WorldWideScience

Sample records for resistance diabetes hypertriglyceridemia

  1. Hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Brahm

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG is commonly encountered in lipid and cardiology clinics. Severe HTG warrants treatment because of the associated increased risk of acute pancreatitis. However, the need to treat, and the correct treatment approach for patients with mild to moderate HTG are issues for ongoing evaluation. In the past, it was felt that triglyceride does not directly contribute to development of atherosclerotic plaques. However, this view is evolving, especially for triglyceride-related fractions and variables measured in the non-fasting state. Our understanding of the etiology, genetics and classification of HTG states is also evolving. Previously, HTG was considered to be a dominant disorder associated with variation within a single gene. The old nomenclature includes the term “familial” in the names of several hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP phenotypes that included HTG as part of their profile, including combined hyperlipidemia (HLP type 2B, dysbetalipoproteinemia (HLP type 3, simple HTG (HLP type 4 and mixed hyperlipidemia (HLP type 5. This old thinking has given way to the idea that genetic susceptibility to HTG results from cumulative effects of multiple genetic variants acting in concert. HTG most is often a “polygenic” or “multigenic” trait. However, a few rare autosomal recessive forms of severe HTG have been defined. Treatment depends on the overall clinical context, including severity of HTG, concomitant presence of other lipid disturbances, and the patient's global risk of cardiovascular disease. Therapeutic strategies include dietary counselling, lifestyle management, control of secondary factors, use of omega-3 preparations and selective use of pharmaceutical agents.

  2. The Association between Persistent Hypertriglyceridemia and the Risk of Diabetes Development: The Kangbuk Samsung Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yu Hyun; Kim, Seul Ki; Cho, Jung Hwan; Kwon, Hyemi; Park, Se Eun; Oh, Hyung Geun; Park, Cheol Young; Lee, Won Young; Oh, Ki Won; Park, Sung Woo; Rhee, Eun Jung

    2018-03-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is known to have an association with increased risks of insulin resistance and diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the risk of diabetes mellitus, according to changes in the concentrations of triglycerides, over time. A total of 15,932 non-diabetic participants (mean age 43.2 years, 68% men) who attended five consecutive annual health check-ups at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, between January 2010 and December 2014, were recruited. Participants were classified according to their triglyceride concentrations; normal (<150 mg/dL) and abnormal (≥150 mg/dL). According to the triglyceride levels in 2010 and 2012, subjects were divided into four groups: normal-normal, normal-abnormal, abnormal-normal, and abnormal-abnormal. The risk for incident diabetes was assessed in 2014. Among the total subjects, 67.5% belonged to the normal-normal group, 8.6% to the normal-abnormal group, 9.4% to the abnormal-normal group, and 14.5% to the abnormal-abnormal group. A total of 234 subjects (1.5%) were newly diagnosed with diabetes, between 2010 and 2014. Over 4 years, 1%, 1.5%, 2.1%, and 3.0% of the subjects developed diabetes in the normal-normal, normal-abnormal, abnormal-normal, and abnormal-abnormal groups, respectively. When the risk for incident diabetes was analyzed in the groups, after adjusting the confounding variables, a 1.58-fold increase in the risk of diabetes (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10 to 2.26) was observed in the participants with persistent hypertriglyceridemia (abnormal-abnormal group). This was attenuated by further adjustments for body mass index (BMI) (hazard ratio, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.80). In this large study population, persistent hypertriglyceridemia, over a period of 2 years, was significantly associated with the risk of incident diabetes, which was attenuated after adjustment for BMI. Copyright © 2018 Korean Endocrine Society.

  3. The effective fraction isolated from Radix Astragali alleviates glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia in db/db diabetic mice through its anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, Ruby Lc; Wong, Janice Yl; Qiao, Cf; Xu, A; Xu, Hx; Lam, Karen Sl

    2010-08-24

    Macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue together with the aberrant production of pro-inflammatory cytokines has been identified as the key link between obesity and its related metabolic disorders. This study aims to isolate bioactive ingredients from the traditional Chinese herb Radix Astragali (Huangqi) that alleviate obesity-induced metabolic damage through inhibiting inflammation. Active fraction (Rx) that inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokine production was identified from Radix Astragali by repeated bioactivity-guided high-throughput screening. Major constituents in Rx were identified by column chromatography followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass-spectrometry. Anti-diabetic activity of Rx was evaluated in db/db mice. Treatment with Rx, which included calycosin-7-β-D-glucoside (0.9%), ononin (1.2%), calycosin (4.53%) and formononetin (1.1%), significantly reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1) in human THP-1 macrophages and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of NF-κB in mouse RAW-Blue macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Chronic administration of Rx in db/db obese mice markedly decreased the levels of both fed and fasting glucose, reduced serum triglyceride, and also alleviated insulin resistance and glucose intolerance when compared to vehicle-treated controls. The mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cell markers CD68 and F4/80, and cytokines MCP-1, TNF-α and IL-6 were significantly reduced in epididymal adipose tissue while the alternatively activated macrophage marker arginase I was markedly increased in the Rx-treated mice. These findings suggest that suppression of the inflammation pathways in macrophages represents a valid strategy for high-throughput screening of lead compounds with anti-diabetic and insulin sensitizing properties, and further support the etiological role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of obesity-related metabolic disorders.

  4. The effective fraction isolated from Radix Astragali alleviates glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia in db/db diabetic mice through its anti-inflammatory activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoo Ruby LC

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue together with the aberrant production of pro-inflammatory cytokines has been identified as the key link between obesity and its related metabolic disorders. This study aims to isolate bioactive ingredients from the traditional Chinese herb Radix Astragali (Huangqi that alleviate obesity-induced metabolic damage through inhibiting inflammation. Methods Active fraction (Rx that inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokine production was identified from Radix Astragali by repeated bioactivity-guided high-throughput screening. Major constituents in Rx were identified by column chromatography followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and mass-spectrometry. Anti-diabetic activity of Rx was evaluated in db/db mice. Results Treatment with Rx, which included calycosin-7-β-D-glucoside (0.9%, ononin (1.2%, calycosin (4.53% and formononetin (1.1%, significantly reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1 in human THP-1 macrophages and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced activation of NF-κB in mouse RAW-Blue macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Chronic administration of Rx in db/db obese mice markedly decreased the levels of both fed and fasting glucose, reduced serum triglyceride, and also alleviated insulin resistance and glucose intolerance when compared to vehicle-treated controls. The mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cell markers CD68 and F4/80, and cytokines MCP-1, TNF-α and IL-6 were significantly reduced in epididymal adipose tissue while the alternatively activated macrophage marker arginase I was markedly increased in the Rx-treated mice. Conclusion These findings suggest that suppression of the inflammation pathways in macrophages represents a valid strategy for high-throughput screening of lead compounds with anti-diabetic and insulin sensitizing properties, and further support the etiological role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of

  5. Hbaic as an indirect marker of hypertriglyceridemia in type-2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, S.M.H.; Ghafoor, A.; Randhawa, F.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is usually accompanied by dyslipidaemia, and among these triglyceride levels are related to the insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. HbAlc which is an indicator of diabetes control can depict the severity of hypertriglyceridemia. The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between HbAlc and Triglyceride levels in type 2 Diabetes mellitus. Method: A sample of 150 diabetic patients fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected for this cross-sectional study. Patient included were type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with HbAlc >7. Patients with history of cardiovascular disease, taking lipid lowering medications, smoker and history of cerebral stroke were excluded. HbAlc and triglyceride levels were noted .Study patients were further stratified on the basis of severity of HbAlc and Triglyceride values. The correlation between HbAlc and Triglyceride levels were established with Pearson Correlation. Results: Among total number of 150 patients 44 percentage (n=70) were male and 50.3 percentage (n=80) were female. The correlation of HbAlc with Triglyceride as estimated by Pearson Correlation was positive (p=0.033, r=0.033) and statistically significant. Conclusions: In type 2 diabetes mellitus there is a predictable relationship between Triglycerides and HbAlc. (author)

  6. Association of statin use and hypertriglyceridemia with diabetic macular edema in patients with type 2 diabetes and diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoo-Ri; Park, Sung Wook; Choi, Shin-Young; Kim, Seung Woo; Moon, Ka Young; Kim, Jeong Hun; Lee, Kihwang

    2017-01-07

    To investigate the effects of dyslipidemia and statin therapy on progression of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema in patients with type 2 diabetes. The medical records of 110 patients with type 2 diabetes (70 statin users and 40 non-users) were retrospectively reviewed. The two outcome measures were progression of diabetic retinopathy by two or more steps on the early treatment diabetic retinopathy study scale and diabetic macular edema based on optical coherence tomography. Serum lipid profiles were analyzed from 6 months prior to diagnosis of diabetic macular edema. Diabetic retinopathy progressed in 23% of statin users and 18% of non-users (p = 0.506), but diabetic macular edema was present in 23% of statin users and 48% of non-users (p = 0.008). Statins reduced low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with and without diabetic macular edema (p = 0.043 and p = 0.031, respectively). Among statin users, patients with diabetic macular edema had higher levels of triglycerides (p = 0.004) and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p = 0.033) than those without diabetic macular edema. Logistic regression analysis showed that statin use significantly lowered the risk of diabetic macular edema [odds ratio (OR): 0.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12-0.91, p = 0.032]. Hypertriglyceridemia at 6 months prior to development of macular edema was significantly associated with central retinal thickness (OR: 1.52; 95% CI 1.14-2.02, p = 0.005). Lipid lowering therapy with statins protected against the development of diabetic macular edema and progression of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hypertriglyceridemia could be used as a surrogate marker for diabetic macular edema.

  7. Acute Pancreatitis Complicated with Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Young Adult without Hypertriglyceridemia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Hyun; Oh, Myung Jin

    2016-11-25

    Systemic complications related to acute pancreatitis include acute respiratory distress syndrome, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, hypocalcemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin dependent diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. In practice, the development of diabetic ketoacidosis induced by acute pancreatitis is rare and generally associated with hypertriglyceridemia. However, herein we report a case of a 34-year-old female without hypertriglyceridemia, who was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis. The patient was admitted with complaints of febrile sensation, back pain, and abdominal pain around the epigastric area. Levels of serum amylase and lipase were elevated to 663 U/L and 3,232 U/L. Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT showed pancreatic swelling, peri-pancreatic fat infiltration and fluid collection. The patient was initially diagnosed with simple acute pancreatitis. Though the symptoms were rapidly relieved after initiation of treatment, severe hyperglycemia (575 mg/dL), severe metabolic acidosis (pH 6.9), and ketonuria developed at four days after hospitalization. However, serum triglyceride levels remained within the normal range (134 mg/dL). Finally, the patient was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis unrelated to hypertriglyceridemia. She recovered through insulin and fluid therapy, and receives insulin therapy at the outpatient clinic.

  8. Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI in a juvenile miniature schnauzer dog with concurrent hypertriglyceridemia, necrotizing pancreatitis, and diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Mayrim L; Kridel, Heather A; Gallagher, Alex; Sheppard, Barbara J; Reese, Shona; Kondo, Hirotaka; Alleman, Rick; Giger, Urs

    2015-03-01

    A 7-month-old, neutered male miniature schnauzer dog with a history of cryptorchidism and umbilical hernia was referred for diabetic ketoacidosis. Clinical evaluation revealed stunted growth, skeletal abnormalities, hypertriglyceridemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, and acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Further testing was diagnostic for mucopolysaccharidosis type VI causing the stunted growth and skeletal deformities, but no connection between mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, hypertriglyceridemia, and pancreatic diseases was found.

  9. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation on Diabetic Nephropathy Progression in Patients with Diabetes and Hypertriglyceridemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Han

    Full Text Available Beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acid (O3FA supplementation in a wide range of disease condition have been well studied. However, there is limited information regarding the effects of O3FAs on chronic kidney disease (CKD, especially in diabetic nephropathy (DN with hypertriglyceridemia. We investigate whether O3FA supplementation could help maintain renal function in patients with diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. Total 344 type 2 diabetic patients with a history of O3FA supplementation for managing hypertriglyceridemia were included. Reduction in urine albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR and glomerular filtrate rate (GFR were examined. Subgroup analyses were stratified according to the daily O3FA doses. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, and urine ACR significantly reduced after O3FA supplementation. Overall, 172 (50.0% patients did not experience renal function loss, and 125 (36.3% patients had a GFR with a positive slope. The patients treated with O3FAs at 4g/day showed greater maintenance in renal function than those treated with lower dosages (p < 0.001. This dose dependent effect remains significant after adjustment for multiple variables. O3FA supplementation in diabetic patients with hypertriglyceridemia shows benefits of reducing albuminuria and maintaining renal function. The effects are dependent on the dose of daily O3FA supplementation.

  10. Influencing factors for acute pancreatitis in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated by hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAI Yunlei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the association between hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis in patients with type 2 diabetes, in order to guide the prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis in patients with diabetes. MethodsA total of 46 patients with type 2 diabetes complicated by acute pancreatitis who were admitted to The First Hospital of Yulin from January 2013 to December 2016 were enrolled as study group, and 52 patients with type 2 diabetes alone who were admitted to our hospital within the same period of time were enrolled as control group. Related data were recorded, including age, sex, course of diabetes, body height and weight, abdominal circumference, smoking, drinking, gallstones, hypertension, blood glucose, and blood lipids [total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C]. The incidence rates of complications associated with diabetes were analyzed. The chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data (general status, blood lipids, and diabetic complications between two groups; and the t-test was used for comparison of such data between two groups. A logistic regression analysis was used for multivariate analysis. ResultsThere were no significant differences between the two groups in age, sex composition, body height and weight, abdominal circumference, smoking and drinking habits, hypertension, gallstones, and course of diabetes (all P>005. The study group had significantly higher levels of TC, TG, and LDL-C than the control group (t=5.122, 4.127, and 3.524, P<0.01, <0.01, and =0.012, while the control group had a significantly higher level of HDL-C than the study group (t=2.231, P=0.037. The study group had a significantly higher incidence rate of diabetic microangiopathy (diabetic retinopathy and chronic diabetic nephropathy than the control group (χ2=92.126, P<0.01. The multivariate analysis showed that

  11. Hypertriglyceridemia, an important and independent risk factor for acute pancreatitis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albai O

    2017-04-01

    presence and severity of DM chronic complications. In this study, the prevalence of AP events in patients with DM was 3.7%. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, hypertriglyceridemia, acute pancreatitis, insulin resistance

  12. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids improve lipoprotein particle size and concentration in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Kana; Koshizaka, Masaya; Tokuyama, Hirotake; Tokuyama, Takahiko; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Takemoto, Minoru; Yokote, Koutaro

    2018-03-15

    Patients with type 2 diabetes are at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Although hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) can reduce cardiovascular events, residual risk remains even after target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels have been achieved. Lipoprotein particle size and fraction changes are thought to contribute to such risks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), predominantly eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, on lipoprotein particle size, concentration, and glycemic control in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. This was a multicenter, prospective, open-label, single arm study. We enrolled 14 patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia treated with statins and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) n-3 PUFAs for 12 weeks. Lipoprotein particle sizes, concentrations, lipoprotein insulin resistance (LPIR) scores, lipid profiles, HbA1c, and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) were measured before and after treatment. Lipoprotein profiles were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Concentrations of total cholesterol (P n-3 PUFA administration. N-3 PUFAs decreased the size of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL; P N-3 PUFAs partly improved atherogenic lipoprotein particle size and concentration, and produced less atherogenic lipoprotein subclass ratios in patients that achieved target LDL-C levels and glycemic control. These results suggest that n-3 PUFAs may reduce residual cardiovascular risk factors in statin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. The study was registered at UMIN-ID: UMIN000013776 .

  13. Persistent hypertriglyceridemia in statin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feher M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael Feher,1–3 Mark Greener,4 Neil Munro1–3,51Beta Cell Diabetes Centre, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, 2Diabetes Therapies Evaluation Network, London, 3CSRI, Warwick University, Warwick, 4ROCK Medical Communications, Richmond, 5Department of Health Care Management, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, UKPurpose: This paper reports the results of an audit that assessed the prevalence of residual hypertriglyceridemia and the potential need for intensified management among patients with statin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in primary care in the UK.Patients and methods: A cross-sectional, observational, systematic audit of patients with diagnosed diabetes from 40 primary care practices was undertaken. The audit collected basic demographic information and data on prescriptions issued during the preceding 4 months. T2DM patients were stratified according to the proportion that attained European Society of Cardiology treatment targets.Results: The audit collected data from 14,652 patients with diagnosed diabetes: 89.5% (n = 13,108 of the total cohort had T2DM. Of the people with T2DM, 22.2% (2916 were not currently receiving lipid-lowering therapy. Up to approximately 80% of these people showed evidence of dyslipidemia. Among the group that received lipid-lowering therapy, 94.7% (9647 were on statin monotherapy, which was usually simvastatin (69.5% of patients receiving statin monotherapy; 6707. The currently available statins were prescribed, with the most common dose being 40 mg simvastatin (44.2%; 4267. Irrespective of the statin used, around half of the patients receiving statin monotherapy did not attain the European Society of Cardiology treatment targets for triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol.Conclusion: T2DM patients managed in UK primary care commonly show persistent lipid abnormalities. Clinicians need to optimize compliance with lipid-lowering and other

  14. Association of APOA5 -1131T>C and S19W gene polymorphisms with both mild hypertriglyceridemia and hyperchylomicronemia in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charriere, Sybil; Bernard, Sophie; Aqallal, Mahdi; Merlin, Micheline; Billon, Stéphane; Perrot, Laurence; Le Coquil, Elodie; Sassolas, Agnès; Moulin, Philippe; Marcais, Christophe

    2008-08-01

    Two minor apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) gene haplotypes, represented by -1131T>C and S19W polymorphisms, are strong determinants of plasma triglyceride (TG) concentration variability across human populations. Hypertriglyceridemia is frequent in type 2 diabetes (T2D) and hyperchylomicronemia is not uncommon. We investigated the association of -1131T>C and S19W polymorphisms with diabetic dyslipidemia in 400 Caucasian T2D patients divided in 2 groups: group N with 130 normotriglyceridemics (TG15 mM) was also studied. The -1131C allele was more frequent in both mild and severe hypertriglyceridemia (20.6% vs 9.8% vs 5.0%, group H vs M vs N, pC and S19W polymorphisms are associated with hyperchylomicronemia and only -1131T>C polymorphism with mild hypertriglyceridemia.

  15. Chronic Inhibition of 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 Activity Decreases Hypertension, Insulin Resistance, and Hypertriglyceridemia in Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine G. Schnackenberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors including hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and obesity that promote the development of cardiovascular disease. Metabolic syndrome has been associated with changes in the secretion or metabolism of glucocorticoids, which have important functions in adipose, liver, kidney, and vasculature. Tissue concentrations of the active glucocorticoid cortisol are controlled by the conversion of cortisone to cortisol by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1. Because of the various cardiovascular and metabolic activities of glucocorticoids, we tested the hypothesis that 11β-HSD1 is a common mechanism in the hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome. In obese and lean SHR/NDmcr-cp (SHR-cp, cardiovascular, metabolic, and renal functions were measured before and during four weeks of administration of vehicle or compound 11 (10 mg/kg/d, a selective inhibitor of 11β-HSD1. Compound 11 significantly decreased 11β-HSD1 activity in adipose tissue and liver of SHR-cp. In obese SHR-cp, compound 11 significantly decreased mean arterial pressure, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia, and plasma renin activity with no effect on heart rate, body weight gain, or microalbuminuria. These results suggest that 11β-HSD1 activity in liver and adipose tissue is a common mediator of hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome.

  16. Are hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL causal factors in the development of insulin resistance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Naishi; Fu, Jingyuan; Koonen, Debby P.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Snieder, Harold; Hofker, Marten H.

    Insulin resistance often occurs with dyslipidemia as part of the metabolic syndrome and the current dominant paradigm is that insulin resistance leads to dyslipidemia. However, dyslipidemia may also cause insulin resistance; this was postulated 30 years ago, but has never been substantiated.

  17. Effect of Hypertriglyceridemia on Beta Cell Mass and Function in ApoC3 Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-Zi; Cheng, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Ting; Lee, Sojin; Yamauchi, Jun; Xiao, Xiangwei; Gittes, George; Qu, Shen; Jiang, Chun-Lei; Dong, H Henry

    2016-07-08

    Hypertriglyceridemia results from increased production and decreased clearance of triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoproteins, a pathological condition that accounts for heightened risk of ischemic vascular diseases in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Despite its intimate association with insulin resistance, whether hypertriglyceridemia constitutes an independent risk for beta cell dysfunction in diabetes is unknown. Answering this fundamental question is stymied by the fact that hypertriglyceridemia is intertwined with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in obese and diabetic subjects. To circumvent this limitation, we took advantage of apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC3)-transgenic mice, a model with genetic predisposition to hypertriglyceridemia. We showed that ApoC3-transgenic mice, as opposed to age/sex-matched wild-type littermates, develop hypertriglyceridemia with concomitant elevations in plasma cholesterol and non-esterified fatty acid levels. Anti-insulin and anti-glucagon dual immunohistochemistry in combination with morphometric analysis revealed that ApoC3-transgenic and wild-type littermates had similar beta cell and alpha cell masses as well as islet size and architecture. These effects correlated with similar amplitudes of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and similar degrees of postprandial glucose excursion in ApoC3-transgenic versus wild-type littermates. Oil Red O histology did not visualize lipid infiltration into islets, correlating with the lack of ectopic triglyceride and cholesterol depositions in the pancreata of ApoC3-transgenic versus wild-type littermates. ApoC3-transgenic mice, despite persistent hypertriglyceridemia, maintained euglycemia under both fed and fasting conditions without manifestation of insulin resistance and fasting hyperinsulinemia. Thus, hypertriglyceridemia per se is not an independent risk factor for beta cell dysfunction in ApoC3 transgenic mice. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  18. Effects of exercise training on glucose control, lipid metabolism, and insulin sensitivity in hypertriglyceridemia and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampman, R M; Schteingart, D E

    1991-06-01

    Exercise training has potential benefits for patients with hyperlipidemia and/or non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. In nondiabetic, nonobese subjects with hypertriglyceridemia, exercise training alone increased insulin sensitivity, improved glucose tolerance, and lowered serum triglyceride and cholesterol levels. These improvements did not occur when exercise training alone was given to similar patients with impaired glucose tolerance. In severely obese (X = 125 kg) subjects without diabetes melitus, a 600 calorie diet alone decreased glucose and insulin concentrations and improved glucose tolerance but did not increase insulin sensitivity. The addition of exercise training improved insulin sensitivity. Obese, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus subjects on sulfonylurea therapy alone increased insulin levels but failed to improve insulin sensitivity or glucose levels. In contrast, the addition of exercise training to this medication resulted in improved insulin sensitivity and lowered glucose levels. We conclude that exercise training has major effects on lowering triglyceride levels in hyperlipidemic subjects and can potentiate the effect of diet or drug therapy on glucose metabolism in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

  19. Smoking, inflammatory patterns, and postprandial hypertriglyceridemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Smoking is associated with increased postprandial hypertriglyceridemia (PPT). Inflammation and insulin resistance are potential "drivers" for this phenomenon. We tested whether inflammatory patterns and/or insulin resistance explain the effect of smoking on PPT. Methods: Men and women i...

  20. Altered plasma lysophosphatidylcholines and amides in non-obese and non-diabetic subjects with borderline-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae Young Lee

    Full Text Available Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG is a risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD. We investigated alterations in plasma metabolites associated with borderline-to-moderate HTG (triglycerides (TG 150-500 mg/dL. Using UPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis, the metabolomics profiles of 111 non-diabetic and non-obese individuals with borderline-to-moderate HTG were compared with those of 111 age- and sex-matched controls with normotriglyceridemia (NTG, TG <150 mg/dL. When compared to the NTG control group, the HTG group exhibited higher plasma levels of lysophosphatidylcholines (lysoPCs, including C14:0 (q = 0.001 and C16:0 (q = 1.8E-05, and several amides, including N-ethyldodecanamide (q = 2.9E-05, N-propyldodecanamide (q = 3.5E-05, palmitoleamide (q = 2.9E-06, and palmitic amide (q = 0.019. The metabolomic profiles of the HTG group also exhibited lower plasma levels of cis-4-octenedioic acid (q<1.0E-9 and docosanamide (q = 0.002 compared with those of the NTG controls. LysoPC 16:0 and palmitoleamide emerged as the primary metabolites able to discriminate the HTG group from the NTG group in a partial least-squares discriminant analysis and were positively associated with the fasting triglyceride levels. We identified alterations in lysoPCs, amides, and cis-4-octenedioic acid among non-diabetic and non-obese individuals with borderline-to-moderate HTG. These results provide novel insights into the metabolic alterations that occur in the early metabolic stages of HTG. This information may facilitate the design of early interventions to prevent disease progression.

  1. Estrogen-associated severe hypertriglyceridemia with pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljenedil, Sumayah; Hegele, Robert A; Genest, Jacques; Awan, Zuhier

    Estrogen, whether therapeutic or physiologic, can cause hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis is a rare complication. We report 2 women who developed estrogen-associated severe hypertriglyceridemia with pancreatitis. The first patient developed pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia associated with in vitro fertilization cycles. Marked reduction in her triglyceride was achieved with dietary restrictions and fibrate. The second patient developed pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia during her pregnancies. She was noncompliant with the treatment; therefore, her triglyceride remained high after delivery. In both patients, no hypertriglyceridemia-associated genes mutations were identified, although the second patient had strong polygenic susceptibility to hypertriglyceridemia. Estrogen-induced severe hypertriglyceridemia with pancreatitis can be a life-threatening condition. Screening in high-risk patients is crucial to prevent subsequent complications. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term and was successfully treated with postpartum therapeutic plasma exchange. Patient also developed several other complications related to her substantial hypertriglyceridemia including preeclampsia, chylous ascites, retinal detachment, pleural effusion, and chronic pericarditis. This patient had no previous family or personal history of lipid abnormality and had four successful prior pregnancies without developing gestational hypertriglyceridemia. Such a severe hypertriglyceridemia is usually seen in patients with familial chylomicronemia syndromes where hypertriglyceridemia is exacerbated by the pregnancy, leading to fatal complications such as acute pancreatitis.

  3. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Natasha Gupta; Seema Ahmed; Lemuel Shaffer; Paula Cavens; Josef Blankstein

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term an...

  4. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpytis, Mindaugas; Karosas, Vytautas; Tamosauskas, Rokas; Dementaviciene, Jurate; Strupas, Kestutis; Sileikis, Audrius; Sipylaite, Jurate

    2012-11-10

    Hypertriglyceridemia is a well known phenomenon of pregnancy occurring due to physiologic changes in sex hormone levels. Occasionally, it could lead to development of acute pancreatitis. Gestational hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis occurs in pregnant women usually with preexisting abnormalities of the lipid metabolism and is associated with additional diagnostic and therapeutic challenges related to hypertriglyceridemia and pregnancy. We present a case of the hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnant woman with no previous history of lipid abnormality and pregnancy as the only known triggering factor for hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis is a rare complication of pregnancy; however, it should be suspected in all pregnant patients admitted for nonobsteric abdominal pain.

  5. Supplementation with two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus curvatus HY7601 and Lactobacillus plantarum KY1032, reduces fasting triglycerides and enhances apolipoprotein A-V levels in non-diabetic subjects with hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyeon Yeong; Kim, Minjoo; Chae, Jey Sook; Ahn, Young-Tae; Sim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Il-Dong; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Ho

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have indicated that supplementation with probiotics might improve lipid metabolism. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of supplementation with probiotic strains Lactobacillus curvatus (L. curvatus) HY7601 and Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) KY1032 on triglyceride (TG) and apolipoprotein A-V (apo A-V) levels. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study was conducted with 128 non-diabetic subjects with hypertriglyceridemia. Over a 12-week test period, the probiotic group consumed 2 g/day of a powdered supplement containing L. curvatus HY7601 and L. plantarum KY1032, whereas the placebo group consumed a powder lacking probiotics. After the treatment, the probiotic group showed an 18.3% (P probiotic group had a significant reduction in TGs (P = 0.040) and increases in the plasma apo A-V (P = 0.003) and LDL particle size (P probiotic group, the reduction in the TG levels was negatively correlated with changes in the apo A-V and baseline TGs, regardless of the APOA5 -1131T > C genotype. The consumption of two probiotic strains for 12 weeks reduced TGs and increased the apo A-V and LDL particle size in hypertriglyceridemic subjects. This effect was more pronounced in subjects with higher levels of fasting TGs regardless of their APOA5 -1131T > C genotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Streptozotocin diabetes and insulin resistance impairment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Streptozotocin diabetes and insulin resistance impairment of spermatogenesis in adult rat testis: central Vs local mechanism. *1. Arikawe A. P.,. 1. Oyerinde A.,. 2. Olatunji-Bello I.I., and. 3. Obika L.F.O. Department of Physiology, 1Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-. Araba, Lagos ...

  7. Streptozotocin diabetes and insulin resistance impairment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Group 7 > Insulin resistant-ginger treated group; fed ad libitum on a special diet as in group 4 above, and also treated with 500 mg/Kg Ginger extract orally. Hormonal and tissue biochemistry analyses revealed that both central and local mechanisms are implicated in the impairment of spermatogenesis by diabetes but the ...

  8. Chronic administration of palmitoleic acid reduces insulin resistance and hepatic lipid accumulation in KK-Ay Mice with genetic type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatanaka Akimasa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of palmitoleic acid (C16:1 n-7 on reducing muscle insulin resistance and preventing beta-cell apoptosis. However, the effect of palmitoleic acid on diabetes remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to examine the antidiabetic effect of palmitoleic acid in KK-Ay mice, a spontaneous model for studies of obese type 2 diabetes with low insulin sensitivity. Methods KK-Ay mice were orally administered vehicle, 300 mg/kg of palmitoleic acid, or 300 mg/kg of palmitic acid (C16:0 on a daily basis for 4 weeks. Results Palmitoleic acid reduced body weight increase, ameliorated the development of hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia, and improved insulin sensitivity. In addition, hepatic characteristics were significantly affected, as weight of the liver and hepatic triglyceride levels were lower in the palmitoleic acid group when compared to the control (vehicle and palmitic acid groups. Oil red O staining clearly indicated reduced hepatic lipid accumulation in response to palmitoleic acid. Furthermore, palmitoleic acid down-regulated mRNA expressions of proinflammatory adipocytokine genes (TNFα and resistin in white adipose tissue and lipogenic genes (SREBP-1, FAS, and SCD-1 in liver. Conclusions These results suggest that palmitoleic acid improves hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia by increasing insulin sensitivity, in part owing to suppressing proinflammatory gene expressions and improving hepatic lipid metabolism in diabetic mice.

  9. Type 2 diabetes mellitus as a disorder of galanin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Penghua; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Bo, Ping; Zhang, Zhenwen

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus with its high morbidity and mortality becomes an important health problem. The multifactorial etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus is relative to many gene and molecule alterations, and increased insulin resistance. Besides these, however, there are still other predisposing and risk factors accounting for type 2 diabetes mellitus not to be identified and recognized. Emerging evidence indicated that defects in galanin function played a crucial role in development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Galanin homeostasis is tightly relative to insulin resistance and is regulated by blood glucose. Hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinism, enhanced plasma galanin levels and decreased galanin receptor activities are some of the characters of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The discrepancy between high insulin level and low glucose handling is named as insulin resistance. Similarly, the discrepancy between high galanin level and low glucose handling may be denominated as galanin resistance too. In this review, the characteristic milestones of type 2 diabetes mellitus were condensed as two analogical conceptual models, obesity-hyper-insulin-insulin resistance-type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity-hyper-galanin-galanin resistance-type 2 diabetes mellitus. Both galanin resistance and insulin resistance are correlative with each other. Conceptualizing the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus as a disorder of galanin resistance may inspire a new concept to deepen our knowledge about pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, eventually leading to novel preventive and therapeutic interventions for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hypertriglyceridemia, a common dyslipidemia of complex definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Trenti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertriglyceridemia is a common biochemical finding. Depending on the triglyceride levels it can be associated with increased risk of acute pancreatitis and of cardiovascular disease. The most severe forms have a genetic basis. Clinical case: We report a case of a 60-year-old woman with very high triglycerides (800- 3,000 mg/dL and normal cholesterol levels. The patient is a non smoker, on hypolipemic diet, non alcoholic consumer, and on regular physical exercise. Her blood pressure is normal, BMI is 20, waist circumference is 78 cm. Thyroid, renal and hepatic function are normal. She has never had acute pancreatitis or cardiovascular disease. Discussion: The diagnostic and therapeutic management of this case is discussed. Causes of primary (genetic and secondary hypertriglyceridemia are also reviewed, together with clinical features and management on every day practice. We focused on severe hypertriglyceridemia.

  11. Understanding hypertriglyceridemia in women: clinical impact and management with prescription omega-3-acid ethyl esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas D Dayspring

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Thomas D DayspringNorth Jersey Institute of Menopausal Lipidology, Wayne, NJ, USABackground: Elevated triglycerides (TGs are a common lipid disorder in the US and are associated with comorbidities such as pancreatitis, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. TGs are generally elevated in postmenopausal women compared with premenopausal women. Meta-analysis has shown that elevated TGs are associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD.Objective: This article provides a general overview of TG metabolism and reviews data on the epidemiology and risk of elevated TGs in women, as pregnancy and menopause, in particular, have been associated with unfavorable changes in the lipoprotein profile, including elevations in TGs. In addition, this review seeks to explain the recommended TG goals and treatment options for hypertriglyceridemia with an emphasis on severe hypertriglyceridemia (TGs ≥ 500 mg/dL and its respective treatment with prescription omega-3-acid ethyl esters (P-OM3.Methods: MedLine was searched for articles published through August 2009 using the terms “hypertriglyceridemia” and “dyslipidemia”, with subheadings for “prevalence”, “women”, “treatment”, “guidelines”, “risk”, and “omega-3 fatty acids”. Publications discussing the epidemiology of hypertriglyceridemia, CHD risk, treatment guidelines for lipid management, or clinical trials involving P-OM3 were selected for review. The reference lists of relevant articles were also examined for additional citations.Results: Hypertriglyceridemia is associated with increased CHD risk. Women, especially those with polycystic ovarian syndrome, type 2 diabetes, or who are postmenopausal, should be monitored regularly for the impact of hypertriglyceridemia on their lipid profile. Cardiovascular risk of TGs can be indirectly assessed by monitoring non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C levels. There are multiple sets of guidelines

  12. Severe hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Alptekin; Kulaksizoglu, Mustafa; Sahin, Mustafa; Ertugrul, Derun Taner; Ozer, Feyza; Tutuncu, Neslihan Bascil; Demirag, Nilgun Guvener

    2006-04-01

    Chylomicronemia syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the presence of chylomicrons in the fasting state. An acute and potentially life-threatening complication of chyiomicronemia syndrome is severe acute pancreatitis. We report a case of a 24-year-old primigravida with severe hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis. We reviewed the clinical course and treatment of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis. She was admitted in the 37th week of gestation with severe abdominal pain, which was radiating to the back, and having uterine contractions. Cesarean delivery was performed under spinal anesthesia, and a healthy male infant was born. Intraoperative findings included milky peritoneal fluid collection. Elevated pancreatic enzymes with significant hypertriglyceridemia (10,092 mg/dL) suggesting acute pancreatitis were also found on chemical analysis. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was confirmed by computed tomography scan. Treatment with continuous intravenous insulin--glucose, cessation of oral intake, and nasogastric decompression--dramatically decreased the triglyceride levels to 608 mg/dL within five days. She was discharged as symptom free with strict dietary intervention after 10 days. Intravenous insulin is a low-cost and effective alternative treatment in hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis during pregnancy. To our knowledge, such a high triglyceride level has not previously been reported in pregnancy.

  13. Comparison of iron status and insulin resistance between non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetics and non-diabetic offspring of non-diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, U.; Qureshi, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is positively correlated with body iron. It is unclear whether iron is a cause or an outcome of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance precedes type 2 diabetes mellitus. Offspring of type 2 diabetics are insulin resistant as compared to those of the non-diabetics. The present study was designed to compare and correlate insulin resistance with iron parameters (including serum ferritin, transferrin saturation and blood haemoglobin) in non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetics and non-diabetic offspring of non-diabetics. Methods: It was a cross-sectional study, conducted on one hundred and twenty male subjects 20-40 years of age. They were divided into two groups, each group having 60 subjects. Group A included non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetics, while Group B included non-diabetic offspring of non-diabetics. Fasting blood sample was taken and examined for glucose, haemoglobin, insulin, iron, TIBC and ferritin. Data was analysed by SPSS-17. Results: Insulin resistance and iron parameters were significantly higher (p<0.05) in non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetics as compared to those of the non-diabetics. There was significant positive correlation (p=0.027) between insulin resistance and serum iron in non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetics. There was also significant positive correlation between insulin resistance and serum iron, transferrin saturation and haemoglobin in non-diabetic offspring of non-diabetics. Conclusion: Non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetics have iron load and insulin resistance, that predispose them to the development of type 2 diabetes. (author)

  14. Renal Doppler indices in diabetic children with insulin resistance syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Ghaffar, Shereen; El Kaffas, Khaled; Hegazy, Ranya; Mostafa, Mohamed

    2010-11-01

    End-stage renal failure is still a leading cause of mortality among type 1 diabetes patients. Insulin resistance plays a larger role in type 1 diabetes disease process than is commonly recognized. Detection of diabetic nephropathy as early as possible currently offers the best chance of delaying or possibly preventing progression to end-stage disease. Renal resistive index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI), measured using renal Doppler ultrasonography, reflect intrarenal vascular resistance. The present work aimed at examining renal Doppler indices (RI and PI) in type 1 diabetic children and their relation to features of insulin resistance and other established parameters of early diabetic nephropathy as microalbuminuria. One hundred diabetic children with a mean age of 13.4 ± 2.9 yr and an average diabetes duration of (7.2 ± 2.5 yr) were included. Thirty healthy children served as controls. All renal Doppler indices were significantly higher in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (p ≤ 0.01). The worst parameters were observed in children diagnosed with insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) (38%), hypertensive (12%), and obese (4%) children. Resistive index showed a significant correlation to blood pressure (r = 0.2, p = 0.04), waist-hip ratio (r = 0.5, p = 0.02), insulin dose (r = 0.2, p = 0.02) and estimated glucose disposal rate (r = -0.5, p = 0.01). No correlation was noted to microalbuminuria, HbA1c, or duration of diabetes. The present work concluded that renal Doppler indices are worse in diabetic children and particularly those with IRS. These children appear to be at graver risk for diabetic nephropathy. In these patients adding renal Doppler assessment to their work up, might diagnose diabetic nephropathy at a prealbuminuric stage. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia - Induced Pancreatitis During Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Çelik

    2008-08-01

    scan of abdomen was normal, with no evidence of cholelithiasis but there was perisplenic fluid accumulation. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia was made. With early conservative treatment the patient’s condition was effectively improved and she was discharged from the hospital 8 days later. After 12 weeks, cesarean section was performed due to previous cesarean section. She was discharged home three days later with her baby.

  16. Alloxan-induced and Insulin-resistant Diabetes Mellitus affect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance on semen parameters, histology of reproductive organs and serum concentrations of testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH). Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 180 - 200g were made diabetic by intravenous injection of ...

  17. Increased amino acids levels and the risk of developing of hypertriglyceridemia in a 7-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Mook-Kanamori, D. O.; Römisch-Margl, W.; Kastenmüller, G.; Prehn, C.; Petersen, A. K.; Illig, T.; Gieger, C.; Wang-Sattler, R.; Meisinger, C.; Peters, A.; Adamski, J.; Suhre, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, five branched-chain and aromatic amino acids were shown to be associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). Aim We set out to examine whether amino acids are also associated with the development of hypertriglyceridemia. Materials and methods We determined the serum amino acids concentrations of 1,125 individuals of the KORA S4 baseline study, for which follow-up data were available also at the KORA F4 7 years later. After exclusion for hypertriglyceridemia...

  18. Hypertriglyceridemia and omega-3 fatty acids: Their often overlooked role in cardiovascular disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arca, M; Borghi, C; Pontremoli, R; De Ferrari, G M; Colivicchi, F; Desideri, G; Temporelli, P L

    2018-03-01

    This review aims to describe the pathogenic role of triglycerides in cardiometabolic risk, and the potential role of omega-3 fatty acids in the management of hypertriglyceridemia and cardiovascular disease. In epidemiological studies, hypertriglyceridemia correlates with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even after adjustment for low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. This has been further supported by Mendelian randomization studies where triglyceride-raising common single nucleotide polymorphisms confer an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Although guidelines vary in their definition of hypertriglyceridemia, they consistently define a normal triglyceride level as risk of cardiovascular disease, even in patients with optimally managed LDL-C levels, triglycerides are an important secondary target in both assessment and treatment. Dietary changes are a key element of first-line lifestyle intervention, but pharmacological treatment including omega-3 fatty acids may be indicated in people with persistently high triglyceride levels. Moreover, in patients with pre-existing cardiovascular disease, omega-3 supplements significantly reduce the risk of sudden death, cardiac death and myocardial infarction and are generally well tolerated. Targeting resistant hypertriglyceridemia should be considered as a part of clinical management of cardiovascular risk. Omega-3 fatty acids may represent a valuable resource to this aim. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Studies of association of AGPAT6 variants with type 2 diabetes and related metabolic phenotypes in 12,068 Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snogdal, Lena Sønder; Grarup, Niels; Banasik, Karina

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes, obesity and insulin resistance are characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and ectopic accumulation of lipids in liver and skeletal muscle. AGPAT6 encodes a novel glycerol-3 phosphate acyltransferase, GPAT4, which catalyzes the first step in the de novo triglyceride synthesis. AGPA......-deficient mice show lower weight and resistance to diet- and genetically induced obesity. Here, we examined whether common or low-frequency variants in AGPAT6 associate with type 2 diabetes or related metabolic traits in a Danish population.......Type 2 diabetes, obesity and insulin resistance are characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and ectopic accumulation of lipids in liver and skeletal muscle. AGPAT6 encodes a novel glycerol-3 phosphate acyltransferase, GPAT4, which catalyzes the first step in the de novo triglyceride synthesis. AGPAT6...

  20. status and insulin resistance in diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taslima Akter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Complication of diabetes mellitus includes peripheral neuropathy which causes ischemic foot ulceration. Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance may accelerate the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Objective: To assess the glycaemic status and insulin resistance for development of peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: This control case control study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka from July 2014 to June 2015. A total number of 150 Type 2 diabetic patients of both sexes were selected with age ranging 40 to 50 years. Among them, 75 patients with peripheral neuropathy were included in study group and 75 patients without peripheral neuropathy were control. For evaluation of glycaemic status, fasting serum glucose (FSG, Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c and to calculate insulin resistance by homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, fasting serum insulin (FSI, were estimated. For statistical analysis, unpaired Student’s ‘t’ test was done. Results: In this study, significant increase in FSG, HbA1c, FSI, HOMA-IR were found in diabetic subjects with peripheral neuropathy in comparison to control group. Conclusion: From the study results, it is concluded that poor glycaemic control and greater insulin resistance may be associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  1. Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis (Chylomicronemia Syndrome Treated with Supportive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Uysal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertriglyceridemia is a rare cause of pancreatitis. In treatment pancreatic rest, lifestyle changes, medications (fibrates, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and nicotinic acid are essential. Many experimental treatment modalities have been reported as insulin and heparin infusion and plasmapheresis. In this study we present the hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis treated with supportive care.

  2. Hypertension management and microvascular insulin resistance in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seung-Hyun; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2010-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes is in essence a vascular disease and is frequently associated with hypertension, macrovascular events, and microvascular complications. Microvascular dysfunction, including impaired recruitment and capillary rarefaction, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Microvascular insulin resistance and renin-angiotensin system upregulation are present in diabetes, and each contributes to the development of hypertension and microvascular dysfunction. In the insulin-sensitive state, insulin increases microvascular perfusion by increasing endothelial nitric oxide production, but this effect is abolished by insulin resistance. Angiotensin II, acting via the type 1 receptors, induces inflammation and oxidative stress, leading to impaired insulin signaling, reduced nitric oxide availability, and vasoconstriction. Conversely, it acts on the type 2 receptors to cause vasodilatation. Because substrate and hormonal exchanges occur in the microvasculature, antihypertensive agents targeted to improve microvascular insulin sensitivity and function may have beneficial effects beyond their capacity to lower blood pressure in patients with diabetes.

  3. Insulin resistance and progression to type 1 diabetes in the European Nicotinamide Diabetes Intervention Trial (ENDIT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingley, Polly J; Mahon, Jeffrey L; Gale, Edwin A M

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin resistance can modulate progression to type 1 diabetes in individuals with ongoing islet autoimmunity. We wanted to see whether measures of insulin resistance improved risk assessment in islet cell antibody (ICA)-positive relatives when added to other immune and metabolic markers....... RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The retrospective cohort analysis included 213 family members participating in the European Nicotinamide Diabetes Intervention Trial. All were aged or=20 Juvenile Diabetes Foundation units. Median length of follow......-up was 4.21 years, and 105 individuals developed diabetes. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance tests were performed at baseline; antibodies to GAD, IA-2, and insulin were determined by radioimmunoassay; and insulin resistance was estimated by homeostasis model assessment. Risk was assessed by Cox...

  4. Interactions of obesity and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in familial hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruhama, Y; Abe, R; Okuguchi, F; Oikawa, S; Ohneda, A; Goto, Y

    1978-06-01

    Plasma lipids and lipoproteins, glucose tolerance, plasma insulin response to glucose load, and liver function were examined in 81 relatives of 12 index cases with primary endogenous hypertriglyceridemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hepatic steatosis, as well as in 90 nonrelatives, including the spouses, as controls. Insulin hypersecretion (with or without glucose intolerance), endogenous hypertriglyceridemia, and abnormal liver function suggesting hepatic steatosis were shown to exist in the relatives mostly in combined fashion. Correlation analysis and stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that the combined disorder developed on the basis of obesity. The incidence of diabetes mellitus was significantly high in the relatives (14.8 per cent) as compared with the normal Japanese population (3.5 per cent). Although the vertical transmission of the combined disorder was noted in almost all pedigrees, the frequency distribution analysis of insulin response, glucose tolerance, and plasma triglyceride showed the histograms of these variables similarly skewed to the right as compared with those of the controls, with no apparent bimodality. In view of the hitherto suggested role of insulin in triglyceride metabolism, it is concluded that hyperinsulinemia coupled with obesity seems to be the basic trait of this form of familial hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis, though the mode of transmission remains to be elucidated.

  5. Acute Effect of Metformin on Postprandial Hypertriglyceridemia through Delayed Gastric Emptying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Daisuke; Morino, Katsutaro; Nakagawa, Fumiyuki; Murata, Koichiro; Sekine, Osamu; Beppu, Fumiaki; Gotoh, Naohiro; Ugi, Satoshi; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2017-06-16

    Postprandial hypertriglyceridemia is a potential target for cardiovascular disease prevention in patients with diabetic dyslipidemia. Metformin has been reported to reduce plasma triglyceride concentrations in the postprandial states. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the triglyceride-lowering effect of metformin. Here, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid metabolism after olive oil-loading in 129S mice fed a high fat diet for three weeks. Metformin administration (250 mg/kg) for one week decreased postprandial plasma triglycerides. Pre-administration (250 mg/kg) of metformin resulted in a stronger triglyceride-lowering effect (approximately 45% lower area under the curve) than post-administration. A single administration (250 mg/kg) of metformin lowered plasma postprandial triglycerides comparably to administration for one week, suggesting an acute effect of metformin on postprandial hypertriglyceridemia. To explore whole body lipid metabolism after fat-loading, stomach size, fat absorption in the intestine, and fat oxidation ( 13 C/ 12 C ratio in expired CO₂ after administration of glyceryl-1- 13 C tripalmitate) were measured with and without metformin (250 mg/kg) pre-treatment. In metformin-treated mice, larger stomach size, lower fat oxidation, and no change in lipid absorption were observed. In conclusion, metformin administration before fat loading reduced postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, most likely by delaying gastric emptying.

  6. Acute pancreatitis associated with hypertriglyceridemia: a life-threatening complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayataş, Semra Eser; Eser, Mehmet; Cam, Cetin; Cogendez, Ebru; Guzin, Kadir

    2010-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is rare cause in pregnancy and gallstones are clearly the most common cause of pancreatitis during pregnancy. Only a small percentage of women with acute pancreatitis are associated with hypertriglyceridemia and it is most often noted during the last two trimesters of pregnancy. Hypertriglyceridemia is a rare cause of pancreatitis in pregnant women and complication such as pancreatitis carries a higher risk of mortality for both the mother and the fetus. Our purpose was to report our experience with acute pancreatitis as a lethal complication of hypertriglyceridemia during the third trimester of pregnancy.

  7. Obesity and Insulin Resistance: Management in Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Suhel Ashraff; Muhammad A. Siddiqui; Thomas E. Carline

    2013-01-01

    Obesity today, is a major public health problem across the world. The rapid increase in the incidence of obesity and associated co-morbidities presents a major challenge to health care globally. Insulin resistance is commonly associated with obesity and other life style diseases. However, much uncertainty remains about the mechanism regarding the association between insulin resistance and human disease mainly because of the difficulties of defining insulin resistance in clinical terms and of ...

  8. Necrotizing Pancreatitis with Hypertriglyceridemia Development Results: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ižbrahim Yetim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia is a relatively rare clinical entity. Acute pancreatic necrosis is a life threatening form of acute pancreatitis in which early recognition and treatment is important. Necrotising pancreatitis should be treated immediately. We presented a case of pancreatic necrosis due to hypert¬riglyceridemia which required surgical intervention. We performed necrosectomy. After surgery the patient recovered. We presented the case in order to mention necrotising pancreatitis arising from hypertriglyceridemia and requiring surgical exploration.

  9. Heterozygous CAV1 frameshift mutations (MIM 601047 in patients with atypical partial lipodystrophy and hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alston Lindsay

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice with a deleted Cav1 gene encoding caveolin-1 develop adipocyte abnormalities and insulin resistance. From genomic DNA of patients with atypical lipodystrophy and hypertriglyceridemia who had no mutations in any known lipodystrophy gene, we used DNA sequence analysis to screen the coding regions of human CAV1 (MIM 601047. Results We found a heterozygous frameshift mutation in CAV1, designated I134fsdelA-X137, in a female patient who had atypical partial lipodystrophy, with subcutaneous fat loss affecting the upper part of her body and face, but sparing her legs, gluteal region and visceral fat stores. She had severe type 5 hyperlipoproteinemia, with recurrent pancreatitis. In addition, she had some atypical features, including congenital cataracts and neurological findings. Her father was also heterozygous for this mutation, and had a similar pattern of fat redistribution, hypertriglyceridemia and congenital cataracts, with milder neurological involvement. An unrelated patient had a different heterozygous frameshift mutation in the CAV1 gene, designated -88delC. He also had a partial lipodystrophy phenotype, with subcutaneous fat loss affecting the arms, legs and gluteal region, but sparing his face, neck and visceral fat stores. He also had severe type 5 hyperlipoproteinemia, with recurrent pancreatitis; however he had no clinically apparent neurological manifestations. The mutations were absent from the genomes of 1063 healthy individuals. Conclusion Thus, very rare CAV1 frameshift mutations appear to be associated with atypical lipodystrophy and hypertriglyceridemia.

  10. Insulin resistance in three dogs with hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, S L; Nelson, R W; Feldman, E C; Niwa, D

    1993-05-01

    Insulin resistance resolved in 3 dogs with hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus after treatment with sodium levothyroxine. A thorough diagnostic evaluation failed to identify any other cause of insulin resistance in these dogs. Hypothyroidism was diagnosed in each dog on the basis of clinical signs, physical findings, hyperlipidemia, and results of thyrotropin or thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test. Hypoglycemia was documented in each dog within 2 weeks of starting sodium levothyroxine administration. The insulin dosage was decreased by 60 to 62% during the ensuing months and good glycemic control was obtained at these lower insulin dosages in all dogs. These findings would suggest hypothyroidism-induced insulin resistance in these dogs.

  11. Risk factors of diabetes in North Indians with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratyush, Daliparthy D; Tiwari, Shalbha; Singh, Saurabh; Singh, Surya K

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome progresses to diabetes and determinants of this progression like hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and genetic factors have been speculative. The present study was aimed at quantifying the insulin resistance and influence of family history of diabetes in subjects with metabolic syndrome developing prediabetes and diabetes. Consecutive subjects attending the endocrine clinic were evaluated for metabolic syndrome as per definition of International Diabetes Federation, 2005. The family history of diabetes in their first degree relatives was ascertained and Homeostasis model assessment of Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), Homeostasis model assessment for beta cell function (HOMA-B) and Quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) were calculated in 163 subjects enrolled. HOMA-IR was higher (pmetabolic syndrome+prediabetes or diabetes compared to metabolic syndrome with normal glucose tolerance. HOMA-B was lower and prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes was higher in metabolic syndrome subjects with family history of diabetes than in those without such family history (pmetabolic syndrome having prediabetes and diabetes had more severe insulin resistance than those with metabolic syndrome only. Beta cell dysfunction was remarkable and prevalence of prediabetes was high in metabolic syndrome subjects with family history of diabetes. Both the severity of the insulin resistance and family history of diabetes are therefore proposed to be determinants of diminished Beta cell function leading to diabetes in metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Diabetic retinopathy is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anan, Futoshi; Takayuki, Masaki; Takahashi, Naohiko; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Eshima, Nobuoki; Saikawa, Tetsunori; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction are associated with high mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. This preliminary study was therefore designed to test the hypothesis that DR is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients without insulin treatment. Seventy persons were diagnosed to have type 2 diabetes in the examination from June 2004 to May 2006. The study group consisted of 29 type 2 diabetic patients with DR (age: 58±6 years, mean±standard deviation (s.d.)) and 41 type 2 diabetic patients with no DR (NDR) (n=41, 58±5 years). Cardiovascular autonomic function was assessed by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), heart rate variability, plasma norepinephrine concentration and cardiac 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphic findings. DR patients had lower BRS, early and delayed 123 I-MIBG myocardial uptake values and higher percent washout rate (WR) of 123 I-MIBG than the NDR patients. With respect to metabolic findings, DR patients had higher fasting plasma insulin concentration (P 123 I-MIBG (P 123 I-MIBG are independently associated with DR in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. (author)

  13. Management of Severe Hypertriglyceridemia with Plasmapheresis During Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Boyraz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although severe hypertriglyceridemia is rarely seen in pregnancy, it may result in acute pancreatitis leading to increased morbidity in both mother and fetus. Restriction of dietary lipid and lipid-lowering medications are the cornerstones of the treatment. Experiences with plasmapheresis are limited. Herein, a pregnant woman with hypertriglyceridemia who was given preconceptional counseling and medical therapy and kept under close observation since the early weeks of gestation, succesfully managed with dietary lipid restriction and especially with serial plasmapheresis is discussed. Her previous pregnancy was remarkable with fetal demise due to acute pancreatitis at 24th weeks of gestation. It is important that the clinicians have a clear understanding of the normal lipid profile during pregnancy, the clinical picture, the potential complications, available treatment options of hypertriglyceridemia particularly during pregnancy.

  14. [Hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis in pregnancy. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exbrayat, V; Morel, J; De Filippis, J-P; Tourne, G; Jospe, R; Auboyer, C

    2007-01-01

    We report the case of a 31-year-old pregnant patient in the 33rd week of gestation, with no history of dyslipidaemia, admitted for sub-acute epigastric pain. The milky aspect of blood samples was remarkable. Blood analysis showed a moderate increase in pancreatic enzymes but a major hyperlipaemia: triglyceridaemia 113 g/l and total cholesterolaemia 25 g/l. We suspected a hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis in pregnancy. The diagnosis was confirmed by CT-scan. Abdominal echography showed no abnormalities in biliary duct. After few hours, a caesarean was performed for acute fetal distress. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit where a decrease of hypertriglyceridemia was already observed. Only one plasmapheresis was performed. Heparin was introduced. Rapid clinical improvement allowed discharge from intensive care at day 3. This case report illustrates lipid decrease with undertaken treatments. We discuss the management of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis in pregnancy.

  15. Association Between Adiponectin and Insulin Resistance in Diabetic Urolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Meiyappan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The prevalence of urolithiasis is increasing worldwide. Diabetes mellitus (DM is characterized by insulin resistance, which increases the risk of kidney stone formation. Adiponectin is an insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory cytokine, which is known to improve glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in humans. The association of insulin and adiponectin with kidney stones is not clear. Hence, the present study aim to assess the serum levels of adiponectin and insulin resistance in DM patients with urolithiasis in comparison to those without. Methods: This study involved two groups, group A consisted of 30 patients with DM and urolithiasis, and group B consisted of 30 patients with DM but without urolithiasis (control group. Biochemical parameters studied were serum adiponectin, insulin, glucose, urea, creatinine, and 24 hours urinary calcium and phosphate. Results: The serum adiponectin level was significantly increased in the diabetic urolithiasis cases (group A compared to the control group (group B. The levels of 24 hours urine calcium and phosphorus were also significantly increased in group A. There was no significant difference in serum insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance between the two groups. A negative correlation was seen between serum adiponectin and insulin among the cases (r = -0.368 and p = 0.045. Conclusions: We found that serum adiponectin levels are increased in patients with DM and urolithiasis.

  16. Impaired hepatic ketogenesis in moderately obese men with hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Gloria Lena; Dunn, Fredrick L; Grundy, Scott M

    2009-04-01

    Several studies suggest that increased nonesterified fatty acid flux and increased de novo lipogenesis may contribute to hypertriglyceridemia, but few studies have examined fatty acid oxidation as a factor. Endogenous hypertriglyceridemia (increased very low density lipoprotein triglyceride) could result from (a) re-esterification of excess nonesterified fatty acids entering the liver, (b) activation of hepatic lipogenesis, and/or (c) defective oxidation of hepatic fatty acids leading to greater triglyceride synthesis. Therefore, this study used plasma levels of 3-hydroxybutyrate as a marker for fatty acid oxidation. The study was carried out in hypertriglyceridemic and normotriglyceridemic subjects under 3 conditions: (a) in the fasting state, (b) after a fatty meal that should enhance fatty acid oxidation, and (c) after an oxandrolone challenge, which we recently showed increases fatty acid oxidation. In the fasting state, 3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in hypertriglyceridemic patients were only 53% of levels in normotriglyceridemic subjects. After a fatty meal, moderate increases in 3-hydroxybutyrate were observed, but values for patients with hypertriglceridemia remained 62% of the levels in the normotriglyceridemic group. A similar pattern of response was observed with oxandrolone challenge. There were no significant changes in fasting or postprandial levels of nonesterfified fatty acids, glycerol, or triglycerides before and during the oxandrolone challenge. Patients with endogenous hypertriglyceridemia seem to have a defect in fatty acid oxidation as indicated by reduced levels of 3-hydroxybutyrate. This defect was observed during fasting, postprandially, and during oxandrolone challenge. We propose that this defect contributes to the development of hypertriglyceridemia.

  17. Successful Plasma Exchange for Acute Pancreatitis Complicated With Hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Takahira MD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old male with acute pancreatitis induced by hypertriglyceridemia had problems during treatment with plasma exchange. The hypercoagulable state was prevented by introducing innovative methods for cleaning and warming of the circuit and dialyzer. This enabled successful therapy, and the patient fully recovered from life-threatening acute pancreatitis.

  18. Successful Plasma Exchange for Acute Pancreatitis Complicated With Hypertriglyceridemia

    OpenAIRE

    Takahira, Shuji; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kin, Hunsook; Ooya, Yoshitaka; Sekine, Yasumasa; Sonoda, Kenichiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yushi; Takane, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Youhei; Tsukamoto, Isao; Nemoto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male with acute pancreatitis induced by hypertriglyceridemia had problems during treatment with plasma exchange. The hypercoagulable state was prevented by introducing innovative methods for cleaning and warming of the circuit and dialyzer. This enabled successful therapy, and the patient fully recovered from life-threatening acute pancreatitis.

  19. Genetic Variants Associated with Gestational Hypertriglyceridemia and Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sai-Li; Chen, Tan-Zhou; Huang, Xie-Lin; Chen, Chao; Jin, Rong; Huang, Zhi-Ming; Zhou, Meng-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia is a well-known cause of pancreatitis. Usually, there is a moderate increase in plasma triglyceride level during pregnancy. Additionally, certain pre-existing genetic traits may render a pregnant woman susceptible to development of severe hypertriglyceridemia and pancreatitis, especially in the third trimester. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of gestational hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis, we undertook DNA mutation analysis of the lipoprotein lipase (LPL), apolipoprotein C2 (APOC2), apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5), lipase maturation factor 1 (LMF1), and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) genes in five unrelated pregnant Chinese women with severe hypertriglyceridemia and pancreatitis. DNA sequencing showed that three out of five patients had the same homozygous variation, p.G185C, in APOA5 gene. One patient had a compound heterozygous mutation, p.A98T and p.L279V, in LPL gene. Another patient had a compound heterozygous mutation, p.A98T & p.C14F in LPL and GPIHBP1 gene, respectively. No mutations were seen in APOC2 or LMF1 genes. All patients were diagnosed with partial LPL deficiency in non-pregnant state. As revealed in our study, genetic variants appear to play an important role in the development of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia, and, p.G185C mutation in APOA5 gene appears to be the most common variant implicated in the Chinese population. Antenatal screening for mutations in susceptible women, combined with subsequent interventions may be invaluable in the prevention of potentially life threatening gestational hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis.

  20. Genetic Variants Associated with Gestational Hypertriglyceridemia and Pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai-Li Xie

    Full Text Available Severe hypertriglyceridemia is a well-known cause of pancreatitis. Usually, there is a moderate increase in plasma triglyceride level during pregnancy. Additionally, certain pre-existing genetic traits may render a pregnant woman susceptible to development of severe hypertriglyceridemia and pancreatitis, especially in the third trimester. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of gestational hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis, we undertook DNA mutation analysis of the lipoprotein lipase (LPL, apolipoprotein C2 (APOC2, apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5, lipase maturation factor 1 (LMF1, and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1 genes in five unrelated pregnant Chinese women with severe hypertriglyceridemia and pancreatitis. DNA sequencing showed that three out of five patients had the same homozygous variation, p.G185C, in APOA5 gene. One patient had a compound heterozygous mutation, p.A98T and p.L279V, in LPL gene. Another patient had a compound heterozygous mutation, p.A98T & p.C14F in LPL and GPIHBP1 gene, respectively. No mutations were seen in APOC2 or LMF1 genes. All patients were diagnosed with partial LPL deficiency in non-pregnant state. As revealed in our study, genetic variants appear to play an important role in the development of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia, and, p.G185C mutation in APOA5 gene appears to be the most common variant implicated in the Chinese population. Antenatal screening for mutations in susceptible women, combined with subsequent interventions may be invaluable in the prevention of potentially life threatening gestational hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis.

  1. Assessing Psychological Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes-Truscott, Elizabeth; Pouwer, F; Speight, Jane

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This study aims to examine the operationalisation of 'psychological insulin resistance' (PIR) among people with type 2 diabetes and to identify and critique relevant measures. RECENT FINDINGS: PIR has been operationalised as (1) the assessment of attitudes or beliefs about...... insulin therapy and (2) hypothetical or actual resistance, or unwillingness, to use to insulin. Five validated PIR questionnaires were identified. None was fully comprehensive of all aspects of PIR, and the rigour and reporting of questionnaire development and psychometric validation varied considerably...... between measures. Assessment of PIR should focus on the identification of negative and positive attitudes towards insulin use. Actual or hypothetical insulin refusal may be better conceptualised as a potential consequence of PIR, as its assessment overlooks the attitudes that may prevent insulin use...

  2. Subcutaneous NPH Insulin for Severe Hypertriglyceridemia in a Pregnant Patient with Type V Hyperlipoproteinemia: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kemal Balcı

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An increase in triglyceride levels in familial hyperlipidemia during pregnancy has been reported. Severe hypertriglyceridemia can lead to complications such as acute pancreatitis, preeclampsia, maternal and fetal complications. Because of the teratogenic effects associated with fibrate therapy in pregnancy, alternative treatment strategies such as insulin as a rapid and potent activator of lipoprotein lipase are required during pregnancy. We report a case of hypertriglyceridemia in a 33-year-old pregnant woman in whom treatment with merely single one time administration of Neutral Protamine Hagedorn insulin was accompanied by a reduction in the serum triglyceride level; to the best of our knowledge, this has never been reported in the literature. Her triglyceride level was 3616 mg/dL before insulin treatment and 1246 mg/dL after insulin treatment. Although this regimen was used safely and effectively in our patient, comprehensive studies are required to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of subcutaneously intermediate-acting Neutral Protamine Hagedorn insulin for the treatment of severe hypertriglyceridemia in non-diabetic pregnant women.

