specific small interfering RNA or a SRC family kinase inhibitor reduced cell growth of TamR cell lines while exerting no significant effect on MCF...... in primary breast tumors from two cohorts of endocrine-treated ER+ breast cancer patients, one with advanced disease (N=47) and the other with early disease (N=76), showed that in the former, plasma membrane-associated FYN expression strongly correlated with longer progression-free survival (P

  3. Exploiting regulatory variation to identify genes underlying quantitative resistance to the wheat stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druka, Arnis; Potokina, Elena; Luo, Zewei; Bonar, Nicola; Druka, Ilze; Zhang, Ling; Marshall, David F; Steffenson, Brian J; Close, Timothy J; Wise, Roger P; Kleinhofs, Andris; Williams, Robert W; Kearsey, Michael J; Waugh, Robbie

    2008-07-01

    We previously mapped mRNA transcript abundance traits (expression-QTL or eQTL) using the Barley1 Affymetrix array and 'whole plant' tissue from 139 progeny of the Steptoe x Morex (St/Mx) reference barley mapping population. Of the 22,840 probesets (genes) on the array, 15,987 reported transcript abundance signals that were suitable for eQTL analysis, and this revealed a genome-wide distribution of 23,738 significant eQTLs. Here we have explored the potential of using these mRNA abundance eQTL traits as surrogates for the identification of candidate genes underlying the interaction between barley and the wheat stem rust fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici. We re-analysed quantitative 'resistance phenotype' data collected on this population in 1990/1991 and identified six loci associated with barley's reaction to stem rust. One of these coincided with the major stem rust resistance locus Rpg1, that we had previously positionally cloned using this population. Correlation analysis between phenotype values for rust infection and mRNA abundance values reported by the 22,840 GeneChip probe sets placed Rpg1, which is on the Barley1 GeneChip, in the top five candidate genes for the major QTL on chromosome 7H corresponding to the location of Rpg1. A second co-located with the rpg4/Rpg5 stem rust resistance locus that has been mapped in a different population and the remaining four were novel. Correlation analyses identified candidate genes for the rpg4/Rpg5 locus on chromosome 5H. By combining our data with additional published mRNA profiling data sets, we identify a putative sensory transduction histidine kinase as a strong candidate for a novel resistance locus on chromosome 2H and compile candidate gene lists for the other three loci.

  4. Overexpression of Three Glucosinolate Biosynthesis Genes in Brassica napus Identifies Enhanced Resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Zhang

    Full Text Available Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea are notorious plant pathogenic fungi with an extensive host range including Brassica crops. Glucosinolates (GSLs are an important group of secondary metabolites characteristic of the Brassicales order, whose degradation products are proving to be increasingly important in plant protection. Enhancing the defense effect of GSL and their associated degradation products is an attractive strategy to strengthen the resistance of plants by transgenic approaches. We generated the lines of Brassica napus with three biosynthesis genes involved in GSL metabolic pathway (BnMAM1, BnCYP83A1 and BnUGT74B1, respectively. We then measured the foliar GSLs of each transgenic lines and inoculated them with S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea. Compared with the wild type control, over-expressing BnUGT74B1 in B. napus increased the aliphatic and indolic GSL levels by 1.7 and 1.5 folds in leaves respectively; while over-expressing BnMAM1 or BnCYP83A1 resulted in an approximate 1.5-fold higher only in the aliphatic GSL level in leaves. The results of plant inoculation demonstrated that BnUGT74B1-overexpressing lines showed less severe disease symptoms and tissue damage compared with the wild type control, but BnMAM1 or BnCYP83A1-overexpressing lines showed no significant difference in comparison to the controls. These results suggest that the resistance to S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea in B. napus could be enhanced through tailoring the GSL profiles by transgenic approaches or molecular breeding, which provides useful information to assist plant breeders to design improved breeding strategies.

  5. High throughput phenotypic selection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutants with impaired resistance to reactive oxygen species identifies genes important for intracellular growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mestre

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis has the remarkable capacity to survive within the hostile environment of the macrophage, and to resist potent antibacterial molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS. Thus, understanding mycobacterial resistance mechanisms against ROS may contribute to the development of new anti-tuberculosis therapies. Here we identified genes involved in such mechanisms by screening a high-density transposon mutant library, and we show that several of them are involved in the intracellular lifestyle of the pathogen. Many of these genes were found to play a part in cell envelope functions, further strengthening the important role of the mycobacterial cell envelope in protection against aggressions such as the ones caused by ROS inside host cells.

  6. NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Research News From NIH NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of ... gene variant that doubles an individual's risk for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The new functional variant, or allele, is ...

  7. Klebsiella pneumoniae antibiotic resistance identified by atomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In particular, we studied Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria provided by the Lavagna Hospital ASL4Liguria (Italy), where there are cases linked with antibiotics resistance of the Klebsiella pneumoniae. By comparing AFMimages of bacteria strains treated with different antibiotics is possible to identify unambiguously the ...

  8. QTLminer: identifying genes regulating quantitative traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schughart Klaus

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping identifies genomic regions that likely contain genes regulating a quantitative trait. However, QTL regions may encompass tens to hundreds of genes. To find the most promising candidate genes that regulate the trait, the biologist typically collects information from multiple resources about the genes in the QTL interval. This process is very laborious and time consuming. Results QTLminer is a bioinformatics tool that automatically performs QTL region analysis. It is available in GeneNetwork and it integrates information such as gene annotation, gene expression and sequence polymorphisms for all the genes within a given genomic interval. Conclusions QTLminer substantially speeds up discovery of the most promising candidate genes within a QTL region.

  9. Identifying Cancer Driver Genes Using Replication-Incompetent Retroviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Bii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying novel genes that drive tumor metastasis and drug resistance has significant potential to improve patient outcomes. High-throughput sequencing approaches have identified cancer genes, but distinguishing driver genes from passengers remains challenging. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have emerged as a powerful tool to identify cancer genes. Unlike replicating retroviruses and transposons, replication-incompetent retroviral vectors lack additional mutagenesis events that can complicate the identification of driver mutations from passenger mutations. They can also be used for almost any human cancer due to the broad tropism of the vectors. Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have the ability to dysregulate nearby cancer genes via several mechanisms including enhancer-mediated activation of gene promoters. The integrated provirus acts as a unique molecular tag for nearby candidate driver genes which can be rapidly identified using well established methods that utilize next generation sequencing and bioinformatics programs. Recently, retroviral vector screens have been used to efficiently identify candidate driver genes in prostate, breast, liver and pancreatic cancers. Validated driver genes can be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. In this review, we describe the emergence of retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors as a novel tool to identify cancer driver genes in different cancer types.

  10. Evaluation of sequence ambiguities of the HIV-1 pol gene as a method to identify recent HIV-1 infection in transmitted drug resistance surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Emmi; Shao, Wei; Bontell, Irene; Cham, Fatim; Cuong, Do Duy; Wondwossen, Amogne; Morris, Lynn; Hunt, Gillian; Sönnerborg, Anders; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Maldarelli, Frank; Jordan, Michael R

    2013-08-01

    Identification of recent HIV infection within populations is a public health priority for accurate estimation of HIV incidence rates and transmitted drug resistance at population level. Determining HIV incidence rates by prospective follow-up of HIV-uninfected individuals is challenging and serological assays have important limitations. HIV diversity within an infected host increases with duration of infection. We explore a simple bioinformatics approach to assess viral diversity by determining the percentage of ambiguous base calls in sequences derived from standard genotyping of HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase. Sequences from 691 recently infected (≤1 year) and chronically infected (>1 year) individuals from Sweden, Vietnam and Ethiopia were analyzed for ambiguity. A significant difference (p<0.0001) in the proportion of ambiguous bases was observed between sequences from individuals with recent and chronic infection in both HIV-1 subtype B and non-B infection, consistent with previous studies. In our analysis, a cutoff of <0.47% ambiguous base calls identified recent infection with a sensitivity and specificity of 88.8% and 74.6% respectively. 1,728 protease and reverse transcriptase sequences from 36 surveys of transmitted HIV drug resistance performed following World Health Organization guidance were analyzed for ambiguity. The 0.47% ambiguity cutoff was applied and survey sequences were classified as likely derived from recently or chronically infected individuals. 71% of patients were classified as likely to have been infected within one year of genotyping but results varied considerably amongst surveys. This bioinformatics approach may provide supporting population-level information to identify recent infection but its application is limited by infection with more than one viral variant, decreasing viral diversity in advanced disease and technical aspects of population based sequencing. Standardization of sequencing techniques and base calling

  11. Fine mapping of a dominantly inherited powdery mildew resistance major-effect QTL, Pm1.1, in cucumber identifies a 41.1 kb region containing two tandemly arrayed cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuewen; Yu, Ting; Xu, Ruixue; Shi, Yang; Lin, Xiaojian; Xu, Qiang; Qi, Xiaohua; Weng, Yiqun; Chen, Xuehao

    2016-03-01

    A dominantly inherited major-effect QTL for powdery mildew resistance in cucumber was fine mapped. Two tandemly arrayed cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase genes were identified as the most possible candidates. Powdery mildew (PM) is one of the most severe fungal diseases of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) and other cucurbit crops, but the molecular genetic mechanisms of powdery mildew resistance in cucurbits are still poorly understood. In this study, through marker-assisted backcrossing with an elite cucumber inbred line, D8 (PM susceptible), we developed a single-segment substitution line, SSSL0.7, carrying 95 kb fragment from PM resistance donor, Jin5-508, that was defined by two microsatellite markers, SSR16472 and SSR16881. A segregating population with 3600 F2 plants was developed from the SSSL0.7 × D8 mating; segregation analysis confirmed a dominantly inherited major-effect QTL, Pm1.1 in cucumber chromosome 1 underlying PM resistance in SSSL0.7. New molecular markers were developed through exploring the next generation resequenced genomes of Jin5-508 and D8. Linkage analysis and QTL mapping in a subset of the F2 plants delimited the Pm1.1 locus into a 41.1 kb region, in which eight genes were predicted. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed that two concatenated genes, Csa1M064780 and Csa1M064790 encoding the same function of a cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase, were the most likely candidate genes. GFP fusion protein-aided subcellular localization indicated that both candidate genes were located in the plasma membrane, but Csa1M064780 was also found in the nucleus. This is the first report of dominantly inherited PM resistance in cucumber. Results of this study will provide new insights into understanding the phenotypic and genetic mechanisms of PM resistance in cucumber. This work should also facilitate marker-assisted selection in cucumber breeding for PM resistance.

  12. Comparison of constitutive and thiabendazole-induced expression of five cytochrome P450 genes in fourth-stage larvae of Haemonchus contortus isolates with different drug susceptibility identifies one gene with high constitutive expression in a multi-resistant isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Esra; Ramünke, Sabrina; Demeler, Janina; Krücken, Jürgen

    2017-12-01

    Benzimidazoles (BZs) remain amongst the most widely used anthelmintic drug classes against gastro-intestinal nematode infections, although their efficacy is increasingly compromised by resistance. The primary underlying mechanisms for BZ resistance are single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the isotype 1 β-tubulin gene causing the substitutions F167Y, E198A or F200Y. However, resistance is believed to be multi-genic and previous studies have shown that isolates carrying 90-100% F200Y can vary considerably in their resistance level in the egg hatch assay (EHA). Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs) are associated with drug resistance in mammals and arthropods and have been considered as mediators of anthelmintic resistance. In Caenorhabditis elegans, several members of the CYP34/35 and CYP31 families are BZ and/or xenobiotic inducible and thiabendazole (TBZ) is metabolised by CYP35D1. Here, expression of all 5 CYPs closely related to the C. elegans CYP34/35 and CYP31 families was investigated in fourth-stage larvae of two susceptible and three BZ-resistant Haemonchus contortus isolates following in vitro exposure to TBZ for 3 and 6 h using real-time RT-PCR. The resistance status of all isolates was determined using EHAs and quantification of resistance-associated β-tubulin SNPs using pyrosequencing. While none of the CYPs was TBZ inducible, constitutive expression of CYP34/35 family member HCOI100383400 was significantly 2.4-3.7-fold higher in the multi-drug resistant WR isolate with the strongest BZ resistance phenotype compared to susceptible and intermediate-level BZ-resistant isolates. Although this increase is only moderate, HCOI100383400 might still be involved in high-level BZ resistance by further decreasing susceptibility in isolates already carrying 100% of a β-tubulin SNP causing BZ resistance. Lower transcript levels were observed for all CYPs in the intermediately resistant IRE isolate in comparison to the susceptible HcH isolate, which, except

  13. New resistance genes in the Zea mays: exserohilum turcicum pathosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Bernardi Ogliari

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of monogenic race-specific resistance is widespread for the control of maize (Zea mays L. helminthosporiosis caused by Exserohilum turcicum. Inoculation of 18 Brazilian isolates of E. turcicum onto elite maize lines containing previously identified resistance genes and onto differential near-isogenic lines allowed the identification of new qualitative resistance genes. The inoculation of one selected isolate on differential near-isogenic lines, F1 generations and a BC1F1 population from the referred elite lines enabled the characterization of the resistance spectrum of three new genes, one dominant (HtP, one recessive (rt and a third with non-identified genetic action. Three physiological races of the pathogen were also identified including two with new virulence factors capable of overcoming the resistance of one of the resistance genes identified here (rt.

  14. Differential gene expression before and after ionizing radiation of subcutaneous fibroblasts identifies breast cancer patients resistant to radiation-induced fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsner, Jan; Rødningen, Olaug K.; Overgaard, Jens

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Differentially gene expression between patients with either very low or very high risk of radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) in patient-derived fibroblasts after irradiation has previously been reported. In the present study, we are investigating the robustness of radiation...... and changes in radiation-induced gene expression in fibroblasts. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Gene expression was analysed by quantitative real-time PCR before and after a fractionated scheme with 3x3.5Gy/3 days in fibroblasts derived from 26 patients with breast cancer treated with post-mastectomy radiotherapy....... RESULTS: Robust radiation-induced changes in gene expression were observed, with differential gene expression between low and high risk patients being most pronounced for the fold induction level ('after' value divided by 'before' value for each patient). When including patients with intermediate risk...

  15. Obesity genes and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, Anna C; Denis, Gerald V

    2010-10-01

    The exploding prevalence of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) linked to obesity has become an alarming public health concern. Worldwide, approximately 171 million people suffer from obesity-induced diabetes and public health authorities expect this situation to deteriorate rapidly. An interesting clinical population of 'metabolically healthy but obese' (MHO) cases is relatively protected from T2D and its associated cardiovascular risk. The molecular basis for this protection is not well understood but is likely to involve reduced inflammatory responses. The inflammatory cells and pathways that respond to overnutrition are the primary subject matter for this review. The chance discovery of a genetic mutation in the Brd2 gene, which is located in the class II major histocompatibility complex and makes mice enormously fat but protects them from diabetes, offers revolutionary new insights into the cellular mechanisms that link obesity to insulin resistance and T2D. These Brd2-hypomorphic mice have reduced inflammation in fat that is normally associated with insulin resistance, and resemble MHO patients, suggesting novel therapeutic pathways for obese patients at risk for T2D. Deeper understanding of the functional links between genes that control inflammatory responses to diet-induced obesity is crucial to the development of therapies for obese, insulin-resistant patients.

  16. Occurrence of integrons and resistance genes among sulphonamide-resistant Shigella spp. from Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peirano, G.; Agersø, Yvonne; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the occurrence of class 1 and 2 integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes among sulphonamide-resistant Shigella strains isolated in Brazil during 1999-2003. Methods: Sixty-two Shigella (Shigella flexneri, n = 47 and Shigella sonnei, n = 15) were tested against 21....... Conclusions: The detection of class 1 and 2 integrons and additional antimicrobial resistance genes allowed us to identify the most frequent antimicrobial resistance patterns of Shigella spp. isolated in Brazil....

  17. The cfr and cfr-like multiple resistance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Birte

    2018-01-01

    . The cfr gene is found in various bacteria in many geographical locations and placed on plasmids or associated with transposons. Cfr-related genes providing similar resistance have been identified in Bacillales, and now also in the pathogens Clostridium difficile and Enterococcus faecium. In addition......, the presence of the cfr gene has been detected in harbours and food markets....

  18. Klebsiella pneumoniae antibiotic resistance identified by atomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vincenzo Ierardi

    2017-10-03

    Oct 3, 2017 ... In the last decade the detection of the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics treatment, developed by different kind of bacteria, is becoming a huge problem. We hereby present a different approach to the current problem of detection of bacteria resistance to antibiotics. Our aims were to use the atomic force ...

  19. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer-associated somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are known. Currently, one of the challenges is to identify the molecular downstream effects of these variants. Although several SCNAs are known to change gene expression levels, it is not clear whether each individual SCNA affects gen...

  20. Complex Interactions between Fungal Avirulence Genes and Their Corresponding Plant Resistance Genes and Consequences for Disease Resistance Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohann Petit-Houdenot

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available During infection, pathogens secrete an arsenal of molecules, collectively called effectors, key elements of pathogenesis which modulate innate immunity of the plant and facilitate infection. Some of these effectors can be recognized directly or indirectly by resistance (R proteins from the plant and are then called avirulence (AVR proteins. This recognition usually triggers defense responses including the hypersensitive response and results in resistance of the plant. R—AVR gene interactions are frequently exploited in the field to control diseases. Recently, the availability of fungal genomes has accelerated the identification of AVR genes in plant pathogenic fungi, including in fungi infecting agronomically important crops. While single AVR genes recognized by their corresponding R gene were identified, more and more complex interactions between AVR and R genes are reported (e.g., AVR genes recognized by several R genes, R genes recognizing several AVR genes in distinct organisms, one AVR gene suppressing recognition of another AVR gene by its corresponding R gene, two cooperating R genes both necessary to recognize an AVR gene. These complex interactions were particularly reported in pathosystems showing a long co-evolution with their host plant but could also result from the way agronomic crops were obtained and improved (e.g., through interspecific hybridization or introgression of resistance genes from wild related species into cultivated crops. In this review, we describe some complex R—AVR interactions between plants and fungi that were recently reported and discuss their implications for AVR gene evolution and R gene management.

  1. Barley Stem Rust Resistance Genes: Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andris Kleinhofs

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Rusts are biotrophic pathogens that attack many plant species but are particularly destructive on cereal crops. The stem rusts (caused by have historically caused severe crop losses and continue to threaten production today. Barley ( L. breeders have controlled major stem rust epidemics since the 1940s with a single durable resistance gene . As new epidemics have threatened, additional resistance genes were identified to counter new rust races, such as the complex locus against races QCCJ and TTKSK. To understand how these genes work, we initiated research to clone and characterize them. The gene encodes a unique protein kinase with dual kinase domains, an active kinase, and a pseudokinase. Function of both domains is essential to confer resistance. The and genes are closely linked and function coordinately to confer resistance to several wheat ( L. stem rust races, including the race TTKSK (also called Ug99 that threatens the world's barley and wheat crops. The gene encodes typical resistance gene domains NBS, LRR, and protein kinase but is unique in that all three domains reside in a single gene, a previously unknown structure among plant disease resistance genes. The gene encodes an actin depolymerizing factor that functions in cytoskeleton rearrangement.

  2. Identifying candidate driver genes by integrative ovarian cancer genomics data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinguo; Lu, Jibo

    2017-08-01

    Integrative analysis of molecular mechanics underlying cancer can distinguish interactions that cannot be revealed based on one kind of data for the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients. Tumor samples exhibit heterogeneity in omics data, such as somatic mutations, Copy Number Variations CNVs), gene expression profiles and so on. In this paper we combined gene co-expression modules and mutation modulators separately in tumor patients to obtain the candidate driver genes for resistant and sensitive tumor from the heterogeneous data. The final list of modulators identified are well known in biological processes associated with ovarian cancer, such as CCL17, CACTIN, CCL16, CCL22, APOB, KDF1, CCL11, HNF1B, LRG1, MED1 and so on, which can help to facilitate the discovery of biomarkers, molecular diagnostics, and drug discovery.

  3. Mobile antibiotic resistance – the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Godziszewska

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  4. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-07-07

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  5. Klebsiella pneumoniae antibiotic resistance identified by atomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the last decade the detection of the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics treatment, developed by different kind of bacteria,is becoming a huge problem. We hereby present a different approach to the current problem of detection of bacteriaresistance to antibiotics. Our aims were to use the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to ...

  6. Mapping fusiform rust resistance genes within a complex mating design of loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tania Quesada; Marcio F.R. Resende Jr.; Patricio Munoz; Jill L. Wegrzyn; David B. Neale; Matias Kirst; Gary F. Peter; Salvador A. Gezan; C.Dana Nelson; John M. Davis

    2014-01-01

    Fusiform rust resistance can involve gene-for-gene interactions where resistance (Fr) genes in the host interact with corresponding avirulence genes in the pathogen, Cronartium quercuum f.sp. fusiforme (Cqf). Here, we identify trees with Fr genes in a loblolly pine population derived from a complex mating design challenged with two Cqf inocula (one gall and 10 gall...

  7. Identifying Coevolving Partners from Paralogous Gene Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Hsiang Yeang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Many methods have been developed to detect coevolution from aligned sequences. However, all the existing methods require a one-to-one mapping of candidate coevolving partners (nucleotides, amino acids a priori. When two families of sequences have distinct duplication and loss histories, finding the one-to-one mapping of coevolving partners can be computationally involved. We propose an algorithm to identify the coevolving partners from two families of sequences with distinct phylogenetic trees. The algorithm maps each gene tree to a reference species tree, and builds a joint state of sequence composition and assignments of coevolving partners for each species tree node. By applying dynamic programming on the joint states, the optimal assignments can be identified. Time complexity is quadratic to the size of the species tree, and space complexity is exponential to the maximum number of gene tree nodes mapped to the same species tree node. Analysis on both simulated data and Pfam protein domain sequences demonstrates that the paralog coevolution algorithm picks up the coevolving partners with 60%–88% accuracy. This algorithm extends phylogeny-based coevolutionary models and make them applicable to a wide range of problems such as predicting protein-protein, protein-DNA and DNA-RNA interactions of two distinct families of sequences.

  8. Overexpression of antibiotic resistance genes in hospital effluents over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Will P M; Baker-Austin, Craig; Verner-Jeffreys, David W; Ryan, Jim J; Micallef, Christianne; Maskell, Duncan J; Pearce, Gareth P

    2017-06-01

    Effluents contain a diverse abundance of antibiotic resistance genes that augment the resistome of receiving aquatic environments. However, uncertainty remains regarding their temporal persistence, transcription and response to anthropogenic factors, such as antibiotic usage. We present a spatiotemporal study within a river catchment (River Cam, UK) that aims to determine the contribution of antibiotic resistance gene-containing effluents originating from sites of varying antibiotic usage to the receiving environment. Gene abundance in effluents (municipal hospital and dairy farm) was compared against background samples of the receiving aquatic environment (i.e. the catchment source) to determine the resistome contribution of effluents. We used metagenomics and metatranscriptomics to correlate DNA and RNA abundance and identified differentially regulated gene transcripts. We found that mean antibiotic resistance gene and transcript abundances were correlated for both hospital ( ρ  = 0.9, two-tailed P  resistance genes ( bla GES and bla OXA ) were overexpressed in all hospital effluent samples. High β-lactam resistance gene transcript abundance was related to hospital antibiotic usage over time and hospital effluents contained antibiotic residues. We conclude that effluents contribute high levels of antibiotic resistance genes to the aquatic environment; these genes are expressed at significant levels and are possibly related to the level of antibiotic usage at the effluent source. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  9. Detection of bacterial blight resistance genes in basmati rice landraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, I; Jamil, S; Iqbal, M Z; Shaheen, H L; Hasni, S M; Jabeen, S; Mehmood, A; Akhter, M

    2012-07-20

    Aromatic basmati rice is vulnerable to bacterial blight disease. Genes conferring resistance to bacterial blight have been identified in coarse rice; however, their incorporation into basmati varieties compromises the prized basmati aroma. We identified bacterial blight resistance genes Xa4, xa5, Xa7, and xa13 in 52 basmati landraces and five basmati cultivars using PCR markers. The Xa7 gene was found to be the most prevalent among the cultivars and landraces. The cultivars Basmati-385 and Basmati-2000 also contained the Xa4 gene; however, xa5 and xa13 were confined to landraces only. Ten landraces were found to have multiple resistance genes. Landraces Basmati-106, Basmati-189 and Basmati-208 contained Xa4 and Xa7 genes. Whereas, landraces Basmati-122, Basmati-427, Basmati-433 were observed to have xa5 and Xa7 genes. Landraces Basmati-48, Basmati-51A, Basmati-334, and Basmati-370A possessed Xa7 and xa13 genes. The use of landraces containing recessive genes xa5 and xa13 as donor parents in hybridization with cultivars Basmati-385 and Basmati-2000, which contain the genes Xa4 and Xa7, will expedite efforts to develop bacterial blight-resistant basmati rice cultivars through marker assisted selection, based on a pyramiding approach, without compromising aroma and grain quality.

  10. Sponge Microbiota are a Reservoir of Functional Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versluis, Dennis; de Evgrafov, Mari Cristina Rodriguez; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Wide application of antibiotics has contributed to the evolution of multi-drug resistant human pathogens, resulting in poorer treatment outcomes for infections. In the marine environment, seawater samples have been investigated as a resistance reservoir; however, no studies have methodically...... examined sponges as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance. Sponges could be important in this respect because they often contain diverse microbial communities that have the capacity to produce bioactive metabolites. Here, we applied functional metagenomics to study the presence and diversity of functional......). Fifteen of 37 inserts harbored resistance genes that shared resistance gene could be identified with high confidence, in which case we predicted resistance to be mainly mediated by antibiotic efflux. One marine-specific ampicillin-resistance...

  11. Identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in multidrug-resistant clinical Bacteroides fragilis isolates by whole genome shotgun sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Thomas Vognbjerg; Sóki, József; Hasman, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis constitutes the most frequent anaerobic bacterium causing bacteremia in humans. The genetic background for antimicrobial resistance in B. fragilis is diverse with some genes requiring insertion sequence (IS) elements inserted upstream for increased expression. To evaluate whole...... genome shotgun sequencing as a method for predicting antimicrobial resistance properties, one meropenem resistant and five multidrug-resistant blood culture isolates were sequenced and antimicrobial resistance genes and IS elements identified using ResFinder 2.1 (http...

  12. Transposon activation mutagenesis as a screening tool for identifying resistance to cancer therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Li; Schmidt, Emmett V; Stuart, Lynda; Ohsumi, Toshiro K; Burgess, Shawn; Varshney, Gaurav K; Dastur, Anahita; Borowsky, Mark; Benes, Cyril; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The development of resistance to chemotherapies represents a significant barrier to successful cancer treatment. Resistance mechanisms are complex, can involve diverse and often unexpected cellular processes, and can vary with both the underlying genetic lesion and the origin or type of tumor. For these reasons developing experimental strategies that could be used to understand, identify and predict mechanisms of resistance in different malignant cells would be a major advance. Here we describe a gain-of-function forward genetic approach for identifying mechanisms of resistance. This approach uses a modified piggyBac transposon to generate libraries of mutagenized cells, each containing transposon insertions that randomly activate nearby gene expression. Genes of interest are identified using next-gen high-throughput sequencing and barcode multiplexing is used to reduce experimental cost. Using this approach we successfully identify genes involved in paclitaxel resistance in a variety of cancer cell lines, including the multidrug transporter ABCB1, a previously identified major paclitaxel resistance gene. Analysis of co-occurring transposons integration sites in single cell clone allows for the identification of genes that might act cooperatively to produce drug resistance a level of information not accessible using RNAi or ORF expression screening approaches. We have developed a powerful pipeline to systematically discover drug resistance in mammalian cells in vitro. This cost-effective approach can be readily applied to different cell lines, to identify canonical or context specific resistance mechanisms. Its ability to probe complex genetic context and non-coding genomic elements as well as cooperative resistance events makes it a good complement to RNAi or ORF expression based screens

  13. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  14. Plasmids carrying antimicrobial resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozwandowicz, M.; Brouwer, M.S.M.; Fischer, J.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Gonzalez-Zorn, B.; Guerra, B.; Mevius, D.J.; Hordijk, J.

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is constantly evolving and horizontal gene transfer through plasmids plays a major role. The identification of plasmid characteristics and their association with different bacterial hosts provides crucial knowledge that is essential to understand the

  15. Cancer therapeutic target genes identified on chromosome 20q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An integrated quantitative genome data analysis was recently able to pinpoint 18 genes on human chromosome 20q that could potentially serve as novel molecular targets for cancer therapy. Researchers Antoine M Snijders and Jian-Hua Mao from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Biological Systems and Engineering Division in Berkeley, California, United States, in their study published by the journal Advances in Modern Oncology Research (AMOR sought to compare the amounts of individual mRNAs – messenger RNAs that specify the amino acid sequence of the protein products of gene expression – in cancerous human tissues with corresponding normal tissues. The duo conducted a meta-analysis of genes on chromosome 20q that are found to be consistently upregulated across different human tumor types, while collecting gene transcript data of normal and tumor tissues across 11 different tumor types including brain, breast, colon, gastric, head and neck, liver, lung, ovarian, cervix, pancreas, and prostate cancers. “We calculated the differential expression of all 301 genes present on chromosome 20q for which gene transcript data was available. We then filtered for genes that were upregulated in tumors by at least 1.5 fold (p < 0.05 in seven or more tumor types,” they said. The resulting analysis identified 18 genes – some such as AURKA, UBE2C, TPX2, FAM83D, ZNF217, SALL4 and MMP9 have been previously known to potentially cause cancer. The 18-gene signature is revealed by the study to have robustly elevated levels across human cancers. “We observed significant association of our signature with disease-free survival in all 18 independent data… These data indicated that our signature is broadly predictive for disease-free survival, independent of tumor type,” the researchers said. In certain cases, Snijders and Mao found that increased gene expression was associated with better prognosis. “For example, the increased expressions of MMP9 and

  16. Identification of acquired antimicrobial resistance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zankari, Ea; Hasman, Henrik; Cosentino, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    ObjectivesIdentification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic laborato......ObjectivesIdentification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic...... laboratories and is anticipated to substitute traditional methods for resistance gene identification. Thus, the current challenge is to extract the relevant information from the large amount of generated data.MethodsWe developed a web-based method, ResFinder that uses BLAST for identification of acquired...... antimicrobial resistance genes in whole-genome data. As input, the method can use both pre-assembled, complete or partial genomes, and short sequence reads from four different sequencing platforms. The method was evaluated on 1862 GenBank files containing 1411 different resistance genes, as well as on 23 de...

  17. Distribution of Florfenicol Resistance Genes fexA and cfr among Chloramphenicol-Resistant Staphylococcus Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrenberg, Corinna; Schwarz, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    A total of 302 chloramphenicol-resistant Staphylococcus isolates were screened for the presence of the florfenicol/chloramphenicol resistance genes fexA and cfr and their localization on mobile genetic elements. Of the 114 isolates from humans, only a single Staphylococcus aureus isolate showed an elevated MIC to florfenicol, but did not carry either of the known resistance genes, cfr or fexA. In contrast, 11 of the 188 staphylococci from animal sources were considered florfenicol resistant and carried either cfr (one isolate), fexA (five isolates), or both resistance genes (five isolates). In nine cases we confirmed that these genes were carried on a plasmid. Five different types of plasmids could be differentiated on the basis of their sizes, restriction patterns, and resistance genes. The gene fexA, which has previously been shown to be part of the nonconjugative transposon Tn558, was identified in 10 of the 11 resistant isolates from animals. PCR assays were developed to detect different parts of this transposon as well as their physical linkage. Complete copies of Tn558 were found in five different isolates and shown by inverse PCR to be functionally active. Truncated copies of Tn558, in which the tnpA-tnpB area was in part deleted by the integration of a 4,674-bp segment including the gene cfr and a novel 2,446-bp IS21-like insertion sequence, were seen in a plasmid present in three staphylococcal isolates. PMID:16569824

  18. Tagging of resistance gene(s) to rhizomania disease in sugar beet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rhizomania disease is one of the most important diseases in Iran and some other parts of the world which potentially could play a role in decreasing sugar yield in fields. One approach to combat with this disease is the use of resistance varieties. This varieties have been identified which are having resistance genes to ...

  19. Exploring Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Metal Resistance Genes in Plasmid Metagenomes from Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Dong eLi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer, they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge and digested sludge of two wastewater treatment plants. Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes and metal resistance genes (23 out of a total 23 types on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs than the activated sludge and the digested sludge metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in wastewater treatment plants could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes.

  20. Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes from antibiotic producers to pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinglin; Ellabaan, Mostafa M Hashim; Charusanti, Pep

    2017-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that some antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) found in pathogenic bacteria derive from antibiotic-producing actinobacteria. Here we provide bioinformatic and experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis. We identify genes in proteobacteria, including some pathogens......, that appear to be closely related to actinobacterial ARGs known to confer resistance against clinically important antibiotics. Furthermore, we identify two potential examples of recent horizontal transfer of actinobacterial ARGs to proteobacterial pathogens. Based on this bioinformatic evidence, we propose...... results support the existence of ancient and, possibly, recent transfers of ARGs from antibiotic-producing actinobacteria to proteobacteria, and provide evidence for a defined mechanism....

  1. Identifying and utilizing resistance to Puccinia striiformis in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Line, R.F.; Allan, R.E.; Konzak, C.F.

    1976-01-01

    Resistance to Puccinia striiformis in wheat cultivars, breeding lines, and induced mutants, was studied on plants exposed to natural rust inoculum at field sites and on plants inoculated with specific races and grown under controlled temperatures. Based on infection types and disease intensity at various stages of plant growth throughout the duration of rust establishment, the following resistance-types (R-types) were identified: R-type 1, plants resistant or susceptible at all stages of growth and at both low and high temperatures throughout duration of rust establishment; R-type 2, plants initially resistant in the seedling stage but eventually become susceptible, plants resistant at later stages in the field; R-type 3, variable resistance in the seedling stage, high resistance in later growth stages; R-type 4, plants resistant in the eedling stage, but susceptible in late stages of growth; R-type 5, plants susceptible, but the pathogen is slow to sporulate and consequently, rust increases slower in the field; R-type 6, plants susceptible at low temperatures and resistant at high temperatures at all stages of growth; R-type 7, plants very susceptible at both low and high temperatures in the seedling stage and at low temperatures in later stages; when temperatures are high, plants become more resistant in later stages; R-type 8, plants susceptible at all stages, when rust intensity is low and when not under stress, but become more resistant when intensity is high or under moderate stress in the field. Combinations of the above types were also observed. Techniques for identifying resistance to stripe rust, race specificity of the resistance-types, relationship of plant growth habit and head characteristics to disease intensity, historical significance of various types of resistance in the United States, and methods of using the resistance-types are also discussed. (author)

  2. Novel streptomycin and spectinomycin resistance gene as a gene cassette within a class 1 integron isolated from Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, D.

    1999-01-01

    The aadA genes, encoding resistance to streptomycin and spectinomycin, have been found as gene cassettes in different gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial species. The present study has revealed the sequence of a new gene, aadA5, integrated as a gene cassette together with the trimethoprim...... resistance gene dfr7 in a class 1 integron. The integron was located on a plasmid and was identified in a pathogenic porcine Escherichia coli isolate....

  3. Novel Streptomycin and Spectinomycin Resistance Gene as a Gene Cassette within a Class 1 Integron Isolated from Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandvang, Dorthe

    1999-01-01

    The aadA genes, encoding resistance to streptomycin and spectinomycin, have been found as gene cassettes in different gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial species. The present study has revealed the sequence of a new gene, aadA5, integrated as a gene cassette together with the trimethoprim resistance gene dfr7 in a class 1 integron. The integron was located on a plasmid and was identified in a pathogenic porcine Escherichia coli isolate. PMID:10582907

  4. Resistance Genes in Global Crop Breeding Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, K A; Andersen, K F; Asche, F; Bowden, R L; Forbes, G A; Kulakow, P A; Zhou, B

    2017-10-01

    Resistance genes are a major tool for managing crop diseases. The networks of crop breeders who exchange resistance genes and deploy them in varieties help to determine the global landscape of resistance and epidemics, an important system for maintaining food security. These networks function as a complex adaptive system, with associated strengths and vulnerabilities, and implications for policies to support resistance gene deployment strategies. Extensions of epidemic network analysis can be used to evaluate the multilayer agricultural networks that support and influence crop breeding networks. Here, we evaluate the general structure of crop breeding networks for cassava, potato, rice, and wheat. All four are clustered due to phytosanitary and intellectual property regulations, and linked through CGIAR hubs. Cassava networks primarily include public breeding groups, whereas others are more mixed. These systems must adapt to global change in climate and land use, the emergence of new diseases, and disruptive breeding technologies. Research priorities to support policy include how best to maintain both diversity and redundancy in the roles played by individual crop breeding groups (public versus private and global versus local), and how best to manage connectivity to optimize resistance gene deployment while avoiding risks to the useful life of resistance genes. [Formula: see text] Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY 4.0 International license .

  5. Vancomycin-resistance phenotypes, vancomycin-resistance genes, and resistance to antibiotics of enterococci isolated from food of animal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gousia, Panagiota; Economou, Vangelis; Bozidis, Petros; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, 500 raw beef, pork, and chicken meat samples and 100 pooled egg samples were analyzed for the presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci, vancomycin-resistance phenotypes, and resistance genes. Of 141 isolates of enterococci, 88 strains of Enterococcus faecium and 53 strains of E. faecalis were identified. The most prevalent species was E. faecium. Resistance to ampicillin (n = 93, 66%), ciprofloxacin (n = 74, 52.5%), erythromycin (n = 73, 51.8%), penicillin (n = 59, 41.8%) and tetracycline (n = 52, 36.9%) was observed, while 53.2% (n = 75) of the isolates were multiresistant and 15.6% (n = 22) were susceptible to all antibiotics. Resistance to vancomycin was exhibited in 34.1% (n = 30) of the E. faecium isolates (n = 88) and 1.9% (n = 1) of the E. faecalis isolates (n = 53) using the disc-diffusion test and the E-test. All isolates were tested for vanA and vanB using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiplex PCR, and for vanC, vanD, vanE, vanG genes using multiplex PCR only. Among E. faecalis isolates, no resistance genes were identified. Among the E. faecium isolates, 28 carried the vanA gene when tested by multiplex PCR and 29 when tested with real-time PCR. No isolate carrying the vanC, vanD, vanE, or vanG genes was identified. Melting-curve analysis of the positive real-time PCR E. faecium isolates showed that 22 isolates carried the vanA gene only, 2 isolates the vanB2,3 genes only, and seven isolates carried both the vanA and vanB2,3 genes. Enterococci should be considered a significant zoonotic pathogen and a possible reservoir of genes encoding resistance potentially transferred to other bacterial species.

  6. Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance Genes in the Plant Pathogen Dickeya dadantii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandin, Caroline; Caroff, Martine; Condemine, Guy

    2016-11-01

    Modification of teichoic acid through the incorporation of d-alanine confers resistance in Gram-positive bacteria to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). This process involves the products of the dltXABCD genes. These genes are widespread in Gram-positive bacteria, and they are also found in a few Gram-negative bacteria. Notably, these genes are present in all soft-rot enterobacteria (Pectobacterium and Dickeya) whose dltDXBAC operons have been sequenced. We studied the function and regulation of these genes in Dickeya dadantii dltB expression was induced in the presence of the AMP polymyxin. It was not regulated by PhoP, which controls the expression of some genes involved in AMP resistance, but was regulated by ArcA, which has been identified as an activator of genes involved in AMP resistance. However, arcA was not the regulator responsible for polymyxin induction of these genes in this bacterium, which underlines the complexity of the mechanisms controlling AMP resistance in D. dadantii Two other genes involved in resistance to AMPs have also been characterized, phoS and phoH dltB, phoS, phoH, and arcA but not dltD mutants were more sensitive to polymyxin than the wild-type strain. Decreased fitness of the dltB, phoS, and phoH mutants in chicory leaves indicates that their products are important for resistance to plant AMPs. Gram-negative bacteria can modify their lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) to resist antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Soft-rot enterobacteria (Dickeya and Pectobacterium spp.) possess homologues of the dlt genes in their genomes which, in Gram-positive bacteria, are involved in resistance to AMPs. In this study, we show that these genes confer resistance to AMPs, probably by modifying LPSs, and that they are required for the fitness of the bacteria during plant infection. Two other new genes involved in resistance were also analyzed. These results show that bacterial resistance to AMPs can occur in bacteria through many different mechanisms that need to be

  7. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies New Loci for Resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans in Canola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Coombes, Neil; Song, Jie; Diffey, Simon; Kilian, Andrzej; Lindbeck, Kurt; Barbulescu, Denise M.; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Salisbury, Phil A.; Marcroft, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Key message “We identified both quantitative and quantitative resistance loci to Leptosphaeria maculans, a fungal pathogen, causing blackleg disease in canola. Several genome-wide significant associations were detected at known and new loci for blackleg resistance. We further validated statistically significant associations in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to L. maculans. One of the novel loci identified for the first time, Rlm12, conveys adult plant resistance in canola.” Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is a significant disease which affects the sustainable production of canola (Brassica napus). This study reports a genome-wide association study based on 18,804 polymorphic SNPs to identify loci associated with qualitative and quantitative resistance to L. maculans. Genomic regions delimited with 694 significant SNP markers, that are associated with resistance evaluated using 12 single spore isolates and pathotypes from four canola stubble were identified. Several significant associations were detected at known disease resistance loci including in the vicinity of recently cloned Rlm2/LepR3 genes, and at new loci on chromosomes A01/C01, A02/C02, A03/C03, A05/C05, A06, A08, and A09. In addition, we validated statistically significant associations on A01, A07, and A10 in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to L. maculans. One of the novel loci identified for the first time, Rlm12, conveys adult plant resistance and mapped within 13.2 kb from Arabidopsis R gene of TIR-NBS class. We showed that resistance loci are located in the vicinity of R genes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus on the sequenced genome of B. napus cv. Darmor-bzh. Significantly associated SNP markers provide a valuable tool to enrich germplasm for favorable alleles in order to improve the level of resistance to L. maculans in

  8. Interspecies gene transfer provides soybean resistance to a fungal pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbach, Caspar; Schultheiss, Holger; Rosendahl, Martin; Tresch, Nadine; Conrath, Uwe; Goellner, Katharina

    2016-02-01

    Fungal pathogens pose a major challenge to global crop production. Crop varieties that resist disease present the best defence and offer an alternative to chemical fungicides. Exploiting durable nonhost resistance (NHR) for crop protection often requires identification and transfer of NHR-linked genes to the target crop. Here, we identify genes associated with NHR of Arabidopsis thaliana to Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causative agent of the devastating fungal disease called Asian soybean rust. We transfer selected Arabidopsis NHR-linked genes to the soybean host and discover enhanced resistance to rust disease in some transgenic soybean lines in the greenhouse. Interspecies NHR gene transfer thus presents a promising strategy for genetically engineered control of crop diseases. © 2015 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Identifying novel genes contributing to asthma pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holloway, John W.; Koppelman, Gerard H.

    Purpose of review To illustrate recent examples of novel asthma genes such as those encoding G-protein-coupled receptor for asthma susceptibility, filaggrin and tenascin-C, and to describe the process that is needed to translate these findings to the clinic. Recent findings Many hundreds of studies

  10. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, Kira S. [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Omelchenko, Marina [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Gaidamakova, Elena [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS); Matrosova, Vera [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS); Vasilenko, Alexander [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS); Zhai, Min [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kim, Edwin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Samual [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lai, Barry [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ravel, Bruce [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kemner, Kenneth M [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Wolf, Yuri [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Sorokin, Alexei [Genetique Microbienne; Gerasimova, Anna [Research Institute of Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms, Mosco; Gelfand, Mikhail [Moscow State University; Fredrickson, James K [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Koonin, Eugene [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Daly, Michael [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS)

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at its optimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  11. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-24

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at itsoptimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  12. Deinococcus geothermalis: the pool of extreme radiation resistance genes shrinks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira S Makarova

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR, ultraviolet light (UV and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at its optimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and

  13. Environmental cycle of antibiotic resistance encoded genes: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. ghanbari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes enter the environment in different ways. The release of these factors into the environment has increased concerns related to public health. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in the environmental resources. In this systematic review, the data were extracted from valid sources of information including ScienceDirect, PubMed, Google Scholar and SID. Evaluation and selection of articles were conducted on the basis of the PRISMA checklist. A total of 39 articles were included in the study, which were chosen from a total of 1249 papers. The inclusion criterion was the identification of genes encoding antibiotic resistance against the eight important groups of antibiotics determined by using the PCR technique in the environmental sources including municipal and hospital wastewater treatment plants, animal and agricultural wastes, effluents from treatment plants, natural waters, sediments, and drinking waters. In this study, 113 genes encoding antibiotic resistance to eight groups of antibiotics (beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, macrolides, sulfonamides, chloramphenicol, glycopeptides and quinolones were identified in various environments. Antibiotic resistance genes were found in all the investigated environments. The investigation of microorganisms carrying these genes shows that most of the bacteria especially gram-negative bacteria are effective in the acquisition and the dissemination of these pollutants in the environment. Discharging the raw wastewaters and effluents from wastewater treatments acts as major routes in the dissemination of ARGs into environment sources and can pose hazards to public health.

  14. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies New Loci for Resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans in Canola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Raman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is a significant disease which affects the sustainable production of canola. This study reports a genome-wide association study based on 18,804 polymorphic SNPs to identify loci associated with qualitative and quantitative resistance to L. maculans. Genomic regions delimited with 503 significant SNP markers, that are associated with resistance evaluated using 12 single spore isolates and pathotypes from four canola stubble were identified. Several significant associations were detected at known disease resistance loci including in the vicinity of recently cloned Rlm2/LepR3 genes, and at new loci on chromosomes A01/C01, A02/C02, A03/C03, A05/C05, A06, A08, and A09. In addition, we validated statistically significant associations on A01, A07 and A10 in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to L. maculans. One of the novel loci identified for the first time, Rlm12, conveys adult plant resistance and mapped within 13.2 kb from Arabidopsis R gene of TIR-NBS class. We showed that resistance loci are located in the vicinity of R genes of A. thaliana and B. napus on the sequenced genome of B. napus cv. Darmor-bzh. Significantly associated SNP markers provide a valuable tool to enrich germplasm for favorable alleles in order to improve the level of resistance to L. maculans in canola.

  15. The rpg4/Rpg5 stem rust resistance locus in barley: resistance genes and cytoskeleton dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggeman, Robert; Steffenson, Brian J; Kleinhofs, Andris

    2009-04-01

    Two closely linked resistance genes, rpg4 and Rpg5, conferring resistance to several races of Puccinia graminis, were cloned and characterized. The Rpg5 gene confers resistance to an isolate of Puccinia graminis f. sp. secalis (Pgs), while rpg4 confers resistance to Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt). Rpg5 is a novel gene containing nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat domains in combination with a serine threonine protein kinase domain. High-resolution mapping plus allele and recombinant sequencing identified the rpg4 gene, which encodes an actin depolymerizing factor-like protein (ADF2). Resistance against the Pgt races QCCJ, MCCF, TTKSK (aka Ug99) and RCRS requires both Rpg5 and rpg4, while Rpg5 alone confers resistance to Pgs isolate 92-MN-90. The dependency on the actin modifying protein ADF2 indicates cytoskeleton reorganization or redirection plays a role in pathogen-host interactions. Rpg5 may interact with ADF2 to activate or deactivate its function in the resistance response. Alternatively, Rpg5 could initiate signal transduction leading to resistance in response to detecting ADF2 protein modification. Pgt may redirect the actin cytoskeleton by inducing modifications of ADF2. The redirection of actin could possibly enable the pathogen to develop a haustoria-plant cell cytoskeleton interface for acquisition of nutrients.

  16. Genes involved in barley yellow dwarf virus resistance of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Frederike; Habekuß, Antje; Stich, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    The results of our study suggest that genes involved in general resistance mechanisms of plants contribute to variation of BYDV resistance in maize. With increasing winter temperatures in Europe, Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) is expected to become a prominent problem in maize cultivation. Breeding for resistance is the best strategy to control the disease and break the transmission cycle of the virus. The objectives of our study were (1) to determine genetic variation with respect to BYDV resistance in a broad germplasm set and (2) to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers linked to genes that are involved in BYDV resistance. An association mapping population with 267 genotypes representing the world's maize gene pool was grown in the greenhouse. Plants were inoculated with BYDV-PAV using viruliferous Rhopalosiphum padi. In the association mapping population, we observed considerable genotypic variance for the trait virus extinction as measured by double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) and the infection rate. In a genome-wide association study, we observed three SNPs significantly [false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.05] associated with the virus extinction on chromosome 10 explaining together 25 % of the phenotypic variance and five SNPs for the infection rate on chromosomes 4 and 10 explaining together 33 % of the phenotypic variance. The SNPs significantly associated with BYDV resistance can be used in marker assisted selection and will accelerate the breeding process for the development of BYDV resistant maize genotypes. Furthermore, these SNPs were located within genes which were in other organisms described to play a role in general resistance mechanisms. This suggests that these genes contribute to variation of BYDV resistance in maize.

  17. Identifying genomic changes associated with insecticide resistance in the dengue mosquito Aedes aegypti by deep targeted sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucon, Frederic; Dusfour, Isabelle; Gaude, Thierry; Navratil, Vincent; Boyer, Frederic; Chandre, Fabrice; Sirisopa, Patcharawan; Thanispong, Kanutcharee; Juntarajumnong, Waraporn; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap; Girod, Romain; Corbel, Vincent; Reynaud, Stephane; David, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of mosquitoes to resist insecticides threatens the control of diseases such as dengue and malaria. Until alternative control tools are implemented, characterizing resistance mechanisms is crucial for managing resistance in natural populations. Insecticide biodegradation by detoxification enzymes is a common resistance mechanism; however, the genomic changes underlying this mechanism have rarely been identified, precluding individual resistance genotyping. In particular, the role of copy number variations (CNVs) and polymorphisms of detoxification enzymes have never been investigated at the genome level, although they can represent robust markers of metabolic resistance. In this context, we combined target enrichment with high-throughput sequencing for conducting the first comprehensive screening of gene amplifications and polymorphisms associated with insecticide resistance in mosquitoes. More than 760 candidate genes were captured and deep sequenced in several populations of the dengue mosquito Ae. aegypti displaying distinct genetic backgrounds and contrasted resistance levels to the insecticide deltamethrin. CNV analysis identified 41 gene amplifications associated with resistance, most affecting cytochrome P450s overtranscribed in resistant populations. Polymorphism analysis detected more than 30,000 variants and strong selection footprints in specific genomic regions. Combining Bayesian and allele frequency filtering approaches identified 55 nonsynonymous variants strongly associated with resistance. Both CNVs and polymorphisms were conserved within regions but differed across continents, confirming that genomic changes underlying metabolic resistance to insecticides are not universal. By identifying novel DNA markers of insecticide resistance, this study opens the way for tracking down metabolic changes developed by mosquitoes to resist insecticides within and among populations. PMID:26206155

  18. Expression Study of Banana Pathogenic Resistance Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenny M. Dwivany

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Banana is one of the world's most important trade commodities. However, infection of banana pathogenic fungi (Fusarium oxysporum race 4 is one of the major causes of decreasing production in Indonesia. Genetic engineering has become an alternative way to control this problem by isolating genes that involved in plant defense mechanism against pathogens. Two of the important genes are API5 and ChiI1, each gene encodes apoptosis inhibitory protein and chitinase enzymes. The purpose of this study was to study the expression of API5 and ChiI1 genes as candidate pathogenic resistance genes. The amplified fragments were then cloned, sequenced, and confirmed with in silico studies. Based on sequence analysis, it is showed that partial API5 gene has putative transactivation domain and ChiI1 has 9 chitinase family GH19 protein motifs. Data obtained from this study will contribute in banana genetic improvement.

  19. Association mapping and gene-gene interaction for stem rust resistance in CIMMYT spring wheat germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Long-Xi; Lorenz, Aaron; Rutkoski, Jessica; Singh, Ravi P; Bhavani, Sridhar; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Sorrells, Mark E

    2011-12-01

    The recent emergence of wheat stem rust Ug99 and evolution of new races within the lineage threatens global wheat production because they overcome widely deployed stem rust resistance (Sr) genes that had been effective for many years. To identify loci conferring adult plant resistance to races of Ug99 in wheat, we employed an association mapping approach for 276 current spring wheat breeding lines from the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT). Breeding lines were genotyped with Diversity Array Technology (DArT) and microsatellite markers. Phenotypic data was collected on these lines for stem rust race Ug99 resistance at the adult plant stage in the stem rust resistance screening nursery in Njoro, Kenya in seasons 2008, 2009 and 2010. Fifteen marker loci were found to be significantly associated with stem rust resistance. Several markers appeared to be linked to known Sr genes, while other significant markers were located in chromosome regions where no Sr genes have been previously reported. Most of these new loci colocalized with QTLs identified recently in different biparental populations. Using the same data and Q + K covariate matrices, we investigated the interactions among marker loci using linear regression models to calculate P values for pairwise marker interactions. Resistance marker loci including the Sr2 locus on 3BS and the wPt1859 locus on 7DL had significant interaction effects with other loci in the same chromosome arm and with markers on chromosome 6B. Other resistance marker loci had significant pairwise interactions with markers on different chromosomes. Based on these results, we propose that a complex network of gene-gene interactions is, in part, responsible for resistance to Ug99. Further investigation may provide insight for understanding mechanisms that contribute to this resistance gene network.

  20. Nickel-resistance determinants in Acidiphilium sp. PM identified by genome-wide functional screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patxi San Martin-Uriz

    Full Text Available Acidiphilium spp. are conspicuous dwellers of acidic, metal-rich environments. Indeed, they are among the most metal-resistant organisms; yet little is known about the mechanisms behind the metal tolerance in this genus. Acidiphilium sp. PM is an environmental isolate from Rio Tinto, an acidic, metal-laden river located in southwestern Spain. The characterization of its metal resistance revealed a remarkable ability to tolerate high Ni concentrations. Here we report the screening of a genomic library of Acidiphilium sp. PM to identify genes involved in Ni resistance. This approach revealed seven different genes conferring Ni resistance to E. coli, two of which form an operon encoding the ATP-dependent protease HslVU (ClpQY. This protease was found to enhance resistance to both Ni and Co in E. coli, a function not previously reported. Other Ni-resistance determinants include genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the synthesis of branched amino acids. The diversity of molecular functions of the genes recovered in the screening suggests that Ni resistance in Acidiphilium sp. PM probably relies on different molecular mechanisms.

  1. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... rust resistance depicted a single major gene conditioning adult plant resistance (APR) with stripe rust reaction varying from TR-20MS in resistant RILs signifying the presence of some minor genes as well. Genetic association with leaf rust resistance revealed that two genes are located at a recombination distance of 13%.

