WorldWideScience

Sample records for resin-to-dentin interface morphology

  1. Tubular occlusion optimizes bonding of hydrophobic resins to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, F T; Pashley, D H; Ferrari, M; Tay, F R

    2007-06-01

    Although hydrophobic resins may be bonded to acid-etched dentin with an ethanol wet-bonding technique, the protocol is sensitive to moisture contamination when bonding is performed in deep dentin. This study tested the hypothesis that the use of oxalate or poly(glutamic) acid-modified, diluted ceramicrete (PADC) for dentinal tubule occlusion prevents fluid contamination and improves the bonding of an experimental hydrophobic adhesive to acid-etched, ethanol-dehydrated dentin. Mid-coronal and deep acid-etched moist dentin pre-treated with oxalate or PADC was dehydrated by ethanol wet-bonding and infiltrated with the experimental three-step etch-and-rinse hydrophobic adhesive under simulated pulpal pressure. Tensile bond strengths to deep dentin without pre-treatment were severely compromised. Conversely, oxalate and PADC pre-treatments reduced dentin permeability, prevented water contamination, and improved bond strengths. Minimal nanoleakage was identified within hybrid layers created in the oxalate- and PADC-pre-treated deep dentin. The use of tubular occluding agents optimized bonding of hydrophobic resins to dentin.

  2. Effect of adhesive layers on microshear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bond strength of adhesive layer can absorb unwanted stresses of polymerization shrinkage in composite resin restorations; increased microshear bond strength can prevent failure of restoration materials, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of adhesive layers on microshear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to dentin. Material and Methods Two different types of adhesive systems: universal adhesive (ExciTE) and newly developed adhesive (Nano-Bond), and one type of light-cured resin restorative material (Nanocomposite resin) were used in this study. The occlusal surfaces of extracted human molar teeth were ground perpendicular to the long axis of each tooth to expose a flat dentin surface. The adhesives were applied on dentin surfaces (single application or double application). Nanocomposite resin was then placed and light cured for 40 seconds. After 24 hours of immersion in water at 37°C, then subjected to thermocycling before testing, a microshear bond test was carried out. The data were analyzed by a two-way ANOVA. For comparison between groups, Tukey’s post-hoc test was used. Results The mean bond strengths of ExciTE and Nano-Bond adhesives with a single application were 8.8 and 16.6 MPa, respectively. The mean bond strengths of ExciTE and Nano-Bond adhesives with double application were 13.2 and 21.8MPa, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in microshear bond strengths between the single application of Nano-Bond and the double application of ExciTE adhesives. Conclusions Microshear bond strength increased significantly as the applied adhesive layer was doubled. Key words:Adhesive, microshear, bond, strength, nanocomposite. PMID:28210433

  3. In-vitro comparison of the effect of different bonding strategies on the micro-shear bond strength of a silorane-based composite resin to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi, Pouran; Alizadeh, Vahid; Fathpour, Kamyar; Mazaheri, Hamid; Mortazavi, Vajihosadat

    2016-01-01

    Background: The current study evaluated the micro-shear bond strengths of a new low-shrinkage composite resin to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 70 extracted premolars were assigned to one of seven groups (n = 10): Group 1: OptiBond Solo Plus (Opt; Kerr); Group 2: SE Bond (SE; Kuraray); Group 3: Silorane System Adhesive (SSA; 3M ESPE); Group 4: OptiBond Solo Plus + LS Bond (Opt LS); Group 5: SE Bond + LS Bond (SE LS); Group 6: OptiBond Solo Plus (Opt Po); and Group 7: SE Bond (SE Po). Occlusal dentin was exposed and restored with Filtek LS (3M ESPE) in groups 1 to 5 and Point 4 (Kerr) in groups 6 and 7. After thermocycling (1000 cycles at 5/55΀C), micro-shear bond test was carried out to measure the bond strengths. The results were submitted to analysis of variance and post hoc Tukeytests (P composite resin (P = 0.187), between bonding agents (P = 0.06) and between composite resin and bonding agents (P = 0.894). Because P value of bonding agents was near the significance level, one-way ANOVA was used separately between the two composite groups. This analysis showed significant differences between silorane composite resin groups (P = 0.045) and Tukey test showed a significant difference between Groups 4 and 5 (P = 0.03). Conclusion: The application of total-etch and self-etch methacrylate-based adhesives with and without use of a hydrophobic resin coating resulted in acceptable bond strengths. PMID:27076826

  4. Dynamic Morphologies of Microscale Droplet Interface Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya [ORNL; Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Sarles, Stephen A [ORNL; Venkatesan, Guru [The University of Tennessee; Hayes, Douglas G [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) are a powerful platform for studying the dynamics of synthetic cellular membranes; however, very little has been done to exploit the unique dynamical features of DIBs. Here, we generate microscale droplet interface bilayers ( DIBs) by bringing together femtoliter-volume water droplets in a microfluidic oil channel, and characterize morphological changes of the DIBs as the droplets shrink due to evaporation. By varying the initial conditions of the system, we identify three distinct classes of dynamic morphology. (1) Buckling and Fission: When forming DIBs using the lipid-out method (lipids in oil phase), lipids in the shrinking monolayers continually pair together and slide into the bilayer to conserve their mass. As the bilayer continues to grow, it becomes confined, buckles, and eventually fissions one or more vesicles. (2) Uniform Shrinking: When using the lipid-in method (lipids in water phase) to form DIBs, lipids uniformly transfer from the monolayers and bilayer into vesicles contained inside the water droplets. (3) Stretching and Unzipping: Finally, when the droplets are pinned to the wall(s) of the microfluidic channel, the droplets become stretched during evaporation, culminating in the unzipping of the bilayer and droplet separation. These findings offer a better understanding of the dynamics of coupled lipid interfaces.

  5. Plastic solar cell interface and morphological characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guralnick, Brett W.

    Plastic solar cell research has become an intense field of study considering these devices may be lightweight, flexible and reduce the cost of photovoltaic devices. The active layer of plastic solar cells are a combination of two organic components which blend to form an internal morphology. Due to the poor electrical transport properties of the organic components it is important to understand how the morphology forms in order to engineer these materials for increased efficiency. The focus of this thesis is a detailed study of the interfaces between the plastic solar cell layers and the morphology of the active layer. The system studied in detail is a blend of P3HT and PCBM that acts as the primary absorber, which is the electron donor, and the electron acceptor, respectively. The key morphological findings are, while thermal annealing increases the crystallinity parallel to the substrate, the morphology is largely unchanged following annealing. The deposition and mixing conditions of the bulk heterojunction from solution control the starting morphology. The spin coating speed, concentration, solvent type, and solution mixing time are all critical variables in the formation of the bulk heterojunction. In addition, including the terminals or inorganic layers in the analysis is critical because the inorganic surface properties influence the morphology. Charge transfer in the device occurs at the material interfaces, and a highly resistive transparent conducting oxide layer limits device performance. It was discovered that the electron blocking layer between the transparent conducting oxide and the bulk heterojunction is compromised following annealing. The electron acceptor material can diffuse into this layer, a location which does not benefit device performance. Additionally, the back contact deposition is important since the organic material can be damaged by the thermal evaporation of Aluminum, typically used for plastic solar cells. Depositing a thin thermal and

  6. Morphological characterization of the tooth/adhesive interface

    OpenAIRE

    Moura,Sandra Kiss; SANTOS,José Fortunato Ferreira; Ballester,Rafael Yagüe

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the morphological characteristics of the tooth/adhesive interface using different adhesive systems in MOD restorations under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The tested hypothesis was that the morphology of the bonding interface would vary in different areas of MOD restorations for the three adhesive systems. MOD cavities were prepared in 12 sound extracted human third molars and restored with Filtek Z250 composite resin and one of the following adhe...

  7. Observations of a monotectic solidification interface morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Frazier, D. O.

    1985-01-01

    For detailed studies of the region around a solidification interface on a microscopic scale, a very thin (essentially two-dimensional) test cell may be translated across two temperature-controlled heating/cooling blocks and viewed with a microscope. Such a device is sometimes referred to as a temperature gradient microscope stage (TGS). Of particular interest in this study is the behavior of a monotectic type solution during solidification. Succinonitrile based model systems for metallic monotectic alloys, when solidified on a TGS, form an unusual 'worm-like' micromorphology. These interfaces are observable in situ under high optical magnification during growth.

  8. The Syntax-Semantics Interface in Distributed Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Justin Robert

    2013-01-01

    Distributed Morphology (DM; Halle & Marantz 1993; Marantz 1997) is founded on the premise that the syntax is the only computational component of the grammar. Much research focuses on how this premise is relevant to the syntax-morphology interface in DM. In this dissertation, I examine theory-internal issues related to the syntax-semantics…

  9. Spectroscopic and morphologic characterization of the dentin/adhesive interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemor, R. M.; Kruger, Michael B.; Wieliczka, David M.; Swafford, Jim R.; Spencer, Paulette

    1999-01-01

    The potential environmental risks associated with mercury release have forced many European countries to ban the use of dental amalgam. Alternative materials such as composite resins do not provide the clinical function for the length of time characteristically associated with dental amalgam. The weak link in the composite restoration is the dentin/adhesive bond. The purpose of this study was to correlate morphologic characterization of the dentin/adhesive bond with chemical analyses using micro- Fourier transform infrared and micro-Raman spectroscopy. A commercial dental adhesive was placed on dentin substrates cut from extracted, unerupted human third molars. Sections of the dentin/adhesive interface were investigated using infrared radiation produced at the Aladdin synchrotron source; visible radiation from a Kr+ laser was used for the micro-Raman spectroscopy. Sections of the dentin/adhesive interface, differentially stained to identify protein, mineral, and adhesive, were examined using light microscopy. Due to its limited spatial resolution and the unknown sample thickness the infrared results cannot be used quantitatively in determining the extent of diffusion. The results from the micro-Raman spectroscopy and light microscopy indicate exposed protein at the dentin/adhesive interface. Using a laser that reduces background fluorescence, the micro-Raman spectroscopy provides quantitative chemical and morphologic information on the dentin/adhesive interface. The staining procedure is sensitive to sites of pure protein and thus, complements the Raman results.

  10. Morphology of the asymmetric iron–silicon interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badía-Romano, L., E-mail: lbadia@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Rubín, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Bartolomé, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Magén, C. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Fundación ARAID, E-50004 Zaragoza (Spain); Bartolomé, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); and others

    2015-04-05

    Highlights: • Exhaustive study of the Fe silicide formation at interfaces of (Fe/Si) multilayers. • Thickness = 1.4 nm and roughness = 0.6 nm are found for the Si-on-Fe interface. • First time that the Fe 1s HAXPES spectra of a multilayered system is recorded. • The c-Fe{sub 1−x}Si sublayer is identical in both Si-on-Fe and Fe-on-Si interfaces. • The asymmetry is caused only by the ferromagnetic silicide Fe{sub 1−x}Si{sub x} sublayer. - Abstract: A systematic study of the iron–silicon interfaces formed upon preparation of (Fe/Si) multilayers has been performed by combination of modern and powerful techniques. Samples were prepared by thermal evaporation under ultrahigh vacuum onto a Si(1 0 0) substrate. The morphology of these films and their interfaces was studied by a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray reflectivity, angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Si-on-Fe interface thickness and roughness were determined to be 1.4(1) nm and 0.6(1) nm, respectively. Moreover, determination of the stable phases formed at both Fe-on-Si and Si-on-Fe interfaces was performed using conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy on multilayers with well separated Si-on-Fe and Fe-on-Si interfaces. It is shown that while a fraction of Fe remains as α-Fe, the rest has reacted with Si, forming the paramagnetic c-Fe{sub 1−x}Si phase and a ferromagnetic Fe rich silicide (DO{sub 3} type phase). We conclude that the paramagnetic c-Fe{sub 1−x}Si silicide sublayer is identical in both Si-on-Fe and Fe-on-Si interfaces, whereas an asymmetry is revealed in the composition of the ferromagnetic silicide sublayer.

  11. Controlling Particle Morphologies at Fluid Interfaces: Macro- and Micro- approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesabathuni, Shilpa Naidu

    The controlled generation of varying shaped particles is important for many applications: consumer goods, biomedical diagnostics, food processing, adsorbents and pharmaceuticals which can benefit from the availability of geometrically complex and chemically inhomogeneous particles. This thesis presents two approaches to spherical and non-spherical particle synthesis using macro and microfluidics. In the first approach, a droplet microfluidic technique is explored to fabricate spherical conducting polymer, polyaniline, particles with precise control over morphology and functionality. Microfluidics has recently emerged as an important alternate to the synthesis of complex particles. The conducting polymer, polyaniline, is widely used and known for its stability, high conductivity, and favorable redox properties. In this approach, monodisperse micron-sized polyaniline spherical particles were synthesized using two-phase droplet microfluidics from Aniline and Ammonium persulfate oxidative polymerization in an oil-based continuous phase. The morphology of the polymerized particles is porous in nature which can be used for encapsulation as well as controlled release applications. Encapsulation of an enzyme, glucose oxidase, was also performed using the technique to synthesize microspheres for glucose sensing. The polymer microspheres were characterized using SEM, UV-Vis and EDX to understand the relationship between their microstructure and stability. In the second approach, molten drop impact in a cooling aqueous medium to generate non-spherical particles was explored. Viscoelastic wax based materials are widely used in many applications and their performance and application depends on the particle morphology and size. The deformation of millimeter size molten wax drops as they impacted an immiscible liquid interface was investigated. Spherical molten wax drops impinged on a cooling water bath, then deformed and as a result of solidification were arrested into various

  12. Morphology and Spelling in Arabic: Development and Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Haitham; Saiegh-Haddad, Elinor

    2017-02-01

    In the current study, two experiments were carried out: the first tested the development of derivational root and word-pattern morphological awareness in Arabic; the second tested morphological processing in Arabic spelling. 143 Arabic native speaking children with normal reading skills in 2nd, 4th and 6th grade participated in the study. The results of the first experiment demonstrated the early emergence of derivational morphological awareness in children, with root awareness emerging earlier than word-pattern awareness. The second experiment supported the implication of morphological processing in spelling words and pseudo words across all grades tested. The results are discussed within a developmental psycholinguistic framework with particular emphasis on the characteristics of the Arabic language and orthography.

  13. Effect of Melt Superheating Treatment on Directional Solidification Interface Morphology of Multi-component Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changshuai Wang; Jun Zhang; Lin Liu; Hengzhi Fu

    2011-01-01

    The influence of melt superheating treatment on the solid/liquid (S/L) interface morphology of directionally solidified Ni-based superalloy DZ125 is investigated to elucidate the relationship between melt characteristic and S/L interface stability. The results indicate that the interface morphology is not only related to the withdrawal velocity (R) but also to the melt superheating temperature (Ts) when the thermal gradient of solidification interface remains constant for different Ts with appropriate superheating treatment regulation. The interface morphology changes from cell to plane at R of 1.1 μm/s when Ts increases from 1500°C to 1650°C, and maintains plane with further elevated Ts of 1750°C. However, the interface morphology changes from coarse dendrite to cell and then to cellular dendrite at R of 2.25 μm/s when Ts increases from 1500°C to 1650°C and then to 1750°C. It is proved that the solidification onset temperature and the solidification interval undergo the nonlinear variation when Ts increases from 1500°C to 1680°C, and the turning point is 1650°C at which the solidification onset temperature and the solidification interval are all minimum. This indicates that the melt superheating treatment enhances the solidification interface stability and has important effect on the solidification characteristics.

  14. Effect of gravity convection on interface morphology during solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN MengMeng; CHEN ChangLe; LI ZhanYao; JIN QuanWei

    2007-01-01

    An experimental apparatus consisting of a crystal growth room and a crystal growth observation system was developed for the study of the effect of the gravity convection perpendicular to the growth direction on the growth process by use of model alloy succinonitrile (SCN)-5wt%ethanol. It was found that the convection improves the stability of the interface and causes the downstream alternation of the cell growth direction because of the dual effect of the Stokes force and the gravity. The second dendrite arm facing the flow comes into being earlier than that at another side when the interface transforms cell to dendrite. Then the dendrite at the side facing the flow comes into being earlier. The second dendrite arm facing the flow grows faster and is more developed than that at another side. In addition, the primary dendrite arm spacing increases and the dendrite tip radius decreases under the gravity convection.

  15. Effect of gravity convection on interface morphology during solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An experimental apparatus consisting of a crystal growth room and a crystal growth observation system was developed for the study of the effect of the gravity convection perpendicular to the growth direction on the growth process by use of model alloy succinonitrile (SCN)-5wt%ethanol. It was found that the convection improves the stability of the interface and causes the downstream alternation of the cell growth direction because of the dual effect of the Stokes force and the gravity. The second dendrite arm facing the flow comes into being earlier than that at an- other side when the interface transforms cell to dendrite. Then the dendrite at the side facing the flow comes into being earlier. The second dendrite arm facing the flow grows faster and is more developed than that at another side. In addition, the primary dendrite arm spacing increases and the dendrite tip radius decreases un- der the gravity convection.

  16. Polymers for opto-electronic applications: structure and morphology of thin films and their interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hutten, P F; Krasnikov, V.V.; Hadziioannou, G

    2001-01-01

    Organic-organic and metal-organic interfaces are explored. The influence of the morphology of thin films of MEH-phenylene-vinylene oligomer (OPV5):C60 blends on their photovoltaic characteristics is demonstrated. An interdigitating structure is considered to be favorable for efficient operation. The

  17. A relaxation method for the energy and morphology of grain boundaries and interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnels, Brandon; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Conti, Sergio; Ortiz, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The energy density of crystal interfaces exhibits a characteristic "cusp" structure that renders it non-convex. Furthermore, crystal interfaces are often observed to be faceted, i.e., to be composed of flat facets in alternating directions. In this work, we forge a connection between these two observations by positing that the faceted morphology of crystal interfaces results from energy minimization. Specifically, we posit that the lack of convexity of the interfacial energy density drives the development of finely faceted microstructures and accounts for their geometry and morphology. We formulate the problem as a generalized minimal surface problem couched in a geometric measure-theoretical framework. We then show that the effective, or relaxed, interfacial energy density, with all possible interfacial morphologies accounted for, corresponds to the convexification of the bare or unrelaxed interfacial energy density, and that the requisite convexification can be attained by means of a faceting construction. We validate the approach by means of comparisons with experiment and atomistic simulations including symmetric and asymmetric tilt boundaries in face-centered cubic (FCC) and body-centered cubic (BCC) crystals. By comparison with simulated and experimental data, we show that this simple model of interfacial energy combined with a general microstructure construction based on convexification is able to replicate complex interfacial morphologies, including thermally induced morphological transitions.

  18. Effect of phase morphologies on the mechanical properties of babbitt-bronze composite interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, P. K.; Gungor, M. N.; Logsdon, W. A.; Ijiri, Y.; Taszarek, B. J.; Frohlich, S.

    1990-02-01

    Interfaces of two different babbitt-bronze composites were tested ultrasonically and then were fractured using the Chalmers test method. The primary distinction between the two composites was in the copper content. Use of less copper in the babbitt resulted in interfaces with higher strength, lower ductility, less cracking, and less unbonded area. The differences appeared to stem from the structure of the intermetallic compounds found at the interface, namely, the Cu3Sn and the Cu6Sn5 layers. The low-copper composite failed within a thick, dendrite-like Cu6Sn5 layer, while the high-copper one separated at the interface between a smooth Cu6Sn5 layer and the babbitt metal. The rough interface morphology seemed responsible for the low-copper composite’s increased strength. The correlation between mechanical and ultrasonic properties was poor for the low-copper composite but excellent for the high-copper one. These results suggest that interface morphology can significantly affect mechanical as well as ultrasonic properties.

  19. Morphology and stress at silicon-glass interface in anodic bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jiali [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety (MOE), School of Mechanical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Cai, Cheng [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Ming, Xiaoxiang [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety (MOE), School of Mechanical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Yu, Xinhai, E-mail: yxhh@ecust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety (MOE), School of Mechanical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhao, Shuangliang, E-mail: szhao@ecust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Tu, Shan-Tung [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety (MOE), School of Mechanical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liu, Honglai [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Amorphous SiO{sub 2} is the most probable silica morphology generated in anodic bonding. • Amorphous SiO{sub 2} thickness at the interface is at least 2 nm for 90 min anodic bonding. • Silicon oxidation rate at the interface is 0.022 nm min{sup −1} from 30 to 90 min. - Abstract: The morphologies and structural details of formed silica at the interface of silicon-glass anodic bonding determine the stress at the interface but they have been rarely clarified. In this study, a miniaturized anodic bonding device was developed and coupled with a Raman spectrometer. The silicon-glass anodic bonding was carried out and the evolution of the stress at the bonding interface was measured in situ by a Raman spectrometer. In addition, large-scale atomistic simulations were conducted by considering the formed silica with different morphologies. The most conceivable silica morphology was identified as the corresponding silicon-glass interfacial stress presents qualitatively agreement with the experimental observation. It was found that amorphous SiO{sub 2} is the silica morphology generated in anodic bonding. The amorphous SiO{sub 2} thickness is at least 2 nm in the case of 90 min anodic bonding at 400 °C with the DC voltage of −1000 V. The combination of experimental and simulation results can ascertain the silicon oxidation reaction rate in anodic bonding process, and under the above-mentioned condition, the reaction rate was estimated as 0.022 nm min{sup −1} from 30 to 90 min.