  3. Prevention of cardiovascular complications of diabetes mellitus by aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles-James, Candi; James, Erskine A; Sowers, James R

    2004-01-01

    Eighteen million Americans have type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) while another 40 million have impaired glucose tolerance. Atherosclerotic heart disease is the leading cause of death in patients with diabetes mellitus. In addition to the increased risk for CardioVascular Disease (CVD), patients with diabetes have a worse prognosis than nondiabetics when they suffer an ischemic event. Insulin resistance is increasingly recognized as a chronic, low-level, inflammatory state. Hyperinsulinemia has been proposed as the forerunner of hypertension, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, abdominal obesity, and altered glucose tolerance, linking all these abnormalities to the development of coronary vascular disease. Atherosclerosis and insulin resistance share similar pathophysiological mechanisms, due to the actions of proinflammatory cytokines. The dynamic inflammatory milieu found in diabetes explains the susceptibility of diabetics to CVD and the potential mechanism by which aspirin may prevent CVD in diabetics. Aspirin decreases the risk for CVD in diabetic patients by a variety of established and novel mechanisms. Therapeutic strategies that lesson the CVD risk in diabetic patients, including the use of aspirin for primary and secondary prevention, are potentially very important. This review article addresses the antiatherosclerotic effects of aspirin, the potential anti-diabetic effects of aspirin, and the clinical trial evidence for CVD prevention by aspirin in diabetics. We also present recommendations for the use of aspirin in the diabetic population and the current guidelines put forth by the American Heart Association and by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. A novel botanical formula prevents diabetes by improving insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Juntao; Velliquette, Rodney A; Grann, Kerry; Burns, Charlie R; Scholten, Jeff; Tian, Feng; Zhang, Qi; Gui, Min

    2017-07-05

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and the prevalence has increased significantly in recent decades to epidemic proportions in China. Individually, fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum) seed, mulberry (Morus alba L.) leaf and American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) root can improve glycemia in various animal models and humans with impaired glucose metabolism and T2DM. The aim of this study was to design an optimized botanical formula containing these herbal extracts as a nutritional strategy for the prevention of insulin resistance and T2DM. Cell-free α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzyme assays were used to determine inhibitory potential of extracts. Glucose uptake was examined in differentiated human adipocytes using radiolabeled 2-deoxyglucose. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided and glycemia balanced into 5 groups: two controls (naïve and model) and three doses of the botanical test formula containing standardized fenugreek seed, mulberry leaf and American ginseng extracts (42.33, 84.66 and 169.33 mg/kg BW). Insulin resistance and T2DM was induced by feeding animals a high fat diet and with an alloxan injection. Glucose tolerance was examined by measuring serum glucose levels following an oral glucose load. Fenugreek seed and mulberry leaf dose dependently inhibited α-amylase (IC50 = 73.2 μg/mL) and α-glucosidase (IC50 = 111.8 ng/mL), respectively. All three botanical extracts improved insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake in human adipocytes, which lead to the design of an optimized botanical test formula. In a rat model of insulin resistance and T2DM, the optimized botanical test formula improved fasting serum glucose levels, fasting insulin resistance and the development of impaired glucose tolerance. The reduction in epididymal adipose tissue GLUT4 and PDK1 expression induced by high fat diet and alloxan was blunted by the botanical test formula. A novel botanical formula containing standardized

  5. Prevalence of Aspirin Resistance in Diabetic Patients and its Associated Factors

    OpenAIRE

    HABIZAL, Nor Halwani; ABDUL HALIM, Sanihah; BHASKAR, Shalini; WAN BEBAKAR, Wan Mohamed; ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aspirin resistance has posed a major dilemma in the prevention of cardiovascular disease and stroke. There have been many factors that have been associated with aspirin resistance. Among these factors, the inflammatory processes of diabetes and glycaemic control have been significantly associated with aspirin resistance. Our study evaluated the prevalence of aspirin resistance and its associated factors.

  6. Effect of resistance training on plasma nitric oxide and asymmetric dimethylarginine concentrations in type I diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parivash Shekarchizadeh Esfahani

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Elevated ADMA level in diabetic animals can normalize during resistance exercise. Reduced ADMA level and increased NO level following resistance training might improve cardiovascular risk in diabetic subjects.

  7. Determinants of Intravascular Resistance in Indian Diabetic Nephropathy Patients: A Hospital-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhav Thukral

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives. Metabolic dysregulation has failed to explain clinical variability of patients with diabetic nephropathy and hence a renewed interest emerged in haemodynamic factors as determinant of progression and development of diabetic nephropathy. We therefore studied for various factors which can correlate with raised renal vascular resistance in diabetic nephropathy. Material and Methods. Renal vascular resistance was measured in patients with established and incipient diabetic nephropathy and compared with controls using noninvasive color Doppler examinations of intrarenal vasculature. Results. Renal vascular resistance correlated with age, duration of disease, GFR, serum creatinine, and stage of retinopathy. Renal vascular resistance was significantly reduced in patients on treatment with RAAS inhibitors and insulin, than those on OHA and antihypertensives other than RAAS inhibitors. Conclusion. The study implies that renal vascular resistance may help identify diabetics at high risk of developing nephropathy, and these set of patients could be candidates for RAAS inhibition and early insulin therapy even in patients without albuminuria.

  8. Obesity, insulin resistance, and type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, Sarit; Ellis, Samuel L

    2015-08-01

    To summarize recent studies about obesity, insulin resistance, and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Overweight and obesity continue to be prevalent among individuals with T1DM. Obesity rates appear to have reached a plateau among children with T1DM in some parts of the world. The risk for development of T1DM is increased by obesity and may occur at an earlier age among obese individuals with a predisposition. Obesity increases the risk for comorbidities among individuals with T1DM, especially metabolic syndrome, and microvascular and macrovascular diseases. Metformin, glucagon-like peptide-1 agonist therapy, sodium glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor therapy, and bariatric surgery may be beneficial therapies for glucose control, comorbidity management, and obesity among adults with T1DM. Insulin resistance may be improved among obese individuals with T1DM by biguanides (metformin) and glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists (exenatide). We review the last 18 months of literature on obesity, insulin resistance, and T1DM to highlight new epidemiologic results and treatments.

  9. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy causing maternal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hae Rin; Kim, Suk Young; Cho, Yoon Jin; Chon, Seung Joo

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is rare and occurs in approximately 3 in 10,000 pregnancies. It rarely complicates pregnancy, and can occur during any trimester, however over half (52%) of cases occur during the third trimester and during the post-partum period. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, acute pancreatitis caused by hypertriglyceridemia due to increase of estrogen during the gestational period is very unusual, but complication carries a higher risk of morbidity and mortality for both the mother and the fetus. We experienced a case of pregnant woman who died of acute exacerbation of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis at 23 weeks of gestation. We report on progress and management of this case along with literature reviews.

  10. Pegaspargase Induced Hypertriglyceridemia Resulting in Severe Fatal Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Vyas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pegaspargase is used to treat acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL. Pegaspargase definitely has its benefits in treating ALL; however we cannot lose sight of one of its very rare but potentially deadly complications, acute pancreatitis. Clinicians should monitor triglycerides while the patient is on treatment with Pegaspargase and suspect acute pancreatitis if the patient develops abdominal pain. If pancreatitis occurs, therapy should be stopped immediately and not reinstituted. For patients with hypertriglyceridemia without pancreatitis, discontinuation of therapy should be considered.

  11. Hypertriglyceridemia-associated acute pancreatitis with chylous ascites in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shih-Chang; Lee, King-Teh; Wang, Shen-Nien; Kuo, Kung-Kai; Chen, Jong-Shyong

    2006-07-01

    Both cholesterol and triglyceride levels in serum increase progressively during pregnancy. Hypertriglyceridemia is a well-recognized cause of acute pancreatitis, while pancreatitis-associated chylous ascites has rarely been reported. We report a 28-year-old female with coexistence of hypertriglyceridemia, acute pancreatitis, and chylous ascites during pregnancy. After emergency cesarean section, she was treated with nil per os, intravenous hydration, antibiotics, and analgesics as required. Due to the development of positive peritonitis 5 days later, an exploratory laparotomy was performed. Surgical interventions included pancreatic necrosectomy, right hemicolectomy and ileostomy, cholecystostomy, gastrostomy, and feeding jejunostomy. Postoperative treatment included antibiotics, total parenteral nutrition, and then low-fat diet with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation. She was discharged on the 43rd day after surgery and was free of symptoms during 6 months of follow-up. Ileocolostomy was performed 6 months after discharge. Fasting lipid profile should be regularly monitored during pregnancy due to the association of hypertriglyceridemia with development of acute pancreatitis in the mother.

  12. Hypertriglyceridemia-associated Acute Pancreatitis with Chylous Ascites in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chang Chuang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Both cholesterol and triglyceride levels in serum increase progressively during pregnancy. Hypertrigly-ceridemia is a well-recognized cause of acute pancreatitis, while pancreatitis-associated chylous ascites has rarely been reported. We report a 28-year-old female with coexistence of hypertriglyceridemia, acute pancreatitis, and chylous ascites during pregnancy. After emergency cesarean section, she was treated with nil per os, intravenous hydration, antibiotics, and analgesics as required. Due to the development of positive peritonitis 5 days later, an exploratory laparotomy was performed. Surgical interventions included pancreatic necrosec-tomy, right hemicolectomy and ileostomy, cholecystostomy, gastrostomy, and feeding jejunostomy. Postoperative treatment included antibiotics, total parenteral nutrition, and then low-fat diet with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation. She was discharged on the 43rd day after surgery and was free of symptoms during 6 months of follow-up. Ileocolostomy was performed 6 months after discharge. Fasting lipid profile should be regularly monitored during pregnancy due to the association of hypertriglyceridemia with development of acute pancreatitis in the mother.

  13. Serum Uric Acid Levels and Risk of Incident Hypertriglyceridemia: A Longitudinal Population-based Epidemiological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rongjiong; Ren, Ping; Chen, Qingmei; Yang, Tianmeng; Chen, Changxi; Mao, Yushan

    2017-09-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is one of lipid metabolism abnormalities; however, it is still debatable whether serum uric acid is a cause or a consequence of hypertriglyceridemia. We performed the study to investigate the longitudinal association between serum uric acid levels and hypertriglyceridemia. The study included 4190 subjects without hypertriglyceridemia. The subjects had annual health examinations for 8 years to assess incident hyperglyceridemia, and the subjects were divided into groups based on the serum uric acid quartile. Cox regression models were used to analyze the risk factors of development hypertriglyceridemia. During follow-up, 1461 (34.9%) subjects developed hypertriglyceridemia over 8 years of follow-up. The cumulative incidence of hypertriglyceridemia was 28.2%, 29.1%, 36.9%, and 45.6% in quartile 1,2,3 and 4, respectively ( P for trend uric acid levels were independently and positively associated with the risk of incident hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia has become a serious public health problem. This longitudinal study demonstrates that high serum uric acid levels increase the risk of hypertriglyceridemia. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  14. Assessment of urinary tract infection and their resistance to antibiotics in diabetic and non-diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nureen Zahra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic patients are more susceptible to urinary tract infections (UTIs than non-diabetic patients and due to the development of multidrug resistant uropathogenic strains, the choice of antibacterial agents is being limited. The study was undertaken to determine the influence of diabetes mellitus on the uropathogens and antibiotic sensitivity pattern among patients with UTIs. A cross-sectional study was conducted in which total of 400 patients were studied out of which 150 were diabetics and 250 were non-diabetics. Patients with negative urine culture (n = 240 were excluded from the study and 160 patients with positive culture of UTIs of which 80 were diabetics and 80 were non-diabetics, included in this study. Clinical data were obtained from individual study participant with informed written consent using pre-tested questionnaire. According to the clean-catch procedure, midstream urine samples were collected and cultured for the diagnosis and susceptibility of bacteriuria. Out of 160 uropathogenic isolates, E. coli was found as a leading pathogen i.e. 46.25% followed by Candida spp. 30.62%, S. Faecalis 15.62%, P. aeruginosa 3.13%, Pneumococcus. 1.25%, MSSA 1.25%, MRSA 0.63%, Proteus spp. 0.63% and Vancomycin resistant enterococcus spp. 0.63%. The results indicated that prevalence of UTIs was significantly higher in diabetic patients than in non-diabetic subjects. E. coli was found to be the most common isolate. It was observed that UTIs in diabetic patients was more in female diabetic patients than in male patients. Investigation of bacteriuria in diabetic patients for UTIs is an important tool for the treatment and prevention of renal complications.

  15. Helicobacter pylori Infection and Insulin Resistance in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Vafaeimanesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (HP is a common worldwide infection with known gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal complications. One of the gastrointestinal side effects posed for this organism is its role in diabetes and increased insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between HP and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients and nondiabetics. This cross-sectional study was carried out from May to December 2013 on 211 diabetic patients referred to diabetes clinic of Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Qom and 218 patients without diabetes. HP was evaluated using serology method and insulin resistance was calculated using HOMA-IR. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was 55.8% and 44.2% in diabetics and nondiabetics (P=0.001. The study population was divided into two HP positive and negative groups. Among nondiabetics, insulin resistance degree was 3.01±2.12 and 2.74±2.18 in HP+ and HP− patients, respectively P=0.704. Oppositely, insulin resistance was significantly higher in diabetic HP+ patients rather than seronegative ones (4.484±2.781 versus 3.160±2.327, P=0.013. In diabetic patients, in addition to higher prevalence of HP, it causes a higher degree of insulin resistance.

  16. Insulin resistance and serum parameters of iron status in type 2 diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, U.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a predominant public health concern worldwide, accounting for 90% of the cases of diabetes globally. Pathogenesis of T2DM involves insulin resistance, defective insulin secretion and increased glucose production by the liver. Subclinical haemochromatosis has been considered as one of the probable causes of insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to determine and correlate insulin resistance and serum parameters of iron status (serum ferritin and transferrin saturation) in type 2 diabetics. Methods: It was a correlational study. This study was conducted on sixty male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Fasting blood sample was taken from each subject and analysed for glucose, haemoglobin, insulin, iron, Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) and ferritin. Insulin resistance was determined by HOMA-IR index. Transferrin saturation was calculated from serum iron and TIBC. Data was analysed using SPSS-17. Results: There was significant positive correlation between insulin resistance and transferrin saturation, but there was no significant correlation of insulin resistance with blood haemoglobin, serum iron and serum ferritin in type 2 diabetics. Conclusion: Correlation between insulin resistance and transferrin saturation reveals that iron has negative impact on insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetics. (author)

  17. Saroglitazar for the treatment of dyslipidemia in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shashank R

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes and dyslipidemia are commonly associated modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Majority of patients with diabetes also suffer from dyslipidemia (diabetic dyslipidemia). Diabetic dyslipidemia is more atherogenic as it is commonly associated with high triglyceride (TG) levels, high proportion of small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level (atherogenic dyslipidemia). Currently used pharmacotherapies for the management of diabetes and dyslipidemia like thiazolidinediones (PPAR-γ agonist; for insulin resistance) and fibrates (PPAR-α agonist; for hypertriglyceridemia) have many limitations and side effects. Saroglitazar , a dual PPAR-α/γ agonists, is an emerging therapeutic option with its dual benefit on glycemic and lipid parameters. This paper reviews the clinical development of saroglitazar for the management of diabetic dyslipidemia. The efficacy and safety profile of saroglitazar is reviewed in context to currently available therapy like pioglitazone for diabetes and fibrates for hypertriglyceridemia. In addition, this paper also reviews the association between diabetes and dyslipidemia and the role of TG in reducing cardiovascular events. Saroglitazar, a dual PPAR-α/γ agonist, is a potential therapeutic option for the management of diabetic dyslipidemia. It has dual benefit of significant improvement in glycemic parameters (glycated hemoglobin and fasting blood glucose) and significant improvement in dyslipidemia (TGs, apolipoprotein B, non-HDL-C). The results of Phase III clinical trials indicate that saroglitazar is devoid of conventional side effects of fibrates and pioglitazone. Future clinical trials of saroglitazar will further establish its place in the management of diabetes, dyslipidemia and associated cardiovascular risk.

  18. Resistant starch but not enzymatic treated waxy maize delays development of diabetes in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedemann, Mette Skou; Hermansen, Kjeld; Pedersen, Sven

    2017-01-01

    of diabetes in male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Methods: Forty-eight male ZDF rats, aged 5 wk, were divided into 4 groups and fed experimental diets for 9 wk that contained 52.95% starch: gelatinized corn starch (S), glucidex (GLU), resistant starch (RS), or enzymatically modified starch (EMS). Blood......Background: The incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide, and nutritional management of circulating glucose may be a strategic tool in the prevention of T2D. Objective: We studied whether enzymatically modified waxy maize with an increased degree of branching delayed the onset...

  19. Automated ribotyping and antibiotic resistance determining of Bacillus spp from conjunctiva of diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertaç Argun Kıvanç

    2014-02-01

    Conclusion: Diabetic patients seem to be more prone to B. cereus infections than healthy individuals. It would be greatly beneficial to understand and recognize the prevalence of microorganisms and their resistance patterns for better outcome in ocular surgeries.

  20. Effects of Hormone Replacement Therapy on Insulin Resistance in Postmenopausal Diabetic Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskra Bitoska

    2016-02-01

    CONCLUSION: HRT was associated with statistically signifficant increase of insulin sensitivity. Larger clinical trials will be necessary to understand whether HRT may improve insulin resistance and glucose homeostasis in women with diabetes, especially when given shortly after entering menopause.

  1. Diabetes and early postpartum methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in US hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parriott, Andrea M.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in postpartum women is not well characterized. Because diabetes is a risk factor for some infections, we sought to characterize the relationship between diabetes and invasive MRSA infections in women admitted to US

  2. Effects of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the pharmacology of rat conduit and resistance intrapulmonary arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howarth Frank C

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor control of blood glucose in diabetes is known to promote vascular dysfunction and hypertension. Diabetes was recently shown to be linked to an increased prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine how the pharmacological reactivity of intrapulmonary arteries is altered in a rat model of diabetes. Methods Diabetes was induced in rats by the β-cell toxin, streptozotocin (STZ, 60 mg/kg, and isolated conduit and resistance intrapulmonary arteries studied 3–4 months later. Isometric tension responses to the vasoconstrictors phenylephrine, serotonin and PGF2α, and the vasodilators carbachol and glyceryl trinitrate, were compared in STZ-treated rats and age-matched controls. Results STZ-induced diabetes significantly blunted the maximum response of conduit, but not resistance pulmonary arteries to phenylephrine and serotonin, without a change in pEC50. Agonist responses were differentially reduced, with serotonin (46% smaller affected more than phenylephrine (32% smaller and responses to PGF2α unaltered. Vasoconstriction caused by K+-induced depolarisation remained normal in diabetic rats. Endothelium-dependent dilation to carbachol and endothelium-independent dilation to glyceryl trinitrate were also unaffected. Conclusion The small resistance pulmonary arteries are relatively resistant to STZ-induced diabetes. The impaired constrictor responsiveness of conduit vessels was agonist dependent, suggesting possible loss of receptor expression or function. The observed effects cannot account for pulmonary hypertension in diabetes, rather the impaired reactivity to vasoconstrictors would counteract the development of pulmonary hypertensive disease.

  3. Perivascular Fat and the Microcirculation: Relevance to Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, A.J.; Eringa, E.C.; Jonk, A.M.; Serné, E.H.; Smulders, Y.M.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes and its major risk factor, obesity, are a growing burden for public health. The mechanisms that connect obesity and its related disorders, such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension, are still undefined. Microvascular dysfunction may be a pathophysiologic link

  4. Effect of Creosote Bush-Derived NDGA on Expression of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism in Liver of High-Fructose Fed Rats: Relevance to NDGA Amelioration of Hypertriglyceridemia and Hepatic Steatosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Zhang

    Full Text Available Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA, the main metabolite of Creosote bush, has been shown to have profound effects on the core components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS, lowering blood glucose, free fatty acids (FFA and triglyceride (TG levels in several models of dyslipidemia, as well as improving body weight (obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes and hypertension, and ameliorating hepatic steatosis. In the present study, a high-fructose diet (HFrD fed rat model of hypertriglyceridemia was employed to further delineate the underlying mechanism by which NDGA exerts its anti-hypertriglyceridemic action. In the HFrD treatment group, NDGA administration by oral gavage decreased plasma levels of TG, glucose, FFA, and insulin, increased hepatic mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and attenuated hepatic TG accumulation. qRT-PCR measurements indicated that NDGA treatment increased the mRNA expression of key fatty acid transport (L-FABP, CD36, and fatty acid oxidation (ACOX1, CPT-2, and PPARα transcription factor genes and decreased the gene expression of enzymes involved in lipogenesis (FASN, ACC1, SCD1, L-PK and ChREBP and SREBP-1c transcription factors. Western blot analysis indicated that NDGA administration upregulated hepatic insulin signaling (P-Akt, AMPK activity (P-AMPK, MLYCD, and PPARα protein levels, but decreased SCD1, ACC1 and ACC2 protein content and also inactivated ACC1 activity (increased P-ACC1. These findings suggest that NDGA ameliorates hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis primarily by interfering with lipogenesis and promoting increased channeling of fatty acids towards their oxidation.

  5. Effect of Creosote Bush-Derived NDGA on Expression of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism in Liver of High-Fructose Fed Rats: Relevance to NDGA Amelioration of Hypertriglyceridemia and Hepatic Steatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Li, Yihang; Hu, Jie; Shen, Wen-Jun; Singh, Madhurima; Hou, Xiaoming; Bittner, Alex; Bittner, Stefanie; Cortez, Yuan; Tabassum, Juveria; Kraemer, Fredric B.; Azhar, Salman

    2015-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), the main metabolite of Creosote bush, has been shown to have profound effects on the core components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), lowering blood glucose, free fatty acids (FFA) and triglyceride (TG) levels in several models of dyslipidemia, as well as improving body weight (obesity), insulin resistance, diabetes and hypertension, and ameliorating hepatic steatosis. In the present study, a high-fructose diet (HFrD) fed rat model of hypertriglyceridemia was employed to further delineate the underlying mechanism by which NDGA exerts its anti-hypertriglyceridemic action. In the HFrD treatment group, NDGA administration by oral gavage decreased plasma levels of TG, glucose, FFA, and insulin, increased hepatic mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and attenuated hepatic TG accumulation. qRT-PCR measurements indicated that NDGA treatment increased the mRNA expression of key fatty acid transport (L-FABP, CD36), and fatty acid oxidation (ACOX1, CPT-2, and PPARα transcription factor) genes and decreased the gene expression of enzymes involved in lipogenesis (FASN, ACC1, SCD1, L-PK and ChREBP and SREBP-1c transcription factors). Western blot analysis indicated that NDGA administration upregulated hepatic insulin signaling (P-Akt), AMPK activity (P-AMPK), MLYCD, and PPARα protein levels, but decreased SCD1, ACC1 and ACC2 protein content and also inactivated ACC1 activity (increased P-ACC1). These findings suggest that NDGA ameliorates hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis primarily by interfering with lipogenesis and promoting increased channeling of fatty acids towards their oxidation. PMID:26394137

  6. Changes of plasma angiogenic factors during chronic resistance exercise in type 1 diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esfahani, S.P.; Gharakhanlou, R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Exercise has several beneficial effects on cardiovascular system. However, the exact mechanism is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic resistance exercise on some plasma angiogenic factors in type 1 diabetic rats. Methodology: Thirty male Wistar rats were divided into three groups of control, diabetic and diabetic trained (n = 10 each). Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (55 mg/kg). The rats in the trained group undertook one training session per day, 3 days/week, for 4 weeks. Blood samples were taken and the concentrations of plasma glucose, lipid profile, nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and soluble form of VEGF receptor-1 (sFlt-1) were determined. Results: We found a significant reduction in plasma NO concentrations in diabetic rats compared to the controls (p 0.05). There were no significant differences in plasma VEGF and sFlt-1 concentrations between diabetic sedentary and trained groups (p > 0.05). Moreover, VEGF/sFlt-1 ratios in diabetic animals were lower than the control group and resistance exercise could not increase this ratio in diabetic animals (p > 0.05) Conclusion: Resistance exercise could not change plasma VEGF, sFlt-1 and VEGF/sFlt-1 ratio. However, it increased plasma NO concentrations in diabetic animals. More studies are needed to determine the effects of this type of exercise on the angiogenesis process. (author)

  7. A review of recent evidence relating to sugars, insulin resistance and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    MacDonald, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    The potential impact on health of diets rich in free sugars, and particularly fructose, is of major concern. The focus of this review is the impact of these sugars on insulin resistance and obesity, and the associated risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Much of the concern is focussed on specific metabolic effects of fructose, which are argued to lead to increased fat deposition in the liver and skeletal muscle with subsequent insulin resistance and increased risk of diabetes. However, much o...

  8. Explaining psychological insulin resistance in adults with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes-Truscott, E.; Skinner, T. C.; Pouwer, F.

    2016-01-01

    significantly to the model. Conclusions Psychological insulin resistance may reflect broader distress about diabetes and concerns about its treatment but not general beliefs about medicines, depression or anxiety. Reducing diabetes distress and current treatment concerns may improve attitudes towards insulin......Aims To investigate the contribution of general and diabetes-specific emotional wellbeing and beliefs about medicines in the prediction of insulin therapy appraisals in adults with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes. Methods The sample included Diabetes MILES-Australia cross-sectional survey......' of current diabetes medications (BMQ Specific); negative insulin therapy appraisals (ITAS); depression (PHQ-9); anxiety (GAD-7), and diabetes distress (DDS-17). Factors associated with ITAS Negative scores were examined using hierarchical multiple regressions. Results Twenty-two percent of the variance...

  9. Diabetes, Insulin Resistance, and Metabolic Syndrome in Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip J.; Wiedmeyer, Charles E.; LaCarrubba, Alison; Ganjam, V. K. (Seshu); Messer, Nat T.

    2012-01-01

    Analogous to the situation in human medicine, contemporary practices in horse management, which incorporate lengthy periods of physical inactivity coupled with provision of nutritional rations characterized by inappropriately high sugar and starch, have led to obesity being more commonly recognized by practitioners of equine veterinary practice. In many of these cases, obesity is associated with insulin resistance (IR) and glucose intolerance. An equine metabolic syndrome (MS) has been described that is similar to the human MS in that both IR and aspects of obesity represent cornerstones of its definition. Unlike its human counterpart, identification of the equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) portends greater risk for development of laminitis, a chronic, crippling affliction of the equine hoof. When severe, laminitis sometimes necessitates euthanasia. Unlike the human condition, the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and many other chronic conditions, for which the risk is recognized as increased in the face of MS, is less likely in horses. The equine veterinary literature has been replete with reports of scientific investigations regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of EMS. PMID:22768883

  10. Comparison of the effects of endurance, resistance and concurrent training on insulin resistance and adiponectin-leptin ratio in diabetic rat

    OpenAIRE

    A. Saremi

    2017-01-01

    Background: The obesity-related hormones leptin and adiponectin are independently and oppositely associated with insulin resistance. Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of endurance, resistance and concurrent training on insulin resistance and adiponectin-leptin ratio in diabetic rats. Methods: Ten out of 50 male Wistar rats were separated as healthy subjects. Then diabetes was induced in the remaining rats by the injection of streptozotocin. Diabetic r...

  11. Resistance Exercise Restores Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Barreto, André Sales; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos; Oliveira, Antônio Cesar Cabral de; Wichi, Rogério Brandão; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana

    2014-01-01

    Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent. The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8); sedentary diabetic (n = 8); and trained diabetic (n = 8). Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings. A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg) as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group. Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats

  12. Resistance Exercise Restores Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Mendonça Mota

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent. Objectives: The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats. Methods: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8; sedentary diabetic (n = 8; and trained diabetic (n = 8. Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings. Results: A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2% and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3% without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05 in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05 in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg as compared to the sedentary diabetic group. Conclusions: Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

  13. Resistance Exercise Restores Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Barreto, André Sales; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos [Departamento de Fisiologia - Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Oliveira, Antônio Cesar Cabral de; Wichi, Rogério Brandão [Departamento de Educação Física - UFS, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana, E-mail: marciorvsantos@bol.com.br [Departamento de Fisiologia - Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent. The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8); sedentary diabetic (n = 8); and trained diabetic (n = 8). Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings. A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg) as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group. Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

  14. Extreme Insulin Resistance in a Patient with Diabetes Ketoacidosis and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin H. Oo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia is common in hospitalized patients and associated with adverse clinical outcomes. In hospitalized patients, multiple factors contribute to hyperglycemia, such as underlying medical conditions, pathophysiological stress, and medications. The development of transient insulin resistance is a known cause of hyperglycemia in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Though physicians are familiar with common diseases that are known to be associated with insulin resistance, the majority of us rarely come across a case of extreme insulin resistance. Here, we report a case of prolonged course of extreme insulin resistance in a patient admitted with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA and acute myocardial infarction (MI. The main purpose of this paper is to review the literature to identify the underlying mechanisms of extreme insulin resistance in a patient with DKA and MI. We will also briefly discuss the different clinical conditions that are associated with insulin resistance and a general approach to a patient with severe insulin resistance.

  15. Determination of renal vascular resistance in dogs with diabetes mellitus and hyperadrenocorticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novellas, R; de Gopegui, R Ruiz; Espada, Y

    2008-11-15

    In dogs, diabetes mellitus and hyperadrenocorticism are causes of hypertension associated with increases in vascular peripheral resistance. In human patients, the renal resistive index (ri) and pulsatility index (pi) are related to hypertension and diabetes and are used as indicators of disease severity. In this study the renal vascular resistance was measured in 12 dogs with hyperadrenocorticism, three with diabetes mellitus and four with both conditions, and the possible relationships between the two indices, blood pressure and biochemical parameters were investigated. Hypertension, defined as a systolic blood pressure more than 150 mmHg, was recorded in two of the dogs with hyperadrenocorticism and three of the dogs with hyperadrenocorticism and diabetes. The overall mean values for ri, pi and systolic blood pressure were higher in the diseased group of dogs than in 27 healthy dogs, and both indices were correlated with blood glucose concentration.

  16. Biological variation of homeostasis model assessment-derived insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayagopal, Vijay; Kilpatrick, Eric S; Jennings, Paul E; Hepburn, David A; Atkin, Stephen L

    2002-11-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes are particularly vulnerable to cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance is a major determinant of this increased risk and is a potential therapeutic target. This study was undertaken to establish the natural biological variation of insulin resistance in individuals with type 2 diabetes. The biological variation of insulin resistance was assessed by measuring insulin resistance at 4-day intervals on 10 consecutive occasions in 12 postmenopausal women with diet-controlled type 2 diabetes and in 11 weight- and age-matched postmenopausal women without type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance was derived using the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) method. The distribution of HOMA-IR was log Gaussian in the type 2 diabetic study group and Gaussian in the control group. The HOMA-IR in the type 2 diabetic group was significantly greater than that of the control group (mean +/- SD: 4.33 +/- 2.3 vs. 2.11 +/- 0.79 units, P = 0.001). After accounting for analytical variation, the mean intraindividual variation was also substantially greater in the type 2 diabetic group than in the control group (mean 1.05 vs. 0.15, P = 0.001). Consequently, at any level of HOMA-IR, a subsequent sample must increase by >90% or decrease by >47% to be considered significantly different from the first. HOMA-IR is significantly greater and more variable for individuals with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, this inherent variability needs to be accounted for in studies evaluating therapeutic reduction of HOMA-IR in this group.

  17. Alloxan-induced diabetes and insulin resistant effects on ovulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    diabetes mellitus alters corpus luteum functions and predisposes to polycystic ovarian syndrome in female rats. Also recently Spadotto et al, (2012) showed that chronic hyperglycemia during gestation and lactation affected the reproductive functions of female offspring. Unlike the male rats, the effects of diabetes mellitus on.

  18. Insulin resistance and neurodegeneration: Roles of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    de la Monte, Suzanne M; Longato, Lisa; Tong, Ming; Wands, Jack R

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have linked obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to insulin resistance in the brain, cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. Insulin resistance compromises cell survival, metabolism and neuronal plasticity, and increases oxidative stress, cytokine activation and apoptosis. T2DM/NASH has been demonstrated to be associated with increased ceramide generation, suggesting a mechanistic link between peripheral insulin resistance and neu...

  19. Effect of adrenomedullin gene delivery on insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Y. Henein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is one of the common metabolic disorders that ultimately afflicts large number of individuals. Adrenomedullin (AM is a potent vasodilator peptide; previous studies reported development of insulin resistance in aged AM deficient mice. In this study, we employed a gene delivery approach to explore its potential role in insulin resistance. Four groups were included: control, diabetic, non-diabetic injected with the AM gene and diabetic injected with the AM gene. One week following gene delivery, serum glucose, insulin, triglycerides, leptin, adiponectin and corticosterone were measured as well as the insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR. Soleus muscle glucose uptake and RT-PCR of both AM and glucose transporter-4 (GLUT 4 gene expressions were assessed. A single tail vein injection of adrenomedullin gene in type 2 diabetic rats improved skeletal muscle insulin responsiveness with significant improvement of soleus muscle glucose uptake, HOMA-IR, serum glucose, insulin and triglycerides and significant increase in muscle GLUT 4 gene expression (P < 0.05 compared with the non-injected diabetic rats. The beneficial effects of AM gene delivery were accompanied by a significant increase in the serum level of adiponectin (2.95 ± 0.09 versus 2.33 ± 0.17 μg/ml in the non-injected diabetic group as well as a significant decrease in leptin and corticosterone levels (7.51 ± 0.51 and 262.88 ± 10.34 versus 10.63 ± 1.4 and 275.86 ± 11.19 ng/ml respectively in the non-injected diabetic group. The conclusion of the study is that AM gene delivery can improve insulin resistance and may have significant therapeutic applications in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  20. Frequency of Cutaneous Fungal Infections and Azole Resistance of the Isolates in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Raiesi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic patients are more susceptible to cutaneous fungal infections. The higher blood sugar levels cause increasing the cutaneous fungal infections in these patients. The main objective of this study was to find the frequency of fungal infections among cutaneous lesions of diabetic patients and to investigate azole antifungal agent susceptibility of the isolates. Materials and Methods: In this study, type 1diabetes (n = 78 and type 2 diabetes (n = 44 comprised 47 cases (38.5% with diabetic foot ulcers and 75 cases (61.5% with skin and nail lesions were studied. Fungal infection was confirmed by direct examination and culture methods. Antifungal susceptibility testing by broth microdilution method was performed according to the CLSI M27-A and M38-A references. Results: Out of 122 diabetic patients, thirty (24.5% were affected with fungal infections. Frequency of fungal infection was 19.1% in patients with diabetic foot ulcer and 28% of patients with skin and nail lesions. Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus were the most common species isolated from thirty patients with fungal infection, respectively. Susceptibility testing carried out on 18 representative isolates (13 C. albicans, five C. glabrata revealed that 12 isolates (10 C. albicans and two C. glabrata isolates (66.6% were resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥64 mg/ml to fluconazole (FCZ. Likewise, eight isolates (80% of Aspergillus spp. were resistant (MIC ≥4 mg/ml, to itraconazole. Conclusion: Our finding expands current knowledge about the frequency of fungal infections in diabetic patients. We noted the high prevalence of FCZ-resistant Candida spp., particularly in diabetic foot ulcers. More attention is important in diabetic centers about this neglected issue.

  1. Treatment options for hypertriglyceridemia: from risk reduction to pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Lars; Brunzell, John D.; Goldberg, Anne C.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Stalenhoef, Anton

    2013-01-01

    While there has been considerable focus on the role and treatment of LDL cholesterol levels, a definitive role of triglycerides in the management of cardiovascular disease has been uncertain. Notably, with increasing triglyceride levels, there is a parallel increase in cholesterol levels carried by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, which has prompted interest in the use of non-HDL cholesterol levels as a tool guiding interventions. Recent studies have provided evidence for an independent role of triglyceride levels as a cardiovascular risk factor, and recently, an Endocrine Society guideline was published for treatment of hypertriglyceridemia. In contrast to the relative uncertainty regarding triglycerides and cardiovascular disease, a role of very high triglyceride levels as a risk factor for pancreatitis has been well known. The present paper summarizes the underlying evidence for a risk role for triglyceride levels in cardiovascular disease and pancreatitis, current treatment recommendations and areas of future research. PMID:24840268

  2. The role of insulin resistance in diabetic neuropathy in Koreans with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a 6-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yu Na; Lee, Kee Ook; Jeong, Julie; Park, Hyung Jun; Kim, Seung-Min; Shin, Ha Young; Hong, Ji-Man; Ahn, Chul Woo; Choi, Young-Chul

    2014-05-01

    We previously reported that insulin resistance, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and glycaemic exposure Index are independently associated with peripheral neuropathy in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We followed the patients who participated in that study in 2006 for another 6 years to determine the relationship between insulin resistance and neuropathy. This study involved 48 of the original 86 Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were referred to the Neurology clinic for the assessment of diabetic neuropathy from January 2006 to December 2006. These 48 patients received management for glycaemic control and prevention of diabetic complications in the outpatient clinic up to 2012. We reviewed blood test results and the nerve conduction study findings of these patients, taken over a 6-year period. Low HDL cholesterol and high triglycerides significantly influenced the development of diabetic neuropathy. Kitt value (1/insulin resistance) in the previous study affected the occurrence of neuropathy, despite adequate glycaemic control with HbA1c resistance affected the development of diabetic neuropathy after 6 years: insulin resistance in 2006 showed a positive correlation with a change in sural sensory nerve action potential in 2012. Diabetic neuropathy can be affected by previous insulin resistance despite regular glycaemic control. Dyslipidaemia should be controlled in patients who show high insulin resistance because HDL cholesterol and triglycerides are strongly correlated with later development of diabetic neuropathy.

  3. The Effect of Resistance Training on Cardio-Metabolic Factors in Males with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghalavand

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes is one of the most important metabolic diseases in the world and exercise is a common advice to manage diabetes and reduce its complications. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of resistance training on blood glucose, blood pressure and resting heart rate in males with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods In this semi-experimental study, 20 males with type 2 diabetes with mean age of 46 ± 3.4 years old who met the inclusion criteria were selected. The participants were randomly assigned into resistance training (n = 10 and control (n = 10 groups. Resistance exercise training program was performed for eight weeks, three sessions per week. Cardiovascular and biochemical parameters were measured before and after the intervention. To analyze the measured parameters changes t-test was used at P ≤ 0.05 significance level. Results After eight weeks, a significant decrease in fasting blood sugar (P = 0.002, glycosylated hemoglobin (P = 0.025 and systolic blood pressure (P = 0.022 was observed in the resistance group. In addition, there was a significant difference in blood sugar (P = 0.003 and glycosylated hemoglobin (P = 0.031 between the two groups. Conclusions Findings of this study confirmed the positive influence of resistance training to control blood glucose and blood pressure in males with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Mice deficient in PAPP-A show resistance to the development of diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Jessica R; Resch, Zachary T; McLean, Gary R; Mikkelsen, Jakob H; Oxvig, Claus; Marler, Ronald J; Conover, Cheryl A

    2013-10-01

    We investigated pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) in diabetic nephropathy. Normal human kidney showed specific staining for PAPP-A in glomeruli, and this staining was markedly increased in diabetic kidney. To assess the possible contribution of PAPP-A in the development of diabetic nephropathy, we induced diabetes with streptozotocin in 14-month-old WT and Papp-A knockout (KO) mice. Renal histopathology was evaluated after 4 months of stable hyperglycemia. Kidneys from diabetic WT mice showed multiple abnormalities including thickening of Bowman's capsule (100% of mice), increased glomerular size (80% of mice), tubule dilation (80% of mice), and mononuclear cell infiltration (90% of mice). Kidneys of age-matched non-diabetic WT mice had similar evidence of tubule dilation and mononuclear cell infiltration to those of diabetic WT mice, indicating that these changes were predominantly age-related. However, thickened Bowman's capsule and increased glomerular size appeared specific for the experimental diabetes. Kidneys from diabetic Papp-A KO mice had significantly reduced or no evidence of changes in Bowman's capsule thickening and glomerular size. There was also a shift to larger mesangial area and increased macrophage staining in diabetic WT mice compared with Papp-A KO mice. In summary, elevated PAPP-A expression in glomeruli is associated with diabetic nephropathy in humans and absence of PAPP-A is associated with resistance to the development of indicators of diabetic nephropathy in mice. These data suggest PAPP-A as a potential therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy.

  5. Relationship between blood pressure and insulin resistance in patients with gestational diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan Shujuan; Zhang Sujuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship existe between blood pressure level and degree of insulin resistance in patients with gestational diabetes. Methods: Ninety-five cases of gestational diabetes were diagnosed among 350 pregnant women. Of them, 55 were found to be hypertensive and 40 were normotensive. Fasting, 1,2, 3h post-prandial (75g glucose) blood sugar (with peroxidase method) levels and fasting insulin (with RIA) levels were measured in these patients and 85 normal pregnant women (as control). Results: Fasting, 1, 2, 3h post 75g glucose blood sugar and fasting insulin levels in the 55 hypertensive diabetics were significantly higher than those in the normotensives and controls (P<0.05). The calculated insulin sensitivity indices were significantly lower (P also < 0.05). Conclusion: A higher insulin resistance existed in hypertensive gestational diabetics which might be a risk factor of developing hypertension. (authors)

  6. Low intensity resistance training improves systolic function and cardiovascular autonomic control in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostarda, Cristiano T; Rodrigues, Bruno; de Moraes, Oscar Albuquerque; Moraes-Silva, Ivana C; Arruda, Paula Barros Olinto; Cardoso, Ruymar; Scapini, Katia Bilhar; Dos Santos, Fernando; De Angelis, Kátia; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of low intensity resistance training (RT) on left ventricular (LV) function, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and cardiovascular autonomic control of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into (n=8 each group): sedentary control (SC), trained control (TC), sedentary diabetic (SD), and trained diabetic (TD). Trained groups underwent low intensity RT (40%-50% 1 repetition maximum) for 10 weeks. Echocardiographic evaluation, arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), BRS, and autonomic measurements were performed. Diabetes induced an increase in glycemia and a reduction in body weight in diabetics when compared with control animals. Diabetic rats displayed cardiac dysfunction, reduced systolic AP and HR, impaired BRS and autonomic derangement when compared to control rats. RT improved ejection fraction (SD: 68%±1.3% vs. TD: 75%±3.0%) and velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (SD: 0.32±0.02 vs. TD: 0.40±0.01 circ/seg.10(-4)). Trained diabetic rats presented increased AP (+10.2%), HR (+10.4%), and BRS after RT protocol. Low intensity RT induced an increase in systolic function in diabetic rats. This may be due to positive LV remodeling and BRS improvement, which may have played an important role in the attenuation of hemodynamic impairment and cardiac autonomic neuropathy in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Correlation between serum cathepsin S and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN, RUO-PING; REN, AN; YE, SHAN-DONG

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin S (CatS), a proteolytic enzyme, which belongs to the cysteine proteinase family, is associated with atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, cancer and other diseases. The present study aimed to explore the correlation between serum CatS and insulin resistance (IR) in patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 51 patients with type 2 diabetes (Group DM) were recruited for this study and 49 healthy individuals were selected as normal controls (Group NC). Blood pressure and body mass i...

  8. The role of hepatic lipids in hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Rachel J; Samuel, Varman T.; Petersen, Kitt Mia Falck

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its downstream sequelae, hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, are rapidly growing epidemics, which lead to increased morbidity and mortality rates, and soaring health-care costs. Developing interventions requires a comprehensive understanding...... of the mechanisms by which excess hepatic lipid develops and causes hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Proposed mechanisms implicate various lipid species, inflammatory signalling and other cellular modifications. Studies in mice and humans have elucidated a key role for hepatic diacylglycerol...... activation of protein kinase Cε in triggering hepatic insulin resistance. Therapeutic approaches based on this mechanism could alleviate the related epidemics of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes....

  9. Risk factors for incident type 2 diabetes in individuals with a BMI of Resistance Syndrome (DESIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, A; Balkau, B; Lange, C; Tichet, J; Bonnet, F

    2010-02-01

    Risk factors for incident type 2 diabetes, in particular, hepatic markers, have rarely been studied in leaner individuals. We aimed to identify the metabolic and hepatic markers associated with incident diabetes in men and women with a BMI of or=27 kg/m(2). Risk factors for 9 year incident diabetes were compared in the French Data from an Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance Syndrome (DESIR) cohort. Comparisons were made between the 2,947 participants with a BMI of or=27 kg/m(2). There were 92 incident cases of diabetes in individuals with a BMI of or=27 kg/m(2). Among those who were not markedly overweight, classical biological markers were associated with 9 year incident diabetes, glycaemia being the strongest predictor. gamma-Glutamyltransferase (GGT), either considered as a continuous variable or at levels >or=20 U/l, was associated with incident diabetes, with a stronger effect in the BMI or=27 kg/m(2) (results after adjustment for alcohol intake, alanine aminotransferase, waist circumference and the HOMA insulin resistance index). In individuals with a BMI of resistance, suggesting potential interactions between GGT, enhanced hepatic neoglucogenesis and/or early alterations of insulin secretion.

  10. Low dose spironolactone reduces blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolzenburg Oxlund, Christina; Henriksen, J. E.; Tarnow, L.

    2013-01-01

    Background:The increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with arterial hypertension is particularly pronounced in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Blood pressure control is, therefore, decisively important but often not sufficiently achieved.Objective:The primary...... diabetes mellitus....... objective of this study was to evaluate the antihypertensive effect of low dose spironolactone added to triple therapy for resistant hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes measured by ambulatory monitoring. Secondary objectives were to evaluate the effects on glycaemic control and urinary albumin...

  11. Increased renal resistive index in type 2 diabetes: Clinical relevance, mechanisms and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Baris; Elsurer, Rengin

    Type 2 diabetes is a global health challenge. In type 2 diabetes both microvascular (nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy) and macrovascular complications arise. In kidney, renal pathological changes leading to diabetic nephropathy are mainly secondary to atherosclerosis of the intra and extra renal arteries together with microangiopathy of the glomerular capillaries, afferent arterioles and efferent arterioles. Renal resistive index (RRI) is defined as a ratio of the difference between maximum and minimum (end-diastolic) flow velocity to maximum flow velocity derived from the Doppler measurements of main renal and intrarenal (segmental/interlobar) arteries. Renal resistive index is tightly related to renal arteriolosclerosis, and represents an integrated index of arterial compliance, pulsatility and downstream microvascular impedance. In meantime, growing suggest that RRI has also been closely related with atherosclerosis. Most studies performed in type 2 diabetes showed RRI is increased in type 2 diabetes. In this review, we summarize the data regarding RRI with regard to performed studies, pathogenesis and prognosis, especially focusing on type 2 diabetes (T2D). We also review the data regarding the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and RRI. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of sialic acid in insulin action and the insulin resistance of diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salhanick, A.I.; Amatruda, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Adipocytes treated with neuraminidase show markedly reduced responsiveness to insulin without any alteration in insulin binding. In addition, several studies have separately demonstrated both insulin resistance and decreases in membrane sialic acid content and associated biosynthetic enzymes in diabetes mellitus. In the present study, the authors investigated the role that sialic acid residues may play in insulin action and in the hepatic insulin resistance associated with nonketotic diabetes. Primary cultures of hepatocytes from normal rats treated with neuraminidase demonstrated a dose-dependent decrease in insulin-stimulated lipogenesis. At a concentration of neuraminidase that decreases insulin action by 50%, 23% of total cellular sialic acid content was released. Neuraminidase-releasable sialic acid was significantly decreased in hepatocytes from diabetic rats and this was associated with significant insulin resistance. Treatment of hepatocytes from diabetic rats with cytidine 5'-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-NANA) enhanced insulin responsiveness 39%. The enhanced insulin responsiveness induced by CMP-NANA was blocked by cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP) suggesting that the CMP-NANA effect was catalyzed by a cell surface sialyl-transferase. CMP reduced neuraminidase-releasable [ 14 C]sialic acid incorporation into hepatocytes by 43%. The data demonstrate a role for cell surface sialic acid residues in hepatic insulin action and support a role for decreased cell surface sialic acid residues in the insulin resistance of diabetes mellitus

  13. Association between intrarenal arterial resistance and diastolic dysfunction in type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews D Geoffrey

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In comparison to the well established changes in compliance that occur at the large vessel level in diabetes, much less is known about the changes in compliance of the cardiovascular system at the end-organ level. The aim of this study was therefore to examine whether there was a correlation between resistance of the intrarenal arteries of the kidney and compliance of the left ventricle, as estimated by measurements of diastolic function, in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Methods We studied 167 unselected clinic patients with type 2 diabetes with a kidney duplex scan to estimate intrarenal vascular resistance, i.e. the resistance index (RI = peak systolic velocity-minimum diastolic velocity/peak systolic velocity and a transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE employing tissue doppler studies to document diastolic and systolic ventricular function. Results Renal RI was significantly higher in subjects with diastolic dysfunction (0.72 ± 0.05 when compared with those who had a normal TTE examination (0.66 ± 0.06, p Conclusion Increasing vascular resistance of the intrarenal arteries was associated with markers of diastolic dysfunction in subjects with type 2 diabetes. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that vascular and cardiac stiffening in diabetes are manifestations of common pathophysiological mechanisms.

  14. Effects of Resistance Training on Serum Level of Reproductive Hormones and Sperm Parameters in Type 2 Diabetes Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Parastesh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in fertility indices. Resistance training, on the other hand, through reducing the adverse effects of diabetes, exerts a positive impact on diabetic individuals. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of ten weeks of resistance training on serum levels of reproductive hormones and sperm parameters in Wistar rats with diabetes mellitus type 2. Materials and Methods:In this experimental study, 36 Wistar rats with mean weight of 200±50 were ran-domly assigned to healthy control, diabetic control and diabetic training groups. The diabetic resistance training group received ten weeks of resistance training (climbing up the ladder following the induction of diabetes. Twenty-four hours after the last training session, left epididymis of the rats was examined for studying sperm parameters and blood serum samples were examined for evaluating reproductive hormones. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Turkey’s Post Hoc test at 0.05%. Results: Ten weeks of resistance training induced significant increases in serum testosterone and FSH levels in the resistance training group in comparison to the diabetic group (p<0.007.Resistance training did not have any significant effects on serum LH levels in the resistance training group compared to the diabetic control group. In ad-dition, sperm parameters (sperm count, survival rate and motility presented significant improvements compared to the diabetic group(p<0.05. Conclusion: Resistance training can improve sperm parameters, including sperm count, survival rate and motility, through increasing serum testosterone, LH and FSH levels (reproductive hormones in rats with diabetes mellitus type 2.

  15. Association of TNF-α with insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Swaroop, Jatla Jyothi; Rajarajeswari, Duggirala; Naidu, J.N.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: TNF-α is an adipocytokine that has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance. Dysregulation of TNF-α production has been implicated in a variety of human diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to find out the association of TNF-α levels with insulin resistance, body mass index and waist hip ratio; and to elicit its role with respect to duration of the disease, if any. Methods: 50 type-2 diabetic patients attending Narayana Medical Hospita...

  16. Insulin resistance in non-diabetic patients of chronic Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, Zareen; Zuberi, Bader Faiyaz; Anis, Daniah; Qadeer, Rashid; Hassan, Khalid; Afsar, Salahuddin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine insulin resistance in non-diabetic chronic hepatitis C patients using Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). Methodology: Patients having anti-HCV positive were included in this study. Patients with diabetes mellitus, thyroid disease, hyperlipidemias, hypercortisolism and infective diseases other than hepatitis C were excluded. Age, weight, height and absence of diabetes were documented. Fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin levels were done. Body mass index and insulin resistance was calculated using the formulas. Patients having insulin resistance using formula HOMA-IR>2.5 were labeled as insulin resistant. Data was analyzed using SPSS-18. Results: One hundred and fifty five patients according to sample size estimation were enrolled, in whom HOMA-IR was calculated, the mean value was found to be 2.47 ±1.30. A total of 79 (51%) of patients had HOMA-IR more than 2.5 showing insulin resistance. Conclusion: In a third world country like Pakistan, where there is a high prevalence of hepatitis C infection, the consequences of the disease are also very common. Insulin resistance was found in 51% of patients with chronic hepatitis C. PMID:24353540

  17. PROMETHEUS: an observational, cross-sectional, retrospective study of hypertriglyceridemia in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Yuri; Khomitskaya, Yunona

    2015-08-25

    Data regarding the prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia in the Russian population are lacking, despite triglyceride (TG)-mediated pathways being causal in cardiovascular disease. The prevalence of mixed dyslipidemia and severe hypertriglyceridemia in the Russian population (PROMETHEUS) was undertaken to address this gap. This was an observational, cross-sectional retrospective study. Data from adults with a full/partial lipoprotein record who had blood analyses done at an INVITRO laboratory in Russia between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2013 were analyzed. The primary endpoint was the prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia (TG ≥ 1.7 mmol/L); secondary endpoints included prevalence of borderline high, high, and very high TG and severe hypertriglyceridemia, defined as a TG level of 1.7 to <2.3, 2.3 to <5.6, ≥5.6, and ≥10.0 mmol/L, respectively. Statistical analyses involved the Wilcoxon and the Chi square tests. Correlations between log-transformed TG and low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and HDL-C) and total cholesterol (TC) were assessed. The correlation between glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and TG levels in a nested sample of subjects with HbA1c and TG data was also assessed using a log-linear model. The full dataset and nested sample comprised 357,072 and 54,602 individuals, respectively. Prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia, borderline high TG, high TG, very high TG, and severe hypertriglyceridemia in the full dataset was 29.2, 16.2, 12.9, 0.11, and 0.011%, respectively; corresponding rates in the nested sample were 19.0, 17.2, 0.25, and 0.016%, respectively. TG levels were 16.4% higher in males versus females; males had a greater risk of hypertriglyceridemia (risk ratio 1.25; 95% CI 1.24, 1.26; P < 0.0001). Prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia increased with age, peaking at 40-49 years in males (42.8%) and 60-69 years in females (34.4%); a 0.61% increase in TG levels for each year of life was predicted. Hypertriglyceridemia prevalence increased

  18. Effects of compound K on hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuang; Ren, Dayong; Li, Jianrui; Yuan, Guangxin; Li, Hongyu; Xu, Guangyu; Han, Xiao; Du, Peige; An, Liping

    2014-06-01

    Compound K (CK) is a final metabolite of panaxadiol ginsenosides from Panax ginseng. Although anti-diabetic activity of CK has been reported in recent years, the molecular mechanism of CK in the treatment of diabetes mellitus remains unclear. In the present investigation, we established a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with insulin resistance using high-fat diet (HFD) and streptozotocin (STZ), and attempted to verify more details and exact mechanisms in the treatment of T2DM. CK was administered orally at three doses [300, 100 and 30 mg/kg bodyweight (b.w.)] to the diabetic rats. Bodyweight, food-intake, fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting serum insulin (FINS), insulin sensitivity (ISI), total glycerin (TG), total cholesterol (TC), as well as oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were evaluated in normal and diabetic rats. According to our results, CK could improve bodyweight and food-intake of diabetic rats. CK exhibited dose-dependent reduction of FBG, TG and TC of diabetic rats. CK treatment also enhanced FINS and ISI. Meanwhile, the glucose tolerance observed in the present study was improved significantly by CK. It is concluded from the results that CK may have improving effects on hyperglycemia and insulin resistance of diabetic rats. Furthermore, research showed that CK could promote the expression of InsR, IRS1, PI3Kp85, pAkt and Glut4 in skeletal muscle tissue of diabetic rats. These results indicate that the hypoglycemic activity of CK is mediated by improvement of insulin sensitivity, which is closely related to PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. An alternative treatment in hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy: Plasmapheresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Altun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormonal influences during pregnancy can compromise otherwise controlled lipid levels in women with familial hypertriglyceridemia and predispose to pancreatitis leading to increased morbidity in both mother and fetus. Both cholesterol and triglyceride levels in serum increase progressively during pregnancy. The mainstay of treatment includes dietary restriction of fatty meal and lipid-lowering medications. Experiences with plasmapheresis are limited. We report two cases of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis during pregnancy, which were successfully treated by plasmapheresis.

  20. Metabolomics: Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) develops over many years, providing an opportunity to consider early prognostic tools that guide interventions to thwart disease. Advancements in analytical chemistry enable quantitation of hundreds of metabolites in biofluids and tissues (metabolomics), providing in...

  1. Dietary Patterns, Insulin Resistance, and Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in the Whitehall II Study

    OpenAIRE

    McNaughton, Sarah A.; Mishra, Gita D.; Brunner, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE?The aim of this study was to identify a dietary pattern associated with insulin resistance and investigate whether this pattern was prospectively associated with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS?Analysis was based on 7,339 participants of the Whitehall II study. Dietary intake was measured using a 127-item food frequency questionnaire. We used the reduced rank regression method to determine dietary patterns using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance as ...

  2. Hypertriglyceridemia as a possible cause of coma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inokuchi Ryota

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Many studies suggest that elevated triglyceride levels are associated with increased long-term risk of stroke, including transient ischemic attacks. In addition, elevated triglyceride levels independently contribute to plasma viscosity and decreased blood flow. However, no consensus has been reached regarding the significance of hypertriglyceridemia as an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Case presentation We report the case of a patient admitted to our hospital for sudden onset of coma. Laboratory test results revealed he had high blood glucose (28.2mmol/L, high glycated hemoglobin (11.4 percent, considerably high serum triglyceride levels (171.5mmol/L; type V hyperlipoproteinemia, and high plasma viscosity (1.90mPa/s with normal β-hydroxybutyric acid levels. His triglyceride levels decreased after administering intravenous fluids. Our patient’s consciousness level improved gradually over three days. All serum lipid levels decreased seven days after admission. Conclusions The findings in our patient’s case are likely explained by triglyceride-mediated hyperviscosity causing a transient ischemic attack. In the present report we suggest that when several tests do not reveal the cause of stroke-like symptoms, measurement of plasma viscosity may be informative.

  3. Hemorheological abnormalities in lipoprotein lipase deficient mice with severe hypertriglyceridemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Tieqiang; Guo Jun; Li Hui; Huang Wei; Xian Xunde; Ross, Colin J.D.; Hayden, Michael R.; Wen Zongyao; Liu George

    2006-01-01

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a metabolic disturbance often seen in clinical practice. It is known to induce life-threatening acute pancreatitis, but its role in atherogenesis remains elusive. Hemorheological abnormality was thought to play an important role in pathogenesis of both pancreatitis and atherosclerosis. However, hemorheology in severe HTG was not well investigated. Recently, we established a severe HTG mouse model deficient in lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in which severe HTG was observed to cause a significant increase in plasma viscosity. Disturbances of erythrocytes were also documented, including decreased deformability, electrophoresis rate, and membrane fluidity, and increased osmotic fragility. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that most erythrocytes of LPL deficient mice deformed with protrusions, irregular appearances or indistinct concaves. Analysis of erythrocyte membrane lipids showed decreased cholesterol (Ch) and phospholipid (PL) contents but unaltered Ch/PL ratio. The changes of membrane lipids may be partially responsible for the hemorheological and morphologic abnormalities of erythrocytes. This study indicated that severe HTG could lead to significant impairment of hemorheology and this model may be useful in delineating the role of severe HTG in the pathogenesis of hyperlipidemic pancreatitis and atherosclerosis

  4. ROS-mediated glucose metabolic reprogram induces insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Kelei; Ni, Hua; Wu, Meiling; Tang, Ziqing; Halim, Michael; Shi, Dongyun

    2016-08-05

    Oxidative stress is known to contribute to insulin resistance in diabetes, however the mechanism is not clear. Here we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) could reprogram the glucose metabolism through upregulating the pentose pathway so as to induce insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). By using streptozotocin-high fat diet (STZ-HFD) induced T2DM in rats, we show that diabetic rats exhibited high level of oxidative stress accompanied with insulin resistance. Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) protein expression as well as its downstream target glucokinase (GK), were upregulated; The glycogen synthesis increased accordingly; However the glycolysis was inhibited as indicated by decreased phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1), pyruvate kinase (PK), phospho-PFK-2/PFK-2 (p-PFK-2/PFK-2) ratio, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK); Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) which promotes pyruvate to generate acetyl-CoA declined as well. While phospho-acetyl-CoA carboxylase/acetyl-CoA carboxylase (p-ACC/ACC) ratio increased, meaning that lipid beta-oxidation increased. The pentose pathway was activated as indicated by increased G6PD activity and NADPH level. Our results suggest that diabetic rats countervail ROS stress through increasing pentose pathway, and reprogram the energy metabolic pathway from glycolysis into lipid oxidation in order to compensate the ATP requirement of the body, which causes insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Interleukin-18 resistance in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zilverschoon, G.R.; Tack, C.J.J.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Kullberg, B.J.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Netea, M.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Interleukin-18 (IL-18) has been recently demonstrated to improve experimental hyperphagia and insulin resistance. Paradoxically, concentrations of circulating IL-18 in obese subjects and in patients with type 2 diabetes are increased. The objective of this study is to provide an

  6. Metabolic flexibility in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes : effects of lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corpeleijn, E.; Saris, W. H. M.; Blaak, E. E.

    Lipotoxicity in skeletal muscle plays a critical role in the aetiology of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus by interference of lipid metabolites with insulin signalling and action. The dynamics of lipid oxidation and fine tuning with fatty acid uptake and intramyocellular

  7. Increased vascular resistance in vasodilated skin an indicator of diabetic microangiopathy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faris, I B; Lassen, N A

    1982-01-01

    The method of isotope clearance has been used to investigate the vascular resistance in skin in severely atherosclerotic patients with and without diabetes. Dilatation of the skin vessels was achieved by the injection of histamine with a radioactive tracer (99mTc). The perfusion pressure of the s...

  8. Insulin resistance and cognitive performance in type 2 diabetes : The Maastricht study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijselaers, Stefan L C; Sep, Simone J S; Schram, Miranda T; van Boxtel, Martin P J; Henry, Ronald M A; Verhey, Frans R J; Kroon, Abraham A; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Dagnelie, Pieter C; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Biessels, Geert Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165576367

    AIMS: Type 2 diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance are associated with cognitive impairment. Experimental studies indicate that insulin signaling in the brain is related to cognitive performance. Here we evaluated whether insulin-related variables contribute to the variance in cognitive

  9. Insulin resistance, role of metformin and other noninsulin therapies in pediatric type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in youth is a challenging chronic medical condition. Its management should address not only the glycemic control but also insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease risk factors which are increasingly recognized to be present in youth with TID. Current knowledge on...

  10. Diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome in HIV-positive patients in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothi Idiculla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jyothi Idiculla1, G D Ravindra’n1, Jason D’Souza1, Girija Singh1, Sultana Furruqh21Department of Medicine, 2Department of Biochemistry, St. John's Medical College, Bangalore, IndiaAbstract: Insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection are increasingly being reported in the global medical literature. This cross-sectional study was done to describe the occurrence of metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance in HIV-positive patients in a tertiary referral center in South India. A total of 60 patients who had HIV infection for 12 months or more were enrolled in the study. Of these, 30 patients were antiretroviral therapy (ART-naïve, and 30 were treated with ART. Biochemical estimations (fasting blood glucose, 75 g oral glucose tolerance test, lipid profile, and fasting insulin and anthropometric measurements (height, weight, and waist circumference were performed for each patient. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using National Cholesterol Education Program–Adult Treatment Plan III criteria, and insulin resistance was calculated applying the homeostasis model assessment method. Diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glycemia, and impaired glucose tolerance were diagnosed based on American Diabetes Association criteria. A high prevalence of metabolic syndrome was observed in patients with HIV (16/60, and was more prevalent in the ART-treated group (13/30; P = 0.028. Similarly, insulin resistance was also noted to be high (24/60, and of these patients, 15 were on ART. Seventy-five percent of patients with metabolic syndrome had insulin resistance. Diabetes was diagnosed in one patient who was ART-naïve and in six patients who were on ART. Our observations suggest an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and diabetes mellitus in ART-treated patients. These warrant attention and substantiation with larger studies. While ART

  11. Molecular typing, virulence traits and antimicrobial resistance of diabetic foot staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottola, Carla; Semedo-Lemsaddek, Teresa; Mendes, João J; Melo-Cristino, José; Tavares, Luís; Cavaco-Silva, Patrícia; Oliveira, Manuela

    2016-03-08

    Diabetes mellitus is a major chronic disease that continues to increase significantly. One of the most important and costly complications of diabetes are foot infections that may be colonized by pathogenic and antimicrobial resistant bacteria, harboring several virulence factors, that could impair its successful treatment. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most prevalent isolate in diabetic foot infections, together with aerobes and anaerobes. In this study, conducted in the Lisbon area, staphylococci isolated (n = 53) from diabetic foot ulcers were identified, genotyped and screened for virulence and antimicrobial resistance traits. Genetic relationship amongst isolates was evaluated by pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis with further multilocus sequence typing of the identified pulsotypes. PCR was applied for detection of 12 virulence genes and e-test technique was performed to determine minimal inhibitory concentration of ten antibiotics. Among the 53 isolates included in this study, 41 Staphylococcus aureus were identified. Staphylococcal isolates were positive for intercellular adhesins icaA and icaD, negative for biofilm associated protein bap and pantone-valentine leucocidin pvl. S. aureus quorum sensing genes agrI and agrII were identified and only one isolate was positive for toxic shock syndrome toxin tst. 36 % of staphylococci tested were multiresistant and higher rates of resistance were obtained for ciprofloxacin and erythromycin. Clonality analysis revealed high genomic diversity and numerous S. aureus sequence types, both community- and hospital-acquired, belonging mostly to clonal complexes CC5 and C22, widely diffused in Portugal nowadays. This study shows that diabetic foot ulcer staphylococci are genomically diverse, present resistance to medically important antibiotics and harbour virulence determinants. These properties suggest staphylococci can contribute to persistence and severity of these infections, leading to treatment failure and to

  12. Empagliflozin decreases remnant-like particle cholesterol in type 2 diabetes patients with insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Sachiko

    2017-11-28

    Remnant lipoproteins are thought to be atherogenic. Remnant-like particle cholesterol (RLP-C), which reflects the levels of various kinds of remnant lipoproteins in the blood, has a significant correlation with insulin resistance. In the present study, we measured the effect of empagliflozin (EMPA) on the levels of RLP-C, and investigated whether EMPA-mediated change in RLP-C is associated with a change in insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients who have insulin resistance. Patients were allocated to receive a placebo (n = 51) or EMPA (n = 58) as an add-on treatment. Fasting blood samples were collected before and 12 weeks after this intervention. EMPA significantly decreased glycated hemoglobin, bodyweight, systolic blood pressure, plasma triglycerides, liver transaminases and estimated glomerular filtration rate, and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Furthermore, EMPA decreased RLP-C and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance. In the placebo group, there were no significant changes in these factors except for slight increases in liver transaminases. Multiple regression analysis showed that the change in homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (P = 0.0102) and the change in alanine aminotransferase (P = 0.0301) were significantly associated with the change in RLP-C in the EMPA group. The change in RLP-C significantly correlated with the change in homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.503, 95% confidence interval 0.199-0.719; P = 0.00241). EMPA decreases RLP-C levels, which is closely associated with amelioration of insulin sensitivity in diabetes patients who have insulin resistance. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. The Effect of 8 Weeks Aerobic Exercise on Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Motahari-Tabari, Narges; Shirvani, Marjan Ahmad; Shirzad-e-Ahoodashty, Mahbobeh; Yousefi-Abdolmaleki, Elham; Teimourzadeh, Mojgan

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes complications are the main reasons behind morbidity and mortality preventable by healthy diet and physical activity. There are few studies about the effect of aerobic exercises on insulin resistance in human. Also various training protocols are associated with different results. Since approaches to decrease insulin resistance may be followed by more effectiveness treatment, this study assessed the effect of aerobic exercise on insulin resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. In this r...

  14. Food intake patterns associated with incident type 2 diabetes: the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Angela D; Weis, Kristina E; Schulz, Mandy; Tooze, Janet A

    2009-02-01

    Markers of hemostasis and inflammation such as plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and fibrinogen have been associated with risk of type 2 diabetes. We aimed to identify food intake patterns influencing this pathway and evaluate their association with incident diabetes. The Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study cohort included 880 middle-aged adults initially free of diabetes. At the 5-year follow-up, 144 individuals had developed diabetes. Usual dietary intake was ascertained with a 114-item food frequency questionnaire. Using reduced rank regression, we identified a food pattern maximizing the explained variation in PAI-1 and fibrinogen. Subsequently, the food pattern-diabetes association was evaluated using logistic regression. High intake of the food groups red meat, low-fiber bread and cereal, dried beans, fried potatoes, tomato vegetables, eggs, cheese, and cottage cheese and low intake of wine characterized the pattern, which was positively associated with both biomarkers. With increasing pattern score, the odds of diabetes increased significantly (Ptrend < 0.01). After multivariate adjustment, the odds ratio comparing extreme quartiles was 4.3 (95% CI 1.7-10.8). Adjustment for insulin sensitivity and secretion and other metabolic factors had little impact (4.9, 1.8-13.7). Our findings provide support for potential behavioral prevention strategies, as we identified a food intake pattern that was strongly related to PAI-1 and fibrinogen and independently predicted type 2 diabetes.