  2. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertinellys TEIXEIRA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC, aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD, and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH, is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137 were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU, mainly from discharges (96/137. The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively. Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49, followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49. The aac(6´-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  3. Antibiotic-Resistance Genes in Waste Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkman, Antti; Do, Thi Thuy; Walsh, Fiona; Virta, Marko P J

    2018-03-01

    Waste water and waste water treatment plants can act as reservoirs and environmental suppliers of antibiotic resistance. They have also been proposed to be hotspots for horizontal gene transfer, enabling the spread of antibiotic resistance genes between different bacterial species. Waste water contains antibiotics, disinfectants, and metals which can form a selection pressure for antibiotic resistance, even in low concentrations. Our knowledge of antibiotic resistance in waste water has increased tremendously in the past few years with advances in the molecular methods available. However, there are still some gaps in our knowledge on the subject, such as how active is horizontal gene transfer in waste water and what is the role of the waste water treatment plant in the environmental resistome? The purpose of this review is to briefly describe some of the main methods for studying antibiotic resistance in waste waters and the latest research and main knowledge gaps on the issue. In addition, some future research directions are proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Multiple herbicide resistance in Lolium multiflorum and identification of conserved regulatory elements of herbicide resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Mahmood

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of L. multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them a reliable marker. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of Lolium multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O.sativa and A.thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward towards a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management.

  5. Novel Plasmodium falciparum metabolic network reconstruction identifies shifts associated with clinical antimalarial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Maureen A; Papin, Jason A; Guler, Jennifer L

    2017-07-19

    Malaria remains a major public health burden and resistance has emerged to every antimalarial on the market, including the frontline drug, artemisinin. Our limited understanding of Plasmodium biology hinders the elucidation of resistance mechanisms. In this regard, systems biology approaches can facilitate the integration of existing experimental knowledge and further understanding of these mechanisms. Here, we developed a novel genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction, iPfal17, of the asexual blood-stage P. falciparum parasite to expand our understanding of metabolic changes that support resistance. We identified 11 metabolic tasks to evaluate iPfal17 performance. Flux balance analysis and simulation of gene knockouts and enzyme inhibition predict candidate drug targets unique to resistant parasites. Moreover, integration of clinical parasite transcriptomes into the iPfal17 reconstruction reveals patterns associated with antimalarial resistance. These results predict that artemisinin sensitive and resistant parasites differentially utilize scavenging and biosynthetic pathways for multiple essential metabolites, including folate and polyamines. Our findings are consistent with experimental literature, while generating novel hypotheses about artemisinin resistance and parasite biology. We detect evidence that resistant parasites maintain greater metabolic flexibility, perhaps representing an incomplete transition to the metabolic state most appropriate for nutrient-rich blood. Using this systems biology approach, we identify metabolic shifts that arise with or in support of the resistant phenotype. This perspective allows us to more productively analyze and interpret clinical expression data for the identification of candidate drug targets for the treatment of resistant parasites.

  6. Plasmid metagenomics reveals multiple antibiotic resistance gene classes among the gut microbiomes of hospitalised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jitwasinkul, Tossawan; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are rapidly spread between pathogens and the normal flora, with plasmids playing an important role in their circulation. This study aimed to investigate antibiotic resistance plasmids in the gut microbiome of hospitalised patients. Stool samples were collected from seven...... sequences (using >80% alignment length as the cut-off), and ResFinder was used to classify the antibiotic resistance gene pools. Plasmid replicon modules were used for plasmid typing. Forty-six genes conferring resistance to several classes of antibiotics were identified in the stool samples. Several...... antibiotic resistance genes were shared by the patients; interestingly, most were reported previously in food animals and healthy humans. Four antibiotic resistance genes were found in the healthy subject. One gene (aph3-III) was identified in the patients and the healthy subject and was related...

  7. High chlorpyrifos resistance in Culex pipiens mosquitoes: strong synergy between resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alout, H; Labbé, P; Berthomieu, A; Makoundou, P; Fort, P; Pasteur, N; Weill, M

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the genetic determinism of high chlorpyrifos resistance (HCR), a phenotype first described in 1999 in Culex pipiens mosquitoes surviving chlorpyrifos doses ⩾1 mg l(-1) and more recently found in field samples from Tunisia, Israel or Indian Ocean islands. Through chlorpyrifos selection, we selected several HCR strains that displayed over 10 000-fold resistance. All strains were homozygous for resistant alleles at two main loci: the ace-1 gene, with the resistant ace-1(R) allele expressing the insensitive G119S acetylcholinesterase, and a resistant allele of an unknown gene (named T) linked to the sex and ace-2 genes. We constructed a strain carrying only the T-resistant allele and studied its resistance characteristics. By crossing this strain with strains harboring different alleles at the ace-1 locus, we showed that the resistant ace-1(R) and the T alleles act in strong synergy, as they elicited a resistance 100 times higher than expected from a simple multiplicative effect. This effect was specific to chlorpyrifos and parathion and was not affected by synergists. We also examined how HCR was expressed in strains carrying other ace-1-resistant alleles, such as ace-1(V) or the duplicated ace-1(D) allele, currently spreading worldwide. We identified two major parameters that influenced the level of resistance: the number and the nature of the ace-1-resistant alleles and the number of T alleles. Our data fit a model that predicts that the T allele acts by decreasing chlorpyrifos concentration in the compartment targeted in insects.

  8. Rapid identification of rice blast resistance gene by specific length amplified fragment sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Excavation of resistance genes is one of the most effective and environment-friendly measures to control the devastating rice disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae. Many resistance genes have been mapped and characterized in the last century. Nevertheless, only a few of the total resistance genes could be really applied in the rice breeding program. Huazhan (HZ is a new native rice restorer line developed in China and widely used in hybrid rice in recent years. HZ and its crossed combinations usually show a broad spectrum of resistance against rice blast in different rice ecosystems in China. Dissection of the genetic background of HZ is very useful for its further application. In this study, a combined method based on bulked segregation analysis (BSA and specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq was used to identify blast resistance gene(s in HZ. A total of 56,187 SLAFs labels were captured and 9051 polymorphic SLAFs markers were analysed and procured in this study. One trait associated with candidate resistance genes region on chromosome 12 overlapping 10.2–17.6 Mb has been identified, in which 10 NBS-LRR (nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat coding genes were used as resistance gene candidates. Our result indicated that SLAF-seq with BSA is a rapid and effective method for initial identification of blast resistance genes. The identification of resistance gene in HZ will improve its molecular breeding and resistance variety application.

  9. A genome scale RNAi screen identifies GLI1 as a novel gene regulating vorinostat sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenberg, K J; Newbold, A; Gould, C M; Luu, J; Trapani, J A; Matthews, G M; Simpson, K J; Johnstone, R W

    2016-07-01

    Vorinostat is an FDA-approved histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) that has proven clinical success in some patients; however, it remains unclear why certain patients remain unresponsive to this agent and other HDACis. Constitutive STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) activation, overexpression of prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins and loss of HR23B have been identified as potential biomarkers of HDACi resistance; however, none have yet been used to aid the clinical utility of HDACi. Herein, we aimed to further elucidate vorinostat-resistance mechanisms through a functional genomics screen to identify novel genes that when knocked down by RNA interference (RNAi) sensitized cells to vorinostat-induced apoptosis. A synthetic lethal functional screen using a whole-genome protein-coding RNAi library was used to identify genes that when knocked down cooperated with vorinostat to induce tumor cell apoptosis in otherwise resistant cells. Through iterative screening, we identified 10 vorinostat-resistance candidate genes that sensitized specifically to vorinostat. One of these vorinostat-resistance genes was GLI1, an oncogene not previously known to regulate the activity of HDACi. Treatment of vorinostat-resistant cells with the GLI1 small-molecule inhibitor, GANT61, phenocopied the effect of GLI1 knockdown. The mechanism by which GLI1 loss of function sensitized tumor cells to vorinostat-induced apoptosis is at least in part through interactions with vorinostat to alter gene expression in a manner that favored apoptosis. Upon GLI1 knockdown and vorinostat treatment, BCL2L1 expression was repressed and overexpression of BCL2L1 inhibited GLI1-knockdown-mediated vorinostat sensitization. Taken together, we present the identification and characterization of GLI1 as a new HDACi resistance gene, providing a strong rationale for development of GLI1 inhibitors for clinical use in combination with HDACi therapy.

  10. A Functional, Genome-wide Evaluation of Liposensitive Yeast Identifies the “ARE2 Required for Viability” (ARV1) Gene Product as a Major Component of Eukaryotic Fatty Acid Resistance*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Kelly V.; Garbarino, Jeanne; Liu, Ying; Moon, James; Schneider, Kerry; Henneberry, Annette; Billheimer, Jeff; Millar, John S.; Marchadier, Dawn; Valasek, Mark A.; Joblin-Mills, Aidan; Gulati, Sonia; Munkacsi, Andrew B.; Repa, Joyce J.; Rader, Dan; Sturley, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    The toxic subcellular accumulation of lipids predisposes several human metabolic syndromes, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of neurodegeneration. To identify pathways that prevent lipid-induced cell death, we performed a genome-wide fatty acid sensitivity screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 167 yeast mutants as sensitive to 0.5 mm palmitoleate, 45% of which define pathways that were conserved in humans. 63 lesions also impacted the status of the lipid droplet; however, this was not correlated to the degree of fatty acid sensitivity. The most liposensitive yeast strain arose due to deletion of the “ARE2 required for viability” (ARV1) gene, encoding an evolutionarily conserved, potential lipid transporter that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Down-regulation of mammalian ARV1 in MIN6 pancreatic β-cells or HEK293 cells resulted in decreased neutral lipid synthesis, increased fatty acid sensitivity, and lipoapoptosis. Conversely, elevated expression of human ARV1 in HEK293 cells or mouse liver significantly increased triglyceride mass and lipid droplet number. The ARV1-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation was accompanied by up-regulation of DGAT1, a triglyceride synthesis gene, and the fatty acid transporter, CD36. Furthermore, ARV1 was identified as a transcriptional of the protein peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a key regulator of lipid homeostasis whose transcriptional targets include DGAT1 and CD36. These results implicate ARV1 as a protective factor in lipotoxic diseases due to modulation of fatty acid metabolism. In conclusion, a lipotoxicity-based genetic screen in a model microorganism has identified 75 human genes that may play key roles in neutral lipid metabolism and disease. PMID:24273168

  11. A functional, genome-wide evaluation of liposensitive yeast identifies the "ARE2 required for viability" (ARV1) gene product as a major component of eukaryotic fatty acid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Kelly V; Garbarino, Jeanne; Liu, Ying; Moon, James; Schneider, Kerry; Henneberry, Annette; Billheimer, Jeff; Millar, John S; Marchadier, Dawn; Valasek, Mark A; Joblin-Mills, Aidan; Gulati, Sonia; Munkacsi, Andrew B; Repa, Joyce J; Rader, Dan; Sturley, Stephen L

    2014-02-14

    The toxic subcellular accumulation of lipids predisposes several human metabolic syndromes, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of neurodegeneration. To identify pathways that prevent lipid-induced cell death, we performed a genome-wide fatty acid sensitivity screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 167 yeast mutants as sensitive to 0.5 mm palmitoleate, 45% of which define pathways that were conserved in humans. 63 lesions also impacted the status of the lipid droplet; however, this was not correlated to the degree of fatty acid sensitivity. The most liposensitive yeast strain arose due to deletion of the "ARE2 required for viability" (ARV1) gene, encoding an evolutionarily conserved, potential lipid transporter that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Down-regulation of mammalian ARV1 in MIN6 pancreatic β-cells or HEK293 cells resulted in decreased neutral lipid synthesis, increased fatty acid sensitivity, and lipoapoptosis. Conversely, elevated expression of human ARV1 in HEK293 cells or mouse liver significantly increased triglyceride mass and lipid droplet number. The ARV1-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation was accompanied by up-regulation of DGAT1, a triglyceride synthesis gene, and the fatty acid transporter, CD36. Furthermore, ARV1 was identified as a transcriptional of the protein peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a key regulator of lipid homeostasis whose transcriptional targets include DGAT1 and CD36. These results implicate ARV1 as a protective factor in lipotoxic diseases due to modulation of fatty acid metabolism. In conclusion, a lipotoxicity-based genetic screen in a model microorganism has identified 75 human genes that may play key roles in neutral lipid metabolism and disease.

  12. Molecular study on some antibiotic resistant genes in Salmonella spp. isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Ari Q.

    2017-09-01

    Studying the genes related with antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella spp. is a crucial step toward a correct and faster treatment of infections caused by the pathogen. In this work Integron mediated antibiotic resistant gene IntI1 (Class I Integrase IntI1) and some plasmid mediated antibiotic resistance genes (Qnr) were scanned among the isolated non-Typhoid Salmonellae strains with known resistance to some important antimicrobial drugs using Sybr Green real time PCR. The aim of the study was to correlate the multiple antibiotics and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella spp. with the presence of integrase (IntI1) gene and plasmid mediated quinolone resistant genes. Results revealed the presence of Class I Integrase gene in 76% of the isolates with confirmed multiple antibiotic resistances. Moreover, about 32% of the multiple antibiotic resistant serotypes showed a positive R-PCR for plasmid mediated qnrA gene encoding for nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin resistance. No positive results could be revealed form R-PCRs targeting qnrB or qnrS. In light of these results we can conclude that the presence of at least one of the qnr genes and/or the presence of Integrase Class I gene were responsible for the multiple antibiotic resistance to for nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin from the studied Salmonella spp. and further studies required to identify the genes related with multiple antibiotic resistance of the pathogen.

  13. Putative resistance genes in the CitEST database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Guidetti-Gonzalez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Disease resistance in plants is usually associated with the activation of a wide variety of defense responses to prevent pathogen replication and/or movement. The ability of the host plant to recognize the pathogen and to activate defense responses is regulated by direct or indirect interaction between the products of plant resistance (R and pathogen avirulence (Avr genes. Attempted infection of plants by avirulent pathogens elicits a battery of defenses often followed by the collapse of the challenged host cells. Localized host cell death may help to prevent the pathogen from spreading to uninfected tissues, known as hypersensitive response (HR. When either the plant or the pathogen lacks its cognate gene, activation of the plant’s defense responses fails to occur or is delayed and does not prevent pathogen colonization. In the CitEST database, we identified 1,300 reads related to R genes in Citrus which have been reported in other plant species. These reads were translated in silico, and alignments of their amino acid sequences revealed the presence of characteristic domains and motifs that are specific to R gene classes. The description of the reads identified suggests that they function as resistance genes in citrus.

  14. Major Gene for Field Stem Rust Resistance Co-Locates with Resistance Gene Sr12 in 'Thatcher' Wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin W Hiebert

    Full Text Available Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt, is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effective stem rust resistance genes. 'Thatcher' wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was to examine APR in 'Thatcher' and look for genetic interactions with Lr34. A RIL population was tested for stem rust resistance in field nurseries in Canada, USA, and Kenya. BSA was used to find SNP markers associated with reduced stem rust severity. A major QTL was identified on chromosome 3BL near the centromere in all environments. Seedling testing showed that Sr12 mapped to the same region as the QTL for APR. The SNP markers were physically mapped and the region carrying the resistance was searched for sequences with homology to members of the NB-LRR resistance gene family. SNP marker from one NB-LRR-like sequence, NB-LRR3 co-segregated with Sr12. Two additional populations, including one that lacked Lr34, were tested in field nurseries. NB-LRR3 mapped near the maximum LOD for reduction in stem rust severity in both populations. Lines from a population that segregated for Sr12 and Lr34 were tested for seedling Pgt biomass and infection type, as well as APR to field stem rust which showed an interaction between the genes. We concluded that Sr12, or a gene closely linked to Sr12, was responsible for 'Thatcher'-derived APR in several environments and this resistance was enhanced in the presence of Lr34.

  15. Major Gene for Field Stem Rust Resistance Co-Locates with Resistance Gene Sr12 in 'Thatcher' Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Colin W; Kolmer, James A; McCartney, Curt A; Briggs, Jordan; Fetch, Tom; Bariana, Harbans; Choulet, Frederic; Rouse, Matthew N; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effective stem rust resistance genes. 'Thatcher' wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was to examine APR in 'Thatcher' and look for genetic interactions with Lr34. A RIL population was tested for stem rust resistance in field nurseries in Canada, USA, and Kenya. BSA was used to find SNP markers associated with reduced stem rust severity. A major QTL was identified on chromosome 3BL near the centromere in all environments. Seedling testing showed that Sr12 mapped to the same region as the QTL for APR. The SNP markers were physically mapped and the region carrying the resistance was searched for sequences with homology to members of the NB-LRR resistance gene family. SNP marker from one NB-LRR-like sequence, NB-LRR3 co-segregated with Sr12. Two additional populations, including one that lacked Lr34, were tested in field nurseries. NB-LRR3 mapped near the maximum LOD for reduction in stem rust severity in both populations. Lines from a population that segregated for Sr12 and Lr34 were tested for seedling Pgt biomass and infection type, as well as APR to field stem rust which showed an interaction between the genes. We concluded that Sr12, or a gene closely linked to Sr12, was responsible for 'Thatcher'-derived APR in several environments and this resistance was enhanced in the presence of Lr34.

  16. Major Gene for Field Stem Rust Resistance Co-Locates with Resistance Gene Sr12 in ‘Thatcher’ Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Colin W.; Kolmer, James A.; McCartney, Curt A.; Briggs, Jordan; Fetch, Tom; Bariana, Harbans; Choulet, Frederic; Rouse, Matthew N.; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis (Pgt), is a damaging disease of wheat that can be controlled by utilizing effective stem rust resistance genes. ‘Thatcher’ wheat carries complex resistance to stem rust that is enhanced in the presence of the resistance gene Lr34. The purpose of this study was to examine APR in ‘Thatcher’ and look for genetic interactions with Lr34. A RIL population was tested for stem rust resistance in field nurseries in Canada, USA, and Kenya. BSA was used to find SNP markers associated with reduced stem rust severity. A major QTL was identified on chromosome 3BL near the centromere in all environments. Seedling testing showed that Sr12 mapped to the same region as the QTL for APR. The SNP markers were physically mapped and the region carrying the resistance was searched for sequences with homology to members of the NB-LRR resistance gene family. SNP marker from one NB-LRR-like sequence, NB-LRR3 co-segregated with Sr12. Two additional populations, including one that lacked Lr34, were tested in field nurseries. NB-LRR3 mapped near the maximum LOD for reduction in stem rust severity in both populations. Lines from a population that segregated for Sr12 and Lr34 were tested for seedling Pgt biomass and infection type, as well as APR to field stem rust which showed an interaction between the genes. We concluded that Sr12, or a gene closely linked to Sr12, was responsible for ‘Thatcher’-derived APR in several environments and this resistance was enhanced in the presence of Lr34. PMID:27309724

  17. Whole exome sequencing identifies novel candidate genes that modify chronic obstructive pulmonary disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruse, Shannon; Moreau, Michael; Bromberg, Yana; Jang, Jun-Ho; Wang, Nan; Ha, Hongseok; Picchi, Maria; Lin, Yong; Langley, Raymond J; Qualls, Clifford; Klensney-Tait, Julia; Zabner, Joseph; Leng, Shuguang; Mao, Jenny; Belinsky, Steven A; Xing, Jinchuan; Nyunoya, Toru

    2016-01-07

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by an irreversible airflow limitation in response to inhalation of noxious stimuli, such as cigarette smoke. However, only 15-20 % smokers manifest COPD, suggesting a role for genetic predisposition. Although genome-wide association studies have identified common genetic variants that are associated with susceptibility to COPD, effect sizes of the identified variants are modest, as is the total heritability accounted for by these variants. In this study, an extreme phenotype exome sequencing study was combined with in vitro modeling to identify COPD candidate genes. We performed whole exome sequencing of 62 highly susceptible smokers and 30 exceptionally resistant smokers to identify rare variants that may contribute to disease risk or resistance to COPD. This was a cross-sectional case-control study without therapeutic intervention or longitudinal follow-up information. We identified candidate genes based on rare variant analyses and evaluated exonic variants to pinpoint individual genes whose function was computationally established to be significantly different between susceptible and resistant smokers. Top scoring candidate genes from these analyses were further filtered by requiring that each gene be expressed in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). A total of 81 candidate genes were thus selected for in vitro functional testing in cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-exposed HBECs. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing experiments, we showed that silencing of several candidate genes augmented CSE-induced cytotoxicity in vitro. Our integrative analysis through both genetic and functional approaches identified two candidate genes (TACC2 and MYO1E) that augment cigarette smoke (CS)-induced cytotoxicity and, potentially, COPD susceptibility.

  18. Fate of antibiotic resistance genes and metal resistance genes during thermophilic aerobic digestion of sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Lee, Jangwoo; Kim, Young Beom; Jeon, Jong Hun; Shin, Jingyeong; Park, Mee-Rye; Kim, Young Mo

    2018-02-01

    This study examines the fate of twenty-three representative antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) encoding tetracyclines, sulfonamides, quinolones, β-lactam antibiotics, macrolides, florfenicol and multidrug resistance during thermophilic aerobic digestion (TAD) of sewage sludge. The bacterial community, class 1 integrons (intI1) and four metal resistance genes (MRGs) were also quantified to determine the key drivers of changes in ARGs during TAD. At the end of digestion, significant decreases in the quantities of ARGs, MRGs and intI1 as well as 16S rRNA genes were observed. Partial redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that shifts in temperature were the key factors affecting a decrease in ARGs. Shifts in temperature led to decreased amounts of ARGs by reducing resistome and bacterial diversity, rather than by lowering horizontal transfer potential via intI1 or co-resistance via MRGs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Plant resistance genes : their structure, function and evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, F.L.W.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Plants have developed efficient mechanisms to avoid infection or to mount responses that render them resistant upon attack by a pathogen. One of the best-studied defence mechanisms is based on gene-for-gene resistance through which plants, harbouring specific resistance (R) genes, specifically

  20. Relationship between Psidium species (Myrtaceae) by resistance gene analog markers: focus on nematode resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noia, L R; Tuler, A C; Ferreira, A; Ferreira, M F S

    2017-03-16

    Guava (Psidium guajava L.) crop is severely affected by the nematode Meloidogyne enterolobii. Native Psidium species have been reported as sources of resistance against this nematode. Knowledge on the molecular relationship between Psidium species based on plant resistance gene analogs (RGA) can be useful in the genetic breeding of guava for resistance to M. enterolobii. In this study, RGA markers from conserved domains, and structural features of plant R genes, were employed to characterize Psidium species and establish genetic proximity, with a focus on nematode resistance. SSR markers were also applied owing to their neutral nature, thus differing from RGA markers. For this, species reported as sources of resistance to M. enterolobii, such as P. cattleianum and P. friedrichsthalianum, as well as species occurring in the Atlantic Rainforest and susceptible genotypes, were investigated. In 10 evaluated Psidium species, high interspecific genetic variability was verified through RGA and SSR markers, with intraspecific variation in P. guajava higher with SSR, as was expected. Resistant species were clustered by RGA markers, and differential amplicons among genotypes resistant and susceptible to M. enterolobii were identified. Knowledge on the molecular relationships between Psidium species constitutes useful information for breeding of the guava tree, providing direction for hybridization and material for rootstocks. Additionally, the genetic relationship between native species, which have been little studied, and P. guajava were estimated by RGAs, which were confirmed as important markers for genetic diversity related to pathogen resistance.

  1. Incidence of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from eels and aquaculture ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mao; Wu, Xiaomei; Yan, Qingpi; Ma, Ying; Huang, Lixing; Qin, Yingxue; Xu, Xiaojin

    2016-07-07

    The overuse of antimicrobials in aquaculture has promoted the selection of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. Here we investigated the abundance of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in 108 strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from eels and aquaculture ponds in China. Conventional PCR was implemented to examine common antibiotic-resistance genes, integrons, and their gene cassette arrays. The results showed that the antibiotic-resistance genes blaTEM, tetC, sulI, aadA, floR, and qnrB were detected at high percentages, as were a number of other resistance genes. Class I integrons were present in 79.63% of the strains, and 10 out of 108 isolates carried class II integrons. Class III integrons were not detected. Three strains carried both class I and class II integrons, and 73.26% of the class I integron-positive isolates contained the qacEΔ1/sul1 gene. Fourteen types of integron cassette arrays were found among class I integron-positive isolates. A new array, dfrB4-catB3-blaOXA-10-aadA1, was discovered in this study. The gene cassette array dfrA12-orfF-aadA2 was the most widely distributed. In summary, 23 different gene cassettes encoding resistance to 8 classes of antibiotics were identified in the class I integrons, and the main cassettes contained genes encoding resistance to aminoglycosides (aad) and trimethoprim (dfr). All class II integron-positive strains had only a single gene cassette array, viz. dfrA1-catB2-sat2-aadA1. High levels of antimicrobial-resistance genes and integrons in eels and auqauculture ponds suggest that the overuse of antimicrobials should be strictly controlled and that the levels of bacterial antimicrobial-resistance genes in aquaculture should be monitored.

  2. Candidate genes for cross-resistance against DNA-damaging drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittig, Rainer; Nessling, Michelle; Will, Rainer D

    2002-01-01

    Drug resistance of tumor cells leads to major drawbacks in the treatment of cancer. To identify candidate genes for drug resistance, we compared the expression patterns of the drug-sensitive human malignant melanoma cell line MeWo and three derived sublines with acquired resistance to the DNA...... as several apoptosis-related genes, in particular STK17A and CRYAB. As MPP1 and CRYAB are also among the 14 genes differentially expressed in all three of the drug-resistant sublines, they represent the strongest candidates for resistance against DNA-damaging drugs....

  3. 'Omics' approaches in tomato aimed at identifying candidate genes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adriana

    2013-12-04

    Dec 4, 2013 ... that provides a virtual workbench for researchers working ... lab, we undertook two different 'omics' approaches to in- .... In our laboratory, an association mapping approach by candidate gene has been undertaken with the aim of identifying among 96 different genotypes new alleles in genes that could.

  4. Rice Transcriptome Analysis to Identify Possible Herbicide Quinclorac Detoxification Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenying eXu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Quinclorac is a highly selective auxin-type herbicide, and is widely used in the effective control of barnyard grass in paddy rice fields, improving the world’s rice yield. The herbicide mode of action of quinclorac has been proposed and hormone interactions affect quinclorac signaling. Because of widespread use, quinclorac may be transported outside rice fields with the drainage waters, leading to soil and water pollution and environmental health problems.In this study, we used 57K Affymetrix rice whole-genome array to identify quinclorac signaling response genes to study the molecular mechanisms of action and detoxification of quinclorac in rice plants. Overall, 637 probe sets were identified with differential expression levels under either 6 or 24 h of quinclorac treatment. Auxin-related genes such as GH3 and OsIAAs responded to quinclorac treatment. Gene Ontology analysis showed that genes of detoxification-related family genes were significantly enriched, including cytochrome P450, GST, UGT, and ABC and drug transporter genes. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that top candidate P450 families such as CYP81, CYP709C and CYP72A genes were universally induced by different herbicides. Some Arabidopsis genes for the same P450 family were up-regulated under quinclorac treatment.We conduct rice whole-genome GeneChip analysis and the first global identification of quinclorac response genes. This work may provide potential markers for detoxification of quinclorac and biomonitors of environmental chemical pollution.

  5. Chromosomal location and molecular mapping of tan spot resistance genes in common wheat (T. aestivum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Tadesse, Wuletaw

    2008-01-01

    In this study, 75 cultivars highly resistant to tan spot were identified. A positive correlation (r = 0.864; P = 0.001) was found between seedling resistance and adult plant resistance. Inheritance of tan spot resistance was found to be qualitative goverened by single major genes. Three novel resistance genes: tsn3, tsn4 and tsn5 were identified and located on chromosomes 3D, 3A and 3B, respectively. Linkage analysis using SSR markers showed that both the tsn3 (tsn3a, Tsn3b and tsn3c) and ts...

  6. Host range of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treatment plant influent and effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Jenni; Tamminen, Manu; Pärnänen, Katariina; Cairns, Johannes; Karkman, Antti; Virta, Marko

    2018-04-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) collect wastewater from various sources for a multi-step treatment process. By mixing a large variety of bacteria and promoting their proximity, WWTPs constitute potential hotspots for the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Concerns have been expressed regarding the potential of WWTPs to spread antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) from environmental reservoirs to human pathogens. We utilized epicPCR (Emulsion, Paired Isolation and Concatenation PCR) to detect the bacterial hosts of ARGs in two WWTPs. We identified the host distribution of four resistance-associated genes (tetM, int1, qacEΔ1and blaOXA-58) in influent and effluent. The bacterial hosts of these resistance genes varied between the WWTP influent and effluent, with a generally decreasing host range in the effluent. Through 16S rRNA gene sequencing, it was determined that the resistance gene carrying bacteria include both abundant and rare taxa. Our results suggest that the studied WWTPs mostly succeed in decreasing the host range of the resistance genes during the treatment process. Still, there were instances where effluent contained resistance genes in bacterial groups not carrying these genes in the influent. By permitting exhaustive profiling of resistance-associated gene hosts in WWTP bacterial communities, the application of epicPCR provides a new level of precision to our resistance gene risk estimates.

  7. ENU Mutagenesis in Mice Identifies Candidate Genes For Hypogonadism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jeffrey; Hurley, Lisa A.; Harris, Rebecca M.; Finlayson, Courtney; Tong, Minghan; Fisher, Lisa A.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Beier, David R.; Mason, Christopher; Jameson, J. Larry

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide mutagenesis was performed in mice to identify candidate genes for male infertility, for which the predominant causes remain idiopathic. Mice were mutagenized using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), bred, and screened for phenotypes associated with the male urogenital system. Fifteen heritable lines were isolated and chromosomal loci were assigned using low density genome-wide SNP arrays. Ten of the fifteen lines were pursued further using higher resolution SNP analysis to narrow the candidate gene regions. Exon sequencing of candidate genes identified mutations in mice with cystic kidneys (Bicc1), cryptorchidism (Rxfp2), restricted germ cell deficiency (Plk4), and severe germ cell deficiency (Prdm9). In two other lines with severe hypogonadism candidate sequencing failed to identify mutations, suggesting defects in genes with previously undocumented roles in gonadal function. These genomic intervals were sequenced in their entirety and a candidate mutation was identified in SnrpE in one of the two lines. The line harboring the SnrpE variant retains substantial spermatogenesis despite small testis size, an unusual phenotype. In addition to the reproductive defects, heritable phenotypes were observed in mice with ataxia (Myo5a), tremors (Pmp22), growth retardation (unknown gene), and hydrocephalus (unknown gene). These results demonstrate that the ENU screen is an effective tool for identifying potential causes of male infertility. PMID:22258617

  8. Anthropogenic antibiotic resistance genes mobilization to the polar regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Jorge; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic influences in the southern polar region have been rare, but lately microorganisms associated with humans have reached Antarctica, possibly from military bases, fishing boats, scientific expeditions, and/or ship-borne tourism. Studies of seawater in areas of human intervention and proximal to fresh penguin feces revealed the presence of Escherichia coli strains least resistant to antibiotics in penguins, whereas E. coli from seawater elsewhere showed resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, and trim-sulfa. In seawater samples, bacteria were found carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-type CTX-M genes in which multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) showed different sequence types (STs), previously reported in humans. In the Arctic, on the contrary, people have been present for a long time, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) appears to be much more wide-spread than was previously reported. Studies of E coli from Arctic birds (Bering Strait) revealed reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, but one globally spreading clone of E. coli genotype O25b-ST131, carrying genes of ESBL-type CTX-M, was identified. In the few years between sample collections in the same area, differences in resistance pattern were observed, with E. coli from birds showing resistance to a maximum of five different antibiotics. Presence of resistance-type ESBLs (TEM, SHV, and CTX-M) in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was also confirmed by specified PCR methods. MLST revealed that those bacteria carried STs that connect them to previously described strains in humans. In conclusion, bacteria previously related to humans could be found in relatively pristine environments, and presently human-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria have reached a high global level of distribution that they are now found even in the polar regions.

  9. Anthropogenic antibiotic resistance genes mobilization to the polar regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Hernández

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic influences in the southern polar region have been rare, but lately microorganisms associated with humans have reached Antarctica, possibly from military bases, fishing boats, scientific expeditions, and/or ship-borne tourism. Studies of seawater in areas of human intervention and proximal to fresh penguin feces revealed the presence of Escherichia coli strains least resistant to antibiotics in penguins, whereas E. coli from seawater elsewhere showed resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, and trim-sulfa. In seawater samples, bacteria were found carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-type CTX-M genes in which multilocus sequencing typing (MLST showed different sequence types (STs, previously reported in humans. In the Arctic, on the contrary, people have been present for a long time, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs appears to be much more wide-spread than was previously reported. Studies of E coli from Arctic birds (Bering Strait revealed reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, but one globally spreading clone of E. coli genotype O25b-ST131, carrying genes of ESBL-type CTX-M, was identified. In the few years between sample collections in the same area, differences in resistance pattern were observed, with E. coli from birds showing resistance to a maximum of five different antibiotics. Presence of resistance-type ESBLs (TEM, SHV, and CTX-M in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was also confirmed by specified PCR methods. MLST revealed that those bacteria carried STs that connect them to previously described strains in humans. In conclusion, bacteria previously related to humans could be found in relatively pristine environments, and presently human-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria have reached a high global level of distribution that they are now found even in the polar regions.

  10. A new homolog of FocA transporters identified in cadmium-resistant Euglena gracilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delomenie, Claudine; Foti, Emilie; Floch, Enora; Diderot, Vimala; Porquet, Dominique; Dupuy, Corinne; Bonaly, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    To better understand the cellular mechanism of stress resistance to various pollutants (cadmium, pentachlorophenol), we undertook a survey of the Euglena gracilis transcriptome by mRNA differential display and cDNA cloning. We performed a real-time RT-PCR analysis upon four selected genes. One of them significantly changed its expression level in response to stress treatments: B25 gene was overexpressed in Cd-resistant cells whereas it was down-regulated in PCP-adapted cells. By Race assays we obtained for B25 a 1093 bp cDNA. The deduced protein was identified as a bacterial formate/nitrite transporter (FocA) homolog and the gene was named EgFth. From all the data, we concluded that EgFth overexpression was related to chronic exposure to cadmium

  11. Exploring antibiotic resistance genes and metal resistance genes in plasmid metagenomes from wastewater treatment plants

    OpenAIRE

    Li, An-Dong; Li, Li-Guan; Zhang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer, they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge and digested sludge of two wastewater treatment plants. Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the...

  12. Clusters of Antibiotic Resistance Genes Enriched Together Stay Together in Swine Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy A; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Wang, Qiong; Cole, James R; Hashsham, Syed A; Looft, Torey; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Tiedje, James M

    2016-04-12

    Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide health risk, but the influence of animal agriculture on the genetic context and enrichment of individual antibiotic resistance alleles remains unclear. Using quantitative PCR followed by amplicon sequencing, we quantified and sequenced 44 genes related to antibiotic resistance, mobile genetic elements, and bacterial phylogeny in microbiomes from U.S. laboratory swine and from swine farms from three Chinese regions. We identified highly abundant resistance clusters: groups of resistance and mobile genetic element alleles that cooccur. For example, the abundance of genes conferring resistance to six classes of antibiotics together with class 1 integrase and the abundance of IS6100-type transposons in three Chinese regions are directly correlated. These resistance cluster genes likely colocalize in microbial genomes in the farms. Resistance cluster alleles were dramatically enriched (up to 1 to 10% as abundant as 16S rRNA) and indicate that multidrug-resistant bacteria are likely the norm rather than an exception in these communities. This enrichment largely occurred independently of phylogenetic composition; thus, resistance clusters are likely present in many bacterial taxa. Furthermore, resistance clusters contain resistance genes that confer resistance to antibiotics independently of their particular use on the farms. Selection for these clusters is likely due to the use of only a subset of the broad range of chemicals to which the clusters confer resistance. The scale of animal agriculture and its wastes, the enrichment and horizontal gene transfer potential of the clusters, and the vicinity of large human populations suggest that managing this resistance reservoir is important for minimizing human risk. Agricultural antibiotic use results in clusters of cooccurring resistance genes that together confer resistance to multiple antibiotics. The use of a single antibiotic could select for an entire suite of resistance genes if

  13. Continental-scale pollution of estuaries with antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Zhao, Yi; Li, Bing; Huang, Chu-Long; Zhang, Si-Yu; Yu, Shen; Chen, Yong-Shan; Zhang, Tong; Gillings, Michael R; Su, Jian-Qiang

    2017-01-30

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have moved from the environmental resistome into human commensals and pathogens, driven by human selection with antimicrobial agents. These genes have increased in abundance in humans and domestic animals, to become common components of waste streams. Estuarine habitats lie between terrestrial/freshwater and marine ecosystems, acting as natural filtering points for pollutants. Here, we have profiled ARGs in sediments from 18 estuaries over 4,000 km of coastal China using high-throughput quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and investigated their relationship with bacterial communities, antibiotic residues and socio-economic factors. ARGs in estuarine sediments were diverse and abundant, with over 200 different resistance genes being detected, 18 of which were found in all 90 sediment samples. The strong correlations of identified resistance genes with known mobile elements, network analyses and partial redundancy analysis all led to the conclusion that human activity is responsible for the abundance and dissemination of these ARGs. Such widespread pollution with xenogenetic elements has environmental, agricultural and medical consequences.

  14. Insulin resistance in obesity can be reliably identified from fasting plasma insulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, K. W.; Gilijamse, P. W.; Koopman, K. E.; de Weijer, B. A.; Brands, M.; Kootte, R. S.; Romijn, J. A.; Ackermans, M. T.; Nieuwdorp, M.; Soeters, M. R.; Serlie, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the major contributor to cardiometabolic complications of obesity. We aimed to (1) establish cutoff points for insulin resistance from euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps (EHCs), (2) identify insulin-resistant obese subjects and (3) predict insulin resistance from routinely

  15. A double EPSPS gene mutation endowing glyphosate resistance shows a remarkably high resistance cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heping; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Jalaludin, Adam; Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2017-12-01

    A novel glyphosate resistance double point mutation (T102I/P106S, TIPS) in the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene has been recently identified for the first time only in the weed species Eleusine indica. Quantification of plant resistance cost associated with the TIPS and the often reported glyphosate resistance single P106S mutation was performed. A significant resistance cost (50% in seed number currency) associated with the homozygous TIPS but not the homozygous P106S EPSPS variant was identified in E. indica plants. The resistance cost associated with the TIPS mutation escalated to 85% in plants under resource competition with rice crops. The resistance cost was not detected in nonhomozygous TIPS plants denoting the recessive nature of the cost associated with the TIPS allele. An excess of 11-fold more shikimate and sixfold more quinate in the shikimate pathway was detected in TIPS plants in the absence of glyphosate treatment compared to wild type, whereas no changes in these compounds were observed in P106S plants when compared to wild type. TIPS plants show altered metabolite levels in several other metabolic pathways that may account for the expression of the observed resistance cost. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2013-07-31

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  17. Plant agricultural streptomycin formulations do not carry antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Stockwell, Virginia O; Duffy, Brion

    2009-07-01

    Streptomycin is used in plant agriculture for bacterial disease control, particularly against fire blight in pome fruit orchards. Concerns that this may increase environmental antibiotic resistance have led to bans or restrictions on use. Experience with antibiotic use in animal feeds raises the possible influence of formulation-delivered resistance genes. We demonstrate that agricultural streptomycin formulations do not carry producer organism resistance genes. By using an optimized extraction procedure, Streptomyces 16S rRNA genes and the streptomycin resistance gene strA were not detected in agricultural streptomycin formulations. This diminishes the likelihood for one potential factor in resistance development due to streptomycin use.

  18. Antibiotic resistance genes in anaerobic bacteria isolated from primary dental root canal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F

    2012-12-01

    Fourty-one bacterial strains isolated from infected dental root canals and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence were screened for the presence of 14 genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, tetracycline and macrolides. Thirteen isolates (32%) were positive for at least one of the target antibiotic resistance genes. These strains carrying at least one antibiotic resistance gene belonged to 11 of the 26 (42%) infected root canals sampled. Two of these positive cases had two strains carrying resistance genes. Six out of 7 Fusobacterium strains harbored at least one of the target resistance genes. One Dialister invisus strain was positive for 3 resistance genes, and 4 other strains carried two of the target genes. Of the 6 antibiotic resistance genes detected in root canal strains, the most prevalent were blaTEM (17% of the strains), tetW (10%), and ermC (10%). Some as-yet-uncharacterized Fusobacterium and Prevotella isolates were positive for blaTEM, cfxA and tetM. Findings demonstrated that an unexpectedly large proportion of dental root canal isolates, including as-yet-uncharacterized strains previously regarded as uncultivated phylotypes, can carry antibiotic resistance genes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Systematic review of allelic exchange experiments aimed at identifying mutations that confer drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebenzahl-Guimaraes, Hanna; Jacobson, Karen R; Farhat, Maha R; Murray, Megan B

    2014-02-01

    Improving our understanding of the relationship between the genotype and the drug resistance phenotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis will aid the development of more accurate molecular diagnostics for drug-resistant tuberculosis. Studies that use direct genetic manipulation to identify the mutations that cause M. tuberculosis drug resistance are superior to associational studies in elucidating an individual mutation's contribution to the drug resistance phenotype. We systematically reviewed the literature for publications reporting allelic exchange experiments in any of the resistance-associated M. tuberculosis genes. We included studies that introduced single point mutations using specialized linkage transduction or site-directed/in vitro mutagenesis and documented a change in the resistance phenotype. We summarize evidence supporting the causal relationship of 54 different mutations in eight genes (katG, inhA, kasA, embB, embC, rpoB, gyrA and gyrB) and one intergenic region (furA-katG) with resistance to isoniazid, the rifamycins, ethambutol and fluoroquinolones. We observed a significant role for the strain genomic background in modulating the resistance phenotype of 21 of these mutations and found examples of where the same drug resistance mutations caused varying levels of resistance to different members of the same drug class. This systematic review highlights those mutations that have been shown to causally change phenotypic resistance in M. tuberculosis and brings attention to a notable lack of allelic exchange data for several of the genes known to be associated with drug resistance.

  20. Identifying Candidate Reprogramming Genes in Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fang; Li, Jingyu; Zhang, Heng; Yang, Xu; An, Tiezhu

    2017-08-01

    Factor-based induced reprogramming approaches have tremendous potential for human regenerative medicine, but the efficiencies of these approaches are still low. In this study, we analyzed the global transcriptional profiles of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (miPSCs) and mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) from seven different labs and present here the first successful clustering according to cell type, not by lab of origin. We identified 2131 different expression genes (DEs) as candidate pluripotency-associated genes by comparing mESCs/miPSCs with somatic cells and 720 DEs between miPSCs and mESCs. Interestingly, there was a significant overlap between the two DE sets. Therefore, we defined the overlap DEs as "consensus DEs" including 313 miPSC-specific genes expressed at a higher level in miPSCs versus mESCs and 184 mESC-specific genes in total and reasoned that these may contribute to the differences in pluripotency between mESCs and miPSCs. A classification of "consensus DEs" according to their different expression levels between somatic cells and mESCs/miPSCs shows that 86% of the miPSC-specific genes are more highly expressed in somatic cells, while 73% of mESC-specific genes are highly expressed in mESCs/miPSCs, indicating that the miPSCs have not efficiently silenced the expression pattern of the somatic cells from which they are derived and failed to completely induce the genes with high expression levels in mESCs. We further revealed a strong correlation between oocyte-enriched factors and insufficiently induced mESC-specific genes and identified 11 hub genes via network analysis. In light of these findings, we postulated that these key hub genes might not only drive somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) reprogramming but also augment the efficiency and quality of miPSC reprogramming.

  1. Marker mapping and resistance gene associations in soybean

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The invention provides novel molecular genetic markers in soybean, where the markers are useful, for example, in the marker-assisted selection of gene alleles that impart disease-resistance, thereby allowing the identification and selection of a disease-resistant plant. The markers also find use in positional cloning of disease-resistance genes.

  2. Detection and coexistence of six categories of resistance genes in Escherichia coli strains from chickens in Anhui Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterise the prevalence of class 1 integrons and gene cassettes, tetracycline-resistance genes, phenicol-resistance genes, 16S rRNA methylase genes, extended-spectrum β-lactamase genes and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance determinants in 184 Escherichia coli isolates from chickens in Anhui Province, China. Susceptibility to 15 antimicrobials was determined using broth micro-dilution. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing were used to characterise the molecular basis of the antibiotic resistance. High rates of antimicrobial resistance were observed; 131 out of the 184 (72.3% isolates were resistant to at least six antimicrobial agents. The prevalences of class 1 integrons, tetracycline-resistance genes, phenicol-resistance genes, 16S rRNA methylase genes, extended-spectrum β-lactamase genes and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance determinants were 49.5, 17.4, 15.8, 0.5, 57.6 and 46.2%, respectively. In 82 isolates, 48 different kinds of coexistence of the different genes were identified. Statistical (χ2 analysis showed that the resistance to amoxicillin, doxycycline, florfenicol, ofloxacin and gentamicin had significant differences (P<0.01 or 0.01resistance genes, which showed a certain correlation between antimicrobial resistance and the presence of resistance genes.

  3. Dissection of Resistance Genes to Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola in UI3 Common Bean Cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ana M; Godoy, Luís; Santalla, Marta

    2017-11-23

    Few quantitative trait loci have been mapped for resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola in common bean. Two F₂ populations were developed from the host differential UI3 cultivar. The objective of this study was to further characterize the resistance to races 1, 5, 7 and 9 of Psp included in UI3. Using a QTL mapping approach, 16 and 11 main-effect QTLs for pod and primary leaf resistance were located on LG10, explaining up to 90% and 26% of the phenotypic variation, respectively. The homologous genomic region corresponding to primary leaf resistance QTLs detected tested positive for the presence of resistance-associated gene cluster encoding nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat (NL), Natural Resistance Associated Macrophage (NRAMP) and Pentatricopeptide Repeat family (PPR) proteins. It is worth noting that the main effect QTLs for resistance in pod were located inside a 3.5 Mb genomic region that included the Phvul.010G021200 gene, which encodes a protein that has the highest sequence similarity to the RIN4 gene of Arabidopsis, and can be considered an important candidate gene for the organ-specific QTLs identified here. These results support that resistance to Psp from UI3 might result from the immune response activated by combinations of R proteins, and suggest the guard model as an important mechanism in pod resistance to halo blight. The candidate genes identified here warrant functional studies that will help in characterizing the actual defense gene(s) in UI3 genotype.

  4. GESearch: An Interactive GUI Tool for Identifying Gene Expression Signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The huge amount of gene expression data generated by microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies present challenges to exploit their biological meanings. When searching for the coexpression genes, the data mining process is largely affected by selection of algorithms. Thus, it is highly desirable to provide multiple options of algorithms in the user-friendly analytical toolkit to explore the gene expression signatures. For this purpose, we developed GESearch, an interactive graphical user interface (GUI toolkit, which is written in MATLAB and supports a variety of gene expression data files. This analytical toolkit provides four models, including the mean, the regression, the delegate, and the ensemble models, to identify the coexpression genes, and enables the users to filter data and to select gene expression patterns by browsing the display window or by importing knowledge-based genes. Subsequently, the utility of this analytical toolkit is demonstrated by analyzing two sets of real-life microarray datasets from cell-cycle experiments. Overall, we have developed an interactive GUI toolkit that allows for choosing multiple algorithms for analyzing the gene expression signatures.

  5. GESearch: An Interactive GUI Tool for Identifying Gene Expression Signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ning; Yin, Hengfu; Liu, Jingjing; Dai, Xiaogang; Yin, Tongming

    2015-01-01

    The huge amount of gene expression data generated by microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies present challenges to exploit their biological meanings. When searching for the coexpression genes, the data mining process is largely affected by selection of algorithms. Thus, it is highly desirable to provide multiple options of algorithms in the user-friendly analytical toolkit to explore the gene expression signatures. For this purpose, we developed GESearch, an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) toolkit, which is written in MATLAB and supports a variety of gene expression data files. This analytical toolkit provides four models, including the mean, the regression, the delegate, and the ensemble models, to identify the coexpression genes, and enables the users to filter data and to select gene expression patterns by browsing the display window or by importing knowledge-based genes. Subsequently, the utility of this analytical toolkit is demonstrated by analyzing two sets of real-life microarray datasets from cell-cycle experiments. Overall, we have developed an interactive GUI toolkit that allows for choosing multiple algorithms for analyzing the gene expression signatures.

  6. Gene Signature in Sessile Serrated Polyps Identifies Colon Cancer Subtype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanth, Priyanka; Bronner, Mary P.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Burt, Randall W.; Neklason, Deborah W.; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Delker, Don A.

    2016-01-01

    Sessile serrated colon adenoma/polyps (SSA/Ps) are found during routine screening colonoscopy and may account for 20–30% of colon cancers. However, differentiating SSA/Ps from hyperplastic polyps (HP) with little risk of cancer is challenging and complementary molecular markers are needed. Additionally, the molecular mechanisms of colon cancer development from SSA/Ps are poorly understood. RNA sequencing was performed on 21 SSA/Ps, 10 HPs, 10 adenomas, 21 uninvolved colon and 20 control colon specimens. Differential expression and leave-one-out cross validation methods were used to define a unique gene signature of SSA/Ps. Our SSA/P gene signature was evaluated in colon cancer RNA-Seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to identify a subtype of colon cancers that may develop from SSA/Ps. A total of 1422 differentially expressed genes were found in SSA/Ps relative to controls. Serrated polyposis syndrome (n=12) and sporadic SSA/Ps (n=9) exhibited almost complete (96%) gene overlap. A 51-gene panel in SSA/P showed similar expression in a subset of TCGA colon cancers with high microsatellite instability (MSI-H). A smaller seven-gene panel showed high sensitivity and specificity in identifying BRAF mutant, CpG island methylator phenotype high (CIMP-H) and MLH1 silenced colon cancers. We describe a unique gene signature in SSA/Ps that identifies a subset of colon cancers likely to develop through the serrated pathway. These gene panels may be utilized for improved differentiation of SSA/Ps from HPs and provide insights into novel molecular pathways altered in colon cancer arising from the serrated pathway. PMID:27026680

  7. A 6-gene signature identifies four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogner Per

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are currently three postulated genomic subtypes of the childhood tumour neuroblastoma (NB; Type 1, Type 2A, and Type 2B. The most aggressive forms of NB are characterized by amplification of the oncogene MYCN (MNA and low expression of the favourable marker NTRK1. Recently, mutations or high expression of the familial predisposition gene Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK was associated to unfavourable biology of sporadic NB. Also, various other genes have been linked to NB pathogenesis. Results The present study explores subgroup discrimination by gene expression profiling using three published microarray studies on NB (47 samples. Four distinct clusters were identified by Principal Components Analysis (PCA in two separate data sets, which could be verified by an unsupervised hierarchical clustering in a third independent data set (101 NB samples using a set of 74 discriminative genes. The expression signature of six NB-associated genes ALK, BIRC5, CCND1, MYCN, NTRK1, and PHOX2B, significantly discriminated the four clusters (p ALK, BIRC5, and PHOX2B, and was significantly associated with higher tumour stage, poor outcome and poor survival compared to the Type 1-corresponding favourable group (INSS stage 4 and/or dead of disease, p Conclusions Based on expression profiling we have identified four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma, which can be distinguished by a 6-gene signature. The fourth subgroup has not been described elsewhere, and efforts are currently made to further investigate this group's specific characteristics.

  8. Identifying co-targets to fight drug resistance based on a random walk model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liang-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug resistance has now posed more severe and emergent threats to human health and infectious disease treatment. However, wet-lab approaches alone to counter drug resistance have so far still achieved limited success due to less knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance. Our approach apply a heuristic search algorithm in order to extract active network under drug treatment and use a random walk model to identify potential co-targets for effective antibacterial drugs. Results We use interactome network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and gene expression data which are treated with two kinds of antibiotic, Isoniazid and Ethionamide as our test data. Our analysis shows that the active drug-treated networks are associated with the trigger of fatty acid metabolism and synthesis and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH-related processes and those results are consistent with the recent experimental findings. Efflux pumps processes appear to be the major mechanisms of resistance but SOS response is significantly up-regulation under Isoniazid treatment. We also successfully identify the potential co-targets with literature confirmed evidences which are related to the glycine-rich membrane, adenosine triphosphate energy and cell wall processes. Conclusions With gene expression and interactome data supported, our study points out possible pathways leading to the emergence of drug resistance under drug treatment. We develop a computational workflow for giving new insights to bacterial drug resistance which can be gained by a systematic and global analysis of the bacterial regulation network. Our study also discovers the potential co-targets with good properties in biological and graph theory aspects to overcome the problem of drug resistance.

  9. Microsatellite Scan Identifies New Candidate Genes for Susceptibility to Alcoholic Chronic Pancreatitis in Japanese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Kitahara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse is one of the most common risk factor for chronic pancreatitis, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to identify genes that contribute to susceptibility or resistance for alcoholic chronic pancreatitis by screening the whole genome. Sixty-five patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (63 men and 2 women, mean age 55.2 years and 99 healthy Japanese controls were enrolled in this study. This was an association study using 400 polymorphic microsatellite markers with an average spacing of 10.8 cM distributed throughout the whole genome. This search revealed 10 candidate susceptibility regions and 5 candidate resistant regions throughout the genome. No specific microsatellite markers were detected in association with previously reported susceptibility genes for chronic pancreatitis, such as PRSS1, PRSS2, CTRC, SPINK1, CFTR, ALDH2, and CYP2E1. Among the statistically significant markers, D15S1007 on chromosome 15q14 showed strong evidence for disease susceptibility (70.8% vs. 35.1%, Pc = 0.0001. Within 500 kb of D15S1007, several genes were candidate genes for susceptibility, including FMN1, DKFZP686C2281, LOC440268, RYR3, and AVEN, This study identified 10 candidate susceptibility and 5 candidate resistant regions that may contain genes involved in ACP pathogenesis.