  20. Faceted interfaces: a key feature to quantitative understanding of transformation morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Zheng; Gu, Xin-Fu; Dai, Fu-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    Faceted interfaces are a typical key feature of the morphology of many microstructures generated from solid-state phase transformations. Interpretation, prediction and simulation of this faceted morphology remain a challenge, especially for systems where irrational orientation relationships (ORs) between two phases and irrational interface orientations (IOs) are preferred. In terms of structural singularities, this work suggests an integrated framework, which possibly encompasses all candidates of faceted interfaces. The structural singularities are identified from a matching pattern, a dislocation structure and/or a ledge structure. The resultant singular interfaces have discrete IOs, described with low-index g's (rational orientations) and/or Δg's (either rational or irrational orientations). Various existing models are grouped according to their determined results regarding the OR and IO, and the links between the models are clarified in the integrated framework. Elimination of defect types as far as possible in a dominant singular interface often exerts a central restriction on the OR. An irrational IO is usually due to the elimination of dislocations in one direction, i.e., an O-line interface. Analytical methods using both three-dimensional and two-dimensional models for quantitative determinations of O-line interfaces are reviewed, and a detailed example showing the calculation for an irrational interface is given. The association between structural singularities and local energy minima is verified by atomistic calculations of interfacial energies in fcc/bcc alloys where it is found that the calculated equilibrium cross-sections are in a good agreement with observations from selected alloys.

  1. Morphology and stress at silicon-glass interface in anodic bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiali; Cai, Cheng; Ming, Xiaoxiang; Yu, Xinhai; Zhao, Shuangliang; Tu, Shan-Tung; Liu, Honglai

    2016-11-01

    The morphologies and structural details of formed silica at the interface of silicon-glass anodic bonding determine the stress at the interface but they have been rarely clarified. In this study, a miniaturized anodic bonding device was developed and coupled with a Raman spectrometer. The silicon-glass anodic bonding was carried out and the evolution of the stress at the bonding interface was measured in situ by a Raman spectrometer. In addition, large-scale atomistic simulations were conducted by considering the formed silica with different morphologies. The most conceivable silica morphology was identified as the corresponding silicon-glass interfacial stress presents qualitatively agreement with the experimental observation. It was found that amorphous SiO2 is the silica morphology generated in anodic bonding. The amorphous SiO2 thickness is at least 2 nm in the case of 90 min anodic bonding at 400 °C with the DC voltage of -1000 V. The combination of experimental and simulation results can ascertain the silicon oxidation reaction rate in anodic bonding process, and under the above-mentioned condition, the reaction rate was estimated as 0.022 nm min-1 from 30 to 90 min.

  2. Shipibo-Spanish: Differences in Residual Transfer at the Syntax-Morphology and the Syntax-Pragmatics Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Liliana; Camacho, Jose; Ulloa, Jose Elias

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we present a study that tests the Interface Hypothesis (Sorace and Filiaci, 2006) at the syntax-pragmatics interface and its possible extension to the syntax-morphology interface in two groups of first language (L1) speakers of Shipibo with different levels of formal instruction in Spanish as a second language (L2). Shipibo is a…

  3. Effect of Er:YAG laser energy on the morphology of enamel/adhesive system interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfino, Carina Sinclér; Souza-Zaroni, Wanessa Christine; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of Er:YAG laser energy variation to cavity preparation on the morphology of enamel/adhesive system interface, using SEM. Eighteen molars were used and the buccal surfaces were flattened without dentine exposure. The specimens were randomly assigned to two groups, according to the adhesive system (conventional total-etching or self-etching), and each group was divided into three subgroups (bur carbide in turbine of high rotation, Er:YAG laser 250 mJ/4 Hz and Er:YAG laser 300 mJ/4 Hz) containing six teeth each. The enamel/adhesive system interface was serially sectioned and prepared for SEM. The Er:YAG laser, in general, produced a more irregular adhesive interface than the control group. For Er:YAG laser 250 mJ there was formation of a more regular hybrid layer with good tag formation, mainly in the total-etching system. However, Er:YAG laser 300 mJ showed a more irregular interface with amorphous enamel and fused areas, for both adhesive systems. It was concluded that cavity preparation with Er:YAG laser influenced on the morphology of enamel/adhesive system interface and the tissual alterations were more evident when the energy was increased.

  4. Accelerated lattice Boltzmann model for colloidal suspensions rheology and interface morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Farhat, Hassan; Kondaraju, Sasidhar

    2014-01-01

    Colloids are ubiquitous in the food, medical, cosmetics, polymers, water purification, and pharmaceutical industries. The thermal, mechanical, and storage properties of colloids are highly dependent on their interface morphology and their rheological behavior. Numerical methods provide a convenient and reliable tool for the study of colloids. Accelerated Lattice Boltzmann Model for Colloidal Suspensions introduce the main building-blocks for an improved lattice Boltzmann–based numerical tool designed for the study of colloidal rheology and interface morphology. This book also covers the migrating multi-block used to simulate single component, multi-component, multiphase, and single component multiphase flows and their validation by experimental, numerical, and analytical solutions.   Among other topics discussed are the hybrid lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for surfactant-covered droplets; biological suspensions such as blood; used in conjunction with the suppression of coalescence for investigating the...

  5. Morphological instability of a non-equilibrium ice-colloid interface

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, S. S. L.

    2009-10-02

    We assess the morphological stability of a non-equilibrium ice-colloidal suspension interface, and apply the theory to bentonite clay. An experimentally convenient scaling is employed that takes advantage of the vanishing segregation coefficient at low freezing velocities, and when anisotropic kinetic effects are included, the interface is shown to be unstable to travelling waves. The potential for travelling-wave modes reveals a possible mechanism for the polygonal and spiral ice lenses observed in frozen clays. A weakly nonlinear analysis yields a long-wave evolution equation for the interface shape containing a new parameter related to the highly nonlinear liquidus curve in colloidal systems. We discuss the implications of these results for the frost susceptibility of soils and the fabrication of microtailored porous materials. © 2009 The Royal Society.

  6. SOME ASPECTS OF MORPHOLOGIES AND INTERFACES IN COPOLYMER/HOMOPOLYMER BLENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ming; CAO Xianyi; YU Tongyin

    1988-01-01

    Based on a series of morphological studies of blends of homopolymer (Homo) and a variety of block and graft copolymers (Cop), the nature of phase separation, interface, emulsification and inner morphology of copolymer-dispersed phase etc. in the blends are discussed. In the cases of Cop AB/Homo A/Homo B systems,in which one homopolymer forms matrix, it is observed that the dispersed homopolymer phase is exclusively associated with Cop AB, i.e. no Homo A-Homo B interface exists. This phenomenon is believed to be caused by minimizing the interfacial energy of the systems. Meanwhile, preferential solubilization or anchoring of the like chains of copolymer into homopolymer matrix leads to stabilization of the dispersed phase in the matrix.In addition, regular variation of the inner morphology of the dispersed copolymer phase with the composition and molecular parameters of the component polymers is observed. When the two components have comparable proportions, alternating concentric shells are the most common feature which is associated with minimizing the interfacial energy in the Cop/Homo systems.

  7. Magnetic properties, morphology and interfaces of (Fe/Si){sub n} nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolomé, J., E-mail: barto@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Badía-Romano, L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Rubín, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Bartolomé, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Varnakov, S.N.; Ovchinnikov, S.G. [Kirensky Institute of Physics SB of RAS, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Bürgler, D.E. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-6), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    A systematic study of the iron–silicon interfaces formed upon preparation of (Fe/Si) multilayers has been performed by the combination of modern and powerful techniques. Samples were prepared by molecular beam epitaxy under ultrahigh vacuum onto Si wafers or single crystalline Ag(100) buffer layers grown on GaAs(100). The morphology of these films and their interfaces was studied by a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray reflectivity, angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Si-on-Fe interface thickness and roughness were determined to be 1.4(1) nm and 0.6(1) nm, respectively. Moreover, determination of the stable phases formed at both Fe-on-Si and Si-on-Fe interfaces was performed using conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy on multilayers with well separated Si-on-Fe and Fe-on-Si interfaces. It is shown that while a fraction of Fe remains as α-Fe, the rest has reacted with Si, forming the paramagnetic FeSi phase and a ferromagnetic Fe rich silicide. We conclude that there is an identical paramagnetic c-Fe{sub 1−x}Si silicide sublayer in both Si-on-Fe and Fe-on-Si interfaces, whereas an asymmetry is revealed in the composition of the ferromagnetic silicide sublayer. - Highlights: • The Si-on-Fe interface has a thickness of 1.4 nm and a roughness of 0.6 nm. • The para- c-Fe{sub 1-x}Si and the ferromagnetic Fe{sub 1−x}Si{sub x} form the interfaces. • c-Fe{sub 1−x}Si is symmetric and Fe{sub 1−x}Si{sub x} is asymmetric in Si/Fe and Fe/Si interfaces. • (Fe/Si){sub 3} multilayers conserve their integrity just till T≈450 K. • Irreversible chemical transformations take place at high temperature.

  8. Effects of void-induced convection on interface morphology and segregation during low-g solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsi, S.; Alexander, J.I.D. [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Kassemi, M. [NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). National Center for Microgravity Research

    2004-11-01

    Recent microgravity experiments have been hampered by convection caused by unwanted voids and/or bubbles in the melt. In this work, a numerical model is developed to describe how thermocapillary convection generated by a void can affect a typical Bridgman solidification process in microgravity. The model is based on the quasi-steady Navier-Stokes equations for a Newtonian fluid coupled with the conservation equations for transport of energy and species. Numerical solutions for a variety of operating conditions indicate that void-generated thermocapillary convection can have a drastic effect on both interface morphology and solutal transport. (author)

  9. Effects of interface morphology and TGO thickness on residual stress of EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianwei; Zhao, Yang; Ma, Jian

    2015-04-01

    The residual stress of electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) is complex and difficult to be obtained. In this paper, the interface morphology of TBCs subjected to cyclic heating and cooling was observed by SEM. Based on the thermal elastic-plastic finite method, corresponding interface model of TBCs was established. The residual stress of EB-PVD TBCs with different interface morphologies and TGO thicknesses was calculated using the FE method without regard to the presence of cracks and defects. The result shows that the distribution of residual stress is significantly affected by the interface morphology, and the growth of TGO also has influence on the residual stress of TC and TGO.

  10. Interface morphology and mechanical properties of Al-Cu-Al laminated composites fabricated by explosive welding and subsequent rolling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini-Athar, M. M.; Tolaminejad, B.

    2016-07-01

    Explosive welding is a well-known solid state method for joining similar and dissimilar materials. In the present study, tri-layered Al-Cu-Al laminated composites with different interface morphologies were fabricated by explosive welding and subsequent rolling. Effects of explosive ratio and rolling thickness reduction on the morphology of interface and mechanical properties were evaluated through optical/scanning electron microscopy, micro-hardness, tensile and tensile-shear tests. Results showed that by increasing the thickness reduction, bonding strength of specimens including straight and wavy interfaces increases. However, bonding strength of the specimens with melted layer interface decreases up to a threshold thickness reduction, then rapidly increases by raising the reduction. Hardness Values of welded specimens were higher than those of original material especially near the interface and a more uniform hardness profile was obtained after rolling process.

  11. Temperature Dependent Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Interface Resistance of Pentacene Thin Films with Varying Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jillian; Ong, Wee-Liat; Bettinger, Christopher J; Malen, Jonathan A

    2016-07-27

    Temperature dependent thermal conductivities and thermal interface resistances of pentacene (Pn) thin films deposited on silicon substrates and self-assembled monolayer-modified [octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES)] silicon substrates were measured using frequency domain thermoreflectance. Atomic force microscopy images were used to derive an effective film thickness for thermal transport that accounts for surface roughness. Data taken over a temperature range of 77-300 K for various morphologies and film thicknesses show that the thermal conductivity increases with increasing Pn grain size. The sum of the substrate-Pn and Pn-gold thermal interface resistances was isolated from the intrinsic thermal resistance of the Pn films and found to be independent of surface chemistry. Corresponding Kapitza lengths of approximately 150 nm are larger than the physical thicknesses of typical Pn thin films and indicate that the interfaces play a dominant role in the total thermal resistance. This study has implications for increasing the performance and effective thermal management of small molecule electronic and energy conversion devices.

  12. The morphology of coating/substrate interface in hot-dip-aluminized steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awan, Gul Hameed [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan); Hasan, Faiz ul [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan)], E-mail: drfaiz@uet.edu.pk

    2008-01-15

    In hot-dip-aluminized (HAD) steels, the morphology and the profile of the interface between the aluminum coating and the substrate steel, are affected both by the composition of the molten aluminum as well as by the composition, and even the microstructure, of the substrate steel. This effect has been investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The reaction between the steel and the molten aluminum leads to the formation of Fe-Al inter-metallic compounds on the steel surface. The thickness of the inter-metallic compound layer as well as the morphology of the interface between the steel and the interlayer varies with the silicon content of the molten aluminum. In hot-dip-aluminizing with pure aluminum, the interlayer is 'thick' and exhibits a finger-like growth into the steel. With a gradually increasing addition of silicon into the aluminum melt, the thickness of the interlayer decreases while the interface between the interlayer and the substrate gradually becomes 'smoother'. With an increase in the carbon content of the substrate steel the growth of the interlayer into the steel is impeded by the pearlite phase, whereas the ferrite phase appears to dissolve more readily. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopic studies showed that the interlayer formed in samples aluminized in pure aluminum, essentially consisted of orthorhombic Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}. It was further observed that the finger-like grains of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} phase exhibited a preferred lattice orientation. With a gradual addition of silicon into the aluminum melt, a cubic phase based on Fe{sub 3}Al also started to form in the interlayer and replaced most of the Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}.

  13. Morphologic characteristics and growth interface stability of nano-micron FeS_2 whiskers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Fei; WANG RuCheng; ZHANG WenLan; YAO YuZeng; PENG YanDong; KOU DaMing

    2009-01-01

    Micromorphology is further studied on the basis of our previous researches concerned with the na-no-micron FeS_2 whisker. There are obvious differences in the intensive degree, diameter and micro-morphology among the FeS_2 whiskers growing in different stages. From the early to late stage, the intensive degree increases, the diameter decreases, and the surface micro-morphology changes fol-lowing the regularity: protrusive nodulation → coarse → smooth → flat. According to the theory of crystal growth, the geological setting and processes of whisker formation, we discuss the stability and evolution of crystal growth interface of FeS_2 whisker occurring in Gengzhuang gold deposit (Shanxi Province, China). The results suggest that the negative temperature gradient and the supercooling appear in the early stage of the whisker growth, whereas the positive temperature gradient of reposeful state appears in the late stage. In the whisker growth stage, the component concentration changes through the three stages: severely nonhomogeneous in the early stage, relatively homogeneous in the middle stage, more homogeneous in the late stage. The general changing process of the interracial state is from unstable to stable. Micromorphology of FeS_2 whisker in Gengzhuang is the result of syn-ergism of temperature, component concentration and stability of crystal interface phase in hydro-thermal system. The micromorphology not only reflects the physical and chemical characteristics of the hydrothermal system during the whisker growth, but also indicates the stability characteristics of the interface phase and records the changing process of the whisker growth.

  14. Effect of interface on surface morphology and proton conduction of polymer electrolyte thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Akihiro; Kuroda, Seiichi; Mohamed, Hamdy F M; Tavernier, Bruno

    2013-07-21

    To understand the relationship between surface morphology and proton conduction of polymer electrolyte thin films, perfluorinated ionomer Nafion® thin films were prepared on different substrates such as glassy carbon (GC), hydrophilic-GC (H-GC), and platinum (Pt) as models for the ionomer film within a catalyst layer. Atomic force microscopy coupled with an electrochemical (e-AFM) technique revealed that proton conduction decreased with film thickness; an abrupt decrease in proton conductance was observed when the film thickness was less than ca. 10 nm on GC substrates in addition to a significant change in surface morphology. Furthermore, thin films prepared on H-GC substrates with UV-ozone treatment exhibited higher proton conduction than those on untreated GC substrates. However, Pt substrates exhibited proton conduction comparable to that of GCs for films thicker than 20 nm; a decrease in proton conduction was observed at ∼5 nm thick film but was still much higher than for carbon substrates. These results indicate that the number of active proton-conductive pathways and/or the connectivity of the proton path network changed with film thickness. The surface morphology of thinner films was significantly affected by the film/substrate interface and was fundamentally different from that of the bulk thick membrane.

  15. Accelerated lattice Boltzmann model for colloidal suspensions rheology and interface morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Hassan

    Colloids are ubiquitous in the food, medical, cosmetic, polymer, water purification and pharmaceutical industries. Colloids thermal, mechanical and storage properties are highly dependent on their interface morphology and their rheological behavior. Numerical methods provide a cheap and reliable virtual laboratory for the study of colloids. However efficiency is a major concern to address when using numerical methods for practical applications. This work introduces the main building-blocks for an improved lattice Boltzmann-based numerical tool designed for the study of colloidal rheology and interface morphology. The efficiency of the proposed model is enhanced by using the recently developed and validated migrating multi-block algorithms for the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The migrating multi-block was used to simulate single component, multi-component, multiphase and single component multiphase flows. Results were validated by experimental, numerical and analytical solutions. The contamination of the fluid-fluid interface influences the colloids morphology. This issue was addressed by the introduction of the hybrid LBM for surfactant-covered droplets. The module was used for the simulation of surfactant-covered droplet deformation under shear and uniaxial extensional flows respectively and under buoyancy. Validation with experimental and theoretical results was provided. Colloids are non-Newtonian fluids which exhibit rich rheological behavior. The suppression of coalescence module is the part of the proposed model which facilitates the study of colloids rheology. The model results for the relative viscosity were in agreement with some theoretical results. Biological suspensions such as blood are macro-colloids by nature. The study of the blood flow in the microvasculature was heuristically approached by assuming the red blood cells as surfactant covered droplets. The effects of interfacial tension on the flow velocity and the droplet exclusion from the walls

  16. Dependence of the magnetization on the interface morphology in ultra-thin magnetic/non-magnetic films: Monte Carlo approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razouk, A. [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Universite Sultan Moulay Slimane, BP 523, 23000 Beni-Mellal (Morocco); Sahlaoui, M., E-mail: msahlaoui@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Universite Sultan Moulay Slimane, BP 523, 23000 Beni-Mellal (Morocco); Sajieddine, M. [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Universite Sultan Moulay Slimane, BP 523, 23000 Beni-Mellal (Morocco)

    2009-07-30

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we have studied the dependence of magnetic properties on interface morphology in magnetic/non-magnetic (M/NM) multilayers. Our aim is to relate macroscopic magnetic properties of the multilayers to their concentration profile at the interface. Our model consists of an alternate staking of magnetic and non-magnetic layers with disordered interfaces. We have considered different concentration and the existence of local magnetic domains at the interface. The results indicate the crucial dependence of magnetization amplitude with interface multilayers atomic composition and the spatial arrangement of magnetic atoms. In particular, we show that isolated islands at the interface leads to the apparition of super-paramagnetic behavior.

  17. Influence of brazing parameters and alloy composition on interface morphology of brazed diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, Ulrich E. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for Joining and Interface Technology, Uberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)], E-mail: klotz@fem-online.de; Liu Chunlei [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for Joining and Interface Technology, Uberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Khalid, Fazal A. [Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, GIK Institute, Topi, NWFP (Pakistan); Elsener, Hans-Rudolf [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for Joining and Interface Technology, Uberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2008-11-15

    Active brazing is an effective technique for joining diamond or cBN grit to metallic substrates. This technique is currently used to manufacture superabrasive, high-performance tools. The investigation of interface reactions between diamond and active brazing alloys plays an important role in understanding and improving the brazing process and the resultant tool performance. Focused ion beam (FIB) milling enabled the high resolution investigation of these extremely difficult to prepare metal-diamond joints. The interfacial nanostructure is characterized by the formation of two layers of TiC with different morphologies. First a cuboidal layer forms directly on the diamond and reaches a thickness of approximately 70 nm. Then a second layer with columnar TiC crystals grows on the first layer into the brazing filler metal by a diffusion-controlled process. The combined thickness of both TiC layers varies between 50 nm and 600 nm depending on the brazing temperature and holding time.

  18. Effect of water layer at the SiO2/graphene interface on pentacene morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhikara, Manisha; Pavlica, Egon; Matković, Aleksandar; Gajić, Radoš; Bratina, Gvido

    2014-10-07

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to examine early stages of pentacene growth on exfoliated single-layer graphene transferred to SiO2 substrates. We have observed 2D growth with mean height of 1.5 ± 0.2 nm on as-transferred graphene. Three-dimensional islands of pentacene with an average height of 11 ± 2 nm were observed on graphene that was annealed at 350 °C prior to pentacene growth. Compellingly similar 3D morphology has been observed on graphene transferred onto SiO2 that was treated with hexamethyldisilazane prior to the transfer of graphene. On multilayer graphene we have observed 2D growth, regardless of the treatment of SiO2. We interpret this behavior of pentacene molecules in terms of the influence of the dipolar field that emerges from the water monolayer at the graphene/SiO2 interface on the surface energy of graphene.

  19. Morphology of sealant/enamel interface after surface treatment with bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho; Silveira, Renata Espíndola; Abuna, Gabriel; Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra; Alandia-Román, Carla Cecilia; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze, by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the morphology of sealant/enamel interface after surface treatment with Biosilicate. Before pits and fissures sealing, the occlusal surfaces of 10 sound human molars were sectioned perpendicularly at the fissures in order to obtain three slices for each tooth. Slices were randomly assigned into three groups (n = 10) according to sealing protocol: Group 1- Acid etching + Biosilicate + glass ionomer-based sealant (Clinpro XT Varnish, 3M ESPE); Group 2- Acid etching + glass ionomer-based sealant (Clinpro XT Varnish, 3M ESPE); Group 3- No sealing. All slices were subjected to thermal cycling (5,000 cycles; 5-55°C; dwell time: 30s). Half of the slices from each group (n = 5) were analyzed by CLSM and the other half by SEM. Groups 1 and 2 were also submitted to EDS analysis and their data were evaluated by Two-Way ANOVA e Tukey's test (α=5%). EDS data analysis showed higher amounts of silicon (Si) ions than calcium (Ca) ions in Group 1 (P glass ionomer-based sealant/enamel interfaces.