  15. Is resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus? A register review in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Fengling; Jiang, Guanglu; Du, Jian; Li, Liang; Yue, Wentao; Harries, Anthony D; Gudmund Hinderaker, Sven; Lin, Yan

    2014-01-01

    China has a high burden of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes mellitus (DM). The objectives of this study were to determine the following in patients with culture-confirmed TB: 1) demographic characteristics and disease patterns in relation to the presence or absence of type 2 diabetes and 2) presence or absence of drug resistance to isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP) or both in relation to duration of diabetes and control of diabetes. This is a cross-sectional and retrospective study involving record reviews. There were 621 patients with culture-positive TB, of whom 187 (30%) had previously known or new type 2 diabetes. In those with diabetes, there was a significantly higher proportion of males, persons aged ≥35 years and patients registered with new TB (pdiabetes. In patients with diabetes, there was no association of drug resistance with diabetes duration or disease control [assessed by fasting blood glucose (FBG) at 1 week]. A high proportion of patients with TB in a tertiary health facility, Beijing, China, had diabetes, but there was no association between type 2 diabetes and drug-resistant TB. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  16. Insulin resistance, role of metformin and other non-insulin therapies in pediatric type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacha, Fida; Klinepeter Bartz, Sara

    2016-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in youth is a challenging chronic medical condition. Its management should address not only the glycemic control but also insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease risk factors which are increasingly recognized to be present in youth with TID. Current knowledge on the mechanisms of insulin resistance in T1DM is reviewed. The use of adjunctive therapies that are beneficial to achieve adequate glycemic control while mitigating the effects of insulin resistance are discussed with a focus on metformin therapy and an overview of other new pharmacologic agents. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Potential Roles of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni in Abrogating Insulin Resistance and Diabetes: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Radzman, Nabilatul Hani; Ismail, W. I. W.; Adam, Zainah; Jaapar, Siti Safura; Adam, Aishah

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key factor in metabolic disorders like hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, which are promoted by obesity and may later lead to Type II diabetes mellitus. In recent years, researchers have identified links between insulin resistance and many noncommunicable illnesses other than diabetes. Hence, studying insulin resistance is of particular importance in unravelling the pathways employed by such diseases. In this review, mechanisms involving free fatty acids, adipocytokines such as TNFα and PPARγ and serine kinases like JNK and IKKβ, asserted to be responsible in the development of insulin resistance, will be discussed. Suggested mechanisms for actions in normal and disrupted states were also visualised in several manually constructed diagrams to capture an overall view of the insulin-signalling pathway and its related components. The underlying constituents of medicinal significance found in the Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni plant (among other plants that potentiate antihyperglycemic activities) were explored in further depth. Understanding these factors and their mechanisms may be essential for comprehending the progression of insulin resistance towards the development of diabetes mellitus. PMID:24324517

  18. Potential Roles of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni in Abrogating Insulin Resistance and Diabetes: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabilatul Hani Mohd-Radzman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is a key factor in metabolic disorders like hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, which are promoted by obesity and may later lead to Type II diabetes mellitus. In recent years, researchers have identified links between insulin resistance and many noncommunicable illnesses other than diabetes. Hence, studying insulin resistance is of particular importance in unravelling the pathways employed by such diseases. In this review, mechanisms involving free fatty acids, adipocytokines such as TNFα and PPARγ and serine kinases like JNK and IKKβ, asserted to be responsible in the development of insulin resistance, will be discussed. Suggested mechanisms for actions in normal and disrupted states were also visualised in several manually constructed diagrams to capture an overall view of the insulin-signalling pathway and its related components. The underlying constituents of medicinal significance found in the Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni plant (among other plants that potentiate antihyperglycemic activities were explored in further depth. Understanding these factors and their mechanisms may be essential for comprehending the progression of insulin resistance towards the development of diabetes mellitus.

  19. Influence of resistance exercise training on glucose control in women with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenicchia, L M; Kanaley, J A; Azevedo, J L; Miller, C S; Weinstock, R S; Carhart, R L; Ploutz-Snyder, L L

    2004-03-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of acute and chronic resistance training on glucose and insulin responses to a glucose load in women with type 2 diabetes. Subjects consisted of type 2 diabetic women (n = 7) and age-matched controls (n = 8) with normal glucose tolerance. All subjects participated in 3 oral glucose tolerance tests: pretraining, 12 to 24 hours after the first exercise session (acute) and 60 to 72 hours after the final training session (chronic). Exercise training consisted of a whole body resistance exercise program using weight-lifting machines 3 days per week for 6 weeks. Resistance training was effective in increasing strength of all muscle groups in all subjects. Integrated glucose concentration expressed as area under the curve (AUC) was 3,355.0 +/- 324.6 mmol/L. min pretraining, improved significantly (P benefits, individuals must follow a regular schedule that includes daily exercise.

  20. Purified anthocyanin supplementation reduces dyslipidemia, enhances antioxidant capacity, and prevents insulin resistance in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Zhang, Yuhua; Liu, Yan; Sun, Ruifang; Xia, Min

    2015-04-01

    Oxidative stress plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Anthocyanin, a natural antioxidant, has been reported to reduce oxidative stress and to attenuate insulin resistance and diabetes in animal models; however, the translation of these observations to humans has not been fully tested. This study was designed to investigate the effects of purified anthocyanins on dyslipidemia, oxidative status, and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 58 diabetic patients were given 160 mg of anthocyanins twice daily or placebo (n = 29/group) for 24 wk in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Participants and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. Anthocyanin supplementation significantly decreased serum LDL cholesterol (by 7.9%; P anthocyanin group showed higher total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter and ferric ion reducing antioxidant power values than did patients in the placebo group (both P anthocyanin group were significantly less than in patients in the placebo group (23.4%, 25.8%; P anthocyanin lowered fasting plasma glucose (by 8.5%; P anthocyanin supplementation exerts beneficial metabolic effects in subjects with type 2 diabetes by improving dyslipidemia, enhancing antioxidant capacity, and preventing insulin resistance. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02317211. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  1. Icosapent ethyl for the treatment of severe hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares H

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hassan Fares,1 Carl J Lavie,2,3 James J DiNicolantonio,4 James H O'Keefe,5 Richard V Milani2 1Department of Hospital Medicine, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA, 2Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinical School, University of Queensland School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 3Department of Preventive Medicine, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University System, Baton Rouge, LA, 4Mid America Heart Institute at Saint Luke's Hospital, Kansas City, MO, 5Mid America Heart Institute, University of Missouri–Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA Abstract: Hypertriglyceridemia is a highly prevalent lipid abnormality and it is associated with atherosclerosis, with a growing body of evidence linking elevated triglycerides (TGs with cardiovascular disease. The current major omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA/docosahexaenoic acid (DHA combination, lowers serum TGs while often increasing levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Icosapent ethyl is an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid with a 96% pure ethyl ester of EPA that has been recently approved for lowering TG levels in patients with very high TGs (≥500 mg/dL, and it does so without significantly affecting serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The potential benefits of omega-3 fatty acid therapy for dyslipidemias will be discussed, including the potential pros and cons of EPA alone versus the more common and readily available EPA/DHA combination therapy. Keywords: triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid

  2. Sodium salicylate reduced insulin resistance in the retina of a type 2 diabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Youde; Thakran, Shalini; Bheemreddy, Rajini; Coppess, William; Walker, Robert J; Steinle, Jena J

    2015-01-01

    Sodium salicylate has been reported to reduce markers of diabetic retinopathy in a type 1 rat model. Because rates of type 2 diabetes are on the rise, we wanted to determine whether salicylate could improve insulin resistance in a type 2 rat model, as well as improve retinal function. We treated lean and obese BBZDR/Wor type 2 diabetic rats with salicylate in their chow for 2 months. Prior to salicylate treatment, rats underwent an electroretinogram to measure retinal function. After 2 months of treatment, rats underwent an additional electroretinogram prior to sacrifice. In addition to the animal model, we also treated retinal endothelial cells (REC) and rat Müller cells with salicylate and performed the same analyses as done for the rat retinal lysates. To investigate the role of salicylate in insulin signaling, we measured TNFα and caspase 3 levels by ELISA, as well as performed Western blotting for insulin receptor substrate 1, insulin receptor, SOCS3, and pro- and anti-apoptotic markers. Data demonstrated that salicylate significantly improved retinal function, as well as reduced TNFα and SOCS3-induced insulin resistance in all samples. Overall, results suggest that salicylate is effective in reducing insulin resistance in the retina of type 2 diabetic rat models.

  3. Sodium Salicylate Reduced Insulin Resistance in the Retina of a Type 2 Diabetic Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Youde; Thakran, Shalini; Bheemreddy, Rajini; Coppess, William; Walker, Robert J.; Steinle, Jena J.

    2015-01-01

    Sodium salicylate has been reported to reduce markers of diabetic retinopathy in a type 1 rat model. Because rates of type 2 diabetes are on the rise, we wanted to determine whether salicylate could improve insulin resistance in a type 2 rat model, as well as improve retinal function. We treated lean and obese BBZDR/Wor type 2 diabetic rats with salicylate in their chow for 2 months. Prior to salicylate treatment, rats underwent an electroretinogram to measure retinal function. After 2 months of treatment, rats underwent an additional electroretinogram prior to sacrifice. In addition to the animal model, we also treated retinal endothelial cells (REC) and rat Müller cells with salicylate and performed the same analyses as done for the rat retinal lysates. To investigate the role of salicylate in insulin signaling, we measured TNFα and caspase 3 levels by ELISA, as well as performed Western blotting for insulin receptor substrate 1, insulin receptor, SOCS3, and pro- and anti-apoptotic markers. Data demonstrated that salicylate significantly improved retinal function, as well as reduced TNFα and SOCS3-induced insulin resistance in all samples. Overall, results suggest that salicylate is effective in reducing insulin resistance in the retina of type 2 diabetic rat models. PMID:25874611

  4. Association of Oxidative Stress and Obesity with Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, P; Biswas, S; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, S K

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress occurs due to delicate imbalance between pro-oxidant and anti oxidant forces in our system. It has been found to be associated with many morbidities but its association with obesity and insulin resistance is still controversial. Here in our study we examined 167 patients of recent onset type 2 diabetes mellitus and 60 age sex matched non-diabetic control. Body Mass Index (BMI), abdominal circumference, fasting blood glucose, serum insulin and plasma Malondealdehyde (MDA, marker for oxidative stress) were measured in them. On the basis of BMI, subjects were divided into obese (BMI≥25) and non obese (BMIdiabetes than their non diabetic controls. The said parameters also showed significant difference in obese and non-obese sub groups. Insulin resistance score showed positive correlation with BMI, abdominal circumference, and plasma MDA, strength of association being highest with abdominal circumference. Plasma MDA was found to have positive correlation with physical parameters. Study concludes that, obesity mainly central type may predispose to insulin resistance and oxidative stress may be a crucial factor in its pathogenesis. Thus, oxidative stress may be the connecting link between obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, two on going global epidemics.

  5. The correlation of adiponectin, IL-6 with insulin resistance and macrovascular lesion in type 2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Bimin; Cheng Xingbo

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the serum level changes of adiponectin and IL-6 and their relation with macrovascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes before and after thiazolidinediones intervention. Methods: Serum adiponectin and IL-6 level were examined using ELISA method in 16 patients with obese type 2 diabetes, 24 patients with diabetes with normal body weight, and 14 controls. Their body mass index (BMI) and HOMA-IR were calculated and the internal membrane thickness (IMT) of carotid artery was also observed. These indexes were reexamined after thiazolidinediones (Avandia) intervention and correlation analysis was performed. Results: A decreased serum concentration of adiponectin and an elevated level of IL-6 and HOMA-IR were found in diabetes group especially in those with obesity (P<0.01). Serum adiponectin was negatively correlated with HOMA-IR, BMI, IL-6 and IMT while IL-6 was positively correlated with the above-mentioned indexes. After treatment with thiazolidinediones, the insulin resistance state and adponectin and IL-6 were significantly improved especially in those with obesity (P<0.05, P<0.01). Conclusion: Adiponectin is closed correlated with obesity (P<0.05, P<0.01). Conclusion: Adiponectin is closed correlated with obesity, insulin resistance and macrovascular lesions. IL-6 may be involved in the mechanism of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients especially in the obese diabetes group. In addition to enhance the sensitivity of insulin, thiazolidinediones may play a potential role in anti-inflammation, anti-atherosclerosis and immuno-regulation. (authors)

  6. Comparison of the effects of endurance, resistance and concurrent training on insulin resistance and adiponectin-leptin ratio in diabetic rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Saremi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The obesity-related hormones leptin and adiponectin are independently and oppositely associated with insulin resistance. Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of endurance, resistance and concurrent training on insulin resistance and adiponectin-leptin ratio in diabetic rats. Methods: Ten out of 50 male Wistar rats were separated as healthy subjects. Then diabetes was induced in the remaining rats by the injection of streptozotocin. Diabetic rats divided into 4 groups: Control, resistance training (5 sessions/week, 4 reps/3 sets, endurance training (5 sets per week of treadmill running and concurrent training. The resistance training protocol consisted of ten weeks climbing up the ladder, while endurance training performed on treadmill for ten weeks. Concurrent training group completed a combination of both resistances and endurance treadmill training. Blood samples were taken to assess leptin, adiponectin and insulin resistance. Findings: Endurance, resistance and concurrent training significantly decreased insulin resistance and glucose (P0.05. On the one hand, adiponctin level and adiponctin-leptin ratio significantly increased in all of training groups (P<0.05. Conclusion: Exercise training, as defined in this study, leads to improvements in adiponectin-leptin ratio and concurrent training has more impact on insulin resistance index in diabetic rats.

  7. Gender difference and relationship of insulin resistance with microalbuminuria type-2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Ahmad, A.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the relationship of insulin resistance with microalbuminuria in patients of type-2 Diabetes mellitus and observe gender difference if any. Study Design: A cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Diabetes Clinic of Combined Military Hospital, Malir Cantt, from April to August 2007. Methodology: One hundred and fifty five patients of type-2 Diabetes mellitus were included in the study who had either microalbuminuria or normo albuminuria. Body mass index, waist circumference and blood pressure were recorded. Fasting venous blood sample was collected for plasma glucose (FPG), serum insulin, total and HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine and HbA1c. Urine albumin excretion was determined using urine albumin to creatinine ratio. Insulin resistance was calculated from fasting plasma glucose and serum insulin levels, using homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Correlation and association testing was carried out with significance at p < 0.05. Results: Microalbuminuria was found to be significantly correlated with HOMA-IR (r = 0.33, p < 0.001), serum insulin (r = 0.28, p = < 0.001), body mass index (r = 0.18, p = 0.02) and waist circumference (r = 0.21, p = 0.008). This correlation was more significant in women (n = 85, r = 0.48, p = < 0.0001) as compared to men (n = 70, r = 0.14, p = 0.12). The correlation between HOMA-IR and urine albumin excretion remained highly significant (p = 0.001) after controlling for gender, age, duration of diabetes, waist circumference, hypertension, triglycerides and HbA1c. Conclusion: Urinary albumin excretion in patients of type-2 diabetes is strongly associated with insulin resistance and related cardiovascular risk factors. This association appears to be stronger in women than the men, in our population. (author)

  8. Plasma adiponectin and insulin resistance in Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Jin; Yoo, Kwang-Ha; Park, Hyung-Suk; Chung, Sang-Man; Jin, Choon-Jo; Lee, Yoen; Shin, Young-Goo; Chung, Choon-Hee

    2005-02-28

    Insulin resistance, which implies impairment of insulin signaling in the target tissues, is a common cause of type 2 diabetes. Adipose tissue plays an important role in insulin resistance through the dysregulated production and secretion of adipose-derived proteins, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, leptin, resistin, angiotensinogen, and adiponectin. Adiponectin was estimated to be a protective adipocytokine against atherosclerosis, and also to have an anti-inflammatory effect. In this study, the relationship between fasting plasma adiponectin concentration and adiposity, body composition, insulin sensitivity (ITT, HOMAIR, QUICK), lipid profile, fasting insulin concentration were examined in Korean type 2 diabetes. The difference in the adiponectin concentrations was also examined in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects, with adjustment for gender, age and body mass index. 102 type 2 diabetics and 50 controls were examined. After a 12-h overnight fast, all subjects underwent a 75 gram oral glucose tolerance test. Baseline blood samples were drawn for the determinations of fasting plasma glucose, insulin, adiponectin, total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. The body composition was estimated using a bioelectric impedance analyzer (Inbody 2.0). The insulin sensitivity was estimated using the insulin tolerance test (ITT), HOMAIR and QUICK methods. In the diabetic group, the fasting adiponectin concentrations were significantly lower in men than in women. They were negatively correlated with BMI (r=-0.453), hip circumference (r=-0.341), fasting glucose concentrations (r=-0.277) and HOMAIR (r= -0.233). In addition, they were positively correlated with systolic blood pressure (r=0.321) and HDL-cholesterol (r= 0.291). The systolic blood pressure and HDL-cholesterol were found to be independent variables, from a multiple logistic regression analysis, which influenced the adiponectin concentration

  9. Sleep duration and insulin resistance in individuals without type 2 diabetes: the PPP-Botnia study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyykkönen, Antti-Jussi; Isomaa, Bo; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Eriksson, Johan G; Groop, Leif; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Räikkönen, Katri

    2014-08-01

    Both short and long sleep duration may increase risk of type 2 diabetes (diabetes). We studied if short and long sleep durations were associated with insulin resistance (IR) and insulin secretion in individuals without diabetes, and if the associations remained after we excluded individuals who reported more frequent and severe complaints of sleep apnea and insomnia. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed for 722 adults without diabetes. Indices of IR and insulin secretion were calculated. Sleep duration and complaints of sleep apnea and insomnia were self-reported. In comparison to average sleepers (6-9 h/night), short sleepers (< 6 h/night) had higher 120-min insulin and AUC glucose, and long sleepers (≥ 9 h/night) had higher fasting and 120-min insulin, 120-min glucose, and HOMAIR and lower Insulin Sensitivity Index. After adjusting for confounders and after excluding individuals who reported more frequent and severe complaints of sleep apnea and insomnia, long sleep duration remained significantly associated with IR and insulin secretion. Long but not short sleep duration is associated with IR and insulin secretion in individuals without diabetes whether or not accompanied by sleep complaints. Long sleepers may benefit from targeted preventions and interventions that aim at reducing risk of future diabetes.

  10. Gallic Acid Alleviates Hypertriglyceridemia and Fat Accumulation via Modulating Glycolysis and Lipolysis Pathways in Perirenal Adipose Tissues of Rats Fed a High-Fructose Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Da-Wei; Chang, Wen-Chang; Yang, Heng-Jui; Wu, James Swi-Bea; Shen, Szu-Chuan

    2018-01-15

    This study investigated the ameliorative effect of gallic acid (GA) on hypertriglyceridemia and fat accumulation in perirenal adipose tissues of high-fructose diet (HFD)-induced diabetic rats. The previous results showed that orally administered GA (30 mg/kg body weight) for four weeks significantly reduced the levels of plasma glucose and triglyceride (TG) in HFD rats. GA also markedly decreased the perirenal adipose tissues weight of HFD rats in present study ( p perirenal adipose tissues of HFD rats. Moreover, GA enhanced expression of glycolysis-related proteins, such as phosphofructokinase (PFK) and pyruvate kinase (PK), and increased the expression of lipolysis-related proteins, such as adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), which is involved in lipolysis in the perirenal adipose tissues of HFD rats. This study revealed that GA may alleviate hypertriglyceridemia and fat accumulation through enhancing glycolysis and lipolysis pathways in perirenal adipose tissues of HFD rats. These findings also suggest the potential of GA in preventing the progression of diabetes mellitus (DM) complications.

  11. Gallic Acid Alleviates Hypertriglyceridemia and Fat Accumulation via Modulating Glycolysis and Lipolysis Pathways in Perirenal Adipose Tissues of Rats Fed a High-Fructose Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Wei Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the ameliorative effect of gallic acid (GA on hypertriglyceridemia and fat accumulation in perirenal adipose tissues of high-fructose diet (HFD-induced diabetic rats. The previous results showed that orally administered GA (30 mg/kg body weight for four weeks significantly reduced the levels of plasma glucose and triglyceride (TG in HFD rats. GA also markedly decreased the perirenal adipose tissues weight of HFD rats in present study (p < 0.05. Western blot assay indicated that GA restored expression of insulin signaling-related proteins, such as insulin receptor (IR, protein kinase C-zeta (PKC-ζ, and glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4 in the perirenal adipose tissues of HFD rats. Moreover, GA enhanced expression of glycolysis-related proteins, such as phosphofructokinase (PFK and pyruvate kinase (PK, and increased the expression of lipolysis-related proteins, such as adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, which is involved in lipolysis in the perirenal adipose tissues of HFD rats. This study revealed that GA may alleviate hypertriglyceridemia and fat accumulation through enhancing glycolysis and lipolysis pathways in perirenal adipose tissues of HFD rats. These findings also suggest the potential of GA in preventing the progression of diabetes mellitus (DM complications.

  12. Inflammation, insulin resistance, and diabetes--Mendelian randomization using CRP haplotypes points upstream.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Brunner

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Raised C-reactive protein (CRP is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. According to the Mendelian randomization method, the association is likely to be causal if genetic variants that affect CRP level are associated with markers of diabetes development and diabetes. Our objective was to examine the nature of the association between CRP phenotype and diabetes development using CRP haplotypes as instrumental variables.We genotyped three tagging SNPs (CRP + 2302G > A; CRP + 1444T > C; CRP + 4899T > G in the CRP gene and measured serum CRP in 5,274 men and women at mean ages 49 and 61 y (Whitehall II Study. Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c were measured at age 61 y. Diabetes was ascertained by glucose tolerance test and self-report. Common major haplotypes were strongly associated with serum CRP levels, but unrelated to obesity, blood pressure, and socioeconomic position, which may confound the association between CRP and diabetes risk. Serum CRP was associated with these potential confounding factors. After adjustment for age and sex, baseline serum CRP was associated with incident diabetes (hazard ratio = 1.39 [95% confidence interval 1.29-1.51], HOMA-IR, and HbA1c, but the associations were considerably attenuated on adjustment for potential confounding factors. In contrast, CRP haplotypes were not associated with HOMA-IR or HbA1c (p = 0.52-0.92. The associations of CRP with HOMA-IR and HbA1c were all null when examined using instrumental variables analysis, with genetic variants as the instrument for serum CRP. Instrumental variables estimates differed from the directly observed associations (p = 0.007-0.11. Pooled analysis of CRP haplotypes and diabetes in Whitehall II and Northwick Park Heart Study II produced null findings (p = 0.25-0.88. Analyses based on the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (1,923 diabetes cases, 2,932 controls using three SNPs in tight linkage disequilibrium with our

  13. GLUT4 is reduced in slow muscle fibers of type 2 diabetic patients: is insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes a slow, type 1 fiber disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Staehr, P; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2001-01-01

    To gain further insight into the mechanisms underlying muscle insulin resistance, the influence of obesity and type 2 diabetes on GLUT4 immunoreactivity in slow and fast skeletal muscle fibers was studied. Through a newly developed, very sensitive method using immunohistochemistry combined...... and thus contribute to skeletal muscle insulin resistance....

  14. Topicality of the problem of combined course of multi-drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Raznatovska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization, today in the world among the infectious chronic diseases one of the leading places and causes of death is multi-drug resistant tuberculosis of the lungs, and chronic non-communicable diseases – diabetes mellitus. The situation is complicated by the fact that the number of patients with combined course of these two heavy separate illnesses that complicate each other increases. It is established that with increasing severity of diabetes mellitus, tuberculosis process in the lungs becomes more complicate and deteriorates, and vice versa, the specific process complicates the course of diabetes mellitus, contributing to the development of diabetic complications. Against this background, the effectiveness of treatment of patients suffering from multi-drug resistant tuberculosis of the lungs in our country remains very low, mainly due to the toxic adverse reactions to antimycobacterial drugs of the reserve line, and in the case of adding diabetes mellitus, it deteriorates even more. The aim of this study was to review the scientific literature to determine the relevance of the study of combined course of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis of the lungs with diabetes mellitus and perspectives of innovative methods of diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Early diagnosis of pre-diabetes, and autoimmune diseases will allow the use of timely correction techniques that prevents the development of diabetes mellitus, depending on its type, and in the future the development of serious irreversible processes, allow timely applying appropriate methods of correction of the revealed violations. Results. Very little amount of work is dedicated to the problem of combined course of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis of the lungs with diabetes mellitus, regardless of its type, the theme is relevant for today, in Ukraine there are no data regarding its study. This combined course of very difficult in the treatment diseases requires

  15. Analysis of the effect of diabetes type 2 duration on beta cell secretory function and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Ljiljana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes type 2 is a chronic metabolic disorder. Pathogenesis of diabetes type 2 results from the impaired insulin secretion, impaired insulin action and increased endogenous glucose production. Diabetes evolves through several phases characterized by qualitative and quantitative changes of beta cell secretory function. The aim of our study was to analyze the impact of diabetes duration on beta cell secretory function and insulin resistance. The results indicated significant negative correlation of diabetes duration and fasting insulinemia, as well as beta cell secretory function assessed by HOMA β index. Our study also found significant negative correlation of diabetes duration and insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index. Significant positive correlation was established between beta cell secretory capacity (fasting insulinemia and HOMA β and insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index, independently of diabetes duration. These results indicate that: beta cell secretory capacity, assessed by HOMA β index, significantly decreases with diabetes duration. In parallel with decrease of fasting insulinemia, reduction of insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index was found as well.

  16. Diabetes mellitus in itself is not a risk factor for antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from patients with bacteriuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meiland, R.; Geerlings, S. E.; de Neeling, A. J.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from patients with bacteriuria. METHODS: Data were obtained from a multicentre study. A clean-voided midstream urine culture was collected from 636 women with diabetes, who were between 18 and

  17. Direct Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Stimulation Ameliorates Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mice with PPARγ Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohshima, Kousei; Mogi, Masaki; Jing, Fei

    2012-01-01

    The role of angiotensin II type 2 (AT(2)) receptor stimulation in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance is still unclear. Therefore we examined the possibility that direct AT(2) receptor stimulation by compound 21 (C21) might contribute to possible insulin-sensitizing/anti-diabetic effects in type...... 2 diabetes (T2DM) with PPARγ activation, mainly focusing on adipose tissue....

  18. Differential hepatic distribution of insulin receptor substrates causes selective insulin resistance in diabetes and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Naoto; Kubota, Tetsuya; Kajiwara, Eiji; Iwamura, Tomokatsu; Kumagai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Taku; Inoue, Mariko; Takamoto, Iseki; Sasako, Takayoshi; Kumagai, Katsuyoshi; Kohjima, Motoyuki; Nakamuta, Makoto; Moroi, Masao; Sugi, Kaoru; Noda, Tetsuo; Terauchi, Yasuo; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2016-10-06

    Hepatic insulin signalling involves insulin receptor substrates (Irs) 1/2, and is normally associated with the inhibition of gluconeogenesis and activation of lipogenesis. In diabetes and obesity, insulin no longer suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis, while continuing to activate lipogenesis, a state referred to as 'selective insulin resistance'. Here, we show that 'selective insulin resistance' is caused by the differential expression of Irs1 and Irs2 in different zones of the liver. We demonstrate that hepatic Irs2-knockout mice develop 'selective insulin resistance', whereas mice lacking in Irs1, or both Irs1 and Irs2, develop 'total insulin resistance'. In obese diabetic mice, Irs1/2-mediated insulin signalling is impaired in the periportal zone, which is the primary site of gluconeogenesis, but enhanced in the perivenous zone, which is the primary site of lipogenesis. While hyperinsulinaemia reduces Irs2 expression in both the periportal and perivenous zones, Irs1 expression, which is predominantly in the perivenous zone, remains mostly unaffected. These data suggest that 'selective insulin resistance' is induced by the differential distribution, and alterations of hepatic Irs1 and Irs2 expression.

  19. Topical insulin accelerates cutaneous wound healing in insulin-resistant diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Tianyi; Gao, Min; Yang, Peilang; Pei, Qing; Liu, Dan; Wang, Di; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Insulin signaling defects could lead to insulin resistance in insulin target organs: typically, in the muscler, liver, and adipose tissue. We have observed that insulin accelerated diabetic wound healing in our previous works; to further elucidate the mechanism, we investigated the expression and activation of insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 signaling, compared insulin sensitivity in skin tissue with that in liver tissue, and also observed the regulation of insulin on inflammat...

  20. The Effects of Diabetes Mellitus on the Relationship Between Myocardial Adenosine Production and Coronary Vascular Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-13

    However, in the cat , Segal and McKenzie (1986) were able to b l ock sympathetically - mediated coronary vasospasm with the alpha1 blocker... cat with int r acoronary prazosin adminis t ration, but there was a regional change in coronary vascular resistance. It can be concluded from the...acids into the circulation by increasing glycogenolysis , lipolysis, and protein catabolism in liver, skeletal muscle, and fat. In diabetes, the

  1. The Association between Monocyte Surface CD163 and Insulin Resistance in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reina Kawarabayashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the association between monocyte CD163 and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. One hundred sixty-six patients with type 2 diabetes without inflammatory or chronic kidney disease were recruited. The monocyte CD163 levels were measured by flow cytometry and soluble CD163 (sCD163 by ELISA. Insulin resistance was evaluated by the index of the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-R. Results. The median sCD163 and monocyte CD163 expression levels were 582.9 (472.4–720.0 ng/ml and 6061 (4486–7876 mean fluorescent intensity (MFI, respectively. In a simple regression analysis, monocyte CD163 was inversely correlated with log [HOMA-R] (r=–0.257, p=0.010, and sCD163 was positively correlated with log [HOMA-R] (r=0.198, p=0.042. In multiple regression analyses, monocyte CD163 was an independent contributor to log [HOMA-R] (β=–0.220, p=0.020 even after adjustment of various clinical factors for HOMA-R (R2=0.281, p=0.001, whereas sCD163 was not. Conclusions. Monocyte surface CD163 expression levels were more significantly associated with insulin resistance than sCD163 in patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting a novel pathophysiological role of CD163.

  2. Comparative study of telmisartan with pioglitazone on insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Qayyum, A.; Khan, B.T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the effects of telmisartan and pioglitazone on peripheral insulin resistance in diabetic mice. Study Design: Randomized control trail. Place and Duration of Study: National Institute of Health, Islamabad and pharmacology dept, Army Medical College, from 17th March to 17th June 2014. Material and Methods: Twenty four BALB/c mice, both male and female, of 35 to 40 grams were used for this study. Animals were randomly divided into four groups. Two were taken as control groups, one was normal control and the other was diabetic control. Two were taken as interventional groups and received either pioglitazone or telmisartan for four weeks after induction of diabetes. Results: After treatment, pioglitazone reduced all the biochemical parameters significantly when compared with diabetic control. Negative correlation between glucose and insulin was changed into positive correlation (r-value, 0.92) with significant p-value (0.015) in pioglitazone treated group, while telmisartan only managed to convert a negative correlation between insulin and glucose into statistically non-significant positive. Conclusion: Telmisartan although reduces glucose levels and improves beta cell mass but the effect is statistically non-significant as compared to pioglitazone. In hypertensive type 2 diabetics a combination of these two drugs may help in reducing the dose of pioglitazone and consequently the cardiovascular adverse effects of pioglitazone. (author)

  3. Peroxynitrite-Driven Mechanisms in Diabetes and Insulin Resistance – the Latest Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, K.

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery, peroxynitrite has been known as a potent oxidant in biological systems, and a rapidly growing body of literature has characterized its biochemistry and role in the pathophysiology of various conditions. Either directly or by inducing free radical pathways, peroxynitrite damages vital biomolecules such as DNA, proteins including enzymes with important functions, and lipids. It also initiates diverse reactions leading eventually to disrupted cell signaling, cell death, and apoptosis. The potential role and contribution of this deleterious species has been the subject of investigation in several important diseases, including but not limited to, cancer, neurodegeneration, stroke, inflammatory conditions, cardiovascular problems, and diabetes mellitus. Diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes-related complications represent a major health problem at epidemic levels. Therefore, tremendous efforts have been put into investigation of the molecular basics of peroxynitrite-related mechanisms in diabetes. Studies constantly seek new therapeutical approaches in order to eliminate or decrease the level of peroxynitrite, or to interfere with its downstream mechanisms. This review is intended to emphasize the latest findings about peroxynitrite and diabetes, and, in addition, to discuss recent and novel advances that are likely to contribute to a better understanding of peroxynitrite-mediated damage in this disease. PMID:21110800

  4. Aerobic versus resistance exercise training in modulation of insulin resistance, adipocytokines and inflammatory cytokine levels in obese type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehab M. Abd El-Kader

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available It is suggested that adipocytokines secreted by adipose tissue play a role in the development of obesity-related complications and diabetes. Regular aerobic exercise has been shown to reduce the risk of metabolic complications in obese type 2 diabetic subjects. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of aerobic versus resistance training on insulin resistance, adipocytokines and inflammatory cytokine in obese type 2 diabetic patients. Forty obese type 2 diabetic patients of both sexes with body mass index (BMI ranging from 31 to 35 kg/m2, non smokers, and free from respiratory, kidney, liver, metabolic and neurological disorders, were selected for this study. Their ages ranged from 34 to 56 years. The subjects were divided into two equal groups: the first group received aerobic exercise training. The second group (B received resisted exercise training three times a week for three months. The mean values of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6, Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA index for insulin sensitivity and glycosylated hemoglobin (HBA1c, were significantly decreased in both groups. Also, there was a significant difference between the groups after treatment on all measured variables. It is suggested that in obese type 2 diabetic patients aerobic exercise is more appropriate for modulating insulin resistance, adipocytokines and inflammatory cytokine levels than is resisted exercise training.

  5. [Aspects of the antimicrobial resistence profile in infections with Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in diabetic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovici, Cristina G; Dorobăţ, Carmen; Matei, Mioara; Teodor, Andra; Luca, V; Miftode, Egidia

    2011-01-01

    Infections in diabetic patient remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality, triggering and maintaining a prolonged metabolic imbalance. Emergence of extented spectrum beta-lactmase (ESBL) in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major concern, because of the atypical manner infection acts in this group of imunodepressed patients and also for the limited therapeutic solutions. For this reason we have evaluated the profile of antimicrobial resistance of these pathogens in both diabetic and non diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate, in a retrospective case control study, the antibiotic susceptibility pattern in isolates of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. from different biological products in 49 diabetics and 150 non-diabetics admitted in The Clinical Hospital of Infectious Diseases Iaşi over a period of two years. Most of strains of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. ESBL positive were found in uroculture. Significant differences in E. coli resistance rate between diabetics and nondiabetics were noted for amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ciprofloxacin (31,4% vs.13,98%, p=0,04, respectively 52,9% vs. 24,46%, p=0,004). More isolates of ESBL positive K. pneumoniae were found in diabetic patients (50% vs. 24%). Ciprofloxacin resistance of K. pneumoniae was significantly higher in diabetics (75% vs 39%; p=0,05). There was no resistance in E. coli and K. pneumoniae isolates to imipenem in the diabetic group. The high resistance rate to quinolones and 3rd generation cefalosporins limits their use for the treatment of Escherichia coli and K. pneumoniae infections. Other alternatives for empiric therapy in community and nosocomial-acquired infections in diabetic patient remains carbapenems, aminoglycosides and colimycin.

  6. Vitamin D intake associates with insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes, but not in latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Sánchez, Laura Ivonne; Gómez-Díaz, Rita A; Wacher, Niels H

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between vitamin D (vitD) intake and serum concentrations and insulin secretion (assessed by C-peptide serum concentration)/insulin resistance (determined by estimated glucose disposal rate [eGDR]) in patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). C-peptide, serum vitD, lipid profile, insulin, glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were assessed; vitD intake was determined; and eGDR was calculated. Groups were compared using the Student t or Mann-Whitney U test. Correlations were performed between insulin secretion, insulin resistance, and vitD, and linear regression models were adjusted for confounding variables. Of 107 patients included, age was 55.3 ± 11.84 years old, and time since diabetes diagnosis was 13.23 ± 5.96 years. There were significant intergroup differences in age, body mass index (BMI), hip measurements, glucose, and HbA1c. The correlation between vitD intake and C-peptide for the whole group was significant (r = 0.213; P = .032) as well as for vitD deficiency/sufficiency in T2DM (P = .042), whereas neither was significant in eGDR. After adjustment for age, HbA1c, disease progression, physical activity, solar exposure, sex, and BMI, vitD intake was only significant in T2DM (P = .028). In serum vitD, only the correlation between eGDR and vitD in T2DM was significant and intragroup when comparing vitD sufficiency. After adjustments, significance was lost. Patients with LADA had lower intake of vitD, poorer metabolic control, lower BMI, and younger age compared to T2DM patients. There was no association between serum vitD or vitD intake and insulin secretion when analyzed by group, although vitD intake was associated with insulin resistance in T2DM, but not LADA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A new model to estimate insulin resistance via clinical parameters in adults with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xueying; Huang, Bin; Luo, Sihui; Yang, Daizhi; Bao, Wei; Li, Jin; Yao, Bin; Weng, Jianping; Yan, Jinhua

    2017-05-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a risk factor to assess the development of micro- and macro-vascular complications in type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, diabetes management in adults with T1D is limited by the difficulty of lacking simple and reliable methods to estimate insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to develop a new model to estimate IR via clinical parameters in adults with T1D. A total of 36 adults with adulthood onset T1D (n = 20) or childhood onset T1D (n = 16) were recruited by quota sampling. After an overnight insulin infusion to stabilize the blood glucose at 5.6 to 7.8 mmol/L, they underwent a 180-minute euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Glucose disposal rate (GDR, mg kg -1  min -1 ) was calculated by data collected from the last 30 minutes during the test. Demographic factors (age, sex, and diabetes duration) and metabolic parameters (blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin A 1c [HbA 1c ], waist to hip ratio [WHR], and lipids) were collected to evaluate insulin resistance. Then, age at diabetes onset and clinical parameters were used to develop a model to estimate lnGDR by stepwise linear regression. From the stepwise process, a best model to estimate insulin resistance was generated, including HbA 1c , diastolic blood pressure, and WHR. Age at diabetes onset did not enter any of the models. We proposed the following new model to estimate IR as in GDR for adults with T1D: lnGDR = 4.964 - 0.121 × HbA 1c (%) - 0.012 × diastolic blood pressure (mmHg) - 1.409 × WHR, (adjusted R 2  = 0.616, P Insulin resistance in adults living with T1D can be estimated using routinely collected clinical parameters. This simple model provides a potential tool for estimating IR in large-scale epidemiological studies of adults with T1D regardless of age at onset. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Associations of vitamin D with insulin resistance, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimalawansa, Sunil J

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the relationships of vitamin D with diabetes, insulin resistance obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Intra cellular vitamin D receptors and the 1-α hydroxylase enzyme are distributed ubiquitously in all tissues suggesting a multitude of functions of vitamin D. It plays an indirect but an important role in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism as reflected by its association with type 2 diabetes (T2D), metabolic syndrome, insulin secretion, insulin resistance, polycystic ovarian syndrome, and obesity. Peer-reviewed papers, related to the topic were extracted using key words, from PubMed, Medline, and other research databases. Correlations of vitamin D with diabetes, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome were examined for this evidence-based review. In addition to the well-studied musculoskeletal effects, vitamin D decreases the insulin resistance, severity of T2D, prediabetes, metabolic syndrome, inflammation, and autoimmunity. Vitamin D exerts autocrine and paracrine effects such as direct intra-cellular effects via its receptors and the local production of 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 , especially in muscle and pancreatic β-cells. It also regulates calcium homeostasis and calcium flux through cell membranes, and activation of a cascade of key enzymes and cofactors associated with metabolic pathways. Cross-sectional, observational, and ecological studies reported inverse correlations between vitamin D status with hyperglycemia and glycemic control in patients with T2D, decrease the rate of conversion of prediabetes to diabetes, and obesity. However, no firm conclusions can be drawn from current studies, because (A) studies were underpowered; (B) few were designed for glycemic outcomes, (C) the minimum (or median) serum 25(OH) D levels achieved are not measured or reported; (D) most did not report the use of diabetes medications; (E) some trials used too little (F) others used too large, unphysiological and infrequent doses of vitamin D; and

  9. Prevalence and contributing factors of methicillin-resistant staph. aureus and microbiological profile in diabetic foot infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboubeh Haji Abdolbaghi

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: In this study, MRSA prevalence was similar to other Asian studies and different from west countries study. There wasn't significant difference between gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms that look out to change of microbiological profile in diabetic foot infections and creation multi-drug resistant bacteria. MRSA infections and other multi drug resistant organisms is a serious problem and increasing problem in diabetic foot infections. Further studies are required to assess the need for antibiotics in treating foot ulcers in diabetes and to assess the optimal therapeutic management.

  10. Management of familial hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis during pregnancy with therapeutic plasma exchange: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Fadi; Toumeh, Anis; Abuissa Qadan, Mahmoud A; Karaz, Rana; AlAkdar, Bassam; Assaly, Ragheb

    2014-01-01

    Familial severe hypertriglyceridemia (levels greater than 1000 mg/dL) is a known cause of acute pancreatitis. Pregnancy can dysregulate controlled lipid levels in women with familial hypertriglyceridemia and lead to acute pancreatitis and significant morbidity in both mother and fetus. We report a case of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis during pregnancy that was successfully treated using therapeutic plasma exchange, resulting in delivery of a healthy preterm infant. Therapeutic plasma exchange is an effective approach to treat gestational hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis. Other treatment options include combined heparin and insulin infusion. Moreover, particular caution should be applied when interpreting the results of prothrombin time in the setting of severe hypertriglyceridemia as false elevation with testing methods could happen.

  11. Association of Adipokine Resistin With Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance in Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokhanguei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Resistin is a recently discovered signal molecule that has been linked to obesity, type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM and metabolic syndrome. Objectives This study aimed to assess whether serum resistin is associated with insulin resistance and glucose concentration in males with T2DM. Patients and Methods Thirty two adult non-trained males with type II diabetes, 34-48 years old and 88-110 kg of body weight, participated in this study by accessible sampling. Fasting blood samples were collected from all participants in order to measure serum resistin, insulin and glucose concentration. Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR was calculated using fasting insulin and glucose. Relations between variables were determined by Pearson correlations. Results We found that serum resistin had a positive significant correlation with insulin resistance (P = 0.000, r = 0.64. No significant correlation was found between serum resistin and fasting glucose concentration in the studied patients (P = 0.21, r = 0.23. Conclusions Based on these data, we can argue that circulating glucose concentration is not directly affected by serum resistin in T2DM. It seems that resistin affects glucose indirectly, through insulin resistance.

  12. The relationship between insulin resistance and the change of cytosol free calcium concentration in gestational diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Pu; Zheng Lei; Cen Rongguang; Song Yangxiu

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between the insulin resistance (IR) and abnormalities of cellular calcium metabolism in gestational diabetes mellitus, the changes in the [Ca 2+ ]i and the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity in circulating erythrocytes of 32 cases gestational diabetes were compared with those of 47 normal pregnant and 43 non pregnant women. The level of [Ca 2+ ]i in circulating erythrocyte in gestational diabetes mellitus women was significantly higher than that in the pregnant and non pregnant women (P 2+ ]i in circulating erythrocytes in gestational diabetes mellitus was positively correlated with fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin, negatively with the insulin receptor tyrosine kisase activity (P 2+ ]i level during the gastational period might be one of the possible factor in the insulin resistance of gestaional diabetes mellitus. (authors)

  13. Nonfasting Mild-to-Moderate Hypertriglyceridemia and Risk of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Simon B; Langsted, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-12-01

    × 10-8). Corresponding HRs for myocardial infarction were 1.6 (95% CI, 1.4-1.9; 41 events/10 000 person-years), 2.2 (95% CI, 1.9-2.7; 57 events/10 000 person-years), 3.2 (95% CI, 2.6-4.1; 72 events/10 000 person-years), 2.8 (95% CI, 2.0-3.9; 68 events/10 000 person-years), and 3.4 (95% CI, 2.4-4.7; 78 events/10 000 person-years) (trend, P = 6 × 10-31), respectively. The multivariable adjusted HR for acute pancreatitis was 1.17 (95% CI, 1.10-1.24) per 89 mg/dL (1 mmol/L) higher triglycerides. When stratified by sex, age, education, smoking, hypertension, statin use, study cohort, diabetes, body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), alcohol intake, and gallstone disease, these results were similar with no statistical evidence of interaction. Nonfasting mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia from 177 mg/dL (2 mmol/L) and above is associated with high risk of acute pancreatitis, with HR estimates higher than for myocardial infarction.

  14. The Relationship Between Osteomyelitis Complication and Drug-Resistant Infection Risk in Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Ding, Hui; Wu, Hua; Chen, Hong-Lin

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between osteomyelitis complications and drug-resistant infection risk in diabetic foot ulcer. Searches of MEDLINE and ISI databases were performed for the studies. Odds ratios (ORs) for drug-resistant infection incidence were calculated for diabetic foot ulcer patients with or without osteomyelitis complications. Eleven studies (12 cohorts) with 1526 patients were included in this study. Meta-analysis showed that the summary OR was 3.343 (95% CI = 2.355-4.745; Z = 6.75, P analysis by only pooled the adjusted ORs showed that the result was robust (the summary OR = 4.081, 95% CI = 2.471-6.739). Subgroup analysis by drug-resistant type showed that the summary OR was 4.391 (95% CI = 2.287-8.394) for methicillin-resistant infection subgroup, and 2.693 (95% CI = 1.882-3.851) for multidrug-resistant infection subgroup. The meta-regression showed that drug-resistant incidence ( t = -0.90, P = .389) and published year ( t = -0.11, P = .913) were not related with the OR changes. In conclusion, our meta-analysis indicates that osteomyelitis complications are related with drug-resistant infection risk in diabetic foot ulcer. We suggest bone culture-based narrow-spectrum antibiotic therapy for osteomyelitis for prevention drug-resistant infection in diabetic foot ulcer.

  15. Association of serum sparc with insulin resistance in type-2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeem, K.; Ahmed, U.; Arif, H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association of serum SPARC with insulin resistance in type-2 diabetes. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Physiology department and CREAM lab, Army medical college, Rawalpindi, in collaboration with Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Feb 2016 to Oct 2016. Material and Methods: Sixty individuals were recruited in this descriptive study. Thirty diagnosed cases of type- 2 DM were included, while thirty age and gender matched healthy individuals were included as controls through non-probability purposive sampling. Controls were labelled as group A, while cases were labelled as group B. Patients with type-1 DM, type-2 DM on insulin therapy, hyperglycemic states other than DM and inflammatory disorders were excluded from the study. Data were collected after informed and written consent. Blood samples were withdrawn under strict aseptic measures and serum was stored at -20 degree C. Serum insulin levels and serum SPARC levels were analyzed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Insulin resistance was determined using homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and its value >1.5 was considered significant. Results: Fasting insulin levels were significantly higher in group B as compared with group A, supporting the diagnosis of type-2 DM. HOMA-IR values were greater than 1.5 in group B, thus establishing significant insulin resistance. Serum SPARC levels were significantly higher in group B than group A (17.7 ± 1.14 vs 8.7 ± 1.08 ng/ml) with p-value<0.001. Serum SPARC levels showed positive correlation with fasting insulin levels and HOMA-IR values. Conclusion: Our study showed a positive correlation between serum SPARC levels and insulin resistance, which indicates that SPARC plays an important role in the development of insulin resistance in type-2 diabetes mellitus. (author)

  16. Gestational diabetes: should it be added to the syndrome of insulin resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C M; Qiu, C; Amerman, B; Porter, B; Fineberg, N; Aldasouqi, S; Golichowski, A

    1997-05-01

    The significance of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) results from its short-term detrimental effects on the fetus and its long-term prediction of NIDDM in the mother. We compared several variables associated with insulin resistance between GDM and non-GDM pregnant women to show the similarities between GDM and NIDDM (and thus insulin resistance). On the basis of a 3-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), 52 GDM patients and 127 non-GDM patients were recruited from pregnant, non-diabetic women who had a nonfasting 1-h-50-g glucose screening test > or = 7.2 mmol/l (130 mg/dl) performed between 16 and 33 weeks of gestation (a total of 518 of 3,041 women drawn from six community health care prenatal clinics were screened positive). During the OGTT, several potential markers of insulin resistance were measured at fasting and 2-h time points, in addition to the standard glucose measurements. The relationship of these variables with the diagnosis of GDM was studied. GDM patients, compared with non-GDM patients, had 1) higher prepregnancy weight (P = 0.011), prepregnancy BMI (P = 0.006), C-peptide at fasting (P = 0.002) and at 2 h (P women with GDM did not differ significantly from those without GDM. Our results show that many of the known metabolic components of the syndrome of insulin resistance (syndrome X) are predictive of GDM. These results are in keeping with the argument that GDM is one phase of the syndrome of insulin resistance. We suggest that GDM be looked upon as a component of the syndrome of insulin resistance that provides an excellent model for the study and prevention of NIDDM in a relatively young age-group.

  17. Hepatic insulin resistance both in prediabetic and diabetic patients determines postprandial lipoprotein metabolism: from the CORDIOPREV study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Acuña, A; Alcala-Diaz, J F; Delgado-Lista, J; Torres-Peña, J D; Lopez-Moreno, J; Camargo, A; Garcia-Rios, A; Marin, C; Gomez-Delgado, F; Caballero, J; Van-Ommen, B; Malagon, M M; Perez-Martinez, P; Lopez-Miranda, J

    2016-04-19

    Previous evidences have shown the presence of a prolonged and exaggerated postprandial response in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its relation with an increase of cardiovascular risk. However, the response in prediabetes population has not been established. The objective was to analyze the degree of postprandial lipemia response in the CORDIOPREV clinical trial (NCT00924937) according to the diabetic status. 1002 patients were submitted to an oral fat load test meal (OFTT) with 0.7 g fat/kg body weight [12 % saturated fatty acids (SFA), 10 % polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), 43 % monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), 10 % protein and 25 % carbohydrates]. Serial blood test analyzing lipid fractions were drawn at 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h during postprandial state. Postprandial triglycerides (TG) concentration at any point >2.5 mmol/L (220 mg/dL) has been established as undesirable response. We explored the dynamic response in 57 non-diabetic, 364 prediabetic and 581 type 2 diabetic patients. Additionally, the postprandial response was evaluated according to basal insulin resistance subgroups in patients non-diabetic and diabetic without pharmacological treatment (N = 642). Prevalence of undesirable postprandial TG was 35 % in non-diabetic, 48 % in prediabetic and 59 % in diabetic subgroup, respectively (p postprandial response compared with those non-diabetic patients (p postprandial response of TG compared with those patients with muscle-IR or without any insulin-resistance respectively (p postprandial response increases progressively according to non-diabetic, prediabetic and type 2 diabetic state and it is higher in patients with liver insulin-resistance. To identify this subgroup of patients is important to treat more intensively in order to avoid future cardiometabolic complications.

  18. Resistance Training for Diabetes Prevention and Therapy: Experimental Findings and Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Strasser

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D is characterized by insulin resistance, impaired glycogen synthesis, lipid accumulation, and impaired mitochondrial function. Exercise training has received increasing recognition as a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of T2D. Emerging research suggests that resistance training (RT has the power to combat metabolic dysfunction in patients with T2D and seems to be an effective measure to improve overall metabolic health and reduce metabolic risk factors in diabetic patients. However, there is limited mechanistic insight into how these adaptations occur. This review provides an overview of the intervention data on the impact of RT on glucose metabolism. In addition, the molecular mechanisms that lead to adaptation in skeletal muscle in response to RT and that are associated with possible beneficial metabolic responses are discussed. Some of the beneficial adaptations exerted by RT include increased GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscle, increased insulin sensitivity and hence restored metabolic flexibility. Increased energy expenditure and excess postexercise oxygen consumption in response to RT may be other beneficial effects. RT is increasingly establishing itself as an effective measure to improve overall metabolic health and reduce metabolic risk factors in diabetic patients.

  19. Hypertriglyceridemia and transient corneal lipidosis in a cat following intravenous lipid therapy for permethrin toxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuh, Eunice L; Keir, Iain

    2018-02-01

    An 8-year-old male neutered domestic shorthair cat developed corneal lipidosis and marked hypertriglyceridemia approximately 36 hours after intravenous lipid therapy (IVLT) for the treatment of permethrin toxicosis. The cat's ocular changes resolved approximately 72 hours after IVLT without treatment. This study reports a rare complication of IVLT.

  20. Successful Plasma Exchange for Acute Pancreatitis Complicated With Hypertriglyceridemia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahira, Shuji; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kin, Hunsook; Ooya, Yoshitaka; Sekine, Yasumasa; Sonoda, Kenichiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yushi; Takane, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Youhei; Tsukamoto, Isao; Nemoto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male with acute pancreatitis induced by hypertriglyceridemia had problems during treatment with plasma exchange. The hypercoagulable state was prevented by introducing innovative methods for cleaning and warming of the circuit and dialyzer. This enabled successful therapy, and the patient fully recovered from life-threatening acute pancreatitis.

  1. Circulating angiopoietin-like 4 links proteinuria with hypertriglyceridemia in nephrotic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clement, L.C.; Mace, C.; Avila-Casado, C.; Joles, J.A.; Kersten, A.H.; Chugh, S.S.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular link between proteinuria and hyperlipidemia in nephrotic syndrome is not known. We show in the present study that plasma angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4) links proteinuria with hypertriglyceridemia through two negative feedback loops. In previous studies in a rat model that mimics human

  2. Ketosis resistance in fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes: II. Hepatic ketogenesis after oral medium-chain triglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajnik, C S; Sardesai, B S; Bhat, D S; Naik, S S; Raut, K N; Shelgikar, K M; Orskov, H; Alberti, K G; Hockaday, T D

    1997-01-01

    A majority of patients with fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) do not become ketotic even in adverse conditions. It is not clear whether this ketosis resistance is due to reduced fatty acid release from adipose tissue or to impaired hepatic ketogenesis. We tested hepatic ketogenesis in FCPD patients using a ketogenic challenge of oral medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) and compared it with that in matched insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) patients and healthy controls. After oral MCTs, FCPD patients showed only a mild increase in blood 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-HB) concentrations (median: fasting, 0.13 mmol/L; peak, 0.52) compared with IDDM patients (fasting, 0.44; peak, 3.39) and controls (fasting, 0.04; peak, 0.75). Plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were comparable in the two diabetic groups (FCPD: fasting, 0.50 mmol/L; peak, 0.79; IDDM: fasting, 0.91; peak, 1.04). Plasma C-peptide concentrations were low and comparable in the two diabetic groups. Plasma glucagon concentrations were higher in IDDM patients in the fasting state, but declined to levels comparable to those in FCPD patients after oral MCTs. Plasma carnitine concentrations were comparable in the two groups of patients. It is concluded that the failure to stimulate ketogenesis under these conditions could be partly due to inhibition of a step beyond fatty acid entry into the mitochondria.

  3. Studies on insulin secretion and insulin resistance in non-insulin-dependent diabetes in young Indians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidoo, C.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. In the discrete genetic syndrome of NIDDY (non-insulin-dependent diabetes in the young), the situation is less clear and these aspects is the subject of this thesis. This study included Indian pasients with three generation transmission of NIDDM via one parent. The insulin and C-peptide responses to oral and intravenous glucose in patients with NIDDY were studied. The insulin and glucose responses to non-glucose secretogogues glucagon, tolbutamide and arginine, in NIDDY were also investigated. The following aspects with regard to insulin resistance in NIDDY were examined: glucose and free fatty acid response to intravenous insulin administration, insulin binding to circulating erythrocytes and monocytes, 125 I-insulin binding to the solubilized erythrocyte membrane receptor and 125 I-insulin binding to fibroblasts in culture

  4. The Role of Heat Shock Response in Insulin Resistance and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Kondo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of life-style related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome (MS and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, appears to be unstoppable. It is also difficult to cease their complications in spite of many antidiabetic medications or intervention of public administration. We and our collaborators found that physical medicine using simultaneous stimulation of heat with mild electric current activates heat shock response, thereby reducing visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, chronic inflammation and improving glucose homeostasis in mice models of T2DM, as well as in humans with MS or T2DM. This combination therapy exerts novel action on insulin signaling, β-cell protection and body compositions, and may provide a new therapeutic alternative in diabetic treatment strategy.

  5. The role of heat shock response in insulin resistance and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tatsuya; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Igata, Motoyuki; Kawashima, Junji; Matsumura, Takeshi; Kai, Hirofumi; Araki, Eiichi

    2014-04-01

    The expansion of life-style related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), appears to be unstoppable. It is also difficult to cease their complications in spite of many antidiabetic medications or intervention of public administration. We and our collaborators found that physical medicine using simultaneous stimulation of heat with mild electric current activates heat shock response, thereby reducing visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, chronic inflammation and improving glucose homeostasis in mice models of T2DM, as well as in humans with MS or T2DM. This combination therapy exerts novel action on insulin signaling, β-cell protection and body compositions, and may provide a new therapeutic alternative in diabetic treatment strategy.

  6. Prevalence and prevention of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Maung-U, Khin; Jagadeesh, Gowraganahalli

    2016-11-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have become important causes of mortality on a global scale. According to the report of World Health Organization (WHO), NCDs killed 38 million people (out of 56 million deaths that occurred worldwide) during 2012. Cardiovascular diseases accounted for most NCD deaths (17.5 million NCD deaths), followed by cancers (8.2 million NCD deaths), respiratory diseases (4.0 million NCD deaths) and diabetes mellitus (1.5 million NCD deaths). Globally, the leading cause of death is cardiovascular diseases; their prevalence is incessantly progressing in both developed and developing nations. Diabetic patients with insulin resistance are even at a greater risk of cardiovascular disease. Obesity, high cholesterol, hypertriglyceridemia and elevated blood pressure are mainly considered as major risk factors for diabetic patients afflicted with cardiovascular disease. The present review sheds light on the global incidence of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. Additionally, measures to be taken to reduce the global encumbrance of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus are highlighted. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Resistance exercise versus aerobic exercise for type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zuyao; Scott, Catherine A; Mao, Chen; Tang, Jinling; Farmer, Andrew J

    2014-04-01

    Resistance and aerobic exercises are both recommended as effective treatments for people with type 2 diabetes. However, the optimum type of exercise for the disease remains to be determined to inform clinical decision-making and facilitate personalized exercise prescription. Our objective was to investigate whether resistance exercise is comparable to aerobic exercise in terms of effectiveness and safety in people with type 2 diabetes. PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and SPORTdiscus were systematically searched up to March 2013. The reference lists of eligible studies and relevant reviews were also checked. We used the following criteria to select studies for inclusion in the review: (i) the study was a randomized controlled trial; (ii) the participants were people with type 2 diabetes aged 18 years or more; (iii) the trial compared resistance exercise with aerobic exercise for a duration of at least 8 weeks, with pre-determined frequency, intensity, and duration; and (iv) the trial provided relevant data on at least one of the following: glycaemic control, blood lipids, anthropometric measures, blood pressure, fitness, health status, and adverse events. The assessment of study quality was based on the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. For effectiveness measures, differences (resistance group minus aerobic group) in the changes from baseline with the two exercises were combined, using a random-effects model wherever possible. For adverse events, the relative risks (resistance group vs. aerobic group) were combined. Twelve trials (n = 626) were included. Following the exercise interventions, there was a greater reduction of glycosylated hemoglobin with aerobic exercise than with resistance exercise (difference 0.18% (1.97 mmol/mol), 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01, 0.36). This difference became non-significant with sensitivity analysis (p = 0.14). The differences in changes from baseline were also statistically significant for body mass index (difference 0.22, 95% CI 0

  8. The Effect of 8-week Aerobic and Concurrent (aerobic- resistance Exercise Training on Serum IL-6 Levels and Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Yousefipoor

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introductoin: Increased level of serum IL-6 is related to development of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. The American Diabetes Association and the American College of Sports Medicine recommend that combination of resistance and aerobic exercise is favorable for patients with type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 8 weeks of aerobic exercise and concurrent (aerobic-resistance exercise on serum IL-6 Levels and insulin resistance in Type 2 Diabetic patients. Methods: In this study, from patients referring to Kermanshah Diabetes Association, 24 volunteers participated in the study as subjects and were divided into aerobic (n=8, concurrent (n=8, and control group (n=8 randomly. Training program for the aerobic group included 3 sessions of running per week with 60 to 80% maximal heart rate for 8 weeks but the concurrent group in addition to running, performed resistance training of major muscles groups. Before and after the intervention, body weight, BMI, fasting blood glucose, serum IL-6 and HOMA-IR were measured. Results: HOMA-IR and fasting blood glucose were significantly decreased in both training groups after intervention, but showed no significant changes in the control group. No significant changes were observed for serum IL-6 levels, body weight or BMI. Conclusion: performing 8 weeks of aerobic or concurrent training with improvement of insulin resistance and fasting blood glucose could be helpful for type 2 diabetic patients; however, it cannot significantly affect serum IL-6 levels, body weight, or BMI in these patients.

  9. Superoxide dismutase entrapped-liposomes restore the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation of resistance arteries in experimental diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinea, Manuela; Georgescu, Adriana; Manea, Adrian; Dragomir, Elena; Manduteanu, Ileana; Popov, Doina; Simionescu, Maya

    2004-01-19

    Diabetes is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation. We questioned whether administration of superoxide dismutase (superoxide: superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) entrapped in long-circulating liposomes improves the vascular reactivity of the resistance arteries. Using the myograph technique, the vasodilation in response to acetylcholine was measured in mesenteric resistance arteries isolated from diabetic or normal hamsters treated for 3 days with superoxide dismutase entrapped in liposomes, with the same concentrations of free superoxide dismutase and plain liposomes, or untreated. Superoxide dismutase activity and nitric oxide (NO) levels were assayed by spectrophotometry, superoxide dismutase levels by Western blot and the role of N(pi)-nitro-L-arginine ethylester (L-NAME) on vasodilation by the myograph technique. Our data revealed that: (i) superoxide dismutase entrapped in liposomes restored to a great extent the endothelium-dependent relaxation of diabetic hamster resistance arteries; (ii) in superoxide dismutase entrapped in liposomes-treated diabetic animals, the activity and the level of superoxide dismutase in arterial homogenates as well as the serum nitrite levels were significantly higher than those in untreated hamsters or hamsters treated with free superoxide dismutase and plain liposomes: (iii) L-NAME inhibited the response of arteries to acetylcholine in superoxide dismutase entrapped in liposomes-treated diabetic hamsters. These results suggest that superoxide dismutase entrapped in liposomes is effective in scavenging superoxide anions, increases nitric oxide bioactivity and improves the vasorelaxation of resistance arteries in diabetic hamsters.

  10. Rifampin resistance and diabetes mellitus in a cross-sectional study of adult patients in rural South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Saurabh; Yu, Elaine Ann; Ahamed, Syed Fazil; Bonam, Wesley; Kenneth, John

    2015-10-26

    Despite increasing reports of the linkage between diabetes and tuberculosis (TB), there is limited information regarding diabetes and TB drug resistance. In this cross-sectional study, sputum and blood samples were collected from 304 adult patients in rural Andhra Pradesh. Rifampin resistance was assessed by Xpert MTB/RIF (Xpert), and diabetes status was based on self-report. Additionally, samples were assayed by acid-fast bacilli sputum smear microscopy (AFB) and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-G), in order to compare relative diagnostic performances. Among patients with confirmed TB (n = 194), diabetes was associated with 3.0-fold higher risk of rifampin resistance (95 % CI 1.3-6.7). Considering Xpert MTB/RIF the gold standard, AFB had lower sensitivity (72.2 vs. 82.5 %) and higher specificity (96.4 vs. 37.0 %) compared to QFT-G for diagnosing TB. The increased risk of rifampin resistance in patients with diabetes highlights the need for integrated diabetes surveillance in TB programs, particularly in settings undergoing the epidemiological transition.

  11. Surrogate Measures of Insulin Resistance in Middle-aged Non-diabetic Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Csép

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Insulin resistance has been shown to be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The assessment of insulin sensitivity in the clinical practice, however, faces several difficulties. The study proposes to analyze surrogate measures of insulin resistance based on fasting insulin levels in central Romania, and check whether the diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome is an adequate strategy to identify middle-aged persons with reduced insulin sensitivity. Methods: Anthropometric measurements, metabolic profile, and surrogates measures of insulin sensitivity (GIR, HOMA, QUICKI, FIRI, Belfiore, Bennett, Raynaud, McAuley index based on fasting insulin levels were assessed in 233 non-diabetic middle aged subjects. Results: Cutoff values, determined as the lowest quartile of insulin sensitivity for fasting insulin, HOMA, IRI (1/QUICKI, FIRI and Belfiore's, Bennett's, Raynaud's and McAuley's insulin sensitivity indices were 10.49 mU/L, 2.1, 3.01, 2.32, and 0.03, 1.34, 3.81, 6.29, 5.82. Components of the metabolic syndrome showed moderate but significant correlations with the surrogate measures of insulin resistance (r = 0.22-0.56, p <0.05. HOMA-IR and McAuley indices were the best predictors of clustered cardiometabolic risk factors (AUC - 0.83, 0.81 and 0.82. The metabolic syndrome diagnosis performed well in identifying patients with reduced insulin sensitivity (McAuley 2: sensitivity - 0.78, specificity - 0.84. Conclusion: Fasting insulin derived insulin sensitivity indices may help the recognittion of insulin resistant states predicting cardiometabolic disorders. Actively looking for insulin resistance by these simple indices, or by diagnosing the metabolic syndrome, those at increased risk can be recognized

  12. Selenite exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in mouse model of type 2 diabetes through oxidative stress-mediated JNK pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jun; Xu, Gang; Bai, Zhaoshuai; Li, Kaicheng; Yan, Junyan; Li, Fen; Ma, Shuai; Xu, Huibi; Huang, Kaixun

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a potential pro-diabetic effect of selenite treatment in type 2 diabetics; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we investigated the effects and the underlying mechanisms of selenite treatment in a nongenetic mouse model of type 2 diabetes. High-fat diet (HFD)/streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were orally gavaged with selenite at 0.5 or 2.0 mg/kg body weight/day or vehicle for 4 weeks. High-dose selenite treatment significantly elevated fasting plasma insulin levels and insulin resistance index, in parallel with impaired glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and pyruvate tolerance. High-dose selenite treatment also attenuated hepatic IRS1/Akt/FoxO1 signaling and pyruvate kinase gene expressions, but elevated the gene expressions of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxyl kinase (PEPCK), glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase), peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and selenoprotein P (SelP) in the liver. Furthermore, high-dose selenite treatment caused significant increases in MDA contents, protein carbonyl contents, and a decrease in GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver, concurrent with enhanced ASK1/MKK4/JNK signaling. Taken together, these findings suggest that high-dose selenite treatment exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in mouse model of type 2 diabetes, at least in part through oxidative stress-mediated JNK pathway, providing new mechanistic insights into the pro-diabetic effect of selenite in type 2 diabetes. - Highlights: • Selenite exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in HFD/STZ-induced diabetic mice. • Selenite elevates hepatic gluconeogenesis and reduces glycolysis in diabetic mice. • Selenite exacerbates hepatic oxidative stress and triggers JNK signaling pathway. • Selenite elevates hepatic selenoprotein P expression in diabetic mice.