  10. Genome-wide functional screen identifies a compendium of genes affecting sensitivity to tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Pereira, Ana M; Sims, David; Dexter, Tim; Fenwick, Kerry; Assiotis, Ioannis; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Hakas, Jarle; Zvelebil, Marketa; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2012-02-21

    Therapies that target estrogen signaling have made a very considerable contribution to reducing mortality from breast cancer. However, resistance to tamoxifen remains a major clinical problem. Here we have used a genome-wide functional profiling approach to identify multiple genes that confer resistance or sensitivity to tamoxifen. Combining whole-genome shRNA screening with massively parallel sequencing, we have profiled the impact of more than 56,670 RNA interference reagents targeting 16,487 genes on the cellular response to tamoxifen. This screen, along with subsequent validation experiments, identifies a compendium of genes whose silencing causes tamoxifen resistance (including BAP1, CLPP, GPRC5D, NAE1, NF1, NIPBL, NSD1, RAD21, RARG, SMC3, and UBA3) and also a set of genes whose silencing causes sensitivity to this endocrine agent (C10orf72, C15orf55/NUT, EDF1, ING5, KRAS, NOC3L, PPP1R15B, RRAS2, TMPRSS2, and TPM4). Multiple individual genes, including NF1, a regulator of RAS signaling, also correlate with clinical outcome after tamoxifen treatment.

  11. Contemporary Approaches for Identifying Rare Bone Disease Causing Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Charles R; Clemens, Thomas L

    Recent improvements in the speed and accuracy of DNA sequencing, together with increasingly sophisticated mathematical approaches for annotating gene networks, have revolutionized the field of human genetics and made these once time consuming approaches assessable to most investigators. In the field of bone research, a particularly active area of gene discovery has occurred in patients with rare bone disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) that are caused by mutations in single genes. In this perspective, we highlight some of these technological advances and describe how they have been used to identify the genetic determinants underlying two previously unexplained cases of OI. The widespread availability of advanced methods for DNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis can be expected to greatly facilitate identification of novel gene networks that normally function to control bone formation and maintenance.

  12. Identifying lipid metabolism genes in pig liver after clenbuterol administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiuyue; Zhang, Jin; Guo, Wei; Zhao, Yiqiang; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Li, Ning

    2012-06-01

    Clenbuterol is a repartition agent (beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist) that can decrease fat deposition and increase skeletal muscle growth at manageable dose. To better understand the molecular mechanism of Clenbuterol's action, GeneChips and real-time PCR were used to compare the gene expression profiles of liver tissue in pigs with/without administration of Clenbuterol. Metabolism effects and the global gene expression profiles of liver tissue from Clenbuterol-treated and untreated pigs were conducted. Function enrichment tests showed that the differentially expressed genes are enriched in glycoprotein protein, plasma membrane, fatty acid and amino acid metabolic process, and cell differentiation and signal transduction groups. Pathway mining analysis revealed that physiological pathways such as MAPK, cell adhesion molecules, and the insulin signaling pathway, were remarkably regulated when Clenbuterol was administered. Gene prioritization algorithm was used to associate a number of important differentially expressed genes with lipid metabolism in response to Clenbuterol. Genes identified as differentially expressed in this study will be candidates for further investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved in Clenbuterol's effects on adipose and skeletal muscle tissue.

  13. Molecular characterization of a new efficiently transducing bacteriophage identified in meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Marian; Pantůček, Roman; Růžičková, Vladislava; Doškař, Jirˇí

    2016-01-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, generalized transduction mediated by temperate bacteriophages represents a highly efficient way of transferring antibiotic resistance genes between strains. In the present study, we identified and characterized in detail a new efficiently transducing bacteriophage of the family Siphoviridae, designated ϕJB, which resides as a prophage in the meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain Jevons B. Whole-genome sequencing followed by detailed in silico analysis uncovered a linear dsDNA genome consisting of 43 ,12 bp and comprising 70 ORFs, of which ∼40 encoded proteins with unknown function. A global genome alignment of ϕJB and other efficiently transducing phages ϕ11, ϕ53, ϕ80, ϕ80α and ϕNM4 showed a high degree of homology with ϕNM4 and substantial differences with regard to other phages. Using a model transduction system with a well-defined donor and recipient, ϕJB transferred the tetracycline resistance plasmid pT181 and a penicillinase plasmid with outstanding frequencies, beating most of the above-mentioned phages by an order of magnitude. Moreover, ϕJB demonstrated high frequencies of transferring antibiotic resistance plasmids even upon induction from a lysogenic donor strain. Considering such transducing potential, ϕJB and related bacteriophages may serve as a suitable tool for elucidating the nature of transduction and its contribution to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes in naturally occurring MRSA populations.

  14. DNA tagging of blast resistant gene(s in three Brazilian rice cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Sandhu

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice blast is the most important fungal disease of rice and is caused by Pyricularia oryzae Sacc. (Telomorph Magnoporthe grisea Barr.. Seven randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers OPA5, OPG17, OPG18, OPG19, OPF9, OPF17 and OPF19 showed very clear polymorphism in resistant cultivar lines which differed from susceptible lines. By comparing different susceptible lines, nine DNA amplifications of seven primers (OPA5(1000, OPA5(1200, OPG17(700, OPG18(850, OPG19(500, OPG19(600, OPF9(600, OPF17(1200 and OPF19(600 were identified as dominant markers for the blast resistant gene in resistant cultivar lines. These loci facilitate the indirect scoring of blast resistant and blast susceptible genotypes. The codomine RAPDs markers will facilitate marker-assisted selection of the blast resistant gene in two blast resistant genotypes of rice (Labelle and Line 11 and will be useful in rice breeding programs.

  15. Identifying genes for neurobehavioural traits in rodents: progress and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Baud

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Identifying genes and pathways that contribute to differences in neurobehavioural traits is a key goal in psychiatric research. Despite considerable success in identifying quantitative trait loci (QTLs associated with behaviour in laboratory rodents, pinpointing the causal variants and genes is more challenging. For a long time, the main obstacle was the size of QTLs, which could encompass tens if not hundreds of genes. However, recent studies have exploited mouse and rat resources that allow mapping of phenotypes to narrow intervals, encompassing only a few genes. Here, we review these studies, showcase the rodent resources they have used and highlight the insights into neurobehavioural traits provided to date. We discuss what we see as the biggest challenge in the field – translating QTLs into biological knowledge by experimentally validating and functionally characterizing candidate genes – and propose that the CRISPR/Cas genome-editing system holds the key to overcoming this obstacle. Finally, we challenge traditional views on inbred versus outbred resources in the light of recent resource and technology developments.

  16. Characterization of the Maize Chitinase Genes and Their Effect on Aspergillus flavus and Aflatoxin Accumulation Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Leigh K.; Mylroie, J. Erik; Oliveira, Dafne A.; Smith, J. Spencer; Ozkan, Seval; Windham, Gary L.; Williams, W. Paul; Warburton, Marilyn L.

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a crop of global importance, but prone to contamination by aflatoxins produced by fungi in the genus Aspergillus. The development of resistant germplasm and the identification of genes contributing to resistance would aid in the reduction of the problem with a minimal need for intervention by farmers. Chitinolytic enzymes respond to attack by potential pathogens and have been demonstrated to increase insect and fungal resistance in plants. Here, all chitinase genes in the maize genome were characterized via sequence diversity and expression patterns. Recent evolution within this gene family was noted. Markers from within each gene were developed and used to map the phenotypic effect on resistance of each gene in up to four QTL mapping populations and one association panel. Seven chitinase genes were identified that had alleles associated with increased resistance to aflatoxin accumulation and A. flavus infection in field grown maize. The chitinase in bin 1.05 identified a new and highly significant QTL, while chitinase genes in bins 2.04 and 5.03 fell directly beneath the peaks of previously published QTL. The expression patterns of these genes corroborate possible grain resistance mechanisms. Markers from within the gene sequences or very closely linked to them are presented to aid in the use of marker assisted selection to improve this trait. PMID:26090679

  17. Fine mapping of the Asian soybean rust resistance gene Rpp2 from soybean PI 230970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Neil; Kim, Myungsik; King, Zachary R; Harris, Donna K; Buck, James W; Li, Zenglu; Diers, Brian W

    2015-03-01

    Asian soybean rust (ASR) resistance gene Rpp2 has been fine mapped into a 188.1 kb interval on Glyma.Wm82.a2, which contains a series of plant resistance ( R ) genes. Asian soybean rust (ASR), caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrihizi Syd. & P. Syd., is a serious disease in major soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] production countries worldwide and causes yield losses up to 75 %. Defining the exact chromosomal position of ASR resistance genes is critical for improving the effectiveness of marker-assisted selection (MAS) for resistance and for cloning these genes. The objective of this study was to fine map the ASR resistance gene Rpp2 from the plant introduction (PI) 230970. Rpp2 was previously mapped within a 12.9-cM interval on soybean chromosome 16. The fine mapping was initiated by identifying recombination events in F2 and F3 plants using simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers that flank the gene. Seventeen recombinant plants were identified and then tested with additional genetic markers saturating the gene region to localize the positions of each recombination. The progeny of these selected plants were tested for resistance to ASR and with SSR markers resulting in the mapping of Rpp2 to a 188.1 kb interval on the Williams 82 reference genome (Glyma.Wm82.a2). Twelve genes including ten toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-nucleotide-binding site (NBS)-leucine-rich repeat (LRR) genes were predicted to exist in this interval on the Glyma.Wm82.a2.v1 gene model map. Eight of these ten genes were homologous to the Arabidopsis TIR-NBS-LRR gene AT5G17680.1. The identified SSR and SNP markers close to Rpp2 and the candidate gene information presented in this study will be significant resources for MAS and gene cloning research.

  18. Full-Genome Sequencing Identifies in the Genetic Background Several Determinants That Modulate the Resistance Phenotype in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Carrying the NovelmecCGene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milheiriço, Catarina; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Tomasz, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Most methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics due to the presence of the mecA gene, encoding an extra penicillin-binding protein (PBP2A) that has low affinity for virtually all beta-lactam antibiotics. Recently, a new resistance determinant-the mecC gene-was identified in S. aureus isolates recovered from humans and dairy cattle. Although having typically low MICs to beta-lactam antibiotics, MRSA strains with the mecC determinant are also capable of expressing high levels of oxacillin resistance when in an optimal genetic background. In order to test the impact of extensive beta-lactam selection on the emergence of mecC -carrying strains with high levels of antibiotic resistance, we exposed the prototype mecC -carrying MRSA strain, LGA251, to increasing concentrations of oxacillin. LGA251 was able to rapidly adapt to high concentrations of oxacillin in growth medium. In such laboratory mutants with increased levels of oxacillin resistance, we identified mutations in genes with no relationship to the mecC regulatory system, indicating that the genetic background plays an important role in the establishment of the levels of oxacillin resistance. Our data also indicate that the stringent stress response plays a critical role in the beta-lactam antibiotic resistance phenotype of MRSA strains carrying the mecC determinant. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Genetic analysis and mapping of genes for resistance to multiple strains of Soybean mosaic virus in a single resistant soybean accession PI 96983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongqing; Zheng, Guijie; Han, Lu; Dagang, Wang; Yang, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Saihua; Zhi, Haijian

    2013-07-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is one of the most broadly distributed soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) diseases and causes severe yield loss and seed quality deficiency. Multiple studies have proved that a single dominant gene can confer resistance to several SMV strains. Plant introduction (PI) 96983 has been reported to contain SMV resistance genes (e.g., Rsv1 and Rsc14) on chromosome 13. The objective of this study was to delineate the genetics of resistance to SMV in PI 96983 and determine whether one gene can control resistance to more than one Chinese SMV strain. In this study, PI 96983 was identified as resistant and Nannong 1138-2 was identified as susceptible to four SMV strains SC3, SC6, SC7, and SC17. Genetic maps based on 783 F2 individuals from the cross of PI 96983 × Nannong 1138-2 showed that the gene(s) conferring resistance to SC3, SC6, and SC17 were between SSR markers BARCSOYSSR_13_1114 and BARCSOYSSR_13_1136, whereas SC7 was between markers BARCSOYSSR_13_1140 and BARCSOYSSR_13_1185. The physical map based on 58 recombinant lines confirmed these results. The resistance gene for SC7 was positioned between BARCSOYSSR_13_1140 and BARCSOYSSR_13_1155, while the resistance gene(s) for SC3, SC6, and SC17 were between BARCSOYSSR_13_1128 and BARCSOYSSR_13_1136. We concluded that, there were two dominant resistance genes flanking Rsv1 or one of them at the reported genomic location of Rsv1. One of them (designated as "Rsc-pm") conditions resistance for SC3, SC6, and SC17 and another (designated as "Rsc-ps") confers resistance for SC7. The two tightly linked genes identified in this study would be helpful to cloning of resistance genes and breeding of multiple resistances soybean cultivars to SMV through marker-assisted selection (MAS).

  20. A 6-gene signature identifies four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abel, Frida

    2011-04-14

    Abstract Background There are currently three postulated genomic subtypes of the childhood tumour neuroblastoma (NB); Type 1, Type 2A, and Type 2B. The most aggressive forms of NB are characterized by amplification of the oncogene MYCN (MNA) and low expression of the favourable marker NTRK1. Recently, mutations or high expression of the familial predisposition gene Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) was associated to unfavourable biology of sporadic NB. Also, various other genes have been linked to NB pathogenesis. Results The present study explores subgroup discrimination by gene expression profiling using three published microarray studies on NB (47 samples). Four distinct clusters were identified by Principal Components Analysis (PCA) in two separate data sets, which could be verified by an unsupervised hierarchical clustering in a third independent data set (101 NB samples) using a set of 74 discriminative genes. The expression signature of six NB-associated genes ALK, BIRC5, CCND1, MYCN, NTRK1, and PHOX2B, significantly discriminated the four clusters (p < 0.05, one-way ANOVA test). PCA clusters p1, p2, and p3 were found to correspond well to the postulated subtypes 1, 2A, and 2B, respectively. Remarkably, a fourth novel cluster was detected in all three independent data sets. This cluster comprised mainly 11q-deleted MNA-negative tumours with low expression of ALK, BIRC5, and PHOX2B, and was significantly associated with higher tumour stage, poor outcome and poor survival compared to the Type 1-corresponding favourable group (INSS stage 4 and\\/or dead of disease, p < 0.05, Fisher\\'s exact test). Conclusions Based on expression profiling we have identified four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma, which can be distinguished by a 6-gene signature. The fourth subgroup has not been described elsewhere, and efforts are currently made to further investigate this group\\'s specific characteristics.

  1. Integrating mean and variance heterogeneities to identify differentially expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Weiwei; An, Qiang; Zhao, Jinying; Qin, Huaizhen

    2016-12-06

    In functional genomics studies, tests on mean heterogeneity have been widely employed to identify differentially expressed genes with distinct mean expression levels under different experimental conditions. Variance heterogeneity (aka, the difference between condition-specific variances) of gene expression levels is simply neglected or calibrated for as an impediment. The mean heterogeneity in the expression level of a gene reflects one aspect of its distribution alteration; and variance heterogeneity induced by condition change may reflect another aspect. Change in condition may alter both mean and some higher-order characteristics of the distributions of expression levels of susceptible genes. In this report, we put forth a conception of mean-variance differentially expressed (MVDE) genes, whose expression means and variances are sensitive to the change in experimental condition. We mathematically proved the null independence of existent mean heterogeneity tests and variance heterogeneity tests. Based on the independence, we proposed an integrative mean-variance test (IMVT) to combine gene-wise mean heterogeneity and variance heterogeneity induced by condition change. The IMVT outperformed its competitors under comprehensive simulations of normality and Laplace settings. For moderate samples, the IMVT well controlled type I error rates, and so did existent mean heterogeneity test (i.e., the Welch t test (WT), the moderated Welch t test (MWT)) and the procedure of separate tests on mean and variance heterogeneities (SMVT), but the likelihood ratio test (LRT) severely inflated type I error rates. In presence of variance heterogeneity, the IMVT appeared noticeably more powerful than all the valid mean heterogeneity tests. Application to the gene profiles of peripheral circulating B raised solid evidence of informative variance heterogeneity. After adjusting for background data structure, the IMVT replicated previous discoveries and identified novel experiment

  2. [Establishment of 5 resistant ovarian cancer cell strains and expression of resistance-related genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Ying-zi; Li, Li; Li, Dang-rong; Zhang, Wei; Tang, Bu-jian

    2004-06-01

    To investigate expression difference of several drug resistance related genes between sensitive and resistant ovarian carcinoma cells. Cell lines resistant to cisplatin, carboplatin and taxol were established from ovarian carcinoma cell lines of SKOV3 and A2780, and their biological features were detected. The expressions of several genes related to drug resistance were measured by RT-PCR method. (1) The values of resistance index (RI) of resistant cells to relevant drugs were elevated 3 times or more, with different degrees of cross-resistance to several other drugs (RI 2 approximately 20). They grew more slowly than primary cells (Td elongated 1.4 approximately 2.4 times, P 0.05). Intracellular concentrations of relevant drugs were reduced 2.0 approximately 8.5 times in resistant cells (P p53, lung resistance protein-1 (LRP-1), multiple drug resistance related protein-1 (MRP-1) genes were expressed at lower levels in resistant cells than in sensitive cells; while protein kinase C (PKC), topoisomerase (topo) I, and topo II beta were expressed higher, no obvious alterations were found concerning glutathione S transferase-pi (GST-pi), and topo II alpha. Expression of multiple drug resistance-1 (MDR-1) gene was either elevated or reduced in different cells. The expressions of resistance related genes were widely different in different kinds of resistant cells, suggesting more than one pathway leading to resistance transformation. This adds more difficulties for clinical management.

  3. Methods for identifying an essential gene in a prokaryotic microorganism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizuya, Hiroaki

    2006-01-31

    Methods are provided for the rapid identification of essential or conditionally essential DNA segments in any species of haploid cell (one copy chromosome per cell) that is capable of being transformed by artificial means and is capable of undergoing DNA recombination. This system offers an enhanced means of identifying essential function genes in diploid pathogens, such as gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

  4. Systematic Analysis and Comparison of Nucleotide-Binding Site Disease Resistance Genes in a Diploid Cotton Gossypium raimondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hengling; Li, Wei; Sun, Xiwei; Zhu, Shuijin; Zhu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Plant disease resistance genes are a key component of defending plants from a range of pathogens. The majority of these resistance genes belong to the super-family that harbors a Nucleotide-binding site (NBS). A number of studies have focused on NBS-encoding genes in disease resistant breeding programs for diverse plants. However, little information has been reported with an emphasis on systematic analysis and comparison of NBS-encoding genes in cotton. To fill this gap of knowledge, in this study, we identified and investigated the NBS-encoding resistance genes in cotton using the whole genome sequence information of Gossypium raimondii. Totally, 355 NBS-encoding resistance genes were identified. Analyses of the conserved motifs and structural diversity showed that the most two distinct features for these genes are the high proportion of non-regular NBS genes and the high diversity of N-termini domains. Analyses of the physical locations and duplications of NBS-encoding genes showed that gene duplication of disease resistance genes could play an important role in cotton by leading to an increase in the functional diversity of the cotton NBS-encoding genes. Analyses of phylogenetic comparisons indicated that, in cotton, the NBS-encoding genes with TIR domain not only have their own evolution pattern different from those of genes without TIR domain, but also have their own species-specific pattern that differs from those of TIR genes in other plants. Analyses of the correlation between disease resistance QTL and NBS-encoding resistance genes showed that there could be more than half of the disease resistance QTL associated to the NBS-encoding genes in cotton, which agrees with previous studies establishing that more than half of plant resistance genes are NBS-encoding genes. PMID:23936305

  5. Identifying key genes in glaucoma based on a benchmarked dataset and the gene regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Wang, Qiao-Ling; Zhang, Meng-Hui

    2017-10-01

    The current study aimed to identify key genes in glaucoma based on a benchmarked dataset and gene regulatory network (GRN). Local and global noise was added to the gene expression dataset to produce a benchmarked dataset. Differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) between patients with glaucoma and normal controls were identified utilizing the Linear Models for Microarray Data (Limma) package based on benchmarked dataset. A total of 5 GRN inference methods, including Zscore, GeneNet, context likelihood of relatedness (CLR) algorithm, Partial Correlation coefficient with Information Theory (PCIT) and GEne Network Inference with Ensemble of Trees (Genie3) were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and precision and recall (PR) curves. The interference method with the best performance was selected to construct the GRN. Subsequently, topological centrality (degree, closeness and betweenness) was conducted to identify key genes in the GRN of glaucoma. Finally, the key genes were validated by performing reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). A total of 176 DEGs were detected from the benchmarked dataset. The ROC and PR curves of the 5 methods were analyzed and it was determined that Genie3 had a clear advantage over the other methods; thus, Genie3 was used to construct the GRN. Following topological centrality analysis, 14 key genes for glaucoma were identified, including IL6 , EPHA2 and GSTT1 and 5 of these 14 key genes were validated by RT-qPCR. Therefore, the current study identified 14 key genes in glaucoma, which may be potential biomarkers to use in the diagnosis of glaucoma and aid in identifying the molecular mechanism of this disease.

  6. Microarray-based Detection of Antibiotic Resisteance Genes in Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Aarts, H.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the presented study, 143 Salmonella isolates belonging to 26 different serovars were screened for the presence of antibiotic resistance genes by microarray analysis. The microarray contained a total of 223 oligonucleotides representing genes encoding for resistance to the following antibiotic

  7. Gene interactions and genetics of blast resistance and yield ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Oryza sativa L.) ... four blast resistance genes Pi1, Pi2, Pi33 and Pi54 in combination were used to study the nature and magnitude of gene action for disease resistance and yield attributes. ... Please take note of this change.

  8. Molecular detection of disease resistance genes to powdery mildew ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to detect the presence of disease resistance genes to infection of wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici) in selected wheat cultivars from China using molecular markers. Genomic DNA of sixty cultivars was extracted and tested for the presence of selected prominent resistance genes to ...

  9. Codon-optimized antibiotic resistance gene improves efficiency of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Success rate of transient transformation and cell growth in selective culture were significantly increased by use of fgmR instead of a native gentamicin resistance gene, suggesting that codon optimization improved translation efficiency of the marker gene and increased antibiotic resistance. Our result shows that similarity in ...

  10. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic mapping indicated the introgression of stripe rust resistance gene on wheat chromosome. 5DS in the region carrying leaf rust resistance gene LrAc, but as an independent introgression. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-tagged site (STS) markers designed from the survey sequence data of 5DS ...

  11. Genome scanning for identification of resistance gene analogs (RGAs)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Disease resistance in plants is a desirable economic trait. Many disease resistance genes from various plants have been cloned so far. The gene products of some of these can be distinguished by the presence of an N terminal nucleotide binding site and a C-terminal stretch of leucine-rich repeats. Oligonucleotides already ...

  12. Genes Expressed Differentially in Hessian Fly Larvae Feeding in Resistant and Susceptible Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Shun Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor, is a destructive pest of wheat worldwide and mainly controlled by deploying resistant cultivars. In this study, we investigated the genes that were expressed differentially between larvae in resistant plants and those in susceptible plants through RNA sequencing on the Illumina platform. Informative genes were 11,832, 14,861, 15,708, and 15,071 for the comparisons between larvae in resistant versus susceptible plants for 0.5, 1, 3, and 5 days, respectively, after larvae had reached the feeding site. The transcript abundance corresponding to 5401, 6902, 8457, and 5202 of the informative genes exhibited significant differences (p ≤ 0.05 in the respective paired comparisons. Overall, genes involved in nutrient metabolism, RNA and protein synthesis exhibited lower transcript abundance in larvae from resistant plants, indicating that resistant plants inhibited nutrient metabolism and protein production in larvae. Interestingly, the numbers of cytochrome P450 genes with higher transcript abundance in larvae from resistant plants were comparable to, or higher than those with lower transcript abundance, indicating that toxic chemicals from resistant plants may have played important roles in Hessian fly larval death. Our study also identified several families of genes encoding secreted salivary gland proteins (SSGPs that were expressed at early stage of 1st instar larvae and with more genes with higher transcript abundance in larvae from resistant plants. Those SSGPs are candidate effectors with important roles in plant manipulation.

  13. Class 1 and 2 integrons, sul resistance genes and antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from Dongjiang River, South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Haochang; Ying Guangguo; Tao Ran; Zhang Ruiquan; Zhao Jianliang; Liu Yousheng

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic susceptibility, detection of sul gene types and presence of class 1, 2 and 3 integrons and gene cassettes using PCR assays were investigated in 3456 Escherichia coli isolates obtained from 38 sampling sites of the Dongjiang River catchment in the dry and wet seasons. 89.1% of the isolates were resistant and 87.5% showed resistance to at least three antibiotics. sul2 was detected most frequently in 89.2% of 1403 SXT-resistant isolates. The presence of integrons (class 1 and 2) was frequently observed (82.3%) while no class 3 integron was found. In these integrons, 21 resistance genes of 14 gene cassette arrays and 10 different families of resistance genes were identified. Three gene cassette arrays, aac(6')-Ib-cr-aar-3-dfrA27-aadA16, aacA4-catB3-dfrA1 and aadA2-lnuF, were detected for the first time in surface water. The results showed that bacterial resistance in the catchment was seriously influenced by human activities, especially discharge of wastewater. Highlights: ► Antibiotic resistance was investigated for a river catchment of southern China. ► 87.5% of E coli isolates showed resistance to at least three antibiotics. ► The presence of integrons (class 1 and 2) was frequently observed (82.3%). ► Bacterial resistance in the catchment was seriously influenced by human activities. - Bacterial resistance to antibiotics in a catchment is related to the discharge of wastewater into the aquatic environment.

  14. Pyramiding B genes in cotton achieves broader but not always higher resistance to bacterial blight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essenberg, Margaret; Bayles, Melanie B; Pierce, Margaret L; Verhalen, Laval M

    2014-10-01

    Near-isogenic lines of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) carrying single, race-specific genes B4, BIn, and b7 for resistance to bacterial blight were used to develop a pyramid of lines with all possible combinations of two and three genes to learn whether the pyramid could achieve broad and high resistance approaching that of L. A. Brinkerhoff's exceptional line Im216. Isogenic strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. malvacearum carrying single avirulence (avr) genes were used to identify plants carrying specific resistance (B) genes. Under field conditions in north-central Oklahoma, pyramid lines exhibited broader resistance to individual races and, consequently, higher resistance to a race mixture. It was predicted that lines carrying two or three B genes would also exhibit higher resistance to race 1, which possesses many avr genes. Although some enhancements were observed, they did not approach the level of resistance of Im216. In a growth chamber, bacterial populations attained by race 1 in and on leaves of the pyramid lines decreased significantly with increasing number of B genes in only one of four experiments. The older lines, Im216 and AcHR, exhibited considerably lower bacterial populations than any of the one-, two-, or three-B-gene lines. A spreading collapse of spray-inoculated AcBIn and AcBInb7 leaves appears to be a defense response (conditioned by BIn) that is out of control.

  15. Analysis of rice PDR-like ABC transporter genes in sheath blight resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most damaging diseases of rice worldwide. To understand the molecular mechanism of resistance, we identified 450 differentially expressed genes in a resistant rice cultivar Jasmine 85 after R. solani infection with a combination of DNA microar...

  16. A stochastic model for identifying differential gene pair co-expression patterns in prostate cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Yu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of gene differential co-expression patterns between cancer stages is a newly developing method to reveal the underlying molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Most researches of this subject lack an algorithm useful for performing a statistical significance assessment involving cancer progression. Lacking this specific algorithm is apparently absent in identifying precise gene pairs correlating to cancer progression. Results In this investigation we studied gene pair co-expression change by using a stochastic process model for approximating the underlying dynamic procedure of the co-expression change during cancer progression. Also, we presented a novel analytical method named 'Stochastic process model for Identifying differentially co-expressed Gene pair' (SIG method. This method has been applied to two well known prostate cancer data sets: hormone sensitive versus hormone resistant, and healthy versus cancerous. From these data sets, 428,582 gene pairs and 303,992 gene pairs were identified respectively. Afterwards, we used two different current statistical methods to the same data sets, which were developed to identify gene pair differential co-expression and did not consider cancer progression in algorithm. We then compared these results from three different perspectives: progression analysis, gene pair identification effectiveness analysis, and pathway enrichment analysis. Statistical methods were used to quantify the quality and performance of these different perspectives. They included: Re-identification Scale (RS and Progression Score (PS in progression analysis, True Positive Rate (TPR in gene pair analysis, and Pathway Enrichment Score (PES in pathway analysis. Our results show small values of RS and large values of PS, TPR, and PES; thus, suggesting that gene pairs identified by the SIG method are highly correlated with cancer progression, and highly enriched in disease-specific pathways. From

  17. Identifying Chloris Species from Cuban Citrus Orchards and Determining Their Glyphosate-Resistance Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo R. Bracamonte

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Chloris genus is a C4 photosynthetic species mainly distributed in tropical and subtropical regions. Populations of three Chloris species occurring in citrus orchards from central Cuba, under long history glyphosate-based weed management, were studied for glyphosate-resistant status by characterizing their herbicide resistance/tolerance mechanisms. Morphological and molecular analyses allowed these species to be identified as C. ciliata Sw., Chloris elata Desv., and Chloris barbata Sw. Based on the glyphosate rate that causes 50% mortality of the treated plants, glyphosate resistance (R was confirmed only in C. elata, The R population was 6.1-fold more resistant compared to the susceptible (S population. In addition, R plants of C. elata accumulated 4.6-fold less shikimate after glyphosate application than S plants. Meanwhile, populations of C. barbata and C. ciliata with or without glyphosate application histories showed similar LD50 values and shikimic acid accumulation rates, demonstrating that resistance to glyphosate have not evolved in these species. Plants of R and S populations of C. elata differed in 14C-glyphosate absorption and translocation. The R population exhibited 27.3-fold greater 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS activity than the S population due to a target site mutation corresponding to a Pro-106-Ser substitution found in the EPSPS gene. These reports show the innate tolerance to glyphosate of C. barbata and C. ciliata, and confirm the resistance of C. elata to this herbicide, showing that both non-target site and target-site mechanisms are involved in its resistance to glyphosate. This is the first case of herbicide resistance in Cuba.

  18. Transfer of tetracycline resistance gene (tetr) between replicons in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing among the isolates showed resistance to amoxicillin (92%), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (84.4%), tetracycline (71.4%), gentamycin (43.5%), nalidixic acid (38.3%) and nitrofurantoin (7.9%). E. coli showed the highest resistance to most of the antibiotics. Tetracycline resistance gene was ...

  19. Gene-network analysis identifies susceptibility genes related to glycobiology in autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert van der Zwaag

    Full Text Available The recent identification of copy-number variation in the human genome has opened up new avenues for the discovery of positional candidate genes underlying complex genetic disorders, especially in the field of psychiatric disease. One major challenge that remains is pinpointing the susceptibility genes in the multitude of disease-associated loci. This challenge may be tackled by reconstruction of functional gene-networks from the genes residing in these loci. We applied this approach to autism spectrum disorder (ASD, and identified the copy-number changes in the DNA of 105 ASD patients and 267 healthy individuals with Illumina Humanhap300 Beadchips. Subsequently, we used a human reconstructed gene-network, Prioritizer, to rank candidate genes in the segmental gains and losses in our autism cohort. This analysis highlighted several candidate genes already known to be mutated in cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders, including RAI1, BRD1, and LARGE. In addition, the LARGE gene was part of a sub-network of seven genes functioning in glycobiology, present in seven copy-number changes specifically identified in autism patients with limited co-morbidity. Three of these seven copy-number changes were de novo in the patients. In autism patients with a complex phenotype and healthy controls no such sub-network was identified. An independent systematic analysis of 13 published autism susceptibility loci supports the involvement of genes related to glycobiology as we also identified the same or similar genes from those loci. Our findings suggest that the occurrence of genomic gains and losses of genes associated with glycobiology are important contributors to the development of ASD.

  20. Identification and characterization of antibiotic resistance genes in Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactobacillus plantarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egervärn, M; Roos, S; Lindmark, H

    2009-11-01

    The study aimed to identify the resistance genes mediating atypical minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin and chloramphenicol within two sets of representative strains of the species Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactobacillus plantarum and to characterize identified genes by means of gene location and sequencing of flanking regions. A tet(W) gene was found in 24 of the 28 Lact. reuteri strains with atypical MIC for tetracycline, whereas four of the six strains with atypical MIC for erythromycin were positive for erm(B) and one strain each was positive for erm(C) and erm(T). The two Lact. plantarum strains with atypical MIC for tetracycline harboured a plasmid-encoded tet(M) gene. The majority of the tet(W)-positive Lact. reuteri strains and all erm-positive Lact. reuteri strains carried the genes on plasmids, as determined by Southern blot and a real-time PCR method developed in this study. Most of the antibiotic-resistant strains of Lact. reuteri and Lact. plantarum harboured known plasmid-encoded resistance genes. Examples of putative transfer machineries adjacent to both plasmid- and chromosome-located resistance genes were also demonstrated. These data provide some of the knowledge required for assessing the possible risk of using Lact. reuteri and Lact. plantarum strains carrying antibiotic resistance genes as starter cultures and probiotics.

  1. Genome-wide association analysis identifies resistance loci for bacterial blight in a diverse collection of indica rice germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Zhi-Chao; Wang, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Fan; Dingkuhn, Michael; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhou, Yong-Li; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial blight, which is caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is one of the most devastating rice diseases worldwide. The development and use of disease-resistant cultivars have been the most effective strategy to control bacterial blight. Identifying the genes mediating bacterial blight resistance is a prerequisite for breeding cultivars with broad-spectrum and durable resistance. We herein describe a genome-wide association study involving 172 diverse Oryza sativa ssp. indica accessions to identify loci influencing the resistance to representative strains of six Xoo races. Twelve resistance loci containing 121 significantly associated signals were identified using 317,894 single nucleotide polymorphisms, which explained 13.3-59.9% of the variability in lesion length caused by Xoo races P1, P6, and P9a. Two hotspot regions (L11 and L12) were located within or nearby two cloned R genes (xa25 and Xa26) and one fine-mapped R gene (Xa4). Our results confirmed the relatively high resolution of genome-wide association studies. Moreover, we detected novel significant associations on chromosomes 2, 3, and 6-10. Haplotype analyses of xa25, the Xa26 paralog (MRKc; LOC_Os11g47290), and a Xa4 candidate gene (LOC_11g46870) revealed differences in bacterial blight resistance among indica subgroups. These differences were responsible for the observed variations in lesion lengths resulting from infections by Xoo races P1 and P9a. Our findings may be relevant for future studies involving bacterial blight resistance gene cloning, and provide insights into the genetic basis for bacterial blight resistance in indica rice, which may be useful for knowledge-based crop improvement.

  2. Genome-wide association analysis identifies resistance loci for bacterial blight in a diverse collection of indica rice germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Fan; Dingkuhn, Michael; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhou, Yong-Li; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial blight, which is caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is one of the most devastating rice diseases worldwide. The development and use of disease-resistant cultivars have been the most effective strategy to control bacterial blight. Identifying the genes mediating bacterial blight resistance is a prerequisite for breeding cultivars with broad-spectrum and durable resistance. We herein describe a genome-wide association study involving 172 diverse Oryza sativa ssp. indica accessions to identify loci influencing the resistance to representative strains of six Xoo races. Twelve resistance loci containing 121 significantly associated signals were identified using 317,894 single nucleotide polymorphisms, which explained 13.3–59.9% of the variability in lesion length caused by Xoo races P1, P6, and P9a. Two hotspot regions (L11 and L12) were located within or nearby two cloned R genes (xa25 and Xa26) and one fine-mapped R gene (Xa4). Our results confirmed the relatively high resolution of genome-wide association studies. Moreover, we detected novel significant associations on chromosomes 2, 3, and 6–10. Haplotype analyses of xa25, the Xa26 paralog (MRKc; LOC_Os11g47290), and a Xa4 candidate gene (LOC_11g46870) revealed differences in bacterial blight resistance among indica subgroups. These differences were responsible for the observed variations in lesion lengths resulting from infections by Xoo races P1 and P9a. Our findings may be relevant for future studies involving bacterial blight resistance gene cloning, and provide insights into the genetic basis for bacterial blight resistance in indica rice, which may be useful for knowledge-based crop improvement. PMID:28355306

  3. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Yee-Chin

    2016-08-22

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence.

  4. DriverFinder: A Gene Length-Based Network Method to Identify Cancer Driver Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pi-Jing Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Integration of multi-omics data of cancer can help people to explore cancers comprehensively. However, with a large volume of different omics and functional data being generated, there is a major challenge to distinguish functional driver genes from a sea of inconsequential passenger genes that accrue stochastically but do not contribute to cancer development. In this paper, we present a gene length-based network method, named DriverFinder, to identify driver genes by integrating somatic mutations, copy number variations, gene-gene interaction network, tumor expression, and normal expression data. To illustrate the performance of DriverFinder, it is applied to four cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas including breast cancer, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, thyroid carcinoma, and kidney renal clear cell carcinoma. Compared with some conventional methods, the results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective. Moreover, it can decrease the influence of gene length in identifying driver genes and identify some rare mutated driver genes.

  5. Validation of candidate genes putatively associated with resistance to SCMV and MDMV in maize (Zea mays L.) by expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzarowska, Anna; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Sarholz, Barbara; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Xu, Mingliang; Ingvardsen, Christina Rønn; Wenzel, Gerhard; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2009-02-02

    The potyviruses sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) are major pathogens of maize worldwide. Two loci, Scmv1 and Scmv2, have ealier been shown to confer complete resistance to SCMV. Custom-made microarrays containing previously identified SCMV resistance candidate genes and resistance gene analogs were utilised to investigate and validate gene expression and expression patterns of isogenic lines under pathogen infection in order to obtain information about the molecular mechanisms involved in maize-potyvirus interactions. By employing time course microarray experiments we identified 68 significantly differentially expressed sequences within the different time points. The majority of differentially expressed genes differed between the near-isogenic line carrying Scmv1 resistance locus at chromosome 6 and the other isogenic lines. Most differentially expressed genes in the SCMV experiment (75%) were identified one hour after virus inoculation, and about one quarter at multiple time points. Furthermore, most of the identified mapped genes were localised outside the Scmv QTL regions. Annotation revealed differential expression of promising pathogenesis-related candidate genes, validated by qRT-PCR, coding for metallothionein-like protein, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, germin-like protein or 26S ribosomal RNA. Our study identified putative candidate genes and gene expression patterns related to resistance to SCMV. Moreover, our findings support the effectiveness and reliability of the combination of different expression profiling approaches for the identification and validation of candidate genes. Genes identified in this study represent possible future targets for manipulation of SCMV resistance in maize.

  6. Confirmation of root-knot nematode resistant gene Rmi1 using SSR markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musarrat Ramzan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Root Knot Nematode (RKN is a serious economic threat to various cultivated crops worldwide. It is a devastating pest of soybean and responsible to cause severe yield loss in Pakistan. The cultivation of resistant soybean varieties against this pest is the sustainable strategy to manage the heavy loss and increase yield. There is an utmost need to identify RKN resistant varieties of soybean against cultivated in Pakistan. The presented study is an attempt to identify and confirm the presence of resistant gene Rmi1 in soybean. Method: Molecular studies have been done using Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR marker system to identify resistant soybean varieties against Root Knot Nematode (RKN using fifteen (15 indigenous cultivars and four (4 US cultivars. DNA was isolated, purified, quantified and then used to employ various SSR markers. The amplified product is observed using gel documentation system after electrophoresis. Results: Diagnostic SSR markers Satt-358 and Satt-492 have shown the presence of Rmi1 gene in all resistance carrying genotypes. Satt-358 amplified the fragment of 200 bp and Satt-492 generated 232 bp bands in all resistant genotypes. This study confirmed the Rmi gene locus (G248A-1 in all internationally confirmed resistant including six (6 native varieties. Conclusion: These investigations have identified six (6 resistant cultivars revealing the effective and informative sources that can be utilized in breeding programs for the selection of RKN resistance soybean genotypes in Pakistan.

  7. Discovery and characterization of two new stem rust resistance genes in Aegilops sharonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guotai; Champouret, Nicolas; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Olivera, Pablo D; Simmons, Jamie; Williams, Cole; Johnson, Ryan; Moscou, Matthew J; Hernández-Pinzón, Inmaculada; Green, Phon; Sela, Hanan; Millet, Eitan; Jones, Jonathan D G; Ward, Eric R; Steffenson, Brian J; Wulff, Brande B H

    2017-06-01

    We identified two novel wheat stem rust resistance genes, Sr-1644-1Sh and Sr-1644-5Sh in Aegilops sharonensis that are effective against widely virulent African races of the wheat stem rust pathogen. Stem rust is one of the most important diseases of wheat in the world. When single stem rust resistance (Sr) genes are deployed in wheat, they are often rapidly overcome by the pathogen. To this end, we initiated a search for novel sources of resistance in diverse wheat relatives and identified the wild goatgrass species Aegilops sharonesis (Sharon goatgrass) as a rich reservoir of resistance to wheat stem rust. The objectives of this study were to discover and map novel Sr genes in Ae. sharonensis and to explore the possibility of identifying new Sr genes by genome-wide association study (GWAS). We developed two biparental populations between resistant and susceptible accessions of Ae. sharonensis and performed QTL and linkage analysis. In an F 6 recombinant inbred line and an F 2 population, two genes were identified that mapped to the short arm of chromosome 1S sh , designated as Sr-1644-1Sh, and the long arm of chromosome 5S sh , designated as Sr-1644-5Sh. The gene Sr-1644-1Sh confers a high level of resistance to race TTKSK (a member of the Ug99 race group), while the gene Sr-1644-5Sh conditions strong resistance to TRTTF, another widely virulent race found in Yemen. Additionally, GWAS was conducted on 125 diverse Ae. sharonensis accessions for stem rust resistance. The gene Sr-1644-1Sh was detected by GWAS, while Sr-1644-5Sh was not detected, indicating that the effectiveness of GWAS might be affected by marker density, population structure, low allele frequency and other factors.

  8. Comparative Transcriptomics to Identify Novel Genes and Pathways in Dinoflagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, D.

    2016-02-01

    The unarmored dinoflagellate Karenia brevis is among the most prominent harmful, bloom-forming phytoplankton species in the Gulf of Mexico. During blooms, the polyketides PbTx-1 and PbTx-2 (brevetoxins) are produced by K. brevis. Brevetoxins negatively impact human health and the Gulf shellfish harvest. However, the genes underlying brevetoxin synthesis are currently unknown. Because the K. brevis genome is extremely large ( 1 × 1011 base pairs long), and with a high proportion of repetitive, non-coding DNA, it has not been sequenced. In fact, large, repetitive genomes are common among the dinoflagellate group. High-throughput RNA sequencing technology enabled us to assemble Karenia transcriptomes de novo and investigate potential genes in the brevetoxin pathway through comparative transcriptomics. The brevetoxin profile varies among K. brevis clonal cultures. For example, well-documented Wilson-CCFWC268 typically produces 8-10 pg PbTx per cell, whereas SP1 produces polyketide synthases (PKSs), were only expressed by brevetoxin-producing K. brevis and K. papilionacea, not K. mikimotoi. Examination of gene expression between the typical- and low-toxin Wilson clones identified about 3,500 genes with significantly different expression levels, including 2 putative PKSs. One of the 2 PKSs was only found in the brevetoxin-producing Karenia species. These transcriptomes could not have been characterized without high-throughput RNA sequencing.

  9. Strategies to identify long noncoding RNAs involved in gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Catherine

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have been detected in nearly every cell type and found to be fundamentally involved in many biological processes. The characterization of lncRNAs has immense potential to advance our comprehensive understanding of cellular processes and gene regulation, along with implications for the treatment of human disease. The recent ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements study reported 9,640 lncRNA loci in the human genome, which corresponds to around half the number of protein-coding genes. Because of this sheer number and their functional diversity, it is crucial to identify a pool of potentially relevant lncRNAs early on in a given study. In this review, we evaluate the methods for isolating lncRNAs by immunoprecipitation and review the advantages, disadvantages, and applications of three widely used approaches – microarray, tiling array, and RNA-seq – for identifying lncRNAs involved in gene regulation. We also look at ways in which data from publicly available databases such as ENCODE can support the study of lncRNAs.

  10. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PUNEET INDER TOOR

    end of 5DS linked with a group of four colocated SSRs and two resistance gene analogue (RGA)-STS markers at a distance of 5.3 cM. ... and LrAc appear to be the candidate genes for marker-assisted enrichment of the wheat gene pool for rust resistance. [Toor P. I., Kaur S., Bansal ..... stocks with reduced alien chromatin.

  11. Fate of antibiotic resistant cultivable heterotrophic bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songhe; Han, Bing; Gu, Ju; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Ma, Yanyan; Cao, Jiashun; He, Zhenli

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging contaminants of environmental concern. Heterotrophic bacteria in activated sludge have an important role in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). However, the fate of cultivable heterotrophic ARB and ARGs in WWPTs process remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the antibiotic-resistant phenotypes of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria from influent and effluent water of three WWTPs and analysed thirteen ARGs in ARB and in activated sludge from anoxic, anaerobic and aerobic compartments. From each influent or effluent sample of the three plants, 200 isolates were randomly tested for susceptibility to 12 antibiotics. In these samples, between 5% and 64% isolates showed resistance to >9 antibiotics and the proportion of >9-drug-resistant bacteria was lower in isolates from effluent than from influent. Eighteen genera were identified in 188 isolates from influent (n=94) and effluent (n=94) of one WWTP. Six genera (Aeromonas, Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Microbacterium, Providencia, and Staphylococcus) were detected in both influent and effluent samples. Gram-negative and -positive isolates dominated in influent and effluent, respectively. The 13 tetracycline-, sulphonamide-, streptomycin- and β-lactam-resistance genes were detected at a higher frequency in ARB from influent than from effluent, except for sulA and CTX-M, while in general, the abundances of ARGs in activated sludge from two of the three plants were higher in aerobic compartments than in anoxic ones, indicating abundant ARGs exit in the excess sledges and/or in uncultivable bacteria. These findings may be useful for elucidating the effect of WWTP on ARB and ARGs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Novel Florfenicol and Chloramphenicol Resistance Gene Discovered in Alaskan Soil by Using Functional Metagenomics▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kevin S.; Anderson, Janet M.; Schwarz, Stefan; Williamson, Lynn; Handelsman, Jo; Singer, Randall S.

    2010-01-01

    Functional metagenomics was used to search for florfenicol resistance genes in libraries of cloned DNA isolated from Alaskan soil. A gene that mediated reduced susceptibility to florfenicol was identified and designated pexA. The predicted PexA protein showed a structure similar to that of efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily. PMID:20543056

  13. Novel florfenicol and chloramphenicol resistance gene discovered in Alaskan soil by using functional metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kevin S; Anderson, Janet M; Schwarz, Stefan; Williamson, Lynn; Handelsman, Jo; Singer, Randall S

    2010-08-01

    Functional metagenomics was used to search for florfenicol resistance genes in libraries of cloned DNA isolated from Alaskan soil. A gene that mediated reduced susceptibility to florfenicol was identified and designated pexA. The predicted PexA protein showed a structure similar to that of efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily.

  14. The genetics of resistance to powdery mildew in cultivated oats (Avena sativa L.): current status of major genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsam, Sai L K; Mohler, Volker; Zeller, Friedrich J

    2014-05-01

    The genetics of resistance to powdery mildew caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. avenae of four cultivated oats was studied using monosomic analysis. Cultivar 'Bruno' carries a gene (Pm6) that shows a recessive mode of inheritance and is located on chromosome 10D. Cultivar 'Jumbo' possesses a dominant resistance gene (Pm1) on chromosome 1C. In cultivar 'Rollo', in addition to the gene Pm3 on chromosome 17A, a second dominant resistance gene (Pm8) was identified and assigned to chromosome 4C. In breeding line APR 122, resistance was conditioned by a dominant resistance gene (Pm7) that was allocated to chromosome 13A. Genetic maps established for resistance genes Pm1, Pm6 and Pm7 employing amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers indicated that these genes are independent of each other, supporting the results from monosomic analysis.

  15. Comparison of antimicrobial resistant genes in chicken gut microbiome grown on organic and conventional diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narasimha V. Hegde

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are widely used in chicken production for therapeutic purposes, disease prevention and growth promotion, and this may select for drug resistant microorganisms known to spread to humans through consumption of contaminated food. Raising chickens on an organic feed regimen, without the use of antibiotics, is increasingly popular with the consumers. In order to determine the effects of diet regimen on antibiotic resistant genes in the gut microbiome, we analyzed the phylotypes and identified the antimicrobial resistant genes in chicken, grown under conventional and organic dietary regimens. Phylotypes were analyzed from DNA extracted from fecal samples from chickens grown under these dietary conditions. While gut microbiota of chicken raised in both conventional and organic diet exhibited the presence of DNA from members of Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, organic diet favored the growth of members of Fusobacteria. Antimicrobial resistance genes were identified from metagenomic libraries following cloning and sequencing of DNA fragments from fecal samples and selecting for the resistant clones (n=340 on media containing different concentrations of eight antibiotics. The antimicrobial resistant genes exhibited diversity in their host distribution among the microbial population and expressed more in samples from chicken grown on a conventional diet at higher concentrations of certain antimicrobials than samples from chicken grown on organic diet. Further studies will elucidate if this phenomena is widespread and whether the antimicrobial resistance is indeed modulated by diet. This may potentially assist in defining strategies for intervention to reduce the prevalence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in the production environment.

  16. The LBP Gene and Its Association with Resistance to Aeromonas hydrophila in Tilapia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui Hong Fu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to pathogens is important for the sustainability and profitability of food fish production. In immune-related genes, the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP gene is an important mediator of the inflammatory reaction. We analyzed the cDNA and genomic structure of the LBP gene in tilapia. The full-length cDNA (1901 bp of the gene contained a 1416 bp open reading frame, encoding 471 amino acid residues. Its genomic sequence was 5577 bp, comprising 15 exons and 14 introns. Under normal conditions, the gene was constitutively expressed in all examined tissues. The highest expression was detected in intestine and kidney. We examined the responses of the gene to challenges with two bacterial pathogens Streptcoccus agalactiae and Aeromonas hydrophila. The gene was significantly upregulated in kidney and spleen post-infection with S. agalactiae and A. hydrophila, respectively. However, the expression profiles of the gene after the challenge with the two pathogens were different. Furthermore, we identified three SNPs in the gene. There were significant associations (p < 0.05 of two of the three SNPs with the resistance to A. hydrophila, but not with the resistance to S. agalactiae or growth performance. These results suggest that the LBP gene is involved in the acute-phase immunologic response to the bacterial infections, and the responses to the two bacterial pathogens are different. The two SNPs associated with the resistance to A. hydrophila may be useful in the selection of tilapia resistant to A. hydrophila.

  17. Generation of novel resistance genes using mutation and targeted gene editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical breeding for virus resistance is a lengthy process and is restricted by the availability of resistance genes. Precise genome editing is a "dream technology" to improve plants for virus resistance and these tools have opened new and very promising ways to generate virus resistant plants by ...

  18. Gene expression analysis of two extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis isolates show that two-component response systems enhance drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guohua; Cui, Zhenling; Sun, Xian; Peng, Jinfu; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Wei; Huang, Wenhua; Chu, Kaili; Zhang, Lu; Ge, Baoxue; Li, Yao

    2015-05-01

    Global analysis of expression profiles using DNA microarrays was performed between a reference strain H37Rv and two clinical extensively drug-resistant isolates in response to three anti-tuberculosis drug exposures (isoniazid, capreomycin, and rifampicin). A deep analysis was then conducted using a combination of genome sequences of the resistant isolates, resistance information, and related public microarray data. Certain known resistance-associated gene sets were significantly overrepresented in upregulated genes in the resistant isolates relative to that observed in H37Rv, which suggested a link between resistance and expression levels of particular genes. In addition, isoniazid and capreomycin response genes, but not rifampicin, either obtained from published works or our data, were highly consistent with the differentially expressed genes of resistant isolates compared to those of H37Rv, indicating a strong association between drug resistance of the isolates and genes differentially regulated by isoniazid and capreomycin exposures. Based on these results, 92 genes of the studied isolates were identified as candidate resistance genes, 10 of which are known resistance-related genes. Regulatory network analysis of candidate resistance genes using published networks and literature mining showed that three two-component regulatory systems and regulator CRP play significant roles in the resistance of the isolates by mediating the production of essential envelope components. Finally, drug sensitivity testing indicated strong correlations between expression levels of these regulatory genes and sensitivity to multiple anti-tuberculosis drugs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These findings may provide novel insights into the mechanism underlying the emergence and development of drug resistance in resistant tuberculosis isolates and useful clues for further studies on this issue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Associations between Antimicrobial Resistance Phenotypes, Antimicrobial Resistance Genes, and Virulence Genes of Fecal Escherichia coli Isolates from Healthy Grow-Finish Pigs ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Rosengren, Leigh B.; Waldner, Cheryl L.; Reid-Smith, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli often carries linked antimicrobial resistance genes on transmissible genetic elements. Through coselection, antimicrobial use may select for unrelated but linked resistance or virulence genes. This study used unconditional statistical associations to investigate the relationships between antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and antimicrobial resistance genes in 151 E. coli isolates from healthy pigs. Phenotypic resistance to each drug was significantly associated with phenotyp...

  20. New genes associated with rheumatoid arthritis identified by gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Guo, J; Jiang, J; Wu, W; Chang, X; Zhou, H; Li, Z; Zhao, J

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we aimed to find new genes associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) so that more comprehensive genes would be used for monitoring and/or diagnosing patients. Illumina digital gene expression profiling was applied in two sample types - peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and synovial cells to compare the gene expression pattern between 17 patients with RA and three control groups (six osteoarthritis patients, three ankylosing spondylitis patients and 17 healthy controls). Bioinformatics was performed on pathway analysis and protein-protein interaction networks. Four novel genes from PBMCs - DHRS3, TTC38, SAP30BP and LPIN2 - were found to be associated with RA and further confirmed through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Five new differentially expressed genes (EPYC, LIFR, GLDN, TADA3 and ZNRF3) found in synovial cells were not confirmed. Pathway analyses revealed 10 significantly enriched pathways, and a protein-protein interaction network analysis showed that four novel PBMC-derived genes were connected to previously reported genes by four intermediate genes. Therefore, we proposed that four newly identified PBMC-derived genes could be integrated with previously reported RA-associated genes to monitor and/or diagnose RA. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. sugE: A gene involved in tributyltin (TBT) resistance of Aeromonas molluscorum Av27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andreia; Micaelo, Nuno; Félix, Vitor; Song, Jun-Young; Kitamura, Shin-Ichi; Suzuki, Satoru; Mendo, Sónia

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of bacterial resistance to tributyltin (TBT) is still unclear. The results herein presented contribute to clarify that mechanism in the TBT-resistant bacterium Aeromonas molluscorum Av27. We have identified and cloned a new gene that is involved in TBT resistance in this strain. The gene is highly homologous (84%) to the Aeromonas hydrophila-sugE gene belonging to the small multidrug resistance gene family (SMR), which includes genes involved in the transport of lipophilic drugs. In Av27, expression of the Av27-sugE was observed at the early logarithmic growth phase in the presence of a high TBT concentration (500 μM), thus suggesting the contribution of this gene for TBT resistance. E. coli cells transformed with Av27-sugE become resistant to ethidium bromide (EtBr), chloramphenicol (CP) and tetracycline (TE), besides TBT. According to the Moriguchi logP (miLogP) values, EtBr, CP and TE have similar properties and are substrates for the sugE-efflux system. Despite the different miLogP of TBT, E. coli cells transformed with Av27-sugE become resistant to this compound. So it seems that TBT is also a substrate for the SugE protein. The modelling studies performed also support this hypothesis. The data herein presented clearly indicate that sugE is involved in TBT resistance of this bacterium.

