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Sample records for resistance cell adherence

  1. Clonogenic assay: adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafehi, Haloom; Orlowski, Christian; Georgiadis, George T; Ververis, Katherine; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2011-03-13

    The clonogenic (or colony forming) assay has been established for more than 50 years; the original paper describing the technique was published in 1956. Apart from documenting the method, the initial landmark study generated the first radiation-dose response curve for X-ray irradiated mammalian (HeLa) cells in culture. Basically, the clonogenic assay enables an assessment of the differences in reproductive viability (capacity of cells to produce progeny; i.e. a single cell to form a colony of 50 or more cells) between control untreated cells and cells that have undergone various treatments such as exposure to ionising radiation, various chemical compounds (e.g. cytotoxic agents) or in other cases genetic manipulation. The assay has become the most widely accepted technique in radiation biology and has been widely used for evaluating the radiation sensitivity of different cell lines. Further, the clonogenic assay is commonly used for monitoring the efficacy of radiation modifying compounds and for determining the effects of cytotoxic agents and other anti-cancer therapeutics on colony forming ability, in different cell lines. A typical clonogenic survival experiment using adherent cells lines involves three distinct components, 1) treatment of the cell monolayer in tissue culture flasks, 2) preparation of single cell suspensions and plating an appropriate number of cells in petri dishes and 3) fixing and staining colonies following a relevant incubation period, which could range from 1-3 weeks, depending on the cell line. Here we demonstrate the general procedure for performing the clonogenic assay with adherent cell lines with the use of an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (FEP-1811). Also, our aims are to describe common features of clonogenic assays including calculation of the plating efficiency and survival fractions after exposure of cells to radiation, and to exemplify modification of radiation-response with the use of a natural antioxidant

  2. Cholic acid resistance and the adherence ability of Bifidobacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... 1Faculty of Food Science and Technology, University Putra Malaysia, 43400, .... The adherence of Bifidobacterium strains on HT-29 cell culture was .... Thomas LA, Veysey MJ, French G, Hylemon, PB, Murphy GM, Dowling.

  3. Method of detaching adherent cells for flow cytometry

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep; Esau, Luke E.

    2015-01-01

    In one aspect, a method for detaching adherent cells can include adding a cell lifting solution to the media including a sample of adherent cells and incubating the sample of adherent cells with the cell lifting solution. No scraping or pipetting

  4. Adherence of Moraxella bovis to cell cultures of bovine origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annuar, B O; Wilcox, G E

    1985-09-01

    The adherence of five strains of Moraxella bovis to cell cultures was investigated. M bovis adhered to cultures of bovine corneal epithelial and Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells but not to cell types of non-bovine origin. Both piliated and unpiliated strains adhered but piliated strains adhered to a greater extent than unpiliated strains. Antiserum against pili of one strain inhibited adherence of piliated strains but caused only slight inhibition of adherence to the unpiliated strains. Treatment of bacteria with magnesium chloride caused detachment of pili from the bacterial cell and markedly inhibited adherence of piliated strains but caused only slight inhibition of adherence by the unpiliated strains. The results suggested that adhesion of piliated strains to cell cultures was mediated via pili but that adhesins other than pili may be involved in the attachment of unpiliated strains of M bovis to cells.

  5. Method of detaching adherent cells for flow cytometry

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep

    2015-12-24

    In one aspect, a method for detaching adherent cells can include adding a cell lifting solution to the media including a sample of adherent cells and incubating the sample of adherent cells with the cell lifting solution. No scraping or pipetting is needed to facilitate cell detachment. The method do not require inactivation of cell lifting solution and no washing of detaching cells is required to remove cell lifting solution. Detached cells can be stained with dye in the presence of cell lifting solution and are further analyzed using flow cytometer. The method has been tested using 6 different cell lines, 4 different assays, two different plate formats (96 and 384 well plates) and two different flow cytometry instruments. The method is simple to perform, less time consuming, with no cell loss and makes high throughput flow cytometry on adherent cells a reality.

  6. Pinpointing differences in cisplatin-induced apoptosis in adherent and non-adherent cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tastesen, Hanne Sørup; Holm, Jacob Bak; Poulsen, Kristian Arild

    2010-01-01

    Platinum compounds are used in the treatment of cancer. We demonstrate that cisplatin-induced (10 µM) apoptosis (caspase-3 activity) is pronounced within 18 hours in non-adherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC), whereas there is no increase in caspase-3 activity in the adherent Ehrlich Lettré...... ascites tumour cells (ELA). Loss of KCl and cell shrinkage are hallmarks in apoptosis and has been shown in EATC. However, we find no reduction in cell volume and only a minor loss of K(+) which is accompanied by net uptake of Na(+) following 18 hours cisplatin exposure in ELA. Glutathione and taurine...

  7. Microfluidic bioreactors for culture of non-adherent cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Kwasny, Dorota

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic bioreactors (μBR) are becoming increasingly popular for cell culture, sample preparation and analysis in case of routine genetic and clinical diagnostics. We present a novel μBR for non-adherent cells designed to mimic in vivo perfusion of cells based on diffusion of media through...

  8. Sonoporation of adherent cells under regulated ultrasound cavitation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muleki Seya, Pauline; Fouqueray, Manuela; Ngo, Jacqueline; Poizat, Adrien; Inserra, Claude; Béra, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-01

    A sonoporation device dedicated to the adherent cell monolayer has been implemented with a regulation process allowing the real-time monitoring and control of inertial cavitation activity. Use of the cavitation-regulated device revealed first that adherent cell sonoporation efficiency is related to inertial cavitation activity, without inducing additional cell mortality. Reproducibility is enhanced for the highest sonoporation rates (up to 17%); sonoporation efficiency can reach 26% when advantage is taken of the standing wave acoustic configuration by applying a frequency sweep with ultrasound frequency tuned to the modal acoustic modes of the cavity. This device allows sonoporation of adherent and suspended cells, and the use of regulation allows some environmental parameters such as the temperature of the medium to be overcome, resulting in the possibility of cell sonoporation even at ambient temperature. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Radioimmunoassay for antibodies against surface membrane antigens using adhering cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tax, A; Manson, L A [Wistar Inst. of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, Pa. (USA)

    1976-07-01

    A radioimmunoassay using cells adhering to plastic is described. In this assay, A-10 mammary carcinoma attached to the surface of plastic in microtiter plates were permitted to bind antibody and the bound antibody was detected with purified rabbit /sup 125/I-antimouse-Fab. The bound radioactive material was eluted with glycine-HCl buffer (pH 2.5), and the acid eluates were counted in a gamma counter. This assay can be used to detect cytolic or noncytolic antibody to cell surface antigens in studies with any tumor or normal cell that will adhere to a solid surface.

  10. In vitro proliferation of haemopoietic cells in the presence of adherent cell layers. II. Differential effect of adherent cell layers derived from various organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimann, J.; Burger, H.

    1979-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow-derived adherent cell populations promoted proliferation of haemopoietic cells in vitro in a liquid culture system for at least 4 weeks. Adherent cell layers derived from other haemopoietic organs (foetal liver, adult spleen) and fibroblasts from embryonic tissues did not maintain

  11. Fibrinogen-Induced Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Adherence to Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Blanca Lombardo Bedran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans, the predominant bacterial species associated with dental caries, can enter the bloodstream and cause infective endocarditis. The aim of this study was to investigate S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells induced by human fibrinogen. The putative mechanism by which biofilm formation is induced as well as the impact of fibrinogen on S. mutans resistance to penicillin was also evaluated. Bovine plasma dose dependently induced biofilm formation by S. mutans. Of the various plasma proteins tested, only fibrinogen promoted the formation of biofilm in a dose-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of complex aggregates of bacterial cells firmly attached to the polystyrene support. S. mutans in biofilms induced by the presence of fibrinogen was markedly resistant to the bactericidal effect of penicillin. Fibrinogen also significantly increased the adherence of S. mutans to endothelial cells. Neither S. mutans cells nor culture supernatants converted fibrinogen into fibrin. However, fibrinogen is specifically bound to the cell surface of S. mutans and may act as a bridging molecule to mediate biofilm formation. In conclusion, our study identified a new mechanism promoting S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells which may contribute to infective endocarditis.

  12. Efficiency of lipofection of adherent cells is limited by apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek, I; Czajka, M; Wilczok, T

    2002-01-01

    Stability of gene expression and transfection efficiency plays the main role in the application of gene transfer method. In somatic cell gene delivery, expression of the gene product is limited by the function of the cell to which it is delivered. In the present study analyzing the lipofected adherent cells, we have shown that lower level of transgene: beta-galactosidase activity at later time period correlated with decrease in cell viability, which was shown to be due to apoptosis. Apoptosis following DNA uptake occurred only when DNA was present during lipofection.

  13. Adherence to a low-fat vs. low-carbohydrate diet differs by insulin resistance status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, A D; Otten, J J; Hekler, E B; Gardner, C D

    2013-01-01

    Previous research shows diminished weight loss success in insulin-resistant (IR) women assigned to a low-fat (LF) diet compared to those assigned to a low-carbohydrate (LC) diet. These secondary analyses examined the relationship between insulin-resistance status and dietary adherence to either a LF-diet or LC-diet among 81 free-living, overweight/obese women [age = 41.9 ± 5.7 years; body mass index (BMI) = 32.6 ± 3.6 kg/m(2)]. This study found differential adherence by insulin-resistance status only to a LF-diet, not a LC-diet. IR participants were less likely to adhere and lose weight on a LF-diet compared to insulin-sensitive (IS) participants assigned to the same diet. There were no significant differences between IR and IS participants assigned to LC-diet in relative adherence or weight loss. These results suggest that insulin resistance status may affect dietary adherence to weight loss diets, resulting in higher recidivism and diminished weight loss success of IR participants advised to follow LF-diets for weight loss. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Ion channels involved in cell volume regulation: effects on migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death in non adherent EAT cells and adherent ELA cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Adherence of radiopharmaceuticals and labeled cells to intravenous tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segall, G.M.; Gurevich, N.; McDougall, I.R.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of 67 nuclear medicine departments revealed no agreement on which radiolabeled agents could be injected through intravenous lines (IVs) and which required direct venipuncture. Labeled cells and several common radiopharmaceuticals were tested for adherence to intravenous tubing. Residual activity remaining in the tubing after an adequate flush was less than 1% of the injected dose in each case. Administration of radiolabeled agents through existing IVs is an acceptable alternative to direct venipuncture in many cases

  16. Low- and High-Resistance Exercise: Long-Term Adherence and Motivation among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Roie, Evelien; Bautmans, Ivan; Coudyzer, Walter; Boen, Filip; Delecluse, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In terms of motivation and long-term adherence, low-resistance exercise might be more suitable for older adults than high-resistance exercise. However, more data are needed to support this claim. The objective was to investigate the effect of low- and high-resistance exercise protocols on long-term adherence and motivation. This study was designed as an exploratory 24-week follow-up of a randomized 12-week resistance training intervention in older adults. Participants were free to decide whether or not they continued resistance training at their own expense following the intervention. Fifty-six older adults were randomly assigned to HIGH [2 × 10-15 repetitions at 80% of one repetition maximum (1RM)], LOW (1 × 80-100 repetitions at 20% of 1RM), or LOW+ (1 × 60 repetitions at 20% of 1RM + 1 × 10-20 repetitions at 40% 1RM). Motivation, self-efficacy and the perceived barriers for continuing resistance exercise were measured after cessation of each supervised intervention and at follow-up, while long-term adherence was probed retrospectively at follow-up. Participants reported high levels of self-determined motivation before, during, and after the supervised intervention, with no differences between groups (p > 0.05). Nevertheless, only few participants continued strength training after the intervention: 17% in HIGH, 21% in LOW+, and 11% in LOW (p > 0.05). The most commonly reported barriers for continuing resistance exercise were perceived lack of time (46%), being more interested in other physical activities (40%), seasonal reasons (40%), and financial cost (28%). The results suggest no difference in long-term adherence after the end of a supervised exercise intervention at high or low external resistances. Long-term adherence was limited despite high levels of self-determined motivation during the interventions. These findings highlight the importance of further research on developing strategies to overcome barriers of older adults to adhere to resistance

  17. Adherence of B16-F10 melanoma cells to elastin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zetter, B.R.; Netland, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    B16-F10 melanoma cells selectivity colonize lung tissue in vivo. The authors have previously shown that these cells adhere preferentially to lung tissue in vitro. To quantify the binding of B16-F10 cells to isolated components of lung tissue, the authors devised a dot-blot cell adhesion assay. Samples were absorbed to 4 mm dots of nylon based paper under non-denaturing conditions, blocked with albumin or hemoglobin, and incubated with radiolabelled cells for 30 min. at 4 0 C. 125 -I labelled B16-F10 cells demonstrated a dose dependent binding to mouse lung elastin. Autoradiography and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that cells localized preferentially to the elastin dots. The melanoma cells bound more strongly to elastin relative to laminin, fibronectin, collagen types I and IV or heparan sulfate. Neither elastin-associated microfibrillar protein nor fragments of elastin produced by alkali or acid treatment demonstrated significant binding activity for these cells. The findings demonstrate that in addition to its unique mechanical properties that confer elasticity to tissues, elastin can also function as a cell adhesion molecule. The localization of elastin in the lung and its adhesive properties reported here suggest that elastin may facilitate the arrest and eventual colonization of circulating B16-F10 melanoma cells in the mouse lung

  18. Incidence, adherence, and antibiotic resistance of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species causing human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, C A; Stempsey, W

    1984-09-01

    Fifty-two isolates of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species recovered from the blood or intravenous catheters of patients with clinically significant disease were compared to 60 similar isolates from patients who were presumably colonized. All isolates were identified and evaluated for ability to adhere to smooth surfaces, and resistance to anti-staphylococcal penicillins. S. epidermidis, S. hominis, and S. haemolyticus were the most frequently occurring species, representing 65%, 15%, and 10%, respectively, of disease isolates and 57%, 25%, and 8% of colonizers. The seven other species recovered accounted for only 10% of the total in both groups. Differences in isolation rates of each species within the two groups were not significant and were reflective of their reported incidence in the normal flora. All species of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (except S. capitis and S. cohnii, which were isolated in very small numbers) were capable of adhering to smooth surfaces. S. hominis disease isolates were all capable of adherence, and the difference between the disease isolates and colonizers was statistically significant (p less than 0.02). This was not true for any other species that was analyzed nor for all isolates considered as a whole. Resistance to anti-staphylococcal penicillins was documented for all coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species, and was more frequent in S. epidermidis disease isolates than colonizers (p less than 0.05). No correlation was found between resistance to antistaphylococcal penicillins and ability to adhere.

  19. Adherence and scratching resistance of nanometric titania films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascoali, S.; Dominguini, L.; Borges, J.B.

    2012-01-01

    TiO 2 films has been used to extend the wear resistance in bearing, seals for pumps and bone prostheses. In this study was analyzed the conventional hardness and scratch toughness. The scratching test equipment used was developed at the Laboratory of materials Labmat / UFSC. The tests were performed on Titania films deposited on glass plates and ceramics via reactive DC magnetron sputtering. The films were deposited by 10, 15 and 60 min. One of the samples has a titanium metal film of a few nanometers thick between the substrate and the Titania film, the oxide has been deposited for 30 min. At this rang of tests loads the deposited films show good adhesion to substrate, there was no cracking or spalling of the film. (author)

  20. Photosensitizer Adhered to Cell Culture Microplates Induces Phototoxicity in Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Ziegler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro experiments in plastic receptacles are the basis of characterization of new photosensitizers (PSs for the photodynamic therapy. We recently reported that lipophilic PSs adhere to cell culture microplates in a kinetic-like manner (Engelhardt et al., 2011. In the current study, we examined the interaction and phototoxic effects of the microplate-adhered PS in cancer cells. Therefore, we preloaded microplates with hypericin, Foscan, PVP-hypericin, or aluminum (III phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate chloride (AlPCS4 for 24 hours and measured the PS distribution after addition of A431 human carcinoma cells: following another 24 hours up to 68% of hypericin were detected in the cell fraction. The hydrophilic PVP-hypericin and AlPCS4 also diffused into the cells, but the quantities of PS adherence were considerably lower. Microplate-adhered Foscan appeared not to be redistributed. In contrast to the hydrophilic PSs, the cellular phototoxicity of microplate-adhered lipophilic PS was high, independent of whether the PS (i was pre-loaded onto microplates or (ii added simultaneously with the cells or (iii one day after cell seeding. Based on these results, we suggest testing lipophilic PS dyes for their adherence to microplates. Furthermore, the ability of plastic materials to (reversibly store PSs might represent a new approach for the PS delivery or the development of antimicrobial coatings.

  1. Behavioral and Pharmacological Adherence in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease: Parent-Child Agreement and Family Factors Associated With Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzman, Page H; Carmody, Julia K; Belkin, Mary H; Janicke, David M

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate agreement between children and parents on a measure of behavioral and pharmacological adherence in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), and the associations among family factors (i.e., problem-solving skills, routines, communication) and adherence behaviors. In all, 85 children (aged 8-18 years) with SCD and their parents completed questionnaires assessing individual and family factors. Overall parent-child agreement on an adherence measure was poor, particularly for boys and older children. Greater use of child routines was associated with better overall child-reported adherence. Open family communication was associated with higher overall parent-reported adherence. While further research is needed before definitive conclusions can be drawn, results suggest the need to assess child adherence behaviors via both child and parent reports. Findings also suggest that more daily family routines and open family communication may be protective factors for better disease management. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. Calculations of the Acceleration of Centrifugal Loading on Adherent Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kang; Song, Yang; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Chunqiu

    2017-07-01

    Studies have shown that the morphology and function of living cells are greatly affected by the state of different high acceleration. Based on the centrifuge, we designed a centrifugal cell loading machine for the mechanical biology of cells under high acceleration loading. For the machine, the feasibility of the experiment was studied by means of constant acceleration or variable acceleration loading in the Petri dish fixture and/or culture flask. Here we analyzed the distribution of the acceleration of the cells with the change of position and size of the culturing device quantitatively. It is obtained that Petri dish fixture and/or culture flask can be used for constant acceleration loading by experiments; the centripetal acceleration of the adherent cells increases with the increase of the distance between the rotor center of the centrifuge and the fixture of the Petri dish and the size of the fixture. It achieves the idea that the general biology laboratory can conduct the study of mechanical biology at high acceleration. It also provides a basis for more accurate study of the law of high acceleration on mechanobiology of cells.

  3. Modulation of Kingella kingae adherence to human epithelial cells by type IV Pili, capsule, and a novel trimeric autotransporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porsch, Eric A; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; St Geme, Joseph W

    2012-10-23

    Kingella kingae is an emerging bacterial pathogen that is being recognized increasingly as an important etiology of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and bacteremia, especially in young children. Colonization of the posterior pharynx is a key step in the pathogenesis of K. kingae disease. Previous work established that type IV pili are necessary for K. kingae adherence to the respiratory epithelium. In this study, we set out to identify additional factors that influence K. kingae interactions with human epithelial cells. We found that genetic disruption of the gene encoding a predicted trimeric autotransporter protein called Knh (Kingella NhhA homolog) resulted in reduced adherence to human epithelial cells. In addition, we established that K. kingae elaborates a surface-associated polysaccharide capsule that requires a predicted ABC-type transporter export operon called ctrABCD for surface presentation. Furthermore, we discovered that the presence of a surface capsule interferes with Knh-mediated adherence to human epithelial cells by nonpiliated organisms and that maximal adherence in the presence of a capsule requires the predicted type IV pilus retraction machinery, PilT/PilU. On the basis of the data presented here, we propose a novel adherence mechanism that allows K. kingae to adhere efficiently to human epithelial cells while remaining encapsulated and more resistant to immune clearance. Kingella kingae is a Gram-negative bacterium that is being recognized increasingly as a cause of joint and bone infections in young children. The pathogenesis of disease due to K. kingae begins with bacterial colonization of the upper respiratory tract, and previous work established that surface hair-like fibers called type IV pili are necessary for K. kingae adherence to respiratory epithelial cells. In this study, we set out to identify additional factors that influence K. kingae interactions with respiratory epithelial cells. We discovered a novel surface protein called

  4. Surface modification of closed plastic bags for adherent cell cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, K.; Dohse, A.; Thomas, M.; Pohl, S.; Meyring, W.; Dittmar, K. E. J.; Lindenmeier, W.; Klages, C.-P.

    2011-07-01

    In modern medicine human mesenchymal stem cells are becoming increasingly important. However, a successful cultivation of this type of cells is only possible under very specific conditions. Of great importance, for instance, are the absence of contaminants such as foreign microbiological organisms, i.e., sterility, and the chemical functionalization of the ground on which the cells are grown. As cultivation of these cells makes high demands, a new procedure for cell cultivation has been developed in which closed plastic bags are used. For adherent cell growth chemical functional groups have to be introduced on the inner surface of the plastic bag. This can be achieved by a new, atmospheric-pressure plasma-based method presented in this paper. The method which was developed jointly by the Fraunhofer IST and the Helmholtz HZI can be implemented in automated equipment as is also shown in this contribution. Plasma process gases used include helium or helium-based gas mixtures (He + N2 + H2) and vapors of suitable film-forming agents or precursors such as APTMS, DACH, and TMOS in helium. The effect of plasma treatment is investigated by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy as well as surface tension determination based on contact angle measurements and XPS. Plasma treatment in nominally pure helium increases the surface tension of the polymer foil due to the presence of oxygen traces in the gas and oxygen diffusing through the gas-permeable foil, respectively, reacting with surface radical centers formed during contact with the discharge. Primary amino groups are obtained on the inner surface by treatment in mixtures with nitrogen and hydrogen albeit their amount is comparably small due to diffusion of oxygen through the gas-permeable bag, interfering with the plasma-amination process. Surface modifications introducing amino groups on the inner surface turned out to be most efficient in the promotion of cell growth.

  5. By passing microbial resistance: xylitol controls microorganisms growth by means of its anti-adherence property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Aline S; Silva-Paes-Leme, Annelisa F; Raposo, Nádia R B; da Silva, Sílvio S

    2015-01-01

    Xylitol is an important polyalcohol suitable for use in odontological, medical and pharmaceutical products and as an additive in food. The first studies on the efficacy of xylitol in the control and treatment of infections started in the late 1970s and it is still applied for this purpose, with safety and very little contribution to resistance. Xylitol seems to act against microorganisms exerting an anti-adherence effect. Some research studies have demonstrated its action against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts. However, a clear explanation of how xylitol is effective has not been completely established yet. Some evidence shows that xylitol acts on gene expression, down-regulating the ones which are involved in the microorganisms' virulence, such as capsule formation. Another possible clarification is that xylitol blocks lectin-like receptors. The most important aspect is that, over time, xylitol bypasses microbial resistance and succeeds in controlling infection, either alone or combined with another compound. In this review, the effect of xylitol in inhibiting the growth of a different microorganism is described, focusing on studies in which such an anti-adherent property was highlighted. This is the first mini-review to describe xylitol as an anti-adherent compound and take into consideration how it exerts such action.

  6. Measuring The Contact Resistances Of Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Simple method devised to measure contact resistances of photovoltaic solar cells. Method uses readily available equipment and applicable at any time during life of cell. Enables evaluation of cell contact resistance, contact-end resistance, contact resistivity, sheet resistivity, and sheet resistivity under contact.

  7. Effect of in vivo exposure to benzene on the characteristics of bone marrow adherent cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnett, H M; Cronkite, E P; Drew, R T

    1983-01-01

    The effect of benzene on the adherent cell population, cultured from the bone marrow of exposed mice was investigated in the presence and absence of hydrocortisone. The adherent CFUs from exposed animals did not differ either in numbers or self-replicate ability to those derived from shown exposed animals. Adherent layers from mice exposed to 100 or 400 pp-benzene were devoid of fat cells regardless of the presence or absence of hydrocortisone. Hydrocortisone was shown to influence the proportion of acid phosphatase-positive cells derived from benzene-exposed animals. Those results suggest that benzene exposure may influence the bone marrow stromal cells.

  8. Cell fusion through a microslit between adhered cells and observation of their nuclear behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Ken-Ichi; Hosokawa, Kazuo; Kondo, Eitaro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Mizuo

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a novel cell fusion method which induces cell fusion between adhered cells through a microslit for preventing nuclear mixing. For this purpose, a microfluidic device which had ∼ 100 cell pairing structures (CPSs) making cell pairs through microslits with 2.1 ± 0.3 µm width was fabricated. After trapping NIH3T3 cells with hydrodynamic forces at the CPSs, the cells were fused through the microslit by the Sendai virus envelope method. With following timelapse observation, we discovered that the spread cells were much less susceptible to nuclear migration passing through the microslit compared with round cells, and that cytoplasmic fraction containing mitochondria was transferred through the microslit without nuclear mixing. These findings will provide an effective method for cell fusion without nuclear mixing, and will lead to an efficient method for reprograming and transdifferentiation of target cells toward regenerative medicine. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Live-cell calcium imaging of adherent and non-adherent GL261 cells reveals phenotype-dependent differences in drug responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Averey D; Daniels, Richard L

    2017-08-02

    The tumor-derived GL261 cell line is used as a model for studying glioblastoma and other high-grade gliomas, and can be cultured adherently or as free-floating aggregates known as neurospheres. These different culture conditions give rise to distinct phenotypes, with increased tumorigenicity displayed by neurosphere-cultured cells. An important technique for understanding GL261 pathobiology is live cell fluorescent imaging of intracellular calcium. However, live cell imaging of GL261 neurospheres presents a technical challenge, as experimental manipulations where drugs are added to the extracellular media cause the cells to move during analysis. Here we present a method to immobilize GL261 neurospheres with low melting point agarose for calcium imaging using the fluorescent calcium sensor fura-2. GL261 cells were obtained from the NCI-Frederick Cancer Research Tumor Repository and cultured as adherent cells or induced to form neurospheres by placing freshly trypsinized cells into serum-free media containing fibroblast growth factor 2, epidermal growth factor, and B-27 supplement. Prior to experiments, adherent cells were loaded with fura-2 and cultured on 8-well chamber slides. Non-adherent neurospheres were first loaded with fura-2, placed in droplets onto an 8-well chamber slide, and finally covered with a thin layer of low melting point agarose to immobilize the cells. Ratiometric pseudocolored images were obtained during treatment with ATP, capsaicin, or vehicle control. Cells were marked as responsive if fluorescence levels increased more than 30% above baseline. Differences between treatment groups were tested using Student's t-tests and one-way ANOVA. We found that cellular responses to pharmacological treatments differ based on cellular phenotype. Adherent cells and neurospheres both responded to ATP with a rise in intracellular calcium. Notably, capsaicin treatment led to robust responses in GL261 neurospheres but not adherent cells. We demonstrate the use

  10. Inverting adherent cells for visualizing ECM interactions at the basal cell side

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudzenko, Tetyana [DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1a, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Franz, Clemens M., E-mail: clemens.franz@kit.edu [DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1a, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) govern a wide range of cellular functions, including survival, migration and invasion. However, in adherent cells these interactions occur primarily on the basal cell side, making them inaccessible to high-resolution, surface-scanning imaging techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Here we describe a fast and reliable method for inverting adherent cells, exposing the basal cell membrane for direct analysis by AFM or SEM in combination with fluorescence microscopy. Cells including their matrix adhesion sites remain intact during the inversion process and are transferred together with the complete array of basally associated ECM proteins. Molecular features of ECM proteins, such as the characteristic 67 nm collagen D-periodicity, are well preserved after inversion. To demonstrate the versatility of the method, we compared basal interactions of fibroblasts with fibrillar collagen I and fibronectin matrices. While fibroblasts remodel the fibronectin layer exclusively from above, they actively invade even thin collagen layers by contacting individual collagen nanofibrils both basally and apically through a network of cellular extensions. Cell–matrix entanglement coincides with enhanced cell spreading and flattening, indicating that nanoscale ECM interactions govern macroscopic changes in cell morphology. The presented cell inversion technique can thus provide novel insight into nanoscale cell–matrix interactions at the basal cell side. - Highlights: ► We present a novel method for inverting adherent cells to expose the basal cell side. ► Basal cell sides can be imaged at high resolution by AFM and SEM. ► Cells can be inverted together with the underlying extracellular matrix. ► AFM images of inverted cells provide a nanoscale look at basal cell–ECM interactions.

  11. Mitogenic activation of B cells in vitro: the properties of adherent accessory cells as revealed by partition analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettman, J.R.; Soederberg, A.; Lefkovits, I.

    1986-08-15

    The requirement of B cells activated by mitogen (dextran sulfate plus lipopolysaccharide) for accessory cells was studied by partition analysis. Small numbers of splenic B cells were activated to clonal growth, as determined by visual inspection, and to immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis, as determined by release of Ig into the culture fluid. By placing irradiated adherent cells in the periphery of the microculture wells and forcing responding cells to different areas of the well (slant experiments), it was observed that no cell contact was necessary for B cell activation, and that promoted contact (Rock and Roll experiments) does not increase the efficiency of activation. Sequential microcultures suggest that only some irradiated adherent cells act as accessory cells, but they can perform this function to more than one B cell. Attempts to perform limiting dilution analysis by varying irradiated adherent cell input showed non-single-hit behavior. When the data were rearranged, taking into account the distribution of irradiated adherent cells, then single-hit behavior with about 1 to 5% of irradiated adherent cells acting as an accessory cells for B cell clonal activation was observed. The evidence suggests that an uncommon irradiated adherent cell releases a soluble factor necessary for B cell activation and/or clonal proliferation.

  12. Mitogenic activation of B cells in vitro: the properties of adherent accessory cells as revealed by partition analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettman, J.R.; Soederberg, A.; Lefkovits, I.

    1986-01-01

    The requirement of B cells activated by mitogen (dextran sulfate plus lipopolysaccharide) for accessory cells was studied by partition analysis. Small numbers of splenic B cells were activated to clonal growth, as determined by visual inspection, and to immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis, as determined by release of Ig into the culture fluid. By placing irradiated adherent cells in the periphery of the microculture wells and forcing responding cells to different areas of the well (slant experiments), it was observed that no cell contact was necessary for B cell activation, and that promoted contact (Rock and Roll experiments) does not increase the efficiency of activation. Sequential microcultures suggest that only some irradiated adherent cells act as accessory cells, but they can perform this function to more than one B cell. Attempts to perform limiting dilution analysis by varying irradiated adherent cell input showed non-single-hit behavior. When the data were rearranged, taking into account the distribution of irradiated adherent cells, then single-hit behavior with about 1 to 5% of irradiated adherent cells acting as an accessory cells for B cell clonal activation was observed. The evidence suggests that an uncommon irradiated adherent cell releases a soluble factor necessary for B cell activation and/or clonal proliferation

  13. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-07-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% (SD)) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition.

  14. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the [ 3 H]thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% [SD]) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition

  15. Synergism between two helper cell subpopulations characterized by different radiosensitivity and nylon adherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarossi, G.; Mancini, C.; Doria, G.

    1981-01-01

    The present work extends our previous results on the radiosensitivity of the helper cell function. Two helper cell subpopulations, 1 radiosensitive and the other radioresistant, have been demonstrated in the spleen of mice at different times after priming with HRBC. The radiosensitive subpopulation increases with the increasing time interval between carrier-priming and irradiation. The 2 cell subpopulations have been further characterized by different nylon adherence properties: radioresistant helper cells adhere to nylon wool, whereas radiosensitive cells pass through. The 2 cell subpopulations were separated by x-irradiation and nylon wool filtration, and their helper activity was assessed separately or after recombination. The results favor the notion that 2 functionally independent helper T cells, as characterized by different radiosensitivity and nylon adherence, participate synergistically in the helper activity of primed spleen cells

  16. Cyto-adherence of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides to bovine lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Racheal; Mwirigi, Martin Kiogora; Frey, Joachim; Pilo, Paola; Jores, Joerg; Naessens, Jan

    2015-02-07

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm) is the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), a respiratory disease of cattle, whereas the closely related Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri (Mmc) is a goat pathogen. Cyto-adherence is a crucial step in host colonization by mycoplasmas and subsequent pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between Mmm and mammalian host cells by establishing a cyto-adherence flow cytometric assay and comparing tissue and species specificity of Mmm and Mmc strains. There were little significant differences in the adherence patterns of eight different Mmm strains to adult bovine lung epithelial cells. However, there was statistically significant variation in binding to different host cells types. Highest binding was observed with lung epithelial cells, intermediate binding with endothelial cells and very low binding with fibroblasts, suggesting the presence of effective adherence of Mmm on cells lining the airways of the lung, which is the target organ for this pathogen, possibly by high expression of a specific receptor. However, binding to bovine fetal lung epithelial cells was comparably low; suggesting that the lack of severe pulmonary disease seen in many infected young calves can be explained by reduced expression of a specific receptor. Mmm bound with high efficiency to adult bovine lung cells and less efficiently to calves or goat lung cells. The data show that cyto-adherence of Mmm is species- and tissue- specific confirming its role in colonization of the target host and subsequent infection and development of CBPP.

  17. PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 potentiates homoharringtonine antimyeloma activity in myeloma cells adhered to stromal cells and in SCID mouse xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Wen, Xiaofang; Wang, Bin; Hou, Diyu; Zou, Hong; Yuan, Qin; Yang, Hui; Xie, Jieqiong; Huang, Huifang

    2018-05-01

    Homoharringtonine (HHT) is a known anti-leukemia drug that inhibits multiple myeloma (MM) cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our prior study demonstrated that the potency of HHT in MM cells was compromised significantly when myeloma cells were co-cultured with BM stromal cells. This study aimed to investigate whether PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 could potentiate the antimyeloma activity of HHT against MM cells adhered to BM stromal cells and in vivo xenograft models. A co-culture system composed of MM cells and human stromal cells was employed to mimic MM cells in bone marrow niche. The inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effect of HHT and LY294002 was determined by CCK-8 assay or flow cytometry. Expression of PI3K/Akt signaling molecules and anti-apoptotic protein myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) was assessed by western blot analysis and/or reverse transcription real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). MM xenografts were used to evaluate antitumor effect of combined therapy with HHT and LY294002. Adhesion to BM stromal cells rendered MM cells resistant to HHT whereas silencing Mcl-1 partly reversed the resistance. LY294002 induced apoptosis in MM cells and potentiated the antimyeloma effects of HHT by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signal pathway which was abnormally activated during adhesion. LY294002 also enhanced the antimyeloma effect of HHT in in vivo xenograft models. These findings suggest that activation of PI3K/Akt signal pathway was responsible for the resistance to HHT in MM cells adhered to stromal cells. LY294002 can potentiate the antimyeloma activity of HHT both in vitro and in vivo, which may represent a new clinical treatment in MM.

  18. Cargo delivery to adhering myoblast cells from liposome-containing poly(dopamine) composite coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Martin Elias Lynge; Mian Teo, Boon; Laursen, Marie Bækgaard

    2013-01-01

    -engineered composite coatings to impose a corresponding cellular response, e.g., a higher amount of embedded liposomes leads to higher uptake efficiency of the fluorescent lipids and cell mean fluorescence or a higher reduction in the viability of the adhering cells. Assessment of the uptake efficiency and cell mean...

  19. The effect of antibody on the adherence of Staphylococcus aureus to bovine mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmsted, S.B.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of S. aureus to adhere to epithelial cells in the ductuals and alveoli of the gland is believed to add greatly to its virulence and may be necessary for colonization. Two in vitro methods were developed for the purpose of quantifying adherence. Both methods utilize bovine mammary epithelial primary cells as targets for labeled bacteria. In one assay, the bacterial are labeled with [methyl- 3 H] thymidine, and incubated on the primary epithelial monolayers. Adherence of the bacterial sample is expressed as the percent radioactivity in the adherent fraction of the total radioactivity in both fractions. The second assay involves labeling the bacteria with biotin. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is then performed with strepavidin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. Both methods have proven to be reliable, and allow for the testing of many criteria in one assay

  20. Hepatic natural killer cells exclusively kill splenic/blood natural killer-resistant tumor cells by the perforin/granzyme pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermijlen, David; Luo, Dianzhong; Froelich, Christopher J.; Medema, Jan Paul; Kummer, Jean Alain; Willems, Erik; Braet, Filip; Wisse, Eddie

    2002-01-01

    Hepatic natural killer (NK) cells are located in the liver sinusoids adherent to the endothelium. Human and rat hepatic NK cells induce cytolysis in tumor cells that are resistant to splenic or blood NK cells. To investigate the mechanism of cell death, we examined the capacity of isolated, pure

  1. Enhanced adherence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius sequence type 71 to canine and human corneocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latronico, Francesca; Moodley, Arshnee; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2014-01-01

    characterized with respect to genetic background and cell wall-anchored protein (CWAP) gene content. Seventy-seven strain-corneocyte combinations were tested using both exponential- and stationary-phase cultures. Negative binomial regression analysis of counts of bacterial cells adhering to corneocytes revealed...

  2. A radioimmunoassay for antibodies against surface membrane antigens using adhering cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tax, A.; Manson, L.A.

    1976-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay using cells adhering to plastic is described. In this assay, A-10 mammary carcinoma attached to the surface of plastic in microtiter plates were permitted to bind antibody and the bound antibody was detected with purified rabbit 125 I-antimouse-Fab. The bound radioactive material was eluted with glycine-HCl buffer (pH 2.5), and the acid eluates were counted in a gamma counter. This assay can be used to detect cytolic or noncytolic antibody to cell surface antigens in studies with any tumor or normal cell that will adhere to a solid surface

  3. Effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the adherence of pathogenic bacteria to human epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faden, H.; Hong, J.J.; Ogra, P.L.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of RSV infection on the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), Haemophilus influenzae (HI) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) to human epithelial cells was determined. RSV-infected Hep-2 cell cultures at different stages of expression of surface viral antigens and bacteria labeled with /sup 3/H-thymidine were employed to examine the kinetics of bacterial adherence to virus-infected cells. RSV infection did not alter the magnitude of adherence of HI or SA to HEp-2 cells. However, adherence of SP to HEp-2 cells was significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced by prior RSV infection. The degree of adherence was directly related to the amount of viral antigen expressed on the cell surface. The adherence was temperature dependent, with maximal adherence observed at 37/sup 0/C. Heat-inactivation of SP did not alter adherence characteristics. These data suggest that RSV infection increases adherence of SP to the surface of epithelial cells in vitro. Since attachment of bacteria to mucosal surfaces is the first step in many infections, it is suggested that viral infections of epithelial cells render them more susceptible to bacterial adherence. Thus, RSV infection in vivo may predispose children to SP infections, such as in otitis media, by increasing colonization with SP.

  4. Adherence of Staphylococci to plastic, mesothelial cells and mesothelial extracellular matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Betjes, M. G.; Tuk, C. W.; Struijk, D. G.; Krediet, R. T.; Arisz, L.; Beelen, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    In this study we have investigated whether mesothelial cells (MC) and mesothelial extracellular matrix (ECM) are suitable substrates for the adherence of Staphylococci. Mesothelial cells were isolated from the peritoneal dialysis effluent by making use of their lack of Fc-receptors and capacity to

  5. Caregiver's Health Locus of Control and Medication Adherence in Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Kusum; Swaminathan, Neeraja; Viswanathan, Ramaswamy; Lakkaraja, Madhavi

    2015-03-01

    The authors would like to thank Dr. Morisky for giving us permission to use the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale To explore caregivers' Health Locus of Control's relationship to self-reported adherence to penicillin prophylaxis or hydroxyurea in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). A questionnaire-based study was conducted of caregivers of children with SCD who visited a comprehensive sickle cell center in an inner city hospital, who were either on penicillin prophylaxis or hydroxyurea or both. Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLC) and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) questionnaires were used for the study. Caregivers of 43 children (27 on penicillin prophylaxis, 13 on hydroxyurea, and 3 on both) completed the MHLC and the MMAS-8. There was no significant difference in adherence between the penicillin and the hydroxyurea groups. The mean Powerful Others score of caregivers of the hydroxyurea only group (25.5+5.6) was higher than that of the penicillin only group (21.2+6.1, p=0.043). Regression analysis revealed an inverse relationship of Chance Locus of Control to adherence in the entire group (Beta = -0.306, R2=0.093, F[1,40]=4.12, p=0.049). Chance Locus of control may identify caregivers of children with SCD at risk for non-adherence to treatment. © 2015 National Medical Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Proliferative activity of vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramvis, A.; Garnett, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    Vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cell population cultured in Fischer's medium supplemented with 12.5% fetal calf serum and 12.5% horse serum consists of two cell shapes: fusiform (type I) and polygonal (type II). Limiting-dilution cloning of the cells suggested that the two morphologically distinct cell types belong to the same cellular system even though they differ in their proliferative capabilities. The labeling index of type II cells, as measured by autoradiography, was found to be consistently lower than that of type I cells. It is probable that these two phenotypes represent different stages of differentiation, where progenitor type I gives rise to type II cells. The bone marrow-derived adherent cells were found to be cytokinetically at rest in vivo, using the thymidine suicide test, and relatively radioresistant with a D0 = 2.1 Gy and n = 2.36 at the time of explantation from the bone. Furthermore, in culture these cells are characterized by a relatively long cell cycle of 60 h, where the length of the S phase is 30 h, G2 is 12 h, M is 6 h, and G1 is 12 h. Thus, the vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cells represent a cell population with a low turnover rate both in vivo and in vitro

  7. Traction Stresses Exerted by Adherent Cells: From Angiogenesis to Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart-King, Cynthia

    2010-03-01

    Cells exert traction stresses against their substrate that mediate their ability to sense the mechanical properties of their microenvironment. These same forces mediate cell adhesion, migration and the formation of stable cell-cell contacts during tissue formation. In this talk, I will present our data on the traction stresses generated by endothelial cells and metastatic breast cancer cells focused on understanding the processes of angiogenesis and metastasis, respectively. In the context of capillary formation, our data indicate that the mechanics of the substrate play a critical role in establishing endothelial cell-cell contacts. On more compliant substrates, endothelial cell shape and traction stresses polarize and promote the formation of stable cell-cell contacts. On stiffer substrates, traction stresses are less polarized and cell connectivity is disrupted. These data indicate that the mechanical properties of the microenvironment may drive cell connectivity and the formation of stable cell-cell contacts through the reorientation of traction stresses. In our studies of metastatic cell migration, we have found that traction stresses increase with increasing metastatic potential. We investigated three lines of varying metastatic potential (MCF10A, MCF7 and MDAMB231). MDAMB231, which are the most invasive, exert the most significant forces as measured by Traction Force Microscopy. These data present the possibility that cellular traction stress generation aids in the ability of metastatic cells to migrate through the matrix-dense tumor microenvironment. Such measurements are integral to link the mechanical and chemical microenvironment with the resulting response of the cell in health and disease.

  8. Apa is a trimeric autotransporter adhesin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae responsible for autoagglutination and host cell adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Longwen; Zhou, Liang; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Du, ChongTao; Gao, Yu; Ji, Qun; Yang, Shuxin; Wang, Yu; Han, Wenyu; Langford, P R; Lei, Liancheng

    2012-10-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, and adherence to host cells is a key step in the pathogenic process. Although trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) were identified in many pathogenic bacteria in recent years, none in A. pleuropneumoniae have been characterized. In this study, we identified a TAA from A. pleuropneumoniae, Apa, and characterized the contribution of its amino acid residues to the adhesion process. Sequence analysis of the C-terminal amino acid residues of Apa revealed the presence of a putative translocator domain and six conserved HsfBD1-like or HsfBD2-like binding domains. Western blot analysis revealed that the 126 C-terminal amino acids of Apa could form trimeric molecules. By confocal laser scanning microscopy, one of these six domains (ApaBD3) was determined to mediate adherence to epithelial cells. Adherence assays and adherence inhibition assays using a recombinant E. coli- ApaBD3 strain which expressed ApaBD3 on the surface of E. coli confirmed that this domain was responsible for the adhesion activity. Moreover, cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays demonstrated that ApaBD3 mediated high-level adherence to epithelial cell lines. Intriguingly, autoagglutination was observed with the E. coli- ApaBD3 strain, and this phenomenon was dependent upon the association of the expressed ApaBD3 with the C-terminal translocator domain. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. S-carboxymethylcysteine inhibits adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae to human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major pathogen of respiratory infections that utilizes platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) for firm adherence to host cells. The mucolytic agent S-carboxymethylcysteine (S-CMC) has been shown to exert inhibitory effects against infection by several respiratory pathogens including S. pneumoniae in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, clinical studies have implicated the benefits of S-CMC in preventing exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which is considered to be related to respiratory infections. In this study, to assess whether the potency of S-CMC is attributable to inhibition of pneumococcal adherence to host cells, an alveolar epithelial cell line stimulated with interleukin-1α was used as a model of inflamed epithelial cells. Despite upregulation of PAFR by inflammatory activation, treatment with S-CMC efficiently inhibited pneumococcal adherence to host epithelial cells. In order to gain insight into the inhibitory mechanism, the effects of S-CMC on PAFR expression were also investigated. Following treatment with S-CMC, PAFR expression was reduced at both mRNA and post-transcriptional levels. Interestingly, S-CMC was also effective in inhibiting pneumococcal adherence to cells transfected with PAFR small interfering RNAs. These results indicate S-CMC as a probable inhibitor targeting numerous epithelial receptors that interact with S. pneumoniae.

  10. [Ability of Staphylococcus cohnii strains to adhere to epithelial cells and solid surfaces in the hospital environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldon, Edyta; Szewczyk, Eligia M

    2002-01-01

    Presented study describes abilities of staphylococci to adhere to exfoliated cheek and uroepithelial epithelium cells and to various surfaces such as plastics, glass and steel. The subject of the study were strains of Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. cohnii and Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus isolated from Intensive Care Unit of Pediatric Hospital. Staphylococcus cohnii ssp.cohnii adhered in great number to epithelial cells. However, the adhesion differed by individual strains. We did not find relationship between slime production and adherence to epithelial cell. Most of investigated strains adhered closely to surfaces--especially of plastics and glass. This phenomenon was stronger in the presence of culture medium and phosphate buffer.

  11. Silver colloidal nanoparticles: antifungal effect against adhered cells and biofilms of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, D R; Gorup, L F; Silva, S; Negri, M; de Camargo, E R; Oliveira, R; Barbosa, D B; Henriques, M

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silver nanoparticles (SN) against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata adhered cells and biofilms. SN (average diameter 5 nm) were synthesized by silver nitrate reduction with sodium citrate and stabilized with ammonia. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) tests were performed for C. albicans (n = 2) and C. glabrata (n = 2) grown in suspension following the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute microbroth dilution method. SN were applied to adhered cells (2 h) or biofilms (48 h) and after 24 h of contact their effect was assessed by enumeration of colony forming units (CFUs) and quantification of total biomass (by crystal violet staining). The MIC results showed that SN were fungicidal against all strains tested at very low concentrations (0.4-3.3 μg ml(-1)). Furthermore, SN were more effective in reducing biofilm biomass when applied to adhered cells (2 h) than to pre-formed biofilms (48 h), with the exception of C. glabrata ATCC, which in both cases showed a reduction ∼90%. Regarding cell viability, SN were highly effective on adhered C. glabrata and respective biofilms. On C. albicans the effect was not so evident but there was also a reduction in the number of viable biofilm cells. In summary, SN may have the potential to be an effective alternative to conventional antifungal agents for future therapies in Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

  12. Soluble fibrin inhibits monocyte adherence and cytotoxicity against tumor cells: implications for cancer metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Shonak

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soluble fibrin (sFn is a marker for disseminated intravascular coagulation and may have prognostic significance, especially in metastasis. However, a role for sFn in the etiology of metastatic cancer growth has not been extensively studied. We have reported that sFn cross-linked platelet binding to tumor cells via the major platelet fibrin receptor αIIbβ3, and tumor cell CD54 (ICAM-1, which is the receptor for two of the leukocyte β2 integrins (αLβ2 and aMβ2. We hypothesized that sFn may also affect leukocyte adherence, recognition, and killing of tumor cells. Furthermore, in a rat experimental metastasis model sFn pre-treatment of tumor cells enhanced metastasis by over 60% compared to untreated cells. Other studies have shown that fibrin(ogen binds to the monocyte integrin αMβ2. This study therefore sought to investigate the effect of sFn on β2 integrin mediated monocyte adherence and killing of tumor cells. Methods The role of sFn in monocyte adherence and cytotoxicity against tumor cells was initially studied using static microplate adherence and cytotoxicity assays, and under physiologically relevant flow conditions in a microscope perfusion incubator system. Blocking studies were performed using monoclonal antibodies specific for β2 integrins and CD54, and specific peptides which inhibit sFn binding to these receptors. Results Enhancement of monocyte/tumor cell adherence was observed when only one cell type was bound to sFn, but profound inhibition was observed when sFn was bound to both monocytes and tumor cells. This effect was also reflected in the pattern of monocyte cytotoxicity. Studies using monoclonal blocking antibodies and specific blocking peptides (which did not affect normal coagulation showed that the predominant mechanism of fibrin inhibition is via its binding to αMβ2 on monocytes, and to CD54 on both leukocytes and tumor cells. Conclusion sFn inhibits monocyte adherence and cytotoxicity of

  13. SadA-Expressing Staphylococci in the Human Gut Show Increased Cell Adherence and Internalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Luqman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: A subgroup of biogenic amines, the so-called trace amines (TAs, are produced by mammals and bacteria and can act as neuromodulators. In the genus Staphylococcus, certain species are capable of producing TAs through the activity of staphylococcal aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (SadA. SadA decarboxylates aromatic amino acids to produce TAs, as well as dihydroxy phenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan to thus produce the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin. SadA-expressing staphylococci were prevalent in the gut of most probands, where they are part of the human intestinal microflora. Furthermore, sadA-expressing staphylococci showed increased adherence to HT-29 cells and 2- to 3-fold increased internalization. Internalization and adherence was also increased in a sadA mutant in the presence of tryptamine. The α2-adrenergic receptor is required for enhanced adherence and internalization. Thus, staphylococci in the gut might contribute to gut activity and intestinal colonization. : Luqman et al. examine the sadA gene and argue that it contributes to TAs. They found that neuromodulator-producing staphylococci were present in the gut of most probands. The produced neuromodulators enhanced the adherence and internalization of staphylococci to cells in culture. Keywords: adherence, aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, gut microbiota, internalization, neuromodulator, neurotransmitter, staphylococcus

  14. Directional freezing for the cryopreservation of adherent mammalian cells on a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braslavsky, Ido

    2018-01-01

    Successfully cryopreserving cells adhered to a substrate would facilitate the growth of a vital confluent cell culture after thawing while dramatically shortening the post-thaw culturing time. Herein we propose a controlled slow cooling method combining initial directional freezing followed by gradual cooling down to -80°C for robust preservation of cell monolayers adherent to a substrate. Using computer controlled cryostages we examined the effect of cooling rates and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) concentration on cell survival and established an optimal cryopreservation protocol. Experimental results show the highest post-thawing viability for directional ice growth at a speed of 30 μm/sec (equivalent to freezing rate of 3.8°C/min), followed by gradual cooling of the sample with decreasing rate of 0.5°C/min. Efficient cryopreservation of three widely used epithelial cell lines: IEC-18, HeLa, and Caco-2, provides proof-of-concept support for this new freezing protocol applied to adherent cells. This method is highly reproducible, significantly increases the post-thaw cell viability and can be readily applied for cryopreservation of cellular cultures in microfluidic devices. PMID:29447224

  15. The functions of the variable lipoprotein family of Mycoplasma hyorhinis in adherence to host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qiyan; Wang, Jia; Ji, Yan; Ni, Bo; Zhang, Bixiong; Ma, Qinghong; Wei, Yanna; Xiao, Shaobo; Feng, Zhixin; Liu, Maojun; Shao, Guoqing

    2016-04-15

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis (M. hyorhinis) is a swine pathogen that is associated with various human cancers and contamination in cell cultures. However, no studies on the adhesion molecules of this pathogen have yet been reported. The variable lipoprotein (Vlp) family is an important surface component of M. hyorhinis. Herein, we performed several experiments to identify the function of the Vlp family in adherence to host cells. Seven recombinant Vlp (rVlp) proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. The potential role of rVlp adherence to pig kidney (PK-15) and swine tracheal epithelial (STEC) cells was then studied by indirect immunofluorescence assay and microtiter plate adherence assay. Adhesion of M. hyorhinis to PK-15 and STEC cells was specifically inhibited by the addition of a cocktail of rVlp proteins. The rVlp protein mixture was shown to bind to both PK-15 and STEC cells. The binding increased in a dose-dependent manner and could be blocked by antisera against the rVlp proteins. Most of the rVlp proteins could bind individually to both PK-15 and STEC cells except for rVlpD and rVlpF, which bound only to STEC cells. Because Vlp members vary in size among different strains and generations, they may vary in their cytoadhesion capabilities in various strains. In summary, the present results indicate that the Vlp family functions as adhesins of M. hyorhinis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. [Adherence to international recommendations in the fight against antimicrobial resistance - Substantial difference between outpatient consumption in Spain and Denmark].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo, Sara; Rabanaque, María José; Bjerrum, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance represents a major public health threat that jeopardises the future treatment of bacterial infections. This study aims to describe the adherence to recommendations proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO) Advisory Group on Integrated Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance (AGISAR), in Spain and Denmark, and to analyse the relation between the outpatient use of Critically Important Antimicrobials (CIA) and the bacterial resistance rates to these agents. The Antimicrobial consumption interactive database (ESAC-Net) and Antimicrobial resistance interactive database (EARS-Net) provided data on outpatient use (2010-2013) of CIA (fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and 3rd and 4th generation cephalosporins) and the percentages of isolates of the main pathogens causing serious infections, resistant to these agents. The use of cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones, as well as the percentage of bacteria resistant, is higher in Spain than in Denmark. Although consumption of macrolides in both countries is similar, the proportion of Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to macrolides is significantly higher in Spain. The high outpatient consumption of CIA agents in Spain deviates substantially from the WHO recommendations. Moreover, it has the effect of elevated rates of antimicrobial resistance, that are lower in Denmark.

  17. Comparative study of the radiobiological effects induced on adherent vs suspended cells by BNCT, neutrons and gamma rays treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cansolino, L.; Clerici, A.M.; Zonta, C.; Dionigi, P.; Mazzini, G.; Di Liberto, R.; Altieri, S.; Ballarini, F.; Bortolussi, S.; Carante, M.P.; Ferrari, M.; González, S.J.; Postuma, I.; Protti, N.; Santa Cruz, G.A.; Ferrari, C.

    2015-01-01

    The present work is part of a preclinical in vitro study to assess the efficacy of BNCT applied to liver or lung coloncarcinoma metastases and to limb osteosarcoma. Adherent growing cell lines can be irradiated as adherent to the culture flasks or as cell suspensions, differences in radio-sensitivity of the two modalities of radiation exposure have been investigated. Dose related cell survival and cell cycle perturbation results evidenced that the radiosensitivity of adherent cells is higher than that of the suspended ones.

  18. Adherence of Lactobacillus crispatus to vaginal epithelial cells from women with or without a history of recurrent urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Louisa; Stapleton, Ann E; Stamm, Walter E; Hillier, Sharon L; Wobbe, Cheryl L; Gupta, Kalpana

    2006-11-01

    Lactobacillus crispatus strain CTV-05 is a vaginal probiotic proposed for use in women with recurrent urinary tract infection to reduce vaginal colonization with Escherichia coli and the risk of urinary tract infection. However, the ability of this probiotic strain to adhere to the target mucosa, vaginal epithelial cells, has not been assessed in women with recurrent urinary tract infection. We measured the adherence of L. crispatus strain CTV-05 to vaginal epithelial cells collected from more than 100 premenopausal women with (cases) and without (controls) a history of recurrent urinary tract infection. We also examined the effects of relevant host factors on bacterial adherence. Bacterial adherence assays were performed by combining L. crispatus CTV-05 with exfoliated vaginal epithelial cells collected from 51 case women and 51 controls. L. crispatus CTV-05 adhered in high numbers to vaginal epithelial cells from women with recurrent urinary tract infection (mean adherence of 50.5 lactobacilli per vaginal epithelial cell) and controls (mean adherence of 39.4 lactobacilli per vaginal epithelial cell). Adherence was significantly higher using vaginal epithelial cells from women with a maternal history of urinary tract infection (p = 0.036) and a nonsecretor phenotype (p urinary tract infection. These data strongly support further evaluation of this probiotic in clinical trials of women with recurrent urinary tract infection.

  19. Exercise Intervention: Attrition, Compliance, Adherence, and Progression Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Tara; Erdmann, Ruby; Hacker, Eileen Danaher

    2018-02-01

    Exercise is widely touted as an effective intervention to optimize health and well-being after high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. 
. This article reports attrition, compliance, adherence, and progression from the strength training arm of the single-blind randomized, controlled trial Strength Training to Enhance Early Recovery (STEER). 
. 37 patients were randomized to the intervention and participated in a structured strength training program introduced during hospitalization and continued for six weeks after release. Research staff and patients maintained exercise logs to document compliance, adherence, and progression. 
. No patients left the study because of burden. Patients were compliant with completion of exercise sessions, and their adherence was high; they also progressed on their exercise prescription. Because STEER balances intervention effectiveness with patient burden, the findings support the likelihood of successful translation into clinical practice.

  20. Specificity in calcium oxalate adherence to papillary epithelial cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riese, R.J.; Riese, J.W.; Kleinman, J.G.; Wiessner, J.H.; Mandel, G.S.; Mandel, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    Attachment of microcystallites to cellular membranes may be an important component of the pathophysiology of many diseases including urolithiasis. This study attempts to characterize the interaction of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals and apatite (AP) crystals with renal papillary collecting tubule (RPCT) cells in primary culture. Primary cultures of RPCT cells showed the characteristic monolayer growth with sporadically interspersed clumped cells. Cultures were incubated with [ 14 C]CaOx crystals, and the crystals that bound were quantified by microscopy and adherent radioactivity. Per unit of cross-sectional area, 32 times more CaOx crystals were bound to the clumps than to the monolayer. CaOx adherence demonstrated concentration-dependent saturation with a β value (fraction of cell culture area binding CaOx crystals) of 0.179 and a 1/α ox value of 287 μg/cm 2 . On incubation with AP crystals, CaOx binding demonstrated concentration-dependent inhibition with a 1/α AP value of 93 μg/cm 2 . Microcystallite adherence to RPCT cells demonstrates selectivity for cellular clumps, saturation, and inhibition. These features suggest specific binding

  1. Pseudomonas cepacia adherence to respiratory epithelial cells is enhanced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiman, L.; Cacalano, G.; Prince, A.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas cepacia are both opportunistic pathogens of patients with cystic fibrosis. The binding characteristics of these two species were compared to determine if they use similar mechanisms to adhere to respiratory epithelial cells. P. cepacia 249 was shown to be piliated, but there was no detectable homology between P. aeruginosa pilin gene probes and P. cepacia genomic DNA. P. cepacia and P. aeruginosa did not appear to compete for epithelial receptors. In the presence of purified P. aeruginosa pili, the adherence of 35S-labeled strain 249 to respiratory epithelial monolayers was unaffected, while that of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was decreased by 55%. The binding of P. cepacia 249 and 715j was increased by 2.4-fold and 1.5-fold, respectively, in the presence of an equal inoculum of PAO1. Interbacterial agglutination contributed to the increased adherence of P. cepacia, as the binding of 249 was increased twofold in the presence of irradiated PAO1. PAO1 exoproducts had a marked effect in enhancing the ability of the P. cepacia strains to adhere to the epithelial monolayers. A PAO1 supernatant increased the binding of 249 by eightfold and that of 715j by fourfold. Thus, there appears to be a synergistic relationship between P. aeruginosa and P. cepacia in which PAO1 exoproducts modify the epithelial cell surface, exposing receptors and facilitating increased P. cepacia attachment

  2. The periplasmic enzyme, AnsB, of Shigella flexneri modulates bacterial adherence to host epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya T George

    Full Text Available S. flexneri strains, most frequently linked with endemic outbreaks of shigellosis, invade the colonic and rectal epithelium of their host and cause severe tissue damage. Here we have attempted to elucidate the contribution of the periplasmic enzyme, L-asparaginase (AnsB to the pathogenesis of S. flexneri. Using a reverse genetic approach we found that ansB mutants showed reduced adherence to epithelial cells in vitro and attenuation in two in vivo models of shigellosis, the Caenorhabditis elegans and the murine pulmonary model. To investigate how AnsB affects bacterial adherence, we compared the proteomes of the ansB mutant with its wild type parental strain using two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and identified the outer membrane protein, OmpA as up-regulated in ansB mutant cells. Bacterial OmpA, is a prominent outer membrane protein whose activity has been found to be required for bacterial pathogenesis. Overexpression of OmpA in wild type S. flexneri serotype 3b resulted in decreasing the adherence of this virulent strain, suggesting that the up-regulation of OmpA in ansB mutants contributes to the reduced adherence of this mutant strain. The data presented here is the first report that links the metabolic enzyme AnsB to S. flexneri pathogenesis.

  3. Cellular volume regulation and substrate stiffness modulate the detachment dynamics of adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuehua; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2018-03-01

    Quantitative characterizations of cell detachment are vital for understanding the fundamental mechanisms of cell adhesion. Experiments have found that cell detachment shows strong rate dependence, which is mostly attributed to the binding-unbinding kinetics of receptor-ligand bond. However, our recent study showed that the cellular volume regulation can significantly regulate the dynamics of adherent cell and cell detachment. How this cellular volume regulation contributes to the rate dependence of cell detachment remains elusive. Here, we systematically study the role of cellular volume regulation in the rate dependence of cell detachment by investigating the cell detachments of nonspecific adhesion and specific adhesion. We find that the cellular volume regulation and the bond kinetics dominate the rate dependence of cell detachment at different time scales. We further test the validity of the traditional Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) contact model and the detachment model developed by Wyart and Gennes et al (W-G model). When the cell volume is changeable, the JKR model is not appropriate for both the detachments of convex cells and concave cells. The W-G model is valid for the detachment of convex cells but is no longer applicable for the detachment of concave cells. Finally, we show that the rupture force of adherent cells is also highly sensitive to substrate stiffness, since an increase in substrate stiffness will lead to more associated bonds. These findings can provide insight into the critical role of cell volume in cell detachment and might have profound implications for other adhesion-related physiological processes.

  4. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busschots, Steven; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J; Stordal, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. •Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner.•The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation.•The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines.