  13. The role of adding metformin in insulin-resistant diabetic pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Moustafa Ibrahim; Hamdy, Ahmed; Shafik, Adel; Taha, Salah; Anwar, Mohammed; Faris, Mohammed

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess the impact of adding oral metformin to insulin therapy in pregnant women with insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus. The current non-inferiority randomized controlled trial was conducted at Ain Shams University Maternity Hospital. The study included pregnant women with gestational or pre-existing diabetes mellitus at gestations between 20 and 34 weeks, who showed insulin resistance (defined as poor glycemic control at a daily dose of ≥1.12 units/kg). Recruited women were randomized into one of two groups: group I, including women who received oral metformin without increasing the insulin dose; and group II, including women who had their insulin dose increased. The primary outcome was maternal glycemic control. Secondary outcomes included maternal bouts of hypoglycemia, need for another hospital admission for uncontrolled diabetes during pregnancy, gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, birth weight, birth trauma, congenital anomalies, 1- and 5-min Apgar score, neonatal hypoglycemia, need for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and adverse neonatal outcomes. A total number of 154 women with diabetes mellitus with pregnancy were approached; of them 90 women were eligible and were randomly allocated and included in the final analysis. The recruited 90 women were randomized into one of two groups: group I (metformin group) (n = 46), including women who received oral metformin in addition to the same initial insulin dose; and group II (control group) (n = 44), including women who had their insulin dose increased according to the standard protocol. The mean age of included women was 29.84 ± 5.37 years (range 20-42 years). The mean gestational age at recruitment was 28.7 ± 3.71 weeks (range 21-34 weeks). Among the 46 women of group I, 17 (36.9 %) women reached proper glycemic control at a daily metformin dose of 1,500 mg, 18 (39.2 %) at a daily dose of 2,000 mg, while 11 (23.9 %) received metformin at a daily

  14. Resistance Training in Type 2 Diabetic Patients Improves Uric Acid Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sousa Moisés S.S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance training (RT can provide several benefits for individuals with Type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance training on the strength levels and uric acid (UA concentration in individuals with Type 2 diabetes. The study included 68 patients (57.7±9.0 years that participated in an organized program of RT for 12 weeks. The volunteers were divided into two groups: an experimental group (EG; n=34 that performed the resistance training program consisting of seven exercises executed in an alternating order based on segments; and a control group (CG; n=34 that maintained their normal daily life activities. Muscle strength and uric acid were measured both pre- and post-experiment. The results showed a significant increase in strength of the subjects in the EG for all exercises included in the study (p<0.001. Comparing the strength levels of the post-test, intergroup differences were found in supine sitting (p<0.001, leg extension (p<0.001, shoulder press (p<0.001, leg curl (p=0.001, seated row (p<0.001, leg press (p=0.001 and high pulley (p<0.001. The measured uric acid was significantly increased in both experimental and control groups (p<0.001 and p=0.001, respectively. The intergroup comparison showed a significant increase for the EG (p=0.024. We conclude that the training program was effective for strength gains despite an increase in uric acid in Type 2 diabetics.

  15. Potential Biomarkers of Insulin Resistance and Atherosclerosis in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifah Intan Qhadijah Syed Ikmal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with coronary artery disease have become a major public health concern. The occurrence of insulin resistance accompanied with endothelial dysfunction worsens the state of atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. The combination of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction leads to coronary artery disease and ischemic heart disease complications. A recognized biological marker, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, has been used widely to assess the progression of atherosclerosis and inflammation. Along with coronary arterial damage and inflammatory processes, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein is considered as an essential atherosclerosis marker in patients with cardiovascular disease, but not as an insulin resistance marker in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. A new biological marker that can act as a reliable indicator of both the exact state of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis is required to facilitate optimal health management of diabetic patients. Malfunctioning of insulin mechanism and endothelial dysfunction leads to innate immune activation and released several biological markers into circulation. This review examines potential biological markers, YKL-40, alpha-hydroxybutyrate, soluble CD36, leptin, resistin, interleukin-18, retinol binding protein-4, and chemerin, as they may play significant roles in insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with coronary artery disease.

  16. Potential biomarkers of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Ikmal, Sharifah Intan Qhadijah; Zaman Huri, Hasniza; Vethakkan, Shireene Ratna; Wan Ahmad, Wan Azman

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with coronary artery disease have become a major public health concern. The occurrence of insulin resistance accompanied with endothelial dysfunction worsens the state of atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. The combination of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction leads to coronary artery disease and ischemic heart disease complications. A recognized biological marker, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, has been used widely to assess the progression of atherosclerosis and inflammation. Along with coronary arterial damage and inflammatory processes, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein is considered as an essential atherosclerosis marker in patients with cardiovascular disease, but not as an insulin resistance marker in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. A new biological marker that can act as a reliable indicator of both the exact state of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis is required to facilitate optimal health management of diabetic patients. Malfunctioning of insulin mechanism and endothelial dysfunction leads to innate immune activation and released several biological markers into circulation. This review examines potential biological markers, YKL-40, alpha-hydroxybutyrate, soluble CD36, leptin, resistin, interleukin-18, retinol binding protein-4, and chemerin, as they may play significant roles in insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with coronary artery disease.

  17. Role of patient factors in therapy resistance to antiproteinuric intervention in nondiabetic and diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bos, H; Andersen, S; Rossing, P

    2000-01-01

    patients, obtained in prior studies comparing the efficacy of various pharmacological regimens. The individual antiproteinuric response to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition positively correlated to the response to angiotensin type I (AT1) receptor blockade in diabetic (r = 0.67, P ... for individual patient factors in responsiveness or resistance to antiproteinuric intervention. In the search for strategies to improve response in these high risk patients, combination-treatment (combining different drugs, and combining drugs with dietary measures like sodium and protein restriction...

  18. Eruptive xanthomas and acute pancreatitis in a patient with hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez Desirée

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute pancreatitis and eruptive xanthomas are the only recognised direct complications of severe hypertriglyceridaemia. We present the case of a 33-years old male patient in whom the onset of a type 2 diabetes, added to an unknown familial hyperlipidemia, precipitated a dramatic raise of serum triglyceride levels, that cause in turn an acute pancreatitis and the appearance of dermic eruptive xanthomas. Translation This article is translated from Spanish, originally published in Archivos de Medicina. The original work is at doi:10.3823/001

  19. SHP-1 activation inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and intimal hyperplasia in a rodent model of insulin resistance and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qi, Weier; Li, Qian; Liew, Chong Wee

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Accelerated migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) enhances arterial restenosis after angioplasty in insulin resistance and diabetes. Elevation of Src homology 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) induces apoptosis in the microvasculature....... However, the role of SHP-1 in intimal hyperplasia and restenosis has not been clarified in insulin resistance and diabetes. METHODS: We used a femoral artery wire injury mouse model, rodent models with insulin resistance and diabetes, and patients with type 2 diabetes. Further, we modulated SHP-1...... observed in arteries from diabetes and insulin resistance. Augmenting SHP-1 levels is a potential therapeutic strategy to maintain stent patency in patients with insulin resistance and diabetes....

  20. Diabetes-Resistant NOR Mice Are More Severely Affected by Streptozotocin Compared to the Diabetes-Prone NOD Mice: Correlations with Liver and Kidney GLUT2 Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kahraman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonobese Diabetic (NOD mice are susceptible strains for Type 1 diabetes development, and Nonobese Diabetes-Resistant (NOR mice are defined as suitable controls for NOD mice in non-MHC-related research. Diabetes is often accelerated in NOD mice via Streptozotocin (STZ. STZ is taken inside cells via GLUT2 transmembrane carrier proteins, the major glucose transporter isoforms in pancreatic beta cells, liver, kidneys, and the small intestine. We observed severe adverse effects in NOR mice treated with STZ compared to NOD mice that were made diabetic with a similar dose. We suggested that the underlying mechanism could be differential GLUT2 expressions in pancreatic beta cells, yet immunofluorescent and immunohistochemical studies revealed similar GLUT2 expression levels. We also detected GLUT2 expression profiles in NOD and NOR hepatic and renal tissues by western blot analysis and observed considerably higher GLUT2 expression levels in liver and kidney tissues of NOR mice. Although beta cell GLUT2 expression levels are frequently evaluated as a marker predicting STZ sensitivity in animal models, we report here very different diabetic responses to STZ in two different animal strains, in spite of similar initial GLUT2 expressions in beta cells. Furthermore, use of NOR mice in STZ-mediated experimental diabetes settings should be considered accordingly.

  1. Assessing Psychological Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes: a Critical Comparison of Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Truscott, E; Pouwer, F; Speight, J

    2017-07-01

    This study aims to examine the operationalisation of 'psychological insulin resistance' (PIR) among people with type 2 diabetes and to identify and critique relevant measures. PIR has been operationalised as (1) the assessment of attitudes or beliefs about insulin therapy and (2) hypothetical or actual resistance, or unwillingness, to use to insulin. Five validated PIR questionnaires were identified. None was fully comprehensive of all aspects of PIR, and the rigour and reporting of questionnaire development and psychometric validation varied considerably between measures. Assessment of PIR should focus on the identification of negative and positive attitudes towards insulin use. Actual or hypothetical insulin refusal may be better conceptualised as a potential consequence of PIR, as its assessment overlooks the attitudes that may prevent insulin use. This paper provides guidance on the selection of questionnaires for clinical or research purpose and the development of new, or improvement of existing, questionnaires.

  2. Fine-mapping diabetes-related traits, including insulin resistance, in heterogeneous stock rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg Woods, Leah C; Holl, Katie L; Oreper, Daniel; Xie, Yuying; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Valdar, William

    2012-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a disease of relative insulin deficiency resulting from both insulin resistance and beta cell failure. We have previously used heterogeneous stock (HS) rats to fine-map a locus for glucose tolerance. We show here that glucose intolerance in the founder strains of the HS colony is mediated by different mechanisms: insulin resistance in WKY and an insulin secretion defect in ACI, and we demonstrate a high degree of variability for measures of insulin resistance and insulin secretion in HS rats. As such, our goal was to use HS rats to fine-map several diabetes-related traits within a region on rat chromosome 1. We measured blood glucose and plasma insulin levels after a glucose tolerance test in 782 male HS rats. Using 97 SSLP markers, we genotyped a 68 Mb region on rat chromosome 1 previously implicated in glucose and insulin regulation. We used linkage disequilibrium mapping by mixed model regression with inferred descent to identify a region from 198.85 to 205.9 that contains one or more quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fasting insulin and a measure of insulin resistance, the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index. This region also encompasses loci identified for fasting glucose and Insulin_AUC (area under the curve). A separate <3 Mb QTL was identified for body weight. Using a novel penalized regression method we then estimated effects of alternative haplotype pairings under each locus. These studies highlight the utility of HS rats for fine-mapping genetic loci involved in the underlying causes of T2D.

  3. Association between Metabolic Syndrome Criteria and Body-composition Components in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forough Saki

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Metabolic syndrome (MES consists of central obesity, hypertension, reduced high density lipoprotein (HDL, elevated serum triglycerides and high Fasting blood sugar (FBS. They are susceptible to cardio-vascular disease, and insulin resistance. The goal of present research was to assess any relation between the composition of the body in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM children and having components of metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods This cross sectional study included all T1DM children who were referred to the pediatric clinic of diabetes, affiliated to the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran during Jul 2013 to Aug 2014. Anthropometric data, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, lipids and body mass indices like android and gynoid fat mass was done by one physician with standard scale and techniques. The obtained data were analyzed using SPSS-18. Results Overall 87cases with definite diagnosis of T1DM were admitted in this duration (2013-2014.There was a positive correlation appeared between hypertriglyceridemia and Android fat mass (r=0.1 and P =0.046.  Otherwise, there wasn’t any relation between body composition criteria and the reduced HDL level, high blood pressure, Abdominal obesity and elevated FBS (P>0.05 . Conclusion It was revealed that hypertriglyceridemia was associated with Android fat mass. However, more pathophysiological research is needed to reveal the association of MES components and body-composition in T1DM children.

  4. Effect of spontaneous gestational diabetes on fetal and postnatal hepatic insulin resistance in Lepr(db/+) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Shao, Jianhua; Qiao, Liping; Pagliassotti, Michael; Friedman, Jacob E

    2003-03-01

    Infant macrosomia is a classic feature of a gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) pregnancy and is associated with increased risk of adult obesity and type II diabetes mellitus, however mechanisms linking GDM and later disease remain poorly understood. The heterozygous leptin receptor-deficient (Lepr(db/+)) mouse develops spontaneous GDM and the fetuses display characteristics similar to infants of GDM mothers. We examined the effects of GDM on maternal insulin resistance, fetal growth, and postnatal development of hepatic insulin resistance. Fetal body weight on d 18 of gestation was 6.5% greater (p obesity and insulin resistance in the livers of the adult offspring. The specific decrease in Akt phosphorylation in livers of adult offspring suggests that this may be a mechanism for reduced insulin-dependent physiologic events, such as suppression of hepatic glucose production, a defect associated with susceptibility to type II diabetes mellitus.

  5. Will acarbose improve the metabolic abnormalities of insulin-resistant type 2 diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R; Lintott, C J; Zimmet, P; Campbell, L; Bowen, K; Welborn, T

    1999-03-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 105; age 36-71 years) on diet therapy alone, and with quite good glycaemic control (mean HbA1c approximately 7.0%) were randomized to receive acarbose (100 mg three times daily) or placebo for 16 weeks, and changes in clinical and metabolic parameters indicative of Syndrome X were monitored. Fasting levels of glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), true insulin, proinsulin, fibrinogen and lipids were measured four times weekly, and glucose, insulin, proinsulin and triglyceride responses to a standardized 1.6 MJ breakfast were determined at 0, 1 and 2 h post meal. Analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. Fasting levels of glucose (P fasting glucose and triglyceride levels, lowers HbA1c and limits the glycaemic and insulin response to food in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus with Syndrome X. Pharmacological agents that improve the metabolic environment and reduce insulin resistance have the potential to limit the progression of atherogenesis associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Depletion of RT6.1+ T lymphocytes induces diabetes in resistant biobreeding/Worcester (BB/W) rats

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the role of RT6+ T cells in the pathogenesis of diabetes in BB/W rats, we treated animals from the diabetes-resistant (DR) subline with anti-RT6.1 lymphocytotoxic mAb. This depleted greater than 95% of peripheral RT6+ T cells but did not substantially reduce levels of circulating T cells or the in vitro response of spleen cells to mitogen. Treatment of 30-d-old DR BB/W rats in this way: induced insulitis and diabetes, rendered nondiabetic RT6-depleted DR rats susceptible to the...

  7. [Clinical distribution and antimicrobial resistance analysis of 754 pathogenic bacteria in diabetic foot infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qiuyan; Lin, Dini; Zhu, Hong; Ge, Shengjie; Wu, Wenjun; Pan, Xiaoyan; Gu, Xuejiang; Gu, Xuemei; Shen, Feixia

    2014-04-01

    To explore the microbiological profiles and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of organisms isolated from diabetic foot ulcers so as to provide selection rationales of antibiotics. A retrospective study was conducted on the microbiological profiles and antibiotic susceptibilities in 754 strains of pathogens isolated from 519 patients with diabetic foot ulcers at our hospital from January 2010 to August 2013. The inter-group data were compared by Chi-square test. There were 322 (62.0%) males and 197 (38.0%) females. Their mean age was (67.7 ± 12.3) (30-93) years, duration of diabetes 10 (0-40) years, duration of lower-limb lesion 1.0 (0.0-72.0) months and HbA1c (9.09% ± 2.28%). Among 444 (85.5%) cases, a total of 754 strains of pathogens were isolated. Gram-positive aerobes were the most frequently isolated (47.3%, 357 strains) and followed by gram-negative aerobes and fungus (40.3% vs 12.3%, 304 vs 93 strains respectively). With rising Wagner's grades, bacterial floras transformed from Gram-positive cocci to Gram-negative rods while fungus and composite infections increased. And 122 strains were of multi drug resistant organisms (MDRO). Among 357 strains of Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis were dominating floras. Staphylococcus was highly resistant to penicillin G, erythromycin, and oxacillin while vancomycin and linezolid were the most effective agents against gram-positive bacteria. Among 304 strains of gram-negative bacteria, enterobacteria were the most prevalent, including 48 strains of Escherichia coli, 34 strains of Proteus mirabilis and 31 strains of Proteus vulgaris. And there were 29 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Enterobacteria were highly resistant to ampicillin, followed by bactrim and furadantin while meropenem, imipenem, piperacillin/sulbactam, sulperazone and cefepime were the most effective agents. The predominant fungus was Blastomyces albicans. In patients with severe

  8. Klinefelter syndrome, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes: review of literature and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzano, Andrea; D'Assante, Roberta; Heaney, Liam M; Monaco, Federica; Rengo, Giuseppe; Valente, Pietro; Pasquali, Daniela; Bossone, Eduardo; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Lenzi, Andrea; Cittadini, Antonio; Marra, Alberto M; Napoli, Raffaele

    2018-03-23

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS), the most frequent chromosomic abnormality in males, is associated with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The mechanisms involved in increasing risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are not completely understood. This review summarises the current understandings of the complex relationship between KS, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk in order to plan future studies and improve current strategies to reduce mortality in this high-risk population. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus for manuscripts published prior to November 2017 using key words "Klinefelter syndrome" AND "insulin resistance" OR "metabolic syndrome" OR "diabetes mellitus" OR "cardiovascular disease" OR "testosterone". Manuscripts were collated, studied and carried forward for discussion where appropriate. Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes are more frequently diagnosed in KS than in the general population; however, the contribution of hypogonadism to metabolic derangement is highly controversial. Whether this dangerous combination of risk factors fully explains the CVD burden of KS patients remains unclear. In addition, testosterone replacement therapy only exerts a marginal action on the CVD system. Since fat accumulation and distribution seem to play a relevant role in triggering metabolic abnormalities, an early diagnosis and a tailored intervention strategy with drugs aimed at targeting excessive visceral fat deposition appear necessary in patients with KS.

  9. Sleep influences on obesity, insulin resistance, and risk of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutrakul, Sirimon; Van Cauter, Eve

    2018-03-03

    A large body of epidemiologic evidence has linked insufficient sleep duration and quality to the risk of obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. To address putative causal mechanisms, this review focuses on laboratory interventions involving several nights of experimental sleep restriction, fragmentation or extension and examining metabolically relevant outcomes. Sleep restriction has been consistently shown to increase hunger, appetite and food intake, with the increase in caloric intake in excess of the energy requirements of extended wakefulness. Findings regarding decreases in hormones promoting satiety or increases in hormones promoting hunger have been less consistent, possibly because of confounding effects of changes in adiposity when energy intake was not controlled and sampling protocols that did not cover the entire 24-h cycle. Imaging studies revealed alterations in neuronal activity of brain regions involved in food reward. An adverse impact of experimental sleep restriction on insulin resistance, leading to reduced glucose tolerance and increased diabetes risk, has been well-documented. There is limited evidence indicating that sleep fragmentation without reduction in sleep duration also results in a reduction in insulin sensitivity. The adverse metabolic outcomes of sleep disturbances appear to involve multiple mechanistic pathways acting in concert. Emerging evidence supports the benefits of behavioral, but not pharmacological, sleep extension on appetite and glucose metabolism. Further research should focus on the feasibility and efficacy of strategies to optimize sleep duration and quality on obesity and diabetes risk in at-risk populations as well as those with established diseases. Further work is needed to identify mechanistic pathways. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Fibrinolytic dysfunction in insulin-resistant women with previous gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, S; Winzer, C; Tura, A; Quehenberger, P; Bieglmaier, C; Wagner, O F; Huber, K; Waldhäusl, W; Pacini, G; Kautzky-Willer, A

    2006-05-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes (p-GDM) are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) later in life, and therefore at increased risk for future cardiovascular disease. Three months after delivery we investigated the plasma levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), fibrinogen and von Willebrand factor (vWF) in 74 women with p-GDM and 20 healthy females with normal glucose tolerance during and after pregnancy, as well as the relation of fibrinolytic parameters to insulin resistance and glycaemic control. All women underwent an oral (OGTT) as well as an intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGT). Mathematical model analysis disclosed that 50% (n=37 each) of the p-GDM subjects had normal (NIS) or impaired (IIS) insulin sensitivity. Parameters of interest were determined using commercially available test systems. Women with p-GDM and IIS had significantly increased body fat mass (BFM) (Pwomen with p-GDM and NIS and controls, whereas the waist to hip ratio (WHR) was similar in both p-GDM groups but was higher compared with the controls (Pwomen with p-GDM and IIS compared with women with p-GDM and NIS and the controls (Pwomen with IIS had higher PAI-1 levels than lean women with IIS (Pwomen with IIS (Pwomen with IIS independently of their glucose tolerance status (Pwomen with IIS and depends on plasma proinsulin and abdominal obesity. An increase of the PAI-1/SI ratio further characterizes obese insulin-resistant p-GDM women who may be at risk for diabetes and angiopathy.

  11. Resistance to type 1 diabetes induction in 12-lipoxygenase knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, David; Chen, Songyuan; Zipser, Brian; Sun, Duxin; Funk, Colin D.; Nadler, Jerry L.

    1999-01-01

    Leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase (12-LO) gene expression in pancreatic β cells is upregulated by cytotoxic cytokines like IL-1β. Recent studies have demonstrated that 12-LO inhibitors can prevent glutamate-induced neuronal cell death when intracellular glutathione stores are depleted. Therefore, 12-LO pathway inhibition may prevent β-cell cytotoxicity. To evaluate the role of 12-LO gene expression in immune-mediated islet destruction, we used 12-LO knockout (12-LO KO) mice. Male homozygous 12-LO KO mice and control C57BL/6 mice received 5 consecutive daily injections of low-dose streptozotocin to induce immune-mediated diabetes. Fasting serum glucose and insulin levels were measured at 7-day intervals, and the mice were followed up for 28 days. 12-LO KO mice were highly resistant to diabetes development compared with control mice and had higher serum insulin levels on day 28. Isolated pancreatic islets were treated with IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ for 18 hours. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in cytokine-treated islets from C57/BL6 mice decreased 54% from that of untreated islets. In marked contrast, the same cytokine mix led to only a 26% decrease in islets from 12-LO KO mice. Furthermore, cytokine-induced 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) production was absent in 12-LO KO islets but present in C57/BL6 islets. Isolated peritoneal macrophages were stimulated for 48 hours with IFN-γ + LPS and compared for nitrate/nitrite generation. 12-LO KO macrophages generated 50% less nitrate/nitrite when compared with C57BL/6 macrophages. In summary, elimination of leukocyte 12-LO in mice ameliorates low dose streptozotocin–induced diabetes by increasing islet resistance to cytokines and decreasing macrophage production of nitric oxide. PMID:10330425

  12. Resist diabetes: A randomized clinical trial for resistance training maintenance in adults with prediabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda M Davy

    Full Text Available To determine whether a social cognitive theory (SCT-based intervention improves resistance training (RT maintenance and strength, and reduces prediabetes prevalence.Sedentary, overweight/obese (BMI: 25-39.9 kg/m2 adults aged 50-69 (N = 170 with prediabetes participated in the 15-month trial. Participants completed a supervised 3-month RT (2×/wk phase and were randomly assigned (N = 159 to one of two 6-month maintenance conditions: SCT or standard care. Participants continued RT at a self-selected facility. The final 6-month period involved no contact. Assessments occurred at baseline and months 3, 9, and 15. The SCT faded-contact intervention consisted of nine tailored transition (i.e., supervised training to training alone and nine follow-up sessions. Standard care involved six generic follow-up sessions. Primary outcomes were prevalence of normoglycemia and muscular strength.The retention rate was 76%. Four serious adverse events were reported. After 3 months of RT, 34% of participants were no longer prediabetic. This prevalence of normoglycemia was maintained through month 15 (30%, with no group difference. There was an 18% increase in the odds of being normoglycemic for each % increase in fat-free mass. Increases in muscular strength were evident at month 3 and maintained through month 15 (P<0.001, which represented improvements of 21% and 14% for chest and leg press, respectively. Results did not demonstrate a greater reduction in prediabetes prevalence in the SCT condition.Resistance training is an effective, maintainable strategy for reducing prediabetes prevalence and increasing muscular strength. Future research which promotes RT initiation and maintenance in clinical and community settings is warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01112709.

  13. The efficacy of Prosopis glandulosa as antidiabetic treatment in rat models of diabetes and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, C; Lochner, A; Huisamen, B

    2011-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is rampantly increasing and the need for therapeutics is crucial. In recognition of this, untested antidiabetic agents are flooding the market. Diavite™ which is a product consisting solely of the dried and ground pods of Prosopis glandulosa (Torr.) [Fabaceae] is currently marketed as a food supplement with glucose stabilizing properties. However, these are anecdotal claims lacking scientific evidence. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of Prosopis glandulosa as an antidiabetic agent. Male Wistar rats were rendered (a) type 1 diabetic after an intraperitoneal injection of STZ (40 mg/kg) and (b) insulin resistant after a 16-week high caloric diet (DIO). Zucker fa/fa ZDF rats were used in a pilot study. Half of each group of animals was placed on Prosopis glandulosa treatment (100mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks and the remaining animals served as age-matched controls. At the time of sacrifice, blood was collected for glucose and insulin level determination, the pancreata of the STZ rats were harvested for histological analysis and cardiomyocytes prepared from the DIO and Zucker fa/fa hearts for determination of insulin sensitivity. Type 1 diabetic model: Prosopis glandulosa treatment resulted in significant increased insulin levels (pProsopis glandulosa treatment resulted in increased small β-cells (pProsopis glandulosa treatment partially preventing this. Zucker fa/fa rats: Prosopis glandulosa treatment significantly reduced fasting glucose levels (pProsopis glandulosa treatment resulted in an increased basal (pProsopis glandulosa treatment moderately lowers glucose levels in different animal models of diabetes, stimulates insulin secretion, leads to the formation of small β-cells and improves insulin sensitivity of isolated cardiomyocytes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis is not predicted by hypertriglyceridemia or pancreatic enzyme levels in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raja, Raheel Altaf; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Sørensen, Ditte Nørbo

    2017-01-01

    Background: l-Asparaginase is an important drug for treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but is associated with serious toxicities, including pancreatitis and hypertriglyceridemia (HTG). Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis (AAP) is a common reason for stopping asparaginase...

  15. Nonfasting Mild-to-Moderate Hypertriglyceridemia and Risk of Acute Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon B; Langsted, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-01-01

    Importance: Severe hypertriglyceridemia is associated with increased risk of acute pancreatitis. However, the threshold above which triglycerides are associated with acute pancreatitis is unclear. Objective: To test the hypothesis that nonfasting mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia (177-885 mg....../dL; 2-10 mmol/L) is also associated with acute pancreatitis. Design, Setting, and Participants: This prospective cohort study examines individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study in 2003 to 2015 and the Copenhagen City Heart Study initiated in 1976 to 1978 with follow-up examinations...... individuals were followed until the occurrence of an event, death, emigration, or end of follow-up (November 2014), whichever came first. Exposures: Plasma levels of nonfasting triglycerides. Main Outcomes and Measures: Hazard ratios (HRs) for acute pancreatitis (n = 434) and myocardial infarction (n = 3942...

  16. [Acute pancreatitis induced by major hypertriglyceridemia during pregnancy. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, L; Seconda, S; Lassel, L; Le Bouar, G; Poulain, P

    2009-09-01

    A parturient in the 37th week of gestation is referred to the obstetrical emergency ward for an acute abdominal pain with vomiting and fever. Few hours after her admission, a caesarean section is performed for acute fetal distress. It gave birth to a 3940 g healthy newborn. An abundant and milky peritoneal fluid is noted during the C-section related to a major hypertriglyceridemia (84,47 g/L) which induced an acute pancreatitis explaining the early symptoms. The patient is then hospitalized in surgical reanimation: heparin and a low fat diet led to a quick decrease of triglyceridemia and the healing of the acute pancreatitis. We review the most recent literature about acute pancreatitis during pregnancy, especially induced by hypertriglyceridemia, and the different management option: heparin, parenteral nutrition or plasmapheresis.

  17. Mendelian Randomisation Studies Do Not Support a Causal Role for Reduced Circulating Adiponectin Levels in Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Lamina, Claudia; Scott, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin is strongly inversely associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes but its causal role remains controversial. We used a Mendelian randomisation approach to test the hypothesis that adiponectin causally influences insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. We used genetic variants...

  18. Studies of the relationship between the ENPP1 K121Q polymorphism and type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and obesity in 7,333 Danish white subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grarup, N.; Urhammer, S.A.; Ek, J.

    2006-01-01

    ENPP1; genetic epidemiology; K121Q polymorphism; insulin resistance; meta-analysis; obesity; plasma cell membrane glycoprotein 1; type 2 diabetes......ENPP1; genetic epidemiology; K121Q polymorphism; insulin resistance; meta-analysis; obesity; plasma cell membrane glycoprotein 1; type 2 diabetes...

  19. Proteinuria and lipoprotein lipase activity in Miniature schnauzer dogs with and without hypertriglyceridemia

    OpenAIRE

    Furrow, E.; Jaeger, J.Q.; Parker, V.J.; Hinchcliff, K.W.; Johnson, S.E.; Murdoch, S.J.; de Boer, I.H.; Sherding, R.G.; Brunzell, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous hyperlipidemia in rats causes glomerular disease. Idiopathic hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is prevalent in Miniature schnauzers, but its relationship with proteinuria is unknown. Decreased activity of major lipid metabolism enzymes, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase (HL), may play a role in the cyclic relationship between hyperlipidemia and proteinuria. These enzymes have also not been previously investigated in Miniature shnauzers. The aims of this study were to determine ...

  20. Local metabolism of glucocorticoids in Prague hereditary hypertriglyceridemic rats – Effect of hypertriglyceridemia and gender

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klusoňová, Petra; Pátková, Lenka; Ergang, Peter; Mikšík, Ivan; Zicha, Josef; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Pácha, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 12 (2011), s. 1252-1259 ISSN 0039-128X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/08/0139; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB500110703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase * glucocorticoids * hypertriglyceridemia Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.829, year: 2011

  1. Orlistat and L-carnitine compared to orlistat alone on insulin resistance in obese diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Ferrari, Ilaria; D'Angelo, Angela; Fogari, Elena; Palumbo, Ilaria; Randazzo, Sabrina; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2010-01-01

    Our study wants to evaluate the effects of one year treatment with orlistat plus L-carnitine compared to orlistat alone on body weight, glycemic and lipid control, and insulin resistance state in type 2 diabetic patients. Two hundred and fifty-eight patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) [glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) > 8.0%] in therapy with different oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin were enrolled in this study and randomised to take orlistat 120 mg three times a day plus L-carnitine 2 g one time a day or orlistat 120 mg three times a day. We evaluated at baseline, and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months these parameters: body weight, body mass index (BMI), HbA(1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), post-prandial plasma glucose (PPG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (Tg), retinol binding protein-4 (RBP-4), resistin, visfatin, high sensitivity-C reactive protein (Hs-CRP). We observed a faster, and better decrease of body weight, HbA(1c), FPG, PPG, LDL-C, HOMA-IR with orlistat plus L-carnitine compared to orlistat. A faster improvement of TC, Tg, FPI, resistin, RBP-4, visfatin, and Hs-CRP was reached with orlistat plus L-carnitine compared to orlistat. We can safely conclude that the association of orlistat plus L-carnitine was better than orlistat in improving body weight, glycemic and lipid profile, insulin resistance, and inflammatory parameters and no significant adverse events were recorded.

  2. Increased retinol-free RBP4 contributes to insulin resistance in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanmin; Lv, Ping; Du, Mengkai; Liang, Zhaoxia; Zhou, Menglin; Chen, Danqing

    2017-07-01

    Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is a circulating retinol transporter that is strongly associated with insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the RBP4 and retinol level in rat model of gestational diabetes mellitus and the relationship between retinol-free RBP4 (apo-RBP4), retinol-bound RBP4 (holo-RBP4) and insulin resistance. Pregnant rats were administered streptozotocin to induce diabetes. The RBP4 and retinol levels were evaluated in GDM and normal pregnant rats. After then, normal pregnant rats were divided into two groups to receive either apo-RBP4 or vehicle injection. The metabolic parameters and insulin signaling in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and liver were determined in apo-RBP4 and control groups. Primary human adipocytes were cultured in vitro with different proportions of apo-RBP4 and holo-RBP4 for 24 h. The interaction between RBP4 and STRA6 was assessed by co-immunoprecipitation, and the expression of JAK-STAT pathway and insulin signaling were detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. We found increases in serum RBP4 levels and the RBP4:retinol ratio but not in the retinol levels in GDM rats. Exogenous apo-RBP4 injection attenuated insulin sensitivity in pregnant rats. In vitro, a prolonged interaction between RBP4 and STRA6 was observed when apo-RBP4 was present. In response to increased apo-RBP4 levels, cells showed elevated activation of the JAK2/STAT5 cascade and SOCS3 expression, decreased phosphorylation of IR and IRS1, and attenuated GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake upon insulin stimulation. Apo-RBP4 is a ligand that activates the STRA6 signaling cascade, inducing insulin resistance in GDM.

  3. Effect of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine on plasma glucose, plasma insulin and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, M. K.; Hussain, M. M.; Khan, M. A.; Ahmad, T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of combined and individual supplementation of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine on plasma glucose, plasma insulin and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats. Methods: The randomised controlled trial was conducted at the Department of Physiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, between October 2010 and April 2011. It comprised 80 healthy Sprague Dawley rats who were divided into four groups (n = 20 each). Rats were fed high-fat diet for 2 weeks followed by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin to induce type 2 diabetes mellitus. Group I served as diabetic control; group II was given cholecalciferol; group III; levo carnitine; and group IV was administered cholecalciferol and levo carnitine together. After 6 days of supplementation, terminal intracardiac blood extraction was done and samples were analysed for fasting plasma glucose and plasma insulin. Insulin resistance was calculated by homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance. SPSS 17.0 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Fasting plasma glucose levels were significantly decreased (p <0.001) in the combined supplementation group compared to the diabetic control and individual supplementation groups. Combined supplementation showed a significant increase in fasting plasma insulin levels when compared with diabetic control and levo carnitine groups (p <0.001), and the effect of combined supplementation on ameliorating insulin resistance was significantly better (p <0.001) as compared to the individual supplementation of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine. Conclusions: The combined supplementation of cholecalciferol and levo carnitine for 6 days markedly improved the glycaemic control, insulin secretion and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats on high-fat diet. A prolonged supplementation by both the compounds along with caloric restriction may yield a more promising outcome. (author)

  4. INFLUENCE OF HERBAL EXTRACTS ON METABOLIC DISTURBANCES IN DIABETES MELLITUS AND INSULIN RESISTANCE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Yakimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to assess the influence on metabolic processes of herbal extracts, used in diets with different fat content, in diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance model.Material and methods. The experiments were performing on 90 noninbred male albino rats. Diabetes mellitus was modeling with twice-repeated intraperitoneal streptozotocine (30 mg/kg injections. For the insulin resistance formation animals were fad meal with 30% fat content. Against the background rats were administering into the stomach nettle leafs (Urtica dioica L., 100 mg/kg, burdock roots (Arctium lappa L., 25 mg/kg extracts or intraperitoneal insulin preparation Actrapide HM Penfill (3 mg/kg daily during 10 days. During period of agents introduction one-half of animals continued to receive food with high fat content, the other half received diet with 8% fat content. The third rats group received only food with low fat content without extracts or insulin administration. In blood was measured the glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, creatinine, urea, uric acid content, in liver homogenates – glycogen, protein content, aminotransferases and glucose-6phosphatase activity, in muscle homogenates – glycogen and protein content.Results. After streptozotocine injections and diet with 30% fat content the blood glucose level became by 4.0–5.3 fold more than level of intact animals, increased the hemoglobin glycosylation, also creatinine, urea, uric acid blood content, in liver and muscle homogenates raised glycogen content, decreased protein quantity, in liver homogenates increased aminotranferases and glucose-6-phosphatase activity. In animals only feeding with 8% fat diminished hyperglycemia, creatinine blood retention, the liver glycogen content and recovered its protein resources. The nettle or burdock extracts administrating to animals that continued to receive high fat meal decreased the blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin and creatinine content, the liver

  5. Skeletal Muscle TRIB3 Mediates Glucose Toxicity in Diabetes and High- Fat Diet–Induced Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengrui; Kim, Teayoun; Jariwala, Ravi H.; Garvey, W. John; Luo, Nanlan; Kang, Minsung; Ma, Elizabeth; Tian, Ling; Steverson, Dennis; Yang, Qinglin; Fu, Yuchang

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we used muscle-specific TRIB3 overexpressing (MOE) and knockout (MKO) mice to determine whether TRIB3 mediates glucose-induced insulin resistance in diabetes and whether alterations in TRIB3 expression as a function of nutrient availability have a regulatory role in metabolism. In streptozotocin diabetic mice, TRIB3 MOE exacerbated, whereas MKO prevented, glucose-induced insulin resistance and impaired glucose oxidation and defects in insulin signal transduction compared with wild-type (WT) mice, indicating that glucose-induced insulin resistance was dependent on TRIB3. In response to a high-fat diet, TRIB3 MOE mice exhibited greater weight gain and worse insulin resistance in vivo compared with WT mice, coupled with decreased AKT phosphorylation, increased inflammation and oxidative stress, and upregulation of lipid metabolic genes coupled with downregulation of glucose metabolic genes in skeletal muscle. These effects were prevented in the TRIB3 MKO mice relative to WT mice. In conclusion, TRIB3 has a pathophysiological role in diabetes and a physiological role in metabolism. Glucose-induced insulin resistance and insulin resistance due to diet-induced obesity both depend on muscle TRIB3. Under physiological conditions, muscle TRIB3 also influences energy expenditure and substrate metabolism, indicating that the decrease and increase in muscle TRIB3 under fasting and nutrient excess, respectively, are critical for metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27207527

  6. Insulin Sensitivity and Insulin Resistance in Non-Diabetic Middle-Aged Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archontogeorgis, K; Papanas, N; Nena, E; Tzouvelekis, A; Tsigalou, C; Voulgaris, A; Xanthoudaki, M; Mouemin, T; Froudarakis, M; Steiropoulos, P

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome ( OSAS) has been linked with abnormal glucose metabolism, insulin resistance (IR) and development of diabetes mellitus. Non-diabetic patients (n=69) with OSAS, diagnosed by polysomnography, were prospectively recruited. To evaluate IR among OSAS patients, the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) and Insulin sensitivity by Quantitative Insulin sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI) were used. HOMA-IR was positively associated with body-mass index (BMI) (ρ=0.364, p=0.002), time with oxyhaemoglobin saturation HOMA-IR was associated with sleep stage transitions, time with oxyhaemoglobin saturation <90%, average oxyhaemoglobin saturation, minimum oxyhaemoglobin saturation and arousal index. QUICKI was associated with oxygen desaturation index, sleep stage transitions, ESS score, minimum oxyhaemoglobin saturation and arousal index. An independent association between OSAS and IR in patients without pre-existing diabetes mellitus was observed. Recurrent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation in OSAS are associated with IR in these patients.

  7. Low-dose spironolactone reduces plasma fibulin-1 levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and resistant hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolzenburg Oxlund, Christina; Cangemi, Claudia; Henriksen, J E

    2015-01-01

    whether antihypertensive treatment with spironolactone changes plasma fibulin-1 levels. In a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, 119 patients with type 2 diabetes and resistant hypertension were included. A dose of spironolactone 25 mg or matching placebo was added to previous...... treatment (P=0.009), but increased after placebo (P=0.017). Baseline plasma fibulin-1 correlated with BP and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Increased levels of plasma fibulin-1 (P=0.004) were observed in diabetic participants reporting erectile dysfunction as compared with participants who did not....... Treatment with low-dose spironolactone reduced plasma fibulin-1 levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and resistant hypertension. This supports the hypothesis that the antihypertensive effect of the mineralocorticoid receptor blocker in part may be due to regression of vascular remodeling....

  8. YKL-40, a biomarker of inflammation, is elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes and is related to insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathcke, C N; Johansen, J S; Vestergaard, H

    2006-01-01

    YKL-40 participates in inflammatory states and vascular processes, which implies that comparison can be made with other inflammatory markers associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). In the present study levels of plasma YKL-40 and serum hsCRP were evaluated in patients with T2D....

  9. Common variation in oxidative phosphorylation genes is not a major cause of insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snogdal, Lena Sønder; Wod, Mette; Grarup, Niels

    2012-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to insulin resistance and is present in several tissues relevant to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Here, we examined whether common variation in genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) contributes to type 2...

  10. Role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and associated hepatic co-morbidities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrison, M.C.; Kleemann, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state that drives the -development of obesity-related co-morbidities such as insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and cardiovascular disease. This metabolic inflammation is thought to originate

  11. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein activity is independently determined by obesity and insulin resistance in non-diabetic subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Rindert; Kappelle, Paul J. W. H.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is an emerging cardio-metabolic risk factor which is intricately involved in lipoprotein metabolism. Elevated plasma PLTP activity levels are reported in obesity and diabetes mellitus, but the relative contributions of obesity and insulin resistance to plasma

  12. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein activity is independently determined by obesity and insulin resistance in non-diabetic subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Rindert; Kappelle, Paul J.W.H.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    Background: Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is an emerging cardio-metabolic risk factor which is intricately involved in lipoprotein metabolism. Elevated plasma PLTP activity levels are reported in obesity and diabetes mellitus, but the relative contributions of obesity and insulin resistance

  13. Association between diabetes mellitus and multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis : a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tegegne, Balewgizie Sileshi; Habtewold, Tesfa Dejenie; Mengesha, Melkamu Merid; Burgerhof, Johannes G M

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has emerged as a challenge to global tuberculosis (TB) control and remains a major public health concern in many countries. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an increasingly recognized comorbidity that can both accelerate TB disease and complicate its

  14. Psychological insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients regarding oral antidiabetes treatment, subcutaneous insulin injections, or inhaled insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrak, Frank; Herpertz, Stephan; Stridde, Elmar; Pfützner, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    "Psychological insulin resistance" (PIR) is an obstacle to insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes, and patients' expectations regarding alternative ways of insulin delivery are poorly understood. PIR and beliefs regarding treatment alternatives were analyzed in patients with type 2 diabetes (n=532; mean glycated hemoglobin, 68±12 mmol/mol [8.34±1.5%]) comparing oral antidiabetes treatment, subcutaneous insulin injections, or inhaled insulin. Questionnaires were used to assess barriers to insulin treatment (BIT), generic and diabetes-specific quality of life (Short Form 36 and Problem Areas in Diabetes, German version), diabetes knowledge, locus of control (Questionnaire for the Assessment of Diabetes-Specific Locus of Control, in German), coping styles (Freiburg Questionnaire of Illness Coping, 15-Items Short Form), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, German version), and mental disorders (Patient Health Questionnaire, German version). Patients discussed treatment optimization options with a physician and were asked to make a choice about future diabetes therapy options in a two-step treatment choice scenario. Step 1 included oral antidiabetes drugs or subcutaneous insulin injection (SCI). Step 2 included an additional treatment alternative of inhaled insulin (INH). Subgroups were analyzed according to their treatment choice. Most patients perceived their own diabetes-related behavior as active, problem-focused, internally controlled, and oriented toward their doctors' recommendations, although their diabetes knowledge was limited. In Step 1, rejection of the recommended insulin was 82%, and in Step 2, it was 57%. Fear of hypoglycemia was the most important barrier to insulin treatment. Patients choosing INH (versus SCI) scored higher regarding fear of injection, expected hardship from insulin therapy, and BIT-Sumscore. The acceptance of insulin is very low in type 2 diabetes patients. The option to inhale insulin increases the acceptability for some but

  15. Progression from high insulin resistance to type 2 diabetes does not entail additional visceral adipose tissue inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Barbarroja

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with a low-grade chronic inflammation state. As a consequence, adipose tissue expresses pro-inflammatory cytokines that propagate inflammatory responses systemically elsewhere, promoting whole-body insulin resistance and consequential islet β-cell exhaustation. Thus, insulin resistance is considered the early stage of type 2 diabetes. However, there is evidence of obese individuals that never develop diabetes indicating that the mechanisms governing the association between the increase of inflammatory factors and type 2 diabetes are much more complex and deserve further investigation. We studied for the first time the differences in insulin signalling and inflammatory pathways in blood and visceral adipose tissue (VAT of 20 lean healthy donors and 40 equal morbidly obese (MO patients classified in high insulin resistance (high IR degree and diabetes state. We studied the changes in proinflammatory markers and lipid content from serum; macrophage infiltration, mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines and transcription factors, activation of kinases involved in inflammation and expression of insulin signalling molecules in VAT. VAT comparison of these experimental groups revealed that type 2 diabetic-MO subjects exhibit the same pro-inflammatory profile than the high IR-MO patients, characterized by elevated levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, JNK1/2, ERK1/2, STAT3 and NFκB. Our work rules out the assumption that the inflammation should be increased in obese people with type 2 diabetes compared to high IR obese. These findings indicate that some mechanisms, other than systemic and VAT inflammation must be involved in the development of type 2 diabetes in obesity.

  16. Low dose organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls predict obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance among people free of diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duk-Hee Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is emerging evidence that background exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs are important in the development of conditions predisposing to diabetes as well as of type 2 diabetes itself. We recently reported that low dose POPs predicted incident type 2 diabetes in a nested case-control study. The current study examined if low dose POPs predicted future adiposity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance among controls without diabetes in that study.The 90 controls were diabetes-free during 20 years follow-up. They were a stratified random sample, enriched with overweight and obese persons. POPs measured in 1987-88 (year 2 sera included 8 organochlorine (OC pesticides, 22 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, and 1 polybrominated biphenyl (PBB. Body mass index (BMI, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and homeostasis model assessment value for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR were study outcomes at 2005-06 (year 20. The evolution of study outcomes during 18 years by categories of serum concentrations of POPs at year 2 was evaluated by adjusting for the baseline values of outcomes plus potential confounders. Parallel to prediction of type 2 diabetes, many statistically significant associations of POPs with dysmetabolic conditions appeared at low dose, forming inverted U-shaped dose-response relations. Among OC pesticides, p,p'-DDE most consistently predicted higher BMI, triglycerides, and HOMA-IR and lower HDL-cholesterol at year 20 after adjusting for baseline values. Oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor, and hexachlorobenzene also significantly predicted higher triglycerides. Persistent PCBs with ≥7 chlorides predicted higher BMI, triglycerides, and HOMA-IR and lower HDL-cholesterol at year 20 with similar dose-response curves.Simultaneous exposure to various POPs in the general population may contribute to development of obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, common precursors of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases

  17. Effect of probucol on insulin resistance in patients with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Wei, Ri-Bao; Yang, Yue; Wang, Na; Huang, Meng-Jie; Cao, Cui-Ming; Wang, Zi-Cheng; Cai, Guang-Yan; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance (IR) is present at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with CKD progression. Probucol can improve the prognosis of IR in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. This study aimed to observe the effect of probucol on IR and kidney protection in non-diabetic CKD patients. Methods This was an open-label, non-placebo-controlled, randomized study. A total of 59 patients were randomized to the probucol group (0.5 g, twice daily) or the control group using a 1: 1 treatment ratio. IR was determined using a homeostatic model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR) index. An Excel database was established to analyze follow-up data at weeks 0, 12, and 24. The primary outcome of interest was changes in the HOMA-IR, and the secondary outcomes of interest were changes in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), body mass index (BMI), cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and 24-h urinary protein. Results The HOMA-IR index of the probucol group after 24 weeks was significantly decreased (P HOMA-IR index in the control group increased (average increase: 0.54; range: −0.38 to 1.87). For the secondary outcomes of interest, the changes between these two groups also exhibited significant differences in eGFR (P = 0.041), cholesterol (P = 0.001), fasting insulin (P < 0.001), and fasting C-peptide (P = 0.001). Conclusions Compared to angiotensin receptor blockers alone, the combination with probucol ameliorates IR in non-diabetic CKD patients and delays disease progression. PMID:26512244

  18. Diabetic foot gangrene patient with multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas putida infection in Karawaci District, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nata Pratama Hardjo Lugito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas putida is a rod-shaped, non fermenting Gram-negative organism frequently found in the environment that utilizes aerobic metabolism, previously thought to be of low pathogenicity. It had been reported as cause of skin and soft tissue infection, especially in immunocompromised patients. A female green grocer, 51 year-old came to internal medicine out-patient clinic with gangrene and osteomyelitis on her 1 st , 2 nd and 3 rd digit and wound on the sole of the right foot since 1 month prior. The patient had history of uncontrolled diabetes since a year ago. She was given ceftriaxone 2 grams b.i.d, metronidazole 500 mg t.i.d empirically and then amikacin 250 mg b.i.d, followed by amputation of the digits and wound debridement. The microorganism′s culture from pus revealed multi drug resistant Pseudomonas putida. She recovered well after antibiotics and surgery.

  19. Management of Severe Insulin Resistance in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Rebecca; Reutrakul, Sirimon

    2015-10-01

    Managing severe insulin resistance (IR) in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) can be challenging for both clinicians and patients. As average weight for patients with T1DM has increased in recent decades, IR in this population has become more widespread. Currently, almost 50 % of patients with T1DM are overweight or obese. While intensive insulin therapy is associated with reduction in complications, aggressive treatment can lead to weight gain. With increasing weight, insulin can become less effective to control glycemia, resulting in higher insulin doses and hence more weight gain. Novel strategies to break this vicious cycle are needed. This review will investigate current research on insulin formulations, lifestyle modification, adjunct therapies, and surgery that may help better manage patients with T1DM and IR.

  20. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and its influence in the development of multidrug resistance tuberculosis in patients from southeastern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Navarro, Lucia Monserrat; Fuentes-Domínguez, Francisco Javier; Zenteno-Cuevas, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    To determine the factors associated with the presence of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and the effect in the development of drug and multi-drug resistance, in a population with tuberculosis from the southeast of Mexico. This is a case-control study including 409 individuals, 146 with the binomial tuberculosis-type 2 diabetes mellitus and 263 individuals with tuberculosis. Demographic, epidemiological and outcome variables were collected. Risks were calculated. The factors associated with the presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus were age ≥35years, (OR=9.7; CI: 5.2-17.8), previous contact with a person infected with tuberculosis (OR=1.7; CI: 1.1-3.1). Body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2) (OR=2.2; CI: 1.1-4.3), and inherited family history of diabetes (OR=5.4; CI: 3.2-9.2). It was also found that patients with tuberculosis-type 2 diabetes mellitus presented a 4.7-fold (CI: 1.4-11.3) and 3.5-fold (CI: 1.1-11.1) higher risk of developing drug- and multidrug resistance tuberculosis, respectively. By last, individuals with tuberculosis-type 2 diabetes had a 2.3-fold (CI: 1.5-4.1) greater chance of persisting as tuberculosis-positive by the second month of treatment, delaying the resolution of the tuberculosis infection. Type 2 diabetes exerts a strong influence on the presentation and evolution of tuberculosis within the analyzed population and displays remarkable particularities, necessitating the development of dedicated tuberculosis-diabetes surveillance systems that consider the particular epidemiological characteristics of the population affected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Association of Plasma Ghrelin Levels with Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus among Saudi Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qarni, Ali Ahmed; Joatar, Faris Elbahi; Das, Nagalla; Awad, Mohamed; Eltayeb, Mona; Al-Zubair, Ahmed Gasim; Ali, Muhalab E.; Al Masaud, Abdulaziz; Shire, Abdirashid M.; Gumaa, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Background Although the exact mechanism of insulin resistance (IR) has not yet been established, IR is the hallmark characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between plasma ghrelin levels and IR in Saudi subjects with T2DM. Methods Patients with T2DM (n=107, cases) and non-diabetic apparently healthy subjects (n=101, controls) from Saudi Arabia were included in this study. The biochemical profiles and plasma insulin levels of all subjects were analyzed, and IR was estimated using the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index. Active ghrelin levels in plasma were measured using the radioimmunoassay technique. Results Only 46.7% (50 of 107) of the T2DM subjects had IR, including 26% (28 of 107) with severe IR (HOMA-IR ≥5), while 5.9% (six of 101) of the controls had moderate IR (3 ≤HOMA-IR HOMA-IR values were not associated with age, disease duration, or gender. Importantly, T2DM itself and the co-occurrence of IR with T2DM were significantly associated with low plasma ghrelin levels. However, ghrelin levels were inversely correlated with the HOMA-IR index, body weight, and fasting plasma insulin levels, mainly in the control subjects, which was indicative of the breakdown of metabolic homeostasis in T2DM. Conclusion The prevalence of IR was relatively low, and IR may be inversely associated with plasma ghrelin levels among Saudi patients with T2DM. PMID:28555463

  2. Insulin resistance: an additional risk factor in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tushar P; Rawal, Komal; Bagchi, Ashim K; Akolkar, Gauri; Bernardes, Nathalia; Dias, Danielle da Silva; Gupta, Sarita; Singal, Pawan K

    2016-01-01

    Sedentary life style and high calorie dietary habits are prominent leading cause of metabolic syndrome in modern world. Obesity plays a central role in occurrence of various diseases like hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, which lead to insulin resistance and metabolic derangements like cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) mediated by oxidative stress. The mortality rate due to CVDs is on the rise in developing countries. Insulin resistance (IR) leads to micro or macro angiopathy, peripheral arterial dysfunction, hampered blood flow, hypertension, as well as the cardiomyocyte and the endothelial cell dysfunctions, thus increasing risk factors for coronary artery blockage, stroke and heart failure suggesting that there is a strong association between IR and CVDs. The plausible linkages between these two pathophysiological conditions are altered levels of insulin signaling proteins such as IR-β, IRS-1, PI3K, Akt, Glut4 and PGC-1α that hamper insulin-mediated glucose uptake as well as other functions of insulin in the cardiomyocytes and the endothelial cells of the heart. Reduced AMPK, PFK-2 and elevated levels of NADP(H)-dependent oxidases produced by activated M1 macrophages of the adipose tissue and elevated levels of circulating angiotensin are also cause of CVD in diabetes mellitus condition. Insulin sensitizers, angiotensin blockers, superoxide scavengers are used as therapeutics in the amelioration of CVD. It evidently becomes important to unravel the mechanisms of the association between IR and CVDs in order to formulate novel efficient drugs to treat patients suffering from insulin resistance-mediated cardiovascular diseases. The possible associations between insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases are reviewed here.

  3. The Comparison of Two Methods of Exercise (intense interval training and concurrent resistance- endurance training on Fasting Sugar, Insulin and Insulin Resistance in Women with Mellitus Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Bazyar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Exercise is an important component of health and an integral approach to the management of diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of intense interval training and concurrent resistance- endurance training on fasting sugar, insulin and insulin resistance in women with mellitus diabetes.   Methods: Fifty-two overweight female diabetic type 2 patients (aged 45-60 years old with fasting blood glucose≥ 126 mg/dl were selected to participate in the present study. Participants were assigned to intense interval training group (N=17, concurrent resistance- endurance training group (N=17 and control group (N=18. The exercises incorporated 10 weeks of concurrent resistance- endurance training and intense interval training. Fasting blood sugar, serum insulin concentrations levels were measured. Concurrent training group trained eight weeks, three times a week of endurance training at 60% of maximum heart rate (MHR and two resistance training sessions per week with 70% of one repetition maximum (1-RM. Intense interval training group trained for eight weeks, three sessions per week for 4 to 10 repeats Wingate test on the ergometer 30s performed with maximum effort. The control group did no systematic exercise. At the end of experiment 42 subjects were succeed and completed the study period, and 10 subjects were removed due to illness and absence in the exercise sessions. Fasting blood sugar and insulin levels 24 hours before and 48 hours after the last training session was measured.   Results: The findings indicated that in periodic fasting, the blood sugar in intensive training group had a marked decrease (p= 0.000 however, the fasting blood sugar of exercise and power stamina groups reduced significantly (p=0.062. The results showed no significant difference between the groups (171/0 p =0.171. Fasting insulin (p <0.001 and insulin resistance (0001/0 = p=0.001 in periodic intensive training group were

  4. Genetic disassociation of autoimmunity and resistance to costimulation blockade-induced transplantation tolerance in nonobese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Todd; Markees, Thomas G; Serreze, David V; Pierce, Melissa A; Marron, Michele P; Wicker, Linda S; Peterson, Laurence B; Shultz, Leonard D; Mordes, John P; Rossini, Aldo A; Greiner, Dale L

    2003-07-01

    Curing type 1 diabetes by islet transplantation requires overcoming both allorejection and recurrent autoimmunity. This has been achieved with systemic immunosuppression, but tolerance induction would be preferable. Most islet allotransplant tolerance induction protocols have been tested in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, and most have failed. Failure has been attributed to the underlying autoimmunity, assuming that autoimmunity and resistance to transplantation tolerance have a common basis. Out of concern that NOD biology could be misleading in this regard, we tested the hypothesis that autoimmunity and resistance to transplantation tolerance in NOD mice are distinct phenotypes. Unexpectedly, we observed that (NOD x C57BL/6)F(1) mice, which have no diabetes, nonetheless resist prolongation of skin allografts by costimulation blockade. Further analyses revealed that the F(1) mice shared the dendritic cell maturation defects and abnormal CD4(+) T cell responses of the NOD but had lost its defects in macrophage maturation and NK cell activity. We conclude that resistance to allograft tolerance induction in the NOD mouse is not a direct consequence of overt autoimmunity and that autoimmunity and resistance to costimulation blockade-induced transplantation tolerance phenotypes in NOD mice can be dissociated genetically. The outcomes of tolerance induction protocols tested in NOD mice may not accurately predict outcomes in human subjects.

  5. Fruit and vegetable consumption and hypertriglyceridemia: Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES) 2007-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, C; Lee, H-J; Shin, H J; Stampfer, M J; Cho, E

    2015-11-01

    Limited research has been conducted on the association between intake of fruits and vegetables and hypertriglyceridemia, especially in Asian populations. This study aimed to investigate the association between total fruit and vegetable intake, as well as subgroups of fruit and vegetable intake, with hypertriglyceridemia among Korean adults. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 7934 adults aged 19-64 years from the fourth Korean Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Fruit and vegetable intake was estimated from a food frequency questionnaire. Subgroups of fruits and vegetables included citrus, non-citrus and carotene-rich fruits and cruciferous, green leafy and carotene-rich vegetables. Hypertriglyceridemia (plasma triglyceride ⩾150 mg/dl) was diagnosed using a blood sample drawn after 12+ hours of fasting. There were 2001 (25.2%) cases of hypertriglyceridemia among the participants. Total fruit intake was significantly inversely associated with the prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia; the multivariate odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of hypertriglyceridemia across increasing quintiles were 1.00 (ref), 0.76 (0.62, 0.92), 0.72 (0.58, 0.90), 0.68 (0.54, 0.85) and 0.64 (0.49, 0.82; Ptrend=0.001) after controlling for survey year, body mass index, waist circumference, smoking, alcohol drinking, physical activity, education and income. Similar inverse associations were found for all fruit subgroups. However, we found no significant association between intakes of total or subgroups of vegetable and hypertriglyceridemia; the odds ratio for top vs bottom quintile was 1.00 (0.81-1.24) for total vegetable intake. Our findings support a potential beneficial role of fruit consumption to reduce blood triglyceride levels in Asian populations.

  6. Skeletal Muscle TRIB3 Mediates Glucose Toxicity in Diabetes and High- Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Mengrui; Kim, Teayoun; Jariwala, Ravi H; Garvey, W John; Luo, Nanlan; Kang, Minsung; Ma, Elizabeth; Tian, Ling; Steverson, Dennis; Yang, Qinglin; Fu, Yuchang; Garvey, W Timothy

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, we used muscle-specific TRIB3 overexpressing (MOE) and knockout (MKO) mice to determine whether TRIB3 mediates glucose-induced insulin resistance in diabetes and whether alterations in TRIB3 expression as a function of nutrient availability have a regulatory role in metabolism. In streptozotocin diabetic mice, TRIB3 MOE exacerbated, whereas MKO prevented, glucose-induced insulin resistance and impaired glucose oxidation and defects in insulin signal transduction compared with wild-type (WT) mice, indicating that glucose-induced insulin resistance was dependent on TRIB3. In response to a high-fat diet, TRIB3 MOE mice exhibited greater weight gain and worse insulin resistance in vivo compared with WT mice, coupled with decreased AKT phosphorylation, increased inflammation and oxidative stress, and upregulation of lipid metabolic genes coupled with downregulation of glucose metabolic genes in skeletal muscle. These effects were prevented in the TRIB3 MKO mice relative to WT mice. In conclusion, TRIB3 has a pathophysiological role in diabetes and a physiological role in metabolism. Glucose-induced insulin resistance and insulin resistance due to diet-induced obesity both depend on muscle TRIB3. Under physiological conditions, muscle TRIB3 also influences energy expenditure and substrate metabolism, indicating that the decrease and increase in muscle TRIB3 under fasting and nutrient excess, respectively, are critical for metabolic homeostasis. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  7. Bone metabolism and hand grip strength response to aerobic versus resistance exercise training in non-insulin dependent diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shreef, Fadwa M; Al-Jiffri, Osama H; Abd El-Kader, Shehab M

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been shown in many studies to be associated with reduced bone mass and an increased risk of fracture. Currently, our understanding of how to use exercise effectively in diabetic patients in prevention of osteoporosis is incomplete and has prompted our interest to identify the type of effective osteogenic exercise. The aim of this study was to compare the changes in handgrip strength and bone metabolism after 6 months between aerobic and resistance exercise training in non-insulin dependent diabetic patients in Jeddah area. One hundred non-insulin dependent diabetic male patients participated in this study and were divided into two equal groups; the first group (A) received aerobic exercise training, where the second group (B) received resistance exercise training. The program consisted of three sessions per week for six months. The mean values of serum calcium and Hand grip strength were significantly increased, while the mean values of parathyroid hormone were significantly decreased in both groups .Also, there were significant differences between mean levels of the investigated parameters in group (A) and group (B) after treatment. Aerobic exercise training on treadmill is appropriate to improve markers of bone metabolism and hand grip strength in non-insulin dependent diabetic patients.

  8. Effects of marine collagen peptides on glucose metabolism and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, CuiFeng; Zhang, Wei; Mu, Bo; Zhang, Fan; Lai, NanNan; Zhou, JianXin; Xu, AiMin; Liu, JianGuo; Li, Yong

    2017-07-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of marine collagen peptides (MCPs) on glucose metabolism and insulin resistance using a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Forty T2DM obese Wistar rats were randomly assigned to receive varying doses of MCPs or a vehicle control for 4 weeks. Blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as oxidative stress and inflammation were measured. The expression of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) in skeletal muscles and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) in livers of T2DM rats was also measured. It was found that in the group of 9.0 g/kg/day MCPs significantly improved glucose, insulin, and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance, and increased the insulin sensitivity index (ISI). In addition, the groups of 4.5 and 2.25 g/kg/day MCPs significantly improved liver steatosis. It was also found that MCPs decreased expression of oxidative stress biomarkers and inflammatory cytokines and adipocytokines in T2DM rats. In conclusion, medium and high doses of MCPs (≥4.5 g/kg/day) improved glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in T2DM rats. These beneficial effects of MCPs may be mediated by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation and by up-regulating GLUT4, and PPAR-α activity.

  9. Heritability, parental transmission and environment correlation of pediatric-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome-related traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Lora, América L; Vilchis-Gil, Jenny; Molina-Díaz, Mario; Flores-Huerta, Samuel; Klünder-Klünder, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the heritability, parental transmission and environmental contributions to the phenotypic variation in type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome-related traits in families of Mexican children and adolescents. We performed a cross-sectional study of 184 tri-generational pedigrees with a total of 1160 individuals (99 families with a type 2 diabetes mellitus proband before age 19). The family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus in three generations was obtained by interview. Demographic, anthropometric, biochemical and lifestyle information was corroborated in parents and offspring. We obtained correlations for metabolic traits between relative pairs, and variance component methods were used to determine the heritability and environmental components. The heritability of early-onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus was 0.50 (p2-h insulin, and cholesterol (p0.50) for blood pressure, HbA1c and HDL-cholesterol after multivariate adjustment (ptype 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance, were significantly correlated only through the mother and others, such as hypertriglyceridemia, were significantly correlated only through the father. This study demonstrates that type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome-related traits are highly heritable among Mexican children and adolescents. Furthermore, several cardiometabolic factors have strong heritability and/or high environmental contributions that highlight the complex architecture of these alterations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Most Prevalnet Organism in Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Its Drug Sensitivity and Resistance to Different Standard Antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nageen, A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To find the most prevalent organism in diabetic foot ulcers and its drug sensitivity and resistance to different standard antibiotics. Study Design: Adescriptive and cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Ward 7, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center, Karachi, from December 2010 to December 2012. Methodology: Ninety-five diabetic patients with infected foot wounds of Wegener grade 2 - 5 who had not received any previous antibiotics were included in the study by consecutive sampling. Pus culture specimen from wounds was taken and the organism isolated was identified. Also the most sensitive group of antibiotics and the most resistant one to that organism was noted. Results: Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent organism constituting 23.16% (n=22) of the organisms isolated; Escherichia coli with 17.89% (n=17) and Klebsiella with 12.63% (n=12) followed. Males presented more with diabetic foot (n=52) out of 95 patients. The most common age group affected was 41 - 60 years (73 patients). The organisms were most sensitive to Meropenem, effective in 90 (95%) patients and most resistant to Cotrimoxazole (80, 84% patients). Out of the 95 patients, 39 (41%) patients were hypertensive, 30 (31.5%) were obese and 14 (15%) were smokers. Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent organism overall irrespective to gender, age groups and co-morbidity of the patients. Conclusion: Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent organism in diabetic foot ulcers; the most effective antibiotic is Meropenem and least effective is Cotrimoxazole. (author)

  11. An Alteration of Lymphocytes Subpopulations and Immunoglobulins Levels in Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcers Infected Particularly by Resistant Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimíra Fejfarová

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to analyse immune abnormalities in patients with chronic infected diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs especially those infected by resistant microorganisms. Methods. 68 patients treated in our foot clinic for infected chronic DFUs with 34 matched diabetic controls were studied. Patients with infected DFUs were subdivided into two subgroups according to the antibiotic sensitivity of causal pathogen: subgroup S infected by sensitive (n=50 and subgroup R by resistant pathogens (n=18. Selected immunological markers were compared between the study groups and subgroups. Results. Patients with infected chronic DFUs had, in comparison with diabetic controls, significantly reduced percentages (p<0.01 and total numbers of lymphocytes (p<0.001 involving B lymphocytes (p<0.01, CD4+ (p<0.01, and CD8+ T cells (p<0.01 and their naive and memory effector cells. Higher levels of IgG (p<0.05 including IgG1 (p<0.001 and IgG3 (p<0.05 were found in patients with DFUs compared to diabetic controls. Serum levels of immunoglobulin subclasses IgG2 and IgG3 correlated negatively with metabolic control (p<0.05. A trend towards an increased frequency of IgG2 deficiency was found in patients with DFUs compared to diabetic controls (22% versus 15%; NS. Subgroup R revealed lower levels of immunoglobulins, especially of IgG4 (p<0.01 in contrast to patients infected by sensitive bacteria. The innate immunity did not differ significantly between the study groups. Conclusion. Our study showed changes mainly in the adaptive immune system represented by low levels of lymphocyte subpopulations and their memory effector cells, and also changes in humoral immunity in patients with DFUs, even those infected by resistant pathogens, in comparison with diabetic controls.