  2. Epidemiologic evaluation of Vancomycin Resistant genes in Enterococcus spp. isolated from clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Teymournejad

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Isolation of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus from clinical samples is very important. The aim of this study was evaluation of phenotype and genotype of van genes in vancomycine resistant Enterococcus. Materials and Methods: 411 Enterococcus isolates were collected from selected Tehran’s hospitals between March 2004 and December 2007. The enterococcal isolates were identified by biochemical confirmation tests. Resistance of each isolate to vancomycin determined by disk diffusion and agar dilution test. The presence of the vanA, B, C, D, E resistance gene was assessed by PCR. Results: 185(45% and 23(5.6% with disc-diffusion method and agar-dilution method were resistant to vancomucin (VRE and all of VREs were Enterococcus faecium. 12 (52.2%, 7(30.4% of the VRE isolates had vanA, vanB and 3(13% had both of vanA and vanB gene. Conclusion: Most important mechanism for high level resistance to vancomycin is presence of van genes and these genes can transfer between Enterococci. Significance of investigation in molecular level of resistance to vancomycin was due to relation between phenotypic resistant and presence of van genes.

  3. Shotgun metagenomics reveals a wide array of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile elements in a polluted lake in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan eBengtsson-Palme

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence for an environmental origin of many antibiotic resistance genes. Consequently, it is important to identify environments of particular risk for selecting and maintaining such resistance factors. In this study, we described the diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in an Indian lake subjected to industrial pollution with fluoroquinolone antibiotics. We also assessed the genetic context of the identified resistance genes, to try to predict their genetic transferability. The lake harbored a wide range of resistance genes (81 identified gene types against essentially every major class of antibiotics, as well as genes responsible for mobilization of genetic material. Resistance genes were estimated to be 7000 times more abundant than in a Swedish lake included for comparison, where only eight resistance genes were found. The sul2 and qnrD genes were the most common resistance genes in the Indian lake. Twenty-six known and twenty-one putative novel plasmids were recovered in the Indian lake metagenome, which, together with the genes found, indicate a large potential for horizontal gene transfer through conjugation. Interestingly, the microbial community of the lake still included a wide range of taxa, suggesting that, across most phyla, bacteria has adapted relatively well to this highly polluted environment. Based on the wide range and high abundance of known resistance factors we have detected, it is plausible that yet unrecognized resistance genes are also present in the lake. Thus, we conclude that environments polluted with waste from antibiotic manufacturing could be important reservoirs for mobile antibiotic resistance genes.

  4. Insights into novel antimicrobial compounds and antibiotic resistance genes from soil metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    de Castro, Alinne P.; Fernandes, Gabriel da R.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years a major worldwide problem has arisen with regard to infectious diseases caused by resistant bacteria. Resistant pathogens are related to high mortality and also to enormous healthcare costs. In this field, cultured microorganisms have been commonly focused in attempts to isolate antibiotic resistance genes or to identify antimicrobial compounds. Although this strategy has been successful in many cases, most of the microbial diversity and related antimicrobial molecules have be...

  5. Differentially expressed genes in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified through serial analysis of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hustinx, Steven R; Cao, Dengfeng; Maitra, Anirban

    2004-01-01

    generated from six pancreatic cancers were compared to SAGE libraries generated from 11 non-neoplastic tissues. Compared to normal tissue libraries, we identified 453 SAGE tags as differentially expressed in pancreatic cancer, including 395 that mapped to known genes and 58 "uncharacterized" tags....... Of the 395 SAGE tags assigned to known genes, 223 were overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and 172 were underexpressed. In order to map the 58 uncharacterized differentially expressed SAGE tags to genes, we used a newly developed resource called TAGmapper (http://tagmapper.ibioinformatics.org), to identify...

  6. Codon-optimized antibiotic resistance gene improves efficiency of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... native gentamicin resistance gene, suggesting that codon optimization improved translation efficiency of the marker gene and ... to be taken into account when exogenous transgenes are expressed in Frankia cells. [Kucho K, Kakoi K, ..... gene coding for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a versatile ...

  7. Linking microbial community structure and function to characterize antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistant genes from cattle feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is widespread interest in monitoring the development of antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in agriculturally impacted environments, however little is known about the relationships between bacterial community structure, and antibiotic resistance gene profiles. Cattl...

  8. Differentially expressed genes in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified through serial analysis of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hustinx, Steven R; Cao, Dengfeng; Maitra, Anirban

    2004-01-01

    genome and better biocomputational techniques have substantially improved the assignment of differentially expressed SAGE "tags" to human genes. These improvements have provided us with an opportunity to re-evaluate global gene expression in pancreatic cancer using existing SAGE libraries. SAGE libraries...... generated from six pancreatic cancers were compared to SAGE libraries generated from 11 non-neoplastic tissues. Compared to normal tissue libraries, we identified 453 SAGE tags as differentially expressed in pancreatic cancer, including 395 that mapped to known genes and 58 "uncharacterized" tags....... Of the 395 SAGE tags assigned to known genes, 223 were overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and 172 were underexpressed. In order to map the 58 uncharacterized differentially expressed SAGE tags to genes, we used a newly developed resource called TAGmapper (http://tagmapper.ibioinformatics.org), to identify...

  9. Transcriptome analysis of resistant and susceptible genotypes of Glycine tomentella during Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection reveals novel rust resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Guerra, Ruth Elena; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Chang, Sungyul; Haudenshield, James S; Padmanaban, Annamalai; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra; Hartman, Glen L; Ghabrial, Said A; Korban, Schuyler S

    2010-05-01

    Soybean rust, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a destructive foliar disease in nearly all soybean-producing countries. To identify genes controlling resistance to soybean rust, transcriptome profiling was conducted in resistant and susceptible Glycine tomentella genotypes triggered by P. pachyrhizi infection. Among 38,400 genes monitored using a soybean microarray, at 5% false discovery rate, 1,342 genes were identified exhibiting significant differential expression between uninfected and P. pachyrhizi-infected leaves at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h post-inoculation (hpi) in both rust-susceptible and rust-resistant genotypes. Differentially expressed genes were grouped into 12 functional categories, and among those, large numbers relate to basic plant metabolism. Transcripts for genes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway were up-regulated early during rust infection. Similarly, genes coding for proteins related to stress and defense responses such as glutathione-S-transferases, peroxidases, heat shock proteins, and lipoxygenases were consistently up-regulated following infection at all four time points. Whereas, subsets of genes involved in cellular transport, cellular communication, cell cycle, and DNA processing were down-regulated. Quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) on randomly selected genes from the different categories confirmed these findings. Of differentially expressed genes, those associated with the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway as well as those coding for peroxidases and lipoxygenases were likely to be involved in rust resistance in soybean, and would serve as good candidates for functional studies. These findings provided insights into mechanisms underlying resistance and general activation of plant defense pathways in response to rust infection.

  10. Identification of a soybean rust resistance gene in PI 567104B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Li, Shuxian; Swaminathan, Sivakumar; Sahu, Binod B; Leandro, Leonor F; Cardinal, Andrea J; Bhattacharyya, Madan K; Song, Qijian; Walker, David R; Cianzio, Silvia R

    2016-05-01

    Using a combination of phenotypic screening and molecular, statistical, and linkage analyses, we have mapped a dominant soybean rust resistance gene in soybean PI 567104B. Asian soybean rust (SBR), caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. and P. Syd., is one of the most economically important diseases that affect soybean production worldwide. A long-term strategy for minimizing the effects of SBR is the development of genetically resistant cultivars. The objectives of the study were to identify the location of a rust-resistance (Rpp) gene(s) in plant introduction (PI) 567104B, and to determine if the gene(s) in PI 567104B was different from previously mapped Rpp loci. The progeny of the cross of 'IAR 2001 BSR' × PI 567104B was phenotyped from field assays of the F 2:3 and F 4:5 generations and from a growth chamber assay of 253 F 5:6 recombinant inbred lines (RILs). For the growth chamber, the phenotyping was conducted by inoculation with a purified 2006 fungal isolate from Mississippi. A resistance gene locus on PI 567104B was mapped to a region containing the Rpp6 locus on chromosome 18. The high level of resistance of F 1 plants from two other crosses with PI 567104B as one of the parents indicated that the gene from PI 567104B was dominant. The interval containing the gene is flanked by the simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers Satt131 and Satt394, and includes the SSR markers BARCSOYSSR_18_0331 and BARCSOYSSR_18_0380. The results also indicated that the resistance gene from PI 567104B is different from the Rpp1 to the Rpp4 genes previously identified. To determine if the gene from PI 567104B is different from the Rpp6 gene from PI 567102B, additional research will be required.

  11. Determination of rust resistance genes in pakistani bread wheats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qamar, M.; Ahmad, S.D.; Rabbani, M.A.; Shinwari, Z.K.

    2014-01-01

    Stripe and leaf rusts are the major constraints to bread wheat production in Pakistan. Molecular markers were used to investigate the presence of leaf rust and stripe rust resistance gene cluster Lr34/Yr18 and stem rust resistance gene Sr2 in 52 Pakistani bread wheat cultivars/lines. PCR amplification of DNA fragments using DNA marker csLV-34 showed that 13 of the studied cultivars/lines, namely 03FJ26, NR 337, NR 339, NR 347, NR 350, Manthar, Margalla 99, Iqbal 2000, Saleem 2000, Wafaq 2001, Marwat 2001, Pirsabak 2004 and Fareed 2006 carry leaf rust and stripe rust resistance genes Lr34/Yr18. Stem rust resistance gene Sr2 was observed in 36 Pakistani spring wheat cultivars/lines using stm560.3tgag marker. The slow rusting gene Sr2 needs to be combined with additional stem rust resistance genes to establish durable resistance against Ug99 in modern wheat cultivars. Low frequency of Lr34/Yr18 was found in Pakistani wheats. This gene cluster needs to be incorporated into Pakistani wheats for durable rust resistance. (author)

  12. Stormwater loadings of antibiotic resistance genes in an urban stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Emily; Benitez, Romina; von Wagoner, Emily; Sawyer, Richard; Schaberg, Erin; Hession, W Cully; Krometis, Leigh-Anne H; Badgley, Brian D; Pruden, Amy

    2017-10-15

    Antibiotic resistance presents a critical public health challenge and the transmission of antibiotic resistance via environmental pathways continues to gain attention. Factors driving the spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in surface water and sources of ARGs in urban stormwater have not been well-characterized. In this study, five ARGs (sul1, sul2, tet(O), tet(W), and erm(F)) were quantified throughout the duration of three storm runoff events in an urban inland stream. Storm loads of all five ARGs were significantly greater than during equivalent background periods. Neither fecal indicator bacteria measured (E. coli or enterococci) was significantly correlated with sul1, sul2, or erm(F), regardless of whether ARG concentration was absolute or normalized to 16S rRNA levels. Both E. coli and enterococci were correlated with the tetracycline resistance genes, tet(O) and tet(W). Next-generation shotgun metagenomic sequencing was conducted to more thoroughly characterize the resistome (i.e., full complement of ARGs) and profile the occurrence of all ARGs described in current databases in storm runoff in order to inform future watershed monitoring and management. Between 37 and 121 different ARGs were detected in each stream sample, though the ARG profiles differed among storms. This study establishes that storm-driven transport of ARGs comprises a considerable fraction of overall downstream loadings and broadly characterizes the urban stormwater resistome to identify potential marker ARGs indicative of impact. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pollen-mediated gene flow from glyphosate-resistant common waterhemp (Amaranthus rudis Sauer): consequences for the dispersal of resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Debalin; Tyre, Andrew J; Patterson, Eric L; Gaines, Todd A; Irmak, Suat; Knezevic, Stevan Z; Lindquist, John L; Jhala, Amit J

    2017-03-22

    Gene flow is an important component in evolutionary biology; however, the role of gene flow in dispersal of herbicide-resistant alleles among weed populations is poorly understood. Field experiments were conducted at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln to quantify pollen-mediated gene flow (PMGF) from glyphosate-resistant (GR) to -susceptible (GS) common waterhemp using a concentric donor-receptor design. More than 130,000 common waterhemp plants were screened and 26,199 plants were confirmed resistant to glyphosate. Frequency of gene flow from all distances, directions, and years was estimated with a double exponential decay model using Generalized Nonlinear Model (package gnm) in R. PMGF declined by 50% at <3 m distance from the pollen source, whereas 90% reduction was found at 88 m (maximum) depending on the direction of the pollen-receptor blocks. Amplification of the target site gene, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), was identified as the mechanism of glyphosate resistance in parent biotype. The EPSPS gene amplification was heritable in common waterhemp and can be transferred via PMGF, and also correlated with glyphosate resistance in pseudo-F 2 progeny. This is the first report of PMGF in GR common waterhemp and the results are critical in explaining the rapid dispersal of GR common waterhemp in Midwestern United States.

  14. Loci and candidate genes conferring resistance to soybean cyst nematode HG type 2.5.7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue; Teng, Weili; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Dongyuan; Cao, Guanglu; Li, Dongmei; Qiu, Lijuan; Zheng, Hongkun; Han, Yingpeng; Li, Wenbin

    2017-06-14

    Soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) cyst nematode (SCN, Heterodera glycines I,) is a major pest of soybean worldwide. The most effective strategy to control this pest involves the use of resistant cultivars. The aim of the present study was to investigate the genome-wide genetic architecture of resistance to SCN HG Type 2.5.7 (race 1) in landrace and elite cultivated soybeans. A total of 200 diverse soybean accessions were screened for resistance to SCN HG Type 2.5.7 and genotyped through sequencing using the Specific Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq) approach with a 6.14-fold average sequencing depth. A total of 33,194 SNPs were identified with minor allele frequencies (MAF) over 4%, covering 97% of all the genotypes. Genome-wide association mapping (GWAS) revealed thirteen SNPs associated with resistance to SCN HG Type 2.5.7. These SNPs were distributed on five chromosomes (Chr), including Chr7, 8, 14, 15 and 18. Four SNPs were novel resistance loci and nine SNPs were located near known QTL. A total of 30 genes were identified as candidate genes underlying SCN resistance. A total of sixteen novel soybean accessions were identified with significant resistance to HG Type 2.5.7. The beneficial alleles and candidate genes identified by GWAS might be valuable for improving marker-assisted breeding efficiency and exploring the molecular mechanisms underlying SCN resistance.

  15. The impact of R1and R3a genes on tuber resistance to late blight of the potato breeding clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoteyeva Nadezhda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Potato breeding clones were evaluated for resistance to late blight (agent Phytophthora infestans using tuber inoculation tests and for presence of the resistance alleles of R1 and R3a genes in polymerase chain reaction tests. Among clones tested those expressing high, moderate and low resistance were identified. The data were analysed for the impact of R1 and R3a genes on tuber resistance to late blight in tested plant material. In previous evaluations performed on smaller amount of clones the tuber resistance levels significantly depended on presence/absence of the resistance allele of R3a gene and did not depend on presence of R1 gene allele. In the current study the statistical analyses did not prove the significant difference in resistance levels depending on presence of the resistance alleles, neither of R1 gene, nor of R3a gene. Tuber resistant clones bearing R3a gene resistance alleles still noticeably prevailed over the clones bearing the alleles of R1 gene as well as over the clones bearing the no resistance alleles of both genes. In several cases the resistance of clones with detected resistance allele of R1 gene was higher compared to those derived from the same crosses and showing amplification of the allele of R3a gene or those with no resistance alleles. Clones accumulating the resistance alleles of both (R1 and R3a genes expressed high tuber resistance accompanied by necrotic reaction.

  16. Overexpression of multiple detoxification genes in deltamethrin resistant Laodelphax striatellus (Hemiptera: Delphacidae in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The small brown planthopper (SBPH, Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén, is one of the major rice pests in Asia and has developed resistance to multiple classes of insecticides. Understanding resistance mechanisms is essential to the management of this pest. Biochemical and molecular assays were performed in this study to systematically characterize deltamethrin resistance mechanisms with laboratory-selected resistant and susceptible strains of SBPH. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Deltamethrin resistant strains of SBPH (JH-del were derived from a field population by continuously selections (up to 30 generations in the laboratory, while a susceptible strain (JHS was obtained from the same population by removing insecticide pressure for 30 generations. The role of detoxification enzymes in the resistance was investigated using synergism and enzyme activity assays with strains of different resistant levels. Furthermore, 71 cytochrome P450, 93 esterases and 12 glutathione-S-transferases cDNAs were cloned based on transcriptome data of a field collected population. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR screening analysis of 176 identified detoxification genes demonstrated that multiple P450 and esterase genes were overexpressed (>2-fold in JH-del strains (G4 and G30 when compared to that in JHS, and the results of quantitative PCR coincided with the semi-quantitative RT-PCR results. Target mutation at IIS3-IIS6 regions encoded by the voltage-gated sodium channel gene was ruled out for conferring the observed resistance. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: As the first attempt to discover genes potentially involved in SBPH pyrethroid resistance, this study putatively identified several candidate genes of detoxification enzymes that were significantly overexpressed in the resistant strain, which matched the synergism and enzyme activity testing. The biochemical and molecular evidences suggest that the high level pyrethroid resistance in L. striatellus could be due to

  17. Identification of virus and nematode resistance genes in the Chilota Potato Genebank of the Universidad Austral de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon López

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Potato Genebank of the Universidad Austral de Chile (UACh is an important gene bank in Chile. The accessions collected all over the country possess high genetic diversity, present interesting agronomic and cooking traits, and show resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. A particularly interesting subgroup of the gene bank includes the accessions collected in the South of Chile, the Chilota Potato Genebank. The focus of this study is the identification of virus and nematode resistant genes in potatoes (Solatium tuberosum L., using the RYSC3 and YES3-3B molecular markers. The Potato virus Y(PVY resistance genes Ry adg and Ry sto were identified. Furthermore, the CP60 marker was used to assess the Rx resistance gene that confers resistance to Potato virus X (PVX. In addition, the HC and GRO1-4 markers were utilized to identify the GpaVvrn_QTL and Gro1-4, resistance genes of Globodera pallida and Globodera rostochiensis, respectively. Both G. pallida and G. rostochiensis are Potato Cyst Nematodes (PCN. The plant material used in this study included leaves from 271 accessions of the gene bank. These samples were collected in the field where natural pathogen pressure of potential viruses and diseases exists. ELISA assays were run for field detection of PVY and PVX. However, there have been no previous reports of nematode presence in the plant material. The results herein presented indicate presence of virus and nematode resistance genes in accessions of the Chilota Potato Genebank. In terms of virus resistance, 99 accessions out of the 271 tested possess the Ry adg resistance gene and 17 accessions of these 271 tested have the Ry sto resistance gene. Also, 10 accessions showed positive amplification of the Rxl resistant gene marker. As to nematode resistance, 99 accessions have possible resistance to G. pallida and 54 accessions show potential resistance to G. rostochiensis as detected using the available molecular markers.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance genes in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis and Pasteurella multocida isolated from Australian pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayao, Dae; Gibson, J S; Blackall, P J; Turni, C

    2016-07-01

    To identify genes associated with the observed antimicrobial resistance in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis and Pasteurella multocida isolated from Australian pigs. Isolates with known phenotypic resistance to β-lactams, macrolides and tetracycline were screened for the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes. A total of 68 A. pleuropneumoniae, 62 H. parasuis and 20 P. multocida isolates exhibiting phenotypic antimicrobial resistance (A. pleuropneumoniae and P. multocida) or elevated minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) (H. parasuis) to any of the following antimicrobial agents - ampicillin, erythromycin, penicillin, tetracycline, tilmicosin and tulathromycin - were screened for a total of 19 associated antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) by PCR. The gene bla ROB-1 was found in all ampicillin- and penicillin-resistant isolates, but none harboured the bla TEM-1 gene. The tetB gene was found in 76% (74/97) of tetracycline-resistant isolates, 49/53 A. pleuropneumoniae, 17/30 H. parasuis and 8/14 P. multocida. One A. pleuropneumoniae isolate harboured the tetH gene, but none of the 97 isolates had tetA, tetC, tetD, tetE, tetL, tetM or tetO. A total of 92 isolates were screened for the presence of macrolide resistance genes. None was found to have ermA, ermB, ermC, erm42, mphE, mefA, msrA or msrE. The current study has provided a genetic explanation for the resistance or elevated MIC of the majority of isolates of Australian porcine respiratory pathogens to ampicillin, penicillin and tetracycline. However, the macrolide resistance observed by phenotypic testing remains genetically unexplained and further studies are required. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  19. Fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes during wastewater chlorination: implication for antibiotic resistance control.

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    Qing-Bin Yuan

    Full Text Available This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L. The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L. By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L. However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination.

  20. Fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes during wastewater chlorination: implication for antibiotic resistance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination.

  1. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) versus their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1- a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10- a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts ...

  2. RNA-Seq analysis reveals candidate genes for ontogenic resistance in Malus-Venturia pathosystem.

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    Michele Gusberti

    Full Text Available Ontogenic scab resistance in apple leaves and fruits is a horizontal resistance against the plant pathogen Venturia inaequalis and is expressed as a decrease in disease symptoms and incidence with the ageing of the leaves. Several studies at the biochemical level tried to unveil the nature of this resistance; however, no conclusive results were reported. We decided therefore to investigate the genetic origin of this phenomenon by performing a full quantitative transcriptome sequencing and comparison of young (susceptible and old (ontogenic resistant leaves, infected or not with the pathogen. Two time points at 72 and 96 hours post-inoculation were chosen for RNA sampling and sequencing. Comparison between the different conditions (young and old leaves, inoculated or not should allow the identification of differentially expressed genes which may represent different induced plant defence reactions leading to ontogenic resistance or may be the cause of a constitutive (uninoculated with the pathogen shift toward resistance in old leaves. Differentially expressed genes were then characterised for their function by homology to A. thaliana and other plant genes, particularly looking for genes involved in pathways already suspected of appertaining to ontogenic resistance in apple or other hosts, or to plant defence mechanisms in general. IN THIS WORK, FIVE CANDIDATE GENES PUTATIVELY INVOLVED IN THE ONTOGENIC RESISTANCE OF APPLE WERE IDENTIFIED: a gene encoding an "enhanced disease susceptibility 1 protein" was found to be down-regulated in both uninoculated and inoculated old leaves at 96 hpi, while the other four genes encoding proteins (metallothionein3-like protein, lipoxygenase, lipid transfer protein, and a peroxidase 3 were found to be constitutively up-regulated in inoculated and uninoculated old leaves. The modulation of the five candidate genes has been validated using the real-time quantitative PCR. Thus, ontogenic resistance may be the result

  3. Strategy of gene silencing in cassava for validation of resistance genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes, Simon; Lopez, Camilo

    2010-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is a major source of food for more than 1000 million people in the world and constitutes an important staple crop. Cassava bacterial blight, caused by the gram negative bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis, is one of the most important constraints for this crop. A candidate resistance gene against cassava bacterial blight, named RXam1, has been identified previously. In this work, we employed the gene silencing approach using the African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) to validate the function of the RXam1 gene. We used as positive control the su gen, which produce photo blanching in leaves when is silenced. Plants from the SG10735 variety were bombardment with the ACMV-A-SU+ACMV-B y ACMV-A-RXam1+ACMV-B constructions. The silencing efficiency employing the su gene was low, only one of seven plants showed photo blanching. In the putative silenced plants for the RXam1 gene, no presence of siRNAs corresponding to RXam1 was observed; although a low diminution of the RXam1 gene expression was obtained. The growth curves for the Xam strain CIO136 in cassava plants inoculated showing a little but no significance difference in the susceptibility in the silenced plants compared to not silenced

  4. Gene Expression Analysis of Plum pox virus (Sharka Susceptibility/Resistance in Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L..

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    Manuel Rubio

    Full Text Available RNA-Seq has proven to be a very powerful tool in the analysis of the Plum pox virus (PPV, sharka disease/Prunus interaction. This technique is an important complementary tool to other means of studying genomics. In this work an analysis of gene expression of resistance/susceptibility to PPV in apricot is performed. RNA-Seq has been applied to analyse the gene expression changes induced by PPV infection in leaves from two full-sib apricot genotypes, "Rojo Pasión" and "Z506-7", resistant and susceptible to PPV, respectively. Transcriptomic analyses revealed the existence of more than 2,000 genes related to the pathogen response and resistance to PPV in apricot. These results showed that the response to infection by the virus in the susceptible genotype is associated with an induction of genes involved in pathogen resistance such as the allene oxide synthase, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase 2 and the major MLP-like protein 423. Over-expression of the Dicer protein 2a may indicate the suppression of a gene silencing mechanism of the plant by PPV HCPro and P1 PPV proteins. On the other hand, there were 164 genes involved in resistance mechanisms that have been identified in apricot, 49 of which are located in the PPVres region (scaffold 1 positions from 8,050,804 to 8,244,925, which is responsible for PPV resistance in apricot. Among these genes in apricot there are several MATH domain-containing genes, although other genes inside (Pleiotropic drug resistance 9 gene or outside (CAP, Cysteine-rich secretory proteins, Antigen 5 and Pathogenesis-related 1 protein; and LEA, Late embryogenesis abundant protein PPVres region could also be involved in the resistance.

  5. Deep sequence analysis reveals the ovine rumen as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitch, Thomas C A; Thomas, Ben J; Friedersdorff, Jessica C A; Ougham, Helen; Creevey, Christopher J

    2018-04-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasingly important environmental pollutant with direct consequences for human health. Identification of environmental sources of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) makes it possible to follow their evolution and prevent their entry into the clinical setting. ARGs have been found in environmental sources exogenous to the original source and previous studies have shown that these genes are capable of being transferred from livestock to humans. Due to the nature of farming and the slaughter of ruminants for food, humans interact with these animals in close proximity, and for this reason it is important to consider the risks to human health. In this study, we characterised the ARG populations in the ovine rumen, termed the resistome. This was done using the Comprehensive Antibiotic Resistance Database (CARD) to identify the presence of genes conferring resistance to antibiotics within the rumen. Genes were successfully mapped to those that confer resistance to a total of 30 different antibiotics. Daptomycin was identified as the most common antibiotic for which resistance is present, suggesting that ruminants may be a source of daptomycin ARGs. Colistin resistance, conferred by the gene pmrE, was also found to be present within all samples, with an average abundance of 800 counts. Due to the high abundance of some ARGs (against daptomycin) and the presence of rare ARGs (against colistin), we suggest further study and monitoring of the rumen resistome as a possible source of clinically relevant ARGs. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Insights into novel antimicrobial compounds and antibiotic resistance genes from soil metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alinne P Castro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a major worldwide problem has arisen with regard to infectious diseases caused by resistant bacteria. Resistant pathogens are related to high mortality and also to enormous healthcare costs. In this field, cultured microorganisms have been commonly focused in attempts to isolate antibiotic resistance genes or to identify antimicrobial compounds. Although this strategy has been successful in many cases, most of the microbial diversity and related antimicrobial molecules have been completely lost. As an alternative, metagenomics has been used as a reliable approach to reveal the prospective reservoir of antimicrobial compounds and antibiotic resistance genes in the uncultured microbial community that inhabits a number of environments. In this context, this review will focus on resistance genes as well as on novel antibiotics revealed by a metagenomics approach from the soil environment. Biotechnology prospects are also discussed, opening new frontiers for antibiotic development.

  7. New Genes Involved in Mild Stress Response Identified by Transposon Mutagenesis in Lactobacillus paracasei

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    Aurore Palud

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are associated with various plant, animal, and human niches and are also present in many fermented foods and beverages. Thus, they are subjected to several stress conditions and have developed advanced response mechanisms to resist, adapt, and grow. This work aimed to identify the genes involved in some stress adaptation mechanisms in LAB. For this purpose, global reverse genetics was applied by screening a library of 1287 Lactobacillus paracasei transposon mutants for mild monofactorial stresses. This library was submitted independently to heat (52°C, 30 min, ethanol (170 g.L−1, 30 min, salt (NaCl 0.8 M, 24 h, acid (pH 4.5, 24 h, and oxidative (2 mM H2O2, 24 h perturbations which trigger mild monofactorial stresses compatible with bacterial adaptation. Stress sensitivity of mutants was determined either by evaluating viability using propidium iodide (PI staining, or by following growth inhibition through turbidity measurement. The screening for heat and ethanol stresses lead respectively to the identification of 63 and 27 genes/putative promoters whose disruption lead to an increased sensitivity. Among them, 14 genes or putative promoters were common for both stresses. For salt, acid and oxidative stresses, respectively 8, 6, and 9 genes or putative promoters were identified as essential for adaptation to these unfavorable conditions, with only three genes common to at least two stresses. Then, RT-qPCR was performed on selected stress response genes identified by mutant screenings in order to evaluate if their expression was modified in response to stresses in the parental strain. Eleven genes (membrane, transposase, chaperone, nucleotide and carbohydrate metabolism, and hypothetical protein genes were upregulated during stress adaptation for at least two stresses. Seven genes, encoding membrane functions, were upregulated in response to a specific stress and thus could represent potential transcriptomic biomarkers

  8. RNAi validation of resistance genes and their interactions in the highly DDT-resistant 91-R strain of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellatly, Kyle J; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Doherty, Jeffery J; Sun, Weilin; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Clark, J Marshall

    2015-06-01

    4,4'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) has been re-recommended by the World Health Organization for malaria mosquito control. Previous DDT use has resulted in resistance, and with continued use resistance will increase in terms of level and extent. Drosophila melanogaster is a model dipteran that has many available genetic tools, numerous studies done on insecticide resistance mechanisms, and is related to malaria mosquitoes allowing for extrapolation. The 91-R strain of D. melanogaster is highly resistant to DDT (>1500-fold), however, there is no mechanistic scheme that accounts for this level of resistance. Recently, reduced penetration, increased detoxification, and direct excretion have been identified as resistance mechanisms in the 91-R strain. Their interactions, however, remain unclear. Use of UAS-RNAi transgenic lines of D. melanogaster allowed for the targeted knockdown of genes putatively involved in DDT resistance and has validated the role of several cuticular proteins (Cyp4g1 and Lcp1), cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (Cyp6g1 and Cyp12d1), and ATP binding cassette transporters (Mdr50, Mdr65, and Mrp1) involved in DDT resistance. Further, increased sensitivity to DDT in the 91-R strain after intra-abdominal dsRNA injection for Mdr50, Mdr65, and Mrp1 was determined by a DDT contact bioassay, directly implicating these genes in DDT efflux and resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Identifying Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) and Developing Diagnostic Markers Linked to Orange Rust Resistance in Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiping; Islam, Md S; Sood, Sushma; Maya, Stephanie; Hanson, Erik A; Comstock, Jack; Wang, Jianping

    2018-01-01

    Sugarcane ( Saccharum spp.) is an important economic crop, contributing up to 80% of table sugar used in the world and has become a promising feedstock for biofuel production. Sugarcane production has been threatened by many diseases, and fungicide applications for disease control have been opted out for sustainable agriculture. Orange rust is one of the major diseases impacting sugarcane production worldwide. Identifying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and developing diagnostic markers are valuable for breeding programs to expedite release of superior sugarcane cultivars for disease control. In this study, an F 1 segregating population derived from a cross between two hybrid sugarcane clones, CP95-1039 and CP88-1762, was evaluated for orange rust resistance in replicated trails. Three QTLs controlling orange rust resistance in sugarcane (qORR109, qORR4 and qORR102) were identified for the first time ever, which can explain 58, 12 and 8% of the phenotypic variation, separately. We also characterized 1,574 sugarcane putative resistance ( R ) genes. These sugarcane putative R genes and simple sequence repeats in the QTL intervals were further used to develop diagnostic markers for marker-assisted selection of orange rust resistance. A PCR-based Resistance gene-derived maker, G1 was developed, which showed significant association with orange rust resistance. The putative QTLs and marker developed in this study can be effectively utilized in sugarcane breeding programs to facilitate the selection process, thus contributing to the sustainable agriculture for orange rust disease control.

  10. Diversity of Integron- and Culture-Associated Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Freshwater Floc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drudge, Christopher N.; Elliott, Amy V. C.; Plach, Janina M.; Ejim, Linda J.; Wright, Gerard D.; Droppo, Ian G.

    2012-01-01

    Clinically important antibiotic resistance genes were detected in culturable bacteria and class 1 integron gene cassettes recovered from suspended floc, a significant aquatic repository for microorganisms and trace elements, across freshwater systems variably impacted by anthropogenic activities. Antibiotic resistance gene cassettes in floc total community DNA differed appreciably in number and type from genes detected in bacteria cultured from floc. The number of floc antibiotic resistance gene cassette types detected across sites was positively correlated with total (the sum of Ag, As, Cu, and Pb) trace element concentrations in aqueous solution and in a component of floc readily accessible to bacteria. In particular, concentrations of Cu and Pb in the floc component were positively correlated with floc resistance gene cassette diversity. Collectively, these results identify suspended floc as an important reservoir, distinct from bulk water and bed sediment, for antibiotic resistance in aquatic environments ranging from heavily impacted urban sites to remote areas of nature reserves and indicate that trace elements, particularly Cu and Pb, are geochemical markers of resistance diversity in this environmental reservoir. The increase in contamination of global water supplies suggests that aquatic environments will become an even more important reservoir of clinically important antibiotic resistance in the future. PMID:22467502

  11. Dissection of Resistance Genes to Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola in UI3 Common Bean Cultivar

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    Ana M. González

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Few quantitative trait loci have been mapped for resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola in common bean. Two F2 populations were developed from the host differential UI3 cultivar. The objective of this study was to further characterize the resistance to races 1, 5, 7 and 9 of Psp included in UI3. Using a QTL mapping approach, 16 and 11 main-effect QTLs for pod and primary leaf resistance were located on LG10, explaining up to 90% and 26% of the phenotypic variation, respectively. The homologous genomic region corresponding to primary leaf resistance QTLs detected tested positive for the presence of resistance-associated gene cluster encoding nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat (NL, Natural Resistance Associated Macrophage (NRAMP and Pentatricopeptide Repeat family (PPR proteins. It is worth noting that the main effect QTLs for resistance in pod were located inside a 3.5 Mb genomic region that included the Phvul.010G021200 gene, which encodes a protein that has the highest sequence similarity to the RIN4 gene of Arabidopsis, and can be considered an important candidate gene for the organ-specific QTLs identified here. These results support that resistance to Psp from UI3 might result from the immune response activated by combinations of R proteins, and suggest the guard model as an important mechanism in pod resistance to halo blight. The candidate genes identified here warrant functional studies that will help in characterizing the actual defense gene(s in UI3 genotype.

  12. Gene Expression Profile of High IFN-γ Producers Stimulated with Leishmania braziliensis Identifies Genes Associated with Cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Marcia W; Fukutani, Kiyoshi F; Andrade, Bruno B; Curvelo, Rebecca P; Cristal, Juqueline R; Carvalho, Augusto M; Barral, Aldina; Van Weyenbergh, Johan; Barral-Netto, Manoel; de Oliveira, Camila I

    2016-11-01

    The initial response to Leishmania parasites is essential in determining disease development or resistance. In vitro, a divergent response to Leishmania, characterized by high or low IFN-γ production has been described as a potential tool to predict both vaccine response and disease susceptibility in vivo. We identified uninfected and healthy individuals that were shown to be either high- or low IFN-γ producers (HPs and LPs, respectively) following stimulation of peripheral blood cells with Leishmania braziliensis. Following stimulation, RNA was processed for gene expression analysis using immune gene arrays. Both HPs and LPs were shown to upregulate the expression of CXCL10, IFI27, IL6 and LTA. Genes expressed in HPs only (CCL7, IL8, IFI44L and IL1B) were associated with pathways related to IL17 and TREM 1 signaling. In LPs, uniquely expressed genes (for example IL9, IFI44, IFIT1 and IL2RA) were associated with pathways related to pattern recognition receptors and interferon signaling. We then investigated whether the unique gene expression profiles described here could be recapitulated in vivo, in individuals with active Cutaneous Leishmaniasis or with subclinical infection. Indeed, using a set of six genes (TLR2, JAK2, IFI27, IFIT1, IRF1 and IL6) modulated in HPs and LPs, we could successfully discriminate these two clinical groups. Finally, we demonstrate that these six genes are significantly overexpressed in CL lesions. Upon interrogation of the peripheral response of naive individuals with diverging IFN-γ production to L. braziliensis, we identified differences in the innate response to the parasite that are recapitulated in vivo and that discriminate CL patients from individuals presenting a subclinical infection.

  13. Paradoxical DNA repair and peroxide resistance gene conservation in Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032.

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    Jason Gioia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacillus spores are notoriously resistant to unfavorable conditions such as UV radiation, gamma-radiation, H2O2, desiccation, chemical disinfection, or starvation. Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 survives standard decontamination procedures of the Jet Propulsion Lab spacecraft assembly facility, and both spores and vegetative cells of this strain exhibit elevated resistance to UV radiation and H2O2 compared to other Bacillus species. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The genome of B. pumilus SAFR-032 was sequenced and annotated. Lists of genes relevant to DNA repair and the oxidative stress response were generated and compared to B. subtilis and B. licheniformis. Differences in conservation of genes, gene order, and protein sequences are highlighted because they potentially explain the extreme resistance phenotype of B. pumilus. The B. pumilus genome includes genes not found in B. subtilis or B. licheniformis and conserved genes with sequence divergence, but paradoxically lacks several genes that function in UV or H2O2 resistance in other Bacillus species. SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies several candidate genes for further research into UV and H2O2 resistance. These findings will help explain the resistance of B. pumilus and are applicable to understanding sterilization survival strategies of microbes.

  14. PCR Screening of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Faecal Samples from Australian and Chinese Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravensdale, Joshua T; Xian, Darren Ten Wei; Wei, Chooi Ming; Lv, Quanjun; Wen, Xiajian; Guo, Jing; Coorey, Ranil; LeSouëf, Peter; Lu, Fengmin; Zhang, Brad; Dykes, Gary A

    2018-03-31

    Recent public awareness campaigns on the risk of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic microbes has placed pressure on governments to enforce stricter antimicrobial stewardship policies on the hospital and agricultural industry. This study aimed to screen faecal samples from Australian and Chinese children for the presence of antibiotic resistance genes to identify demographics at risk of carriage of these genes and examine antimicrobial stewardship policies from the two countries which may influence carriage. Faecal samples from 46 Australian and 53 Chinese children were screened for the presence of six clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes using PCR. Clinical and demographic data was also collected from each patient. Over 90% of faecal samples from Chinese children tested positive for β-lactam, macrolide, tetracycline, and aminoglycoside resistance genes, which was substantially higher than Australian samples. Besides country of origin, no clear trend could be seen to predict carriage of resistance genes. The exception to this was Chinese born children who immigrated to Australia having higher rates of carriage for bla TEM and tetM genes than children born and still living in Australia. These data indicated that Chinese children were more likely to carry certain antibiotic resistance genes than Australian children. The Chinese government has recently implemented strict policies to control the overuse of antibiotics in hospitals. However, many of these policies do not extend to the agricultural industry which could explain the differences seen in this study. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. TimeXNet: identifying active gene sub-networks using time-course gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ashwini; Nakai, Kenta

    2014-01-01

    Time-course gene expression profiles are frequently used to provide insight into the changes in cellular state over time and to infer the molecular pathways involved. When combined with large-scale molecular interaction networks, such data can provide information about the dynamics of cellular response to stimulus. However, few tools are currently available to predict a single active gene sub-network from time-course gene expression profiles. We introduce a tool, TimeXNet, which identifies active gene sub-networks with temporal paths using time-course gene expression profiles in the context of a weighted gene regulatory and protein-protein interaction network. TimeXNet uses a specialized form of the network flow optimization approach to identify the most probable paths connecting the genes with significant changes in expression at consecutive time intervals. TimeXNet has been extensively evaluated for its ability to predict novel regulators and their associated pathways within active gene sub-networks in the mouse innate immune response and the yeast osmotic stress response. Compared to other similar methods, TimeXNet identified up to 50% more novel regulators from independent experimental datasets. It predicted paths within a greater number of known pathways with longer overlaps (up to 7 consecutive edges) within these pathways. TimeXNet was also shown to be robust in the presence of varying amounts of noise in the molecular interaction network. TimeXNet is a reliable tool that can be used to study cellular response to stimuli through the identification of time-dependent active gene sub-networks in diverse biological systems. It is significantly better than other similar tools. TimeXNet is implemented in Java as a stand-alone application and supported on Linux, MS Windows and Macintosh. The output of TimeXNet can be directly viewed in Cytoscape. TimeXNet is freely available for non-commercial users.

  16. Mutations inside rifampicin-resistance determining region of rpoB gene associated with rifampicin-resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaw, Myo T; Emran, Nor A; Lin, Zaw

    2018-04-26

    Rifampicin (RIF) plays a pivotal role in the treatment of tuberculosis due to its bactericidal effects. Because the action of RIF is on rpoB gene encoding RNA polymerase β subunit, 95% of RIF resistant mutations are present in rpoB gene. The majority of the mutations in rpoB gene are found within an 81bp RIF-resistance determining region (RRDR). Literatures on RIF resistant mutations published between 2010 and 2016 were thoroughly reviewed. The most commonly mutated codons in RRDR of rpoB gene are 531, 526 and 516. The possibilities of absence of mutation in RRDR of rpoB gene in MDR-TB isolates in few studies was due to existence of other rare rpoB mutations outside RRDR or different mechanism of rifampicin resistance. Molecular methods which can identify extensive mutations associated with multiple anti-tuberculous drugs are in urgent need so that the research on drug resistant mutations should be extended. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. The MCP-8 gene and its possible association with resistance to Streptococcus agalactiae in tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Gui Hong; Wan, Zi Yi; Xia, Jun Hong; Liu, Feng; Liu, Xiao Jun; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-09-01

    Mast cell proteases play an important role in the regulation of the immune response. We identified the cDNA of the mast cell protease 8 (MCP-8) gene and analyzed its genomic structure in tilapia. The ORF of the MCP-8 was 768 bp, encoding 255 amino acids. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the MCP-8 gene was expressed predominantly in spleen, moderately in liver, blood, brain, gill, intestine, skin, and weakly expressed in kidney, muscle and eye. After a challenge with Streptococcus agalactiae, the gene was induced significantly (p 0.05). These results suggest that the MCP-8 gene play an important role in the resistance to S. agalactiae in tilapia. The SNP markers in the MCP-8 gene associated with the resistance to the bacterial pathogen may facilitate selection of tilapia resistant to the bacterial disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance and resistance genes in Salmonella strains isolated from broiler chickens along the slaughtering process in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuanting; Lai, Haimei; Zou, Likou; Yin, Sheng; Wang, Chengtao; Han, Xinfeng; Xia, Xiaolong; Hu, Kaidi; He, Li; Zhou, Kang; Chen, Shujuan; Ao, Xiaolin; Liu, Shuliang

    2017-10-16

    A total of 189 Salmonella isolates were recovered from 627 samples which were collected from cecal contents of broilers, chicken carcasses, chicken meat after cutting step and frozen broiler chicken products along the slaughtering process at a slaughterhouse in Sichuan province of China. The Salmonella isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing to 10 categories of antimicrobial agents using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Those antibiotics-resistant isolates were further investigated for the occurrence of resistance genes, the presence of class 1 integron as well as the associated gene cassettes, and the mutations within the gyrA and parC genes. Consequently, the prevalence of Salmonella was 30.14% (47.96% for cecal content, 18.78% for chicken carcasses, 31.33% for cutting meat and 14.00% for frozen meat, respectively). The predominant serotypes were S. Typhimurium (15.34%) and S. Enteritidis (69.84%). High resistance rates to the following drugs were observed: nalidixic acid (99.5%), ampicillin (87.8%), tetracycline (51.9%), ciprofloxacin (48.7%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (48.1%), and spectinomycin (34.4%). Antimicrobial resistance profiling showed that 60.8% of isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), and MDR strains increased from 44.7% to 78.6% along the slaughtering line. 94.6% (n=157) of beta-lactam-resistant isolates harbored at least one resistance gene of bla TEM or bla CTX-M . The relatively low prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance genes (aac(3)-II, aac(3)-IV, and ant(2″)-I) was found in 49 (66.2%) of antibiotic-resistant isolates. The tetracycline resistance genes (tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), and tet(G) and sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2, and sul3) were identified in 84 (85.7%) and 89 (97.8%) antibiotic-resistant isolates respectively. floR was identified in 44 (97.8%) florfenicol-resistant isolates. Class 1 integron was detected in 37.4% (n=43) of the MDR isolates. Two different gene cassettes, bla OXA-30 -aad

  19. [cDNA libraries construction and screening in gene expression profiling of disease resistance in wheat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Meng; Kong, Xiu-Ying; Liu, Yue; Zhou, Rong-Hua; Jia, Ji-Zeng

    2002-09-01

    A wheat line, Bai Nong 3217/Mardler BC5F4 with resistance to powdery mildew, was used to construct a conventional cDNA library and a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library from wheat leaves inoculated by Erysiphe graminis DC. Three hundred and eighty-seven non-redundant ESTs from the conventional cDNA library and 760 ESTs from the SSH cDNA library were obtained, and the ESTs similarity analysis using BLASTn and BLASTx were conducted by comparing these ESTs with sequences in GenBank. The results showed that the redundancy of some kinds of genes such as photosynthesis related genes and ribosome related genes was higher in the conventional cDNA library but the varieties and quantities of disease resistance genes were less than those in the SSH cDNA library. The SSH cDNA library was found to have obvious advantages in gene expression profiling of disease resistance such as simple library construction procedure, rich specific DRR (disease-resistance-related) genes and decreased sequencing amount. To acquire genes that were involved in the powdery mildew resistance of wheat, hybridization with high-density dots membranes was used to screen the two libraries. The result showed that the method was relatively simple in operation, and the membranes could be used for many times. But some problems also existed with this screening method. For instance, a large amount of mRNA and radioactive isotope were needed and the hybridization procedure must be repeated several times to obtain stable hybridization results. About 54.1% function-known ESTs in the SSH cDNA library were identified to be DRR genes by screening. There were 247 clones of the SSH cDNA library that had positive signal in the repeated hybridizations with the pathogen uninfected probe. The identified DRR genes distributed in the whole procedure of powdery mildew resistance, but mainly focused on the SAR (systemic of acquired resistance).

  20. EPSPS gene amplification conferring resistance to glyphosate in windmill grass (Chloris truncata) in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, The D; Malone, Jenna M; Boutsalis, Peter; Gill, Gurjeet; Preston, Christopher

    2018-05-01

    Five glyphosate-resistant populations of Chloris truncata originally collected from New South Wales were compared with one susceptible (S) population from South Australia to confirm glyphosate resistance and elucidate possible mechanisms of resistance. Based on the amounts of glyphosate required to kill 50% of treated plants (LD 50 ), glyphosate resistance (GR) was confirmed in five populations of C. truncata (A536, A528, T27, A534 and A535.1). GR plants were 2.4-8.7-fold more resistant and accumulated less shikimate after glyphosate treatment than S plants. There was no difference in glyphosate absorption and translocation between GR and S plants. The EPSPS gene did not contain any point mutation that had previously been associated with resistance to glyphosate. The resistant plants (A528 and A536) contained up to 32-48 more copies of the EPSPS gene than the susceptible plants. This study has identified EPSPS gene amplification contributing to glyphosate resistance in C. truncata. In addition, a Glu-91-Ala mutation within EPSPS was identified that may contribute to glyphosate resistance in this species. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Discovery and characterization of two new stem rust resistance genes in Aegilops sharonensis

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Guotai; Champouret, Nicolas; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Olivera, Pablo D.; Simmons, Jamie; Williams, Cole; Johnson, Ryan; Moscou, Matthew J.; Hern?ndez-Pinz?n, Inmaculada; Green, Phon; Sela, Hanan; Millet, Eitan; Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Ward, Eric R.; Steffenson, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Key message We identified two novel wheat stem rust resistance genes, Sr-1644-1Sh and Sr-1644-5Sh in Aegilops sharonensis that are effective against widely virulent African races of the wheat stem rust pathogen. Abstract Stem rust is one of the most important diseases of wheat in the world. When single stem rust resistance (Sr) genes are deployed in wheat, they are often rapidly overcome by the pathogen. To this end, we initiated a search for novel sources of resistance in diverse wheat relat...

  2. Resistance gene management: concepts and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher C. Mundt

    2012-01-01

    There is now a very long history of genetics/breeding for disease resistance in annual crops. These efforts have resulted in conceptual advances and frustrations, as well as practical successes and failures. This talk will review this history and its relevance to the genetics of resistance in forest species. All plant breeders and pathologists are familiar with boom-...

  3. The role of Cercospora zeae-maydis homologs of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 1O2-resistance genes in resistance to the photoactivated toxin cercosporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beseli, Aydin; Goulart da Silva, Marilia; Daub, Margaret E

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides and plant pathogenic fungus Cercospora nicotianae have been used as models for understanding resistance to singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)), a highly toxic reactive oxygen species. In Rhodobacter and Cercospora, (1)O(2) is derived, respectively, from photosynthesis and from the (1)O(2)-generating toxin cercosporin which the fungus produces to parasitize plants. We identified common genes recovered in transcriptome studies of putative (1)O(2)-resistance genes in these two systems, suggesting common (1)O(2)-resistance mechanisms. To determine if the Cercospora homologs of R. sphaeroides (1)O(2)-resistance genes are involved in resistance to cercosporin, we expressed the genes in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus Neurospora crassa and assayed for increases in cercosporin resistance. Neurospora crassa transformants expressing genes encoding aldo/keto reductase, succinyl-CoA ligase, O-acetylhomoserine (thiol) lyase, peptide methionine sulphoxide reductase and glutathione S-transferase did not have elevated levels of cercosporin resistance. Several transformants expressing aldehyde dehydrogenase were significantly more resistant to cercosporin. Expression of the transgene and enzyme activity did not correlate with resistance, however. We conclude that although the genes tested in this study are important in (1)O(2) resistance in R. sphaeroides, their Cercospora homologs are not involved in resistance to (1)O(2) generated from cercosporin. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Analysis of metal and biocides resistance genes in drug resistance and susceptible Salmonella enterica from food animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background Generally drug resistant bacteria carry antibiotic resistance genes and heavy metal and biocide resistance genes on large conjugative plasmids. The presence of these metal and biocide resistance genes in susceptible bacteria are not assessed comprehensively. Hence, WGS data of susceptib...

  5. Figmop: a profile HMM to identify genes and bypass troublesome gene models in draft genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, David M; Gilleard, John S; Wasmuth, James D

    2014-11-15

    Gene models from draft genome assemblies of metazoan species are often incorrect, missing exons or entire genes, particularly for large gene families. Consequently, labour-intensive manual curation is often necessary. We present Figmop (Finding Genes using Motif Patterns) to help with the manual curation of gene families in draft genome assemblies. The program uses a pattern of short sequence motifs to identify putative genes directly from the genome sequence. Using a large gene family as a test case, Figmop was found to be more sensitive and specific than a BLAST-based approach. The visualization used allows the validation of potential genes to be carried out quickly and easily, saving hours if not days from an analysis. Source code of Figmop is freely available for download at https://github.com/dave-the-scientist, implemented in C and Python and is supported on Linux, Unix and MacOSX. curran.dave.m@gmail.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Rpr1, a gene required for Rpg1-dependent resistance to stem rust in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Fetch, T; Nirmala, J; Schmierer, D; Brueggeman, R; Steffenson, B; Kleinhofs, A

    2006-09-01

    Rpg1 is a stem rust resistance gene that has protected barley from severe losses for over 60 years in the US and Canada. It confers resistance to many, but not all, pathotypes of the stem rust fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici. A fast neutron induced deletion mutant, showing susceptibility to stem rust pathotype Pgt-MCC, was identified in barley cv. Morex, which carries Rpg1. Genetic and Rpg1 mRNA and protein expression level analyses showed that the mutation was a suppressor of Rpg1 and was designated Rpr1 (Required for P. graminis resistance). Genome-wide expression profiling, using the Affymetrix Barley1 GeneChip containing approximately 22,840 probe sets, was conducted with Morex and the rpr1 mutant. Of the genes represented on the Barley1 microarray, 20 were up-regulated and 33 were down-regulated by greater than twofold in the mutant, while the Rpg1 mRNA level remained constant. Among the highly down-regulated genes (greater than fourfold), genomic PCR, RT-PCR and Southern analyses identified that three genes (Contig4901_s_at, HU03D17U_s_at, and Contig7061_s_at), were deleted in the rpr1 mutant. These three genes mapped to chromosome 4(4H) bin 5 and co-segregated with the rpr1-mediated susceptible phenotype. The loss of resistance was presumed to be due to a mutation in one or more of these genes. However, the possibility exists that there are other genes within the deletions, which are not represented on the Barley1 GeneChip. The Rpr1 gene was not required for Rpg5- and rpg4-mediated stem rust resistance, indicating that it shows specificity to the Rpg1-mediated resistance pathway.