  5. Effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the adherence of pathogenic bacteria to human epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faden, H.; Hong, J.J.; Ogra, P.L.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of RSV infection on the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), Haemophilus influenzae (HI) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) to human epithelial cells was determined. RSV-infected Hep-2 cell cultures at different stages of expression of surface viral antigens and bacteria labeled with 3 H-thymidine were employed to examine the kinetics of bacterial adherence to virus-infected cells. RSV infection did not alter the magnitude of adherence of HI or SA to HEp-2 cells. However, adherence of SP to HEp-2 cells was significantly (P 0 C. Heat-inactivation of SP did not alter adherence characteristics. These data suggest that RSV infection increases adherence of SP to the surface of epithelial cells in vitro. Since attachment of bacteria to mucosal surfaces is the first step in many infections, it is suggested that viral infections of epithelial cells render them more susceptible to bacterial adherence. Thus, RSV infection in vivo may predispose children to SP infections, such as in otitis media, by increasing colonization with SP

  6. Coating with luminal gut-constituents alters adherence of nanoparticles to intestinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Sinnecker

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthropogenic nanoparticles (NPs have found their way into many goods of everyday life. Inhalation, ingestion and skin contact are potential routes for NPs to enter the body. In particular the digestive tract with its huge absorptive surface area provides a prime gateway for NP uptake. Considering that NPs are covered by luminal gut-constituents en route through the gastrointestinal tract, we wanted to know if such modifications have an influence on the interaction between NPs and enterocytes.Results: We investigated the consequences of a treatment with various luminal gut-constituents on the adherence of nanoparticles to intestinal epithelial cells. Carboxylated polystyrene particles 20, 100 and 200 nm in size represented our anthropogenic NPs, and differentiated Caco-2 cells served as model for mature enterocytes of the small intestine. Pretreatment with the proteins BSA and casein consistently reduced the adherence of all NPs to the cultured enterocytes, while incubation of NPs with meat extract had no obvious effect on particle adherence. In contrast, contact with intestinal fluid appeared to increase the particle-cell interaction of 20 and 100 nm NPs.Conclusion: Luminal gut-constituents may both attenuate and augment the adherence of NPs to cell surfaces. These effects appear to be dependent on the particle size as well as on the type of interacting protein. While some proteins will rather passivate particles towards cell attachment, possibly by increasing colloid stability or camouflaging attachment sites, certain components of intestinal fluid are capable to modify particle surfaces in such a way that interactions with cellular surface structures result in an increased binding.

  7. Dynamic quantitative analysis of adherent cell cultures by means of lens-free video microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allier, C.; Vincent, R.; Navarro, F.; Menneteau, M.; Ghenim, L.; Gidrol, X.; Bordy, T.; Hervé, L.; Cioni, O.; Bardin, S.; Bornens, M.; Usson, Y.; Morales, S.

    2018-02-01

    We present our implementation of lens-free video microscopy setup for the monitoring of adherent cell cultures. We use a multi-wavelength LED illumination together with a dedicated holographic reconstruction algorithm that allows for an efficient removal of twin images from the reconstructed phase image for densities up to those of confluent cell cultures (>500 cells/mm2). We thereby demonstrate that lens-free video microscopy, with a large field of view ( 30 mm2) can enable us to capture the images of thousands of cells simultaneously and directly inside the incubator. It is then possible to trace and quantify single cells along several cell cycles. We thus prove that lens-free microscopy is a quantitative phase imaging technique enabling estimation of several metrics at the single cell level as a function of time, for example the area, dry mass, maximum thickness, major axis length and aspect ratio of each cell. Combined with cell tracking, it is then possible to extract important parameters such as the initial cell dry mass (just after cell division), the final cell dry mass (just before cell division), the average cell growth rate, and the cell cycle duration. As an example, we discuss the monitoring of a HeLa cell cultures which provided us with a data-set featuring more than 10 000 cell cycle tracks and more than 2x106 cell morphological measurements in a single time-lapse.

  8. Barriers to hydroxyurea adherence and health-related quality of life in adolescents and young adults with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif M; Thompson, Alexis A; Penedo, Frank J; Lai, Jin-Shei; Rychlik, Karen; Liem, Robert I

    2017-06-01

    To identify barriers to hydroxyurea adherence (negative beliefs, access, and/or recall barriers), and their relationship to adherence rates and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among adolescents and young adults (AYA) with sickle cell disease (SCD). A cross-sectional survey was administered to 34 AYAs (12-22 years old) in SCD clinics from January to December 2015. Study measures included Brief Medication Questionnaire, Modified Morisky Adherence Scale 8-items, visual analog scale, and Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System. Participants (59% male; 91% Black) had a median age of 13.5 years (IQR 12-18). Participants reported negative beliefs (32%), recall barriers (44%), and access barriers (32%). Participants with recall barriers reported worse pain (P=.02), fatigue (P=.05), and depression (P=.05). The number of adherence barriers inversely correlated with adherence level using ©MMAS-8 (r s =-.38, P=.02) and VAS dose (r s =-.25, P=.14) as well as MCV (r s =-.45, P=.01) and HbF% (r s =-.36, P=.05), suggesting higher hydroxyurea adherence in patients with fewer barriers. Patients with fewer barriers to hydroxyurea adherence were more likely to have higher adherence rates and better HRQOL scores. Routine assessment of hydroxyurea adherence and its related barriers could provide actionable information to improve adherence rates, HRQOL, and other clinical outcomes. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Haematology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Drug adherence in treatment resistant and in controlled hypertension-Results from the Swedish Primary Care Cardiovascular Database (SPCCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, Lina; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Kahan, Thomas; Schiöler, Linus; Qvarnström, Miriam; Wettermark, Björn; Hjerpe, Per; Hasselström, Jan; Manhem, Karin

    2018-03-01

    To assess drug adherence in patients treated with ≥3 antihypertensive drug classes, with both controlled and uncontrolled blood pressure and describe associated factors for nonadherence. Patients with hypertension, without cardiovascular comorbidity, aged >30 years treated with ≥3 antihypertensive drug classes were followed for 2 years. Both patients with treatment resistant hypertension (TRH) and patients with controlled hypertension were included. Clinical data were derived from a primary care database. Pharmacy refill data from the Swedish Prescribed drug registry was used to calculate proportion of days covered (PDC). Patients with a PDC level ≥ 80% were included. We found 5846 patients treated ≥3 antihypertensive drug classes, 3508 with TRH (blood pressure ≥ 140/90), and 2338 with controlled blood pressure (drug therapy had similar decline in adherence over time regardless of initial blood pressure control. Diabetes was associated with better adherence, which may imply that the structured caregiving of these patients enhances antihypertensive drug treatment. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Unidirectional Movement of Cellulose Synthase Complexes in Arabidopsis Seed Coat Epidermal Cells Deposit Cellulose Involved in Mucilage Extrusion, Adherence, and Ray Formation1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Patricia; Young, Robin; DeBolt, Seth

    2015-01-01

    CELLULOSE SYNTHASE5 (CESA5) synthesizes cellulose necessary for seed mucilage adherence to seed coat epidermal cells of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The involvement of additional CESA proteins in this process and details concerning the manner in which cellulose is deposited in the mucilage pocket are unknown. Here, we show that both CESA3 and CESA10 are highly expressed in this cell type at the time of mucilage synthesis and localize to the plasma membrane adjacent to the mucilage pocket. The isoxaben resistant1-1 and isoxaben resistant1-2 mutants affecting CESA3 show defects consistent with altered mucilage cellulose biosynthesis. CESA3 can interact with CESA5 in vitro, and green fluorescent protein-tagged CESA5, CESA3, and CESA10 proteins move in a linear, unidirectional fashion around the cytoplasmic column of the cell, parallel with the surface of the seed, in a pattern similar to that of cortical microtubules. Consistent with this movement, cytological evidence suggests that the mucilage is coiled around the columella and unwinds during mucilage extrusion to form a linear ray. Mutations in CESA5 and CESA3 affect the speed of mucilage extrusion and mucilage adherence. These findings imply that cellulose fibrils are synthesized in an ordered helical array around the columella, providing a distinct structure to the mucilage that is important for both mucilage extrusion and adherence. PMID:25926481

  11. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies on Trichomonas vaginalis adhering to and phagocytizing genitourinary epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文列; 陈金富; 钟秀容; 梁平; 林炜

    2004-01-01

    Background Trichomonas vaginalis (T. vaginalis) belongs to a common sexually transmitted disease pathogen causing genitourinary trichomoniasis in both sexes. We investigated the pathogenetic mechanism of genitourinary trichomoniasis.Methods Cultured T. vaginalis bodies were injected into the vaginas of rats, or incubated with genitourinary epithelial cells of female subjects, male subjects, and sperm. The ultrastructural and microscopic changes were observed via transmission and scanning electron microscopy and through microscopic histochemistry.Results Groups of T.vaginalis adhered to PAS positive columnar cells at the surface of stratified epithelium in the middle and upper portions of the vaginas. They also traversed under these cells. The parasites were shown to be PAS, cathepsin D, and actin positive, and they could release hydrolase into the cytoplasm of adhered epithelial cells. In the amebiform T.vaginalis, microfilaments were arranged into reticular formation. Similar phenomena were found during the interaction of T.vaginalis with host cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Usually several protozoa adhered to an epithelial cell and formed polymorphic pseudopodia or surface invaginations to surround and phagocytize the microvilli or other parts of the epithelial cytoplasm. Adhesion and phagocytosis of sperm by the protozoa occurred at 15-30 minutes of incubation. Digestion of sperm was found at 45-75 minutes and was complete at 90-105 minutes.Conclusions T.vaginalis tends to parasitize at the fornix of the vagina, because this is the site where columnar cells are rich in mucinogen granules and their microvilli are helpful for adhesion and nibbling. T.vaginalis possesses some invading and attacking abilities. Shape change, canalization, encystation, phagocytosis, digestion, the cell coat, cytoskeleton, and lysosome all play important roles in the process of adhesion. They have two methods of phagocytosis: nibbling and ingestion. Genitourinary epithelium may be

  12. Epithelial Cell Adherence Mediated by the Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Tia Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Mammarappallil, Joseph G.; Elsinghorst, Eric A.

    2000-01-01

    In vitro studies have shown that enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are capable of invading cultured epithelial cells derived from the human ileum and colon. Two separate invasion loci (tia and tib) have previously been isolated from the classical ETEC strain H10407. The tia locus has been shown to direct the synthesis of Tia, a 25-kDa outer membrane protein. Tia is sufficient to confer the adherence and invasion phenotypes on laboratory stains of E. coli, suggesting that this pr...

  13. Brugia malayi microfilariae adhere to human vascular endothelial cells in a C3-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Hendrik Schroeder

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Brugia malayi causes the human tropical disease, lymphatic filariasis. Microfilariae (Mf of this nematode live in the bloodstream and are ingested by a feeding mosquito vector. Interestingly, in a remarkable co-evolutionary adaptation, Mf appearance in the peripheral blood follows a circadian periodicity and reaches a peak when the mosquito is most likely to feed. For the remaining hours, the majority of Mf sequester in the lung capillaries. This circadian phenomenon has been widely reported and is likely to maximise parasite fitness and optimise transmission potential. However, the mechanism of Mf sequestration in the lungs remains largely unresolved. In this study, we demonstrate that B. malayi Mf can, directly adhere to vascular endothelial cells under static conditions and under flow conditions, they can bind at high (but not low flow rates. High flow rates are more likely to be experienced diurnally. Furthermore, a non-periodic nematode adheres less efficiently to endothelial cells. Strikingly C3, the central component of complement, plays a crucial role in the adherence interaction. These novel results show that microfilariae have the ability to bind to endothelial cells, which may explain their sequestration in the lungs, and this binding is increased in the presence of inflammatory mediators.

  14. Cell shunt resistance and photovoltaic module performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, T.J.; Basso, T.S.; Rummel, S.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Shunt resistance of cells in photovoltaic modules can affect module power output and could indicate flawed manufacturing processes and reliability problems. The authors describe a two-terminal diagnostic method to directly measure the shunt resistance of individual cells in a series-connected module non-intrusively, without deencapsulation. Peak power efficiency vs. light intensity was measured on a 12-cell, series-connected, single crystalline module having relatively high cell shunt resistances. The module was remeasured with 0.5-, 1-, and 2-ohm resistors attached across each cell to simulate shunt resistances of several emerging technologies. Peak power efficiencies decreased dramatically at lower light levels. Using the PSpice circuit simulator, the authors verified that cell shunt and series resistances can indeed be responsible for the observed peak power efficiency vs. intensity behavior. The authors discuss the effect of basic cell diode parameters, i.e., shunt resistance, series resistance, and recombination losses, on PV module performance as a function of light intensity.

  15. Acquisition of anoikis resistance in human osteosarcoma cells does not alter sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz-Montero, C Marcela; McIntyre, Bradley W

    2005-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced cell death can involve the induction of apoptosis. Thus, aberrant function of the pathways involved might result in chemoresistance. Since cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix acts as a survival factor that homeostatically maintains normal tissue architecture, it was tested whether acquisition of resistance to deadhesion-induced apoptosis (anoikis) in human osteosarcoma would result in resistance to chemotherapy. Osteosarcoma cell lines (SAOS-2 and TE-85) obtained from ATCC and were maintained in complete Eagle's MEM medium. Suspension culture was established by placing cells in tissue culture wells coated with poly-HEMA. Cell cytotoxicity was determined using a live/dead cytotoxicity assay. Cell cycle/apoptosis analyses were performed using propidium iodide (PI) staining with subsequent FACS analysis. Apoptosis was also assayed by Annexin-FITC/PI staining. Etoposide, adriamycin, vinblastine, cisplatin and paclitaxel were able to induce apoptosis in human osteosarcoma cells SAOS-2 regardless of their anoikis resistance phenotype or the culture conditions (adhered vs. suspended). Moreover, suspended anoikis resistant TE-85 cells (TE-85ar) retained their sensitivity to chemotherapy as well. Acquisition of anoikis resistance in human osteosarcoma cells does not result in a generalized resistance to all apoptotic stimuli, including chemotherapy. Moreover, our results suggest that the pathways regulating anoikis resistance and chemotherapy resistance might involve the action of different mediators

  16. Acquisition of anoikis resistance in human osteosarcoma cells does not alter sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIntyre Bradley W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotherapy-induced cell death can involve the induction of apoptosis. Thus, aberrant function of the pathways involved might result in chemoresistance. Since cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix acts as a survival factor that homeostatically maintains normal tissue architecture, it was tested whether acquisition of resistance to deadhesion-induced apoptosis (anoikis in human osteosarcoma would result in resistance to chemotherapy. Methods Osteosarcoma cell lines (SAOS-2 and TE-85 obtained from ATCC and were maintained in complete Eagle's MEM medium. Suspension culture was established by placing cells in tissue culture wells coated with poly-HEMA. Cell cytotoxicity was determined using a live/dead cytotoxicity assay. Cell cycle/apoptosis analyses were performed using propidium iodide (PI staining with subsequent FACS analysis. Apoptosis was also assayed by Annexin-FITC/PI staining. Results Etoposide, adriamycin, vinblastine, cisplatin and paclitaxel were able to induce apoptosis in human osteosarcoma cells SAOS-2 regardless of their anoikis resistance phenotype or the culture conditions (adhered vs. suspended. Moreover, suspended anoikis resistant TE-85 cells (TE-85ar retained their sensitivity to chemotherapy as well. Conclusion Acquisition of anoikis resistance in human osteosarcoma cells does not result in a generalized resistance to all apoptotic stimuli, including chemotherapy. Moreover, our results suggest that the pathways regulating anoikis resistance and chemotherapy resistance might involve the action of different mediators.

  17. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay: Book Chapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals for which there is limited toxicological information, motivating the development and application of in vitro systems to profile the biological effects of xenobiotic exposure and predict their potential developmental hazard. An adher...

  18. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay-Book Chapter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals for which there is limited toxicological information, motivating the development and application of in vitro systems to profile the biological effects of xenobiotic exposure and predict their potential developmental hazard. An adhere...

  19. Patterns of Adherence of Helicobacter pylori Clinical Isolates to Epithelial Cells, and its Association with Disease and with Virulence Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Jiménez, Flor Elizabeth; Torres, Javier; Flores-Luna, Lourdes; Cerezo, Silvia Giono; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita

    2016-02-01

    Adherence to the gastric epithelium is one of the most important steps of Helicobacter pylori to remain and cause disease. The aim of this study was to analyze whether H. pylori isolates from patients with different gastroduodenal diseases present differences in the pattern of adherence to gastric epithelial cells (AGS), in the ability to induce IL-8, and in the presence of virulence genes. We tested 75 H. pylori strains isolated from nonatrophic gastritis, gastric cancer, and duodenal ulcer patients. The adhesion pattern and IL-8 induction were determined in AGS cells, and invasion of AGS cells was studied using a gentamicin protection assay. The IL-8 levels induced were determined by ELISA. Helicobacter pylori strains presented diffuse adherence (DA) and localized (LA) adherence patterns, similar to those described for enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), were observed in AGS cells. A DA pattern was observed in 57% and LA in 43% of the strains, and DA was more frequent in isolates from patients with gastric cancer (p = 0.044). Strains with a LA pattern induced higher levels of IL-8 (p = 0.042) in AGS cells. The adherence pattern was not associated with neither invasiveness nor with the presence of virulence genes. Our study shows that H. pylori strains present adherence patterns to AGS cells resembling those observed in EPEC and that these patterns may be associated with disease and with activity on AGS cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Subinhibitory concentrations of triclosan promote Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and adherence to oral epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Blanca Lombardo Bedran

    Full Text Available Triclosan is a general membrane-active agent with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that is commonly used in oral care products. In this study, we investigated the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of triclosan on the capacity of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans to form biofilm and adhere to oral epithelial cells. As quantified by crystal violet staining, biofilm formation by two reference strains of S. mutans was dose-dependently promoted, in the range of 2.2- to 6.2-fold, by 1/2 and 1/4 MIC of triclosan. Observations by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of a dense biofilm attached to the polystyrene surface. Growth of S. mutans in the presence of triclosan at sub-MICs also increased its capacity to adhere to a monolayer of gingival epithelial cells. The expression of several genes involved in adherence and biofilm formation in S. mutans was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. It was found that sub-MICs of triclosan significantly increased the expression of comD, gtfC, and luxS, and to a lesser extent of gtfB and atlA genes. These findings stress the importance of maintaining effective bactericidal concentrations of therapeutic triclosan since sub-MICs may promote colonization of the oral cavity by S. mutans.

  1. Intrinsic radiation resistance in human chondrosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Mollano, Anthony; Martin, James A.; Ayoob, Andrew; Domann, Frederick E.; Gitelis, Steven; Buckwalter, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    Human chondrosarcomas rarely respond to radiation treatment, limiting the options for eradication of these tumors. The basis of radiation resistance in chondrosarcomas remains obscure. In normal cells radiation induces DNA damage that leads to growth arrest or death. However, cells that lack cell cycle control mechanisms needed for these responses show intrinsic radiation resistance. In previous work, we identified immortalized human chondrosarcoma cell lines that lacked p16 ink4a , one of the major tumor suppressor proteins that regulate the cell cycle. We hypothesized that the absence of p16 ink4a contributes to the intrinsic radiation resistance of chondrosarcomas and that restoring p16 ink4a expression would increase their radiation sensitivity. To test this we determined the effects of ectopic p16 ink4a expression on chondrosarcoma cell resistance to low-dose γ-irradiation (1-5 Gy). p16 ink4a expression significantly increased radiation sensitivity in clonogenic assays. Apoptosis did not increase significantly with radiation and was unaffected by p16 ink4a transduction of chondrosarcoma cells, indicating that mitotic catastrophe, rather than programmed cell death, was the predominant radiation effect. These results support the hypothesis that p16 ink4a plays a role in the radiation resistance of chondrosarcoma cell lines and suggests that restoring p16 expression will improve the radiation sensitivity of human chondrosarcomas

  2. Distributed series resistance effects in solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Drud

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical treatment is presented of the effects of one-dimensional distributed series resistance in solar cells. A general perturbation theory is developed, including consistently the induced spatial variation of diode current density and leading to a first-order equivalent lumped resistance...

  3. Aggregative adherent strains of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum enter and survive within HEp-2 epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Cristina de Souza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum is a well-known human pathogen that mainly causes respiratory disease and is associated with high mortality in compromised hosts. Little is known about the virulence factors and pathogenesis of C. pseudodiphtheriticum. In this study, cultured human epithelial (HEp-2 cells were used to analyse the adherence pattern, internalisation and intracellular survival of the ATCC 10700 type strain and two additional clinical isolates. These microorganisms exhibited an aggregative adherence-like pattern to HEp-2 cells characterised by clumps of bacteria with a "stacked-brick" appearance. The differences in the ability of these microorganisms to invade and survive within HEp-2 cells and replicate in the extracellular environment up to 24 h post infection were evaluated. The fluorescent actin staining test demonstrated that actin polymerisation is involved in the internalisation of the C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains. The depolymerisation of microfilaments by cytochalasin E significantly reduced the internalisation of C. pseudodiphtheriticum by HEp-2 cells. Bacterial internalisation and cytoskeletal rearrangement seemed to be partially triggered by the activation of tyrosine kinase activity. Although C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains did not demonstrate an ability to replicate intracellularly, HEp-2 cells were unable to fully clear the pathogen within 24 h. These characteristics may explain how some C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains cause severe infection in human patients.

  4. Loss of Ia-bearing splenic adherent cells after whole body ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letvin, N.L.; Nepom, J.T.; Greene, M.I.; Benacerraf, B.; Germain, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    Daily uv irradiation of mice results in a marked decrease in the antigen-presenting capability of SAC from these mice after 1 wk of uv exposure. To directly examine this cell population, we developed a technique for purifying SAC that involves passing mouse splenocytes through two cycles of glass adherence with an intervening incubation on rabbit anti-mouse Ig-coated dishes. SAC from externally uv irradiated mice prepared by this method, when pulsed with antigen, activate primed T cells to proliferate much less efficiently than SAC from normal mice. Both the proportion and absolute number of Ia-bearing cells in this purified SAC population from uv irradiated mice are considerably smaller than that seen in similarly prepared populations from normal mice. Previous adjuvant immunization was shown to override functional defects elicited by external uv irradiation. This demonstration of a uv irradiation induced selective loss of Ia bearing splenic adherent cells and the functional consequences of this loss provide further evidence for the importance of Ia-bearing accessory cells in antigen presentation of T dependent antigens, and provides insight into the origin of the immunologic defects induced by whole body uv irradiation

  5. Interleukin-3 greatly expands non-adherent endothelial forming cells with pro-angiogenic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachlan M. Moldenhauer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs provide revascularisation for cardiovascular disease and the expansion of these cells opens up the possibility of their use as a cell therapy. Herein we show that interleukin-3 (IL3 strongly expands a population of human non-adherent endothelial forming cells (EXnaEFCs with low immunogenicity as well as pro-angiogenic capabilities in vivo, making their therapeutic utilisation a realistic option. Non-adherent CD133+ EFCs isolated from human umbilical cord blood and cultured under different conditions were maximally expanded by day 12 in the presence of IL3 at which time a 350-fold increase in cell number was obtained. Cell surface marker phenotyping confirmed expression of the hematopoietic progenitor cell markers CD133, CD117 and CD34, vascular cell markers VEGFR2 and CD31, dim expression of CD45 and absence of myeloid markers CD14 and CD11b. Functional experiments revealed that EXnaEFCs exhibited classical properties of endothelial cells (ECs, namely binding of Ulex europaeus lectin, up-take of acetylated-low density lipoprotein and contribution to EC tube formation in vitro. These EXnaEFCs demonstrated a pro-angiogenic phenotype within two independent in vivo rodent models. Firstly, a Matrigel plug assay showed increased vascularisation in mice. Secondly, a rat model of acute myocardial infarction demonstrated reduced heart damage as determined by lower levels of serum creatinine and a modest increase in heart functionality. Taken together, these studies show IL3 as a potent growth factor for human CD133+ cell expansion with clear pro-angiogenic properties (in vitro and in vivo and thus may provide clinical utility for humans in the future.

  6. Chemo Resistance of Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wicha, Max S

    2006-01-01

    .... Development of this new tool will greatly facilitate future studies. Preliminary results both in xenograft models as well as in neoadjuvant trial are providing strong support for our hypothesis for resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy...

  7. Anti-Retroviral Lectins Have Modest Effects on Adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis to Epithelial Cells In Vitro and on Recovery of Tritrichomonas foetus in a Mouse Vaginal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Aparajita; Ratner, Daniel M.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Johnson, Patricia J.; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Secor, W. Evan; Anderson, Deborah J.; Robbins, Phillips W.; Samuelson, John

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes vaginitis and increases the risk of HIV transmission by heterosexual sex, while Tritrichomonas foetus causes premature abortion in cattle. Our goals were to determine the effects, if any, of anti-retroviral lectins, which are designed to prevent heterosexual transmission of HIV, on adherence of Trichomonas to ectocervical cells and on Tritrichomonas infections in a mouse model. We show that Trichomonas Asn-linked glycans (N-glycans), like those of HIV, bind the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) that is part of the innate immune system. N-glycans of Trichomonas and Tritrichomonas bind anti-retroviral lectins (cyanovirin-N and griffithsin) and the 2G12 monoclonal antibody, each of which binds HIV N-glycans. Binding of cyanovirin-N appears to be independent of susceptibility to metronidazole, the major drug used to treat Trichomonas. Anti-retroviral lectins, MBL, and galectin-1 cause Trichomonas to self-aggregate and precipitate. The anti-retroviral lectins also increase adherence of ricin-resistant mutants, which are less adherent than parent cells, to ectocervical cell monolayers and to organotypic EpiVaginal tissue cells. Topical application of either anti-retroviral lectins or yeast N-glycans decreases by 40 to 70% the recovery of Tritrichomonas from the mouse vagina. These results, which are explained by a few simple models, suggest that the anti-retroviral lectins have a modest potential for preventing or treating human infections with Trichomonas. PMID:26252012

  8. Anti-Retroviral Lectins Have Modest Effects on Adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis to Epithelial Cells In Vitro and on Recovery of Tritrichomonas foetus in a Mouse Vaginal Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparajita Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis causes vaginitis and increases the risk of HIV transmission by heterosexual sex, while Tritrichomonas foetus causes premature abortion in cattle. Our goals were to determine the effects, if any, of anti-retroviral lectins, which are designed to prevent heterosexual transmission of HIV, on adherence of Trichomonas to ectocervical cells and on Tritrichomonas infections in a mouse model. We show that Trichomonas Asn-linked glycans (N-glycans, like those of HIV, bind the mannose-binding lectin (MBL that is part of the innate immune system. N-glycans of Trichomonas and Tritrichomonas bind anti-retroviral lectins (cyanovirin-N and griffithsin and the 2G12 monoclonal antibody, each of which binds HIV N-glycans. Binding of cyanovirin-N appears to be independent of susceptibility to metronidazole, the major drug used to treat Trichomonas. Anti-retroviral lectins, MBL, and galectin-1 cause Trichomonas to self-aggregate and precipitate. The anti-retroviral lectins also increase adherence of ricin-resistant mutants, which are less adherent than parent cells, to ectocervical cell monolayers and to organotypic EpiVaginal tissue cells. Topical application of either anti-retroviral lectins or yeast N-glycans decreases by 40 to 70% the recovery of Tritrichomonas from the mouse vagina. These results, which are explained by a few simple models, suggest that the anti-retroviral lectins have a modest potential for preventing or treating human infections with Trichomonas.

  9. Comparison of gene expression of mitogenic kinin path in adherent and non-adherent CD 34-stem cells using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Machaj

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the more interesting cells present in the umbilical cord blood - as far as their potential clinical use is concerned - are stem cells not presenting the CD34 antigen. These are the pluripotential cells with their biological properties similar to mesenchymal stem cells, with the ability to differentiate into such tissue types as bone, cartilage, nervous (to some extent, glia and muscle. The authors compared the activity of genes coding the proteins in mitogenic signal paths activated by kinin receptors using oligonucleotide microarrays in adherent and non-adherent CD 34- cells derived from umbilical cord blood. In the linear regression model with a 95% prognosis area for differentiating genes outside this area, the following genes were selected: c-jun (present in 3 isoforms and c-fos. The fos and jun genes create the AP-1 transcriptive factor which regulates the expression of genes taking part in numerous cellular processes, including the cell cycle and mitosis. The obtained results shed some light on the molecular processes behind the MSC proliferation and are a starting point for further studies on the mesenchymal stem cell biology.

  10. Cell Phone-Based and Adherence Device Technologies for HIV Care and Treatment in Resource-Limited Settings: Recent Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jeffrey I; Haberer, Jessica E

    2015-12-01

    Numerous cell phone-based and adherence monitoring technologies have been developed to address barriers to effective HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. Because most people living with HIV and AIDS reside in resource-limited settings (RLS), it is important to understand the development and use of these technologies in RLS. Recent research on cell phone-based technologies has focused on HIV education, linkage to and retention in care, disease tracking, and antiretroviral therapy adherence reminders. Advances in adherence devices have focused on real-time adherence monitors, which have been used for both antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis. Real-time monitoring has recently been combined with cell phone-based technologies to create real-time adherence interventions using short message service (SMS). New developments in adherence technologies are exploring ingestion monitoring and metabolite detection to confirm adherence. This article provides an overview of recent advances in these two families of technologies and includes research on their acceptability and cost-effectiveness when available. It additionally outlines key challenges and needed research as use of these technologies continues to expand and evolve.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of bortezomib resistant adenocarcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Suzuki

    Full Text Available Bortezomib (Velcade™ is a reversible proteasome inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM. Despite its demonstrated clinical success, some patients are deprived of treatment due to primary refractoriness or development of resistance during therapy. To investigate the role of the duration of proteasome inhibition in the anti-tumor response of bortezomib, we established clonal isolates of HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells adapted to continuous exposure of bortezomib. These cells were ~30-fold resistant to bortezomib. Two novel and distinct mutations in the β5 subunit, Cys63Phe, located distal to the binding site in a helix critical for drug binding, and Arg24Cys, found in the propeptide region were found in all resistant clones. The latter mutation is a natural variant found to be elevated in frequency in patients with MM. Proteasome activity and levels of both the constitutive and immunoproteasome were increased in resistant cells, which correlated to an increase in subunit gene expression. These changes correlated with a more rapid recovery of proteasome activity following brief exposure to bortezomib. Increased recovery rate was not due to increased proteasome turnover as similar findings were seen in cells co-treated with cycloheximide. When we exposed resistant cells to the irreversible proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib we noted a slower rate of recovery of proteasome activity as compared to bortezomib in both parental and resistant cells. Importantly, carfilzomib maintained its cytotoxic potential in the bortezomib resistant cell lines. Therefore, resistance to bortezomib, can be overcome with irreversible inhibitors, suggesting prolonged proteasome inhibition induces a more potent anti-tumor response.

  12. SadA-Expressing Staphylococci in the Human Gut Show Increased Cell Adherence and Internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luqman, Arif; Nega, Mulugeta; Nguyen, Minh-Thu; Ebner, Patrick; Götz, Friedrich

    2018-01-09

    A subgroup of biogenic amines, the so-called trace amines (TAs), are produced by mammals and bacteria and can act as neuromodulators. In the genus Staphylococcus, certain species are capable of producing TAs through the activity of staphylococcal aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (SadA). SadA decarboxylates aromatic amino acids to produce TAs, as well as dihydroxy phenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan to thus produce the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin. SadA-expressing staphylococci were prevalent in the gut of most probands, where they are part of the human intestinal microflora. Furthermore, sadA-expressing staphylococci showed increased adherence to HT-29 cells and 2- to 3-fold increased internalization. Internalization and adherence was also increased in a sadA mutant in the presence of tryptamine. The α2-adrenergic receptor is required for enhanced adherence and internalization. Thus, staphylococci in the gut might contribute to gut activity and intestinal colonization. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adherence to hydroxyurea medication by children with sickle cell disease (SCD) using an electronic device: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Susumu; Kodjebacheva, Gergana; Scherrer, Tammy; Rice, Gary; Grigorian, Matthew; Blankenship, Jeremy; Onwuzurike, Nkechi

    2016-08-01

    Adherence to hydroxyurea (HU) is a significant modifying factor in sickle cell vaso-occlusive pain. We conducted a study using an electronic medication container-monitor-reminder device (GlowCap™) to track adherence and determine whether use of this device affected rates of HU adherence. Subjects were regular attendees to our clinic. They were given a 37-item questionnaire and were asked to use a GlowCap containing HU. When the device cap is opened, it makes a remote "medication taken" record. The device also provides usage reminder in the form of lights and alarm sounds if the cap opening is delayed. Nineteen subjects participated in the survey, and 17 in the intervention phase. Of the 17, 12 had reliable adherence data. Seventeen caregivers of patients and two patients completed the survey. Two most common barriers to adherence identified were lack of reminders and absence of medicine home delivery. The intervention component of this study, which used both the electronic (GlowCap) method and medication possession ratio showed that the median adherence rate for the 12 patients evaluated was 85 %. The GlowCap device accurately kept a record of adherence rates. This device may be an effective tool for increasing HU medication adherence.

  14. Extending metabolome coverage for untargeted metabolite profiling of adherent cultured hepatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; López, Silvia; Castell, José Vicente; Donato, M Teresa; Lahoz, Agustín

    2016-02-01

    MS-based metabolite profiling of adherent mammalian cells comprises several challenging steps such as metabolism quenching, cell detachment, cell disruption, metabolome extraction, and metabolite measurement. In LC-MS, the final metabolome coverage is strongly determined by the separation technique and the MS conditions used. Human liver-derived cell line HepG2 was chosen as adherent mammalian cell model to evaluate the performance of several commonly used procedures in both sample processing and LC-MS analysis. In a first phase, metabolite extraction and sample analysis were optimized in a combined manner. To this end, the extraction abilities of five different solvents (or combinations) were assessed by comparing the number and the levels of the metabolites comprised in each extract. Three different chromatographic methods were selected for metabolites separation. A HILIC-based method which was set to specifically separate polar metabolites and two RP-based methods focused on lipidome and wide-ranging metabolite detection, respectively. With regard to metabolite measurement, a Q-ToF instrument operating in both ESI (+) and ESI (-) was used for unbiased extract analysis. Once metabolite extraction and analysis conditions were set up, the influence of cell harvesting on metabolome coverage was also evaluated. Therefore, different protocols for cell detachment (trypsinization or scraping) and metabolism quenching were compared. This study confirmed the inconvenience of trypsinization as a harvesting technique, and the importance of using complementary extraction solvents to extend metabolome coverage, minimizing interferences and maximizing detection, thanks to the use of dedicated analytical conditions through the combination of HILIC and RP separations. The proposed workflow allowed the detection of over 300 identified metabolites from highly polar compounds to a wide range of lipids.

  15. Rotational magnetic pulses enhance the magnetofection efficiency in vitro in adherent and suspension cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmani, Ch.; Mykhaylyk, O.; Helling, Fl.; Götz, St.; Weyh, Th.; Herzog, H.-G.; Plank, Ch.

    2013-01-01

    The association of magnetic nanoparticles with gene delivery vectors in combination with the use of gradient magnetic fields (magnetofection) enables improved and synchronised gene delivery to cells. In this paper, we report a system comprising rotating permanent magnets to generate defined magnetic field pulses with frequencies from 2.66 to 133 Hz and a field amplitude of 190 or 310 mT at the location of the cells. Low-frequency pulses of 2.66–10 Hz with a magnetic flux density of 190 mT were applied to the examined cells for 30–120 s after magnetofection. These pulses resulted in a 1.5–1.9-fold enhancement in the transfection efficiency compared with magnetofection with only a static magnetic field in both adherent and suspension cells. The magnetic field amplitudes of 190 and 310 mT had similar effects on the transfection efficacy. No increase in the percentage of transgene-expressing suspension cells and no cytotoxic effects (based on the results of the MTT assay) were observed after applying alternating magnetic fields. - Highlights: ► We developed a magnetic system capable of generating defined magnetic pulses based on permanent magnets. ► The main advantage of the system is the lack of heat-induced fluctuations in the working parameters. ► Our system succeeded in enhancing the transfection of adherent human lung epithelial cells and human suspension cells. ► The enhancement in the transfection efficiency compared with static magnetic field is due to the magnetic field pulses. ► The approach could be used as a complementary method for drug targeting

  16. Acinetobacter baumannii and A. pittii clinical isolates lack adherence and cytotoxicity to lung epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Díez, María; Navascués-Lejarza, Teresa; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Navas, Jesús; Icardo, José Manuel; Acosta, Felix; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ramos-Vivas, José

    2016-09-01

    The molecular and genetic basis of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter pittii virulence remains poorly understood, and there is still lack of knowledge in host cell response to these bacteria. In this study, we have used eleven clinical Acinetobacter strains (A. baumannii n = 5; A. pittii n = 6) to unravel bacterial adherence, invasion and cytotoxicity to human lung epithelial cells. Our results showed that adherence to epithelial cells by Acinetobacter strains is scarce and cellular invasion was not truly detected. In addition, all Acinetobacter strains failed to induce any cytotoxic effect on A549 cells. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemo Resistance of Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    165-72. 60. Vestergaard J, Pedersen MW, Pedersen N, Ensinger C, Tumer Z, Tommerup N, et al. Hedgehog signaling in small-cell lung cancer : frequent......NUMBER Chemo Resistance of Breast Cancer Stem Cells 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0471 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  18. Characteristics and function of bone marrow stromal adherent cells in normal and irradiated mice and guinea pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changyu, Zheng; Ji, Liu; Xiaoying, Bi

    1986-04-01

    It has been shown from cytochemical and other characteristic studies of bone marrow stromal cells in CFU-F that there are seven types of stromal cells in the stromal adherent cell layer of normal and irradiated C/sub 57/ mice whereas there are only six types in guinea pigs. On the other hand, a radioresistant cell subtype appears in adherent layer after irradiation of both C/sub 57/ mice and guinea pig since the supernatant of cultured CFU-F of the normal and irradiated C/sub 57/ mice can stimulate production of CFU-Gm. It is justifiable that the bone marrow stromal adherent cells of the C/sub 57/ mice could produce CSF.

  19. Chitosan nanoparticles affect acid tolerance response in adhered cells of strpetococcus mutans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neilands, Julia; Sutherland, Duncan S; Resin, Anton

    2011-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of chitosan nanoparticles on the acid tolerance response (ATR) of adhered Streptococcus mutans. An ATR was induced by exposing S. mutans to pH 5.5 for 2 h and confirmed by exposing the acid-adapted cells to pH 3.5 for 30 min, with the majority of cells...... appearing viable according to the LIVE/DEAD (R) technique. However, when chitosan nanoparticles were present during the exposure to pH 5.5, no ATR occurred as most cells appeared dead after the pH 3.5 shock. We conclude that the chitosan nanoparticles tested had the ability to hinder ATR induction...

  20. The MP65 gene is required for cell wall integrity, adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm formation in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girolamo Antonietta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MP65 gene of Candida albicans (orf19.1779 encodes a putative β-glucanase mannoprotein of 65 kDa, which plays a main role in a host-fungus relationship, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. In this study, we performed an extensive analysis of a mp65Δ mutant to assess the role of this protein in cell wall integrity, adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm formation. Results The mp65Δ mutant showed a high sensitivity to a range of cell wall-perturbing and degrading agents, especially Congo red, which induced morphological changes such as swelling, clumping and formation of hyphae. The mp65Δ mutant showed an activation of two MAPKs (Mkc1p and Cek1p, a high level of expression of two stress-related genes (DDR48 and SOD5, and a modulated expression of β-glucan epitopes, but no gross changes in cell wall polysaccharide composition. Interestingly, the mp65Δ mutant displayed a marked reduction in adhesion to BEC and Caco-2 cells and severe defects in biofilm formation when compared to the wild type. All of the mentioned properties were totally or partially recovered in a revertant strain, demonstrating the specificity of gene deletion. Conclusions We demonstrate that the MP65 gene of Candida albicans plays a significant role in maintaining cell wall integrity, as well as in adherence to epithelia and biofilm formation, which are major virulence attributes of this fungus.

  1. Lithium attenuates lead induced toxicity on mouse non-adherent bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banijamali, Mahsan; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra; Shahhoseini, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    Lead is a poisonous heavy metal that occurs in all parts of environment and causes serious health problems in humans. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible protective effect of lithium against lead nitrate induced toxicity in non-adherent bone marrow stem cells. Trypan blue and MTT assays represented that exposure of the cells to different concentrations of lead nitrate decreased viability in a dose dependent manner, whereas, pretreatment of the cells with lithium protected the cells against lead toxicity. Lead reduced the number and differentiation status of bone marrow-derived precursors when cultured in the presence of colony stimulating factor (CSF), while the effect was attenuated by lithium. The cells treated with lead nitrate exhibited cell shrinkage, DNA fragmentation, anion superoxide production, but lithium prevented lead action. Moreover, apoptotic indexes such as PARP cleavage and release of HMGB1 induced by lead, were protected by lithium, suggesting anti-apoptotic effect of lithium. Immunoblot analysis of histone H3K9 acetylation indicated that lithium overcame lead effect on acetylation. In conclusion, lithium efficiently reduces lead toxicity suggesting new insight into lithium action which may contribute to increased cell survival. It also provides a potentially new therapeutic strategy for lithium and a cost-effective approach to minimize destructive effects of lead on bone marrow stem cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-04-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal beta III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders.

  3. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J.; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal β III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders

  4. Mechanisms of drug resistance in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.P.

    2003-01-01

    Development of drug resist chemotherapy. For the past several years, investigators have been striving hard to unravel mechanisms of drug resistance in cancer cells. Using different experimental models of cancer, some of the major mechanisms of drug resistance identified in mammalian cells include: (a) Altered transport of the drug (decreased influx of the drug; increased efflux of the drug (role of P-glycoprotein; role of polyglutamation; role of multiple drug resistance associated protein)), (b) Increase in total amount of target enzyme/protein (gene amplification), (c) alteration in the target enzyme/protein (low affinity enzyme), (d) Elevation of cellular glutathione, (e) Inhibition of drug-induced apoptosis (mutation in p53 tumor suppressor gene; increased expression of bcl-xl gene). (author)

  5. Resistance profiles and adherence at primary virological failure in three different highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens: analysis of failure rates in a randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, B T; Barfod, T S; Kirk, O

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the interplay between resistance and adherence in the virological failure of three fundamentally different highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens. METHODS: We retrospectively identified 56 verified primary virological failures (viral load >400 HIV-1 RNA...... copies/mL) among 293 patients randomized to two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs)+ritonavir+saquinavir (RS-arm) (n=115), two NRTIs+nevirapine+nelfinavir (NN-arm) (n=118), or abacavir+stavudine+didanosine (ASD-arm) (n=60) followed up for a median of 90 weeks. Data on adherence were...... collected from patient files, and genotyping was performed on plasma samples collected at time of failure. RESULTS: Treatment interruption or poor adherence was mainly caused by side effects and accounted for 74% of failures, and was associated with absence of resistance mutations. In the 30 failing...

  6. In vitro adherence patterns of Shigella serogroups to bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells are similar to those of Escherichia coli O157

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Shigella species, which are human gastrointestinal pathogens, can adhere to cattle recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells using a recently standardized adherence assay, and to compare their adherence patterns to that of Escherichia coli O15...

  7. Metabolite extraction from adherently growing mammalian cells for metabolomics studies: optimization of harvesting and extraction protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Katja; Nürnberger, Nadine; Kaspar, Hannelore; Gruber, Michael A; Almstetter, Martin F; Oefner, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Trypsin/ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) treatment and cell scraping in a buffer solution were compared for harvesting adherently growing mammalian SW480 cells for metabolomics studies. In addition, direct scraping with a solvent was tested. Trypsinated and scraped cell pellets were extracted using seven different extraction protocols including pure methanol, methanol/water, pure acetone, acetone/water, methanol/chloroform/water, methanol/isopropanol/water, and acid-base methanol. The extracts were analyzed by GC-MS after methoximation/silylation and derivatization with propyl chloroformate, respectively. The metabolic fingerprints were compared and 25 selected metabolites including amino acids and intermediates of energy metabolism were quantitatively determined. Moreover, the influence of freeze/thaw cycles, ultrasonication and homogenization using ceramic beads on extraction yield was tested. Pure acetone yielded the lowest extraction efficiency while methanol, methanol/water, methanol/isopropanol/water, and acid-base methanol recovered similar metabolite amounts with good reproducibility. Based on overall performance, methanol/water was chosen as a suitable extraction solvent. Repeated freeze/thaw cycles, ultrasonication and homogenization did not improve overall metabolite yield of the methanol/water extraction. Trypsin/EDTA treatment caused substantial metabolite leakage proving it inadequate for metabolomics studies. Gentle scraping of the cells in a buffer solution and subsequent extraction with methanol/water resulted on average in a sevenfold lower recovery of quantified metabolites compared with direct scraping using methanol/water, making the latter one the method of choice to harvest and extract metabolites from adherently growing mammalian SW480 cells.

  8. Lactobacilli interfere with Streptococcus pyogenes hemolytic activity and adherence to host epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil D Saroj

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A streptococcus (GAS, a frequent colonizer of the respiratory tract mucosal surface, causes a variety of human diseases, ranging from pharyngitis to the life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Lactobacilli have been demonstrated to colonize the respiratory tract. In this study, we investigated the interference of lactobacilli with the virulence phenotypes of GAS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289, but not L. salivarius LMG9477, inhibited the hemolytic activity of GAS. The inhibition of hemolytic activity was attributed to a decrease in the production of streptolysin S (SLS. Conditioned medium (CM from the growth of L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289 was sufficient to down-regulate the expression of the sag operon, encoding SLS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1, L. reuteri PTA-5289 and L. salivarius LMG9477 inhibited the initial adherence of GAS to host epithelial cells. Intriguingly, competition with a combination of Lactobacillus species reduced GAS adherence to host cells most efficiently. The data suggest that an effector molecule released from certain Lactobacillus strains attenuates the production of SLS at the transcriptional level and that combinations of Lactobacillus strains may protect the pharyngeal mucosa more efficiently from the initial colonization of GAS. The effector molecules released from Lactobacillus strains affecting the virulence phenotypes of pathogens hold potential in the development of a new generation of therapeutics.

  9. Cell patterning without chemical surface modification: Cell cell interactions between printed bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) on a homogeneous cell-adherent hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. Y.; Barron, J. A.; Ringeisen, B. R.

    2006-10-01

    Cell printing offers the unique ability to directly deposit one or multiple cell types directly onto a surface without the need to chemically pre-treat the surface with lithographic methods. We utilize biological laser printing (BioLP ™) to form patterns of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) onto a homogeneous cell adherent hydrogel surface. These normal cells are shown to retain near-100% viability post-printing. In order to determine whether BAECs encountered shear and/or heat stress during printing, immunocytochemical staining experiments were performed to detect potential expression of heat shock proteins (HSP) by the deposited cells. Printed BAECs expressed HSP at levels similar to negative control cells, indicating that the BioLP process does not expose cells to damaging levels of stress. However, HSP expression was slightly higher at the highest laser energy studied, suggesting more stress was present under these extreme conditions. Printed BAECs also showed preferential asymmetric growth and migration towards each other and away from the originally printed pattern, demonstrating a retained ability for the cells to communicate post-printing.

  10. Cancer stem cells and chemoradiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Hideshi; Mori, Masaki; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Ieta, Keisuke; Ohta, Daisuke; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Mimori, Koshi

    2008-01-01

    Cancer is a disease of genetic and epigenetic alterations, which are emphasized as the central mechanisms of tumor progression in the multistepwise model. Discovery of rare subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has created a new focus in cancer research. The heterogeneity of tumors can be explained with the help of CSCs supported by antiapoptotic signaling. CSCs mimic normal adult stem cells by demonstrating resistance to toxic injuries and chemoradiation therapy. Moreover, they might be responsible for tumor relapse following apparent beneficial treatments. Compared with hematopoietic malignancies, conventional therapy regimes in solid tumors have improved the overall survival marginally, illustrating the profound impact of treatment resistance. This implies that the present therapies, which follow total elimination of rapidly dividing and differentiated tumor cells, need to be modified to target CSCs that repopulate the tumor. In this review article, we report on recent findings regarding the involvement of CSCs in chemoradiation resistance and provide new insights into their therapeutic implications in cancer. (author)

  11. Campylobacter jejuni type VI secretion system: roles in adaptation to deoxycholic acid, host cell adherence, invasion, and in vivo colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Gamazon, Eric R; Feng, Yan; Park, Danny S; Pang, Jassia; Botka, Georgina; Graffam, Michelle E; Ge, Zhongming; Fox, James G

    2012-01-01

    The recently identified type VI secretion system (T6SS) of proteobacteria has been shown to promote pathogenicity, competitive advantage over competing microorganisms, and adaptation to environmental perturbation. By detailed phenotypic characterization of loss-of-function mutants, in silico, in vitro and in vivo analyses, we provide evidence that the enteric pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni, possesses a functional T6SS and that the secretion system exerts pleiotropic effects on two crucial processes--survival in a bile salt, deoxycholic acid (DCA), and host cell adherence and invasion. The expression of T6SS during initial exposure to the upper range of physiological levels of DCA (0.075%-0.2%) was detrimental to C. jejuni proliferation, whereas down-regulation or inactivation of T6SS enabled C. jejuni to resist this effect. The C. jejuni multidrug efflux transporter gene, cmeA, was significantly up-regulated during the initial exposure to DCA in the wild type C. jejuni relative to the T6SS-deficient strains, suggesting that inhibition of proliferation is the consequence of T6SS-mediated DCA influx. A sequential modulation of the efflux transporter activity and the T6SS represents, in part, an adaptive mechanism for C. jejuni to overcome this inhibitory effect, thereby ensuring its survival. C. jejuni T6SS plays important roles in host cell adhesion and invasion as T6SS inactivation resulted in a reduction of adherence to and invasion of in vitro cell lines, while over-expression of a hemolysin co-regulated protein, which encodes a secreted T6SS component, greatly enhanced these processes. When inoculated into B6.129P2-IL-10(tm1Cgn) mice, the T6SS-deficient C. jejuni strains did not effectively establish persistent colonization, indicating that T6SS contributes to colonization in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate the importance of bacterial T6SS in host cell adhesion, invasion, colonization and, for the first time to our knowledge, adaptation to DCA

  12. Campylobacter jejuni type VI secretion system: roles in adaptation to deoxycholic acid, host cell adherence, invasion, and in vivo colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvin Lertpiriyapong

    Full Text Available The recently identified type VI secretion system (T6SS of proteobacteria has been shown to promote pathogenicity, competitive advantage over competing microorganisms, and adaptation to environmental perturbation. By detailed phenotypic characterization of loss-of-function mutants, in silico, in vitro and in vivo analyses, we provide evidence that the enteric pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni, possesses a functional T6SS and that the secretion system exerts pleiotropic effects on two crucial processes--survival in a bile salt, deoxycholic acid (DCA, and host cell adherence and invasion. The expression of T6SS during initial exposure to the upper range of physiological levels of DCA (0.075%-0.2% was detrimental to C. jejuni proliferation, whereas down-regulation or inactivation of T6SS enabled C. jejuni to resist this effect. The C. jejuni multidrug efflux transporter gene, cmeA, was significantly up-regulated during the initial exposure to DCA in the wild type C. jejuni relative to the T6SS-deficient strains, suggesting that inhibition of proliferation is the consequence of T6SS-mediated DCA influx. A sequential modulation of the efflux transporter activity and the T6SS represents, in part, an adaptive mechanism for C. jejuni to overcome this inhibitory effect, thereby ensuring its survival. C. jejuni T6SS plays important roles in host cell adhesion and invasion as T6SS inactivation resulted in a reduction of adherence to and invasion of in vitro cell lines, while over-expression of a hemolysin co-regulated protein, which encodes a secreted T6SS component, greatly enhanced these processes. When inoculated into B6.129P2-IL-10(tm1Cgn mice, the T6SS-deficient C. jejuni strains did not effectively establish persistent colonization, indicating that T6SS contributes to colonization in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate the importance of bacterial T6SS in host cell adhesion, invasion, colonization and, for the first time to our knowledge

  13. Royal Jelly Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Adherence and Reduces Excessive Inflammatory Responses in Human Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heni Susilowati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium and causes respiratory infection especially in elderly patients. Royal jelly has been used worldwide as a traditional remedy and as a nutrient; however, the effect against P. aeruginosa is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze antibacterial, antiadherent, and anti-inflammatory effects of royal jelly against P. aeruginosa. Wild-type strain PAO1 and clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were used for antibacterial assay and antiadherent assay to abiotic surface and epithelial cells, which are pharynx (Detroit 562 and lung (NCI-H292 epithelial cells. In anti-inflammatory assay, epithelial cells were pretreated with royal jelly before bacterial exposure to investigate its inhibitory effect on interleukin (IL-8 and macrophage inflammatory protein-3α/CCL20 overproduction. Although royal jelly did not have antibacterial activity at concentration of 50% w/v, antiadherent activity was confirmed on the abiotic surface and epithelial cells under concentration of 25%. Pretreatment with royal jelly significantly inhibited overproduction of IL-8 and CCL20 from both cells. These results demonstrated that royal jelly inhibits P. aeruginosa adherence and protects epithelial cells from excessive inflammatory responses against P. aeruginosa infection. Our findings suggested that royal jelly may be a useful supplement as complementary and alternative medicine for preventing respiratory infection caused by P. aeruginosa.

  14. Laser-generated Micro-bubbles for Molecular Delivery to Adherent Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Suzanne Lee

    We examine the use of optical breakdown in aqueous media as a means to deliver molecules into live adherent cell cultures. This process, called optoinjection (OI), is affected both by the media composition and the cellular exposure to hydrodynamic stresses associated with the cavitation bubble formed by the optical breakdown process. Here we explore the possibility of performing OI using laser microbeams focused at low numerical aperture to provide conditions where OI can be performed at high-throughput. We first investigate the effect of media composition on plasma and cavitation bubble formation. We make the discovery that irradiation of minimal essential media, supports the formation of low-density plasmas (LDP) resulting in the generation of small (2--20 mum radius) cavitation bubbles. This provides gentle specific hydrodynamic perturbations to single or small groups of cells. The addition of supplemental fetal bovine serum to the medium prevents the formation LDPs and the resulting avalanche ionization generates larger (> 100 mum radius) bubbles and more violent hydrodynamic effects. Second, using high-speed photography we provide the first visualization of LDP-generated cavitation bubbles at precise offset locations relative to a boundary on which a cell monolayer can be cultured. These images depict the cellular exposure to different hydrodynamic conditions depending on the normalized offset distance (gamma = s/Rmax) and show how it affects the cellular exposure to shear stresses upon bubble expansion and different distributions of bubble energy upon collapse. Lastly, we examine the effects of pulse energy, parameters, and single vs. multiple laser exposures on the ability to deliver 3-5 kDa dextrans into adherent cells using both small (< 20 mum) and large (100mu m) radius bubbles. For single exposures, we identify several conditions under which OI can be optimized: (a) conditions where cell viability is maximized (˜90%) but optoinjection of viable cells

  15. Pneumococcal Replicative State in Relation to its Adherence Capacity to A549-cell Line: A Preliminary in vitro Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Desa, M. N.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was to compare the replication capacity of pneumococcal isolates (serotypes 1, 7F, 19F and 23F with their adherence pattern to monolayer cells (A549. For standardization purposes, all isolates showed a normal growth curve in both bacteriological (THB + 0.5% yeast extract with and without 2% FBS and cell culture media (RPMI + 2% FBS. In the former media, a shorter lag phase was observed for isolate serotypes 1 and 7F in presence of serum while in the later; growth yield was lower for all isolates with stationary phase approaching OD600 of 0.01 as compared to 1.0 in bacteriological media. In the replicative analysis at different growth phases of the isolates in cell culture media, growth capacity at 3 h post-incubation was frequently twice as that at 1 h, and that at early-log phase was frequently higher than that at mid-log phase at both post-incubation times. Adherence was frequently the least at early-log phase although the isolates were in the most active state of replication to increase the number of pneumococcal cells to adhere. At mid- and late-log phases, pneumococcal adherence was frequently higher although the replication was reduced. This study marks the potential correlation between pneumococcal growth fitness and adherence capacity whereby the later may not be superior during the early growth phase.

  16. The behavior of electrochemical cell resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritley, K.A.; Dull, P.M.; Weber, M.H.; Carroll, M.; Hurst, J.J.; Lynn, K.G.

    1990-01-01

    Knowledge of the basic electrochemical behavior found in typical cold fusion experiments is important to understanding and preventing experimental errors. For a Pd/LiOH(D)/Pt electrochemical cell, the applied cell voltage/current relationship (the effective cell resistance) does not obey Ohm's law directly, but instead exhibits a complicated response to the current, voltage, temperature, electrolyte conductance, and other factors. Failure to properly consider this response can possibly result in errors that could affect the heat balance in calorimetry and temperature measurement experiments. Measurements of this response under varying voltage, temperature, and electrolyte conductivity conditions are reported. A plausible scenario in which the temperature dependence of the effective cell resistance can either exaggerate or ameliorate novel exothermic processes is suggested

  17. Culture on 3D Chitosan-Hyaluronic Acid Scaffolds Enhances Stem Cell Marker Expression and Drug Resistance in Human Glioblastoma Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Kievit, Forrest M; Erickson, Ariane E; Silber, John R; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Zhang, Miqin

    2016-12-01

    The lack of in vitro models that support the growth of glioblastoma (GBM) stem cells (GSCs) that underlie clinical aggressiveness hinders developing new, effective therapies for GBM. While orthotopic patient-derived xenograft models of GBM best reflect in vivo tumor behavior, establishing xenografts is a time consuming, costly, and frequently unsuccessful endeavor. To address these limitations, a 3D porous scaffold composed of chitosan and hyaluronic acid (CHA) is synthesized. Growth and expression of the cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype of the GSC GBM6 taken directly from fresh xenogratfs grown on scaffolds or as adherent monolayers is compared. While 2D adherent cultures grow as monolayers of flat epitheliod cells, GBM6 cells proliferate within pores of CHA scaffolds as clusters of self-adherent ovoid cells. Growth on scaffolds is accompanied by greater expression of genes that mediate epithelial-mesenchymal transition and maintain a primitive, undifferentiated phenotype, hallmarks of CSCs. Scaffold-grown cells also display higher expression of genes that promote resistance to hypoxia-induced oxidative stress. In accord, scaffold-grown cells show markedly greater resistance to clinically utilized alkylating agents compared to adherent cells. These findings suggest that our CHA scaffolds better mimic in vivo biological and clinical behavior and provide insights for developing novel individualized treatments. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Surface glycosaminoglycans mediate adherence between HeLa cells and Lactobacillus salivarius Lv72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Rebeca; Martín, Carla; Escobedo, Susana; Suárez, Juan E; Quirós, Luis M

    2013-09-17

    The adhesion of lactobacilli to the vaginal surface is of paramount importance to develop their probiotic functions. For this reason, the role of HeLa cell surface proteoglycans in the attachment of Lactobacillus salivarius Lv72, a mutualistic strain of vaginal origin, was investigated. Incubation of cultures with a variety of glycosaminoglycans (chondroitin sulfate A and C, heparin and heparan sulfate) resulted in marked binding interference. However, no single glycosaminoglycan was able to completely abolish cell binding, the sum of all having an additive effect that suggests cooperation between them and recognition of specific adhesins on the bacterial surface. In contrast, chondroitin sulfate B enhanced cell to cell attachment, showing the relevance of the stereochemistry of the uronic acid and the sulfation pattern on binding. Elimination of the HeLa surface glycosaminoglycans with lyases also resulted in severe adherence impairment. Advantage was taken of the Lactobacillus-glycosaminoglycans interaction to identify an adhesin from the bacterial surface. This protein, identify as a soluble binding protein of an ABC transporter system (OppA) by MALDI-TOF/(MS), was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and shown to interfere with L. salivarius Lv72 adhesion to HeLa cells. These data suggest that glycosaminoglycans play a fundamental role in attachment of mutualistic bacteria to the epithelium that lines the cavities where the normal microbiota thrives, OppA being a bacterial adhesin involved in the process.

  19. Lactoferrin affects the adherence and invasion of Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. dysgalactiae in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Fiona; Beecher, Christine; Chaurin, Valerie; Sweeney, Torres; Giblin, Linda

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. dysgalactiae is an important causative agent of bovine mastitis worldwide. Lactoferrin is an innate immune protein that is associated with many functions including immunomodulatory, antiproliferative, and antimicrobial properties. This study aimed to investigate the interactions between lactoferrin and a clinical bovine mastitis isolate, Strep. dysgalactiae ssp. dysgalactiae DPC5345. Initially a deliberate in vivo bovine intramammary challenge was performed with Strep. dysgalactiae DPC5345. Results demonstrated a significant difference in lactoferrin mRNA levels in milk cells between the control and infused quarters 7h postinfusion. Milk lactoferrin levels in the Strep. dysgalactiae DPC5345 infused quarters were significantly increased compared with control quarters at 48h postinfusion. In vitro studies demonstrated that lactoferrin had a bacteriostatic effect on the growth of Strep. dysgalactiae DPC5345 and significantly decreased the ability of the bacteria to internalize into HC-11 mammary epithelial cells. Confocal microscopy images of HC-11 cells exposed to Strep. dysgalactiae and lactoferrin further supported this effect by demonstrating reduced invasion of bacteria to HC-11 cells. The combined data suggest that a bovine immune response to Strep. dysgalactiae infection includes a significant increase in lactoferrin expression in vivo, and based on in vitro data, lactoferrin limits mammary cell invasion of this pathogen by binding to the bacteria and preventing its adherence. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Human cardiac-derived adherent proliferating cells reduce murine acute Coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapka Miteva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Under conventional heart failure therapy, inflammatory cardiomyopathy typically has a progressive course, indicating a need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term outcomes. We recently isolated and identified novel cardiac-derived cells from human cardiac biopsies: cardiac-derived adherent proliferating cells (CAPs. They have similarities with mesenchymal stromal cells, which are known for their anti-apoptotic and immunomodulatory properties. We explored whether CAPs application could be a novel strategy to improve acute Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3-induced myocarditis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate the safety of our approach, we first analyzed the expression of the coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR and the co-receptor CD55 on CAPs, which are both required for effective CVB3 infectivity. We could demonstrate that CAPs only minimally express both receptors, which translates to minimal CVB3 copy numbers, and without viral particle release after CVB3 infection. Co-culture of CAPs with CVB3-infected HL-1 cardiomyocytes resulted in a reduction of CVB3-induced HL-1 apoptosis and viral progeny release. In addition, CAPs reduced CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation. All CAPs-mediated protective effects were nitric oxide- and interleukin-10-dependent and required interferon-γ. In an acute murine model of CVB3-induced myocarditis, application of CAPs led to a decrease of cardiac apoptosis, cardiac CVB3 viral load and improved left ventricular contractility parameters. This was associated with a decline in cardiac mononuclear cell activity, an increase in T regulatory cells and T cell apoptosis, and an increase in left ventricular interleukin-10 and interferon-γ mRNA expression. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that CAPs are a unique type of cardiac-derived cells and promising tools to improve acute CVB3-induced myocarditis.

  1. Integrating Interactive Web-Based Technology to Assess Adherence and Clinical Outcomes in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori E. Crosby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that the quality of the adherence assessment is one of the best predictors for improving clinical outcomes. Newer technologies represent an opportunity for developing high quality standardized assessments to assess clinical outcomes such as patient experience of care but have not been tested systematically in pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD. The goal of the current study was to pilot an interactive web-based tool, the Take-Charge Program, to assess adherence to clinic visits and hydroxyurea (HU, barriers to adherence, solutions to overcome these barriers, and clinical outcomes in 43 patients with SCD age 6–21 years. Results indicate that the web-based tool was successfully integrated into the clinical setting while maintaining high patient satisfaction (>90%. The tool provided data consistent with the medical record, staff report, and/or clinical lab data. Participants reported that forgetting and transportation were major barriers for adherence to both clinic attendance and HU. A greater number of self-reported barriers (P<.01 and older age (P<.05 were associated with poorer clinic attendance and HU adherence. In summary, the tool represents an innovative approach to integrate newer technology to assess adherence and clinical outcomes for pediatric patients with SCD.