  20. On the morphology of SrCO3 crystals grown at the interface between two immiscible liquids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satyanarayana Reddy; Debabrata Rautaray; S R Sainkar; Murali Sastry

    2003-04-01

    In this paper we report on the growth of strontianite crystals at the interface between an aqueous solution of Sr2+ ions and organic solutions of chloroform and hexane containing fatty acid/fatty amine molecules by reaction with sodium carbonate. When fatty acid was used as an additive at the interface, the crystals grown were self-assembled needle shaped strontianite crystallites branching out from the seed crystal via secondary nucleation. Under identical conditions of supersaturation, the presence of fatty amine molecules at the liquid–liquid interface resulted in needle shaped strontianite crystals with spherical crystallites arranged around central needles. This clearly indicates that the functionality of the head group of the amphiphiles at the liquid–liquid interface affects the morphology of the strontium carbonate crystals formed. The use of interfacial effects such as dielectric discontinuity, polarity and finite solubility of the two solvents etc opens up exciting possibilities for tailoring the morphology of crystals at the liquid–liquid interface and is currently not possible in the more popular crystal growth with similar amphiphiles at the air–water interface.

  1. Organic solar cells: a rigorous model of the donor-acceptor interface for various bulk heterojunction morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raba, Adam; Leroy, Yann; Cordan, Anne-Sophie

    2014-02-01

    Theoretical studies of organic solar cells are mostly based on one dimensional models. Despite their accuracy to reproduce most of the experimental trends, they intrinsically cannot correctly integrate the effects of morphology in cells based on a bulk heterojunction structure. Therefore, accounting for these effects requires the development of two dimensional models, in which donor and acceptor domains are explicitly distinct. In this context, we propose an analytical approach, which focuses on the description of the interface between the two domains. Assuming pinned charge transfer states, we rigorously derive the corresponding boundary conditions and explore the differences between this model and other existing models in the literature for various morphologies of the active layer. On one hand, all tested models are equivalent for an ideal interdigitated bulk heterojunction solar cell with a planar donor-acceptor interface, but divergences between the models rise for small sizes of the donor domain. On the other hand, we carried out a comparison on a less ideal case of cell, with a rough interface between the two domains. Simulations with such cells exhibit distinct behaviors for each model. We conclude that the boundary condition for the interface between the materials is of great importance for the study of solar cells with a non-planar interface. The model must account initially for the roughness of the interface.

  2. Morphological characterization of the resin-dentin interface in primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaden, Christoph; Schmalz, Gottfried; Powers, John M

    2003-12-01

    The effects of self-etching adhesives on primary teeth were evaluated. Reports in the literature suggest differences between the first and second dentition regarding the composition and the morphology and, therefore, a possible difference in the performance of dental adhesives. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of self-etching adhesives on primary dentin. Eight dentin disks were obtained from the occlusal surface of primary molars. The disks were divided between four dental adhesives [Prompt L-PoP (LP), Clearfil SE BOND (SE), Etch&Prime 3.0 (EP) and Prime&Bond NT (PB) + H(3)PO(4) (Control) and "restored" with a composite (Pertac II)]. After sectioning, fixation and HMDS drying, specimens were polished and Field Emission SEM examinations were carried out. Clearly visible hybrid layer formation was found for PB, LP and EP. An undoubtedly detectable interdiffusion zone was not evident after the use of SE. A clearly visible adhesive layer was recognizable for PB, EP and SE, but not continuously detectable for LP. Debonded regions were observed for all systems evaluated, but distinct differences in the failure mode were detected. The evaluated dental adhesives did not generate completely sealed interfaces between the composite resin and the dentin of primary teeth in vitro.

  3. Interface morphology and solute partition during directional soldification process of Al-1.5Cu-3Zn alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuyia Chen; Wanqib Jie [State Key Lab. of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical Univ., Xian (China)

    2005-07-01

    Interface morphology and solute partition during directional solidification process of Al-1.5Cu-3.0Zn alloy were investigated at temperature gradient of 80 K/cm and growth rate between 0.1 and 7.1 {mu}m/s. The solid-liquid interface was quenched during directional solidification and the micromorphology at the longitudinal section was examined by optic microscopy and SEM. The cellular growth interface and dendritic growth interface were observed and characterized. The distribution of Cu and Zn was measured by EDS, the equilibrium solute partition coefficients for Cu and Zn in Al-1.5Cu-3.0Zn alloy were obtained to be 0.31 and 0.58. The activity model and concentration model, developed by present authors, were used to calculate the equilibrium solute partition coefficients in Al-1.5Cu-3Zn alloy. The model-calculated results were compared with experimental data. (orig.)

  4. Effect of surface tension, viscosity, and process conditions on polymer morphology deposited at the liquid-vapor interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Patrick D; Bradley, Laura C; Gupta, Malancha

    2013-09-17

    We have observed that the vapor-phase deposition of polymers onto liquid substrates can result in the formation of polymer films or particles at the liquid-vapor interface. In this study, we demonstrate the relationship between the polymer morphology at the liquid-vapor interface and the surface tension interaction between the liquid and polymer, the liquid viscosity, the deposition rate, and the deposition time. We show that the thermodynamically stable morphology is determined by the surface tension interaction between the liquid and the polymer. Stable polymer films form when it is energetically favorable for the polymer to spread over the surface of the liquid, whereas polymer particles form when it is energetically favorable for the polymer to aggregate. For systems that do not strongly favor spreading or aggregation, we observe that the initial morphology depends on the deposition rate. Particles form at low deposition rates, whereas unstable films form at high deposition rates. We also observe a transition from particle formation to unstable film formation when we increase the viscosity of the liquid or increase the deposition time. Our results provide a fundamental understanding about polymer growth at the liquid-vapor interface and can offer insight into the growth of other materials on liquid surfaces. The ability to systematically tune morphology can enable the production of particles for applications in photonics, electronics, and drug delivery and films for applications in sensing and separations.

  5. Morphological stability of an interface between two non-Newtonian fluids moving in a Hele-Shaw cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyushev, L M; Birzina, A I

    2015-01-01

    The problem of the morphological stability of an interface in the case of the displacement of one non-Newtonian fluid by another non-Newtonian fluid in a radial Hele-Shaw cell has been considered. Both fluids have been described by the two-parameter Ostwald-de Waele power-law model. The nonzero viscosity of the displacing fluid has been taken into account. A generalized Darcy's law for the system under consideration, as well as an equation for the determination of the critical size of morphological stability with respect to harmonic perturbations (linear analysis), has been derived. Morphological phase diagrams have been constructed, and the region of the parameters in which nonequilibrium reentrant morphological transitions are possible has been revealed.

  6. Interface morphology studies of liquid phase epitaxy grown HgCdTe films by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, M.; George, M. A.; Burger, A.; Collins, W. E.; Silberman, E.

    1994-04-01

    In this paper we report an investigation of the morphology of the interfaces of liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) grown HgCdTe thin films on CdTe and CdZnTe substrates by atomic force microscopy (AFM) on freshly cleaved (110) crystallographic planes. An empirical observation which may be linked to lattice mismatch was indicated by an angle between the cleavage steps of the substrate to those of the film. The precipitates with size ranging from 5 nm to 20 nm were found to be most apparent near the interface.

  7. Phase field simulation of the interface morphology evolution and its stability during directional solidification of binary alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The influences of pulling speed V and temperature gradient G on morphology evolution, concentration distribution, solute trapping and interface stability during directional solidification of binary alloys have been studied with the B-S phase field model. Simulated results reproduced the morphology transitions of deep cell to shallow cell and shallow cell to plane front. The primary cellular spacing, depth of groove and effective solute redistribution coefficient for different V and G are compared. The absolute stability under high pulling speed and high temperature gradient has also been predicted, which is in agreement with the Mullins-Sekerka (M-S) stability theory.

  8. Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Computerens interface eller grænseflade har spredt sig overalt. Mobiltelefoner, spilkonsoller, pc'er og storskærme indeholder computere – men computere indbygges også i tøj og andre hverdagslige genstande, så vi konstant har adgang til digitale data. Interface retter fokus mod, hvordan den digita...

  9. Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Computerens interface eller grænseflade har spredt sig overalt. Mobiltelefoner, spilkonsoller, pc'er og storskærme indeholder computere – men computere indbygges også i tøj og andre hverdagslige genstande, så vi konstant har adgang til digitale data. Interface retter fokus mod, hvordan den digitale...... kunst og kultur skabes, spredes og opleves igennem interfaces. Forfatterne undersøger og diskuterer interfacets æstetik, ideologi og kultur – og analyserer aktuel interfacekunst på tværs af musik, kunst, litteratur og film. Bogen belyser interfacets oprindelse i den kolde krigs laboratorier og dets...

  10. DIRECT MORPHOLOGICAL-STUDY OF METAL-POLYMER INTERFACES BY SCANNING FORCE MICROSCOPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AKARI, S; ESSELINK, E; HADZIIOANNOU, G

    1995-01-01

    Using a scanning force microscope, direct imaging of the metal/polymer interface was achieved for the first time by removing the evaporated metal film from the deposited polymer and imaging the side that was exposed to the polymer, This technique allows direct sight of the metal/polymer interface an

  11. Investigating Morphological Stability of Faceted Interfaces with Axial Heat Processing (AHP) Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaschian, Reza; Balikci, Ercan; Deal, Andrew; Gonik, Michael; Golyshev, Viladimir D.; Leonardi, Eddie; deVahlDavis, G.; Chen, P. Y. P.; Timchenko, V.

    2003-01-01

    Successful processing of homogeneous semiconductor single crystals from their melts depends strongly on precise control of thermal and fluid flow conditions near the solid/liquid interface. In this project, we utilize a novel crystal growth technique called Axial Heat Processing (AHP) that uses a baffle, positioned inside the melt near the interface, to supply and/or conduct heat axially to the interface. The baffle, which may or may not have a heater encased in it, can promote more stable and planar growth as well as reduce buoyancy driven convection. The latter is because the baffle reduces the aspect ratio of the melt as it separates the melt into three sections, above the baffle, in the feed gap between the baffle and the crucible wall, and below the baffle between the baffle base and the interface. AHP also enables a close monitoring and/or control of thermal boundaries near the solid/liquid interface during crystal growth by means of thermocouples placed in the baffle. The interface is kept planar when a heating element in the baffle is used. However, a proper choice of melt height is necessary to keep the interface planar when using the baffle without a heater. This study addresses the influence of melt height and growth velocity on the segregation profile of AHP-grown Sb doped Ge single crystals.

  12. Numerical Calculation of the Morphology of a Solid/Liquid Interface Near an Insoluble Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Sen, Subhayu

    2003-01-01

    A numerical mathematical model capable of accurately describing the evolution of the shape of the solid/liquid interface in the proximity of a foreign particle is presented in this paper. The model accounts for the influence of the temperature gradient and the Gibbs-Thomson and disjoining pressure effects. It shows that for the systems characterized by k(sub P) interface curvature to change its sign in the close-contact particle/interface region. It also shows that the increase of the temperature gradient diminishes the effect of the disjoining pressure. Calculated critical solidification velocities for the pushing/engulfment transition are compared with experimental measurements performed in microgravity conditions.

  13. Clinical dental adhesive application: the influence on composite-enamel interface morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matei, Ruxandra; Popescu, Mihai Raul; Suciu, Mircea; Rauten, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    Although the adhesion phenomenon is crucial in achieving and maintaining a composite building on dental structure, this phenomenon is not completely understood. On the other hand, adhesion is dependent on the interface quality (the interface between enamel and adhesive). In this study, the authors approached the subject of the influence of adhesive clinical application on the composite-enamel interface, which was less investigated by the scientists. On intact extracted human teeth were prepared enamel areas, and then filled with light-curing composite. The teeth were sectioned and prepared for microscopic investigation, at 10×, 100× and 200× magnifications.

  14. Shear bond strength of composite resin to dentin after application of cavity disinfectants - SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different cavity disinfectants on dentin bond strengths of composite resin applied with two different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred mandibular molars were sectioned parallel to the occlusal surface to expose dentin in the midcoronal one-third. The dentinal surfaces were polished with waterproof-polishing papers. The specimens were randomly divided into five groups of 40 teeth each as follows: group 1(control -- specimens were not treated with any cavity disinfectants. Groups 2--5 (experimental groups -- dentin surfaces were treated with the following cavity disinfectants, respectively; 2% chlorhexidine solution, 0.1% benzalkonium chloride-based disinfectant, 1% chlorhexidine gel, and an iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectant. The specimens were then randomly divided into two subgroups including 20 teeth each to evaluate the effect of different bonding systems. Dentin bonding systems were applied to the dentin surfaces and the composite buildups were done. After the specimens were stored in an incubator for 24 hours, the shear bond strength was measured at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The specimens were then statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: One way analysis of variance and Tukey-HSD tests were used. Results: There was no significant difference between chlorhexidine gel and control groups regardless of the type of the bonding agent used (P>0.05. On the other hand, pretreatment with benzalkonium chloride-based, iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectants or chlorhexidine solutions had a negative effect on the shear bond strength of self-etching bonding systems. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that when benzalkonium chloride-based, iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectants or chlorhexidine solutions are used as a cavity disinfectant, an etch-and-rinse bonding system should be preferred.

  15. Effect of Pre-heating on Microtensile Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Dentin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrahim Davari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Direct composite resin restorations are widely used and the impact of different storage temperatures on composites is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of composite to dentin after different pre-curing temperatures.Occlusal surfaces of 44 human molars were ground with diamond burs under water coolant and polished with 600 grit silicon carbide papers to obtain flat dentin surfaces. The dentin was etched with 37% phosphoric acid and bonded with Adper Single Bond 2 according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (n=22 according to the composite resin applied: FiltekP60 and Filtek Z250. Each group included three subgroups of composite resin pre-curing temperatures (4°C, 23°C and 37°C. Composite resins were applied to the dentin surfaces in a plastic mold (8mm in diameter and 4mm in length incrementally and cured. Twenty-two composite-to-dentin hour-glass sticks with one mm(2 cross-sectional area per group were prepared. Microtensile bond strength measurements were made using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of one mm/min. For statistical analysis, t-test, one-way and two-way ANOVA were used. The level of significance was set at P<0.05.Filtek P60 pre-heated at 37ºC had significantly higher microtensile bond strength than Filtek Z250 under the same condition. The microtensile bond strengths were not significantly different at 4ºC, 23ºC and 37ºC subgroups of each composite resin group.Filtek P60 and Filtek Z250 did not have significantly different microtensile bond strengths at 4ºC and 23ºC but Filtek P60 had significantly higher microtensile bond strength at 37 ºC. Composite and temperature interactions had significant effects on the bond strength.

  16. Micro-mechanical modeling of the cement-bone interface: the effect of friction morphology and material properties on the micromechanical response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2008-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the micro-mechanical behavior of the cement–bone interface, the effect of parametric variations of frictional, morphological and material properties on the mechanical response of the cement–bone interface were analyzed using a finite element approach. Finite element

  17. Investigation on the Interface Morphologies of Explosive Welding of Inconel 625 to Steel A516 Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; Zareie, H. R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to produce composite plates by explosive cladding process. This is a process in which the controlled energy of explosives is used to create a metallic bond between two similar or dissimilar materials. The welding conditions were tailored through parallel geometry route with different operational parameters. In this investigation, a two-pronged study was adopted to establish the conditions required for producing successful solid state welding: (a) Analytical calculations to determine the weldability domain or welding window; (b) Metallurgical investigations of explosive welding experiments carried out under different explosive ratios to produce both wavy and straight interfaces. The analytical calculations confirm the experimental results. Optical microscopy studies show that a transition from a smooth to wavy interface occurs with an increase in explosive ratio. SEM studies show that the interface was outlined by characteristic sharp transition between two materials.

  18. interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipayan Sanyal

    2005-01-01

    macroscopic conservation equations with an order parameter which can account for the solid, liquid, and the mushy zones with the help of a phase function defined on the basis of the liquid fraction, the Gibbs relation, and the phase diagram with local approximations. Using the above formalism for alloy solidification, the width of the diffuse interface (mushy zone was computed rather accurately for iron-carbon and ammonium chloride-water binary alloys and validated against experimental data from literature.

  19. Effect of the Cold-Sprayed Aluminum Coating-Substrate Interface Morphology on Bond Strength for Aircraft Repair Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blochet, Quentin; Delloro, Francesco; N'Guyen, Franck; Jeulin, Dominique; Borit, François; Jeandin, Michel

    2017-03-01

    This article is dealing with the effects of surface preparation of the substrate on aluminum cold-sprayed coating bond strength. Different sets of AA2024-T3 specimens have been coated with pure Al 1050 feedstock powder, using a conventional cold spray coating technique. The sets were grit-blasted (GB) before coating. The study focuses on substrate surface topography evolution before coating and coating-substrate interface morphology after coating. To study coating adhesion by LASAT® technique for each set, specimens with and without preceding GB treatment were tested in load-controlled conditions. Then, several techniques were used to evaluate the effects of substrate surface treatment on the final coating mechanical properties. Irregularities induced by the GB treatment modify significantly the interface morphology. Results showed that particle anchoring was improved dramatically by the presence of craters. The substrate surface was characterized by numerous anchors. Numerical simulation results exhibited the increasing deformation of particle onto the grit-blasted surface. In addition, results showed a strong relationship between the coating-substrate bond strength on the deposited material and surface preparation.

  20. Impact of annealing on the chemical structure and morphology of the thin-film CdTe/ZnO interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsley, K., E-mail: horsley5@unlv.nevada.edu; Hanks, D. A.; Weir, M. G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Beal, R. J. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Wilks, R. G. [Solar Energy Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB), 14109 Berlin (Germany); Blum, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Advanced Light Source (ALS), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Häming, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hofmann, T. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Bundeswehr Research Institute for Materials, Fuels and Lubricants (WIWeB), Institutsweg 1, 85435 Erding (Germany); Weinhardt, L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); ANKA Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); and others

    2014-07-14

    To enable an understanding and optimization of the optoelectronic behavior of CdTe-ZnO nanocomposites, the morphological and chemical properties of annealed CdTe/ZnO interface structures were studied. For that purpose, CdTe layers of varying thickness (4–24 nm) were sputter-deposited on 100 nm-thick ZnO films on surface-oxidized Si(100) substrates. The morphological and chemical effects of annealing at 525 °C were investigated using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray-excited Auger electron spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. We find a decrease of the Cd and Te surface concentration after annealing, parallel to an increase in Zn and O signals. While the as-deposited film surfaces show small grains (100 nm diameter) of CdTe on the ZnO surface, annealing induces a significant growth of these grains and separation into islands (with diameters as large as 1 μm). The compositional change at the surface is more pronounced for Cd than for Te, as evidenced using component peak fitting of the Cd and Te 3d XPS peaks. The modified Auger parameters of Cd and Te are also calculated to further elucidate the local chemical environment before and after annealing. Together, these results suggest the formation of tellurium and cadmium oxide species at the CdTe/ZnO interface upon annealing, which can create a barrier for charge carrier transport, and might allow for a deliberate modification of interface properties with suitably chosen thermal treatment parameters.

  1. Morphologic assessment of dental surface/ glass ionomer cement interface: influence of Er:YAG laser pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silmara Aparecida Milori Corona

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The aim of this study was to assess the surface and the substrate/glass ionomer cement (GIC interface after Er:YAG laser irradiation by means of scanning electron microcopy. Material and methods: Thirty human third molars were selected and had their roots removed. Crowns were sectioned to obtain discs that were randomly assigned to three groups according to the surface pretreatment: 40% polyacrylic acid (control; Er:YAG laser irradiation (80mJ/2Hz or Er:YAG laser followed by 40% polyacrylic acid. Two discs of each group were put aside to the surface analysis and the others were bisected. One half received Ketac-Fil and the other received Fuji II LC. Specimens were prepared for SEM and were analyzed under different magnifications. Results: Er:YAG laser group showed no adhesive interface for both enamel and dentin, but strongly damaged the interface build-up for dentin/Fuji II LC. The application of laser irradiation followed by the polyacrylic acid exhibited gaps and irregularities for both substrates. Conclusion: Er:YAG laser irradiation combined or not with 40% polyacrylic acid produced a surface unfavorable for GIC interaction, especially for the resin-modified ones.

  2. Long-term morphology of a healing bone-tendon interface: a histological observation in the sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsham-West, R; Nicholson, H; Walton, M; Milburn, P

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and describe the sequence of events involved in long-term biological reconstruction of a tendon-bone interface following surgical reattachment. Patellar tendon re-attachment in the adult sheep was used to investigate and describe the biological components involved in healing and repair of a tendon enthesis. Light microscopy was used to describe the healing morphology at time intervals of 8, 12, 26, 52 and 104 weeks. By 8 weeks a collagen continuum was observed between the tendon and bone. Over time this fibrous bridge became anchored into the original tissues (tendon and bone), with the resultant enthesis resembling more a fibrous rather than the original fibrocartilagenous enthesis. The associated collagen fibrils between the two tissues gradually changed in morphology over time to reflect the fibres seen in the original tendon tissue. The fibrous tissue of the forming enthesis remained hypercellular when compared with the controls. The resultant long-term morphology may be a reflection of functional adaptation rather than anatomical replication.

  3. Effects of Ca(Y)-Si modifier on interface morphology and solute segregation during directional solidification of an austenite medium Mn steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The austenite medium Mn steel modified with controlled additions of Ca, Y, Si were directionally solidified using the vertical Bridgman method to study the effects of Ca(Y)-Si modifier on the solid-liquid (S-L) interface morphology and solute segregation. The interface morphology and the C and Mn segregation of the steel directionally solidified at 6.9 μm/s were investigated with an image analysis and a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The 0.5wt% Ca-Si modified steel is solidified with a planar S-L interface. The interface of the 1.0wt% Ca-Si modified steel is similar to that of the 0.5wt% Ca-Si modified steel, but with larger nodes. The 1.5wt% Ca-Si modified steel displays a cellular growth parttern. The S-L interface morphology of the 0.5wt% Ca-Si+1.0wt% Y-Si modified Mn steel appears as dendritic interface, and primary austenite dendrites reveal developed lateral branching at the quenched liquid. In the meantime, the independent austenite colonies are formed ahead of the S-L interface. A mechanism involving constitutional supercooling explains the S-L interface evolution. It depends mainly on the difference in the contents of Ca, Y, and Si ahead of the S-L interface. The segregation of C and Mn ahead of the S-L interface enhanced by the modifiers is observed.