  7. The antimicrobial resistance crisis: management through gene monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an acknowledged crisis for humanity. Its genetic origins and dire potential outcomes are increasingly well understood. However, diagnostic techniques for monitoring the crisis are currently largely limited to enumerating the increasing incidence of resistant pathogens. Being the end-stage of the evolutionary process that produces antimicrobial resistant pathogens, these measurements, while diagnostic, are not prognostic, and so are not optimal in managing this crisis. A better test is required. Here, using insights from an understanding of evolutionary processes ruling the changing abundance of genes under selective pressure, we suggest a predictive framework for the AMR crisis. We then discuss the likely progression of resistance for both existing and prospective antimicrobial therapies. Finally, we suggest that by the environmental monitoring of resistance gene frequency, resistance may be detected and tracked presumptively, and how this tool may be used to guide decision-making in the local and global use of antimicrobials. PMID:27831476

  8. Tagging of blast resistance gene(s) to DNA markers and marker-assisted selection (MAS) in rice improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, J.Y.; Lu, J.; Qian, H.R.; Lin, H.X.; Zheng, K.L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports progress made on the tagging of blast resistance gene(s) to DNA markers and on the initiation of marker-assisted selection (MAS) for blast resistance in rice improvement. A pair of near isogenic lines, K8OR and K79S, were developed using a Chinese landrace Hong-jiao-zhan as the resistance donor. Ten putatively positive markers were identified by screening 177 mapped DNA markers. Using the F 2 population of 143 plants and the derived F 3 lines, three Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) markers (RG81, RG869 and RZ397) on chromosome 12 of rice were identified to be closely linked to the blast resistance gene Pi-12(t). The genetic distance between Pi-12(t) and the closest marker RG869 was 5.1 cM. By employing the bulk segregant analysis (BSA) procedure, six of 199 arbitrary primers were found to produce positive Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) bands. Tight linkage between Pi-12(t) and three RAPD bands, each from a different primer, was confirmed after amplification of DNA of all F 2 individuals. Two fragments were cloned and sequenced, and two sequence characterised amplified re-ion (SCAR) markers were established. In two other F 3 populations, Xian-feng I/Tetep and Xian-feng, 1/Hong-jiao-zhan, the blast resistance was found to be controlled by interactions of two or more genes. One resistance gene was located in the vicinity of RG81 in both populations. Work to identify other gene(s) is currently under way. Marker assisted selection for blast resistance was initiated. Crosses were made between elite varieties and blast resistance donors to develop populations for DNA marker-assisted selection of blast resistance. In addition, 48 varieties widely used in current rice breeding programs were provided by rice breeders. DNA marker-based polymorphism among, these varieties and resistance donors were analysed to produce a database for future MAS program. (author)

  9. Emergence of macrolide resistance gene mph(B) in Streptococcus uberis and cooperative effects with rdmC-like gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achard, Adeline; Guérin-Faublée, Véronique; Pichereau, Vianney; Villers, Corinne; Leclercq, Roland

    2008-08-01

    Streptococcus uberis UCN60 was resistant to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml) but susceptible to erythromycin (MIC = 0.06 microg/ml), azithromycin (MIC = 0.12 microg/ml), josamycin (MIC = 0.25 microg/ml), and tylosin (MIC = 0.5 microg/ml). A 2.5-kb HindIII fragment was cloned from S. uberis UCN60 DNA on plasmid pUC18 and introduced into Escherichia coli AG100A, where it conferred resistance to spiramycin by inactivation. The sequence analysis of the fragment showed the presence of an rdmC-like gene that putatively encoded a protein belonging to the alpha/beta hydrolase family and of the first 196 nucleotides of the mph(B) gene putatively encoding a phosphotransferase known to inactivate 14-, 15-, and 16-membered macrolides in E. coli. The entire mph(B) gene was then identified in S. uberis UCN60. The two genes were expressed alone or in combination in E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis. Analysis of MICs revealed that rdmC-like alone did not confer resistance to erythromycin, tylosin, and josamycin in those three hosts. It conferred resistance to spiramycin in E. coli and E. faecalis but not in S. aureus. mph(B) conferred resistance in E. coli to erythromycin, tylosin, josamycin, and spiramycin but only low levels of resistance in E. faecalis and S. aureus to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml). The combination of mph(B) and rdmC-like genes resulted in a resistance to spiramycin and tylosin in the three hosts that significantly exceeded the mere addition of the resistance levels conferred by each resistance mechanism alone.

  10. Comparative Genome-Wide-Association Mapping Identifies Common Loci Controlling Root System Architecture and Resistance toAphanomyces euteichesin Pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgroux, Aurore; Baudais, Valentin N; Aubert, Véronique; Le Roy, Gwenola; de Larambergue, Henri; Miteul, Henri; Aubert, Grégoire; Boutet, Gilles; Duc, Gérard; Baranger, Alain; Burstin, Judith; Manzanares-Dauleux, Maria; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Bourion, Virginie

    2017-01-01

    Combining plant genetic resistance with architectural traits that are unfavorable to disease development is a promising strategy for reducing epidemics. However, few studies have identified root system architecture (RSA) traits with the potential to limit root disease development. Pea is a major cultivated legume worldwide and has a wide level of natural genetic variability for plant architecture. The root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches is a major limiting factor of pea crop yield. This study aimed to increase the knowledge on the diversity of loci and candidate genes controlling RSA traits in pea and identify RSA genetic loci associated with resistance to A. euteiches which could be combined with resistance QTL in breeding. A comparative genome wide association (GWA) study of plant architecture and resistance to A. euteiches was conducted at the young plant stage in a collection of 266 pea lines contrasted for both traits. The collection was genotyped using 14,157 SNP markers from recent pea genomic resources. It was phenotyped for ten root, shoot and overall plant architecture traits, as well as three disease resistance traits in controlled conditions, using image analysis. We identified a total of 75 short-size genomic intervals significantly associated with plant architecture and overlapping with 46 previously detected QTL. The major consistent intervals included plant shoot architecture or flowering genes ( PsLE, PsTFL1 ) with putative pleiotropic effects on root architecture. A total of 11 genomic intervals were significantly associated with resistance to A. euteiches confirming several consistent previously identified major QTL. One significant SNP, mapped to the major QTL Ae-Ps7.6 , was associated with both resistance and RSA traits. At this marker, the resistance-enhancing allele was associated with an increased total root projected area, in accordance with the correlation observed between resistance and larger root systems in the collection. Seven

  11. Comparative Genome-Wide-Association Mapping Identifies Common Loci Controlling Root System Architecture and Resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches in Pea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Desgroux

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining plant genetic resistance with architectural traits that are unfavorable to disease development is a promising strategy for reducing epidemics. However, few studies have identified root system architecture (RSA traits with the potential to limit root disease development. Pea is a major cultivated legume worldwide and has a wide level of natural genetic variability for plant architecture. The root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches is a major limiting factor of pea crop yield. This study aimed to increase the knowledge on the diversity of loci and candidate genes controlling RSA traits in pea and identify RSA genetic loci associated with resistance to A. euteiches which could be combined with resistance QTL in breeding. A comparative genome wide association (GWA study of plant architecture and resistance to A. euteiches was conducted at the young plant stage in a collection of 266 pea lines contrasted for both traits. The collection was genotyped using 14,157 SNP markers from recent pea genomic resources. It was phenotyped for ten root, shoot and overall plant architecture traits, as well as three disease resistance traits in controlled conditions, using image analysis. We identified a total of 75 short-size genomic intervals significantly associated with plant architecture and overlapping with 46 previously detected QTL. The major consistent intervals included plant shoot architecture or flowering genes (PsLE, PsTFL1 with putative pleiotropic effects on root architecture. A total of 11 genomic intervals were significantly associated with resistance to A. euteiches confirming several consistent previously identified major QTL. One significant SNP, mapped to the major QTL Ae-Ps7.6, was associated with both resistance and RSA traits. At this marker, the resistance-enhancing allele was associated with an increased total root projected area, in accordance with the correlation observed between resistance and larger root systems in the collection

  12. Resistance to charcoal rot identified in ancestral soybean germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot, caused by the fungal pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina, is an economically important disease on soybean and other crops including maize, sorghum, and sunflowers. Without effective cultural or chemical options to control charcoal rot in soybean, finding sources of genetic resistance is o...

  13. Proteomic analysis of cell lines to identify the irinotecan resistance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MADHU

    Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center, and The State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, West. China Medical School ... Chemotherapeutic drug resistance is a frequent cause of treatment failure in colon cancer patients. Several .... 3.1 Biological characteristics of LoVo/irinotecan cells. The IC50 ...

  14. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes In Deltamethrin-Resistant Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin-Mei; Li, Chun-Xiao; Wu, Qun; Shi, Qing-Ming; Sun, Ai-Juan; Zhang, Heng-Duan; Guo, Xiao-Xia; Dong, Yan-De; Xing, Dan; Zhang, Ying-Mei; Han, Qian; Diao, Xiao-Ping; Zhao, Tong-Yan

    2017-12-01

    Culex quinquefasciatus is one of China's major house-dwelling mosquito species and an important vector of filariasis and encephalitis. Chemical treatments represent one of the most successful approaches for comprehensive mosquito prevention and control. However, the widespread use of chemical pesticides has led to the occurrence and development of insecticide resistance. Therefore, in-depth studies of resistance to insecticides are of vital importance. In this study, we performed a gene expression analysis to investigate genes from Cx. quinquefasciatus that may confer pyrethroid resistance. We aimed to understand the mechanisms of Cx. quinquefasciatus resistance to pyrethroid insecticides and provide insights into insect resistance management. Using a resistance bioassay, we determined the deltamethrin LC 50 values (lethal concentration required to kill 50% of the population) for Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae in the F 21 , F 23 , F 24 , F 26 , F 27 , and F 30 generations. The 7 tested strains exhibited pesticide resistance that was 25.25 to 87.83 times higher than that of the SanYa strain. Moreover, the expression of the OBPjj7a (odorant-binding protein OBPjj7a), OBP28 (odorant-binding protein OBP28), and E2 (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme) genes was positively correlated with deltamethrin resistance ( R 2 = 0.836, P = 0.011; R 2 = 0.788, P = 0.018; and R 2 = 0.850, P = 0.009, respectively) in Cx. quinquefasciatus. The expression of 4 additional genes, H/ACA, S19, SAR2, and PGRP, was not correlated with deltamethrin resistance. In summary, this study identified 3 Cx. quinquefasciatus genes with potential involvement in deltamethrin resistance, and these results may provide a theoretical basis for the control of mosquito resistance and insights into resistance detection.

  15. A genomic analysis of disease-resistance genes encoding nucleotide binding sites in Sorghum bicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A large set of candidate nucleotide-binding site (NBS-encoding genes related to disease resistance was identified in the sorghum (Sorghum bicolor genome. These resistance (R genes were characterized based on their structural diversity, physical chromosomal location and phylogenetic relationships. Based on their N-terminal motifs and leucine-rich repeats (LRR, 50 non-regular NBS genes and 224 regular NBS genes were identified in 274 candidate NBS genes. The regular NBS genes were classified into ten types: CNL, CN, CNLX, CNX, CNXL, CXN, NX, N, NL and NLX. The vast majority (97% of NBS genes occurred in gene clusters, indicating extensive gene duplication in the evolution of S. bicolor NBS genes. Analysis of the S. bicolor NBS phylogenetic tree revealed two major clades. Most NBS genes were located at the distal tip of the long arms of the ten sorghum chromosomes, a pattern significantly different from rice and Arabidopsis, the NBS genes of which have a random chromosomal distribution.

  16. The Number of Genes Controlling Resistance in Beans to Common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten crosses were made between resistant (R), susceptible (S), RxS susceptible and Intermediate (I), SxI and RxR bean lines to common bacterial blight. The F1 were advanced to F2 and in each cross over 250 F2 plants were used to evaluate for the number of genes controlling resistance using Mendelian genetics and ...

  17. Prevalence, antibiotic-resistance properties and enterotoxin gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence, antibiotic-resistance properties and enterotoxin gene profile of Bacillus cereus strains isolated from milk-based baby foods. ... Conclusion: Considerable prevalence of resistant and toxigenic B. cereus and high consumption of milk-based infant foods in Iran, represent an important public health issue which ...

  18. Occurrence and reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seveno, N.; Kallifidas, D.; Smalla, K.; Elsas, van J.D.; Collard, J.M.; Karagouni, A.; Wellington, E.M.H.

    2002-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes have become highly mobile since the development of antibiotic chemotherapy. A considerable body of evidence exists proving the link between antibiotic use and the significant increase in drug-resistant human bacterial pathogens. The application of molecular detection and

  19. Identification of bacterial blight resistance genes Xa4 in Pakistani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of bacterial blight resistance genes Xa4 in Pakistani rice germplasm using PCR. M Arif, M Jaffar, M Babar, MA Sheikh, S Kousar, A Arif, Y Zafar. Abstract. Bacterial blight (BB) caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae (Xoo) is a major biotic constraint in the irrigated rice belts. Genetic resistance is the most ...

  20. Spread of tetracycline resistance genes at a conventional dairy farm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kyselková, Martina; Jirout, Jiří; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Schmitt, Heike; Elhottová, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in animal husbandry contributes to the worldwide problem of increasing antibiotic resistance in animal and human pathogens. Intensive animal production is considered an important source of antibiotic resistance genes released to the environment, while the contribution of

  1. gene effects for resistance to groundnut rossette disease in exotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2016-02-25

    Feb 25, 2016 ... Opposite and significant signs of dominance [d] and dominance × dominance [l] components indicated the importance of duplicate epitasis in the latter crosses in the control of GRD resistance, which revealed a complex nature of inheritance of GRD resistance. Key Words: Arachis hypogaea, gene effects, ...

  2. Progress on introduction of rust resistance genes into confection sunflower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunflower rust (Puccinia helianthi) emerged as a serious disease in the last few years. Confection sunflower is particularly vulnerable to the disease due to the lack of resistance sources. The objectives of this project are to transfer rust resistance genes from oil sunflower to confectionery sunfl...

  3. Isolation and characterization of a candidate gene for resistance to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ARC) domain, and a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain, all of which are typical characteristics of resistance genes. We proposed the resistance mechanism of CreV8 based on functional analysis and predictions from its conserved domains and ...

  4. High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance and Distribution of Aminoglycoside Resistant Genes among Clinical Isolates of Enterococcus Species in Chennai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elango Padmasini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci are nosocomial pathogen with multiple-drug resistance by intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Aminoglycosides along with cell wall inhibitors are given clinically for treating enterococcal infections. 178 enterococcal isolates were analyzed in this study. E. faecalis is identified to be the predominant Enterococcus species, along with E. faecium, E. avium, E. hirae, E. durans, E. dispar and E. gallinarum. High level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR by MIC for gentamicin (GM, streptomycin (SM and both (GM + SM antibiotics was found to be 42.7%, 29.8%, and 21.9%, respectively. Detection of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme encoding genes (AME in enterococci was identified by multiplex PCR for aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia; aph(2′′-Ib; aph(2′′-Ic; aph(2′′-Id and aph(3′-IIIa genes. 38.2% isolates carried aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia gene and 40.4% isolates carried aph(3′-IIIa gene. aph(2′′-Ib; aph(2′′-Ic; aph(2′′-Id were not detected among our study isolates. aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia and aph(3′-IIIa genes were also observed in HLAR E. durans, E. avium, E. hirae, and E. gallinarum isolates. This indicates that high level aminoglycoside resistance genes are widely disseminated among isolates of enterococci from Chennai.

  5. Gene pyramiding enhances durable blast disease resistance in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuoka, Shuichi; Saka, Norikuni; Mizukami, Yuko; Koga, Hironori; Yamanouchi, Utako; Yoshioka, Yosuke; Hayashi, Nagao; Ebana, Kaworu; Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Yano, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Effective control of blast, a devastating fungal disease of rice, would increase and stabilize worldwide food production. Resistance mediated by quantitative trait loci (QTLs), which usually have smaller individual effects than R-genes but confer broad-spectrum or non-race-specific resistance, is a promising alternative to less durable race-specific resistance for crop improvement, yet evidence that validates the impact of QTL combinations (pyramids) on the durability of plant disease resista...

  6. Expression and function analysis of mitotic checkpoint genes identifies TTK as a potential therapeutic target for human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dong Liang

    Full Text Available The mitotic spindle checkpoint (SAC genes have been considered targets of anticancer therapies. Here, we sought to identify the attractive mitotic spindle checkpoint genes appropriate for human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC therapies. Through expression profile analysis of 137 selected mitotic spindle checkpoint genes in the publicly available microarray datasets, we showed that 13 genes were dramatically up-regulated in HCC tissues compared to normal livers and adjacent non-tumor tissues. A role of the 13 genes in proliferation was evaluated by knocking them down via small interfering RNA (siRNA in HCC cells. As a result, several mitotic spindle checkpoint genes were required for maintaining the proliferation of HCC cells, demonstrated by cell viability assay and soft agar colony formation assay. Then we established sorafenib-resistant sublines of HCC cell lines Huh7 and HepG2. Intriguingly, increased TTK expression was significantly associated with acquired sorafenib-resistance in Huh7, HepG2 cells. More importantly, TTK was observably up-regulated in 46 (86.8% of 53 HCC specimens. A series of in vitro and in vivo functional experiment assays showed that TTK overexpression promoted cell proliferation, anchor-dependent colony formation and resistance to sorafenib of HCC cells; TTK knockdown restrained cell growth, soft agar colony formation and resistance to sorafenib of HCC cells. Collectively, TTK plays an important role in proliferation and sorafenib resistance and could act as a potential therapeutic target for human hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. Fine mapping of RYMV3: a new resistance gene to Rice yellow mottle virus from Oryza glaberrima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidon, Hélène; Ghesquière, Alain; Chéron, Sophie; Issaka, Souley; Hébrard, Eugénie; Sabot, François; Kolade, Olufisayo; Silué, Drissa; Albar, Laurence

    2017-04-01

    A new resistance gene against Rice yellow mottle virus was identified and mapped in a 15-kb interval. The best candidate is a CC-NBS-LRR gene. Rice yellow mottle virus (RYMV) disease is a serious constraint to the cultivation of rice in Africa and selection for resistance is considered to be the most effective management strategy. The aim of this study was to characterize the resistance of Tog5307, a highly resistant accession belonging to the African cultivated rice species (Oryza glaberrima), that has none of the previously identified resistance genes to RYMV. The specificity of Tog5307 resistance was analyzed using 18 RYMV isolates. While three of them were able to infect Tog5307 very rapidly, resistance against the others was effective despite infection events attributed to resistance-breakdown or incomplete penetrance of the resistance. Segregation of resistance in an interspecific backcross population derived from a cross between Tog5307 and the susceptible Oryza sativa variety IR64 showed that resistance is dominant and is controlled by a single gene, named RYMV3. RYMV3 was mapped in an approximately 15-kb interval in which two candidate genes, coding for a putative transmembrane protein and a CC-NBS-LRR domain-containing protein, were annotated. Sequencing revealed non-synonymous polymorphisms between Tog5307 and the O. glaberrima susceptible accession CG14 in both candidate genes. An additional resistant O. glaberrima accession, Tog5672, was found to have the Tog5307 genotype for the CC-NBS-LRR gene but not for the putative transmembrane protein gene. Analysis of the cosegregation of Tog5672 resistance with the RYMV3 locus suggests that RYMV3 is also involved in Tog5672 resistance, thereby supporting the CC-NBS-LRR gene as the best candidate for RYMV3.

  8. tcrB, a gene conferring transferable copper resistance in Enterococcus faecium: occurrence, transferability, and linkage to macrolide and glycopeptide resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2002-01-01

    B protein from Enterococcus hirae. The tcrB gene was found in E. faecium isolated from pigs (75%), broilers (34%), calves (16%), and humans (10%) but not in isolates from sheep. Resistant isolates, containing the tcrB gene, grew on brain heart infusion agar plates containing up to 28 mM CuSO4 compared......A newly discovered gene, designated tcrB, which is located on a conjugative plasmid conferring acquired copper resistance in Enterococcus faecium, was identified in an isolate from a pig. The tcrB gene encodes a putative protein belonging to the CPx-type ATPase family with homology (46%) to the Cop...... for resistance to these two antimicrobial agents. The frequent occurrence of this new copper resistance gene in isolates from pigs, where copper sulfate is being used in large amounts as feed additive, suggests that the use of copper has selected for resistance....

  9. Identifying gene-gene interactions that are highly associated with Body Mass Index using Quantitative Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (QMDR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Rishika; Verma, Shefali S; Drenos, Fotios; Holzinger, Emily R; Holmes, Michael V; Hall, Molly A; Crosslin, David R; Carrell, David S; Hakonarson, Hakon; Jarvik, Gail; Larson, Eric; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Moore, Carrie B; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Moore, Jason H; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Keating, Brendan J; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Despite heritability estimates of 40-70 % for obesity, less than 2 % of its variation is explained by Body Mass Index (BMI) associated loci that have been identified so far. Epistasis, or gene-gene interactions are a plausible source to explain portions of the missing heritability of BMI. Using genotypic data from 18,686 individuals across five study cohorts - ARIC, CARDIA, FHS, CHS, MESA - we filtered SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) using two parallel approaches. SNPs were filtered either on the strength of their main effects of association with BMI, or on the number of knowledge sources supporting a specific SNP-SNP interaction in the context of BMI. Filtered SNPs were specifically analyzed for interactions that are highly associated with BMI using QMDR (Quantitative Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction). QMDR is a nonparametric, genetic model-free method that detects non-linear interactions associated with a quantitative trait. We identified seven novel, epistatic models with a Bonferroni corrected p-value of association < 0.1. Prior experimental evidence helps explain the plausible biological interactions highlighted within our results and their relationship with obesity. We identified interactions between genes involved in mitochondrial dysfunction (POLG2), cholesterol metabolism (SOAT2), lipid metabolism (CYP11B2), cell adhesion (EZR), cell proliferation (MAP2K5), and insulin resistance (IGF1R). Moreover, we found an 8.8 % increase in the variance in BMI explained by these seven SNP-SNP interactions, beyond what is explained by the main effects of an index FTO SNP and the SNPs within these interactions. We also replicated one of these interactions and 58 proxy SNP-SNP models representing it in an independent dataset from the eMERGE study. This study highlights a novel approach for discovering gene-gene interactions by combining methods such as QMDR with traditional statistics.

  10. Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Pigeons from Public Parks in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Peña, K; Esperón, F; Torres-Mejía, A M; de la Torre, A; de la Cruz, E; Jiménez-Soto, M

    2017-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is known to be an emerging problem, but the extent of the issue remains incomplete. The aim of this study was to determine the presence or absence of nine resistance genes (bla TEM , catI, mecA, qnrS, sulI, sulII, tet(A), tet(Q), vanA) in the faeces of 141 pigeons from four urban parks in Alajuela, Guadalupe, Tres Ríos and San José in Costa Rica. The genes were identified by real-time PCR directly from enema samples. About 30% of the samples were positive for genes catI and sulI; between 13% and 17% were positive for qnrS, sulII, tet(A) and tet(Q); and 4% were positive for bla TEM . The mecA and vanA genes were not detected. The average of antimicrobial resistance genes detected per pigeon was 2. Eight different patterns of resistance were identified, without differences in the sampling areas, being the most common pattern 2 (sulII positive samples). During rainy season, the genes more frequently found were sulI and tet(A). In conclusion, the urban inhabiting pigeons tested are currently carrying antimicrobial resistance genes, potentially acting as reservoirs of resistant bacteria and vectors to humans. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study carried out on direct detection of resistance genes in the digestive metagenomes of pigeons. © 2017 The Authors. Zoonoses and Public Health Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Candidate genes revealed by a genome scan for mosquito resistance to a bacterial insecticide: sequence and gene expression variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jean-Philippe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome scans are becoming an increasingly popular approach to study the genetic basis of adaptation and speciation, but on their own, they are often helpless at identifying the specific gene(s or mutation(s targeted by selection. This shortcoming is hopefully bound to disappear in the near future, thanks to the wealth of new genomic resources that are currently being developed for many species. In this article, we provide a foretaste of this exciting new era by conducting a genome scan in the mosquito Aedes aegypti with the aim to look for candidate genes involved in resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti insecticidal toxins. Results The genome of a Bti-resistant and a Bti-susceptible strains was surveyed using about 500 MITE-based molecular markers, and the loci showing the highest inter-strain genetic differentiation were sequenced and mapped on the Aedes aegypti genome sequence. Several good candidate genes for Bti-resistance were identified in the vicinity of these highly differentiated markers. Two of them, coding for a cadherin and a leucine aminopeptidase, were further examined at the sequence and gene expression levels. In the resistant strain, the cadherin gene displayed patterns of nucleotide polymorphisms consistent with the action of positive selection (e.g. an excess of high compared to intermediate frequency mutations, as well as a significant under-expression compared to the susceptible strain. Conclusion Both sequence and gene expression analyses agree to suggest a role for positive selection in the evolution of this cadherin gene in the resistant strain. However, it is unlikely that resistance to Bti is conferred by this gene alone, and further investigation will be needed to characterize other genes significantly associated with Bti resistance in Ae. aegypti. Beyond these results, this article illustrates how genome scans can build on the body of new genomic information (here, full

  12. Identification of a second Asian soybean rust resistance gene in Hyuuga soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Mandy D; Harris, Donna K; Ha, Bo-Keun; Hyten, David L; Cregan, Perry B; Frederick, Reid D; Boerma, H Roger; Pedley, Kerry F

    2011-05-01

    ABSTRACT Asian soybean rust (ASR) is an economically significant disease caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi. The soybean genes Rpp3 and Rpp?(Hyuuga) confer resistance to specific isolates of the pathogen. Both genes map to chromosome 6 (Gm06) (linkage group [LG] C2). We recently identified 12 additional soybean accessions that harbor ASR resistance mapping to Gm06, within 5 centimorgans of Rpp3 and Rpp?(Hyuuga). To further characterize genotypes with resistance on Gm06, we used a set of eight P. pachyrhizi isolates collected from geographically diverse areas to inoculate plants and evaluate them for differential phenotypic responses. Three isolates elicited different responses from soybean accessions PI 462312 (Ankur) (Rpp3) and PI 506764 (Hyuuga) (Rpp?[Hyuuga]). In all, 11 of the new accessions yielded responses identical to either PI 462312 or Hyuuga and 1 of the new accessions, PI 417089B (Kuro daizu), differed from all others. Additional screening of Hyuuga-derived recombinant inbred lines indicated that Hyuuga carries two resistance genes, one at the Rpp3 locus on Gm06 and a second, unlinked ASR resistance gene mapping to Gm03 (LG-N) near Rpp5. These findings reveal a natural case of gene pyramiding for ASR resistance in Hyuuga and underscore the importance of utilizing multiple isolates of P. pachyrhizi when screening for ASR resistance.

  13. Omics Approach to Identify Factors Involved in Brassica Disease Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Marta; Soengas, Pilar; Velasco, Pablo; Bhadauria, Vijai; Cartea, Maria E; Rodríguez, Victor M

    2016-01-01

    Understanding plant's defense mechanisms and their response to biotic stresses is of fundamental meaning for the development of resistant crop varieties and more productive agriculture. The Brassica genus involves a large variety of economically important species and cultivars used as vegetable source, oilseeds, forage and ornamental. Damage caused by pathogens attack affects negatively various aspects of plant growth, development, and crop productivity. Over the last few decades, advances in plant physiology, genetics, and molecular biology have greatly improved our understanding of plant responses to biotic stress conditions. In this regard, various 'omics' technologies enable qualitative and quantitative monitoring of the abundance of various biological molecules in a high-throughput manner, and thus allow determination of their variation between different biological states on a genomic scale. In this review, we have described advances in 'omic' tools (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) in the view of conventional and modern approaches being used to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that underlie Brassica disease resistance.

  14. Induced mutations of rust resistance genes in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Induced mutations are being used as a tool to study genes for resistance in wheat. It was found that Pm1 can be separated from Lr20 and Sr15, but these two react like a single pleiotropic gene. Mutants were further examined in crosses and backmutations have been attempted. (author)

  15. Characterization of genomic sequence of a drought-resistant gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Characterization of genomic sequence of a drought-resistant gene. TaSnRK2.7 in wheat species. HONG YING ZHANG1,2, WEI LI3, XIN GUO MAO1 and RUI LIAN JING1∗. 1The National Key Facility for Crop Gene Resources and Genetic Improvement, Institute of Crop Science,. Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, ...

  16. Testing of disease-resistance of pokeweed antiviral protein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transformation of pokeweed antiviral protein gene (PAP) into plants was shown to improve plant resistance to several viruses or fungi pathogens with no much negative effect on plant growth. The non-virulent defective PAP inhibits only the virus but does not interfere with the host. A non-virulent defective PAP gene ...

  17. Isolation and characterization of a candidate gene for resistance to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    xudelin

    2012-05-17

    May 17, 2012 ... Cereal cyst nematode (CCN) (Heterodera avenae Woll.) is one of the most economically damaging endoparasite pests of wheat worldwide. We isolated and characterized a novel cereal CCN resistance candidate gene, CreV8, from Aegilops variabilis (2n = 28, UUSvSv). The gene was 3,568 bp long and.

  18. Identifying genes and gene networks involved in chromium metabolism and detoxification in Crambe abyssinica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zulfiqar, Asma, E-mail: asmazulfiqar08@yahoo.com [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Paulose, Bibin, E-mail: bpaulose@psis.umass.edu [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Chhikara, Sudesh, E-mail: sudesh@psis.umass.edu [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Dhankher, Om Parkash, E-mail: parkash@psis.umass.edu [Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences, 270 Stockbridge Road, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Chromium pollution is a serious environmental problem with few cost-effective remediation strategies available. Crambe abyssinica (a member of Brassicaseae), a non-food, fast growing high biomass crop, is an ideal candidate for phytoremediation of heavy metals contaminated soils. The present study used a PCR-Select Suppression Subtraction Hybridization approach in C. abyssinica to isolate differentially expressed genes in response to Cr exposure. A total of 72 differentially expressed subtracted cDNAs were sequenced and found to represent 43 genes. The subtracted cDNAs suggest that Cr stress significantly affects pathways related to stress/defense, ion transporters, sulfur assimilation, cell signaling, protein degradation, photosynthesis and cell metabolism. The regulation of these genes in response to Cr exposure was further confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Characterization of these differentially expressed genes may enable the engineering of non-food, high-biomass plants, including C. abyssinica, for phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated soils and sediments. - Highlights: > Molecular mechanism of Cr uptake and detoxification in plants is not well known. > We identified differentially regulated genes upon Cr exposure in Crambe abyssinica. > 72 Cr-induced subtracted cDNAs were sequenced and found to represent 43 genes. > Pathways linked to stress, ion transport, and sulfur assimilation were affected. > This is the first Cr transcriptome study in a crop with phytoremediation potential. - This study describes the identification and isolation of differentially expressed genes involved in chromium metabolism and detoxification in a non-food industrial oil crop Crambe abyssinica.

  19. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and the cfiA resistance gene in Danish Bacteroides fragilis group isolates since 1973

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferløv-Schwensen, Simon Andreas; Sydenham, Thomas Vognbjerg; Hansen, Kia Cirkeline Møller

    2017-01-01

    .0%) B. fragilis strains as division II, of which 4 strains, isolated between 2010 and 2015, were resistant to meropenem. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial increases in resistance were found throughout this study. This supports the general perception that antimicrobial resistance in the B. fragilis group has been......OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of resistance and the cfiA carbapenemase-producing gene in historical Bacteroides fragilis group isolates. METHODS: Danish clinical B. fragilis group isolates (n = 444) from 1973 to 2015 were identified with Matrix-Assisted Laser...... Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) on the Biotyper platform. Antimicrobial resistance was determined using a disk diffusion screening method and commercial antibiotic gradient strips. Division I (cfiA-negative) and division II (cfiA-positive) B. fragilis strains were...

  20. Metagenomic Analysis of Apple Orchard Soil Reveals Antibiotic Resistance Genes Encoding Predicted Bifunctional Proteins▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Justin J.; Moe, Luke A.; Converse, Brandon J.; Smart, Keith D.; Berklein, Flora C.; McManus, Patricia S.; Handelsman, Jo

    2010-01-01

    To gain insight into the diversity and origins of antibiotic resistance genes, we identified resistance genes in the soil in an apple orchard using functional metagenomics, which involves inserting large fragments of foreign DNA into Escherichia coli and assaying the resulting clones for expressed functions. Among 13 antibiotic-resistant clones, we found two genes that encode bifunctional proteins. One predicted bifunctional protein confers resistance to ceftazidime and contains a natural fusion between a predicted transcriptional regulator and a β-lactamase. Sequence analysis of the entire metagenomic clone encoding the predicted bifunctional β-lactamase revealed a gene potentially involved in chloramphenicol resistance as well as a predicted transposase. A second clone that encodes a predicted bifunctional protein confers resistance to kanamycin and contains an aminoglycoside acetyltransferase domain fused to a second acetyltransferase domain that, based on nucleotide sequence, was predicted not to be involved in antibiotic resistance. This is the first report of a transcriptional regulator fused to a β-lactamase and of an aminoglycoside acetyltransferase fused to an acetyltransferase not involved in antibiotic resistance. PMID:20453147

  1. Identifying Genes Responsible for Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Meijer (Daniëlle)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is one of the leading causes of death of women in western countries. It affects one out of eight females in the USA (1) and one out of nine females in The Netherlands (www.kankerregistratie.nl) during their lifetime. Many risk factors for breast cancer have been

  2. Transformation Resistance in a Premature Aging Disorder Identifies a Tumor-Protective Function of BRD4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Fernandez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Advanced age and DNA damage accumulation are prominent risk factors for cancer. The premature aging disorder Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS provides a unique opportunity for studying the interplay between DNA damage and aging-associated tumor mechanisms, given that HGPS patients do not develop tumors despite elevated levels of DNA damage. Here, we have used HGPS patient cells to identify a protective mechanism to oncogenesis. We find that HGPS cells are resistant to neoplastic transformation. Resistance is mediated by the bromodomain protein BRD4, which exhibits altered genome-wide binding patterns in transformation-resistant cells, leading to inhibition of oncogenic dedifferentiation. BRD4 also inhibits, albeit to a lower extent, the tumorigenic potential of transformed cells from healthy individuals. BRD4-mediated tumor protection is clinically relevant given that a BRD4 gene signature predicts positive clinical outcome in breast and lung cancer. Our results demonstrate a protective function for BRD4 and suggest tissue-specific roles for BRD4 in tumorigenesis. : The premature aging disorder Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS provides a unique tool for studying the interplay between DNA damage and aging-associated tumor mechanisms, given that HGPS patients do not develop tumors despite elevated levels of DNA damage. Using a genome-wide RNAi screen, Fernandez et al. now identify the bromodomain protein BRD4 as a mediator of the oncogenic resistance of HGPS cells. This tumor-protective function of BRD4 involves inhibition of oncogenic dedifferentiation and is also active in non-HGPS cells in a tissue-specific manner.

  3. Metagenomic profiling of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile genetic elements in a tannery wastewater treatment plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Wang

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are often used to prevent sickness and improve production in animal agriculture, and the residues in animal bodies may enter tannery wastewater during leather production. This study aimed to use Illumina high-throughput sequencing to investigate the occurrence, diversity and abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs in aerobic and anaerobic sludge of a full-scale tannery wastewater treatment plant (WWTP. Metagenomic analysis showed that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria dominated in the WWTP, but the relative abundance of archaea in anaerobic sludge was higher than in aerobic sludge. Sequencing reads from aerobic and anaerobic sludge revealed differences in the abundance of functional genes between both microbial communities. Genes coding for antibiotic resistance were identified in both communities. BLAST analysis against Antibiotic Resistance Genes Database (ARDB further revealed that aerobic and anaerobic sludge contained various ARGs with high abundance, among which sulfonamide resistance gene sul1 had the highest abundance, occupying over 20% of the total ARGs reads. Tetracycline resistance genes (tet were highly rich in the anaerobic sludge, among which tet33 had the highest abundance, but was absent in aerobic sludge. Over 70 types of insertion sequences were detected in each sludge sample, and class 1 integrase genes were prevalent in the WWTP. The results highlighted prevalence of ARGs and MGEs in tannery WWTPs, which may deserve more public health concerns.

  4. Metagenomic profiling of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile genetic elements in a tannery wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Huang, Kailong; Miao, Yu; Shi, Peng; Liu, Bo; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are often used to prevent sickness and improve production in animal agriculture, and the residues in animal bodies may enter tannery wastewater during leather production. This study aimed to use Illumina high-throughput sequencing to investigate the occurrence, diversity and abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in aerobic and anaerobic sludge of a full-scale tannery wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Metagenomic analysis showed that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria dominated in the WWTP, but the relative abundance of archaea in anaerobic sludge was higher than in aerobic sludge. Sequencing reads from aerobic and anaerobic sludge revealed differences in the abundance of functional genes between both microbial communities. Genes coding for antibiotic resistance were identified in both communities. BLAST analysis against Antibiotic Resistance Genes Database (ARDB) further revealed that aerobic and anaerobic sludge contained various ARGs with high abundance, among which sulfonamide resistance gene sul1 had the highest abundance, occupying over 20% of the total ARGs reads. Tetracycline resistance genes (tet) were highly rich in the anaerobic sludge, among which tet33 had the highest abundance, but was absent in aerobic sludge. Over 70 types of insertion sequences were detected in each sludge sample, and class 1 integrase genes were prevalent in the WWTP. The results highlighted prevalence of ARGs and MGEs in tannery WWTPs, which may deserve more public health concerns.

  5. Diversity of Plasmids and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolated from Healthy Companion Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C R; Davis, J A; Frye, J G; Barrett, J B; Hiott, L M

    2015-09-01

    The presence and transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes from commensal bacteria in companion animals to more pathogenic bacteria may contribute to dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. The purpose of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance gene content and the presence of genetic elements in antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli from healthy companion animals. In our previous study, from May to August, 2007, healthy companion animals (155 dogs and 121 cats) from three veterinary clinics in the Athens, GA, USA area were sampled and multidrug-resistant E. coli (n = 36; MDR, resistance to ≥ 2 antimicrobial classes) were obtained. Of the 25 different plasmid replicon types tested by PCR, at least one plasmid replicon type was detected in 94% (34/36) of the MDR E. coli; four isolates contained as many as five different plasmid replicons. Nine replicon types (FIA, FIB, FII, I2, A/C, U, P, I1 and HI2) were identified with FIB, FII, I2 as the most common pattern. The presence of class I integrons (intI) was detected in 61% (22/36) of the isolates with eight isolates containing aminoglycoside- and/or trimethoprim-resistance genes in the variable cassette region of intI. Microarray analysis of a subset of the MDR E. coli (n = 9) identified the presence of genes conferring resistance to aminoglycosides (aac, aad, aph and strA/B), β-lactams (ampC, cmy, tem and vim), chloramphenicol (cat), sulfonamides (sulI and sulII), tetracycline [tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), tet(D) and regulator, tetR] and trimethoprim (dfrA). Antimicrobial resistance to eight antimicrobials (ampicillin, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, streptomycin, gentamicin, sulfisoxazole and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) and five plasmid replicons (FIA, FIB, FII, I1 and I2) were transferred via conjugation. The presence of antimicrobial resistance genes, intI and transferable plasmid replicons indicate that E. coli from companion animals may play an important role in the

  6. The tetracycline resistance determinant Tet 39 and the sulphonamide resistance gene sulII are common among resistant Acinetobacter spp. isolated from integrated fish farms in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Petersen, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    genes [tet(A), tet(B), tet(H), tet(M) and tet(39)] and class II integrons by PCR. One hundred and thirty-four of these isolates were also sulphonamide resistant and these isolates were screened for sulphonamide resistance genes (sulII and sulIII) as well as class I integrons. Plasmid extraction...... and Southern blots with sulII and tet(39) probes were performed on selected isolates. Results: The recently identified tetracycline resistance gene tet(39) was demonstrated in 75% (166/222) of oxytetracycline-resistant Acinetobacter spp. from integrated fish farms in Thailand. Isolates that were also...... sulfamethoxazole-resistant contained sulII (96%; 129/134) and/or sulI (14%; 19/134) (as part of class I integrons). sulII and tet(39) were located on plasmids differing in size in the isolates tested. Conclusions: The study shows tet(39) and sulII to be common resistance genes among clonally distinct Acinetobacter...

  7. The Lr34 adult plant rust resistance gene provides seedling resistance in durum wheat without senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Amy; Gilbert, Brian; Boni, Rainer; Krattinger, Simon G; Singh, Davinder; Park, Robert F; Lagudah, Evans; Ayliffe, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) adult plant resistance gene, Lr34/Yr18/Sr57/Pm38/Ltn1, provides broad-spectrum resistance to wheat leaf rust (Lr34), stripe rust (Yr18), stem rust (Sr57) and powdery mildew (Pm38) pathogens, and has remained effective in wheat crops for many decades. The partial resistance provided by this gene is only apparent in adult plants and not effective in field-grown seedlings. Lr34 also causes leaf tip necrosis (Ltn1) in mature adult plant leaves when grown under field conditions. This D genome-encoded bread wheat gene was transferred to tetraploid durum wheat (T. turgidum) cultivar Stewart by transformation. Transgenic durum lines were produced with elevated gene expression levels when compared with the endogenous hexaploid gene. Unlike nontransgenic hexaploid and durum control lines, these transgenic plants showed robust seedling resistance to pathogens causing wheat leaf rust, stripe rust and powdery mildew disease. The effectiveness of seedling resistance against each pathogen correlated with the level of transgene expression. No evidence of accelerated leaf necrosis or up-regulation of senescence gene markers was apparent in these seedlings, suggesting senescence is not required for Lr34 resistance, although leaf tip necrosis occurred in mature plant flag leaves. Several abiotic stress-response genes were up-regulated in these seedlings in the absence of rust infection as previously observed in adult plant flag leaves of hexaploid wheat. Increasing day length significantly increased Lr34 seedling resistance. These data demonstrate that expression of a highly durable, broad-spectrum adult plant resistance gene can be modified to provide seedling resistance in durum wheat. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Antibiotic resistance and virulence genes in coliform water isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, C; Sidhu, J P S; Tiehm, A; Toze, S

    2016-11-01

    Widespread fecal pollution of surface water may present a major health risk and a significant pathway for dissemination of antibiotic resistance bacteria. The River Rhine is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe and an important raw water source for drinking water production. A total of 100 coliform isolates obtained from River Rhine (Germany) were examined for their susceptibility to seven antimicrobial agents. Resistances against amoxicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline were detected in 48%, 11% and 9% of isolates respectively. The antibiotic resistance could be traced back to the resistance genes bla TEM , bla SHV , ampC, sul1, sul2, dfrA1, tet(A) and tet(B). Whereby, the ampC gene represents a special case, because its presence is not inevitably linked to a phenotypic antibiotic resistance. Multiple antibiotics resistance was often accompanied by the occurrence of class 1 or 2 integrons. E. coli isolates belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1 (commensal) were more predominant (57%) compared to B2 and D groups (43%) which are known to carry virulent genes. Additionally, six E. coli virulence genes were also detected. However, the prevalence of virulence genes in the E. coli isolates was low (not exceeding 4.3% per gene) and no diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes were detected. This study demonstrates that surface water is an important reservoir of ARGs for a number of antibiotic classes such as sulfonamide, trimethoprim, beta-lactam-antibiotics and tetracycline. The occurrence of antibiotic resistance in coliform bacteria isolated from River Rhine provides evidence for the need to develop management strategies to limit the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria in aquatic environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Validation of candidate genes putatively associated with resistance to SCMV and MDMV in maize (Zea mays L.) by expression profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uzarowska, Anna; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Sarholz, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    -related candidate genes, validated by qRT-PCR, coding for metallothionein-like protein, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, germin-like protein or 26S ribosomal RNA. Conclusion Our study identified putative candidate genes and gene expression patterns related to resistance to SCMV. Moreover, our findings support...

  10. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes. Final report, May 1, 1988--April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelmore, R.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce and to clone and characterize disease resistance genes by transposon tagging. The majority of studies were conducted with the Ac/Ds System. Researchers made and tested several constructs as well as utilized constructions shown to be functional in other plant species. Researchers demonstrated movement of Ac and DS in lettuce; however, they transposed at much lower frequencies in lettuce than in other plant species. Therefore, further manipulation of the system, particularly for flower specific expression of transposase, is required before a routine transposon system is available for lettuce. Populations of lettuce were generated and screened to test for the stability of resistance genes and several spontaneous mutations were isolated. Researchers also identified a resistance gene mutant in plants transformed with a Ds element and chimeric transposase gene. This is currently being characterized in detail.

  11. The relationship between codon usage bias and cold resistant genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barozai, M.Y.; Din, M.

    2014-01-01

    This research is based on synonymous codon usage which has been well-known as a feature that affects typical expression level of protein in an organism. Different organisms prefer different codons for same amino acid and this is called Codon Usage Bias (CUB). The codon usage directly affects the level or even direction of changes in protein expression in responses to environmental stimuli. Cold stress is a major abiotic factor that limits the agricultural productivity of plants. In the recent study CUB has been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana cold resistant and housekeeping genes and their homologs in rice (Oryza sativa) to understand the cold stress and housekeeping genes relation with CUB. Six cold resistant and three housekeeping genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and their homologs in rice, were subjected to CUB analysis. The three cold resistant genes (DREB1B, RCI and MYB15) showed more than 50% (52%, 61% and 66% respectively) similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. On the other hand three cold resistant genes (MPK3, ICE1 and ZAT12) showed less than 50% (38%, 38% and 47% respectively) similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. The three housekeeping genes (Actin, Tubulin and Ubiquitin) showed 76% similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. This study will help to manage the plant gene expression through codon optimization under the cold stress. (author)

  12. Analysis of the retinal gene expression profile after hypoxic preconditioning identifies candidate genes for neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzel Andreas

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal degeneration is a main cause of blindness in humans. Neuroprotective therapies may be used to rescue retinal cells and preserve vision. Hypoxic preconditioning stabilizes the transcription factor HIF-1α in the retina and strongly protects photoreceptors in an animal model of light-induced retinal degeneration. To address the molecular mechanisms of the protection, we analyzed the transcriptome of the hypoxic retina using microarrays and real-time PCR. Results Hypoxic exposure induced a marked alteration in the retinal transcriptome with significantly different expression levels of 431 genes immediately after hypoxic exposure. The normal expression profile was restored within 16 hours of reoxygenation. Among the differentially regulated genes, several candidates for neuroprotection were identified like metallothionein-1 and -2, the HIF-1 target gene adrenomedullin and the gene encoding the antioxidative and cytoprotective enzyme paraoxonase 1 which was previously not known to be a hypoxia responsive gene in the retina. The strongly upregulated cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21 was excluded from being essential for neuroprotection. Conclusion Our data suggest that neuroprotection after hypoxic preconditioning is the result of the differential expression of a multitude of genes which may act in concert to protect visual cells against a toxic insult.

  13. A novel method to discover fluoroquinolone antibiotic resistance (qnr genes in fragmented nucleotide sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulund Fredrik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotics are central in modern health care and are used to treat and prevent a wide range of bacterial infections. The recently discovered qnr genes provide a mechanism of resistance with the potential to rapidly spread between bacteria using horizontal gene transfer. As for many antibiotic resistance genes present in pathogens today, qnr genes are hypothesized to originate from environmental bacteria. The vast amount of data generated by shotgun metagenomics can therefore be used to explore the diversity of qnr genes in more detail. Results In this paper we describe a new method to identify qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. We show, using cross-validation, that the method has a high statistical power of correctly classifying sequences from novel classes of qnr genes, even for fragments as short as 100 nucleotides. Based on sequences from public repositories, the method was able to identify all previously reported plasmid-mediated qnr genes. In addition, several fragments from novel putative qnr genes were identified in metagenomes. The method was also able to annotate 39 chromosomal variants of which 11 have previously not been reported in literature. Conclusions The method described in this paper significantly improves the sensitivity and specificity of identification and annotation of qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. The predicted novel putative qnr genes in the metagenomic data support the hypothesis of a large and uncharacterized diversity within this family of resistance genes in environmental bacterial communities. An implementation of the method is freely available at http://bioinformatics.math.chalmers.se/qnr/.

  14. Candidate Gene Identification with SNP Marker-Based Fine Mapping of Anthracnose Resistance Gene Co-4 in Common Bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Andrew J.; William, H. Manilal; Perry, Gregory; Khanal, Raja; Pauls, K. Peter; Kelly, James D.; Navabi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, is an important fungal disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Alleles at the Co–4 locus confer resistance to a number of races of C. lindemuthianum. A population of 94 F4:5 recombinant inbred lines of a cross between resistant black bean genotype B09197 and susceptible navy bean cultivar Nautica was used to identify markers associated with resistance in bean chromosome 8 (Pv08) where Co–4 is localized. Three SCAR markers with known linkage to Co–4 and a panel of single nucleotide markers were used for genotyping. A refined physical region on Pv08 with significant association with anthracnose resistance identified by markers was used in BLAST searches with the genomic sequence of common bean accession G19833. Thirty two unique annotated candidate genes were identified that spanned a physical region of 936.46 kb. A majority of the annotated genes identified had functional similarity to leucine rich repeats/receptor like kinase domains. Three annotated genes had similarity to 1, 3-β-glucanase domains. There were sequence similarities between some of the annotated genes found in the study and the genes associated with phosphoinositide-specific phosphilipases C associated with Co-x and the COK–4 loci found in previous studies. It is possible that the Co–4 locus is structured as a group of genes with functional domains dominated by protein tyrosine kinase along with leucine rich repeats/nucleotide binding site, phosphilipases C as well as β-glucanases. PMID:26431031

  15. MetaCherchant: analyzing genomic context of antibiotic resistance genes in gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olekhnovich, Evgenii I; Vasilyev, Artem T; Ulyantsev, Vladimir I; Kostryukova, Elena S; Tyakht, Alexander V

    2018-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an important global public health problem. Human gut microbiota is an accumulator of resistance genes potentially providing them to pathogens. It is important to develop tools for identifying the mechanisms of how resistance is transmitted between gut microbial species and pathogens. We developed MetaCherchant-an algorithm for extracting the genomic environment of antibiotic resistance genes from metagenomic data in the form of a graph. The algorithm was validated on a number of simulated and published datasets, as well as applied to new 'shotgun' metagenomes of gut microbiota from patients with Helicobacter pylori who underwent antibiotic therapy. Genomic context was reconstructed for several major resistance genes. Taxonomic annotation of the context suggests that within a single metagenome, the resistance genes can be contained in genomes of multiple species. MetaCherchant allows reconstruction of mobile elements with resistance genes within the genomes of bacteria using metagenomic data. Application of MetaCherchant in differential mode produced specific graph structures suggesting the evidence of possible resistance gene transmission within a mobile element that occurred as a result of the antibiotic therapy. MetaCherchant is a promising tool giving researchers an opportunity to get an insight into dynamics of resistance transmission in vivo basing on metagenomic data. Source code and binaries are freely available for download at https://github.com/ctlab/metacherchant. The code is written in Java and is platform-independent. ulyantsev@rain.ifmo.ru. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Gene expression in response to glyphosate treatment in fleabane (Conyza bonariensis) - glyphosate death response and candidate resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereward, James P; Werth, Jeff A; Thornby, David F; Keenan, Michelle; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh; Walter, Gimme H

    2017-11-28

    This study takes a whole-transcriptome approach to assess gene expression changes in response to glyphosate treatment in glyphosate-resistant fleabane. We assessed gene expression changes in both susceptible and resistant lines so that the glyphosate death response could be quantified, and constitutively expressed candidate resistance genes identified. There are three copies of the glyphosate target site (5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate; EPSPS) gene in Conyza and because Conyza bonariensis is allohexaploid, there is a baseline nine copies of the gene in any individual. Many genes were differentially expressed in response to glyphosate treatment. Known resistance mutations are present in EPSPS2 but they are present in a glyphosate-susceptible line as well as resistant lines and therefore not sufficient to confer resistance. EPSPS1 is expressed four times more than EPSPS2, further reducing the overall contribution of these mutations. We demonstrate that glyphosate resistance in C. bonariensis is not the result of EPSPS mutations or overexpression, but due to a non-target-site mechanism. A large number of genes are affected by glyphosate treatment. We present a list of candidate non-target-site-resistance (NTSR) genes in fleabane for future studies into these mechanisms. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Characterization of Aminoglycoside Resistance and Virulence Genes among Enterococcus spp. Isolated from a Hospital in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanxiang Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the aminoglycoside resistance phenotypes and genotypes, as well as the prevalence of virulence genes, in Enterococcus species isolated from clinical patients in China. A total of 160 enterococcal isolates from various clinical samples collected from September 2013 to July 2014 were identified to the species level using the VITEK-2 COMPACT system. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of the identified Enterococcus strains were determined by the Kirby-Bauer (K-B disc diffusion method. PCR-based assays were used to detect the aminoglycoside resistance and virulence genes in all enterococcal isolates. Of 160 Enterococcus isolates, 105 were identified as E. faecium, 35 as E. faecalis, and 20 isolates were classified as “other” Enterococcus species. High-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR for gentamicin, streptomycin, and both antibiotics was identified in 58.8, 50, and 34.4% of strains, respectively. The most common virulence gene (50.6% of isolates was efaA, followed by asa1 (28.8%. The most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance genes were aac(6'-Ie-aph(2'', aph(2'-Id, aph(3'-IIIa, and ant(6'-Ia, present in 49.4%, 1.3%, 48.8% and 31.3% of strains, respectively. Overall, E. faecium and E. faecalis were most frequently associated with hospital-acquired enterococcal infections in Zhejiang Province. All aminoglycoside resistance genes, except aph(2''-Id, were significantly more prevalent in HLAR strains than amongst high level aminoglycoside susceptible (HLAS strains, while there was no significant difference between HLAR and HLAS strains in regard to the prevalence of virulence genes, apart from esp, therefore, measures should be taken to manage infections caused by multi-drug resistant Enterococcus species.