  2. Cross-resistance to radiation in human squamous cell carcinoma cells with induced cisplatin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Keiichi

    1998-01-01

    Accumulated evidence indicates that drug resistance is induced in tumor cells treated with a variety of anti-cancer drugs and that there is a possibility of cross-resistance to ionizing radiation associated with induced drug resistance. Most in vitro studies have shown inconsistent results on cross-resistance probably because of different cell lines used and protocols for drug induction. In this study, TE3 human squamous cell carcinoma cell line was treated with a 4-day cycle of cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II); CDDP) at a concentration yielding 10% cell survival. The treatment was repeated up to 3 cycles. After treatment, cells were tested for CDDP and X-ray sensitivity. One cycle of CDDP treatment induced CDDP resistance with a factor of 1.41 and 2 cycles of the treatment with a factor of 1.86. The resistance factor reached a plateau at 3 cycles of treatment. For analyzing the correlation of CDDP and X-ray resistance, 30 clones from both untreated and 3-cycle treated cells were isolated and analyzed for CDDP and X-ray sensitivity. The sensitivity was expressed as the concentration of drug or dose of X-ray required to reduce the cell survival to x% (Dx). The correlation coefficient of clones with 3-cycle treatment between CDDP and X-ray sensitivity increased gradually by increasing the end point of Dx from D 10 to D 90 , resulting in significant correlation at D 90 . The result suggested that there is a certain common repair-related mechanism affecting both CDDP and X-ray resistance in CDDP-treated cells. (author)

  3. The production of collagenase by adherent mononuclear cells cultured from human peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, J S; Weiss, J; Ryhänen, L; Nies, K M; Rantala-Ryhänen, S; Uitto, J

    1984-12-01

    Mononuclear cells were isolated from human peripheral blood by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation, and the cells adherent to plastic substrata were cultured in serum-free media supplemented with lactalbumin hydrolysate. These cell cultures, which consisted predominantly of monocyte-macrophages as judged by nonspecific esterase staining, accumulated collagenase in the medium. This collagenase resembled other vertebrate collagenases in that it cleaved native triple-helical type I collagen at a locus 3/4-length away from the amino-terminal end of the molecule. The collagenase activity was inhibited by Na2EDTA, dithiothreitol, and fetal calf serum, while the addition of Ca++ or N-ethylmaleimide enhanced the enzyme activity. The accumulation of collagenase in the culture media was markedly enhanced by the incubation of cells with concanavalin A or phorbol myristic acetate. In the presence of cycloheximide, the levels of collagenase activity were markedly reduced, suggesting that active protein synthesis was required to express the enzyme activity. In additional experiments, monocytes were further purified by counterflow centrifugation-elutriation. The collagenase production was markedly increased in cultures enriched in monocyte-macrophages and devoid of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The accumulation of collagenase in monocyte cultures incubated for 48 hours in the presence of concanavalin A or phorbol myristic acetate was of the same order of magnitude as in parallel cultures containing the same number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes purified by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation and Plasmagel sedimentation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Enhanced adherence of mouse fibroblast and vascular cells to plasma modified polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reznickova, Alena, E-mail: alena.reznickova@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Novotna, Zdenka, E-mail: zdenka1.novotna@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Kolska, Zdenka [Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkyně University, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Kasalkova, Nikola Slepickova [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Rimpelova, Silvie [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Svorcik, Vaclav [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    Since the last decade, tissue engineering has shown a sensational promise in providing more viable alternatives to surgical procedures for harvested tissues, implants and prostheses. Biomedical polymers, such as low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), were activated by Ar plasma discharge. Degradation of polymer chains was examined by determination of the thickness of ablated layer. The amount of an ablated polymer layer was measured by gravimetry. Contact angle, measured by goniometry, was studied as a function of plasma exposure and post-exposure aging times. Chemical structure of modified polymers was characterized by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface chemistry and polarity of the samples were investigated by electrokinetic analysis. Changes in surface morphology were followed using atomic force microscopy. Cytocompatibility of plasma activated polyethylene foils was studied using two distinct model cell lines; VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) as a model for vascular graft testing and connective tissue cells L929 (mouse fibroblasts) approved for standardized material cytotoxicity testing. Specifically, the cell number, morphology, and metabolic activity of the adhered and proliferated cells on the polyethylene matrices were studied in vitro. It was found that the plasma treatment caused ablation of the polymers, resulting in dramatic changes in their surface morphology and roughness. ARXPS and electrokinetic measurements revealed oxidation of the polymer surface. It was found that plasma activation has a positive effect on the adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs and L929 cells. - Highlights: • Plasma activation of LDPE, HDPE and UHMWPE • Study of surface properties by several techniques: ARXPS, AFM, zeta-potential, and goniometry • Investigation of adhesion and spreading of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and mouse fibroblasts (L929)

  5. Deleterious effect of ultraviolet-B radiation on accessory function of human blood adherent mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, E.A.; Elmets, C.A.; Fujiwara, H.; Wallis, R.S.; Ellner, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) on accessory function of human blood adherent mononuclear cells (ADH) for antigen and mitogen-induced responses, and production by ADH of the amplifying cytokine interleukin 1 (IL-1) were examined. Responder lymphocytes were rendered accessory cell dependent by treatment of nonadherent cells with OKIal + complement. UV-B depressed accessory function of ADH in a dose-dependent manner. UV-B decreased accessory function of ADH for tetanus toxoid-induced responses and phytohaemagglutinin-induced responses. UV-B also decreased accessory activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells but not Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells for a PPD-reactive T cell line. Interleukin 1 (IL-1) activity of supernatants of ADH was assayed on C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes. Pretreatment of ADH with UV-B decreased lipopolysaccharide-stimulated IL-1 activity. Lysates of UV-B irradiated, LPS-stimulated ADH had no discernible IL-1 activity. Addition of IL-1 partially restored accessory activity of UV-B irradiated ADH for lymphocyte responses to TT. Exposure of ADH to TT or PHA for 30 min before irradiation blocked the inhibitory effect of UV-B on accessory activity. Thus, low doses of UV-B are deleterious to accessory function and to production of IL-1 by ADH. Interference with production of cytokines and with initial interactions of accessory cells with antigen and mitogen may be critical to the effects of UV-B on immunoregulatory function of ADH. (author)

  6. Differential antibody production by adherent and nonadherent spleen cells transferred to irradiated and cyclophosphamide-treated recipient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, J.F.; Deitchman, J.W.; Hassell, S.A.; Ozato, K.

    1975-01-01

    Mouse spleen cells were separated into adherent (Ad) and nonadherent (Nad) populations by incubation in plastic petri dishes. Adherent, Nad and unfractionated cell preparations (UCP) were transferred into syngeneic recipient mice that had been either irradiated or cyclophosphamide (CY) treated and the adoptive humoral Ab responses were studied by assessment of hemolytic Ab-forming cells (PFC) or humoral serum Ab production. Adherent cells failed to produce PFC in irradiated recipients, but functioned vigorously in CY-treated recipients. Nonadherent cells generated PFC in either type of host, as did UCP. Studies of comparative responses in CY-treated recipients revealed that: (a) Ad-cells generated 2 / 3 the number of PFC given by equivalent numbers of transferred Nad cells and UCP; (b) per equivalent numbers of transferred cells the Ad fraction generated 5 times more and 16 times more Ab than did the Nad cells and UCP, respectively. Spleen cells taken from mice 6 hr after CY treatment failed to respond to the mitogens phytohemagglutinin and bacterial lipopolysaccharide, showing that all cells were temporarily incapable of proliferation. Transfer of spleen cells from donor mice 16 hr after CY treatment, into thymectomized, irradiated, bone marrow-reconstituted recipients revealed substantial T-helper cell activity. We conclude that: (a) Ad preparations lacked T cells that were supplied by CY-treated recipients although T cell proliferation was temporarily inhibited in the latter; (b) B cells present in the Ad fraction were removed from some type of inhibitor of Ab synthesis and/or secretion, the production of which may be associated with T cells present in Nad preparations and UCP; (c) T-helper cells were only transiently affected by CY

  7. Primary observation on adherent function of bone marrow stromal cells in mice post combined radiation-burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xinghua; Luo Chengji; Guo Chaohua; Wang Ping; Deng Xuecai

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the adherent function of bone marrow stromal cells in hematopoietic inductive microenvironment post combined radiation-burn injury. Methods: The expression of cell adhesion molecules including vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), fibro-connection (Fn), laminin (Ln) and collagen type IV (Col IV) on bone marrow stromal cells cultured in vitro was detected by flow cytometry and the binding capacity of bone marrow mononuclear cells to stromal cell adherence layer was tested by cell binding assay and cell binding blocking assay respectively from mice treated with 5.0 Gy γ-ray 15% of total body surface area (TBSA), third-degree burn injury and combined irradiation-burn injury, respectively. Results: 1. The expression levels of molecules mentioned above in burn-injured mice were the highest. The molecules levels in control mice were greater than those in radiation-injured mice, which were lower than those in mice with combined radiation-burn injury. 2. The binding capacity of stromal cell adherence layer in burn-injured mice was greater than that in control mice, and significantly increased from 3 to 7 days post injury as compared with that in controls, radiation-injured mice and combined radiation-burn-injured mice, respectively (P < 0.05-0.01). Contrarily, the capacity of binding in the radiation-injured and combined radiation-burn-injured mice was the lowest from 3 to 7 days post injury. 3. The binding rate of bone marrow mononuclear cells to stromal cell adherence layer descended in different degrees after pre-treatment with monoclonal antibodies directed to VCAM-1, Fn, Ln, or Col IV respectively or VCAM-1 combined with anti-Fn, anti-Ln or anti-Col IV, respectively, in stromal cell adherence layer. Conclusion: The damage of cell adherent function for bone marrow hematopoietic inductive microenvironment post combined radiation-burn injury might be one of the important factors in hematopoietic disorder in combined radiation-burn injury

  8. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) has been used to evaluate the effects of xenobiotics using three endpoints, stem cell differentiation, stem cell viability and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal is to establish amodel system that would evaluate chemical effects using a singl...

  9. Surface-layer protein A (SlpA is a major contributor to host-cell adherence of Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Merrigan

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, and a significant etiologic agent of healthcare-associated infections. The mechanisms of attachment and host colonization of C. difficile are not well defined. We hypothesize that non-toxin bacterial factors, especially those facilitating the interaction of C. difficile with the host gut, contribute to the initiation of C. difficile infection. In this work, we optimized a completely anaerobic, quantitative, epithelial-cell adherence assay for vegetative C. difficile cells, determined adherence proficiency under multiple conditions, and investigated C. difficile surface protein variation via immunological and DNA sequencing approaches focused on Surface-Layer Protein A (SlpA. In total, thirty-six epidemic-associated and non-epidemic associated C. difficile clinical isolates were tested in this study, and displayed intra- and inter-clade differences in attachment that were unrelated to toxin production. SlpA was a major contributor to bacterial adherence, and individual subunits of the protein (varying in sequence between strains mediated host-cell attachment to different extents. Pre-treatment of host cells with crude or purified SlpA subunits, or incubation of vegetative bacteria with anti-SlpA antisera significantly reduced C. difficile attachment. SlpA-mediated adherence-interference correlated with the attachment efficiency of the strain from which the protein was derived, with maximal blockage observed when SlpA was derived from highly adherent strains. In addition, SlpA-containing preparations from a non-toxigenic strain effectively blocked adherence of a phylogenetically distant, epidemic-associated strain, and vice-versa. Taken together, these results suggest that SlpA plays a major role in C. difficile infection, and that it may represent an attractive target for interventions aimed at abrogating gut colonization by this pathogen.

  10. Different Use of Cell Surface Glycosaminoglycans As Adherence Receptors to Corneal Cells by Gram Positive and Gram Negative Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Beatriz; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Rodríguez, David; Alcalde, Ignacio; García-Suárez, Olivia; Alfonso, José F.; Baamonde, Begoña; Fernández-Vega, Andrés; Vazquez, Fernando; Quirós, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    The epithelium of the cornea is continuously exposed to pathogens, and adhesion to epithelial cells is regarded as an essential first step in bacterial pathogenesis. In this article, the involvement of glycosaminoglycans in the adhesion of various pathogenic bacteria to corneal epithelial cells is analyzed. All microorganisms use glycosaminoglycans as receptors, but arranged in different patterns depending on the Gram-type of the bacterium. The heparan sulfate chains of syndecans are the main receptors, though other molecular species also seem to be involved, particularly in Gram-negative bacteria. Adherence is inhibited differentially by peptides, including heparin binding sequences, indicating the participation of various groups of Gram-positive, and -negative adhesins. The length of the saccharides produces a major effect, and low molecular weight chains inhibit the binding of Gram-negative microorganisms but increase the adherence of Gram-positives. Pathogen adhesion appears to occur preferentially through sulfated domains, and is very dependent on N- and 6-O-sulfation of the glucosamine residue and, to a lesser extent, 2-O sulfation of uronic acid. These data show the differential use of corneal receptors, which could facilitate the development of new anti-infective strategies. PMID:27965938

  11. High Radiation Resistance IMM Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Noren

    2015-01-01

    Due to high launch costs, weight reduction is a key driver for the development of new solar cell technologies suitable for space applications. This project is developing a unique triple-junction inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology that enables the manufacture of very lightweight, low-cost InGaAsP-based multijunction solar cells. This IMM technology consists of indium (In) and phosphorous (P) solar cell active materials, which are designed to improve the radiation-resistant properties of the triple-junction solar cell while maintaining high efficiency. The intrinsic radiation hardness of InP materials makes them of great interest for building solar cells suitable for deployment in harsh radiation environments, such as medium Earth orbit and missions to the outer planets. NASA Glenn's recently developed epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process also will be applied to this new structure, which will enable the fabrication of the IMM structure without the substrate.

  12. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karobi Moitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed.

  13. Relationship between secretion of the Anton blood group antigen in saliva and adherence of Haemophilus influenzae to oropharynx epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alphen, L.; van Ham, M.; Geelen-van den Broek, L.; Pieters, T.

    1989-01-01

    Inhibition of adherence of bacteria to epithelial cells contributes to a reduction of infections by these bacteria. We have shown that the Anton blood group antigen, the erythrocyte receptor for Haemophilus influenzae (van Alphen et al. 1986, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 37, 69-71), occurs in saliva, that

  14. Evaluation of an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell in vitro assay to predict developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential for most environmental chemicals to produce developmental toxicity is unknown. Mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assays are an alternative in vitro model to assess chemicals. The chemical space evaluated using mESC and compared to in vivo is limited. We used an adher...

  15. The role of Listeria monocytogenes cell wall surface anchor protein LapB in virulence, adherence, and intracellular replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lmof2365_2117 is a Listeria monocytogenes putative cell wall surface anchor protein with a conserved domain found in collagen binding proteins. We constructed a deletion mutation in lmof2365_2117 in serotype 4b strain F2365, evaluated its virulence, and determined its ability to adhere and invade co...

  16. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  17. Cancer Stem Cell Plasticity Drives Therapeutic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary R. Doherty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The connection between epithelial-mesenchymal (E-M plasticity and cancer stem cell (CSC properties has been paradigm-shifting, linking tumor cell invasion and metastasis with therapeutic recurrence. However, despite their importance, the molecular pathways involved in generating invasive, metastatic, and therapy-resistant CSCs remain poorly understood. The enrichment of cells with a mesenchymal/CSC phenotype following therapy has been interpreted in two different ways. The original interpretation posited that therapy kills non-CSCs while sparing pre-existing CSCs. However, evidence is emerging that suggests non-CSCs can be induced into a transient, drug-tolerant, CSC-like state by chemotherapy. The ability to transition between distinct cell states may be as critical for the survival of tumor cells following therapy as it is for metastatic progression. Therefore, inhibition of the pathways that promote E-M and CSC plasticity may suppress tumor recurrence following chemotherapy. Here, we review the emerging appreciation for how plasticity confers therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence.

  18. Multidrug resistance in tumour cells: characterisation of the multidrug resistant cell line K562-Lucena 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIVIAN M. RUMJANEK

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle in the treatment of cancer patients. The best characterised mechanism responsible for multidrug resistance involves the expression of the MDR-1 gene product, P-glycoprotein. However, the resistance process is multifactorial. Studies of multidrug resistance mechanisms have relied on the analysis of cancer cell lines that have been selected and present cross-reactivity to a broad range of anticancer agents. This work characterises a multidrug resistant cell line, originally selected for resistance to the Vinca alkaloid vincristine and derived from the human erythroleukaemia cell K562. This cell line, named Lucena 1, overexpresses P-glycoprotein and have its resistance reversed by the chemosensitisers verapamil, trifluoperazine and cyclosporins A, D and G. Furthermore, we demonstrated that methylene blue was capable of partially reversing the resistance in this cell line. On the contrary, the use of 5-fluorouracil increased the resistance of Lucena 1. In addition to chemotherapics, Lucena 1 cells were resistant to ultraviolet A radiation and hydrogen peroxide and failed to mobilise intracellular calcium when thapsigargin was used. Changes in the cytoskeleton of this cell line were also observed.A resistência a múltiplos fármacos é o principal obstáculo no tratamento de pacientes com câncer. O mecanismo responsável pela resistência múltipla mais bem caracterizado envolve a expressão do produto do gene MDR-1, a glicoproteína P. Entretanto, o processo de resistência tem fatores múltiplos. Estudos de mecanismos de resistência m��ltipla a fármacos têm dependido da análise de linhagens celulares tumorais que foram selecionadas e apresentam reatividade cruzada a uma ampla faixa de agentes anti-tumorais. Este trabalho caracteriza uma linhagem celular com múltipla resistência a fármacos, selecionada originalmente pela resistência ao alcalóide de Vinca vincristina e derivado

  19. Increasing cell-device adherence using cultured insect cells for receptor-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terutsuki, Daigo; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Okamoto, Yuki; Tixier-Mita, Agnès; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi; Mita, Yoshio; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2018-03-01

    Field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensors have a wide range of applications, and a bio-FET odorant sensor, based on insect (Sf21) cells expressing insect odorant receptors (ORs) with sensitivity and selectivity, has emerged. To fully realize the practical application of bio-FET odorant sensors, knowledge of the cell-device interface for efficient signal transfer, and a reliable and low-cost measurement system using the commercial complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) foundry process, will be indispensable. However, the interfaces between Sf21 cells and sensor devices are largely unknown, and electrode materials used in the commercial CMOS foundry process are generally limited to aluminium, which is reportedly toxic to cells. In this study, we investigated Sf21 cell-device interfaces by developing cross-sectional specimens. Calcium imaging of Sf21 cells expressing insect ORs was used to verify the functions of Sf21 cells as odorant sensor elements on the electrode materials. We found that the cell-device interface was approximately 10 nm wide on average, suggesting that the adhesion mechanism of Sf21 cells may differ from that of other cells. These results will help to construct accurate signal detection from expressed insect ORs using FETs.

  20. Comparison of fracture site callus with iliac crest bone marrow as the source of plastic-adherent cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Zaki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Red marrow has been described as the main source of mesenchymal stem cells although its aspiration and isolation from bone marrow was reported to have significant donor site morbidity. Since secondary bone healing occurs through formation of callus as the result of proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, callus may become alternative source for mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we compared the number of plastic-adherent cells from fracture site callus and bone marrow of iliac crest after two and four weeks of culture.Methods: Sixteen New Zealand rabbits were fracturized at the femoral shaft. Then, these rabbits were taken care. After two weeks of fracturization, 3 mL iliac crest bone marrow aspiration and callus extraction of eight rabbits were cultured (group I. The other eight rabbits were treated equally after four weeks of fracturization (group II. Simultaneously, the cultures were observed after one and two weeks. Four weeks later, they were harvested. Cells were counted using Neubauer hemocytometer. The average number of cells between the sources and groups were statistically analyzed using the unpaired t-test. Results: In group I, there were 2.6 ± 0.1 x 104 cells in the culture of iliac crest bone marrow aspirate and 2.5 ± 0.1 x 104 cells in culture of callus extract from fracture site (p = 0.34. In group II, there were 2.7 ± 0.1 x 104 cells and 2.1 ± 0.1 x 104 cells, respectively (p < 0.001.Conclusion: Fracture site callus at the second week post-fracturization may be potential as source of plastic-adherent cells compared with iliac crest bone marrow. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:70-5Keywords: Bone marrow, fracture site callus, iliac crest, long bone, mesenchymal stem cell, plastic-adherent cells

  1. Airway delivery of soluble factors from plastic-adherent bone marrow cells prevents murine asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Lavinia I; Alphonse, Rajesh S; Arizmendi, Narcy; Morgan, Beverly; Abel, Melanie; Eaton, Farah; Duszyk, Marek; Vliagoftis, Harissios; Aprahamian, Tamar R; Walsh, Kenneth; Thébaud, Bernard

    2012-02-01

    Asthma affects an estimated 300 million people worldwide and accounts for 1 of 250 deaths and 15 million disability-adjusted life years lost annually. Plastic-adherent bone marrow-derived cell (BMC) administration holds therapeutic promise in regenerative medicine. However, given the low cell engraftment in target organs, including the lung, cell replacement cannot solely account for the reported therapeutic benefits. This suggests that BMCs may act by secreting soluble factors. BMCs also possess antiinflammatory and immunomodulatory properties and may therefore be beneficial for asthma. Our objective was to investigate the therapeutic potential of BMC-secreted factors in murine asthma. In a model of acute and chronic asthma, intranasal instillation of BMC conditioned medium (CdM) prevented airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation. In the chronic asthma model, CdM prevented airway smooth muscle thickening and peribronchial inflammation while restoring blunted salbutamol-induced bronchodilation. CdM reduced lung levels of the T(H)2 inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 and increased levels of IL-10. CdM up-regulated an IL-10-induced and IL-10-secreting subset of T regulatory lymphocytes and promoted IL-10 expression by lung macrophages. Adiponectin (APN), an antiinflammatory adipokine found in CdM, prevented AHR, airway smooth muscle thickening, and peribronchial inflammation, whereas the effect of CdM in which APN was neutralized or from APN knock-out mice was attenuated compared with wild-type CdM. Our study provides evidence that BMC-derived soluble factors prevent murine asthma and suggests APN as one of the protective factors. Further identification of BMC-derived factors may hold promise for novel approaches in the treatment of asthma.

  2. Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes do not adhere well to C32 melanoma cells or CD36 unless rosettes with uninfected erythrocytes are first disrupted.

    OpenAIRE

    Handunnetti, S M; Hasler, T H; Howard, R J

    1992-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites modify the human erythrocytes in which they grow so that some parasitized erythrocytes (PE) can cytoadhere (C+) to host vascular endothelial cells or adhere in rosettes (R+) to uninfected erythrocytes. These C+ and R+ adherence properties of PE appear to mediate much of the pathogenesis of severe malaria infections, in part by blocking blood flow in microvessels. From one parasite strain, PE were selected in vitro for C+ R+ or C+ R- adherence properties...

  3. Factors Associated with Adherence to and Treatment Duration of Erlotinib Among Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Lisa M; Louder, Anthony; Winfree, Katherine; Zhu, Yajun E; Oton, Ana B; Nair, Radhika

    2017-06-01

    In lung cancer, there is an increasing number of oral agents available for patients; however, little is known about the factors associated with adherence to and treatment duration on oral medications in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To evaluate the clinical and demographic factors associated with adherence and treatment discontinuation, respectively, to oral oncolytics among patients with NSCLC. A retrospective, claims-based analysis of the Humana Research Database supplemented with medical chart review was conducted among patients with NSCLC who started an oral oncolytic between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2013. Patients were required to be enrolled at least 1 year before the start of oral oncolytics and have no evidence of any oral oncolytic use during this period. Logistic regression models and Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify predictors associated with medication adherence and treatment duration, respectively. Among all oral oncolytics, only the cohort starting on erlotinib had sufficient sample size (n = 1,452). A wide variety of factors were found to be associated with adherence. Low-income subsidy status, previous use of intravenous chemotherapy, and lower total baseline health care costs were significantly related to decreasing adherence (each P cost was associated with decreasing adherence to erlotinib (P costs (P Company to Comprehensive Health Insights, a Humana company, as a collaborative research project involving employees of both companies. Hess, Winfree, Zhu, and Oton are employees of Eli Lilly and Company. Louder and Nair are employees of Comprehensive Health Insights, which received funding to complete this research. Study concept and design were contributed by Hess, Zhu, Winfree, and Oton. Nair and Louder collected the data, and data interpretation was performed by all the authors. The manuscript was written primarily by Hess, along with Nair, and revised by Hess, Nair, Louder, and Winfree, with assistance from Zhu and

  4. Tumourigenicity and radiation resistance of mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Andrea, Filippo Peder; Horsman, Michael Robert; Kassem, Moustapha

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cancer stem cells are believed to be more radiation resistant than differentiated tumour cells of the same origin. It is not known, however, whether normal nontransformed adult stem cells share the same radioresistance as their cancerous counterpart. Material and methods....... Nontumourigenic (TERT4) and tumourigenic (TRET20) cell lines, from an immortalised mesenchymal stem cell line, were grown in culture prior to irradiation and gene expression analysis. Radiation resistance was measured using a clonogenic assay. Differences in gene expression between the two cell lines, both under...... the intercellular matrix. These results also indicate that cancer stem cells are more radiation resistant than stem cells of the same origin....

  5. Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains form Biofilm on Abiotic Surfaces Regardless of Their Adherence Pattern on Cultured Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebert F. Culler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the capacity of biofilm formation of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces. Ninety-one aEPEC strains, isolated from feces of children with diarrhea, were analyzed by the crystal violet (CV assay on an abiotic surface after 24 h of incubation. aEPEC strains representing each HEp-2 cell type of adherence were analyzed after 24 h and 6, 12, and 18 days of incubation at 37°C on abiotic and cell surfaces by CFU/cm2 counting and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces occurred in 55 (60.4% of the aEPEC strains. There was no significant difference in biofilm biomass formation on an abiotic versus prefixed cell surface. The biofilms could be visualized by CLSM at various developmental stages. aEPEC strains are able to form biofilm on an abiotic surface with no association with their adherence pattern on HEp-2 cells with the exception of the strains expressing UND (undetermined adherence. This study revealed the capacity of adhesion and biofilm formation by aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces, possibly playing a role in pathogenesis, mainly in cases of persistent diarrhea.

  6. Contribution of the major and minor subunits to fimbria-mediated adherence of Haemophilus influenzae to human epithelial cells and erythrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ham, S. M.; van Alphen, L.; Mooi, F. R.; van Putten, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    Fimbriae are colonization factors of the human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae in that they mediate bacterial adherence to human eukaryotic cells. The contribution of the major (HifA) and putative minor (HifD and HifE) subunits of H. influenzae fimbriae to fimbria-specific adherence was studied by

  7. Technology Access and Smartphone App Preferences for Medication Adherence in Adolescents and Young Adults With Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif M; Thompson, Alexis A; Liem, Robert I

    2016-05-01

    Hydroxyurea is the only Food and Drug Administration approved medication for sickle cell disease (SCD) with short- and long-term benefits for both morbidity and mortality. However, hydroxyurea underutilization and adherence remain challenges for patients with SCD. The objectives of this study were to determine access to technology among adolescents and young adults (AYA) with SCD and to identify their preferred technology-based strategies for improving medication adherence. A cross-sectional survey was administered in a variety of clinical settings from October 2014 through May 2015 to AYA (12-22 years) with SCD (all genotypes) followed in a Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program. Eighty of 107 eligible participants completed the survey for a 75% response rate. Participants (51% female, 94% Black) had a mean age of 15.3 ± 2.8 years. Most participants (75%) were on a daily medication with about half on hydroxyurea. Forgetfulness (67%) was the most common barrier to medication adherence. The majority of participants (85%) owned smartphones and either owned or had access to electronic tablets (83%), laptops (72%), or desktops (70%). Of the proposed smartphone app features, daily medication reminders were ranked first most frequently, followed by education about SCD, adherence text prompts, education about SCD medications, and medication log. The majority of our AYA with SCD owned smartphones and had access to other electronic devices. Our survey results provided valuable insight into the preferred app features and optimal strategies for developing technology-based interventions, such as a multicomponent app, to increase medication adherence for AYA with SCD or other chronic conditions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Human sepsis-associated Escherichia coli (SEPEC) is able to adhere to and invade kidney epithelial cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceição, R.A. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ludovico, M.S. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Andrade, C.G.T.J. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Yano, T. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-13

    The adhesins of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli are essential for mediating direct interactions between the microbes and the host cell surfaces that they infect. Using fluorescence microscopy and gentamycin protection assays, we observed that 49 sepsis-associated E. coli (SEPEC) strains isolated from human adults adhered to and invaded Vero cells in the presence of D-mannose (100%). In addition, bacteria concentrations of approximately 2 × 10{sup 7} CFU/mL were recovered from Vero cells following an invasion assay. Furthermore, PCR analysis of adhesin genes showed that 98.0% of these SEPEC strains tested positive for fimH, 69.4% for flu, 53.1% for csgA, 38.8% for mat, and 32.7% for iha. Analysis of the invasin genes showed that 16.3% of the SEPEC strains were positive for tia, 12.3% for gimB, and 10.2% for ibeA. Therefore, these data suggest that SEPEC adhesion to cell surfaces occurs through non-fimH mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of microcolonies on the Vero cell surface. SEPEC invasiveness was also confirmed by the presence of intracellular bacteria, and ultrastructural analysis using electron transmission microscopy revealed bacteria inside the Vero cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that these SEPEC strains had the ability to adhere to and invade Vero cells. Moreover, these data support the theory that renal cells may be the predominant pathway through which SEPEC enters human blood vessels.

  9. Assessment of the impact of adherence and other predictors during HAART on various CD4 cell responses in resource-limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrogoua DP

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Danho Pascal Abrogoua1,2, Brou Jerome Kablan1, Boua Alexis Thierry Kamenan1,3, Gilles Aulagner4, Konan N'Guessan1, Christian Zohoré11Laboratoire de Pharmacie Clinique, Pharmacologie et Therapeutique – UFR Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, 2Laboratoire de Pharmacologie Clinique, CHU de Cocody, 3Service de Pharmacie, CHU de Cocody, Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire, 4Service Pharmaceutique Hopital Louis Pradel, Lyon, FranceObjective: The aim of this study was to quantify, by modeling, the impact of significant predictors on CD4 cell response during antiretroviral therapy in a resource-limited setting.Methods: Modeling was used to determine which antiretroviral therapy response predictors (baseline CD4 cell count, clinical state, age, and adherence significantly influence immunological response in terms of CD4 cell gain compared to a reference value at different periods of monitoring.Results: At 6 months, CD4 cell response was significantly influenced by baseline CD4 count alone. The probability of no increase in CD4 cells was 2.6 higher in patients with a baseline CD4 cell count of ≥200/mm3. At 12 months, CD4 cell response was significantly influenced by both baseline CD4 cell count and adherence. The probability of no increase in CD4 cells was three times higher in patients with a baseline CD4 cell count of ≥200/mm3 and 0.15 times lower with adherent patients. At 18 months, CD4 cell response was also significantly influenced by both baseline CD4 cell count and adherence. The probability of no increase in CD4 cells was 5.1 times higher in patients with a baseline CD4 cell count of ≥200/mm3 and 0.28 times lower with adherent patients. At 24 months, optimal CD4 cell response was significantly influenced by adherence alone. Adherence increased the probability (by 5.8 of an optimal increase in CD4 cells. Age and baseline clinical state had no significant influence on immunological response.Conclusion: The relationship between adherence and CD4

  10. Menstrual endometrial cells from women with endometriosis demonstrate increased adherence to peritoneal cells and increased expression of CD44 splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Jason S; Liu, Ya-Guang; Tekmal, Rajeshwar R; Binkley, Peter A; Holden, Alan E C; Schenken, Robert S

    2010-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that adherence of endometrial epithelial (EECs) and stromal cells (ESCs) to peritoneal mesothelial cells (PMCs) is partly regulated by ESC/EEC CD44 interactions with PMC associated hyaluronan. CD44, a transmembrane glycoprotein and major ligand for hyaluronan, has numerous splice variants which may impact hyaluronan binding. Here, we assessed whether ESCs and EECs from women with endometriosis demonstrate increased adherence to PMCs and examined CD44 splice variants' potential role in this process. In vitro study. Academic medical center. Fertility patients with and without endometriosis. Menstrual endometrium was collected from women with and without endometriosis confirmed surgically. The adherence of ESC/EECs to PMCs was measured. The ESC/EEC CD44 splice variants were assessed using dot-blot analysis. The ESCs and EECs from women with endometriosis demonstrated increased adherence to PMCs. The predominant CD44 splice variants expressed by ESCs and EECs from women with and without endometriosis were v3, v6, v7, v8, v9, and v10. The ESCs and EECs from women with endometriosis were more likely to express v6, v7, v8, and v9. Increased eutopic endometrial-PMC adherence and CD44 splice variant expression may contribute to the histogenesis of endometriotic lesions. Elucidation of factors controlling this expression may lead to novel endometriosis therapies. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Local pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of the myosin 2A motor in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Michelle A; Billington, Neil; Wang, Aibing; Adelstein, Robert S; Sellers, James R; Fischer, Robert S; Waterman, Clare M

    2017-01-15

    The role of nonmuscle myosin 2 (NM2) pulsatile dynamics in generating contractile forces required for developmental morphogenesis has been characterized, but whether these pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of all actomyosin networks is not known. Here we used live-cell fluorescence imaging to show that transient, local assembly of NM2A "pulses" occurs in the cortical cytoskeleton of single adherent cells of mesenchymal, epithelial, and sarcoma origin, independent of developmental signaling cues and cell-cell or cell-ECM interactions. We show that pulses in the cortical cytoskeleton require Rho-associated kinase- or myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity, increases in cytosolic calcium, and NM2 ATPase activity. Surprisingly, we find that cortical cytoskeleton pulses specifically require the head domain of NM2A, as they do not occur with either NM2B or a 2B-head-2A-tail chimera. Our results thus suggest that pulsatile contractions in the cortical cytoskeleton are an intrinsic property of the NM2A motor that may mediate its role in homeostatic maintenance of tension in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells. © 2017 Baird et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. Multidrug-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cells are enriched for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemotherapy is a main treatment for cancer, while multidrug-resistance is the main reason for chemotherapy failure, and tumor relapse and metastasis. Cancer stem cells or cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are a small subset of cancer cells, which may be inherently resistant to the cytotoxic effect of chemotherapy.

  13. Decreased cisplatin uptake by resistant L1210 leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hromas, R.A.; North, J.A.; Burns, C.P.

    1987-01-01

    Cisplatin resistance remains poorly understood compared to other forms of anti-neoplastic drug resistance. In this report radiolabelled cisplatin and rapid separation techniques were used to compare drug uptake by L1210 leukemia cells that are sensitive (K25) or resistant (SCR9) to cisplatin. Uptake of cisplatin by both cell lines was linear without saturation kinetics up to 100 μM. The resistant ZCR9 cells had 36-60% reduced drug uptake as compared to its sensitive parent line, K25. In contrast, there was no difference in the rate of efflux. We conclude that a decreased rate of uptake is one possible mechanism of cellular cisplatin resistance. (Author)

  14. Oligomannose-Rich Membranes of Dying Intestinal Epithelial Cells Promote Host Colonization by Adherent-Invasive E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Dumych

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel mechanism is revealed by which clinical isolates of adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC penetrate into the epithelial cell layer, replicate, and establish biofilms in Crohn's disease. AIEC uses the FimH fimbrial adhesin to bind to oligomannose glycans on the surface of host cells. Oligomannose glycans exposed on early apoptotic cells are the preferred binding targets of AIEC, so apoptotic cells serve as potential entry points for bacteria into the epithelial cell layer. Thereafter, the bacteria propagate laterally in the epithelial intercellular spaces. We demonstrate oligomannosylation at two distinct sites of a glycoprotein receptor for AIEC, carcinoembryonic antigen related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6 or CD66c, on human intestinal epithelia. After bacterial binding, FimH interacts with CEACAM6, which then clusters. The presence of the highest-affinity epitope for FimH, oligomannose-5, on CEACAM6 is demonstrated using LC-MS/MS. As mannose-dependent infections are abundant, this mechanism might also be used by other adherent-invasive pathogens.

  15. Automated Method for the Rapid and Precise Estimation of Adherent Cell Culture Characteristics from Phase Contrast Microscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Griffin, Lewis D; Keser, Ana; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative determination of key adherent cell culture characteristics such as confluency, morphology, and cell density is necessary for the evaluation of experimental outcomes and to provide a suitable basis for the establishment of robust cell culture protocols. Automated processing of images acquired using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), an imaging modality widely used for the visual inspection of adherent cell cultures, could enable the non-invasive determination of these characteristics. We present an image-processing approach that accurately detects cellular objects in PCM images through a combination of local contrast thresholding and post hoc correction of halo artifacts. The method was thoroughly validated using a variety of cell lines, microscope models and imaging conditions, demonstrating consistently high segmentation performance in all cases and very short processing times (image). Based on the high segmentation performance, it was possible to precisely determine culture confluency, cell density, and the morphology of cellular objects, demonstrating the wide applicability of our algorithm for typical microscopy image processing pipelines. Furthermore, PCM image segmentation was used to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of fluorescence microscopy data, enabling the determination of temporal and spatial expression patterns of a fluorescent reporter. We created a software toolbox (PHANTAST) that bundles all the algorithms and provides an easy to use graphical user interface. Source-code for MATLAB and ImageJ is freely available under a permissive open-source license. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 504–517. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24037521

  16. Treatment Resistance Mechanisms of Malignant Glioma Tumor Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmalz, Philip G.R.; Shen, Michael J.; Park, John K.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly lethal because of their resistance to conventional treatments. Recent evidence suggests that a minor subpopulation of cells with stem cell properties reside within these tumors. These tumor stem cells are more resistant to radiation and chemotherapies than their counterpart differentiated tumor cells and may underlie the persistence and recurrence of tumors following treatment. The various mechanisms by which tumor stem cells avoid or repair the damaging effects of cancer therapies are discussed

  17. /TiN Resistive RAM (RRAM) Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. X.; Fang, Z.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Kamath, A.; Wang, X. P.; Singh, N.; Lo, G.-Q.; Kwong, D.-L.; Wu, Y. H.

    2014-11-01

    We present a study of Ni silicide as the bottom electrode in HfO2-based resistive random-access memory cells. Various silicidation conditions were used for each device, yielding different Ni concentrations within the electrode. A higher concentration of Ni in the bottom electrode was found to cause a parasitic SET operation during certain RESET operation cycles, being attributed to field-assisted Ni cation migration creating a Ni filament. As such, the RESET is affected unless an appropriate RESET voltage is used. Bottom electrodes with lower concentrations of Ni were able to switch at ultralow currents (RESET current <1 nA) by using a low compliance current (<500 nA). The low current is attributed to the tunneling barrier formed by the native SiO2 at the Ni silicide/HfO2 interface.

  18. Desmosomal Molecules In and Out of Adhering Junctions: Normal and Diseased States of Epidermal, Cardiac and Mesenchymally Derived Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pieperhoff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Current cell biology textbooks mention only two kinds of cell-to-cell adhering junctions coated with the cytoplasmic plaques: the desmosomes (maculae adhaerentes, anchoring intermediate-sized filaments (IFs, and the actin microfilament-anchoring adherens junctions (AJs, including both punctate (puncta adhaerentia and elongate (fasciae adhaerentes structures. In addition, however, a series of other junction types has been identified and characterized which contain desmosomal molecules but do not fit the definition of desmosomes. Of these special cell-cell junctions containing desmosomal glycoproteins or proteins we review the composite junctions (areae compositae connecting the cardiomyocytes of mature mammalian hearts and their importance in relation to human arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies. We also emphasize the various plakophilin-2-positive plaques in AJs (coniunctiones adhaerentes connecting proliferatively active mesenchymally-derived cells, including interstitial cells of the heart and several soft tissue tumor cell types. Moreover, desmoplakin has also been recognized as a constituent of the plaques of the complexus adhaerentes connecting certain lymphatic endothelial cells. Finally, we emphasize the occurrence of the desmosomal transmembrane glycoprotein, desmoglein Dsg2, out of the context of any junction as dispersed cell surface molecules in certain types of melanoma cells and melanocytes. This broadening of our knowledge on the diversity of AJ structures indicates that it may still be too premature to close the textbook chapters on cell-cell junctions.

  19. Ginger Phytochemicals Inhibit Cell Growth and Modulate Drug Resistance Factors in Docetaxel Resistant Prostate Cancer Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chi-Ming; Kao, Chiu-Li; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Lo, Yi-Ching; Chen, Chung-Yi

    2017-09-05

    Ginger has many bioactive compounds with pharmacological activities. However, few studies are known about these bioactive compounds activity in chemoresistant cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anticancer properties of ginger phytochemicals in docetaxel-resistant human prostate cancer cells in vitro. In this study, we isolated 6-gingerol, 10-gingerol, 4-shogaol, 6-shogaol, 10-shogaol, and 6-dehydrogingerdione from ginger. Further, the antiproliferation activity of these compounds was examined in docetaxel-resistant (PC3R) and sensitive (PC3) human prostate cancer cell lines. 6-gingerol, 10-gingerol, 6-shogaol, and 10-shogaol at the concentration of 100 μM significantly inhibited the proliferation in PC3R but 6-gingerol, 6-shogaol, and 10-shogaol displayed similar activity in PC3. The protein expression of multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1) and glutathione-S-transferase (GSTπ) is higher in PC3R than in PC3. In summary, we isolated the bioactive compounds from ginger. Our results showed that 6-gingerol, 10-gingerol, 6-shogaol, and 10-shogaol inhibit the proliferation of PC3R cells through the downregulation of MRP1 and GSTπ protein expression.

  20. Influence of non-adherent yeast cells on electrical characteristics of diamond-based field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procházka, Václav, E-mail: prochazkav@fzu.cz [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technická 2, 16627 Prague (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Cifra, Michal [Institute of Photonics and Electronics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Chaberská 57, 182 51 Prague (Czech Republic); Kulha, Pavel [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technická 2, 16627 Prague (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Ižák, Tibor [Institute of Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Rezek, Bohuslav [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technická 2, 16627 Prague (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Kromka, Alexander [Institute of Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Thákurova 7, 16629 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Interaction of non-adherent yeast cells with H-terminated diamond described. • Effect of cell culture solutions on H-diamond SGFET (positive potential shifts). • H-diamond sensitive to metabolic activity of yeast cells (negative potential shift). - Abstract: Diamond thin films provide unique features as substrates for cell cultures and as bio-electronic sensors. Here we employ solution-gated field effect transistors (SGFET) based on nanocrystalline diamond thin films with H-terminated surface which exhibits the sub-surface p-type conductive channel. We study an influence of yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on electrical characteristics of the diamond SGFETs. Two different cell culture solutions (sucrose and yeast peptone dextrose–YPD) are used, with and without the cells. We have found that transfer characteristics of the SGFETs exhibit a negative shift of the gate voltage by −26 mV and −42 mV for sucrose and YPD with cells in comparison to blank solutions without the cells. This effect is attributed to a local pH change in close vicinity of the H-terminated diamond surface due to metabolic processes of the yeast cells. The pH sensitivity of the diamond-based SGFETs, the role of cell and protein adhesion on the gate surface and the role of negative surface charge of yeast cells on the SGFETs electrical characteristics are discussed as well.

  1. Influence of non-adherent yeast cells on electrical characteristics of diamond-based field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procházka, Václav; Cifra, Michal; Kulha, Pavel; Ižák, Tibor; Rezek, Bohuslav; Kromka, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Interaction of non-adherent yeast cells with H-terminated diamond described. • Effect of cell culture solutions on H-diamond SGFET (positive potential shifts). • H-diamond sensitive to metabolic activity of yeast cells (negative potential shift). - Abstract: Diamond thin films provide unique features as substrates for cell cultures and as bio-electronic sensors. Here we employ solution-gated field effect transistors (SGFET) based on nanocrystalline diamond thin films with H-terminated surface which exhibits the sub-surface p-type conductive channel. We study an influence of yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on electrical characteristics of the diamond SGFETs. Two different cell culture solutions (sucrose and yeast peptone dextrose–YPD) are used, with and without the cells. We have found that transfer characteristics of the SGFETs exhibit a negative shift of the gate voltage by −26 mV and −42 mV for sucrose and YPD with cells in comparison to blank solutions without the cells. This effect is attributed to a local pH change in close vicinity of the H-terminated diamond surface due to metabolic processes of the yeast cells. The pH sensitivity of the diamond-based SGFETs, the role of cell and protein adhesion on the gate surface and the role of negative surface charge of yeast cells on the SGFETs electrical characteristics are discussed as well.

  2. Health-related quality of life and adherence to hydroxyurea in adolescents and young adults with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif M; Thompson, Alexis A; Lai, Jin-Shei; Penedo, Frank J; Rychlik, Karen; Liem, Robert I

    2017-06-01

    Complications related to sickle cell disease (SCD) result in significant declines in health-related quality of life (HRQOL). While hydroxyurea reduces SCD complications, adherence remains suboptimal. The study's objectives were to assess the feasibility of Internet-based electronic assessment of HRQOL in SCD clinic and to examine the relationship between HRQOL and hydroxyurea adherence in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with SCD. A cross-sectional survey was administered on tablets to 34 AYAs (12-22 years old) in a SCD clinic from January through December 2015. Study measures included Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS ® ) computerized adaptive testing and ©Modified Morisky Adherence Scale 8-items (©MMAS-8). Participants (59% male, 91% Black) had median age of 13.5 (range 12-18) years. Ninety-one percent completed PROMIS® measures electronically in the clinic, meeting our feasibility criterion of ≥85% completion rate. ©MMAS-8 scores positively correlated with fetal hemoglobin (HbF) (r s = 0.34, P = 0.04) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) (r s = 0.42, P = 0.01) and inversely correlated with fatigue (r s = -0.45, P = 0.01), depression (r s = -0.3, P = 0.08), and social isolation (r s = -0.78, P = 0.02). Low ©MMAS-8 scores, indicating poor adherence, were associated with worse fatigue (P = 0.001) and trended toward significance for pain (P = 0.07) and depression (P = 0.06). Homozygous hemoglobin S disease patients with low HbF (<16%) had worse social isolation (P = 0.04) and those with low MCV (<102 fl) reported worse fatigue (P = 0.001), pain (P = 0.01), mobility (P = 0.01), and social isolation (P = 0.04). HRQOL assessment in the SCD clinic is feasible. SCD patients with low hydroxyurea adherence and/or low HbF or MCV levels had worse HRQOL scores, particularly fatigue. Future prospective studies examining the relationship between HRQOL and hydroxyurea adherence are warranted. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Immunologic effects of whole body ultraviolet (uv) irradiation. II. Defect in splenic adherent cell antigen presentation for stimulation of T cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letvin, N.L.; Fox, I.J.; Greene, M.I.; Benacerraf, B.; Germain, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    Ultraviolet (uv) irradiation has been shown to alter many parameters of the immunologic reactivity of mice. The altered responsiveness of uv-irradiated mice, as measured by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and primary in vitro plaque-forming cell (PFC) responses to T-dependent antigens, has recently been correlated with a functional defect in the splenic adherent cell population of these animals. The present studies describe a model of this altered responsiveness, which allows further clarification of the effects of external uv irradiation on the splenic antigen-presenting cell (APC) in its interactions with T cells

  4. 17β-estradiol exerts anticancer effects in anoikis-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines by targeting IL-6/STAT3 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seulki, E-mail: sl10f@naver.com [Department of Internal Medicine and Liver Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Minjong, E-mail: minjonglee2@naver.com [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kangwon National University Hospital, 156 Baengnyeong-ro, Chuncheon-si, Gangwon-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Bin, E-mail: kkimjp@hanmail.net [Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, 801 16th Ave NE, Austin, MN, 55912 (United States); Jo, Ara, E-mail: loveara0315@naver.com [Department of Internal Medicine and Liver Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eun Ju, E-mail: creatioex@gmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine and Liver Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Su Jong, E-mail: ydoctor2@hanmail.net [Department of Internal Medicine and Liver Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Hoon, E-mail: pindra@empal.com [Department of Internal Medicine and Liver Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jung-Hwan, E-mail: yoonjh@snu.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine and Liver Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yoon Jun, E-mail: yoonjun@snu.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine and Liver Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-13

    17β-Estradiol (E2) has been proven to exert protective effects against HCC; however, its mechanism on HCC proliferation and suppression of invasion remains to be further explored. Because HCC up-regulates serum Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3), molecular agents that attenuate IL-6/STAT3 signaling can potentially suppress HCC development. In this study, we examined involvement of E2 in anoikis resistance that induces invasion capacities and chemo-resistance. Huh-BAT and HepG2 cells grown under anchorage-independent condition were selected. The anoikis-resistant (AR) cells showed stronger chemo-resistance against sorafenib, doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin compared to adherent HCC cells. AR HCC cells exhibited decreased expression of E-cadherin and increased expression of the N-cadherin and vimentin compared to adherent HCC cells. We then demonstrated that E2 suppressed cell proliferation in AR HCC cells. IL-6 treatment enhanced invasive characteristics, and E2 reversed it. Regarding mechanism of E2, it decreased in the phosphorylation of STAT3 that overexpressed on AR HCC cells. The inhibitory effect of E2 on cell growth was accompanied with cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and caspase-3/9/PARP activation through c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. Taken together, these findings suggested that E2 inhibited the proliferation of AR HCC cells through down-regulation of IL-6/STAT3 signaling. Thus, E2 can be a potential therapeutic drug for treatment of metastatic or chemo-resistant HCC. -- Highlights: •Anoikis-resistant HCC cells characterized chemo-resistant and metastatic potentials. •17β-Estradiol down-regulated IL-6/STAT3 signaling in anoikis-resistant HCC cells. •17β-Estradiol suppressed cell proliferation by inducing G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis though JNK phosphorylation.

  5. Carboplatin treatment of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mathilde S; Yde, Christina Westmose; Christensen, Ib J

    2012-01-01

    Antiestrogen resistance is a major clinical problem in current breast cancer treatment. Therefore, biomarkers and new treatment options for antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer are needed. In this study, we investigated whether antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer cell lines have increased...... sensitivity to carboplatin, as it was previously shown with cisplatin, and whether low Bcl-2 expression levels have a potential value as marker for increased carboplatin sensitivity. Breast cancer cells resistant to the pure antiestrogen fulvestrant, and two out of four cell lines resistant...... to the antiestrogen tamoxifen, were more sensitive to carboplatin treatment compared to the parental MCF-7 cell line. This indicates that carboplatin may be an advantageous treatment in antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer; however, a marker for increased sensitivity would be needed. Low Bcl-2 expression...

  6. Microcystin-LR induces anoikis resistance to the hepatocyte uptake transporter OATP1B3-expressing cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hiroyuki; Takumi, Shota; Ikema, Satoshi; Mizoue, Nozomi; Hotta, Yuki; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Sugiyama, Yasumasa; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Komatsu, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    Microcystin-LR is a cyclic peptide released by several bloom-forming cyanobacteria. Understanding the mechanism of microcystin-LR toxicity is important, because of the both potencies of its acute cytotoxicity and tumor-promoting activity in hepatocytes of animals and humans. Recently, we have reported that the expression of human hepatocyte uptake transporter OATP1B3 was critical for the selective uptake of microcystin-LR into hepatocytes and for induction of its fatal cytotoxicity. In this study, we demonstrated a novel function of microcystin-LR which induced bipotential changes including anoikis resistance and cytoskeleton reorganization to OATP1B3-transfected HEK293 cells (HEK293-OATP1B3). After exposure to microcystin-LR, HEK293-OATP1B3 cells were divided to the floating cells and remaining adherent cells. After collection and reseeding the floating cells into a fresh flask, cells were confluently proliferated (HEK293-OATP1B3-FL) under the microcystin-LR-free condition. Both the proliferated HEK293-OATP1B3-FL and remaining adherent HEK293-OATP1B3-AD cells changed the character with down- and up-regulation of E-cadherin, respectively. Additionally, these cells acquired resistance to microcystin-LR. These results suggest that microcystin-LR could be associated with not only tumor promotion, but also epithelial–mesenchymal transition-mediated cancer metastasis. Furthermore, microcystin-LR might induce the cytoskeleton reorganization be accompanied epithelial–mesenchymal transition

  7. Issues in resistance, adherence, and comparative efficacy of the single-tablet regimen combination of tenofovir, emtricitabine, and efavirenz in the management of HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebick G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel Rebick, Sharon L WalmsleyDivision of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Atripla is the first once-daily, single-tablet, triple-combination antiretroviral therapy. It is recommended for the initial treatment of the naïve patient with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 infection in all current guidelines, based on its proven efficacy in numerous head-to-head randomized clinical trials. Not only has it proven efficacy, but the fixed-dose combination, Atripla, has resulted in an improvement in adherence, quality of life, and satisfaction among naïve as well as virally suppressed patients switching from another regimen. Despite the advantages, tolerability issues can arise that are related primarily to the efavirenz component, which is known to cause central nervous side effects such as dizziness, abnormal dreams, and anxiety. Although generally self-limited, these side-effects can lead to treatment discontinuation in the short- or long-term. Based on the observation of neural tube defects in macaque models, and isolated case reports in human fetuses with first trimester exposure, it is rated as Food and Drug Administration pregnancy category D, and considered as contraindicated in the first trimester of pregnancy where alternatives are available. Given the low genetic barrier of each of the individual components, resistance remains an important issue for patients with poor adherence, but is balanced in part by the long half-life of the drugs. Transmitted resistance is described in up to 16% of newly infected patients in population surveys, and is particularly prevalent in men who have sex with men. Minority variants that may impart resistant to efavirenz are not detected with currently used HIV-1 genotype assays, but nonetheless may also be implicated in patients who fail initial treatment. Several single-tablet regimens are recently licensed or in

  8. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Fei; Fofana, Isabel; Heydmann, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies....... In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV...... genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host...

  9. Effects of adherence to antiretroviral therapy on body mass index ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S.A. Olowookere

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... ure, development of drug resistance and subsequent virological and immunological .... adherence during counseling sessions, although 95% adher- ence is sufficient .... evaluation and adherence measurement by self report.

  10. Immunocyto-adherence test for the detection of cell mediated immune response in lambs vaccinated with irradiated amphistome metacercariae (Cercariae indicae XXVI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafeez, Md.; Rao, B.V.; Krishnaswamy, S.

    1985-01-01

    Adherence of lymphocytes and peritoneal macrophages on amphistome metacercariae (Cercaries indicae XXVI) and Paramphistomum epiclitum adult flukes was observed with cells obtained from lambs immunized with either normal or irradiated amphistome metacercariae (Cercariae indicae XXVI). The cell adherence reaction around metacercariae and adult flukes was comparatively more pronounced with cells obtained from lambs immunized with 2.5 or 3 krad irradiated metacercariae in comparison to cells obtained from lambs immunized with normal of 2 krad irradiated metacercariae. Possibly better CMI response was involved in the operation of immunity against the amphistome in the former two groups of lambs. (author)

  11. Increased radiation resistance in lithium-counterdoped silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Mehta, S.

    1984-01-01

    Lithium-counterdoped n(+)p silicon solar cells are found to exhibit significantly increased radiation resistance to 1-MeV electron irradiation when compared to boron-doped n(+)p silicon solar cells. In addition to improved radiation resistance, considerable damage recovery by annealing is observed in the counterdoped cells at T less than or equal to 100 C. Deep level transient spectroscopy measurements are used to identify the defect whose removal results in the low-temperature aneal. It is suggested that the increased radiation resistance of the counterdoped cells is primarily due to interaction of the lithium with interstitial oxygen.

  12. Identification of genes associated with cisplatin resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Ping; Zhang Zhiyuan; Zhou Xiaojian; Qiu Weiliu; Chen Fangan; Chen Wantao

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, details of the molecular mechanism responsible for cisplatin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of genes related to cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Methods A cisplatin-resistant cell line, Tca/cisplatin, was established from a cisplatin-sensitive cell line, Tca8113, which was derived from moderately-differe...

  13. Mechanism of cisplatin resistance in human urothelial carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui-Min; Wang, Tsing-Cheng

    2012-05-01

    An isogenic pair of cisplatin-susceptible (NTUB1) and -resistant (NTUB1/P) human urothelial carcinoma cell lines was used to elucidate the mechanism of cisplatin resistance. The significantly lower intracellular platinum (IP) concentration, which resulted from the decreased cisplatin uptake, was found in NTUB1/P cells. The enhancement of IP concentration did not increase the susceptibility of NTUB1/P cells to cisplatin treatment. The reduction of IP concentration as well was unable to enhance the cisplatin-resistance in susceptible NTUB1 cells. This indicated that reduction of IP concentration was not the account for the development of cisplatin resistance here. Instead, the over expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, anti-oxidative heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and cell cycle regulator p16INK4 seemed to be more important for the gaining of cisplatin in these human urothelial carcinoma cell. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Planktonic and Biofilm Cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson de Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance profile of planktonic and biofilm cells of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS. Two hundred Staphylococcus spp. strains were studied, including 50 S. aureus and 150 CoNS strains (50 S. epidermidis, 20 S. haemolyticus, 20 S. warneri, 20 S. hominis, 20 S. lugdunensis, and 20 S. saprophyticus. Biofilm formation was investigated by adherence to polystyrene plates. Positive strains were submitted to the broth microdilution method to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC for planktonic and biofilm cells and the minimal bactericidal concentration for biofilm cells (MBCB. Forty-nine Staphylococcus spp. strains (14 S. aureus, 13 S. epidermidis, 13 S. saprophyticus, 3 S. haemolyticus, 1 S. hominis, 3 S. warneri, and 2 S. lugdunensis were biofilm producers. These isolates were evaluated regarding their resistance profile. Determination of planktonic cell MIC identified three (21.4% S. aureus strains that were resistant to oxacillin and six (42.8% that were resistant to erythromycin. Among the CoNS, 31 (88.6% strains were resistant to oxacillin, 14 (40% to erythromycin, 18 (51.4% to gentamicin, and 8 (22.8% to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. None of the planktonic isolates were resistant to vancomycin or linezolid. MICs were 2-, 4-, 8-, and up to 16-fold higher for biofilm cells than for planktonic cells. This observation was more common for vancomycin and erythromycin. The MBCB ranged from 8 to >256 µg/mL for oxacillin, 128 to >128 µg/mL for vancomycin, 256 to >256 µg/mL for erythromycin and gentamicin, >64 µg/mL for linezolid, and 32/608 to >32/608 µg/mL for sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. The results showed considerably higher MICs for S. aureus and CoNS biofilm cells compared to planktonic cells. Analysis of MBCM confirmed that even high concentrations of vancomycin were unable to eliminate the biofilms of S. aureus and Co

  15. Collateral methotrexate resistance in cisplatin-selected murine leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to anticancer drugs is a major cause of failure of many therapeutic protocols. A variety of mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon. The exact mechanism depends upon the drug of interest as well as the tumor type treated. While studying a cell line selected for its resistance to cisplatin we noted that the cells expressed a >25,000-fold collateral resistance to methotrexate. Given the magnitude of this resistance we elected to investigate this intriguing collateral resistance. From a series of investigations we have identified an alteration in a membrane protein of the resistant cell as compared to the sensitive cells that could be the primary mechanism of resistance. Our studies reviewed here indicate decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of a protein (molecular mass = 66 in the resistant cells, which results in little or no transfer of methotrexate from the medium into the cell. Since this is a relatively novel function for tyrosine phosphorylation, this information may provide insight into possible pharmacological approaches to modify therapeutic regimens by analyzing the status of this protein in tumor samples for a better survival of the cancer patients.

  16. Soluble interleukin 6 receptor (sIL-6R) mediates colonic tumor cell adherence to the vascular endothelium: a mechanism for metastatic initiation?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dowdall, J F

    2012-02-03

    The mechanisms by which surgery increases metastatic proliferation remain poorly characterized, although endotoxin and immunocytes play a role. Recent evidence suggests that endothelial adherence of tumor cells may be important in the formation of metastases. Soluble receptors of interleukin-6 (sIL-6R) shed by activated neutrophils exert IL-6 effects on endothelial cells, which are unresponsive under normal circumstances. This study examined the hypothesis that sIL-6R released by surgical stress increases tumor cell adherence to the endothelium. Neutrophils (PMN) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, C-reactive protein (CRP), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Soluble IL-6R release was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Colonic tumor cells transfected with green fluorescent protein and endothelial cells were exposed to sIL-6R, and tumor cell adherence and transmigration were measured by fluorescence microscopy. Basal release of sIL-6R from PMN was 44.7 +\\/- 8.2 pg\\/ml at 60 min. This was significantly increased by endotoxin and CRP (131 +\\/- 16.8 and 84.1 +\\/- 5.3, respectively; both P < 0.05). However, tumor necrosis factor-alpha did not significantly alter sIL-6R release. Endothelial and tumor cell exposure to sIL-6R increased tumor cell adherence by 71.3% within 2 h but did not significantly increase transmigration, even at 6 h. Mediators of surgical stress induce neutrophil release of a soluble receptor for IL-6 that enhances colon cancer cell endothelial adherence. Since adherence to the endothelium is now considered to be a key event in metastatic genesis, these findings have important implications for colon cancer treatment strategies.

  17. Glycosaminoglycans are involved in pathogen adherence to corneal epithelial cells differently for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz García

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The epithelium of the cornea is continuously exposed to pathogens, and adhesion to epithelial cells is regarded as an essential first step in bacterial pathogenesis. In this article, the involvement of glycosaminoglycans in the adhesion of various pathogenic bacteria to corneal epithelial cells is analyzed. All microorganisms use glycosaminoglycans as receptors, but arranged in different patterns depending on the Gram-type of the bacterium. The heparan sulfate chains of syndecans are the main receptors, though other molecular species also seem to be involved, particularly in Gram-negative bacteria. Adherence is inhibited differentially by peptides, including heparin binding sequences, indicating the participation of various groups of Gram-positive and -negative adhesins. The length of the saccharides produces a major effect, and low molecular weight chains inhibit the binding of Gram-negative microorganisms but increase the adherence of Gram-positives. Pathogen adhesion appears to occur preferentially through sulfated domains, and is very dependent on N- and 6-O-sulfation of the glucosamine residue and, to a lesser extent, 2-O sulfation of uronic acid. These data show the differential use of corneal receptors, which could facilitate the development of new anti-infective strategies.

  18. Role of free radicals in an adriamycin-resistant human small cell lung cancer cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, C.; Mulder, N H; Timmer-Bosscha, H; Zijlstra, J G; de Vries, E G

    1987-01-01

    In two Adriamycin (Adr) resistant sublines (GLC4-Adr1 and GLC4-Adr2) of a human small cell lung carcinoma cell line, GLC4, cross-resistance for radiation was found. GLC4-Adr1 has an acquired Adr resistance factor of 44 after culturing without Adr for 20 days and GLC4-Adr2, the same subline cultured

  19. CHILDREN'S ADHERENCE TO HAART ADHERENCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    han or equal IQ 2 log" and in 64% of children wirh smaller man 2 log,o decrease in viral load. Secondly, i caregivers are not well prepared for adherence issues before starting HAART, or if regimens are too onerous to follow, treatment is likely to fail. Every effort should be made to see the burden of adherence from the.