  12. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with insulin resistance in nondiabetics and reduced insulin production in type 2 diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteghamati, A; Aryan, Z; Esteghamati, Ar; Nakhjavani, M

    2015-04-01

    It is not known whether the association of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] with glycemic measurements of individuals without diabetes is similar to those with diabetes or not. This study is aimed to investigate the association of serum 25(OH)D with glycemic markers of diabetics, nondiabetics, and prediabetics. A case-control study was conducted on age and sex matched 1,195 patients with type 2 DM, 121 prediabetics, and 209 healthy controls. Anthropometric variables, lipid profile, glycemic measurements, and serum 25(OH)D levels were recorded. Serum insulin and C-peptide levels were also measured. All glycemic measurements were compared between diabetics and nondiabetics and prediabetics at different vitamin D status. Patients with DM had lower serum 25(OH)D compared to prediabetics and healthy controls. Endogenous insulin production in response to food intake and in fasting was significantly lower in vitamin D deficient patients with DM compared to those with serum 25(OH)D>40 ng/ml. Diabetic women with serum 25(OH)D40 ng/ml. Healthy individuals with serum 25(OH)D<20 ng/ml had signs of insulin resistance as estimated by significant increase of HOMA-IR, HbA1c, and fasting plasma glucose (FPG). In addition, we found that serum 25(OH)D was inversely associated with insulin resistance. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with insulin resistance in nondiabetics, which is independent of obesity. Furthermore, vitamin D deficiency is associated with reduced insulin production in type 2 diabetics, which was mainly observed in men. Accordingly, a gender disparity also exists in association of serum 25(OH)D with glycemic measurements. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. The Effect of 12 Weeks Aerobic, Resistance, and Combined Exercises on Omentin-1 Levels and Insulin Resistance among Type 2 Diabetic Middle-Aged Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab AminiLari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRecent studies have shown that omentin-1 derived from adipokines can affect physiological regulations and some metabolic dis-eases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.MethodsThe purpose of this study was to examine the impact of 12 weeks of aerobic (cycle ergometer, resistance, and combined exercises on omentin-1 level, glucose and insulin resistance indices in overweight middle age women with T2DM. In this study, 60 overweight middle age diabetic women were selected using simple random sampling and they were assigned to three groups of aerobic exercise (n=12, resistant exercise (n=12 and combined exercise (n=13, and one control group (n=15. Exercises were done in a three times per week sessions for a total of 12 weeks. Blood samples were collected before each exercise session and 24 hours after of the last session.ResultsPresent study showed that fasting blood sugar decreased significantly in all intervention groups, while homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR decreased only in the aerobic and combined exercises groups. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in the omentin-1 level only in the combined exercise group.ConclusionCompared to aerobic and resistance exercises, 12 weeks of combined exercise was more efficient in improving HOMA-IR and increasing serum omentin-1 among women with T2DM.

  14. Cholera toxin subunit B peptide fusion proteins reveal impaired oral tolerance induction in diabetes-prone but not in diabetes-resistant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presa, Maximiliano; Ortiz, Angela Zarama; Garabatos, Nahir; Izquierdo, Cristina; Rivas, Elisa I; Teyton, Luc; Mora, Conchi; Serreze, David; Stratmann, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    The cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) has been used as adjuvant to improve oral vaccine delivery in type 1 diabetes. The effect of CTB/peptide formulations on Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells has remained largely unexplored. Here, using tetramer analysis, we investigated how oral delivery of CTB fused to two CD4(+) T-cell epitopes, the BDC-2.5 T-cell 2.5 mi mimotope and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 286-300, affected diabetogenic CD4(+) T cells in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. When administered i.p., CTB-2.5 mi activated 2.5 mi(+) T cells and following intragastric delivery generated Ag-specific Foxp3(+) Treg and Th2 cells. While 2.5 mi(+) and GAD-specific T cells were tolerized in diabetes-resistant NODxB6.Foxp3(EGFP) F1 and nonobese resistant (NOR) mice, this did not occur in NOD mice. This indicated that NOD mice had a recessive genetic resistance to induce oral tolerance to both CTB-fused epitopes. In contrast to NODxB6.Foxp3(EGFP) F1 mice, oral treatment in NOD mice lead to strong 2.5 mi(+) T-cell activation and the sequestration of these cells to the effector-memory pool. Oral treatment of NOD mice with CTB-2.5 mi failed to prevent diabetes. These findings underline the importance of investigating the effect of oral vaccine formulations on diabetogenic T cells as in selected cases they may have counterproductive consequences in human patients. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Diabetes is Associated with Severe Adverse Events in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Torrico, Marcela; Caminero-Luna, José; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Carrillo-Alduenda, José Luis; Villareal-Velarde, Héctor; Torres-Cruz, Alfredo; Flores-Vergara, Héctor; Martínez-Mendoza, Dina; García-Sancho, Cecilia; Centis, Rosella; Salazar-Lezama, Miguel Ángel; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio

    2017-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), a very common disease in Mexico, is a well-known risk factor for tuberculosis (TB). However, it is not known by which extent DM predisposes to adverse events (AE) to anti-TB drugs and/or to worse outcomes in patients with multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB). The main objective of this study was to describe the outcomes of TB treatment, the impact of DM and the prevalence of AE in a cohort of patients with MDR-/XDR pulmonary TB treated at the national TB referral centre in Mexico City. Ninety patients were enrolled between 2010 and 2015: 73 with MDR-TB (81.1%), 11 with pre-XDR-TB (12.2%) and 6 (6.7%) with XDR-TB, including 49 (54.4%) with DM, and 3 with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) co-infection (3.3%). In 98% of patients, diagnosis was made by culture and drug susceptibility testing, while in a single case the diagnosis was made by a molecular test. The presence of DM was associated with an increased risk of serious drug-related AEs, such as nephrotoxicity (Odds Ratio [OR]=6.5; 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI]: 1.9-21.8) and hypothyroidism (OR=8.8; 95% CI: 1.8-54.2), but not for a worse outcome. Our data suggest that DM does not impact second-line TB treatment outcomes, but patients with DM have a higher risk of developing serious AEs to drug-resistant TB treatment, such as nephrotoxicity and hypothyroidism. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Are antibiotic-resistant pathogens more common in subsequent episodes of diabetic foot infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Dan; Gariani, Karim; Kressmann, Benjamin; Dach, Elodie von; Huttner, Benedikt; Bartolone, Placido; Lê, Nam; Mohamad, Morad; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Uçkay, Ilker

    2017-06-01

    After antibiotic therapy of an initial diabetic foot infection (DFI), pathogens isolated from subsequent episodes might become more resistant to commonly prescribed antibiotics. If so, this might require a modification of the current recommendations for the selection of empiric antibiotic therapy. This study investigated whether the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) DFI guideline recommendations should be modified based on the number of past DFI episodes. This was a single-centre retrospective cohort survey of DFI patients seen during the years 2010 to 2016. A total 1018 episodes of DFI in 482 adult patients were identified. These patients were followed-up for a median of 3.3 years after the first DFI episode. The total number of episodes was 2257 and the median interval between recurrent episodes was 7.6 months. Among the recurrent DFIs, the causative pathogens were the same as in the previous episode in only 43% of cases (158/365). Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant pathogen in all episodes (range 1 to 13 episodes) and was not more prevalent with the increasing number of episodes. DFIs were treated with systemic antibiotics for a median duration of 20 days (interquartile range 11-35 days). Overall, there was no significant increase in the incidence of antibiotic resistance to methicillin, rifampicin, clindamycin, or ciprofloxacin over the episodes (Pearson's Chi-square test p-values of 0.76, 1.00, 0.06, and 0.46, respectively; corresponding p-values for trend of 0.21, 0.27, 0.38, and 0.08, respectively). After the successful treatment of a DFI, recurrent episodes are frequent. A history of a previous DFI episode did not predict a greater likelihood of any antibiotic-resistant isolate in subsequent episodes. Thus, broadening the spectrum of empiric antibiotic therapy for recurrent episodes of DFI does not appear necessary. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Association of insulin resistance with chronic kidney disease in non-diabetic subjects with normal weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanying Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To the best of our knowledge, the association of insulin resistance (IR with chronic kidney disease (CKD has not been well studied in normal-weight individuals. The aim of this study is to examine whether IR is associated with CKD in non-diabetic subjects with normal weight. We also examine whether the presence of obesity modifies the association of IR with CKD. METHODS: Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey in China. Both estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin to creatinine ratio were used as markers of CKD. Logistic regression models and the quartiles of homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance were used to explore the associations of IR with CKD in entire cohort, normal-weight and overweight/obese subpopulations. RESULTS: In normal-weight subpopulation, the prevalence of IR and metabolic syndrome were 11.11% and 8.99%, respectively. In the entire cohort, the highest quartile HOMA-insulin resistance had a 70% increased risk for CKD (RR 1.70, 95% CI 1.07, 2.71, P=0.03, comparing the highest to the lowest quartile. However, when adding obesity to the model, the association was abolished. IR was associated with CKD in overweight/obese subpopulation but not in normal-weight subpopulation. CONCLUSION: IR and MetS in normal-weight individuals is common in the Chinese population. IR is associated with CKD in overweight/obese subpopulation but not in normal-weight subpopulation and the presence of obesity modifies the association of IR with CKD.

  18. Increased maternal Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) associated with older age at diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech, N J; O'Sullivan, J; Avery, P; Howey, C; Burling, K; Iyer, S; Pascoe, L; Walker, M; Cheetham, T

    2010-12-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance have been linked to rising incidence and earlier onset of Type 1 diabetes. Inherited differences in insulin action might also influence the evolution of Type 1 diabetes.Our aim was to determine whether parental BMI and insulin resistance influences age of onset of Type 1 diabetes in their offspring. BMI standard deviation score and age at diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes was examined in 227 children, and in 206 of these was compared with local matched control subjects. Non-diabetic parents of a subgroup of 80 children with Type 1 diabetes were recruited. Parental BMI was compared with local adult control subjects. The relationship between parental BMI, waist-hip ratio, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), leptin and adiponectin levels and age at diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes in offspring was examined. We found no relationship between age at diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes in children and BMI standard deviation score (P = 0.5). Children with Type 1 diabetes and their parents were heavier than matched control subjects (mean BMI standard deviation score sd in children = 0.66 1.06 vs. 0.32 1.16 in control subjects, P = 0.002; mean parental BMI sd 27.7 0.4 vs. 25.5 0.4 kg ⁄m2 in control subjects; P HOMA-IR accounted for 20% of variation in age at diagnosis (P < 0.001) with increasing maternal insulin resistance associated with later age at diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes. Childrenwith Type 1 diabetes and their parents have an increased BMI at diagnosis.Maternal insulin resistance is associated with later onset of Type 1 diabetes in children.

  19. Tobacco Use, Insulin Resistance, and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: Results from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel J Keith

    Full Text Available Tobacco use is associated with insulin resistance and incident diabetes. Given the racial/ethnic differences in smoking patterns and incident type 2 diabetes our objective was to evaluate the association between tobacco use and insulin resistance (IR as well as incident type 2 diabetes mellitus in a contemporary multiethnic cohort.We studied 5,931 Multi- Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA participants who at baseline were free of type 2 diabetes (fasting glucose ≥7.0 mmol/l (126 mg/dl and/or use of insulin or oral hypoglycemic medications categorized by self-reported tobacco status and reclassified by urinary cotinine (available in 58% of participants as never, current or former tobacco users. The association between tobacco use, IR (fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and incident diabetes over 10 years was evaluated using multivariable linear regression and Cox proportional hazards models, respectively. Mean age of the participants was 62 (±10 years, 46% were male, 41% Caucasian, 12% Chinese, 26% African American and 21% Hispanic/Latino. IR biomarkers did not significantly differ between current, former, and never cigarette users (P >0.10 but showed limited unadjusted differences for users of cigar, pipe and smokeless tobacco (All P <0.05. Fully adjusted models showed no association between dose or intensity of tobacco exposure and any index of IR. When stratified into participants that quit smoking vs. those who continued smoking during the 10-year study there was no difference in serum glucose levels or frequency of diabetes. In fully adjusted models, there was no significant difference in diabetes risk between former or current cigarette smokers compared to never smokers [HR (95% CI 1.02 (0.77,1.37 and 0.81 (0.52,1.26 respectively].In a contemporary multi-ethnic cohort, there was no independent association between tobacco use and IR or incident type 2 diabetes. The role

  20. The effect size of type 2 diabetes mellitus on tuberculosis drug resistance and adverse treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Navarro, Lucia Monserrat; Restrepo, Blanca I; Fuentes-Dominguez, Francisco Javier; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Morales-Romero, Jaime; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Comas, Iñaki; Zenteno-Cuevas, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the effect size of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on tuberculosis (TB) treatment outcomes and multi drug resistance (MDR). A cohort with 507 individuals with diagnosed TB included 183 with coexistence of T2DM and TB (TB-T2DM). Participants were identified at the time of TB diagnosis and followed during the course of TB treatment. Then we computed relative risks and adjustments by Cox proportional hazards for outcome variables (drug resistance, death, relapse, treatment failure), and the size of their effect as Cohen's-d. Patients with TB-T2DM were more likely to remain positive for acid-fast bacilli after two months of anti-TB treatment RR = [2.01 (95% CI: 1.3, 3.1)], to have drug resistant (DR) [OR 3.5 (95% CI: 1.8, 6.7)] and multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB [OR 3.5 (95% CI: 1.8, 7.1)]. The Cohen's-d for DR or MDR in T2DM was 0.69 when compared with non-DM subjects. The T2DM patients had higher odds of resistance to isoniazid (OR 3.9, 95% CI: 2.01, 7.9), rifampicin (OR 3.4, 95% CI: 1.6, 7.2) and pyrazinamide (OR 9.4, 95% CI: 2.8, 25.6), and their effect sizes were ≥0.67. Patients with TB-T2DM (versus no DM) were more likely to present with MDR TB (HR 3.1; 95% CI: 1.7, 5.8; p < 0.001), treatment failure (HR 2.04; 95% CI: 1.07, 3.8; p = 0.02) and relapse (HR 1.86; 95% CI: 1.09, 3.1; p = 0.02), with effect size ≥0.34. T2DM showed a substantial contribution to the presence of DR or MDR-TB and to adverse clinical outcomes during and after TB treatment. Our findings support the importance for routine screening of T2DM among newly-diagnosed TB patients in order to stratify them for immediate DR assessment, and highlight the need for clinical trials to evaluate variations to the standard TB treatment in TB-T2DM to prevent adverse treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Melatonin supplementation plus exercise behavior ameliorate insulin resistance, hypertension and fatigue in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Kwon, Han-Sol; Kim, Myung-Jin; Go, Hyeon-Kyu; Oak, Min-Ho; Kim, Do-Hyung

    2017-08-01

    The objective was to investigate the effects of melatonin and exercise on insulin resistance (IR), hypertension and fatigue syndrome in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Rats were divided into 5 groups namely normal control (NC), T2DM control group (DC), diabetes plus exercise (DE), diabetes plus oral melatonin supplement (DM) and diabetes plus melatonin and exercise (DME) groups. Melatonin was administered orally 5mg/kg twice daily and 40min swimming/day 5days/week were regimented after diabetes induction. Blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, insulin, IR, serum leptin, lipid profiles, inflammatory cytokines, lipid peroxidation increased significantly (Pmelatonin ameliorated markedly hypertension, IR, biochemical alteration induced by diabetes and significantly increased exercise performance (PMelatonin supplementation in combination with exercise behavior may ameliorate IR, hypertension and exercise performance or fatigue possibly by improving antioxidative activities, hyperlipidemia, inflammatory cytokines via up-regulation of GLUT4, PGC-1 α and mitochondrial biogenesis in T2DM rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Hipertrigliceridemia familiar grave durante a gestação Severe familial hypertriglyceridemia during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Augusto Casulari

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available A presença de hipertrigliceridemia grave durante a gravidez é rara, mas comporta grande possibilidade de desenvolver complicações, como a pancreatite aguda, que coloca em risco a mãe e o feto. Apresentamos o relato da evolução da gestação de uma paciente portadora de hipertrigliceridemia grave que havia apresentado pancreatite aguda dois meses antes da fecundação. Foi tratada durante o pré-natal com dieta e 3,0 g de ácidos graxos de cadeia ômega-3 (ácidos eicosapentaenóico 14% e docosahexaenóico 11,13%. Os níveis de triglicerídeos foram mantidos abaixo de 800 mg/dl, sendo este limite considerado seguro para evitar o desenvolvimento de pancreatite aguda. A gestação evoluiu, sem intercorrências, para parto vaginal, a termo. O recém-nato não apresentou alterações morfológicas ao nascimento. Concluímos que, nesta paciente grávida e portadora de hipertrigliceridemia grave, uma dieta adequada e o emprego de ácidos graxos de cadeia ômega-3 foram eficazes em prevenir a pancreatite aguda. Esta abordagem terapêutica pode ser uma alternativa para as gestantes portadoras de hipertrigliceridemia familiar.Severe hypertriglyceridemia during pregnancy rarely occurs but it frequently produces complications, such as acute pancreatitis, a serious health risk both for the mother and the fetus. The treatment of a patient who had had acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia (triglyceridemia = 5100 mg/dl two months before fecundation is presented in this paper. During gestation, bezafibrate was substituted for 3.0 g omega-3 fatty acids (14% eicosapentaenoic and 11.13% docosahexaenoic acids. With this therapy, the triglyceride levels were maintained below 800 mg/dl, which is considered to be the safe limit to avoid acute pancreatitis. No complication occurred during pregnancy, the patient delivered vaginally (40 weeks, and the newborn (3075 g did not present any morphological alterations. We conclude that an adequate diet and the

  3. Hypertriglyceridemia and preeclampsia: Its physiological role and up-to-date evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Paula Martínez Linares

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a disease with a highincidence for maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, mainly indeveloping countries. Although its etiology remains unclear, severalstudies have shown that endothelial cell dysfunction plays an important role in the genesis, development and complications relatedto this disease. Among the different processes, lipid per oxidation is involved in what could be an increase in serum lipid concentrations in pregnant women, especially triglycerides. The aim of this review is to describe the role of lipids in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia and the current evidence about the finding of hypertriglyceridemia and its development.

  4. Genetic ablation of lymphocytes and cytokine signaling in nonobese diabetic mice prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedline, Randall H; Ko, Hwi Jin; Jung, Dae Young; Lee, Yongjin; Bortell, Rita; Dagdeviren, Sezin; Patel, Payal R; Hu, Xiaodi; Inashima, Kunikazu; Kearns, Caitlyn; Tsitsilianos, Nicholas; Shafiq, Umber; Shultz, Leonard D; Lee, Ki Won; Greiner, Dale L; Kim, Jason K

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is characterized by a dysregulated immune system, which may causally associate with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Despite widespread use of nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, NOD with severe combined immunodeficiency (scid) mutation (SCID) mice, and SCID bearing a null mutation in the IL-2 common γ chain receptor (NSG) mice as animal models of human diseases including type 1 diabetes, the underlying metabolic effects of a genetically altered immune system are poorly understood. For this, we performed a comprehensive metabolic characterization of these mice fed chow or after 6 wk of a high-fat diet. We found that NOD mice had ∼50% less fat mass and were 2-fold more insulin sensitive, as measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, than C57BL/6 wild-type mice. SCID mice were also more insulin sensitive with increased muscle glucose metabolism and resistant to diet-induced obesity due to increased energy expenditure (∼10%) and physical activity (∼40%) as measured by metabolic cages. NSG mice were completely protected from diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance with significant increases in glucose metabolism in peripheral organs. Our findings demonstrate an important role of genetic background, lymphocytes, and cytokine signaling in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. © FASEB.

  5. Human LT-alpha-mediated resistance to autoimmune diabetes is induced in NOD, but not NOD-scid, mice and abrogated by IL-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, S; Satoh, J; Takahashi, K; Sakata, Y; Nakazawa, T; Miyazaki, J; Toyota, T

    2001-01-01

    Systemic administration of human lymphotoxin-alpha (hLT-alpha) made NOD mice resistant not only to spontaneous autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus but also to cyclophosphamide (CY)-induced diabetes and diabetes transfer by diabetic NOD spleen cells (triple resistance). In this study we analyzed the mechanisms of hLT-alpha-induced resistance, focusing on (1) hLT-alpha-induced resistance in the pancreatic beta cell, (2) CY-resistant suppressor cells, (3) suppression of induction or function of effector cells for beta cell destruction, or (4) others. To examine the first possibility in vitro, a NOD-derived beta cell line (MIN6N) was pretreated with hLT-alpha and then mixed with diabetic NOD spleen cells and MIN6N cell viability was measured. Treatment with hLT-alpha did not protect MIN6N cells but rather enhanced cytotoxicity. Next NOD-scid mice were pretreated with hLT-alpha and then transferred with diabetic NOD spleen. All the recipients developed diabetes. These results excluded the first possibility. The second possibility was also excluded by a cotransfer experiment, in which diabetic NOD spleen cells were cotransferred to NOD-scid mice with nontreated or hLT-alpha-treated nondiabetic NOD spleens. There was no significant difference in diabetes incidence between the two groups. To observe the third possibility, spleen cells of hLT-alpha-treated triple-resistant NOD mice were transferred to NOD-scid mice. Diabetes developed in the recipients, although the onset of diabetes was slightly delayed. Finally, hLT-alpha-treated triple-resistant NOD mice developed diabetes 1 week after daily IL-12 treatment. In summary, hLT-alpha administration made NOD mice resistant to effector cells for beta cell destruction. This resistance was induced in NOD, but not in NOD-scid, mice, indicating that lymphocytes were obligatory for the resistance. However, it was not mediated by transferable suppressor cells. Because effector cells were present in hLT-alpha-treated NOD spleen and

  6. Chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus predict resistance to vitamin D replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshayeb, Hala M; Wall, Barry M; Showkat, Arif; Mangold, Therese; Quarles, L Darryl

    2013-04-01

    25-Hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is a marker of nutritional status; however, chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in alterations in vitamin D metabolism, including the loss of vitamin D-binding proteins and alterations in CYP27B1 and CYP24 enzymes that metabolize 25(OH)D. This study was designed to determine the predictors of responsiveness to correction of vitamin D deficiency with oral vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) in adults. A retrospective study of 183 veterans with 25(OH)D level vitamin D2, was performed. Logistic regression models were developed to determine the factors predicting the response to treatment, defined as either the change in serum 25(OH)D level/1000 IU of vitamin D2 or the number of vitamin D2 doses (50,000 IU per dose) administered. The mean age of the patients was 63 ± 12 years. About 87% were men and 51% diabetic, and 29% had an estimated glomerular filtration rate of vitamin D2 doses was 10.91 ± 5.95; the average increase in 25(OH)D level was 18 ± 10.80 ng/mL. 25(OH)D levels remained vitamin D2 treatment in logistic regression models. Patients with CKD required greater amounts of vitamin D2 to achieve similar increases in 25(OH)D levels, versus non-CKD patients. The presence of CKD and diabetes mellitus is associated with resistance to correction of 25(OH)D deficiency with vitamin D2 therapy. The underlying mechanism needs to be evaluated in prospective studies.

  7. Impact of Dietary Fiber Consumption on Insulin Resistance and the Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weickert, Martin O; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H

    2018-01-01

    Large prospective cohort studies consistently show associations of a high dietary fiber intake (>25 g/d in women and >38 g/d in men) with a 20-30% reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D), after correction for confounders. It is less well recognized that these effects appear to be mainly driven by high intakes of whole grains and insoluble cereal fibers, which typically are nonviscous and do not relevantly influence postprandial glucose responses [i.e., glycemic index (GI)] or are strongly fermented by the gut microbiota in the colon. In contrast, a dietary focus on soluble, viscous, gel-forming, more readily fermentable fiber intakes derived from fruit and certain vegetables yields mixed results and generally does not appear to reduce T2D risk. Although disentangling types of fiber-rich foods and separating these from possible effects related to the GI is an obvious challenge, the common conclusion that key metabolic effects of high-fiber intake are explained by mechanisms that should mainly apply to the soluble, viscous type can be challenged. More recently, studies in humans and animal models focused on gaining mechanistic insights into why especially high-cereal-fiber (HCF) diets appear to improve insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes risk. Although effects of HCF diets on weight loss are only moderate and comparable to other types of dietary fibers, possible novel mechanisms have emerged, which include the prevention of the absorption of dietary protein and modulation of the amino acid metabolic signature. Here we provide an update of our previous review from 2008, with a focus on mechanistic insights of how HCF diets may improve IR and the risk of developing T2D. © 2018 American Society for Nutrition. All rights reserved.

  8. Endogenous ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid production confers resistance to obesity, dyslipidemia, and diabetes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Li, Fanghong R; Wei, Dong; Jia, Wei; Kang, Jing X; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Dai, Yifan; Zhao, Allan Z

    2014-08-01

    Despite the well-documented health benefits of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), their use in clinical management of hyperglycemia and obesity has shown little success. To better define the mechanisms of ω-3 PUFAs in regulating energy balance and insulin sensitivity, we deployed a transgenic mouse model capable of endogenously producing ω-3 PUFAs while reducing ω-6 PUFAs owing to the expression of a Caenorhabditis elegans fat-1 gene encoding an ω-3 fatty acid desaturase. When challenged with high-fat diets, fat-1 mice strongly resisted obesity, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and hepatic steatosis. Endogenous elevation of ω-3 PUFAs and reduction of ω-6 PUFAs did not alter the amount of food intake but led to increased energy expenditure in the fat-1 mice. The requirements for the levels of ω-3 PUFAs as well as the ω-6/ω-3 ratios in controlling blood glucose and obesity are much more stringent than those in lipid metabolism. These metabolic phenotypes were accompanied by attenuation of the inflammatory state because tissue levels of prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and TNF-α were significantly decreased. TNF-α-induced nuclear factor-κB signaling was almost completely abolished. Consistent with the reduction in chronic inflammation and a significant increase in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activity in the fat-1 liver tissue, hepatic insulin signaling was sharply elevated. The activities of prolipogenic regulators, such as liver X receptor, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1, and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 were sharply decreased, whereas the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, a nuclear receptor that facilitates lipid β-oxidation, was markedly increased. Thus, endogenous conversion of ω-6 to ω-3 PUFAs via fat-1 strongly protects against obesity, diabetes, inflammation, and dyslipidemia and may represent a novel therapeutic modality to treat these prevalent

  9. Prevalence of micro- and macrovascular diabetes complications at time of type 2 diabetes diagnosis and associated clinical characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gedebjerg, Anne; Almdal, Thomas Peter; Berencsi, Klara

    2018-01-01

    , smoking, elevated CRP levels, and anti-hypertensive therapy. Microvascular complications were associated with high blood pressure, hypertriglyceridemia, and absence of lipid-lowering therapy. CONCLUSIONS: One-third of patients with T2D had diabetes complications around time of diagnosis. Our findings...

  10. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus with idiopathic Fanconi's syndrome in a child who presented as vitamin D resistant rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Soumya; Nadri, Gulnaz; Chowdhary, Harish; Pemde, Harish K; Singh, Varinder; Chandra, Jagdish

    2011-10-01

    Fanconi's syndrome is a complex of multiple tubular dysfunctions of proximal tubular cells occurring alone or in association with a variety of inherited (primary) or acquired (secondary) disorders. It is characterized by aminoaciduria, normoglycaemic glycosuria, tubular proteinuria without hematuria, metabolic acidosis without anion gap and excessive urinary excretion of phosphorous, calcium, uric acid, bicarbonate, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Whereas diabetes insipidus is a disease of collecting tubules and child mainly presents with dehydration and hypernatremia. Though all the cases published till date were secondary to drugs, myeloma, hematological disorders, etc., we are reporting the first case of idiopathic Fanconi's syndrome along with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a child who presented to us as resistant rickets. Medline search did not reveal any case of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus associated with idiopathic Fanconi syndrome. We hypothesized that the NDI may be due to of severe hypokalemia induced tubular dysfunction.

  11. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus with idiopathic Fanconi′s syndrome in a child who presented as vitamin D resistant rickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Patra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi′s syndrome is a complex of multiple tubular dysfunctions of proximal tubular cells occurring alone or in association with a variety of inherited (primary or acquired (secondary disorders. It is characterized by aminoaciduria, normoglycaemic glycosuria, tubular proteinuria without hematuria, metabolic acidosis without anion gap and excessive urinary excretion of phosphorous, calcium, uric acid, bicarbonate, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Whereas diabetes insipidus is a disease of collecting tubules and child mainly presents with dehydration and hypernatremia. Though all the cases published till date were secondary to drugs, myeloma, hematological disorders, etc., we are reporting the first case of idiopathic Fanconi′s syndrome along with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a child who presented to us as resistant rickets. Medline search did not reveal any case of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus associated with idiopathic Fanconi syndrome. We hypothesized that the NDI may be due to of severe hypokalemia induced tubular dysfunction.

  12. Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women with gestat......For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  13. Rhizoma Anemarrhenae extract ameliorates hyperglycemia and insulin resistance via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in diabetic rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun; Yang, Na; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Chuan; Liang, Fengying; Xie, WeiFen; Chen, Wansheng

    2015-08-22

    Rhizoma Anemarrhenae has been used in Asian countries for thousands of years to treat diabetes. Insulin resistance (IR) is the primary cause responsible for type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to to assess the hypoglycemic and insulin sensitizing properties of Rhizoma Anemarrhenae extract (TFA) in animal models of insulin resistance and/or diabetes and to delineate modes of action. In-vivo studies were performed on STZ-induced diabetic mice and KK-Ay mice, the former of which were given the extract alone or in combination with insulin for 7 days, and the latter of which were given the extract for 8 consecutive weeks. Fasting blood glucose and serum insulin levels were measured. Pancreatic tissue sections were examined using transmission electron micrographs. Further, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamping study was conducted in BCG vaccine-induced insulin resistance rats, and glucose infusion rate was examined. Mechanisms of action were investigated in 3T3-L1 and Hela cells using Western blot analysis. Our study showed that TFA enhanced the glucose-lowering effects of exogenous insulin administration in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Therapeutic administration of TFA significantly reduced fasting blood glucose, and serum insulin levels, and markedly increased the size and the number of insulin-producing beta cells in KK-Ay mice. Further, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamping study showed that glucose infusion rate was significantly improved in TFA-treated BCG vaccine-induced insulin resistance rats. Study of mechanism of action revealed that TFA increased phosphorylation of AMPK and its downstream target, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) in 3T3-L1 cells. It activates AMPK in a LKB1-independent manner, providing a unified explanation for the beneficial effects of TFA. This study that TFA mediates activation of AMPK and improves overall glucose and lipid metabolism in diabetic rodents, highlights the potential utility of TFA for the management of type 2 diabetes

  14. Correlation of blood glucose, serum chemerin and insulin resistance with NAFLD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengjun; Wang, Jijun; Wang, Hongmei

    2018-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a form of clinical syndrome characterized by the fatty degeneration in liver histology and should be further investigated. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of blood glucose, serum chemerin and insulin resistance on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to provide a basis for the prevention and treatment thereof. In total, 300 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated and admitted into the Endocrinology Department of our hospital from June 2015 to June 2017 were enrolled and divided into the simple type 2 diabetes mellitus (group A) and concurrent NAFLD (group B) groups. The sex, age, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, blood biochemical indexes and chemerin level were compared between the two groups. The patients in group B were further divided into the mild fatty liver (group B1), moderate fatty liver (group B2) and severe fatty liver (group B3) groups. The sex, age, BMI blood pressure, blood biochemical indexes and chemerin level were also compared among the three groups. Finally, the risk factors of type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated by NAFLD were analyzed via logistic regression. The BMI, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2 h post-prandial plasma glucose (2hPG), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), fasting insulin (FINS), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and HOMA-β indexes and serum chemerin level in group B were significantly higher than those in group A (Ptype 2 diabetes mellitus complicated by NAFLD is closely associated with severe glucose-lipid metabolism disorder and insulin resistance, and BMI, FPG, TC, LDL-c, FINS, HOMA-IR and chemerin constitute risk factors of concurrent NAFLD.

  15. Relation of Absolute or Relative Adiposity to Insulin Resistance, Retinol Binding Protein-4, Leptin, and Adiponectin in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Lim Kim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCentral fat mass (CFM correlates with insulin resistance and increases the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications; however, peripheral fat mass (PFM is associated with insulin sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation of absolute and relative regional adiposity to insulin resistance index and adipokines in type 2 diabetes.MethodsTotal of 83 overweighted-Korean women with type 2 diabetes were enrolled, and rate constants for plasma glucose disappearance (KITT and serum adipokines, such as retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4, leptin, and adiponectin, were measured. Using dual X-ray absorptiometry, trunk fat mass (in kilograms was defined as CFM, sum of fat mass on the lower extremities (in kilograms as PFM, and sum of CFM and PFM as total fat mass (TFM. PFM/TFM ratio, CFM/TFM ratio, and PFM/CFM ratio were defined as relative adiposity.ResultsMedian age was 55.9 years, mean body mass index 27.2 kg/m2, and mean HbA1c level 7.12±0.84%. KITT was positively associated with PMF/TFM ratio, PMF/CFM ratio, and negatively with CFM/TFM ratio, but was not associated with TFM, PFM, or CFM. RBP4 levels also had a significant relationship with PMF/TFM ratio and PMF/CFM ratio. Adiponectin, leptin, and apolipoprotein A levels were related to absolute adiposity, while only adiponectin to relative adiposity. In correlation analysis, KITT in type 2 diabetes was positively related with HbA1c, fasting glucose, RBP4, and free fatty acid.ConclusionThese results suggest that increased relative amount of peripheral fat mass may aggravate insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes.

  16. Selective Insulin Resistance and the Development of Cardiovascular Diseases in Diabetes: The 2015 Edwin Bierman Award Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoungmin; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    The Edwin Bierman Award Lecture is presented in honor of the memory of Edwin L. Bierman, MD, an exemplary scientist, mentor, and leader in the field of diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis. The award and lecture recognizes a leading scientist in the field of macrovascular complications and contributing risk factors in diabetes. George L. King, MD, of the Section of Vascular Cell Biology and Complications, Dianne Nunnally Hoppes Laboratory for Diabetes Complications, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, received the prestigious award at the American Diabetes Association’s 75th Scientific Sessions, 5–9 June 2015, in Boston, MA. He presented the Edwin Bierman Award Lecture, “Selective Insulin Resistance and the Development of Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes,” on Sunday, 7 June 2015. This review is focused on the factors and potential mechanisms that are causing various cardiovascular pathologies. In diabetes, insulin’s actions on the endothelium and other vascular cells have significant influence on systemic metabolisms and the development of cardiovascular pathologies. Our studies showed that insulin receptors on the endothelium are important for insulin transport across the endothelial barrier and mediate insulin’s actions in muscle, heart, fat, and the brain. Insulin actions on the vascular cells are mediated by two pathways involving the actions of either IRS/PI3K/Akt or Grb/Shc/MAPK. Insulin’s activation of IRS/PI3K/Akt results in mostly antiatherogenic actions, as this pathway induces activation of eNOS, the expressions of HO-1 and VEGF, and the reduction of VCAM-1. In contrast, insulin’s activation of the Grb/Shc/MAPK pathway mediates the expressions of ET-1 and PAI-1 and migration and proliferation of contractile cells, which have proatherogenic actions. Elevated levels of glucose, free fatty acids, and inflammatory cytokines due to diabetes and insulin resistance selectively inhibit insulin

  17. The Role of Hypertriglyceridemia in the Development of Atherosclerosis and Endothelial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saki Matsumoto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A hereditary postprandial hypertriglyceridemic rabbit (PHT rabbit is a new dyslipidemic model showing remarkably high plasma triglycerides with only limited elevation of plasma total cholesterol. In PHT rabbits, plasma triglyceride was markedly elevated postprandially compared with healthy Japanese white (JW rabbits. In physiological experiments, the ring preparation of the thoracic aorta was suspended in an organ bath filled with modified Krebs-Henseleit solution, and the developed tension was recorded. Endothelial function was evaluated by acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation in each preparation with intact endothelium. The acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation was diminished in PHT compared with JW rabbits, suggesting endothelial dysfunction in PHT rabbits. Histological examination was carried out in adipose tissue, liver and aorta. They were fixed in formaldehyde and embedded in paraffin. The tissues were sliced (4 μm and stained using hematoxylin-eosin solution. In the adipose tissue, the visceral fat accumulated, and the size of adipose cells was enlarged in PHT rabbits. The liver of the PHT rabbit was fatty and degenerated. In aorta, increased intimal thickness was observed, suggesting the progression of atherosclerosis in the PHT rabbit. This study suggests the important role of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia in atherosclerosis. By using PHT rabbits, the effects of hypertriglyceridemia on health and diseases could be evaluated precisely.

  18. Inulin Improves Postprandial Hypertriglyceridemia by Modulating Gene Expression in the Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Hiel

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Postprandial hyperlipidemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in the context of obesity. Inulin is a non-digestible carbohydrate, known for its beneficial properties in metabolic disorders. We investigated the impact of inulin on postprandial hypertriglyceridemia and on lipid metabolism in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Mice received a control or a western diet for 4 weeks and were further supplemented or not with inulin for 2 weeks (0.2 g/day per mouse. We performed a lipid tolerance test, measured mRNA expression of genes involved in postprandial lipid metabolism, assessed post-heparin plasma and muscle lipoprotein lipase activity and measured lipid accumulation in the enterocytes and fecal lipid excretion. Inulin supplementation in western diet-fed mice decreases postprandial serum triglycerides concentration, decreases the mRNA expression levels of Cd36 (fatty acid receptor involved in lipid uptake and sensing and apolipoprotein C3 (Apoc3, inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase in the jejunum and increases fecal lipid excretion. In conclusion, inulin improves postprandial hypertriglyceridemia by targeting intestinal lipid metabolism. This work confirms the interest of using inulin supplementation in the management of dyslipidemia linked to obesity and cardiometabolic risk.

  19. Inulin Improves Postprandial Hypertriglyceridemia by Modulating Gene Expression in the Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiel, Sophie; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Rodriguez, Julie; Pachikian, Barbara D; Bouzin, Caroline; Thissen, Jean-Paul; Cani, Patrice D; Bindels, Laure B; Delzenne, Nathalie M

    2018-04-25

    Postprandial hyperlipidemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in the context of obesity. Inulin is a non-digestible carbohydrate, known for its beneficial properties in metabolic disorders. We investigated the impact of inulin on postprandial hypertriglyceridemia and on lipid metabolism in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Mice received a control or a western diet for 4 weeks and were further supplemented or not with inulin for 2 weeks (0.2 g/day per mouse). We performed a lipid tolerance test, measured mRNA expression of genes involved in postprandial lipid metabolism, assessed post-heparin plasma and muscle lipoprotein lipase activity and measured lipid accumulation in the enterocytes and fecal lipid excretion. Inulin supplementation in western diet-fed mice decreases postprandial serum triglycerides concentration, decreases the mRNA expression levels of Cd36 (fatty acid receptor involved in lipid uptake and sensing) and apolipoprotein C3 ( Apoc3 , inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase) in the jejunum and increases fecal lipid excretion. In conclusion, inulin improves postprandial hypertriglyceridemia by targeting intestinal lipid metabolism. This work confirms the interest of using inulin supplementation in the management of dyslipidemia linked to obesity and cardiometabolic risk.

  20. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including: Blurry vision Excess thirst Fatigue Frequent urination Hunger Weight loss Because type 2 diabetes develops slowly, ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  1. Diabetes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These datasets provide de-identified insurance data for diabetes. The data is provided by three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway Health Plan,...

  2. Retinol Binding Protein-4 Is Associated with TNF-α and Not Insulin Resistance in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser M. Al-Daghri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the association between RBP4 and various markers related to insulin resistance and diabetic complications as well as inflammatory markers in Saudi population suffering from type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. Patients with type 2 diabetes were divided into 3 groups according to the type of treatment and involvement of coronary artery disease. Serum RBP4, TNF-α, insulin, CRP, resistin, leptin and adiponectin were analysed in all samples. RBP4 levels increased significantly in the group of diabetic subjects treated with oral hypoglycemic agents and diabetic patients with coronary heart disease (30.2 ± 11.8; 33.4 ± 13.6 respectively, while there was no significant change in the other group for diabetic subjects on low-carbohydrate diet (25.1 ± 10.9 compared to control group (22.6 ± 9.5. RPB4 levels were positively correlated with TNF-α in the group of diabetic subjects on oral hypoglycemic agents and diabetic patients with coronary heart disease (r = 0.52, P < 0.05; r = 0.58, P < 0.05 respectively. No correlations were found between RBP4 levels and insulin resistance in all studied groups. Our findings suggest that serum RBP4 levels is associated with pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α and is not associated with insulin resistance among patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease.

  3. Potential for Improved Glycemic Control with Dietary Momordica charantia in Patients with Insulin Resistance and Pre-Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Jimmy T.; Choi, Yuk Ming; Davies, Stephen W.; Mehra, Sanjay; Anderson, Ethan J.; Katunga, Lalage A.

    2014-01-01

    Bitter Melon (Momordica charantia) is a widely used traditional remedy for hyperglycemia. While the medicinal properties of this plant have been studied extensively using in vitro and animal models, the clinical efficacy and safety in humans is largely unknown. This review discusses the benefits and limitations of bitter melon supplementation in the context of epidemic levels of insulin resistance and pre-diabetes throughout the world. PMID:24566057

  4. Subjective sleep complaints are associated with insulin resistance in individuals without diabetes: the PPP-Botnia Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyykkönen, Antti-Jussi; Isomaa, Bo; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Eriksson, Johan G; Groop, Leif; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Räikkönen, Katri

    2012-11-01

    Sleep disorders and subjective sleep complaints have been associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The evidence with respect to insulin resistance (IR) and insulin secretion in individuals without type 2 diabetes has been scarce and elusive. We examined if subjective sleep complaints and their co-occurrence were associated with IR and insulin secretion in adult women and men without diabetes. Women (n = 442) and men (n = 354) 18-75 years of age without type 2 diabetes underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), with insulin and glucose measured at fasting and at 30 and 120 min. Complaints related to sleep apnea, insomnia, and daytime sleepiness were self-rated with the Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire. In comparison with individuals with no or minor sleep complaints, those with more frequent complaints of sleep apnea, insomnia, and daytime sleepiness were more insulin resistant, as evidenced by higher fasting insulin concentrations and insulin and glucose responses to OGTT, and more frequently had high homeostasis model assessment of IR and low insulin sensitivity index values. The likelihood of being insulin resistant increased significantly and linearly according to the accumulation of co-occurring sleep complaints. These associations changed only a little when adjusted for mediating and confounding factors and for depressive symptoms. Sleep complaints were not associated with indices of deficiency in insulin secretion. Subjective sleep complaints were associated with IR. The likelihood of being insulin resistant increased according to accumulation of co-occurring sleep complaints. Sleep complaints were not associated with deficiency in insulin secretion.

  5. Potential for improved glycemic control with dietary Momordica charantia in patients with insulin resistance and pre-diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Jimmy T; Choi, Yuk Ming; Davies, Stephen W; Mehra, Sanjay; Anderson, Ethan J; Katunga, Lalage A

    2014-02-21

    Bitter Melon (Momordica charantia) is a widely used traditional remedy for hyperglycemia. While the medicinal properties of this plant have been studied extensively using in vitro and animal models, the clinical efficacy and safety in humans is largely unknown. This review discusses the benefits and limitations of bitter melon supplementation in the context of epidemic levels of insulin resistance and pre-diabetes throughout the world.

  6. Potential for Improved Glycemic Control with Dietary Momordica charantia in Patients with Insulin Resistance and Pre-Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Efird, Jimmy T.; Choi, Yuk Ming; Davies, Stephen W.; Mehra, Sanjay; Anderson, Ethan J.; Katunga, Lalage A.

    2014-01-01

    Bitter Melon (Momordica charantia) is a widely used traditional remedy for hyperglycemia. While the medicinal properties of this plant have been studied extensively using in vitro and animal models, the clinical efficacy and safety in humans is largely unknown. This review discusses the benefits and limitations of bitter melon supplementation in the context of epidemic levels of insulin resistance and pre-diabetes throughout the world.

  7. Valproic acid reduces insulin-resistance, fat deposition and FOXO1-mediated gluconeogenesis in type-2 diabetic rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sabbir; Kumar, Sandeep; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidences highlighted the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in insulin-resistance, gluconeogenesis and islet function. HDACs can modulate the expression of various genes, which directly or indirectly affect glucose metabolism. This study was aimed to evaluate the role of valproic acid (VPA) on fat deposition, insulin-resistance and gluconeogenesis in type-2 diabetic rat. Diabetes was developed in Sprague-Dawley rats by the combination of high-fat diet and low dose streptozotocin. VPA at the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg/day and metformin (positive control) 150 mg/kg twice daily for 10 weeks were administered by oral gavage. Insulin-resistance, dyslipidemia and glycemia were evaluated by biochemical estimations, while fat accumulation and structural alteration were assessed by histopathology. Protein expression and insulin signaling were evaluated by western blot and immunohistochemistry. VPA treatment significantly reduced the plasma glucose, HbA1c, insulin-resistance, fat deposition in brown adipose tissue, white adipose tissue and liver, which are comparable to metformin treatment. Further, VPA inhibited the gluconeogenesis and glucagon expression as well as restored the histopathological alterations in pancreas and liver. Our findings provide new insights on the anti-diabetic role of VPA in type-2 diabetes mellitus by the modulation of insulin signaling and forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1)-mediated gluconeogenesis. Since VPA is a well established clinical drug, the detailed molecular mechanisms of the present findings can be further investigated for possible clinical use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  8. Potential for Improved Glycemic Control with Dietary Momordica charantia in Patients with Insulin Resistance and Pre-Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy T. Efird

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bitter Melon (Momordica charantia is a widely used traditional remedy for hyperglycemia. While the medicinal properties of this plant have been studied extensively using in vitro and animal models, the clinical efficacy and safety in humans is largely unknown. This review discusses the benefits and limitations of bitter melon supplementation in the context of epidemic levels of insulin resistance and pre-diabetes throughout the world.

  9. Rosiglitazone treatment of patients with extreme insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus due to insulin receptor mutations has no effects on glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Lund, S; Pedersen, O

    2001-01-01

    Rosiglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD), increases insulin sensitivity by reducing levels of plasma NEFA, triglycerides (TG), glucose and serum insulin. Rosiglitazone treatment decreases insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients, but no data exist concerning rosiglitazone treatment of patie......Rosiglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD), increases insulin sensitivity by reducing levels of plasma NEFA, triglycerides (TG), glucose and serum insulin. Rosiglitazone treatment decreases insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients, but no data exist concerning rosiglitazone treatment...

  10. Kaempferol alleviates insulin resistance via hepatic IKK/NF-κB signal in type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cheng; Yang, Hui; Tang, Chengyong; Yao, Gaoqiong; Kong, Lingxi; He, Haixia; Zhou, Yuanda

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies show that inflammation underlies the metabolic disorders of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Since kaempferol, a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been described to have potent anti-inflammatory properties, we investigated whether kaempferol could ameliorate insulin resistance through inhibiting inflammatory responses. The model of diabetic rat was induced by 6-week high-fat diet plus streptozotocin. Animals were orally treated with kaempferol (50 or 150 mg/kg) and aspirin (100mg/kg) for 10 weeks. The results showed that kaempferol ameliorated blood lipids and insulin in an dose-dependent manner. Kaempferol effectively restored insulin resistance induced alteration of glucose disposal by using an insulin tolerance test and the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp method. Western blotting results showed that KPF inhibited the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), IkB kinase α (IKKα) and IkB kinase β (IKKβ). These effects were accompanied with reduction in nucleic and cytosol levels of nuclear factor kappa-β (NF-κB), and further tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels. Aspirin had similar effects. These results provide in vivo evidence that kaempferol-mediated down-regulation of IKK and subsequent inhibition of NF-κB pathway activation may be associated with the reduction of hepatic inflammatory lesions, which is contributing to the improvement of insulin signaling defect in diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Correlation of insulin resistance with serum C-reactive protein, adiponectin and leptin levels in patients with type 2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Yangqiang; Wang Zuobing; Yu Hui

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between serum C-reactive protein (CRP), adiponectin (APN), leptin (Leptin) levels, insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) disease susceptibility. Methods: The plasma leptin and insulin (FINS) levels in the DM patients were determined by RIA, and the serum ANP levels were determined by ELSIA. The CRP, conventional serum fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels were determine by automatic biochemistry analyzer. The insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR, FPG x FINS/22.5) was calculated. The result was analyzed with normal healthy control group. Results: The serum CRP and leptin, HOMA-IR levels in T2DM group were significantly higher than that of in control group (P< 0.01), and the serum ANP was significantly lower than in control group (P<0.01). The HOMA-IR in T2DM was positively correlated with serum CRP (r= 0.36, P<0.05) and leptin(r= 0.39, P<0.05), and was negatively correlated with serum APN (r=0.32, P<0.05). Conclusion: The high serum CRP and leptin and low APN levels hyperlipidaemia might be factors for diabetes, and their metabolic disorders may be closely related with insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes. (authors)

  12. Relationship of Soluble RAGE with Insulin Resistance and Beta Cell Function during Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Kumar Biswas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined whether circulating levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE alter in prediabetes and correlate with insulin resistance (IR and beta cell function in prediabetes and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Subjects without previous history of diabetes were recruited and grouped as control, prediabetes, and newly diagnosed T2DM. The control subjects (n=40 and people with prediabetes (n=52 and diabetes (n=66 were similar in terms of age, sex, BMI, systolic and diastolic BP, and fasting insulin level. HOMA-IR was found significantly higher in people with diabetes than control subjects (p<0.001 and people with prediabetes (p=0.005; and HOMA-%B was found significantly deteriorated in people with diabetes (p<0.001 compared to control subjects and people with prediabetes. However, serum sRAGE levels did not show any significant alteration in people with prediabetes compared to control subjects. Moreover, univariate and multivariate analyses did not identify any significant correlation and statistical association of sRAGE with HOMA-IR and HOMA-%B in people with prediabetes and newly diagnosed T2DM. Our data suggest that serum sRAGE levels do not alter in people with prediabetes compared to control subjects and do not correlate or associate with IR and beta cell function during development of T2DM.

  13. Diabetes mellitus is associated with cavities, smear grade, and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, M J; Kempker, R R; Kipiani, M; Gandhi, N R; Darchia, L; Tukvadze, N; Howards, P P; Narayan, K M V; Blumberg, H M

    2015-06-01

    National tuberculosis (TB) treatment facility in the country of Georgia. To determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and pre-DM among patients with TB using glycosylated-hemoglobin (HbA1c), and to estimate the association between DM and clinical characteristics and response to anti-tuberculosis treatment. A cohort study was conducted from 2011 to 2014 at the National Centre for TB and Lung Disease in Tbilisi. Patients aged ⩾ 35 years with pulmonary TB were included. HbA1c was used to define DM (⩾ 6.5%), pre-DM (⩾ 5.7-6.4%), and no DM (tuberculosis treatment outcomes. A total of 318 newly diagnosed patients with TB were enrolled. The prevalence of DM and pre-DM was 11.6% and 16.4%, respectively. In multivariable analyses, patients with TB-DM had more cavitation (adjusted OR [aOR] 2.26), higher smear grade (aOR 2.37), and more multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) (aOR 2.27) than patients without DM. The risk of poor anti-tuberculosis treatment outcomes was similar among patients with and those without DM (28.1% vs. 23.6%). DM and pre-DM were common among adults with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB in Tbilisi, Georgia, and DM was associated with more clinical symptoms, and MDR-TB, at presentation.

  14. Hypothyroidism associated with acromegaly and insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus in a Samoyed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, T; Terzo, E; Mooney, C T

    2014-11-01

    The aetiology of insulin resistance (IR) in naturally occurring canine hypothyroidism is poorly understood and likely multifactorial. Excess secretion of growth hormone (GH) by transdifferentiated pituitary cells may contribute to IR in some hypothyroid dogs, but although this has been demonstrated in experimental studies, it has not yet been documented in clinical cases. A 4-year-old male entire Samoyed presented with an 8-month history of pedal hyperkeratosis and shifting lameness, which had been unresponsive to zinc supplementation, antibiotics and glucocorticoid therapy. The dog also exhibited exercise intolerance and polydipsia of 12 and 2 months duration, respectively. On physical examination, obesity, poor coat condition, widened interdental spaces and mild respiratory stridor were noted. Initial laboratory test results revealed concurrent hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus (DM). Further investigations showed IR, GH excess and a paradoxical increase of GH following stimulation with thyrotropin-releasing hormone. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case that suggests that GH alterations may have clinical significance in naturally occurring hypothyroidism. Among other factors, hypothyroidism-induced GH excess should be considered as a possible cause of IR in patients suffering from hypothyroidism and concurrent DM. In such cases, DM may reverse with treatment of hypothyroidism, as was documented in this case. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  15. Postreceptor defects causing insulin resistance in normoinsulinemic non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolinder, J.; Ostman, J.; Arner, P.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanisms of the diminished hypoglycemic response to insulin in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) with normal levels of circulating plasma insulin were investigated. Specific binding of mono- 125 I (Tyr A14)-insulin to isolated adipocytes and effects of insulin (5--10,000 microunits/ml) on glucose oxidation and lipolysis were determined simultaneously in subcutaneous adipose tissue of seven healthy subjects of normal weight and seven untreated NIDDM patients with normal plasma insulin levels. The two groups were matched for age, sex, and body weight. Insulin binding, measured in terms of receptor number and affinity, was normal in NIDDM, the total number of receptors averaging 350,000 per cell. Neither sensitivity nor the maximum antilipolytic effect of insulin was altered in NIDDM patients as compared with control subjects; the insulin concentration producing half the maximum effect (ED50) was 10 microunits/ml. As regards the effect of insulin on glucose oxidation, for the control subjects ED50 was 30 microunits/ml, whereas in NIDDM patients, insulin exerted no stimulatory effect. The results obtained suggest that the effect of insulin on glucose utilization in normoinsulinemic NIDDM may be diminished in spite of normal insulin binding to receptors. The resistance may be due solely to postreceptor defects, and does not involve antilipolysis

  16. The nuances of atherogenic dyslipidemia in diabetes: focus on triglycerides and current management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoria, P C; Chopra, H K; Parashar, S K; Dutta, A L; Pinto, Brian; Mullasari, Ajit; Prajapati, Samir

    2013-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a pandemic disease and an important cardiovascular (CV) risk factor. The atherogenic dyslipidemia in diabetes (ADD) is characterized by high serum triglycerides, high small dense LDL levels, low HDL levels and postprandial lipemia. Insulin resistance is a primary cause for ADD. Though statins are highly effective for CVD prevention in DM but a significant residual CV risk remains even after optimal statin therapy. Fibrates, niacin and omega-3 fatty acids are used in addition to statin for treatment of ADD (specifically hypertriglyceridemia). All these drugs have some limitations and they are far from being ideal companions of statins. Many newer drugs are in pipeline for management of ADD. Dual PPAR α/γ agonists are in most advanced stage of clinical development and they have a rational approach as they control blood glucose levels (by reducing insulin resistance, a primary factor for ADD) in addition to modulating ADD. Availability of dual PPAR α/γ agnosits and other drugs for ADD management may improve CV outcomes and decrease morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients in future. Copyright © 2013 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The nuances of atherogenic dyslipidemia in diabetes: Focus on triglycerides and current management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. Manoria

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a pandemic disease and an important cardiovascular (CV risk factor. The atherogenic dyslipidemia in diabetes (ADD is characterized by high serum triglycerides, high small dense LDL levels, low HDL levels and postprandial lipemia. Insulin resistance is a primary cause for ADD. Though statins are highly effective for CVD prevention in DM but a significant residual CV risk remains even after optimal statin therapy. Fibrates, niacin and omega-3 fatty acids are used in addition to statin for treatment of ADD (specifically hypertriglyceridemia. All these drugs have some limitations and they are far from being ideal companions of statins. Many newer drugs are in pipeline for management of ADD. Dual PPAR α/γ agonists are in most advanced stage of clinical development and they have a rational approach as they control blood glucose levels (by reducing insulin resistance, a primary factor for ADD in addition to modulating ADD. Availability of dual PPAR α/γ agnosits and other drugs for ADD management may improve CV outcomes and decrease morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients in future.

  18. Insulineresistentie en diabetes mellitus type 2 bij kinderen met overgewicht [Insulin resistance and diabetes type 2 in overweight children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renders, C.M.; Delemarre-van De Waal, H.A.; Dekker, J.M.; Hirasing, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    De prevalentie van overgewicht en obesitas bij kinderen neemt snel toe. Deze toename zal gepaard gaan met meer vóórkomen van diabetes mellitus type 2 bij jeugdigen. De belangrijkste beïnvloedbare risicofactor voor het ontstaan van insulineresistentie bij jongeren is overgewicht. De diagnostische

  19. Effects of 1-year orlistat treatment compared to placebo on insulin resistance parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derosa, G; Cicero, A F G; D'Angelo, A; Fogari, E; Maffioli, P

    2012-04-01

      The behavioural approach is usually slow and not always sufficient to achieve optimal targets in weight and metabolic control in obese diabetic patients, and a pharmacological treatment is often necessary. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of orlistat and placebo on body weight, glycaemic and lipid profile and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Two hundred and fifty-four obese, diabetic patients were enrolled in this study and randomized to take orlistat 360mg or placebo for 1year. We evaluated at baseline and after 3, 6, 9 and 12months body weight, waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI), glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c) ), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), post-prandial plasma glucose (PPG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), lipid profile, retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP-4), resistin, visfatin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP). We observed a significant reduction in body weight, WC, BMI, lipid profile, RBP-4 and visfatin in the orlistat group but not in control group. Faster improvements in HbA(1c) , PPG, FPI, HOMA-IR, resistin and Hs-CRP were recorded with orlistat than with placebo. A similar decrease in FPG was seen in the two groups. Significant predictors of change in insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were RBP-4 and resistin concentration in the orlistat group (r=-0·53, Peffect of orlistat on insulin resistance and markers of inflammation. Orlistat improved lipid profile and led to faster glycaemic control and insulin resistance parameters than the control, without any serious adverse event. Orlistat also improved RBP-4 and visfatin, effects not observed with placebo. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Effect of vitamins C and E on insulin resistance in diabetes: a meta-analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaeian, Mehrnoosh; Tabatabaei-Malazy, Ozra; Qorbani, Mostafa; Farzadfar, Farshad; Amini, Peyvand; Larijani, Bagher

    2015-11-01

    Data regarding the effect of vitamin C (VC) and vitamin E (VE) supplementation on insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are controversial. We aimed to systematically review the current data on this topic. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted to assess the effect of VC and/or VE on insulin resistance in diabetes published in Google Scholar and PubMed web databases until January 2014 were included. Exclusion criteria were studies conducted in animal, type 1 DM, children or pregnant women. Main outcome measure was insulin resistance by homoeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index. According to degree of heterogeneity, fixed- or random-effect model was employed by stata software (11.0). We selected 14 RCTs involving 735 patients with T2DM. VE or mixture-mode supplementation did not have any significant effect on HOMA with a standardized mean difference (SMD): 0·017, 95% CI: -0·376 to 0·411 (P = 0·932); and SMD: -0·035, 95% CI: -0·634 to 0·025 (P = 0·070), respectively, by random-effect model. VC supplement alone did not improve insulin resistance with a SMD: -0·150, 95% CI: -0·494 to 0·194 (P = 0·391), by fixed-effect model. Meta-regression test demonstrated that HOMA index may have not been influenced by the year of publication, dosage or duration of treatment. The sole intake of VC, VE or their combination with other antioxidants could not improve insulin resistance in diabetes. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  1. Diabetes-related neurological implications and pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Rojas Carranza Camilo; Helena, Bustos Cruz Rosa; Juliana, Pino Pinzón Carmen; Viviana, Ariza Marquez Yeimy; Margarita, Gómez Bello Rosa; Marisa, Cañadas Garre

    2017-03-17

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most commonly occurring cause of neuropathy around the world and is beginning to grow in countries where there is a risk of obesity. DM Type II, (T2DM) is a common age-related disease and is a major health concern, particularly in developed countries in Europe where the population is aging. T2DM is a chronic disease which is characterised by hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, together with the body's inability to use glucose as energy. Such metabolic disorder produces a chronic inflammatory state, as well as changes in lipid metabolism leading to hypertriglyceridemia, thereby producing chronic deterioration of the organs and premature morbidity and mortality. The pathology's effects increase cerebral damage, leading to the rapid onset of neurodegenerative diseases. Hyperglycemia causes oxidative stress in tissues which are susceptible to the complications involved in diabetes, including peripheral nerves. Other additional mechanisms include activation of polyol aldose reductase signalling accompanied by protein kinase C (PKC)-ß activation, poly(ADP ribose) polymerase activation, cyclooxygenase (COX) 2 activation, endothelial dysfunction, altered Na+/K+ ATPase pump function, dyslipidaemia and perturbation of calcium balance. All the forgoing has an impact on neuron activity, mitochondrial function, membrane permeability and endothelial function. These biochemical processes directly affect the neurons and endothelial tissue, thereby accelerating cerebral aging by means of peroxidation of the polyunsaturated fatty acids and thus injuring cell membrane integrity and inducing apoptosis in the glial cells. The central nervous system (CNS) includes two types de glial cells: microglia and macroglia (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and radial cells which include Bergmann cells and Müller cells). Glial cells constitute more than 90% of the CNS cell population. Human studies have shown that some oral anti-diabetic drugs can

  2. Prevalence and characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization among a community-based diabetes population in Foshan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jialing; Xu, Ping; Peng, Yang; Lin, Dongxin; Ou, Qianting; Zhang, Ting; Bai, Chan; Ye, Xiaohua; Zhou, Junli; Yao, Zhenjiang

    2017-05-01

    Evidence suggests that diabetes might cause an increase in colonization of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in community settings. We carried out a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence and influencing factors of S. aureus and MRSA nasal colonization among a community-based diabetes population, and to identify the characteristics of the isolated strains. A total of 956 participants from 11 community settings were included in the study. Of the 529 diabetes participants, 46 were colonized with S. aureus and 22 were colonized with MRSA. Of the 427 non-diabetes participants, 25 were colonized with S. aureus and 12 were colonized with MRSA. Men (odds ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.20-0.99, P = 0.047) were less likely to have S. aureus nasal colonization, and those with well-controlled blood glucose (odds ratio 2.04, 95% confidence interval 1.01-4.13, P = 0.047) among the diabetes population were more likely to have S. aureus nasal colonization. The proportion of multidrug-resistant S. aureus strains in the diabetes population (52.17%) was higher than that in the non-diabetes population (28.00%; χ 2 = 3.848, P = 0.050). The most common clonal complex type and Staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec type of MRSA in diabetes population was clonal complex 5 (40.91%) and type IV (27.27%), respectively. The proportion of Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene in MRSA strains was 17.65%. There was great sequence type diversity in MRSA strains. The prevalence of MRSA in the community-based diabetes population was moderate, and the high proportions of multidrug-resistant S. aureus strains and diverse molecular characteristics in the diabetes population should be noticed. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Achieving ADA/ISPAD clinical guideline goals is associated with higher insulin sensitivity and cardiopulmonary fitness in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: Results from RESistance to InSulin in Type 1 ANd Type 2 diabetes (RESISTANT) and Effects of MEtformin on CardiovasculaR Function in AdoLescents with Type 1 Diabetes (EMERALD) Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornstad, Petter; Cree-Green, Melanie; Baumgartner, Amy; Coe, Gregory; Reyes, Yesenia Garcia; Schäfer, Michal; Pyle, Laura; Regensteiner, Judith G; Reusch, Jane Eb; Nadeau, Kristen J

    2018-05-01

    Most youth with type 1 diabetes do not meet the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) targets for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), blood pressure (BP), lipids, and body mass index (BMI). We hypothesized that ISPAD/ADA goal achievement would be associated with better insulin sensitivity (IS) and cardiopulmonary fitness. IS was quantified as glucose infusion rate (GIR) from a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp in youth with type 1 diabetes from the RESistance to InSulin in Type 1 ANd Type 2 diabetes (RESISTANT) (n = 86) and Effects of MEtformin on CardiovasculaR Function in AdoLescents with Type 1 Diabetes (EMERALD) (n = 41) cohorts (n = 127; age 15.7 ± 2.2 years, 52% girls). Cardiopulmonary fitness was measured as peak oxygen consumption (VO 2 peak/kg) during upright (RESISTANT) or supine (EMERALD) cycle ergometry and were stratified by cycle type. Goal achievement was defined as HbA1c 35 mg/dL, triglycerides EMERALD participants for supine VO 2 peak. ADA/ISPAD goal achievement was associated with greater IS and cardiopulmonary fitness. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Lipid Accumulation Product Is Associated with Insulin Resistance, Lipid Peroxidation, and Systemic Inflammation in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Mirmiran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLipid accumulation product (LAP is a novel biomarker of central lipid accumulation related to risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we assessed the association of LAP with glucose homeostasis, lipid and lipid peroxidation, and subclinical systemic inflammation in diabetic patients.MethodsThirty-nine male and 47 female type 2 diabetic patients were assessed for anthropometrics and biochemical measurements. LAP was calculated as [waist circumference (cm-65]×[triglycerides (mmol/L] in men, and [waist circumference (cm-58]×[triglycerides (mmol/L] in women. Associations of LAP with fasting glucose, insulin, insulin resistance index, lipid and lipoprotein levels, malondialdehyde, and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP were assessed.ResultsMean age and LAP index were 53.6±9.6 and 51.9±31.2 years, respectively. After adjustments for age, sex and body mass index status, a significant positive correlation was observed between LAP index and fasting glucose (r=0.39, P<0.001, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (r=0.31, P<0.05. After additional adjustment for fasting glucose levels, antidiabetic and antilipidemic drugs, the LAP index was also correlated to total cholesterol (r=0.45, P<0.001, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels (r=-0.29, P<0.05, triglycerides to HDL-C ratio (r=0.89, P<0.001, malondialdehyde (r=0.65, P<0.001, and hs-CRP levels (r=0.27, P<0.05.ConclusionHigher central lipid accumulation in diabetic patients was related to higher insulin resistance, oxidative stress and systemic inflammation.