  4. Superplasticity in ceramic and metal matrix composites and the role of grain size, segregation, interfaces, and second phase morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1992-10-01

    Structural ceramics and ceramic composites have been shown to exhibit superplasticity in recent times and this discovery has attracted tremendous interest. Although the number of ceramics exhibits superplasticity is now quite large, there are gaps in understanding the requirements for superplasticity in ceramics. Also, superplastic behavior at very high strain rates (1 s{sup {minus}1}) in metallic-based materials is an area of increasing research. In this case, the phenomenon has been observed quite extensively in aluminum alloy-based metal matrix composites and mechanically alloyed aluminum- and nickel-based materials. Again, the details of the structural requirements of this phenomenon are not yet understood. In the present paper, experimental results on superplasticity in ceramic-based materials and on high strain rate behavior in metallic-based materials are presented. The roles of grain size, grain boundary and interface chemistry, and second phase morphology and compatibility with the matrix material will be emphasized.

  5. Morphological changes at the interface of the nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia point electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaberg, Rolf Jarle; Tunold, Reidar; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg;

    1998-01-01

    ex situ. The anodic current was found to induce a self-catalytic effect on the electrode, and the anodic "steady state" current increased to more than twice the initial value with a time constant of about 40 h. In contrast, cathodic polarization reduced the performance of the electrode...... and the cathodic current decreased significantly with a time constant of about 20 h. Redistribution of material in the reaction zone is suggested to control most of the changes in electrode activity. At anodic overpotentials it was observed that Ni was transported to the electrolyte surface, forming a "necklace...... of dispersed metal particles reduced the TPB length, and accordingly the cathodic current. In addition to the morphological modifications, the catalytic properties of the surfaces were significantly altered as the electrode was polarized. Transformation from cubic to tetragonal YSZ, due to segregation...

  6. Surface properties and morphology of mixed POSS-DPPC monolayers at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojewska, Monika; Skrzypiec, Marta; Prochaska, Krystyna

    2017-02-01

    From the point of view of the possible medical applications of POSS (polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes), it is crucial to analyse interactions occurring between POSS and model biological membrane at molecular level. Knowledge of the interaction between POSS and DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) allows prediction of the impact of POSS contained in biomaterials or cosmetics on a living organism. In the study presented, the surface properties and morphology of Langmuir monolayers formed by mixtures of POSS and the phospholipid (DPPC) at the air/water surface are examined. We selected two POSS derivatives, with completely different chemical structure of substituents attached to the corner of the silicon open cage, which allowed the analysis of the impact of the character of organic moieties (strongly hydrophobic or clearly hydrophilic) on the order of POSS molecules and their tendency to form self-aggregates at the air/water surface. POSS derivatives significantly changed the profile of the π-A isotherms obtained for DPPC but in different ways. On the basis of the regular solution theory, the miscibility and stability of the two components in the monolayer were analysed in terms of compression modulus (Cs(-1)), excess Gibbs free energy (ΔGexc), activity coefficients (γ) and interaction parameter (ξ). The results obtained indicate the existence of two different interaction mechanisms between DPPC and POSS which depend on the chemical character of moieties present in POSS molecules.

  7. Numerical Modeling and In-Situ Observations of the Dynamics of the Solid/Liquid Interface Morphology During Directional Solidification of Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Sen, Subhayu; Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, W. F.

    1999-01-01

    The departure from interface planarity and the subsequent evolution to a periodic array of cells or dendrites is a fundamental process that characterizes most microstructures in solidified alloys. The growing demand for high quality alloys and semiconductor crystals requires a precise methodology to predict and subsequently control both the interface morphology and the distribution of impurities, additives, and phases in the grown crystal. Apart from its practical significance, the study of morphological evolution has also been viewed as a means to unearth a general paradigm for pattern formation in nature. A previously developed 2D numerical model for the solid/liquid interface tracking has been further refined and used to simulate the time-evolution of the perturbations on the interface. The dynamics of the local growth velocity, interface undercooling and solute concentration at the interface has been theoretically predicted by means of the numerical model for Al-Cu and Pb-Sn alloys. The model shows that perturbations with a wavelengths, lambda greater than a critical wavelength lambda(sub c) continue to grow in time whereas perturbations with lambda interface. Comparison of these predictions with existing theories of pattern formation and experimental results will be discussed.

  8. Numerical Modeling and In-Situ Observations of the Dynamics of the Solid/Liquid Interface Morphology During Directional Solidification of Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Sen, Subhayu; Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, W. F.

    1999-01-01

    The departure from interface planarity and the subsequent evolution to a periodic array of cells or dendrites is a fundamental process that characterizes most microstructures in solidified alloys. The growing demand for high quality alloys and semiconductor crystals requires a precise methodology to predict and subsequently control both the interface morphology and the distribution of impurities, additives, and phases in the grown crystal. Apart from its practical significance, the study of morphological evolution has also been viewed as a means to unearth a general paradigm for pattern formation in nature. A previously developed 2D numerical model for the solid/liquid interface tracking has been further refined and used to simulate the time-evolution of the perturbations on the interface. The dynamics of the local growth velocity, interface undercooling and solute concentration at the interface has been theoretically predicted by means of the numerical model for Al-Cu and Pb-Sn alloys. The model shows that perturbations with a wavelengths, lambda greater than a critical wavelength lambda(sub c) continue to grow in time whereas perturbations with lambda < lambda(sub c) cease to propagate. The model further predicts that under certain conditions perturbation can also propagate along the interface. Comparison of these predictions with existing theories of pattern formation and experimental results will be discussed.

  9. Evolution of solid-liquid interface morphology of primary TiB2 in non-equilibrium solidified Ti-Al-B alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张虎; 高文理; 金云学; 曾松岩

    2002-01-01

    Ti-Al-B alloys were produced by in-situ synthesis method. The phase constitutions, microstructure of these alloys and the morphology of the primary TiB2 were investigated by XRD and SEM. The results show that these alloys are composed of TiAl and TiB2, and the primary TiB2 is hexagonal prism shape. Growth terraces, pyramidal protrusion, and rod shape dendrites are observed on (0001) plane of primary TiB2. There are thin flake convexes on plane of primary TiB2, parallel to (0001) plane of the primary TiB2. The rod-shaped crystal orientation and thin flake convexes are parallel to primary TiB2 where they protrude out. The solid-liquid interface morphology of primary TiB2 during solidification was also investigated. It was indicated that the solid-liquid interface morphology of primary TiB2 is instable and gradually develops into a complicated interface consisted of a few separated secondary interfaces. These secondary interfaces are facet with the same crystalline orientation.

  10. Morphological Evolution of Directional Solidification Interfaces in Microgravity: An Analysis of Model Experiments Performed on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Grugel, R. N.; Trivedi, R. K.

    2005-01-01

    A series of experiments performed using the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) apparatus within the glovebox facility (GBX) on board the International Space Station (ISS) has provided video images of the morphological evolution of a three-dimensional interface in a diffusion controlled regime. The experimental samples were prepared on ground by filling glass tubes, 1 cm ID and approximately 30 cm in length, with "alloys" of succinonitrile (SCN) and water in an atmosphere of nitrogen at 450 millibar pressure. The compositions of the samples processed and analyzed are 0.25,0.5 and 1.0 wt% water. Experimental processing parameters of temperature gradient and translation speed, as well as camera settings, were remotely monitored and manipulated from the ground Telescience Center (TSC) at the Marshall !3pace Flight Center. During the experiments, the sample was first subjected to a unidirectional melt back, generally at 10 microns per second, with a constant temperature gradient ahead of the melting interface. Following the melt back, the interface was allowed to stabilize before translation is initiated. The temperatures in the sample were monitored by six in situ thermocouples and the position is monitored by an optical linear encoder. For the experiments performed and analyzed, the gradients ranged from 2.5 - 3.3 K/mm and the initial pulling velocities ranged from 0.7 micron per second to 1 micron per second with subsequent transition velocities of up to 100 microns per second. The data provided by the PFMI for analysis includes near-real-time (NRT) video captured on the ground during the experiment runs, ISS Video Tape Recorder (VTR) data dumped from the VTR at the end of the experiment run and recorded on the ground, telemetry data including temperature and position measurements, and limited flight HI-8 tapes in 2 camera views of experiment runs for which tapes have been returned to the investigators from ISS. Because of limited down mass from the ISS

  11. Morphologies of solid-liquid interface and surface steps during rapid growth of BaB2O4 single crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of solid-liquid interface during BBO single crystal growth was stud- ied by the differential interference microscopy. And the step morphology on (0001) surface of the as-grown crystal was observed by the atomic force microscopy as well. It was found that the transition from a flat solid-liquid interface to a skeletal shape will occur in case of rapid growth. However, AFM images of surface steps revealed morphology differences correlated with crystallographic directions. The steps advancing along <1010 > direction form the step flow, whereas those steps propagating along <0110 > direction shape into step segments. Measurements of step heights by AFM indicated that it is the high anisotropy of the dimension of growth unit and step bunching due to the enlargement of concentration difference along the surface that results in the anisotropy of step morphologies.

  12. Morphologies of solid-liquid interface and surface steps during rapid growth of BaB2O4 single crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN XiuHong; AI Fei; JIN WeiQing; LIU Yan; ZHANG Ying

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of solid-liquid interface during BBO single crystal growth was studied by the differential interference microscopy. And the step morphology on (0001) surface of the as-grown crystal was observed by the atomic force microscopy as well. It was found that the transition from a flat solid-liquid interface to a skeletal shape will occur in case of rapid growth. However, AFM images of surface steps revealed morphology differences correlated with crystallographic directions. The steps advancing along direction form the step flow, whereas those steps propagating along direction shape into step segments. Measurements of step heights by AFM indicated that it is the high anisotropy of the dimension of growth unit and step bunching due to the enlargement of concentration difference along the surface that results in the anisotropy of step morphologies.

  13. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy of resin-dentin interface morphology of seven dentin adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanumiharja, M; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J; Carpenter, J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the resin-dentin interface morphology of 7 resin-based dentin adhesive systems (Solid Bond, EBS-Multi, PermaQuik, One Coat Bond, Gluma One Bond, Prime & Bond NT/NRC, and Clearfil Liner Bond 2V). Fourteen dentin disks 1.0 mm thick were obtained from superficial occlusal dentin of extracted human third molars, and finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Two dentin disks were bonded using each of the adhesives above according to the manufacturers' instructions, and a thin layer of flowable resin composite was applied. The specimens were kept in tap water for 24 h at 37 degrees C, and then assigned to one of two observational techniques: a fracture technique and an acid-base technique. Fracture technique: shallow grooves were cut, fixed in 10% buffered formalin, and dehydrated in an ascending ethanol series up to 100%, critical-point dried, and fractured along the prepared grooves. Acid-base technique: the specimens were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned through the center, polished with diamond paste down to 0.25-micron particle size, and treated with 10% orthophosphoric acid for 10 s and 5% sodium hypochlorite for 5 min. All the specimens were mounted on aluminum stubs, gold sputter coated, and observed using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). All the dentin adhesive systems showed hybrid layer formation, but the thickness varied depending on the bonding system used. The self-etching priming systems (Prime & Bond NT/NRC and Clearfil Liner Bond 2V) showed the thinnest hybrid layer at 1 to 2 microns, whereas the "single-bottle" system (Gluma One Bond) exhibited the thickest hybrid layer at 8 to 16 microns. The ultramorphological structures of dentin bonding systems are determined by the composition of each system. Characterization of the interface of the adhesive system using the fracture technique provides additional information regarding the pattern of resin infiltration in some dentin bonding

  14. Microstructure, Interface Morphology, and Antioxidant Properties of Sn-8.5Zn-0.1Cr-(Nd,Al,Cu) Solders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongqun; Liu, Moumiao; Ma, Yueyuan; Du, Zaixiang; Zhan, Yongzhong; Yang, Wenchao

    2016-08-01

    The effects of minor alloying element Nd, Al or Cu on the fundamental microstructural properties, interface morphology, and antioxidant properties of Sn-8.5Zn-0.1Cr (SZC) alloy have been investigated. Addition of Nd, Al or Cu element significantly refined the microstructure of SZC alloy, especially promoting disappearance of the stripe Zn-rich phase. Precipitated phases could be found in the β-Sn matrix when the content of each element reached 0.1 wt.%. During soldering, it was found that Nd, Al or Cu element addition did not contribute to intermetallic compound (IMC) formation, as verified by the same IMC phase as at the Sn-8.5Zn/Cu interface and no obvious influence on interface morphology. After 15 days of aging, IMC interface layers increased severely and a wide Zn-poor transition zone formed. The growth rate of IMC was reduced and the transition zone became narrower after microalloying. Meanwhile, addition of Al or Cu element improved the oxidation resistance of the SZC alloy, while Nd-containing alloys oxidized severely. The wettability and microhardness of the SZC-xM alloys were superior to those of SZC alloy.

  15. Microstructure, Interface Morphology, and Antioxidant Properties of Sn-8.5Zn-0.1Cr-(Nd,Al,Cu) Solders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongqun; Liu, Moumiao; Ma, Yueyuan; Du, Zaixiang; Zhan, Yongzhong; Yang, Wenchao

    2017-01-01

    The effects of minor alloying element Nd, Al or Cu on the fundamental microstructural properties, interface morphology, and antioxidant properties of Sn-8.5Zn-0.1Cr (SZC) alloy have been investigated. Addition of Nd, Al or Cu element significantly refined the microstructure of SZC alloy, especially promoting disappearance of the stripe Zn-rich phase. Precipitated phases could be found in the β-Sn matrix when the content of each element reached 0.1 wt.%. During soldering, it was found that Nd, Al or Cu element addition did not contribute to intermetallic compound (IMC) formation, as verified by the same IMC phase as at the Sn-8.5Zn/Cu interface and no obvious influence on interface morphology. After 15 days of aging, IMC interface layers increased severely and a wide Zn-poor transition zone formed. The growth rate of IMC was reduced and the transition zone became narrower after microalloying. Meanwhile, addition of Al or Cu element improved the oxidation resistance of the SZC alloy, while Nd-containing alloys oxidized severely. The wettability and microhardness of the SZC- xM alloys were superior to those of SZC alloy.

  16. Evolution of unusual morphologies in Lentibulariaceae (bladderworts and allies) and Podostemaceae (river-weeds): a pictorial report at the interface of developmental biology and morphological diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    Various groups of flowering plants reveal profound ('saltational') changes of their bauplans (architectural rules) as compared with related taxa. These plants are known as morphological misfits that appear as rather large morphological deviations from the norm. Some of them emerged as morphological key innovations (perhaps 'hopeful monsters') that gave rise to new evolutionary lines of organisms, based on (major) genetic changes. This pictorial report places emphasis on released bauplans as typical for bladderworts (Utricularia, approx. 230 secies, Lentibulariaceae) and river-weeds (Podostemaceae, three subfamilies, approx. 54 genera, approx. 310 species). Bladderworts (Utricularia) are carnivorous, possessing sucking traps. They live as submerged aquatics (except for their flowers), as humid terrestrials or as epiphytes. Most Podostemaceae are restricted to rocks in tropical river-rapids and waterfalls. They survive as submerged haptophytes in these extreme habitats during the rainy season, emerging with their flowers afterwards. The recent scientific progress in developmental biology and evolutionary history of both Lentibulariaceae and Podostemaceae is summarized. Lentibulariaceae and Podostemaceae follow structural rules that are different from but related to those of more typical flowering plants. The roots, stems and leaves - as still distinguishable in related flowering plants - are blurred ('fuzzy'). However, both families have stable floral bauplans. The developmental switches to unusual vegetative morphologies facilitated rather than prevented the evolution of species diversity in both families. The lack of one-to-one correspondence between structural categories and gene expression may have arisen from the re-use of existing genetic resources in novel contexts. Understanding what developmental patterns are followed in Lentibulariaceae and Podostemaceae is a necessary prerequisite to discover the genetic alterations that led to the evolution of these

  17. Morphology and structure of various phases at the bonding interface of Al/steel formed by explosive welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li; Hashimoto; Sukedai; Zhang; Zhang

    2000-01-01

    The bonding interface of explosively-welded aluminium and steel in three explosive conditions have been investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and electron probe microanalysis methods. The results show that all the interfaces have the shape of waves with curled front formed by process of superplasticity and some discontinuous reacted zones. They consist of amorphous and nano sized crystals and quasi-crystals as well as the compounds such as AlFe, Al2Fe, Al3Fe and Al6Fe with various shapes. The basal steel crystal near the interface has structure of martensite and perlite crystals which are deformed by the process of superplasticity. The size of reacted zone becomes large with increasing amount of explosive charge powder and separation of the driver Al plate from the basal steel plate.

  18. The phonology-morphology interface in the speech of Hebrew-speaking children with specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, A J; Dromi, E; Leonard, L B

    2001-01-01

    Phonological deficits are common in children with specific language impairment (SLI). However, the degree to which they constitute an area of extraordinary difficulty, and their contribution to the morphological deficits of these children are largely unknown. In this investigation, we studied a group of young children with SLI who were acquiring Hebrew, a language in which phonology and morphology are closely linked. The phonology of these children lagged behind that of same-age peers as well as younger normally developing children matched according to mean number of morphemes per utterance. Furthermore, the children with SLI were more likely to commit phonological errors that neutralized important morphological distinctions in their language. These findings have implications for both assessment and therapy. As a result of this activity, the following learning outcomes will be achieved: The participant will be able to: (1) describe the differences in phonology between children with SLI and typically developing children; (2) describe the impact ofphonological disorders on the assessment of the morphological systems of children with SLI; and (3) explain the necessary modifications to a therapy program for children with a combination of morphological and phonological disorders.

  19. The Effect of Hydrofluoric Acid Concentration on the Bond Strength and Morphology of the Surface and Interface of Glass Ceramics to a Resin Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundfeld Neto, D; Naves, L Z; Costa, A R; Correr, A B; Consani, S; Borges, G A; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of various concentrations of hydrofluoric acid (HF) on the surface/interface morphology and μ-shear bond strength (μSBS) between IPS Empress Esthetic (EST) (Ivoclar Vivadent) and IPS e.max Press (EMX) (Ivoclar Vivadent) ceramics and resin cement. Ceramic blocks were divided into 12 groups for each kind of ceramic. Six different HF concentrations were evaluated: 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 15%. All groups were silanated after etching, and half of the specimens within each group received a thin layer of unfilled resin (UR). Three resin cement cylinders were prepared on each ceramic block for μSBS testing. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. The μSBS test was carried out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The data were submitted to three-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons were performed using the Tukey post hoc test (p0.05). When evaluating UR, μSBS mean was significantly higher and better infiltration was observed on the etched surfaces. No statistical difference was found between the ceramics. The HF concentration and UR influenced the bond strength and surface/interface morphology.

  20. The Effect of Water or Wax-based Binders on the Chemical and Morphological Characteristics of the Margin Ceramic-Framework Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, Umut; de Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Cappa; Canay, Senay; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated the effect of binder choice in mixing ceramic powder on the chemical and morphological features between the margin ceramic-framework interfaces. Titanium and zirconia frameworks (15 x 5 x 0.5 mm3) were veneered with margin ceramics prepared with two different binders, namely a) water/conventional or b) wax-based. For each zirconia framework material, four different margin ceramics were used: a- Creation Zi (Creation Willi Geller International); b- GC Initial Zr (GC America); Triceram (Dentaurum); and d- IPS emax (voclar Vivadent). For the titanium framework, three different margin ceramics were used: a- Creation Ti (Creation Willi Geller International); b- Triceram (Dentaurum); and c- VITA Titaniumkeramik (Vita Zahnfabrik). The chemical composition of the framework-margin ceramic interface was analyzed using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and porosity level was quantified within the margin ceramic using an image program (ImageJ) from four random areas (100 x 100 pixels) on each SEM image. EDS analysis showed the presence of Carbon at the margin ceramic-framework interface in the groups where wax-based binder technique was used with the concentration being the highest for the IPS emax ZirCAD group. While IPS system (IPS ZirCAD and IPS Emax) presented higher porosity concentration using wax binder, in the other groups wax-based binder reduced the porosity of margin ceramic, except for Titanium - Triceram combination.

  1. Morphological experimental study of bone stress at the interface acetabular bone/prosthetic cup in the bipolar hip prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuşca, D; Pleşea, I E; Iliescu, N; Tomescu, P; Poenaru, F; Dascălu, V; Pop, O T

    2006-01-01

    By calculating the tension and distortion of the elements composing the bipolar prosthesis under extreme conditions encountered in real life using a special post-processing program, we established the variation curves of the contact pressure at the hip bone-cup, armor-cup and cup-femoral head interface. By comparing the data obtained from all the examined cases, important conclusions were drawn regarding the influence of tension and pressure distribution on the structural integrity and biomechanics of the prosthesis, as well as the acetabular wear and tear, in order to assess its reliability. The experimentally determined tension and distortion status at the acetabular bone-metal armour interface, lead to the wear and tear phenomenon, which can be explained by three mechanisms and theories incompletely reflecting the overall process. The histopathologic study of the acetabular bone tissue using FEM (finite elements method) on surgically removed specimens will probably lead to the identification of a series of factors that could reduce the rate of the wear and tear process.

  2. Morphological instability of the solid-liquid interface under a thin shear flow with a free surface-ripples on icicles and stalactites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Kazuto

    2007-03-01

    Icicles and stalactites grow when their surfaces are covered with a thin film of flowing water through which latent heat of fusion and carbon dioxide are released to the surrounding air by diffusion and convection. Despite the complete difference in their basic growth mechanism, their surfaces often have ripples of centimeter-scale wavelengths. We consider the underlying common mechanism of ripple formation and find that the mean thickness of the water film and the capillary length associated with the surface tension of the water-air surface are common important characteristic lengths in determining the centimeter-scale wavelength of ripples. This is the first theoretical work on the morphological instability of solidification front during icicle and stalactite growth from a thin shear flow with one side being a free surface, in which we take into account the change of shape of the water-air surface when the shape of the solid-liquid interface is changed.