  20. Role of the plant cell wall in gravity resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki

    2015-04-01

    Gravity resistance, mechanical resistance to the gravitational force, is a principal graviresponse in plants, comparable to gravitropism. The cell wall is responsible for the final step of gravity resistance. The gravity signal increases the rigidity of the cell wall via the accumulation of its constituents, polymerization of certain matrix polysaccharides due to the suppression of breakdown, stimulation of cross-link formation, and modifications to the wall environment, in a wide range of situations from microgravity in space to hypergravity. Plants thus develop a tough body to resist the gravitational force via an increase in cell wall rigidity and the modification of growth anisotropy. The development of gravity resistance mechanisms has played an important role in the acquisition of responses to various mechanical stresses and the evolution of land plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterisation and Manipulation of Docetaxel Resistant Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Amanda J

    2011-10-07

    Abstract Background There is no effective treatment strategy for advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer. Although Docetaxel (Taxotere®) represents the most active chemotherapeutic agent it only gives a modest survival advantage with most patients eventually progressing because of inherent or acquired drug resistance. The aims of this study were to further investigate the mechanisms of resistance to Docetaxel. Three Docetaxel resistant sub-lines were generated and confirmed to be resistant to the apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects of increasing concentrations of Docetaxel. Results The resistant DU-145 R and 22RV1 R had expression of P-glycoprotein and its inhibition with Elacridar partially and totally reversed the resistant phenotype in the two cell lines respectively, which was not seen in the PC-3 resistant sublines. Resistance was also not mediated in the PC-3 cells by cellular senescence or autophagy but multiple changes in pro- and anti-apoptotic genes and proteins were demonstrated. Even though there were lower basal levels of NF-κB activity in the PC-3 D12 cells compared to the Parental PC-3, docetaxel induced higher NF-κB activity and IκB phosphorylation at 3 and 6 hours with only minor changes in the DU-145 cells. Inhibition of NF-κB with the BAY 11-7082 inhibitor reversed the resistance to Docetaxel. Conclusion This study confirms that multiple mechanisms contribute to Docetaxel resistance and the central transcription factor NF-κB plays an immensely important role in determining docetaxel-resistance which may represent an appropriate therapeutic target.

  2. Characterization of ibrutinib-sensitive and -resistant mantle lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiao; Lu, Pin; Guo, Ailin; Cheng, Shuhua; Zong, Hongliang; Martin, Peter; Coleman, Morton; Wang, Y Lynn

    2014-09-01

    Ibrutinib inhibits Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK), a key component of early B-cell receptor (BCR) signalling pathways. A multicentre phase 2 trial of ibrutinib in patients with relapsed/refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) demonstrated a remarkable response rate. However, approximately one-third of patients have primary resistance to the drug while other patients appear to lose response and develop secondary resistance. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying ibrutinib sensitivity is of paramount importance. In this study, we investigated cell lines and primary MCL cells that display differential sensitivity to ibrutinib. We found that the primary cells display a higher BTK activity than normal B cells and MCL cells show differential sensitivity to BTK inhibition. Genetic knockdown of BTK inhibits the growth, survival and proliferation of ibrutinib-sensitive but not resistant MCL cell lines, suggesting that ibrutinib acts through BTK to produce its anti-tumour activities. Interestingly, inhibition of ERK1/2 and AKT, but not BTK phosphorylation per se, correlates well with cellular response to BTK inhibition in cell lines as well as in primary tumours. Our study suggests that, to prevent primary resistance or to overcome secondary resistance to BTK inhibition, a combinatory strategy that targets multiple components or multiple pathways may represent the most effective approach. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Chinese hamster pleiotropic multidrug-resistant cells are not radioresistant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.B.; Gamson, J.; Russo, A.; Friedman, N.; DeGraff, W.; Carmichael, J.; Glatstein, E.

    1988-01-01

    The inherent cellular radiosensitivity of a Chinese hamster ovary pleiotropic cell line that is multidrug resistant (CHRC5) was compared to that of its parental cell line (AuxB1). Radiation survival curve parameters n and D0 were 4.5 and 1.1 Gy, respectively, for the CHRC5 line and 5.0 and 1.2 Gy, respectively, for the parental line. Thus, the inherent radiosensitivity of the two lines was similar even though key intracellular free radical scavenging and detoxifying systems employing glutathione, glutathione transferase, and catalase produced enzyme levels that were 2.0-, 1.9-, and 1.9-fold higher, respectively, in the drug-resistant cell line. Glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine resulted in the same extent of aerobic radiosensitization in both lines (approximately 10%). Incorporation of iododeoxyuridine into cellular DNA sensitized both cell lines to radiation. These studies indicate that pleiotropic drug resistance does not necessarily confer radiation resistance

  4. Application Of Artificial Neural Networks In Modeling Of Manufactured Front Metallization Contact Resistance For Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musztyfaga-Staszuk M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of artificial neural networks for prediction contact resistance of front metallization for silicon solar cells. The influence of the obtained front electrode features on electrical properties of solar cells was estimated. The front electrode of photovoltaic cells was deposited using screen printing (SP method and next to manufactured by two methods: convectional (1. co-fired in an infrared belt furnace and unconventional (2. Selective Laser Sintering. Resistance of front electrodes solar cells was investigated using Transmission Line Model (TLM. Artificial neural networks were obtained with the use of Statistica Neural Network by Statsoft. Created artificial neural networks makes possible the easy modelling of contact resistance of manufactured front metallization and allows the better selection of production parameters. The following technological recommendations for the screen printing connected with co-firing and selective laser sintering technology such as optimal paste composition, morphology of the silicon substrate, co-firing temperature and the power and scanning speed of the laser beam to manufacture the front electrode of silicon solar cells were experimentally selected in order to obtain uniformly melted structure well adhered to substrate, of a small front electrode substrate joint resistance value. The prediction possibility of contact resistance of manufactured front metallization is valuable for manufacturers and constructors. It allows preserving the customers’ quality requirements and bringing also measurable financial advantages.

  5. CD133 expression in chemo-resistant Ewing sarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovar Heinrich

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some human cancers demonstrate cellular hierarchies in which tumor-initiating cancer stem cells generate progeny cells with reduced tumorigenic potential. This cancer stem cell population is proposed to be a source of therapy-resistant and recurrent disease. Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFT are highly aggressive cancers in which drug-resistant, relapsed disease remains a significant clinical problem. Recently, the cell surface protein CD133 was identified as a putative marker of tumor-initiating cells in ESFT. We evaluated ESFT tumors and cell lines to determine if high levels of CD133 are associated with drug resistance. Methods Expression of the CD133-encoding PROM1 gene was determined by RT-PCR in ESFT tumors and cell lines. CD133 protein expression was assessed by western blot, FACS and/or immunostaining. Cell lines were FACS-sorted into CD133+ and CD133- fractions and proliferation, colony formation in soft agar, and in vivo tumorigenicity compared. Chemosensitivity was measured using MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxy-methoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium assays. Results PROM1 expression was either absent or extremely low in most tumors. However, PROM1 was highly over-expressed in 4 of 48 cases. Two of the 4 patients with PROM1 over-expressing tumors rapidly succumbed to primary drug-resistant disease and two are long-term, event-free survivors. The expression of PROM1 in ESFT cell lines was similarly heterogeneous. The frequency of CD133+ cells ranged from 2-99% and, with one exception, no differences in the chemoresistance or tumorigenicity of CD133+ and CD133- cell fractions were detected. Importantly, however, the STA-ET-8.2 cell line was found to retain a cellular hierarchy in which relatively chemo-resistant, tumorigenic CD133+ cells gave rise to relatively chemo-sensitive, less tumorigenic, CD133- progeny. Conclusions Up to 10% of ESFT express high levels of PROM1. In some tumors and cell

  6. Pluripotent cells display enhanced resistance to mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Cooper

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent cells have been reported to exhibit lower frequencies of point mutations and higher levels of DNA repair than differentiated cells. This predicts that pluripotent cells are less susceptible to mutagenic exposures than differentiated cells. To test this prediction, we used a lacI mutation-reporter transgene system to assess the frequency of point mutations in multiple lines of mouse pluripotent embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent cells, as well as in multiple lines of differentiated fibroblast cells, before and after exposure to a moderate dose of the mutagen, methyl methanesulfonate. We also measured levels of key enzymes in the base excision repair (BER pathway in each cell line before and after exposure to the mutagen. Our results confirm that pluripotent cells normally maintain lower frequencies of point mutations than differentiated cells, and show that differentiated cells exhibit a large increase in mutation frequency following a moderate mutagenic exposure, whereas pluripotent cells subjected to the same exposure show no increase in mutations. This result likely reflects the higher levels of BER proteins detectable in pluripotent cells prior to exposure and supports our thesis that maintenance of enhanced genetic integrity is a fundamental characteristic of pluripotent cells.

  7. Estimation of contact resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lianhong; Liu, Ying; Song, Haimin; Wang, Shuxin [School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University, 92 Weijin Road, Nankai District, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhou, Yuanyuan; Hu, S. Jack [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125 (United States)

    2006-11-22

    The contact resistance between the bipolar plate (BPP) and the gas diffusion layer (GDL) is an important factor contributing to the power loss in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. At present there is still not a well-developed method to estimate such contact resistance. This paper proposes two effective methods for estimating the contact resistance between the BPP and the GDL based on an experimental contact resistance-pressure constitutive relation. The constitutive relation was obtained by experimentally measuring the contact resistance between the GDL and a flat plate of the same material and processing conditions as the BPP under stated contact pressure. In the first method, which was a simplified prediction, the contact area and contact pressure between the BPP and the GDL were analyzed with a simple geometrical relation and the contact resistance was obtained by the contact resistance-pressure constitutive relation. In the second method, the contact area and contact pressure between the BPP and GDL were analyzed using FEM and the contact resistance was computed for each contact element according to the constitutive relation. The total contact resistance was then calculated by considering all contact elements in parallel. The influence of load distribution on contact resistance was also investigated. Good agreement was demonstrated between experimental results and predictions by both methods. The simplified prediction method provides an efficient approach to estimating the contact resistance in PEM fuel cells. The proposed methods for estimating the contact resistance can be useful in modeling and optimizing the assembly process to improve the performance of PEM fuel cells. (author)

  8. Effect of estrogens on bacterial adherence to HeLa cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugarman, B; Epps, L R

    1982-01-01

    Incubating confluent cell culture HeLa cells for 18 h with increasing concentrations of estrogens progressively enhanced the subsequent attachment of a variety of radiolabeled bacteria to the HeLa cells. This effect was not caused by other hormones and was not produced by 1-h incubations of HeLa cells or bacteria with hormones. Estrogens did not similarly affect two other receptor cell lines studied. The addition of metabolic inhibitors showed that this effect of estrogens on HeLa cells was e...

  9. Constrained Adherable Area of Nanotopographic Surfaces Promotes Cell Migration through the Regulation of Focal Adhesion via Focal Adhesion Kinase/Rac1 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jiwon; Choi, Andrew; Kim, Hyung Woo; Yoon, Hyungjun; Park, Sang Min; Tsai, Chia-Hung Dylan; Kaneko, Makoto; Kim, Dong Sung

    2018-05-02

    Cell migration is crucial in physiological and pathological processes such as embryonic development and wound healing; such migration is strongly guided by the surrounding nanostructured extracellular matrix. Previous studies have extensively studied the cell migration on anisotropic nanotopographic surfaces; however, only a few studies have reported cell migration on isotropic nanotopographic surfaces. We herein, for the first time, propose a novel concept of adherable area on cell migration using isotropic nanopore surfaces with sufficient nanopore depth by adopting a high aspect ratio. As the pore size of the nanopore surface was controlled to 200, 300, and 400 nm in a fixed center-to-center distance of 480 nm, it produced 86, 68, and 36% of adherable area, respectively, on the fabricated surface. A meticulous investigation of the cell migration in response to changes in the constrained adherable area of the nanotopographic surface showed 1.4-, 1.5-, and 1.6-fold increase in migration speeds and a 1.4-, 2-, and 2.5-fold decrease in the number of focal adhesions as the adherable area was decreased to 86, 68, and 36%, respectively. Furthermore, a strong activation of FAK/Rac1 signaling was observed to be involved in the promoted cell migration. These results suggest that the reduced adherable area promotes cell migration through decreasing the FA formation, which in turn upregulates FAK/Rac1 activation. The findings in this study can be utilized to control the cell migration behaviors, which is a powerful tool in the research fields involving cell migration such as promoting wound healing and tissue repair.

  10. Poliovirus Mutants Resistant to Neutralization with Soluble Cell Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Gerardo; Peters, David; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    1990-12-01

    Poliovirus mutants resistant to neutralization with soluble cellular receptor were isolated. Replication of soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants was blocked by a monoclonal antibody directed against the HeLa cell receptor for poliovirus, indicating that the mutants use this receptor to enter cells. The srr mutants showed reduced binding to HeLa cells and cell membranes. However, the reduced binding phenotype did not have a major impact on viral replication, as judged by plaque size and one-step growth curves. These results suggest that the use of soluble receptors as antiviral agents could lead to the selection of neutralization-resistant mutants that are able to bind cell surface receptors, replicate, and cause disease.

  11. NF-κB signaling is activated and confers resistance to apoptosis in three-dimensionally cultured EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Yuji; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Nakamura, Yoshiyasu; Yoshihara, Mitsuyo; Matsukuma, Shoichi; Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► EGFR-mutant cells in 3D culture resist EGFR inhibition compared with suspended cells. ► Degradation of IκB and activation of NF-κB are observed in 3D-cultured cells. ► Inhibiting NF-κB enhances the efficacy of the EGFR inhibitor in 3D-cultured cells. -- Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells in suspension undergo apoptosis to a greater extent than adherent cells in a monolayer when EGFR autophosphorylation is inhibited by EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This suggests that cell adhesion to a culture dish may activate an anti-apoptotic signaling pathway other than the EGFR pathway. Since the microenvironment of cells cultured in a monolayer are substantially different to that of cells existing in three-dimension (3D) in vivo, we assessed whether two EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, HCC827 and H1975, were more resistant to EGFR TKI-induced apoptosis when cultured in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) as compared with in suspension. The ECM-adherent EGFR-mutant cells in 3D were significantly less sensitive to treatment with WZ4002, an EGFR TKI, than the suspended cells. Further, a marked degradation of IκBα, the inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, was observed only in the 3D-cultured cells, leading to an increase in the activation of NF-κB. Moreover, the inhibition of NF-κB with pharmacological inhibitors enhanced EGFR TKI-induced apoptosis in 3D-cultured EGFR-mutant cells. These results suggest that inhibition of NF-κB signaling would render ECM-adherent EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells in vivo more susceptible to EGFR TKI-induced cell death.

  12. A family of cell-adhering peptides homologous to fibrinogen C-termini

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy-Beladev, Liron; Levdansky, Lilia; Gaberman, Elena; Friedler, Assaf; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Cell-adhesive sequences homologous to fibrinogen C-termini exist in other proteins. → The extended homologous cell-adhesive C-termini peptides family is termed Haptides. → In membrane-like environment random coiled Haptides adopt a helical conformation. → Replacing positively charged residues with alanine reduces Haptides activity. -- Abstract: A family of cell-adhesive peptides homologous to sequences on different chains of fibrinogen was investigated. These homologous peptides, termed Haptides, include the peptides Cβ, preCγ, and CαE, corresponding to sequences on the C-termini of fibrinogen chains β, γ, and αE, respectively. Haptides do not affect cell survival and rate of proliferation of the normal cell types tested. The use of new sensitive assays of cell adhesion clearly demonstrated the ability of Haptides, bound to inert matrices, to mediate attachment of different matrix-dependent cell types including normal fibroblasts, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells. Here we present new active Haptides bearing homologous sequences derived from the C-termini of other proteins, such as angiopoietin 1 and 2, tenascins C and X, and microfibril-associated glycoprotein-4. The cell adhesion properties of all the Haptides were found to be associated mainly with their 11 N-terminal residues. Mutated preCγ peptides revealed that positively charged residues account for their attachment effect. These results suggest a mechanism of direct electrostatic interaction of Haptides with the cell membrane. The extended Haptides family may be applied in modulating adhesion of cells to scaffolds for tissue regeneration and for enhancement of nanoparticulate transfection into cells.

  13. Slow-Adhering Stem Cells Derived from Injured Skeletal Muscle Have Improved Regenerative Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    stress urinary incontinence . Urology 2006, 68:449–454 15. Chermansky CJ, Tarin T, Kwon DD, Jankowski RJ, Cannon TW, de Groat WC, Huard J, Chancellor...from control noninjured muscle. These data suggest that traumatic injury may modify stem cell characteristics through trophic factors and improve the...alter the microenvironment of resident muscle cells (ie, stimu- lating cell dedifferentiation on various trophic factors )20,21 and result in profound

  14. Optimization of proximity ligation assay (PLA) for detection of protein interactions and fusion proteins in non-adherent cells: application to pre-B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaize, Lydie; Jakobczyk, Hélène; Rio, Anne-Gaëlle; Gandemer, Virginie; Troadec, Marie-Bérengère

    2017-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities, including chromosomal translocations, are described for many hematological malignancies. From the clinical perspective, detection of chromosomal abnormalities is relevant not only for diagnostic and treatment purposes but also for prognostic risk assessment. From the translational research perspective, the identification of fusion proteins and protein interactions has allowed crucial breakthroughs in understanding the pathogenesis of malignancies and consequently major achievements in targeted therapy. We describe the optimization of the Proximity Ligation Assay (PLA) to ascertain the presence of fusion proteins, and protein interactions in non-adherent pre-B cells. PLA is an innovative method of protein-protein colocalization detection by molecular biology that combines the advantages of microscopy with the advantages of molecular biology precision, enabling detection of protein proximity theoretically ranging from 0 to 40 nm. We propose an optimized PLA procedure. We overcome the issue of maintaining non-adherent hematological cells by traditional cytocentrifugation and optimized buffers, by changing incubation times, and modifying washing steps. Further, we provide convincing negative and positive controls, and demonstrate that optimized PLA procedure is sensitive to total protein level. The optimized PLA procedure allows the detection of fusion proteins and protein interactions on non-adherent cells. The optimized PLA procedure described here can be readily applied to various non-adherent hematological cells, from cell lines to patients' cells. The optimized PLA protocol enables detection of fusion proteins and their subcellular expression, and protein interactions in non-adherent cells. Therefore, the optimized PLA protocol provides a new tool that can be adopted in a wide range of applications in the biological field.

  15. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaro, Christopher, E-mail: cchiaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Lazarova, Darina L., E-mail: dlazarova@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Bordonaro, Michael, E-mail: mbordonaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulates butyrate's effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulation of butyrate's effects differ by cell context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G{sub 1} to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that

  16. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiaro, Christopher; Lazarova, Darina L.; Bordonaro, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. ► Tcf3 modulates butyrate’s effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. ► Tcf3 modulation of butyrate’s effects differ by cell context. ► Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. ► Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G 1 to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that prevent or reverse butyrate resistance.

  17. Overcoming reprogramming resistance of Fanconi anemia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lars U. W.; Milsom, Michael D.; Harris, Chad E.; Vyas, Rutesh; Brumme, Kristina M.; Parmar, Kalindi; Moreau, Lisa A.; Schambach, Axel; Park, In-Hyun; London, Wendy B.; Strait, Kelly; Schlaeger, Thorsten; DeVine, Alexander L.; Grassman, Elke; D'Andrea, Alan; Daley, George Q.

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive syndrome characterized by progressive fatal BM failure and chromosomal instability. FA cells have inactivating mutations in a signaling pathway that is critical for maintaining genomic integrity and protecting cells from the DNA damage caused by cross-linking agents. Transgenic expression of the implicated genes corrects the phenotype of hematopoietic cells, but previous attempts at gene therapy have failed largely because of inadequate numbers of hematopoietic stem cells available for gene correction. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) constitute an alternate source of autologous cells that are amenable to ex vivo expansion, genetic correction, and molecular characterization. In the present study, we demonstrate that reprogramming leads to activation of the FA pathway, increased DNA double-strand breaks, and senescence. We also demonstrate that defects in the FA DNA-repair pathway decrease the reprogramming efficiency of murine and human primary cells. FA pathway complementation reduces senescence and restores the reprogramming efficiency of somatic FA cells to normal levels. Disease-specific iPSCs derived in this fashion maintain a normal karyotype and are capable of hematopoietic differentiation. These data define the role of the FA pathway in reprogramming and provide a strategy for future translational applications of patient-specific FA iPSCs. PMID:22371882

  18. DNA from radiation resistant human tumor cells transfers resistance to NIH/3T3 cells with varying degrees of penetrance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasid, U.; Dritschilo, A.; Weichselbaum, R.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that clinical radiation resistance may correlate with in vitro radiation survival parameters. Specifically, they isolated several cell lines from radioresistant head and neck carcinomas with D/sub 0/ values greater than 2 Gy. The authors co-transfected DNA from cell line SQ2OB (D/sub 0/ = 2.4 Gy) with the rhoSVNeO plasmid into NIH/3T3 cells (D/sub 0/ = 1.7 Gy). Antibiotic G418 resistant, transformed clones were isolated and confirmed by Southern blotting to contain human alu, as well as rhoSVNeO sequences. Screening for radiation resistance with 8Gy (Cs-137) revealed that 3 of 4 tested hybrid clones show a radiation survival intermediate between NIH/3T3 and SQ2OB. This suggests that radiation resistance is a dominant, transfectable phenotype of mammalian cells and can be expressed in more sensitive cells. Karyotyping of resistant hybrid clones shows the presence of double minute chromosomes. Secondary transfection results and experiments to clone the genetic factors responsible for radiation resistance are in progress and results will be reported

  19. PHA-induced cytotoxicity of human lymphocytes against adherent hela-cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huges-Law, G.; de Gast, G. C.; The, T. Hauw

    The conditions for a phytohaemagglutinin(PHA)-induced cytotoxicity test of human peripheral blood lymphocytes were investigated. [3H]thymidine prelabelled HeLa cells were used as target cells. Stimulation with 10 μl PHA/ml during 24 h gave the best measure of lymphocyte cytotoxic capacity.

  20. Force fluctuations of non-adherent cells: effects of osmotic pressure and motor inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Samaneh; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Squires, Todd M.

    Cells sense their micro-environment through biochemical and mechanical interactions. They can respond to stimuli by undergoing shape- and possibly volume changes. Key components in determining the mechanical response of a cell are the viscoelastic properties of the actomyosin cortex, effective surface tension, and the osmotic pressure. We use custom-designed microfluidic chambers with integrated hydrogel micro windows to be able to rapidly change solution conditions for cells without active mixing, stirring or diluting of fluid. We use biochemical inhibitors and different osmolytes and investigate the time-dependent response of individual cells. Using a dual optical trap makes it possible to probe viscoelasticity of suspended cells by active and passive microrheology to quantify the response to the various stimuli. SFB 937, Germany.

  1. Canine osteosarcoma cells exhibit resistance to aurora kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, C M; Pozniak, J; Scott, M C; Ito, D; Gorden, B H; Graef, A J; Modiano, J F

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated the effect of Aurora kinase inhibitors AZD1152 and VX680 on canine osteosarcoma cells. Cytotoxicity was seen in all four cell lines; however, half-maximal inhibitory concentrations were significantly higher than in human leukaemia and canine lymphoma cells. AZD1152 reduced Aurora kinase B phosphorylation, indicating resistance was not because of failure of target recognition. Efflux mediated by ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters is one known mechanism of resistance against these drugs and verapamil enhanced AZD1152-induced apoptosis; however, these transporters were only expressed by a small percentage of cells in each line and the effects of verapamil were modest, suggesting other mechanisms contribute to resistance. Our results indicate that canine osteosarcoma cells are resistant to Aurora kinase inhibitors and suggest that these compounds are unlikely to be useful as single agents for this disease. Further investigation of these resistance mechanisms and the potential utility of Aurora kinase inhibitors in multi-agent protocols is warranted. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Culicoides antigen extract stimulates equine blood mononuclear (BMN) cell proliferation and the release of eosinophil adherence-inducing factor(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckelvie, J; Foster, A P; Hamblin, A S; Cunningham, F M

    2001-04-01

    Intradermal injection of a Culicoides antigen extract (CAgX) induces T lymphocyte and eosinophil accumulation in the skin of horses with sweet itch. Blood mononuclear (BMN) cells from normal ponies proliferate when stimulated by mitogen (phytohaemagglutinin, PHA) or antigen (tetanus toxoid, TT) and, as shown here, release soluble factor(s) that induce eosinophil adherence. CAgX also caused concentration dependent proliferation of BMN cells from sweet itch and normal ponies [stimulation index: 29 (13) and 17 (7) for BMN cells from sweet itch and normal ponies, respectively during the active phase of disease; 4 microg protein ml(-1)CAgX; 168 h]. A heat labile factor(s) which caused eosinophil adherence was also released [sweet itch ponies: 6.0 (1.6) per cent adherence versus 1.3 (0.4) per cent; normal ponies: 6.6 (0.5) per cent adherence versus 0.9 (0.1) per cent for supernatants from CAgX (4 microg protein ml(-1); 48 hours) stimulated versus unstimulated BMN cells, respectively]. These results suggest that soluble proteins released from T lymphocytes could affect eosinophil function in the lesional skin of sweet itch horses. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  3. Adherence to Mediterranean-style dietary pattern and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a case-control study in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    The benefit of adherence to a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern in relation to the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has not been investigated among non-Mediterranean high-risk populations. The objective of the present study was to examine the association of compliance with the Med...

  4. Plasmodium falciparum parasites expressing pregnancy-specific variant surface antigens adhere strongly to the choriocarcinoma cell line BeWo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Rikke N; Megnekou, Rosette; Lundquist, Maja

    2006-01-01

    Placenta-sequestering Plasmodium falciparum parasites causing pregnancy-associated malaria express pregnancy-specific variant surface antigens (VSA(PAM)). We report here that VSA(PAM)-expressing patient isolates adhere strongly to the choriocarcinoma cell line BeWo and that the BeWo line can...... be used to efficiently select for VSA(PAM) expression in vitro....

  5. Effect of yttrium on the oxide scale adherence of pre-oxidized silicon-containing heat-resistant alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Jingbo; Gao Yimin; Shen Yudi; Yang Fang; Yi Dawei; Ye Zhaozhong; Liang Long; Du Yingqian

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → AE experiment shows yttrium has a beneficial effect on the pre-oxidized HP40 alloy. → Yttrium facilitates the formation of internal oxide after 10 h of oxidation. → Internal oxide changes the rupture behaviour of the oxide scale. → Twins form in the internal oxide and improve the binding strength of the scale. - Abstract: This paper investigates the effect of the rare earth element yttrium on the rupture behaviour of the oxide scale on the silicon-containing heat-resistant alloy during cooling. After 10 h of oxidation, yttrium is found to facilitate the formation of internal oxides (silica) at the scale-matrix interface. Due to the twinning observed by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in silica, the critical strain value for the scale failure can be dramatically improved, and the formation of cracks at the scale-matrix interface is inhibited.

  6. Reversible adaptive plasticity: A mechanism for neuroblastoma cell heterogeneity and chemo-resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina eChakrabarti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe a novel form of tumor cell plasticity characterized by reversible adaptive plasticity in murine and human neuroblastoma. Two cellular phenotypes were defined by their ability to exhibit adhered, anchorage dependent (AD or sphere forming, anchorage independent (AI growth. The tumor cells could transition back and forth between the two phenotypes and the transition was dependent on the culture conditions. Both cell phenotypes exhibited stem-like features such as expression of nestin, self-renewal capacity and mesenchymal differentiation potential. The AI tumorspheres were found to be more resistant to chemotherapy and proliferated slower in vitro compared to the AD cells. Identification of specific molecular markers like MAP2, β-catenin and PDGFRβ enabled us to characterize and observe both phenotypes in established mouse tumors. Irrespective of the phenotype originally implanted in mice, tumors grown in vivo show phenotypic heterogeneity in molecular marker signatures and are indistinguishable in growth or histologic appearance. Similar molecular marker heterogeneity was demonstrated in primary human tumor specimens. Chemotherapy or growth factor receptor inhibition slowed tumor growth in mice and promoted initial loss of AD or AI heterogeneity, respectively. Simultaneous targeting of both phenotypes led to further tumor growth delay with emergence of new unique phenotypes. Our results demonstrate that neuroblastoma cells are plastic, dynamic and may optimize their ability to survive by changing their phenotype. Phenotypic switching appears to be an adaptive mechanism to unfavorable selection pressure and could explain the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of neuroblastoma.

  7. Reversible Adaptive Plasticity: A Mechanism for Neuroblastoma Cell Heterogeneity and Chemo-Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarti, Lina; Abou-Antoun, Thamara; Vukmanovic, Stanislav; Sandler, Anthony D., E-mail: asandler@childrensnational.org [The Joseph E. Robert Center for Surgical Care, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); The Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-08-02

    We describe a novel form of tumor cell plasticity characterized by reversible adaptive plasticity in murine and human neuroblastoma. Two cellular phenotypes were defined by their ability to exhibit adhered, anchorage dependent (AD) or sphere forming, anchorage independent (AI) growth. The tumor cells could transition back and forth between the two phenotypes and the transition was dependent on the culture conditions. Both cell phenotypes exhibited stem-like features such as expression of nestin, self-renewal capacity, and mesenchymal differentiation potential. The AI tumorspheres were found to be more resistant to chemotherapy and proliferated slower in vitro compared to the AD cells. Identification of specific molecular markers like MAP2, β-catenin, and PDGFRβ enabled us to characterize and observe both phenotypes in established mouse tumors. Irrespective of the phenotype originally implanted in mice, tumors grown in vivo show phenotypic heterogeneity in molecular marker signatures and are indistinguishable in growth or histologic appearance. Similar molecular marker heterogeneity was demonstrated in primary human tumor specimens. Chemotherapy or growth factor receptor inhibition slowed tumor growth in mice and promoted initial loss of AD or AI heterogeneity, respectively. Simultaneous targeting of both phenotypes led to further tumor growth delay with emergence of new unique phenotypes. Our results demonstrate that neuroblastoma cells are plastic, dynamic, and may optimize their ability to survive by changing their phenotype. Phenotypic switching appears to be an adaptive mechanism to unfavorable selection pressure and could explain the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of neuroblastoma.

  8. Cell Wall-Associated Protein Antigens of Streptococcus salivarius: Purification, Properties, and Function in Adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Weerkamp, Anton H.; Jacobs, Ton

    1982-01-01

    Three cell wall-associated protein antigens (antigens b, c, and d) were isolated from mutanolysin-solubilized cell walls of Streptococcus salivarius HB and purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and immunoadsorption chromatography. Antigens b and c were also isolated from culture supernatants. Antigen b consisted of more than 80% protein and had an apparent molecular weight as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel el...

  9. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Busschots

    2015-01-01

    • The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3 was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01 and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01 cell lines.

  10. Targeting therapy-resistant cancer stem cells by hyperthermia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oei, A L; Vriend, L E M; Krawczyk, P M

    2017-01-01

    Eradication of all malignant cells is the ultimate but challenging goal of anti-cancer treatment; most traditional clinically-available approaches fail because there are cells in a tumour that either escape therapy or become therapy-resistant. A subpopulation of cancer cells, the cancer stem cells...... are limited. Here, we argue that hyperthermia - a therapeutic approach based on local heating of a tumour - is potentially beneficial for targeting CSCs in solid tumours. First, hyperthermia has been described to target cells in hypoxic and nutrient-deprived tumour areas where CSCs reside and ionising...

  11. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, David M; Benoit, Michael R; Nelson, Emily S; Hammond, Timmothy G

    2004-03-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  12. Dragon (RGMb) induces oxaliplatin resistance in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ying; Huang, Xiao-Xiao; Chen, Guo-Bin; Wang, Ying; Zhi, Qiang; Liu, Yuan-Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Li-Fen; Yang, Bing; Xiao, Chuan-Xing; Xing, Hui-Qin; Ren, Jian-Lin; Xia, Yin; Guleng, Bayasi

    2016-07-26

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers and a major cause of cancer mortality. Chemotherapy resistance remains a major challenge for treating advanced CRC. Therefore, the identification of targets that induce drug resistance is a priority for the development of novel agents to overcome resistance. Dragon (also known as RGMb) is a member of the repulsive guidance molecule (RGM) family. We previously showed that Dragon expression increases with CRC progression in human patients. In the present study, we found that Dragon inhibited apoptosis and increased viability of CMT93 and HCT116 cells in the presence of oxaliplatin. Dragon induced resistance of xenograft tumor to oxaliplatinin treatment in mice. Mechanistically, Dragon inhibited oxaliplatin-induced JNK and p38 MAPK activation, and caspase-3 and PARP cleavages. Our results indicate that Dragon may be a novel target that induces drug resistance in CRC.

  13. Sialidases affect the host cell adherence and epsilon toxin-induced cytotoxicity of Clostridium perfringens type D strain CN3718.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihong Li

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens type B or D isolates, which cause enterotoxemias or enteritis in livestock, produce epsilon toxin (ETX. ETX is exceptionally potent, earning it a listing as a CDC class B select toxin. Most C. perfringens strains also express up to three different sialidases, although the possible contributions of those enzymes to type B or D pathogenesis remain unclear. Type D isolate CN3718 was found to carry two genes (nanI and nanJ encoding secreted sialidases and one gene (nanH encoding a cytoplasmic sialidase. Construction in CN3718 of single nanI, nanJ and nanH null mutants, as well as a nanI/nanJ double null mutant and a triple sialidase null mutant, identified NanI as the major secreted sialidase of this strain. Pretreating MDCK cells with NanI sialidase, or with culture supernatants of BMC206 (an isogenic CN3718 etx null mutant that still produces sialidases enhanced the subsequent binding and cytotoxic effects of purified ETX. Complementation of BMC207 (an etx/nanH/nanI/nanJ null mutant showed this effect is mainly attributable to NanI production. Contact between BMC206 and certain mammalian cells (e.g., enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells resulted in more rapid sialidase production and this effect involved increased transcription of BMC206 nanI gene. BMC206 was shown to adhere to some (e.g. Caco-2 cells, but not all mammalian cells, and this effect was dependent upon sialidase, particularly NanI, expression. Finally, the sialidase activity of NanI (but not NanJ or NanH could be enhanced by trypsin. Collectively these in vitro findings suggest that, during type D disease originating in the intestines, trypsin may activate NanI, which (in turn could contribute to intestinal colonization by C. perfringens type D isolates and also increase ETX action.

  14. Tumourigenicity and radiation resistance of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Filippo P; Horsman, Michael R; Kassem, Moustapha; Overgaard, Jens; Safwat, Akmal

    2012-05-01

    Cancer stem cells are believed to be more radiation resistant than differentiated tumour cells of the same origin. It is not known, however, whether normal nontransformed adult stem cells share the same radioresistance as their cancerous counterpart. Nontumourigenic (TERT4) and tumourigenic (TRET20) cell lines, from an immortalised mesenchymal stem cell line, were grown in culture prior to irradiation and gene expression analysis. Radiation resistance was measured using a clonogenic assay. Differences in gene expression between the two cell lines, both under nontreated and irradiated conditions, were assessed with microarrays (Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST array). The cellular functions affected by the altered gene expressions were assessed through gene pathway mapping (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis). Based on the clonogenic assay the nontumourigenic cell line was found to be more sensitive to radiation than the tumourigenic cell line. Using the exon chips, 297 genes were found altered between untreated samples of the cell lines whereas only 16 genes responded to radiation treatment. Among the genes with altered expression between the untreated samples were PLAU, PLAUR, TIMP3, MMP1 and LOX. The pathway analysis based on the alteration between the untreated samples indicated cancer and connective tissue disorders. This study has shown possible common genetic events linking tumourigenicity and radiation response. The PLAU and PLAUR genes are involved in apoptosis evasion while the genes TIMP3, MMP1 and LOX are involved in regulation of the surrounding matrix. The first group may contribute to the difference in radiation resistance observed and the latter could be a major contributor to the tumourigenic capabilities by degrading the intercellular matrix. These results also indicate that cancer stem cells are more radiation resistant than stem cells of the same origin.

  15. Breast cancer resistance protein is localized at the plasma membrane in mitoxantrone- and topotecan-resistant cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, GL; Maliepaard, M; Pijnenborg, ACLM; van Gastelen, MA; Schroeijers, AB; Allen, JD; Ross, DD; van der Valk, P; Dalton, WS; Schellens, JHM; Scheper, RJ; de Jong, MC

    2000-01-01

    Tumor cells may display a multidrug resistant phenotype by overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporters such as multidrug resistance (,MDR1) P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The presence of BCRP has thus far been reported

  16. Glycolysis is governed by growth regime and simple enzyme regulation in adherent MDCK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehberg, Markus; Ritter, Joachim B; Reichl, Udo

    2014-10-01

    Due to its vital importance in the supply of cellular pathways with energy and precursors, glycolysis has been studied for several decades regarding its capacity and regulation. For a systems-level understanding of the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell metabolism, we couple a segregated cell growth model published earlier with a structured model of glycolysis, which is based on relatively simple kinetics for enzymatic reactions of glycolysis, to explain the pathway dynamics under various cultivation conditions. The structured model takes into account in vitro enzyme activities, and links glycolysis with pentose phosphate pathway and glycogenesis. Using a single parameterization, metabolite pool dynamics during cell cultivation, glucose limitation and glucose pulse experiments can be consistently reproduced by considering the cultivation history of the cells. Growth phase-dependent glucose uptake together with cell-specific volume changes generate high intracellular metabolite pools and flux rates to satisfy the cellular demand during growth. Under glucose limitation, the coordinated control of glycolytic enzymes re-adjusts the glycolytic flux to prevent the depletion of glycolytic intermediates. Finally, the model's predictive power supports the design of more efficient bioprocesses.

  17. Colorectal cancer cell lines made resistant to SN38-and Oxaliplatin: Roles of altered ion transporter function in resistance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandra, Christensen; Jensen, Niels Frank; Stoeckel, Johanne Danmark

    2013-01-01

    , respectively. Studies are ongoing to assess glutamate uptake in parental and resistant CRC cells and the effect of inhibition/knockdown of SLC1A1 and -3 on SN38- and Oxp resistance. In conclusion, SN38-and Oxp-resistance in CRC cells is associated with SLC1A1 and -3 dysregulation. As these transporters have...

  18. Anti-adherence potential of Enterococcus durans cells and its cell-free supernatant on plastic and stainless steel against foodborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amel, Ait Meddour; Farida, Bendali; Djamila, Sadoun

    2015-07-01

    It is demonstrated that numerous bacteria are able to attach to surfaces of equipment used for food handling or processing. In this study, a strain of Enterococcus durans, originally isolated from a milking machine surface, was firstly studied for its biofilm formation potential on plastic and stainless steel supports. The strain was found to be a biofilm producer either at 25, 30 or 37 °C on polystyrene microtitre plates, with a best adherence level observed at 25 °C. En. durans showed a strong adhesion to stainless steel AISI-304. Antibacterial and anti-adherence activities of En. durans were tested against four foodborne pathogens (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Listeria innocua CLIP 74915) which were shown as biofilm producers on both plastic and stainless steel. En. durans cells and cell-free culture supernatant showed a significant (P < 0.05) inhibition potential of the pathogens either on solid media or in broth co-cultures. Characterization of the antibacterial substances indicated their proteinaceous nature which assigned them most probably to bacteriocins group.

  19. Role of Porphyromonas gingivalis’s peptidylarginine deiminase in multispecies biofilm formation and bacterial adherence to host cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliko, Ardita; Kamińska, Marta; Bergum, Brith; Hellvard, Annelie; Jonsson, Roland; Mydel, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porphyromonas gingivalis’s peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD) is one of the most unique virulence factors in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, as well as one of the possible links between this chronic inflammatory disease and other disorders, like rheumatoid arthritis. However, it is yet unclear how it is involved in the infection of epithelial cells, therefore the aim of this study was to examine whether PPAD enzyme has an effect on the formation of biofilm by P. gingivalis in consortium with four other bacteria species, and the bacterial adhesion and invasion of gingival keratinocytes and their subsequent response. Using PPAD-deficient strains, we have demonstrated that its activity has no effect on P. gingivalis’s ability to form a biofilm, nor does it change the species composition in such a formation. Moreover, flow cytometry analysis of the adhesion and invasion of keratinocytes by those bacteria did not reveal any difference depending on PPAD activity, which was further supported by the analysis of transcriptome, as expression of genes involved in the process of internalization of bacteria were not affected. Therefore, we conclude that PPAD activity does not play any role during biofilm formation or P. gingivalis’s ability to adhere to and enter host’s cells.

  20. The use of real-time cell analyzer technology in drug discovery: defining optimal cell culture conditions and assay reproducibility with different adherent cellular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atienzar, Franck A; Tilmant, Karen; Gerets, Helga H; Toussaint, Gaelle; Speeckaert, Sebastien; Hanon, Etienne; Depelchin, Olympe; Dhalluin, Stephane

    2011-07-01

    The use of impedance-based label-free technology applied to drug discovery is nowadays receiving more and more attention. Indeed, such a simple and noninvasive assay that interferes minimally with cell morphology and function allows one to perform kinetic measurements and to obtain information on proliferation, migration, cytotoxicity, and receptor-mediated signaling. The objective of the study was to further assess the usefulness of a real-time cell analyzer (RTCA) platform based on impedance in the context of quality control and data reproducibility. The data indicate that this technology is useful to determine the best coating and cellular density conditions for different adherent cellular models including hepatocytes, cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, and hybrid neuroblastoma/neuronal cells. Based on 31 independent experiments, the reproducibility of cell index data generated from HepG2 cells exposed to DMSO and to Triton X-100 was satisfactory, with a coefficient of variation close to 10%. Cell index data were also well reproduced when cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts were exposed to 21 compounds three times (correlation >0.91, p technology appears to be a powerful and reliable tool in drug discovery because of the reasonable throughput, rapid and efficient performance, technical optimization, and cell quality control.

  1. Colorectal Cancer Cells Adhere to and Migrate Along the Neurons of the Enteric Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Duchalais

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Our data show that the enteric neuronal network guides tumor cell migration, partly via L1CAM and N-cadherin. These results open a new avenue of research on the underlying mechanisms and consequences of perineural invasion in colorectal cancer.

  2. Roles for Cell Wall Glycopeptidolipid in Surface Adherence and Planktonic Dispersal of Mycobacterium avium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium is a significant inhabitant of biofilms in drinking water distribution systems. M. avium expresses on its cell surface serovar-specific glycopeptidolipids (ssGPLs). Studies have implicated the core GPL in biofilm formation by M. aviu...

  3. Radiation resistant passivation of silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, R.M.; Gan, J.Y.; Gruenbaum, P.E.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a silicon solar cell having improved stability when exposed to concentrated solar radiation. It comprises a body of silicon material having a major surface for receiving radiation, a plurality of p and n conductivity regions in the body for collecting electrons and holes created by impinging radiation, and a passivation layer on the major surface including a first layer of silicon oxide in contact with the body and a polycrystalline silicon layer on the first layer of silicon oxide

  4. Adherence of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli to Human Epithelial Cells: The Role of Intimin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-28

    mucosa (e.g., enterotoxigenic E. coli, Vibrio cholerae , and Boroetella pertussis); ii) damage to the epithelial cell microvilli induced by the...diarrhea in Mayan childm in Mexico . J. Infect. Dis. 163, 507-513. G6mez-Ouarte, O.G. and Kaper, J.B. (1995). A plasmid-encoded regulartory region...de la Cabaca, F., and Garibay, E.V. (1987). Enteroadherent Escherichia coli as a cause of diarrhea among children in Mexico . J . Clin. Microbiol. 25

  5. Mast Cells Can Enhance Resistance to Snake and Honeybee Venoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Martin; Piliponsky, Adrian M.; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Lammel, Verena; Åbrink, Magnus; Pejler, Gunnar; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2006-07-01

    Snake or honeybee envenomation can cause substantial morbidity and mortality, and it has been proposed that the activation of mast cells by snake or insect venoms can contribute to these effects. We show, in contrast, that mast cells can significantly reduce snake-venom-induced pathology in mice, at least in part by releasing carboxypeptidase A and possibly other proteases, which can degrade venom components. Mast cells also significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality induced by honeybee venom. These findings identify a new biological function for mast cells in enhancing resistance to the morbidity and mortality induced by animal venoms.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus extracellular adherence protein triggers TNFα release, promoting attachment to endothelial cells via protein A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Edwards

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bacteraemia, which frequently results in complications such as infective endocarditis, osteomyelitis and exit from the bloodstream to cause metastatic abscesses. Interaction with endothelial cells is critical to these complications and several bacterial proteins have been shown to be involved. The S. aureus extracellular adhesion protein (Eap has many functions, it binds several host glyco-proteins and has both pro- and anti-inflammatory activity. Unfortunately its role in vivo has not been robustly tested to date, due to difficulties in complementing its activity in mutant strains. We previously found Eap to have pro-inflammatory activity, and here show that purified native Eap triggered TNFα release in whole human blood in a dose-dependent manner. This level of TNFα increased adhesion of S. aureus to endothelial cells 4-fold via a mechanism involving protein A on the bacterial surface and gC1qR/p33 on the endothelial cell surface. The contribution this and other Eap activities play in disease severity during bacteraemia was tested by constructing an isogenic set of strains in which the eap gene was inactivated and complemented by inserting an intact copy elsewhere on the bacterial chromosome. Using a murine bacteraemia model we found that Eap expressing strains cause a more severe infection, demonstrating its role in invasive disease.

  7. Advances in the theory and application of BSF cells. [including electrical resistivity and photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelkorn, J.; Lamneck, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The characteristics and behavior of p(+), p solar cells were investigated. The p(+), p cells were made by the removal of the n(+) surface layers from n(+), p p(+), BSF cells followed by application of a suitable contact to the resultant p(+), p structures. The open circuit voltage of p(+), p cells was found to increase with increasing 'p' bulk resistivity. The measured open circuit velocity-temperature coefficients were positive and increased with increasing resistivity. An outline of prior limitations in solar cell design is presented, and the removal of these limitations through use of BSF effects is pointed out. The study of BSF effects made feasible production of very thin high efficiency silicon cells as well as high resistivity-high efficiency cells, two desirable types of silicon cells which were previously impossible to make.

  8. Destruction of radiation-resistant cell populations by hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roettinger, E.M.; Gerweck, L.E.

    1979-01-01

    Animal experiments with local hyperthermia have shown that the radiauion dose necessary for the local control of 50% of the tumours examined was essentially reduced by heating to 42,5 0 C. In-vitro experients indicated selective destruction of relatively radiation-resistent cell populations by the combination of hyperthermie and reduced hydrogen ion concentration. Experiments with glioblastoma cells confirmed these results qualitatively, but showed quantitatively considerably lower sensitivity towards hyperthermia. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 RDG [de

  9. Identification of genes associated with cisplatin resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Xiaojian; Qiu, Weiliu; Chen, Fangan; Chen, Wantao

    2006-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, details of the molecular mechanism responsible for cisplatin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of genes related to cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. A cisplatin-resistant cell line, Tca/cisplatin, was established from a cisplatin-sensitive cell line, Tca8113, which was derived from moderately-differentiated tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Global gene expression in this resistant cell line and its sensitive parent cell line was analyzed using Affymetrix HG-U95Av2 microarrays. Candidate genes involved in DNA repair, the MAP pathway and cell cycle regulation were chosen to validate the microarray analysis results. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis following cisplatin exposure were also investigated. Cisplatin resistance in Tca/cisplatin cells was stable for two years in cisplatin-free culture medium. The IC50 for cisplatin in Tca/cisplatin was 6.5-fold higher than that in Tca8113. Microarray analysis identified 38 genes that were up-regulated and 25 that were down-regulated in this cell line. Some were novel candidates, while others are involved in well-characterized mechanisms that could be relevant to cisplatin resistance, such as RECQL for DNA repair and MAP2K6 in the MAP pathway; all the genes were further validated by Real-time PCR. The cell cycle-regulated genes CCND1 and CCND3 were involved in cisplatin resistance; 24-hour exposure to 10 μM cisplatin induced a marked S phase block in Tca/cisplatin cells but not in Tca8113 cells. The Tca8113 cell line and its stable drug-resistant variant Tca/cisplatin provided a useful model for identifying candidate genes responsible for the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our data provide a useful basis for screening candidate targets for early diagnosis and further intervention in cisplatin resistance

  10. Identification of genes associated with cisplatin resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ping

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, details of the molecular mechanism responsible for cisplatin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of genes related to cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Methods A cisplatin-resistant cell line, Tca/cisplatin, was established from a cisplatin-sensitive cell line, Tca8113, which was derived from moderately-differentiated tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Global gene expression in this resistant cell line and its sensitive parent cell line was analyzed using Affymetrix HG-U95Av2 microarrays. Candidate genes involved in DNA repair, the MAP pathway and cell cycle regulation were chosen to validate the microarray analysis results. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis following cisplatin exposure were also investigated. Results Cisplatin resistance in Tca/cisplatin cells was stable for two years in cisplatin-free culture medium. The IC50 for cisplatin in Tca/cisplatin was 6.5-fold higher than that in Tca8113. Microarray analysis identified 38 genes that were up-regulated and 25 that were down-regulated in this cell line. Some were novel candidates, while others are involved in well-characterized mechanisms that could be relevant to cisplatin resistance, such as RECQL for DNA repair and MAP2K6 in the MAP pathway; all the genes were further validated by Real-time PCR. The cell cycle-regulated genes CCND1 and CCND3 were involved in cisplatin resistance; 24-hour exposure to 10 μM cisplatin induced a marked S phase block in Tca/cisplatin cells but not in Tca8113 cells. Conclusion The Tca8113 cell line and its stable drug-resistant variant Tca/cisplatin provided a useful model for identifying candidate genes responsible for the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our data provide a useful basis for screening candidate targets for early diagnosis

  11. Cancer stem cells and drug resistance: the potential of nanomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Wei, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Properties of the small group of cancer cells called tumor-initiating or cancer stem cells (CSCs) involved in drug resistance, metastasis and relapse of cancers can significantly affect tumor therapy. Importantly, tumor drug resistance seems to be closely related to many intrinsic or acquired properties of CSCs, such as quiescence, specific morphology, DNA repair ability and overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, drug efflux transporters and detoxifying enzymes. The specific microenvironment (niche) and hypoxic stability provide additional protection against anticancer therapy for CSCs. Thus, CSC-focused therapy is destined to form the core of any effective anticancer strategy. Nanomedicine has great potential in the development of CSC-targeting drugs, controlled drug delivery and release, and the design of novel gene-specific drugs and diagnostic modalities. This review is focused on tumor drug resistance-related properties of CSCs and describes current nanomedicine approaches, which could form the basis of novel combination therapies for eliminating metastatic and CSCs. PMID:22471722

  12. The role of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapA-1 in Neisseria meningitidis adherence to human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooldridge Karl G

    2010-11-01

    isogenic siaD gapA-1 double mutant. Conclusions Our data demonstrates that meningococcal GapA-1 is a constitutively-expressed, highly-conserved surface-exposed protein which is antibody-accessible only in the absence of capsule. Mutation of GapA-1 does not affect the in vitro growth rate of N. meningitidis, but significantly affects the ability of the organism to adhere to human epithelial and endothelial cells in a capsule-independent process suggesting a role in the pathogenesis of meningococcal infection.

  13. Selective up-regulation of protein kinase C eta in phorbol ester-sensitive versus -resistant EL4 mouse thymoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, M S; Luo, X; Vinton, E G; Sando, J J

    1997-06-01

    Stimulation of sensitive EL4 mouse thymoma cells (s-EL4) with phorbol esters results in production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), adherence to a plastic substrate, and growth inhibition, whereas a phorbol ester-resistant variant (r-EL4) fails to respond. Previous studies revealed substantially decreased expression of protein kinase C (PKC) epsilon in the r-EL4 versus s-EL4 cells. This work has been extended to examine the more recently described PKC isozymes. Western and Northern analyses revealed a marked decrease in PKC eta and theta in r-EL4 as compared to s-EL4 cells. Treatment of these lines with phorbol ester for 24 h resulted in down-regulation of all PKC isozymes examined except PKC eta, which was up-regulated in the s-EL4 cells at the time of maximal IL-2 production. Two newly isolated EL4 clones, resistant to phorbol ester-induced growth inhibition but still exhibiting the phorbol ester-induced adherence and IL-2 production, both expressed PKC eta and theta. Collectively, these observations suggest a dissociation of growth inhibition from adherence and IL-2 production pathways and a potential role for PKC eta in the latter.

  14. Study of SEM preparation artefacts with correlative microscopy: Cell shrinkage of adherent cells by HMDS-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsen-Globa, Alisa; Puetz, Norbert; Gepp, Michael M; Neubauer, Julia C; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2016-11-01

    One of the often reported artefacts during cell preparation to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is the shrinkage of cellular objects, that mostly occurs at a certain time-dependent stage of cell drying. Various methods of drying for SEM, such as critical point drying, freeze-drying, as well as hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS)-drying, were usually used. The latter becomes popular since it is a low cost and fast method. However, the correlation of drying duration and real shrinkage of objects was not investigated yet. In this paper, cell shrinkage at each stage of preparation for SEM was studied. We introduce a shrinkage coefficient using correlative light microscopy (LM) and SEM of the same human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The influence of HMDS-drying duration on the cell shrinkage is shown: the longer drying duration, the more shrinkage is observed. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that cell shrinkage is inversely proportional to cultivation time: the longer cultivation time, the more cell spreading area and the less cell shrinkage. Our results can be applicable for an exact SEM quantification of cell size and determination of cell spreading area in engineering of artificial cellular environments using biomaterials. SCANNING 38:625-633, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Identification of glycan structure alterations on cell membrane proteins in desoxyepothilone B resistant leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Miyako; Saldanha, Rohit; Göbel, Anja; Kavallaris, Maria; Packer, Nicolle H

    2011-11-01

    Resistance to tubulin-binding agents used in cancer is often multifactorial and can include changes in drug accumulation and modified expression of tubulin isotypes. Glycans on cell membrane proteins play important roles in many cellular processes such as recognition and apoptosis, and this study investigated whether changes to the glycan structures on cell membrane proteins occur when cells become resistant to drugs. Specifically, we investigated the alteration of glycan structures on the cell membrane proteins of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cells that were selected for resistance to desoxyepothilone B (CEM/dEpoB). The glycan profile of the cell membrane glycoproteins was obtained by sequential release of N- and O-glycans from cell membrane fraction dotted onto polyvinylidene difluoride membrane with PNGase F and β-elimination respectively. The released glycan alditols were analyzed by liquid chromatography (graphitized carbon)-electrospray ionization tandem MS. The major N-glycan on CEM cell was the core fucosylated α2-6 monosialo-biantennary structure. Resistant CEM/dEpoB cells had a significant decrease of α2-6 linked sialic acid on N-glycans. The lower α2-6 sialylation was caused by a decrease in activity of β-galactoside α2-6 sialyltransferase (ST6Gal), and decreased expression of the mRNA. It is clear that the membrane glycosylation of leukemia cells changes during acquired resistance to dEpoB drugs and that this change occurs globally on all cell membrane glycoproteins. This is the first identification of a specific glycan modification on the surface of drug resistant cells and the mechanism of this downstream effect on microtubule targeting drugs may offer a route to new interventions to overcome drug resistance.

  16. Influence of human milk oligosaccharides on adherence of bifidobacteria and clostridia to cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, Sarka; Modrackova, Nikol; Doskocil, Ivo; Svejstil, Roman; Rada, Vojtech

    2017-12-01

    Adhesion of gut bacteria to the intestinal epithelium is the first step in their colonization of the neonatal immature gut. Bacterial colonization of the infant gut is influenced by several factors, of which the most important are the mode of delivery and breast-feeding. Breast-fed infants ingest several grams of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) per day, which can become receptor decoys for intestinal bacteria. The most abundant intestinal bacteria in vaginally delivered infants are bifidobacteria, whereas infants born by cesarean section are colonized by clostridia. The influence of HMOs on the adhesion of five strains of intestinal bacteria (three bifidobacterial strains and two clostridial strains) to mucus-secreting and non-mucus-secreting human epithelial cells was investigated. Bifidobacterium bifidum 1 and Bifidobacterium longum displayed almost the same level of adhesion in the presence and absence of HMOs. By contrast, adhesion of Clostridium butyricum 1 and 2 decreased from 14.41% to 6.72% and from 41.54% to 30.91%, respectively, in the presence of HMOs. The results of this study indicate that HMOs affect bacterial adhesion and are an important factor influencing bacterial colonization of the gut. Adhesion of the tested bacteria correlates with their ability to autoaggregate.

  17. Improved Guideline Adherence With Integrated Sickle Cell Disease and Asthma Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Brandi L; Ivy, Zalaya K; Bryant, Valencia; Rodeghier, Mark; DeBaun, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    In children with sickle cell disease (SCD), concomitant asthma is associated with increased morbidity and mortality when compared with children with SCD without asthma. Despite the well-established burden of asthma in children with SCD, no paradigm of care exists for the co-management of these two diseases. To address this gap, an integrated SCD and asthma clinic was created in a community health center that included (1) a dual respiratory therapist/asthma case manager; (2) an SCD nurse practitioner with asthma educator certification; (3) an onsite pulmonary function test laboratory; (4) a pediatric hematologist with expertise in managing SCD and asthma; and (5) application of the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines. A before (2010-2012) and after (2013-2014) study design was used to assess for improved quality of care with implementation of an integrative care model among 61 children with SCD and asthma followed from 2010 to 2014. Asthma action plan utilization after initial diagnosis increased with the integrative care model (n=16, 56% before, 100% after, p=0.003), as did the use of spirometry in children aged ≥5 years (n=41, 65% before, 95% after, pintegrative care model for SCD and asthma improved evidence-based asthma care, longer follow-up and evaluation will be needed to determine the impact on SCD-related morbidity. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Immobilisation increases yeast cells' resistance to dehydration-rehydration treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovikova, Diana; Rozenfelde, Linda; Pavlovska, Ilona; Rapoport, Alexander

    2014-08-20

    This study was performed with the goal of revealing if the dehydration procedure used in our new immobilisation method noticeably decreases the viability of yeast cells in immobilised preparations. Various yeasts were used in this research: Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells that were rather sensitive to dehydration and had been aerobically grown in an ethanol-containing medium, a recombinant strain of S. cerevisiae grown in aerobic conditions which were completely non-resistant to dehydration and an anaerobically grown bakers' yeast strain S. cerevisiae, as well as a fairly resistant Pichia pastoris strain. Experiments performed showed that immobilisation of all these strains essentially increased their resistance to a dehydration-rehydration treatment. The increase of cells' viability (compared with control cells dehydrated in similar conditions) was from 30 to 60%. It is concluded that a new immobilisation method, which includes a dehydration stage, does not lead to an essential loss of yeast cell viability. Correspondingly, there is no risk of losing the biotechnological activities of immobilised preparations. The possibility of producing dry, active yeast preparations is shown, for those strains that are very sensitive to dehydration and which can be used in biotechnology in an immobilised form. Finally, the immobilisation approach can be used for the development of efficient methods for the storage of recombinant yeast strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation resistance of amorphous silicon alloy solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanak, J.J.; Chen, E.; Myatt, A.; Woodyard, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation resistance of a-Si alloy solar cells when bombarded by high energy particles is reviewed. The results of investigations of high energy proton radiation resistance of a-Si alloy thin film photovoltaic cells are reported. Irradiations were carried out with 200 keV and 1.00 MeV protons with fluences ranging betweeen 1E11 and 1E15 cm-2. Defect generation and passivation mechanisms were studied using the AM1 conversion efficiency and isochronal anneals. It is concluded that the primary defect generation mechanism results from the knock-on of Si and Ge in the intrinsic layer of the cells. The defect passivation proceeds by the complex annealing of Si and Ge defects and not by the simple migration of hydrogen

  20. Evaluation of 309 environmental chemicals using a mouse embryonic stem cell adherent cell differentiation and cytotoxicity assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Chandler

    Full Text Available The vast landscape of environmental chemicals has motivated the need for alternative methods to traditional whole-animal bioassays in toxicity testing. Embryonic stem (ES cells provide an in vitro model of embryonic development and an alternative method for assessing developmental toxicity. Here, we evaluated 309 environmental chemicals, mostly food-use pesticides, from the ToxCast™ chemical library using a mouse ES cell platform. ES cells were cultured in the absence of pluripotency factors to promote spontaneous differentiation and in the presence of DMSO-solubilized chemicals at different concentrations to test the effects of exposure on differentiation and cytotoxicity. Cardiomyocyte differentiation (α,β myosin heavy chain; MYH6/MYH7 and cytotoxicity (DRAQ5™/Sapphire700™ were measured by In-Cell Western™ analysis. Half-maximal activity concentration (AC₅₀ values for differentiation and cytotoxicity endpoints were determined, with 18% of the chemical library showing significant activity on either endpoint. Mining these effects against the ToxCast Phase I assays (∼500 revealed significant associations for a subset of chemicals (26 that perturbed transcription-based activities and impaired ES cell differentiation. Increased transcriptional activity of several critical developmental genes including BMPR2, PAX6 and OCT1 were strongly associated with decreased ES cell differentiation. Multiple genes involved in reactive oxygen species signaling pathways (NRF2, ABCG2, GSTA2, HIF1A were strongly associated with decreased ES cell differentiation as well. A multivariate model built from these data revealed alterations in ABCG2 transporter was a strong predictor of impaired ES cell differentiation. Taken together, these results provide an initial characterization of metabolic and regulatory pathways by which some environmental chemicals may act to disrupt ES cell growth and differentiation.

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Contact Resistance in Silicon Photovoltaic Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Black, J. P.

    2013-10-22

    In screen-printed silicon-crystalline solar cells, the contact resistance of a thin interfacial glass layer between the silicon and the silver electrode plays a limiting role for electron transport. We analyze a simple model for electron transport across this layer, based on the driftdiffusion equations. We utilize the size of the current/Debye length to conduct asymptotic techniques to simplify the model; we solve the model numerically to find that the effective contact resistance may be a monotonic increasing, monotonic decreasing, or nonmonotonic function of the electron flux, depending on the values of the physical parameters. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  2. Determination of the Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Student Cell Phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Ann Blankinship

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sampling of common use items (e.g., student cell phones for bacterial presence, identification, and antibiotic resistance profiling helps students to recognize the need for routine cleaning of personal items and encourages thoughtful use of currently available medications. This multilab period project can be used to teach or reinforce several methods from general microbiology including aseptic technique, isolation streak, serial dilution, spread plating, Kirby Bauer testing, unknown identification, and media production. The data generated can be saved and added to each semester, thus providing a data set that reflects a local trend of antibiotic resistance.      