  5. Effect of high- versus low-intensity supervised aerobic and resistance training on modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes; the Italian Diabetes and Exercise Study (IDES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Balducci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While current recommendations on exercise type and volume have strong experimental bases, there is no clear evidence from large-sized studies indicating whether increasing training intensity provides additional benefits to subjects with type 2 diabetes. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of moderate-to-high intensity (HI versus low-to-moderate intensity (LI training of equal energy cost, i.e. exercise volume, on modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. DESIGN: Pre-specified sub-analysis of the Italian Diabetes and Exercise Study (IDES, a randomized multicenter prospective trial comparing a supervised exercise intervention with standard care for 12 months (2005-2006. SETTING: Twenty-two outpatient diabetes clinics across Italy. PATIENTS: Sedentary patients with type 2 diabetes assigned to twice-a-week supervised progressive aerobic and resistance training plus exercise counseling (n = 303. INTERVENTIONS: Subjects were randomized by center to LI (n = 142, 136 completed or HI (n = 161, 152 completed progressive aerobic and resistance training, i.e. at 55% or 70% of predicted maximal oxygen consumption and at 60% or 80% of predicted 1-Repetition Maximum, respectively, of equal volume. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S: Hemoglobin (Hb A(1c and other cardiovascular risk factors; 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD risk scores. RESULTS: Volume of physical activity, both supervised and non-supervised, was similar in LI and HI participants. Compared with LI training, HI training produced only clinically marginal, though statistically significant, improvements in HbA(1c (mean difference -0.17% [95% confidence interval -0.44,0.10], P = 0.03, triglycerides (-0.12 mmol/l [-0.34,0.10], P = 0.02 and total cholesterol (-0.24 mmol/l [-0.46, -0.01], P = 0.04, but not in other risk factors and CHD risk scores. However, intensity was not an independent predictor of reduction of any of these parameters. Adverse event rate was similar in HI and LI subjects

  6. Effect of Resistance Exercise Training Associated with Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy on Serum Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in STZ-induced Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdieh Molanouri Shamsi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy is associated with type 1 diabetes. Effects of resistance exercise training associated with skeletal muscle hypertrophy on serum inflammatory cytokines was exactly not clarified. Protein levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β in serum of healthy and streptozotocin (STZ- induced diabetic rats subjected to resistance exercise training were assessed in this study. Rats were divided into the control, training, control diabetic and diabetic training groups. Training groups performed the resistance training consisted of climbing a 1 m ladder with increasing weight added to the tail. Proteins levels of IL-6, TNF-α and IL-1β in serum were measured by the ELIZA method. The results of this study indicated that resistance training induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy in diabetic samples (P<0.05. Also, Resistance training decrease IL-6 protein levels in serum. Inflammatory cytokines could act as stress factors in diabetes. It seems that this kind of exercise training individually could not change cytokines levels in serum.

  7. Periodontitis and insulin resistance: casual or causal relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurav, Abhijit N

    2012-12-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is now considered as a chronic and low level inflammatory condition. It is closely related to altered glucose tolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, abdominal obesity, and coronary heart disease. IR is accompanied by the increase in the levels of inflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1 and 6, tumor necrosis factor-α. These inflammatory cytokines also play a crucial part in pathogenesis and progression of insulin resistance. Periodontitis is the commonest of oral diseases, affecting tooth investing tissues. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are released in the disease process of periodontitis. Periodontitis can be attributed with exacerbation of IR. Data in the literature supports a "two way relationship" between diabetes and periodontitis. Periodontitis is asymptomatic in the initial stages of disease process and it often escapes diagnosis. This review presents the blurred nexus between periodontitis and IR, underlining the pathophysiology of the insidious link. The knowledge of the association between periodontitis and IR can be valuable in planning effectual treatment modalities for subjects with altered glucose homeostasis and diabetics. Presently, the studies supporting this association are miniscule. Further studies are mandatory to substantiate the role of periodontitis in the deterioration of IR.

  8. Periodontitis and Insulin Resistance: Casual or Causal Relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit N. Gurav

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance (IR is now considered as a chronic and low level inflammatory condition. It is closely related to altered glucose tolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, abdominal obesity, and coronary heart disease. IR is accompanied by the increase in the levels of inflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1 and 6, tumor necrosis factor-α. These inflammatory cytokines also play a crucial part in pathogenesis and progression of insulin resistance. Periodontitis is the commonest of oral diseases, affecting tooth investing tissues. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are released in the disease process of periodontitis. Periodontitis can be attributed with exacerbation of IR. Data in the literature supports a "two way relationship" between diabetes and periodontitis. Periodontitis is asymptomatic in the initial stages of disease process and it often escapes diagnosis. This review presents the blurred nexus between periodontitis and IR, underlining the pathophysiology of the insidious link. The knowledge of the association between periodontitis and IR can be valuable in planning effectual treatment modalities for subjects with altered glucose homeostasis and diabetics. Presently, the studies supporting this association are miniscule. Further studies are mandatory to substantiate the role of periodontitis in the deterioration of IR.

  9. Increased interaction with insulin receptor substrate 1, a novel abnormality in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caruso, Michael; Ma, Danjun; Msallaty, Zaher

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) is a key mediator of insulin signal transduction. Perturbations involving IRS1 complexes may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Surprisingly little is known about the proteins that interact with IRS1 in humans under health...... and disease conditions. We used a proteomic approach to assess IRS1 interaction partners in skeletal muscle from lean healthy control subjects (LCs), obese insulin-resistant nondiabetic control subjects (OCs), and participants with T2D before and after insulin infusion. We identified 113 novel endogenous IRS1...... in obesity and T2D in humans, provides new insights into the molecular mechanism of insulin resistance and identifies new targets for T2D drug development....

  10. Android Adiposity and Lack of Moderate and Vigorous Physical Activity Are Associated With Insulin Resistance and Diabetes in Aging Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark D; Al Snih, Soham; Serra-Rexach, José A; Burant, Charles

    2015-08-01

    Physical inactivity and excess adiposity are thought to be interdependent "lifestyle" factors and thus, many older adults are at exaggerated risk for preventable diseases. The purposes of this study were to determine the degree of discordance between body mass index (BMI) and adiposity among adults older than 50 years, and to determine the extent to which direct measures of adiposity, and objectively measured sedentary behavior (SB) and physical activity (PA) are associated with insulin resistance (IR) or diabetes. A population representative sample of 2,816 individuals, aged 50-85 years, was included from the combined 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) datasets. BMI, percent body fat (%BF) and android adiposity as determined by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, objectively measured SB and PA, established markers of cardiometabolic risk, IR, and type 2 diabetes were analyzed. Approximately 50% of the men and 64% of the women who were normal weight according to BMI had excessive %BF. Adults with the least SB and greatest moderate and vigorous PA exhibited the healthiest cardiometabolic profiles, whereas adults with the greatest SB and lowest activity had highest risk. Greater android adiposity stores were robustly associated with IR or diabetes in all adults, independent of SB and activity. Among men, less moderate-to-vigorous PA was associated with IR or diabetes; whereas among women, less lifestyle moderate activity was associated with IR or diabetes. Android adiposity and low moderate and vigorous PA are the strongest predictors of IR or diabetes among aging adults. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Insulin Resistance and Risk of Ischemic Stroke among Non-Diabetic Individuals from the Northern Manhattan Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundek, Tatjana; Gardener, Hannah; Xu, Qiang; Goldberg, Ronald B.; Wright, Clinton B.; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Disla, Norbelina; Paik, Myunghee C.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Sacco, Ralph L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between insulin resistance and risk of first ischemic stroke in a large multiethnic, stroke-free cohort without diagnosis of diabetes. Research Design and Methods A cohort of 1,509 non-diabetic participants from the Northern Manhattan Study (mean age 68±10 years; 64% women; 59% Hispanics) was analyzed for insulin sensitivity, expressed by the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Sensitivity (HOMA index = [fasting insulin (µU/ml]×[fasting glucose (mmol/L)] ÷ 22.5). Insulin resistance (IR) was defined by a HOMA-IR index in the top quartile (Q4). Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine the effect of HOMA-IR on the risk of incident ischemic stroke (IS), myocardial infarction (MI), vascular death, and combined outcomes (IS, MI, or vascular death). Results The mean HOMA-IR was 2.3 ± 2.1, and Q4 was ≥2.8. During a mean follow-up of 8.5 years, vascular events occurred among 180 subjects; 46 had fatal or non-fatal ischemic stroke, 45 had fatal or non-fatal MI, and 121 died of vascular causes. The top quartile of the HOMA-IR vs. resistance estimated by the homeostatic model assessment is a marker of increased risk of incident stroke among non-diabetic individuals. Our findings emphasize the need to better characterize individuals at increased risk of stroke, and the potential role for primary preventive therapies targeted at insulin resistance. PMID:20937946

  12. Insulin resistance predicts early cardiovascular morbidity in men without diabetes mellitus, with effect modification by physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, Margareta I; Daka, Bledar; Jansson, Per-Anders; Lindblad, Ulf; Larsson, Charlotte A

    2015-07-01

    to assess how well insulin resistance predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) in non-diabetic men and women and to explore the influence of physical activity. in this prospective study 2563 men and women without diabetes were examined with an oral glucose tolerance test, anthropometric measurements and blood pressure assessment. Questionnaires about lifestyle and physical activity were completed. Insulin resistance was estimated by fasting concentrations of plasma insulin and by HOMA index for insulin resistance. Participants were followed up for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality during an 8-year period, using information from the National Swedish Inpatient and Mortality registers. at follow-up, HOMAir predicted CVD morbidity in males (50 events) and females (28 events) combined (HRage/sex-adj 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.7); however, when stratified by gender HOMAir was predictive solely in men (HRage-adj 1.8, 95% CI 1.3-2.4), whereas no association was found in women (HRage-adj 1.1, 95% CI 0.8-1.5). When stratifying the data for high and low physical activity, the predictive value of insulin resistance became stronger in sedentary men (HRage-adj 2.3, 95% CI 1.5-3.4) but was abolished in men performing moderate to vigorous physical activity (HRage-adj 1.0, 95% CI 0.6-1.6). The results remained when step-wise adjusted also for BMI, ApoB/ApoA1 and hypertension, as well as for smoking, alcohol consumption and education. Outcome for fasting plasma insulin was similar to HOMAir. insulin resistance predicts CVD in the general population; however, men may be more vulnerable to increased insulin resistance than women, and physically inactive men seem to be at high risk. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. Hypertriglyceridemia: Is there a role for prophylactic apheresis? A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Francisco

    Full Text Available Abstract Severe hypertriglyceridemia has been consistently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and other complications, namely acute pancreatitis. We report a case of a 64 year-old woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and metabolic syndrome with triglyceride level of 3260 mg/dL. Plasma exchange was performed with simultaneous medical treatment to achieve a rapid and effective lowering of triglycerides in order to prevent clinical complications. After three plasmapheresis sessions a marked reduction in triglyceride and total cholesterol levels was observed. Several cases have shown the importance of plasmapheresis in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. We intend to demonstrate the applicability of this technique as primary prophylaxis in the presence of extremely high serum triglyceridemia levels.

  14. An insulin resistance associated neural correlate of impulsivity in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstrand, Kristen L.; Mummareddy, Nishit; Kang, Hakmook; Cowan, Ronald; Zhou, Minchun; Zald, David; Silver, Heidi J.; Niswender, Kevin D.; Avison, Malcolm J.

    2017-01-01

    Central insulin resistance (IR) influences striatal dopamine (DA) tone, an important determinant of behavioral self-regulation. We hypothesized that an association exists between the degree of peripheral IR and impulse control, mediated by the impact of IR on brain circuits controlling the speed of executing “go” and/or “stop” responses. We measured brain activation and associated performance on a stop signal task (SST) in obese adults with type 2 diabetes (age, 48.1 ± 6.9 yrs (mean ± SD); BMI, 36.5 ± 4.0 kg/m2; HOMA-IR, 7.2 ± 4.1; 12 male, 18 female). Increasing IR, but not BMI, was a predictor of shorter critical stop signal delay (cSSD), a measure of the time window during which a go response can be successfully countermanded (R2 = 0.12). This decline was explained by an IR-associated increase in go speed (R2 = 0.13) with little impact of IR or BMI on stop speed. Greater striatal fMRI activation contrast in stop error (SE) compared with stop success (SS) trials (CONSE>SS) was a significant predictor of faster go speeds (R2 = 0.33, p = 0.002), and was itself predicted by greater IR (CONSE>SS vs HOMA-IR: R2 = 0.10, p = 0.04). Furthermore, this impact of IR on striatal activation was a significant mediator of the faster go speeds and greater impulsivity observed with greater IR. These findings suggest a neural mechanism by which IR may increase impulsivity and degrade behavioral self-regulation. PMID:29228027

  15. Organic Nitrates and Nitrate Resistance in Diabetes: The Role of Vascular Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress with Emphasis on Antioxidant Properties of Pentaerithrityl Tetranitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Oelze

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic nitrates represent a class of drugs which are clinically used for treatment of ischemic symptoms of angina as well as for congestive heart failure based on the idea to overcome the impaired NO bioavailability by “NO” replacement therapy. The present paper is focused on parallels between diabetes mellitus and nitrate tolerance, and aims to discuss the mechanisms underlying nitrate resistance in the setting of diabetes. Since oxidative stress was identified as an important factor in the development of tolerance to organic nitrates, but also represents a hallmark of diabetic complications, this may represent a common principle for both disorders where therapeutic intervention should start. This paper examines the evidence supporting the hypothesis that pentaerithrityl tetranitrate may represent a nitrate for treatment of ischemia in diabetic patients. This evidence is based on the considerations of parallels between diabetes mellitus and nitrate tolerance as well as on preliminary data from experimental diabetes studies.

  16. Relationship of Soluble RAGE with Insulin Resistance and Beta Cell Function during Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Subrata Kumar; Mohtarin, Sabreena; Mudi, Sonchita Rani; Anwar, Taznuva; Banu, Laila Anjuman; Alam, Sheikh Md Khorshed; Fariduddin, Md; Arslan, M Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether circulating levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) alter in prediabetes and correlate with insulin resistance (IR) and beta cell function in prediabetes and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Subjects without previous history of diabetes were recruited and grouped as control, prediabetes, and newly diagnosed T2DM. The control subjects (n = 40) and people with prediabetes (n = 52) and diabetes (n = 66) were similar in terms of age, sex, BMI, systolic and diastolic BP, and fasting insulin level. HOMA-IR was found significantly higher in people with diabetes than control subjects (p alteration in people with prediabetes compared to control subjects. Moreover, univariate and multivariate analyses did not identify any significant correlation and statistical association of sRAGE with HOMA-IR and HOMA-%B in people with prediabetes and newly diagnosed T2DM. Our data suggest that serum sRAGE levels do not alter in people with prediabetes compared to control subjects and do not correlate or associate with IR and beta cell function during development of T2DM.

  17. Adherence to the DASH Diet is inversely associated with incidence of type 2 diabetes: the insulin resistance atherosclerosis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Angela D; Nichols, Michele; Sun, Xuezheng; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Haffner, Steven M

    2009-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet has been widely promoted; however, little is known about its impact on type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We evaluated the association of the DASH diet with incidence of type 2 diabetes among 862 participants of the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study (IRAS) who completed a 1-year food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Type 2 diabetes odds ratios (ORs) were estimated at tertiles of the DASH score. RESULTS An inverse association was observed in whites (tertile 2 vs. tertile 1, OR 0.66 [95% CI 0.29-1.48]) that became significant for the most extreme contrast (tertile 3 vs. tertile 1, 0.31 [0.13-0.75]), with adjustment for covariates. No association was observed in blacks or Hispanics (tertile 2 vs. tertile 1, 1.16 [0.61-2.18 ]; tertile 3 vs. tertile 1, 1.34 [0.70-2.58 ]). CONCLUSIONS Adherence to the DASH dietary pattern, which is rich in vegetables, fruit, and low-fat dairy products, may have the potential to prevent type 2 diabetes.

  18. Swimming training alleviated insulin resistance through Wnt3a/β-catenin signaling in type 2 diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Increasing evidence suggests that regular physical exercise improves type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. However, the potential beneficial effects of swimming on insulin resistance and lipid disorder in T2DM, and its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Materials and Methods: Rats were fed with high fat diet and given a low dosage of Streptozotocin (STZ to induce T2DM model, and subsequently treated with or without swimming exercise. An 8-week swimming program (30, 60 or 120 min per day, 5 days per week decreased body weight, fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin. Results: Swimming ameliorated lipid disorder, improved muscular atrophy and revealed a reduced glycogen deposit in skeletal muscles of diabetic rats. Furthermore, swimming also inhibited the activation of Wnt3a/β-catenin signaling pathway, decreased Wnt3a mRNA and protein level, upregulated GSK3β phosphorylation activity and reduced the expression of β-catenin phosphorylation in diabetic rats. Conclusion: The trend of the result suggests that swimming exercise proved to be a potent ameliorator of insulin resistancein T2DM through the modulation of Wnt3a/β-catenin pathway and therefore, could present a promising therapeutic measure towards the treatment of diabetes and its relatives.

  19. Visceral adipose tissue is more strongly associated with insulin resistance than subcutaneous adipose tissue in Chinese subjects with pre-diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Feng, Jitao; Zhang, Gong; Yuan, Xiaodan; Li, Fan; Yang, Tingting; Hao, Shujie; Huang, Dejian; Hsue, Cunyi; Lou, Qinging

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the value of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in a cohort of a community's residents who were diagnosed as pre-diabetes, and to evaluate the association of VAT and SAT with insulin resistance. This study was based on cross-sectional analysis of data from 107 adults. VAT and SAT were assessed by computed tomography. Insulin resistance was defined by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance >2.69. The relationship of VAT and SAT with insulin resistance were examined by linear regression. Logistic regression was used to analyze the association of VAT and SAT with insulin resistance. A total of 87 subjects had VAT ≥100 cm 2 . Thirty-six out of 107 (33.6%) subjects were detected to have insulin resistance, 71 were normal (66.4%), and all had insulin resistance with VAT ≥100 cm 2 . VAT (r = 0.378, p VAT and SAT were simultaneously included after adjustment for age, gender, BMI, and WC, the association between VAT and insulin resistance was still maintained (p = .003), but that of SAT was lost. Pre-diabetic subjects with insulin resistance had elevated levels of VAT. VAT was more strongly associated with insulin resistance than SAT in Chinese subjects with pre-diabetes.

  20. What I Need to Know about Gestational Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes? Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance Gestational Diabetes Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Tests & Diagnosis Management & Treatment Prevention After Your Baby is Born Monogenic ...

  1. Role of reduced insulin-stimulated bone blood flow in the pathogenesis of metabolic insulin resistance and diabetic bone fragility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Pamela S

    2016-08-01

    Worldwide, 387 million adults live with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and an additional 205 million cases are projected by 2035. Because T2D has numerous complications, there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. Identification of early events in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and T2D might lead to more effective treatments that would mitigate health and monetary costs. Here, we present our hypothesis that impaired bone blood flow is an early event in the pathogenesis of whole-body metabolic insulin resistance that ultimately leads to T2D. Two recent developments in different fields form the basis for this hypothesis. First, reduced vascular function has been identified as an early event in the development of T2D. In particular, before the onset of tissue or whole body metabolic insulin resistance, insulin-stimulated, endothelium-mediated skeletal muscle blood flow is impaired. Insulin resistance of the vascular endothelium reduces delivery of insulin and glucose to skeletal muscle, which leads to tissue and whole-body metabolic insulin resistance. Second is the paradigm-shifting discovery that the skeleton has an endocrine function that is essential for maintenance of whole-body glucose homeostasis. Specifically, in response to insulin signaling, osteoblasts secret osteocalcin, which stimulates pancreatic insulin production and enhances insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle, adipose, and liver. Furthermore, the skeleton is not metabolically inert, but contributes to whole-body glucose utilization, consuming 20% that of skeletal muscle and 50% that of white adipose tissue. Without insulin signaling or without osteocalcin activity, experimental animals become hyperglycemic and insulin resistant. Currently, it is not known if insulin-stimulated, endothelium-mediated blood flow to bone plays a role in the development of whole body metabolic insulin resistance. We hypothesize that it is a key, early event. Microvascular dysfunction is a

  2. The p53 codon 72 (Arg72Pro) polymorphism is associated with the degree of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic subjects: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfigli, Anna Rita; Sirolla, Cristina; Testa, Roberto; Cucchi, Michela; Spazzafumo, Liana; Salvioli, Stefano; Ceriello, Antonio; Olivieri, Fabiola; Festa, Roberto; Procopio, Antonio Domenico; Brandoni, Gabriele; Boemi, Massimo; Marra, Maurizio; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-06-01

    Tumor suppressor protein p53 has been demonstrated to regulate genes involved in energy generating metabolic pathways and apoptosis. To date, a new field of research is the involvement of TP53 codon 72 (Arg72Pro) polymorphism in the diabetic disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the genotype and the related genetic models of Arg72Pro polymorphism of TP53 (rs1042522) are associated with insulin resistance and its metabolic parameters in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. We examined 335 type 2 diabetic patients (65.5 ± 8.4 years) and 367 non-diabetic subjects (60.5 ± 11.7 years). The results were validated in a validation sample consisting of 199 type 2 diabetic (66.2 ± 8.5 years) and 224 non-diabetic subjects (61.2 ± 12.7 years). In the study sample, the analysis of covariance, adjusted for the effects of age, gender and BMI, showed a significant genotype-diabetes effect on insulin resistance evaluated by HOMA-IR (p = 0.038). This result was mediated by variations in fasting plasma insulin (p = 0.027), as no TP53 genotype-diabetes effects were detected for fasting plasma glucose. In particular, in the diabetic subjects, Pro/Pro genotype was associated with lower values of HOMA-IR with respect to Arg/Arg (p = 0.013) and Arg/Pro (p = 0.006) carriers. No difference in HOMA-IR between diabetic and non-diabetic Pro/Pro carriers was found. Significant recessive model-diabetes interaction effects on fasting insulin and HOMA-IR adjusted for age, sex and BMI were found (p = 0.007 and p = 0.029, respectively). Linear regression analyses, based on the assumption of an additive genetic model adjusted for age, sex and BMI, highlight p53 gene-diabetes interaction effects on fasting insulin (β = -1.27; p = 0.001) and HOMA-IR (β = -0.22; p = 0.006). The results of statistical analyses on fasting insulin and HOMA-IR were all confirmed in the validation sample. Furthermore, the logistic regression models confirmed that the effect of HOMA-IR levels on diabetes

  3. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Associated Metabolic Risks of Hypertension in Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Community-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms facilitating hypertension in diabetes still remain to be elucidated. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, which is a higher risk factor for insulin resistance, shares many predisposing factors with diabetes. However, little work has been performed on the pathogenesis of hypertension in type 2 diabetes (T2DM with NAFLD. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of hypertension in different glycemic statuses and to analyze relationships between NAFLD, metabolic risks, and hypertension within a large community-based population after informed written consent. A total of 9473 subjects aged over 45 years, including 1648 patients with T2DM, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Clinical and biochemical parameters of all participants were determined. The results suggested that the patients with prediabetes or T2DM were with higher risks to have hypertension. T2DM with NAFLD had significantly higher levels of blood pressure, triglyceride, uric acid, and HOMA-IR than those without NAFLD. Data analyses suggested that hypertriglyceridemia [OR = 1.773 (1.396, 2.251], NAFLD [OR = 2.344 (1.736, 3.165], hyperuricemia [OR = 1.474 (1.079, 2.012], and insulin resistance [OR = 1.948 (1.540, 2.465] were associated with the higher prevalence of hypertension independent of other metabolic risk factors in type 2 diabetes. Further studies are needed to focus on these associations.

  4. Use of maggot therapy for treating a diabetic foot ulcer colonized by multidrug resistant bacteria in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Marilia A R Q; Ferraz, Julianny B; Junior, Miguel A A; Moura, Andrew D; da Costa, Maria E S M; Costa, Fagner J M D; Neto, Valter F A; Neto, Renato M; Gama, Renata A

    2015-03-01

    This study reports the efficacy of maggot therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer infected with multidrug resistant microorganisms. A 74 year old female patient with diabetes for over 30 years, was treated with maggot therapy using larvae of Chrysomya megacephala. The microbiological samples were collected to evaluate aetiology of the infection. The therapy done for 43 days resulted in a reduction of necrosis and the ulcer's retraction of 0.7 cm [2] in area. Analysis of the bacteriological swabs revealed the presence of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Further studies need to be done to confirm the role of maggot therapy in wound healing using a large sample and a proper study design.

  5. Use of maggot therapy for treating a diabetic foot ulcer colonized by multidrug resistant bacteria in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia A.R.Q. Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the efficacy of maggot therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer infected with multidrug resistant microorganisms. A 74 year old female patient with diabetes for over 30 years, was treated with maggot therapy using larvae of Chrysomya megacephala. The microbiological samples were collected to evaluate aetiology of the infection. The therapy done for 43 days resulted in a reduction of necrosis and the ulcer′s retraction of 0.7 cm [2] in area. Analysis of the bacteriological swabs revealed the presence of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Further studies need to be done to confirm the role of maggot therapy in wound healing using a large sample and a proper study design.

  6. THE ROLE OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN THE PRIMARY PREVENTION OF TYPE 2 DIABETES VIA THE AMELIORATION OF INSULIN RESISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ash C. Routen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is the most common endocrine disease in our society, affecting around 5% of Western populations, whilst showing a steady rise in prevalence. The complications that arise from the disease are known to cause morbidity and mortality, and are associated with long-term damage, dysfunction, and failure of variousorgans. These complications include atherosclerosis in the micro and macro vasculature, kidney dysfunction, nerve problems, hypertension; and eye problems such as retinopathy. Epidemiological evidence suggests regular physical activity improves insulin sensitivity. This review presents the case for physical activity as a tool ofprimary prevention, in the population of non-diabetics and high risk individuals (IFG & IGT, in reference to obesity related insulin resistance. Cross-sectional, prospective cohort and randomised control trials clearly show that moderate-intensity physical activity can improve insulin sensitivity; this can be improved further byundertaking vigorous-intensity physical activity.

  7. Ketosis Onset Type 2 Diabetes Had Better Islet β-Cell Function and More Serious Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongyun; Hu, Fang; Zeng, Yingjuan; Zou, Lingling; Luo, Shunkui; Sun, Ying; Liu, Hong; Sun, Liao

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic ketosis had been identified as a characteristic of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but now emerging evidence has identified that they were diagnosed as T2DM after long time follow up. This case control study was aimed at comparing the clinical characteristic, β-cell function, and insulin resistance of ketosis and nonketotic onset T2DM and providing evidence for treatment selection. 140 cases of newly diagnosed T2DM patients were divided into ketosis (62 cases) and nonketotic onset group (78 cases). After correction of hyperglycemia and ketosis with insulin therapy, plasma C-peptide concentrations were measured at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 hours after 75 g glucose oral administration. Area under the curve (AUC) of C-peptide was calculated. Homoeostasis model assessment was used to estimate basal β-cell function (HOMA-β) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Our results showed that ketosis onset group had higher prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) than nonketotic group (P = 0.04). Ketosis onset group had increased plasma C-peptide levels at 0 h, 0.5 h, and 3 h and higher AUC0–0.5, AUC0–1, AUC0–3 (P ketosis onset T2DM had better islet β-cell function and more serious insulin resistance than nonketotic onset T2DM. PMID:24829925

  8. A study of the pancreatic islet β-cell function and insulin resistance of type2 diabetic gastroparesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Gang; Shao Hao; Lu Zeyuan; Ding Yuzhen; Chen Guanrong; Fu Juan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the pancreatic islet β-cell function and insulin resistance of diabetic gastroparesis (DGP). Methods: 31 subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 32 subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), 38 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and 31 subjects with DGP were en-rolled in the study, assessed by steamed bread meal tests, the plasma glucose and insulin at 0, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min were respectively measured by using glucose oxidase and radioimmunoassay, investigate the changes of area under insulin cure (INSAUC), Homa-insulin resistance (Homa-IR) index and modified β-cell function index (MBCI). Results: The INSAUC of IGT, T2DM, NGT and DGP fell in turn, there were signif-icantly differences among the groups. The Homa-IR index of NGT, IGT, DGP and T2DM rose in turn, there were significantly differences among the groupsexcept between T2DM and DGP. Conclusions: The pancreatic islet β-cell function of DGP was worse that NGT, IGT and T2DM, and the insulin resistance was stronger than NGT and IGT. (authors)

  9. Nutritional correlates and dynamics of diabetes in the Nile rat (Arvicanthis niloticus: a novel model for diet-induced type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maslova Ekaterina

    2010-04-01

    , whereas blood glucose and the perirenal fat pad, as well as liver and kidney weight, were positively related to early-onset diabetes. Rats weaned early (4-5 wks and challenged with a high-fat Western-type diet developed diabetes faster, and body fat accumulation was more apparent, whereas food restriction curtailed it. Conclusion The Nile rat fed typical rodent diets develops hyperinsulinemia that precedes hyperglycemia (insulin resistance leading to diet-induced type 2 diabetes associated with hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension. Dietary modulation affected growth rate (weight gain and central adiposity to impact disease progression. This rodent model represents a novel system of gene-diet interactions affecting energy utilization that can provide insight into the prevention and treatment of the type 2 diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome.

  10. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, a viscous soluble fiber, reduces insulin resistance and decreases fatty liver in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brockman David A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diets producing a high glycemic response result in exaggerated insulin secretion which induces hepatic lipogenesis, contributing to development of insulin resistance and fatty liver. Viscous dietary fibers blunt the postprandial rise in blood glucose, however their effect on type 2 diabetes and obesity are not entirely known. This study examined the effect of chronic consumption of the viscous, non-fermentable dietary fiber, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC, on glucose control, insulin resistance and liver lipids in an obese diabetic rat model. Methods Three groups of Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF rats were fed diets containing either 5% non-viscous cellulose (control, low viscosity HPMC (LV-HPMC or high viscosity HPMC (HV- HPMC for six weeks. Zucker lean littermates consuming cellulose served as a negative control. Markers of glucose control, including oral glucose tolerance test, glycated hemoglobin and urinary glucose, were measured as well as adiposity and the accumulation of liver lipids. Results The HPMC diets increased the viscosity of the small intestinal contents and reduced the postprandial rise in blood glucose. The food efficiency ratio was greater with HPMC feeding compared to the obese control and urinary excretion of glucose and ketone bodies was reduced. The two HPMC groups had lower glycated hemoglobin and kidney weights and a reduced area under the curve during a glucose tolerance test, indicating improved glucose control. Epididymal fat pad weight as percent of body weight was reduced in the HV-HPMC group compared to the obese control group. The HV-HPMC group also had lower concentrations of liver lipid and cholesterol and reduced liver weight. However, HV-HPMC feeding did not affect hepatic gene expression of SREBP-1c or FAS. Muscle concentration of acylcarnitines, a lipid intermediate in fatty acid β-oxidation, was not different between the HPMC groups and obese control, suggesting no change in muscle

  11. Supplementation with Glucosamine Has no Adverse Effects on Glycemic Level and Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Mazloom

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of glucosamine as an alternative treatment for osteoarthritis is becoming more frequent, including in those who have diabetes at the same time. The results from in vitro and animal studies propose that glucosamine may inversely affect glucose metabolism. However, the recommended dose of oral glucosamine in healthy people or diabetics did not have such effects consistently. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of glucosamine on glycemic control and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: Fifty-four patients with type 2 diabetes participated in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The participants were assigned to receive 1500 mg glucosamine hydrochloride or placebo for 12 weeks. After determining their baseline characteristics, body mass index and dietary intake components, fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin were measured at weeks of 0, 8, and 12. Indices of insulin function including quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR were calculated by specific formulas. Independent t-test and general linear model repeated measures were used to analyze the data. Results: In the glucosamine group, the means of fasting blood glucose and insulin were 107.31±24.07 mg/dl and 8.75±4.37 μu/ ml, respectively at baseline, which reached 112.38±31.50 and 9.10±4.17 at week 12. In the placebo group, the mean for fasting blood glucose and insulin were 103.84±24.15 and 9.79±4.02 at the beginning of the study, which reached to 111.40±26.43 and 8.58±3.68 at week 12. The results showed that there were no significant differences in fasting blood glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR and QUICKI indices at all the studied time points (weeks of 0, 8 and 12 within or between the groups. Conclusion: Twelve weeks of a normal recommended dose of glucosamine supplements may not have adverse effects on glycemic control and insulin

  12. Management of obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in children: consensus and controversy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Fleischman

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Amy Fleischman, Erinn T RhodesDivision of Endocrinology, Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, United StatesAbstract: Childhood obesity has become a national and international epidemic. The prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes in youth have been increasing, and type 2 diabetes is one of the most challenging complications of obesity in childhood. Comprehensive lifestyle interventions that include attention to dietary change, increased physical activity and behavior change appear to be required for the successful treatment of pediatric obesity. In particular, aspects of behavioral interventions that have been identified as contributing to effectiveness have included intensity, parent/family participation, addressing healthy dietary change, promoting physical activity, and involving behavioral management principles such as goal setting. A multidisciplinary team approach is required for successful management of type 2 diabetes in youth as well. As with many therapies in pediatrics, clinical trials and support for treatments of obesity and type 2 diabetes in youth lag behind adult data. Pediatric recommendations may be extrapolated from adult data and are often based on consensus guidelines. Type 2 diabetes in children is most commonly managed with lifestyle modification and medications, metformin and/or insulin, the only medications currently approved for use in children. However, many opportunities exist for ongoing research to clarify optimal management for obesity and type 2 diabetes in youth.Keywords: children, obesity, type 2 diabetes, metformin, insulin, bariatric surgery

  13. Methylglyoxal, A Metabolite Increased in Diabetes is Associated with Insulin Resistance, Vascular Dysfunction and Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsaldeen, Yousif A; Mackenzie, Louise S; Lione, Lisa A; Benham, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a pandemic metabolic disease characterized by a chronically elevated blood glucose concentration (hyperglycemia) due to insulin dysfunction. Approximately 50% of diabetics show diabetes complications by the time they are diagnosed. Vascular dysfunction, nephropathy and neuropathic pain are common diabetes complications. Chronic hyperglycemia contributes to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation such as methylglyoxal (MGO). Peer reviewed research papers were studied through bibliographic databases searching focused on review questions and inclusion/exclusion criteria. The reviewed papers were appraised according to the searching focus. The characteristics of screened papers were described, and a deductive qualitative content analysis methodology was applied to the included studies using a conceptual framework to yield this comprehensive systematic review. Sixty-six papers were included in this review. Eleven papers related methylglyoxal generation to carbohydrates metabolism, ten papers related lipid metabolism to methylglyoxal and 5 papers showed the proteolytic pathways that contribute to methylglyoxal generation. Methylglyoxal metabolism was derived from 7 papers. Descriptive figure 1 was drawn to explain methylglyoxal sources and how diabetes increases methylglyoxal generation. Furthermore, twenty-six papers related methylglyoxal to diabetes complications from which 9 papers showed methylglyoxal ability to induce insulin dysfunction, an effect which was described in schematic figure 2. Additionally, fifteen papers revealed methylglyoxal contribution to vascular dysfunction and 3 papers showed methylglyoxal to cause neuropathic pain. Methylglyoxal-induced vascular dysfunction was drawn in a comprehensive figure 3. This review correlated methylglyoxal with diabetes and diabetes complications which were summarised in table 1. The findings of this review suggesting methylglyoxal as an essential therapeutic target for managing diabetes in

  14. Sympathetic reflex control of resistance in collateral arteries in the lower extremities in patients with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, K; Tønnesen, K H

    1982-01-01

    The vascular response in the lower extremities to 40 degrees head-up tilt was studied in 5 patients with occlusion of the superficial femoral artery and maturity onset diabetes mellitus with symptoms suggesting autonomic neuropathy. The pressure measurements were performed via catheters placed...... in the brachial artery, femoral artery and vein and popliteal artery and vein. Relative blood flow was calculated as the relative change in arterio-venous oxygen saturation. Absolute blood flow in the common femoral artery was measured by an indicator dilution technique. Resistance of the collateral arteries...

  15. A simple way to identify insulin resistance in non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome patients with impaired fasting glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayantan Ray

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD is increasing in India. Recent data suggesting insulin resistance can predict cardiovascular disease independently of the other risk factors, such as hypertension, visceral obesity, or dyslipidemia, so a focus on the relation between acute coronary syndrome (ACS and insulin resistance is relevant. Several studies addressing serum lipoprotein ratios as surrogates for insulin resistance have found promising results. We analyzed the association of lipoprotein ratios with the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. Methods: One hundred non-diabetic patients with impaired fasting glucose admitted with a diagnosis of ACS were included in the study. Admission fasting glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. The HOMA-IR was used to calculate insulin resistance. The fasting serum total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C levels are used to calculate following lipid ratios: TC/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C. The areas under the curves (AUC of the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC were used to compare the power of these serum lipoprotein ratio markers. Results: Lipoprotein ratios were significantly higher in patients with HOMA Index >2 as compared to patients with Index <2. TG/HDL-C ratio and TC/HDL-C ratio were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR (P < 0.05 as obtained by Pearson′s correlation analysis (r = 0.4459, P = 0.0012; r = 0.4815, P = 0.0004; r = 0.3993; P = 0.0041, respectively. The area under the ROC curve of the TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratios for predicting insulin resistance was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67-0.93, 0.78 (95% CI, 0.65-0.91, respectively. Conclusion: A plasma TG/HDL-C ratio and TC/HDL-C ratio provide a simple means of identifying insulin resistant and can be used as the markers of insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases risk in adult non-diabetic patients.

  16. Role of patient factors in therapy resistance to antiproteinuric intervention in nondiabetic and diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bos, H; Andersen, S; Rossing, P

    2000-01-01

    Reduction of proteinuria is a prerequisite for successful long-term renoprotection. To investigate whether individual patient factors are determinants of antiproteinuric efficacy, we analyzed individual responses to different modes of antiproteinuric intervention in nondiabetic and diabetic...... patients, obtained in prior studies comparing the efficacy of various pharmacological regimens. The individual antiproteinuric response to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition positively correlated to the response to angiotensin type I (AT1) receptor blockade in diabetic (r = 0.67, P ... = 16) as well as nondiabetic patients (r = 0.75, P 1 receptor blockade in diabetic (r = 0.73, P

  17. Risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus : Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Resistance and Primary Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Hydrie, Muhammad Zafar Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of the study was to identify the extent of metabolic syndrome on the basis of ATP III and IDF definition in subjects aged 25 years and above from an urban population of Karachi. Also to see the association of risk factors related to diabetes and metabolic syndrome in this population. And finally to prove the hypothesis of intervention effect on the onset of type 2 diabetes in a high risk urban population and evaluate the rate of conversion of IGT to diabetes by these interve...

  18. Diabetes and pre-diabetes are associated with cardiovascular risk factors and carotid/femoral intima-media thickness independently of markers of insulin resistance and adiposity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paccaud Fred

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impaired glucose regulation (IGR is associated with detrimental cardiovascular outcomes such as cardiovascular disease risk factors (CVD risk factors or intima-media thickness (IMT. Our aim was to examine whether these associations are mediated by body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (waist or fasting serum insulin (insulin in a population in the African region. Methods Major CVD risk factors (systolic blood pressure, smoking, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, were measured in a random sample of adults aged 25–64 in the Seychelles (n = 1255, participation rate: 80.2%. According to the criteria of the American Diabetes Association, IGR was divided in four ordered categories: 1 normal fasting glucose (NFG, 2 impaired fasting glucose (IFG and normal glucose tolerance (IFG/NGT, 3 IFG and impaired glucose tolerance (IFG/IGT, and 4 diabetes mellitus (DM. Carotid and femoral IMT was assessed by ultrasound (n = 496. Results Age-adjusted levels of the major CVD risk factors worsened gradually across IGR categories (NFG Conclusion We found graded relationships between IGR categories and both major CVD risk factors and carotid/femoral IMT. These relationships were only partly accounted for by BMI, waist and insulin. This suggests that increased CVD-risk associated with IGR is also mediated by factors other than the considered markers of adiposity and insulin resistance. The results also imply that IGR and associated major CVD risk factors should be systematically screened and appropriately managed.

  19. Management of obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in children: consensus and controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Amy; Rhodes, Erinn T

    2009-11-27

    Childhood obesity has become a national and international epidemic. The prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes in youth have been increasing, and type 2 diabetes is one of the most challenging complications of obesity in childhood. Comprehensive lifestyle interventions that include attention to dietary change, increased physical activity and behavior change appear to be required for the successful treatment of pediatric obesity. In particular, aspects of behavioral interventions that have been identified as contributing to effectiveness have included intensity, parent/family participation, addressing healthy dietary change, promoting physical activity, and involving behavioral management principles such as goal setting. A multidisciplinary team approach is required for successful management of type 2 diabetes in youth as well. As with many therapies in pediatrics, clinical trials and support for treatments of obesity and type 2 diabetes in youth lag behind adult data. Pediatric recommendations may be extrapolated from adult data and are often based on consensus guidelines. Type 2 diabetes in children is most commonly managed with lifestyle modification and medications, metformin and/or insulin, the only medications currently approved for use in children. However, many opportunities exist for ongoing research to clarify optimal management for obesity and type 2 diabetes in youth.

  20. Co-therapy using lytic bacteriophage and linezolid: effective treatment in eliminating methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA from diabetic foot infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Chhibber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus remains the predominant pathogen in diabetic foot infections and prevalence of methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA strains further complicates the situation. The incidence of MRSA in infected foot ulcers is 15-30% and there is an alarming trend for its increase in many countries. Diabetes acts as an immunosuppressive state decreasing the overall immune functioning of body and to worsen the situation, wounds inflicted with drug resistant strains represent a morbid combination in diabetic patients. Foot infections caused by MRSA are associated with an increased risk of amputations, increased hospital stay, increased expenses and higher infection-related mortality. Hence, newer, safer and effective treatment strategies are required for treating MRSA mediated diabetic foot infections. The present study focuses on the use of lytic bacteriophage in combination with linezolid as an effective treatment strategy against foot infection in diabetic population. METHODOLOGY: Acute hindpaw infection with S.aureus ATCC 43300 was established in alloxan induced diabetic BALB/c mice. Therapeutic efficacy of a well characterized broad host range lytic bacteriophage, MR-10 was evaluated alone as well as in combination with linezolid in resolving the course of hindpaw foot infection in diabetic mice. The process of wound healing was also investigated. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A single administration of phage exhibited efficacy similar to linezolid in resolving the course of hindpaw infection in diabetic animals. However, combination therapy using both the agents was much more effective in arresting the entire infection process (bacterial load, lesion score, foot myeloperoxidase activity and histopathological analysis. The entire process of tissue healing was also hastened. Use of combined agents has been known to decrease the frequency of emergence of resistant mutants, hence this approach can serve as an effective strategy in

  1. Significant association of TREM-1 with HMGB1, TLRs and RAGE in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in obese diabetic populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Saravanan; Pallati, Pradeep K; Sharma, Poonam; Agrawal, Devendra K; Nandipati, Kalyana C

    2017-01-01

    Activated cell surface and intracellular receptors lead to insulin resistance in obesity. Among these receptors, triggering receptors expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1, toll like receptors (TLRs), and receptors for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) play a significant role in the induction of inflammatory response in innate immunity. TREM-1 potentially amplifies TLRs and RAGE synergistically with DNA-binding high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1). The objective of the study was to analyze the association between TREM-1/DAP12 and HMGB-1, RAGE and TLRs in obesity-induced insulin resistance. We examined the mRNA expression by RT-PCR and protein expression by Western blotting and immunofluorescence for TREM-1, TREM-2, DAP-12, HMGB-1, RAGE, TLR-4 and TLR-2 in omentum, subcutaneous and liver biopsy tissues of obese diabetic (n=22) and non-diabetic subjects (n=24) and compared with the non-obese non-diabetic controls (n=5). There was a significantly increased expression of TREM-1, DAP-12, HMGB-1, RAGE, TLR-4 and TLR-2 and decreased expression of TREM-2 in the omentum, subcutaneous and liver biopsy of obese diabetic subjects compared to obese non-diabetics and the non-obese population. Overall, obese diabetic subjects had high expression of TREM-1 in association with HMGB1 (100% vs 58.3%, P=0.003), RAGE (77.3% vs 41.7%, P=0.045), TLR4 (100% vs 58.3%, P=0.003), and TLR2 (100% vs 50%, P=0.003) in liver biopsy samples in comparison to obese non-diabetic subjects. Obese diabetics have significantly increased TREM-1, HMGB1, RAGE, and TLRs compared to obese non-diabetics. Our findings suggest a potential pathophysiological role of TREM-1 in conjunction with HMGB1 and inflammatory cell receptors (RAGE, TLR-4 and TLR-2) in obesity-induced insulin resistance.

  2. Co-therapy using lytic bacteriophage and linezolid: effective treatment in eliminating methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from diabetic foot infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhibber, Sanjay; Kaur, Tarsem; Sandeep Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus remains the predominant pathogen in diabetic foot infections and prevalence of methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA) strains further complicates the situation. The incidence of MRSA in infected foot ulcers is 15-30% and there is an alarming trend for its increase in many countries. Diabetes acts as an immunosuppressive state decreasing the overall immune functioning of body and to worsen the situation, wounds inflicted with drug resistant strains represent a morbid combination in diabetic patients. Foot infections caused by MRSA are associated with an increased risk of amputations, increased hospital stay, increased expenses and higher infection-related mortality. Hence, newer, safer and effective treatment strategies are required for treating MRSA mediated diabetic foot infections. The present study focuses on the use of lytic bacteriophage in combination with linezolid as an effective treatment strategy against foot infection in diabetic population. Acute hindpaw infection with S.aureus ATCC 43300 was established in alloxan induced diabetic BALB/c mice. Therapeutic efficacy of a well characterized broad host range lytic bacteriophage, MR-10 was evaluated alone as well as in combination with linezolid in resolving the course of hindpaw foot infection in diabetic mice. The process of wound healing was also investigated. A single administration of phage exhibited efficacy similar to linezolid in resolving the course of hindpaw infection in diabetic animals. However, combination therapy using both the agents was much more effective in arresting the entire infection process (bacterial load, lesion score, foot myeloperoxidase activity and histopathological analysis). The entire process of tissue healing was also hastened. Use of combined agents has been known to decrease the frequency of emergence of resistant mutants, hence this approach can serve as an effective strategy in treating MRSA mediated foot infections in diabetic individuals who do

  3. Resistance exercise training increases lower limb speed of strength generation during stair ascent and descent in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handsaker, J C; Brown, S J; Bowling, F L; Maganaris, C N; Boulton, A J M; Reeves, N D

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effects of a 16-week resistance exercise training intervention on the speed of ankle and knee strength generation during stair ascent and descent, in people with neuropathy. A total of 43 people: nine with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, 13 with diabetes but no neuropathy and 21 healthy control subjects ascended and descended a custom-built staircase. The speed at which ankle and knee strength were generated, and muscle activation patterns of the ankle and knee extensor muscles were analysed before and after a 16-week intervention period. Ankle and knee strength generation during both stair ascent and descent were significantly higher after the intervention than before the intervention in the people with diabetes who undertook the resistance exercise intervention (P strength generation observed after the intervention would be expected to improve stability during the crucial weight acceptance phase of stair ascent and descent, and ultimately contribute towards reducing the risk of falling. Improvements in muscle strength as a result of the resistance exercise training intervention are likely to be the most influential factor for increasing the speed of strength generation. It is recommended that these exercises could be incorporated into a multi-faceted exercise programme to improve safety in people with diabetes and neuropathy. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  4. Effects of the use of assisted reproductive technologies and an obesogenic environment on resistance artery function and diabetes biomarkers in mice offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco I Ramirez-Perez

    Full Text Available Maternal obesity affects the incidence of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in offspring. Also the use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART has been associated with cardiovascular deficiencies in offspring. Obese women often suffer from infertility and use ART to achieve a pregnancy, but the combined effects of maternal obesity and ART on cardiovascular health and incidence of diabetes in the offspring is not known. Here, we report the effects of the use of ART within an obesogenic environment, consisting of feeding a western diet (WD to dams and offspring, on resistance artery function and presence of diabetes biomarkers in juvenile mice offspring. Our results indicate that WD and ART interacted to induce endothelial dysfunction in mesenteric resistance arteries isolated from 7-week-old mice offspring. This was determined by presence of a reduced acetylcholine-induced dilation compared to controls. The arteries from these WD-ART mice also had greater wall cross-sectional areas and wall to lumen ratios indicative of vascular hypertrophic remodeling. Of the diabetes biomarkers measured, only resistin was affected by a WD×ART interaction. Serum resistin was significantly greater in WD-ART offspring compared to controls. Diet and sex effects were observed in other diabetes biomarkers. Our conclusion is that in mice the use of ART within an obesogenic environment interacts to favor the development of endothelial dysfunction in the resistance arteries of juvenile offspring, while having marginal effects on diabetes biomarkers.

  5. A step ahead of PPARγ full agonists to PPARγ partial agonists: therapeutic perspectives in the management of diabetic insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigurupati, Sridevi; Dhanaraj, Sokkalingam A; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2015-05-15

    Described since long as a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) regulate the gene expression of proteins involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. PPARs indeed regulate several physiologic processes, including lipid homeostasis, adipogenesis, inflammation, and wound healing. PPARs bind natural or synthetic PPAR ligands can function as cellular sensors to regulate the gene transcription. Dyslipidemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with insulin resistance are treated using agonists of PPARα and PPARγ, respectively. The PPARγ is a key regulator of insulin sensitization and glucose metabolism, and therefore is considered as an imperative pharmacological target to combat diabetic metabolic disease and insulin resistance. Of note, currently available PPARγ full agonists like rosiglitazone display serious adverse effects such as fluid retention/oedema, weight gain, and increased incidence of cardiovascular events. On the other hand, PPARγ partial agonists are being suggested to devoid or having less incidence of these undesirable events, and are under developmental stages. Current research is on the way for the development of novel PPARγ partial agonists with enhanced therapeutic efficacy and reduced adverse effects. This review sheds lights on the current status of development of PPARγ partial agonists, for the management of T2DM, having comparatively less or no adverse effects to that of PPARγ full agonists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Health status of older adults with Type 2 diabetes mellitus after aerobic or resistance training: A randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goh Su-Yen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A prior study showed positive effects of resistance training on health status in individuals with diabetes compared to aerobic or no exercise, the exercise regimens were either different in volume, duration or rate of progression. We aimed to compare the effects of progressive resistance training (PRT or aerobic training (AT of similar volume over an 8-week period on health status (measured using the Short-form 36 Questionnaire in middle aged adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Findings Sixty subjects aged 58 (7 years were randomised to PRT (n = 30 or AT (n = 30. General health and vitality were significantly improved in both groups (mean (SD change scores for PRT were 12.2(11.5 and 10.5(18.2, and for AT, 13.3(19.6 and 10.0(13.1, respectively and exceeded the minimally important difference of 5 points. The PRT group also had improved physical function and mental health status (mean (SD change scores: 9.0(22.6, p Conclusions Both exercise regimens have positive impact on health status that correlated well with clinical improvement in patients with T2DM. PRT may have some additional benefits as there were significant changes in more domains of the SF-36 than that observed for the AT group. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01000519

  7. Higher Risk of Abdominal Obesity, Elevated LDL Cholesterol and Hypertriglyceridemia, but not of Hypertension, in People Living with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelpi, Marco; Afzal, Shoaib; Lundgren, Jens

    2018-01-01

    Background: People living with HIV (PLWH) have lower life expectancy than uninfected individuals, partly explained by excess risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and CVD risk factors. We investigated the association between HIV infection and abdominal obesity, elevated LDL cholesterol (LDL...... and underwent blood pressure, waist-, hip-, weight-, and height-measurements. Non-fasting blood samples were obtained from all participants. We assessed whether HIV was independently associated with abdominal obesity, elevated LDL-C, hypertriglyceridemia and hypertension using logistic regression models...... adjusted for known risk factors. Results: HIV infection was associated with higher risk of abdominal obesity (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.92[1.60-2.30]) for a given BMI, elevated LDL-C (aOR: 1.32[1.09-1.59]), hypertriglyceridemia (aOR 1.76[1.49-2.08]), and lower risk of hypertension (aOR: 0.63[0.54 - 0...

  8. The-1131T > C Polymorphism in the Apolipoprotein A5 Gene is Related to Hypertriglyceridemia in Taiwanese Aborigines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chuan Huang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia, considered to be an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease, is high in Taiwanese aborigines. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of the -1131T > C polymorphism in the apolipoprotein A5 gene on serum triglyceride levels in female Taiwanese aborigines. This was a cross-sectional study, and a total of 316 unrelated female Taiwanese aborigines were genotyped at the -1131T > C polymorphism in apolipoprotein A5 using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Serum triglyceride ≥150 mg/dL was defined as the hypertriglyceridemia group and triglyceride C polymorphism of the Apo A5 gene influences serum triglyceride levels in female Taiwanese aborigines, and that differences exist in the frequency of the C allele among people of various ethnicities.

  9. Relationship between the serum concentrations of C-reactive protein and parameters of adiposity and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Tomoyuki; Nakajima, Atsushi; Yoneda, Masato; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2006-01-01

    Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations have been reported to be associated with body fat, especially visceral fat accumulation, but most studies up to now have been conducted on non-diabetic subjects. In this study, we investigated the association between the serum CRP concentrations and parameters of adiposity and insulin resistance in both Japanese type 2 diabetes patients and non-diabetic subjects. A total of 248 Japanese subjects (140 type 2 diabetes patients and 108 non-diabetic subjects) were enrolled for the study. The degree of insulin resistance was estimated by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-R) method. Fat accumulation was evaluated by measuring visceral and subcutaneous fat areas at the level of the umbilicus in abdominal CT scans. To assess hepatic fat content, the ratio of CT attenuation value of the liver to that of the spleen (L/S ratio) was calculated. Serum CRP was found to be significantly correlated with various indices of adiposity, including L/S ratio, visceral fat area (VFA), subcutaneous fat area (SFA), and HOMA-R, in both the diabetic patients and the non-diabetic subjects. After adjustment for five variables (age, gender, serum CRP, HbAlc, and smoking), serum CRP was still significantly correlated with L/S ratio, VFA, SFA, and HOMA-R in the diabetic patients. We also found that changes in serum CRP concentrations were correlated with changes in the VFA and SFA at 1 year after the baseline in 24 diabetic patients. We conclude that serum CRP may be closely related to the degree of liver steatosis and visceral fat accumulation in Japanese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. (author)

  10. The effect of Punica granatum L. along with aerobic training on resistin, serum adiponectin and insulin resistance in women with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Abdi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Factors secreted from adipocytes, such as resistin and adiponectin can affect peripheral insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Physical activity and pomegranate, which has both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties can affect resistin and adiponectin. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of Punica granatum L. along with aerobic training on serum resistin, adiponectin and insulin resistance in women with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: In this study, 33 diabetic women with type 2 diabetes were selected from Babol city and were randomly divided into four groups (control, P. granatum L., training and P. granatum L.+ training. The training groups participated in an aerobic training for six weeks, three sessions a week (60% to 75% of the reserved heart rate and for 25 to 45 min. The control groups of P. granatum L. and P. granatum L. + training were fed 150 mL of P. granatum L. for six weeks (at about 18 p.m. Two days before and after the protocol, blood samples were taken. Results: The results showed that there was no significant difference in the serum resistin levels among the three experimental groups. Also, the results showed a significant difference between adiponectin levels and insulin resistance in four groups. Conclusions: It seems that aerobic training and P. granatum L. and combination of both can have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects on reduction of adiponectin and insulin resistance in women with type 2 diabetes.

  11. Upregulation of fatty acid synthesis and the suppression of hepatic triglyceride lipase as a direct cause of hereditary postprandial hypertriglyceridemia in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Naoki; Ito, Tsunekata; Ohwada, Kazuo; Fujii, Junichi

    2013-01-01

    Rabbits with hereditary postprandial hypertriglyceridemia exhibit central obesity and are regarded as a reliable model for metabolic syndrome. This study was performed to gain insight into the affected process of lipid metabolism and into the causative genes of the postprandial hypertriglyceridemia rabbits. Eleven genes that play key roles in lipid metabolism were selected, their mRNA levels were assessed by quantitative PCR, and their expressions were compared among postprandial hypertriglyc...

  12. Synthetic LXR agonist attenuates plaque formation in apoE-/- mice without inducing liver steatosis and hypertriglyceridemia* s?

    OpenAIRE

    Kratzer, Adelheid; Buchebner, Marlene; Pfeifer, Thomas; Becker, Tatjana M.; Uray, Georg; Miyazaki, Makoto; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Ebner, Birgit; Chandak, Prakash G.; Kadam, Rajendra S.; Calayir, Emine; Rathke, Nora; Ahammer, Helmut; Radovic, Branislav; Trauner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are important regulators of cholesterol and lipid metabolism. LXR agonists have been shown to limit the cellular cholesterol content by inducing reverse cholesterol transport, increasing bile acid production, and inhibiting intestinal cholesterol absorption. Most of them, however, also increase lipogenesis via sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP1c) and carbohydrate response element-binding protein activation resulting in hypertriglyceridemia and liver ...

  13. Lack of plasma albumin impairs intravascular lipolysis and explains the associated free fatty acids deficiency and hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Helena CF

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormalities in lipid metabolism and transport are hallmarks in analbuminemic Nagase rats (NAR and humans. Triglyceridemia is nearly 3- to 5-fold higher in female NAR than in control Sprague-Dawley rats (SDR. Also, NAR present with a severe plasma free fatty acid (FFA deficit. There are conflicting results regarding the mechanisms underlying NAR hypertriglyceridemia. Objective We aimed at investigating whether liver lipogenesis and triglyceride secretion rates into the plasma contribute to the hypertriglyceridemia in NAR. We also studied whether heparin or albumin administration would release the hypothesized lipolysis inhibition in NAR. Methods The incorporation of tritiated water into lipids and the linear accumulation rate of plasma triglycerides after Triton WR1339 injection were the measures of liver lipogenesis and triglyceride secretion rates. Results Lipogenesis (596 ± 40 vs. 929 ± 124 μmol 3H2O/g/h and triglyceride (4.25 ± 1.00 vs. 7.04 ± 1.68 mg/dL/min secretion rates were slower (P ≤ 0.05 in fasted NAR than in control SDR. The injection of either heparin or albumin elicited an increase in NAR plasma FFA levels over time. FFA levels reached control levels 90 min after the albumin administration, increasing from 0.36 ± 0.05 to 1.34 ± 0.16 mEq/L (P ≤ 0.05. These results indicate that the lack of plasma albumin inhibits intravascular lipolysis and causes the FFA deficit observed in NAR. Conclusion NAR hepatic triglyceride synthesis and output do not contribute to NAR hypertriglyceridemia. We propose that the lack of albumin diminishes intravascular lipolysis which reduces the plasma triglyceride removal rate and explain both NAR hypertriglyceridemia and FFA deficiency.

  14. Metabolic markers associated with insulin resistance predict type 2 diabetes in Koreans with normal blood pressure or prehypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ki-Chul; Park, Hyun-Young; Kim, Min-Ju; Reaven, Gerald

    2016-03-22

    Questions remain as to the association between essential hypertension and increased incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The premise of this analysis is that insulin resistance/compensatory hyperinsulinemia is a major predictor of T2DM, and the greater the prevalence of insulin resistance within any population, normotensive or hypertensive, the more likely T2DM will develop. The hypothesis to be tested is that surrogate estimates of insulin resistance will predict incident T2DM to a significant degree in persons with normal blood pressure or prehypertension. Analysis of data from a population-based survey of 10, 038 inhabitants of rural and urban areas of Korea, ≥40 years-old, initiated in 2001, with measures of demographic and metabolic characteristics at baseline and 8-years later. Participants were classified as having normal blood pressure or prehypertension, and three simple manifestations of insulin resistance related to the pathophysiology of T2DM used to predict incident T2DM: (1) glycemia (plasma glucose concentration 2-hour after 75 g oral glucose challenge = 2-hour PG); (2) hyperinsulinemia (plasma insulin concentration 2-hour after 75 g oral glucose challenge = 2-hour PI); and (3) dyslipidemia (ratio of fasting plasma triglyceride/high/density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration = TG/HDL-C ratio). Fully adjusted hazard ratios (HR, 95 % CI) for incident T2DM were highest (P insulin resistance was the 2-hour PI concentration. Subjects with normal blood pressure in the highest quartile of 2-hour PI concentrations were significantly associated with incident T2DM, with HRs of 1.5 (1.02-2.20, P = 0.25) and 2.02 (1.35-3.02, P insulin resistance (glycemia, insulinemia, and dyslipidemia) predict the development of T2DM in patients with either normal blood pressure or prehypertension.

  15. Optimal Waist Circumference Cutoff Value Based on Insulin Resistance and Visceral Obesity in Koreans with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Soo Lim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundVisceral obesity is the most powerful contributor to the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS and cardiovascular diseases. In light of visceral obesity, however, there is a paucity of data on the appropriate cutoff point of waist circumference (WC in subjects with type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal cutoff value for WC that signals insulin resistance (IR and visceral obesity in Koreans with type 2 diabetes.MethodsWe evaluated 4,252 patients with type 2 diabetes (male 2,220, female 2,032, mean age 57.24 years who visited our clinic between January 2003 and June 2009. WC was measured at the midpoint between the lower rib and the iliac crest, and insulin sensitivity was assessed by the rate constant of plasma glucose disappearance (Kitt %/min using an insulin tolerance test. Visceral fat thickness was measured using ultrasonography. Statistical analysis was performed using receiver operating characteristic curve.ResultsThe optimal cutoff points for WC for identifying the presence of IR and visceral obesity, as well as two or more metabolic components, were 87 cm for men and 81 cm for women. Moreover, these cutoff points had the highest predictive powers for the presence of visceral obesity. The MetS defined by new criteria correlated with the increased carotid intima-media thickness in female subjects.ConclusionOur results suggest that the optimal cutoff values for WC in Koreans with type 2 diabetes should be reestablished based on IR and visceral obesity.

  16. Fumosorinone, a novel PTP1B inhibitor, activates insulin signaling in insulin-resistance HepG2 cells and shows anti-diabetic effect in diabetic KKAy mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhi-Qin [College of Life Sciences, Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis of Ministry of Education, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, key laboratory of pharmaceutical quality control of Hebei province, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Liu, Ting; Chen, Chuan [College of Life Sciences, Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis of Ministry of Education, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Li, Ming-Yan; Wang, Zi-Yu; Chen, Ruo-song; Wei, Gui-xiang; Wang, Xiao-yi [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, key laboratory of pharmaceutical quality control of Hebei province, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Luo, Du-Qiang, E-mail: duqiangluo999@126.com [College of Life Sciences, Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis of Ministry of Education, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is characterized by defects in insulin signaling. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of the insulin signaling pathways, and its increased activity and expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Therefore, the inhibition of PTP1B is anticipated to become a potential therapeutic strategy to treat T2DM. Fumosorinone (FU), a new natural product isolated from insect fungi Isaria fumosorosea, was found to inhibit PTP1B activity in our previous study. Herein, the effects of FU on insulin resistance and mechanism in vitro and in vivo were investigated. FU increased the insulin-provoked glucose uptake in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, and also reduced blood glucose and lipid levels of type 2 diabetic KKAy mice. FU decreased the expression of PTP1B both in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells and in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. Furthermore, FU increased the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt, GSK3β and Erk1/2 in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, as well as the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. These results showed that FU increased glucose uptake and improved insulin resistance by down-regulating the expression of PTP1B and activating the insulin signaling pathway, suggesting that it may possess antidiabetic properties. - Highlights: • Fumosorinone is a new PTP1B inhibitor isolated from insect pathogenic fungi. • Fumosorinone attenuated the insulin resistance both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone decreased the expression of PTP1B both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone activated the insulin signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Fumosorinone, a novel PTP1B inhibitor, activates insulin signaling in insulin-resistance HepG2 cells and shows anti-diabetic effect in diabetic KKAy mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhi-Qin; Liu, Ting; Chen, Chuan; Li, Ming-Yan; Wang, Zi-Yu; Chen, Ruo-song; Wei, Gui-xiang; Wang, Xiao-yi; Luo, Du-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is characterized by defects in insulin signaling. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of the insulin signaling pathways, and its increased activity and expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Therefore, the inhibition of PTP1B is anticipated to become a potential therapeutic strategy to treat T2DM. Fumosorinone (FU), a new natural product isolated from insect fungi Isaria fumosorosea, was found to inhibit PTP1B activity in our previous study. Herein, the effects of FU on insulin resistance and mechanism in vitro and in vivo were investigated. FU increased the insulin-provoked glucose uptake in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, and also reduced blood glucose and lipid levels of type 2 diabetic KKAy mice. FU decreased the expression of PTP1B both in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells and in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. Furthermore, FU increased the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt, GSK3β and Erk1/2 in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, as well as the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. These results showed that FU increased glucose uptake and improved insulin resistance by down-regulating the expression of PTP1B and activating the insulin signaling pathway, suggesting that it may possess antidiabetic properties. - Highlights: • Fumosorinone is a new PTP1B inhibitor isolated from insect pathogenic fungi. • Fumosorinone attenuated the insulin resistance both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone decreased the expression of PTP1B both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone activated the insulin signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo

  18. The -1131T>C polymorphism in the apolipoprotein A5 gene is related to hypertriglyceridemia in Taiwanese aborigines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Meng-Chuan; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Wang, Huan-Sen; Sung, Yi-Ching; Ko, Ying-Chin; Chiang, Hung-Che

    2008-04-01

    The prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia, considered to be an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease, is high in Taiwanese aborigines. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of the -1131T>C polymorphism in the apolipoprotein A5 gene on serum triglyceride levels in female Taiwanese aborigines. This was a cross-sectional study, and a total of 316 unrelated female Taiwanese aborigines were genotyped at the -1131T>C polymorphism in apolipoprotein A5 using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Serum triglyceride > or = 150 mg/dL was defined as the hypertriglyceridemia group and triglyceride Japanese and Han Chinese, but was higher than that in Caucasians. In a multiple logistic model adjusted for possible confounders, C allele-containing variants were independently associated with greater risks (CT genotype: OR = 3.28, 95% CI = 1.43-7.56; CC genotype: OR = 5.86, 95% CI = 2.15-15.99) of hypertriglyceridemia than the TT genotype (p fashion (for trend, p C polymorphism of the Apo A5 gene influences serum triglyceride levels in female Taiwanese aborigines, and that differences exist in the frequency of the C allele among people of various ethnicities.