  18. Characterization of Aminoglycoside Resistance and Virulence Genes among Enterococcus spp. Isolated from a Hospital in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanxiang; Li, Jing; Wei, Quhao; Hu, Qingfeng; Lin, Xiaowei; Chen, Mengquan; Ye, Renji; Lv, Huoyang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the aminoglycoside resistance phenotypes and genotypes, as well as the prevalence of virulence genes, in Enterococcus species isolated from clinical patients in China. A total of 160 enterococcal isolates from various clinical samples collected from September 2013 to July 2014 were identified to the species level using the VITEK-2 COMPACT system. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of the identified Enterococcus strains were determined by the Kirby-Bauer (K-B) disc diffusion method. PCR-based assays were used to detect the aminoglycoside resistance and virulence genes in all enterococcal isolates. Of 160 Enterococcus isolates, 105 were identified as E. faecium, 35 as E. faecalis, and 20 isolates were classified as “other” Enterococcus species. High-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) for gentamicin, streptomycin, and both antibiotics was identified in 58.8, 50, and 34.4% of strains, respectively. The most common virulence gene (50.6% of isolates) was efaA, followed by asa1 (28.8%). The most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance genes were aac(6')-Ie-aph(2''), aph(2')-Id, aph(3')-IIIa, and ant(6')-Ia, present in 49.4%, 1.3%, 48.8% and 31.3% of strains, respectively. Overall, E. faecium and E. faecalis were most frequently associated with hospital-acquired enterococcal infections in Zhejiang Province. All aminoglycoside resistance genes, except aph(2'')-Id, were significantly more prevalent in HLAR strains than amongst high level aminoglycoside susceptible (HLAS) strains, while there was no significant difference between HLAR and HLAS strains in regard to the prevalence of virulence genes, apart from esp, therefore, measures should be taken to manage infections caused by multi-drug resistant Enterococcus species. PMID:25768240

  19. Influence of Soil Use on Prevalence of Tetracycline, Streptomycin, and Erythromycin Resistance and Associated Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeczycka, Marzenna; Miernik, Antoni; Krawczyk-Balska, Agata; Walsh, Fiona; Duffy, Brion

    2012-01-01

    This study examined differences in antibiotic-resistant soil bacteria and the presence and quantity of resistance genes in soils with a range of management histories. We analyzed four soils from agricultural systems that were amended with manure from animals treated with erythromycin and exposed to streptomycin and/or oxytetracycline, as well as non-manure-amended compost and forest soil. Low concentrations of certain antibiotic resistance genes were detected using multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), with tet(B), aad(A), and str(A) each present in only one soil and tet(M) and tet(W) detected in all soils. The most frequently detected resistance genes were tet(B), tet(D), tet(O), tet(T), and tet(W) for tetracycline resistance, str(A), str(B), and aac for streptomycin resistance, and erm(C), erm(V), erm(X), msr(A), ole(B), and vga for erythromycin resistance. Transposon genes specific for Tn916, Tn1549, TnB1230, Tn4451, and Tn5397 were detected in soil bacterial isolates. The MIC ranges of isolated bacteria for tetracycline, streptomycin, and erythromycin were 8 to >256 μg/ml, 6 to >1,024 μg/ml, and 0.094 to >256 μg/ml, respectively. Based on 16S rRNA gene similarity, isolated bacteria showed high sequence identity to genera typical of soil communities. Bacteria with the highest MICs were detected in manure-amended soils or soils from agricultural systems with a history of antibiotic use. Non-manure-amended soils yielded larger proportions of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but these had lower MICs, carried fewer antibiotic resistance genes, and did not display multidrug resistance (MDR). PMID:22203596

  20. Influence of soil use on prevalence of tetracycline, streptomycin, and erythromycin resistance and associated resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popowska, Magdalena; Rzeczycka, Marzenna; Miernik, Antoni; Krawczyk-Balska, Agata; Walsh, Fiona; Duffy, Brion

    2012-03-01

    This study examined differences in antibiotic-resistant soil bacteria and the presence and quantity of resistance genes in soils with a range of management histories. We analyzed four soils from agricultural systems that were amended with manure from animals treated with erythromycin and exposed to streptomycin and/or oxytetracycline, as well as non-manure-amended compost and forest soil. Low concentrations of certain antibiotic resistance genes were detected using multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), with tet(B), aad(A), and str(A) each present in only one soil and tet(M) and tet(W) detected in all soils. The most frequently detected resistance genes were tet(B), tet(D), tet(O), tet(T), and tet(W) for tetracycline resistance, str(A), str(B), and aac for streptomycin resistance, and erm(C), erm(V), erm(X), msr(A), ole(B), and vga for erythromycin resistance. Transposon genes specific for Tn916, Tn1549, TnB1230, Tn4451, and Tn5397 were detected in soil bacterial isolates. The MIC ranges of isolated bacteria for tetracycline, streptomycin, and erythromycin were 8 to >256 μg/ml, 6 to >1,024 μg/ml, and 0.094 to >256 μg/ml, respectively. Based on 16S rRNA gene similarity, isolated bacteria showed high sequence identity to genera typical of soil communities. Bacteria with the highest MICs were detected in manure-amended soils or soils from agricultural systems with a history of antibiotic use. Non-manure-amended soils yielded larger proportions of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but these had lower MICs, carried fewer antibiotic resistance genes, and did not display multidrug resistance (MDR).

  1. Bioprospecting for β-lactam resistance genes using a metagenomics-guided strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Yang, Ying; Che, You; Xia, Yu; Li, Liguan; Xiong, Wenguang; Zhang, Tong

    2017-08-01

    Emergence of new antibiotic resistance bacteria poses a serious threat to human health, which is largely attributed to the evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). In this work, a metagenomics-guided strategy consisting of metagenomic analysis and function validation was proposed for rapidly identifying novel ARGs from hot spots of ARG dissemination, such as wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and animal feces. We used an antibiotic resistance gene database to annotate 76 putative β-lactam resistance genes from the metagenomes of sludge and chicken feces. Among these 76 candidate genes, 25 target genes that shared 40~70% amino acid identity to known β-lactamases were cloned by PCR from the metagenomes. Their resistances to four β-lactam antibiotics were further demonstrated. Furthermore, the validated ARGs were used as the reference sequences to identify novel ARGs in eight environmental samples, suggesting the necessity of re-examining the profiles of ARGs in environmental samples using the validated novel ARG sequences. This metagenomics-guided pipeline does not rely on the activity of ARGs during the initial screening process and may specifically select novel ARG sequences for function validation, which make it suitable for the high-throughput screening of novel ARGs from environmental metagenomes.

  2. Identification of Genes Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm-Specific Resistance to Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li; Fritsch, Meredith; Hammond, Lisa; Landreville, Ryan; Slatculescu, Cristina; Colavita, Antonio; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key opportunistic pathogen characterized by its biofilm formation ability and high-level multiple antibiotic resistance. By screening a library of random transposon insertion mutants with an increased biofilm-specifc antibiotic susceptibility, we previously identified 3 genes or operons of P. aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 (ndvB, PA1875-1877 and tssC1) that do not affect biofilm formation but are involved in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance. In this study, we demonstr...

  3. Fine Mapping and Characterization of Candidate Genes that Control Resistance to Cercospora sojina K. Hara in Two Soybean Germplasm Accessions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh-Tung Pham

    Full Text Available Frogeye leaf spot (FLS, caused by the fungus Cercospora sojina K. Hara, may cause a significant yield loss to soybean growers in regions with a warm and humid climate. Two soybean accessions, PI 594891 and PI 594774, were identified to carry a high level of resistance similar to that conditioned by the Rcs3 gene in 'Davis'. Previously, we reported that the resistance to FLS in these two plant introductions (PIs was controlled by a novel gene (s on chromosome 13 that is different from Rcs3. To fine-map the novel FLS resistance gene(s in these two PIs, F2: 3 seeds from the crosses between PI 594891 and PI 594774, and the FLS susceptible genotype 'Blackhawk' were genotyped with SNP markers that were designed based on the SoySNP50k iSelect BeadChip data to identify recombinant events and locate candidate genes. Analysis of lines possessing key recombination events helped narrow down the FLS-resistance genomic region in PI 594891 from 3.3 Mb to a 72.6 kb region with five annotated genes. The resistance gene in PI 594774 was fine-mapped into a 540 kb region that encompasses the 72.6 kb region found in PI 594891. Sequencing five candidate genes in PI 594891 identified three genes that have several mutations in the promoter, intron, 5', and 3' UTR regions. qPCR analysis showed a difference in expression levels of these genes in both lines compared to Blackhawk in the presence of C. sojina. Based on phenotype, genotype and haplotype analysis results, these two soybean accessions might carry different resistance alleles of the same gene or two different gene(s. The identified SNPs were used to develop Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR (KASP assays to detect the resistance alleles on chromosome 13 from the two PIs for marker-assisted selection.

  4. Identifying novel genes in C. elegans using SAGE tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Nansheng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite extensive efforts devoted to predicting protein-coding genes in genome sequences, many bona fide genes have not been found and many existing gene models are not accurate in all sequenced eukaryote genomes. This situation is partly explained by the fact that gene prediction programs have been developed based on our incomplete understanding of gene feature information such as splicing and promoter characteristics. Additionally, full-length cDNAs of many genes and their isoforms are hard to obtain due to their low level or rare expression. In order to obtain full-length sequences of all protein-coding genes, alternative approaches are required. Results In this project, we have developed a method of reconstructing full-length cDNA sequences based on short expressed sequence tags which is called sequence tag-based amplification of cDNA ends (STACE. Expressed tags are used as anchors for retrieving full-length transcripts in two rounds of PCR amplification. We have demonstrated the application of STACE in reconstructing full-length cDNA sequences using expressed tags mined in an array of serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE of C. elegans cDNA libraries. We have successfully applied STACE to recover sequence information for 12 genes, for two of which we found isoforms. STACE was used to successfully recover full-length cDNA sequences for seven of these genes. Conclusions The STACE method can be used to effectively reconstruct full-length cDNA sequences of genes that are under-represented in cDNA sequencing projects and have been missed by existing gene prediction methods, but their existence has been suggested by short sequence tags such as SAGE tags.

  5. Gene Expression and the Diversity of Identified Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Buck, L.; Stein, R.; Palazzolo, M.; Anderson, D. J.; Axel, R.

    1983-01-01

    Nervous systems consist of diverse populations of neurons that are anatomically and functionally distinct. The diversity of neurons and the precision with which they are interconnected suggest that specific genes or sets of genes are activated in some neurons but not expressed in others. Experimentally, this problem may be considered at two levels. First, what is the total number of genes expressed in the brain, and how are they distributed among the different populations of neurons? Second, ...

  6. Molecular Scree ning of Blast Resistance Genes in Rice Germplasms Resistant to Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular screening of major rice blast resistance genes was determined with molecular markers, which showed close-set linkage to 11 major rice blast resistance genes (Pi-d2, Pi-z, Piz-t, Pi-9, Pi-36, Pi-37, Pi5, Pi-b, Pik-p, Pik-h and Pi-ta2, in a collection of 32 accessions resistant to Magnaporthe oryzae. Out of the 32 accessions, the Pi-d2 and Pi-z appeared to be omnipresent and gave positive express. As the second dominant, Pi-b and Piz-t gene frequencies were 96.9% and 87.5%. And Pik-h and Pik-p gene frequencies were 43.8% and 28.1%, respectively. The molecular marker linkage to Pi-ta2 produced positive bands in eleven accessions, while the molecular marker linkage to Pi-36 and Pi-37 in only three and four accessions, respectively. The natural field evaluation analysis showed that 30 of the 32 accessions were resistant, one was moderately resistant and one was susceptible. Infection types were negatively correlated with the genotype scores of Pi-9, Pi5, Pi-b, Pi-ta2 and Pik-p, although the correlation coefficients were very little. These results are useful in identification and incorporation of functional resistance genes from these germplasms into elite cultivars through marker-assisted selection for improved blast resistance in China and worldwide.

  7. Molecular tagging of a novel rust resistance gene R(12) in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, L; Hulke, B S; Gulya, T J; Markell, S G; Qi, L L

    2013-01-01

    Sunflower production in North America has recently suffered economic losses in yield and seed quality from sunflower rust (Puccinia helianthi Schwein.) because of the increasing incidence and lack of resistance to new rust races. RHA 464, a newly released sunflower male fertility restorer line, is resistant to both of the most predominant and most virulent rust races identified in the Northern Great Plains of the USA. The gene conditioning rust resistance in RHA 464 originated from wild Helianthus annuus L., but has not been molecularly marked or determined to be independent from other rust loci. The objectives of this study are to identify molecular markers linked to the rust resistance gene and to investigate the allelism of this gene with the unmapped rust resistance genes present in HA-R6, HA-R8 and RHA 397. Virulence phenotypes of seedlings for the F(2) population and F(2:3) families suggested that a single dominant gene confers rust resistance in RHA 464, and this gene was designated as R(12). Bulked segregant analysis identified ten markers polymorphic between resistant and susceptible bulks. In subsequent genetic mapping, the ten markers covered 33.4 cM of genetic distance on linkage group 11 of sunflower. A co-dominant marker CRT275-11 is the closest marker distal to R(12) with a genetic distance of 1.0 cM, while ZVG53, a dominant marker linked in the repulsion phase, is proximal to R(12) with a genetic distance of 9.6 cM. The allelism test demonstrated that R(12) is not allelic to the rust resistance genes in HA-R6, HA-R8 and RHA 397, and it is also not linked to any previously mapped rust resistance genes. Discovery of the R(12) novel rust resistance locus in sunflower and associated markers will potentially support the molecular marker-assisted introgression and pyramiding of R(12) into sunflower breeding lines.

  8. The identification of new genes related to cisplatin resistance in ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line A2780

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar, P.; Fedorocko, P.; Sytkowski, A.; Hodorova, I.

    2006-01-01

    Ovarian cancer cells are usually sensitive to platinum-based chemotherapy, such as cisplatin (CDDP), initially but typically become resistant to the drug over time. The phenomenon of clinical drug resistance represents a serious problem for successful disease treatment, and the molecular mechanism(s) are not fully understood. In search of novel mechanisms that may lead to the development of CDDP chemoresistance we have applied subtractive hybridization based on the PCR-select cDNA subtraction. In current study we have used subtractive hybridization to identify differentially-expressed genes in CDDP resistant CP70 and C200 cells versus CDDP-sensitive A2780 human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells. We have analyzed 256 randomly selected clones. Subtraction efficiency was determined by dot blot and DNA sequencing. Confirmation of differentially expressed cDNAs was done by virtual northern blot analysis, and 17 genes that were differentially expressed in both CDDP resistant cell lines versus CDDP sensitive A2780 cells were identified. The expression of 10 of these genes was undetectable or detected with low expression in sensitive A2780 cells in comparison to resistant ones. These genes included ARHGDIB, RANBP2, ASPH, PRTFDC1, SSX2IP, MBNL1, DNAJC15, MMP10, TCTE1L and one unidentified sequence. Additional 7 genes that were more highly expressed in resistant CP70 and C200 vs. A2780 cells included ANXA2, USP8, HSPCA, TRA1, CNAP1, ATP2B1 and COX2. Interestingly, multi-drug resistance associated p-glycoprotein (p170) was not detected by the western blot in CDDP resistant CP70 and C200 cells. Our identified genes are involved in diverse processes, such as stress response, chromatin condensation, protection from protein degradation, invasiveness of cells, alterations of Ca 2+ homeostasis and others which may contribute to CDDP resistance of ovarian adenocarcinoma cells. Further characterization of these genes and gene products should yield important insights into the biology of

  9. Virulence and antibiotic resistance genes in Campylobacter spp. in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardoň, J; Pudová, V; Koláčková, I; Karpíšková, R; Röderová, M; Kolář, M

    2017-01-01

    Thermotolerant species of the genus Campy-lobacter are the important agents causing human foodborne infections throughout the world. The aims of this study were to evaluate the presence of nine putative virulence genes in Campylobacter spp. isolated from patients and from foods (poultry meat, pork liver), to determine the resistance of Campylobacter isolates to eight antibiotic agents and to detect four resistance genes.Matherial and methods: The presence of the virulence genes cdtA, cdtB, cdtC, virB11, ciaB, wlaN, iam, dnaJ and racR was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 94 Campylobacter spp. isolates from humans and 123 campylobacters from foods. The phenotypic resistance to selected antimicrobial agents was tested with microdilution method in 82 human isolates and 91 food isolates. The isolates with antibiograms were tested for the presence of blaOXA-61, tet(O), aph-3-1 and cmeB genes by PCR with specific primers. In both human and food C. jejuni isolates the preva-lence of the studied virulence genes, especially dnaJ, racR, ciaB genes and the toxigenic genes cdtA, cdtB, cdtC, was considerably higher than in C. coli isolates. The only exception was the iam gene identified in only C. coli. The tested isolates of both C. jejuni and C. coli were highly resistant to quinolone antibiotics. Additionally, C. coli was also more resistant to erythromycin, streptomycin and, in case of isolates from pork liver, to tetracycline. High prevalence rates of genes encoding antibiotic resistance was noted for the blaOXA-61 and tet(O) genes in both Campylobacter species. The presented study is the first to assess the presence of genes for virulence and resistance to antibiotics in thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. isolated from humans and foods in the Czech Republic. The resistance of Campylobacter isolates to eight antibiotic agents was also assessed. The prevalence of genes responsible for virulence and resistance is rather varied in thermotolerant Campylobacter spp.

  10. Gene expression in human hippocampus from cocaine abusers identifies genes which regulate extracellular matrix remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah C Mash

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The chronic effects of cocaine abuse on brain structure and function are blamed for the inability of most addicts to remain abstinent. Part of the difficulty in preventing relapse is the persisting memory of the intense euphoria or cocaine "rush". Most abused drugs and alcohol induce neuroplastic changes in brain pathways subserving emotion and cognition. Such changes may account for the consolidation and structural reconfiguration of synaptic connections with exposure to cocaine. Adaptive hippocampal plasticity could be related to specific patterns of gene expression with chronic cocaine abuse. Here, we compare gene expression profiles in the human hippocampus from cocaine addicts and age-matched drug-free control subjects. Cocaine abusers had 151 gene transcripts upregulated, while 91 gene transcripts were downregulated. Topping the list of cocaine-regulated transcripts was RECK in the human hippocampus (FC = 2.0; p<0.05. RECK is a membrane-anchored MMP inhibitor that is implicated in the coordinated regulation of extracellular matrix integrity and angiogenesis. In keeping with elevated RECK expression, active MMP9 protein levels were decreased in the hippocampus from cocaine abusers. Pathway analysis identified other genes regulated by cocaine that code for proteins involved in the remodeling of the cytomatrix and synaptic connections and the inhibition of blood vessel proliferation (PCDH8, LAMB1, ITGB6, CTGF and EphB4. The observed microarray phenotype in the human hippocampus identified RECK and other region-specific genes that may promote long-lasting structural changes with repeated cocaine abuse. Extracellular matrix remodeling in the hippocampus may be a persisting effect of chronic abuse that contributes to the compulsive and relapsing nature of cocaine addiction.

  11. Analysis of Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzyme Genes Responsible for High-Level Aminoglycoside Resistance among Enterococcal Isolates

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    Vishal Shete

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic modification results in high-level resistance to aminoglycoside (HLAR, which eliminates the synergistic bactericidal effect of combined exposure to a cell wall-active agent and an aminoglycoside. So aim of the study was to determine prevalence of HLAR enterococcal isolate and to study distribution of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme genes in them. A total of 100 nonrepeat isolates of enterococci from various clinical samples were analyzed. As per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines enterococci were screened for HLAR by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentration of all isolates for gentamicin and streptomycin was determined by E-test. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR was carried out for HLAR enterococcal isolates to identify aminoglycoside modifying enzymes genes responsible for resistance. 60% isolates were found to be high-level gentamicin resistant (HLGR whereas 45% isolates were found to be high-level streptomycin resistant (HLSR. By multiplex PCR 80% HLGR isolates carried bifunctional aminoglycoside modifying enzyme gene aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia whereas 18 out of 45 high-level streptomycin resistant, that is, 40%, isolates carried aph(3′-IIIa. However, aph(2′′-Ib, aph(2′′-Ic, aph(2′′-Id, and ant(4′-Ia genes which encode other aminoglycosides modifying enzymes were not detected. Bifunctional aminoglycoside modifying enzyme gene aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia is the predominant gene responsible for HLAR.

  12. A novel gene of Kalanchoe daigremontiana confers plant drought resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhu, Chen; Jin, Lin; Xiao, Aihua; Duan, Jie; Ma, Luyi

    2018-02-07

    Kalanchoe (K.) daigremontiana is important for studying asexual reproduction under different environmental conditions. Here, we describe a novel KdNOVEL41 (KdN41) gene that may confer drought resistance and could thereby affect K. daigremontiana development. The detected subcellular localization of a KdN41/Yellow Fluorescent Protein (YFP) fusion protein was in the nucleus and cell membrane. Drought, salt, and heat stress treatment in tobacco plants containing the KdN41 gene promoter driving β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene transcription revealed that only drought stress triggered strong GUS staining in the vascular tissues. Overexpression (OE) of the KdN41 gene conferred improved drought resistance in tobacco plants compared to wild-type and transformed with empty vector plants by inducing higher antioxidant enzyme activities, decreasing cell membrane damage, increasing abscisic acid (ABA) content, causing reinforced drought resistance related gene expression profiles. The 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) and nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) staining results also showed less relative oxygen species (ROS) content in KdN41-overexpressing tobacco leaf during drought stress. Surprisingly, by re-watering after drought stress, KdN41-overexpressing tobacco showed earlier flowering. Overall, the KdN41 gene plays roles in ROS scavenging and osmotic damage reduction to improve tobacco drought resistance, which may increase our understanding of the molecular network involved in developmental manipulation under drought stress in K. daigremontiana.

  13. Presence of the optrA Gene in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus sciuri of Porcine Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Run; Li, Dexi; Wang, Yang; He, Tao; Feßler, Andrea T; Schwarz, Stefan; Wu, Congming

    2016-12-01

    A total of 57 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates and 475 methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) collected from pigs in the Guangdong province of China in 2014 were investigated for the presence of the novel oxazolidinone-phenicol resistance gene optrA The optrA gene was detected in 6.9% (n = 33) of the MRCoNS, all of which were Staphylococcus sciuri isolates, but in none of the MRSA isolates. Five optrA-carrying methicillin-resistant (MR) S. sciuri isolates also harbored the multiresistance gene cfr Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and dru typing of the 33 optrA-carrying MR S. sciuri isolates revealed 25 patterns and 5 sequence types, respectively. S1 nuclease PFGE and Southern blotting confirmed that optrA was located in the chromosomal DNAs of 29 isolates, including 1 cfr-positive isolate. The remaining four isolates harbored a ∼35-kb pWo28-3-like plasmid on which optrA and cfr were located together with other resistance genes, as confirmed by sequence analysis. Six different types of genetic environments (types I to VI) of the chromosome-borne optrA genes were identified; these types had the optrA gene and its transcriptional regulator araC in common. Tn558 was found to be associated with araC-optrA in types II to VI. The optrA gene in types II and III was found in close proximity to the ccr gene complex of the respective staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec). Since oxazolidinones are last-resort antimicrobial agents for the control of serious infections caused by methicillin-resistant staphylococci in humans, the location of the optrA gene close to the ccr complex is an alarming observation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Novel gentamicin resistance genes in Campylobacter isolated from humans and retail meats in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shaohua; Mukherjee, Sampa; Chen, Yuansha; Li, Cong; Young, Shenia; Warren, Melissa; Abbott, Jason; Friedman, Sharon; Kabera, Claudine; Karlsson, Maria; McDermott, Patrick F

    2015-05-01

    To understand the molecular epidemiology of gentamicin-resistant Campylobacter and investigate aminoglycoside resistance mechanisms. One-hundred-and-fifty-one gentamicin-resistant Campylobacter isolates from humans (n = 38 Campylobacter jejuni; n = 41, Campylobacter coli) and retail chickens (n = 72 C. coli), were screened for the presence of gentamicin resistance genes by PCR and subtyped using PFGE. A subset of the isolates (n = 41) was analysed using WGS. Nine variants of gentamicin resistance genes were identified: aph(2″)-Ib, Ic, Ig, If, If1, If3, Ih, aac(6')-Ie/aph(2″)-Ia and aac(6')-Ie/aph(2″)-If2. The aph(2″)-Ib, Ic, If1, If3, Ih and aac(6')-Ie/aph(2″)-If2 variants were identified for the first time in Campylobacter. Human isolates showed more diverse aminoglycoside resistance genes than did retail chicken isolates, in which only aph(2″)-Ic and -Ig were identified. The aph(2″)-Ig gene was only gene shared by C. coli isolates from human (n = 27) and retail chicken (n = 69). These isolates displayed the same resistance profile and similar PFGE patterns, suggesting that contaminated retail chicken was probably the source of human C. coli infections. Human isolates were genetically diverse and generally more resistant than the retail chicken isolates. The most frequent co-resistance was to tetracycline (78/79, 98.7%), followed by ciprofloxacin/nalidixic acid (46/79, 58.2%), erythromycin and azithromycin (36/79, 45.6%), telithromycin (32/79, 40.5%) and clindamycin (18/79, 22.8%). All human and retail meat isolates were susceptible to florfenicol. This study demonstrated that several new aminoglycoside resistance genes underlie the recent emergence of gentamicin-resistant Campylobacter, and that, in addition to contaminated retail chicken, other sources have also contributed to gentamicin-resistant Campylobacter infections in humans. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial

  15. Identification of genes differentially expressed in a resistant reaction to Mycosphaerella pinodes in pea using microarray technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cubero José I

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ascochyta blight, caused by Mycosphaerella pinodes is one of the most important pea pathogens. However, little is known about the genes and mechanisms of resistance acting against M. pinodes in pea. Resistance identified so far to this pathogen is incomplete, polygenic and scarce in pea, being most common in Pisum relatives. The identification of the genes underlying resistance would increase our knowledge about M. pinodes-pea interaction and would facilitate the introgression of resistance into pea varieties. In the present study differentially expressed genes in the resistant P. sativum ssp. syriacum accession P665 comparing to the susceptible pea cv. Messire after inoculation with M. pinodes have been identified using a M. truncatula microarray. Results Of the 16,470 sequences analysed, 346 were differentially regulated. Differentially regulated genes belonged to almost all functional categories and included genes involved in defense such as genes involved in cell wall reinforcement, phenylpropanoid and phytoalexins metabolism, pathogenesis- related (PR proteins and detoxification processes. Genes associated with jasmonic acid (JA and ethylene signal transduction pathways were induced suggesting that the response to M. pinodes in pea is regulated via JA and ET pathways. Expression levels of ten differentially regulated genes were validated in inoculated and control plants using qRT-PCR showing that the P665 accession shows constitutively an increased expression of the defense related genes as peroxidases, disease resistance response protein 39 (DRR230-b, glutathione S-transferase (GST and 6a-hydroxymaackiain methyltransferase. Conclusions Through this study a global view of genes expressed during resistance to M. pinodes has been obtained, giving relevant information about the mechanisms and pathways conferring resistance to this important disease. In addition, the M. truncatula microarray represents an efficient tool to

  16. Identification of genes differentially expressed in a resistant reaction to Mycosphaerella pinodes in pea using microarray technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondevilla, Sara; Küster, Helge; Krajinski, Franziska; Cubero, José I; Rubiales, Diego

    2011-01-13

    Ascochyta blight, caused by Mycosphaerella pinodes is one of the most important pea pathogens. However, little is known about the genes and mechanisms of resistance acting against M. pinodes in pea. Resistance identified so far to this pathogen is incomplete, polygenic and scarce in pea, being most common in Pisum relatives. The identification of the genes underlying resistance would increase our knowledge about M. pinodes-pea interaction and would facilitate the introgression of resistance into pea varieties. In the present study differentially expressed genes in the resistant P. sativum ssp. syriacum accession P665 comparing to the susceptible pea cv. Messire after inoculation with M. pinodes have been identified using a M. truncatula microarray. Of the 16,470 sequences analysed, 346 were differentially regulated. Differentially regulated genes belonged to almost all functional categories and included genes involved in defense such as genes involved in cell wall reinforcement, phenylpropanoid and phytoalexins metabolism, pathogenesis- related (PR) proteins and detoxification processes. Genes associated with jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene signal transduction pathways were induced suggesting that the response to M. pinodes in pea is regulated via JA and ET pathways. Expression levels of ten differentially regulated genes were validated in inoculated and control plants using qRT-PCR showing that the P665 accession shows constitutively an increased expression of the defense related genes as peroxidases, disease resistance response protein 39 (DRR230-b), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and 6a-hydroxymaackiain methyltransferase. Through this study a global view of genes expressed during resistance to M. pinodes has been obtained, giving relevant information about the mechanisms and pathways conferring resistance to this important disease. In addition, the M. truncatula microarray represents an efficient tool to identify candidate genes controlling resistance to M

  17. Antibiotic resistance and resistance genes in Escherichia coli from poultry farms, southwest Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Adelowo, Olawale O.; Fagade, Obasola E.; Agersø, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the mechanisms of resistance in 36 E. coli isolated from waste, litter, soil and water samples collected from poultry farms in Southwestern Nigeria. Methodology: Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions of the isolates were determined using the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute and resistance genes detected by PCR. Results: A total of 30 isolates (94%) showed resistance to more than one antimicrobial. Percentage resista...

  18. Occurrence of tetracycline-resistant fecal coliforms and their resistance genes in an urban river impacted by municipal wastewater treatment plant discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong-Miao; Du, Cong; Xu, Huan; Miao, Yan-Hui; Cheng, Yan-Yan; Tang, Hao; Zhou, Jin-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance of fecal coliforms in an urban river poses great threats to both human health and the environment. To investigate the occurrence and distribution of antibiotic resistant bacteria in an urban river, water samples were collected from the Chanhe River in Xi'an, China. After membrane filtration of water samples, the tetracycline resistance rate of fecal coliforms and their resistance genes were detected by plating and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. We found that fecal coliforms were generally resistant to tetracycline and saw average resistance rates of 44.7%. The genes tetA and tetB were widely detected, and their positive rate was 60%-100% and 40%-90%, respectively. We found few strains containing tetC, tetK, tetQ and tetX, and we did not identify any strains containing tetG, tetM or tetO. The prevalence of tetA and tetB over other genes indicated that the main mechanism for resistance to tetracycline is by changes to the efflux pump. Our analysis of the types and proportion of tetracycline resistance genes in the Chanhe River at locations upstream and downstream of the urban center suggests that the increased number of tetracycline-resistant fecal coliforms and spatial variation of tetracycline resistance genes diversity were related to municipal wastewater treatment plant discharge.

  19. Identifying Androgen Receptor-Independent Mechanisms of Prostate Cancer Resistance to Second-Generation Antiandrogen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    cancers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Glucocorticoid Receptor, Serum and glucocorticoid -regulated kinase 1, SGK1, epithelial- mesenchymal transition, EMT 16...receptor transcription factor, glucocorticoid receptor (GR), can activate an overlapping set of AR target genes and can mediate resistance to enzalutamide... glucocorticoid -regulated kinase 1 (SGK1), a target gene of the GR transcriptional program, might be more suitable for targeted inhibition. GR and

  20. Antimicrobial resistance and resistance gene determinants in clinical Escherichia coli from different animal species in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanz, Roland; Kuhnert, Peter; Boerlin, Patrick

    2003-01-02

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on a total of 581 clinical Escherichia coli isolates from diarrhea and edema disease in pigs, from acute mastitis in dairy cattle, from urinary tract infections in dogs and cats, and from septicemia in laying hens collected in Switzerland between 1999 and 2001. Among the 16 antimicrobial agents tested, resistance was most frequent for sulfonamides, tetracycline, and streptomycin. Isolates from swine presented significantly more resistance than those from the other animal species. The distribution of the resistance determinants for sulfonamides, tetracycline, and streptomycin was assessed by hybridization and PCR in resistant isolates. Significant differences in the distribution of resistance determinants for tetracycline (tetA, tetB) and sulfonamides (sulII) were observed between the isolates from swine and those from the other species. Resistance to sulfonamides could not be explained by known resistance mechanisms in more than a quarter of the sulfonamide-resistant and sulfonamide-intermediate isolates from swine, dogs and cats. This finding suggests that one or several new resistance mechanisms for sulfonamides may be widespread among E. coli isolates from these animal species. The integrase gene (intI) from class I integrons was detected in a large proportion of resistant isolates in association with the sulI and aadA genes, thus demonstrating the importance of integrons in the epidemiology of resistance in clinical E. coli isolates from animals.

  1. Methodology of Establishing and Identifying NCI-H2228/Crizotinib-resistant Cell Lines In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di WU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The mechanisms of small molecule targeting drug resistance and ways to overcome resistance are now both urgent need to improve the clinical efficacy. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of using different methods to establish the crizotinib-resistant non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H2228/Crizotinib cell lines and to clarify the mechanisms of resistance to small molecule targeting drug, thus providing experimental and theoretical bases for further studies to overcome the mechanisms of Crizotinib resistance. Methods The study utilized stepwise increase of drug concentrations and chemical mutagen to induce Crizotinib-resistant NCI-H2228 cells. The drug 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of parental and resistant cells and the population doubling time were determined by MTT assay. The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and Western blot. Full-length sequencing method was used to compare the EML4-ALK genes in the parent and drug-resistant cells and analyze the mechanisms of drug resistance. Results The method of gradually increasing drug concentration to induce Crizotinib-resistant NCI-H2228 cells was time-consuming because the cell growth recovery was extremely slow. Thus, this method was considered invalid. However, chemical mutagen ENU can effectively induce NCI-H2228 cells resistant to crizotinib in a short time [IC50]= (3.810±1.100 μmol/L, P=0.002,9 vs parental cells]. Furthermore, the gene mutation frequency of EML4-ALK in the resistant cells was significantly higher than that in the parent cells. Conclusion Chemical mutagen-induced cell resistance was easily operated and had effectively shortened the experimental process. Preliminary technical methods and experimental evidence for in-depth study of drug resistance mechanisms and approaches to overcome the targeted drug resistance were also provided.

  2. Functional metagenomic characterization of antibiotic resistance genes in agricultural soils from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jian Qiang; Wei, Bei; Xu, Chun Yan; Qiao, Min; Zhu, Yong Guan

    2014-04-01

    Soil has been regarded as a rich source of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) due to the complex microbial community and diverse antibiotic-producing microbes in soil, however, little is known about the ARGs in unculturable bacteria. To investigate the diversity and distribution of ARGs in soil and assess the impact of agricultural practice on the ARGs, we screened soil metagenomic library constructed using DNA from four different agricultural soil for ARGs. We identified 45 clones conferring resistance to minocycline, tetracycline, streptomycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, amikacin, chloramphenicol and rifampicin. The similarity of identified ARGs with the closest protein in GenBank ranged from 26% to 92%, with more than 60% of identified ARGs had low similarity less than 60% at amino acid level. The identified ARGs include aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, aminoglycoside 6-adenyltransferase, ADP-ribosyl transferase, ribosome protection protein, transporters and other antibiotic resistant determinants. The identified ARGs from the soil with manure application account for approximately 70% of the total ARGs in this study, implying that manure amendment may increase the diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in soil bacteria. These results suggest that antibiotic resistance in soil remains unexplored and functional metagenomic approach is powerful in discovering novel ARGs and resistant mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of aac(2')-I type b aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes in resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T; Tang, C G; Li, Q H; Ji, J; Ge, H Y; Zhang, X Y; Sun, H P

    2015-03-13

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the drug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii toward aminoglycosides. A total of 32 A. baumannii strains were identified by molecular identification and subsequently isolated. The isolates were then amplified by polymerase chain reaction to analyze the 9 aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes and 7 16S rRNA methylase genes. Five types of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes and 1 type of 16S rRNA methylase gene were detected in the 32 drug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Positive genes included 7 detection modes, of which the all-6-gene-positive mode aac(2')-Ib+aac(3)-I+aac(6')-Ib+ant(3'')-I+aph(3')-I+armA exhibited the largest number of strains (12, 37.5%). The resistance of A. baumannii against aminoglycosides resulted from the presence of 5 types of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes and the 16S rRNA methylase gene armA. This study is the first to isolate the aac(2')-Ib aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene from A. baumannii in a domestic clinical setting.

  4. Elevation of antibiotic resistance genes at cold temperatures: implications for winter storage of sludge and biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J H; Novak, J T; Knocke, W R; Pruden, A

    2014-12-01

    Prior research suggests that cold temperatures may stimulate the proliferation of certain antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and gene transfer elements during storage of biosolids. This could have important implications on cold weather storage of biosolids, as often required in northern climates until a time suitable for land application. In this study, levels of an integron-associated gene (intI1) and an ARG (sul1) were monitored in biosolids subject to storage at 4, 10 and 20°C. Both intI1 and sul1 were observed to increase during short-term storage (gene transfer of integron-associated ARGs and that biosolids storage conditions should be considered prior to land application. Wastewater treatment plants have been identified as the hot spots for the proliferation and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) to the environment through discharge of treated effluent to water bodies as well as application of biosolids to land. Identifying critical control points within the treatment process may aid in the development of solutions for the reduction of ARGs and ARB and curbing the spread of antibiotic resistance. This study found increases in ARGs during biosolids storage and identifies changes in operational protocols that could help reduce ARG loading to the environment when biosolids are land-applied. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Discovery of functional genes for systemic acquired resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana through integrated data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Youlian; Pylatuik, Jeffrey D; Ouyang, Junjun; Famili, A Fazel; Fobert, Pierre R

    2004-12-01

    Various data mining techniques combined with sequence motif information in the promoter region of genes were applied to discover functional genes that are involved in the defense mechanism of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in Arabidopsis thaliana. A series of K-Means clustering with difference-in-shape as distance measure was initially applied. A stability measure was used to validate this clustering process. A decision tree algorithm with the discover-and-mask technique was used to identify a group of most informative genes. Appearance and abundance of various transcription factor binding sites in the promoter region of the genes were studied. Through the combination of these techniques, we were able to identify 24 candidate genes involved in the SAR defense mechanism. The candidate genes fell into 2 highly resolved categories, each category showing significantly unique profiles of regulatory elements in their promoter regions. This study demonstrates the strength of such integration methods and suggests a broader application of this approach.

  6. Effect of swine manure application timing on the persistence and transport of antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus and resistance genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swine manure applied to agricultural fields may lead to the transport of antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes to freshwater systems. Enterococci were studied because they are fecal indicator bacteria associated with manure. Resistance genes include genes from live cells, dea...

  7. Cloning of genes responsible for acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, M; Takemura, H; Okumura, H; Kawamura, Y; Horinouchi, S; Beppu, T

    1990-04-01

    Five acetic acid-sensitive mutants of Acetobacter aceti subsp. aceti no. 1023 were isolated by mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Three recombinant plasmids that complemented the mutations were isolated from a gene bank of the chromosome DNA of the parental strain constructed in Escherichia coli by using cosmid vector pMVC1. One of these plasmids (pAR1611), carrying about a 30-kilobase-pair (kb) fragment that conferred acetic acid resistance to all five mutants, was further analyzed. Subcloning experiments indicated that a 8.3-kb fragment was sufficient to complement all five mutations. To identify the mutation loci and genes involved in acetic acid resistance, insertional inactivation was performed by insertion of the kanamycin resistance gene derived from E. coli plasmid pACYC177 into the cloned 8.3-kb fragment and successive integration into the chromosome of the parental strain. The results suggested that three genes, designated aarA, aarB, and aarC, were responsible for expression of acetic acid resistance. Gene products of these genes were detected by means of overproduction in E. coli by use of the lac promoter. The amino acid sequence of the aarA gene product deduced from the nucleotide sequence was significantly similar to those of the citrate synthases (CSs) of E. coli and other bacteria. The A. aceti mutants defective in the aarA gene were found to lack CS activity, which was restored by introduction of a plasmid containing the aarA gene. A mutation in the CS gene of E. coli was also complemented by the aarA gene. These results indicate that aarA is the CS gene.

  8. Antibiotic Resistance and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Isolates from Hospital Wastewater in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Pham Thi; Chuc, Nguyen Thi Kim; Hoa, Nguyen Quynh; Nhung, Pham Hong; Thoa, Nguyen Thi Minh; Diwan, Vishal; Tamhankar, Ashok J.; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    The environmental spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has been recognised as a growing public health threat for which hospitals play a significant role. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in Escherichia coli isolates from hospital wastewater in Vietnam. Wastewater samples before and after treatment were collected using continuous sampling every month over a year. Standard disk diffusion and E-test were used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production was tested using combined disk diffusion. ARGs were detected by polymerase chain reactions. Resistance to at least one antibiotic was detected in 83% of isolates; multidrug resistance was found in 32%. The highest resistance prevalence was found for co-trimoxazole (70%) and the lowest for imipenem (1%). Forty-three percent of isolates were ESBL-producing, with the blaTEM gene being more common than blaCTX-M. Co-harbouring of the blaCTX-M, blaTEM and qepA genes was found in 46% of isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin. The large presence of antibiotic-resistant E. coli isolates combined with ARGs in hospital wastewater, even post-treatment, poses a threat to public health. It highlights the need to develop effective processes for hospital wastewater treatment plants to eliminate antibiotic resistant bacteria and ARGs. PMID:28661465

  9. Antibiotic Resistance and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Isolates from Hospital Wastewater in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, La Thi Quynh; Lan, Pham Thi; Chuc, Nguyen Thi Kim; Hoa, Nguyen Quynh; Nhung, Pham Hong; Thoa, Nguyen Thi Minh; Diwan, Vishal; Tamhankar, Ashok J; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    2017-06-29

    The environmental spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has been recognised as a growing public health threat for which hospitals play a significant role. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in Escherichia coli isolates from hospital wastewater in Vietnam. Wastewater samples before and after treatment were collected using continuous sampling every month over a year. Standard disk diffusion and E-test were used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production was tested using combined disk diffusion. ARGs were detected by polymerase chain reactions. Resistance to at least one antibiotic was detected in 83% of isolates; multidrug resistance was found in 32%. The highest resistance prevalence was found for co-trimoxazole (70%) and the lowest for imipenem (1%). Forty-three percent of isolates were ESBL-producing, with the bla TEM gene being more common than bla CTX-M . Co-harbouring of the bla CTX-M , bla TEM and qepA genes was found in 46% of isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin. The large presence of antibiotic-resistant E. coli isolates combined with ARGs in hospital wastewater, even post-treatment, poses a threat to public health. It highlights the need to develop effective processes for hospital wastewater treatment plants to eliminate antibiotic resistant bacteria and ARGs.

  10. Staff resistance to restraint reduction: identifying & overcoming barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Staci Silver

    2007-05-01

    Professional organizations, regulating agencies, and hospital administrators have taken a strong stance on restraint reduction policies. When implementing a restraint reduction initiative, it is important to identify the barriers to restraint reduction, such as concern for personal safety, lack of knowledge about and practice using alternate de-escalation skills, and fear of disrupting the therapeutic milieu by using a variety of de-escalation methods. Education aimed to reduce the use of restraints needs to do more than simply provide information. It is important to acknowledge the emotional response of the nursing staff and the culture of the current practice. A variety of educational strategies, including role-playing, and case studies will help identify attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors that are congruent with reducing the use of restraints. If the ultimate goal of restraint reduction is philosophical change, it will eventually lead to a new culture of practice.

  11. Seedling Resistance to Stem Rust and Molecular Marker Analysis of Resistance Genes in Wheat Cultivars of Yunnan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian Ya; Cao, Yuan Yin; Wu, Xian Xin; Xu, Xiao Feng; Wang, Wan Lin

    2016-01-01

    Stem rust is one of the most potentially harmful wheat diseases, but has been effectively controlled in China since 1970s. However, the interest in breeding wheat with durable resistance to stem rust has been renewed with the emergence of Ug99 (TTKSK) virulent to the widely used resistance gene Sr31, and by which the wheat stem rust was controlled for 40 years in wheat production area worldwide. Yunnan Province, located on the Southwest border of China, is one of the main wheat growing regions, playing a pivotal role in the wheat stem rust epidemic in China. This study investigated the levels of resistance in key wheat cultivars (lines) of Yunnan Province. In addition, the existence of Sr25, Sr26, Sr28, Sr31, Sr32, and Sr38 genes in 119 wheat cultivars was assessed using specific DNA markers. The results indicated that 77 (64.7%) tested wheat varieties showed different levels of resistance to all the tested races of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici. Using molecular markers, we identified the resistance gene Sr31 in 43 samples; Sr38 in 10 samples; Sr28 in 12 samples, and one sample which was resistant against Ug99 (avirulent to Sr32). No Sr25 or Sr26 (effective against Ug99) was identified in any cultivars tested. Furthermore, 5 out of 119 cultivars tested carried both Sr31 and Sr38 and eight contained both Sr31 and Sr28. The results enable the development of appropriate strategies to breed varieties resistant to stem rust.

  12. Seedling Resistance to Stem Rust and Molecular Marker Analysis of Resistance Genes in Wheat Cultivars of Yunnan, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Ya Li

    Full Text Available Stem rust is one of the most potentially harmful wheat diseases, but has been effectively controlled in China since 1970s. However, the interest in breeding wheat with durable resistance to stem rust has been renewed with the emergence of Ug99 (TTKSK virulent to the widely used resistance gene Sr31, and by which the wheat stem rust was controlled for 40 years in wheat production area worldwide. Yunnan Province, located on the Southwest border of China, is one of the main wheat growing regions, playing a pivotal role in the wheat stem rust epidemic in China. This study investigated the levels of resistance in key wheat cultivars (lines of Yunnan Province. In addition, the existence of Sr25, Sr26, Sr28, Sr31, Sr32, and Sr38 genes in 119 wheat cultivars was assessed using specific DNA markers. The results indicated that 77 (64.7% tested wheat varieties showed different levels of resistance to all the tested races of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici. Using molecular markers, we identified the resistance gene Sr31 in 43 samples; Sr38 in 10 samples; Sr28 in 12 samples, and one sample which was resistant against Ug99 (avirulent to Sr32. No Sr25 or Sr26 (effective against Ug99 was identified in any cultivars tested. Furthermore, 5 out of 119 cultivars tested carried both Sr31 and Sr38 and eight contained both Sr31 and Sr28. The results enable the development of appropriate strategies to breed varieties resistant to stem rust.

  13. Linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain 1128105, the first known clinical isolate possessing the cfr multidrug resistance gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Jeffrey B; Zuill, Douglas E; Scharn, Caitlyn R; Deane, Jennifer; Sahm, Daniel F; Denys, Gerald A; Goering, Richard V; Shaw, Karen J

    2014-11-01

    The Cfr methyltransferase confers resistance to six classes of drugs which target the peptidyl transferase center of the 50S ribosomal subunit, including some oxazolidinones, such as linezolid (LZD). The mobile cfr gene was identified in European veterinary isolates from the late 1990s, although the earliest report of a clinical cfr-positive strain was the 2005 Colombian methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolate CM05. Here, through retrospective analysis of LZD(r) clinical strains from a U.S. surveillance program, we identified a cfr-positive MRSA isolate, 1128105, from January 2005, predating CM05 by 5 months. Molecular typing of 1128105 revealed a unique pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profile most similar to that of USA100, spa type t002, and multilocus sequence type 5 (ST5). In addition to cfr, LZD resistance in 1128105 is partially attributed to the presence of a single copy of the 23S rRNA gene mutation T2500A. Transformation of the ∼37-kb conjugative p1128105 cfr-bearing plasmid from 1128105 into S. aureus ATCC 29213 background strains was successful in recapitulating the Cfr antibiogram, as well as resistance to aminoglycosides and trimethoprim. A 7-kb cfr-containing region of p1128105 possessed sequence nearly identical to that found in the Chinese veterinary Proteus vulgaris isolate PV-01 and in U.S. clinical S. aureus isolate 1900, although the presence of IS431-like sequences is unique to p1128105. The cfr gene environment in this early clinical cfr-positive isolate has now been identified in Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains of clinical and veterinary origin and has been associated with multiple mobile elements, highlighting the versatility of this multidrug resistance gene and its potential for further dissemination. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. A Generally Applicable Translational Strategy Identifies S100A4 as a Candidate Gene in Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Sören; Fang, Yu; Barrenäs, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    The identification of diagnostic markers and therapeutic candidate genes in common diseases is complicated by the involvement of thousands of genes. We hypothesized that genes co-regulated with a key gene in allergy, IL13, would form a module that could help to identify candidate genes. We identi...

  15. Remapping of the stripe rust resistance gene Yr10 in common wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cuiling; Wu, Jingzheng; Yan, Baiqiang; Hao, Qunqun; Zhang, Chaozhong; Lyu, Bo; Ni, Fei; Caplan, Allan; Wu, Jiajie; Fu, Daolin

    2018-02-23

    Yr10 is an important gene to control wheat stripe rust, and the search for Yr10 needs to be continued. Wheat stripe rust or yellow rust is a devastating fungal disease caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst). Host disease resistance offers a primary source for controlling wheat stripe rust. The stripe rust resistance gene Yr10 confers the race-specific resistance to most tested Pst races in China including CYR29. Early studies proposed that Yr10 was a nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich repeat gene archived as GenBank accession AF149112 (hereafter designated the Yr10 candidate gene or Yr10 CG ). In this study, we revealed that 15 Chinese wheat cultivars positive for Yr10 CG are susceptible to CYR29. We then expressed the Yr10 CG cDNA in the common wheat 'Bobwhite'. The Yr10 CG -cDNA positive transgenic plants were also susceptible to CYR29. Thus, it is highly unlikely that Yr10 CG corresponds to the Yr10 resistance gene. Using the Yr10 donor 'Moro' and the Pst-susceptible wheat 'Huixianhong', we generated two F 3 populations that displayed a single Mendelian segregation on the Yr10 gene, and used them to remap the Yr10 gene. Six markers were placed in the Yr10 region, with the Yr10 CG gene now mapping about 1.2-cM proximal to the Yr10 locus and the Xsdauw79 marker is completely linked to the Yr10 locus. Apparently, the Yr10 gene has not yet been identified. Fine mapping and positional cloning of Yr10 is important for gene pyramiding for stripe rust resistance in wheat.

  16. A Comprehensive Insight into Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Activated Sludge Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kailong; Tang, Junying; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Xu, Ke; Ren, Hongqiang

    2014-01-01

    In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera consisting of Sulfuritalea, Armatimonas, Prosthecobacter, Hyphomicrobium, Azonexus, Longilinea, Paracoccus, Novosphingobium and Rhodobacter were identified as potential TRB in the sludge. Results of qPCR, molecular cloning and metagenomic analysis consistently indicated that tetracycline treatment could increase both the abundance and diversity of the tet genes, but decreased the occurrence and diversity of non-tetracycline ARG, especially sulfonamide resistance gene sul2. Cluster analysis showed that tetracycline treatment at subinhibitory concentrations (5 mg/L) was found to pose greater effects on the bacterial community composition, which may be responsible for the variations of the ARGs abundance. This study indicated that joint use of 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing can be effectively used to explore ARB and ARGs in the environment, and future studies should include an in-depth investigation of the relationship between microbial community, ARGs and antibiotics in sewage treatment plant (STP) sludge. PMID:24905407

  17. A Comprehensive Insight into Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Activated Sludge Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailong Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera consisting of Sulfuritalea, Armatimonas, Prosthecobacter, Hyphomicrobium, Azonexus, Longilinea, Paracoccus, Novosphingobium and Rhodobacter were identified as potential TRB in the sludge. Results of qPCR, molecular cloning and metagenomic analysis consistently indicated that tetracycline treatment could increase both the abundance and diversity of the tet genes, but decreased the occurrence and diversity of non-tetracycline ARG, especially sulfonamide resistance gene sul2. Cluster analysis showed that tetracycline treatment at subinhibitory concentrations (5 mg/L was found to pose greater effects on the bacterial community composition, which may be responsible for the variations of the ARGs abundance. This study indicated that joint use of 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing can be effectively used to explore ARB and ARGs in the environment, and future studies should include an in-depth investigation of the relationship between microbial community, ARGs and antibiotics in sewage treatment plant (STP sludge.

  18. A comprehensive insight into tetracycline resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in activated sludge using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kailong; Tang, Junying; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Xu, Ke; Ren, Hongqiang

    2014-06-05

    In order to comprehensively investigate tetracycline resistance in activated sludge of sewage treatment plants, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing were used to detect potential tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in sludge cultured with different concentrations of tetracycline. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that tetracycline treatment greatly affected the bacterial community structure of the sludge. Nine genera consisting of Sulfuritalea, Armatimonas, Prosthecobacter, Hyphomicrobium, Azonexus, Longilinea, Paracoccus, Novosphingobium and Rhodobacter were identified as potential TRB in the sludge. Results of qPCR, molecular cloning and metagenomic analysis consistently indicated that tetracycline treatment could increase both the abundance and diversity of the tet genes, but decreased the occurrence and diversity of non-tetracycline ARG, especially sulfonamide resistance gene sul2. Cluster analysis showed that tetracycline treatment at subinhibitory concentrations (5 mg/L) was found to pose greater effects on the bacterial community composition, which may be responsible for the variations of the ARGs abundance. This study indicated that joint use of 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing can be effectively used to explore ARB and ARGs in the environment, and future studies should include an in-depth investigation of the relationship between microbial community, ARGs and antibiotics in sewage treatment plant (STP) sludge.

  19. An assessment of the resistance gene analogues of Oryza sativa ssp. japonica: their presence and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczyk, Grzegorz; Chełkowski, Jerzy

    2003-01-01

    Rice is the first cereal genome of known draft sequence, and the finished sequence for it is now nearly complete. In this paper, we describe a preliminary analysis of known rice genes aimed to detect resistance gene analogues of known structural classes. Putative resistance genes were identified in a dual approach--by using BLASTP searches to identify candidate sequences and by using Hidden Markov Models to predict domain presence in the candidates. The set of proteins examined was obtained from the publicly available data of TIGR (The Institute for Genomic Research). 1744 distinct RGAs were identified, 597 of which belonged to the NBS-LRR class. Supplementary data (sequences and annotations) is available on the web site http:/gkoczyk.bioinfo.pl/CMBL.

  20. The Lr34 adult plant rust resistance gene provides seedling resistance in durum wheat without senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Rinaldo, Amy; Gilbert, Brian; Boni, Rainer; Krattinger, Simon G.; Singh, Davinder; Park, Robert F.; Lagudah, Evans; Ayliffe, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Summary The hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) adult plant resistance gene, Lr34/Yr18/Sr57/Pm38/Ltn1, provides broad?spectrum resistance to wheat leaf rust (Lr34), stripe rust (Yr18), stem rust (Sr57) and powdery mildew (Pm38) pathogens, and has remained effective in wheat crops for many decades. The partial resistance provided by this gene is only apparent in adult plants and not effective in field?grown seedlings. Lr34 also causes leaf tip necrosis (Ltn1) in mature adult plant leaves when ...

  1. High frequencies of antibiotic resistance genes in infants’ meconium and early fecal samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosalbes, M. J.; Vallès, Y.; Jiménez-Hernández, N.

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) microbiota has been identified as an important reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) that can be horizontally transferred to pathogenic species. Maternal GIT microbes can be transmitted to the offspring, and recent work indicates that such transfer start...

  2. Plasmodium falciparum parasite population structure and gene flow associated to anti-malarial drugs resistance in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Ankit; Khim, Nimol; Reynes, Christelle; Ravel, Patrice; Ma, Laurence; Tichit, Magali; Bourchier, Christiane; Kim, Saorin; Dourng, Dany; Khean, Chanra; Chim, Pheaktra; Siv, Sovannaroth; Frutos, Roger; Lek, Dysoley; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ariey, Frédéric; Menard, Didier; Cornillot, Emmanuel

    2016-06-14

    Western Cambodia is recognized as the epicentre of emergence of Plasmodium falciparum multi-drug resistance. The emergence of artemisinin resistance has been observed in this area since 2008-2009 and molecular signatures associated to artemisinin resistance have been characterized in k13 gene. At present, one of the major threats faced, is the possible spread of Asian artemisinin resistant parasites over the world threatening millions of people and jeopardizing malaria elimination programme efforts. To anticipate the diffusion of artemisinin resistance, the identification of the P. falciparum population structure and the gene flow among the parasite population in Cambodia are essential. To this end, a mid-throughput PCR-LDR-FMA approach based on LUMINEX technology was developed to screen for genetic barcode in 533 blood samples collected in 2010-2011 from 16 health centres in malaria endemics areas in Cambodia. Based on successful typing of 282 samples, subpopulations were characterized along the borders of the country. Each 11-loci barcode provides evidence supporting allele distribution gradient related to subpopulations and gene flow. The 11-loci barcode successfully identifies recently emerging parasite subpopulations in western Cambodia that are associated with the C580Y dominant allele for artemisinin resistance in k13 gene. A subpopulation was identified in northern Cambodia that was associated to artemisinin (R539T resistant allele of k13 gene) and mefloquine resistance. The gene flow between these subpopulations might have driven the spread of artemisinin resistance over Cambodia.