  3. Exosomes promote cetuximab resistance via the PTEN/Akt pathway in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S; Zhang, Y; Qu, J; Che, X; Fan, Y; Hou, K; Guo, T; Deng, G; Song, N; Li, C; Wan, X; Qu, X; Liu, Y

    2017-11-13

    Cetuximab is widely used in patients with metastatic colon cancer expressing wildtype KRAS. However, acquired drug resistance limits its clinical efficacy. Exosomes are nanosized vesicles secreted by various cell types. Tumor cell-derived exosomes participate in many biological processes, including tumor invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance. In this study, exosomes derived from cetuximab-resistant RKO colon cancer cells induced cetuximab resistance in cetuximab-sensitive Caco-2 cells. Meanwhile, exosomes from RKO and Caco-2 cells showed different levels of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and phosphor-Akt. Furthermore, reduced PTEN and increased phosphorylated Akt levels were found in Caco-2 cells after exposure to RKO cell-derived exosomes. Moreover, an Akt inhibitor prevented RKO cell-derived exosome-induced drug resistance in Caco-2 cells. These findings provide novel evidence that exosomes derived from cetuximab-resistant cells could induce cetuximab resistance in cetuximab-sensitive cells, by downregulating PTEN and increasing phosphorylated Akt levels.

  4. Normal and malignant epithelial cells with stem-like properties have an extended G2 cell cycle phase that is associated with apoptotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biddle Adrian

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subsets of cells with stem-like properties have been previously isolated from human epithelial cancers and their resistance to apoptosis-inducing stimuli has been related to carcinoma recurrence and treatment failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of resistance to apoptosis-inducing agents of cells with stem-like properties in both normal and malignant human epithelia. Methods Cells isolated from fresh human head and neck carcinomas (n = 11, cell lines derived from head and neck, prostate and breast human carcinomas (n = 7, and from normal human oral mucosa (n = 5, were exposed to various apoptosis-inducing stimuli (UV, Tumour Necrosis Factor, Cisplatin, Etoposide, and Neocarzinostatin. Flow cytometry for CD44 and epithelial-specific antigen (ESA expression, colony morphology, tumour sphere formation and rapid adherence assays were used to identify the subset of cells with stem-like properties. Apoptosis, cell cycle and expression of various cell cycle checkpoint proteins were assessed (Western Blot, qPCR. The role of G2-checkpoint regulators Chk1 and Chk2 was investigated by use of debromohymenialdisine (DBH and siRNA. Results In both cancer biopsies and carcinoma cell lines a subset of CD44high cells showed increased clonogenicity, a significantly lower rate of apoptosis, and a significantly higher proportion of cells in the G2-phase of the cell cycle. An inverse correlation between the percentage of cells in G2-phase and the rate of apoptosis was found. Pulse-chase with iododeoxyuridine (IdU demonstrated that CD44high carcinoma cells spent longer time in G2, even in un-treated controls. These cells expressed higher levels of G2 checkpoint proteins, and their release from G2 with BDH or Chk1 siRNA increased their rate of apoptosis. Low passage cultures of normal keratinocytes were also found to contain a subset of CD44high cells showing increased clonogenicity, and a similar pattern of G2-block

  5. Normal and malignant epithelial cells with stem-like properties have an extended G2 cell cycle phase that is associated with apoptotic resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, Lisa J; Costea, Daniela Elena; Gammon, Luke; Fazil, Bilal; Biddle, Adrian; Mackenzie, Ian C

    2010-01-01

    Subsets of cells with stem-like properties have been previously isolated from human epithelial cancers and their resistance to apoptosis-inducing stimuli has been related to carcinoma recurrence and treatment failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of resistance to apoptosis-inducing agents of cells with stem-like properties in both normal and malignant human epithelia. Cells isolated from fresh human head and neck carcinomas (n = 11), cell lines derived from head and neck, prostate and breast human carcinomas (n = 7), and from normal human oral mucosa (n = 5), were exposed to various apoptosis-inducing stimuli (UV, Tumour Necrosis Factor, Cisplatin, Etoposide, and Neocarzinostatin). Flow cytometry for CD44 and epithelial-specific antigen (ESA) expression, colony morphology, tumour sphere formation and rapid adherence assays were used to identify the subset of cells with stem-like properties. Apoptosis, cell cycle and expression of various cell cycle checkpoint proteins were assessed (Western Blot, qPCR). The role of G2-checkpoint regulators Chk1 and Chk2 was investigated by use of debromohymenialdisine (DBH) and siRNA. In both cancer biopsies and carcinoma cell lines a subset of CD44 high cells showed increased clonogenicity, a significantly lower rate of apoptosis, and a significantly higher proportion of cells in the G2-phase of the cell cycle. An inverse correlation between the percentage of cells in G2-phase and the rate of apoptosis was found. Pulse-chase with iododeoxyuridine (IdU) demonstrated that CD44 high carcinoma cells spent longer time in G2, even in un-treated controls. These cells expressed higher levels of G2 checkpoint proteins, and their release from G2 with BDH or Chk1 siRNA increased their rate of apoptosis. Low passage cultures of normal keratinocytes were also found to contain a subset of CD44 high cells showing increased clonogenicity, and a similar pattern of G2-block associated with apoptotic resistance. These data

  6. Non-p-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in detransformed rat cells selected for resistance to methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J M; Sircar, S; Horvath, J; Dion, P

    1989-11-01

    Three independent variants (G2, G4, G5), resistant to methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), an anticancer drug, have been isolated by single step selection from an adenovirus-transformed rat brain cell line (1). These variants display selective cross-resistance to several natural product drugs of dissimilar structure and action. Multidrug resistance has recently been shown to be caused by overexpression of the membrane-associated p-glycoprotein, most often caused by amplification of the mdr gene. Several types of experiments were conducted to determine whether the observed drug resistance in our cell lines could be due to changes at the mdr locus. The following results were obtained: (a) the mdr locus was not amplified; (b) transcription of the mdr gene and p-glycoprotein synthesis were not increased; (c) multidrug resistance cell lines, which carry an amplified mdr locus, were not cross-resistant to methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone); (d) verapamil did not reverse the resistance of G cells or mdr cells to methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), nor that of G cells to vincristine; and (e) methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) resistance was recessive and depended on a block to drug uptake, as opposed to mdr cells which are dominant and express increased drug efflux. The results obtained suggest that the drug resistance in the G2, G4, and G5 cells was atypical and may be due to a mechanism distinct from that mediated by the mdr locus.

  7. In vitro generation of three-dimensional substrate-adherent embryonic stem cell-derived neural aggregates for application in animal models of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargus, Gunnar; Cui, Yi-Fang; Dihné, Marcel; Bernreuther, Christian; Schachner, Melitta

    2012-05-01

    In vitro-differentiated embryonic stem (ES) cells comprise a useful source for cell replacement therapy, but the efficiency and safety of a translational approach are highly dependent on optimized protocols for directed differentiation of ES cells into the desired cell types in vitro. Furthermore, the transplantation of three-dimensional ES cell-derived structures instead of a single-cell suspension may improve graft survival and function by providing a beneficial microenvironment for implanted cells. To this end, we have developed a new method to efficiently differentiate mouse ES cells into neural aggregates that consist predominantly (>90%) of postmitotic neurons, neural progenitor cells, and radial glia-like cells. When transplanted into the excitotoxically lesioned striatum of adult mice, these substrate-adherent embryonic stem cell-derived neural aggregates (SENAs) showed significant advantages over transplanted single-cell suspensions of ES cell-derived neural cells, including improved survival of GABAergic neurons, increased cell migration, and significantly decreased risk of teratoma formation. Furthermore, SENAs mediated functional improvement after transplantation into animal models of Parkinson's disease and spinal cord injury. This unit describes in detail how SENAs are efficiently derived from mouse ES cells in vitro and how SENAs are isolated for transplantation. Furthermore, methods are presented for successful implantation of SENAs into animal models of Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and spinal cord injury to study the effects of stem cell-derived neural aggregates in a disease context in vivo.

  8. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells in Insulin Resistance and Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcamo-Orive, Ivan; Huang, Ngan F; Quertermous, Thomas; Knowles, Joshua W

    2017-11-01

    Insulin resistance leads to a number of metabolic and cellular abnormalities including endothelial dysfunction that increase the risk of vascular disease. Although it has been particularly challenging to study the genetic determinants that predispose to abnormal function of the endothelium in insulin-resistant states, the possibility of deriving endothelial cells from induced pluripotent stem cells generated from individuals with detailed clinical phenotyping, including accurate measurements of insulin resistance accompanied by multilevel omic data (eg, genetic and genomic characterization), has opened new avenues to study this relationship. Unfortunately, several technical barriers have hampered these efforts. In the present review, we summarize the current status of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells for modeling endothelial dysfunction associated with insulin resistance and discuss the challenges to overcoming these limitations. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. The Use of Cell Phone Support for Non-adherent HIV-Infected Youth and Young Adults: An Initial Randomized and Controlled Intervention Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzer, Marvin E.; Naar-King, Sylvie; Olson, Johanna; Sarr, Moussa; Thornton, Sarah; Kahana, Shoshana Y.; Gaur, Aditya H.; Clark, Leslie F.

    2014-01-01

    This randomized behavioral trial examined whether youth living with HIV (YLH) receiving cell-phone support with study funded phone plans, demonstrated improved adherence and viral control during the 24 week intervention and 24 weeks post-intervention compared to controls. Monday through Friday phone calls confirmed medications were taken, provided problem-solving support, and referred to services to address adherence barriers. Of 37 participants (ages 15–24), 62 % were male and 70 % were African American. Self-reported adherence was significantly higher in the intervention group compared to the control at 24 and 48 weeks for the past month (P = 0.007) and log 10 HIV VL was significantly lower at both 24 weeks (2.82 versus 4.52 P = 0.002) and 48 weeks (3.23 versus 4.23 P = 0.043). Adherence and viral load showed medium to large effect sizes across the 48 week study. This is the first study to demonstrate sustained clinically significant reductions in HIV VL using youth friendly technology. PMID:24271347

  10. Rhodacyanine derivative selectively targets cancer cells and overcomes tamoxifen resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Koren

    Full Text Available MKT-077, a rhodacyanine dye, was shown to produce cancer specific cell death. However, complications prevented the use of this compound beyond clinical trials. Here we describe YM-1, a derivative of MKT-077. We found that YM-1 was more cytotoxic and localized differently than MKT-077. YM-1 demonstrated this cytotoxicity across multiple cancer cell lines. This toxicity was limited to cancer cell lines; immortalized cell models were unaffected. Brief applications of YM-1 were found to be non-toxic. Brief treatment with YM-1 restored tamoxifen sensitivity to a refractory tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 cell model. This effect is potentially due to altered estrogen receptor alpha phosphorylation, an outcome precipitated by selective reductions in Akt levels (Akt/PKB. Thus, modifications to the rhodocyanine scaffold could potentially be made to improve efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties. Moreover, the impact on tamoxifen sensitivity could be a new utility for this compound family.

  11. Gastrointestinal cell lines form polarized epithelia with an adherent mucus layer when cultured in semi-wet interfaces with mechanical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navabi, Nazanin; McGuckin, Michael A; Lindén, Sara K

    2013-01-01

    Mucin glycoproteins are secreted in large quantities by mucosal epithelia and cell surface mucins are a prominent feature of the glycocalyx of all mucosal epithelia. Currently, studies investigating the gastrointestinal mucosal barrier use either animal experiments or non-in vivo like cell cultures. Many pathogens cause different pathology in mice compared to humans and the in vitro cell cultures used are suboptimal because they are very different from an in vivo mucosal surface, are often not polarized, lack important components of the glycocalyx, and often lack the mucus layer. Although gastrointestinal cell lines exist that produce mucins or polarize, human cell line models that reproducibly create the combination of a polarized epithelial cell layer, functional tight junctions and an adherent mucus layer have been missing until now. We trialed a range of treatments to induce polarization, 3D-organization, tight junctions, mucin production, mucus secretion, and formation of an adherent mucus layer that can be carried out using standard equipment. These treatments were tested on cell lines of intestinal (Caco-2, LS513, HT29, T84, LS174T, HT29 MTX-P8 and HT29 MTX-E12) and gastric (MKN7, MKN45, AGS, NCI-N87 and its hTERT Clone5 and Clone6) origins using Ussing chamber methodology and (immuno)histology. Semi-wet interface culture in combination with mechanical stimulation and DAPT caused HT29 MTX-P8, HT29 MTX-E12 and LS513 cells to polarize, form functional tight junctions, a three-dimensional architecture resembling colonic crypts, and produce an adherent mucus layer. Caco-2 and T84 cells also polarized, formed functional tight junctions and produced a thin adherent mucus layer after this treatment, but with less consistency. In conclusion, culture methods affect cell lines differently, and testing a matrix of methods vs. cell lines may be important to develop better in vitro models. The methods developed herein create in vitro mucosal surfaces suitable for studies

  12. Gastrointestinal cell lines form polarized epithelia with an adherent mucus layer when cultured in semi-wet interfaces with mechanical stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Navabi

    Full Text Available Mucin glycoproteins are secreted in large quantities by mucosal epithelia and cell surface mucins are a prominent feature of the glycocalyx of all mucosal epithelia. Currently, studies investigating the gastrointestinal mucosal barrier use either animal experiments or non-in vivo like cell cultures. Many pathogens cause different pathology in mice compared to humans and the in vitro cell cultures used are suboptimal because they are very different from an in vivo mucosal surface, are often not polarized, lack important components of the glycocalyx, and often lack the mucus layer. Although gastrointestinal cell lines exist that produce mucins or polarize, human cell line models that reproducibly create the combination of a polarized epithelial cell layer, functional tight junctions and an adherent mucus layer have been missing until now. We trialed a range of treatments to induce polarization, 3D-organization, tight junctions, mucin production, mucus secretion, and formation of an adherent mucus layer that can be carried out using standard equipment. These treatments were tested on cell lines of intestinal (Caco-2, LS513, HT29, T84, LS174T, HT29 MTX-P8 and HT29 MTX-E12 and gastric (MKN7, MKN45, AGS, NCI-N87 and its hTERT Clone5 and Clone6 origins using Ussing chamber methodology and (immunohistology. Semi-wet interface culture in combination with mechanical stimulation and DAPT caused HT29 MTX-P8, HT29 MTX-E12 and LS513 cells to polarize, form functional tight junctions, a three-dimensional architecture resembling colonic crypts, and produce an adherent mucus layer. Caco-2 and T84 cells also polarized, formed functional tight junctions and produced a thin adherent mucus layer after this treatment, but with less consistency. In conclusion, culture methods affect cell lines differently, and testing a matrix of methods vs. cell lines may be important to develop better in vitro models. The methods developed herein create in vitro mucosal surfaces

  13. Autophagy contributes to resistance of tumor cells to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaachouay, Hassan; Ohneseit, Petra; Toulany, Mahmoud; Kehlbach, Rainer; Multhoff, Gabriele; Rodemann, H Peter

    2011-06-01

    Autophagy signaling is a novel important target to improve anticancer therapy. To study the role of autophagy on resistance of tumor cells to ionizing radiation (IR), breast cancer cell lines differing in their intrinsic radiosensitivity were used. Breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and HBL-100 were examined with respect to clonogenic cell survival and induction of autophagy after radiation exposure and pharmacological interference of the autophagic process. As marker for autophagy the appearance of LC3-I and LC3-II proteins was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Formation of autophagic vacuoles was monitored by immunofluorescence staining of LC3. LC3-I and LC3-II formation differs markedly in radioresistant MDA-MB-231 versus radiosensitive HBL-100 cells. Western blot analyses of LC3-II/LC3-I ratio indicated marked induction of autophagy by IR in radioresistant MDA-MB-231 cells, but not in radiosensitive HBL-100 cells. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis of LC3-II positive vacuoles confirmed this differential effect. Pre-treatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) antagonized IR-induced autophagy. Likewise, pretreatment of radioresistant MDA-231 cells with autophagy inhibitors 3-MA or chloroquine (CQ) significantly reduced clonogenic survival of irradiated cells. Our data clearly indicate that radioresistant breast tumor cells show a strong post-irradiation induction of autophagy, which thus serves as a protective and pro-survival mechanism in radioresistance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiation resistance of solar cells for space application, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Ryuichi; Sunaga, Hiromi

    1989-07-01

    A 50-μm thick ultrathin silicon solar cell and a 280-μm thick high performance AlGaAs/GaAs solar cell with high radiation resistance have been recently developed by National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). In order to study the radiation resistance of these cells, a joint research was carried out between Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and NASDA from 1984 through 1987. In this research, the irradiation method of electron beams, the effects of the irradiation conditions on the deterioration of solar cells by electron beams, and the annealing effects of the radiation damage in solar cells were investigated. This paper is the first one of a series of reports of the joint research. In this paper, the space radiation environment which artificial satellites will encounter, the solar cells used, and the experimental methods are described. In addition to these, the results of the study on the irradiation procedure of electron beams are reported. In the study of the irradiation method of electron beams, three methods, that is, the fixed irradiation method, the moving irradiation method, and the spot irradiation method were examined. In the fixed irradiation method and moving one, stationary solar cells and solar cells moving by conveyer were irradiated by scanning electron beams, respectively. On the other hand, in the spot irradiation method, stationary solar cells were irradiated by non-scanning steady electron beams. It was concluded that the fixed irradiation method was the most proper method. In addition to this, in this study, some pieces of information were obtained with respect to the changes in the electrical characteristics of solar cells caused by the irradiation of electron beams. (author) 52 refs

  15. Prevalência da adesão ao tratamento anti-hipertensivo em hipertensos resistentes e validação de três métodos indiretos de avaliação da adesão Prevalence of anti-hypertensive treatment adherence in patients with resistant hypertension and validation of three indirect methods for assessing treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Vergetti Bloch

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O estudo estimou a adesão ao tratamento anti-hipertensivo farmacológico utilizando-se três métodos indiretos em uma coorte de hipertensos resistentes no Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, 2005. Os métodos foram: avaliação pelo paciente; avaliação do médico; teste de Morisky-Green (TMG adaptado para a língua portuguesa. Foi realizada validação preditiva comparando-se a diferença tanto de pressões de consultório como de monitorização de 24 horas (MAPA, em duas ocasiões, de pacientes com e sem adesão. As médias de pressões entre os grupos foram comparadas usando-se testes não-paramétricos. Foram entrevistados 200 pacientes com idade média de 63 anos (DP = 10,3, 73,5% do sexo feminino. A prevalência de adesão foi de 51% pelo TMG, 52% pelo médico e 80,5% pelo paciente. Ocorreram reduções das pressões arteriais de consultório e na MAPA dos pacientes com adesão por todos os métodos, mas não para os não-aderentes. O emprego de mais de um método para avaliação da adesão mostrou que indivíduos não-aderentes pelos três métodos (11,9% tiveram pior evolução dos níveis tensionais. Esse achado sugere que a hipertensão resistente não pode ser atribuída unicamente à baixa adesão.This study estimated adherence to anti-hypertensive medication using three indirect methods and their combinations in a cohort of patients with resistant hypertension in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2005. The methods used were: self-reported adherence; physicians' adherence evaluation; and the Morisky-Green test (MGT translated into Portuguese. The predictive validation was performed comparing office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, measured on two different occasions, from patients classified as adherent or not. The means were compared using non-parametric tests. Two hundred patients were interviewed. Mean age was 63 years (SD = 10.3, and 73.5% were female. Adherence prevalence was 51% using MGT, 52% according to the physician

  16. Castration-Resistant Lgr5+ Cells Are Long-Lived Stem Cells Required for Prostatic Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu-er Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The adult prostate possesses a significant regenerative capacity that is of great interest for understanding adult stem cell biology. We demonstrate that leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5 is expressed in a rare population of prostate epithelial progenitor cells, and a castration-resistant Lgr5+ population exists in regressed prostate tissue. Genetic lineage tracing revealed that Lgr5+ cells and their progeny are primarily luminal. Lgr5+ castration-resistant cells are long lived and upon regeneration, both luminal Lgr5+ cells and basal Lgr5+ cells expand. Moreover, single Lgr5+ cells can generate multilineage prostatic structures in renal transplantation assays. Additionally, Lgr5+ cell depletion revealed that the regenerative potential of the castrated adult prostate depends on Lgr5+ cells. Together, these data reveal insights into the cellular hierarchy of castration-resistant Lgr5+ cells, indicate a requirement for Lgr5+ cells during prostatic regeneration, and identify an Lgr5+ adult stem cell population in the prostate.

  17. Polyvinylpyrrolidone-Capped Silver Nanoparticle Inhibits Infection of Carbapenem-Resistant Strain of Acinetobacter baumannii in the Human Pulmonary Epithelial Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishvanath Tiwari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii, an opportunistic ESKAPE pathogen, causes respiratory and urinary tract infections. Its prevalence increases gradually in the clinical setup. Pathogenicity of Acinetobacter is significantly influenced by its ability to infect and survive in human pulmonary cells. Therefore, it is important to study the infection of A. baumannii in human pulmonary host cell (A-549, monitoring surface interacting and internalized bacteria. It was found that during infection of A. baumannii, about 40% bacteria adhered to A-549, whereas 20% got internalized inside pulmonary cell and induces threefold increase in the reactive oxygen species production. We have synthesized polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-capped AgNPs using chemical methods and tested its efficacy against carbapenem-resistant strain of A. baumannii. PVP-capped silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs (30 µM have shown antibacterial activity against carbapenem-resistant strain of A. baumannii and this concentration does not have any cytotoxic effect on the human pulmonary cell line (IC50 is 130 µM. Similarly, PVP-AgNPs treatment decreases 80% viability of intracellular bacteria, decreases adherence of A. baumannii to A-549 (40 to 2.2%, and decreases intracellular concentration (20 to 1.3% of A. baumannii. This concludes that PVP-AgNPs can be developed as a substitute for carbapenem to control the infection caused by carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii.

  18. Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Modulate Fungal Cell Wall Elasticity and Osmotic Stress Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, Iuliana V; Walker, Louise A; Schiavone, Marion; Lee, Keunsook K; Martin-Yken, Hélène; Dague, Etienne; Gow, Neil A R; Munro, Carol A; Brown, Alistair J P

    2015-07-28

    The fungal cell wall confers cell morphology and protection against environmental insults. For fungal pathogens, the cell wall is a key immunological modulator and an ideal therapeutic target. Yeast cell walls possess an inner matrix of interlinked β-glucan and chitin that is thought to provide tensile strength and rigidity. Yeast cells remodel their walls over time in response to environmental change, a process controlled by evolutionarily conserved stress (Hog1) and cell integrity (Mkc1, Cek1) signaling pathways. These mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways modulate cell wall gene expression, leading to the construction of a new, modified cell wall. We show that the cell wall is not rigid but elastic, displaying rapid structural realignments that impact survival following osmotic shock. Lactate-grown Candida albicans cells are more resistant to hyperosmotic shock than glucose-grown cells. We show that this elevated resistance is not dependent on Hog1 or Mkc1 signaling and that most cell death occurs within 10 min of osmotic shock. Sudden decreases in cell volume drive rapid increases in cell wall thickness. The elevated stress resistance of lactate-grown cells correlates with reduced cell wall elasticity, reflected in slower changes in cell volume following hyperosmotic shock. The cell wall elasticity of lactate-grown cells is increased by a triple mutation that inactivates the Crh family of cell wall cross-linking enzymes, leading to increased sensitivity to hyperosmotic shock. Overexpressing Crh family members in glucose-grown cells reduces cell wall elasticity, providing partial protection against hyperosmotic shock. These changes correlate with structural realignment of the cell wall and with the ability of cells to withstand osmotic shock. The C. albicans cell wall is the first line of defense against external insults, the site of immune recognition by the host, and an attractive target for antifungal therapy. Its tensile strength is conferred by

  19. Radiation induction of drug resistance in RIF-1 tumors and tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, L.E.; Moulder, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The RIF-1 tumor cell line contains a small number of cells (1-20 per 10(6) cells) that are resistant to various single antineoplastic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), and adriamycin (ADR). For 5FU the frequency of drug resistance is lower for tumor-derived cells than for cells from cell culture; for MTX the reverse is true, and for ADR there is no difference. In vitro irradiation at 5 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU, MTX, and ADR. In vivo irradiation at 3 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU and MTX, but not for ADR. The absolute risk for in vitro induction of MTX, 5FU, and ADR resistance, and for in vivo induction of 5FU resistance, was 1-3 per 10(6) cells per Gy; but the absolute risk for in vivo induction of MTX resistance was 54 per 10(6) cells per Gy. The frequency of drug-resistant cells among individual untreated tumors was highly variable; among individual irradiated tumors the frequency of drug-resistant cells was significantly less variable. These studies provide supporting data for models of the development of tumor drug resistance, and imply that some of the drug resistance seen when chemotherapy follows radiotherapy may be due to radiation-induced drug resistance

  20. Measurement of the Extracellular pH of Adherently Growing Mammalian Cells with High Spatial Resolution Using a Voltammetric pH Microsensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Raluca-Elena; Stǎnicǎ, Luciana; Gheorghiu, Mihaela; Gáspár, Szilveszter

    2018-05-15

    There are only a few tools suitable for measuring the extracellular pH of adherently growing mammalian cells with high spatial resolution, and none of them is widely used in laboratories around the world. Cell biologists very often limit themselves to measuring the intracellular pH with commercially available fluorescent probes. Therefore, we built a voltammetric pH microsensor and investigated its suitability for monitoring the extracellular pH of adherently growing mammalian cells. The voltammetric pH microsensor consisted of a 37 μm diameter carbon fiber microelectrode modified with reduced graphene oxide and syringaldazine. While graphene oxide was used to increase the electrochemically active surface area of our sensor, syringaldazine facilitated pH sensing through its pH-dependent electrochemical oxidation and reduction. The good sensitivity (60 ± 2.5 mV/pH unit), reproducibility (coefficient of variation ≤3% for the same pH measured with 5 different microsensors), and stability (pH drift around 0.05 units in 3 h) of the built voltammetric pH sensors were successfully used to investigate the acidification of the extracellular space of both cancer cells and normal cells. The results indicate that the developed pH microsensor and the perfected experimental protocol based on scanning electrochemical microscopy can reveal details of the pH regulation of cells not attainable with pH sensors lacking spatial resolution or which cannot be reproducibly positioned in the extracellular space.

  1. Detailed Functional and Proteomic Characterization of Fludarabine Resistance in Mantle Cell Lymphoma Cells.

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    Lucie Lorkova

    Full Text Available Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL is a chronically relapsing aggressive type of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma considered incurable by currently used treatment approaches. Fludarabine is a purine analog clinically still widely used in the therapy of relapsed MCL. Molecular mechanisms of fludarabine resistance have not, however, been studied in the setting of MCL so far. We therefore derived fludarabine-resistant MCL cells (Mino/FR and performed their detailed functional and proteomic characterization compared to the original fludarabine sensitive cells (Mino. We demonstrated that Mino/FR were highly cross-resistant to other antinucleosides (cytarabine, cladribine, gemcitabine and to an inhibitor of Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK ibrutinib. Sensitivity to other types of anti-lymphoma agents was altered only mildly (methotrexate, doxorubicin, bortezomib or remained unaffacted (cisplatin, bendamustine. The detailed proteomic analysis of Mino/FR compared to Mino cells unveiled over 300 differentially expressed proteins. Mino/FR were characterized by the marked downregulation of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK and BTK (thus explaining the observed crossresistance to antinucleosides and ibrutinib, but also by the upregulation of several enzymes of de novo nucleotide synthesis, as well as the up-regulation of the numerous proteins of DNA repair and replication. The significant upregulation of the key antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in Mino/FR cells was associated with the markedly increased sensitivity of the fludarabine-resistant MCL cells to Bcl-2-specific inhibitor ABT199 compared to fludarabine-sensitive cells. Our data thus demonstrate that a detailed molecular analysis of drug-resistant tumor cells can indeed open a way to personalized therapy of resistant malignancies.

  2. Resistivity and thickness effects in dendritic web silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, D. L.; Hwang, J. M.; Greggi, J.; Campbell, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    The decrease of minority carrier lifetime as resistivity decreases in dendritic-web silicon solar cells is addressed. This variation is shown to be consistent with the presence of defect levels in the bandgap which arise from extended defects in the web material. The extended defects are oxide precipitates (SiOx) and the dislocation cores they decorate. Sensitivity to this background distribution of defect levels increases with doping because the Fermi level moves closer to the majority carrier band edge. For high-resistivity dendritic-web silicon, which has a low concentration of these extended defects, cell efficiencies as high as 16.6 percent (4 sq cm, 40 ohm-cm boron-doped base, AM1.5 global, 100 mW/sq cm, 25 C JPL LAPSS1 measurement) and a corresponding electron lifetime of 38 microsec have been obtained. Thickness effects occur in bifacial cell designs and in designs which use light trapping. In some cases, the dislocation/precipitate defect can be passivated through the full thickness of web cells by hydrogen ion implantation.

  3. In vitro complement activation, adherence to red blood cells and induction of mononuclear cell cytokine production by four strains of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans with different fimbriation and expression of leukotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, C.; Reinholdt, J.; Palarasah, Y.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been proposed as pro-atherogenic, and complement-mediated adherence to red blood cells (RBCs) may facilitate its systemic spread. We investigated the ability of four strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans wi...

  4. Mechanisms of therapeutic resistance in cancer (stem cells with emphasis on thyroid cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eHombach-Klonisch

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissue invasion, metastasis and therapeutic resistance to anti-cancer treatments are common and main causes of death in cancer patients. Tumor cells mount complex and still poorly understood molecular defense mechanisms to counteract and evade oxygen deprivation, nutritional restrictions as well as radio- and chemotherapeutic treatment regimens aimed at destabilizing their genomes and important cellular processes. In thyroid cancer, as in other tumors, such defense strategies include the reactivation in cancer cells of early developmental programs normally active exclusively in stem cells, the stimulation of cancer stem-like cells resident within the tumor tissue and the recruitment of bone marrow-derived progenitors into the tumor (Thomas et al., 2008;Klonisch et al., 2009;Derwahl, 2011. Metastasis and therapeutic resistance in cancer (stem cells involves the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition- (EMT- mediated enhancement in cellular plasticity, which includes coordinated dynamic biochemical and nuclear changes (Ahmed et al., 2010. The purpose of the present review is to provide an overview of the role of DNA repair mechanisms contributing to therapeutic resistance in thyroid cancer and highlight the emerging roles of autophagy and damage associated molecular pattern (DAMP responses in EMT and chemoresistance in tumor cells. Finally, we use the stem cell factor and nucleoprotein High Mobility Group A2 (HMGA2 as an example to demonstrate how factors intended to protect stem cells are wielded by cancer (stem cells to gain increased transformative cell plasticity which enhances metastasis, therapeutic resistance and cell survival. Wherever possible, we have included information on these cellular processes and associated factors as they relate to thyroid cancer cells.

  5. Characterisation of non-P-glycoprotein multidrug-resistant Ehrlich ascites tumour cells selected for resistance to mitoxantrone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D; Eriksen, J; Maare, C

    2000-01-01

    An Ehrlich ascites tumour cell line (EHR2) was selected in vivo for resistance to mitoxantrone (MITOX). The resistant cell line (EHR2/MITOX) was 6123-, 33-, and 30-fold-resistant to mitoxantrone, daunorubicin, and etoposide, respectively, but retained sensitivity to vincristine. The resistant cel...... to be associated with: 1) a quantitative reduction in topoisomerase IIalpha and beta protein; 2) reduced drug accumulation, probably as a result of increased expression of a novel transport protein with ATPase activity; and 3) increased expression of MRP mRNA....

  6. Hydroxy decenoic acid down regulates gtfB and gtfC expression and prevents Streptococcus mutans adherence to the cell surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousefi Behnam

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 10-Hydroxy-2-decenoic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid is the most active and unique component to the royal jelly that has antimicrobial properties. Streptococcus mutans is associated with pathogenesis of oral cavity, gingivoperiodontal diseases and bacteremia following dental manipulations. In the oral cavity, S. mutans colonize the soft tissues including tongue, palate, and buccal mucosa. When considering the role of supragingival dental plaque in caries, the proportion of acid producing bacteria (particularly S. mutans, has direct relevance to the pathogenicity of the plaque. The genes that encode glucosyltransferases (gtfs especially gtfB and gtfC are important in S. mutans colonization and pathogenesis. This study investigated the hydroxy-decenoic acid (HDA effects on gtfB and gtfC expression and S. mutans adherence to cells surfaces. Methods Streptococcus mutans was treated by different concentrations of HPLC purified HDA supplied by Iran Beekeeping and Veterinary Association. Real time RT-PCR and western blot assays were conducted to evaluate gtfB and gtfC genes transcription and translation before and after HDA treatment. The bacterial attachment to the cell surfaces was evaluated microscopically. Results 500 μg ml-1 of HDA inhibited gtfB and gtfC mRNA transcription and its expression. The same concentration of HDA decreased 60% the adherence of S. mutans to the surface of P19 cells. Conclusion Hydroxy-decenoic acid prevents gtfB and gtfC expression efficiently in the bactericide sub-concentrations and it could effectively reduce S. mutans adherence to the cell surfaces. In the future, therapeutic approaches to affecting S. mutans could be selective and it’s not necessary to put down the oral flora completely.

  7. Hydroxy decenoic acid down regulates gtfB and gtfC expression and prevents Streptococcus mutans adherence to the cell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Behnam; Ghaderi, Shahrooz; Rezapoor-Lactooyi, Alireza; Amiri, Niusha; Verdi, Javad; Shoae-Hassani, Alireza

    2012-07-28

    10-Hydroxy-2-decenoic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid is the most active and unique component to the royal jelly that has antimicrobial properties. Streptococcus mutans is associated with pathogenesis of oral cavity, gingivoperiodontal diseases and bacteremia following dental manipulations. In the oral cavity, S. mutans colonize the soft tissues including tongue, palate, and buccal mucosa. When considering the role of supragingival dental plaque in caries, the proportion of acid producing bacteria (particularly S. mutans), has direct relevance to the pathogenicity of the plaque. The genes that encode glucosyltransferases (gtfs) especially gtfB and gtfC are important in S. mutans colonization and pathogenesis. This study investigated the hydroxy-decenoic acid (HDA) effects on gtfB and gtfC expression and S. mutans adherence to cells surfaces. Streptococcus mutans was treated by different concentrations of HPLC purified HDA supplied by Iran Beekeeping and Veterinary Association. Real time RT-PCR and western blot assays were conducted to evaluate gtfB and gtfC genes transcription and translation before and after HDA treatment. The bacterial attachment to the cell surfaces was evaluated microscopically. 500 μg ml-1 of HDA inhibited gtfB and gtfC mRNA transcription and its expression. The same concentration of HDA decreased 60% the adherence of S. mutans to the surface of P19 cells. Hydroxy-decenoic acid prevents gtfB and gtfC expression efficiently in the bactericide sub-concentrations and it could effectively reduce S. mutans adherence to the cell surfaces. In the future, therapeutic approaches to affecting S. mutans could be selective and it's not necessary to put down the oral flora completely.

  8. Investigation on cytoskeleton dynamics for no-adherent cells subjected to point-like stimuli by digital holographic microscopy and holographic optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Lisa; Merola, Francesco; Memmolo, Pasquale; Mugnano, Martina; Fusco, Sabato; Netti, Paolo A.; Ferraro, Pietro

    2014-05-01

    Guiding, controlling and studying cellular functions are challenging themes in the biomedical field, as they are fundamental prerequisites for new therapeutic strategies from tissue regeneration to controlled drug delivery. In recent years, multidisciplinary studies in nanotechnology offer new tools to investigate important biophysical phenomena in response to the local physical characteristics of the extracellular environment, some examples are the mechanisms of cell adhesion, migration, communication and differentiation. Indeed for reproducing the features of the extracellular matrix in vitro, it is essential to develop active devices that evoke as much as possible the natural cellular environment. Our investigation is in the framework of studying and clarifying the biophysical mechanisms of the interaction between cells and the microenvironment in which they exist. We implement an optical tweezers setup to investigate cell material interaction and we use Digital Holography as non-invasive imaging technique in microscopy. We exploit Holographic Optical Tweezers arrangement in order to trap and manage functionalized micrometric latex beads to induce mechanical deformation in suspended cells. A lot of papers in literature examine the dynamics of the cytoskeleton when cells adhere on substrates and nowadays well established cell models are based on such research activities. Actually, the natural cell environment is made of a complex extracellular matrix and the single cell behavior is due to intricate interactions with the environment and are strongly correlated to the cell-cell interactions. Our investigation is devoted to understand the inner cell mechanism when it is mechanically stressed by point-like stimulus without the substrate influence.

  9. Antimicrobial and anti-virulence activity of capsaicin against erythromycin-resistant, cell-invasive Group A streptococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela eMarini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide is the active component of Capsicum plants (chilli peppers, which are grown as food and for medicinal purposes since ancient times, and is responsible for the pungency of their fruit. Besides its multiple pharmacological and physiological properties (pain relief, cancer prevention, and beneficial cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal effects capsaicin has recently attracted considerable attention because of its antimicrobial and anti-virulence activity. This is the first study of its in vitro antibacterial and anti-virulence activity against Streptococcus pyogenes [Group A streptococci (GAS], a major human pathogen. The test strains were previously characterized, erythromycin-susceptible (n=5 and erythromycin-resistant (n=27, cell-invasive pharyngeal isolates. The MICs of capsaicin were 64-128 μg/mL (the most common MIC was 128 µg/mL. The action of capsaicin was bactericidal, as suggested by MBC values that were equal or close to the MICs, and by early detection of dead cells in the live/dead assay. No capsaicin-resistant mutants were obtained in single-step resistance selection studies. Interestingly, growth in presence of sublethal capsaicin concentrations induced an increase in biofilm production (p ≤ 0.05 and in the number of bacteria adhering to A549 monolayers, and a reduction in cell-invasiveness and haemolytic activity (both p ≤ 0.05. Cell invasiveness fell so dramatically that a highly invasive strain became non-invasive. The dose-response relationship, characterized by opposite effects of low and high capsaicin doses, suggests a hormetic response. The present study documents that capsaicin has promising bactericidal activity against erythromycin-resistant, cell-invasive pharyngeal GAS isolates. The fact that sublethal concentrations inhibited cell invasion and reduced haemolytic activity, two important virulence traits of GAS, is also interesting, considering that cell

  10. Phenotypic Plasticity Determines Cancer Stem Cell Therapeutic Resistance in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Biddle

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs drive tumour spread and therapeutic resistance, and can undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET to switch between epithelial and post-EMT sub-populations. Examining oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, we now show that increased phenotypic plasticity, the ability to undergo EMT/MET, underlies increased CSC therapeutic resistance within both the epithelial and post-EMT sub-populations. The post-EMT CSCs that possess plasticity exhibit particularly enhanced therapeutic resistance and are defined by a CD44highEpCAMlow/−CD24+ cell surface marker profile. Treatment with TGFβ and retinoic acid (RA enabled enrichment of this sub-population for therapeutic testing, through which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stressor and autophagy inhibitor Thapsigargin was shown to selectively target these cells. Demonstration of the link between phenotypic plasticity and therapeutic resistance, and development of an in vitro method for enrichment of a highly resistant CSC sub-population, provides an opportunity for the development of improved chemotherapeutic agents that can eliminate CSCs.

  11. Phenotypic Plasticity Determines Cancer Stem Cell Therapeutic Resistance in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Adrian; Gammon, Luke; Liang, Xiao; Costea, Daniela Elena; Mackenzie, Ian C

    2016-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) drive tumour spread and therapeutic resistance, and can undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) to switch between epithelial and post-EMT sub-populations. Examining oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), we now show that increased phenotypic plasticity, the ability to undergo EMT/MET, underlies increased CSC therapeutic resistance within both the epithelial and post-EMT sub-populations. The post-EMT CSCs that possess plasticity exhibit particularly enhanced therapeutic resistance and are defined by a CD44(high)EpCAM(low/-) CD24(+) cell surface marker profile. Treatment with TGFβ and retinoic acid (RA) enabled enrichment of this sub-population for therapeutic testing, through which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stressor and autophagy inhibitor Thapsigargin was shown to selectively target these cells. Demonstration of the link between phenotypic plasticity and therapeutic resistance, and development of an in vitro method for enrichment of a highly resistant CSC sub-population, provides an opportunity for the development of improved chemotherapeutic agents that can eliminate CSCs.

  12. Novel drug-resistance mechanisms of pemetrexed-treated non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanino, Ryosuke; Tsubata, Yukari; Harashima, Nanae; Harada, Mamoru; Isobe, Takeshi

    2018-03-30

    Pemetrexed (PEM) improves the overall survival of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) when administered as maintenance therapy. However, PEM resistance often appears during the therapy. Although thymidylate synthase is known to be responsible for PEM resistance, no other mechanisms have been investigated in detail. In this study, we explored new drug resistance mechanisms of PEM-treated NSCLC using two combinations of parental and PEM-resistant NSCLC cell lines from PC-9 and A549. PEM increased the apoptosis cells in parental PC-9 and the senescent cells in parental A549. However, such changes were not observed in the respective PEM-resistant cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that, besides an increased gene expression of thymidylate synthase in PEM-resistant PC-9 cells, the solute carrier family 19 member1 ( SLC19A1) gene expression was markedly decreased in PEM-resistant A549 cells. The siRNA-mediated knockdown of SLC19A1 endowed the parental cell lines with PEM resistance. Conversely, PEM-resistant PC-9 cells carrying an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation acquired resistance to a tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. Although erlotinib can inhibit the phosphorylation of EGFR and Erk, it is unable to suppress the phosphorylation of Akt in PEM-resistant PC-9 cells. Additionally, PEM-resistant PC-9 cells were less sensitive to the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 than parental PC-9 cells. These results indicate that SLC19A1 negatively regulates PEM resistance in NSCLC, and that EGFR-tyrosine-kinase-inhibitor resistance was acquired with PEM resistance through Akt activation in NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations.

  13. A multidisciplinary approach to study the functional properties of neuron-like cell models constituting a living bio-hybrid system: SH-SY5Y cells adhering to PANI substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Caponi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A living bio-hybrid system has been successfully implemented. It is constituted by neuroblastic cells, the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, adhering to a poly-anyline (PANI a semiconductor polymer with memristive properties. By a multidisciplinary approach, the biocompatibility of the substrate has been analyzed and the functionality of the adhering cells has been investigated. We found that the PANI films can support the cell adhesion. Moreover, the SH-SY5Y cells were successfully differentiated into neuron-like cells for in vitro applications demonstrating that PANI can also promote cell differentiation. In order to deeply characterize the modifications of the bio-functionality induced by the cell-substrate interaction, the functional properties of the cells have been characterized by electrophysiology and Raman spectroscopy. Our results confirm that the PANI films do not strongly affect the general properties of the cells, ensuring their viability without toxic effects on their physiology. Ascribed to the adhesion process, however, a slight increase of the markers of the cell suffering has been evidenced by Raman spectroscopy and accordingly the electrophysiology shows a reduction at positive stimulations in the cells excitability.

  14. Characterisation of multidrug-resistant Ehrlich ascites tumour cells selected in vivo for resistance to etoposide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D; Maare, C; Eriksen, J

    2000-01-01

    -extractable immunoreactive topoisomerase IIalpha and beta in EHR2/VP16 was reduced by 30-40% relative to that in EHR2. The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) mRNA was increased 20-fold in EHR2/VP16 as compared with EHR2, whereas the expression of P-glycoprotein was unchanged. In EHR2/VP16, the steady......M. ATPase activity was slightly stimulated by daunorubicin, whereas vinblastine, verapamil, and cyclosporin A had no effect. In conclusion, development of resistance to VP16 in EHR2 is accompanied by a significant reduction in topoisomerase II (alpha and beta) and by increased expression of MRP mRNA (20......-fold). MRP displays several points of resemblance to P-glycoprotein in its mode of action: 1) like P-glycoprotein, MRP causes resistance to a range of hydrophobic drugs; 2) MRP decreases drug accumulation in the cells and this decrease is abolished by omission of energy; and 3) MRP increases efflux...

  15. Growth and adherence of Staphylococcus aureus were enhanced through the PGE2 produced by the activated COX-2/PGE2 pathway of infected oral epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxia Wang

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen of varieties of oral mucous infection. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 is a pro-inflammatory factor and Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2 is a critical enzyme of PGE2 biosynthesis. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether Staphylococcus aureus can increase PGE2 production of oral epithelial cells and how PGE2 functions in the growth and adherence of Staphylococcus aureus. mRNA levels of COX-2, fnbpA and fnbpB were estimated by quantitative PCR. PGE2 production was measured by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. The binding biomass of Staphylococcus aureus to human fibronectin was investigated by crystal violet staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy and the adherent force was measured by atomic force microscope (AFM. The COX-2 mRNA level and PGE2 production were increased by Staphylococcus aureus. PGE2 promoted the growth and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus, enhanced the attachment of Staphylococcus aureus to the human fibronectin as well as to the HOK cells. The transcription of fnbpB was up-regulated by PGE2 in both early and middle exponential phase but not fnbpA. These results suggest that the activation of COX-2/PGE2 pathway in oral epithelial cell by Staphylococcus aureus can in turn facilitate the growth and the ability to adhere of the pathogen. These findings uncover a new function of PGE2 and may lead to the potential of COX-2/PGE2 targeting in the therapy of inflammation and cancer in both which the COX-2/PGE2 pathway were observed activated.

  16. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens

  17. Fludarabine-mediated circumvention of cytarabine resistance is associated with fludarabine triphosphate accumulation in cytarabine-resistant leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shuji; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Kawai, Yasukazu; Takemura, Haruyuki; Kishi, Shinji; Yoshida, Akira; Urasaki, Yoshimasa; Iwasaki, Hiromichi; Ueda, Takanori

    2007-02-01

    The combination of cytarabine (ara-C) with fludarabine is a common approach to treating resistant acute myeloid leukemia. Success depends on a fludarabine triphosphate (F-ara-ATP)-mediated increase in the active intracellular metabolite of ara-C, ara-C 5'-triphosphate (ara-CTP). Therapy-resistant leukemia may exhibit ara-C resistance, the mechanisms of which might induce cross-resistance to fludarabine with reduced F-ara-ATP formation. The present study evaluated the effect of combining ara-C and fludarabine on ara-C-resistant leukemic cells in vitro. Two variant cell lines (R1 and R2) were 8-fold and 10-fold more ara-C resistant, respectively, than the parental HL-60 cells. Reduced deoxycytidine kinase activity was demonstrated in R1 and R2 cells, and R2 cells also showed an increase in cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II activity. Compared with HL-60 cells, R1 and R2 cells produced smaller amounts of ara-CTP. Both variants accumulated less F-ara-ATP than HL-60 cells and showed cross-resistance to fludarabine nucleoside (F-ara-A). R2 cells, however, accumulated much smaller amounts of F-ara-ATP and were more F-ara-A resistant than R1 cells. In HL-60 and R1 cells, F-ara-A pretreatment followed by ara-C incubation produced F-ara-ATP concentrations sufficient for augmenting ara-CTP production, thereby enhancing ara-C cytotoxicity. No potentiation was observed in R2 cells. Nucleotidase might preferentially degrade F-ara-A monophosphate over ara-C monophosphate, leading to reduced F-ara-ATP production and thereby compromising the F-ara-A-mediated potentiation of ara-C cytotoxicity in R2 cells. Thus, F-ara-A-mediated enhancement of ara-C cytotoxicity depended on F-ara-ATP accumulation in ara-C-resistant leukemic cells but ultimately was associated with the mechanism of ara-C resistance.

  18. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents in gemcitabine-resistant human tumor cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bree, Chris; Castro Kreder, Natasja; Loves, Willem J. P.; Franken, Nicolaas A. P.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Haveman, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine cross-resistance to anti-tumor treatments in 2',2'difluorodeoxycytidine (dFdC, gemcitabine)-resistant human tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human lung carcinoma cells SW-1573 (SWp) were made resistant to dFdC (SWg). Sensitivity to cisplatin (cDDP), paclitaxel,

  19. Exploiting mitochondrial dysfunction for effective elimination of imatinib-resistant leukemic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérome Kluza

    Full Text Available Challenges today concern chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients resistant to imatinib. There is growing evidence that imatinib-resistant leukemic cells present abnormal glucose metabolism but the impact on mitochondria has been neglected. Our work aimed to better understand and exploit the metabolic alterations of imatinib-resistant leukemic cells. Imatinib-resistant cells presented high glycolysis as compared to sensitive cells. Consistently, expression of key glycolytic enzymes, at least partly mediated by HIF-1α, was modified in imatinib-resistant cells suggesting that imatinib-resistant cells uncouple glycolytic flux from pyruvate oxidation. Interestingly, mitochondria of imatinib-resistant cells exhibited accumulation of TCA cycle intermediates, increased NADH and low oxygen consumption. These mitochondrial alterations due to the partial failure of ETC were further confirmed in leukemic cells isolated from some imatinib-resistant CML patients. As a consequence, mitochondria generated more ROS than those of imatinib-sensitive cells. This, in turn, resulted in increased death of imatinib-resistant leukemic cells following in vitro or in vivo treatment with the pro-oxidants, PEITC and Trisenox, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model. Conversely, inhibition of glycolysis caused derepression of respiration leading to lower cellular ROS. In conclusion, these findings indicate that imatinib-resistant leukemic cells have an unexpected mitochondrial dysfunction that could be exploited for selective therapeutic intervention.

  20. Adsorption of tributyltin by tributyltin resistant marine Pseudoalteromonas sp. cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimura, Haruo; Sato, Ryusei; Furuyama, Yuichi; Taniike, Akira; Yagi, Masahiro; Yoshida, Kazutoshi; Kitamura, Akira

    2008-01-01

    The isolate, Pesudoalteromonas sp. TBT1, could grow to overcome the toxicity of tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) up to 30 μM in the absence of Cl - in the medium until the cells reached an exponential phase of growth. The viability, however, was reduced after the cells reached a stationary phase. The degradation products, such as dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT), were not detected in the growth medium, indicating that the isolate has no ability to degrade TBT into less toxic DBT and MBT. Up to about 10 7.5 TBT molecules were adsorbed by a single cell. The observation of morphological changes with an electron microscope showed that the cell surface became wrinkled after exposure to the lethal concentration of 10 mM TBTCl. These results indicate that the resistance of the isolate toward the toxicity of TBTCl is not related to the unique cell surface, which seems to play an important role in preventing the diffusion of TBTCl into the cytoplasm

  1. Adsorption of tributyltin by tributyltin resistant marine Pseudoalteromonas sp. cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimura, Haruo [Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Kobe University, 5-1-1, Fukae, Higashinada, Kobe 658-0022 (Japan)], E-mail: hmimura@maritime.kobe-u.ac.jp; Sato, Ryusei; Furuyama, Yuichi; Taniike, Akira [Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Kobe University, 5-1-1, Fukae, Higashinada, Kobe 658-0022 (Japan); Yagi, Masahiro [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Kobe Institute of Health, 4-6, Minatojima, Chuo, Kobe 650-0046 (Japan); Yoshida, Kazutoshi [Hyogo Prefectural Institute of Technology, 3-1-12, Yukihira, Suma, Kobe 654-0037 (Japan); Kitamura, Akira [Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Kobe University, 5-1-1, Fukae, Higashinada, Kobe 658-0022 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The isolate, Pesudoalteromonas sp. TBT1, could grow to overcome the toxicity of tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) up to 30 {mu}M in the absence of Cl{sup -} in the medium until the cells reached an exponential phase of growth. The viability, however, was reduced after the cells reached a stationary phase. The degradation products, such as dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT), were not detected in the growth medium, indicating that the isolate has no ability to degrade TBT into less toxic DBT and MBT. Up to about 10{sup 7.5} TBT molecules were adsorbed by a single cell. The observation of morphological changes with an electron microscope showed that the cell surface became wrinkled after exposure to the lethal concentration of 10 mM TBTCl. These results indicate that the resistance of the isolate toward the toxicity of TBTCl is not related to the unique cell surface, which seems to play an important role in preventing the diffusion of TBTCl into the cytoplasm.

  2. Aurora kinase B is important for antiestrogen resistant cell growth and a potential biomarker for tamoxifen resistant breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sarah L; Yde, Christina W; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resistance to antiestrogen therapy is a major clinical challenge in the treatment of estrogen receptor α (ER)-positive breast cancer. The aim of the study was to explore the growth promoting pathways of antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cells to identify biomarkers and novel treatm...

  3. Supermolecular drug challenge to overcome drug resistance in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Yasuhiko; Eshita, Yuki; Ji, Rui-Cheng; Kobayashi, Takashi; Onishi, Masayasu; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yoshida, Jun; Kubota, Naoji

    2018-06-04

    Overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells can be accomplished using drug delivery systems in large-molecular-weight ATP-binding cassette transporters before entry into phagolysosomes and by particle-cell-surface interactions. However, these hypotheses do not address the intratumoral heterogeneity in cancer. Anti-MDR must be related to alterations of drug targets, expression of detoxification, as well as altered proliferation. In this study, it is shown that the excellent efficacy and sustainability of anti-MDR is due to a stable ES complex because of the allosteric facilities of artificial enzymes when they are used as supramolecular complexes. The allosteric effect of supermolecular drugs can be explained by the induced-fit model and can provide stable feedback control systems through the loop transfer function of the Hill equation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of RAD51 in etoposide (VP16) resistance in small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lasse Tengbjerg; Lundin, Cecilia; Spang-Thomsen, Mogens

    2003-01-01

    Etoposide (VP16) is a potent inducer of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and is efficiently used in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) therapy. However, acquired VP16 resistance remains an important barrier to effective treatment. To understand the underlying mechanisms for VP16 resistance in SCLC, we...... investigated DSB repair and cellular VP16 sensitivity of SCLC cells. VP16 sensitivity and RAD51, DNA-PK(cs), topoisomerase IIalpha and P-glycoprotein protein levels were determined in 17 SCLC cell lines. In order to unravel the role of RAD51 in VP16 resistance, we cloned the human RAD51 gene, transfected SCLC...... cells with RAD51 sense or antisense constructs and measured the VP16 resistance. Finally, we measured VP16-induced DSBs in the 17 SCLC cell lines. Two cell lines exhibited a multidrug-resistant phenotype. In the other SCLC cell lines, the cellular VP16 resistance was positively correlated with the RAD51...

  5. Quantitative proteomics as a tool to identify resistance mechanisms in erlotinib-resistant subclones of the non-small cell lung cancer cell line HCC827

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirstine

    , which in 43-50% of cases are caused by a secondary mutation (T790M) in EGFR. Importantly, a majority of resistance cases are still unexplained (Lin & Bivona, 2012). Our aim is to identify novel resistance mechanisms – and potentially new drug targets - in erlotinib-resistant subclones of the NSCLC cell...... of erlotinib, and in biological triplicates on a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer. Only proteins identified with minimum 2 unique peptides and in minimum 2 of 3 replicates were accepted. Results: Importantly, the resistant clones did not acquire the T790M or other EGFR or KRAS mutations, potentiating...... the identification of novel resistance mechanisms. We identified 2875 cytoplasmic proteins present in all 4 cell lines. Of these 87, 56 and 23 are upregulated >1.5 fold; and 117, 72 and 32 are downregulated >1.5 fold, respectively, in the 3 resistant clones compared to the parental cell line. By network analysis, we...

  6. Radiation induction of drug resistance in RIF-1: Correlation of tumor and cell culture results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulder, J.E.; Hopwood, L.E.; Volk, D.M.; Davies, B.M.

    1991-01-01

    The RIF-1 tumor line contains cells that are resistant to various anti-neoplastic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), adriamycin (ADR), and etoposide (VP16). The frequency of these drug-resistant cells is increased after irradiation. The frequency of drug-resistant cells and the magnitude of radiation-induced drug resistance are different in cell culture than in tumors. The dose-response and expression time relationships for radiation induction of drug resistance observed in RIF-1 tumors are unusual.We hypothesize that at high radiation doses in vivo, we are selecting for cells that are both drug resistant and radiation resistant due to microenvironmental factors, whereas at low radiation doses in vivo and all radiation doses in vitro, we are observing true mutants. These studies indicate that there can be significant differences in drug-resistance frequencies between tumors and their cell lines of origin, and that radiation induction of drug resistance depends significantly on whether the induction is done in tumors or in cell culture. These results imply that theories about the induction of drug resistance that are based on cell culture studies may be inapplicable to the induction of drug resistance in tumors

  7. Multi-Electrode Resistivity Probe for Investigation of Local Temperature Inside Metal Shell Battery Cells via Resistivity: Experiments and Evaluation of Electrical Resistance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Hong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct Current (DC electrical resistivity is a material property that is sensitive to temperature changes. In this paper, the relationship between resistivity and local temperature inside steel shell battery cells (two commercial 10 Ah and 4.5 Ah lithium-ion cells is innovatively studied by Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT. The Schlumberger configuration in ERT is applied to divide the cell body into several blocks distributed in different levels, where the apparent resistivities are measured by multi-electrode surface probes. The investigated temperature ranges from −20 to 80 °C. Experimental results have shown that the resistivities mainly depend on temperature changes in each block of the two cells used and the function of the resistivity and temperature can be fitted to the ERT-measurement results in the logistical-plot. Subsequently, the dependence of resistivity on the state of charge (SOC is investigated, and the SOC range of 70%–100% has a remarkable impact on the resistivity at low temperatures. The proposed approach under a thermal cool down regime is demonstrated to monitor the local transient temperature.

  8. Exosomes from adriamycin-resistant breast cancer cells transmit drug resistance partly by delivering miR-222.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan-Dan; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Lv, Meng-Meng; Chen, Wei-Xian; Chen, Xiu; Yang, Su-Jin; Shen, Hongyu; Zhong, Shan-Liang; Tang, Jin-Hai; Zhao, Jian-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) is one of the major deadly cancers in women. However, treatment of BCa is still hindered by the acquired-drug resistance. It is increasingly reported that exosomes take part in the development, metastasis, and drug resistance of BCa. However, the specific role of exosomes in drug resistance of BCa is poorly understood. In this study, we investigate whether exosomes transmit drug resistance through delivering miR-222. We established an adriamycin-resistant variant of Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) breast cancer cell line (MCF-7/Adr) from a drug-sensitive variant (MCF-7/S). Exosomes were isolated from cell supernatant by ultracentrifugation. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay and apoptosis assay. Individual miR-222 molecules in BCa cells were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Then, FISH was combined with locked nucleic acid probes and enzyme-labeled fluorescence (LNA-ELF-FISH). Individual miR-222 could be detected as bright photostable fluorescent spots and then the quantity of miR-222 per cell could be counted. Stained exosomes were taken in by the receipt cells. MCF-7/S acquired drug resistance after co-culture with exosomes from MCF-7/Adr (A/exo) but did not after co-culture with exosomes from MCF-7/S (S/exo). The quantity of miR-222 in A/exo-treated MCF-7/S was significantly greater than in S/exo-treated MCF-7/S. MCF-7/S transfected with miR-222 mimics acquired adriamycin resistance while MCF-7/S transfected with miR-222 inhibitors lost resistance. In conclusion, exosomes are effective in transmitting drug resistance and the delivery of miR-222 via exosomes may be a mechanism.

  9. Quantitative proteomics identifies central players in erlotinib resistance of the non-small cell lung cancer cell line HCC827

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirstine; Lund, Rikke Raaen; Beck, Hans Christian

    Background: Erlotinib (Tarceva®, Roche) has significantly changed the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as 70% of patients show significant tumor regression when treated. However, all patients relapse due to development of acquired resistance, which in 43-50% of cases are caused...... by a secondary mutation (T790M) in EGFR. Importantly, a majority of resistance cases are still unexplained. Our aim is to identify novel resistance mechanisms in erlotinib-resistant subclones of the NSCLC cell line HCC827. Materials & Methods: We established 3 erlotinib-resistant subclones (resistant to 10, 20...... or other EGFR or KRAS mutations, potentiating the identification of novel resistance mechanisms. We identified 2875 cytoplasmic proteins present in all 4 cell lines. Of these 87, 56 and 23 are upregulated >1.5 fold; and 117, 72 and 32 are downregulated >1.5 fold, respectively, in the 3 resistant clones...

  10. Danshen extract circumvents drug resistance and represses cell growth in human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Yu; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Chih-Kung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Peng, Bo; Lin, Gu-Jiun; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Chang, Wen-Liang; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2017-12-29

    Danshen is a common traditional Chinese medicine used to treat neoplastic and chronic inflammatory diseases in China. However, the effects of Danshen on human oral cancer cells remain relatively unknown. This study investigated the antiproliferative effects of a Danshen extract on human oral cancer SAS, SCC25, OEC-M1, and KB drug-resistant cell lines and elucidated the possible underlying mechanism. We investigated the anticancer potential of the Danshen extract in human oral cancer cell lines and an in vivo oral cancer xenograft mouse model. The expression of apoptosis-related molecules was evaluated through Western blotting, and the concentration of in vivo apoptotic markers was measured using immunohistochemical staining. The antitumor effects of 5-fluorouracil and the Danshen extract were compared. Cell proliferation assays revealed that the Danshen extract strongly inhibited oral cancer cell proliferation. Cell morphology studies revealed that the Danshen extract inhibited the growth of SAS, SCC25, and OEC-M1 cells by inducing apoptosis. The Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the Danshen extract induced cell cycle G0/G1 arrest. Immunoblotting analysis for the expression of active caspase-3 and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein indicated that Danshen extract-induced apoptosis in human oral cancer SAS cells was mediated through the caspase pathway. Moreover, the Danshen extract significantly inhibited growth in the SAS xenograft mouse model. Furthermore, the Danshen extract circumvented drug resistance in KB drug-resistant oral cancer cells. The study results suggest that the Danshen extract could be a potential anticancer agent in oral cancer treatment.