  3. Lateral Variations of Interplate Coupling along the Mexican Subduction Interface: Relationships with Long-Term Morphology and Fault Zone Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, Baptiste; Lasserre, Cécile; Cubas, Nadaya; Graham, Shannon; Radiguet, Mathilde; DeMets, Charles; Socquet, Anne; Campillo, Michel; Kostoglodov, Vladimir; Cabral-Cano, Enrique; Cotte, Nathalie; Walpersdorf, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Although patterns of interseismic strain accumulation above subduction zones are now routinely characterised using geodetic measurements, their physical origin, persistency through time, and relationships to seismic hazard and long-term deformation are still debated. Here, we use GPS and morphological observations from southern Mexico to explore potential mechanical links between variations in inter-SSE (in between slow slip events) coupling along the Mexico subduction zone and the long-term topography of the coastal regions from Guerrero to Oaxaca. Inter-SSE coupling solutions for two different geometries of the subduction interface are derived from an inversion of continuous GPS time series corrected from slow slip events. They reveal strong along-strike variations in the shallow coupling (i.e. at depths down to 25 km), with high-coupling zones (coupling >0.7) alternating with low-coupling zones (coupling 0.7) and transitions to uncoupled, steady slip at a relatively uniform ˜ 175-km inland from the trench. Along-strike variations in the coast-to-trench distances are strongly correlated with the GPS-derived forearc coupling variations. To explore a mechanical explanation for this correlation, we apply Coulomb wedge theory, constrained by local topographic, bathymetric, and subducting-slab slopes. Critical state areas, i.e. areas where the inner subduction wedge deforms, are spatially correlated with transitions at shallow depth between uncoupled and coupled areas of the subduction interface. Two end-member models are considered to explain the correlation between coast-to-trench distances and along-strike variations in the inter-SSE coupling. The first postulates that the inter-SSE elastic strain is partitioned between slip along the subduction interface and homogeneous plastic permanent deformation of the upper plate. In the second, permanent plastic deformation is postulated to depend on frictional transitions along the subduction plate interface. Based on the

  4. Lateral Variations of Interplate Coupling along the Mexican Subduction Interface: Relationships with Long-Term Morphology and Fault Zone Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, Baptiste; Lasserre, Cécile; Cubas, Nadaya; Graham, Shannon; Radiguet, Mathilde; DeMets, Charles; Socquet, Anne; Campillo, Michel; Kostoglodov, Vladimir; Cabral-Cano, Enrique; Cotte, Nathalie; Walpersdorf, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    Although patterns of interseismic strain accumulation above subduction zones are now routinely characterised using geodetic measurements, their physical origin, persistency through time, and relationships to seismic hazard and long-term deformation are still debated. Here, we use GPS and morphological observations from southern Mexico to explore potential mechanical links between variations in inter-SSE (in between slow slip events) coupling along the Mexico subduction zone and the long-term topography of the coastal regions from Guerrero to Oaxaca. Inter-SSE coupling solutions for two different geometries of the subduction interface are derived from an inversion of continuous GPS time series corrected from slow slip events. They reveal strong along-strike variations in the shallow coupling (i.e. at depths down to 25 km), with high-coupling zones (coupling >0.7) alternating with low-coupling zones (coupling 0.7) and transitions to uncoupled, steady slip at a relatively uniform ˜ 175-km inland from the trench. Along-strike variations in the coast-to-trench distances are strongly correlated with the GPS-derived forearc coupling variations. To explore a mechanical explanation for this correlation, we apply Coulomb wedge theory, constrained by local topographic, bathymetric, and subducting-slab slopes. Critical state areas, i.e. areas where the inner subduction wedge deforms, are spatially correlated with transitions at shallow depth between uncoupled and coupled areas of the subduction interface. Two end-member models are considered to explain the correlation between coast-to-trench distances and along-strike variations in the inter-SSE coupling. The first postulates that the inter-SSE elastic strain is partitioned between slip along the subduction interface and homogeneous plastic permanent deformation of the upper plate. In the second, permanent plastic deformation is postulated to depend on frictional transitions along the subduction plate interface. Based on the

  5. Migration of constituent atoms and interface morphology in a heterojunction between CdS and CuInSe{sub 2} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soo, Y.L.; Huang, S.; Kao, Y.H. [Department of Physics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Amherst, New York, 14260 (United States); Deb, S.K.; Ramanathan, K. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Takizawa, T. [Nihon University (Japan)

    1999-12-01

    Angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence (ADXRF), x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), and grazing incidence x-ray scattering measurements were carried out using synchrotron radiation for a study of the interface morphology and migration of constituent atoms in a heterojunction formed between CdS and CuInSe{sub 2} single crystals. The advantage of using a single crystal for this study is to avoid the usually complicated problems arising from multiple phases of the Cu{endash}In{endash}Se compounds. By a comparison of the results obtained with a bare CuInSe{sub 2} single crystal, the changes of interface microstructures in the CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} heterojunction system with {ital well-defined stoichiometry} can therefore be investigated. Prominent features in the ADXRF data clearly demonstrate that both Cu and Se atoms have migrated into the CdS layer in the heterojunction while In atoms remain intact in the CuInSe{sub 2} single crystal. The local structures around Cu in the system also show a significant change after the deposition of CdS, as manifested by the appearance of new Cd near neighbors in the XAFS spectra. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Anodization parameters influencing the morphology and electrical properties of TiO2 nanotubes for living cell interfacing and investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudhair, D; Bhatti, A; Li, Y; Hamedani, H Amani; Garmestani, H; Hodgson, P; Nahavandi, S

    2016-02-01

    Nanotube structures have attracted tremendous attention in recent years in many applications. Among such nanotube structures, titania nanotubes (TiO2) have received paramount attention in the medical domain due to their unique properties, represented by high corrosion resistance, good mechanical properties, high specific surface area, as well as great cell proliferation, adhesion and mineralization. Although lot of research has been reported in developing optimized titanium nanotube structures for different medical applications, however there is a lack of unified literature source that could provide information about the key parameters and experimental conditions required to develop such optimized structure. This paper addresses this gap, by focussing on the fabrication of TiO2 nanotubes through anodization process on both pure titanium and titanium alloys substrates to exploit the biocompatibility and electrical conductivity aspects, critical factors for many medical applications from implants to in-vivo and in-vitro living cell studies. It is shown that the morphology of TiO2 directly impacts the biocompatibility aspects of the titanium in terms of cell proliferation, adhesion and mineralization. Similarly, TiO2 nanotube wall thickness of 30-40nm has shown to exhibit improved electrical behaviour, a critical factor in brain mapping and behaviour investigations if such nanotubes are employed as micro-nano-electrodes.

  7. Analysis of resin-dentin interface morphology and bond strength evaluation of core materials for one stage post-endodontic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter, Kerstin; Gläser, Christin; Neumann, Konrad; Blunck, Uwe; Frankenberger, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of endodontically treated teeth using fiber posts in a one-stage procedure gains more popularity and aims to create a secondary monoblock. Data of detailed analyses of so called "post-and-core-systems" with respect to morphological characteristics of the resin-dentin interface in combination with bond strength measurements of fiber posts luted with these materials are scarce. The present study aimed to analyze four different post-and-core-systems with two different adhesive approaches (self-etch and etch-and-rinse). Human anterior teeth (n = 80) were endodontically treated and post space preparations and post placement were performed using the following systems: Rebilda Post/Rebilda DC/Futurabond DC (Voco) (RB), Luxapost/Luxacore Z/Luxabond Prebond and Luxabond A+B (DMG) (LC), X Post/Core X Flow/XP Bond and Self Cure Activator (Dentsply DeTrey) (CX), FRC Postec/MultiCore Flow/AdheSE DC (Ivoclar Vivadent) (MC). Adhesive systems and core materials of 10 specimens per group were labeled using fluorescent dyes and resin-dentin interfaces were analyzed using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). Bond strengths were evaluated using a push-out test. Data were analyzed using repeated measurement ANOVA and following post-hoc test. CLSM analyses revealed significant differences between groups with respect to the factors hybrid layer thickness (pstrength was significantly affected by core material (p = 0.001), location inside the root canal (pstrength compared to LC [14.2 (8.7) MPa] and RB [13.3 (3.7) MPa] (pstrengths inside the root canal were not affected by the adhesive approach of the post-and-core-system. All systems demonstrated homogenous hybrid layer formation and penetration into the dentinal tubules in spite of the complicating conditions for adhesion inside the root canal.

  8. Morphological changes in gold core–chitosan shell nanostructures at the interface with physiological media. In vitro and in vivo approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, C.M., E-mail: carmen.mariana.popescu13@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University “Alexandru Ioan Cuza”, Carol I Bd., No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Hritcu, L. [Department of Biology, University “Alexandru Ioan Cuza” of Iasi, Carol I Bd., No. 20A, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Pricop, D.A.; Creanga, D. [Department of Physics, University “Alexandru Ioan Cuza”, Carol I Bd., No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Chitosan easily adapts to pH changes reconstructing at the surface of AuNPs. • Chitosan offeres biocompatibility to AuNPs. • Polymeric shell allows the crossing of the blood–brain barrier. • AuNPs do not agglomerate inside the brain and have a good dispersion within tissue. • The polymeric coating did not degrade with pH increase. • Interaction between AuNPs inside brain tissues is limited in strength and abundance. - Abstract: Chitosan–gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were prepared to investigate the behavior of such nanosystems at the interface with biological media. Microstructural characterization by Transmission Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Optical Microscopy was carried out in order to provide information regarding the morphology features and size distribution. In vivo studies showed no morphological changes within the brain tissue in rats after the administration of AuNPs. However, nanoparticles size distribution in the in vivo localized tissue areas indicated better dispersion than in the in vitro colloidal solution. Also the size of the AuNPs that reached the brain tissue seemed to decrease compared with their size in the colloidal solution. In order to understand the factors that contribute to the increase of AuNPs dispersion degree within the brain tissue, this study was focused on simulating the pH conditions from the hemato-encephalic medium. A theoretical model was also applied in order to correlate the intensity of the interaction between two AuNPs and their volume ratio to further explain the absence of the agglomerated AuNPs and their high degree of dispersion within the brain tissue.

  9. Analysis of resin-dentin interface morphology and bond strength evaluation of core materials for one stage post-endodontic restorations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Bitter

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Restoration of endodontically treated teeth using fiber posts in a one-stage procedure gains more popularity and aims to create a secondary monoblock. Data of detailed analyses of so called "post-and-core-systems" with respect to morphological characteristics of the resin-dentin interface in combination with bond strength measurements of fiber posts luted with these materials are scarce. The present study aimed to analyze four different post-and-core-systems with two different adhesive approaches (self-etch and etch-and-rinse. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human anterior teeth (n = 80 were endodontically treated and post space preparations and post placement were performed using the following systems: Rebilda Post/Rebilda DC/Futurabond DC (Voco (RB, Luxapost/Luxacore Z/Luxabond Prebond and Luxabond A+B (DMG (LC, X Post/Core X Flow/XP Bond and Self Cure Activator (Dentsply DeTrey (CX, FRC Postec/MultiCore Flow/AdheSE DC (Ivoclar Vivadent (MC. Adhesive systems and core materials of 10 specimens per group were labeled using fluorescent dyes and resin-dentin interfaces were analyzed using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM. Bond strengths were evaluated using a push-out test. Data were analyzed using repeated measurement ANOVA and following post-hoc test. RESULTS: CLSM analyses revealed significant differences between groups with respect to the factors hybrid layer thickness (p<0.0005 and number of resin tags (p = 0.02; ANOVA. Bond strength was significantly affected by core material (p = 0.001, location inside the root canal (p<0.0005 and incorporation of fluorescent dyes (p = 0.036; ANOVA. CX [7.7 (4.4 MPa] demonstrated significantly lower bond strength compared to LC [14.2 (8.7 MPa] and RB [13.3 (3.7 MPa] (p<0.05; Tukey HSD but did not differ significantly from MC [11.5 (3.5 MPa]. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that bond strengths inside the root canal were not affected by the adhesive approach of the post-and-core-system. All systems

  10. Morphology of resin-dentin interfaces after Er,Cr:YSGG laser and acid etching preparation and application of different bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Franziska; Buchmair, Alfred; Körpert, Wolfram; Marvastian, Leila; Wernisch, Johann; Moritz, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this study was to show the modifications in the ultrastructure of the dentin surface morphology following different surface treatments. The stability of the adhesive compound with dentin after laser preparation compared with conventional preparation using different bonding agents was evaluated. An Er,Cr:YSGG laser and 36% phosphoric acid in combination with various bonding systems were used. A total of 100 caries-free human third molars were used in this study. Immediately after surgical removal teeth were cut using a band saw and 1-mm thick dentin slices were created starting at a distance of 4 mm from the cusp plane to ensure complete removal of the enamel. The discs were polished with silicon carbide paper into rectangular shapes to a size of 6 × 4 mm (±0,2 mm).The discs as well as the remaining teeth stumps were stored in 0.9% NaCl at room temperature. The specimens were divided into three main groups (group I laser group, group II etch group, group III laser and etch group) and each group was subdivided into three subgroups which were allocated to the different bonding systems (subgroup A Excite, subgroup B Scotchbond, subgroup C Syntac). Each disc and the corresponding tooth stump were treated in the same way. After preparation the bonding composite material was applied according to the manufacturers' guidelines in a hollow tube of 2 mm diameter to the disc as well as to the corresponding tooth stump. Shear bond strength testing and environmental scanning electron microscopy were used to assess the morphology and stability of the resin-dentin interface. The self-etching bonding system showed the highest and the most constant shear values in all three main groups, thus enabling etching with phosphoric acid after laser preparation to be avoided. Thus we conclude that laser preparation creates a surface texture that allows prediction of the quality of the restoration without the risk of negative influences during the following treatment steps. This

  11. Influence of gold species (AuCl4(-) and AuCl2(-)) on self-assembly of PS-b-P2VP in solutions and morphology of composite thin films fabricated at the air/liquid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingjuan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Xiaokai; Lee, Yong-Ill; Liu, Hong-Guo

    2016-01-21

    Composite thin films doped with Au species were fabricated at an air/liquid interface via a series of steps, including the mass transfer of polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) across the liquid/liquid interface between a DMF/CHCl3 solution and an aqueous solution containing either AuCl4(-) or AuCl2(-), self-assembly of PS-b-P2VP in a mixed DMF-water solution, and adsorption and further self-organization of the formed aggregates at the air/liquid interface. This is a new approach for fabricating composite polymer films and can be completed within a very short time. AuCl4(-) and AuCl2(-) ions were found to significantly influence the self-assembly behavior of the block copolymer and the morphologies of the composite films, leading to the formation of nanowire arrays and a foam structure at the air/liquid interface, respectively, which originated from rod-like micelles and microcapsules that had formed in the respective solutions. The effect of the metal complex was analyzed based on the packing parameters of the amphiphilic polymer molecules in different microenvironments and the interactions between the pyridine groups and the metal chloride anions. In addition, these composite thin films exhibited stable and durable performance as heterogeneous catalysts for the hydrogenation of nitroaromatics in aqueous solutions.

  12. A mesoporous biomaterial for biomimetic crystallization in dentinal tubules without impairing the bonding of a self-etch resin to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chih Chiang

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: CCMS-HP can be used to form a biomimetic barrier for prevention of dentin sensitivity because it neither impedes the bonding of SBU to dentin nor impairs the shear bonding strength between the SBU and dentin.

  13. Morphology of interior interfaces in dilute nitride III/V material systems; Morphologie innerer Grenzflaechen in verduennt stickstoffhaltigen III/V-Materialsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberhoff, S.

    2007-12-03

    This study aims to clarify structure formation processes in dilute N-containing III/V-based material systems, using highly selective etching methods and subsequent atomic force microscopy (AFM) to expose and analyse interior interfaces. In the first part of this study it was directly proved for the first time that adding Sb during growth interruption inhibits the GI-induced structural phase transition and reduces the diffusivity on GaAs and (GaIn)(NAs) surfaces. However, applying Sb during GI does not affect the driving force of the structural phase transition. Therefore a fundamental analysis about the incorporation of Sb into GaAs, Ga(NAs) and (GaIn)(NAs) was carried out in the second part of the study. Using a combination of high resolution X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and SIMS measurements, it was verified that incorporating Sb into (GaIn)(NAs) causes an increase of the In content and a decrease of the N content. In the third part of the study, novel etching methods for the GaP-based material system Ga(NAsP) are introduced which provide the opportunity to analyse structure formation processes on interior interfaces in this material system by AFM. (orig.)

  14. Dynamic Restoration Processes in a 23Cr-6Ni-3Mo Duplex Stainless Steel: Effect of Austenite Morphology and Interface Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghdadi, N.; Cizek, P.; Beladi, H.; Hodgson, P. D.

    2017-07-01

    The austenite and ferrite microstructure evolution and restoration mechanisms were studied during hot uniaxial compression of a 23Cr-6Ni-3Mo duplex stainless steel with two markedly different austenite morphologies (i.e., equiaxed and Widmanstätten). The deformation was performed at a temperature of 1273 K (1000 °C) at a strain rate of 0.1 s-1. The strain was preferentially partitioned in ferrite for both the microstructures studied. Both austenite morphologies displayed frequent splitting into complex-shaped deformation bands, containing dislocation cells and local stacking faults. Equiaxed austenite was favorable to the local development of microbands (MBs), while its Widmanstätten counterpart appeared to be completely resistant to their formation. This was attributed to the complexity of deformation inside the irregularly shaped Widmanstätten plates precluding the formation of self-screening MB arrays. The MB boundaries were typically aligned along highly stressed slip planes. The presence of discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DDRX) within both the austenite morphologies was very limited. A slightly higher fraction of DDRX was detected in Widmanstätten austenite, compared to equiaxed austenite, which was ascribed to its higher contribution to the overall deformation and lower fraction of low-mobility coherent twin boundaries. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX) was the main restoration mechanism within ferrite for both the microstructure types studied. The CDRX development within ferrite was accelerated in the microstructure with equiaxed austenite. This was related to the comparatively lower fraction of coherent interphases in this microstructure, which would hinder the slip transmission across the interphase and make the strain concentrate within ferrite.

  15. Effects of Interface Morphology on the Residual Stress of Thermal Barrier Coatings%界面形貌对热障涂层残余应力分布的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡涛涛; 胡兵兵; 苗壮; 田弋纬; 王朋伟; 许飞

    2012-01-01

    用ABAQUS有限元软件建立了热障涂层模型,计算得出,在热载荷作用下,界面形貌对热障涂层材料残余应力分布影响很大,σ22主要集中在热生长氧化层和过渡层波峰处,随着热生长氧化层变厚、波长变小、振幅变大,σ22变大,且最大值产生在热生长氧化层/过渡层界面的波峰处.%A two-dimensional model of thermal barrier coatings was established and the influence of the interface morphology on the residual stress distribution was calculated by means of the finite element software ABAQUS. The results showed that the σ22 tensile stress concentrated mainly at the wave crest of the thermall grown oxide layer and bond coat. With the growth of thermally grown oxide, wavelength became smaller, amplitude became larger, and the tensile stressσ22 became higher with the maximum lying in the peak of thermal oxide layer / bond coat interface.

  16. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  17. Effect of surface tension anisotropy on the interface morphological stability of deep cellular crystal%各向异性表面张力对深胞晶界面形态稳定性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋晗; 陈明文; 史国栋; 王涛; 王自东

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of anisotropic surface tension on the interface morphological stability of deep cel-lular crystal during directional solidification. We assume that the process of solidification is viewed as a two-dimensional problem, the anisotropic surface tension is a four-fold symmetry function, the solute diffusion in the solid phase is neg-ligible, the thermodynamic properties are the same for both solid and liquid phases, and there is no convection in the system. On the basis of the basic state solution for the deep cellular crystal in directional solidification, by the matched asymptotic expansion method and the multiple variable expansion method, we obtain the asymptotic solution, and then the quantization condition of interfacial morphology for deep cellular crystal is obtained. The results show that by comparison with the directional solidification system of surface tension isotropy, the in-terface morphological stability of surface tension anisotropy also possesses two types of global instability mechanisms:the global oscillatory instability (GTW-mode), whose neutral modes yield strong oscillatory dendritic structures, and the low-frequency instability (IF-mode), whose neutral modes yield weakly oscillatory cellular structures. Both of the two global instability mechanisms have the symmetrical mode (S-mode) and the anti-symmetrical mode (A-mode), and the growth rate of the S-mode with the same index n is greater than that of the A-mode. In this sense we say that the S-mode is more dangerous than the A-mode. All the neutral curves of the GTW-S-modes and LF-S-modes divide the parameter plane into two subdomains: the stable domain and the unstable domain. In the paper we show the neural curves of the GTW-S-modes and LS-S-modes for various n, respectively. It is seen that among all the GTW-S-modes (n = 0, 1, 2), the GTW-S-mode with n = 0 is the most dangerous oscillatory mode, while among all the LF-S-modes (n=0, 1, 2), the LF-S-mode with

  18. Oxidation of TiZr alloys in air and oxygen. Pt. 3. Morphological peculiarities of the oxide/alloy interface of the Ti[sub 52]Zr[sub 48] alloy. Oxydation des alliages of TiZr sous air et sous oxygene. Pt. 3. Particularites morphologiques de l'interface substrat/oxyde de l'alliage ti[sub 52]Zr[sub 48

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halley, I. (Laboratoire de Recherches sur la Reactivite des Solides, UA 23, Faculte des Sciences Mirande, BP 138, 21004 Dijon (France)); Ciosmak, D. (Laboratoire de Recherches sur la Reactivite des Solides, UA 23, Faculte des Sciences Mirande, BP 138, 21004 Dijon (France)); Lallemant, M. (Laboratoire de Recherches sur la Reactivite des Solides, UA 23, Faculte des Sciences Mirande, BP 138, 21004 Dijon (France)); Claude, J.M. (Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, UA 158, Faculte des Sciences, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France))

    1994-11-01

    Oxidation of the Ti[sub 52]Zr[sub 48] alloy at 720 C leads to a morphological peculiarity: undulation of the oxide-alloy interface. This phenomenon, which can be linked neither to preferential oxidation of the metal nor to preferential oxidation at boundary grains, has been ascribed to the relaxation of strains by an [alpha]+[beta] two-phase substrate. This hypothesis is supported by measurements of the concentration profiles of titanium, zirconium and oxygen using Castaing's electronic microprobe. In conclusion, there are four conditions which the TiZr alloys have to fulfil for the alloy interface to be undulated. ((orig.))