  19. The effect of 8 weeks of Circuit Resistance Training on metabolic syndrome risk factors and body composition in women over age 50 with diabetes mellitus type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyede Amene Azarmehr

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM increased significantly in the last three decades, and effective strategies to manage and prevent this disease are urgently needed. Physical activity and exercise training is an effective way for metabolic syndrome risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients. However, the effects of Circuit Resistance Training (CRT program on patients T2DM are unknown. The purpose of this study is to investigation the effect of 8 weeks of Circuit resistance training (CRT on metabolic syndrome and body composition in women over age 50 with T2DM. Methods: Twenty women over 50 years old with diabetes Referred to diabetes Center of 17 Shahrivar hospital in Amol and they were divided randomly into two groups; Circuit resistance (n=10 and Control (n=10. Resistance training consisted of 10 stations for 8 weeks and 3 sessions per week (Intensity 60-80% 1RM. Levels of Lipid profile and body composition before and after eight weeks training in both groups were measured. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out by SPSS (v. 22. Results Fasting Blood Sugar (FBS levels (P=0.021, Triglycerides (0.010, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (0.042, significant decreased in CRT. Also after 8 weeks circuit resistance training, BMI (P= 0.003, WHR (P=0.004 and body fat present (0.019 significant decreased in CRT. Conclusion: According to our results, CRT was an effective approach to improve the Anthropometrics, FBS, lipid profile in women over age 50 with diabetes mellitus type 2. Moreover, CRT did have influence on LDL level.  Keywords: Circuit resistance training, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, body composition

  20. Effects of exercise training using resistance bands on glycaemic control and strength in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Samantha K; Armstrong, Marni J; Boulé, Normand G; Sigal, Ronald J

    2015-04-01

    Resistance exercise using free weights or weight machines improves glycaemic control and strength in people with type 2 diabetes. Resistance band training is potentially less expensive and more accessible, but the effects of resistance band training on glycaemic control and strength in this population are not well understood. This paper aims to systematically review and meta-analyse the effect of resistance band training on haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and strength in adults with type 2 diabetes. Database searches were performed in August 2013 (MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, EMBASE, and CINAHL). Reference lists of eligible articles were hand-searched for additional studies. Randomised trials evaluating the effects of resistance band training in adults with type 2 diabetes on HbA1c or objectively measured strength were selected. Baseline and post-intervention HbA1c and strength were extracted for the intervention and control groups. Details of the exercise interventions and methodological quality were collected. Seven trials met inclusion criteria. Post-intervention-weighted mean HbA1c was nonsignificantly lower in exercise groups compared to control groups [weighted mean difference (WMD) = -0.18 percentage points (-1.91 mmol/mol); P = 0.27]. Post-intervention strength was significantly higher in the exercise groups compared to the control groups in the lower extremities (WMD = 21.90 kg; P diabetes.

  1. Clinical features and treatment of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis during pregnancy: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunlan; Liu, Jie; Lu, Yingying; Fan, Junjie; Wang, Xingpeng; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Yue

    2016-12-01

    To analyze the features and treatment of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis (HTGP) during pregnancy. A retrospective study of 21 pregnant women diagnosed with acute pancreatitis (AP) was performed. Patients were divided into acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP), HTGP, and idiopathic groups according to etiology. 95% of the patients were in the third trimester of gestation. The percentage of patients with HTGP was higher than that of ABP (48% vs.14%). The percentage of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in the HTGP group was higher than that in the ABP group (40.0% vs.0%). The Ranson scores for moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP) and SAP in the HTGP group were significantly different (2.50 ± 0.58 vs.3.60 ± 0.89, P  0.05, respectively). In the HTGP group, there were five patients given plasma exchange therapy and five not. Plasmapheresis decreased the incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) from 100% to 28.6% and the TG level from 20.36 ± 7.41 mmol/L to 5.23 ± 3.62 mmol/L (P pregnancy with SIRS or multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). J. Clin. Apheresis 31:571-578, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Proteinuria and lipoprotein lipase activity in Miniature Schnauzer dogs with and without hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrow, E; Jaeger, J Q; Parker, V J; Hinchcliff, K W; Johnson, S E; Murdoch, S J; de Boer, I H; Sherding, R G; Brunzell, J D

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous hyperlipidemia in rats causes glomerular disease. Idiopathic hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is prevalent in Miniature Schnauzers, but its relationship with proteinuria is unknown. Decreased activity of major lipid metabolism enzymes, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase (HL), may play a role in the cyclic relationship between hyperlipidemia and proteinuria. These enzymes have also not been previously investigated in Miniature Schnauzers. The aims of this study were to determine the relationship between HTG and proteinuria in Miniature Schnauzers and to measure LPL and HL activities in a subset of dogs. Fifty-seven Miniature Schnauzers were recruited (34 with and 23 without HTG). Fasting serum triglyceride concentrations and urine protein-to-creatinine ratios (UPC) were measured in all dogs, and LPL and HL activities were determined in 17 dogs (8 with and 9 without HTG). There was a strong positive correlation between triglyceride concentration and UPC (r = 0.77-0.83, P dogs with HTG and absent from all dogs without HTG (P dogs were not azotemic or hypoalbuminemic. Dogs with HTG had a 65% reduction in LPL activity relative to dogs without HTG (P Schnauzers and could be due to lipid-induced glomerular injury. Reduced LPL activity may contribute to the severity of HTG, but further assay validation is required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Diabetic nephropathy is resistant to oral L-arginine or L-citrulline supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Hanning; Gao, Ting; Cooper, Timothy K; Morris, Sidney M; Awad, Alaa S

    2014-12-01

    Our recent publication showed that pharmacological blockade of arginases confers kidney protection in diabetic nephropathy via a nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS)3-dependent mechanism. Arginase competes with endothelial NOS (eNOS) for the common substrate L-arginine. Lack of L-arginine results in reduced NO production and eNOS uncoupling, which lead to endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, we hypothesized that L-arginine or L-citrulline supplementation would ameliorate diabetic nephropathy. DBA mice injected with multiple low doses of vehicle or streptozotocin (50 mg/kg ip for 5 days) were provided drinking water with or without L-arginine (1.5%, 6.05 g·kg(-1)·day(-1)) or L-citrulline (1.66%, 5.73 g·kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 9 wk. Nonsupplemented diabetic mice showed significant increases in albuminuria, blood urea nitrogen, glomerular histopathological changes, kidney macrophage recruitment, kidney TNF-α and fibronectin mRNA expression, kidney arginase activity, kidney arginase-2 protein expression, and urinary oxidative stress along with a significant reduction of nephrin and eNOS protein expression and kidney nitrite + nitrate compared with normal mice after 9 wk of diabetes. Surprisingly, L-arginine or L-citrulline supplementation in diabetic mice did not affect any of these parameters despite greatly increasing kidney and plasma arginine levels. These findings demonstrate that chronic L-arginine or L-citrulline supplementation does not prevent or reduce renal injury in a model of type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Ketosis Onset Type 2 Diabetes Had Better Islet β-Cell Function and More Serious Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyun Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic ketosis had been identified as a characteristic of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, but now emerging evidence has identified that they were diagnosed as T2DM after long time follow up. This case control study was aimed at comparing the clinical characteristic, β-cell function, and insulin resistance of ketosis and nonketotic onset T2DM and providing evidence for treatment selection. 140 cases of newly diagnosed T2DM patients were divided into ketosis (62 cases and nonketotic onset group (78 cases. After correction of hyperglycemia and ketosis with insulin therapy, plasma C-peptide concentrations were measured at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 hours after 75 g glucose oral administration. Area under the curve (AUC of C-peptide was calculated. Homoeostasis model assessment was used to estimate basal β-cell function (HOMA-β and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. Our results showed that ketosis onset group had higher prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD than nonketotic group (P=0.04. Ketosis onset group had increased plasma C-peptide levels at 0 h, 0.5 h, and 3 h and higher AUC0–0.5, AUC0–1, AUC0–3 (P<0.05. Moreover, this group also had higher HOMA-β and HOMA-IR than nonketotic group (P<0.05. From these data, we concluded that ketosis onset T2DM had better islet β-cell function and more serious insulin resistance than nonketotic onset T2DM.

  5. Dorothy Hodgkin Lecture 2012: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, insulin resistance and ectopic fat: a new problem in diabetes management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, C D

    2012-09-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is now recognized as the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a spectrum of fat-associated liver conditions that can result in end-stage liver disease and the need for liver transplantation. Simple steatosis, or fatty liver, occurs early in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis with increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Prevalence estimates for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease range from 17 to 33% in the general populations and it has been estimated that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease exists in up to 70% of people with Type 2 diabetes. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease increases risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In people with Type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most frequent cause (∼80%) of fatty liver diagnosed by ultrasound. As non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is strongly associated with insulin resistance, the presence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with diabetes often contributes to poor glycaemic control. Consequently, strategies that decrease liver fat and improve whole-body insulin sensitivity may both contribute to prevention of Type 2 diabetes and to better glycaemic control in people who already have developed diabetes. This review summarizes the Dorothy Hodgkin lecture given by the author at the 2012 Diabetes UK annual scientific conference, proposing that fatty acid fluxes through the liver are crucial for the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and for increasing insulin resistance. © 2012 The Author. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  6. Associations of Low-Intensity Resistance Training with Body Composition and Lipid Profile in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Kawashima, Yu; Tamada, Yoshiki; Furuta, Masashi; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Sako, Akahito; Yanai, Hidekatsu

    2015-01-01

    Resistance training to increase muscle mass and functional capacity is an integral part of diet and exercise programs for the management of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Low-intensity resistance training with slow movement and tonic force generation (LST) may be a practical and safe regimen for elderly obese individuals but the health benefits are uncertain. This study investigated the effects of LST on body composition and metabolic parameters in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-six obese patients with type 2 diabetes engaged in LST training during hospitalization and were advised to maintain this regimen for 12 weeks after discharge. We compared lipid profile, arterial stiffness, and body composition before and after LST training. After 12 weeks of LST training, the ratio of lower extremity muscle mass to body weight increased significantly (0.176 ± 0.028 to 0.184 ± 0.023, mean ± SD), while body fat mass and body fat percentage decreased significantly (36.2 ± 10.9 kg to 34.3 ± 9.4 kg and 41.2 ± 8.6% to 40.1 ± 7.7%, respectively). Moreover, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly increased (42.2 ± 14 mg/dl to 46.3 ± 12.4 mg/dl) and both free fatty acids and lipoprotein(a) were decreased (665.2 ± 212.1 μEq/l to 525.4 ± 231.3 μEq/l and 15.4 ± 18 mg/dl to 13.8 ± 18 mg/dl, respectively). No significant change was observed in arterial stiffness. Although this study was a non-controlled investigation and some confounding factors including dietary intake, medication and compliance with training might affect the study result, a brief (12-week) LST training program may be a safe and effective strategy for the management of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  7. Associations of Low-Intensity Resistance Training with Body Composition and Lipid Profile in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetaka Hamasaki

    Full Text Available Resistance training to increase muscle mass and functional capacity is an integral part of diet and exercise programs for the management of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Low-intensity resistance training with slow movement and tonic force generation (LST may be a practical and safe regimen for elderly obese individuals but the health benefits are uncertain. This study investigated the effects of LST on body composition and metabolic parameters in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-six obese patients with type 2 diabetes engaged in LST training during hospitalization and were advised to maintain this regimen for 12 weeks after discharge. We compared lipid profile, arterial stiffness, and body composition before and after LST training. After 12 weeks of LST training, the ratio of lower extremity muscle mass to body weight increased significantly (0.176 ± 0.028 to 0.184 ± 0.023, mean ± SD, while body fat mass and body fat percentage decreased significantly (36.2 ± 10.9 kg to 34.3 ± 9.4 kg and 41.2 ± 8.6% to 40.1 ± 7.7%, respectively. Moreover, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly increased (42.2 ± 14 mg/dl to 46.3 ± 12.4 mg/dl and both free fatty acids and lipoprotein(a were decreased (665.2 ± 212.1 μEq/l to 525.4 ± 231.3 μEq/l and 15.4 ± 18 mg/dl to 13.8 ± 18 mg/dl, respectively. No significant change was observed in arterial stiffness. Although this study was a non-controlled investigation and some confounding factors including dietary intake, medication and compliance with training might affect the study result, a brief (12-week LST training program may be a safe and effective strategy for the management of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  8. Intestinal microbiota and faecal transplantation as treatment modality for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Udayappan, S. D.; Hartstra, A. V.; Dallinga-Thie, G. M.; Nieuwdorp, M.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus type 2 is increasing rapidly around the globe. Recent insights have generated an entirely new perspective that the intestinal microbiota may play a significant role in the development of these metabolic disorders. Alterations in the intestinal

  9. A common Greenlandic TBC1D4 variant confers muscle insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moltke, Ida; Grarup, Niels; Jørgensen, Marit E.

    2014-01-01

    The Greenlandic population, a small and historically isolated founder population comprising about 57,000 inhabitants, has experienced a dramatic increase in type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevalence during the past 25 years. Motivated by this, we performed association mapping of T2D-related quantitative t...

  10. Role of vitamin D in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilz, S.; Kienreich, K.; Rutters, F.; de Jongh, R.T.; van Ballegooijen, A.J.; Grübler, M.; Tomaschitz, A.; Dekker, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is mainly a consequence of insufficient sunlight induced vitamin D production in the skin and has been associated with various chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes. Experimental data have shown that vitamin D is important for glucose induced insulin secretion, improves

  11. Severe insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus in patients with congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Klein, H H; Hansen, T

    1995-01-01

    . Insulin receptor function and glycogen synthase (GS) activity and expression were examined in biopsies of vastus lateralis muscle. Despite a 45-90-fold increase in both fasting and postprandial serum insulin levels, both CFTDM patients had diabetes mellitus. Clamp studies revealed that the oldest boy had...

  12. Increased Muscular 5α-Dihydrotestosterone in Response to Resistance Training Relates to Skeletal Muscle Mass and Glucose Metabolism in Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Horii

    Full Text Available Regular resistance exercise induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy and improvement of glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients. Administration of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, a sex steroid hormone precursor, increases 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT synthesis and is associated with improvements in fasting blood glucose level and skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether increase in muscle DHT levels, induced by chronic resistance exercise, can contribute to skeletal muscle hypertrophy and concomitant improvement of muscular glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats. Male 20-week-old type 2 diabetic rats (OLETF were randomly divided into 3 groups: sedentary control, resistance training (3 times a week on alternate days for 8 weeks, or resistance training with continuous infusion of a 5α-reductase inhibitor (n = 8 each group. Age-matched, healthy nondiabetic Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO rats (n = 8 were used as controls. The results indicated that OLETF rats showed significant decrease in muscular DHEA, free testosterone, DHT levels, and protein expression of steroidogenic enzymes, with loss of skeletal muscle mass and hyperglycemia, compared to that of LETO rats. However, 8-week resistance training in OLETF rats significantly increased the levels of muscle sex steroid hormones and protein expression of steroidogenic enzymes with a concomitant increase in skeletal muscle mass, improved fasting glucose level, and insulin sensitivity index. Moreover, resistance training accelerated glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4 translocation and protein kinase B and C-ζ/λ phosphorylation. Administering the 5α-reductase inhibitor in resistance-trained OLETF rats resulted in suppression of the exercise-induced effects on skeletal muscle mass, fasting glucose level, insulin sensitivity index, and GLUT-4 signaling, with a decline in muscular DHT levels. These findings suggest that resistance training

  13. Dietary patterns and the insulin resistance phenotype among non-diabetic adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Information on the relation between dietary patterns derived by cluster analysis and insulin resistance is scarce. Objective: To compare insulin resistance phenotypes, including waist circumference, body mass index, fasting and 2-hour post-challenge insulin, insulin sensitivity index (I...

  14. The Therapeutic Potential of Resistant Starch in Modulation of Insulin Resistance, Endotoxemia, Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Biomarkers in Women with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, P; Farhangi, M Abbasalizad; Sarmadi, B; Gargari, B P; Zare Javid, A; Pouraghaei, M; Dehghan, P

    2016-01-01

    This trial aims to determine the effects of resistant starch (RS) subtype 2 (RS2) on glycemic status, metabolic endotoxemia and markers of oxidative stress. A randomized, controlled, parallel-group clinical trial group of 56 females with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was divided to 2 groups. The intervention group (n = 28) and control group (n = 28) received 10 g/day RS2 or placebo for 8 weeks, respectively. Fasting blood samples were taken to determine glycemic status, endotoxin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), antioxidant enzymes concentrations as well as uric acid at baseline and after the intervention. After 8 weeks, RS2 caused a significant decrease in the levels of MDA (-34.10%), glycosylated hemoglobin (-9.40%), insulin (-29.36%), homeostasis model of insulin resistance (-32.85%) and endotoxin (-25.00%), a significant increase in TAC (18.10%) and glutathione peroxidase (11.60%) as compared with control. No significant changes were observed in fasting plasma glucose, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, hs-CRP, superoxide dismutase, catalase and uric acid in the RS2 group as compared with the control group. Supplementation with RS2 may be improved glycemic status, endotoxemia and markers of oxidative stress in patients with T2DM. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Phosphoprotein enriched in diabetes (PED/PEA15) promotes migration in hepatocellular carcinoma and confers resistance to sorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintavalle, Cristina; Hindupur, Sravanth Kumar; Quagliata, Luca; Pallante, Pierlorenzo; Nigro, Cecilia; Condorelli, Gerolama; Andersen, Jesper Bøje; Tagscherer, Katrin Elisabeth; Roth, Wilfried; Beguinot, Francesco; Heim, Markus Hermann; Ng, Charlotte Kiu Yan; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Matter, Matthias Sebastian

    2017-10-26

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third-leading cause of cancer-related death with limited treatment options and frequent resistance to sorafenib, the only drug currently approved for first-line therapy. Therefore, better understanding of HCC tumor biology and its resistance to treatment is urgently needed. Here, we analyzed the role of phosphoprotein enriched in diabetes (PED) in HCC. PED has been shown to regulate cell proliferation, apoptosis and migration in several types of cancer. However, its function in HCC has not been addressed yet. Our study revealed that both transcript and protein levels of PED were significantly high in HCC compared with non-tumoral tissue. Clinico-pathological correlation revealed that PED high HCCs showed an enrichment of gene signatures associated with metastasis and poor prognosis. Further, we observed that PED overexpression elevated the migration potential and PED silencing the decreased migration potential in liver cancer cell lines without effecting cell proliferation. Interestingly, we found that PED expression was regulated by a hepatocyte specific nuclear factor, HNF4α. A reduction of HNF4α induced an increase in PED expression and consequently, promoted cell migration in vitro. Finally, PED reduced the antitumoral effect of sorafenib by inhibiting caspase-3/7 activity. In conclusion, our data suggest that PED has a prominent role in HCC biology. It acts particularly on promoting cell migration and confers resistance to sorafenib treatment. PED may be a novel target for HCC therapy and serve as a predictive marker for treatment response against sorafenib.

  16. Association of a microsatellite in FASL to type II diabetes and of the FAS-670G>A genotype to insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolsøe, R L; Hamid, Y H; Pociot, F

    2006-01-01

    association to type II diabetes for the allele distribution of the FASL microsatellite (P-value 0.02, Bonferroni corrected). The FAS-670G>A was associated with homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index and body mass index (P-values 0.02 and 0.02). We conclude that polymorphisms of FASL and FAS...

  17. Role of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Obesity, Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes, and Associated Hepatic Co-Morbidities: A Comprehensive Review of Human and Rodent Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrison, M.C.; Kleemann, R.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state that drives the -development of obesity-related co-morbidities such as insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and cardiovascular disease. This metabolic inflammation is thought to originate in

  18. Complement Factor 3 is associated with insulin resistance and with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus over a 7-year follow-up period: the CODAM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wlazlo, N.; Greevenbroek, van M.M.J.; Ferreira, I.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Kallen, van der C.J.H.; Schalkwijk, C.G.; Bravenboer, B.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Immune dysregulation can affect insulin resistance (IR) and b-cell function and hence contribute to development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The complement system, as a regulator of immune and inflammatory homeostasis, may be a relevant contributor therein. However, longitudinal

  19. Insulin resistance in multiple tissues in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus on long-term continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke [Leiden Univ., LUMC; Hoogma, Roel P. L. M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P. M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether insulin resistance is present in lean patients with uncomplicated type 1 diabetes mellitus on long-term continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), compared with matched healthy controls. We studied eight patients (four men and four women) with

  20. Use of HbA1c in predicting progression to diabetes in French men and women: data from an Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance Syndrome (DESIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droumaguet, Celine; Balkau, Beverley; Simon, Dominique; Caces, Emile; Tichet, Jean; Charles, Marie Aline; Eschwege, Eveline

    2006-07-01

    Early identification of subjects at high risk for diabetes is essential, and random HbA(1c) (A1C) may be more practical than fasting plasma glucose (FPG). The predictive value of A1C, in comparison to FPG, is evaluated for 6-year incident diabetes. From the French cohort study Data from an Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance Syndrome (DESIR), 1,383 men and 1,437 women, aged 30-65 years, were volunteers for a routine health check-up. Incident diabetes was defined by FPG >or=7.0 mmol/l or treatment by antidiabetic drugs. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to predict diabetes at 6 years. Receiver operating characteristic curves compared the predictive values of A1C and FPG. At 6 years, 30 women (2.1%) and 60 men (4.3%) had developed diabetes. Diabetes risk increased exponentially with A1C in both sexes (P or=6.10 mmol/l): the odds ratio (95% CI) for a 1% increase in A1C was 7.20 (3.00-17.00). In these subjects, an A1C of 5.9% gave an optimal sensitivity of 64% and specificity of 77% to predict diabetes. A1C predicted diabetes, even though the diagnosis of diabetes was based on FPG, but it was less sensitive and specific than FPG. It could be used as a test if fasting blood sampling was not available or in association with FPG. In subjects with IFG, A1C is better than glucose to evaluate diabetes risk, and it could be used to select subjects for intensive early intervention.

  1. Exercise or physical activity and cognitive function in adults with type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance or impaired glucose tolerance: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ren Ru; O'Sullivan, Anthony J; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes is an important risk factor for cognitive impairment. Although some studies suggest that physical exercise can minimize age-related cognitive declines or improve brain morphology or function, benefits in diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance are unclear. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of exercise or physical activity on cognition in adults with type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance or impaired glucose tolerance. An electronic search for studies published from the earliest record until February 2017 was conducted using Medline, EMBASE, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. Any experimental or observational study designs were included, as long as they were conducted in individuals of any age with type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance or impaired glucose tolerance, and they directly examined exercise/physical activity effects on cognitive outcomes or the relationship between changes in cognition and changes in either insulin resistance and glucose homeostasis. Study quality was assessed using the PEDro scale; data on participant and intervention characteristics and outcomes were extracted. Six studies enrolling 2289 participants met the eligibility criteria. Quality was modest and effect sizes variable and mostly small or negligible. Overall, four of the six studies (67%) reported significant benefits of greater exercise/physical activity participation for some aspects of cognition, but only 26% of cognitive outcomes were significant across all trials. Clinical improvements in insulin resistance/glucose homeostasis were related to improvements in cognitive function in three studies. Overall results were inconsistent, with benefits varying across exercise types and cognitive domains. Literature does not provide evidence that physical activity or exercise interventions contribute to a better cognitive function in patients with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. Large-scale, long-term, robust randomized controlled trials are required to

  2. Isolation of bacteriophages to multi-drug resistant Enterococci obtained from diabetic foot: A novel antimicrobial agent waiting in the shelf?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C S Vinodkumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While foot infections in persons with diabetes are initially treated empirically, therapy directed at known causative organisms may improve the outcome. Many studies have reported on the bacteriology of diabetic foot infections (DFIs, but the results have varied and have often been contradictory. The purpose of the research work is to call attention to a frightening twist in the antibiotic-resistant Enterococci problem in diabetic foot that has not received adequate attention from the medical fraternity and also the pharmaceutical pipeline for new antibiotics is drying up. Materials and Methods: Adult diabetic patients admitted for lower extremity infections from July 2008 to December 2009 in the medical wards and intensive care unit of medical teaching hospitals were included in the study. The extent of the lower extremity infection on admission was assessed based on Wagner′s classification from grades I to V. Specimens were collected from the lesions upon admission prior to the initiation of antibiotic therapy or within the first 48 h of admission. Results: During the 18-month prospective study, 32 strains of Enterococcus spp. (26 Enterococcus faecalis and 06 E. faecium were recovered. Antibiotic sensitivity testing was done by Kirby-Bauer′s disk diffusion method. Isolates were screened for high-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR. A total of 65.6% of Enterococcus species showed HLAR. Multidrug resistance and concomitant resistance of HLAR strains to other antibiotics were quite high. None of the Enterococcus species was resistant to vancomycin. Conclusion: Multidrug-resistant Enterococci are a real problem and continuous surveillance is necessary. Today, resistance has rendered most of the original antibiotics obsolete for many infections, mandating the development of alternative anti-infection modalities. One of such alternatives stemming up from an old idea is the bacteriophage therapy. In the present study, we could

  3. Oral hypoglycaemic agents, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Lund, Søren S; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    This article is a narrative review of the current evidence of the effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) of oral hypoglycaemic agents that increase insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In overweight T2D patients, metformin has been demonstrated to reduce CVD risk, and this......This article is a narrative review of the current evidence of the effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) of oral hypoglycaemic agents that increase insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In overweight T2D patients, metformin has been demonstrated to reduce CVD risk......, and this beneficial effect may be conserved with the combination of metformin and insulin treatment. However, the effect of glitazones on CVD is uncertain. There is conflicting evidence from large randomized trials to support a protective effect against CVD of lowering blood glucose per se but a systematic review...

  4. Diabetes mellitus is associated with cavities, smear grade, and multidrug resistant tuberculosis in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Matthew J; Kempker, Russell R; Kipiani, Maia; Gandhi, Neel R; Darchia, Lasha; Tukvadze, Nestan; Howards, Penelope P; Venkat Narayan, KM; Blumberg, Henry M

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Setting National tuberculosis (TB) treatment facility, country of Georgia. Objective To determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and pre-DM among patients with TB using glycosylated-hemoglobin (HbA1c), and to estimate the association between DM and clinical characteristics and response to TB therapy. Design A cohort study was conducted (2011–2014) at the National Center for TB and Lung Disease in Tbilisi. Patients ≥35 years with pulmonary TB were included. HbA1c was used to define DM (≥6.5%), pre-DM (≥5.7%–6.4%), and no DM (Diabetes and pre-DM were common among adults with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB in Tbilisi, Georgia and DM was associated with more clinical symptoms at presentation including MDR-TB. PMID:25946360

  5. A variation in the cerebroside sulfotransferase gene is linked to exercise-modified insulin resistance and to type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roeske-Nielsen, A.; Buschard, K.; Manson, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    .8.2.11). The aim of this study was to investigate whether two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), rs2267161 located in an exon or rs42929 located in an intron, in the gene encoding CST are linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D). METHODS: As a population survey, 265 male and female patients suffering from T2D and 291......, the homozygous CC individuals displayed lower insulin resistance measured by HOMA-IR (P = .05) than the C/T or TT persons; this was particularly prevalent in individuals who exercise (P = .03). CONCLUSION: Heterozygosity at SNP rs2267161 in the gene encoding the CST enzyme confers increased risk of T2D. Females...

  6. Lethal ventricular tachycardia triggered after femoral fracture repair in an obese man with insulin-resistant diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hideyuki; Uramatsu, Masashi; Nakajima, Susumu; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi

    2016-11-01

    An obese man (height, 178 cm; weight, 160 kg; body mass index, 50.5 kg/m 2 ) with a history of recurrent ventricular tachycardia (VT), cardiomyopathy, coronary sclerosis, and insulin-resistant diabetes suffered a right femur fracture in a vehicular accident. His fracture was repaired the following day, but shortly after surgery, his serum potassium (K + ) level increased, presumably due to K + leakage from the injured muscles, leading to persistent VT and death. An autopsy revealed severe cardiac hypertrophy, moderate coronary sclerosis, and histological findings of myocardial hypercontraction, but not myoglobin-related renal failure, pulmonary thrombosis, lipid emboli, or inflammation. The hyperkalemia was not corrected by glucose-insulin infusion and led to the death of the patient due to the preexisting cardiomyopathy, coronary sclerosis, and a predisposition to VT. In addition to the autopsy, the analysis of the clinical course was indispensable for determining the cause of death as hyperkalemia-related VT.

  7. The impact of resistance exercise training on the mental health of older Puerto Rican adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Alisa K; Shepherd, Amy; Johnson, Peggy L; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2011-09-01

    To determine the impact of a 16 week high-intensity progressive resistance exercise training (PRT) program on the mental health of older Puerto Rican adults with type 2 diabetes. Fifty-eight Puerto Rican adults were randomly assigned to supervised PRT (n = 29) or a control group (n = 29). A secondary analyses were conducted, and 2 mental health outcomes, the Geriatric Depression Scale and the SF-36 mental component summary score, were used to assess the impact of PRT on mental health status. At baseline, no differences were found on measures of self-reported mental health status. PRT participants had significantly improved mental health status at follow-up (16 weeks). The incorporation of exercise into treatment planning for older adults may have important benefits on their mental health status. More work is needed to understand the mechanisms by which this occurred as well as the applicability of these findings to sustainable community programs.

  8. Phytosterols protect against diet-induced hypertriglyceridemia in Syrian golden hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In addition to lowering LDL-C, emerging data suggests that phytosterols (PS) may reduce blood triglycerides (TG), however, the underlying mechanisms are not known. Methods We examined the TG-lowering mechanisms of dietary PS in Syrian golden hamsters randomly assigned to a high fat (HF) diet or the HF diet supplemented with PS (2%) for 6 weeks (n = 12/group). An additional subset of animals (n = 12) was provided the HF diet supplemented with ezetimibe (EZ, 0.002%) as a positive control as it is a cholesterol-lowering agent with known TG-lowering properties. Results In confirmation of diet formulation and compound delivery, both the PS and EZ treatments lowered (p < 0.05) intestinal cholesterol absorption (24 and 31%, respectively), blood non-HDL cholesterol (61 and 66%, respectively), and hepatic cholesterol (45 and 55%, respectively) compared with the HF-fed animals. Blood TG concentrations were lower (p < 0.05) in the PS (49%) and EZ (68%)-treated animals compared with the HF group. The TG-lowering response in the PS-supplemented group was associated with reduced (p < 0.05) intestinal SREBP1c mRNA (0.45 fold of HF), hepatic PPARα mRNA (0.73 fold of HF), hepatic FAS protein abundance (0.68 fold of HD), and de novo lipogenesis (44%) compared with the HF group. Similarly, lipogenesis was lower in the EZ-treated animals, albeit through a reduction in the hepatic protein abundance of ACC (0.47 fold of HF). Conclusions Study results suggest that dietary PS are protective against diet-induced hypertriglyceridemia, likely through multiple mechanisms that involve modulation of intestinal fatty acid metabolism and a reduction in hepatic lipogenesis. PMID:24393244

  9. A Novel Selective PPARα Modulator (SPPARMα), K-877 (Pemafibrate), Attenuates Postprandial Hypertriglyceridemia in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairyo, Masami; Kobayashi, Takuya; Masuda, Daisaku; Kanno, Koutaro; Zhu, Yinghong; Okada, Takeshi; Koseki, Masahiro; Ohama, Tohru; Nishida, Makoto; Sakata, Yasushi; Yamashita, Shizuya

    2018-02-01

    Fasting and postprandial hypertriglyceridemia (PHTG) are caused by the accumulation of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins and their remnants, which have atherogenic effects. Fibrates can improve fasting and PHTG; however, reduction of remnants is clinically needed to improve health outcomes. In the current study, we investigated the effects of a novel selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α modulator (SPPARMα), K-877 (Pemafibrate), on PHTG and remnant metabolism. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) only, or an HFD containing 0.0005% K-877 or 0.05% fenofibrate, from 8 to 12 weeks of age. After 4 weeks of feeding, we measured plasma levels of TG, free fatty acids (FFA), total cholesterol (TC), HDL-C, and apolipoprotein (apo) B-48/B-100 during fasting and after oral fat loading (OFL). Plasma lipoprotein profiles after OFL, which were assessed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and fasting lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity were compared among the groups. Both K-877 and fenofibrate suppressed body weight gain and fasting and postprandial TG levels and enhanced LPL activity in mice fed an HFD. As determined by HPLC, K-877 and fenofibrate significantly decreased the abundance of TG-rich lipoproteins, including remnants, in postprandial plasma. Both K-877 and fenofibrate decreased intestinal mRNA expression of ApoB and Npc1l1; however, hepatic expression of Srebp1c and Mttp was increased by fenofibrate but not by K-877.Hepatic mRNA expression of apoC-3 was decreased by K-877 but not by fenofibrate. K-877 may attenuate PHTG by suppressing the postprandial increase of chylomicrons and the accumulation of chylomicron remnants more effectively than fenofibrate.

  10. Hypertriglyceridemia: Is there a role for prophylactic apheresis? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Ana Rita; Gonçalves, Inês; Veiga, Fátima; Pedro, Mónica Mendes; Pinto, Fausto J; Brito, Dulce

    2016-01-01

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia has been consistently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and other complications, namely acute pancreatitis. We report a case of a 64 year-old woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and metabolic syndrome with triglyceride level of 3260 mg/dL. Plasma exchange was performed with simultaneous medical treatment to achieve a rapid and effective lowering of triglycerides in order to prevent clinical complications. After three plasmapheresis sessions a marked reduction in triglyceride and total cholesterol levels was observed. Several cases have shown the importance of plasmapheresis in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. We intend to demonstrate the applicability of this technique as primary prophylaxis in the presence of extremely high serum triglyceridemia levels. Resumo A hipertrigliceridemia grave tem sido associada de forma consistente ao aumento do risco cardiovascular e a outras complicações, nomeadamente, pancreatite aguda. Descrevemos um caso de uma mulher de 64 anos, com miocardiopatia hipertrófica e síndrome metabólica com valor sérico de triglicerídeos de 3260 mg/dL. Foi efectuada plasmaferese e optimizado o tratamento médico para alcançar uma redução rápida e efectiva dos níveis dos triglicerídeos, prevenindo complicações clínicas. Após três sessões de plasmaferese, verificou-se uma redução marcada dos triglicerídeos e do colesterol total. Existem alguns casos descritos na literatura demonstrado a importância da plasmaferese no tratamento da pancreatite aguda em contexto de hipertrigliceridemia grave. Os autores pretendem com este caso demonstrar a aplicabilidade desta técnica em contexto de prevenção primária em doentes com níveis de triglicerídeos extremamente aumentados.

  11. Cost avoidance using linezolid for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in a specialist diabetes foot clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Matthew J; Hodges, Gemma; McCardle, Joanne E

    2012-12-01

    An audit was performed to determine whether linezolid (Zyvox, Pharmacia Limited, Sandwich, UK) was being used in accordance with local guidelines and if this had an effect on admissions for diabetes foot ulceration. Seven hundred and four patient records from 2005 to 2010 in the Diabetes Foot Clinic, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh were audited for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, admissions and antibiotic use. Seventeen percent (n = 119) of patients had proven MRSA infections. Of these, 28% (n = 33) were prescribed linezolid, 94% (n = 31) for up to 14 days and none for >28 days. Eight (24%) had repeated courses. Ninety-one percent (n = 30) either avoided admission or were discharged early with resolution of infection. Four out of 33 patients had reversible blood abnormalities. The total cost for linezolid over this period was £58 000. However, 420 bed days, costing £500/day, were avoided, producing a total saving of £210 000 on inpatient costs. Linezolid guidelines reduced lengths of stay, inpatient costs and overuse of this expensive but effective treatment.

  12. Taurine ameliorates hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia by reducing insulin resistance and leptin level in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) rats with long-term diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Da Hee; Kim, Jung Yeon; Lee, Bong Gn; You, Jeong Soon; Chang, Kyung Ja; Chung, Hyunju; Yoo, Myung Chul; Yang, Hyung-In; Kang, Ja-Heon; Hwang, Yoo Chul; Ahn, Kue Jeong; Chung, Ho-Yeon

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether taurine supplementation improves metabolic disturbances and diabetic complications in an animal model for type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether taurine has therapeutic effects on glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and diabetic complications in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) rats with long-term duration of diabetes. Fourteen 50-week-old OLETF rats with chronic diabetes were fed a diet supplemented with taurine (2%) or a non-supplemented control diet for 12 weeks. Taurine reduced blood glucose levels over 12 weeks, and improved OGTT outcomes at 6 weeks after taurine supplementation, in OLETF rats. Taurine significantly reduced insulin resistance but did not improve β-cell function or islet mass. After 12 weeks, taurine significantly decreased serum levels of lipids such as triglyceride, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Taurine significantly reduced serum leptin, but not adiponectin levels. However, taurine had no therapeutic effect on damaged tissues. Taurine ameliorated hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia, at least in part, by improving insulin sensitivity and leptin modulation in OLETF rats with long-term diabetes. Additional study is needed to investigate whether taurine has the same beneficial effects in human diabetic patients. PMID:23114424

  13. Cardiac Outcomes After Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: Effects of Pioglitazone in Patients With Insulin Resistance Without Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lawrence H; Viscoli, Catherine M; Curtis, Jeptha P; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Schwartz, Gregory G; Lovejoy, Anne M; Furie, Karen L; Gorman, Mark J; Conwit, Robin; Abbott, J Dawn; Jacoby, Daniel L; Kolansky, Daniel M; Pfau, Steven E; Ling, Frederick S; Kernan, Walter N

    2017-05-16

    Insulin resistance is highly prevalent among patients with atherosclerosis and is associated with an increased risk for myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. The IRIS trial (Insulin Resistance Intervention after Stroke) demonstrated that pioglitazone decreased the composite risk for fatal or nonfatal stroke and MI in patients with insulin resistance without diabetes mellitus, after a recent ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. The type and severity of cardiac events in this population and the impact of pioglitazone on these events have not been described. We performed a secondary analysis of the effects of pioglitazone, in comparison with placebo, on acute coronary syndromes (MI and unstable angina) among IRIS participants. All potential acute coronary syndrome episodes were adjudicated in a blinded fashion by an independent clinical events committee. The study cohort was composed of 3876 IRIS participants, mean age 63 years, 65% male, 89% white race, and 12% with a history of coronary artery disease. Over a median follow-up of 4.8 years, there were 225 acute coronary syndrome events, including 141 MIs and 84 episodes of unstable angina. The MIs included 28 (19%) with ST-segment elevation. The majority of MIs were type 1 (94, 65%), followed by type 2 (45, 32%). Serum troponin was 10× to 100× upper limit of normal in 49 (35%) and >100× upper limit of normal in 39 (28%). Pioglitazone reduced the risk of acute coronary syndrome (hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.94; P =0.02). Pioglitazone also reduced the risk of type 1 MI (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.96; log-rank P =0.03), but not type 2 MI (hazard ratio, 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-1.91; P =0.87). Similarly, pioglitazone reduced the risk of large MIs with serum troponin >100× upper limit of normal (hazard ratio, 0.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.22-0.87; P =0.02), but not smaller MIs. Among patients with insulin resistance without diabetes mellitus

  14. Phloretin exerts hypoglycemic effect in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and improves insulin resistance in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen X

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Xin Shen,1,* Nan Zhou,1,* Le Mi,1 Zishuo Hu,2 Libin Wang,1 Xueying Liu,1 Shengyong Zhang1 1Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, 2Student Brigade, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The present study investigated the possible antiobesity and hypoglycemic effects of phloretin (Ph. In an attempt to discover the hypoglycemic effect and potential mechanism of Ph, we used the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and (L6 myotubes. Daily oral treatment with Ph for 4 weeks significantly (P<0.05 reduced postprandial blood glucose and improved islet injury and lipid metabolism. Glucose consumption and glucose tolerance were improved by Ph via GOD–POD method. Western blot results revealed that the expression of Akt, PI3K, IRS-1, and GLUT4 were upregulated in skeletal muscle of T2D rats and in L6 myotubes by Ph. The immunofluorescence studies confirmed that Ph improved the translocation of GLUT4 in L6 myotubes. Ph exerted hypoglycemic effects in vivo and in vitro, hence it may play an important role in the management of diabetes. Keywords: phloretin, diabetes, insulin sensitivity, blood glucose consumption, skeletal muscle

  15. Changes of serum leptin and their relationships with insulin resistance in patients with simple obesity and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated with obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Changzhou Wujin People's Hospital of Jiangsu Province, Changzhou; Shi Linlin; Lu Dan; Zhang Lei; Wang Qing; Yao Wenhua

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of serum leptin in patients with simple obesity and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated with obesity in order to explore the relationship of leptin and insulin resistance and the role of leptin in the occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: 60 cases of simple obesity, 60 cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus and 30 cases of normal control were included according to the diagnostic criteria of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. the levels of fasting serum leptin, fasting serum insulin, fasting glucose, fasting blood lipid were measured in all cases. The body mass index (BMI) and insulin action index were calculated. Results: The level of BMI, serum leptin, serum insulin, blood lipid were significantly higher in patients with simple obesity and with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated with obesity than in normal control cases, while (IAI) was significantly lower. The levels of free serum leptin, serum insulin, free glucose, and blood lipid were significantly higher in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated with obesity than in patients with simple obesity, while IAI was significantly lower. The level of serum leptin was positively correlated with BMI (r=0.48, P<0.55) and fasting serum leptin (r=0.55, P<0.05) and negatively correlated with IAI (r=-0.47, P<0.05) in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated with obesity. Conclusion: The overexpression of serum leptin may play an important role in the occurrence of the insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus in obesity patients. (authors)

  16. Effects of empagliflozin on blood pressure and markers of arterial stiffness and vascular resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, R; Tikkanen, I; Cannon, C P; Crowe, S; Woerle, H J; Broedl, U C; Johansen, O E

    2015-12-01

    To determine the effects of empagliflozin on blood pressure (BP) and markers of arterial stiffness and vascular resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We conducted a post hoc analysis of data from a phase III trial in patients with T2DM and hypertension receiving 12 weeks' empagliflozin and four phase III trials in patients with T2DM receiving 24 weeks' empagliflozin (cohort 1, n = 823; cohort 2, n = 2477). BP was measured using 24-h BP monitoring (cohort 1) or seated office measurements (cohort 2). Empagliflozin reduced systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP in both cohorts (p Empagliflozin reduced pulse pressure (PP; adjusted mean difference vs placebo cohort 1: -2.3 mmHg; cohort 2: -2.3 mmHg), mean arterial pressure (MAP; cohort 1, -2.3 mmHg; cohort 2, -2.1 mmHg) and double product (cohort 1, -385 mmHg × bpm; cohort 2, -369 mmHg × bpm) all p empagliflozin in cohort 1 (p = 0.059 vs placebo). AASI was not measured in cohort 2. Subgroup analyses showed that there were greater reductions in PP with increasing baseline SBP in cohort 1 (p = 0.092). In cohort 2, greater reductions in MAP were achieved in patients with higher baseline SBP (p = 0.027) and greater reductions in PP were observed in older patients (p = 0.011). Empagliflozin reduced BP and had favourable effects on markers of arterial stiffness and vascular resistance. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Chronic hyperinsulinemia contributes to insulin resistance under dietary restriction in association with altered lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Ippei; Tanimoto, Keiichi; Akiyama, Nobuteru; Naya, Noriyuki; Fujieda, Kumiko; Iwasaki, Takanori; Yukioka, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    Hyperinsulinemia is widely thought to be a compensatory response to insulin resistance, whereas its potentially causal role in the progression of insulin resistance remains to be established. Here, we aimed to examine whether hyperinsulinemia could affect the progression of insulin resistance in Zucker fatty diabetic (ZDF) rats. Male ZDF rats at 8 wk of age were fed a diet ad libitum (AL) or dietary restriction (DR) of either 15 or 30% from AL feeding over 6 wk. Insulin sensitivity was determined by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. ZDF rats in the AL group progressively developed hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia by 10 wk of age, and then plasma insulin rapidly declined to nearly normal levels by 12 wk of age. Compared with AL group, DR groups showed delayed onset of hyperglycemia and persistent hyperinsulinemia, leading to weight gain and raised plasma triglycerides and free fatty acids by 14 wk of age. Notably, insulin sensitivity was significantly reduced in the DR group rather than the AL group and inversely correlated with plasma levels of insulin and triglyceride but not glucose. Moreover, enhanced lipid deposition and upregulation of genes involved in lipogenesis were detected in liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissues of the DR group rather than the AL group. Alternatively, continuous hyperinsulinemia induced by insulin pellet implantation produced a decrease in insulin sensitivity in ZDF rats. These results suggest that chronic hyperinsulinemia may lead to the progression of insulin resistance under DR conditions in association with altered lipid metabolism in peripheral tissues in ZDF rats. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Sweet Taste Receptor TAS1R2 Polymorphism (Val191Val Is Associated with a Higher Carbohydrate Intake and Hypertriglyceridemia among the Population of West Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Ramos-Lopez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Some high-carbohydrate diets may lead to obesity and multiple metabolic disorders, including hypertriglyceridemia (HTG. This lipid abnormality is considered an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The sweet taste receptor TAS1R2 polymorphism (Ile191Val has been reported to be associated with carbohydrate intake. The aim of this study was to analyze the association of the TAS1R2 gene polymorphism with carbohydrate intake and HTG among the population of West Mexico. In a cross-sectional study, 441 unrelated subjects were analyzed for TAS1R2 genotypes (Ile/Ile, Ile/Val and Val/Val by an allelic discrimination assay. Biochemical tests and a three-day food record were assessed. The Val/Val genotype carriers had a higher intake of total carbohydrates, fiber and servings of cereals and vegetables than the other genotype carriers. The Val/Val genotype conferred a higher risk for HTG than the Ile/Val and Ile/Ile genotypes (OR = 3.26, 95%CI 1.35–7.86, p = 0.006 and OR = 2.61, 95%CI 1.12–6.07, p = 0.02, respectively. Furthermore, the Val/Val genotype was associated with approximately 30% higher triglycerides compared with Ile/Val and Ile/Ile genotypes (β = 44.09, 95%CI 9.94–78.25, p = 0.01 and β = 45.7, 95%CI 10.85–80.54, p = 0.01, respectively. In conclusion, the Val/Val genotype of TAS1R2 was associated with a higher carbohydrate intake and HTG.

  19. Triple verses glimepiride plus metformin therapy on cardiovascular risk biomarkers and diabetic cardiomyopathy in insulin resistance type 2 diabetes mellitus rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashish Kumar; Srinivasan, B P

    2009-12-08

    IRtype2DM patients are often treated with a combination of antidiabetic agents. Drugs with different complementary mechanisms of action frequently used in daily clinical practice but glycemic control with monotherapeutic attempts fail in the long run. To date, biomarkers for cardiovascular risk and insulin sensitivity with combination of triple oral hypoglycemic therapies are not fully revelled in view of additional cardiovascular risk reduction. In the present study, IRtype2DM induced by administering streptozotocin (90 mg/kg, i.p.) in neonatal rat model. IRtype2DM rats were selected by determining FPI [>60 pmol/l]; HOMA-IR & Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique at 6 weeks and then treated for 8 weeks with (i) Metformin (120 mg/kg, o.d.)+Glimepiride (1mg/kg, o.d.), (ii) Metformin (265 mg/kg, o.d.)+Rosiglitazone (1mg/kg, o.d.)+Glimepiride (0.7 mg/kg, o.d.). At the end cardiovascular risk parameters evaluated by ELISA kits and insulin sensitivity were determined by HOMA-IR. In conclusion, triple oral hypoglycemic therapy improves glycemic control, insulin sensitivity, retards diabetic cardiomyopathy and does not increased body weight; decrease more detrimental inflammatory markers, increase interleukin-10 and adiponectin in neonatal streptozotocin-induced IRtype2DM Wistar Albino Rats. Triple therapy showed a synergistic effect and was promising in insulin resistance, better in additional cardiovascular risk reduction and those nonresponders to metformin add on glimepiride therapy.

  20. Efficacy and Safety of Adding Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Statin-treated Patients with Residual Hypertriglyceridemia: ROMANTIC (Rosuvastatin-OMAcor iN residual hyperTrIglyCeridemia), a Randomized, Double-blind, and Placebo-controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chee Hae; Han, Kyung Ah; Yu, Jaemyung; Lee, Sang Hak; Jeon, Hui Kyung; Kim, Sang Hyun; Kim, Seok Yeon; Han, Ki Hoon; Won, Kyungheon; Kim, Dong-Bin; Lee, Kwang-Jae; Min, Kyungwan; Byun, Dong Won; Lim, Sang-Wook; Ahn, Chul Woo; Kim, SeongHwan; Hong, Young Joon; Sung, Jidong; Hur, Seung-Ho; Hong, Soon Jun; Lim, Hong-Seok; Park, Ie Byung; Kim, In Joo; Lee, Hyoungwoo; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy and safety of adding ω-3 fatty acids to rosuvastatin in patients with residual hypertriglyceridemia despite statin treatment. This study was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. After a 4-week run-in period of rosuvastatin treatment, the patients who had residual hypertriglyceridemia were randomized to receive rosuvastatin 20 mg/d plus ω-3 fatty acids 4 g/d (ROSUMEGA group) or rosuvastatin 20 mg/d (rosuvastatin group) with a 1:1 ratio and were prescribed each medication for 8 weeks. A total of 201 patients were analyzed (mean [SD] age, 58.1 [10.7] years; 62.7% male). After 8 weeks of treatment, the percentage change from baseline in triglycerides (TGs) and non-HDL-C was significantly greater in the ROSUMEGA group than in the rosuvastatin group (TGs: -26.3% vs -11.4%, P < 0.001; non-HDL-C: -10.7% vs -2.2%, P = 0.001). In the linear regression analysis, the lipid-lowering effect of ω-3 fatty acids was greater when baseline TG or non-HDL-C levels were high and body mass index was low. The incidence of adverse events was not significantly different between the 2 groups. In patients with residual hypertriglyceridemia despite statin treatment, a combination of ω-3 fatty acids and rosuvastatin produced a greater reduction of TGs and non-HDL-C than rosuvastatin alone. Further study is needed to determine whether the advantages of this lipid profile of ω-3 fatty acids actually leads to the prevention of cardiovascular event. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT03026933. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dose- and time-dependent association of smoking and its cessation with glycemic control and insulin resistance in male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Ohkuma

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking is an important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. However, the effect of smoking and its cessation on glycemic control in diabetic patients has not been fully examined yet. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of smoking status with glycemic level and markers of insulin resistance and secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.A total of 2,490 Japanese male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus aged ≥20 years were divided according to smoking status, amount of cigarettes smoked and years since quitting. The associations with glycemic level and markers of insulin resistance and secretion were examined cross-sectionally.HbA1c levels increased progressively with increases in both number of cigarettes per day and pack-years of cigarette smoking compared with never smokers (P for trend = 0.001 and <0.001, respectively, whereas fasting plasma glucose did not. On the other hand, HbA1c, but not fasting plasma glucose, decreased linearly with increase in years after smoking cessation (P for trend <0.001. These graded relationships persisted significantly after controlling for the confounders, including total energy intake, current drinking, regular exercise, depressive symptoms, and BMI. In addition, a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein also showed similar trends.Smoking and its cessation showed dose- and time-dependent relationship with glycemic control and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. These findings may highlight the importance of smoking cessation in the clinical management of diabetes mellitus.

  2. The SNARE protein SNAP23 and the SNARE-interacting protein Munc18c in human skeletal muscle are implicated in insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boström, Pontus; Andersson, Linda; Vind, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    association between lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle and insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes in humans, as well as to identify a potential regulator of SNAP23. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies from patients with type 2 diabetes and healthy, insulin-sensitive control......OBJECTIVE: Our previous studies suggest that the SNARE protein synaptosomal-associated protein of 23 kDa (SNAP23) is involved in the link between increased lipid levels and insulin resistance in cardiomyocytes. The objective was to determine whether SNAP23 may also be involved in the known...... subjects for expression (mRNA and protein) and intracellular localization (subcellular fractionation and immunohistochemistry) of SNAP23, and for expression of proteins known to interact with SNARE proteins. Insulin resistance was determined by a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Potential mechanisms...

  3. Serum lipoprotein ratios as markers of insulin resistance: A study among non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome patients with impaired fasting glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ray

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Recent data suggest that insulin resistance can predict cardiovascular disease independently of the other risk factors, such as hypertension, visceral obesity or dyslipidaemia. However, the majority of available methods to evaluate insulin resistance are complicated to operate, expensive, and time consuming. This study was undertaken to assess whether serum lipoprotein ratios could predict insulin resistance in non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome (ACS patients. Methods: Ninety non-diabetic patients with impaired fasting glucose admitted with a diagnosis of ACS were included in the study. At the time of admission fasting glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. The homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR was used for insulin resistance. The fasting serum total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels were checked, and then TC/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C ratios were calculated. The areas under the curves (AUC of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were used to compare the power of these serum lipoprotein ratios as markers. Results: Lipoprotein ratios were significantly higher in patients with HOMA-IR index > 2.5 as compared to patients with index <2.5 (P < 0.05. Both TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratios were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR (P<0.05. The area under the ROC curve of the TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratio for predicting insulin resistance was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67 to 0.93, 0.78 (95% CI, 0.65 to 0.91, respectively. Interpretation & conclusions: The findings of this study demonstrate that serum lipoprotein ratios can provide a simple means of identifying insulin resistance and can be used as markers of insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases risk in adult non-diabetic patients.

  4. Inflammatory Cytokine Profile Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Molina-Ayala, Mario; Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Vargas, Guadalupe; Isibasi, Armando; Archundia-Riveros, Irma; Mendoza, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-10, TNF, IL-8, resistin, and adiponectin in type 1 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and to determine the cut-off point of the estimated glucose disposal rate that accurately differentiated these groups. Design. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of all patients in our type 1 diabetes clinic from January 2012 to January 2013. Patients were considered to have metabolic syndrome when they fulfilled the joint statement criteria and were evaluated for clinical, biochemical, and immunological features. Methods. We determined serum IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF with flow cytometry and adiponectin and resistin concentrations with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with and without metabolic syndrome. We also compared estimated glucose disposal rate between groups. Results. We tested 140 patients. Forty-four percent fulfilled the metabolic syndrome criteria (n = 61), 54% had central obesity, 30% had hypertriglyceridemia, 29% had hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and 19% had hypertension. We observed that resistin concentrations were higher in patients with MS. Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of MS in Mexican patients with T1D. The increased level of resistin may be related to the increased fat mass and could be involved in the development of insulin resistance. PMID:26273680

  5. Inflammatory Cytokine Profile Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Ferreira-Hermosillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-10, TNF, IL-8, resistin, and adiponectin in type 1 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and to determine the cut-off point of the estimated glucose disposal rate that accurately differentiated these groups. Design. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of all patients in our type 1 diabetes clinic from January 2012 to January 2013. Patients were considered to have metabolic syndrome when they fulfilled the joint statement criteria and were evaluated for clinical, biochemical, and immunological features. Methods. We determined serum IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF with flow cytometry and adiponectin and resistin concentrations with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with and without metabolic syndrome. We also compared estimated glucose disposal rate between groups. Results. We tested 140 patients. Forty-four percent fulfilled the metabolic syndrome criteria (n=61, 54% had central obesity, 30% had hypertriglyceridemia, 29% had hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and 19% had hypertension. We observed that resistin concentrations were higher in patients with MS. Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of MS in Mexican patients with T1D. The increased level of resistin may be related to the increased fat mass and could be involved in the development of insulin resistance.

  6. Maternal and fetal lipid metabolism under normal and gestational diabetic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Emilio; Desoye, Gernot

    2016-05-01

    Maternal lipids are strong determinants of fetal fat mass. Here we review the overall lipid metabolism in normal and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) pregnancies. During early pregnancy, the increase in maternal fat depots is facilitated by insulin, followed by increased adipose tissue breakdown and subsequent hypertriglyceridemia, mainly as a result of insulin resistance (IR) and estrogen effects. The response to diabetes is variable as a result of greater IR but decreased estrogen levels. The vast majority of fatty acids (FAs) in the maternal circulation are esterified and associated with lipoproteins. These are taken up by the placenta and hydrolyzed by lipases. The released FAs enter various metabolic routes and are released into fetal circulation. Although these determinants are modified in maternal GDM, the fetus does not seem to receive more FAs than in non-GDM pregnancies. Long-chain polyunsaturated FAs are essential for fetal development and are obtained from the mother. Mitochondrial FA oxidation occurs in fetal tissue and in placenta and contributes to energy production. Fetal fat accretion during the last weeks of gestation occurs very rapidly and is sustained not only by FAs crossing the placenta, but also by fetal lipogenesis. Fetal hyperinsulinemia in GDM mothers promotes excess accretion of adipose tissue, which gives rise to altered adipocytokine profiles. Fetal lipoproteins are low at birth, but the GDM effects are unclear. The increase in body fat in neonates of GDM women is a risk factor for obesity in early childhood and later life.

  7. APOA5 Q97X Mutation Identified through homozygosity mapping causes severe hypertriglyceridemia in a Chilean consanguineous family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dussaillant Catalina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG has been linked to defects in LPL, APOC2, APOA5, LMF1 and GBIHBP1 genes. However, a number of severe HTG cases are probably caused by as yet unidentified mutations. Very high triglyceride plasma levels (>112 mmol/L at diagnosis were found in two sisters of a Chilean consanguineous family, which is strongly suggestive of a recessive highly penetrant mutation. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic locus responsible for the severe HTG in this family. Methods We carried out a genome-wide linkage study with nearly 300,000 biallelic markers (Illumina Human CytoSNP-12 panel. Using the homozygosity mapping strategy, we searched for chromosome regions with excess of homozygous genotypes in the affected cases compared to non-affected relatives. Results A large homozygous segment was found in the long arm of chromosome 11, with more than 2,500 consecutive homozygous SNP shared by the proband with her affected sister, and containing the APOA5/A4/C3/A1 cluster. Direct sequencing of the APOA5 gene revealed a known homozygous nonsense Q97X mutation (p.Gln97Ter found in both affected sisters but not in non-affected relatives nor in a sample of unrelated controls. Conclusion The Q97X mutation of the APOA5 gene in homozygous status is responsible for the severe hypertriglyceridemia in this family. We have shown that homozygosity mapping correctly pinpointed the genomic region containing the gene responsible for severe hypertriglyceridemia in this consanguineous Chilean family.

  8. Sleep duration, obesity and insulin resistance in a multi-ethnic UK population at high risk of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, E M; Bodicoat, D H; Hall, A P; Khunti, K; Yates, T; Edwardson, C; Davies, M J

    2018-03-09

    Investigating the association between sleep duration, obesity, adipokines and insulin resistance (via Leptin:Adiponectin ratio (LAR)), in those at high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Adults with impaired glucose regulation (IGR) were included. Fasting bloods for inflammatory biomarkers and glycaemic status, 2-h glucose, anthropometrics, objective physical activity, and self-reported sleep were collected. The average number of hours slept in a 24 h period was categorised as ≤5.5, 6-6.5, 7-7.5, 8-8.5, and ≥9 h. Regression models were fitted with sleep (linear and quadratic) and logistic regression used for IGR and adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, body mass index, waist circumference and objective physical activity. 2848 participants included (593 with inflammatory marker data). Short sleep and long sleep duration were significantly independently associated with higher body mass index (P < 0.001), body weight (P < 0.01), and waist circumference (P < 0.001). 6-7 h of sleep/24 h is associated with the lowest obesity measures. Fasting insulin and LAR were positively associated with sleep duration. Adiponectin levels were negatively associated with sleep duration. These results support the evidence of an association between short and long sleep duration and indices of obesity. We demonstrate an independent relationship between long sleep duration and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Visfatin in overweight/obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases: a meta-analysis and systemic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hung; Chang, Dao-Ming; Lin, Kun-Cheng; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Lee, Yau-Jiunn

    2011-09-01

    There are controversies regarding the association of visfatin with overweight/obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance (IR), metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease in published articles. A meta-analysis was performed to identify the significance of visfatin in these diseases. We searched for relevant articles in Pubmed, Scopus and SCIE. A total of 1035 articles were surveyed and 46 articles were identified, with 14 reports reporting more than one of our investigated diseases. A total of 13 (n = 644), 19 (n = 2405), 20 (n = 2249), 5 (n = 527) and 5 (n = 851) articles/(participants) were included in each meta-analysis regarding the association of visfatin and overweight/obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases, respectively. Plasma visfatin concentrations were increased in participants diagnosed with overweight/obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases, with pooled log odds ratios of 1.164 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.348 to 1.981, p = 0.005], 1.981 (95% CI: 1.377 to 2.584, p diabetes status, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Effects of a treatment with Se-rich rice flour high in resistant starch on enteric dysbiosis and chronic inflammation in diabetic ICR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huaibo; Wang, Wenjuan; Chen, Deyi; Zhu, Xiping; Meng, Lina

    2017-05-01

    Enteric dysbiosis is associated with chronic inflammation and interacts with obesity and insulin resistance. Obesity and diabetes are induced in ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) mice fed a high-fat diet and administered a streptozocin injection. These mice were treated with normal rice (NR), normal rice with a high resistant starch content (NRRS) or Se-rich rice (selenium-enriched rice) with a high resistant starch content (SRRS). Faecal cell counts of Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus and Enterococcus were significantly higher in SRRS-treated mice than in diabetic controls, while Enterobacter cloacae were lower. Similar results were also found in NRRS-treated mice. In contrast, no significant difference was found between NR-treated and diabetic control groups. The treatments with SRRS and NRRS reduced the faecal pH values of the diabetic mice. Regarding the inflammatory factor levels, lower levels of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), nuclear factor-k-gene binding (NF-κB) and leptin (LEP) and higher adiponutrin (ADPN) levels were found in the SRRS and NRRS-treated mice compared with the diabetic and NR-treated mice. In addition, the CRP, IL-6 and NF-κB levels in the SRRS-treated mice were significantly reduced compared with those observed in the NRRS-treated mice. The reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) results showed that the SRRS and NRRS-treated mice presented higher expression levels of orphan G protein-coupled receptor 41 (GPR41) and orphan G protein-coupled receptor 43 (GPR43) proteins compared with diabetic mice and NR-treated mice. These results indicate that treatments with rice high in RS exert beneficial effects by improving enteric dysbiosis and chronic inflammation. In addition, selenium and RS may exert synergistic effects on chronic inflammation. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Effect of Roux-en-Y Bariatric Surgery on Lipoproteins, Insulin Resistance, and Systemic and Vascular Inflammation in Obesity and Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rahul; Hama, Salam; Liu, Yifen; Siahmansur, Tarza; Schofield, Jonathan; Syed, Akheel A; France, Michael; Pemberton, Philip; Adam, Safwaan; Ho, Jan Hoong; Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Dhage, Shaishav; Donn, Rachelle; Malik, Rayaz A; New, John P; Jeziorska, Maria; Durrington, Paul; Ammori, Basil A; Soran, Handrean

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a major modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Bariatric surgery is considered to be the most effective treatment option for weight reduction in obese patients with and without type 2 diabetes (T2DM). To evaluate changes in lipoproteins, insulin resistance, mediators of systemic and vascular inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction following Roux-en-Y bariatric surgery in obese patients with and without diabetes. Lipoproteins, insulin resistance, mediators of systemic and vascular inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction were measured in 37 obese patients with ( n  = 17) and without ( n  = 20) T2DM, before and 6 and 12 months after Roux-en-Y bariatric surgery. Two way between subject ANOVA was carried out to study the interaction between independent variables ( time since surgery and presence of diabetes ) and all dependent variables. There was a significant effect of time since surgery on (large effect size) weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, triglycerides (TG), small-dense LDL apolipoprotein B (sdLDL ApoB), HOMA-IR, CRP, MCP-1, ICAM-1, E-selectin, P-selectin, leptin, and adiponectin. BMI and waist circumference had the largest impact of time since surgery . The effect of time since surgery was noticed mostly in the first 6 months. Absence of diabetes led to a significantly greater reduction in total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol although the effect size was small to medium. There was a greater reduction in TG and HOMA-IR in patients with diabetes with a small effect size. No patients were lost to follow up. Lipoproteins, insulin resistance, mediators of systemic and vascular inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction improve mostly 6 months after bariatric surgery in obese patients with and without diabetes. www.ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT02169518. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02169518?term=paraoxonase&cntry1=EU%3AGB&rank=1.

  12. Newborn size and body composition as predictors of insulin resistance and diabetes in the parents: Parthenon Birth Cohort Study, Mysore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veena, Sargoor R; Krishnaveni, Ghattu V; Fall, Caroline H

    2012-09-01

    We aimed to examine detailed neonatal measurements as predictors of later diabetes in both parents. Babies (n = 617) born to nondiabetic parents in Holdsworth Memorial Hospital, Mysore, India, were measured at birth for weight; crown-to-heel length (CHL), crown-to-rump length (CRL), and leg length; skinfolds (triceps and subscapular); and circumferences (head, abdomen, and mid-upper-arm circumference [MUAC]). Nine and a half years later, glucose tolerance and fasting insulin were measured in their parents (469 mothers and 398 fathers). Sixty-two (15.6%) fathers and 22 (4.7%) mothers had developed diabetes. There were linear inverse associations of the children's birth weight, CHL, CRL, MUAC, and skinfolds with paternal diabetes and insulin resistance (P < 0.05 for all). Offspring birth weight and adiposity (MUAC, abdominal circumference, and skinfolds) showed U-shaped associations with maternal diabetes (P for quadratic association <0.05 for all). These associations persisted after adjusting for the parents' current adiposity and maternal glucose concentrations and adiposity during pregnancy. Newborn adiposity was positively related to maternal insulin resistance; this association was nonsignificant after adjusting for maternal current adiposity. Newborn size is a window into the future health of the parents. Small newborn size (especially soft-tissue body components) predicts an increased risk of later diabetes in both parents, suggesting a genetic or epigenetic link between parents' diabetes risk and reduced fetal growth in their children. The association of higher birth weight and newborn adiposity with later maternal diabetes suggests effects on fetal adiposity of the intrauterine environment in prediabetic mothers.