  11. The extracellular adherence protein (Eap) of Staphylococcus aureus acts as a proliferation and migration repressing factor that alters the cell morphology of keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbeis, Janina; Peisker, Henrik; Backes, Christian S; Bur, Stephanie; Hölters, Sebastian; Thewes, Nicolas; Greiner, Markus; Junker, Christian; Schwarz, Eva C; Hoth, Markus; Junker, Kerstin; Preissner, Klaus T; Jacobs, Karin; Herrmann, Mathias; Bischoff, Markus

    2017-02-01

    Staphyloccocus aureus is a major human pathogen and a common cause for superficial and deep seated wound infections. The pathogen is equipped with a large arsenal of virulence factors, which facilitate attachment to various eukaryotic cell structures and modulate the host immune response. One of these factors is the extracellular adherence protein Eap, a member of the "secretable expanded repertoire adhesive molecules" (SERAM) protein family that possesses adhesive and immune modulatory properties. The secreted protein was previously shown to impair wound healing by interfering with host defense and neovascularization. However, its impact on keratinocyte proliferation and migration, two major steps in the re-epithelialization process of wounds, is not known. Here, we report that Eap affects the proliferation and migration capacities of keratinocytes by altering their morphology and adhesive properties. In particular, treatment of non-confluent HaCaT cell cultures with Eap resulted in cell morphology changes as well as a significant reduction in cell proliferation and migration. Eap-treated HaCaT cells changed their appearance from an oblong via a trapezoid to an astral-like shape, accompanied by decreases in cell volume and cell stiffness, and exhibited significantly increased cell adhesion. Eap had a similar influence on endothelial and cancer cells, indicative for a general effect of Eap on eukaryotic cell morphology and functions. Specifically, Eap was found to interfere with growth factor-stimulated activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that is known to be responsible for cell shape modulation, induction of proliferation and migration of epithelial cells. Western blot analyses revealed that Eap blocked the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) in keratinocyte growth factor (KGF)-stimulated HaCaT cells. Together, these data add another antagonistic mechanism of Eap in wound healing, whereby the

  12. Serum Proteins Enhance Dispersion Stability and Influence the Cytotoxicity and Dosimetry of ZnO Nanoparticles in Suspension and Adherent Cancer Cell Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Catherine B.; Chess, Jordan J.; Wingett, Denise G.; Punnoose, Alex

    2015-11-01

    Agglomeration and sedimentation of nanoparticles (NPs) within biological solutions is a major limitation in their use in many downstream applications. It has been proposed that serum proteins associate with the NP surface to form a protein corona that limits agglomeration and sedimentation. Here, we investigate the effect of fetal bovine serum (FBS) proteins on the dispersion stability, dosimetry, and NP-induced cytotoxicity of cationic zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) synthesized via forced hydrolysis with a core size of 10 nm. Two different in vitro cell culture models, suspension and adherent, were evaluated by comparing a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) nZnO dispersion (nZnO/PBS) and an FBS-stabilized PBS nZnO dispersion (nZnO - FBS/PBS). Surface interactions of FBS on nZnO were analyzed via spectroscopic and optical techniques. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the adsorption of negatively charged protein components on the cationic nZnO surface through the disappearance of surfaced-adsorbed carboxyl functional groups and the subsequent detection of vibrational modes associated with the protein backbone of FBS-associated proteins. Further confirmation of these interactions was noted in the isoelectric point shift of the nZnO from the characteristic pH of 9.5 to a pH of 6.1. In nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersions, the FBS reduced agglomeration and sedimentation behaviors to impart long-term improvements (>24 h) to the nZnO dispersion stability. Furthermore, mathematical dosimetry models indicate that nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersions had consistent NP deposition patterns over time unlike unstable nZnO/PBS dispersions. In suspension cell models, the stable nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersion resulted in a ~33 % increase in the NP-induced cytotoxicity for both Jurkat leukemic and Hut-78 lymphoma cancer cells. In contrast, the nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersion resulted in 49 and 71 % reductions in the cytotoxicity observed towards the adherent breast (T-47D) and prostate

  13. Serum Proteins Enhance Dispersion Stability and Influence the Cytotoxicity and Dosimetry of ZnO Nanoparticles in Suspension and Adherent Cancer Cell Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Catherine B; Chess, Jordan J; Wingett, Denise G; Punnoose, Alex

    2015-12-01

    Agglomeration and sedimentation of nanoparticles (NPs) within biological solutions is a major limitation in their use in many downstream applications. It has been proposed that serum proteins associate with the NP surface to form a protein corona that limits agglomeration and sedimentation. Here, we investigate the effect of fetal bovine serum (FBS) proteins on the dispersion stability, dosimetry, and NP-induced cytotoxicity of cationic zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) synthesized via forced hydrolysis with a core size of 10 nm. Two different in vitro cell culture models, suspension and adherent, were evaluated by comparing a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) nZnO dispersion (nZnO/PBS) and an FBS-stabilized PBS nZnO dispersion (nZnO - FBS/PBS). Surface interactions of FBS on nZnO were analyzed via spectroscopic and optical techniques. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the adsorption of negatively charged protein components on the cationic nZnO surface through the disappearance of surfaced-adsorbed carboxyl functional groups and the subsequent detection of vibrational modes associated with the protein backbone of FBS-associated proteins. Further confirmation of these interactions was noted in the isoelectric point shift of the nZnO from the characteristic pH of 9.5 to a pH of 6.1. In nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersions, the FBS reduced agglomeration and sedimentation behaviors to impart long-term improvements (>24 h) to the nZnO dispersion stability. Furthermore, mathematical dosimetry models indicate that nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersions had consistent NP deposition patterns over time unlike unstable nZnO/PBS dispersions. In suspension cell models, the stable nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersion resulted in a ~33 % increase in the NP-induced cytotoxicity for both Jurkat leukemic and Hut-78 lymphoma cancer cells. In contrast, the nZnO - FBS/PBS dispersion resulted in 49 and 71 % reductions in the cytotoxicity observed towards the adherent breast (T-47D) and prostate

  14. Nuclear respiratory factor-1 and bioenergetics in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radde, Brandie N.; Ivanova, Margarita M.; Mai, Huy Xuan; Alizadeh-Rad, Negin; Piell, Kellianne; Van Hoose, Patrick; Cole, Marsha P.; Muluhngwi, Penn; Kalbfleisch, Ted S.; Rouchka, Eric C.; Hill, Bradford G.; Klinge, Carolyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Acquired tamoxifen (TAM) resistance is a significant clinical problem in treating patients with estrogen receptor α (ERα)+ breast cancer. We reported that ERα increases nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), which regulates nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene transcription, in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and NRF-1 knockdown stimulates apoptosis. Whether NRF-1 and target gene expression is altered in endocrine resistant breast cancer cells is unknown. We measured NRF-1and metabolic features in a cell model of progressive TAM-resistance. NRF-1 and its target mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were higher in TAM-resistant LCC2 and LCC9 cells than TAM-sensitive MCF-7 cells. Using extracellular flux assays we observed that LCC1, LCC2, and LCC9 cells showed similar oxygen consumption rate (OCR), but lower mitochondrial reserve capacity which was correlated with lower Succinate Dehydrogenase Complex, Subunit B in LCC1 and LCC2 cells. Complex III activity was lower in LCC9 than MCF-7 cells. LCC1, LCC2, and LCC9 cells had higher basal extracellular acidification (ECAR), indicating higher aerobic glycolysis, relative to MCF-7 cells. Mitochondrial bioenergetic responses to estradiol and 4-hydroxytamoxifen were reduced in the endocrine-resistant cells compared to MCF-7 cells. These results suggest the acquisition of altered metabolic phenotypes in response to long term antiestrogen treatment may increase vulnerability to metabolic stress. - Highlights: • NRF-1 and TFAM expression are higher in endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells. • Oxygen consumption rate is similar in endocrine-sensitive and resistant cells. • Mitochondrial reserve capacity is lower in endocrine-resistant cells. • Endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells have increased glycolysis. • Bioenergetic responses to E2 and tamoxifen are lower in endocrine-resistant cells.

  15. Nuclear respiratory factor-1 and bioenergetics in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radde, Brandie N.; Ivanova, Margarita M.; Mai, Huy Xuan; Alizadeh-Rad, Negin; Piell, Kellianne; Van Hoose, Patrick; Cole, Marsha P.; Muluhngwi, Penn; Kalbfleisch, Ted S. [Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Genetics, Center for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Rouchka, Eric C. [Bioinformatics and Biomedical Computing Laboratory, Department of Computer Engineering and Computer Science, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Hill, Bradford G. [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Klinge, Carolyn M., E-mail: carolyn.klinge@louisville.edu [Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Genetics, Center for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States)

    2016-09-10

    Acquired tamoxifen (TAM) resistance is a significant clinical problem in treating patients with estrogen receptor α (ERα)+ breast cancer. We reported that ERα increases nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), which regulates nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene transcription, in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and NRF-1 knockdown stimulates apoptosis. Whether NRF-1 and target gene expression is altered in endocrine resistant breast cancer cells is unknown. We measured NRF-1and metabolic features in a cell model of progressive TAM-resistance. NRF-1 and its target mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were higher in TAM-resistant LCC2 and LCC9 cells than TAM-sensitive MCF-7 cells. Using extracellular flux assays we observed that LCC1, LCC2, and LCC9 cells showed similar oxygen consumption rate (OCR), but lower mitochondrial reserve capacity which was correlated with lower Succinate Dehydrogenase Complex, Subunit B in LCC1 and LCC2 cells. Complex III activity was lower in LCC9 than MCF-7 cells. LCC1, LCC2, and LCC9 cells had higher basal extracellular acidification (ECAR), indicating higher aerobic glycolysis, relative to MCF-7 cells. Mitochondrial bioenergetic responses to estradiol and 4-hydroxytamoxifen were reduced in the endocrine-resistant cells compared to MCF-7 cells. These results suggest the acquisition of altered metabolic phenotypes in response to long term antiestrogen treatment may increase vulnerability to metabolic stress. - Highlights: • NRF-1 and TFAM expression are higher in endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells. • Oxygen consumption rate is similar in endocrine-sensitive and resistant cells. • Mitochondrial reserve capacity is lower in endocrine-resistant cells. • Endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells have increased glycolysis. • Bioenergetic responses to E2 and tamoxifen are lower in endocrine-resistant cells.

  16. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  17. The stepwise evolution of the exome during acquisition of docetaxel resistance in breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Ninel; Ehlers, Natasja Spring; Zhu, Shida

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resistance to taxane-based therapy in breast cancer patients is a major clinical problem that may be addressed through insight of the genomic alterations leading to taxane resistance in breast cancer cells. In the current study we used whole exome sequencing to discover somatic genomic...... alterations, evolving across evolutionary stages during the acquisition of docetaxel resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Results: Two human breast cancer in vitro models (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) of the step-wise acquisition of docetaxel resistance were developed by exposing cells to 18 gradually increasing...... resistance relevant genomic variation appeared to arise midway towards fully resistant cells corresponding to passage 31 (5 nM docetaxel) for MDA-MB-231 and passage 16 (1.2 nM docetaxel) for MCF-7, and where the cells also exhibited a period of reduced growth rate or arrest, respectively. MCF-7 cell acquired...

  18. Phagocytosis and Epithelial Cell Invasion by Crohn’s Disease-Associated Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli Are Inhibited by the Anti-inflammatory Drug 6-Mercaptopurine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Migliore

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC strains are overrepresented in the dysbiotic microbiota of Crohn’s disease (CD patients, and contribute to the onset of the chronic inflammation typical of the disease. However, the effects of anti-inflammatory drugs used for CD treatment on AIEC virulence have not yet been investigated. In this report, we show that exposure of AIEC LF82 strain to amino-6-mercaptopurine (6-MP riboside, one of the most widely used anti-inflammatory drugs in CD, impairs its ability to adhere to, and consequently to invade, human epithelial cells. Notably, phagocytosis of LF82 treated with 6-MP by human macrophages is also reduced, suggesting that 6-MP affects AIEC cell surface determinants involved both in interaction with epithelial cells and in uptake by macrophages. Since a main target of 6-MP in bacterial cells is the inhibition of the important signal molecule c-di-GMP, we also tested whether perturbations in cAMP, another major signaling pathway in E. coli, might have similar effects on interactions with human cells. To this aim, we grew LF82 in the presence of glucose, which leads to inhibition of cAMP synthesis. Growth in glucose-supplemented medium resulted in a reduction in AIEC adhesion to epithelial cells and uptake by macrophages. Consistent with these results, both 6-MP and glucose can affect expression of cell adhesion-related genes, such as the csg genes, encoding thin aggregative fimbriae (curli. In addition, glucose strongly inhibits expression of the fim operon, encoding type 1 pili, a known AIEC determinant for adhesion to human cells. To further investigate whether 6-MP can indeed inhibit c-di-GMP signaling in AIEC, we performed biofilm and motility assays and determination of extracellular polysaccharides. 6-MP clearly affected biofilm formation and cellulose production, but also, unexpectedly, reduced cell motility, itself an important virulence factor for AIEC. Our results provide strong evidence

  19. Cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cell-derived exosomes increase cisplatin resistance of recipient cells in exosomal miR-100-5p-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaobing; Yu, Shaorong; Zhou, Leilei; Shi, Meiqi; Hu, Yong; Xu, Xiaoyue; Shen, Bo; Liu, Siwen; Yan, Dali; Feng, Jifeng

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes derived from lung cancer cells confer cisplatin (DDP) resistance to other cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. A549 resistance to DDP (A549/DDP) was established. Microarray was used to analyze microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles of A549 cells, A549/DDP cells, A549 exosomes, and A549/DDP exosomes. There was a strong correlation of miRNA profiles between exosomes and their maternal cells. A total of 11 miRNAs were significantly upregulated both in A549/DDP cells compared with A549 cells and in exosomes derived from A549/DDP cells in contrast to exosomes from A549 cells. A total of 31 downregulated miRNAs were also observed. miR-100-5p was the most prominent decreased miRNA in DDP-resistant exosomes compared with the corresponding sensitive ones. Downregulated miR-100-5p was proved to be involved in DDP resistance in A549 cells, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) expression was reverse regulated by miR-100-5p. Exosomes confer recipient cells' resistance to DDP in an exosomal miR-100-5p-dependent manner with mTOR as its potential target both in vitro and in vivo. Exosomes from DDP-resistant lung cancer cells A549 can alter other lung cancer cells' sensitivity to DDP in exosomal miR-100-5p-dependent manner. Our study provides new insights into the molecular mechanism of DDP resistance in lung cancer.

  20. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major problem in the successful treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). New treatment strategies are needed, such as gene therapy specifically targeting the MDR cells in the tumor. Retroviral LacZ gene-containing vectors that were either pseudotyped...... for the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV-1) receptor or had specificity for the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-A) receptor were used for transduction of five SCLC cell lines differing by a range of MDR mechanisms. Transduction efficiencies in these cell lines were compared by calculating the percentage...... of blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC...

  1. Melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells are resistant to cell injury, but not always.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georg, Birgitte; Ghelli, Anna; Giordano, Carla; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Sadun, Alfredo A; Carelli, Valerio; Hannibal, Jens; La Morgia, Chiara

    2017-09-01

    Melanopsin retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) are intrinsically photosensitive RGCs deputed to non-image forming functions of the eye such as synchronization of circadian rhythms to light-dark cycle. These cells are characterized by unique electrophysiological, anatomical and biochemical properties and are usually more resistant than conventional RGCs to different insults, such as axotomy and different paradigms of stress. We also demonstrated that these cells are relatively spared compared to conventional RGCs in mitochondrial optic neuropathies (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and Dominant Optic Atrophy). However, these cells are affected in other neurodegenerative conditions, such as glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease. We here review the current evidences that may underlie this dichotomy. We also present our unpublished data on cell experiments demonstrating that melanopsin itself does not explain the robustness of these cells and some preliminary data on immunohistochemical assessment of mitochondria in mRGCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Dispensing of very low volumes of ultra high viscosity alginate gels: a new tool for encapsulation of adherent cells and rapid prototyping of scaffolds and implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gepp, Michael M; Ehrhart, Friederike; Shirley, Stephen G; Howitz, Steffen; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2009-01-01

    We present a tool for dispensing very low volumes (20 nL or more) of ultra high viscosity (UHV) medical-grade alginate hydrogels. It uses a modified piezo-driven micrometering valve, integrated into a versatile system that allows fast prototyping of encapsulation procedures and scaffold production. Valves show excellent dispensing properties for UHV alginate in concentrations of 0.4% and 0.7% and also for aqueous liquids. An optimized process flow provides excellent handling of biological samples under sterile conditions. This technique allows the encapsulation of adherent cells and structuring of substrates for biotechnology and regenerative medicine. A variety of cell lines showed at least 70% viability after encapsulation (including cell lines that are relevant in regenerative medicine like Hep G2), and time-lapse analysis revealed cells proliferating and showing limited motility under alginate spots. Cells show metabolic activity, gene product expression, and physiological function. Encapsulated cells have contact with the substrate and can exchange metabolites while being isolated from macromolecules in the environment. Contactless dispensing allows structuring of substrates with alginate, isolation and transfer of cell-alginate complexes, and the dispensing of biological active hydrogels like extracellular matrix-derived gels.

  3. Characterization of a distinct population of circulating human non-adherent endothelial forming cells and their recruitment via intercellular adhesion molecule-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Appleby

    Full Text Available Circulating vascular progenitor cells contribute to the pathological vasculogenesis of cancer whilst on the other hand offer much promise in therapeutic revascularization in post-occlusion intervention in cardiovascular disease. However, their characterization has been hampered by the many variables to produce them as well as their described phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. Herein we have isolated, enriched for and then characterized a human umbilical cord blood derived CD133(+ population of non-adherent endothelial forming cells (naEFCs which expressed the hematopoietic progenitor cell markers (CD133, CD34, CD117, CD90 and CD38 together with mature endothelial cell markers (VEGFR2, CD144 and CD31. These cells also expressed low levels of CD45 but did not express the lymphoid markers (CD3, CD4, CD8 or myeloid markers (CD11b and CD14 which distinguishes them from 'early' endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs. Functional studies demonstrated that these naEFCs (i bound Ulex europaeus lectin, (ii demonstrated acetylated-low density lipoprotein uptake, (iii increased vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1 surface expression in response to tumor necrosis factor and (iv in co-culture with mature endothelial cells increased the number of tubes, tubule branching and loops in a 3-dimensional in vitro matrix. More importantly, naEFCs placed in vivo generated new lumen containing vasculature lined by CD144 expressing human endothelial cells (ECs. Extensive genomic and proteomic analyses of the naEFCs showed that intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-3 is expressed on their cell surface but not on mature endothelial cells. Furthermore, functional analysis demonstrated that ICAM-3 mediated the rolling and adhesive events of the naEFCs under shear stress. We suggest that the distinct population of naEFCs identified and characterized here represents a new valuable therapeutic target to control aberrant vasculogenesis.

  4. Characterization of a Distinct Population of Circulating Human Non-Adherent Endothelial Forming Cells and Their Recruitment via Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Emma J.; Barrett, Jeffrey M.; Tooley, Katie; Sen, Shaundeep; Sun, Wai Yan; Grose, Randall; Nicholson, Ian; Levina, Vitalina; Cooke, Ira; Talbo, Gert; Lopez, Angel F.; Bonder, Claudine S.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating vascular progenitor cells contribute to the pathological vasculogenesis of cancer whilst on the other hand offer much promise in therapeutic revascularization in post-occlusion intervention in cardiovascular disease. However, their characterization has been hampered by the many variables to produce them as well as their described phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. Herein we have isolated, enriched for and then characterized a human umbilical cord blood derived CD133+ population of non-adherent endothelial forming cells (naEFCs) which expressed the hematopoietic progenitor cell markers (CD133, CD34, CD117, CD90 and CD38) together with mature endothelial cell markers (VEGFR2, CD144 and CD31). These cells also expressed low levels of CD45 but did not express the lymphoid markers (CD3, CD4, CD8) or myeloid markers (CD11b and CD14) which distinguishes them from ‘early’ endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Functional studies demonstrated that these naEFCs (i) bound Ulex europaeus lectin, (ii) demonstrated acetylated-low density lipoprotein uptake, (iii) increased vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) surface expression in response to tumor necrosis factor and (iv) in co-culture with mature endothelial cells increased the number of tubes, tubule branching and loops in a 3-dimensional in vitro matrix. More importantly, naEFCs placed in vivo generated new lumen containing vasculature lined by CD144 expressing human endothelial cells (ECs). Extensive genomic and proteomic analyses of the naEFCs showed that intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-3 is expressed on their cell surface but not on mature endothelial cells. Furthermore, functional analysis demonstrated that ICAM-3 mediated the rolling and adhesive events of the naEFCs under shear stress. We suggest that the distinct population of naEFCs identified and characterized here represents a new valuable therapeutic target to control aberrant vasculogenesis. PMID:23144795

  5. Heterogeneity in induced thermal resistance of rat tumor cell clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasovic, S.P.; Rosenblatt, P.L.; Heitzman, D.

    1983-01-01

    Four 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma clones were examined for their survival response to heating under conditions that induced transient thermal resistance (thermotolerance). Clones MTC and MTF7 were isolated from the subcutaneous locally growing tumor, whereas clones MTLn2 and MTLn3 were derived from spontaneous lung metastases. There was heterogeneity among these clones in thermotolerance induced by either fractionated 45 0 C or continuous 42 0 C heating, but the order of sensitivity was not necessarily the same. The clones developed thermal resistance at different rates and to different degrees within the same time intervals. There was heterogeneity between clones isolated from within either the primary site or metastatic lesions. However, clones derived from metastatic foci did not intrinsically acquire more or less thermotolerance to fractionated 45 0 C or continuous 42 0 C heating than did clones from the primary tumor. Further, there was no apparent relationship between any phenotypic properties that conferred more or less thermotolerance in vitro and any phenotypic properties that conferred enhanced metastatic success of these same clones by spontaneous (subcutaneous) or experimental (intravenous) routes in vivo. These tumor clones also differ in their karyotype, metastatic potential, cell surface features, sensitivity to x-irradiation and drugs, and ability to repair sublethal radiation damage. These results provide further credence to the concept that inherent heterogeneity within tumors may be as important in therapeutic success as other known modifiers of outcome such as site and treatment heterogeneity

  6. Thioridazine affects transcription of genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mette; Højland, Dorte Heidi; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2011-01-01

    have previously shown that the expression of some resistance genes is abolished after treatment with thioridazine and oxacillin. To further understand the mechanism underlying the reversal of resistance, we tested the expression of genes involved in antibiotic resistance and cell wall biosynthesis...... in response to thioridazine in combination with oxacillin. We observed that the oxacillin-induced expression of genes belonging to the VraSR regulon is reduced by the addition of thioridazine. The exclusion of such key factors involved in cell wall biosynthesis will most likely lead to a weakened cell wall...... reversal of resistance by thioridazine relies on decreased expression of specific genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis....

  7. Radiation response of drug-resistant variants of a human breast cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, S.; Greene, D.; Batist, G.

    1989-01-01

    The radiation response of drug-resistant variants of the human tumor breast cancer cell line MCF-7 has been investigated. Two sublines, one resistant to adriamycin (ADRR) and the other to melphalan (MLNR), have been selected by exposure to stepwise increasing concentrations of the respective drugs. ADRR cells are 200-fold resistant to adriamycin and cross-resistant to a number of other drugs and are characterized by the presence of elevated levels of selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase. MLNR cells are fourfold resistant to melphalan and cross-resistant to some other drugs. The only mechanism of drug resistance established for MLNR cells to date is an enhancement of DNA excision repair processes. While the spectrum of drug resistance and the underlying mechanisms differ for the two sublines, their response to radiation is qualitatively similar. Radiation survival curves for ADRR and MLNR cells differ from that for wild-type cells in a complex manner with, for the linear-quadratic model, a decrease in the size of alpha and an increase in the size of beta. There is a concomitant decrease in the size of the alpha/beta ratio which is greater for ADRR cells than for MLNR cells. Analysis of results using the multitarget model gave values of D0 of 1.48, 1.43, and 1.67 Gy for MCF-7 cells are not a consequence of cell kinetic differences between these sublines. Results of split-dose experiments indicated that for both drug-resistant sublines the extent of sublethal damage repair reflected the width of the shoulder on the single-dose survival curve. For MCF-7 cells in the stationary phase of growth, the drug-resistant sublines did not show cross-resistance to radiation; however, delayed subculture following irradiation of stationary-phase cultures increased survival to a greater extent for ADRR and MLNR cells than for wild-type cells

  8. Protease activation involved in resistance of human cells to x-ray cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong-Chang; Takahashi, Shuji; Karata, Kiyonobu; Kita, Kazuko; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2003-01-01

    Little is known of proteases that play roles in the early steps of X-ray irradiation response. In the present study, we first searched for proteases whose activity is induced in human RSa-R cells after X-ray irradiation. The activity was identified as fibrinolytic, using 125 I-labeled fibrin as a substrate. Protease samples were prepared by lysation of cells with a buffer containing MEGA-8. RSa-R cells showed an increased level of protease activity 10 min after X-ray (up to 3 Gy) irradiation. We next examined whether this protease inducibility is causally related with the X-ray susceptibility of cells. Leupeptin, a serine-cysteine protease inhibitor, inhibited the protease activity in samples obtained from X-ray-irradiated RSa-R cells. Treatment of RSa-R cells with the inhibitor before and after X-ray irradiation resulted in an increased susceptibility of the cells to X-ray cell killing. However, the treatment of cells with other inhibitors tested did not modulate the X-ray susceptibility. These results suggest that leupeptin-sensitive proteases are involved in the resistance of human cells to X-ray cell killing. (author)

  9. Treatment adherence in concurrent chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma: Results of daily intravenous prehydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uyterlinde, Wilma; Chen, Chun; Nijkamp, Jasper; Obbink, Marieke Groot; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Belderbos, Jose; Heuvel, Michel van den

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that daily intravenous pre-hydration decreases renal toxicity and improves chemotherapy adherence in patients receiving daily cisplatin to concurrent radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods: Patients with locally advanced NSCLC were treated between 2008 and August 2012 with daily 6 mg/m 2 cisplatin as a bolus injection in 10 ml; of saline and 66 Gy/24 fr radiotherapy in 32 days. Since January 2011, the administration of cisplatin was routinely preceded by intravenous pre-hydration with 1 L of natriumchloride 0.9%. Patients were divided in a pre-hydrated (PH) and non-pre-hydrated (NPH) cohort. Serum-creatinine and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were assessed twice weekly during treatment. Retrospectively, baseline data, toxicity, treatment adherence and efficacy data were compared. Results: Of the 356 patients 232 NPH patients and 100 PH patients were eligible. Patient-and treatment characteristics compared equally. The median of the maximum decrease in GFR was 24% and 8% for NPH and PH (p < 0.01), respectively. Sixty-nine percent of the patients in the NPH group completed the 24 administrations of cisplatin, as compared to 83% of the PH group (p < 0.01). Nineteen percent vs. 2% of the patients in the NPH and PH group discontinued cisplatin treatment because of renal toxicity. Surprisingly, the incidence of acute esophageal toxicity grade ⩾2 decreased following prehydration: 62% vs. 34% (p < 0.001) for the NPH and PH groups, respectively. The one-year survival was comparable between groups (75% for NPH and 71% for PH). Conclusion: Daily pre-hydration was associated with a reduced rate of both renal and acute esophageal toxicity and an increased chemotherapy adherence in patients receiving daily dose of cisplatin and concurrent radiotherapy for locally advanced NSCLC

  10. Phenolic Modified Ceramic Coating on Biodegradable Mg Alloy: The Improved Corrosion Resistance and Osteoblast-Like Cell Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Pang Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys have great potential for developing orthopedic implants due to their biodegradability and mechanical properties, but the rapid corrosion rate of the currently-available alloys limits their clinical applications. To increase the corrosion resistance of the substrate, a protective ceramic coating is constructed by a micro-arc oxidation (MAO process on ZK60 magnesium alloy. The porous ceramic coating is mainly composed of magnesium oxide and magnesium silicate, and the results from cell cultures show it can stimulate osteoblastic cell growth and proliferation. Moreover, gallic acid, a phenolic compound, was successfully introduced onto the MAO coating by grafting on hydrated oxide and chelating with magnesium ions. The gallic acid and rough surface of MAO altered the cell attachment behavior, making it difficult for fibroblasts to adhere to the MAO coating. The viability tests showed that gallic acid could suppress fibroblast growth and stimulate osteoblastic cell proliferation. Overall, the porous MAO coating combined with gallic acid offered a novel strategy for increasing osteocompatibility.

  11. Chemosensitivity of irradiated resistant cells of multicellular spheroids in A549 lung adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Degang; Shi Genming; Huang Gang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the chemosensitivity of irradiated resistant cells of multicellular spheroids in A549 lung adenocarcinoma. Methods: The A549 irradiated resistant cells were the 10th regrowth generations after irradiated with 2.5 Gy of 6 MV X-ray, the control groups were A549 parent cells and MCFY/VCR resistant cells. The 6 kinds of chemotherapeutic drugs were DDP, VDS, 5-FU, HCP, MMC and ADM respectively, with verapamil (VPL) as reverse agent. The treatment effect was compared with MTT assay, and the multidrug resistant gene expressions of mdrl and MRP were measured with RT-PCR method. Results: A549 cells and irradiated resistant cells were resistant to DDP, but sensitivity to VDS,5-FU, HCP, MMC and ADM. The inhibitory rates of VPL to the above two cells were 98% and 25% respectively(P 2 -MG and MRP/β 2 -MG of all A549 cells were about 0 and 0.7 respectively, and those of MCFT/VCR cells were 35 and 4.36. Conclusion: The chemosensitivity of A549 irradiated resistant cells had not changed markedly, the decreased sensitivity to VPL could not be explained by the gene expression of mdrl and MRP. It is conferred that some kinds of changes in the cell membrane and decreased regrowth ability to result in resistance. Unlike multidrug resistance induced by chemotherapy, VPL may be not an ideal reverser to irradiated resistant cells. The new kinds of biological preparation should be sought to combine chemotherapy to treat recurring tumor with irradiated resistance. (authors)

  12. Fimch antiserum inhibits the adherence of Escherichia coli to cells collected by voided urine specimens of diabetic women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meiland, Ruby; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Langermann, Solomon; Brouwer, Ellen C.; Coenjaerts, Frank E. J.; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: With the increasing problem of resistance in pathogenic microorganisms the development of nonantimicrobial therapies is important. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract infections. The majority of Escherichia coli strains, which is the most

  13. T cell resistance to activation by dendritic cells requires long-term culture in simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Jillian H.; Stein, Rachel; Randolph, Brad; Molina, Emily; Arnold, Jennifer P.; Gregg, Randal K.

    2017-11-01

    activation of SMG-T cells occurred in SMG, the T cells produced less IL-2 than control T cell cultures upon incubation with PMA and ionomycin. Short-term (24 h) SMG culture and activation of T cells by DC resulted in enhanced IL-2 production compared to Static-T cells, however, when culture was extended to 120 h, SMG-T cells secreted significantly less IL-2 than Static-T cells. SMG-T cell IL-2 doubled upon stimulation of the DC prior to addition to the T cell culture but remained less than control. SMG-T cell resistance to activation appeared comparable to the phenomenon of T cell exhaustion observed in patients with chronic diseases or persistent tumors. That is, long-term culture of T cells in SMG resulted in increased expression of the inhibitory receptor, CTLA-4. Blockade of CTLA-4 interaction with DC ligands resulted in improved T cell IL-2 production. Overall, this is the first study to determine the efficacy of DC in activating peptide-specific T cells. Furthermore, the findings suggests that countermeasures to restore T cell responsiveness in astronauts during long-term spaceflight or those living in microgravity environments should target possible inhibitory pathways that arise on activated T cells following stimulation.

  14. T cell resistance to activation by dendritic cells requires long-term culture in simulated microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Jillian H; Stein, Rachel; Randolph, Brad; Molina, Emily; Arnold, Jennifer P; Gregg, Randal K

    2017-11-01

    . When activation of SMG-T cells occurred in SMG, the T cells produced less IL-2 than control T cell cultures upon incubation with PMA and ionomycin. Short-term (24 h) SMG culture and activation of T cells by DC resulted in enhanced IL-2 production compared to Static-T cells, however, when culture was extended to 120 h, SMG-T cells secreted significantly less IL-2 than Static-T cells. SMG-T cell IL-2 doubled upon stimulation of the DC prior to addition to the T cell culture but remained less than control. SMG-T cell resistance to activation appeared comparable to the phenomenon of T cell exhaustion observed in patients with chronic diseases or persistent tumors. That is, long-term culture of T cells in SMG resulted in increased expression of the inhibitory receptor, CTLA-4. Blockade of CTLA-4 interaction with DC ligands resulted in improved T cell IL-2 production. Overall, this is the first study to determine the efficacy of DC in activating peptide-specific T cells. Furthermore, the findings suggests that countermeasures to restore T cell responsiveness in astronauts during long-term spaceflight or those living in microgravity environments should target possible inhibitory pathways that arise on activated T cells following stimulation. Copyright © 2017 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased autophagy in CD4(+) T cells of rheumatoid arthritis patients results in T-cell hyperactivation and apoptosis resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loosdregt, Jorg; Rossetti, Maura; Spreafico, Roberto; Moshref, Maryam; Olmer, Merissa; Williams, Gary W; Kumar, Pavanish; Copeland, Dana; Pischel, Ken; Lotz, Martin; Albani, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease hallmarked by aberrant cellular homeostasis, resulting in hyperactive CD4(+) T cells that are more resistant to apoptosis. Both hyperactivation and resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the pathogenicity of CD4(+) T cells in the autoimmune

  16. Farnesyl diphosphate synthase is involved in the resistance to zoledronic acid of osteosarcoma cells. : resistance of osteosarcoma to nitrogen bisphosphonates

    OpenAIRE

    Ory , Benjamin; Moriceau , Gatien; Trichet , Valérie; Blanchard , Frédéric; Berreur , Martine; Rédini , Françoise; Rogers , Michael; Heymann , Dominique

    2008-01-01

    International audience; We recently demonstrated original anti-tumor effects of zoledronic acid (Zol) on osteosarcoma cell lines independently of their p53 and Rb status. The present study investigated the potential Zol-resistance acquired by osteosarcoma cells after prolonged treatment. After 12 weeks of culture in the presence of 1 microm Zol, the effects of high doses of Zol (10-100 microm) were compared between the untreated rat (OSRGA, ROS) and human (MG63, SAOS2) osteosarcoma cells and ...

  17. Acquired IFNγ resistance impairs anti-tumor immunity and gives rise to T-cell-resistant melanoma lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucker, Antje; Zhao, Fang; Pieper, Natalia; Heeke, Christina; Maltaner, Raffaela; Stadtler, Nadine; Real, Birgit; Bielefeld, Nicola; Howe, Sebastian; Weide, Benjamin; Gutzmer, Ralf; Utikal, Jochen; Loquai, Carmen; Gogas, Helen; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Zeschnigk, Michael; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Trilling, Mirko; Horn, Susanne; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Griewank, Klaus G.; Paschen, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma treatment has been revolutionized by antibody-based immunotherapies. IFNγ secretion by CD8+ T cells is critical for therapy efficacy having anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on tumour cells. Our study demonstrates a genetic evolution of IFNγ resistance in different melanoma patient models. Chromosomal alterations and subsequent inactivating mutations in genes of the IFNγ signalling cascade, most often JAK1 or JAK2, protect melanoma cells from anti-tumour IFNγ activity. JAK1/2 mutants further evolve into T-cell-resistant HLA class I-negative lesions with genes involved in antigen presentation silenced and no longer inducible by IFNγ. Allelic JAK1/2 losses predisposing to IFNγ resistance development are frequent in melanoma. Subclones harbouring inactivating mutations emerge under various immunotherapies but are also detectable in pre-treatment biopsies. Our data demonstrate that JAK1/2 deficiency protects melanoma from anti-tumour IFNγ activity and results in T-cell-resistant HLA class I-negative lesions. Screening for mechanisms of IFNγ resistance should be considered in therapeutic decision-making. PMID:28561041

  18. Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is up-regulated in metformin resistant prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Nitu; Mishra, Prasun J.; Stein, Mark; DiPaola, Robert S.; Bertino, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies showed that metformin, a widely used anti-diabetic drug might prevent certain cancers. Metformin also has an anti-proliferative effect in preclinical studies of both hematologic malignancies as well as solid cancers and clinical studies testing metformin as an anti-cancer drug are in progress. However, all cancer types do not respond to metformin with the same effectiveness or acquire resistance. To understand the mechanism of acquired resistance and possibly its mechanism of action as an anti-proliferative agent, we developed metformin resistant LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Metformin resistant LNCaP cells had an increased proliferation rate, increased migration and invasion ability as compared to the parental cells, and expressed markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). A detailed gene expression microarray comparing the resistant cells to the wild type cells revealed that Edil2, Ereg, Axl, Anax2, CD44 and Anax3 were the top up-regulated genes and calbindin 2 and TPTE (transmembrane phosphatase with tensin homology) and IGF1R were down regulated. We focused on Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase that has been shown to be up regulated in several drug resistance cancers. Here, we show that the metformin resistant cell line as well as castrate resistant cell lines that over express Axl were more resistant to metformin, as well as to taxotere compared to androgen sensitive LNCaP and CWR22 cells that do not overexpress Axl. Forced overexpression of Axl in LNCaP cells decreased metformin and taxotere sensitivity and knockdown of Axl in resistant cells increased sensitivity to these drugs. Inhibition of Axl activity by R428, a small molecule Axl kinase inhibitor, sensitized metformin resistant cells that overexpressed Axl to metformin. Inhibitors of Axl may enhance tumor responses to metformin and other chemotherapy in cancers that over express Axl. PMID:26036314

  19. Overexpression of protein kinase A - RIalpha reduces lipofection efficiency of cisplatin-resistant human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, K K; Rosenblatt, J

    2001-04-10

    Cisplatin-resistant variant A2780CP/vector cells were 4.0-5.3-fold more transfectable and 7.6-fold more resistant to cisplatin than their parent cisplatin-sensitive human ovarian carcinoma A2780/vector cells. Overexpression of cAMP-dependent protein kinase Type I regulatory alpha subunit (PKA-RIalpha) gene in A2780CP cells significantly reduced (maximum 47.0%) the transfection activity, with a slight reduction (maximum 27.3%) of cisplatin resistance, of A2780CP cells. However, RIalpha-overexpressing A2780CP (A2780CP/RIalpha) cells were still 2.5-to 3.0-fold more transfectable and 5.5-fold more resistant to cisplatin than A2780 cells. This results suggest that gene transfer efficiency is associated with cisplatin resistance, in part, through the PKA-mediated cAMP signal transduction pathway.

  20. Downregulation of taurine uptake in multidrug resistant Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, K A; Litman, Thomas; Eriksen, J

    2002-01-01

    In daunorubicin resistant Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (DNR), the initial taurine uptake was reduced by 56% as compared to the parental, drug sensitive Ehrlich cells. Kinetic experiments indicated that taurine uptake in Ehrlich cells occurs via both high- and low-affinity transporters. The maximal...... rate constant for the initial taurine uptake was reduced by 45% (high-affinity system) and 49% (low affinity system) in the resistant subline whereas the affinity of the transporters to taurine was unchanged. By immunoblotting we identified 3 TauT protein bands in the 50-70 kDa region. A visible...... reduction in the intensity of the band with the lowest molecular weight was observed in resistant cells. Quantitative RT-PCR indicated a significant reduction in the amount of taurine transporter mRNA in the resistant cells. Drug resistance in DNR Ehrlich cells is associated with overexpression of the mdr1...

  1. Comparative analysis of adherence, viability, proliferation and morphology of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells seeded on different titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollweck, Trixi; Marschmann, Michaela; Hartmann, Isabel; Akra, Bassil; Meiser, Bruno; Reichart, Bruno; Eissner, Guenther; Eblenkamp, Markus; Wintermantel, Erich

    2010-01-01

    Umbilical cord tissue comprises an attractive new source for mesenchymal stem cells. Umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC) exhibit self-renewal, multipotency and immunological naivity, and they can be obtained without medical intervention. The transfer of UCMSC to the ischemic region of the heart may have a favorable impact on tissue regeneration. Benefit from typical cell delivery by injection to the infarcted area is often limited due to poor cell retention and survival. Another route of administration is to use populated scaffolds implanted into the infarcted zone. In this paper, the seeding efficiency of UCMSC on uncoated and titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) scaffolds with different surface structures was determined. Dualmesh (registered) (DM) offers a corduroy-like surface in contrast to the comparatively planar surface of cardiovascular patch (CVP). The investigation of adherence, viability and proliferation of UCMSC demonstrates that titanium-coated scaffolds are superior to uncoated scaffolds, independent of the surface structure. Microscopic images reveal spherical UCMSC seeded on uncoated scaffolds. In contrast, UCMSC on titanium-coated scaffolds display their characteristic spindle-shaped morphology and a homogeneous coverage of CVP. In summary, titanium coating of clinically approved CVP enhances the retention of UCMSC and thus offers a potential cell delivery system for the repair of the damaged myocardium.

  2. Computational modeling of adherent cell growth in a hollow-fiber membrane bioreactor for large-scale 3-D bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebbi-Kalhori, Davod; Behzadmehr, Amin; Doillon, Charles J; Hadjizadeh, Afra

    2012-09-01

    The use of hollow-fiber membrane bioreactors (HFMBs) has been proposed for three-dimensional bone tissue growth at the clinical scale. However, to achieve an efficient HFMB design, the relationship between cell growth and environmental conditions must be determined. Therefore, in this work, a dynamic double-porous media model was developed to determine nutrient-dependent cell growth for bone tissue formation in a HFMB. The whole hollow-fiber scaffold within the bioreactor was treated as a porous domain in this model. The domain consisted of two interpenetrating porous regions, including a porous lumen region available for fluid flow and a porous extracapillary space filled with a collagen gel that contained adherent cells for promoting long-term growth into tissue-like mass. The governing equations were solved numerically and the model was validated using previously published experimental results. The contributions of several bioreactor design and process parameters to the performance of the bioreactor were studied. The results demonstrated that the process and design parameters of the HFMB significantly affect nutrient transport and thus cell behavior over a long period of culture. The approach presented here can be applied to any cell type and used to develop tissue engineering hollow-fiber scaffolds.

  3. Comparative analysis of adherence, viability, proliferation and morphology of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells seeded on different titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollweck, Trixi; Marschmann, Michaela; Hartmann, Isabel; Akra, Bassil; Meiser, Bruno; Reichart, Bruno; Eissner, Guenther [Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Eblenkamp, Markus; Wintermantel, Erich, E-mail: Guenther.Eissner@med.uni-muenchen.d [Chair of Medical Engineering, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstrasse 15, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Umbilical cord tissue comprises an attractive new source for mesenchymal stem cells. Umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC) exhibit self-renewal, multipotency and immunological naivity, and they can be obtained without medical intervention. The transfer of UCMSC to the ischemic region of the heart may have a favorable impact on tissue regeneration. Benefit from typical cell delivery by injection to the infarcted area is often limited due to poor cell retention and survival. Another route of administration is to use populated scaffolds implanted into the infarcted zone. In this paper, the seeding efficiency of UCMSC on uncoated and titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) scaffolds with different surface structures was determined. Dualmesh (registered) (DM) offers a corduroy-like surface in contrast to the comparatively planar surface of cardiovascular patch (CVP). The investigation of adherence, viability and proliferation of UCMSC demonstrates that titanium-coated scaffolds are superior to uncoated scaffolds, independent of the surface structure. Microscopic images reveal spherical UCMSC seeded on uncoated scaffolds. In contrast, UCMSC on titanium-coated scaffolds display their characteristic spindle-shaped morphology and a homogeneous coverage of CVP. In summary, titanium coating of clinically approved CVP enhances the retention of UCMSC and thus offers a potential cell delivery system for the repair of the damaged myocardium.

  4. Fabrication of nanofibrous scaffold using a PLA and hagfish thread keratin composite; its effect on cell adherence, growth, and osteoblast differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Lee, Jun; Park, Ko Eun; Park, Won Ho

    2013-01-01

    Electrospinning is a useful method for the production of nanofibrous scaffolds in the field of tissue engineering. Keratin has been used as a biomaterial for electrospinning and can be used in a variety of biomedical applications because it is a natural protein, giving it the ability to improve cell affinity of scaffolds. In this study, keratin was extracted from hagfish slime thread (H-keratin) and blended with polylactic acid (PLA) polymer solution to construct a nanofibrous scaffold. Wool keratin (W-keratin) was used as a control for the comparison of morphological, physical, and biological properties. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed the presence of both W-keratin and H-keratin in the electrospun PLA/keratin. Observations with a scanning electron microscope revealed that PLA, PLA/W-keratin, and PLA/H-keratin had similar average diameters (∼800 nm). Cell attachment experiments showed that MG-63 cells adhered more rapidly and spread better onto PLA/H-keratin than onto the pure PLA or PLA/W-keratin. Cell proliferation assay, DNA content, live/dead, and alkaline phosphatase activity assays showed that PLA/H-keratin scaffolds could accelerate the viability, proliferation, and osteogenesis of MG-63 cells relative to pure PLA or PLA/W-keratin nanofibrous scaffolds. These findings suggest that H-keratin can improve cellular attraction and has great potential to be used as a biomaterial in bone tissue engineering. (paper)

  5. Colon cancer stem cells dictate tumor growth and resist cell death by production of interleukin-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todaro, Matilde; Alea, Mileidys Perez; Di Stefano, Anna B; Cammareri, Patrizia; Vermeulen, Louis; Iovino, Flora; Tripodo, Claudio; Russo, Antonio; Gulotta, Gaspare; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio

    2007-10-11

    A novel paradigm in tumor biology suggests that cancer growth is driven by stem-like cells within a tumor. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of such cells from colon carcinomas using the stem cell marker CD133 that accounts around 2% of the cells in human colon cancer. The CD133(+) cells grow in vitro as undifferentiated tumor spheroids, and they are both necessary and sufficient to initiate tumor growth in immunodeficient mice. Xenografts resemble the original human tumor maintaining the rare subpopulation of tumorigenic CD133(+) cells. Further analysis revealed that the CD133(+) cells produce and utilize IL-4 to protect themselves from apoptosis. Consistently, treatment with IL-4Ralpha antagonist or anti-IL-4 neutralizing antibody strongly enhances the antitumor efficacy of standard chemotherapeutic drugs through selective sensitization of CD133(+) cells. Our data suggest that colon tumor growth is dictated by stem-like cells that are treatment resistant due to the autocrine production of IL-4.

  6. Distinct apoptotic blocks mediate resistance to panHER inhibitors in HER2+ breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Bahriye; Ozmay, Yeliz; Basaga, Huveyda; Gul, Ozgur; Kutuk, Ozgur

    2018-05-04

    Despite the development of novel targeted therapies, de novo or acquired chemoresistance remains a significant factor for treatment failure in breast cancer therapeutics. Neratinib and dacomitinib are irreversible panHER inhibitors, which block their autophosphorylation and downstream signaling. Moreover, neratinib and dacomitinib have been shown to activate cell death in HER2-overexpressing cell lines. Here we showed that increased MCL1 and decreased BIM and PUMA mediated resistance to neratinib in ZR-75-30 and SKBR3 cells while increased BCL-XL and BCL-2 and decreased BIM and PUMA promoted neratinib resistance in BT474 cells. Cells were also cross-resistant to dacomitinib. BH3 profiles of HER2+ breast cancer cells efficiently predicted antiapoptotic protein dependence and development of resistance to panHER inhibitors. Reactivation of ERK1/2 was primarily responsible for acquired resistance in SKBR3 and ZR-75-30 cells. Adding specific ERK1/2 inhibitor SCH772984 to neratinib or dacomitinib led to increased apoptotic response in neratinib-resistant SKBR3 and ZR-75-30 cells, but we did not detect a similar response in neratinib-resistant BT474 cells. Accordingly, suppression of BCL-2/BCL-XL by ABT-737 was required in addition to ERK1/2 inhibition for neratinib- or dacomitinib-induced apoptosis in neratinib-resistant BT474 cells. Our results showed that different mitochondrial apoptotic blocks mediated acquired panHER inhibitor resistance in HER2+ breast cancer cell lines as well as highlighted the potential of BH3 profiling assay in prediction of panHER inhibitor resistance in breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Adhered Supported Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Dale F.; Craft, Benjamin J.; Jaffe, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (NTs) in excess of 200 μm long are grown by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon vapors. The nanotubes grow continuously without the typical extinction due to catalyst encapsulation. A woven metal mesh supports the nanotubes creating a metal supported nanotube (MSNT) structure. The 140 μm wide mesh openings are completely filled by 70 nm diameter multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs). The MWNTs are straight, uniform and highly crystalline. Their wall thickness is about 10 nm (30 graphite layers). The adherent NTs are not removed from the support in a Scotch tape pull test. A 12.5 cm 2 capacitor made from two MSNT structures immersed in 1 M KCl has a capacitance of 0.35 F and an equivalent series resistance of 0.18 Ω. Water flows through the MSNT at a flow velocity of 1 cm/min with a pressure drop of 15 inches of water. With the support removed, the MWNTs naturally form a carbon nanocomposite (CNC) paper with a specific area of 80 m 2 /gm, a bulk density of 0.21 g/cm 3 , an open pore fraction of 0.81, and a resistivity of 0.16 Ω-cm

  8. Binding of paraquat to cell walls of paraquat resistant and susceptible biotypes of Hordeum glaucum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, H.M.; Preston, C.; Powles, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Paraquat is a widely used, non-selective, light activated contact herbicide acting as a photosystem electron acceptor. Resistance to paraquat in weed species has occurred in Australia and world-wide following extensive use of this herbicide. The mechanism of resistance to paraquat in 'Hordeum glaucum' is correlated with reduced herbicide translocation and may be due to sequestration of herbicide away from its site of action by either binding to cell walls or other means. We measured paraquat binding to a cell wall fraction in resistant and susceptible biotypes of H. glaucum to determine whether differences in binding of paraquat to cell walls could explain herbicide resistance. The cell wall fraction was isolated from leaves of resistant and susceptible biotypes and incubated with 14 C-labelled paraquat. Of the total paraquat - absorbed by a cell wall preparation, about 80% remains strongly bind to the cell wall and doesn't readily exchange with solution in the absence of divalent cations. Divalent cations (Ca 2+ ,putrescine and paraquat) can competitively exchange for paraquat tightly bound to the cell wall. From kinetic experiments it seems that there are two types of binding sites in the cell wall with different affinities for paraquat. No significant differences between cell wall, characteristics of resistant and susceptible biotypes of H. glaucum have been found in any of our experiments. Therefore, increased binding of paraquat to the cell wall appears not to be a mechanism for exclusion of paraquat in resistant biotype

  9. Resistance of a soybean cell line to oxyfluorfen by overproduction of mitochondrial protoporphyrinogen oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warabi, E; Usui, K; Tanaka, Y; Matsumoto, H

    2001-08-01

    The diphenyl ether herbicide oxyfluorfen (2-chloro-4-trifluoromethylphenyl 3-ethoxy-4-nitrophenyl ether) inhibits protoporphyrinogen oxidase (Protox) which catalyzes the oxidation of protoporphyrinogen IX (Protogen) to protoporphyrin IX (Proto IX), the last step of the common pathway to chlorophyll and haeme biosynthesis. We have selected an oxyfluorfen-resistant soybean cell line by stepwise selection methods, and the resistance mechanism has been investigated. No growth inhibition was observed in resistant cells at a concentration of 10(-7) M oxyfluorfen, a concentration at which normal cells did not survive. While the degree of inhibition of total extractable Protox by oxyfluorfen was the same in both cell types, the enzyme activity in the mitochondrial fraction from non-treated resistant cells was about nine-fold higher than that from normal cells. Northern analysis of mitochondrial Protox revealed that the concentration of mitochondrial Protox mRNA was much higher in resistant cells than that in normal cells. There were no differences in the absorption and metabolic breakdown of oxyfluorfen. The growth of resistant cells was also insensitive to oxadiazon [5-tert-butyl-3-(2,4-dichloro-5-isopropoxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-(3H)- one], the other chemical class of Protox inhibitor. Therefore, the resistance of the selected soybean cell line to oxyfluorfen is probably mainly due to the overproduction of mitochondrial Protox.

  10. The overexpression of MRP4 is related to multidrug resistance in osteosarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghui He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (Adriamycin, ADM is an antimitotic drug used in the treatment of a wide range of malignant tumors, including acute leukemia, lymphoma, osteosarcoma, breast cancer, and lung cancer. Multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs are members of a superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters, which can transport various molecules across extra- and intra-cellular membranes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a correlation between MRP4 and primary ADM resistance in osteosarcoma cells. In this paper, we chose the human osteosarcoma cell line MG63, ADM resistant cell line MG63/DOX, and the patient′s primary cell GSF-0686. We checked the ADM sensitivity and cytotoxicity of all the three cells by cell proliferation assay. The intracellular drug concentrations were measured by using LC-MS/MS. We also examined MRP4 gene expression by RT-PCR and Western Blot. We found that the intracellular ADM concentration of the parent osteosarcoma cell line MG63 was higher than the ADM resistant osteosarcoma MG63/DOX cell line or the GSF-0686 cell after ADM treatment (P < 0.05. In addition, MRP4 mRNA and protein levels in ADM resistant osteosarcoma cells were higher than in MG63 cell (P < 0.05. Taking together, this work suggests that overexpression of MRP4 may confer ADM resistance in osteosarcoma cells.

  11. Corrosion-resistant, electrically-conductive plate for use in a fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J David [Bolingbrook, IL; Mawdsley, Jennifer R [Woodridge, IL; Niyogi, Suhas [Woodridge, IL; Wang, Xiaoping [Naperville, IL; Cruse, Terry [Lisle, IL; Santos, Lilia [Lombard, IL

    2010-04-20

    A corrosion resistant, electrically-conductive, durable plate at least partially coated with an anchor coating and a corrosion resistant coating. The corrosion resistant coating made of at least a polymer and a plurality of corrosion resistant particles each having a surface area between about 1-20 m.sup.2/g and a diameter less than about 10 microns. Preferably, the plate is used as a bipolar plate in a proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) fuel cell stack.

  12. Role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP) in glutathione S-conjugate transport in mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, M.; de Vries, E. G.; Jansen, P. L.

    1996-01-01

    The human multidrug resistance protein (MRP), a 190-kDa member of the ABC-protein superfamily, is an ATP-dependent glutathione S-conjugate carrier (GS-X pump) and is present in membranes of many, if not all, cells. Overexpression of MRP in tumor cells contributes to resistance to natural product

  13. MRP proteins as potential mediators of heavy metal resistance in zebrafish cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yong; Li, Qing; Wang, Youhui; Cui, Zongbin

    2011-04-01

    Acquired resistance of mammalian cells to heavy metals is closely relevant to enhanced expression of several multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP), but it remains unclear whether MRP proteins confer resistance to heavy metals in zebrafish. In this study, we obtained zebrafish (Danio rerio) fibroblast-like ZF4 cells with resistance to toxic heavy metals after chronic cadmium exposure and selection for 6months. These cadmium-resistant cells (ZF4-Cd) were maintained in 5μM cadmium and displayed cross-resistance to cadmium, mercury, arsenite and arsenate. ZF4-Cd cells remained the resistance to heavy metals after protracted culture in cadmium-free medium. In comparison with ZF4-WT cells, ZF4-Cd cells exhibited accelerated rate of cadmium excretion, enhanced activity of MRP-like transport, elevated expression of abcc2, abcc4 and mt2 genes, and increased content of cellular GSH. Inhibition of MRP-like transport activity, GSH biosynthesis and GST activity significantly attenuated the resistance of ZF4-Cd cells to heavy metals. The results indicate that some of MRP transporters are involved in the efflux of heavy metals conjugated with cellular GSH and thus play crucial roles in heavy metal detoxification of zebrafish cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP) in glutathione S-conjugate transport in mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M; deVries, EGE; Jansen, PLM

    1996-01-01

    The human multidrug resistance protein (MRP), a 190-kDa member of the ABC-protein superfamily, is an ATP-dependent glutathione S-conjugate carrier (GS-X pump) and is present in membranes of many, if not all, cells, Overexpression of MRP in tumor cells contributes to resistance to natural product

  15. pH regulation in sensitive and multidrug resistant Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Pedersen, S F; Kramhøft, B

    1998-01-01

    Maintenance and regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) was studied in wild-type Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EHR2) and five progressively daunorubicin-resistant, P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-expressing strains, the maximally resistant of which is EHR2/1.3. Steady-state pHi was similar in cells expressing...

  16. Cytoplasmic RAP1 mediates cisplatin resistance of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lu; Lan, Xiaoying; Shi, Xianping; Zhao, Kai; Wang, Dongrui; Wang, Xuejun; Li, Faqian; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Jinbao

    2017-05-18

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy agents (e.g., cisplatin) are the first-line drugs to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but NSCLC develops resistance to the agent, limiting therapeutic efficacy. Despite many approaches to identifying the underlying mechanism for cisplatin resistance, there remains a lack of effective targets in the population that resist cisplatin treatment. In this study, we sought to investigate the role of cytoplasmic RAP1, a previously identified positive regulator of NF-κB signaling, in the development of cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells. We found that the expression of cytoplasmic RAP1 was significantly higher in high-grade NSCLC tissues than in low-grade NSCLC; compared with a normal pulmonary epithelial cell line, the A549 NSCLC cells exhibited more cytoplasmic RAP1 expression as well as increased NF-κB activity; cisplatin treatment resulted in a further increase of cytoplasmic RAP1 in A549 cells; overexpression of RAP1 desensitized the A549 cells to cisplatin, and conversely, RAP1 depletion in the NSCLC cells reduced their proliferation and increased their sensitivity to cisplatin, indicating that RAP1 is required for cell growth and has a key mediating role in the development of cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells. The RAP1-mediated cisplatin resistance was associated with the activation of NF-κB signaling and the upregulation of the antiapoptosis factor BCL-2. Intriguingly, in the small portion of RAP1-depleted cells that survived cisplatin treatment, no induction of NF-κB activity and BCL-2 expression was observed. Furthermore, in established cisplatin-resistant A549 cells, RAP1 depletion caused BCL2 depletion, caspase activation and dramatic lethality to the cells. Hence, our results demonstrate that the cytoplasmic RAP1-NF-κB-BCL2 axis represents a key pathway to cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells, identifying RAP1 as a marker and a potential therapeutic target for cisplatin resistance of NSCLC.

  17. Stimulation of cytolytic T lymphocytes by azaguanine-resistant mouse tumor cells in selective hat medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snick, J. van; Uyttenhove, C.; Pel, A. van; Boon, T.

    1981-01-01

    Primed syngeneic or umprimed allogeneic mouse spleen cells were stimulated with azaguanine-resistant P815 tumor cells that were killed by the addition of aminopterin to the stimulation medium. The recovery of lymphocytes and their cytolytic activity and specificity were similar to those obtained after stimulation with irradiated cells. This method conveniently replaces the inactivation of stimulatory cells by irradiation or mitomycin treatment. Moreover, it has the advantage of inactivating not only the stimulatory cells but also the tumor cells that often contaminate the spleens of tumor-bearing animals, provided these animals have been inoculated with azaguanine-resistant tumor cell mutants. (Auth.)

  18. Failure of Elevating Calcium Induces Oxidative Stress Tolerance and Imparts Cisplatin Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Liwei; Wang, Hongjun; Wang, Chunyan; Su, Jing; Xie, Qi; Xu, Lu; Yu, Yang; Liu, Shibing; Li, Songyan; Xu, Ye; Li, Zhixin

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug, used for the treatment of malignant ovarian cancer, but acquired resistance limits its application. There is therefore an overwhelming need to understand the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer, that is, ovarian cancer cells are insensitive to cisplatin treatment. Here, we show that failure of elevating calcium and oxidative stress tolerance play key roles in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cell lines. Cisplatin induce...

  19. Characterization of acquired paclitaxel resistance of breast cancer cells and involvement of ABC transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta; Kopperová, Dana; Balušíková, Kamila; Ehrlichová, Marie; Brynychová, Veronika; Václavíková, Radka; Daniel, Petr; Souček, Pavel; Kovář, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Development of taxane resistance has become clinically very important issue. The molecular mechanisms underlying the resistance are still unclear. To address this issue, we established paclitaxel-resistant sublines of the SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines that are capable of long-term proliferation in 100 nM and 300 nM paclitaxel, respectively. Application of these concentrations leads to cell death in the original counterpart cells. Both sublines are cross-resistant to doxorubicin, indicating the presence of the MDR phenotype. Interestingly, resistance in both paclitaxel-resistant sublines is circumvented by the second-generation taxane SB-T-1216. Moreover, we demonstrated that it was not possible to establish sublines of SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cells resistant to this taxane. It means that at least the tested breast cancer cells are unable to develop resistance to some taxanes. Employing mRNA expression profiling of all known human ABC transporters and subsequent Western blot analysis of the expression of selected transporters, we demonstrated that only the ABCB1/PgP and ABCC3/MRP3 proteins were up-regulated in both paclitaxel-resistant sublines. We found up-regulation of ABCG2/BCRP and ABCC4 proteins only in paclitaxel-resistant SK-BR-3 cells. In paclitaxel-resistant MCF-7 cells, ABCB4/MDR3 and ABCC2/MRP2 proteins were up-regulated. Silencing of ABCB1 expression using specific siRNA increased significantly, but did not completely restore full sensitivity to both paclitaxel and doxorubicin. Thus we showed a key, but not exclusive, role for ABCB1 in mechanisms of paclitaxel resistance. It suggests the involvement of multiple mechanisms in paclitaxel resistance in tested breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Expression of all ABC transporters in paclitaxel-resistant sublines of SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cells was analyzed. • SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cells are unable to develop resistance to some taxanes. • Some taxanes are able to overcome developed resistance to

  20. Characterization of acquired paclitaxel resistance of breast cancer cells and involvement of ABC transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta, E-mail: vlasta.furstova@lf3.cuni.cz [Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Kopperová, Dana; Balušíková, Kamila [Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Ehrlichová, Marie; Brynychová, Veronika; Václavíková, Radka [Toxicogenomics Unit, National Institute of Public Health, Prague (Czech Republic); Daniel, Petr [Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Souček, Pavel [Toxicogenomics Unit, National Institute of Public Health, Prague (Czech Republic); Kovář, Jan [Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-01

    Development of taxane resistance has become clinically very important issue. The molecular mechanisms underlying the resistance are still unclear. To address this issue, we established paclitaxel-resistant sublines of the SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines that are capable of long-term proliferation in 100 nM and 300 nM paclitaxel, respectively. Application of these concentrations leads to cell death in the original counterpart cells. Both sublines are cross-resistant to doxorubicin, indicating the presence of the MDR phenotype. Interestingly, resistance in both paclitaxel-resistant sublines is circumvented by the second-generation taxane SB-T-1216. Moreover, we demonstrated that it was not possible to establish sublines of SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cells resistant to this taxane. It means that at least the tested breast cancer cells are unable to develop resistance to some taxanes. Employing mRNA expression profiling of all known human ABC transporters and subsequent Western blot analysis of the expression of selected transporters, we demonstrated that only the ABCB1/PgP and ABCC3/MRP3 proteins were up-regulated in both paclitaxel-resistant sublines. We found up-regulation of ABCG2/BCRP and ABCC4 proteins only in paclitaxel-resistant SK-BR-3 cells. In paclitaxel-resistant MCF-7 cells, ABCB4/MDR3 and ABCC2/MRP2 proteins were up-regulated. Silencing of ABCB1 expression using specific siRNA increased significantly, but did not completely restore full sensitivity to both paclitaxel and doxorubicin. Thus we showed a key, but not exclusive, role for ABCB1 in mechanisms of paclitaxel resistance. It suggests the involvement of multiple mechanisms in paclitaxel resistance in tested breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Expression of all ABC transporters in paclitaxel-resistant sublines of SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cells was analyzed. • SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cells are unable to develop resistance to some taxanes. • Some taxanes are able to overcome developed resistance to

  1. Reduced expression of bax in small cell lung cancer cells is not sufficient to induce cisplatin-resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagosch J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Resistance to cisplatin in the course of chemotherapy contributes to the poor prognosis of small cell lung cancer (SCLC. B cell lymphoma-2 is the founding member of a large family of proteins that either promote or inhibit apoptosis. We aimed at investigating if the pro-apoptotic members Bad, Bax, Bim and Bid are involved in cisplatin-resistance. Cisplatin-resistance in the SCLC cell line H1339 was induced by repetitive exposure to cisplatin. Protein expression was quantified by Western Blot and immuno-fluorescence analysis. Protein expression was altered using siRNA interference. Four "cycles" of 0.5 μg/ml cisplatin led to partial cisplatin-resistance in H1339 cells. The expression of Bad, Bim and Bid was comparable in naïve and resistant cells while the expression of Bax was reduced in the resistant clone. But, reducing Bax expression in naïve cells did not lead to altered cisplatin sensitivity neither in H1339 nor in H187 SCLC cells. We conclude that the reduced Bax expression after exposure to cisplatin is not sufficient to induce cis-platin-resistance in SCLC cells.