  3. Gene interactions and genetics of blast resistance and yield

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Blast disease caused by the pathogen Pyricularia oryzae is a serious threat to rice production. Six generations viz., P1, P2, F1, F2, B1 and B2 of a cross between blast susceptible high-yielding rice cultivar ADT 43 and resistant near isogenic line (NIL) CT13432-3R, carrying four blast resistance genes Pi1, Pi2, Pi33 and Pi54 ...

  4. Identifying human disease genes through cross-species gene mapping of evolutionary conserved processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Poot

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding complex networks that modulate development in humans is hampered by genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity within and between populations. Here we present a method that exploits natural variation in highly diverse mouse genetic reference panels in which genetic and environmental factors can be tightly controlled. The aim of our study is to test a cross-species genetic mapping strategy, which compares data of gene mapping in human patients with functional data obtained by QTL mapping in recombinant inbred mouse strains in order to prioritize human disease candidate genes.We exploit evolutionary conservation of developmental phenotypes to discover gene variants that influence brain development in humans. We studied corpus callosum volume in a recombinant inbred mouse panel (C57BL/6J×DBA/2J, BXD strains using high-field strength MRI technology. We aligned mouse mapping results for this neuro-anatomical phenotype with genetic data from patients with abnormal corpus callosum (ACC development.From the 61 syndromes which involve an ACC, 51 human candidate genes have been identified. Through interval mapping, we identified a single significant QTL on mouse chromosome 7 for corpus callosum volume with a QTL peak located between 25.5 and 26.7 Mb. Comparing the genes in this mouse QTL region with those associated with human syndromes (involving ACC and those covered by copy number variations (CNV yielded a single overlap, namely HNRPU in humans and Hnrpul1 in mice. Further analysis of corpus callosum volume in BXD strains revealed that the corpus callosum was significantly larger in BXD mice with a B genotype at the Hnrpul1 locus than in BXD mice with a D genotype at Hnrpul1 (F = 22.48, p<9.87*10(-5.This approach that exploits highly diverse mouse strains provides an efficient and effective translational bridge to study the etiology of human developmental disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia.

  5. Identification and characterization of potential NBS-encoding resistance genes and induction kinetics of a putative candidate gene associated with downy mildew resistance in Cucumis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Hongjian

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the variation and mutation of the races of Pseudoperonospora cubensis, downy mildew has in recent years become the most devastating leaf disease of cucumber worldwide. Novel resistance to downy mildew has been identified in the wild Cucumis species, C. hystrix Chakr. After the successful hybridization between C. hystrix and cultivated cucumber (C. sativus L., an introgression line (IL5211S was identified as highly resistant to downy mildew. Nucleotide-binding site and leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR genes are the largest class of disease resistance genes cloned from plant with highly conserved domains, which can be used to facilitate the isolation of candidate genes associated with downy mildew resistance in IL5211S. Results Degenerate primers that were designed based on the conserved motifs in the NBS domain of resistance (R proteins were used to isolate NBS-type sequences from IL5211S. A total of 28 sequences were identified and named as cucumber (C. sativus = CS resistance gene analogs as CSRGAs. Polygenetic analyses separated these sequences into four different classes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analysis showed that these CSRGAs expressed at different levels in leaves, roots, and stems. In addition, introgression from C. hystrix induced expression of the partial CSRGAs in cultivated cucumber, especially CSRGA23, increased four-fold when compared to the backcross parent CC3. Furthermore, the expression of CSRGA23 under P. cubensis infection and abiotic stresses was also analyzed at different time points. Results showed that the P. cubensis treatment and four tested abiotic stimuli, MeJA, SA, ABA, and H2O2, triggered a significant induction of CSRGA23 within 72 h of inoculation. The results indicate that CSRGA23 may play a critical role in protecting cucumber against P. cubensis through a signaling the pathway triggered by these molecules. Conclusions Four classes of NBS-type RGAs were

  6. Transcriptome Profiling to Discover Putative Genes Associated with Paraquat Resistance in Goosegrass (Eleusine indica L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jing; Shen, Xuefeng; Ma, Qibin; Yang, Cunyi; Liu, Simin; Chen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background Goosegrass (Eleusine indica L.), a serious annual weed in the world, has evolved resistance to several herbicides including paraquat, a non-selective herbicide. The mechanism of paraquat resistance in weeds is only partially understood. To further study the molecular mechanism underlying paraquat resistance in goosegrass, we performed transcriptome analysis of susceptible and resistant biotypes of goosegrass with or without paraquat treatment. Results The RNA-seq libraries generated 194,716,560 valid reads with an average length of 91.29 bp. De novo assembly analysis produced 158,461 transcripts with an average length of 1153.74 bp and 100,742 unigenes with an average length of 712.79 bp. Among these, 25,926 unigenes were assigned to 65 GO terms that contained three main categories. A total of 13,809 unigenes with 1,208 enzyme commission numbers were assigned to 314 predicted KEGG metabolic pathways, and 12,719 unigenes were categorized into 25 KOG classifications. Furthermore, our results revealed that 53 genes related to reactive oxygen species scavenging, 10 genes related to polyamines and 18 genes related to transport were differentially expressed in paraquat treatment experiments. The genes related to polyamines and transport are likely potential candidate genes that could be further investigated to confirm their roles in paraquat resistance of goosegrass. Conclusion This is the first large-scale transcriptome sequencing of E. indica using the Illumina platform. Potential genes involved in paraquat resistance were identified from the assembled sequences. The transcriptome data may serve as a reference for further analysis of gene expression and functional genomics studies, and will facilitate the study of paraquat resistance at the molecular level in goosegrass. PMID:24927422

  7. Identification of genes associated with cisplatin resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ping

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, details of the molecular mechanism responsible for cisplatin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of genes related to cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Methods A cisplatin-resistant cell line, Tca/cisplatin, was established from a cisplatin-sensitive cell line, Tca8113, which was derived from moderately-differentiated tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Global gene expression in this resistant cell line and its sensitive parent cell line was analyzed using Affymetrix HG-U95Av2 microarrays. Candidate genes involved in DNA repair, the MAP pathway and cell cycle regulation were chosen to validate the microarray analysis results. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis following cisplatin exposure were also investigated. Results Cisplatin resistance in Tca/cisplatin cells was stable for two years in cisplatin-free culture medium. The IC50 for cisplatin in Tca/cisplatin was 6.5-fold higher than that in Tca8113. Microarray analysis identified 38 genes that were up-regulated and 25 that were down-regulated in this cell line. Some were novel candidates, while others are involved in well-characterized mechanisms that could be relevant to cisplatin resistance, such as RECQL for DNA repair and MAP2K6 in the MAP pathway; all the genes were further validated by Real-time PCR. The cell cycle-regulated genes CCND1 and CCND3 were involved in cisplatin resistance; 24-hour exposure to 10 μM cisplatin induced a marked S phase block in Tca/cisplatin cells but not in Tca8113 cells. Conclusion The Tca8113 cell line and its stable drug-resistant variant Tca/cisplatin provided a useful model for identifying candidate genes responsible for the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our data provide a useful basis for screening candidate targets for early diagnosis

  8. Identification of genes associated with cisplatin resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Xiaojian; Qiu, Weiliu; Chen, Fangan; Chen, Wantao

    2006-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, details of the molecular mechanism responsible for cisplatin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of genes related to cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. A cisplatin-resistant cell line, Tca/cisplatin, was established from a cisplatin-sensitive cell line, Tca8113, which was derived from moderately-differentiated tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Global gene expression in this resistant cell line and its sensitive parent cell line was analyzed using Affymetrix HG-U95Av2 microarrays. Candidate genes involved in DNA repair, the MAP pathway and cell cycle regulation were chosen to validate the microarray analysis results. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis following cisplatin exposure were also investigated. Cisplatin resistance in Tca/cisplatin cells was stable for two years in cisplatin-free culture medium. The IC50 for cisplatin in Tca/cisplatin was 6.5-fold higher than that in Tca8113. Microarray analysis identified 38 genes that were up-regulated and 25 that were down-regulated in this cell line. Some were novel candidates, while others are involved in well-characterized mechanisms that could be relevant to cisplatin resistance, such as RECQL for DNA repair and MAP2K6 in the MAP pathway; all the genes were further validated by Real-time PCR. The cell cycle-regulated genes CCND1 and CCND3 were involved in cisplatin resistance; 24-hour exposure to 10 μM cisplatin induced a marked S phase block in Tca/cisplatin cells but not in Tca8113 cells. The Tca8113 cell line and its stable drug-resistant variant Tca/cisplatin provided a useful model for identifying candidate genes responsible for the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our data provide a useful basis for screening candidate targets for early diagnosis and further intervention in cisplatin resistance

  9. Comparative genome analysis and resistance gene mapping in grain legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, N.D.

    1998-01-01

    Using, DNA markers and genome organization, several important disease resistance genes have been analyzed in mungbean (Vigna radiata), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), and soybean (Glycine max). In the process, medium-density linkage maps consisting of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers were constructed for both mungbean and cowpea. Comparisons between these maps, as well as the maps of soybean and common bean, indicate that there is significant conservation of DNA marker order, though the conserved blocks in soybean are much shorter than in the others. DNA mapping results also indicate that a gene for seed weight may be conserved between mungbean and cowpea. Using the linkage maps, genes that control bruchid (genus Callosobruchus) and powdery mildew (Erysiphe polygoni) resistance in mungbean, aphid resistance in cowpea (Aphis craccivora), and cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) resistance in soybean have all been mapped and characterized. For some of these traits resistance was found to be oligogenic and DNA mapping uncovered multiple genes involved in the phenotype. (author)

  10. Emergence of Plasmid-Borne dfrA14 Trimethoprim Resistance Gene in Shigella sonnei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALFONSO MIRANDA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The most common mechanism of trimethoprim (TMP-resistance is the acquisition of dihydrofolate reductase enzyme resistant to this drug. Previous molecular characterization of TMP-genes resistance in Chilean isolates of S. sonnei searching for dfrA1 and dfrA8, showed solely the presence of dfrA8 (formerly dhfrIIIc. However, these genetic markers were absent in S. sonnei strains further isolated during an outbreak in 2009. To identify the TMP-resistance gene in these strains, a genomic DNA library from a TMP-resistant (TMPR S. sonnei representative strain for the outbreak was used to clone, select and identify a TMP-resistance marker. The TMPR clone was sequenced by primer walking, identifying the presence of the dfrA14 gene in the sul2-strA’-dfrA14-‘strA-strB gene arrangement, harbored in a native 6,779-bp plasmid. The same plasmid was isolated by transforming with a ~4.2 MDa plasmid extracted from several TMPR S. sonnei strains into E. coli. This plasmid, named pABC-3, was present only in dfrA14-positive strains and was homologous to a previously described pCERC-1, but different due to the absence of an 11-bp repetitive unit. The distribution of dfrA1, dfrA8 and dfrA14 TMP-resistance genes was determined in 126 TMPR S. sonnei isolates. Most of the strains (96 % carried only one of the three TMP-resistance genes assessed. Thus, all strains obtained during the 2009-outbreak harbored only dfrA14, whereas, dfrA8 was the most abundant gene marker before outbreak and, after the outbreak dfrA1 seems have appeared in circulating strains. According to PFGE, dfrA14-positive strains were clustered in a genetically related group including some dfrA1- and dfrA8-positive strains; meanwhile other genetic group included most of the dfrA8-positive strains. This distribution also correlated with the isolation period, showing a dynamics of trimethoprim genetic markers prevalent in Chilean S. sonnei strains. To our knowledge, dfrA14 gene associated to a small

  11. Antibiotic resistance and resistance genes in Escherichia coli from poultry farms, southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelowo, Olawale O; Fagade, Obasola E; Agersø, Yvonne

    2014-09-12

    This study investigated the mechanisms of resistance in 36 E. coli isolated from waste, litter, soil and water samples collected from poultry farms in Southwestern Nigeria. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions of the isolates were determined using the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute and resistance genes detected by PCR. A total of 30 isolates (94%) showed resistance to more than one antimicrobial. Percentage resistance was: tetracycline 81%, sulphamethoxazole 67%, streptomycin 56%, trimethoprim 47 %, ciprofloxacin 42%, ampicillin 36%, spectinomycin 28%, nalidixic acid 25%, chloramphenicol 22%, neomycin 14%, gentamicin 8%, amoxicillin-clavulanate, ceftiofur, cefotaxime, colistin, florfenicol and apramycin 0%. Resistance genes found among the isolates include bla-TEM (85%), sul2 (67%), sul3 (17%), aadA (65%), strA (70%), strB (61%), catA1 (25%), cmlA1 (13%), tetA (21%) and tetB (17%). Class 1 and 2 integrons were found in five (14%) and six (17%) isolates, respectively, while one isolate was positive for both classes of integrons. Seven out of eight isolates with resistance to ciprofloxacin and MIC ≤ 32 mg/L to nalidixic acid contained qnrS genes. Our findings provided additional evidence that the poultry production environment in Nigeria represents an important reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes such as qnrS that may spread from livestock production farms to human populations via manure and water.

  12. A 6-gene signature identifies four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Abel, Frida; Dalevi, Daniel; Nethander, Maria; Jörnsten, Rebecka; De Preter, Katleen; Vermeulen, Joëlle; Stallings, Raymond; Kogner, Per; Maris, John; Nilsson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background There are currently three postulated genomic subtypes of the childhood tumour neuroblastoma (NB); Type 1, Type 2A, and Type 2B. The most aggressive forms of NB are characterized by amplification of the oncogene MYCN (MNA) and low expression of the favourable marker NTRK1. Recently, mutations or high expression of the familial predisposition gene Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) was associated to unfavourable biology of sporadic NB. Also, various other genes have been linke...

  13. Validation of candidate genes putatively associated with resistance to SCMV and MDMV in maize (Zea mays L. by expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzel Gerhard

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potyviruses sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV and maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV are major pathogens of maize worldwide. Two loci, Scmv1 and Scmv2, have ealier been shown to confer complete resistance to SCMV. Custom-made microarrays containing previously identified SCMV resistance candidate genes and resistance gene analogs were utilised to investigate and validate gene expression and expression patterns of isogenic lines under pathogen infection in order to obtain information about the molecular mechanisms involved in maize-potyvirus interactions. Results By employing time course microarray experiments we identified 68 significantly differentially expressed sequences within the different time points. The majority of differentially expressed genes differed between the near-isogenic line carrying Scmv1 resistance locus at chromosome 6 and the other isogenic lines. Most differentially expressed genes in the SCMV experiment (75% were identified one hour after virus inoculation, and about one quarter at multiple time points. Furthermore, most of the identified mapped genes were localised outside the Scmv QTL regions. Annotation revealed differential expression of promising pathogenesis-related candidate genes, validated by qRT-PCR, coding for metallothionein-like protein, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, germin-like protein or 26S ribosomal RNA. Conclusion Our study identified putative candidate genes and gene expression patterns related to resistance to SCMV. Moreover, our findings support the effectiveness and reliability of the combination of different expression profiling approaches for the identification and validation of candidate genes. Genes identified in this study represent possible future targets for manipulation of SCMV resistance in maize.

  14. Recessive Resistance to Plant Viruses: Potential Resistance Genes Beyond Translation Initiation Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Hashimoto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of plant viruses to propagate their genomes in host cells depends on many host factors. In the absence of an agrochemical that specifically targets plant viral infection cycles, one of the most effective methods for controlling viral diseases in plants is taking advantage of the host plant’s resistance machinery. Recessive resistance is conferred by a recessive gene mutation that encodes a host factor critical for viral infection. It is a branch of the resistance machinery and, as an inherited characteristic, is very durable. Moreover, recessive resistance may be acquired by a deficiency in a negative regulator of plant defense responses, possibly due to the autoactivation of defense signaling. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF 4E and eIF4G and their isoforms are the most widely exploited recessive resistance genes in several crop species, and they are effective against a subset of viral species. However, the establishment of efficient, recessive resistance-type antiviral control strategies against a wider range of plant viral diseases requires genetic resources other than eIF4Es. In this review, we focus on recent advances related to antiviral recessive resistance genes evaluated in model plants and several crop species. We also address the roles of next-generation sequencing and genome editing technologies in improving plant genetic resources for recessive resistance-based antiviral breeding in various crop species.

  15. Spread of tetracycline resistance genes at a conventional dairy farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eKyselkova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics in animal husbandry contributes to the worldwide problem of increasing antibiotic resistance in animal and human pathogens. Intensive animal production is considered an important source of antibiotic resistance genes released to the environment, while the contribution of smaller farms remains to be evaluated. Here we monitor the spread of tetracycline resistance (TC-r genes at a middle-size conventional dairy farm, where chlortetracycline (CTC, as intrauterine suppository is prophylactically used after each calving. Our study has shown that animals at the farm acquired the TC-r genes in their early age (1-2 weeks, likely due to colonization with TC-resistant bacteria from their mothers and/or the farm environment. The relative abundance of the TC-r genes tet(W, tet(Q and tet(M in fresh excrements of calves was about 1-2 orders of magnitude higher compared to heifers and dairy cows, possibly due to the presence of antibiotic residues in milk fed to calves. The occurrence and abundance of TC-r genes in fresh excrements of heifers and adult cows remained unaffected by intrauterine CTC applications, with tet(O, tet(Q and tet(W representing a ‘core TC-resistome’ of the farm, and tet(A, tet(M, tet(Y and tet(X occurring occasionally. The genes tet(A, tet(M, tet(Y and tet(X were shown to be respectively harbored by Shigella, Lactobacillus and Clostridium, Acinetobacter, and Wautersiella. Soil in the farm proximity, as well as field soil to which manure from the farm was applied, was contaminated with TC-r genes occurring in the farm, and some of the TC-r genes persisted in the field over 3 months following the manure application. Concluding, our study shows that antibiotic resistance genes may be a stable part of the intestinal metagenome of cattle even if antibiotics are not used for growth stimulation, and that smaller dairy farms may also contribute to environmental pollution with antibiotic resistance genes.

  16. Antibiotic resistance and resistance genes in Escherichia coli from poultry farms, southwest Nigeria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelowo, Olawale O.; Fagade, Obasola E.; Agersø, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the mechanisms of resistance in 36 E. coli isolated from waste, litter, soil and water samples collected from poultry farms in Southwestern Nigeria. Methodology: Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions of the isolates were determined using...... the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute and resistance genes detected by PCR. Results: A total of 30 isolates (94%) showed resistance to more than one antimicrobial. Percentage resistance was: tetracycline 81%, sulphamethoxazole 67%, streptomycin 56%, trimethoprim 47 %, ciprofloxacin 42......%, ampicillin 36%, spectinomycin 28%, nalidixic acid 25%, chloramphenicol 22%, neomycin 14%, gentamicin 8%, amoxicillin-clavulanate, ceftiofur, cefotaxime, colistin, florfenicol and apramycin 0%. Resistance genes found among the isolates include bla-TEM (85%), sul2 (67%), sul3 (17%), aadA (65%), strA (70%), str...

  17. Dissemination of metal resistance genes among animal methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argudín, M Angeles; Butaye, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The use of metals as feed supplement has been recognized as a potential driver for co-selection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pigs. However, the prevalence of these determinants in methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) is largely unknown. In this study, a collection of 130 MRCoNS from pigs and veal calves were investigated for the presence of metal-resistance genes (czrC, copB, cadD, arsA) associated to SCCmec. Near half of the isolates carried metal resistance genes (czrC 5.4%, copB 38.5%, cadD 7.7%, arsA 26.2%) regardless of their SCCmec type. The increased use of metals in livestock animals, especially zinc in pigs in several European countries may co-select for methicillin-resistance in several staphylococcal species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dissection of two soybean QTL conferring partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae through sequence and gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hehe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytophthora sojae is the primary pathogen of soybeans that are grown on poorly drained soils. Race-specific resistance to P. sojae in soybean is gene-for-gene, although in many areas of the US and worldwide there are populations that have adapted to the most commonly deployed resistance to P. sojae ( Rps genes. Hence, this system has received increased attention towards identifying mechanisms and molecular markers associated with partial resistance to this pathogen. Several quantitative trait loci (QTL have been identified in the soybean cultivar ‘Conrad’ that contributes to the expression of partial resistance to multiple P. sojae isolates. Results In this study, two of the Conrad QTL on chromosome 19 were dissected through sequence and expression analysis of genes in both resistant (Conrad and susceptible (‘Sloan’ genotypes. There were 1025 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 87 of 153 genes sequenced from Conrad and Sloan. There were 304 SNPs in 54 genes sequenced from Conrad compared to those from both Sloan and Williams 82, of which 11 genes had SNPs unique to Conrad. Eleven of 19 genes in these regions analyzed with qRT-PCR had significant differences in fold change of transcript abundance in response to infection with P. sojae in lines with QTL haplotype from the resistant parent compared to those with the susceptible parent haplotype. From these, 8 of the 11 genes had SNPs in the upstream, untranslated region, exon, intron, and/or downstream region. These 11 candidate genes encode proteins potentially involved in signal transduction, hormone-mediated pathways, plant cell structural modification, ubiquitination, and basal resistance. Conclusions These findings may indicate a complex defense network with multiple mechanisms underlying these two soybean QTL conferring resistance to P. sojae. SNP markers derived from these candidate genes can contribute to fine mapping of QTL and marker assisted breeding for

  19. Pl(17) is a novel gene independent of known downy mildew resistance genes in the cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, L L; Long, Y M; Jan, C C; Ma, G J; Gulya, T J

    2015-04-01

    Pl 17, a novel downy mildew resistance gene independent of known downy mildew resistance genes in sunflowers, was genetically mapped to linkage group 4 of the sunflower genome. Downy mildew (DM), caused by Plasmopara halstedii (Farl.). Berl. et de Toni, is one of the serious sunflower diseases in the world due to its high virulence and the variability of the pathogen. DM resistance in the USDA inbred line, HA 458, has been shown to be effective against all virulent races of P. halstedii currently identified in the USA. To determine the chromosomal location of this resistance, 186 F 2:3 families derived from a cross of HA 458 with HA 234 were phenotyped for their resistance to race 734 of P. halstedii. The segregation ratio of the population supported that the resistance was controlled by a single dominant gene, Pl 17. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) primers were used to identify molecular markers linked to Pl 17. Bulked segregant analysis using 849 SSR markers located Pl 17 to linkage group (LG) 4, which is the first DM gene discovered in this linkage group. An F2 population of 186 individuals was screened with polymorphic SSR and SNP primers from LG4. Two flanking markers, SNP SFW04052 and SSR ORS963, delineated Pl 17 in an interval of 3.0 cM. The markers linked to Pl 17 were validated in a BC3 population. A search for the physical location of flanking markers in sunflower genome sequences revealed that the Pl 17 region had a recombination frequency of 0.59 Mb/cM, which was a fourfold higher recombination rate relative to the genomic average. This region can be considered amenable to molecular manipulation for further map-based cloning of Pl 17.

  20. Tagging of resistance gene(s) to rhizomania disease in sugar beet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-19

    Feb 19, 2008 ... plasmodiophoride-like fungus, Polymyxa betae Keskin. (1964) (Tamada and Richard, 1992). Source of resistance to rhizomania were found in Holly sugar beet company source (Lewellen, 1987). Resistance in Holly is simply inherited by a single dominant gene(Rz1). (Lewellen et al., 1987; Scholten et al., ...

  1. Identifying Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs and Developing Diagnostic Markers Linked to Orange Rust Resistance in Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiping Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. is an important economic crop, contributing up to 80% of table sugar used in the world and has become a promising feedstock for biofuel production. Sugarcane production has been threatened by many diseases, and fungicide applications for disease control have been opted out for sustainable agriculture. Orange rust is one of the major diseases impacting sugarcane production worldwide. Identifying quantitative trait loci (QTLs and developing diagnostic markers are valuable for breeding programs to expedite release of superior sugarcane cultivars for disease control. In this study, an F1 segregating population derived from a cross between two hybrid sugarcane clones, CP95-1039 and CP88-1762, was evaluated for orange rust resistance in replicated trails. Three QTLs controlling orange rust resistance in sugarcane (qORR109, qORR4 and qORR102 were identified for the first time ever, which can explain 58, 12 and 8% of the phenotypic variation, separately. We also characterized 1,574 sugarcane putative resistance (R genes. These sugarcane putative R genes and simple sequence repeats in the QTL intervals were further used to develop diagnostic markers for marker-assisted selection of orange rust resistance. A PCR-based Resistance gene-derived maker, G1 was developed, which showed significant association with orange rust resistance. The putative QTLs and marker developed in this study can be effectively utilized in sugarcane breeding programs to facilitate the selection process, thus contributing to the sustainable agriculture for orange rust disease control.

  2. In Silico Analysis of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in the Gut Microflora of Individuals from Diverse Geographies and Age-Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Gupta, Sourav Sen; Nair, Gopinath Balakrish; Mande, Sharmila S.

    2013-01-01

    The spread of antibiotic resistance, originating from the rampant and unrestrictive use of antibiotics in humans and livestock over the past few decades has emerged as a global health problem. This problem has been further compounded by recent reports implicating the gut microbial communities to act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance. We have profiled the presence of probable antibiotic resistance genes in the gut flora of 275 individuals from eight different nationalities. For this purpose, available metagenomic data sets corresponding to 275 gut microbiomes were analyzed. Sequence similarity searches of the genomic fragments constituting each of these metagenomes were performed against genes conferring resistance to around 240 antibiotics. Potential antibiotic resistance genes conferring resistance against 53 different antibiotics were detected in the human gut microflora analysed in this study. In addition to several geography/country-specific patterns, four distinct clusters of gut microbiomes, referred to as ‘Resistotypes’, exhibiting similarities in their antibiotic resistance profiles, were identified. Groups of antibiotics having similarities in their resistance patterns within each of these clusters were also detected. Apart from this, mobile multi-drug resistance gene operons were detected in certain gut microbiomes. The study highlighted an alarmingly high abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in two infant gut microbiomes. The results obtained in the present study presents a holistic ‘big picture’ on the spectra of antibiotic resistance within our gut microbiota across different geographies. Such insights may help in implementation of new regulations and stringency on the existing ones. PMID:24391833

  3. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Differential Gene Expression Related to Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Resistance in the Octoploid Strawberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The strawberry is an important fruit worldwide; however, the development of the strawberry industry is limited by fungal disease. Anthracnose is caused by the pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and leads to large-scale losses in strawberry quality and production. However, the transcriptional response of strawberry to infection with C. gloeosporioides is poorly understood. In the present study, the strawberry leaf transcriptome of the ‘Yanli’ and ‘Benihoppe’ cultivars were deep sequenced via an RNA-seq analysis to study C. gloeosporioides resistance in strawberry. Among the sequences, differentially expressed genes were annotated with Gene Ontology terms and subjected to pathway enrichment analysis. Significant categories included defense, plant–pathogen interactions and flavonoid biosynthesis were identified. The comprehensive transcriptome data set provides molecular insight into C. gloeosporioides resistance genes in resistant and susceptible strawberry cultivars. Our findings can enhance breeding efforts in strawberry.

  4. Characterisation of integrons and antibiotic resistance genes in Danish multiresistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, Dorthe; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1997-01-01

    The presence and genetic content of integrons was investigated in eight Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104 isolates from different pig herds in Denmark. Two different integrons were identified using PCR and sequencing. Each of the integrons carried a single resistance cassette in addition...... to the sul1 and qacE Delta 1 genes characteristic of integrons. The first integron encoded the ant (3 ")-Ia gene that specified resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin. The second contained the pse-l beta-lactamase gene. All the multiresistant strains contained both integrons. The presence of these two...... integrons did not account for the total phenotypic resistance of all the isolates and does not exclude the presence of other mobile DNA elements....

  5. Characterisation of integrons and antibiotic resistance genes in Danish multiresistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, Dorthe; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1998-01-01

    The presence and genetic content of integrons was investigated in eight Salmonella enteritica Typhimurium DT104 isolates from different pig herds in Denmark. Two different integrons were identified using PCR and sequencing. Each of the integrons carried a single resistance cassette in addition...... to the sul1 and qacE Delta 1 genes characteristic of integrons. The first integron encoded the ant (3")-Ia gene that specified resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin. The second contained the pse-1 beta-lactamase gene. All the multiresistant strains contained both integrons. The presence of these two...... integrons did not account for the total phenotypic resistance of all the isolates and does not exclude the presence of other mobile DNA elements....

  6. A rapid seedling resistance assay identifies wild tomato lines that are resistant to Psuedomonas syringe pv. tomato race 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial speck caused by Pseudomonas syringae has historically been controlled by the Pto/Prf gene cluster. Emerging strains like P. syringae pv. tomato race 1 overcome resistance conferred by Pto/Prf, and can cause serious crop loss under appropriate environmental conditions. We developed a rapid ...

  7. Prediction of novel target genes and pathways involved in irinotecan-resistant colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Precious Takondwa Makondi

    Full Text Available Acquired drug resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug irinotecan (the active metabolite of which is SN-38 is one of the significant obstacles in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC. The molecular mechanism or targets mediating irinotecan resistance are still unclear. It is urgent to find the irinotecan response biomarkers to improve CRC patients' therapy.Genetic Omnibus Database GSE42387 which contained the gene expression profiles of parental and irinotecan-resistant HCT-116 cell lines was used. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs between parental and irinotecan-resistant cells, protein-protein interactions (PPIs, gene ontologies (GOs and pathway analysis were performed to identify the overall biological changes. The most common DEGs in the PPIs, GOs and pathways were identified and were validated clinically by their ability to predict overall survival and disease free survival. The gene-gene expression correlation and gene-resistance correlation was also evaluated in CRC patients using The Cancer Genomic Atlas data (TCGA.The 135 DEGs were identified of which 36 were upregulated and 99 were down regulated. After mapping the PPI networks, the GOs and the pathways, nine genes (GNAS, PRKACB, MECOM, PLA2G4C, BMP6, BDNF, DLG4, FGF2 and FGF9 were found to be commonly enriched. Signal transduction was the most significant GO and MAPK pathway was the most significant pathway. The five genes (FGF2, FGF9, PRKACB, MECOM and PLA2G4C in the MAPK pathway were all contained in the signal transduction and the levels of those genes were upregulated. The FGF2, FGF9 and MECOM expression were highly associated with CRC patients' survival rate but not PRKACB and PLA2G4C. In addition, FGF9 was also associated with irinotecan resistance and poor disease free survival. FGF2, FGF9 and PRKACB were positively correlated with each other while MECOM correlated positively with FGF9 and PLA2G4C, and correlated negatively with FGF2 and PRKACB after doing gene-gene

  8. Survey of Candidate Genes for Maize Resistance to Infection by Aspergillus flavus and/or Aflatoxin Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Leigh K.; Tang, Juliet D.; Tomashek, John; Alves Oliveira, Dafne; Ogunola, Oluwaseun F.; Smith, J. Spencer; Williams, W. Paul

    2018-01-01

    Many projects have identified candidate genes for resistance to aflatoxin accumulation or Aspergillus flavus infection and growth in maize using genetic mapping, genomics, transcriptomics and/or proteomics studies. However, only a small percentage of these candidates have been validated in field conditions, and their relative contribution to resistance, if any, is unknown. This study presents a consolidated list of candidate genes identified in past studies or in-house studies, with descriptive data including genetic location, gene annotation, known protein identifiers, and associated pathway information, if known. A candidate gene pipeline to test the phenotypic effect of any maize DNA sequence on aflatoxin accumulation resistance was used in this study to determine any measurable effect on polymorphisms within or linked to the candidate gene sequences, and the results are published here. PMID:29385107

  9. Analysis of acetohydroxyacid synthase1 gene in chickpea conferring resistance to imazamox herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Parul; Tar'an, Bunyamin

    2014-11-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) production in the Canadian prairies is challenging due to a lack of effective weed management mainly because of poor competition ability of the crop and limited registered herbicide options. Chickpea genotype with resistance to imidazolinone (IMI) herbicides has been identified. A point mutation in the acetohydroxyacid synthase1 (AHAS1) gene at C581 to T581, resulting in an amino acid substitution from Ala194 to Val194 (position 205, standardized to arabidopsis), confers the resistance to imazamox in chickpea. However, the molecular mechanism leading to the resistance is not fully understood. In many plant species, contrasting transcription levels of AHAS gene has been implicated in the resistant and susceptible genotypes in response to IMI. The objectives of this research were to compare the AHAS gene expression and AHAS enzyme activity in resistant and susceptible chickpea cultivars in response to imazamox herbicide treatment. Results from RT-qPCR indicated that there is no significant change in the transcript levels of AHAS1 between the susceptible and the resistant genotypes in response to imazamox treatment. Protein hydrophobic cluster analysis, protein-ligand docking analysis, and AHAS enzyme activity assay all indicated that the resistance to imazamox in chickpea is due to the alteration of interaction of the AHAS1 enzyme with the imazamox herbicide.

  10. Evaluation of 19,460 Wheat Accessions Conserved in the Indian National Genebank to Identify New Sources of Resistance to Rust and Spot Blotch Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sherry R.; Srinivasan, Kalyani; Radhamani, J.; Parimalan, R.; Sivaswamy, M.; Tyagi, Sandhya; Yadav, Mamata; Kumari, Jyotisna; Deepali; Sharma, Sandeep; Bhagat, Indoo; Meeta, Madhu; Bains, N. S.; Chowdhury, A. K.; Saha, B. C.; Bhattacharya, P. M.; Kumari, Jyoti; Singh, M. C.; Gangwar, O. P.; Prasad, P.; Bharadwaj, S. C.; Gogoi, Robin; Sharma, J. B.; GM, Sandeep Kumar; Saharan, M. S.; Bag, Manas; Roy, Anirban; Prasad, T. V.; Sharma, R. K.; Dutta, M.; Sharma, Indu; Bansal, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive germplasm evaluation study of wheat accessions conserved in the Indian National Genebank was conducted to identify sources of rust and spot blotch resistance. Genebank accessions comprising three species of wheat–Triticum aestivum, T. durum and T. dicoccum were screened sequentially at multiple disease hotspots, during the 2011–14 crop seasons, carrying only resistant accessions to the next step of evaluation. Wheat accessions which were found to be resistant in the field were then assayed for seedling resistance and profiled using molecular markers. In the primary evaluation, 19,460 accessions were screened at Wellington (Tamil Nadu), a hotspot for wheat rusts. We identified 4925 accessions to be resistant and these were further evaluated at Gurdaspur (Punjab), a hotspot for stripe rust and at Cooch Behar (West Bengal), a hotspot for spot blotch. The second round evaluation identified 498 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts and 868 accessions potentially resistant to spot blotch. Evaluation of rust resistant accessions for seedling resistance against seven virulent pathotypes of three rusts under artificial epiphytotic conditions identified 137 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts. Molecular analysis to identify different combinations of genetic loci imparting resistance to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and spot blotch using linked molecular markers, identified 45 wheat accessions containing known resistance genes against all three rusts as well as a QTL for spot blotch resistance. The resistant germplasm accessions, particularly against stripe rust, identified in this study can be excellent potential candidates to be employed for breeding resistance into the background of high yielding wheat cultivars through conventional or molecular breeding approaches, and are expected to contribute toward food security at national and global levels. PMID:27942031

  11. Evaluation of 19,460 Wheat Accessions Conserved in the Indian National Genebank to Identify New Sources of Resistance to Rust and Spot Blotch Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep Kumar

    Full Text Available A comprehensive germplasm evaluation study of wheat accessions conserved in the Indian National Genebank was conducted to identify sources of rust and spot blotch resistance. Genebank accessions comprising three species of wheat-Triticum aestivum, T. durum and T. dicoccum were screened sequentially at multiple disease hotspots, during the 2011-14 crop seasons, carrying only resistant accessions to the next step of evaluation. Wheat accessions which were found to be resistant in the field were then assayed for seedling resistance and profiled using molecular markers. In the primary evaluation, 19,460 accessions were screened at Wellington (Tamil Nadu, a hotspot for wheat rusts. We identified 4925 accessions to be resistant and these were further evaluated at Gurdaspur (Punjab, a hotspot for stripe rust and at Cooch Behar (West Bengal, a hotspot for spot blotch. The second round evaluation identified 498 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts and 868 accessions potentially resistant to spot blotch. Evaluation of rust resistant accessions for seedling resistance against seven virulent pathotypes of three rusts under artificial epiphytotic conditions identified 137 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts. Molecular analysis to identify different combinations of genetic loci imparting resistance to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and spot blotch using linked molecular markers, identified 45 wheat accessions containing known resistance genes against all three rusts as well as a QTL for spot blotch resistance. The resistant germplasm accessions, particularly against stripe rust, identified in this study can be excellent potential candidates to be employed for breeding resistance into the background of high yielding wheat cultivars through conventional or molecular breeding approaches, and are expected to contribute toward food security at national and global levels.

  12. Evaluation of 19,460 Wheat Accessions Conserved in the Indian National Genebank to Identify New Sources of Resistance to Rust and Spot Blotch Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sundeep; Archak, Sunil; Tyagi, R K; Kumar, Jagdish; Vk, Vikas; Jacob, Sherry R; Srinivasan, Kalyani; Radhamani, J; Parimalan, R; Sivaswamy, M; Tyagi, Sandhya; Yadav, Mamata; Kumari, Jyotisna; Deepali; Sharma, Sandeep; Bhagat, Indoo; Meeta, Madhu; Bains, N S; Chowdhury, A K; Saha, B C; Bhattacharya, P M; Kumari, Jyoti; Singh, M C; Gangwar, O P; Prasad, P; Bharadwaj, S C; Gogoi, Robin; Sharma, J B; Gm, Sandeep Kumar; Saharan, M S; Bag, Manas; Roy, Anirban; Prasad, T V; Sharma, R K; Dutta, M; Sharma, Indu; Bansal, K C

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive germplasm evaluation study of wheat accessions conserved in the Indian National Genebank was conducted to identify sources of rust and spot blotch resistance. Genebank accessions comprising three species of wheat-Triticum aestivum, T. durum and T. dicoccum were screened sequentially at multiple disease hotspots, during the 2011-14 crop seasons, carrying only resistant accessions to the next step of evaluation. Wheat accessions which were found to be resistant in the field were then assayed for seedling resistance and profiled using molecular markers. In the primary evaluation, 19,460 accessions were screened at Wellington (Tamil Nadu), a hotspot for wheat rusts. We identified 4925 accessions to be resistant and these were further evaluated at Gurdaspur (Punjab), a hotspot for stripe rust and at Cooch Behar (West Bengal), a hotspot for spot blotch. The second round evaluation identified 498 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts and 868 accessions potentially resistant to spot blotch. Evaluation of rust resistant accessions for seedling resistance against seven virulent pathotypes of three rusts under artificial epiphytotic conditions identified 137 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts. Molecular analysis to identify different combinations of genetic loci imparting resistance to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and spot blotch using linked molecular markers, identified 45 wheat accessions containing known resistance genes against all three rusts as well as a QTL for spot blotch resistance. The resistant germplasm accessions, particularly against stripe rust, identified in this study can be excellent potential candidates to be employed for breeding resistance into the background of high yielding wheat cultivars through conventional or molecular breeding approaches, and are expected to contribute toward food security at national and global levels.

  13. Thioridazine affects transcription of genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mette; Højland, Dorte Heidi; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2011-01-01

    have previously shown that the expression of some resistance genes is abolished after treatment with thioridazine and oxacillin. To further understand the mechanism underlying the reversal of resistance, we tested the expression of genes involved in antibiotic resistance and cell wall biosynthesis...... reversal of resistance by thioridazine relies on decreased expression of specific genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis....

  14. Isolation of NBS-LRR class resistant gene (I2 gene) from tomato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2013-10-16

    Oct 16, 2013 ... Isolation of NBS-LRR class resistant gene (I2 gene) from tomato cultivar Heamsona ... avirulence protein or effector protein secreted by fungal pathogen during the host colonization in tomato. These effector proteins .... and efficient method for isolation of genomic DNA from plant tissue. J. Cell Tissue Res.

  15. The Integrative Method Based on the Module-Network for Identifying Driver Genes in Cancer Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinguo Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With advances in next-generation sequencing(NGS technologies, a large number of multiple types of high-throughput genomics data are available. A great challenge in exploring cancer progression is to identify the driver genes from the variant genes by analyzing and integrating multi-types genomics data. Breast cancer is known as a heterogeneous disease. The identification of subtype-specific driver genes is critical to guide the diagnosis, assessment of prognosis and treatment of breast cancer. We developed an integrated frame based on gene expression profiles and copy number variation (CNV data to identify breast cancer subtype-specific driver genes. In this frame, we employed statistical machine-learning method to select gene subsets and utilized an module-network analysis method to identify potential candidate driver genes. The final subtype-specific driver genes were acquired by paired-wise comparison in subtypes. To validate specificity of the driver genes, the gene expression data of these genes were applied to classify the patient samples with 10-fold cross validation and the enrichment analysis were also conducted on the identified driver genes. The experimental results show that the proposed integrative method can identify the potential driver genes and the classifier with these genes acquired better performance than with genes identified by other methods.

  16. Multiplex single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay for detection of soybean mosaic virus resistance genes in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ainong; Chen, Pengyin; Vierling, Richard; Zheng, Cuming; Li, Dexiao; Dong, Dekun; Shakiba, Ehsan; Cervantez, Innan

    2011-02-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is one of the most destructive viral diseases in soybean (Glycine max). Three independent loci for SMV resistance have been identified in soybean germplasm. The use of genetic resistance is the most effective method of controlling this disease. Marker assisted selection (MAS) has become very important and useful in the effort of selecting genes for SMV resistance. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), because of its abundance and high-throughput potential, is a powerful tool in genome mapping, association studies, diversity analysis, and tagging of important genes in plant genomics. In this study, a 10 SNPs plus one insert/deletion (InDel) multiplex assay was developed for SMV resistance: two SNPs were developed from the candidate gene 3gG2 at Rsv1 locus, two SNPs selected from the clone N11PF linked to Rsv1, one 'BARC' SNP screened from soybean chromosome 13 [linkage group (LG) F] near Rsv1, two 'BARC' SNPs from probe A519 linked to Rsv3, one 'BARC' SNP from chromosome 14 (LG B2) near Rsv3, and two 'BARC' SNPs from chromosome 2 (LG D1b) near Rsv4, plus one InDel marker from expressed sequence tag (EST) AW307114 linked to Rsv4. This 11 SNP/InDel multiplex assay showed polymorphism among 47 diverse soybean germplasm, indicating this assay can be used to investigate the mode of inheritance in a SMV resistant soybean line carrying Rsv1, Rsv3, and/or Rsv4 through a segregating population with phenotypic data, and to select a specific gene or pyramid two or three genes for SMV resistance through MAS in soybean breeding program. The presence of two SMV resistance genes (Rsv1 and Rsv3) in J05 soybean was confirmed by the SNP assay.

  17. Resistance to rust ( Puccinia psidii Winter) in eucalyptus: mode of inheritance and mapping of a major gene with RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, D T; Alfenas, A C; Brommonschenkel, S H; Oda, S; Mello, E J; Grattapaglia, D

    2003-12-01

    Rust is one of the most-damaging eucalypt diseases in Brazil and is considered a potential threat to eucalypt plantations worldwide. To determine the mode of inheritance of resistance in the Eucalyptus grandis- Puccinia psidii pathosystem, ten full-sib families, generated from crosses between susceptible and resistant trees, were inoculated with a single-pustule isolate of the pathogen and rust severity was scored. The observed segregation ratios in segregating families suggested major gene control of rust resistance, although clearly incomplete penetrance, variable expressivity and minor genes are also involved in the global rust-resistance response. To identify markers linked to the resistance locus, screening of RAPD polymorphisms was conducted using bulked segregant analysis in a large full-sib family. A linkage group was built around the Ppr1 gene ( P. psidii resistance gene 1) encompassing six RAPD markers, with a genetic window spanning 5 cM with the two most-closely linked flanking markers. Besides these two flanking markers, RAPD marker AT9/917 co-segregated with Ppr1 without a single recombinant in 994 meioses. This tightly linked marker should prove useful for marker-assisted introgression and will provide an initial lead for a positional cloning effort of this resistance allele. This is the first report of a disease resistance gene identified in Eucalyptus, and one of the few examples of the involvement of a major gene in a non-coevolved pathosystem.

  18. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses identify a role for chlorophyll catabolism and phytoalexin during Medicago nonhost resistance against Asian soybean rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Gill, Upinder S; Huhman, David; Tang, Yuhong; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2015-08-12

    Asian soybean rust (ASR) caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a devastating foliar disease affecting soybean production worldwide. Understanding nonhost resistance against ASR may provide an avenue to engineer soybean to confer durable resistance against ASR. We characterized a Medicago truncatula-ASR pathosystem to study molecular mechanisms of nonhost resistance. Although urediniospores formed appressoria and penetrated into epidermal cells of M. truncatula, P. pachyrhizi failed to sporulate. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the induction of phenylpropanoid, flavonoid and isoflavonoid metabolic pathway genes involved in the production of phytoalexin medicarpin in M. truncatula upon infection with P. pachyrhizi. Furthermore, genes involved in chlorophyll catabolism were induced during nonhost resistance. We further characterized one of the chlorophyll catabolism genes, Stay-green (SGR), and demonstrated that the M. truncatula sgr mutant and alfalfa SGR-RNAi lines showed hypersensitive-response-like enhanced cell death upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. Consistent with transcriptomic analysis, metabolomic analysis also revealed the accumulation of medicarpin and its intermediate metabolites. In vitro assay showed that medicarpin inhibited urediniospore germination and differentiation. In addition, several triterpenoid saponin glycosides accumulated in M. truncatula upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. In summary, using multi-omic approaches, we identified a correlation between phytoalexin production and M. truncatula defense responses against ASR.

  19. Antibiotic resistance and ndvB gene expression among biofilm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel antibiotic resistant mechanism among biofilms is glucan-mediated sequestration in which ndvB gene encodes a glucosyltransferase involved in the formation of this glucans. We studied the biofilm formation and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical samples, and measured the ...

  20. Gene pyramiding as a Bt resistance management strategy: How ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reports on the emergence of insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis delta endotoxins have raised doubts on the sustainability of Bt-toxin based pest management technologies. Corporate industry has responded to this challenge with innovations that include gene pyramiding among others. Pyramiding entails stacking ...

  1. Determination and expression of genes for resistance to blast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination and expression of genes for resistance to blast (Magnaporthe oryza) in Basmati and non-Basmati indica rices (Oryza sativa L.) Naveen Kumar, D Singh, S Gupta, A Sirohi, B Ramesh, Preeti Sirohi, Parul Sirohi, Atar Singh, N Kumar, A Kumar, Rajendra Kumar, R Kumar, J Singh, P. Kumar, P. Chauhan, ...

  2. Gene interactions and genetics of blast resistance and yield ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-08-11

    Aug 11, 2014 ... Keywords. blast; gene action; generation mean analysis; resistance; yield. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 93, No. .... Utilizing the variance of different generations, the variances of A, B, C and D scales were ...... Jia Y. 2003 Marker assisted selection for the control of rice blast disease. Pesticide Outlook 14 ...

  3. Evaluating antibiotic resistance genes in soils with applied manures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are commonly used in livestock production to promote growth and combat disease. Recent studies have shown the potential for spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) to the environment following application of livestock manures. In this study, concentrations of bacteria with ARG in soi...

  4. Absence of meca gene in methicillin-resistant staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a serious threat to public health, causing both hospital and community-associated infections. The gold standard for MRSA detection is the amplification of the mecA gene that codes for the production of the altered penicillin-binding protein (PBP2a) responsible for ...

  5. Molecular Detection of Virulence Genes and Antibiotic Resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an important food-borne pathogen that can cause diarrhea, haemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uremic syndrome. This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence, virulence genes and antibiotic resistance patterns of E. coli O157:H7 in raw beef meat sold in Abeokuta, South west Nigeria ...

  6. Molecular detection of disease resistance genes to powdery mildew ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2017-01-04

    Jan 4, 2017 ... 2. State Key Laboratory of Biology for Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of. Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China. Received 10 October, 2016; Accepted 14 December, 2016. A study was conducted to detect the presence of disease resistance genes to ...

  7. Cloning of a carbendazim-resistant gene from Colletotrichum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cloning of a carbendazim-resistant gene from Colletotrichum gloeosporioides of mango in South China. ... Abstract. Mango anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is an important disease and prevalent in tropical regions of China. High carbendazim ... employed to further test the above results. It involved an ...

  8. Cloning and characterization of NBS-LRR resistance gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    biotech

    2013-07-03

    Jul 3, 2013 ... Resistance genes honologues I theobroma cacao as useful genetic markers. Theor. Appl. Gent. 107:191-202. Kumar S, Tamura K, Nei M (2004). MEGA3: integrated software for molecular evolutionary genetics analysis and sequence alignment. Brief Bioinform. 5:150-163. Lacock L, Niekerk CV, Loots S, ...

  9. Cloning and characterization of NBS-LRR resistance gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    biotech

    2013-07-03

    Jul 3, 2013 ... Full Length Research Paper. Cloning and characterization of NBS-LRR resistance gene analogues of Musa spp. and their expression profiling studies against Pratylenchus coffeae. S. Backiyarani*, S. Uma, G. Arunkumar, M. S. Saraswathi and P. Sundararaju. National Research Centre for Banana (ICAR), ...

  10. Prevalence, antibiotic-resistance properties and enterotoxin gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    milk-based infant foods in Iran, represent an important public health issue which should be considered ... Keywords: Prevalence, Bacillus cereus, Antibiotic resistance, Enterotoxigenic genes, Milk-based infant food. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science ..... and cereals collected in Korea.

  11. Codon-optimized antibiotic resistance gene improves efficiency of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We generated a synthetic gentamicin resistance gene whose codon usage is optimized to Frankia (fgmR) and evaluated its usefulness as a selection marker using a transient transformation system. Success rate of transient transformation and cell growth in selective culture were significantly increased by use of fgmR ...

  12. Resistance-related gene transcription and antioxidant enzyme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The two tobacco relatives of Nicotiana alata and Nicotiana longiflora display a high level of resistance against Colletotrichum nicotianae and the two genes NTF6 and NtPAL related to pathogen defense transcription were higher in N. alata and N. longiflora than the commercial cv. K326. Inoculation with C. nicotianae ...

  13. Genetic analysis and location of a resistance gene to Puccinia ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Electrophoresis was carried out at 1400. V for 1.0 - 1.5 h. Gel staining and visualization was done as previously described (Chen et al. 1998). Polymorphic markers were used to genotype the F2 population. Genotype data were used to construct a genetic map and locate the resistance gene. Mapping and Data analysis.

  14. ( Euphausia superba ) transcriptome to identify function genes and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MA

    database, Superba SE, was described by Hunt et al (2017) and KrillDB was developed (Sales et al., 2017) for purpose of free accession to annotation information for users. However, the availability of molecular data concerning function genes, microsatellites, and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in E. superba is still ...

  15. ( Euphausia superba ) transcriptome to identify function genes and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MA

    Further analysis produced 106,250 unigenes, of which. 31,683 were annotated based on protein homology searches against protein databases. Gene. Ontology (GO) analysis showed that Ion binding, organic substance metabolic process, and cell part were the most abundant terms in molecular function, biological process ...

  16. Transposon-tagging identifies novel pathogenicity genes in Fusarium graminearum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufresne, M.; Lee, van der T.A.J.; M'Barek, Ben S.; Xu, X.; Zhang, X.; Kema, G.H.J.; Daboussi, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    With the increase of sequenced fungal genomes, high-throughput methods for functional analyses of genes are needed. We assessed the potential of a new transposon mutagenesis tool deploying a Fusarium oxysporum miniature inverted-repeat transposable element mimp1, mobilized by the transposase of

  17. Allelic polymorphism of 'Makoei' sheep myostatin gene identified by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-05

    Sep 5, 2011 ... Key words: Myostatin gene, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), single strand conformation polymorphism technique (SSCP), Ovis aries. ..... Kambadur R, Sharmam M, Smith TPL, Bass JJ (1997). Mutations In. Myostatin (GDF8) In Double-Muscled Belgian Blue And Piemontese. Cattle. Genome. Res., 7: ...

  18. Allelic polymorphism of Makoei sheep leptin gene identified by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-05

    Dec 5, 2011 ... intake, energy expenditure and whole-body energy balance in animals. In the present study, the polymorphism of the leptin gene (LEP) of Makoei sheep was investigated by polymerase chain reaction and single strand conformation polymorphism technique (PCR–SSCP). Genomic DNA was extracted.

  19. Postulation of rust resistance genes in Nordic spring wheat genotypes and identification of widely effective sources of resistance against the Australian rust flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Mandeep; Bansal, Urmil; Lillemo, Morten; Miah, Hanif; Bariana, Harbans

    2016-11-01

    Wild relatives, landraces and cultivars from different geographical regions have been demonstrated as the sources of genetic variation for resistance to rust diseases. This study involved assessment of diversity for resistance to three rust diseases among a set of Nordic spring wheat cultivars. These cultivars were tested at the seedling stage against several pathotypes of three rust pathogens in the greenhouse. All stage stem rust resistance genes Sr7b, Sr8a, Sr12, Sr15, Sr17, Sr23 and Sr30, and leaf rust resistance genes Lr1, Lr3a, Lr13, Lr14a, Lr16 and Lr20 were postulated either singly or in different combinations among these cultivars. A high proportion of cultivars were identified to carry linked rust resistance genes Sr15 and Lr20. Although 51 cultivars showed variation against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) pathotypes used in this study, results were not clearly contrasting to enable postulation of stripe rust resistance genes in these genotypes. Stripe rust resistance gene Yr27 was postulated in four cultivars and Yr1 was present in cultivar Zebra. Cultivar Tjalve produced low stripe rust response against all Pst pathotypes indicating the presence either of a widely effective resistance gene or combination of genes with compensating pathogenic specificities. Several cultivars carried moderate to high level of APR to leaf rust and stripe rust. Seedling stem rust susceptible cultivar Aston exhibited moderately resistant to moderately susceptible response, whereas other cultivars belonging to this class were rated moderately susceptible or higher. Molecular markers linked with APR genes Yr48, Lr34/Yr18/Sr57, Lr68 and Sr2 detected the presence of these genes in some genotypes.