  13. Effect of atorvastatin on pancreatic Beta-cell function and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Aman; Singh, Surender; Tandon, Nikhil; Gupta, Nandita; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Statins are commonly used for the management of dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. We hypothesized that atorvastatin could modulate the beta-cell function by altering the levels of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic lipoproteins and could also have an effect on insulin resistance. The aim of the present pilot study was to assess the effect of atorvastatin 10 mg on pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin resistance in patients with hyperlipidemia and type 2 diabetes by using the homeostasis model assessment-2 (HOMA2) index. Fifty-one type 2 diabetes patients receiving oral antidiabetes drugs, not taking statins, with baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol between 2.6 mmol/L and 4.1 mmol/L were included. Forty-three patients (21 in placebo group and 22 in atorvastatin group) completed the study and were taken up for final analysis. Fasting blood samples were obtained at baseline and at 12 weeks to determine levels of blood glucose, lipid profile, insulin, C-peptide and glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C). Atorvastatin nonsignificantly increased fasting serum insulin (+14.29%, p=0.18), accompanied by marginal nonsignificant increases in fasting plasma glucose and A1C. There was a decrease in HOMA2 percent beta-cell function (-2.9%, p=0.72) and increase in HOMA2 insulin resistance (+14%, p=0.16) in the atorvastatin group as compared with baseline, but the difference was not statistically significant. Atorvastatin in the dose used failed to produce significant change in pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients as assessed by the HOMA2 index. The possible explanations include absence of lipotoxicity at prevailing levels of dyslipidemia at baseline or inadequacy of statin dose used in the study. (Clinical Trials Registry-India: CTRI/2008/091/000099). Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cinnamon: potential role in the prevention of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The metabolic syndrome is associated with insulin resistance, elevated glucose and lipids, inflammation, decreased antioxidant activity, increased weight gain, and increased glycation of proteins. Cinnamon has been shown to improve aspects of metabolic syndrome in cells cultured in vitro, and in an...

  15. Severe insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus in patients with congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Klein, H H; Hansen, T

    1995-01-01

    severe insulin resistance of both liver and peripheral tissues. The impaired insulin-stimulated glucose disposal to peripheral tissues was primarily due to reduced nonoxidative glucose metabolism. These changes were paralleled by reduced basal values of muscle GS total activity, allosterical activation...

  16. Liver alanine aminotransferase, insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction in normotriglyceridaemic subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schindhelm, RK; Diamant, M; Bakker, SJL; van Dijk, RAJM; Scheffer, PG; Teerlink, T; Kostense, PJ; Heine, RJ

    Background Plasma levels of liver transaminases, including alanine aminotransferase (ALT), are elevated in most cases of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Elevated ALT levels are associated with insulin resistance, and subjects with NAFLD have features of the metabolic syndrome that confer

  17. Pleotropic effects of leptin to reverse insulin resistance and diabetic ketoacidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Rachel J; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    In this review we discuss the mechanisms for the pleotropic effects of leptin replacement therapy to reverse liver and muscle insulin resistance in lipodystrophic individuals, as well as insulin-independent effects of leptin replacement therapy to suppress white adipose tissue lipolysis, hepatic ...

  18. Alteration of serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha level in gestational diabetes mellitus and correlation with insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Gang; Li Cuiyin; Shao Hao; Lu Zeyuan; Lai Liping; Liu Lan; Hu Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the dynamic of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)and its correlation with insulin resistance (IR)during different stages of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods: Thirty-two subjects with GDM and 31 cases of normal pregnant women nonnal glucose tolerance, NGT were enrolled in the study, serum TNF-α and insulin were determined by radioimmunoassay. The plasma glucose was measured by using glucose oxidase. Tests repeated for each group according different stages of prenatal 25-28 weeks, 29-32 weeks, 37-38 weeks and postpartum 6-8 weeks. IR was assessed by the homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR). Results: (1)Serum TNF-α levels in CDM and NGT group rose with gestational age, and both significantly decreased at postpartum. (2) Serum TNF-α levels in GDM of above-mentioned four stages respectively were (7.05±0.67) ng/L, (7.11± 0.75) ng/L, (7.36±0.79) ng/L, (5.46±0.37) ng/L respectively. All significantly increased than those in the same stage group (t=7.81, 7.05, 7.15, P<0.01). (3) Maternal serum TNF-α levels were in positive correlation with HOMA-IR in GDM (r=0.571, P<0.05). Conclusions: Serum TNF-α levels in GDM rose with gestational age, but significantly decreased at postpartum. The dynamic changes of serum TNF-α contribute to occurrence of insulin resistance. (authors)

  19. Combination of a structured aerobic and resistance exercise improves glycaemic control in pregnant women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus. A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklempe Kokic, Iva; Ivanisevic, Marina; Biolo, Gianni; Simunic, Bostjan; Kokic, Tomislav; Pisot, Rado

    2017-10-18

    Gestational diabetes mellitus, defined as any carbohydrate intolerance first diagnosed during pregnancy, is associated with a variety of adverse outcomes, both for the mother and her child. To investigate the impact of a structured exercise programme which consisted of aerobic and resistance exercises on the parameters of glycaemic control and other health-related outcomes in pregnant women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus. Thirty-eight pregnant women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus were randomised to two groups. Experimental group was treated with standard antenatal care for gestational diabetes mellitus, and regular supervised exercise programme plus daily brisk walks of at least 30min. Control group received only standard antenatal care for gestational diabetes mellitus. The exercise programme was started from the time of diagnosis of diabetes until birth. It was performed two times per week and sessions lasted 50-55min. The experimental group had lower postprandial glucose levels at the end of pregnancy (Pexercise programme had a beneficial effect on postprandial glucose levels at the end of pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Prevalence of Hypertriglyceridemia: New Data Across the Russian Population. The PROMETHEUS Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov On Behalf Of Participants Of The Prometheus Study, Yu A

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of the study was to estimate prevalence of subjects with hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) in Russia. Secondary objectives were to explore HTG prevalence by levels, age and sex, and to assess correlation between glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and triglyceride (TG) level. Additionally, we analyzed geographical differences in HTG prevalence in regions of Russia. This was a cross-sectional, retrospective, observational study using database of results of lipid profile determination in 357,072 subjects from 254 Russian cities during the 3-year period from 2011 to 2013. Altogether, 29.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 29.1-29.4%) of Russian individuals had HTG (serum TG more or equal 1.7 mmol/L). The percentage of patients with very high (TG more or equal 5.6 mmol/L) and severe HTG (TG more or equal 10.0mmol/L) was low (0.01% and 0.011%, respectively). At the same time, the portion of subjects with mixed hyperlipidemia (total cholesterol [TC] more or equal 5.2mmol/L, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C] more or equal 3.4 mmol/L, TG more or equal 1.7 mmol/L) was 19% of the study population. Men had 1.25 (95% CI, 1.24-1.26) times higher risk of HTG than women. Prevalence of HTG increased with age: in women TG level was maximal in the age group 60-69 years (34%), whereas in men TG level was maximal in the age group 40-49 years (43%). Prevalence of HTG increased from 2011 to 2013 from 28 to 30% (p<0.0001). Risk of HTG was 1.69 times greater when high HbA1C more or equal 6.5% was present, and vice versa, risk of HbA1C more or equal 6.5% was 2.04 times higher in individuals with HTG. Distribution of HTG and dyslipidemia by regions of Russia had large variability being higher in the south and lower in the northern regions of European part of Russia. Almost a third of Russian population has HTG. Men have higher risk of HTG than women. Prevalence of HTG increases with age and reaches its peak in age groups 60-69 years in (women) and 40-49 years (men). There is a

  1. "The impact of vitamin C and E, Magnesium and Zinc on glycemic control and insulin resistance in type II diabetic patients "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farvid MS

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study designed to assess the effect of Mg+Zn, vitamin C+E, and combination of these micronutrients on glycemic control and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial, 69 type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into four groups, each group receiving one of the following daily supplement for 3 months; group M: 200 mg and 30 mg Zn (n=16, group V: 200 mg vitamin C and 150 mg vitamin E (n=18, group MV: minerals plus vitamins (n=17, group P: placebo (n=18.Fasting blood glucose, fructosamine, HbA1c and serum insulin were measured at the beginning and at the end of 3 months supplementation. Insulin resistance was calculated by HOMA score. Treatment effects were analyzed by general linear modeling. Results: After 3 months of supplementation fasting blood glucose decreased in MV group (165±46 vs 177±41 mg/dl, p=0.035. There was no significant change in fructoseamin, HbA1c, serum insulin or insulin resistance in treatment groups. Conclusion: The results of the present study provide evidence for the effects of combination of Mg, Zn and vitamin C and E supplementations on improvement of fasting blood glucose but not fructosamine, HbA1c, serum insulin or insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients.

  2. Relative iron "overload" in offspring of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a new component in the conundrum of insulin resistance syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psyrogiannis, Agathoklis; Kyriazopoulou, Venetsana; Symeonidis, Argiris; Leotsinidis, Michalis; Vagenakis, Apostolos G

    2003-01-01

    There are a few reports suggesting that subtle disturbances of iron metabolism are frequently found in patients with type 2 diabetes (DM2), but it is not known if these disturbances precede or accompany the diabetic state. We investigated the serum iron indices in 41 offspring of DM2 parents (group I) with normal glucose tolerance, and in 49 offspring whose parents had no history of DM2 and were matched for sex, age, body mass index (BMI), waist to hip ratio (WHR) and blood pressure (group II). Serum iron, ferritin, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), transferrin saturation, serum triglycerides, cholesterol, Apo-B, high density lipoprotein (HDL) and glucose and insulin values during an oral glucose tolerance test were measured. Insulin resistance was assessed using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA - Insuline resistence index-IRI). In comparison to controls (group II), the offspring of DM2 subjects (group I) had higher fasting serum triglycerides (mean +/- SD 2.25+/-2.08 vs. 1.6+/-0.8 mmol/L, pinsulin in the Area Under the Curve (204.7+/-140.8 v. 153.1 +/- 63.0 microU/ml, pinsulin resistance. Hence, the relative iron "overload" in offspring of type 2 diabetics is present along with insulin resistance and might worsen the hepatic insulin insensitivity already present in these patients.

  3. Undercarboxylated osteocalcin does not correlate with insulin resistance as assessed by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mori Katsuhito

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have suggested a critical role of osteocalcin (OC, especially the undercarboxylated form (ucOC, in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between serum ucOC levels and insulin resistance in humans with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Findings We measured serum ucOC levels in 129 patients with type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance was assessed using the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique. The insulin resistance indices used were the M value, which is the total body glucose disposal rate, and the M/I value, which is the M value adjusted for the steady state plasma insulin level. ucOC levels were not correlated with the M value (ρ = −0.013, p = 0.886 or the M/I value (ρ = 0.001, p = 0.995. Conclusions We found no association between ucOC levels and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  4. Leptin-to-Adiponectin Ratio is Related to Low Grade Inflammation and Insulin Resistance Independent of Obesity in Non-Diabetic Taiwanese: A Cross-Sectional Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Hsin-Hua; Hsu, Lung-An; Wu, Semon; Teng, Ming-Sheng; Sun, Yu-Chen; Ko, Yu-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background Leptin and adiponectin are secreted from adipose tissue and exert opposing effects on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and insulin resistance. As hypertrophic adipocytes secrete more leptin and less adiponectin, the leptin-to adiponectin ratio (LAR) has been proposed as a useful measure of insulin resistance and vascular risk. We investigated whether LAR may serve as a better predictor than either leptin or adiponectin alone for low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance independent of obesity in a non-diabetic Taiwanese population. Methods This study included 568 non-diabetic Taiwanese individuals (297 men, 271 women). CRP, leptin and adiponectin were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The degree of insulin resistance was determined using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Results In the receiver operator characteristic analysis, the area under the curve of LAR in predicting individuals with elevated CRP and insulin resistance was significantly greater than that for either leptin (p = 0.0035 vs. elevated CRP, p HOMA-IR index (p HOMA-IR are greater than the association with leptin or adiponectin alone. PMID:27122790

  5. Design of Hack-Resistant Diabetes Devices and Disclosure of Their Cyber Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackner-Bernstein, Jonathan

    2017-03-01

    The focus of the medical device industry and regulatory bodies on cyber security parallels that in other industries, primarily on risk assessment and user education as well as the recognition and response to infiltration. However, transparency of the safety of marketed devices is lacking and developers are not embracing optimal design practices with new devices. Achieving cyber safe diabetes devices: To improve understanding of cyber safety by clinicians and patients, and inform decision making on use practices of medical devices requires disclosure by device manufacturers of the results of their cyber security testing. Furthermore, developers should immediately shift their design processes to deliver better cyber safety, exemplified by use of state of the art encryption, secure operating systems, and memory protections from malware.

  6. Benefits of a 12-week lifestyle modification program including diet and combined aerobic and resistance exercise on albuminuria in diabetic and non-diabetic Japanese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto-Kabasawa, Keiko; Hosojima, Michihiro; Yata, Yusuke; Saito, Mariko; Tanaka, Noriko; Tanaka, Junta; Tanabe, Naohito; Narita, Ichiei; Arakawa, Masaaki; Saito, Akihiko

    2015-12-01

    Albuminuria is a biomarker for chronic kidney disease and an independent predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. A recent meta-analysis concluded that these risks increase with urinary albumin concentration, even when below the microalbuminuria threshold. Thus, minimizing urinary albumin may be a valuable therapeutic goal regardless of disease status. We investigated the benefits and safety of a 12-week lifestyle modification program including diet and combined aerobic and resistance exercise for reducing albuminuria in 295 normoalbuminuric or microalbuminuric Japanese adults, including 30 with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), 104 with metabolic syndrome (MS), and 145 with hypertension (HT). In the study population, the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (UACR) was reduced significantly (ΔUACR -3.8 ± 16.8 mg/g, P < 0.001) with no change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (ΔeGFR -0.4 ± 7.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2), P = 0.343). The reduction in UACR was associated with decreased fasting plasma glucose (P < 0.05). The UACR was also reduced in the T2DM, MS, and HT groups with no change in eGFR. Reduced UACR was associated with decreased fasting plasma glucose in the MS group and decreased systolic blood pressure in the HT group. The UACR was also reduced in 46 subjects using renin-angiotensin system inhibitors with no change in eGFR. Our 12-week lifestyle modification program reduced UACR, maintained eGFR, and improved multiple fitness findings in Japanese subjects including T2DM, MS, and HT patients.

  7. Neighborhood price of healthier food relative to unhealthy food and its association with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance: The multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, David M; Auchincloss, Amy H; Stehr, Mark F; Diez Roux, Ana V; Moore, Kari A; Kanter, Genevieve P; Robinson, Lucy F

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the association between the price of healthier food relative to unhealthy food and type 2 diabetes prevalence, incidence and insulin resistance (IR). Data came from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis exam 5 administered 2010-2012 (exam 4, five years prior, was used only for diabetes incidence) and supermarket food/beverage prices derived from Information Resources Inc. For each individual, average price of a selection of healthier foods, unhealthy foods and their ratio was computed for supermarkets within 3miles of the person's residential address. Diabetes status was confirmed at each exam and IR was assessed via the homeostasis model assessment index. Multivariable-adjusted logistic, modified Poisson and linear regression models were used to model diabetes prevalence, incidence and IR, respectively as a function of price and covariates; 2353 to 3408 participants were included in analyses (depending on the outcome). A higher ratio of healthy-to-unhealthy neighborhood food price was associated with greater IR (4.8% higher HOMA-IR score for each standard deviation higher price ratio [95% CI -0.2% to 10.1%]) after adjusting for region, age, gender, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, income/wealth index, education, smoking status, physical activity, and neighborhood socioeconomic status. No association with diabetes incidence (relative risk=1.11, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.44) or prevalence (odds ratio=0.95, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.11) was observed. Higher neighborhood prices of healthier food relative to unhealthy food were positively associated with IR, but not with either diabetes outcome. This study provides new insight into the relationship between food prices with IR and diabetes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Diabetic Foot Infections in a Large Academic Hospital: Implications for Antimicrobial Stewardship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly R Reveles

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot infections (DFIs are the leading cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations in the United States. Antimicrobials active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are recommended in patients with associated risk factors; however, limited data exist to support these recommendations. Due to the changing epidemiology of MRSA, and the consequences of unnecessary antibiotic therapy, guidance regarding the necessity of empirical MRSA coverage in DFIs is needed. We sought to 1 describe the prevalence of MRSA DFIs at our institution and compare to the proportion of patients who receive MRSA antibiotic coverage and 2 identify risk factors for MRSA DFI.This was a retrospective cohort study of all adult, culture-positive DFI patients managed at University Hospital, San Antonio, TX between January 1, 2010 and September 1, 2014. Patient eligibility included a principal ICD-9-CM discharge diagnosis code for foot infection and a secondary diagnosis of diabetes. The primary outcome was MRSA identified in the wound culture. Independent variables assessed included patient demographics, comorbidities, prior hospitalization, DFI therapies, prior antibiotics, prior MRSA infection, and laboratory values. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for MRSA DFI.Overall, 318 patients met inclusion criteria. Patients were predominantly Hispanic (79% and male (69%. Common comorbidities included hypertension (76%, dyslipidemia (52%, and obesity (49%. S. aureus was present in 46% of culture-positive DFIs (MRSA, 15%. A total of 273 patients (86% received MRSA antibiotic coverage, resulting in 71% unnecessary use. Male gender (OR 3.09, 95% CI 1.37-7.99 and bone involvement (OR 1.93, 1.00-3.78 were found to be independent risk factors for MRSA DFI.Although MRSA was the causative pathogen in a small number of DFI, antibiotic coverage targeted against MRSA was unnecessarily high.

  9. Association between diabetes mellitus and multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis: a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegegne, Balewgizie Sileshi; Habtewold, Tesfa Dejenie; Mengesha, Melkamu Merid; Burgerhof, Johannes G M

    2017-01-14

    Multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has emerged as a challenge to global tuberculosis (TB) control and remains a major public health concern in many countries. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an increasingly recognized comorbidity that can both accelerate TB disease and complicate its treatment. The aim of this study is to summarize available evidence on the association of DM and MDR-TB among TB patients and to provide a pooled estimate of risks. All studies published in English before October 2016 will be searched using comprehensive search strings through PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and WHO Global Health Library databases which have reported the association of DM and MDR-TB in adults with TB (age > =15). Two authors will independently collect detailed information using structured data abstraction form. The quality of studies will be checked using Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for cohort and case-control studies and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality tool for cross-sectional studies. Heterogeneity between included studies will be assessed using the I 2 statistic. We will check potential publication bias by visual inspection of the funnel plot and Egger's regression test statistic. We will use the random effects model to compute a pooled estimate. Increases in the burden of non-communicable diseases and aging populations are changing the importance of different risk factors for TB, and the profile of comorbidities and clinical challenges for people with TB. Although classic risk factors and comorbidities such as overcrowding, under-nutrition, silicosis, and HIV infection are crucial to address, chronic conditions like diabetes are important factors that impair host defenses against TB. Thus, undertaking integrated multifaceted approach is remarkably necessary for reducing the burden of DM and successful TB treatment outcome. PROSPERO CRD42016045692 .

  10. Insulin resistance as a physiological defense against metabolic stress: implications for the management of subsets of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Christopher J; Ruderman, Neil B; Kahn, Steven E; Pedersen, Oluf; Prentki, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Stratifying the management of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has to take into account marked variability in patient phenotype due to heterogeneity in its pathophysiology, different stages of the disease process, and multiple other patient factors including comorbidities. The focus here is on the very challenging subgroup of patients with T2D who are overweight or obese with insulin resistance (IR) and the most refractory hyperglycemia due to an inability to change lifestyle to reverse positive energy balance. For this subgroup of patients with T2D, we question the dogma that IR is primarily harmful to the body and should be counteracted at any cost. Instead we propose that IR, particularly in this high-risk subgroup, is a defense mechanism that protects critical tissues of the cardiovascular system from nutrient-induced injury. Overriding IR in an effort to lower plasma glucose levels, particularly with intensive insulin therapy, could therefore be harmful. Treatments that nutrient off-load to lower glucose are more likely to be beneficial. The concepts of "IR as an adaptive defense mechanism" and "insulin-induced metabolic stress" may provide explanation for some of the unexpected outcomes of recent major clinical trials in T2D. Potential molecular mechanisms underlying these concepts; their clinical implications for stratification of T2D management, particularly in overweight and obese patients with difficult glycemic control; and future research requirements are discussed. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  11. Cinnamon: Potential Role in the Prevention of Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Syndrome, and Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Bolin; Panickar, Kiran S.; Anderson, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with insulin resistance, elevated glucose and lipids, inflammation, decreased antioxidant activity, increased weight gain, and increased glycation of proteins. Cinnamon has been shown to improve all of these variables in in vitro, animal, and/or human studies. In addition, cinnamon has been shown to alleviate factors associated with Alzheimer's disease by blocking and reversing tau formation in vitro and in ischemic stroke by blocking cell swelling. In vitro s...

  12. [Physiological patterns of intestinal microbiota. The role of dysbacteriosis in obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmos, Tamás; Suba, Ilona

    2016-01-03

    The intestinal microbiota is well-known for a long time, but due to newly recognized functions, clinician's attention has turned to it again in the last decade. About 100 000 billion bacteria are present in the human intestines. The composition of bacteriota living in diverse parts of the intestinal tract is variable according to age, body weight, geological site, and diet as well. Normal bacteriota defend the organism against the penetration of harmful microorganisms, and has many other functions in the gut wall integrity, innate immunity, insulin sensitivity, metabolism, and it is in cross-talk with the brain functions as well. It's a recent recognition, that intestinal microbiota has a direct effect on the brain, and the brain also influences the microbiota. This two-way gut-brain axis consists of microbiota, immune and neuroendocrine system, as well as of the autonomic and central nervous system. Emerging from fermentation of carbohydrates, short-chain fatty acids develop into the intestines, which produce butyrates, acetates and propionates, having favorable effects on different metabolic processes. Composition of the intestinal microbiota is affected by the circadian rhythm, such as in shift workers. Dysruption of circadian rhythm may influence intestinal microbiota. The imbalance between the microbiota and host organism leads to dysbacteriosis. From the membrane of Gram-negative bacteria lipopolysacharides penetrate into the blood stream, via impaired permeability of the intestinal mucosa. These processes induce metabolic endotoxaemia, inflammation, impaired glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, obesity, and contribute to the development of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, inflammarory bowel diseases, autoimmunity and carcinogenesis. Encouraging therapeutic possibility is to restore the normal microbiota either using pro- or prebiotics, fecal transplantation or bariatric surgery. Human investigations seem to prove that fecal transplant from lean

  13. Deletion of the basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan type XVIII collagen causes hypertriglyceridemia in mice and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Bishop

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein lipase (Lpl acts on triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the peripheral circulation, liberating free fatty acids for energy metabolism or storage. This essential enzyme is synthesized in parenchymal cells of adipose tissue, heart, and skeletal muscle and migrates to the luminal side of the vascular endothelium where it acts upon circulating lipoproteins. Prior studies suggested that Lpl is immobilized by way of heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the endothelium, but genetically altering endothelial cell heparan sulfate had no effect on Lpl localization or lipolysis. The objective of this study was to determine if extracellular matrix proteoglycans affect Lpl distribution and triglyceride metabolism.We examined mutant mice defective in collagen XVIII (Col18, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan present in vascular basement membranes. Loss of Col18 reduces plasma levels of Lpl enzyme and activity, which results in mild fasting hypertriglyceridemia and diet-induced hyperchylomicronemia. Humans with Knobloch Syndrome caused by a null mutation in the vascular form of Col18 also present lower than normal plasma Lpl mass and activity and exhibit fasting hypertriglyceridemia.This is the first report demonstrating that Lpl presentation on the lumenal side of the endothelium depends on a basement membrane proteoglycan and demonstrates a previously unrecognized phenotype in patients lacking Col18.

  14. Surprisingly low infertility rate in married type 2 diabetic women: A rather curious paradox to the current opinion of insulin resistance as the joint pathogenesis of poly cystic ovary syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakolian Arjmand, Abbas; Nouri, Mahnaz; Tavakolian Arjmand, Shima

    2015-01-01

    Sharing the same pathophysiologic principle which is insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and poly cystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are usually considered closely related and easily interchangeable medical entities. Numerous attempts have been made to document this illusory perspective. Based on a delicate pathophysiologic notion, we believe that fully developed T2DM is infrequently observed with fully featured PCOS. In an observational descriptive study 257 married T2DM women were consecutively included and meticulously investigated for fertility history and, albeit, clinical and biochemical features of PCOS. Of 257 married diabetic women only six (2.3%) had no children. In one case a male problem (azoospermia) and in the second case, late marriage (aged 45 at wedding ceremony) was the cause of infertility. Thus, only four (1.6%) might have been labeled as true female factor infertility. Astounding to report was the average pregnancies for each participant which was 5.1±2.5, ranging from zero to fifteen. we would suggest that, despite the well-established fact of insulin resistance as the common pathophysiologic process for T2DM and PCOS, they are definitely separate medical entities. As a matter of fact T2DM and PCOS are the two opposite aspect of the insulin resistance coin. Copyright © 2015 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased cholesterol efflux from cultured fibroblasts to plasma from hypertriglyceridemic type 2 diabetic patients : Roles of pre beta-HDL, phospholipid transfer protein and cholesterol esterification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, R.; Groen, A. K.; Perton, F. G.; Dallinga-Thie, G. M.; van Wijland, M. J. A.; Dikkeschei, L. D.; Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R.; van Tol, A.; Dullaart, R. P. F.

    We tested whether hypertriglyceridemia associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus is accompanied by alterations in pre beta-HDL, which are considered to be initial acceptors of cell-derived cholesterol, and by changes in the ability of plasma to promote cellular cholesterol efflux. In 28

  16. Idiopathic Fanconi's syndrome with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a child who presented as vitamin D resistant rickets--a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Soumya; Nadri, Gulnaz; Chowdhary, Harish; Pemde, Harish K; Singh, Varinder; Chandra, Jagdish

    2011-01-01

    Fanconi's syndrome is a complex of multiple tubular dysfunctions of proximal tubular cells occurring alone or in association with a variety of inherited (primary) or acquired (secondary) disorders. It is characterized by aminoaciduria, normoglycemic glycosuria, tubular proteinuria without hematuria, metabolic acidosis without anion gap and excessive urinary excretion of phosphorous, calcium, uric acid, bicarbonate, sodium, potassium and magnesium. Diabetes insipidus is a disease of collecting tubules and a child mainly presents with dehydration and hypernatremia. We report the first case of idiopathic Fanconi's syndrome along with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) in a child who presented to us as resistant rickets. Medline search did not reveal any case of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus associated with idiopathic Fanconi's syndrome. We hypothesized that the NDI may be due to severe hypokalemia induced tubular dysfunction. The child was treated for hypophosphatemic rickets with severe metabolic acidosis and the treatment for NDI was also given. Now he has healed rickets and normal blood pH, sodium and osmolarity.

  17. A case report of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus with idiopathic Fanconi syndrome in a child who presented with vitamin D resistant rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Soumya; Nadri, Gulnaz; Chowdhary, Harish; Pemde, Harish K; Singh, Varinder; Chandra, Jagdish

    2014-05-01

    Fanconi syndrome is a complex of multiple tubular dysfunctions of proximal tubular cells, occurring alone or in association with a variety of inherited (primary) or acquired (secondary) disorders. It is characterized by aminoaciduria, normoglycemic glycosuria, tubular proteinuria without hematuria, metabolic acidosis without anion gap and excessive urinary excretion of phosphorous, calcium, uric acid, bicarbonate, sodium, potassium and magnesium. Diabetes insipidus is a disease of collecting tubules and children mainly present with dehydration and hypernatremia. We are reporting the first case of idiopathic Fanconi's syndrome along with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a child who presented to us with vitamin D resistant rickets. Medline search did not reveal any case of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) associated with idiopathic Fanconi syndrome. We hypothesized that the NDI may be due to to severe hypokalemia induced tubular dysfunction.

  18. GLUT4 is reduced in slow muscle fibers of type 2 diabetic patients: is insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes a slow, type 1 fiber disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Staehr, P; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2001-01-01

    was reduced to 77% in the obese subjects and to 61% in type 2 diabetic patients compared with the control subjects. We propose that a reduction in the fraction of slow-twitch fibers, combined with a reduction in GLUT4 expression in slow fibers, may reduce the insulin-sensitive GLUT4 pool in type 2 diabetes...

  19. Sympathovagal imbalance contributes to prehypertension status and cardiovascular risks attributed by insulin resistance, inflammation, dyslipidemia and oxidative stress in first degree relatives of type 2 diabetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Krushna Pal

    Full Text Available Though cardiovascular (CV risks are reported in first-degree relatives (FDR of type 2 diabetics, the pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to these risks are not known. We investigated the association of sympathovagal imbalance (SVI with CV risks in these subjects.Body mass index (BMI, basal heart rate (BHR, blood pressure (BP, rate-pressure product (RPP, spectral indices of heart rate variability (HRV, autonomic function tests, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, lipid profile, inflammatory markers, oxidative stress (OS marker, rennin, thyroid profile and serum electrolytes were measured and analyzed in subjects of study group (FDR of type 2 diabetics, n = 72 and control group (subjects with no family history of diabetes, n = 104.BMI, BP, BHR, HOMA-IR, lipid profile, inflammatory and OS markers, renin, LF-HF (ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency power of HRV, a sensitive marker of SVI were significantly increased (p<0.0001 in study group compared to the control group. SVI in study group was due to concomitant sympathetic activation and vagal inhibition. There was significant correlation and independent contribution of markers of insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, inflammation and OS to LF-HF ratio. Multiple-regression analysis demonstrated an independent contribution of LF-HF ratio to prehypertension status (standardized beta 0.415, p<0.001 and bivariate logistic-regression showed significant prediction (OR 2.40, CI 1.128-5.326, p = 0.002 of LF-HF ratio of HRV to increased RPP, the marker of CV risk, in study group.SVI in FDR of type 2 diabetics occurs due to sympathetic activation and vagal withdrawal. The SVI contributes to prehypertension status and CV risks caused by insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, inflammation and oxidative stress in FDR of type 2 diabetics.

  20. Resistance Training Leads to Clinically Meaningful Improvements in Control of Glycemia and Muscular Strength in Untrained Middle-aged Patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Unaise Abdul; Manzar, Dilshad; Raza, Shahid; Shareef, Mohd Yakub; Hussain, Mohd Ejaz

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies in diverse ethnic groups have reported that progressive resistance training is effective for glycemic control. However, it is unknown whether this form of exercise therapy leads to clinically meaningful changes in metabolic, cardiovascular and anthropometric parameters in Asian Indians. The study was designed to investigate the efficacy of progressive resistance training on glycemic, musculoskeletal, anthropometric and cardiovascular variables in untrained middle-aged type 2 diabetic patients living in North India. Forty-eight untrained patients, 35 men and 13 women (mean ± SD age, 44.7 ± 4.2 years), with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes were randomly divided into 2 groups: A group receiving progressive resistance training and a control group who provided participative involvement. The primary outcomes were glycemic control and muscle strength. Additionally, anthropometric and cardiovascular risk parameters were evaluated at baseline and after intervention or control program at 8 weeks. Mixed ANOVA revealed a significant group-by-time interaction for the main outcomes of the study. Change in glycosylated hemoglobin was mean ± SD, 0.6 ± 0.5 in progressive resistance training group compared to no change in control group (P < .001). Progressive resistance training group showed a greater improvement in upper and lower body muscle strength (P < .001), waist circumference (P = .008), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = .004). However, no significant group-by-time interaction was detected on body weight, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. A short-term progressive resistance training program leads to clinically meaningful improvements in glycemic control and muscle strength in untrained middle-aged type 2 diabetic patients of Asian Indian ethnicity.

  1. Risk Factors for Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Syndrome, and Diabetes in 248 HFE C282Y Homozygotes Identified by Population Screening in the HEIRS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J. Clayborn; Adams, Paul C.; Acton, Ronald T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We sought to identify risk factors for insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and diabetes mellitus in 248 non-Hispanic white HFE C282Y homozygotes identified by population screening. Methods: We analyzed observations obtained prospectively in a postscreening examination: age; sex; body mass index (BMI); systolic/diastolic blood pressure; metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint hypertrophy; hepatomegaly; complete blood counts; alanine/aspartate aminotransferase levels; elevated C-reactive protein (>0.5 mg/dL); transferrin saturation; serum ferritin; homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR); and MetS. Results: Twenty-six participants (10.5%) had diabetes diagnoses. A significant trend across HOMA-IR quartiles was observed only for blood neutrophils. Logistic regression on HOMA-IR fourth quartile revealed positive associations: age (P = 0.0002); male sex (P = 0.0022); and BMI (P HOMA-IR fourth quartile predicted MetS (P HOMA-IR fourth quartile, MetS, or diabetes. Conclusions: In screening C282Y homozygotes, age, male sex, and BMI predicted HOMA-IR fourth quartile. HOMA-IR fourth quartile alone predicted MetS. Diabetes was associated with greater age, male sex, MP joint hypertrophy, greater blood neutrophil counts, and MetS. PMID:26771691

  2. Rare Mutations of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma: Frequencies and Relationship with Insulin Resistance and Diabetes Risk in the Mixed Ancestry Population from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vergotine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Genetic variants in the nuclear transcription receptor, PPARG, are associated with cardiometabolic traits, but reports remain conflicting. We determined the frequency and the clinical relevance of PPARG SNPs in an African mixed ancestry population. Methods. In a cross-sectional study, 820 participants were genotyped for rs1800571, rs72551362, rs72551363, rs72551364, and rs3856806, using allele-specific TaqMan technology. The homeostatic model assessment of insulin (HOMA-IR, β-cells function (HOMA-B%, fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI, and the quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index (QUICKI were calculated. Results. No sequence variants were found except for the rs3856806. The frequency of the PPARG-His447His variant was 23.8% in the overall population group, with no difference by diabetes status (P=0.215. The His447His allele T was associated with none of the markers of insulin resistance overall and by diabetes status. In models adjusted for 2-hour insulin, the T allele was associated with lower prevalent diabetes risk (odds ratio 0.56 (95% CI 0.31–0.95. Conclusion. Our study confirms the almost zero occurrences of known rare PPARG SNPs and has shown for the first time in an African population that one of the common SNPs, His447His, may be protective against type 2 diabetes.

  3. Ratio of low molecular weight serum adiponectin to the total adiponectin value is associated with type 2 diabetes through its relation to increasing insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Minoru; Hara, Kazuo; Kamura, Yutaka; Honoki, Hisae; Fujisaka, Shiho; Ishiki, Manabu; Usui, Isao; Yagi, Kunimasa; Fukushima, Yasuo; Takano, Atsuko; Kato, Hiromi; Murakami, Shihou; Higuchi, Kiyohiro; Kobashi, Chikaaki; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Koshimizu, Yukiko; Tobe, Kazuyuki

    2018-01-01

    Among the three adiponectin isoforms, a lower ratio of high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin to total adiponectin (TA) is well known to cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, how the levels of other adiponectin isoforms, such as the middle molecular weight (MMW) and low molecular weight (LMW) isoforms, and their relative ratio to TA change in T2D subjects has not been determined. Therefore, we investigated the association of these adiponectin-related parameters with T2D. We examined the associations between adiponectin-related parameters and diabetes in a group of 394 T2D subjects and 374 controls (1st group) randomly selected from among the participants in our previous study. The associations between these parameters and the HOMA-IR in a 2nd group, consisting of the subjects remaining in the 1st group after the exclusion of subjects receiving diabetic medication, were also examined. In the 1st group, after adjusting for confounding factor, the levels of all the adiponectin isoforms and the HMW/TA ratio were significantly lower among the diabetic subjects than among the controls (all P values resistance.

  4. A transcriptional signature of "exercise resistance" in skeletal muscle of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Natalie A; Xie, Hui; Johannsen, Neil M; Church, Timothy S; Smith, Steven R; Sparks, Lauren M

    2015-09-01

    Exercise benefits most, but not all, individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of this study was to determine whether a proportion of individuals with T2DM would fail to demonstrate exercise-induced metabolic improvements. We hypothesized that this lack of response would be related to their skeletal muscle transcriptional profile. 42 participants with T2DM from the previously reported HART-D study underwent a 9-month supervised exercise intervention. We performed a principal components analysis to distinguish Responders from Non-Responders (n=9 each) based on: decreases in (1) HbA1c, (2) %fat (3) BMI and (4) increase in skeletal muscle mtDNA. mRNA expression patterns in muscle tissue at baseline were assessed by microarray and qRT-PCR analysis in both groups. Of 186 genes identified by microarray analysis, 70% were up-regulated in Responders and down-regulated in Non-Responders. Several genes involved in substrate metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis were significantly different (fold-change>1.5, pexercise response in metabolic outcomes, thus allowing exercise interventions to be targeted to these individuals and aid in the identification of novel approaches to treat Non-Responders in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and thyroid dysfunction in patients with palmoplantar pustulosis: a case-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Ataş

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP is a chronic pustular inflammatory skin disease; however, its pathogenesis is not well understood. Several factors, such as genetics, tobacco use and autoimmune issues, may contribute to this disease. Aim : This research was conducted to investigate the relationships between insulin resistance, thyroid disease and PPP. Material and methods : Thirty-three patients with PPP and 27 age- and gender-matched controls were analysed for their smoking histories, thyroid function tests, anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO levels, fasting glucose, fasting insulin levels and the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA index for insulin resistance. Results : We found significant differences between the PPP and control groups according to their tobacco use and anti-TPO levels (p = 0.009 and p = 0.009, respectively. The proportion of tobacco use was 90% in the PPP patients and 63% in the controls. Gender and tobacco use were predictive risk factors for PPP in the multivariate analysis (OR = 141.7, p 35 U/ml and the presence of a thyroid abnormality were independent risk factors in the univariate, but not the multivariate analysis (OR = 4.2, p = 0.025 and OR = 5.4, p = 0.004, respectively. A moderate correlation between the gender and anti-TPO level was found (r = 0.361, p = 0.039; however, the fasting glucose, insulin and HOMA index were not significant between the PPP and control groups. Conclusions : Female gender and smoking were the most important risk factors for PPP; however, the increase in the anti-TPO level may be related to the predominance of females afflicted with this disease. Additional studies are necessary to clarify the relationships between PPP, thyroid disease and diabetes mellitus.

  6. Resistance Training for Glycemic Control, Muscular Strength, and Lean Body Mass in Old Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, JungHoon; Kim, DoHoun; Kim, ChangKeun

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Type 2 diabetes (T2D) in elderly patients is associated with accelerated loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. However, there are few meta-analysis reviews which investigate the effects of resistance training (RT) on glycemic control and skeletal muscle in the patients. Methods Three electronic databases were searched (from the earliest date available to November 2016). Studies were included according to the inclusion criteria: T2D patients at least 60?years old, fasting pla...

  7. Effects of Probiotics and Synbiotics on Obesity, Insulin Resistance Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Review of Human Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    S?ez-Lara, Maria Jose; Robles-Sanchez, Candido; Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco Javier; Plaza-Diaz, Julio; Gil, Angel

    2016-01-01

    The use of probiotics and synbiotics in the prevention and treatment of different disorders has dramatically increased over the last decade. Both probiotics and synbiotics are well known ingredients of functional foods and nutraceuticals and may provide beneficial health effects because they can influence the intestinal microbial ecology and immunity. The present study reviews the effects of probiotics and synbiotics on obesity, insulin resistance syndrome (IRS), type 2 diabetes (T2D) and non...

  8. The Effectiveness of Green Tea or Green Tea Extract on Insulin Resistance and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyue Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Green tea or green tea extract (GT/GTE has been demonstrated to reduce insulin resistance and improve glycemic control. However, evidence for this health beneficial effect is inconsistent. This systematic review evaluated the effect of GT/GTE on insulin resistance and glycemic control in people with pre-diabetes/type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, AMED, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library were searched up to April 2017 for randomised controlled trials of participants with pre-diabetes or T2DM, where the intervention was GT/GTE. Meta-analysis was performed to assess the standardised mean difference (SMD in biomarkers of insulin resistance and glycemic control between GT/GTE and placebo groups. Six studies (n=382 were pooled into random-effects meta-analysis. Overall, no differences were found between GT/GTE and the placebo for glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c: SMD, −0.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], −0.86 to 0.23, homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR: SMD, 0.10; 95% CI, −0.17 to 0.38, fasting insulin (SMD, −0.25; 95% CI, −0.64 to 0.15, and fasting glucose (SMD, −0.10; 95% CI, −0.50 to 0.30. No evidence support the consumption of GT/GTE could reduce the levels of HbA1c, HOMA-IR, fasting insulin, or fasting glucose in people with pre-diabetes/T2DM. However, the studies included were small and of varying quality.

  9. Meat Intake and Insulin Resistance in Women without Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Larry A; LeCheminant, James D; Bailey, Bruce W

    2015-01-01

    To examine the relationship between meat intake and insulin resistance (IR) in 292 nondiabetic women. IR was evaluated using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). Diet was assessed via 7-day weighed food records. Servings of very lean meat (VLM) and regular meat (meat) were indexed using the ADA Exchange Lists Program. Physical activity was assessed using accelerometers and body fat was measured using the Bod Pod. Meat intake was directly related to HOMA (F = 7.4; P = 0.007). Women with moderate or high meat intakes had significantly higher HOMA levels than their counterparts. Adjusting for body fat weakened the relationship (F = 1.0; P = 0.3201). Odds ratio results showed that the low meat quartile had 67% lower odds of being IR (75th percentile) compared to their counterparts (OR = 0.33; 95% CI = 0.16-0.71). These findings changed little after adjusting for all covariates simultaneously (OR = 0.34; 95% CI = 0.14-0.83). Conversely, VLM intake was not related to HOMA, with or without the covariates. Moderate and high meat intakes are associated with increased insulin resistance in nondiabetic women. However, differences in body fat contribute significantly to the relationship. VLM is not predictive of IR. Prudence in the amount and type of meat consumed may be helpful in decreasing the likelihood of IR.

  10. Gastro-Resistant Insulin Receptor-Binding Peptide from Momordica charantia Improved the Glucose Tolerance in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice via Insulin Receptor Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hsin-Yi; Li, Chia-Cheng; Chen, Feng-Yuan; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun; Ho, Tin-Yun

    2017-10-25

    Momordica charantia is a commonly used food and has been used for the management of diabetes. Our previous study has identified an insulin receptor (IR)-binding protein (mcIRBP) from Momordica charantia. Here we identified the gastro-resistant hypoglycemic bioactive peptides from protease-digested mcIRBP. By in vitro digestion and IR kinase activity assay, we found that a 9-amino-acid-residue peptide, mcIRBP-9, was a gastro-resistant peptide that enhanced IR kinase activities. mcIRBP-9 activated IR signaling transduction pathway, which resulted in the phosphorylation of IR, the translocation of glucose transporter 4, and the uptake of glucose in cells. Intraperitoneal and oral administration of mcIRBP-9 stimulated the glucose clearance by 30.91 ± 0.39% and 32.09 ± 0.38%, respectively, in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Moreover, a pilot study showed that daily ingestion of mcIRBP-9 for 30 days decreased the fasting blood glucose levels and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels by 23.62 ± 6.14% and 24.06 ± 1.53%, respectively. In conclusion, mcIRBP-9 is a unique gastro-resistant bioactive peptide generated after the digestion of mcIRBP. Furthermore, oral administration of mcIRBP-9 improves both the glucose tolerance and the HbA1c levels in diabetic mice via targeting IR signaling transduction pathway.

  11. The Thr92Ala deiodinase type 2 (DIO2) variant is not associated with type 2 diabetes or indices of insulin resistance in the old order of Amish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentuccia, Daniela; Thomas, Matthew J; Coppotelli, Giuseppe; Reinhart, Laurie J; Mitchell, Braxton D; Shuldiner, Alan R; Celi, Francesco S

    2005-11-01

    A common polymorphism of the type 2 deiodinase gene (Thr92Ala DIO2) was found to be associated with insulin resistance in a mixed Caucasian population. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the Thr92Ala DIO2 variant to indices of insulin resistance in the Old Order Amish. A genotype-phenotype association study was performed at the research clinic in Strasburg, Pennsylvania, and the molecular genetics laboratory at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, and the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. A total of 1,268 subjects participated in the Amish Family Diabetes Study. An association among the Thr92Ala DIO2 variant and type 2 diabetes, indices of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), insulin secretion, free thyroid hormones, and thyrotropin (TSH) was found. No association was found among the Thr92Ala DIO2 variant and type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, or body mass index (BMI) in the Amish. In nondiabetics (n = 747), the Ala92 allele tended to be associated with decreased rather then increased insulin secretion. No differences were observed in thyroid hormones or TSH. Contrary to prior findings, the Thr92Ala DIO2 variant tends to be associated with increased rather then decreased insulin sensitivity in the Amish. These findings could be secondary to a different genetic background or to environmental factors specific for this population.

  12. The Higher the Insulin Resistance the Lower the Cardiac Output in Men with Type 1 Diabetes During the Maximal Exercise Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiecki, Pawel; Naskret, Dariusz; Pilacinski, Stanislaw; Pempera, Maciej; Uruska, Aleksandra; Adamska, Anna; Zozulinska-Ziolkiewicz, Dorota

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the hemodynamic parameters analyzed in bioimpedance cardiography during maximal exercise in patients with type 1 diabetes differing in insulin resistance. The study group consisted of 40 men with type 1 diabetes. Tissue sensitivity to insulin was assessed on the basis of the glucose disposal rate (GDR) analyzed during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Patients were divided into groups with GDR insulin sensitivity) and GDR ≥4.5 mg/kg/min (G2 group-higher insulin sensitivity). During the exercise test, the heart rate, systolic volume, cardiac output, cardiac index were measured by the impedance meter (PhysioFlow). Compared with the G2 group, the G1 group had a lower cardiac output (CO): during exercise 8.6 (IQR 7.7-10.0) versus 12.8 (IQR 10.8-13.7) L/min; P insulin resistance is associated with cardiac hemodynamic parameters assessed during and after exercise. The higher the insulin resistance the lower the cardiac output during maximal exercise in men with type 1 diabetes.

  13. Associations of Haplotypes Upstream of IRS1 with Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes, Dyslipidemia, Preclinical Atherosclerosis, and Skeletal Muscle LOC646736 mRNA Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma M. Soyal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The genomic region ~500 kb upstream of IRS1 has been implicated in insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, adverse lipid profile, and cardiovascular risk. To gain further insight into this chromosomal region, we typed four SNPs in a cross-sectional cohort and subjects with type 2 diabetes recruited from the same geographic region. From 16 possible haplotypes, 6 haplotypes with frequencies >0.01 were observed. We identified one haplotype that was protective against insulin resistance (determined by HOMA-IR and fasting plasma insulin levels, type 2 diabetes, an adverse lipid profile, increased C-reactive protein, and asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease (assessed by intima media thickness of the common carotid arteries. BMI and total adipose tissue mass as well as visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue mass did not differ between the reference and protective haplotypes. In 92 subjects, we observed an association of the protective haplotype with higher skeletal muscle mRNA levels of LOC646736, which is located in the same haplotype block as the informative SNPs and is mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, but only at very low levels in liver or adipose tissues. These data suggest a role for LOC646736 in human insulin resistance and warrant further studies on the functional effects of this locus.

  14. Immediate effect of passive static stretching versus resistance exercises on postprandial blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurudut, Peeyoosha; Rajan, Abey P

    2017-10-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is rapidly rising all over the globe at an alarming rate. In India, more than 61.3 million people have been presently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is possible to control the circulating blood glucose levels by reducing life style risk factors through physical activities comprising of muscle stretches, aerobic training, resistance exercises (REs), yoga, etc. The aim of this study is to identify and compare the immediate effect of passive static stretching (PSS) versus RE on blood glucose level in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present study included 51 participants between the age of 40-65 years with type 2 diabetes mellitus, to study the immediate effect of 60-min PSS (n=25) and 60-min RE (n=26). The outcome measure was blood glucose level which was checked by glucometer (free-style neo). Blood sugar was assessed at 3 points of time that included fasting blood sugar level, 2 hr after the meal and immediately after the exercise regimen. Results of this study showed significant reduction in blood glucose level in subjects according to glucometer with PSS ( P =0.000) and RE ( P =0.00). However, both groups demonstrated equal effect in terms of lowering blood sugar level immediately after the exercise. The conclusion is both PSS and RE are effective in reducing postprandial blood glucose level in type 2 diabetes mellitus and must be prescribed for the patients who demonstrate difficulty in controlling post prandial spike.

  15. Effect of Eight Weeks High Intensity Interval Training and Medium Intensity Interval Training and Aloe vera Intake on Serum Vaspin and Insulin Resistance in Diabetic Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darya Asgari Hazaveh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The use of herbal supplements and exercise training for the treatment of diabetic has increased.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of eight weeks high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training and Aloe vera intake on serum vaspin and insulin resistance in diabetic male rats. Materials and Methods: During this experimental study, 32 diabetic rats with STZ Wistar were randomly divided into four groups including the control, high intensity interval training +supplement, moderate intensity interval training + supplement and supplement. Training program was planned for 8 weeks and 3 sessions per week. Each session consisted of 6 to 12 periods of 2-minute activity with the intensity of 90% and 60% with one minute rest (speed: 10m/min. In the supplement groups, 300milligrams Aloe vera solution per kilogram of body weight Gavage was given 5 sessions per week for 8 weeks. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: The results showed that high and moderate intensity interval training with supplement has no significant effect on the of serum vaspin (p=0.112. High intensity interval training with supplement had significant effects on insulin in diabetic male rats (0.000. Conclusion: .Based on the findings of this study, it seems that supplementation of Aloe vera with high intensity interval training can have better effects on serum insulin in diabetic rats.

  16. Cell Type-Specific Immunomodulation Induced by Helminthes: Effect on Metainflammation, Insulin Resistance and Type-2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravindhan, Vivekanandhan; Anand, Gowrishankar

    2017-12-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have documented an inverse relationship between the decreasing prevalence of helminth infections and the increasing prevalence of metabolic diseases ("metabolic hygiene hypothesis"). Chronic inflammation leading to insulin resistance (IR) has now been identified as a major etiological factor for a variety of metabolic diseases other than obesity and Type-2 diabetes (metainflammation). One way by which helminth infections such as filariasis can modulate IR is by inducing a chronic, nonspecific, low-grade, immune suppression mediated by modified T-helper 2 (Th2) response (induction of both Th2 and regulatory T cells) which can in turn suppress the proinflammatory responses and promote insulin sensitivity (IS). This article provides evidence on how the cross talk between the innate and adaptive arms of the immune responses can modulate IR/sensitivity. The cross talk between innate (macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells, natural killer T cells, myeloid derived suppressor cells, innate lymphoid cells, basophils, eosinophils, and neutrophils) and adaptive (helper T [CD4 + ] cells, cytotoxic T [CD8 + ] cells and B cells) immune cells forms two opposing circuits, one associated with IR and the other associated with IS under the conditions of metabolic syndrome and helminth-mediated immunomodulation, respectively.

  17. Prevalence of insulin resistance and prediction of glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbikova, Jana; Dvorakova, Katerina; Grimmichova, Tereza; Hill, Martin; Stanicka, Sona; Cibula, David; Bendlova, Bela; Starka, Luboslav; Vondra, Karel

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) affects 10% of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of clinical and fasting biochemical parameters in screening for impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and DM2. Women with PCOS [n=244, age 27.4+/-7.5 years, body mass index (BMI) 27.5+/-6.9 kg/m(2)] and healthy women (n=57, age 26.8+/-5.8 years, BMI 21.3+/-2.1 kg/m(2)) underwent basal blood sampling and an oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT). Insulin resistance was identified in 40.2% of PCOS women. Impaired fasting glucose (5.6-6.9 mmol/L) was found in 30 subjects (12.3%), but the oGTT revealed IGT in only six of these cases and DM2 in one subject. IGT was found in 23 (9.4%) and DM2 in four (1.6%) of the women with PCOS. The conventional upper limits for total cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and fasting glucose revealed low sensitivity for the identification of impaired glucose metabolism. No single parameter nor any combination of them showed an accuracy sufficient for screening of IGT or DM2 in PCOS patients. All PCOS patients should be screened using an oGTT to identify disturbances in glucose metabolism.

  18. Major Pathophysiology in Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes: Decreased Insulin in Lean and Insulin Resistance in Obese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadi, Udaya M

    2017-06-01

    Lowering of body mass index (BMI) to ≥25 kg/m 2 as obesity by ADA suggests insulin resistance as a major mechanism of impaired glucose metabolism (IGM) in Asians. However, glimepiride, an insulin secretagogue, delayed onset of type 2 diabetes (DM2) from prediabetes (PreDM), indicating decreased insulin secretion (IS) as a major factor in lean (L; BMI DM2. Seventy-five men and 45 women ages 36 to 75 years were divided into six groups: LN, LPreDM, LDM2, ObN, ObPreDM, and ObDM2. Determination of IS by insulinogenic indices (I/G) at fasting (FI/FG), first phase (∆I/∆G), and cumulative responses over 2 hours of OGTT (CRI/CRG), and IR by FIXFG, ∆IX∆G, and CRIXCRG. Changes in IS and IR for PreDM and DM2 were calculated as % fall and % rise, respectively, from levels in N. All indices of IS and IR were lower ( P DM2 ( P < 0.05) in both groups. However, the declines in IS were greater ( P < 0.05) than rises in IR in LPreDM and LDM2. Whereas, the rises in IR were higher ( P < 0.05) than declines in IS in ObPreDM and ObDM2. In L, major mechanism of IGM is declining IS and not rising IR documented among Ob.

  19. The Potential Protective Action of Vitamin D in Hepatic Insulin Resistance and Pancreatic Islet Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Po Sing

    2016-03-05

    Vitamin D deficiency (i.e., hypovitaminosis D) is associated with increased insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion, and poorly controlled glucose homeostasis, and thus is correlated with the risk of metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The liver plays key roles in glucose and lipid metabolism, and its dysregulation leads to abnormalities in hepatic glucose output and triglyceride accumulation. Meanwhile, the pancreatic islets are constituted in large part by insulin-secreting β cells. Consequently, islet dysfunction, such as occurs in T2DM, produces hyperglycemia. In this review, we provide a critical appraisal of the modulatory actions of vitamin D in hepatic insulin sensitivity and islet insulin secretion, and we discuss the potential roles of a local vitamin D signaling in regulating hepatic and pancreatic islet functions. This information provides a scientific basis for establishing the benefits of the maintenance, or dietary manipulation, of adequate vitamin D status in the prevention and management of obesity-induced T2DM and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  20. The mean and the biological variation of insulin resistance does not differ between polycystic ovary syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Li Wei; Jayagopal, V; Kilpatrick, E S; Atkin, S L

    2009-05-01

    There is an assumption that the mean and biological variation of insulin resistance (IR) is less in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and intuitively higher in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). To test this hypothesis we compared the mean and biological variation in IR in PCOS to that of T2DM and to age- and weight-matched controls. Twelve PCOS, 11 matched healthy women; 12 postmenopausal diet-controlled T2DM and 11 matched healthy postmenopausal women were recruited. Blood samples were collected at 4-d intervals on 10 consecutive occasions. The biological variability of IR was derived on duplicate samples. Mean and biological variability of HOMA-IR for PCOS did not differ from T2DM. Both measures were higher than the matched controls. There was no difference in insulin or IR measures between the body mass index matched pre- and postmenopausal women. Percentage beta cell function were 208.8%, 62.3%, 106.5% and 111.9%, respectively, in PCOS, postmenopausal women with T2DM, healthy premenopausal and healthy postmenopausal women. The progression from PCOS to the development of T2DM is unlikely to be due to a further increase in IR (or variability), but rather the progressive failure of pancreatic beta cells with a decrease in insulin production. The clinical trial registration number for this study is ISRCTN65353256.

  1. Tanshinone I alleviates insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus rats through IRS-1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ying; Gao, Jiaqi; Qin, Lingling; Xu, Yunling; Wang, Dongchao; Shi, Haoxia; Xu, Tunhai; Liu, Tonghua

    2017-09-01

    Tanshinone I from tanshen has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory diseases. Given the link between inflammation and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), we suspect that tanshinone I may have a beneficial effect on T2DM. This study was to investigate the potential effects of tanshinone I on T2DM and its underlying mechanism. T2DM was thus induced in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats using streptozotocin (STZ) and high-fat diet. It was observed that T2DM rats had higher levels of total cholesterol (TC), nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), total triglyceride (TG) and total low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) compared with normal, healthy SD rats. Treatment with tanshinone I decreased these levels and lowered blood glucose level in T2DM rats. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis showed that T2DM rats had elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, Western blot analysis revealed that T2DM rats had enhanced nuclear translocation of NF-κB as well as elevated phosphorylation of Ser307 in IRS-1(insulin receptor substrate 1). Treatment by tanshinone I lowered the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α, decreased nuclear translocation of NF-κB as well as phosphorylation of Ser307 in IRS-1. These results demonstrated that tanshinone I could alleviate T2DM syndrome in rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic variant near IRS1 is associated with type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rung, Johan; Cauchi, Stéphane; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    previously reported T2D risk loci, which predominantly associate with impaired beta cell function, the C allele of rs2943641 was associated with insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia in 14,358 French, Danish and Finnish participants from population-based cohorts; this allele was also associated...... sample of 4,977 French individuals. We then selected the 28 best hits for replication in 7,698 Danish subjects and identified 4 SNPs showing strong association with T2D, one of which (rs2943641, P = 9.3 x 10(-12), OR = 1.19) was located adjacent to the insulin receptor substrate 1 gene (IRS1). Unlike...... with reduced basal levels of IRS1 protein and decreased insulin induction of IRS1-associated phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase activity in human skeletal muscle biopsies....

  3. Serum aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand activity is associated with insulin resistance and resulting type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Eun; Kwak, Soo Heon; Jung, Hye Seung; Cho, Young Min; Pak, Youngmi Kim; Park, Kyong Soo; Kim, Seong Yeon; Lee, Hong Kyu

    2015-06-01

    Dioxin or dioxin-like compounds are ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which is a ligand-activated nuclear transcription factor. There are limited studies about the association of serum AhR ligand activities and T2DM. Our objective was to investigate the association of serum AhR ligand activities with T2DM and its related metabolic parameters. This case-control study involved 83 subjects with T2DM as well as age-, sex-, and body mass index (BMI)-matched subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, n = 130) and normal glucose tolerance (NGT, n = 83). Serum AhR ligand activities were measured using a cell-based AhR ligand assay and standardized as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDDeq, pmol/l). The T2DM group had the highest AhR ligand activities compared to the IGT and NGT groups [median (interquartile range), 68.1 (53.1, 81.5), 60.2 (45.8, 75.1), and 53.3 (46.1, 63.7) pmol/l, respectively; P = 0.003]. In the multivariate analysis, the log2-transformed TCDDeq levels were significantly associated with the risk of T2DM after adjusting for age, sex, and BMI (odds ratio 2.26, 95 % confidence interval 1.34-3.82; P = 0.002). In nondiabetic subjects, serum AhR ligand activities showed a positive correlation with fasting glucose and insulin concentrations and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, but showed a negative correlation with adiponectin concentrations. Serum AhR ligand activities were higher in the T2DM group and were correlated with the parameters of insulin resistance. Further investigation is required to elucidate the causal relationship between AhR ligand activity and T2DM.

  4. Association of the DASH dietary pattern with insulin resistance and diabetes in US Hispanic/Latino adults: results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsino, Leonor; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Butera, Nicole M; Siega-Riz, Anna María; Palacios, Cristina; Pérez, Cynthia M; Albrecht, Sandra S; Espinoza Giacinto, Rebecca A; Perera, Marisa Judith; Horn, Linda Van; Avilés-Santa, M Larissa

    2017-01-01

    To examine the association between diet quality and both diabetes status and insulin resistance in Hispanic/Latino adults, and the extent to which differences in diet quality contribute to differences in outcomes across Hispanic/Latino heritage. Cross-sectional study. Data are from 15 942 individuals enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Diet was ascertained using two 24-hour dietary recalls, and diet quality was measured using the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) score (range: 0-80, lowest to highest). Diabetes status was defined based on self-reported diagnosis, use of antihyperglycemic medications, or unrecognized diabetes (determined by baseline laboratory measures). Insulin resistance was determined using homeostatic model assessment of β-cell function and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The association between DASH and diabetes status was examined using multinomial logistic regression. The association between DASH and HOMA-IR was assessed using linear regression, and we tested whether the association was modified by Hispanic/Latino heritage or diabetes status. DASH score was highest in those with self-reported diabetes (controlled) and no medications (44.8%). A higher DASH score was associated with a lower HOMA-IR, and the association was the same regardless of diabetes status (p>0.8 for the interaction). The association between DASH and diabetes status was strongest for those with controlled self-reported diabetes and who were not taking antihyperglycemic medications. A higher DASH score was associated with less insulin resistance among Hispanics/Latinos. Differences in DASH scores by Hispanic/Latino heritage did not explain the differences in prevalence of diabetes and insulin resistance reported in the diverse Hispanic/Latino population. NCT02060344.

  5. Association of Serum Selenium, Zinc and Magnesium Levels with Glycaemic Indices and Insulin Resistance in Pre-diabetes: a Cross-Sectional Study from South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Charu; Manjrekar, Poornima A; Agarwal, Ashish; Ahmad, Afzal; Hegde, Anupama; Srikantiah, Rukmini Mysore

    2017-01-01

    A growing understanding of antioxidant mechanisms and insulin-like actions of trace elements selenium and zinc has rekindled researchers' interest towards their role in diabetes mellitus, nutritional management of which concentrates predominantly on macronutrient intake. However, selenium studies limiting largely to diabetes have yielded inconsistent results with sparse knowledge in the pre-diabetes population. This hospital-based cross-sectional study screened 300 people who came to the institutional hospital laboratory with fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated haemoglobin requisition over a period of 6 months. Thirty-five pre-diabetes subjects aged 25-45 years and 35 age-matched healthy controls were selected as per inclusion criteria and clinical history. Serum selenium was estimated by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, zinc and magnesium by colorimetric end-point methods and insulin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and insulin resistance was calculated using a homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) 2 calculator. Data analysis was done using SPSS ver. 16 employing an independent sample t test for intergroup comparison of means and Pearson's correlation for correlation analysis. Serum mineral levels in the pre-diabetes group (selenium 63.01 ± 17.6 μg/L, zinc 55.78 ± 13.49 μg/dL, magnesium 1.37 ± 0.38 mg/dL) were significantly reduced (p selenium 90.98 ± 15.81 μg/L, zinc 94.53 ± 15.41 μg/dL, magnesium 2.12 ± 0.22 mg/dL). A significant negative correlation was seen with glycaemic indices and insulin resistance. This study conducted in pre-diabetes subjects highlights a considerable deficiency of serum selenium, zinc and magnesium observed at a much earlier pre-clinical phase. This coupled with the evidence of a strong inverse association with glycaemic indices and insulin resistance postulates the role of mineral alterations in the pathophysiology of hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance.

  6. Bacteriological profile of diabetic foot ulcer with special reference to drug-resistant strains in a tertiary care center in North-East India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir K Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was carried out to determine the bacteriological profile of infected diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs and the antibiotic resistance pattern from the isolates. An attempt was made to suggest an empiric antibiotic regimen to treat such patients. Materials and Methods: Tissue samples were collected from 150 patients between February 2015 and January 2016 with DFUs under aseptic precautions and they were processed as per the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Results: A total of 185 bacterial isolates were obtained from 150 persons with diabetic and with foot ulcers. The age group of these persons ranged from 35 to 80 years and the maximum number of persons with DFUs was in the age group of 60–65 years. Among the isolates, Gram-negative bacilli were isolated in 112/185 (61% and Gram-positive cocci in 73/185 (39% cases. The most common isolate was Staphylococcus spp. 46 (25%, followed by Escherichia coli (20% and Enterococcus spp. (15%. The antibiotic sensitivity profile of the bacteria was also studied. Among the isolates, 59/112 (53% of the Gram-negative bacilli were extended spectrum beta-lactamase producers, 19/46 (41% were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and 5/27 (19% were vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Conclusions: This study showed a preponderance of multidrug-resistant strains among the isolates from the DFUs. Knowledge on the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of the isolates will be helpful in determining the drugs for the empirical treatment of diabetic ulcers. Thus, indiscriminate use of antibiotics and chances of subsequent development of antibiotic resistance can also be reduced.

  7. Effectiveness of resistance exercise compared to aerobic exercise without insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Cybelle; Moraes, Silvia Regina Arruda De; Novaes, Karyne Albino; Bezerra, Márcio Almeida; Silveira, Patrícia Verçoza De Castro; Lemos, Andrea

    Physical exercise has been used to mitigate the metabolic effects of diabetes mellitus. To evaluate the effect of resistance exercise when compared to aerobic exercise without insulin therapy on metabolic and clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Papers were searched on the databases MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, LILACS, and SCIELO, without language or date of publication limits. Clinical trials that compared resistance exercise to aerobic exercise in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus who did not use insulin therapy were included. The quality of evidence and risk of bias were assessed using the GRADE system and the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool, respectively. Meta-analysis was also used, whenever possible. Two reviewers extracted the data independently. Eight eligible articles were included in this study, with a total of 336 individuals, with a mean age of 48-58 years. The protocols of aerobic and resistance exercise varied in duration from eight to 22 weeks, 30-60min/day, three to five times/week. Overall the available evidence came from a very low quality of evidence and there was an increase in Maximal oxygen consumption (mean difference: -2.86; 95% CI: -3.90 to -1.81; random effect) for the resistance exercise and no difference was found in Glycated hemoglobin, Body mass index, High-density lipoprotein cholesterol, Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Resistance exercise appears to be more effective in promoting an increase in Maximal oxygen consumption in protocols longer than 12 weeks and there is no difference in the control of glycemic and lipid