  2. Reduced expression of p27 is a novel mechanism of docetaxel resistance in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Iain; Shalli, Kawan; McDonald, Sarah L; Moir, Susan E; Hutcheon, Andrew W; Heys, Steven D; Schofield, Andrew C

    2004-01-01

    Docetaxel is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of breast cancer. Breast cancers can have an inherent or acquired resistance to docetaxel but the causes of this resistance remain unclear. However, apoptosis and cell cycle regulation are key mechanisms by which most chemotherapeutic agents exert their cytotoxic effects. We created two docetaxel-resistant human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and performed cDNA microarray analysis to identify candidate genes associated with docetaxel resistance. Gene expression changes were validated at the RNA and protein levels by reverse transcription PCR and western analysis, respectively. Gene expression cDNA microarray analysis demonstrated reduced p27 expression in docetaxel-resistant breast cancer cells. Although p27 mRNA expression was found to be reduced only in MCF-7 docetaxel-resistant sublines (2.47-fold), reduced expression of p27 protein was noted in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 docetaxel-resistant breast cancer cells (2.83-fold and 3.80-fold, respectively). This study demonstrates that reduced expression of p27 is associated with acquired resistance to docetaxel in breast cancer cells. An understanding of the genes that are involved in resistance to chemotherapy may allow further development in modulating drug resistance, and may permit selection of those patients who are most likely to benefit from such therapies

  3. 3D cellular structures and co-cultures formed through the contactless magnetic manipulation of cells on adherent surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Fattah, Abdel Rahman; Mishriki, Sarah; Kammann, Tobias; Sahu, Rakesh P; Geng, Fei; Puri, Ishwar K

    2018-02-27

    A magnet array is employed to manipulate diamagnetic cells that are contained in paramagnetic medium to demonstrate for the first time the contactless bioprinting of three-dimensional (3D) cellular structures and co-cultures of breast cancer MCF-7 and endothelial HUVEC at prescribed locations on tissue culture treated well plates. Sequential seeding of different cell lines and the spatial displacement of the magnet array creates co-cultured cellular structures within a well without using physically intrusive well inserts. Both monotypic and co-culture experiments produce morphologically rich 3D cell structures that are otherwise absent in regular monolayer cell cultures. The magnetic contactless bioprinting of cells provides further insight into cell behaviour, invasion strategies and transformations that are useful for potential applications in drug screening, 3D cell culture formation and tissue engineering.

  4. Identification of resistance mechanisms in erlotinib-resistant subclones of the non-small cell lung cancer cell line HCC827 by exome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirstine; Alcaraz, Nicolas; Lund, Rikke Raaen

    the SeqCap EZ Human Exome Library v3.0 kit and whole-exome sequencing of these (100 bp paired-end) were performed on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Using a recently developed in-house analysis pipeline the sequencing data were analyzed. The analysis pipeline includes quality control using Trim......Background: Erlotinib (Tarceva®, Roche) has significantly changed the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as 70% of patients show significant tumor regression upon treatment (Santarpia et. al., 2013). However, all patients relapse due to development of acquired resistance, which...... mutations in erlotinib-resistant subclones of the NSCLC cell line, HCC827. Materials & Methods: We established 3 erlotinib-resistant subclones (resistant to 10, 20, 30 µM erlotinib, respectively). DNA libraries of each subclone and the parental HCC827 cell line were prepared in biological duplicates using...

  5. The establishment of insulin resistance model in FL83B and L6 cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanlan; Han, Jizhong; Li, Haoran; Liu, Mengmeng; Zeng, Bin

    2017-10-01

    The insulin resistance models of mouse liver epithelial and rat myoblasts cells were induced by three kinds of inducers: dexamethasone, high insulin and high glucose. The purpose is to select the optimal insulin resistance model, to provide a simple and reliable TR cell model for the study of the pathogenesis of TR and the improvement of TR drugs and functional foods. The MTT method is used for toxicity screening of three compounds, selecting security and suitable concentration. We performed a Glucose oxidase peroxidase (GOD-POD) method involving FL83B and L6 cell with dexamethasone, high insulin and high glucose-induced insulin resistance. Results suggested that FL83B cells with dexamethasone-induced (0.25uM) were established insulin resistance and L6 cells with high-glucose (30mM) and dexamethasone-induced (0.25uM) were established insulin resistance.

  6. Efficacy of ponatinib against ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okabe, Seiichi; Tauchi, Tetsuzo; Tanaka, Yuko; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Efficacy of ponatinib against ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant leukemia cells okabe et al. •Imatinib or nilotinib resistance was involved Src family kinase. •The BCR-ABL point mutation (E334V) was highly resistant to imatinib or nilotinib. •Ponatinib was a powerful strategy against imatinib or nilotinib resistant Ph-positive cells. -- Abstract: Because a substantial number of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia acquire resistance to ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), their management remains a challenge. Ponatinib, also known as AP24534, is an oral multi-targeted TKI. Ponatinib is currently being investigated in a pivotal phase 2 clinical trial. In the present study, we analyzed the molecular and functional consequences of ponatinib against imatinib- or nilotinib-resistant (R) K562 and Ba/F3 cells. The proliferation of imatinib- or nilotinib-resistant K562 cells did not decrease after treatment with imatinib or nilotinib. Src family kinase Lyn was activated. Point mutation Ba/F3 cells (E334 V) were also highly resistant to imatinib and nilotinib. Treatment with ponatinib for 72 h inhibited the growth of imatinib- and nilotinib-resistant cells. The phosphorylation of BCR-ABL, Lyn, and Crk-L was reduced. This study demonstrates that ponatinib has an anti-leukemia effect by reducing ABL and Lyn kinase activity and this information may be of therapeutic relevance

  7. Efficacy of ponatinib against ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okabe, Seiichi, E-mail: okabe@tokyo-med.ac.jp; Tauchi, Tetsuzo; Tanaka, Yuko; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Efficacy of ponatinib against ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant leukemia cells okabe et al. •Imatinib or nilotinib resistance was involved Src family kinase. •The BCR-ABL point mutation (E334V) was highly resistant to imatinib or nilotinib. •Ponatinib was a powerful strategy against imatinib or nilotinib resistant Ph-positive cells. -- Abstract: Because a substantial number of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia acquire resistance to ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), their management remains a challenge. Ponatinib, also known as AP24534, is an oral multi-targeted TKI. Ponatinib is currently being investigated in a pivotal phase 2 clinical trial. In the present study, we analyzed the molecular and functional consequences of ponatinib against imatinib- or nilotinib-resistant (R) K562 and Ba/F3 cells. The proliferation of imatinib- or nilotinib-resistant K562 cells did not decrease after treatment with imatinib or nilotinib. Src family kinase Lyn was activated. Point mutation Ba/F3 cells (E334 V) were also highly resistant to imatinib and nilotinib. Treatment with ponatinib for 72 h inhibited the growth of imatinib- and nilotinib-resistant cells. The phosphorylation of BCR-ABL, Lyn, and Crk-L was reduced. This study demonstrates that ponatinib has an anti-leukemia effect by reducing ABL and Lyn kinase activity and this information may be of therapeutic relevance.

  8. Cell surface alteration in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cells from patients with extreme insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorden, D.L.; Robert, A.; Moncada, V.Y.; Taylor, S.I.; Muehlhauser, J.C.; Carpentier, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    An abnormality was detected in the morphology of the cell surface of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes of patients with genetic forms of insulin resistance. In cells from two patients with leprechaunism and two patients with type A extreme insulin resistance, scanning electron microscopy demonstrated a decrease in the percentage of the cell surface occupied by microvilli in cells from the patients with leprechaunism and type A insulin resistance compared with control cells. When cells from a healthy control subject and one of the patients with leprechaunism (Lep/Ark-1) were incubated with 125 I-labeled insulin, there was a decrease in the percentage of 125 I-insulin associated with microvilli on the cell surface. Thus, the decreased localization of insulin receptors with the microvillous region of the cell surface was in proportion to the decrease in microvilli

  9. [A novel chemo-resistant gene MSX2 discovered by establishment of two pancreatic cancer drug resistant cell lines JF305/CDDP and PANC-1/GEM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, W; Sui, C G; Ma, X; Ma, J

    2018-05-23

    Objective: To explore new multidrug resistant genes of pancreatic cancer by establishment and characterization of chemo-resistant cell lines. Methods: The cisplatin-resistant cell line JF305/CDDP and the gemcitabine-resistant cell line PANC-1/GEM were induced by high-dose intermittent treatment. CCK-8 assay was used to detect the 50% inhibiting concentration (IC(50)), drug resistance index (R), cross-resistance, and growth difference of different cells. The changes of cell cycle and migration ability of drug-resistant cells were determined by flow cytometry and transwell assay, respectively. And then real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR was used to detect the expression of multidrug resistance-related genes. Results: The drug resistance indexes of JF305/CDDP and PANC-1/GEM were 15.3 and 27.31, respectively, and there was cross-resistance. Compared with the parental cells, the proliferation rate of JF305/CDDP was decreased by 40% on the fourth day ( P PANC-1 cells upregulated MRP2 level ( P PANC-1/GEM, were successfully established. MSX2 might be a new drug resistance related gene in pancreatic cancer cells by up-regulation of MRP2 expression.

  10. Bortezomib resistance in mantle cell lymphoma is associated with plasmacytic differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez-Galán, Patricia; Mora-Jensen, Helena; Weniger, Marc A

    2011-01-01

    bortezomib-resistant MCL cell lines and primary tumor cells from MCL patients with inferior clinical response to bortezomib also expressed plasmacytic features. Knockdown of IRF4 was toxic for the subset of MCL cells with plasmacytic differentiation, but only slightly sensitized cells to bortezomib. We...

  11. Establishment and characterization of arsenic trioxide resistant KB/ATO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Dai, Chunling; Yuan, Chun-Gang; Wu, Hsiang-Chun; Xiao, Zhijie; Lei, Zi-Ning; Yang, Dong-Hua; Le, X Chris; Fu, Liwu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2017-09-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is used as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. However, increasing drug resistance is reducing its efficacy. Therefore, a better understanding of ATO resistance mechanism is required. In this study, we established an ATO-resistant human epidermoid carcinoma cell line, KB/ATO, from its parental KB-3-1 cells. In addition to ATO, KB/ATO cells also exhibited cross-resistance to other anticancer drugs such as cisplatin, antimony potassium tartrate, and 6-mercaptopurine. The arsenic accumulation in KB/ATO cells was significantly lower than that in KB-3-1 cells. Further analysis indicated that neither application of P-glycoprotein inhibitor, breast cancer resistant protein (BCRP) inhibitor, or multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) inhibitor could eliminate ATO resistance. We found that the expression level of ABCB6 was increased in KB/ATO cells. In conclusion, ABCB6 could be an important factor for ATO resistance in KB/ATO cells. The ABCB6 level may serve as a predictive biomarker for the effectiveness of ATO therapy.

  12. Circumvention of acquired resistance to doxorubicin in K562 human leukemia cells by oxatomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, M; Fujita, R; Furusawa, S; Takayanagi, M; Sasaki, K; Satoh, S

    2001-10-01

    We studied the effect of oxatomide, an antiallergic drug, on the resistance of K562 cells to doxorubicin. Oxatomide synergistically potentiated the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in doxorubicin-resistant K562 cells (K562/DXR) at a concentration of 1-10 microM, but had hardly any synergistic effect on the parental cell line (K562) at the same concentration. Oxatomide inhibit P-glycoprotein pump-efflux activity and the binding of [3H]-azidopine to the cell-surface protein P-glycoprotein, in a dose-related manner. These results indicate that oxatomide reverses the multidrug-resistance phenotype through direct interaction with P-glycoprotein.

  13. Development of hyper osmotic resistant CHO host cells for enhanced antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamachi, Yasuharu; Omasa, Takeshi

    2018-04-01

    Cell culture platform processes are generally employed to shorten the duration of new product development. A fed-batch process with continuous feeding is a conventional platform process for monoclonal antibody production using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. To establish a simplified platform process, the feeding method can be changed from continuous feed to bolus feed. However, this change induces a rapid increase of osmolality by the bolus addition of nutrients. The increased osmolality suppresses cell culture growth, and the final product concentration is decreased. In this study, osmotic resistant CHO host cells were developed to attain a high product concentration. To establish hyper osmotic resistant CHO host cells, CHO-S host cells were passaged long-term in a hyper osmotic basal medium. There were marked differences in cell growth of the original and established host cells under iso- (328 mOsm/kg) or hyper-osmolality (over 450 mOsm/kg) conditions. Cell growth of the original CHO host cells was markedly decreased by the induction of osmotic stress, whereas cell growth of the hyper osmotic resistant CHO host cells was not affected. The maximum viable cell concentration of hyper osmotic resistant CHO host cells was 132% of CHO-S host cells after the induction of osmotic stress. Moreover, the hyper osmotic resistant characteristic of established CHO host cells was maintained even after seven passages in iso-osmolality basal medium. The use of hyper osmotic resistance CHO host cells to create a monoclonal antibody production cell line might be a new approach to increase final antibody concentrations with a fed-batch process. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Drug-resistant colon cancer cells produce high carcinoembryonic antigen and might not be cancer-initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-chung; Ling, Qing-Dong; Yu, Wan-Chun; Hung, Chunh-Ming; Kao, Ta-Chun; Huang, Yi-Wei; Higuchi, Akon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the higher levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) secreted by the LoVo human colon carcinoma cells in a medium containing anticancer drugs. Drug-resistant LoVo cells were analyzed by subcutaneously xenotransplanting them into mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the drug-resistant cells isolated in this study were cancer-initiating cells, known also as cancer stem cells (CSCs). Methods The production of CEA was investigated in LoVo cells that were cultured with 0–10 mM of anticancer drugs, and we evaluated the increase in CEA production by the LoVo cells that were stimulated by anticancer drug treatment. The expression of several CSC markers in LoVo cells treated with anticancer drugs was also evaluated. Following anticancer drug treatment, LoVo cells were injected subcutaneously into the flanks of severe combined immunodeficiency mice in order to evaluate the CSC fraction. Results Production of CEA by LoVo cells was stimulated by the addition of anticancer drugs. Drug-resistant LoVo cells expressed lower levels of CSC markers, and LoVo cells treated with any of the anticancer drugs tested did not generate tumors within 8 weeks from when the cells were injected subcutaneously into severe combined immunodeficiency mice. These results suggest that the drug-resistant LoVo cells have a smaller population of CSCs than the untreated LoVo cells. Conclusion Production of CEA by LoVo cells can be stimulated by the addition of anticancer drugs. The drug-resistant subpopulation of LoVo colon cancer cells could stimulate the production of CEA, but these cells did not act as CSCs in in vivo tumor generation experiments. PMID:23818760

  15. Stanniocalcin 2 promotes cell proliferation and cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yuxia; Gao, Ying; Cheng, Hairong; Yang, Guichun; Tan, Wenhua

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common carcinomas in the female reproductive system. Treatment of cervical cancer involves surgical removal and chemotherapy. Resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy drugs including cisplatin has increasingly become an important problem in the treatment of cervical cancer patients. We found in this study that stanniocalcin 2 (STC2) expression was upregulated in both cervical cancer tissues and cell lines. The levels of STC2 expression in cervical cancer cell lines were positively correlated with the rate of cell proliferation. Furthermore, in cisplatin resistant cervical cancer cells, the levels of STC2 expression were significantly elevated. Modulation of STC2 expression by siRNA or overexpression in cisplatin resistant cells resulted in altered cell survival, apoptosis, and cisplatin resistance. Finally, we found that there was significant difference in the activity of the MAPK signaling pathway between cisplatin sensitive and resistant cervical cancer cells, and that STC2 could regulate the activity of the MAPK signaling pathway. - Highlights: • STC2 was upregulated in cervical cancer and promoted cervical cancer cell proliferation. • Cisplatin resistant cells had elevated STC2 levels and enhanced proliferation. • STC2 regulated cisplatin chemosensitivity in cervical cancer cells. • STC2 regulated the activity of the MAPK signaling pathway.

  16. Raman spectroscopy differentiates between sensitive and resistant multiple myeloma cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Domenico; Trusso, Sebastiano; Fazio, Enza; Allegra, Alessandro; Musolino, Caterina; Speciale, Antonio; Cimino, Francesco; Saija, Antonella; Neri, Fortunato; Nicolò, Marco S.; Guglielmino, Salvatore P. P.

    2017-12-01

    Current methods for identifying neoplastic cells and discerning them from their normal counterparts are often nonspecific and biologically perturbing. Here, we show that single-cell micro-Raman spectroscopy can be used to discriminate between resistant and sensitive multiple myeloma cell lines based on their highly reproducible biomolecular spectral signatures. In order to demonstrate robustness of the proposed approach, we used two different cell lines of multiple myeloma, namely MM.1S and U266B1, and their counterparts MM.1R and U266/BTZ-R subtypes, resistant to dexamethasone and bortezomib, respectively. Then, micro-Raman spectroscopy provides an easily accurate and noninvasive method for cancer detection for both research and clinical environments. Characteristic peaks, mostly due to different DNA/RNA ratio, nucleic acids, lipids and protein concentrations, allow for discerning the sensitive and resistant subtypes. We also explored principal component analysis (PCA) for resistant cell identification and classification. Sensitive and resistant cells form distinct clusters that can be defined using just two principal components. The identification of drug-resistant cells by confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy is thus proposed as a clinical tool to assess the development of resistance to glucocorticoids and proteasome inhibitors in myeloma cells.

  17. The lipid content of cisplatin- and doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, I N; Lukyanova, N Yu; Chekhun, V F

    2012-07-01

    To perform the comparative study both of qualitative and quantitative content of lipids in parental and drug resistant breast cancer cells. Parental (MCF-7/S) and resistant to cisplatin (MCF-7/CP) and doxorubicin (MCF-7/Dox) human breast cancer cells were used in the study. Cholesterol, total lipids and phospholipids content were determined by means of thin-layer chromatography. It was found that cholesterol as well as cholesterol ethers content are significantly higher but diacylglycerols, triacyl-glycerols content are significantly lower in resistant cell strains than in parental (sensitive) cells. Moreover the analysis of individual phospholipids showed the increase of sphingomyelin, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, phosphatidic acid and the decrease of phosphatidy-lethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine in MCF-7/CP and MCF-7/Dox cells. Obtained results allow to suggest that the lipid profile changes can mediate the modulation of membrane fluidity in drug resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

  18. Co-induction of glucose regulated proteins and adriamycin resistance in Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, J.; Hughes, C.; Cai, J.; Bartels, C.; Gessner, T.; Subjeck, J.

    1987-01-01

    Glucose deprivation, anoxia, calcium ionophore A23187 or 2-deoxyglucose all inducers of glucose regulated proteins (grps), also lead to a significant induction of resistance to the drug adriamycin. In the case of anoxia, A23187 and 2-deoxyglucose, the induction of resistance correlates with both the application of the inducing stress and the induction of grps. In the case of glucose deprivation, the onset of resistance correlates with the onset of glucose deprivation and precedes grp induction. Removal of each grp including condition results in the rapid disappearance of this resistance in a manner which correlates with the repression of the grps. This drug resistance can be induced in confluent cells or in actively proliferating cells, although the effect is greater in the more sensitive proliferating cells. Induction of heat shock proteins (hsps) does not appear to lead to any major change in adriamycin resistance. Grp induced cells retain less adriamycin than do controls with the greatest reduction occurring during anoxia, which is also the strongest inducer of grps and resistance. The authors propose that the application of a grp inducing stress leads to a concurrent induction in drug resistance, possibly via the translocation of grps in the cell. Finally, they also observed that adriamycin itself can induce both hsps and grps. It is possible that adriamycin exposure may correspondingly induce auto-resistance

  19. Fibrocytes: A Novel Stromal Cells to Regulate Resistance to Anti-Angiogenic Therapy and Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hisatsugu; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2017-12-29

    An adequate blood supply is essential for cancer cells to survive and grow; thus, the concept of inhibiting tumor angiogenesis has been applied to cancer therapy, and several drugs are already in clinical use. It has been shown that treatment with those anti-angiogenic drugs improved the response rate and prolonged the survival of patients with various types of cancer; however, it is also true that the effect was mostly limited. Currently, the disappointing clinical results are explained by the existence of intrinsic or acquired resistance to the therapy mediated by both tumor cells and stromal cells. This article reviews the mechanisms of resistance mediated by stromal cells such as endothelial cells, pericytes, fibroblasts and myeloid cells, with an emphasis on fibrocytes, which were recently identified as the cell type responsible for regulating acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy. In addition, the other emerging role of fibrocytes as mediator-producing cells in tumor progression is discussed.

  20. Cell wall alterations in the leaves of fusariosis-resistant and susceptible pineapple cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Farias Viégas Aquije, Glória Maria; Zorzal, Poliana Belisário; Buss, David Shaun; Ventura, José Aires; Fernandes, Patricia Machado Bueno; Fernandes, Antonio Alberto Ribeiro

    2010-10-01

    Fusariosis, caused by the fungus Fusarium subglutinans f. sp. ananas (Syn. F. guttiforme), is one of the main phytosanitary threats to pineapple (Ananas comosus var. comosus). Identification of plant cell responses to pathogens is important in understanding the plant-pathogen relationship and establishing strategies to improve and select resistant cultivars. Studies of the structural properties and phenolic content of cell walls in resistant (Vitoria) and susceptible (Perola) pineapple cultivars, related to resistance to the fungus, were performed. The non-chlorophyll base of physiologically mature leaves was inoculated with a conidia suspension. Analyses were performed post-inoculation by light, atomic force, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and measurement of cell wall-bound phenolic compounds. Non-inoculated leaves were used as controls to define the constitutive tissue characteristics. Analyses indicated that morphological differences, such as cell wall thickness, cicatrization process and lignification, were related to resistance to the pathogen. Atomic force microscopy indicated a considerable difference in the mechanical properties of the resistant and susceptible cultivars, with more structural integrity, associated with higher levels of cell wall-bound phenolics, found in the resistant cultivar. p-Coumaric and ferulic acids were shown to be the major phenolics bound to the cell walls and were found in higher amounts in the resistant cultivar. Leaves of the resistant cultivar had reduced fungal penetration and a faster and more effective cicatrization response compared to the susceptible cultivar.

  1. Resistance to RadLV-induced leukemia: non-participation of splenic natural killer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St-Pierre, Y.; Hugo, P.; Lemieux, S.; Lussier, G.; Potworowski, E.F.

    1988-01-01

    The phenotypic expression of genetically determined resistance to radiation leukemia virus (RadLV)-induced leukemia in mice has been shown to reside in the bone marrow. Because the bone marrow contains precursors of natural killer (NK) cells, known to play a role in retrovirally induced infections, and because these cells have been suggested as participating in resistance to radiation-induced leukemia, it was pertinent to establish whether their levels differed in strains of mice susceptible and resistant to leukemia. We therefore tested splenic NK cell levels in C57BL/Ka (susceptible) and B10.A(5R) (resistant) mice before viral inoculation, immediately after viral inoculation, and throughout the preleukemic period and showed that they were not different. This indicates that splenic NK cell levels have no bearing on the resistance to RadLV-induced leukemia and that other immune or non-immune mechanisms must be sought

  2. Mouse dendritic cells pulsed with capsular polysaccharide induce resistance to lethal pneumococcal challenge: roles of T cells and B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Cohen

    Full Text Available Mice are exceedingly sensitive to intra-peritoneal (IP challenge with some virulent pneumococci (LD50 = 1 bacterium. To investigate how peripheral contact with bacterial capsular polysaccharide (PS antigen can induce resistance, we pulsed bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC of C57BL/6 mice with type 4 or type 3 PS, injected the BMDC intra-foot pad (IFP and challenged the mice IP with supra-lethal doses of pneumococci. We examined the responses of T cells and B cells in the draining popliteal lymph node and measured the effects on the bacteria in the peritoneum and blood. We now report that: 1 The PS co-localized with MHC molecules on the BMDC surface; 2 PS-specific T and B cell proliferation and IFNγ secretion was detected in the draining popliteal lymph nodes on day 4; 3 Type-specific resistance to lethal IP challenge was manifested only after day 5; 4 Type-specific IgM and IgG antibodies were detected in the sera of only some of the mice, but B cells were essential for resistance; 5 Control mice vaccinated with a single injection of soluble PS did not develop a response in the draining popliteal lymph node and were not protected; 6 Mice injected with unpulsed BMDC also did not resist challenge: In unprotected mice, pneumococci entered the blood shortly after IP inoculation and multiplied exponentially in both blood and peritoneum killing the mice within 20 hours. Mice vaccinated with PS-pulsed BMDC trapped the bacteria in the peritoneum. The trapped bacteria proliferated exponentially IP, but died suddenly at 18-20 hours. Thus, a single injection of PS antigen associated with intact BMDC is a more effective vaccine than the soluble PS alone. This model system provides a platform for studying novel aspects of PS-targeted vaccination.

  3. Adherence to antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola Farinde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While major depression is considered a frequent mental illness there are ongoing reports of high non-adherence to antidepressant medications which places suffers at high risk for relapse, recurrence, or greater impairment,. The World Health Organization (WHO defines adherence as the extent to which a person′s behavior (e.g. taking medications can align with the agreed recommendations of a health care provider. Unfortunately while patient may recognize the importance of adherence to antidepressant medications the majority of patients do not adhere to their prescribed antidepressants. Some of the factors that may contribute to or lead to non-adherence include knowingly or unknowingly missing doses, taking extra doses, delaying administration times, or taking drug holidays. Pharmacists have the unique ability to deter non-adherence through the performance of continuous assessment and monitoring of adherence in this population given these accessibility. Additionally, pharmacists are able to develop therapeutic alliances with patients that can help to increase the likelihood of achieving positive patient outcomes. Antidepressant non-adherence can be viewed as a significant public health concern so it is important for patients to be educated about the importance of adherence, and health care professionals should be aware of factors or patient characteristics that can serve as barriers to non-adherence.

  4. Enhanced expression of transferrin receptor confers UV-resistance in human and monkey cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zheng; Nomura, Jun; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2005-01-01

    One of the most intriguing biological subjects is cell-surface molecules that regulate the susceptibility of human cells to cell-killing effects after irradiation with far-ultraviolet light (UV, principally 254 nm wavelength). Human RSa cells have unusual sensitivity to UV-induced cell-killing. We searched for molecules on the cell-surface of RSa cells that were present in different amounts as compared to a variant of these cells, UV r -1 cells, which have increased resistance to UV cell-killing. Among the 21 molecules examined, the amount of transferrin receptor (TfR) protein was found to be 2-fold higher in UV r -1 cells compared with in RSa cells. The amounts of this protein were also higher in the UV-resistant hematopoietic cell lines, CEM6 and Daudi, as compared to the UV-sensitive cell lines, Molt4 and 697. Culturing of UV r -1 cells in a medium containing anti-transferrin antibodies resulted in sensitization of the cells to UV cell-killing as demonstrated by colony formation assay. Similar results were observed by treatment of the cells with TfR siRNA. In contrast, overexpression of TfR protein led to a resistance to UV cell-killing in RSa cells and monkey COS7 cells as demonstrated by both colony formation and apoptosis assay. In TfR-overexpressing cells, reduction of p53 and Bax protein was observed after UV-irradiation. Thus, TfR expression appears to be involved in the regulation of UV-resistance, possibly via modulation of the amount of p53 and Bax protein. (author)

  5. Cell potentials, cell resistance, and proton fluxes in corn root tissue. Effects of dithioerythritol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W.; Hanson, J.B.

    1976-09-01

    Studies were made of the effect of dithioerythritol on net proton flux, potassium influx and efflux, cell potential, and cell resistance in fresh and washed corn (Zea mays L. WF9XM14) root tissue. Dithioerythritol induces equal proton influx and potassium efflux rates, decreases membrane resistance, and hyperpolarizes the cell potential. Greater effects on H/sup +/ and K/sup +/ fluxes are secured at pH 7 than at pH 5. Other sulfhydryl-protecting reagents produced the same responses. No evidence could be found that dithioerythritol affected energy metabolism or membrane ATPase, and proton influx was induced in the presence of uncoupling agents. We deduce that dithioerythritol activates a passive H/sup +//K/sup +/ antiport, driven in these experiments by the outwardly directed electrochemical gradient of K/sup +/. The net effect on H/sup +/ and K/sup +/ fluxes is believed to reside with the combined activity of a polarized H/sup +//K/sup +/ exchanging ATPase and the passive H/sup +//K/sup +/ antiport. A model is presented to show how the combined system might produce stable potential differences and K/sup +/ content.

  6. Ethidium bromide resistance of L929 cells is accompanied by regular changes in karotype structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinchuk, T.M.; Novikova, I.Yu.; Sorokina, E.A.; Sal'nikov, K.V.

    1988-01-01

    Using the method of differential staining of chromosomes for G-bands a comparative karyological analysis of line L 929 mouse cells has been conducted, after the L 929 cells had been sequentially selected for resistance to ethidium bromide at concentrations of 1, 10, 25, and 50 μg/ml and had retained these levels of resistance for a number of cell generations. It was found that the resistant variants exhibited certain karyotypic changes. Only thirteen of the thirty six marker chromosomes typical of the original ethidium bromide-sensitive cells were preserved. Sixteen of the markers were specific for the resistant variants. The changes detected arose at the initial selection stage and were preserved unaltered as the concentration of the toxin was raised. The detection of similar karyotypic changes in cells of clone L 929 of independent origin selected for resistance of 3 μg/ml of ethidium bromide and also in cells of the clone selected for resistance to 25 μg/ml of ethidium bromide and studied previously by the present authors suggests that these changes are universal for L 929 cells resistant to ethidium bromide

  7. Partial resistance of carrot to Alternaria dauci correlates with in vitro cultured carrot cell resistance to fungal exudates.

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    Mickaël Lecomte

    Full Text Available Although different mechanisms have been proposed in the recent years, plant pathogen partial resistance is still poorly understood. Components of the chemical warfare, including the production of plant defense compounds and plant resistance to pathogen-produced toxins, are likely to play a role. Toxins are indeed recognized as important determinants of pathogenicity in necrotrophic fungi. Partial resistance based on quantitative resistance loci and linked to a pathogen-produced toxin has never been fully described. We tested this hypothesis using the Alternaria dauci-carrot pathosystem. Alternaria dauci, causing carrot leaf blight, is a necrotrophic fungus known to produce zinniol, a compound described as a non-host selective toxin. Embryogenic cellular cultures from carrot genotypes varying in resistance against A. dauci were confronted with zinniol at different concentrations or to fungal exudates (raw, organic or aqueous extracts. The plant response was analyzed through the measurement of cytoplasmic esterase activity, as a marker of cell viability, and the differentiation of somatic embryos in cellular cultures. A differential response to toxicity was demonstrated between susceptible and partially resistant genotypes, with a good correlation noted between the resistance to the fungus at the whole plant level and resistance at the cellular level to fungal exudates from raw and organic extracts. No toxic reaction of embryogenic cultures was observed after treatment with the aqueous extract or zinniol used at physiological concentration. Moreover, we did not detect zinniol in toxic fungal extracts by UHPLC analysis. These results suggest that strong phytotoxic compounds are present in the organic extract and remain to be characterized. Our results clearly show that carrot tolerance to A. dauci toxins is one component of its partial resistance.

  8. Posttransplant Intramuscular Injection of PLX-R18 Mesenchymal-Like Adherent Stromal Cells Improves Human Hematopoietic Engraftment in A Murine Transplant Model

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    Leland Metheny

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Late-term complications of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT are numerous and include incomplete engraftment. One possible mechanism of incomplete engraftment after HCT is cytokine-mediated suppression or dysfunction of the bone marrow microenvironment. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs elaborate cytokines that nurture or stimulate the marrow microenvironment by several mechanisms. We hypothesize that the administration of exogenous MSCs may modulate the bone marrow milieu and improve peripheral blood count recovery in the setting of incomplete engraftment. In the current study, we demonstrated that posttransplant intramuscular administration of human placental derived mesenchymal-like adherent stromal cells [PLacental eXpanded (PLX-R18] harvested from a three-dimensional in vitro culture system improved posttransplant engraftment of human immune compartment in an immune-deficient murine transplantation model. As measured by the percentage of CD45+ cell recovery, we observed improvement in the peripheral blood counts at weeks 6 (8.4 vs. 24.1%, p < 0.001 and 8 (7.3 vs. 13.1%, p < 0.05 and in the bone marrow at week 8 (28 vs. 40.0%, p < 0.01 in the PLX-R18 cohort. As measured by percentage of CD19+ cell recovery, there was improvement at weeks 6 (12.6 vs. 3.8% and 8 (10.1 vs. 4.1%. These results suggest that PLX-R18 may have a therapeutic role in improving incomplete engraftment after HCT.

  9. Absence of death receptor translocation into lipid rafts in acquired TRAIL-resistant NSCLC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wen; Yang, Chunxu; Zhang, Simin; Liu, Yu; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Junhong; Zhou, Fuxiang; Zhou, Yunfeng; Xie, Conghua

    2013-02-01

    Resistance to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a major limitation for its clinical use. The mechanisms of TRAIL resistance have been mostly studied in the context of cell lines that are intrinsically resistant to TRAIL. However, little is known about the molecular alterations that contribute to the development of acquired resistance during treatment with TRAIL. In this study, we established H460R, an isogenic cell line with acquired TRAIL resistance, from the TRAIL‑sensitive human lung cancer cell line H460 to investigate the mechanisms of acquired resistance. The acquired TRAIL‑resistant H460R cells remained sensitive to cisplatin. The mRNA and protein expression levels of death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5) were not altered in either of the TRAIL-treated cell lines. Nevertheless, tests in which the DR4 or DR5 gene was overexpressed or silenced suggest that death receptor expression is necessary but not sufficient for TRAIL‑induced apoptosis. Compared with parental TRAIL-sensitive H460 cells, H460R cells showed a decreased TRAIL-induced translocation of DR4/DR5 into lipid rafts. Further studies showed that nystatin partially prevented lipid raft aggregation and DR4 and DR5 clustering and reduced apoptosis in H460 cells again. Analysis of apoptotic molecules showed that more pro-caspase-8, FADD, caspase-3 and Bid, but less cFLIP in H460 cells than in H460R cells. Our findings suggest that the lack of death receptor redistribution negatively impacts DISC assembly in lipid rafts, which at least partially leads to the development of acquired resistance to TRAIL in H460R cells.

  10. Pertussis Toxin Exploits Host Cell Signaling Pathways Induced by Meningitis-Causing E. coli K1-RS218 and Enhances Adherence of Monocytic THP-1 Cells to Human Cerebral Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Julia Starost

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pertussis toxin (PTx, the major virulence factor of the whooping cough-causing bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis, permeabilizes the blood–brain barrier (BBB in vitro and in vivo. Breaking barriers might promote translocation of meningitis-causing bacteria across the BBB, thereby facilitating infection. PTx activates several host cell signaling pathways exploited by the neonatal meningitis-causing Escherichia coli K1-RS218 for invasion and translocation across the BBB. Here, we investigated whether PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 exert similar effects on MAPK p38, NF-κB activation and transcription of downstream targets in human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells using qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and ELISA in combination with specific inhibitors. PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 activate MAPK p38, but only E. coli K1-RS218 activates the NF-κB pathway. mRNA and protein levels of p38 and NF-κB downstream targets including IL-6, IL-8, CxCL-1, CxCL-2 and ICAM-1 were increased. The p38 specific inhibitor SB203590 blocked PTx-enhanced activity, whereas E. coli K1-RS218’s effects were inhibited by the NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Further, we found that PTx enhances the adherence of human monocytic THP-1 cells to human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells, thereby contributing to enhanced translocation. These modulations of host cell signaling pathways by PTx and meningitis-causing E. coli support their contributions to pathogen and monocytic THP-1 cells translocation across the BBB.

  11. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents in gemcitabine-resistant human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bree, Chris van; Kreder, Natasja Castro; Loves, Willem J.P.; Franken, Nicolaas A.P.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Haveman, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine cross-resistance to anti-tumor treatments in 2',2'difluorodeoxycytidine (dFdC, gemcitabine)-resistant human tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human lung carcinoma cells SW-1573 (SWp) were made resistant to dFdC (SWg). Sensitivity to cisplatin (cDDP), paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), methotrexate (MTX), cytarabine (ara-C), and dFdC was measured by a proliferation assay. Radiosensitivity and radioenhancement by dFdC of this cell panel and the human ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780 and its dFdC-resistant variant AG6000 were determined by clonogenic assay. Bivariate flowcytometry was performed to study cell cycle changes. Results: In the SWg, a complete deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) deficiency was found on mRNA and protein level. This was accompanied by a 10-fold decrease in dCK activity which resulted in the >1000-fold resistance to dFdC. Sensitivity to other anti-tumor drugs was not altered, except for ara-C (>100-fold resistance). Radiosensitivity was not altered in the dFdC-resistant cell lines SWg and AG6000. High concentrations (50-100 μM dFdC) induced radioenhancement in the dFdC-resistant cell lines similar to the radioenhancement obtained at lower concentrations (10 nM dFdC) in the parental lines. An early S-phase arrest was found in all cell lines after dFdC treatment where radioenhancement was achieved. Conclusions: In the dFdC-resistant lung tumor cell line SWg, the deficiency in dCK is related to the resistance to dFdC and ara-C. No cross-resistance was observed to other anti-tumor drugs used for the treatment in lung cancer. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation was not altered in two different dFdC-resistant cell lines. Resistance to dFdC does not eliminate the ability of dFdC to sensitize cells to radiation

  12. Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to Trastuzumab Emtansine in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangmin; Guo, Jun; Shen, Ben-Quan; Bumbaca Yadav, Daniela; Sliwkowski, Mark X; Crocker, Lisa M; Lacap, Jennifer A; Lewis Phillips, Gail D

    2018-04-25

    The receptor tyrosine kinase HER2 is overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancer, and its amplification is associated with reduced survival. Trastuzumab emtansine (Kadcyla®, T-DM1), an antibody-drug conjugate that is comprised of trastuzumab covalently linked to the anti-mitotic agent DM1 through a stable linker, was designed to selectively deliver DM1 to HER2-overexpressing tumor cells. T-DM1 is approved for the treatment of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer following progression on trastuzumab and a taxane. Despite the improvement in clinical outcome, many patients who initially respond to T-DM1 treatment eventually develop progressive disease. The mechanisms that contribute to T-DM1 resistance are not fully understood. To this end, we developed T-DM1-resistant in vitro models to examine the mechanisms of acquired T-DM1 resistance. We demonstrate that decreased HER2 and up-regulation of MDR1 contribute to T-DM1 resistance in KPL-4 T-DM1 resistant cells. In contrast, both loss of SLC46A3 and PTEN deficiency play a role in conferring resistance in BT-474M1 T-DM1 resistant cells. Our data suggest that these two cell lines acquire resistance through distinct mechanisms. Furthermore, we show that the KPL-4 T-DM1 resistance can be overcome by treatment with an inhibitor of MDR1, whereas a PI3K inhibitor can rescue PTEN loss-induced resistance in T-DM1-resistant BT-474M1 cells. Our results provide a rationale for developing therapeutic strategies to enhance T-DM1 clinical efficacy by combining T-DM1 and other inhibitors that target signaling transduction or resistance pathways. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Hypoxia-induced resistance to doxorubicin and methotrexate in human melanoma cell lines in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, K; Rofstad, E K

    1994-07-15

    Rodent cell lines can develop resistance to doxorubicin and methotrexate during hypoxic stress. This has so far not been observed in human tumor cell lines. The purpose of our communication is to show that doxorubicin and methotrexate resistance can also develop in human melanoma cells during exposure to hypoxia. Four cell lines (BEX-c, COX-c, SAX-c, WIX-c) have been studied. Cells were exposed to hypoxia (O2 concentration WIX-c. BEX-c and SAX-c were sensitive to methotrexate without hypoxia pre-treatment, whereas COX-c and WIX-c were resistant initially. Hypoxia-induced drug resistance was present immediately after reoxygenation and tended to decrease with time but remained statistically significant even 42 hr after reoxygenation.

  14. HABIT, a Randomized Feasibility Trial to Increase Hydroxyurea Adherence, Suggests Improved Health-Related Quality of Life in Youths with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldone, Arlene; Findley, Sally; Manwani, Deepa; Jia, Haomiao; Green, Nancy S

    2018-06-01

    To examine the effect of a community health worker (CHW) intervention, augmented by tailored text messages, on adherence to hydroxyurea therapy in youths with sickle cell disease, as well as on generic and disease-specific health-related quality of life (HrQL) and youth-parent self-management responsibility concordance. We conducted a 2-site randomized controlled feasibility study (Hydroxyurea Adherence for Personal Best in Sickle Cell Treatment [HABIT]) with 2:1 intervention allocation. Youths and parents participated as dyads. Intervention dyads received CHW visits and text message reminders. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and growth models adjusting for group assignment, time, and multiple comparisons. Changes in outcomes from 0 to 6 months were compared with their respective minimal clinically important differences. A total of 28 dyads (mean age of youths, 14.3 ± 2.6 years; 50% Hispanic) participated (18 in the intervention group, 10 in the control group), with 10.7% attrition. Accounting for group assignment, time, and multiple comparisons, at 6 months intervention youths reported improved generic HrQL total score (9.8 points; 95% CI, 0.4-19.2) and Emotions subscale score (15.0 points; 95% CI, 1.6-28.4); improved disease-specific subscale scores for Worry I (30.0 points; 95% CI, 8.5-51.5), Emotions (37.0 points, 95% CI, 9.4-64.5), and Communication I (17.8 points; 95% CI, 0.5-35.1); and 3-month dyad self-management responsibility concordance (3.5 points; 95% CI, -0.2 to 7.1). There were no differences in parent proxy-reported HrQL measures at 6 months. These findings add to research examining effects of behavioral interventions on HrQL outcomes in youths with sickle cell disease. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02029742. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reversal of cisplatin resistance in non-small cell lung cancer stem cells by Taxus chinensis var.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y Q; Xu, X P; Guo, Q M; Xu, X C; Liu, Q Y; An, S H; Xu, J L; Su, F; Tai, J B

    2016-09-02

    Drug resistance in cells is a major impedance to successful treatment of lung cancer. Taxus chinensis var. inhibits the growth of tumor cells and promotes the synthesis of interleukins 1 and 2 and tumor necrosis factor, enhancing immune function. In this study, T. chinensis var.-induced cell death was analyzed in lung cancer cells (H460) enriched for stem cell growth in a defined serum-free medium. Taxus-treated stem cells were also analyzed for Rhodamine 123 (Rh-123) expression by flow cytometry, and used as a standard functional indicator of MDR. The molecular basis of T. chinensis var.-mediated drug resistance was established by real-time PCR analysis of ABCC1, ABCB1, and lung resistance-related protein (LRP) mRNA, and western blot analysis of MRP1, MDR1, and LRP. Our results revealed that stem cells treated with higher doses of T. chinensis var. showed significantly lower growth inhibition rates than did H460 cells (P var. and cisplatin was also significantly inhibited (P var. (P var.-treated stem cells showed significant downregulation of the ABCC1, ABCB1, and LRP mRNA and MRP1, MDR1, and LRP (P var.-mediated downregulation of MRP1, MDR1, and LRP might contribute to the reversal of drug resistance in non-small cell lung cancer stem cells.

  16. [Establishment of human multidrug-resistant lung carcinoma cell line (D6/MVP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sheng-lin; Feng, Jian-guo; Gu, Lin-hui; Ling, Yu-tian

    2003-03-01

    To establish human multidrug-resistant lung carcinoma cell line (D6/MVP) with its characteristics studied. Intermittent administration of high-dose MMC, VDS and DDP (MVP) was used to induce human lung carcinoma cell line (D6) to a multidrug-resistant variety (D6/MVP). MTT assay was used to study the multidrug resistance of D6/MVP to multianticarcinogen. Flow cytometry was used to study the cell cycle distribution and the expression of P-gp, multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and GSH/GST. 1. D6/MVP was resistant to many anti-tumor agents, with the IC(50) 13.3 times higher and the drug resistance 2 - 6 times higher than D6, 2. The multiplication time of D6/MVP was prolonged and the cell number of S-phase decreased while that of G1- and G(2)-phase increased and 3. The expression of P-gp and MRP was enhanced significantly (96.2% vs 51.7%), but the expression of GSH/GST kept stable. D6/MVP is a multidrug-resistant cell line possessing the basic characteristics of drug-resistance.

  17. Reprogramming mediated radio-resistance of 3D-grown cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Gang; Ren Zhenxin; Chen Yaxiong; Zhu Jiayun; Du Yarong; Pan Dong; Li Xiaoman; Hu Burong; Grabham, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro 3D growth of tumors is a new cell culture model that more closely mimics the features of the in vivo environment and is being used increasingly in the field of biological and medical research. It has been demonstrated that cancer cells cultured in 3D matrices are more radio-resistant compared with cells in monolayers. However, the mechanisms causing this difference remain unclear. Here we show that cancer cells cultured in a 3D microenvironment demonstrated an increase in cells with stem cell properties. This was confirmed by the finding that cells in 3D cultures upregulated the gene and protein expression of the stem cell reprogramming factors such as OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, LIN28 and miR-302a, compared with cells in monolayers. Moreover, the expression of β-catenin, a regulating molecule of reprogramming factors, also increased in 3D-grown cancer cells. These findings suggest that cancer cells were reprogrammed to become stem cell-like cancer cells in a 3D growth culture microenvironment. Since cancer stem cell-like cells demonstrate an increased radio-resistance and chemo-resistance, our results offer a new perspective as to why. Our findings shed new light on understanding the features of the 3D growth cell model and its application in basic research into clinical radiotherapy and medicine. (author)

  18. TUCAN/CARDINAL/CARD8 and apoptosis resistance in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Checinska, Agnieszka; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Hoogeland, Bas SJ; Ferreira, Carlos G; Rodriguez, Jose A; Kruyt, Frank AE

    2006-01-01

    Activation of caspase-9 in response to treatment with cytotoxic drugs is inhibited in NSCLC cells, which may contribute to the clinical resistance to chemotherapy shown in this type of tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of caspase-9 inhibition, with a focus on a possible role of TUCAN as caspase-9 inhibitor and a determinant of chemosensitivity in NSCLC cells. Caspase-9 processing and activation were investigated by Western blot and by measuring the cleavage of the fluorogenic substrate LEHD-AFC. Proteins interaction assays, and RNA interference in combination with cell viability and apoptosis assays were used to investigate the involvement of TUCAN in inhibition of caspase-9 and chemosensitivity NSCLC. Analysis of the components of the caspase-9 activation pathway in a panel of NSCLC and SCLC cells revealed no intrinsic defects. In fact, exogenously added cytochrome c and dATP triggered procaspase-9 cleavage and activation in lung cancer cell lysates, suggesting the presence of an inhibitor. The reported inhibitor of caspase-9, TUCAN, was exclusively expressed in NSCLC cells. However, interactions between TUCAN and procaspase-9 could not be demonstrated by any of the assays used. Furthermore, RNA interference-mediated down-regulation of TUCAN did not restore cisplatin-induced caspase-9 activation or affect cisplatin sensitivity in NSCLC cells. These results indicate that procaspase-9 is functional and can undergo activation and full processing in lung cancer cell extracts in the presence of additional cytochrome c/dATP. However, the inhibitory protein TUCAN does not play a role in inhibition of procaspase-9 and in determining the sensitivity to cisplatin in NSCLC

  19. Treatment of a solid tumor using engineered drug-resistant immunocompetent cells and cytotoxic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Anindya; Shields, Jordan E; Spencer, H Trent

    2012-07-01

    Multimodal therapy approaches, such as combining chemotherapy agents with cellular immunotherapy, suffers from potential drug-mediated toxicity to immune effector cells. Overcoming such toxic effects of anticancer cellular products is a potential critical barrier to the development of combined therapeutic approaches. We are evaluating an anticancer strategy that focuses on overcoming such a barrier by genetically engineering drug-resistant variants of immunocompetent cells, thereby allowing for the coadministration of cellular therapy with cytotoxic chemotherapy, a method we refer to as drug-resistant immunotherapy (DRI). The strategy relies on the use of cDNA sequences that confer drug resistance and recombinant lentiviral vectors to transfer nucleic acid sequences into immunocompetent cells. In the present study, we evaluated a DRI-based strategy that incorporates the immunocompetent cell line NK-92, which has intrinsic antitumor properties, genetically engineered to be resistant to both temozolomide and trimetrexate. These immune effector cells efficiently lysed neuroblastoma cell lines, which we show are also sensitive to both chemotherapy agents. The antitumor efficacy of the DRI strategy was demonstrated in vivo, whereby neuroblastoma-bearing NOD/SCID/γ-chain knockout (NSG) mice treated with dual drug-resistant NK-92 cell therapy followed by dual cytotoxic chemotherapy showed tumor regression and significantly enhanced survival compared with animals receiving either nonengineered cell-based therapy and chemotherapy, immunotherapy alone, or chemotherapy alone. These data show there is a benefit to using drug-resistant cellular therapy when combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy approaches.

  20. Drosophila Wnt and STAT Define Apoptosis-Resistant Epithelial Cells for Tissue Regeneration after Irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpi Verghese

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster larvae irradiated with doses of ionizing radiation (IR that kill about half of the cells in larval imaginal discs still develop into viable adults. How surviving cells compensate for IR-induced cell death to produce organs of normal size and appearance remains an active area of investigation. We have identified a subpopulation of cells within the continuous epithelium of Drosophila larval wing discs that shows intrinsic resistance to IR- and drug-induced apoptosis. These cells reside in domains of high Wingless (Wg, Drosophila Wnt-1 and STAT92E (sole Drosophila signal transducer and activator of transcription [STAT] homolog activity and would normally form the hinge in the adult fly. Resistance to IR-induced apoptosis requires STAT and Wg and is mediated by transcriptional repression of the pro-apoptotic gene reaper. Lineage tracing experiments show that, following irradiation, apoptosis-resistant cells lose their identity and translocate to areas of the wing disc that suffered abundant cell death. Our findings provide a new paradigm for regeneration in which it is unnecessary to invoke special damage-resistant cell types such as stem cells. Instead, differences in gene expression within a population of genetically identical epithelial cells can create a subpopulation with greater resistance, which, following damage, survive, alter their fate, and help regenerate the tissue.

  1. Label-free recognition of drug resistance via impedimetric screening of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Eker

    Full Text Available We present a novel study on label-free recognition and distinction of drug resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7 DOX from their parental cells (MCF-7 WT via impedimetric measurements. Drug resistant cells exhibited significant differences in their dielectric properties compared to wild-type cells, exerting much higher extracellular resistance (Rextra . Immunostaining revealed that MCF-7 DOX cells gained a much denser F-actin network upon acquiring drug resistance indicating that remodeling of actin cytoskeleton is probably the reason behind higher Rextra , providing stronger cell architecture. Moreover, having exposed both cell types to doxorubicin, we were able to distinguish these two phenotypes based on their substantially different drug response. Interestingly, impedimetric measurements identified a concentration-dependent and reversible increase in cell stiffness in the presence of low non-lethal drug doses. Combined with a profound frequency analysis, these findings enabled distinguishing distinct cellular responses during drug exposure within four concentration ranges without using any labeling. Overall, this study highlights the possibility to differentiate drug resistant phenotypes from their parental cells and to assess their drug response by using microelectrodes, offering direct, real-time and noninvasive measurements of cell dependent parameters under drug exposure, hence providing a promising step for personalized medicine applications such as evaluation of the disease progress and optimization of the drug treatment of a patient during chemotherapy.

  2. ABCF2, an Nrf2 target gene, contributes to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lingjie; Wu, Jianfa; Dodson, Matthew; Rojo de la Vega, Elisa Montserrat; Ning, Yan; Zhang, Zhenbo; Yao, Ming; Zhang, Donna D; Xu, Congjian; Yi, Xiaofang

    2017-06-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that NRF2 plays a key role in mediating cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer. To further explore the mechanism underlying NRF2-dependent cisplatin resistance, we stably overexpressed or knocked down NRF2 in parental and cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells, respectively. These two pairs of stable cell lines were then subjected to microarray analysis, where we identified 18 putative NRF2 target genes. Among these genes, ABCF2, a cytosolic member of the ABC superfamily of transporters, has previously been reported to contribute to chemoresistance in clear cell ovarian cancer. A detailed analysis on ABCF2 revealed a functional antioxidant response element (ARE) in its promoter region, establishing ABCF2 as an NRF2 target gene. Next, we investigated the contribution of ABCF2 in NRF2-mediated cisplatin resistance using our stable ovarian cancer cell lines. The NRF2-overexpressing cell line, containing high levels of ABCF2, was more resistant to cisplatin-induced apoptosis compared to its control cell line; whereas the NRF2 knockdown cell line with low levels of ABCF2, was more sensitive to cisplatin treatment than its control cell line. Furthermore, transient overexpression of ABCF2 in the parental cells decreased apoptosis and increased cell viability following cisplatin treatment. Conversely, knockdown of ABCF2 using specific siRNA notably increased apoptosis and decreased cell viability in cisplatin-resistant cells treated with cisplatin. This data indicate that the novel NRF2 target gene, ABCF2, plays a critical role in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer, and that targeting ABCF2 may be a new strategy to improve chemotherapeutic efficiency. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. BAG3 Overexpression and Cytoprotective Autophagy Mediate Apoptosis Resistance in Chemoresistant Breast Cancer Cells

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    Chandan Kanta Das

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Target-specific treatment modalities are currently not available for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC, and acquired chemotherapy resistance is a primary obstacle for the treatment of these tumors. Here we employed derivatives of BT-549 and MDA-MB-468 TNBC cell lines that were adapted to grow in the presence of either 5-Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin or Docetaxel in an aim to identify molecular pathways involved in the adaptation to drug-induced cell killing. All six drug-adapted BT-549 and MDA-MB-468 cell lines displayed cross resistance to chemotherapy and decreased apoptosis sensitivity. Expression of the anti-apoptotic co-chaperone BAG3 was notably enhanced in two thirds (4/6 of the six resistant lines simultaneously with higher expression of HSP70 in comparison to parental controls. Doxorubicin-resistant BT-549 (BT-549rDOX20 and 5-Fluorouracil-resistant MDA-MB-468 (MDA-MB-468r5-FU2000 cells were chosen for further analysis with the autophagy inhibitor Bafilomycin A1 and lentiviral depletion of ATG5, indicating that enhanced cytoprotective autophagy partially contributes to increased drug resistance and cell survival. Stable lentiviral BAG3 depletion was associated with a robust down-regulation of Mcl-1, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, restoration of drug-induced apoptosis and reduced cell adhesion in these cells, and these death-sensitizing effects could be mimicked with the BAG3/Hsp70 interaction inhibitor YM-1 and by KRIBB11, a selective transcriptional inhibitor of HSF-1. Furthermore, BAG3 depletion was able to revert the EMT-like transcriptional changes observed in BT-549rDOX20 and MDA-MB-468r5-FU2000 cells. In summary, genetic and pharmacological interference with BAG3 is capable to resensitize TNBC cells to treatment, underscoring its relevance for cell death resistance and as a target to overcome therapy resistance of breast cancer.

  4. Genome wide single cell analysis of chemotherapy resistant metastatic cells in a case of gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjortland, Geir Olav; Fodstad, Oystein; Smeland, Sigbjorn; Hovig, Eivind; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Beiske, Klaus; Ree, Anne H; Tveito, Siri; Hoifodt, Hanne; Bohler, Per J; Hole, Knut H; Myklebost, Ola

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic progression due to development or enrichment of therapy-resistant tumor cells is eventually lethal. Molecular characterization of such chemotherapy resistant tumor cell clones may identify markers responsible for malignant progression and potential targets for new treatment. Here, in a case of stage IV adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction, we report the successful genome wide analysis using array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) of DNA from only fourteen tumor cells using a bead-based single cell selection method from a bone metastasis progressing during chemotherapy. In a case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction, the progression of bone metastasis was observed during a chemotherapy regimen of epirubicin, oxaliplatin and capecitabine, whereas lung-, liver and lymph node metastases as well as the primary tumor were regressing. A bone marrow aspirate sampled at the site of progressing metastasis in the right iliac bone was performed, and single cell molecular analysis using array-CGH of Epithelial Specific Antigen (ESA)-positive metastatic cells, and revealed two distinct regions of amplification, 12p12.1 and 17q12-q21.2 amplicons, containing the KRAS (12p) and ERBB2 (HER2/NEU) (17q) oncogenes. Further intrapatient tumor heterogeneity of these highlighted gene copy number changes was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in all available primary and metastatic tumor biopsies, and ErbB2 protein expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry. ERBB2 was heterogeneously amplified by FISH analysis in the primary tumor, as well as liver and bone metastasis, but homogenously amplified in biopsy specimens from a progressing bone metastasis after three initial cycles of chemotherapy, indicating a possible enrichment of erbB2 positive tumor cells in the progressing bone marrow metastasis during chemotherapy. A similar amplification profile was detected for wild-type KRAS, although more heterogeneously

  5. Oxygen radical detoxification enzymes in doxorubicin-sensitive and -resistant P388 murine leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramu, A.; Cohen, L.; Glaubiger, D.

    1984-01-01

    One of the proposed mechanisms for the cytotoxic effects of anthracycline compounds suggests that the effect is mediated through the formation of intracellular superoxide radicals. It is therefore possible that doxorubicin resistance is associated with increased intracellular enzyme capacity to convert these superoxide radicals to inactive metabolites. We have measured the relative activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in P388 mouse leukemia cells and in a doxorubicin-resistant subline. Since oxygen-reactive metabolites also play a role in mediating the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation, the radiosensitivity of both cell lines was also studied. No significant differences in superoxide dismutase activity between these cell lines was observed, indicating that they have a similar capacity to convert superoxide anion radicals to hydrogen peroxide. P388 cells that are resistant to doxorubicin have 1.5 times the glutathione content and 1.5 times the activity of glutathione peroxidase measured in drug-sensitive P388 cells. However, incubation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, which covalently binds glutathione, had no effect on the sensitivity of either cell line to doxorubicin. Measured catalase activity in drug-resistant P388 cells was one-third of the activity measured in doxorubicin-sensitive P388 cells. The activity of this enzyme was much higher than that of glutathione peroxidase in terms of H 2 O 2 deactivation in both cell lines. It is therefore unlikely that doxorubicin-resistant P388 cells have an increased ability to detoxify reactive oxygen metabolites when compared to drug-sensitive cells. Doxorubicin-resistant P388 cells were significantly more sensitive to X-irradiation than were drug-sensitive P388 cells. These observations suggest that the difference in catalase activity in these cell lines may be associated with the observed differences in radiosensitivity

  6. Influence of non-adherent yeast cells on electrical characteristics of diamond-based field-effect transistors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházka, Václav; Cifra, Michal; Kulha, Pavel; Ižák, Tibor; Rezek, Bohuslav; Kromka, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 395, Feb (2017), s. 214-219 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:67985882 Keywords : nanocrystalline diamond * yeast cells * field-effect transistor * transfer characteristics pH sensitivity Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  7. Study of determinants of Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment among HIV Patients covered by Ahwaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Moradi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is essential for achieving durable clinical outcomes in patients with HIV. In addition, suboptimal adherence can accelerate development of drug-resistant HIV and mitigate HAART’s role in reducing HIV incidence and transmission. The present research has been conducted to study treatment adherence and determine its effective factors on HIV/AIDS patients with the support of Ahvaz JundiShapur University of Medical Sciences in 2015. This is a cross-sectional study in which 158 HIV/AIDS patients who had been registered in the counseling centers of behavioral diseases of Ahvaz and were receiving antiretroviral treatment. They had been selected by census method. Data were collected using the AACTG (Adult Aids Clinical Trials Group questionnaire. The collected data was analyzed and interpreted using descriptive statistical tests, χ2 and step by step regression by spss-16 software. The mean age of patients was 32.8±10.36. Among them 20.8% were female, 47.5% were single and 35.6% had a job. Also 33.7% of the respondents had CD4+ cell count less than 350 cells/μL. and average treatment duration was 9 months at study entry. According to the findings of this study, the degree of adherence was reported as % 63.9.The main reasons for non-adherence were forgetfulness (26% and side effects (19%. There were no significant differences between highly adherent and less adherent patients with regard to age, gender, education Employment status, Treatment duration, time of diagnosis. Adherence to HAART is a key factor in disease course in persons with HIV/AIDS. Low-level adherence in subjects of the study indicated that educational and intervention is quite necessary for patients in order to improve their medication self-management.

  8. Cetuximab-Induced MET Activation Acts as a Novel Resistance Mechanism in Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Song

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant MET expression and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF signaling are implicated in promoting resistance to targeted agents; however, the induced MET activation by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors mediating resistance to targeted therapy remains elusive. In this study, we identified that cetuximab-induced MET activation contributed to cetuximab resistance in Caco-2 colon cancer cells. MET inhibition or knockdown sensitized Caco-2 cells to cetuximab-mediated growth inhibition. Additionally, SRC activation promoted cetuximab resistance by interacting with MET. Pretreatment with SRC inhibitors abolished cetuximab-mediated MET activation and rendered Caco-2 cells sensitive to cetuximab. Notably, cetuximab induced MET/SRC/EGFR complex formation. MET inhibitor or SRC inhibitor suppressed phosphorylation of MET and SRC in the complex, and MET inhibitor singly led to disruption of complex formation. These results implicate alternative targeting of MET or SRC as rational strategies for reversing cetuximab resistance in colon cancer.

  9. Bitter melon juice targets molecular mechanisms underlying gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    SOMASAGARA, RANGANATHA R.; DEEP, GAGAN; SHROTRIYA, SANGEETA; PATEL, MANISHA; AGARWAL, CHAPLA; AGARWAL, RAJESH

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PanC) is one of the most lethal malignancies, and resistance towards gemcitabine, the front-line chemotherapy, is the main cause for dismal rate of survival in PanC patients; overcoming this resistance remains a major challenge to treat this deadly malignancy. Whereas several molecular mechanisms are known for gemcitabine resistance in PanC cells, altered metabolism and bioenergetics are not yet studied. Here, we compared metabolic and bioenergetic functions between gemcita...