  19. Study of diffusion welding between the zirconium alloy Zy{sub 4} and the stainless steel 304L. Morphology of the interface and nature of the phases formed; Etude du soudage diffusion entre l'alliage de zirconium Zy{sub 4} et l'acier inoxydable 304L. Morphologie de l'interface et nature des phases formees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taouinet, M. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire de Draria (CRNA), Alger (Algeria); Lebaili, S. [Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, Lab. de Science et Genie des Materiaux, Faculte de Genie Mecanique et Genie des Procedes, Alger (Algeria); Souami, N. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger (CRNA), Alger (Algeria)

    2009-07-01

    We approach a study on the solid state diffusion bonding between zircaloy (Zy{sub 4}) and stainless steel (304L) for an application in the sector of the nuclear power. The diffusion couples prepared underwent treatments at the temperatures ranging between 850 and 1020 C in a controlled atmosphere and under dynamic pressures. We give a particular attention to the morphology of the interface, formed, and to the determination of the nature of the compounds formed. The observations and chemical analysis are realized by ESEM-EDX and XRD. The quantitative distribution as well as the detailed localization of the basic chemical elements are defined by chemical profiles, and series of images X. The junction of diffusion consists of three zones distinct, formed from a solid solution FeCr({alpha}), rich in Cr in the form of a homogeneous edge, localized in steel side. The two other zones of the center of the Zy{sub 4} side are two phase of type Zr{sub {alpha}}, (FeCr){sub {alpha}}-Zr(Fe, Cr){sub 2} and Zr{sub {alpha}}-Zr{sub 2}(Fe{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}), 0.15{<=}x{<=}0.25. The detailed results obtained, are a regrouping, between those obtained from the observations and chemical analysis and radio crystallographic. The values of the measured micro-hardnesses give very heterogeneous filiations to the level of the interface. (authors)

  20. 不同固定方式对腱-骨愈合界面影响的形态学研究%Effect of different fixations on tendon-bone healing interface:a morphological study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建锋; 李艳菊

    2013-01-01

    postoperatively. Results:There was a large theoretical tensile strength for tendon-bone interface by button plate fixation. However, antolo-gous bone and screw interfered the healing of tendon-bone interface; fibrocytes were arranged irregularly and tensile strength was reduced, especially in the interface of extrusion screws. Conclusions:The fixation method of tendon can impact early bone healing. Tendon-bone healing by suspension fixation is better than other fixations in morphology.

  1. Interface Consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes that Interface Consistency is an important issue for the development of modular designs. Byproviding a precise specification of component interfaces it becomes possible to check that separately developedcomponents use a common interface in a coherent matter thus avoiding a very...... significant source of design errors. Awide range of interface specifications are possible, the simplest form is a syntactical check of parameter types.However, today it is possible to do more sophisticated forms involving semantic checks....

  2. Interface models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Anders P.; Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for specifying interfaces between concurrently executing modules of a computing system. The model does not prescribe a particular type of communication protocol and is aimed at describing interfaces between both software and hardware modules or a combination of the two....... The model describes both functional and timing properties of an interface...

  3. Interface dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interface dermatitis includes diseases in which the primary pathology involves the dermo-epidermal junction. The salient histological findings include basal cell vacuolization, apoptotic keratinocytes (colloid or Civatte bodies, and obscuring of the dermo-epidermal junction by inflammatory cells. Secondary changes of the epidermis and papillary dermis along with type, distribution and density of inflammatory cells are used for the differential diagnoses of the various diseases that exhibit interface changes. Lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, lichen planus, graft versus host disease, erythema multiforme, fixed drug eruptions, lichen striatus, and pityriasis lichenoides are considered major interface diseases. Several other diseases (inflammatory, infective, and neoplastic may show interface changes.

  4. Interface Screenings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bodil Marie Stavning

    2015-01-01

    and memories. From a transvisual perspective, the question is whether or not these (by now realized) diagrammatic modes involving the body in ubiquitous global media can be analysed in terms of the affects and events created in concrete interfaces. The examples used are filmic as felt sensations...... of an interface are invisible and not easy to describe....

  5. Fluid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2001-01-01

    Fluid interaction, interaction by the user with the system that causes few breakdowns, is essential to many user interfaces. We present two concrete software systems that try to support fluid interaction for different work practices. Furthermore, we present specificity, generality, and minimality...... as design goals for fluid interfaces....

  6. Interface Realisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pold, Søren

    2005-01-01

    This article argues for seeing the interface as an important representational and aesthetic form with implications for postmodern culture and digital aesthetics. The interface emphasizes realism due in part to the desire for transparency in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and partly to the devel...

  7. Testing Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim T.; Henriksen, Mogens; Nilson, Jesper K.;

    1999-01-01

    The wide use of solid insulating materials combinations in combinations has introduced problems in the interfaces between components. The most common insulating materials are cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), silicone rubber (SIR) and ethylene-propylene rubbers (EPR). Assemblies of these materials...... have caused major failures. In the Netherlands, a major black out was caused by interface problems in 150kV cable terminations, causing a cascade of breakdowns. There is a need to investigate the reasons for this and other similar breakdowns.The major problem is expected to lie in the interface between...... two different materials. Environmental influence, surface treatment, defects in materials and interface, design, pressure and rubbing are believed to have an effect on interface degradation. These factors are believed to increase the possibility of partial discharges (PD). PD will, with time, destroy...

  8. Microprocessor interfacing

    CERN Document Server

    Vears, R E

    2014-01-01

    Microprocessor Interfacing provides the coverage of the Business and Technician Education Council level NIII unit in Microprocessor Interfacing (syllabus U86/335). Composed of seven chapters, the book explains the foundation in microprocessor interfacing techniques in hardware and software that can be used for problem identification and solving. The book focuses on the 6502, Z80, and 6800/02 microprocessor families. The technique starts with signal conditioning, filtering, and cleaning before the signal can be processed. The signal conversion, from analog to digital or vice versa, is expl

  9. Morphological Snakes

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez, Luis; Baumela Molina, Luis; Henríquez, Pedro; Márquez Neila, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a morphological approach to curve evolution. The differential operators used in the standard PDE snake models can be approached using morphological operations on a binary level set. By combining the morphological operators associated to the PDE components we achieve a new snakes evolution algorithm. This new solution is based on numerical methods which are very simple, fast and stable. Moreover, since the level set is just a binary piecewise constant function, this approach does ...

  10. Designing Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tidwell, Jenifer

    2010-01-01

    Despite all of the UI toolkits available today, it's still not easy to design good application interfaces. This bestselling book is one of the few reliable sources to help you navigate through the maze of design options. By capturing UI best practices and reusable ideas as design patterns, Designing Interfaces provides solutions to common design problems that you can tailor to the situation at hand. This updated edition includes patterns for mobile apps and social media, as well as web applications and desktop software. Each pattern contains full-color examples and practical design advice th

  11. Group morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2000-01-01

    In its original form, mathematical morphology is a theory of binary image transformations which are invariant under the group of Euclidean translations. This paper surveys and extends constructions of morphological operators which are invariant under a more general group TT, such as the motion group

  12. Gesture Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkert, F.W.

    2007-01-01

    Take away mouse and keyboard. Now, how do you interact with a computer? Especially one that has a display that is the size of an entire wall. One possibility is through gesture interfaces. Remember Minority Report? Cool stuff, but that was already five years ago.. So, what is already possible now an

  13. Manufacturing Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, van F.J.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper identifies the changing needs and requirements with respect to the interfacing of manufacturing functions. It considers the manufacturing system, its components and their relationships from the technological and logistic point of view, against the background of concurrent engineering. Desi

  14. Testing Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim T.; Henriksen, Mogens; Nilson, Jesper K.;

    1999-01-01

    The wide use of solid insulating materials combinations in combinations has introduced problems in the interfaces between components. The most common insulating materials are cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), silicone rubber (SIR) and ethylene-propylene rubbers (EPR). Assemblies of these materials...

  15. Interface engineering in organic transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong Don Park

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent technological advances in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs have triggered intensive research into the molecular and mesoscale structures of organic semiconductor films that determine their charge-transport characteristics. Since the molecular structure and morphology of an organic semiconductor are largely determined by the properties of the interface between the organic film and the insulator, a great deal of research has focused on interface engineering. We review recent progress in interface engineering for the fabrication of high-performance OFETs and, in particular, engineering of the interfaces between semiconductors and insulators. The effects of interfacial characteristics on the molecular and mesoscale structures of π-conjugated molecules and the performance of OFET devices are discussed.

  16. The Ni-YSZ interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karin Vels

    The anode/electrolyte interface in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) is known to cause electrical losses. Geometrically simple Ni/yttria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ) interfaces were examined to gain information on the structural and chemical changes occurring during experiments at 1000°C in an atmosphere...... content (99.8% Ni and 99.995% Ni) were used to examine the impact of impurities on the polarisation resistance and contact area morphology. The electropolished nickel wires were pressed against a polished 8 mol% YSZ surface. Extensive structural changes from a flat interface to a hill and valley structure...... between polarised and non-polarised samples. With pure nickel wires, however, the microstructures depended on the polarisation/non-polarisation conditions. At non-polarised conditions a hill and valley type structure was found. Anodic polarisation produced an up to 1 μm thick interface layer consisting...

  17. Mathematical morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Najman, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical Morphology allows for the analysis and processing of geometrical structures using techniques based on the fields of set theory, lattice theory, topology, and random functions. It is the basis of morphological image processing, and finds applications in fields including digital image processing (DSP), as well as areas for graphs, surface meshes, solids, and other spatial structures. This book presents an up-to-date treatment of mathematical morphology, based on the three pillars that made it an important field of theoretical work and practical application: a solid theoretical foun

  18. Interface learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorhauge, Sally

    2014-01-01

    "Interface learning - New goals for museum and upper secondary school collaboration" investigates and analyzes the learning that takes place when museums and upper secondary schools in Denmark work together in local partnerships to develop and carry out school-related, museum-based coursework...... for students. The research focuses on the learning that the students experience in the interface of the two learning environments: The formal learning environment of the upper secondary school and the informal learning environment of the museum. Focus is also on the learning that the teachers and museum...... professionals experience as a result of their collaboration. The dissertation demonstrates how a given partnership’s collaboration affects the students’ learning experiences when they are doing the coursework. The dissertation presents findings that museum-school partnerships can use in order to develop...

  19. Museets interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pold, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Søren Pold gør sig overvejelser med udgangspunkt i museumsprojekterne Kongedragter.dk og Stigombord.dk. Han argumenterer for, at udviklingen af internettets interfaces skaber nye måder at se, forstå og interagere med kulturen på. Brugerne får nye medievaner og perceptionsmønstre, der må medtænkes i...

  20. Museets interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pold, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Søren Pold gør sig overvejelser med udgangspunkt i museumsprojekterne Kongedragter.dk og Stigombord.dk. Han argumenterer for, at udviklingen af internettets interfaces skaber nye måder at se, forstå og interagere med kulturen på. Brugerne får nye medievaner og perceptionsmønstre, der må medtænkes i...

  1. SOFC interface studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Bay, Lasse; West, Keld

    As previously shown the morphology of the cathode-YSZ electrolyte interface changes from a smooth surface to a roughened structure during the passage of current (\\ref{Lasse97}, \\ref{Karin01). These structural changes are probably responsible for the current induced improvement of the electrode...... in this and the corresponding anode interface investigated in more detail in part I (\\ref{Tine}) of this work. Although extrapolation to $1000^\\circ$C of the cation mobility in YSZ yields values in the order of $\\mathrm{cm^2s^{-1}}$, i.e.\\ by far to low to account for any transfer of YSZ material, the fact that these changes...... are observed points to a significant contribution from surface and grain boundary transport. The consequence of a significant tranport number for cations is a transfer of YSZ material from the anode-YSZ interface to that of the cathode. This is supported by the observation of a porous YSZ structure below...

  2. Morphology of solidification front in eutectic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Trepczyńska - Łent

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the analysis of morphology of solidification front in eutectic made. It was present influence of composition, solidification velocity, concentration micro-field and capillarity effects on the morphology of the solid/liquid interface. It was introduced phase-field model.

  3. Electrokinetics of heterogeneous interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembala, Maria

    2004-12-31

    The influence of surface heterogeneity of various types on electrokinetic parameters is reviewed. The scope of the paper covers classical electrokinetic phenomena characterized by linear dependence of electrokinetic parameters vs. related driving forces. Neither non-linear effects nor the effects of non-equilibrium electric double layer are considered. A historical description of hydrodynamic aspect of electrokinetic phenomena exploiting the slip plane idea is briefly outlined. Attempts to estimate the slip plane location by comparing the diffuse layer and zeta potential values for some model systems are presented. The surface heterogeneity was divided into three categories. Heterogeneity of the first type was related to geometrical morphology of an interfacial region characterized by a considerable surface development producing a three-dimensional interfacial region. The effects of solid roughness, hairy surface, dense polymer layers and gel-like layers are discussed here. The very high surface conductivity detected for such interfaces seems to be a good indicator of the presence of structured layers of this type. Heterogeneous interfaces of the second class cover systems exhibiting non-uniform distribution of surface charge. The non-uniform surface charge distribution can be either of a molecular (discrete charges) or of a microscale (two-dimensional micropatches or three-dimensional structures formed by polyelectrolyte multilayers). The last class of systems examined includes interfaces composed of charged substrate covered by charged bulky objects (particles). In comparison to the homogeneous surfaces, adsorbed charged particles modify both hydrodynamic flow and the electrostatic field significantly altering the electrokinetic parameters. The new description of electrokinetics of composed interfaces presented here takes into account both hydrodynamic and electric field modification and is free of the previously assumed slip plane shift caused by adsorbed

  4. Simulation of nuclei morphologies for binary alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We study the critical nuclei morphologies of a binary alloy by the string method. The dynamic equation of the string, connecting the metastable phase (liquid) and stable phase (solid), is governed by Helmholtz free energy for the binary alloy system at a given temperature. The stationary string through the critical nucleus (saddle point) is obtained if the relaxation time of the string is su?ciently large. The critical nucleus radius and energy barrier to nucleation of a pure alloy with isotropic interface energy in two and three dimensions are calculated, which are consistent with the classical nucleation theory. The critical nuclei morphologies are sensitive to the anisotropy strength of interface energy and interface thickness of alloy in two and three dimensions. The critical nucleus and energy barrier to nucleation become smaller if the anisotropy strength of the interface energy is increased, which means that it is much easier to form a stable nucleus if the anisotropy of the interface energy is considered.

  5. Interfaces habladas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Soto Sanfiel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo describe y piensa al fenómeno de las Interfaces habladas (IH desde variados puntos de vista y niveles de análisis. El texto se ha concebido con los objetivos específicos de: 1.- procurar una visión panorámica de aspectos de la producción y consumo comunicativo de las IH; 2.- ofrecer recomendaciones para su creación y uso eficaz, y 3.- llamar la atención sobre su proliferación e inspirar su estudio desde la comunicación. A pesar de la creciente presencia de las IF en nues-tras vidas cotidianas, hay ausencia de textos que las caractericen y analicen por sus aspectos comunicativos. El trabajo es pertinente porque el fenómeno significa un cambio respecto a estadios comunica-tivos precedentes con consecuencias en las concepciones intelectuales y emocionales de los usuarios. La proliferación de IH nos abre a nue-vas realidades comunicativas: hablamos con máquinas.

  6. Convection and morphological stability during directional solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coriell, Sam R.; Chernov, A. A.; Murray, Bruce T.; Mcfadden, G. B.

    1994-01-01

    For growth of a vicinal face at constant velocity, the effect of anisotropic interface kinetics on morphological stability is calculated for a binary alloy. The dependence of the interface kinetic coefficient on crystallographic orientation is based on the motion and density of steps. Anisotropic kinetics give rise to traveling waves along the crystal-melt interface, and can lead to a significant enhancement of morphological stability. The stability enhancement increases as the orientation approaches a singular orientation and as the solidification velocity increases. Shear flows interact with the traveling waves and, depending on the direction of the flow, may either stabilize or destabilize the interface. Specific calculations are carried out for germanium-silicon alloys.

  7. Using a Corpus for Teaching Turkish Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Guvenir, H A; Oflazer, Kemal

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the preliminary phase of our ongoing research towards developing an intelligent tutoring environment for Turkish grammar. One of the components of this environment is a corpus search tool which, among other aspects of the language, will be used to present the learner sample sentences along with their morphological analyses. Following a brief introduction to the Turkish language and its morphology, the paper describes the morphological analysis and ambiguity resolution used to construct the corpus used in the search tool. Finally, implementation issues and details involving the user interface of the tool are discussed.

  8. Interface Simulation Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Černý

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical (boolean notion of refinement for behavioral interfaces of system components is the alternating refinement preorder. In this paper, we define a distance for interfaces, called interface simulation distance. It makes the alternating refinement preorder quantitative by, intuitively, tolerating errors (while counting them in the alternating simulation game. We show that the interface simulation distance satisfies the triangle inequality, that the distance between two interfaces does not increase under parallel composition with a third interface, and that the distance between two interfaces can be bounded from above and below by distances between abstractions of the two interfaces. We illustrate the framework, and the properties of the distances under composition of interfaces, with two case studies.

  9. Computation of Semantic Number from Morphological Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent, Iris; Pinker, Steven; Tzelgov, Joseph; Bibi, Uri; Goldfarb, Liat

    2005-01-01

    The distinction between singular and plural enters into linguistic phenomena such as morphology, lexical semantics, and agreement and also must interface with perceptual and conceptual systems that assess numerosity in the world. Three experiments examine the computation of semantic number for singulars and plurals from the morphological…

  10. Solid Surfaces, Interfaces and Thin Films

    CERN Document Server

    Lüth, Hans

    2010-01-01

    This book emphasises both experimental and theoretical aspects of surface, interface and thin film physics. As in previous editions the preparation of surfaces and thin films, their atomic and morphological, their vibronic and electronic properties as well as fundamentals of adsorption are treated. Because of their importance in modern information technology and nanostructure physics particular emphasis is paid to electronic surface and interface states, semiconductor space charge layers and heterostructures as well as to superconductor/semiconductor interfaces and magnetic thin films. The latter topic was significantly extended in this new edition by more details about the giant magnetoresistance and a section about the spin-transfer torque mechanism including one new problem as exercise. Two new panels about Kerr-effect and spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy were added, too. Furthermore, the meanwhile important group III-nitride surfaces and high-k oxide/semiconductor interfaces are shortly discu...

  11. After Rigid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troiano, Giovanni Maria

    Deformable and shape-changing interfaces are rapidly emerging in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI). Deformable interfaces provide users with newer input possibilities such as bending, squeezing, or stretching, which were impossible to achieve with rigid interfaces. Shape-changing inte......Deformable and shape-changing interfaces are rapidly emerging in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI). Deformable interfaces provide users with newer input possibilities such as bending, squeezing, or stretching, which were impossible to achieve with rigid interfaces. Shape...

  12. After Rigid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troiano, Giovanni Maria

    to convey particular information (e.g., big-isurgent, loud-is-up). The second work presents a large-scale analysis of 340 Sci-Fi movies that identifies instances of shape-changing interfaces. Results from the analysis reveals emergent behavioral patterns of shape change, namely Reconfiguration......Deformable and shape-changing interfaces are rapidly emerging in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI). Deformable interfaces provide users with newer input possibilities such as bending, squeezing, or stretching, which were impossible to achieve with rigid interfaces. Shape......-changing interfaces can reconfigure their shape dynamically, providing users with new affordances and output modalities. This thesis contributes to both the field of deformable interfaces and shape-changing interfaces through empirical research. In the area of deformable interfaces, this thesis presents two studies...

  13. Interface localization near criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Delfino, Gesualdo

    2016-01-01

    The theory of interface localization in near-critical planar systems at phase coexistence is formulated from first principles. We show that mutual delocalization of two interfaces, amounting to interfacial wetting, occurs when the bulk correlation length critical exponent $\

  14. Microcomputer interfacing and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, M A

    1990-01-01

    This is the applications guide to interfacing microcomputers. It offers practical non-mathematical solutions to interfacing problems in many applications including data acquisition and control. Emphasis is given to the definition of the objectives of the interface, then comparing possible solutions and producing the best interface for every situation. Dr Mustafa A Mustafa is a senior designer of control equipment and has written many technical articles and papers on the subject of computers and their application to control engineering.

  15. A Visual Galaxy Classification Interface and its Classroom Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautsch, Stefan J.; Phung, Chau; VanHilst, Michael; Castro, Victor H

    2014-06-01

    Galaxy morphology is an important topic in modern astronomy to understand questions concerning the evolution and formation of galaxies and their dark matter content. In order to engage students in exploring galaxy morphology, we developed a web-based, graphical interface that allows students to visually classify galaxy images according to various morphological types. The website is designed with HTML5, JavaScript, PHP, and a MySQL database. The classification interface provides hands-on research experience and training for students and interested clients, and allows them to contribute to studies of galaxy morphology. We present the first results of a pilot study and compare the visually classified types using our interface with that from automated classification routines.

  16. Complex Interfaces Under Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosbjerg, Dan

    and mechanical processes that develop within this structure. Water-related processes at the interfaces between the compartments are complex, depending both on the interface itself, and on the characteristics of the interfaced compartments. Various aspects of global change directly or indirectly impact...

  17. Water at Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björneholm, Olle; Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Hodgson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The interfaces of neat water and aqueous solutions play a prominent role in many technological processes and in the environment. Examples of aqueous interfaces are ultrathin water films that cover most hydrophilic surfaces under ambient relative humidities, the liquid/solid interface which drives...