  20. Functional screening of antibiotic resistance genes from human gut microbiota reveals a novel gene fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gong; Hu, Yongfei; Yin, Yeshi; Yang, Xi; Xiang, Chunsheng; Wang, Baohong; Chen, Yanfei; Yang, Fengling; Lei, Fang; Wu, Na; Lu, Na; Li, Jing; Chen, Quanze; Li, Lanjuan; Zhu, Baoli

    2012-11-01

    The human gut microbiota has a high density of bacteria that are considered a reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, one fosmid metagenomic library generated from the gut microbiota of four healthy humans was used to screen for ARGs against seven antibiotics. Eight new ARGs were obtained: one against amoxicillin, six against d-cycloserine, and one against kanamycin. The new amoxicillin resistance gene encodes a protein with 53% identity to a class D β-lactamase from Riemerella anatipestifer RA-GD. The six new d-cycloserine resistance genes encode proteins with 73-81% identity to known d-alanine-d-alanine ligases. The new kanamycin resistance gene encodes a protein of 274 amino acids with an N-terminus (amino acids 1-189) that has 42% identity to the 6'-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase [AAC(6')] from Enterococcus hirae and a C-terminus (amino acids 190-274) with 35% identity to a hypothetical protein from Clostridiales sp. SSC/2. A functional study on the novel kanamycin resistance gene showed that only the N-terminus conferred kanamycin resistance. Our results showed that functional metagenomics is a useful tool for the identification of new ARGs. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Genomic and Transcriptomic Associations Identify a New Insecticide Resistance Phenotype for the Selective Sweep at the Cyp6g1 Locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Battlay

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Scans of the Drosophila melanogaster genome have identified organophosphate resistance loci among those with the most pronounced signature of positive selection. In this study, the molecular basis of resistance to the organophosphate insecticide azinphos-methyl was investigated using the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, and genome-wide association. Recently released full transcriptome data were used to extend the utility of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel resource beyond traditional genome-wide association studies to allow systems genetics analyses of phenotypes. We found that both genomic and transcriptomic associations independently identified Cyp6g1, a gene involved in resistance to DDT and neonicotinoid insecticides, as the top candidate for azinphos-methyl resistance. This was verified by transgenically overexpressing Cyp6g1 using natural regulatory elements from a resistant allele, resulting in a 6.5-fold increase in resistance. We also identified four novel candidate genes associated with azinphos-methyl resistance, all of which are involved in either regulation of fat storage, or nervous system development. In Cyp6g1, we find a demonstrable resistance locus, a verification that transcriptome data can be used to identify variants associated with insecticide resistance, and an overlap between peaks of a genome-wide association study, and a genome-wide selective sweep analysis.

  2. Genomic and Transcriptomic Associations Identify a New Insecticide Resistance Phenotype for the Selective Sweep at the Cyp6g1 Locus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battlay, Paul; Schmidt, Joshua M; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Robin, Charles

    2016-08-09

    Scans of the Drosophila melanogaster genome have identified organophosphate resistance loci among those with the most pronounced signature of positive selection. In this study, the molecular basis of resistance to the organophosphate insecticide azinphos-methyl was investigated using the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, and genome-wide association. Recently released full transcriptome data were used to extend the utility of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel resource beyond traditional genome-wide association studies to allow systems genetics analyses of phenotypes. We found that both genomic and transcriptomic associations independently identified Cyp6g1, a gene involved in resistance to DDT and neonicotinoid insecticides, as the top candidate for azinphos-methyl resistance. This was verified by transgenically overexpressing Cyp6g1 using natural regulatory elements from a resistant allele, resulting in a 6.5-fold increase in resistance. We also identified four novel candidate genes associated with azinphos-methyl resistance, all of which are involved in either regulation of fat storage, or nervous system development. In Cyp6g1, we find a demonstrable resistance locus, a verification that transcriptome data can be used to identify variants associated with insecticide resistance, and an overlap between peaks of a genome-wide association study, and a genome-wide selective sweep analysis. Copyright © 2016 Battlay et al.

  3. Gene expression profile is associated with chemoradiation resistance in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, G A; Chen, Y; Dejulius, K; Mace, A G; Barnholtz-Sloan, J; Kalady, M F

    2014-01-01

    Patients with rectal cancer who achieve a complete pathological response after preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) have an improved oncological outcome. Identifying factors associated with a lack of response could help our understanding of the underlying biology of treatment resistance. This study aimed to develop a gene expression signature for CRT-resistant rectal cancer using high-throughput nucleotide microarrays. Pretreatment biopsies of rectal adenocarcinomas were prospectively collected and freshly frozen according to an institutional review board-approved protocol. Total tumour mRNA was extracted and gene expression levels were measured using microarrays. Patients underwent proctectomy after completing standard long-course CRT and the resected specimens were graded for treatment response. Gene expression profiles for nonresponders were compared with those of responders. Differentially expressed genes were analyzed for functional significance using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software. Thirty-three patients treated between 2006 and 2009 were included. We derived 812-gene and 183-gene signatures separating nonresponders from responders. The classifiers were able to identify nonresponders with a sensitivity and specificity of 100% using the 812-gene signature, and sensitivity and specificity of 33% and 100% using the 183-gene signature. IPA canonical pathway analysis revealed a significant ratio of differentially expressed genes in the 'DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination' pathway. Certain rectal cancer gene profiles are associated with poor response to CRT. Alterations in the DNA double-strand break repair pathway could contribute to treatment resistance and provides an opportunity for further studies. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. Effects of ultraviolet disinfection on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli from wastewater: inactivation, antibiotic resistance profiles and antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong-Miao; Xu, Li-Mei; Wang, Xiaochang C; Zhuang, Kai; Liu, Qiang-Qiang

    2017-04-29

    To evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) disinfection on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli). Antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains were isolated from a wastewater treatment plant and subjected to UV disinfection. The effect of UV disinfection on the antibiotic resistance profiles and the antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of antibiotic-resistant E. coli was evaluated by a combination of antibiotic susceptibility analysis and molecular methods. Results indicated that multiple-antibiotic-resistant (MAR) E. coli were more resistant at low UV doses and required a higher UV dose (20 mJ cm -2 ) to enter the tailing phase compared with those of antibiotic-sensitive E. coli (8 mJ cm -2 ). UV disinfection caused a selective change in the inhibition zone diameters of surviving antibiotic-resistant E. coli and a slight damage to ARGs. The inhibition zone diameters of the strains resistant to antibiotics were more difficult to alter than those susceptible to antibiotics because of the existence and persistence of corresponding ARGs. The resistance of MAR bacteria to UV disinfection at low UV doses and the changes in inhibition zone diameters could potentially contribute to the selection of ARB in wastewater treatment after UV disinfection. The risk of spread of antibiotic resistance still exists owing to the persistence of ARGs. Our study highlights the acquisition of other methods to control the spread of ARGs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Bacteria from Animals as a Pool of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argudín, Maria Angeles; Deplano, Ariane; Meghraoui, Alaeddine; Dodémont, Magali; Heinrichs, Amelie; Denis, Olivier; Nonhoff, Claire; Roisin, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents are used in both veterinary and human medicine. The intensive use of antimicrobials in animals may promote the fixation of antimicrobial resistance genes in bacteria, which may be zoonotic or capable to transfer these genes to human-adapted pathogens or to human gut microbiota via direct contact, food or the environment. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the use of antimicrobial agents in animal health and explores the role of bacteria from animals as a pool of antimicrobial resistance genes for human bacteria. This review focused in relevant examples within the ESC(K)APE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile (Klebsiella pneumoniae), Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae) group of bacterial pathogens that are the leading cause of nosocomial infections throughout the world. PMID:28587316

  6. IMA: Identifying disease-related genes using MeSH terms and association rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongwoo; Bang, Changbae; Hwang, Hyeonseo; Kim, Doyoung; Park, Chihyun; Park, Sanghyun

    2017-12-01

    Genes play an important role in several diseases. Hence, in biology, identifying relationships between diseases and genes is important for the analysis of diseases, because mutated or dysregulated genes play an important role in pathogenesis. Here, we propose a method to identify disease-related genes using MeSH terms and association rules. We identified genes by analyzing the MeSH terms and extracted information on gene-gene interactions based on association rules. By integrating the extracted interactions, we constructed gene-gene networks and identified disease-related genes. We applied the proposed method to study five cancers, including prostate, lung, breast, stomach, and colorectal cancer, and demonstrated that the proposed method is more useful for identifying disease-related and candidate disease-related genes than previously published methods. In this study, we identified 20 genes for each disease. Among them, we presented 34 important candidate genes with evidence that supports the relationship of the candidate genes with diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sparse canonical correlation analysis for identifying, connecting and completing gene-expression networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwinderman Aeilko H

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We generalized penalized canonical correlation analysis for analyzing microarray gene-expression measurements for checking completeness of known metabolic pathways and identifying candidate genes for incorporation in the pathway. We used Wold's method for calculation of the canonical variates, and we applied ridge penalization to the regression of pathway genes on canonical variates of the non-pathway genes, and the elastic net to the regression of non-pathway genes on the canonical variates of the pathway genes. Results We performed a small simulation to illustrate the model's capability to identify new candidate genes to incorporate in the pathway: in our simulations it appeared that a gene was correctly identified if the correlation with the pathway genes was 0.3 or more. We applied the methods to a gene-expression microarray data set of 12, 209 genes measured in 45 patients with glioblastoma, and we considered genes to incorporate in the glioma-pathway: we identified more than 25 genes that correlated > 0.9 with canonical variates of the pathway genes. Conclusion We concluded that penalized canonical correlation analysis is a powerful tool to identify candidate genes in pathway analysis.

  8. Antibiotic discovery throughout the Small World Initiative: A molecular strategy to identify biosynthetic gene clusters involved in antagonistic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elizabeth; Sloan, Tyler; Aurelius, Krista; Barbour, Angela; Bodey, Elijah; Clark, Brigette; Dennis, Celeste; Drown, Rachel; Fleming, Megan; Humbert, Allison; Glasgo, Elizabeth; Kerns, Trent; Lingro, Kelly; McMillin, MacKenzie; Meyer, Aaron; Pope, Breanna; Stalevicz, April; Steffen, Brittney; Steindl, Austin; Williams, Carolyn; Wimberley, Carmen; Zenas, Robert; Butela, Kristen; Wildschutte, Hans

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of bacterial pathogens resistant to all known antibiotics is a global health crisis. Adding to this problem is that major pharmaceutical companies have shifted away from antibiotic discovery due to low profitability. As a result, the pipeline of new antibiotics is essentially dry and many bacteria now resist the effects of most commonly used drugs. To address this global health concern, citizen science through the Small World Initiative (SWI) was formed in 2012. As part of SWI, students isolate bacteria from their local environments, characterize the strains, and assay for antibiotic production. During the 2015 fall semester at Bowling Green State University, students isolated 77 soil-derived bacteria and genetically characterized strains using the 16S rRNA gene, identified strains exhibiting antagonistic activity, and performed an expanded SWI workflow using transposon mutagenesis to identify a biosynthetic gene cluster involved in toxigenic compound production. We identified one mutant with loss of antagonistic activity and through subsequent whole-genome sequencing and linker-mediated PCR identified a 24.9 kb biosynthetic gene locus likely involved in inhibitory activity in that mutant. Further assessment against human pathogens demonstrated the inhibition of Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the presence of this compound, thus supporting our molecular strategy as an effective research pipeline for SWI antibiotic discovery and genetic characterization. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Detection of the florfenicol resistance gene floR in Chryseobacterium isolates from rainbow trout. Exception to the general rule?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verner-Jeffreys, David W; Brazier, Thomas; Perez, Ramon Y; Ryder, David; Card, Roderick M; Welch, Timothy J; Hoare, Rowena; Ngo, Thao; McLaren, Nikki; Ellis, Richard; Bartie, Kerry L; Feist, Stephen W; Rowe, William M P; Adams, Alexandra; Thompson, Kim D

    2017-04-01

    Bacteria from the family Flavobacteriaceae often show low susceptibility to antibiotics. With the exception of two Chryseobacterium spp. isolates that were positive for the florfenicol resistance gene floR, no clinical resistance genes were identified by microarray in 36 Flavobacteriaceae isolates from salmonid fish that could grow in ≥ 4 mg/L florfenicol. Whole genome sequence analysis of the floR positive isolates revealed the presence of a region that contained the antimicrobial resistance genes floR, a tet(X) tetracycline resistance gene, a streptothricin resistance gene and a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. In silico analysis of 377 published genomes for Flavobacteriaceae isolates from a range of sources confirmed that well-characterised resistance gene cassettes were not widely distributed in bacteria from this group. Efflux pump-mediated decreased susceptibility to a range of antimicrobials was confirmed in both floR positive isolates using an efflux pump inhibitor (phenylalanine-arginine β-naphthylamide) assay. The floR isolates possessed putative virulence factors, including production of siderophores and haemolysins, and were mildly pathogenic in rainbow trout. Results support the suggestion that, despite the detection of floR, susceptibility to antimicrobials in Flavobacteriaceae is mostly mediated via intrinsic mechanisms rather than the horizontally acquired resistance genes more normally associated with Gram-negative bacterial pathogens such as Enterobacteriaceae. © Crown copyright 2017.

  10. Targeted next-generation sequencing identification of mutations in disease resistance gene anologs (RGAs) in wild and cultivated beets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance gene analogs (RGAs) were searched bioinformatically in the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) genome as potential candidates for improving resistance against different diseases. In the present study, Ion Torrent sequencing technology was used to identify mutations in 21 RGAs. The DNA samples o...

  11. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of alien introgressions with gene Fhb3 for resistance to Fusarium head blight disease of wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance was identified in the alien species Leymus racemosus, and wheat-Leymus introgression lines with FHB resistance were reported previously. Detailed molecular cytogenetic analysis of alien introgressions T01, T09, and T14 and the mapping of Fhb3, a new gene for FHB...

  12. The LBP Gene and Its Association with Resistance to Aeromonas hydrophila in Tilapia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Gui Hong; Liu, Feng; Xia, Jun Hong; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to pathogens is important for the sustainability and profitability of food fish production. In immune-related genes, the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) gene is an important mediator of the inflammatory reaction. We analyzed the cDNA and genomic structure of the LBP gene in tilapia. The full-length cDNA (1901 bp) of the gene contained a 1416 bp open reading frame, encoding 471 amino acid residues. Its genomic sequence was 5577 bp, comprising 15 exons and 14 introns. Under normal conditions, the gene was constitutively expressed in all examined tissues. The highest expression was detected in intestine and kidney. We examined the responses of the gene to challenges with two bacterial pathogens Streptcoccus agalactiae and Aeromonas hydrophila. The gene was significantly upregulated in kidney and spleen post-infection with S. agalactiae and A. hydrophila, respectively. However, the expression profiles of the gene after the challenge with the two pathogens were different. Furthermore, we identified three SNPs in the gene. There were significant associations (p tilapia resistant to A. hydrophila. PMID:25470022

  13. GmSGT1 is differently required for soybean Rps genes-mediated and basal resistance to Phytophthora sojae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiang; Cui, Xiaoxia; Su, Liming; Xu, Na; Guo, Na; Xing, Han; Dou, Daolong

    2014-08-01

    Using RNAi approach, we demonstrate that GmSGT1 is an essential component in soybean against Phytophthora sojae, but not required for Rps 2 or Rps 3a-mediated resistance. Utilization of disease resistance in soybean is a major approach to combat root and stem rot disease, which is caused by Phytophthora sojae and poses a growing threat to soybean safety production. The SGT1 protein is essential for disease resistance in many plant species. Here, we analyzed and characterized functions of GmSGT1 gene family in R protein-mediated resistance and basal defense in this important crop. Five candidate genes of GmSGT1 were identified and they were grouped into three clades. Transcriptional levels of all the tested genes were highly induced upon P. sojae infection in four soybean cultivars that confer different resistant levels. Using a gene silencing system in soybean cotyledons, we demonstrated that silencing GmSGT1 genes comprised race-specific resistance in soybean lines carrying genes at the following loci for race-specific resistance to P. sojae: Rps1a, Rps1c, Rps1d, Rps1k, and Rps8. In contrast, the resistance mediated by Rps2 or Rps3a was not affected. Silencing GmSGT1 genes in cotyledons also reduced resistance to this pathogen in a moderately partial resistant cultivar. We further showed that transient overexpression of GmSGT1-1 in Nicotiana benthamiana could enhance the resistance to P. capsici. These results suggest that GmSGT1 is an essential component for soybean in resisting the pathogen and pathways of Rps-mediated disease resistance are diverse in soybean.

  14. Antibiotic-resistant genes and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the effluent of urban residential areas, hospitals, and a municipal wastewater treatment plant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianan; Cheng, Weixiao; Xu, Like; Strong, P J; Chen, Hong

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we determined the abundance of 8 antibiotics (3 tetracyclines, 4 sulfonamides, and 1 trimethoprim), 12 antibiotic-resistant genes (10 tet, 2 sul), 4 antibiotic-resistant bacteria (tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, and combined resistance), and class 1 integron integrase gene (intI1) in the effluent of residential areas, hospitals, and municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) systems. The concentrations of total/individual targets (antibiotics, genes, and bacteria) varied remarkably among different samples, but the hospital samples generally had a lower abundance than the residential area samples. The WWTP demonstrated removal efficiencies of 50.8% tetracyclines, 66.8% sulfonamides, 0.5 logs to 2.5 logs tet genes, and less than 1 log of sul and intI1 genes, as well as 0.5 log to 1 log removal for target bacteria. Except for the total tetracycline concentration and the proportion of tetracycline-resistant bacteria (R (2) = 0.330, P antibiotics and the corresponding resistant bacteria (P > 0.05). In contrast, various relationships were identified between antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (P antibiotic-resistant bacteria (P < 0.01).

  15. NMR Spectroscopy Identifies Metabolites Translocated from Powdery Mildew Resistant Rootstocks to Susceptible Watermelon Scions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Iqbal; Kousik, Chandrasekar; Hassell, Richard; Chowdhury, Kamal; Boroujerdi, Arezue F

    2015-09-16

    Powdery mildew (PM) disease causes significant loss in watermelon. Due to the unavailability of a commercial watermelon variety that is resistant to PM, grafting susceptible cultivars on wild resistant rootstocks is being explored as a short-term management strategy to combat this disease. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolic profiles of susceptible and resistant rootstocks of watermelon and their corresponding susceptible scions (Mickey Lee) were compared to screen for potential metabolites related to PM resistance using multivariate principal component analysis. Significant score plot differences between the susceptible and resistant groups were revealed through Mahalanobis distance analysis. Significantly different spectral buckets and their corresponding metabolites (including choline, fumarate, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetate, and melatonin) have been identified quantitatively using multivariate loading plots and verified by volcano plot analyses. The data suggest that these metabolites were translocated from the powdery mildew resistant rootstocks to their corresponding powdery mildew susceptible scions and can be related to PM disease resistance.

  16. Comparative Genomics of Non-TNL Disease Resistance Genes from Six Plant Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, Madhav P; Andersen, Ethan J; Neupane, Surendra; Benson, Benjamin V

    2017-09-30

    Disease resistance genes (R genes), as part of the plant defense system, have coevolved with corresponding pathogen molecules. The main objectives of this project were to identify non-Toll interleukin receptor, nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich repeat (nTNL) genes and elucidate their evolutionary divergence across six plant genomes. Using reference sequences from Arabidopsis , we investigated nTNL orthologs in the genomes of common bean, Medicago , soybean, poplar, and rice. We used Hidden Markov Models for sequence identification, performed model-based phylogenetic analyses, visualized chromosomal positioning, inferred gene clustering, and assessed gene expression profiles. We analyzed 908 nTNL R genes in the genomes of the six plant species, and classified them into 12 subgroups based on the presence of coiled-coil (CC), nucleotide binding site (NBS), leucine rich repeat (LRR), resistance to Powdery mildew 8 (RPW8), and BED type zinc finger domains. Traditionally classified CC-NBS-LRR (CNL) genes were nested into four clades (CNL A-D) often with abundant, well-supported homogeneous subclades of Type-II R genes. CNL-D members were absent in rice, indicating a unique R gene retention pattern in the rice genome. Genomes from Arabidopsis , common bean, poplar and soybean had one chromosome without any CNL R genes. Medicago and Arabidopsis had the highest and lowest number of gene clusters, respectively. Gene expression analyses suggested unique patterns of expression for each of the CNL clades. Differential gene expression patterns of the nTNL genes were often found to correlate with number of introns and GC content, suggesting structural and functional divergence.

  17. Comparative Genomics of Non-TNL Disease Resistance Genes from Six Plant Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav P. Nepal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Disease resistance genes (R genes, as part of the plant defense system, have coevolved with corresponding pathogen molecules. The main objectives of this project were to identify non-Toll interleukin receptor, nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich repeat (nTNL genes and elucidate their evolutionary divergence across six plant genomes. Using reference sequences from Arabidopsis, we investigated nTNL orthologs in the genomes of common bean, Medicago, soybean, poplar, and rice. We used Hidden Markov Models for sequence identification, performed model-based phylogenetic analyses, visualized chromosomal positioning, inferred gene clustering, and assessed gene expression profiles. We analyzed 908 nTNL R genes in the genomes of the six plant species, and classified them into 12 subgroups based on the presence of coiled-coil (CC, nucleotide binding site (NBS, leucine rich repeat (LRR, resistance to Powdery mildew 8 (RPW8, and BED type zinc finger domains. Traditionally classified CC-NBS-LRR (CNL genes were nested into four clades (CNL A-D often with abundant, well-supported homogeneous subclades of Type-II R genes. CNL-D members were absent in rice, indicating a unique R gene retention pattern in the rice genome. Genomes from Arabidopsis, common bean, poplar and soybean had one chromosome without any CNL R genes. Medicago and Arabidopsis had the highest and lowest number of gene clusters, respectively. Gene expression analyses suggested unique patterns of expression for each of the CNL clades. Differential gene expression patterns of the nTNL genes were often found to correlate with number of introns and GC content, suggesting structural and functional divergence.

  18. RNA-seq analyses of changes in the Anopheles gambiae transcriptome associated with resistance to pyrethroids in Kenya: identification of candidate-resistance genes and candidate-resistance SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Ochomo, Eric; Dunn, William Augustine; Britton, Monica; Afrane, Yaw; Zhou, Guofa; Hartsel, Joshua; Lee, Ming-Chieh; Xu, Jiabao; Githeko, Andrew; Fass, Joseph; Yan, Guiyun

    2015-09-17

    The extensive use of pyrethroids for control of malaria vectors, driven by their cost, efficacy and safety, has led to widespread resistance. To favor their sustainable use, the World Health Organization (WHO) formulated an insecticide resistance management plan, which includes the identification of the mechanisms of resistance and resistance surveillance. Recognized physiological mechanisms of resistance include target site mutations in the para voltage-gated sodium channel, metabolic detoxification and penetration resistance. Such understanding of resistance mechanisms has allowed the development of resistance monitoring tools, including genotyping of the kdr mutation L1014F/S in the para gene. The sequence-based technique RNA-seq was applied to study changes in the transcriptome of deltamethrin-resistant and -susceptible Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes from the Western Province of Kenya. The resulting gene expression profiles were compared to data in the most recent literature to derive a list of candidate resistance genes. RNA-seq data were analyzed also to identify sequence polymorphisms linked to resistance. A total of five candidate-resistance genes (AGAP04177, AGAP004572, AGAP008840, AGAP007530 and AGAP013036) were identified with altered expression between resistant and susceptible mosquitoes from West and East Africa. A change from G to C at position 36043997 of chromosome 3R resulting in A101G of the sulfotransferase gene AGAP009551 was significantly associated with the resistance phenotype (odds ratio: 5.10). The kdr L1014S mutation was detected at similar frequencies in both phenotypically resistant and susceptible mosquitoes, suggesting it is no longer fully predictive of the resistant phenotype. Overall, these results support the conclusion that resistance to pyrethroids is a complex and evolving phenotype, dependent on multiple gene functions including, but not limited to, metabolic detoxification. Functional convergence among metabolic detoxification

  19. Genes involved in arsenic transformation and resistance associated with different levels of arsenic-contaminated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Gejiao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is known as a toxic metalloid, which primarily exists in inorganic form [As(III and As(V] and can be transformed by microbial redox processes in the natural environment. As(III is much more toxic and mobile than As(V, hence microbial arsenic redox transformation has a major impact on arsenic toxicity and mobility which can greatly influence the human health. Our main purpose was to investigate the distribution and diversity of microbial arsenite-resistant species in three different arsenic-contaminated soils, and further study the As(III resistance levels and related functional genes of these species. Results A total of 58 arsenite-resistant bacteria were identified from soils with three different arsenic-contaminated levels. Highly arsenite-resistant bacteria (MIC > 20 mM were only isolated from the highly arsenic-contaminated site and belonged to Acinetobacter, Agrobacterium, Arthrobacter, Comamonas, Rhodococcus, Stenotrophomonas and Pseudomonas. Five arsenite-oxidizing bacteria that belonged to Achromobacter, Agrobacterium and Pseudomonas were identified and displayed a higher average arsenite resistance level than the non-arsenite oxidizers. 5 aoxB genes encoding arsenite oxidase and 51 arsenite transporter genes [18 arsB, 12 ACR3(1 and 21 ACR3(2] were successfully amplified from these strains using PCR with degenerate primers. The aoxB genes were specific for the arsenite-oxidizing bacteria. Strains containing both an arsenite oxidase gene (aoxB and an arsenite transporter gene (ACR3 or arsB displayed a higher average arsenite resistance level than those possessing an arsenite transporter gene only. Horizontal transfer of ACR3(2 and arsB appeared to have occurred in strains that were primarily isolated from the highly arsenic-contaminated soil. Conclusion Soils with long-term arsenic contamination may result in the evolution of highly diverse arsenite-resistant bacteria and such diversity was probably caused in

  20. Functional study of the novel multidrug resistance gene HA117 and its comparison to multidrug resistance gene 1

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    Chen Tingfu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The novel gene HA117 is a multidrug resistance (MDR gene expressed by all-trans retinoic acid-resistant HL-60 cells. In the present study, we compared the multidrug resistance of the HA117 with that of the classical multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1 in breast cancer cell line 4T1. Methods Transduction of the breast cancer cell line 4T1 with adenoviral vectors encoding the HA117 gene and the green fluorescence protein gene (GFP (Ad-GFP-HA117, the MDR1 and GFP (Ad-GFP-MDR1 or GFP (Ad-GFP was respectively carried out. The transduction efficiency and the multiplicity of infection (MOI were detected by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry. The transcription of HA117 gene and MDR1 gene were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Western blotting analysis was used to detect the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp but the expression of HA117 could not be analyzed as it is a novel gene and its antibody has not yet been synthesized. The drug-excretion activity of HA117 and MDR1 were determined by daunorubicin (DNR efflux assay. The drug sensitivities of 4T1/HA117 and 4T1/MDR1 to chemotherapeutic agents were detected by Methyl-Thiazolyl-Tetrazolium (MTT assay. Results The transducted efficiency of Ad-GFP-HA117 and Ad-GFP-MDR1 were 75%-80% when MOI was equal to 50. The transduction of Ad-GFP-HA117 and Ad-GFP-MDR1 could increase the expression of HA117 and MDR1. The drug resistance index to Adriamycin (ADM, vincristine (VCR, paclitaxel (Taxol and bleomycin (BLM increased to19.8050, 9.0663, 9.7245, 3.5650 respectively for 4T1/HA117 and 24.2236, 11.0480, 11.3741, 0.9630 respectively for 4T1/MDR1 as compared to the control cells. There were no significant differences in drug sensitivity between 4T1/HA117 and 4T1/MDR1 for the P-gp substrates (ADM, VCR and Taxol (P Conclusions These results confirm that HA117 is a strong MDR gene in both HL-60 and 4T1 cells. Furthermore, our results indicate that the MDR

  1. Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter and multidrug resistance 1 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkatesan, Meera; Gadalla, Nahla B; Stepniewska, Kasia

    2014-01-01

    Adequate clinical and parasitologic cure by artemisinin combination therapies relies on the artemisinin component and the partner drug. Polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes are associated...... with decreased sensitivity to amodiaquine and lumefantrine, but effects of these polymorphisms on therapeutic responses to artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) have not been clearly defined. Individual patient data from 31 clinical trials were harmonized and pooled by using standardized...

  2. Characterization of Resistance Genes and Plasmids from Outbreaks and Illness Clusters Caused by Salmonella Resistant to Ceftriaxone in the United States, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folster, Jason P; Grass, Julian E; Bicknese, Amelia; Taylor, Julia; Friedman, Cindy R; Whichard, Jean M

    2017-03-01

    Salmonella is an important cause of foodborne illness; however, quickly identifying the source of these infections can be difficult, and source identification is a crucial step in preventing additional illnesses. Although most infections are self-limited, invasive salmonellosis may require antimicrobial treatment. Ceftriaxone, an extended-spectrum cephalosporin, is commonly used for treatment of salmonellosis. Previous studies have identified a correlation between the food animal/retail meat source of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella and the type of resistance gene and plasmid it carries. In this study, we examined seven outbreaks of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella infections, caused by serotypes Typhimurium, Newport, Heidelberg, and Infantis. All isolates were positive for a plasmid-encoded bla CMY gene. Plasmid incompatibility typing identified five IncI1 and two IncA/C plasmids. Both outbreaks containing bla CMY -IncA/C plasmids were linked to consumption of cattle products. Three of five outbreaks with bla CMY -IncI1 (ST12) plasmids were linked to a poultry source. The remaining IncI1 outbreaks were associated with ground beef (ST20) and tomatoes (ST12). In addition, we examined isolates from five unsolved clusters of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella infections and used our plasmid-encoded gene findings to predict the source. Overall, we identified a likely association between the source of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella outbreaks and the type of resistance gene/plasmid it carries.

  3. Expression profile of genes during resistance reversal in a temephos selected strain of the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti.

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    Clare Strode

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mosquito Aedes aegypti is one of the most important disease vectors because it transmits two major arboviruses, dengue and yellow fever, which cause significant global morbidity and mortality. Chemical insecticides form the cornerstone of vector control. The organophosphate temephos a larvicide recommended by WHO for controlling Ae. aegypti, however, resistance to this compound has been reported in many countries, including Brazil. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The aim of this study was to identify genes implicated in metabolic resistance in an Ae. aegypti temephos resistant strain, named RecR, through microarray analysis. We utilized a custom 'Ae. aegypti detox chip' and validated microarray data through RT-PCR comparing susceptible and resistant individuals. In addition, we analyzed gene expression in 4(th instar larvae from a reversed susceptible strain (RecRev, exposed and unexposed to temephos. The results obtained revealed a set of 13 and 6 genes significantly over expressed in resistant adult mosquitoes and larvae, respectively. One of these genes, the cytochrome P450 CYP6N12, was up-regulated in both stages. RT-PCR confirmed the microarray results and, additionally, showed no difference in gene expression between temephos exposed and unexposed RecRev mosquitoes. This suggested that the differences in the transcript profiles among the strains are heritable due to a selection process and are not caused by immediate insecticide exposure. Reversal of temephos resistance was demonstrated and, importantly, there was a positive correlation between a decrease in the resistance ratio and an accompanying decrease in the expression levels of previously over expressed genes. Some of the genes identified here have also been implicated in metabolic resistance in other mosquito species and insecticide resistant populations of Ae. aegypti. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The identification of gene expression signatures associated to

  4. Development of SRAP, SRAP-RGA, RAPD and SCAR markers linked with a Fusarium wilt resistance gene in eggplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Nedim; Boyaci, Filiz Hatice; Göçmen, Münevver; Abak, Kazim

    2008-11-01

    Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht. f. sp. melongenae) is a vascular disease of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.). The objectives of this work were (1) to confirm the monogenic inheritance of fusarium wilt resistance in eggplant, (2) to identify molecular markers linked to this resistance, and (3) to develop SCAR markers from most informative markers. We report the tagging of the gene for resistance to fusarium wilt (FOM) in eggplant using SRAP, RGA, SRAP-RGA and RAPD markers. Analysis of segregation data confirmed the monogenic inheritance of resistance. DNA from F(2) and BC(1) populations of eggplant segregating for fusarium wilt resistance was screened with 2,316 primer combinations to detect polymorphism. Three markers were linked within 2.6 cM of the gene. The codominant SRAP marker Me8/Em5 and dominant SRAP-RGA marker Em12/GLPL2 were tightly linked to each other and mapped 1.2 cM from the resistance gene, whereas RAPD marker H12 mapped 2.6 cM from the gene and on the same side as the other two markers. The SRAP marker was converted into two dominant SCAR markers that were confirmed to be linked to the resistance gene in the F(2,) BC(1) and F(2) of BC(3) generations of the same cross. These markers provide a starting point for mapping the eggplant FOM resistance gene in eggplant and for exploring the synteny between solanaceous crops for fusarium wilt resistance genes. The SCAR markers will be useful for identifying fusarium wilt-resistant genotypes in marker-assisted selection breeding programs using segregating progenies of the resistant eggplant progenitor used in this study.

  5. Identification and characterization of novel NBS-LRR resistance gene analogues from the pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djebbi, S; Bouktila, D; Makni, H; Makni, M; Mezghani-Khemakhem, M

    2015-06-11

    Pea (Pisum sativum) is one of the most cultivated le-gumes in the world, and its yield and seed quality are affected by a variety of pathogens. In plants, NBS-LRR (nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat) is the main class of disease resistance genes. Using degenerate primers deduced from conserved motifs in the NBS domain of known resistance genes, we identified 10 NBS sequences in three varieties of P. sativum. The deduced amino acid sequences of the iden-tified resistance gene analogues (RGAs) exhibited the typical motifs of the NBS domain (P-loop, kinase-2, kinase-3a, and the hydrophobic domain, GLPL) present in the majority of plant proteins belonging to the NBS-LRR class. Phylogenetic analysis showed that seven RGAs belonged to the non-TIR-NBS-LRR subclass and three to the TIR-NBS-LRR subclass. The results of this study provide insights into the structure of this class of resistance genes in the pea, and their evolution-ary relationships with those of other plant species.

  6. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyuha; Reinhard, Carsten; Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A; Underwood, Charles J; Zhao, Xiaohui; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Yelina, Nataliya E; Griffin, Catherine; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Henderson, Ian R

    2016-07-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity.

  7. Towards allele mining of bacterial wilt disease resistance gene in tomato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvez, H.F.; Narciso, J.O.; Opina, N.L.; Canama, A.O.; Colle, M.G.; Latiza, M.A.; Caspillo, C.L.; Bituin, J.L.; Frankie, R.B.; Hautea, D.M.

    2005-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) is the most important vegetable commodity of the Philippines. Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is one serious constraint in tomato production particularly during off-season planting. A major locus derived from H7996 that confers resistance to bacterial wilt has been mapped in the tomato genome. To validate the biological function of the resistance locus and generate multiple allele -mimics-, targeted mutation was induced in tomato using gamma ray and ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) mutagens. Suitable mutagen treatment was established by evaluating a wide range of mutagen doses/concentrations for a) percent seed germination, b) reduction in plant height, and c) loss of resistance. Six hundred Gy and 1.0% EMS were identified to generate large M1 families of H7996. From 10,000 initial seeds treated with either gamma ray or EMS, a total of 3,663 M1 plants were generated. M2 seeds were harvested from all surviving M1 plants. Several DNA markers have been resourced and are being developed specific to the bacterial wilt resistant gene. In the large M2 population, of H7996, both the phenotypic manifestation of bacterial wilt susceptibility and nucleotide changes in the resistance locus will be evaluated. Large M3 families for the different allele series of the bacterial wilt resistance gene will be established for future high throughput TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes) analysis in the gene region

  8. Gene expression profiling in the thiamethoxam resistant and susceptible B-biotype sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen; Yang, Xin; Wang, Shao-Ii; Wu, Qing-jun; Yang, Ni-na; Li, Ru-mei; Jiao, Xiao-guo; Pan, Hui-peng; Liu, Bai-ming; Feng, Yun-tao; Xu, Bao-yun; Zhou, Xu-guo; Zhang, You-jun

    2012-01-01

    Thiamethoxam has been used as a major insecticide to control the B-biotype sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). Due to its excessive use, a high level of resistance to thiamethoxam has developed worldwide over the past several years. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance in B. tabaci, gene profiles between the thiamethoxam-resistant and thiamethoxam-susceptible strains were investigated using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) library approach. A total of 72 and 52 upand down-regulated genes were obtained from the forward and reverse SSH libraries, respectively. These expressed sequence tags (ESTs) belong to several functional categories based on their gene ontology annotation. Some categories such as cell communication, response to abiotic stimulus, lipid particle, and nuclear envelope were identified only in the forward library of thiamethoxam-resistant strains. In contrast, categories such as behavior, cell proliferation, nutrient reservoir activity, sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factor activity, and signal transducer activity were identified solely in the reverse library. To study the validity of the SSH method, 16 differentially expressed genes from both forward and reverse SSH libraries were selected randomly for further analyses using quantitative realtime PCR (qRT-PCR). The qRT-PCR results were fairly consistent with the SSH results; however, only 50% of the genes showed significantly different expression profiles between the thiamethoxam-resistant and thiamethoxam-susceptible whiteflies. Among these genes, a putative NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase was substantially over-expressed in the thiamethoxamresistant adults compared to their susceptible counterparts. The distributed profiles show that it was highly expressed during the egg stage, and was most abundant in the abdomen of adult females.

  9. Gene pyramiding enhances durable blast disease resistance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Shuichi; Saka, Norikuni; Mizukami, Yuko; Koga, Hironori; Yamanouchi, Utako; Yoshioka, Yosuke; Hayashi, Nagao; Ebana, Kaworu; Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Yano, Masahiro

    2015-01-14

    Effective control of blast, a devastating fungal disease of rice, would increase and stabilize worldwide food production. Resistance mediated by quantitative trait loci (QTLs), which usually have smaller individual effects than R-genes but confer broad-spectrum or non-race-specific resistance, is a promising alternative to less durable race-specific resistance for crop improvement, yet evidence that validates the impact of QTL combinations (pyramids) on the durability of plant disease resistance has been lacking. Here, we developed near-isogenic experimental lines representing all possible combinations of four QTL alleles from a durably resistant cultivar. These lines enabled us to evaluate the QTLs singly and in combination in a homogeneous genetic background. We present evidence that pyramiding QTL alleles, each controlling a different response to M. oryzae, confers strong, non-race-specific, environmentally stable resistance to blast disease. Our results suggest that this robust defence system provides durable resistance, thus avoiding an evolutionary "arms race" between a crop and its pathogen.

  10. Blood-gene expression reveals reduced circadian rhythmicity in individuals resistant to sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnardottir, Erna S; Nikonova, Elena V; Shockley, Keith R; Podtelezhnikov, Alexei A; Anafi, Ron C; Tanis, Keith Q; Maislin, Greg; Stone, David J; Renger, John J; Winrow, Christopher J; Pack, Allan I

    2014-10-01

    To address whether changes in gene expression in blood cells with sleep loss are different in individuals resistant and sensitive to sleep deprivation. Blood draws every 4 h during a 3-day study: 24-h normal baseline, 38 h of continuous wakefulness and subsequent recovery sleep, for a total of 19 time-points per subject, with every 2-h psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) assessment when awake. Sleep laboratory. Fourteen subjects who were previously identified as behaviorally resistant (n = 7) or sensitive (n = 7) to sleep deprivation by PVT. Thirty-eight hours of continuous wakefulness. We found 4,481 unique genes with a significant 24-h diurnal rhythm during a normal sleep-wake cycle in blood (false discovery rate [FDR] sleep. After accounting for circadian effects, two genes (SREBF1 and CPT1A, both involved in lipid metabolism) exhibited small, but significant, linear changes in expression with the duration of sleep deprivation (FDR sleep deprivation was a reduction in the amplitude of the diurnal rhythm of expression of normally cycling probe sets. This reduction was noticeably higher in behaviorally resistant subjects than sensitive subjects, at any given P value. Furthermore, blood cell type enrichment analysis showed that the expression pattern difference between sensitive and resistant subjects is mainly found in cells of myeloid origin, such as monocytes. Individual differences in behavioral effects of sleep deprivation are associated with differences in diurnal amplitude of gene expression for genes that show circadian rhythmicity. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  11. Persistence of antimicrobial resistance genes from sows to finisher pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkegård, Anna Camilla; Halasa, Tariq; Folkesson, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in pigs has been under scrutiny for many years. However, many questions remain unanswered, including whether the initial antimicrobial resistance level of a pig will influence the antimicrobial resistance found at slaughter. Faecal samples from finishers pigs from 681 farms...... and from sows from 82 farms were collected, and levels of seven antimicrobial resistance genes, ermB, ermF, sulI, sulII, tet(M), tet(O), and tet(W), were quantified by high-capacity qPCR. There were 40 pairs of observations where the finishers were born in the farms of the sows. The objective of this study...... was to evaluate whether the levels of AMR genes found in finisher pigs at slaughter were associated with the levels in the farm where the finishers were born, and whether the levels of the AMR genes were equal in the sow and finisher pig populations. We found a significant positive correlation between the levels...

  12. Secretome Characterization and Correlation Analysis Reveal Putative Pathogenicity Mechanisms and Identify Candidate Avirulence Genes in the Wheat Stripe Rust Fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chongjing; Wang, Meinan; Cornejo, Omar E; Jiwan, Derick A; See, Deven R; Chen, Xianming

    2017-01-01

    Stripe (yellow) rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici ( Pst ), is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat worldwide. Planting resistant cultivars is an effective way to control this disease, but race-specific resistance can be overcome quickly due to the rapid evolving Pst population. Studying the pathogenicity mechanisms is critical for understanding how Pst virulence changes and how to develop wheat cultivars with durable resistance to stripe rust. We re-sequenced 7 Pst isolates and included additional 7 previously sequenced isolates to represent balanced virulence/avirulence profiles for several avirulence loci in seretome analyses. We observed an uneven distribution of heterozygosity among the isolates. Secretome comparison of Pst with other rust fungi identified a large portion of species-specific secreted proteins, suggesting that they may have specific roles when interacting with the wheat host. Thirty-two effectors of Pst were identified from its secretome. We identified candidates for Avr genes corresponding to six Yr genes by correlating polymorphisms for effector genes to the virulence/avirulence profiles of the 14 Pst isolates. The putative AvYr76 was present in the avirulent isolates, but absent in the virulent isolates, suggesting that deleting the coding region of the candidate avirulence gene has produced races virulent to resistance gene Yr76 . We conclude that incorporating avirulence/virulence phenotypes into correlation analysis with variations in genomic structure and secretome, particularly presence/absence polymorphisms of effectors, is an efficient way to identify candidate Avr genes in Pst . The candidate effector genes provide a rich resource for further studies to determine the evolutionary history of Pst populations and the co-evolutionary arms race between Pst and wheat. The Avr candidates identified in this study will lead to cloning avirulence genes in Pst , which will enable us to understand molecular mechanisms

  13. Use of the Plant Defense Protein Osmotin To Identify Fusarium oxysporum Genes That Control Cell Wall Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, H.

    2010-02-26

    Fusarium oxysporum is the causative agent of fungal wilt disease in a variety of crops. The capacity of a fungal pathogen such as F. oxysporum f. sp. nicotianae to establish infection on its tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) host depends in part on its capacity to evade the toxicity of tobacco defense proteins, such as osmotin. Fusarium genes that control resistance to osmotin would therefore reflect coevolutionary pressures and include genes that control mutual recognition, avoidance, and detoxification. We identified FOR (Fusarium Osmotin Resistance) genes on the basis of their ability to confer osmotin resistance to an osmotin-sensitive strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. FOR1 encodes a putative cell wall glycoprotein. FOR2 encodes the structural gene for glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase, the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of hexosamine and cell wall chitin. FOR3 encodes a homolog of SSD1, which controls cell wall composition, longevity, and virulence in S. cerevisiae. A for3 null mutation increased osmotin sensitivity of conidia and hyphae of F. oxysporum f. sp. nicotianae and also reduced cell wall β-1,3-glucan content. Together our findings show that conserved fungal genes that determine cell wall properties play a crucial role in regulating fungal susceptibility to the plant defense protein osmotin.

  14. Novel Mutations Detected in Avirulence Genes Overcoming Tomato Cf Resistance Genes in Isolates of a Japanese Population of Cladosporium fulvum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Iida

    Full Text Available Leaf mold of tomato is caused by the biotrophic fungus Cladosporium fulvum which complies with the gene-for-gene system. The disease was first reported in Japan in the 1920s and has since been frequently observed. Initially only race 0 isolates were reported, but since the consecutive introduction of resistance genes Cf-2, Cf-4, Cf-5 and Cf-9 new races have evolved. Here we first determined the virulence spectrum of 133 C. fulvum isolates collected from 22 prefectures in Japan, and subsequently sequenced the avirulence (Avr genes Avr2, Avr4, Avr4E, Avr5 and Avr9 to determine the molecular basis of overcoming Cf genes. Twelve races of C. fulvum with a different virulence spectrum were identified, of which races 9, 2.9, 4.9, 4.5.9 and 4.9.11 occur only in Japan. The Avr genes in many of these races contain unique mutations not observed in races identified elsewhere in the world including (i frameshift mutations and (ii transposon insertions in Avr2, (iii point mutations in Avr4 and Avr4E, and (iv deletions of Avr4E, Avr5 and Avr9. New races have developed by selection pressure imposed by consecutive introductions of Cf-2, Cf-4, Cf-5 and Cf-9 genes in commercially grown tomato cultivars. Our study shows that molecular variations to adapt to different Cf genes in an isolated C. fulvum population in Japan are novel but overall follow similar patterns as those observed in populations from other parts of the world. Implications for breeding of more durable C. fulvum resistant varieties are discussed.

  15. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in the bacterial flora of integrated fish farming environments of Pakistan and Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Q A; Colquhoun, Duncan J; Nikuli, Hamisi L; Sørum, Henning

    2012-08-21

    The use of a wide variety of antimicrobials in human and veterinary medicine, including aquaculture, has led to the emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens. In the present study, bacteria from water, sediments, and fish were collected from fish farms in Pakistan and Tanzania with no recorded history of antibiotic use. The isolates were screened for the presence of resistance genes against various antimicrobials used in aquaculture and animal husbandry. Resistant isolates selected by disk diffusion and genotyped by Southern hybridization were further screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and amplicon sequencing. The prominent resistance genes identified encoded tetracycline [tetA(A) and tetA(G)], trimethoprim [dfrA1, dfrA5, dfrA7, dfrA12, and dfrA15], amoxicillin [bla(TEM)], streptomycin [strA-strB], chloramphenicol [cat-1], and erythromycin resistance [mefA]. The int1 gene was found in more than 30% of the bacterial isolates in association with gene cassettes. MAR indices ranged from 0.2 to 1. The bla(NDM-1) gene was not identified in ertapenem resistant isolates. It is hypothesized that integrated fish farming practices utilizing domestic farm and poultry waste along with antibiotic residues from animal husbandry may have contributed to a pool of resistance genes in the aquaculture systems studied.

  16. Resistance-Gene Cassettes Associated With Salmonella enterica Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, Bita; Ghafari, Mohsen; Pourshafie, Mohammad R; Zarbakhsh, Behnaz; Katouli, Mohammad; Rahbar, Mohammad; Hajia, Masoud; Hosseini-Aliabad, Neda; Boustanshenas, Mina

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of salmonellosis is complex because of the diversity and different serotypes of Salmonella enterica (S. enterica) that occur in different reservoirs and geographic incidences. To determine the genotype distribution and resistance-gene content of 2 classes of integron among S. enterica isolates. Thirty-six S. enterica species were isolated and tested for their serological distribution and the resistance-gene contents of 2 classes of integron, as well as for their genetic diversity, using the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) genotyping method. Serogroups E (36.1%) and D (30.5%) were dominant among the isolates. All of the isolates in serogroup D belonged to the serovar enteritidis. The aadA1 gene was found within all resistance-gene cassettes. We observed 4 common and 26 single pulsotypes among the isolates, which indicated a high degree of genetic diversity among the isolates. Using the PulseNet International standard protocol, it was found that these isolates were different from those reported previously in Iran. The presence of a few common and new pulsotypes among the isolates suggests the emergence and spread of new clones of S. enterica in Iran. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP).

  17. Resistance gene transfer during treatments for experimental avian colibacillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheilly, Alexandra; Le Devendec, Laëtitia; Mourand, Gwenaëlle; Bouder, Axelle; Jouy, Eric; Kempf, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in animal facilities to compare the impacts of four avian colibacillosis treatments-oxytetracycline (OTC), trimethoprim-sulfadimethoxine (SXT), amoxicillin (AMX), or enrofloxacin (ENR)-on the susceptibility of Escherichia coli in broiler intestinal tracts. Birds were first orally inoculated with rifampin-resistant E. coli strains bearing plasmid genes conferring resistance to fluoroquinolones (qnr), cephalosporins (bla(CTX-M) or bla(FOX)), trimethoprim-sulfonamides, aminoglycosides, or tetracyclines. Feces samples were collected before, during, and after antimicrobial treatments. The susceptibilities of E. coli strains were studied, and resistance gene transfer was analyzed. An increase in the tetracycline-resistant E. coli population was observed only in OTC-treated birds, whereas multiresistant E. coli was detected in the dominant E. coli populations of SXT-, AMX-, or ENR-treated birds. Most multiresistant E. coli strains were susceptible to rifampin and exhibited various pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles, suggesting the transfer of one of the multiresistance plasmids from the inoculated strains to other E. coli strains in the intestinal tract. In conclusion, this study clearly illustrates how, in E. coli, "old" antimicrobials may coselect antimicrobial resistance to recent and critical molecules.

  18. Detection and Genetic Environment of Pleuromutilin-Lincosamide-Streptogramin A Resistance Genes in Staphylococci Isolated from Pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fengru; Wang, Huiwen; Liao, Yifei; Li, Jun; Feßler, Andrea T; Michael, Geovana B; Schwarz, Stefan; Wang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Increasing emergence of staphylococci resistant to pleuromutilins, lincosamides, and streptogramin A (PLS A ) and isolated from humans and pets is a growing public health concern worldwide. Currently, there was only one published study regarding one of the PLS A genes, vga (A) detected in staphylococci isolated from cat. In this study, eleven pleuromutilin-resistant staphylococci from pets and two from their owners were isolated and further characterized for their antimicrobial susceptibilities, plasmid profiles, genotypes, and genetic context of the PLS A resistance genes. The gene sal (A) identified in 11 staphylococcal isolates was found for the first time in Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus epidermidis , and Staphylococcus xylosus . Moreover, these 11 isolates shared the identical regions flanking the sal (A) gene located in the chromosomal DNA. Two S. haemolyticus isolates from a cat and its owner carried similar vga (A) LC plasmids and displayed indistinguishable PFGE patterns. A novel chromosomal multidrug resistance genomic island (MDRGI) containing 13 resistance genes, including lsa (E), was firstly identified in S. epidermidis . In addition, vga (A) LC , sal (A), and lsa (E) were for the first time identified in staphylococcal isolates originating from pet animals. The plasmids, chromosomal DNA region, and MDRGI associated with the PLS A resistance genes vga (A), vga (A) LC , sal (A), and lsa (E) are present in staphylococci isolated from pets and humans and present significant challenges for the clinical management of infections by limiting therapeutic options.

  19. Identification of genes involved in stem rust resistance from wheat mutant D51 with the cDNA-AFLP technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jing; Wang, Guangjin; Xiao, Jialei; Ma, Fengming; Zhang, Hongji; Sun, Yan; Diao, Yanling; Huang, Jinghua; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Dongjun

    2010-02-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici is one of the main diseases of wheat worldwide. Wheat mutant line D51, which was derived from the highly susceptible cultivar L6239, shows resistance to the prevailing races 21C3CPH, 21C3CKH, and 21C3CTR of P. graminis f. sp. tritici in China. In this study, we used the cDNA-AFLP technology to identify the genes that are likely involved in the stem rust resistance. EcoRI/MseI selective primers were used to generate approximately 1920 DNA fragments. Seventy five differentially transcribed fragments (3.91%) were identified by comparing the samples of 21C3CPH infected D51 with infected L6239 or uninfected D51. Eleven amplified cDNA fragments were sequenced. Eight showed significant similarity to known genes, including TaLr1 (leaf rust resistance gene), wlm24 (wheat powdery mildew resistance gene), stress response genes and ESTs of environment stress of tall fescue. These identified genes are involved in plant defense response and stem rust resistance and need further research to determine their usefulness in breeding new resistance cultivars.

  20. Development of Gene-Pyramid Lines of the Elite Restorer Line, RPHR-1005 Possessing Durable Bacterial Blight and Blast Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash Kumar, V; Balachiranjeevi, C H; Bhaskar Naik, S; Rambabu, R; Rekha, G; Harika, G; Hajira, S K; Pranathi, K; Anila, M; Kousik, M; Vijay Kumar, S; Yugander, A; Aruna, J; Dilip Kumar, T; Vijaya Sudhakara Rao, K; Hari Prasad, A S; Madhav, M S; Laha, G S; Balachandran, S M; Prasad, M S; Viraktamath, B C; Ravindra Babu, V; Sundaram, R M

    2016-01-01

    RPHR-1005, the stable restorer line of the popular medium slender (MS) grain type rice hybrid, DRRH-3 was improved in this study for resistance against bacterial blight (BB) and blast diseases through marker-assisted backcross breeding (MABB). In this study, four major resistance genes (i.e., Xa21 and Xa33 for BB resistance and Pi2 and Pi54 for blast resistance) have been transferred to RPHR-1005 using RPBio Patho-1 (possessing Xa21 + Pi2), RPBio Patho-2 (possessing Xa21 + Pi54) and FBR1-15EM (possessing Xa33) as the donors. Foreground selection was carried out using PCR-based molecular markers specific for the target resistance genes and the major fertility restorer genes, Rf3 and Rf4, while background selection was carried out using a set of parental polymorphic rice SSR markers and backcrossing was continued uptoBC2 generation. At BC2F2, plants possessing the gene combination- Xa21 + Pi2, Xa21 + Pi54 and Xa33 in homozygous condition and with >92% recovery of the recurrent parent genome (RPG) were identified and intercrossed to combine all the four resistance genes. Twenty-two homozygous, pyramid lines of RPHR-1005 comprising of three single-gene containing lines, six 2-gene containing lines, eight 3-gene containing lines, and five 4-gene containing lines were identified among the double intercross lines at F3 generation (DICF3). They were then evaluated for their resistance against BB and blast, fertility restoration ability and for key agro-morphological traits. While single gene containing lines were resistant to either BB or blast, the 2-gene, 3-gene, and 4-gene pyramid lines showed good level of resistance against both and/or either of the two diseases. Most of the 2-gene, 3-gene, and 4-gene containing pyramid lines showed yield levels and other key agro-morphological and grain quality traits comparable to the original recurrent parent and showed complete fertility restoration ability, with a few showing higher yield as compared to RPHR-1005. Further, the