  10. Self-renewal and chemotherapy resistance of p75NTR positive cells in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Sheng-Dong; Yuan, Yang; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Gong, De-Jun; Bai, Chen-Guang; Wang, Feng; Luo, Jun-Hui; Xu, Zhi-Yun

    2009-01-01

    p75 NTR has been used to isolate esophageal and corneal epithelial stem cells. In the present study, we investigated the expression of p75 NTR in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and explored the biological properties of p75 NTR+ cells. p75 NTR expression in ESCC was assessed by immunohistochemistry. p75 NTR+ and p75 NTR- cells of 4 ESCC cell lines were separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Differentially expressed genes between p75 NTR+ and p75 NTR- cells were determined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Sphere formation assay, DDP sensitivity assay, 64 copper accumulation assay and tumorigenicity analysis were performed to determine the capacity of self-renewal, chemotherapy resistance and tumorigenicity of p75 NTR+ cells. In ESCC specimens, p75 NTR was found mainly confined to immature cells and absent in cells undergoing terminal differentiation. The percentage of p75 NTR+ cells was 1.6%–3.7% in Eca109 and 3 newly established ESCC cell lines. The expression of Bmi-1, which is associated with self-renewal of stem cells, was significantly higher in p75 NTR+ cells. p63, a marker identified in keratinocyte stem cells, was confined mainly to p75 NTR+ cells. The expression of CTR1, which is associated with cisplatin (DDP)-resistance, was significantly decreased in p75 NTR+ cells. Expression levels of differentiation markers, such as involucrin, cytokeratin 13, β1-integrin and β4-integrin, were lower in p75 NTR+ cells. In addition, p75 NTR+ cells generated both p75 NTR+ and p75 NTR- cells, and formed nonadherent spherical clusters in serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors. Furthermore, p75 NTR+ cells were found to be more resistant to DDP and exhibited lower 64 copper accumulation than p75 NTR- cells. Our results demonstrated that p75 NTR+ cells possess some characteristics of CSCs, namely, self-renewal and chemotherapy resistance. Chemotherapy resistance of p75 NTR+ cells may probably be attributable to

  11. A shift to organismal stress resistance in programmed cell death mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith E Judy

    Full Text Available Animals have many ways of protecting themselves against stress; for example, they can induce animal-wide, stress-protective pathways and they can kill damaged cells via apoptosis. We have discovered an unexpected regulatory relationship between these two types of stress responses. We find that C. elegans mutations blocking the normal course of programmed cell death and clearance confer animal-wide resistance to a specific set of environmental stressors; namely, ER, heat and osmotic stress. Remarkably, this pattern of stress resistance is induced by mutations that affect cell death in different ways, including ced-3 (cell death defective mutations, which block programmed cell death, ced-1 and ced-2 mutations, which prevent the engulfment of dying cells, and progranulin (pgrn-1 mutations, which accelerate the clearance of apoptotic cells. Stress resistance conferred by ced and pgrn-1 mutations is not additive and these mutants share altered patterns of gene expression, suggesting that they may act within the same pathway to achieve stress resistance. Together, our findings demonstrate that programmed cell death effectors influence the degree to which C. elegans tolerates environmental stress. While the mechanism is not entirely clear, it is intriguing that animals lacking the ability to efficiently and correctly remove dying cells should switch to a more global animal-wide system of stress resistance.

  12. Harnessing the p53-PUMA Axis to Overcome DNA Damage Resistance in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguang Zhou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to DNA damage–induced apoptosis is a hallmark of cancer and a major cause of treatment failure and lethal disease outcome. A tumor entity that is largely resistant to DNA-damaging therapies including chemo- or radiotherapy is renal cell carcinoma (RCC. This study was designed to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms of DNA damage resistance in RCC to develop strategies to resensitize tumor cells to DNA damage–induced apoptosis. Here, we show that apoptosis-resistant RCC cells have a disconnect between activation of p53 and upregulation of the downstream proapoptotic protein p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA. We demonstrate that this disconnect is not caused by gene-specific repression through CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF but instead by aberrant chromatin compaction. Treatment with an HDAC inhibitor was found to effectively reactivate PUMA expression on the mRNA and protein level and to revert resistance to DNA damage–induced cell death. Ectopic expression of PUMA was found to resensitize a panel of RCC cell lines to four different DNA-damaging agents tested. Remarkably, all RCC cell lines analyzed were wild-type for p53, and a knockdown was likewise able to sensitize RCC cells to acute genotoxic stress. Taken together, our results indicate that DNA damage resistance in RCC is reversible, involves the p53-PUMA axis, and is potentially targetable to improve the oncological outcomes of RCC patients.

  13. Modulation of cell metabolic pathways and oxidative stress signaling contribute to acquired melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zub, Kamila Anna; Sousa, Mirta Mittelstedt Leal de; Sarno, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    of the AKR1C family involved in prostaglandin synthesis contribute to the resistant phenotype. Finally, selected metabolic and oxidative stress response enzymes were targeted by inhibitors, several of which displayed a selective cytotoxicity against the melphalan-resistant cells and should be further...... and pathways not previously associated with melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells, including a metabolic switch conforming to the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis), and an elevated oxidative stress response mediated by VEGF/IL8-signaling. In addition, up-regulated aldo-keto reductase levels...

  14. Apparatus for measuring resistance change only in a cell analyzer and method for calibrating it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to resistance only monitoring and calibration in an electrical cell analyzer. Sample and sheath fluid flows of different salinities are utilized, the sample flow being diameter modulated to produce a selected pattern which is compared to the resistance measured across the flows.

  15. Genetic control of x-ray resistance in budding yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benathen, I.A.; Beam, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    Five x-ray-sensitive mutants were selected from 10,000 colonies arising from survivors of ultraviolet light. These were named XS5, XS6, XS7, XS8, and XS9. Mutant XS1 was donated by Nakai. These mutations affect the resistant budding cell survival component of the survival curve and, in diploids, the low-dose interdivisional cell shoulder. They are of two types: Class I, in which budding cells lack resistance; and Class II, in which budding cells show reduced resistance. When crossed with one another, they show a complex complementation pattern. Gene dosage effects are seen in XS1 heterozygotes, while budding but not between divisions. No direct correlation between radiation sensitivity, meiosis, and sporulation is observed; genes which influence radiation sensitivity do not affect meiotic recombination. A single mutation (XS1 or XS5) suppresses the shoulders of the survival curves of both budding haploid cells and diploid nonbudding cells

  16. No impact on P-gp level in radio-resistant Mcf-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhu, L.N.; Rao, Shama; Sarojini, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer has become the leading cause of human death worldwide. One possible cause for therapeutic failure is that residual tumor cells are reminiscent of stem cells, which ultimately give rise to secondary tumors or distant metastasis. The property of resistance to radiation therapy or chemotherapy might be the major clinical criterion to characterize 'cancer stem cells (CSCs)'. In the process of radiotherapy, the radiosensitive cancer will become a radioresistant one. Such radio-resistance cells might also show the characters of multi drug resistance (MRD) properties which may affect the chemotherapy process. The present study was carried out to know the expression level of P-gp, a MRD protein in radioresistance breast cancer cells. The study conducted by exposing the MCF-7 cells to 4Gy of gamma radiation

  17. The effect of milk fat globules on adherence and internalization of Salmonella Enteritidis to HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri, A; Griffiths, M; Khursigara, C M; Corredig, M

    2012-12-01

    Milk fat globules were extracted from bovine and goat milk and incubated with HT-29 human adenocarcinoma cells to assess the attachment and internalization of Salmonella Enteritidis. Because the expression of bacterial adhesins is highly affected by the presence of antibiotic, the attachment was studied with and without antibiotic in the cell growth medium. Although no inhibitory effect of the fat globules was observed in the presence of the antibiotic, milk fat globules significantly inhibited the binding and internalization of Salmonella in medium free of antibiotic. The fat globules from both bovine and goat milk markedly reduced bacterial binding and invasion compared with controls, and the cells treated with goat milk-derived fat globules demonstrated greater protective properties than those derived from bovine milk. The effect of heat treatment on bovine fat globules was also investigated, and it was shown that the fat globules from heated milk had a higher degree of inhibition than those from unheated milk. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Graphene oxide sheets-based platform for induced pluripotent stem cells culture: toxicity, adherence, growth and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Marcela; Andrade, Patricia F.; Durán, Nelson; Luzo, Angela C. M.; Fávaro, Wagner J.

    2015-05-01

    It was prepared the graphene oxide (GO) sheets by suspension of GO in ultrapure deionized water or in Pluronic F-68 using a ultrasonicator bath. Total characterization of GO sheets was carried out. The results on suspension of GO in water showed excellent growth and cell adhesion. GO/Pluronic F-68 platform for the growth and adhesion of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) that exhibits excellent properties for these processes. GO in water suspension exhibited an inhibition of the cell growth over 5 μg/mL In vivo study with GO suspended in water (100 μg/mL) on Fisher 344 rats via i.p. administration showed low toxicity. Despite GO particle accumulates in the intraperitoneal cavity, this fact did not interfere with the final absorption of GO. The AST (aspartate aminotransferase) and ALT (alanine aminotransferase) levels (liver function) did not differ statistically in all experimental groups. Also, creatinine and urea levels (renal function) did not differ statistically in all experimental groups. Taking together, the data suggest the great potential of graphene oxide sheets as platform to ACSs, as well as, new material for treatment several urological diseases.

  19. Complete structure of the cell surface polysaccharide of Streptococcus oralis ATCC 10557: A receptor for lectin-mediated interbacterial adherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeygunawardana, C.; Bush, C.A.; Cisar, J.O.

    1991-01-01

    Lectin-carbohydrate binding is known to play an important role in a number of different cell-cell interactions including those between certain species of oral streptococci and actinomyces that colonize teeth. The cell wall polysaccharides of Streptococcus oralis ATCC 10557, S. oralis 34, and Streptococcus mitis J22, although not identical antigenically, each function as a receptor molecule for the galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine reactive fimbrial lectins of Actinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces naeslundii. Carbohydrate analysis of the receptor polysaccharide isolated from S. oralis ATCC 10557 shows galactose (3 mol), glucose (1 mol), GalNAc (1 mol), and rhamnose (1 mol). 1 H NMR spectra of the polysaccharide show that is partially O-acetylated. Analysis of the 1 H NMR spectrum of the de-O-acetylated polysaccharide shows that it is composed of repeating subunits containing six monosaccharides and that the subunits are joined by a phosphodiester linkage. The 1 H and 13 C NMR spectra were completely assigned by two-dimensional homonuclear correlation methods and by 1 H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum correlation ( 1 H[ 13 C]HMQC). The complete 1 H and 13 C assignment of the native polysaccharide was carried out by the same techniques augmented by a 13 C-coupled hybrid HMQC-COSY method, which is shown to be especially useful for carbohydrates in which strong coupling and overlapping peaks in the 1 H spectrum pose difficulties

  20. Enzalutamide inhibits proliferation of gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer cells with increased androgen receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Koji; Horie, Kengo; Mizutani, Kosuke; Kato, Taku; Fujita, Yasunori; Kawakami, Kyojiro; Kojima, Toshio; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Deguchi, Takashi; Ito, Masafumi

    2017-01-01

    Advanced bladder cancer is treated mainly with gemcitabine and cisplatin, but most patients eventually become resistance. Androgen receptor (AR) signaling has been implicated in bladder cancer as well as other types of cancer including prostate cancer. In this study, we investigated the expression and role of AR in gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer cells and also the potential of enzalutamide, an AR inhibitor, as a therapeutic for the chemoresistance. First of all, we established gemcitabine-resistant T24 cells (T24GR) from T24 bladder cancer cells and performed gene expression profiling. Microarray analysis revealed upregulation of AR expression in T24GR cells compared with T24 cells. AR mRNA and protein expression was confirmed to be increased in T24GR cells, respectively, by quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis, which was associated with more potent AR transcriptional activity as measured by luciferase reporter assay. The copy number of AR gene in T24GR cells determined by PCR was twice as many as that of T24 cells. AR silencing by siRNA transfection resulted in inhibition of proliferation of T24GR cells. Cell culture in charcoal-stripped serum and treatment with enzalutamide inhibited growth of T24GR cells, which was accompanied by cell cycle arrest. AR transcriptional activity was found to be reduced in T24GR cells by enzalutamide treatment. Lastly, enzalutamide also inhibited cell proliferation of HTB5 bladder cancer cells that express AR and possess intrinsic resistance to gemcitabine. Our results suggest that enzalutamide may have the potential to treat patients with advanced gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer with increased AR expression.

  1. Autoradiographic assay of mutants resistant to diphtheria toxin in mammalian cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronen, A.; Gingerich, J.D.; Duncan, A.M.V.; Heddle, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Diptheria toxin kills mammalian cells by ribosylating elongation factor 2, a protein factor necessary for protein synthesis. The frequency of cells able to form colonies in the presence of the toxin can be used as an assay for mutation to diphtheria toxin resistance. Resistance to diphtheria toxin can also be detected autoradiographically in cells exposed to [ 3 H]leucine after treatment with the toxin. In cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells, the frequency of such resistant cells is increased by exposure of the cells to γ-rays, ultraviolet light, ethylnitrosourea, mitomycin c, ethidium bromide, and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The resistant cells form discrete microcolonies if they are allowed to divide several times before intoxication which indicates that they are genuine mutants. The assay is potentially adaptable to any cell population that can be intoxicated with diphtheria toxin and labeled with [ 3 H]leucine, whether or not the cells can form colonies. It may be useful, therefore, for measuring mutation rates in slowly growing or nondividing cell populations such as breast, brain, and liver, as well as in cells that do divide but cannot be readily cloned, such as the colonic epithelium. 23 references, 6 figures

  2. Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure and method of processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jr., Jesse J.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Li, Tingkai

    1993-12-07

    Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure are created using sol-gel processes. The processes have particular application in creating calcium magnesium zirconium phosphate, CMZP, coatings and foams.

  3. Epigenetic Modulation of the Biophysical Properties of Drug-Resistant Cell Lipids to Restore Drug Transport and Endocytic Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Lu, Shan; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2012-01-01

    In our recent studies exploring the biophysical characteristics of resistant cell lipids, and the role they play in drug transport, we demonstrated the difference of drug-resistant breast cancer cells from drug-sensitive cells in lipid composition and biophysical properties, suggesting that cancer cells acquire a drug-resistant phenotype through the alteration of lipid synthesis to inhibit intracellular drug transport to protect from cytotoxic effect. In cancer cells, epigenetic changes (e.g....

  4. Engineered reversal of drug resistance in cancer cells--metastases suppressor factors as change agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Kumar, Akinchan; Mann, Anita; Aggarwal, Suruchi; Kumar, Maneesh; Roy, Sumitabho Deb; Pore, Subrata Kumar; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Mahesh Kumar, Jerald; Thakur, Ram Krishna; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    Building molecular correlates of drug resistance in cancer and exploiting them for therapeutic intervention remains a pressing clinical need. To identify factors that impact drug resistance herein we built a model that couples inherent cell-based response toward drugs with transcriptomes of resistant/sensitive cells. To test this model, we focused on a group of genes called metastasis suppressor genes (MSGs) that influence aggressiveness and metastatic potential of cancers. Interestingly, modeling of 84 000 drug response transcriptome combinations predicted multiple MSGs to be associated with resistance of different cell types and drugs. As a case study, on inducing MSG levels in a drug resistant breast cancer line resistance to anticancer drugs caerulomycin, camptothecin and topotecan decreased by more than 50-60%, in both culture conditions and also in tumors generated in mice, in contrast to control un-induced cells. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of engineered reversal of drug resistance in cancer cells based on a model that exploits inherent cellular response profiles.

  5. Dependency of a therapy-resistant state of cancer cells on a lipid peroxidase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vasanthi S; Ryan, Matthew J; Dhruv, Harshil D; Gill, Shubhroz; Eichhoff, Ossia M; Seashore-Ludlow, Brinton; Kaffenberger, Samuel D; Eaton, John K; Shimada, Kenichi; Aguirre, Andrew J; Viswanathan, Srinivas R; Chattopadhyay, Shrikanta; Tamayo, Pablo; Yang, Wan Seok; Rees, Matthew G; Chen, Sixun; Boskovic, Zarko V; Javaid, Sarah; Huang, Cherrie; Wu, Xiaoyun; Tseng, Yuen-Yi; Roider, Elisabeth M; Gao, Dong; Cleary, James M; Wolpin, Brian M; Mesirov, Jill P; Haber, Daniel A; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Boehm, Jesse S; Kotz, Joanne D; Hon, Cindy S; Chen, Yu; Hahn, William C; Levesque, Mitchell P; Doench, John G; Berens, Michael E; Shamji, Alykhan F; Clemons, Paul A; Stockwell, Brent R; Schreiber, Stuart L

    2017-07-27

    Plasticity of the cell state has been proposed to drive resistance to multiple classes of cancer therapies, thereby limiting their effectiveness. A high-mesenchymal cell state observed in human tumours and cancer cell lines has been associated with resistance to multiple treatment modalities across diverse cancer lineages, but the mechanistic underpinning for this state has remained incompletely understood. Here we molecularly characterize this therapy-resistant high-mesenchymal cell state in human cancer cell lines and organoids and show that it depends on a druggable lipid-peroxidase pathway that protects against ferroptosis, a non-apoptotic form of cell death induced by the build-up of toxic lipid peroxides. We show that this cell state is characterized by activity of enzymes that promote the synthesis of polyunsaturated lipids. These lipids are the substrates for lipid peroxidation by lipoxygenase enzymes. This lipid metabolism creates a dependency on pathways converging on the phospholipid glutathione peroxidase (GPX4), a selenocysteine-containing enzyme that dissipates lipid peroxides and thereby prevents the iron-mediated reactions of peroxides that induce ferroptotic cell death. Dependency on GPX4 was found to exist across diverse therapy-resistant states characterized by high expression of ZEB1, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition in epithelial-derived carcinomas, TGFβ-mediated therapy-resistance in melanoma, treatment-induced neuroendocrine transdifferentiation in prostate cancer, and sarcomas, which are fixed in a mesenchymal state owing to their cells of origin. We identify vulnerability to ferroptic cell death induced by inhibition of a lipid peroxidase pathway as a feature of therapy-resistant cancer cells across diverse mesenchymal cell-state contexts.

  6. Doxorubicin-induced mitophagy contributes to drug resistance in cancer stem cells from HCT8 human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chen; Luo, Lan; Guo, Chang-Ying; Goto, Shinji; Urata, Yoshishige; Shao, Jiang-Hua; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are known to be drug resistant. Mitophagy selectively degrades unnecessary or damaged mitochondria by autophagy during cellular stress. To investigate the potential role of mitophagy in drug resistance in CSCs, we purified CD133 + /CD44 + CSCs from HCT8 human colorectal cancer cells and then exposed to doxorubicin (DXR). Compared with parental cells, CSCs were more resistant to DXR treatment. Although DXR treatment enhanced autophagy levels in both cell types, the inhibition of autophagy by ATG7 silencing significantly increased the toxicity of DXR only in parental cells, not in CSCs. Interestingly, the level of mitochondrial superoxide was detected to be significantly lower in CSCs than in parental cells after DXR treatment. Furthermore, the mitophagy level and expression of BNIP3L, a mitophagy regulator, were significantly higher in CSCs than in parental cells after DXR treatment. Silencing BNIP3L significantly halted mitophagy and enhanced the sensitivity to DXR in CSCs. Our data suggested that mitophagy, but not non-selective autophagy, likely contributes to drug resistance in CSCs isolated from HCT8 cells. Further studies in other cancer cell lines will be needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. RAD18 mediates resistance to ionizing radiation in human glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Chen; Wang, Hongwei; Cheng, Hongbin; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Zhi; Yue, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in glioma cell lines. • RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis. • The elevated expression of RAD18 is associated with recurrent GBM who underwent IR therapy. - Abstract: Radioresistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). RAD18 a central regulator of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), has been shown to play an important role in regulating genomic stability and DNA damage response. In the present study, we investigate the relationship between RAD18 and resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and examined the expression levels of RAD18 in primary and recurrent GBM specimens. Our results showed that RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in GBM. The expression level of RAD18 in glioma cells correlates with their resistance to IR. Ectopic expression of RAD18 in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells confers significant resistance to IR treatment. Conversely, depletion of endogenous RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells sensitized these cells to IR treatment. Moreover, RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells, whereas cells deficient in RAD18 exhibit increased apoptosis induced by IR. Furthermore, knockdown of RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells disrupts HR-mediated repair, resulting in increased accumulation of DSB. In addition, clinical data indicated that RAD18 was significantly higher in recurrent GBM samples that were exposed to IR compared with the corresponding primary GBM samples. Collectively, our findings reveal that RAD18 may serve as a key mediator of the IR response and may function as a potential target for circumventing IR resistance in human GBM

  8. Glucocorticoid resistance is reverted by LCK inhibition in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Valentina; Capuzzo, Giorgia; Milani, Gloria; Minuzzo, Sonia Anna; Pinazza, Marica; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Bresolin, Silvia; Porcù, Elena; Frasson, Chiara; Indraccolo, Stefano; Basso, Giuseppe; Accordi, Benedetta

    2017-12-21

    Pediatric T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients often display resistance to glucocorticoid (GC) treatment. These patients, classified as prednisone poor responders (PPR), have poorer outcome than do the other pediatric T-ALL patients receiving a high-risk adapted therapy. Because glucocorticoids are administered to ALL patients during all the different phases of therapy, GC resistance represents an important challenge to improving the outcome for these patients. Mechanisms underlying resistance are not yet fully unraveled; thus our research focused on the identification of deregulated signaling pathways to point out new targeted approaches. We first identified, by reverse-phase protein arrays, the lymphocyte cell-specific protein-tyrosine kinase (LCK) as aberrantly activated in PPR patients. We showed that LCK inhibitors, such as dasatinib, bosutinib, nintedanib, and WH-4-023, are able to induce cell death in GC-resistant T-ALL cells, and remarkably, cotreatment with dexamethasone is able to reverse GC resistance, even at therapeutic drug concentrations. This was confirmed by specific LCK gene silencing and ex vivo combined treatment of cells from PPR patient-derived xenografts. Moreover, we observed that LCK hyperactivation in PPR patients upregulates the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells signaling triggering to interleukin-4 ( IL-4 ) overexpression. GC-sensitive cells cultured with IL-4 display an increased resistance to dexamethasone, whereas the inhibition of IL-4 signaling could increase GC-induced apoptosis in resistant cells. Treatment with dexamethasone and dasatinib also impaired engraftment of leukemia cells in vivo. Our results suggest a quickly actionable approach to supporting conventional therapies and overcoming GC resistance in pediatric T-ALL patients. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. Increased p38-MAPK is responsible for chemotherapy resistance in human gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xianling; Zhang, Baihe; Wu, Mengchao; Wei, Lixin; Ma, Nannan; Wang, Jin; Song, Jianrui; Bu, Xinxin; Cheng, Yue; Sun, Kai; Xiong, Haiyan; Jiang, Guocheng

    2008-01-01

    Chemoresistance is one of the main obstacles to successful cancer therapy and is frequently associated with Multidrug resistance (MDR). Many different mechanisms have been suggested to explain the development of an MDR phenotype in cancer cells. One of the most studied mechanisms is the overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which is a product of the MDR1 gene. Tumor cells often acquire the drug-resistance phenotype due to upregulation of the MDR1 gene. Overexpression of MDR1 gene has often been reported in primary gastric adenocarcinoma. This study investigated the role of p38-MAPK signal pathway in vincristine-resistant SGC7901/VCR cells. P-gp and MDR1 RNA were detected by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR amplification. Mitgen-activated protein kinases and function of P-gp were demonstrated by Western blot and FACS Aria cytometer analysis. Ap-1 activity and cell apoptosis were detected by Dual-Luciferase Reporter Assay and annexin V-PI dual staining. The vincristine-resistant SGC7901/VCR cells with increased expression of the multidrug-resistance 1 (MDR1) gene were resistant to P-gp-related drug and P-gp-unrelated drugs. Constitutive increases of phosphorylated p38-MAPK and AP-1 activities were also found in the drug-resistant cells. Inhibition of p38-MAPK by SB202190 reduced activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity and MDR1 expression levels and increased the sensitivity of SGC7901/VCR cells to chemotherapy. Activation of the p38-MAPK pathway might be responsible for the modulation of P-glycoprotein-mediated and P-glycoprotein-unmediated multidrug resistance in the SGC7901/VCR cell line

  10. Insulin resistance enhances the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in ovarian granulosa cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linghui Kong

    Full Text Available The ovary is the main regulator of female fertility. Granulosa cell dysfunction may be involved in various reproductive endocrine disorders. Here we investigated the effect of insulin resistance on the metabolism and function of ovarian granulosa cells, and dissected the functional status of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in these cells. Our data showed that dexamethasone-induced insulin resistance in mouse granulosa cells reduced insulin sensitivity, accompanied with an increase in phosphorylation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Furthermore, up-regulation of cytochrome P450 subfamily 17 and testosterone and down-regulation of progesterone were observed in insulin-resistant mouse granulosa cells. Inhibition of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase after induction of insulin resistance in mouse granulosa cells decreased phosphorylation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase, downregulated cytochrome P450 subfamily 17 and lowered progesterone production. This insulin resistance cell model can successfully demonstrate certain mechanisms such as hyperandrogenism, which may inspire a new strategy for treating reproductive endocrine disorders by regulating cell signaling pathways.

  11. Exosomes derived from human mesenchymal stem cells confer drug resistance in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Runbi; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Xu; Xue, Jianguo; Yuan, Xiao; Yan, Yongmin; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2015-08-03

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in chemoresistance. Exosomes have been reported to modify cellular phenotype and function by mediating cell-cell communication. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether exosomes derived from MSCs (MSC-exosomes) are involved in mediating the resistance to chemotherapy in gastric cancer and to explore the underlying molecular mechanism. We found that MSC-exosomes significantly induced the resistance of gastric cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil both in vivo and ex vivo. MSC-exosomes antagonized 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis and enhanced the expression of multi-drug resistance associated proteins, including MDR, MRP and LRP. Mechanistically, MSC-exosomes triggered the activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaM-Ks) and Raf/MEK/ERK kinase cascade in gastric cancer cells. Blocking the CaM-Ks/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway inhibited the promoting role of MSC-exosomes in chemoresistance. Collectively, MSC-exosomes could induce drug resistance in gastric cancer cells by activating CaM-Ks/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Our findings suggest that MSC-exosomes have profound effects on modifying gastric cancer cells in the development of drug resistance. Targeting the interaction between MSC-exosomes and cancer cells may help improve the efficacy of chemotherapy in gastric cancer.

  12. Elevated β-catenin activity contributes to carboplatin resistance in A2780cp ovarian cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barghout, Samir H. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Zepeda, Nubia; Xu, Zhihua [Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Steed, Helen [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Lee, Cheng-Han [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Fu, YangXin, E-mail: yangxin@ualberta.ca [Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2015-12-04

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related mortalities in women. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) represents approximately 90% of all ovarian malignancies. Most EOC patients are diagnosed at advanced stages and current chemotherapy regimens are ineffective against advanced EOC due to the development of chemoresistance. It is important to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to effectively manage this disease. In this study, we examined the expression of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling components in the paired cisplatin-sensitive (A2780s) and cisplatin-resistant (A2780cp) EOC cell lines. Our results showed that several negative regulators of Wnt signaling are downregulated, whereas a few Wnt ligands and known Wnt/β-catenin target genes are upregulated in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells, suggesting that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is more active in A2780cp cells. Further analysis revealed nuclear localization of β-catenin and higher β-catenin transcriptional activity in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells. Finally, we demonstrated that chemical inhibition of β-catenin transcriptional activity by its inhibitor CCT036477 sensitized A2780cp cells to carboplatin, supporting a role for β-catenin in carboplatin resistance in A2780cp cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that increased Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity contributes to carboplatin resistance in A2780cp cells. - Highlights: • Wnt ligands and target genes are upregulated in cisplatin resistant A2780cp cells. • Negative regulators of Wnt signaling are down-regulated in A2780cp cells. • β-catenin transcriptional activity is higher in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells. • Inhibition of β-catenin activity increases carboplatin cytotoxicity in A2780cp cells.

  13. Elevated β-catenin activity contributes to carboplatin resistance in A2780cp ovarian cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barghout, Samir H.; Zepeda, Nubia; Xu, Zhihua; Steed, Helen; Lee, Cheng-Han; Fu, YangXin

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related mortalities in women. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) represents approximately 90% of all ovarian malignancies. Most EOC patients are diagnosed at advanced stages and current chemotherapy regimens are ineffective against advanced EOC due to the development of chemoresistance. It is important to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to effectively manage this disease. In this study, we examined the expression of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling components in the paired cisplatin-sensitive (A2780s) and cisplatin-resistant (A2780cp) EOC cell lines. Our results showed that several negative regulators of Wnt signaling are downregulated, whereas a few Wnt ligands and known Wnt/β-catenin target genes are upregulated in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells, suggesting that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is more active in A2780cp cells. Further analysis revealed nuclear localization of β-catenin and higher β-catenin transcriptional activity in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells. Finally, we demonstrated that chemical inhibition of β-catenin transcriptional activity by its inhibitor CCT036477 sensitized A2780cp cells to carboplatin, supporting a role for β-catenin in carboplatin resistance in A2780cp cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that increased Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity contributes to carboplatin resistance in A2780cp cells. - Highlights: • Wnt ligands and target genes are upregulated in cisplatin resistant A2780cp cells. • Negative regulators of Wnt signaling are down-regulated in A2780cp cells. • β-catenin transcriptional activity is higher in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells. • Inhibition of β-catenin activity increases carboplatin cytotoxicity in A2780cp cells.

  14. C-Cbl reverses HER2-mediated tamoxifen resistance in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Xu, Ling; Che, Xiaofang; Li, Haizhou; Zhang, Ye; Song, Na; Wen, Ti; Hou, Kezuo; Yang, Yi; Zhou, Lu; Xin, Xing; Xu, Lu; Zeng, Xue; Shi, Sha; Liu, Yunpeng; Qu, Xiujuan; Teng, Yuee

    2018-05-02

    Tamoxifen is a frontline therapy for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer in premenopausal women. However, many patients develop resistance to tamoxifen, and the mechanism underlying tamoxifen resistance is not well understood. Here we examined whether ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation is involved in tamoxifen resistance. MTT and colony formation assays were used to measure cell viability and proliferation. Western blot was used to detect protein expression and protein complex formations were detected by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence. SiRNA was used to examine the function of HER2 in of BT474 cells. An in vivo xenograft animal model was established to examine the role of c-Cbl in tumor growth. MTT and colony formation assay showed that BT474 cells are resistant to tamoxifen and T47D cells are sensitive to tamoxifen. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation in BT474 cells but not in T47D cells. However, ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation was detected after overexpressing HER2 in T47D cells and these cells were more resistant to tamoxifen. HER2 knockdown by siRNA in BT474 cells reduced ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation and reversed tamoxifen resistance. ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation was also disrupted and tamoxifen resistance was reversed in BT474 cells by the c-Src inhibitor PP2 and HER2 antibody trastuzumab. Nystatin, a lipid raft inhibitor, reduced ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation and partially reversed tamoxifen resistance. ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation was disrupted by overexpression of c-Cbl but not by the c-Cbl ubiquitin ligase mutant. In addition, c-Cbl could reverse tamoxifen resistance in BT474 cells, but the ubiquitin ligase mutant had no effect. The effect of c-Cbl was validated in BT474 tumor-bearing nude mice in vivo. Immunofluorescence also revealed ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation was reduced in tumor tissues of nude mice with c-Cbl overexpression. Our results suggested that c-Cbl can reverse tamoxifen

  15. Microarray Analysis in a Cell Death Resistant Glioma Cell Line to Identify Signaling Pathways and Novel Genes Controlling Resistance and Malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seznec, Janina; Naumann, Ulrike, E-mail: ulrike.naumann@uni-tuebingen.de [Laboratory of Molecular Neuro-Oncology, Department of General Neurology, Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research and Center Neurology, University of Tuebingen, Otfried-Mueller-Str. 27, Tuebingen 72076 (Germany)

    2011-06-27

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a lethal type of cancer mainly resistant to radio- and chemotherapy. Since the tumor suppressor p53 functions as a transcription factor regulating the expression of genes involved in growth inhibition, DNA repair and apoptosis, we previously assessed whether specific differences in the modulation of gene expression are responsible for the anti-tumor properties of a dominant positive p53, chimeric tumor suppressor (CTS)-1. CTS-1 is based on the sequence of p53 and designed to resist various mechanisms of inactivation which limit the activity of p53. To identify CTS-1-regulated cell death-inducing genes, we generated a CTS-1-resistant glioma cell line (229R). We used Affymetrix whole-genome microarray expression analysis to analyze alterations in gene expression and identified a variety of CTS-1 regulated genes involved in cancer-linked processes. 313 genes were differentially expressed in Adeno-CTS-1 (Ad-CTS-1)-infected and 700 genes in uninfected 229R cells compared to matching parental cells. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) determined a variety of differentially expressed genes in Ad-CTS-1-infected cells that were members of the intracellular networks with central tumor-involved players such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), protein kinase B (PKB/AKT) or transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Differentially regulated genes include secreted factors as well as intracellular proteins and transcription factors regulating not only cell death, but also processes such as tumor cell motility and immunity. This work gives an overview of the pathways differentially regulated in the resistant versus parental glioma cells and might be helpful to identify candidate genes which could serve as targets to develop novel glioma specific therapy strategies.

  16. Microarray Analysis in a Cell Death Resistant Glioma Cell Line to Identify Signaling Pathways and Novel Genes Controlling Resistance and Malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seznec, Janina; Naumann, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a lethal type of cancer mainly resistant to radio- and chemotherapy. Since the tumor suppressor p53 functions as a transcription factor regulating the expression of genes involved in growth inhibition, DNA repair and apoptosis, we previously assessed whether specific differences in the modulation of gene expression are responsible for the anti-tumor properties of a dominant positive p53, chimeric tumor suppressor (CTS)-1. CTS-1 is based on the sequence of p53 and designed to resist various mechanisms of inactivation which limit the activity of p53. To identify CTS-1-regulated cell death-inducing genes, we generated a CTS-1-resistant glioma cell line (229R). We used Affymetrix whole-genome microarray expression analysis to analyze alterations in gene expression and identified a variety of CTS-1 regulated genes involved in cancer-linked processes. 313 genes were differentially expressed in Adeno-CTS-1 (Ad-CTS-1)-infected and 700 genes in uninfected 229R cells compared to matching parental cells. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) determined a variety of differentially expressed genes in Ad-CTS-1-infected cells that were members of the intracellular networks with central tumor-involved players such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), protein kinase B (PKB/AKT) or transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Differentially regulated genes include secreted factors as well as intracellular proteins and transcription factors regulating not only cell death, but also processes such as tumor cell motility and immunity. This work gives an overview of the pathways differentially regulated in the resistant versus parental glioma cells and might be helpful to identify candidate genes which could serve as targets to develop novel glioma specific therapy strategies

  17. Melatonin Promotes Apoptosis of Oxaliplatin-resistant Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Inhibition of Cellular Prion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Hee; Yoon, Yeo Min; Han, Yong-Seok; Yun, Chul Won; Lee, Sang Hun

    2018-04-01

    Drug resistance restricts the efficacy of chemotherapy in colorectal cancer. However, the detailed molecular mechanism of drug resistance in colorectal cancer cells remains unclear. The level of cellular prion protein (PrP C ) in oxaliplatin-resistant colorectal cancer (SNU-C5/Oxal-R) cells was assessed. PrP C level in SNU-C5/Oxal-R cells was significantly increased compared to that in wild-type (SNU-C5) cells. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were higher in SNU-C5/Oxal-R cells than in SNU-C5 cells. Treatment of SNU-C5/Oxal-R cells with oxaliplatin and melatonin reduced PrP C expression, while suppressing antioxidant enzyme activity and increasing superoxide anion generation. In SNU-C5/Oxal-R cells, endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis were significantly increased following co-treatment with oxaliplatin and melatonin compared to treatment with oxaliplatin alone. Co-treatment with oxaliplatin and melatonin increased endoplasmic reticulum stress in and apoptosis of SNU-C5/Oxal-R cells through inhibition of PrP C , suggesting that PrP C could be a key molecule in oxaliplatin resistance of colorectal cancer cells. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. Abnormally banded chromosomal regions in doxorubicin-resistant B16-BL6 murine melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovak, M L; Hoeltge, G A; Ganapathi, R

    1986-08-01

    B16-BL6 murine melanoma cells were selected for cytogenetic evaluation during the stepwise development of increasing resistance in vitro to the antitumor antibiotic, doxorubicin (DOX). Karyotypic studies demonstrated extensive heteroploidy with both numerical and structural abnormalities which were not present in the parental DOX-sensitive B16-BL6 cells. Trypsin-Giemsa banding revealed the presence of several marker chromosomes containing abnormally banding regions (ABRs) in the 44-fold B16-BL6 DOX-resistant subline. These ABRs appeared to be more homogeneously staining at the higher DOX concentrations. Length measurements (ABR index) in seven banded metaphases indicated a direct correlation with increasing DOX concentration. When the DOX-resistant cells were grown in drug-free medium for 1 yr, the drug-resistant phenotype gradually declined in parallel with the level of resistance and the ABR index. DOX-induced cytogenetic damage examined by sister chromatid exchange methodology in parental B16-BL6 cells indicated a linear sister chromatid exchange:DOX dose-response relationship. However, after continuous treatment of parental B16-BL6 cells with DOX (0.01 microgram/ml) for 30 days, sister chromatid exchange scores were found to return to base-line values. The B16-BL6 resistant cells demonstrated a cross-resistant phenotype with N-trifluoroacetyladriamycin-14-valerate, actinomycin D, and the Vinca alkaloids but not with 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine. The results suggest that ABR-containing chromosomes in DOX-resistant sublines may represent cytogenetic alterations of specific amplified genes involved in the expression of DOX resistance. Further studies are required to identify and define the possible gene products and to correlate their relationship to the cytotoxic action of doxorubicin.

  19. the art of avoiding non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is better than cure' may therefore be applicable to the problem of non-adherence among patients on ART even more than in the management of chronic non- infectious diseases in which drug resistance is not an issue of concern. We therefore undertook an analysis of results from the adherence monitoring in our HIV care ...

  20. Prevalence of bortezomib-resistant constitutive NF-kappaB activity in mantle cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahl Brad S

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib can inhibit activation of the transcription factor NF-κB, a mechanism implicated in its anti-neoplastic effects observed in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL. However, NF-κB can be activated through many distinct mechanisms, including proteasome independent pathways. While MCL cells have been shown to harbor constitutive NF-κB activity, what fraction of this activity in primary MCL samples is sensitive or resistant to inhibition by bortezomib remains unclear. Results Proteasome activity in the EBV-negative MCL cell lines Jeko-1 and Rec-1 is inhibited by greater than 80% after exposure to 20 nM bortezomib for 4 hours. This treatment decreased NF-κB activity in Jeko-1 cells, but failed to do so in Rec-1 cells when assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. Concurrently, Rec-1 cells were more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of bortezomib than Jeko-1 cells. Consistent with a proteasome inhibitor resistant pathway of activation described in mouse B-lymphoma cells (WEHI231 and a breast carcinoma cell line (MDA-MB-468, the bortezomib-resistant NF-κB activity in Rec-1 cells is inhibited by calcium chelators, calmodulin inhibitors, and perillyl alcohol, a monoterpene capable of blocking L-type calcium channels. Importantly, the combination of perillyl alcohol and bortezomib is synergistic in eliciting Rec-1 cell cytotoxicity. The relevance of these results is illuminated by the additional finding that a considerable fraction of primary MCL samples (8 out of 10 displayed bortezomib-resistant constitutive NF-κB activity. Conclusion Our findings show that bortezomib-resistant NF-κB activity is frequently observed in MCL samples and suggest that this activity may be relevant to MCL biology as well as serve as a potential therapeutic target.

  1. Surface nanocrystallization of stainless steel for reduced biofilm adherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Bin; Li, D Y; Davis, Elisabeth M; Irvin, Randall T; Hodges, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    Stainless steel is one of the most common metallic biomedical materials. For medical applications, its resistance to the adherence of biofilms is of importance to the elimination or minimization of bacterial infections. In this study, we demonstrate the effectiveness of a process combining surface nanocrystallization and thermal oxidation (or a recovery heat treatment in air) for reducing the biofilm's adherence to stainless steel. During this treatment, a target surface was sandblasted and the resultant dislocation cells in the surface layer were turned into nanosized grains by a subsequent recovery treatment in air. This process generated a more protective oxide film that blocked the electron exchange or reduced the surface activity more effectively. As a result, the biofilm's adherence to the treated surface was markedly minimized. A synthetic peptide was utilized as a substitute of biofilms to evaluate the adhesion between a treated steel surface and biofilms using an atomic force microscope (AFM) through measuring the adhesive force between the target surface and a peptide-coated AFM tip. It was shown that the adhesive force decreased with a decrease in the grain size of the steel. The corresponding surface electron work function (EWF) of the steel was also measured, which showed a trend of variation in EWF with the grain size, consistent with corresponding changes in the adhesive force

  2. Lack of cross-resistance to fostriecin in a human small-cell lung carcinoma cell line showing topoisomerase II-related drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Steven; Zijlstra, J G; Mulder, Nanno; de Vries, Liesbeth

    1991-01-01

    Cells exhibiting decreased topoisomerase II (Topo II) activity are resistant to several drugs that require Topo II as an intermediate. These drugs are cytotoxic due to the formation of a cleavable complex between the drug, Topo II and DNA. Fostriecin belongs to a new class of drugs that inhibit Topo

  3. Cytotoxicity of the indole alkaloid reserpine from Rauwolfia serpentina against drug-resistant tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelfatah, Sara A A; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-02-15

    The antihypertensive reserpine is an indole alkaloid from Rauwolfia serpentina and exerts also profound activity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The present investigation was undertaken to investigate possible modes of action to explain its activity toward drug-resistant tumor cells. Sensitive and drug-resistant tumor cell lines overexpressing P-glycoprotein (ABCB1/MDR1), breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP), mutation-activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), wild-type and p53-knockout cells as well as the NCI panel of cell lines from different tumor origin were analyzed. Reserpine's cytotoxicity was investigated by resazurin and sulforhodamine assays, flow cytometry, and COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of transcriptome-wide microarray-based RNA expressions. P-glycoprotein- or BCRP overexpressing tumor cells did not reveal cross-resistance to reserpine. EGFR-overexpressing cells were collateral sensitive and p53- Knockout cells cross-resistant to this drug compared to their wild-type parental cell lines. Reserpine increased the uptake of doxorubicin in P-glycoprotein-overexpressing cells, indicating that reserpine inhibited the efflux function of P-glycoprotein. Using molecular docking, we found that reserpine bound with even higher binding energy to P-glycoprotein and EGFR than the control drugs verapamil (P-glycoprotein inhibitor) and erlotinib (EGFR inhibitor). COMPARE and cluster analyses of microarray data showed that the mRNA expression of a panel of genes predicted the sensitivity or resistance of the NCI tumor cell line panel with statistical significance. The genes belonged to diverse pathways and biological functions, e.g. cell survival and apoptosis, EGFR activation, regulation of angiogenesis, cell mobility, cell adhesion, immunological functions, mTOR signaling, and Wnt signaling. The lack of cross-resistance to most resistance mechanisms and the collateral sensitivity in EGFR-transfectants compared to wild

  4. Drug-resistant colon cancer cells produce high carcinoembryonic antigen and might not be cancer-initiating cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HC

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hsin-chung Lee,1,2 Qing-Dong Ling,1,3 Wan-Chun Yu,4 Chunh-Ming Hung,4 Ta-Chun Kao,4 Yi-Wei Huang,4 Akon Higuchi3–51Graduate Institute of Systems Biology and Bioinformatics, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan, 2Department of Surgery, Cathay General Hospital, Da'an District, Taipei, 3Cathay Medical Research Institute, Cathay General Hospital, Hsi-Chi City, Taipei, 4Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 5Department of Reproduction, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Okura, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: We evaluated the higher levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA secreted by the LoVo human colon carcinoma cells in a medium containing anticancer drugs. Drug-resistant LoVo cells were analyzed by subcutaneously xenotransplanting them into mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the drug-resistant cells isolated in this study were cancer-initiating cells, known also as cancer stem cells (CSCs.Methods: The production of CEA was investigated in LoVo cells that were cultured with 0–10 mM of anticancer drugs, and we evaluated the increase in CEA production by the LoVo cells that were stimulated by anticancer drug treatment. The expression of several CSC markers in LoVo cells treated with anticancer drugs was also evaluated. Following anticancer drug treatment, LoVo cells were injected subcutaneously into the flanks of severe combined immunodeficiency mice in order to evaluate the CSC fraction.Results: Production of CEA by LoVo cells was stimulated by the addition of anticancer drugs. Drug-resistant LoVo cells expressed lower levels of CSC markers, and LoVo cells treated with any of the anticancer drugs tested did not generate tumors within 8 weeks from when the cells were injected subcutaneously into severe combined immunodeficiency mice. These results suggest that the drug-resistant LoVo cells have a smaller population of CSCs than the

  5. Ultraviolet light-resistant primary transfectants of xeroderma pigmentosum cells are also DNA repair-proficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, M.; Naiman, T.; Canaani, D.

    1989-01-01

    In a previous work, an immortal xeroderma pigmentosum cell line belonging to complementation group C was complemented to a UV-resistant phenotype by transfection with a human cDNA clone library. We now report that the primary transformants selected for UV-resistance also acquired normal levels of DNA repair. This was assessed both by measurement of UV-induced [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation and by equilibrium sedimentation analysis of repair-DNA synthesis. Therefore, the transduced DNA element which confers normal UV-resistance also corrects the excision repair defect of the xeroderma pigmentosum group C cell line

  6. MicroRNA-181a promotes docetaxel resistance in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Cameron M; Liu, Chengfei; Lou, Wei; Lombard, Alan P; Evans, Christopher P; Gao, Allen C

    2017-06-01

    Docetaxel is one of the primary drugs used for treating castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Unfortunately, over time patients invariably develop resistance to docetaxel therapy and their disease will continue to progress. The mechanisms by which resistance develops are still incompletely understood. This study seeks to determine the involvement of miRNAs, specifically miR-181a, in docetaxel resistance in CRPC. Real-time PCR was used to measure miR-181a expression in parental and docetaxel resistant C4-2B and DU145 cells (TaxR and DU145-DTXR). miR-181a expression was modulated in parental or docetaxel resistant cells by transfecting them with miR-181a mimics or antisense, respectively. Following transfection, cell number was determined after 48 h with or without docetaxel. Cross resistance to cabazitaxel induced by miR-181a was also determined. Western blots were used to determine ABCB1 protein expression and rhodamine assays used to assess activity. Phospho-p53 expression was assessed by Western blot and apoptosis was measured by ELISA in C4-2B TaxR and PC3 cells with inhibited or overexpressed miR-181a expression with or without docetaxel. miR-181a is significantly overexpressed in TaxR and DU145-DTXR cells compared to parental cells. Overexpression of miR-181a in parental cells confers docetaxel and cabazitaxel resistance and knockdown of miR-181a in TaxR cells re-sensitizes them to treatment with both docetaxel and cabazitaxel. miR-181a was not observed to impact ABCB1 expression or activity, a protein which was previously demonstrated to be highly involved in docetaxel resistance. Knockdown of miR-181a in TaxR cells induced phospho-p53 expression. Furthermore, miR-181a knockdown alone induced apoptosis in TaxR cells which could be further enhanced by the addition of DTX. Overexpression of mir-181a in prostate cancer cells contributes to their resistance to docetaxel and cabazitaxel and inhibition of mir-181a expression can restore treatment response

  7. The Pathway Analysis of Micrornas Regulated Drug-Resistant Responses in HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yubo; Dai, Cuihong; Cai, Zhipeng; Hou, Aiju; Cheng, Dayou; Wu, Guanying; Li, Jing; Cui, Jie; Xu, Dechang

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy is the main strategy in the treatment of cancer; however, the development of drug-resistance is the obstacle in long-term treatment of cervical cancer. Cisplatin is one of the most common drugs used in cancer therapy. Recently, accumulating evidence suggests that miRNAs are involved in various bioactivities in oncogenesis. It is not unexpected that miRNAs play a key role in acquiring of drug-resistance in the progression of tumor. In this study, we induced and maintained four levels of cisplatin-resistant HeLa cell lines (HeLa/CR1, HeLa/CR2, HeLa/CR3, and HeLa/CR4). According to the previous studies and existing evidence, we selected five miRNAs (miR-183, miR-182, miR-30a, miR-15b, and miR-16) and their potential target mRNAs as our research targets. The real-time RT-PCR was adopted to detect the relative expression of miRNAs and their mRNAs. The results show that miR-182 and miR-15b were up-regulated in resistant cell lines, while miR-30a was significantly down-regulated. At the same time, their targets are related to drug resistance. Compared to their parent HeLa cell line, the expression of selected miRNAs in resistant cell lines altered. The alteration suggests that HeLa cell drug resistance is associated with distinct miRNAs, which indicates that miRNAs may be one of the therapy targets in the treatment of cervical cancer by sensitizing cell to chemotherapy. We suggested a possible network diagram based on the existing theory and the preliminary results of candidate miRNAs and their targets in HeLa cells during development of drug resistance.

  8. MAC-1 Glycoprotein Family mediates adherence of neutrophils to endothelial cells stimulated by leukotriene B/sub 4/ and platelet activating factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonnesen, M.G.; Anderson, D.C.; Springer, T.A.; Knedler, A.; Avdi, N.; Henson, P.M.

    1986-03-01

    The process of neutrophil (N) adhesion to and migration through endothelium (EC), an early event in the induction of the acute inflammatory response, has been attributed to the generation of extravascular chemoattractant peptides and lipids. Although both leukotriene B/sub 4/ (LTB/sub 4/) and platelet activating factor (PAF) enhance N adherence to EC, the mechanisms involved in this interaction are still not completely understood. Since the MAC-1 Glycoprotein (GP) Family has recently been shown to be required for a variety of adherence-dependent functions of stimulated N, the authors questioned whether these adherence-associated GP might be involved in N adherence to EC stimulated by LTB/sub 4/ or PAF. Using a microtiter adherence assay with /sup 111/In labeled N, they assessed the ability of N from patients with MAC-1, LFA-1 Deficiency to adhere to monolayers of human omental microvascular or umbilical vein EC as well as to serum-coated plastic. Patient N exhibited markedly diminished adherence in response to LTB/sub 4/ or PAF compared to normal controls. LTB/sub 4/ and PAF enhanced expression of the MAC-1 GP Family on the surface of normal N as determined by flow cytofluorimetry using a monoclonal antibody (TS1/18) to the GP common beta subunit. In addition TS1/18 (20 ..mu..g/ml) completely inhibited N adherence stimulated by either LTB/sub 4/ (10/sup -8/M) or PAF(10/sup -11/M). Thus, the MAC-1 GP Family appears to be important in chemotactic factor regulation of N adherence to EC.

  9. IL-4-mediated drug resistance in colon cancer stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todaro, Matilde; Perez Alea, Mileidys; Scopelliti, Alessandro; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are defined as cells able to both extensively self-renew and differentiate into progenitors. Cancer stem cells are thus likely to be responsible for maintaining or spreading a cancer, and may be the most relevant targets for cancer therapy. The CD133 glycoprotein was recently

  10. DNA synthesis and uv resistance in Escherichia coli K12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slezarikova, V [Slovenska Akademia Vied, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Vyskumny Ustav Onkologicky

    1976-01-01

    The influence was studied of preirradiation inhibition of proteosynthesis by amino acids starvation on survival and DNA synthesis in E. coli K 12 cells, which differ by their genetic features with regard to a certain type of repair. The surviving fraction was studied by appropriate dilution of cell suspension and spreading on agar plates. DNA synthesis was investigated by the incorporation of thymine-2-/sup 14/C. In our conditions a correlation was found between cell survival and the resistance of DNA replication to UV radiation in cells proficient in excision and post-replication repair. This correlation was not found in the excision deficient strain. It is concluded that enhanced resistance of DNA replication is not a sufficient condition for enhanced cell resistance.

  11. Series Resistance Analysis of Passivated Emitter Rear Contact Cells Patterned Using Inkjet Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha A. T. Lenio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For higher-efficiency solar cell structures, such as the Passivated Emitter Rear Contact (PERC cells, to be fabricated in a manufacturing environment, potentially low-cost techniques such as inkjet printing and metal plating are desirable. A common problem that is experienced when fabricating PERC cells is low fill factors due to high series resistance. This paper identifies and attempts to quantify sources of series resistance in inkjet-patterned PERC cells that employ electroless or light-induced nickel-plating techniques followed by copper light-induced plating. Photoluminescence imaging is used to determine locations of series resistance losses in these inkjet-patterned and plated PERC cells.

  12. The BNCT resistant fraction of cancer cells. An in vitro morphologic and cytofluorimetric study on a rat coloncarcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.; Clerici, A.M.; Mazzini, G.

    2006-01-01

    Given the high efficacy of the BNCT treatment, recurrences reasonably depends on the failure of a cell fraction to uptake and retain adequate levels of boronated compounds. Aim of this study is to identify, quantify and characterize the resistant cell fraction relative to the delivered boron concentration. Experiments were performed on the DHD/K12/TRb line by means of cytofluorimetric DNA analysis, plating efficiency and morphologic observations. Cells were incubated with p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) concentrations ranging from 10 to 40 ppm for 18 h. Following neutron exposure, cells were reseeded for subsequent morphologic observations, counting and DNA analysis. Samples of irradiated cells not BPA enriched and non-irradiated cells with and without boron were compared with them. After 24 hs there were no differences among the four conditions, in terms of number of recovered cells, morphology and cell cycle distribution. Starting from 48 hs and up to 7 days BPA irradiated cells showed growth in dimensions, important cell number reduction and multiclonal DNA profile worsening with time. After 9 days normally sized cell clones appeared confirming the presence of a resistant cell fraction able to restore the original cell population after 21 days. The incidence of surviving cells turned out to be in the range 0,026-0,05%. (author)

  13. Surface display of the receptor-binding region of the Lactobacillus brevis S-layer protein in Lactococcus lactis provides nonadhesive lactococci with the ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avall-Jääskeläinen, Silja; Lindholm, Agneta; Palva, Airi

    2003-04-01

    Lactobacillus brevis is a promising lactic acid bacterium for use as a probiotic dietary adjunct and a vaccine vector. The N-terminal region of the S-layer protein (SlpA) of L. brevis ATCC 8287 was recently shown to mediate adhesion to various human cell lines in vitro. In this study, a surface display cassette was constructed on the basis of this SlpA receptor-binding domain, a proteinase spacer, and an autolysin anchor. The cassette was expressed under control of the nisA promoter in Lactococcus lactis NZ9000. Western blot assay of lactococcal cell wall extracts with anti-SlpA antibodies confirmed that the SlpA adhesion domain of the fusion protein was expressed and located within the cell wall layer. Whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence microscopy verified that the SlpA adhesion-mediating region was accessible on the lactococcal cell surface. In vitro adhesion assays with the human intestinal epithelial cell line Intestine 407 indicated that the recombinant lactococcal cells had gained an ability to adhere to Intestine 407 cells significantly greater than that of wild-type L. lactis NZ9000. Serum inhibition assay further confirmed that adhesion of recombinant lactococci to Intestine 407 cells was indeed mediated by the N terminus-encoding part of the slpA gene. The ability of the receptor-binding region of SlpA to adhere to fibronectin was also confirmed with this lactococcal surface display system. These results show that, with the aid of the receptor-binding region of the L. brevis SlpA protein, the ability to adhere to gut epithelial cells can indeed be transferred to another, nonadhesive, lactic acid bacterium.

  14. Cancer resistance in the blind mole rat is mediated by concerted necrotic cell death mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vera; Hine, Christopher; Tian, Xiao; Ablaeva, Julia; Gudkov, Andrei V.; Nevo, Eviatar; Seluanov, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Blind mole rats Spalax (BMR) are small subterranean rodents common in the Middle East. BMR is distinguished by its adaptations to life underground, remarkable longevity (with a maximum documented lifespan of 21 y), and resistance to cancer. Spontaneous tumors have never been observed in spalacids. To understand the mechanisms responsible for this resistance, we examined the growth of BMR fibroblasts in vitro of the species Spalax judaei and Spalax golani. BMR cells proliferated actively for 7–20 population doublings, after which the cells began secreting IFN-β, and the cultures underwent massive necrotic cell death within 3 d. The necrotic cell death phenomenon was independent of culture conditions or telomere shortening. Interestingly, this cell behavior was distinct from that observed in another long-lived and cancer-resistant African mole rat, Heterocephalus glaber, the naked mole rat in which cells display hypersensitivity to contact inhibition. Sequestration of p53 and Rb proteins using SV40 large T antigen completely rescued necrotic cell death. Our results suggest that cancer resistance of BMR is conferred by massive necrotic response to overproliferation mediated by p53 and Rb pathways, and triggered by the release of IFN-β. Thus, we have identified a unique mechanism that contributes to cancer resistance of this subterranean mammal extremely adapted to life underground. PMID:23129611

  15. Insulin resistance in vascular endothelial cells promotes intestinal tumour formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X; Häring, M-F; Rathjen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    in vascular endothelial cells. Strikingly, these mice had 42% more intestinal tumours than controls, no change in tumour angiogenesis, but increased expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in primary culture of tumour endothelial cells. Insulin decreased VCAM-1 expression and leukocyte...... adhesion in quiescent tumour endothelial cells with intact insulin receptors and partly prevented increases in VCAM-1 and leukocyte adhesion after treatment with tumour necrosis factor-α. Knockout of insulin receptors in endothelial cells also increased leukocyte adhesion in mesenteric venules...

  16. Cell Wall Remodeling by a Synthetic Analog Reveals Metabolic Adaptation in Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidgeon, Sean E; Pires, Marcos M

    2017-07-21

    Drug-resistant bacterial infections threaten to overburden our healthcare system and disrupt modern medicine. A large class of potent antibiotics, including vancomycin, operate by interfering with bacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) evade the blockage of cell wall biosynthesis by altering cell wall precursors, rendering them drug insensitive. Herein, we reveal the phenotypic plasticity and cell wall remodeling of VRE in response to vancomycin in live bacterial cells via a metabolic probe. A synthetic cell wall analog was designed and constructed to monitor cell wall structural alterations. Our results demonstrate that the biosynthetic pathway for vancomycin-resistant precursors can be hijacked by synthetic analogs to track the kinetics of phenotype induction. In addition, we leveraged this probe to interrogate the response of VRE cells to vancomycin analogs and a series of cell wall-targeted antibiotics. Finally, we describe a proof-of-principle strategy to visually inspect drug resistance induction. Based on our findings, we anticipate that our metabolic probe will play an important role in further elucidating the interplay among the enzymes involved in the VRE biosynthetic rewiring.

  17. Is cell viability always directly related to corrosion resistance of stainless steels?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahinejad, E.; Ghaffari, M.; Vashaee, D.; Tayebi, L.

    2016-01-01

    It has been frequently reported that cell viability on stainless steels is improved by increasing their corrosion resistance. The question that arises is whether human cell viability is always directly related to corrosion resistance in these biostable alloys. In this work, the microstructure and in vitro corrosion behavior of a new class of medical-grade stainless steels were correlated with adult human mesenchymal stem cell viability. The samples were produced by a powder metallurgy route, consisting of mechanical alloying and liquid-phase sintering with a sintering aid of a eutectic Mn–Si alloy at 1050 °C for 30 and 60 min, leading to nanostructures. In accordance with transmission electron microscopic studies, the additive particles for the sintering time of 30 min were not completely melted. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic experiments suggested the higher corrosion resistance for the sample sintered for 60 min; however, a better cell viability on the surface of the less corrosion-resistant sample was unexpectedly found. This behavior is explained by considering the higher ion release rate of the Mn–Si additive material, as preferred sites to corrosion attack based on scanning electron microscopic observations, which is advantageous to the cells in vitro. In conclusion, cell viability is not always directly related to corrosion resistance in stainless steels. Typically, the introduction of biodegradable and biocompatible phases to biostable alloys, which are conventionally anticipated to be corrosion-resistant, can be advantageous to human cell responses similar to biodegradable metals. - Highlights: • Cell viability vs. corrosion resistance for medical-grade stainless steels • The stainless steel samples were prepared by powder metallurgy. • Unpenetrated additive played a critical role in the correlation.

  18. Is cell viability always directly related to corrosion resistance of stainless steels?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salahinejad, E., E-mail: salahinejad@kntu.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaffari, M. [Bruker AXS Inc., 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Vashaee, D. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Tayebi, L. [Department of Developmental Sciences, Marquette University School of Dentistry, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    It has been frequently reported that cell viability on stainless steels is improved by increasing their corrosion resistance. The question that arises is whether human cell viability is always directly related to corrosion resistance in these biostable alloys. In this work, the microstructure and in vitro corrosion behavior of a new class of medical-grade stainless steels were correlated with adult human mesenchymal stem cell viability. The samples were produced by a powder metallurgy route, consisting of mechanical alloying and liquid-phase sintering with a sintering aid of a eutectic Mn–Si alloy at 1050 °C for 30 and 60 min, leading to nanostructures. In accordance with transmission electron microscopic studies, the additive particles for the sintering time of 30 min were not completely melted. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic experiments suggested the higher corrosion resistance for the sample sintered for 60 min; however, a better cell viability on the surface of the less corrosion-resistant sample was unexpectedly found. This behavior is explained by considering the higher ion release rate of the Mn–Si additive material, as preferred sites to corrosion attack based on scanning electron microscopic observations, which is advantageous to the cells in vitro. In conclusion, cell viability is not always directly related to corrosion resistance in stainless steels. Typically, the introduction of biodegradable and biocompatible phases to biostable alloys, which are conventionally anticipated to be corrosion-resistant, can be advantageous to human cell responses similar to biodegradable metals. - Highlights: • Cell viability vs. corrosion resistance for medical-grade stainless steels • The stainless steel samples were prepared by powder metallurgy. • Unpenetrated additive played a critical role in the correlation.

  19. Induction of cytosine arabinoside-resistant human myeloid leukemia cell death through autophagy regulation by hydroxychloroquine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yundeok; Eom, Ju-In; Jeung, Hoi-Kyung; Jang, Ji Eun; Kim, Jin Seok; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Young Sam; Min, Yoo Hong

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) on cell death of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C)-resistant human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Ara-C-sensitive (U937, AML-2) and Ara-C-resistant (U937/AR, AML-2/AR) human AML cell lines were used to evaluate HCQ-regulated cytotoxicity, autophagy, and apoptosis as well as effects on cell death-related signaling pathways. We found that HCQ-induced dose- and time-dependent cell death in Ara-C-resistant cells compared to Ara-C-sensitive cell lines. The extent of cell death and features of HCQ-induced autophagic markers including increase in microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) I conversion to LC3-II, beclin-1, ATG5, as well as green fluorescent protein-LC3 positive puncta and autophagosome were remarkably greater in U937/AR cells. Also, p62/SQSTM1 was increased in response to HCQ. p62/SQSTM1 protein interacts with both LC3-II and ubiquitin protein and is degraded in autophagosomes. Therefore, a reduction of p62/SQSTM1 indicates increased autophagic degradation, whereas an increase of p62/SQSTM1 by HCQ indicates inhibited autophagic degradation. Knock down of p62/SQSTM1 using siRNA were prevented the HCQ-induced LC3-II protein level as well as significantly reduced the HCQ-induced cell death in U937/AR cells. Also, apoptotic cell death and caspase activation in U937/AR cells were increased by HCQ, provided evidence that HCQ-induced autophagy blockade. Taken together, our data show that HCQ-induced apoptotic cell death in Ara-C-resistant AML cells through autophagy regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. p-Glycoprotein ABCB5 and YB-1 expression plays a role in increased heterogeneity of breast cancer cells: correlations with cell fusion and doxorubicin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ji Yeon; Ha, Seon-Ah; Yang, Yun-Sik; Kim, Jin Woo

    2010-01-01

    Cancer cells recurrently develop into acquired resistance to the administered drugs. The iatrogenic mechanisms of induced chemotherapy-resistance remain elusive and the degree of drug resistance did not exclusively correlate with reductio