  18. Interface engineering and strain in YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijben, Mark; Koster, Gertjan; Blank, Dave H.A.; Rijnders, Guus

    2008-01-01

    In thin films, new phases can be encountered near interfaces, whether it is the substrate-film interface or subsequent interfaces in the case of heterostructures. Both structural properties and surface morphology are a direct result of the thin film growth, controlled by deposition conditions and su

  19. Interface engineering and strain in YBa2Cu3O7-d thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijben, Mark; Koster, Gertjan; Blank, David H.A.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    In thin films, new phases can be encountered near interfaces, whether it is the substrate-film interface or subsequent interfaces in the case of heterostructures. Both structural properties and surface morphology are a direct result of the thin film growth, controlled by deposition conditions and

  20. Entanglement and topological interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Brehm, Enrico M; Jaud, Daniel; Schmidt-Colinet, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider entanglement entropies in two-dimensional conformal field theories in the presence of topological interfaces. Tracing over one side of the interface, the leading term of the entropy remains unchanged. The interface however adds a subleading contribution, which can be interpreted as a relative (Kullback-Leibler) entropy with respect to the situation with no defect inserted. Reinterpreting boundaries as topological interfaces of a chiral half of the full theory, we rederive the left/right entanglement entropy in analogy with the interface case. We discuss WZW models and toroidal bosonic theories as examples.

  1. Quantization of interface currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotani, Motoko [AIMR, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Schulz-Baldes, Hermann [Department Mathematik, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Villegas-Blas, Carlos [Instituto de Matematicas, Cuernavaca, UNAM, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    At the interface of two two-dimensional quantum systems, there may exist interface currents similar to edge currents in quantum Hall systems. It is proved that these interface currents are macroscopically quantized by an integer that is given by the difference of the Chern numbers of the two systems. It is also argued that at the interface between two time-reversal invariant systems with half-integer spin, one of which is trivial and the other non-trivial, there are dissipationless spin-polarized interface currents.

  2. Interfacing with the WEB

    CERN Document Server

    Dönszelmann, M

    1995-01-01

    Interfacing to the Web or programming interfaces for the Web is used to provide dynamic information for Web users. Using the Web as a transport system of information poses three constraints: namespace, statelessness and performance. To build interfaces on either server or client side of the Web one has to meet these constraints. Several examples, currently in use in High Energy Physics Experiments are described. They range from an interface to show where buildings are located to an interface showing active values of the On-line System of the DELPHI (CERN)..

  3. F8BT薄膜表面形貌及与Al形成界面的电子结构和反应%Surface morphology of F8BT films and interface structures and reactions of Al on F8BT films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘宵; 鞠焕鑫; 冯雪飞; 范其瑭; 王嘉兴; 杨耀文; 朱俊发

    2015-01-01

    The surface morphology and molecular orientation of π-conjugated polymers, along with the chemical interaction and electronic structure at the interface between metals and these polymers, strongly affect the performance of the polymer-based organic electronic and optoelectronic devices. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM), synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SRPES), and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) have been used to in situ investigate the morphology, structure, and molecular orientation of spin-coated poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiodiazole) (F8BT) films and their interaction with the vapor-deposited Al metal. F8BT films were prepared by spin-coating the F8BT chloroform solution onto clean gold-coated silicon wafer surfaces. The room temperature spin-coated F8BT film is rather flat, while mild annealing treatments (120 ◦C) below the glass transition temperature (Tg=130 ◦C) lead to an apparent increase of surface roughness of F8BT film, which is helpful to effectively increase the contact areas between metals and F8BT. After 70 ◦C annealing in vacuum, the aromatic rings of F8BT preferentially stand more edge-on, making an average tilt angle of approximately 49◦ with the substrate, while the 9,9-dioctylfluorene unit (F8) and the benzothiodiazole unit (BT) nearly lie in the same plane. Upon vapor-depositing Al metal onto F8BT at room temperature, strong chemical interactions occur between Al and F8BT, as evidenced by the distinct changes of the S 2p, N 1s and C 1s spectra. Al reacts with S atoms more strongly than with N and C atoms in F8BT. In addition, obvious structural changes in valence band of F8BT are also observed during the Al deposition. Furthermore, Al dopes electrons into F8BT, leading to downward band bending, formation of interfacial dipole at the Al/F8BT interface, and partial occupation of lowest unoccupied molecular orbits (LUMO). However, no doping-induced gap states can be observed during

  4. Refinement by interface instantiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallerstede, Stefan; Hoang, Thai Son

    2012-01-01

    be easily refined. Our first contribution hence is a proposal for a new construct called interface that encapsulates the external variables, along with a mechanism for interface instantiation. Using the new construct and mechanism, external variables can be refined consistently. Our second contribution...... is an approach for verifying the correctness of Event-B extensions using the supporting Rodin tool. We illustrate our approach by proving the correctness of interface instantiation....

  5. Popeye Project: ROV interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scates, C.R.; Hernandez, D.A.; Hickok, D.D.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) interface with the Popeye Project Subsea System. It describes the ROV-related plans, design philosophies, intervention tasks, tooling/equipment requirements, testing activities, and offshore installation experiences. Early identification and continuous consideration of the ROV interfaces significantly improved the overall efficiency of equipment designs and offshore operations. The Popeye Project helped advance the technology and standardization of ROV interfaces for deep water subsea production systems.

  6. Turbomachine Interface Sealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Chupp, Raymond E.; Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2005-01-01

    Sealing interfaces and coatings, like lubricants, are sacrificial, giving up their integrity for the benefit of the component. Clearance control is a major issue in power systems turbomachine design and operational life. Sealing becomes the most cost-effective way to enhance system performance. Coatings, films, and combined use of both metals and ceramics play a major role in maintaining interface clearances in turbomachine sealing and component life. This paper focuses on conventional and innovative materials and design practices for sealing interfaces.

  7. Universal computer interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dheere, RFBM

    1988-01-01

    Presents a survey of the latest developments in the field of the universal computer interface, resulting from a study of the world patent literature. Illustrating the state of the art today, the book ranges from basic interface structure, through parameters and common characteristics, to the most important industrial bus realizations. Recent technical enhancements are also included, with special emphasis devoted to the universal interface adapter circuit. Comprehensively indexed.

  8. Solid surfaces, interfaces and thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Lüth, Hans

    2015-01-01

    This book emphasises both experimental and theoretical aspects of surface, interface and thin-film physics. As in previous editions the preparation of surfaces and thin films, their atomic and morphological structure, their vibronic and electronic properties as well as fundamentals of adsorption are treated. Because of their importance in modern information technology and nanostructure research, particular emphasis is paid to electronic surface and interface states, semiconductor space charge layers and heterostructures. A special chapter of the book is devoted to collective phenomena at interfaces and in thin films such as superconductivity and magnetism. The latter topic includes the meanwhile important issues giant magnetoresistance and spin-transfer torque mechanism, both effects being of high interest in information technology. In this new edition, for the first time, the effect of spin-orbit coupling on surface states is treated. In this context the class of the recently detected topological insulators,...

  9. Electromagnetic Interface Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electromagnetic Interface Testing facilitysupports such testing asEmissions, Field Strength, Mode Stirring, EMP Pulser, 4 Probe Monitoring/Leveling System, and...

  10. Shape-changing interfaces:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegård; Pedersen, Esben Warming; Petersen, Marianne Graves;

    2015-01-01

    these shortcomings. We identify eight types of shape that are transformed in various ways to serve both functional and hedonic design purposes. Interaction with shape-changing interfaces is simple and rarely merges input and output. Three questions are discussed based on the review: (a) which design purposes may......Shape change is increasingly used in physical user interfaces, both as input and output. Yet, the progress made and the key research questions for shape-changing interfaces are rarely analyzed systematically. We review a sample of existing work on shape-changing interfaces to address...

  11. Shape-changing interfaces:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegård; Pedersen, Esben Warming; Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2015-01-01

    Shape change is increasingly used in physical user interfaces, both as input and output. Yet, the progress made and the key research questions for shape-changing interfaces are rarely analyzed systematically. We review a sample of existing work on shape-changing interfaces to address these shortc...... shape-changing interfaces be used for, (b) which parts of the design space are not well understood, and (c) why studying user experience with shape-changing interfaces is important.......Shape change is increasingly used in physical user interfaces, both as input and output. Yet, the progress made and the key research questions for shape-changing interfaces are rarely analyzed systematically. We review a sample of existing work on shape-changing interfaces to address...... these shortcomings. We identify eight types of shape that are transformed in various ways to serve both functional and hedonic design purposes. Interaction with shape-changing interfaces is simple and rarely merges input and output. Three questions are discussed based on the review: (a) which design purposes may...

  12. Interfaces Between Second Interfaces Between Second

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Henrique Soufen Tumolo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The book Interfaces Between Second Language Acquisition and Language Testing Research was edited with the concern of bringing together various researchers who have tried to overcome the separation of the two areas, SLA and LT, by raising and discussing relevant issues related to both. The book Interfaces Between Second Language Acquisition and Language Testing Research was edited with the concern of bringing together various researchers who have tried to overcome the separation of the two areas, SLA and LT, by raising and discussing relevant issues related to both.

  13. Interface or Interlace?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed; Wamberg, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    Departing from an analysis of the computer's indeterminate location between medium and machine, this paper problematises the idea of a clear-cut interface in complex computing, especially Augmented Reality. The idea and pratice of the interface is derived from the medium as a representational...

  14. Verden som interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    Oversættelse af Peter Weibels tekst "The World as Interface" i Passepartout # 27. Interfacekulturens æstetik. Udgivelsesdato: 28.04.07......Oversættelse af Peter Weibels tekst "The World as Interface" i Passepartout # 27. Interfacekulturens æstetik. Udgivelsesdato: 28.04.07...

  15. Interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öner, S.Z.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with material interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics. Interface properties between the absorbing semiconductor and other employed materials are crucial for an efficient solar cell. While the optical properties are largely unaffected by a few nanometer thin layer, the electronic prop

  16. Interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öner, S.Z.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with material interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics. Interface properties between the absorbing semiconductor and other employed materials are crucial for an efficient solar cell. While the optical properties are largely unaffected by a few nanometer thin layer, the electronic prop

  17. The User Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Martha J.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The first of three articles on the design of user interfaces for information retrieval systems discusses the need to examine types of display, prompting, and input as separate entities. The second examines the use of artificial intelligence in creating natural language interfaces, and the third outlines standards for case studies in human computer…

  18. Designing the Instructional Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    Designing the instructional interface is a challenging endeavor requiring knowledge and skills in instructional and visual design, psychology, human-factors, ergonomic research, computer science, and editorial design. This paper describes the instructional interface, the challenges of its development, and an instructional systems approach to its…

  19. Entanglement and topological interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brehm, E.; Brunner, I.; Jaud, D.; Schmidt-Colinet, C. [Arnold Sommerfeld Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    In this paper we consider entanglement entropies in two-dimensional conformal field theories in the presence of topological interfaces. Tracing over one side of the interface, the leading term of the entropy remains unchanged. The interface however adds a subleading contribution, which can be interpreted as a relative (Kullback-Leibler) entropy with respect to the situation with no defect inserted. Reinterpreting boundaries as topological interfaces of a chiral half of the full theory, we rederive the left/right entanglement entropy in analogy with the interface case. We discuss WZW models and toroidal bosonic theories as examples. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. User Interface History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms; Myers, Brad A

    2008-01-01

    User Interfaces have been around as long as computers have existed, even well before the field of Human-Computer Interaction was established. Over the years, some papers on the history of Human-Computer Interaction and User Interfaces have appeared, primarily focusing on the graphical interface era...... and early visionaries such as Bush, Engelbart and Kay. With the User Interface being a decisive factor in the proliferation of computers in society and since it has become a cultural phenomenon, it is time to paint a more comprehensive picture of its history. This SIG will investigate the possibilities...... of  launching a concerted effort towards creating a History of User Interfaces. ...

  1. Non-Porod behavior in systems with rough morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastav, Gaurav P; Banerjee, Varsha; Puri, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Many experiments yield multi-scale morphologies which are smooth on some length scales and fractal on others. Accurate statements about morphological properties, e.g., roughness exponent, fractal dimension, domain size, interfacial width, etc. are obtained from the correlation function and structure factor. In this paper, we present structure factor data for two systems: (a) droplet-in-droplet morphologies of double-phase-separating mixtures; and (b) ground-state morphologies in dilute anti-ferromagnets. An important characteristic of the scattering data is a non-Porod tail, which is associated with scattering off rough domains and interfaces.

  2. Advancement of Molecular Morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾江

    2004-01-01

    @@ Molecular morphology is a new discipline of medical science that studies morphology at the molecular level. This includes the investigation of occurrence and distribution of proteins, peptides, DNA and RNA sequences at the tissue, cellular, and ultrastructural levels.

  3. [Neotropical plant morphology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-García, Blanca; Mendoza, Aniceto

    2002-01-01

    An analysis on plant morphology and the sources that are important to the morphologic interpretations is done. An additional analysis is presented on all published papers in this subject by the Revista de Biología Tropical since its foundation, as well as its contribution to the plant morphology development in the neotropics.

  4. Advancement of Molecular Morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾江

    2004-01-01

    Molecular morphology is a new discipline of medical science that studies morphology at the molecular level. This includes the investigation of occurrence and distribution of proteins, peptides, DNA and RNA sequences at the tissue, cellular, and uhrastructural levels. Morphology is defined as a field of science investigating the shape,

  5. The interface effect

    CERN Document Server

    Galloway, Alexander R

    2013-01-01

    Interfaces are back, or perhaps they never left. The familiar Socratic conceit from the Phaedrus, of communication as the process of writing directly on the soul of the other, has returned to center stage in today's discussions of culture and media. Indeed Western thought has long construed media as a grand choice between two kinds of interfaces. Following the optimistic path, media seamlessly interface self and other in a transparent and immediate connection. But, following the pessimistic path, media are the obstacles to direct communion, disintegrating self and other into misunderstanding

  6. Operator interface for vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissontz, Jay E

    2015-03-10

    A control interface for drivetrain braking provided by a regenerative brake and a non-regenerative brake is implemented using a combination of switches and graphic interface elements. The control interface comprises a control system for allocating drivetrain braking effort between the regenerative brake and the non-regenerative brake, a first operator actuated control for enabling operation of the drivetrain braking, and a second operator actuated control for selecting a target braking effort for drivetrain braking. A graphic display displays to an operator the selected target braking effort and can be used to further display actual braking effort achieved by drivetrain braking.

  7. The Java Legacy Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    The Java Legacy Interface is designed to use Java for encapsulating native legacy code on small embedded platforms. We discuss why existing technologies for encapsulating legacy code (JNI) is not sufficient for an important range of small embedded platforms, and we show how the Java Legacy...... Interface offers this previously missing functionality. We describe an implementation of the Java Legacy Interface for a particular virtual machine, and how we have used this virtual machine to integrate Java with an existing, commercial, soft real-time, C/C++ legacy platform....

  8. The Java Legacy Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    The Java Legacy Interface is designed to use Java for encapsulating native legacy code on small embedded platforms. We discuss why existing technologies for encapsulating legacy code (JNI) is not sufficient for an important range of small embedded platforms, and we show how the Java Legacy...... Interface offers this previously missing functionality. We describe an implementation of the Java Legacy Interface for a particular virtual machine, and how we have used this virtual machine to integrate Java with an existing, commercial, soft real-time, C/C++ legacy platform....

  9. The computer graphics interface

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbrugge Chauveau, Karla; Niles Reed, Theodore; Shepherd, B

    2014-01-01

    The Computer Graphics Interface provides a concise discussion of computer graphics interface (CGI) standards. The title is comprised of seven chapters that cover the concepts of the CGI standard. Figures and examples are also included. The first chapter provides a general overview of CGI; this chapter covers graphics standards, functional specifications, and syntactic interfaces. Next, the book discusses the basic concepts of CGI, such as inquiry, profiles, and registration. The third chapter covers the CGI concepts and functions, while the fourth chapter deals with the concept of graphic obje

  10. Characterization of rough interfaces obtained by boriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos-Silva, I. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, SEPI-ESIME, U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico)], E-mail: icampos@ipn.mx; Balankin, A.S. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, SEPI-ESIME, U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Sierra, A.H. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, UPIICSA, Av. Te 950, Col Granjas, Mexico D.F. 08400 (Mexico); Lopez-Perrusquia, N. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, SEPI-ESIME, U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Escobar-Galindo, R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Cantoblanco, Madrid E-28049 (Spain); Morales-Matamoros, D. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Lazaro Cardenas Norte, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico)

    2008-12-30

    This study evaluates the morphology of borided interfaces by means of the fractal theory. The boride layers were formed in the AISI M2 steel by applying the paste boriding treatment at temperatures of 1253 and 1273 K and treatment times of 2 and 6 h, while a boron carbide paste thickness of 4 or 5 mm covered the samples surface in order to produce the boron diffusion. The morphology of interfaces formed between FeB and Fe{sub 2}B layers and between Fe{sub 2}B layer and steel substrate was analyzed by the rescaled-range (R/S), root-mean-square (RMS), and Fourier power spectrum (FPS) methods. Moreover, the multi-affine spectra of roughness exponent were obtained by calculating the q-order height-height correlation functions. We found that both interfaces are multi-affine, rather than self-affine. The multi-affine spectra of roughness exponents are found to be different for FeB/Fe{sub 2}B and Fe{sub 2}B/substrate interfaces, but independent on the treatment parameters (boron carbide paste thickness, temperature, and boriding time). Furthermore, we found that the multi-affine spectra of both interfaces behave as it is expected for 'universal multi-fractals' with the Levy index {gamma} = 1, associated with the multiplicative cascades with a log-Cauchy distribution. Furthermore, our data suggest a great homogeneity of the boron diffusion field, characterized by universal fractal dimension D{sub diff} = 2.90 {+-} 0.01. These findings provide a novel insight into the nature of phase formation during the boriding treatment.

  11. Interface Limited Lithium Transport in Solid-State Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Qian, Danna; McGilvray, Thomas; Wang, Ziying; Wang, Feng; Camino, Fernando; Graetz, Jason; Dudney, Nancy; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2014-01-16

    Understanding the role of interfaces is important for improving the performance of all-solid-state lithium ion batteries. To study these interfaces, we present a novel approach for fabrication of electrochemically active nanobatteries using focused ion beams and their characterization by analytical electron microscopy. Morphological changes by scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and correlated elemental concentration changes by electron energy loss spectroscopy mapping are presented. We provide first evidence of lithium accumulation at the anode/current collector (Si/Cu) and cathode/electrolyte (LixCoO2/LiPON) interfaces, which can be accounted for the irreversible capacity losses. Interdiffusion of elements at the Si/LiPON interface was also witnessed with a distinct contrast layer. These results highlight that the interfaces may limit the lithium transport significantly in solid-state batteries. Fabrication of electrochemically active nanobatteries also enables in situ electron microscopy observation of electrochemical phenomena in a variety of solid-state battery chemistries.

  12. Interface Anywhere Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To illustrate the viability of this technology, a prototype Natural User Interface (NUI) was developed as a proof-of-concept for system control.  Gesture and...

  13. Space as interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    of interactive systems through the Ph.D. project, I have identified different significant aspects in the relation between space and interface. Based on empirical work, I distill a fragment of work concerned with cameras as the interface for bridging the gap between physical and digital space. By looking across...... multiple projects spanning over fields such as tangible user interfaces, augmented reality, and mobile computing, a conceptual framework characterizing camera-based mixed interaction spaces is developed. To show the applicability of the framework, it is deployed on one of the presented cases and discussed...... to conceptualize space as more than the physical container for human activity. I do this by investigating space as interface. Based on a theory of space and place set forth by Tuan (Tuan, 1977), and informed by an explorative research approach, I make the distinction between space and place as a Euclidian space...

  14. Interface-Based Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Lecture Notes in Computer Science 1466, pages 163–178. Springer-Verlag, 1998. A. Chakrabarti, L. de Alfaro, T.A...Henzinger, M. Jurdziński, and F.Y.C. Mang. Interface compatibility checking for software modules. In Proc. Computer-Aided Verification, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 2404...bidirectional component interfaces. In Proc. Computer-Aided Verification, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 2404, pages 414–427.

  15. Dielectric Effects at Organic/Inorganic Interfaces in Nanostructured Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherkar, Tejas S; Koster, L Jan Anton

    2015-06-10

    Dielectric interfaces are important in organic electronic devices, as they dominate charge generation and recombination dynamics and set the tone for efficiency of the device. In a charge separation scenario across the interface, we calculate the binding energy of a charge carrier for variations in dielectric mismatch (i.e., the ratio of the dielectric constant of materials forming the interface), interface shape and size, and dielectric anisotropy. We find that dielectric mismatch results in binding of the charge carrier to the interface with energies on the order of several kT. For the variation in interface shape and size, epitomized by the device morphology, we show that the assumption of a planar interface overestimates the attractive potential. The change in the interface curvature affects the binding energy of the charge carrier by order of kT. Anisotropy is shown to affect critically the electric field along the principal axis, while the binding energy of the charge is altered by more than 5 kT. We are able to give an upper limit on the change in the binding energy for the variations in the above interfacial factors. These limits can serve as guidelines for optimization, interface engineering, and design of high efficiency organic electronic devices.

  16. Interfaces: nanometric dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, T J [School of Informatics, University of Wales Bangor, Dean Street, Bangor, Gwynedd, LL70 9PX (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-21

    The incorporation of nanometric size particles in a matrix to form dielectric composites shows promise of materials (nanodielectrics) with new and improved properties. It is argued that the properties of the interfaces between the particles and the matrix, which will themselves be of nanometric dimensions, will have an increasingly dominant role in determining dielectric performance as the particle size decreases. The forces that determine the electrical and dielectric properties of interfaces are considered, with emphasis on the way in which they might influence composite behaviour. A number of examples are given in which interfaces at the nanometric level exercise both passive and active control over dielectric, optical and conductive properties. Electromechanical properties are also considered, and it is shown that interfaces have important electrostrictive and piezoelectric characteristics. It is demonstrated that the process of poling, namely subjecting macroscopic composite materials to electrical stress and raised temperatures to create piezoelectric materials, can be explained in terms of optimizing the collective response of the nanometric interfaces involved. If the electrical and electromechanical features are coupled to the long-established electrochemical properties, interfaces represent highly versatile active elements with considerable potential in nanotechnology.

  17. Interfaces: nanometric dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, T. J.

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of nanometric size particles in a matrix to form dielectric composites shows promise of materials (nanodielectrics) with new and improved properties. It is argued that the properties of the interfaces between the particles and the matrix, which will themselves be of nanometric dimensions, will have an increasingly dominant role in determining dielectric performance as the particle size decreases. The forces that determine the electrical and dielectric properties of interfaces are considered, with emphasis on the way in which they might influence composite behaviour. A number of examples are given in which interfaces at the nanometric level exercise both passive and active control over dielectric, optical and conductive properties. Electromechanical properties are also considered, and it is shown that interfaces have important electrostrictive and piezoelectric characteristics. It is demonstrated that the process of poling, namely subjecting macroscopic composite materials to electrical stress and raised temperatures to create piezoelectric materials, can be explained in terms of optimizing the collective response of the nanometric interfaces involved. If the electrical and electromechanical features are coupled to the long-established electrochemical properties, interfaces represent highly versatile active elements with considerable potential in nanotechnology.

  18. Lectures on random interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Funaki, Tadahisa

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces are created to separate two distinct phases in a situation in which phase coexistence occurs. This book discusses randomly fluctuating interfaces in several different settings and from several points of view: discrete/continuum, microscopic/macroscopic, and static/dynamic theories. The following four topics in particular are dealt with in the book. Assuming that the interface is represented as a height function measured from a fixed-reference discretized hyperplane, the system is governed by the Hamiltonian of gradient of the height functions. This is a kind of effective interface model called ∇φ-interface model. The scaling limits are studied for Gaussian (or non-Gaussian) random fields with a pinning effect under a situation in which the rate functional of the corresponding large deviation principle has non-unique minimizers. Young diagrams determine decreasing interfaces, and their dynamics are introduced. The large-scale behavior of such dynamics is studied from the points of view of the hyd...

  19. High temperature interface superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozar, A., E-mail: adrian.gozar@yale.edu [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Bozovic, I. [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Highlight: • This review article covers the topic of high temperature interface superconductivity. • New materials and techniques used for achieving interface superconductivity are discussed. • We emphasize the role played by the differences in structure and electronic properties at the interface with respect to the bulk of the constituents. - Abstract: High-T{sub c} superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-T{sub c} Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  20. Analysis of Solid-Liquid Interface Behavior during Continuous Strip-Casting Process Using Sharp-Interface Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changbum Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous strip casting (CSC has been developed to fabricate thin metal plates while simultaneously controlling the microstructure of the product. A numerical analysis to understand the solid-liquid interface behaviors during CSC was carried out and used to identify the solidification morphologies of the plate, which were then used to obtain the optimum process conditions. In this study, we used a modified level contour reconstruction method and the sharp-interface method to modify the interface tracking, and we performed a simulation analysis to identify the differences in the material properties that affect the interface behavior. The effects of the process parameters such as the heat transfer coefficient and extrusion velocity on the behavior of the solid-liquid interface are estimated and also used to improve the CSC process.

  1. Bonding Interface and Bending Deformation of Al/316LSS Clad Metal Prepared by Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xunzhong; Fan, Minyu; Wang, Liuan; Ma, Fuye

    2016-06-01

    The morphology, elemental distribution, and phase analysis of the bonding interface were investigated by means of SEM, EDS, and XRD to evaluate the interface bonding properties of Al/316LSS clad metal prepared by explosive welding method. Furthermore, the micro-hardness and bending properties were also investigated. The results indicated that the linear and wavy bonding interfaces coexisted and intermetallic phases were present in the local interfacial zone. Moreover, the micro-hardness value at the bonding interface with intermetallic phases was higher than that at the interface without any intermetallic phases. In addition, bulk metal compounds could easily lead to the generation of micro-cracks during the bending forming process.

  2. Morphology of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Wadadekar, Yogesh

    2012-01-01

    The study of the morphology of galaxies is important in order to understand the formation and evolution of galaxies and their sub-components as a function of luminosity, environment, and star-formation and galaxy assembly over cosmic time. Disentangling the many variables that affect galaxy evolution and morphology, requires large galaxy samples and automated ways to measure morphology. The advent of large digital sky surveys, with unprecedented depth and resolution, coupled with sophisticated quantitative methods for morphology measurement are providing new insights in this fast evolving field of astronomical research.

  3. Workshop on Interface Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the first Workshop on Interface Phenomena, organized jointly by the surface science groups at Dalhousie University and the University of Maine. It was our intention to concentrate on just three topics related to the kinetics of interface reactions which, in our opinion, were frequently obscured unnecessarily in the literature and whose fundamental nature warranted an extensive discussion to help clarify the issues, very much in the spirit of the Discussions of the Faraday Society. Each session (day) saw two principal speakers expounding the different views; the session chairmen were asked to summarize the ensuing discussions. To understand the complexity of interface reactions, paradigms must be formulated to provide a framework for the interpretation of experimen­ tal data and for the construction of theoretical models. Phenomenological approaches have been based on a small number of rate equations for the concentrations or mole numbers of the various species involved i...

  4. User interface design considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Engedal; Jakobsen, Arne; Rasmussen, Bjarne D.

    1999-01-01

    When designing a user interface for a simulation model there are several important issues to consider: Who is the target user group, and which a priori information can be expected. What questions do the users want answers to and what questions are answered using a specific model?When developing...... the user interface of EESCoolTools these issues led to a series of simulation tools each with a specific purpose and a carefully selected set of input and output variables. To allow a more wide range of questions to be answered by the same model, the user can change between different sets of input...... and output variables. This feature requires special attention when designing the user interface and a special approach for controlling the user selection of input and output variables are developed. To obtain a consistent system description the different input variables are grouped corresponding...

  5. Portraying User Interface History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms

    2008-01-01

    in that they largely address prevailing UI techno­logies, and thirdly history from above in that they focus on the great deeds of the visionaries. The paper then compares this state-of-art in UI history to the much more mature fields history of computing and history of technology. Based hereon, some speculations......The user interface is coming of age. Papers adressing UI history have appeared in fair amounts in the last 25 years. Most of them address particular aspects such as an in­novative interface paradigm or the contribution of a visionary or a research lab. Contrasting this, papers addres­sing UI...... history at large have been sparse. However, a small spate of publications appeared recently, so a reasonable number of papers are available. Hence this work-in-progress paints a portrait of the current history of user interfaces at large. The paper first describes a theoretical framework recruited from...

  6. An Abstract Data Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, D. J.

    The Abstract Data Interface (ADI) is a system within which both abstract data models and their mappings on to file formats can be defined. The data model system is object-oriented and closely follows the Common Lisp Object System (CLOS) object model. Programming interfaces in both C and \\fortran are supplied, and are designed to be simple enough for use by users with limited software skills. The prototype system supports access to those FITS formats most commonly used in the X-ray community, as well as the Starlink NDF data format. New interfaces can be rapidly added to the system---these may communicate directly with the file system, other ADI objects or elsewhere (e.g., a network connection).

  7. Urban water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, M. O.; Hinkelmann, R.; Nützmann, G.; Jekel, M.; Singer, G.; Lewandowski, J.; Nehls, T.; Barjenbruch, M.

    2014-06-01

    Urban water systems consist of large-scale technical systems and both natural and man-made water bodies. The technical systems are essential components of urban infrastructure for water collection, treatment, storage and distribution, as well as for wastewater and runoff collection and subsequent treatment. Urban aquatic ecosystems are typically subject to strong human influences, which impair the quality of surface and ground waters, often with far-reaching impacts on downstream aquatic ecosystems and water users. The various surface and subsurface water bodies in urban environments can be viewed as interconnected compartments that are also extensively intertwined with a range of technical compartments of the urban water system. As a result, urban water systems are characterized by fluxes of water, solutes, gases and energy between contrasting compartments of a technical, natural or hybrid nature. Referred to as urban water interfaces, boundaries between and within these compartments are often specific to urban water systems. Urban water interfaces are generally characterized by steep physical and biogeochemical gradients, which promote high reaction rates. We hypothesize that they act as key sites of processes and fluxes with notable effects on overall system behaviour. By their very nature, urban water interfaces are heterogeneous and dynamic. Therefore, they increase spatial heterogeneity in urban areas and are also expected to contribute notably to the temporal dynamics of urban water systems, which often involve non-linear interactions and feedback mechanisms. Processes at and fluxes across urban water interfaces are complex and less well understood than within well-defined, homogeneous compartments, requiring both empirical investigations and new modelling approaches at both the process and system level. We advocate an integrative conceptual framework of the urban water system that considers interfaces as a key component to improve our fundamental

  8. Strength distribution at interface of rotary-friction-welded aluminum to nodular cast iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yu-lai; LIU Yao-hui; ZHU Xian-yong; YU Si-rong; ZHANG Ying-bo

    2008-01-01

    The morphology, size and composition of intermetallic compound at the interface of Al 1050 and nodular cast iron were studied by electron microprobe analysis(EMPA) and scan electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The bond strength of the interface was measured by the tensile tests and the morphology of the fracture surface was observed by SEM. The observation of the interface reveals that there are two distinct morphologies: no intermetallic compound exists in the central area at the interface; while numbers of intermetallic compounds (FexAly) are formed in the peripheral area due to the overfull heat input. The tensile tests indicate that the distribution of strength in radial direction at the interface is inhomogeneous, and the central area of the interface performs greater bond strength than the peripheral area, which proves directly that the FexAly intermetallic compounds have a negative effect on the integration of interface. The morphology on the fracture surface shows that the facture in the central area at the interface has characteristic of the ductile micro-void facture. So it is important to restrain the form of the intermetallic compound to increase the bond strength of the Al 1050 and nodular cast iron by optimizing welding parameters and the geometry of components.

  9. Composing morphological filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.A.M. Heijmans (Henk)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractA morphological filter is an operator on a complete lattice which is increasing and idempotent. Two well-known classes of morphological filters are openings and closings. Furthermore, an interesting class of filters, the alternating sequential filters, is obtained if one composes openin

  10. Composing morphological filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, H.J.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    A morphological filter is an operator on a complete lattice which is increasing and idempotent. Two well-known classes of morphological filters are openings and closings. Furthermore, an interesting class of filters, the alternating sequential filters, is obtained if one composes openings and closi

  11. Morphological image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.; Raedt, H. De; Kawakatsu, T.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a morphological image analysis method to characterize images in terms of geometry and topology. We present a method to compute the morphological properties of the objects building up the image and apply the method to triply periodic minimal surfaces and to images taken from polymer chemi

  12. Morphological image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K; De Raedt, H; Kawakatsu, T; Landau, DP; Lewis, SP; Schuttler, HB

    2001-01-01

    We describe a morphological image analysis method to characterize images in terms of geometry and topology. We present a method to compute the morphological properties of the objects building up the image and apply the method to triply periodic minimal surfaces and to images taken from polymer chemi

  13. Politics at the interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannabiran, Gobinaath; Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2010-01-01

    the process of design and into how users interact with the designed product on a day-to-day basis. This paper is an attempt to call to attention the need for a new set of methods, attitudes and approaches, along with the existing, to discuss, analyze and reflect upon the politics at the interface....... By presenting a critical analysis of two design cases, we elicit the importance of such an agenda and the implications for design in doing so. We use the Foucauldian notion of power to analyze the power relationships in these two cases and to articulate the politics at the interface. We conclude by emphasizing...

  14. Semiconductor Oxide Interface States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    0C for 30 minutes. B 9 7 and B17 curves were taken before forming gas annealing and A297 and A77 were taken after annealing in forming gas... A297 and A77’ AL .show a substantial reduction of interface states and a slight increase of positive oxide charges. The reduction of the interface...states is deduced from the voltage differences between A297 and the A77 C-V curves both above and below the cross-over point which are smaller than the

  15. Optical encryption interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Deborah J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An analog optical encryption system based on phase scrambling of two-dimensional optical images and holographic transformation for achieving large encryption keys and high encryption speed. An enciphering interface uses a spatial light modulator for converting a digital data stream into a two dimensional optical image. The optical image is further transformed into a hologram with a random phase distribution. The hologram is converted into digital form for transmission over a shared information channel. A respective deciphering interface at a receiver reverses the encrypting process by using a phase conjugate reconstruction of the phase scrambled hologram.

  16. Distributed User Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Gallud, Jose A; Penichet, Victor M R

    2011-01-01

    The recent advances in display technologies and mobile devices is having an important effect on the way users interact with all kinds of devices (computers, mobile devices, laptops, tablets, and so on). These are opening up new possibilities for interaction, including the distribution of the UI (User Interface) amongst different devices, and implies that the UI can be split and composed, moved, copied or cloned among devices running the same or different operating systems. These new ways of manipulating the UI are considered under the emerging topic of Distributed User Interfaces (DUIs). DUIs

  17. Beneficiated coals' char morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Vargas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the char morphology of beneficiated and original coal (without beneficiation from four Colombian coalmines: Cerrejón (La Guajira, La Jagua (Cesar, Guachinte (Valle del Cauca and Nechí (Antioquia. Column flotation was used to obtain beneficiated coal, whereas a drop tube reactor at 1,000°C, 104 °C/s heating rate and 100 ms residence time was used to obtain char. The chars were analysed by image analysis which determined their shape, size, porosity and wall thickness. It was found that char morphology depended on coal rank and maceral composition. Morphological characteristics like high porosity, thinner walls and network-like morphology which are beneficial in improving combustion were present in vitrinite- and liptinite-rich lowest-ranking coals. Beneficiated coals showed that their chars had better performance regarding their morphological characteristics than their original coal chars.

  18. Morphological study of silver corrosion in highly aggressive sulfur environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minzari, Daniel; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Møller, Per

    2011-01-01

    the silicone coating to the interface has resulted in three corrosion types namely: uniform corrosion, conductive anodic filament type of Ag2S growth, and silver migration with subsequent formation of sulfur compounds. Detailed morphological investigation of new and corroded power modules was carried out...

  19. The Liquid Vapour Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1985-01-01

    In this short review we are concerned with the density variation across the liquid-vapour interface, i.e. from the bulk density of the liquid to the essentially zero density of the vapour phase. This density variation can in principle be determined from the deviation of the reflectivity from...

  20. Photochemistry at Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenthal, Kenneth B [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-02-24

    We have advanced our capabilities to investigate ultrafast excited state dynamics at a liquid interface using a pump to excite molecules to higher electronic states and then probe the subsequent time evolution of the interfacial molecules with femtosecond time delayed vibrational SFG.

  1. Soldier-Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-27

    understandable units. (5) Immediate Feedback : Operators should always be presented with readily understandable information so that they know...operation, system response time, and special commands. d. Feedback : Operators should always be presented with readily understandable information on...considerations (handedness, physical strength, wearing of eyeglasses, and facility of spoken English). TABLE 3. SOLDIER-COMPUTER INTERFACE CRITERIA

  2. Is the interface OK?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.

    When a peripheral device fails, software methods can be initially resorted to before the usual hardware test procedures are used. A test program is presented here that allows various peripherals, inter-faced to a Norsk Data computer, to be tested...

  3. General purpose operator interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennion, S. I.

    1979-07-01

    The Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory in Richland, Washington is developing a general-purpose operator interface for controlling set-point driven processes. The interface concept is being developed around graphics display devices with touch-sensitive screens for direct interaction with the displays. Additional devices such as trackballs and keyboards are incorporated for the operator's convenience, but are not necessary for operation. The hardware and software are modular; only those capabilities needed for a particular application need to be used. The software is written in FORTRAN IV with minimal use of operating system calls to increase portability. Several ASCII files generated by the user define displays and correlate the display variables with the process parameters. It is also necessary for the user to build an interface routine which translates the internal graphics commands into device-specific commands. The interface is suited for both continuous flow processes and unit operations. An especially useful feature for controlling unit operations is the ability to generate and execute complex command sequences from ASCII files. This feature relieves operators of many repetitive tasks. 2 figures.

  4. Urban Sound Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Morten

    2012-01-01

    This paper draws on the theories of Michel de Certeau and Gaston Bachelard to discuss how media architecture, in the form of urban sound interfaces, can help us perceive the complexity of the spaces we inhabit, by exploring the history and the narratives of the places in which we live...

  5. Source interface for ALICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    This interface is part of the ALICE detector data link (DDL), which transmits data at 100 Mbytes/sec from the detectors to a host computer. A total of 400 DDLs will be installed on ALICE. These silicon devices have been developed especially for use in the high radiation levels produced in detector environments.

  6. Workflow User Interfaces Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Vanderdonckt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta una colección de patrones de diseño de interfaces de usuario para sistemas de información para el flujo de trabajo; la colección incluye cuarenta y tres patrones clasificados en siete categorías identificados a partir de la lógica del ciclo de vida de la tarea sobre la base de la oferta y la asignación de tareas a los responsables de realizarlas (i. e. recursos humanos durante el flujo de trabajo. Cada patrón de la interfaz de usuario de flujo de trabajo (WUIP, por sus siglas en inglés se caracteriza por las propiedades expresadas en el lenguaje PLML para expresar patrones y complementado por otros atributos y modelos que se adjuntan a dicho modelo: la interfaz de usuario abstracta y el modelo de tareas correspondiente. Estos modelos se especifican en un lenguaje de descripción de interfaces de usuario. Todos los WUIPs se almacenan en una biblioteca y se pueden recuperar a través de un editor de flujo de trabajo que vincula a cada patrón de asignación de trabajo a su WUIP correspondiente.A collection of user interface design patterns for workflow information systems is presented that contains forty three resource patterns classified in seven categories. These categories and their corresponding patterns have been logically identified from the task life cycle based on offering and allocation operations. Each Workflow User Interface Pattern (WUIP is characterized by properties expressed in the PLML markup language for expressing patterns and augmented by additional attributes and models attached to the pattern: the abstract user interface and the corresponding task model. These models are specified in a User Interface Description Language. All WUIPs are stored in a library and can be retrieved within a workflow editor that links each workflow pattern to its corresponding WUIP, thus giving rise to a user interface for each workflow pattern.

  7. Experimental investigation of reshocked spherical gas interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Yang, Jiming; Luo, Xisheng

    2012-05-01

    The evolution of a spherical gas interface under reshock conditions is experimentally studied using the high-speed schlieren photography with high time resolutions. A number of experimental sets of helium or SF6 bubble surrounded by air for seven different end wall distances have been performed. Distinct flow structures are observed due to the additional vorticity and wave configuration caused by the reshock. In the air/helium case, the deformation of the reshocked bubble is dependent on the development of the penetrating air jet along the symmetry axis of the bubble. In general, two separate vortex rings can be observed, i.e., one develops slowly, and the other approaches and eventually impinges on the shock tube end wall. In the air/SF6 case, two SF6 jets moving in opposite directions are generated and the oscillation of the interface is observed for small end wall distances, while small scale vortex morphologies on the gas interface are found for large end wall distances. The physical mechanisms of the baroclinic vorticity generation and the pressure perturbation are highlighted in the interface evolution process. Based on the sequence of the schlieren images obtained during a single run for each case, the x-t diagrams of the shock and reshock interacting with the helium or SF6 bubble are plotted and the velocities estimated in linear stages are compared with those calculated from one-dimensional gas dynamics. The changes with time in the characteristic bubble sizes including the interface length, height, and vortex diameter are also measured.

  8. Easy-to-use interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattner, M M; Blattner, D O; Tong, Y

    1999-04-01

    Easy-to-use interfaces are a class of interfaces that fall between public access interfaces and graphical user interfaces in usability and cognitive difficulty. We describe characteristics of easy-to-use interfaces by the properties of four dimensions: selection, navigation, direct manipulation, and contextual metaphors. Another constraint we introduced was to include as little text as possible, and what text we have will be in at least four languages. Formative evaluations were conducted to identify and isolate these characteristics. Our application is a visual interface for a home automation system intended for a diverse set of users. The design will be expanded to accommodate the visually disabled in the near future.

  9. PREFACE: Water at interfaces Water at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, P.; Rovere, M.

    2010-07-01

    This special issue is devoted to illustrating important aspects and significant results in the field of modeling and simulation of water at interfaces with solutes or with confining substrates, focusing on a range of temperatures from ambient to supercooled. Understanding the behavior of water, in contact with different substrates and/or in solutions, is of pivotal importance for a wide range of applications in physics, chemistry and biochemistry. Simulations of confined and/or interfacial water are also relevant for testing how different its behavior is with respect to bulk water. Simulations and modeling in this field are of particular importance when studying supercooled regions where water shows anomalous properties. These considerations motivated the organization of a workshop at CECAM in the summer of 2009 which aimed to bring together scientists working with computer simulations on the properties of water in various environments with different methodologies. In this special issue, we collected a variety of interesting contributions from some of the speakers of the workshop. We have roughly classified the contributions into four groups. The papers of the first group address the properties of interfacial and confined water upon supercooling in an effort to understand the relation with anomalous behavior of supercooled bulk water. The second group deals with the specific problem of solvation. The next group deals with water in different environments by considering problems of great importance in technological and biological applications. Finally, the last group deals with quantum mechanical calculations related to the role of water in chemical processes. The first group of papers is introduced by the general paper of Stanley et al. The authors discuss recent progress in understanding the anomalies of water in bulk, nanoconfined, and biological environments. They present evidence that liquid water may display 'polymorphism', a property that can be present in

  10. Scyl1 regulates Golgi morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathon L Burman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Membrane trafficking is a defining feature of eukaryotic cells, and is essential for the maintenance of organelle homeostasis and identity. We previously identified Scy1-like 1 (Scyl1, a member of the Scy1-like family of catalytically inactive protein kinases, as a high-affinity binding partner of COPI coats. COPI-coated vesicles control Golgi to endoplasmic reticulum trafficking and we observed that disruption of Scyl1 function leads to a decrease in trafficking of the KDEL receptor via the COPI pathway. We reasoned that if Scyl1 plays a major role in COPI trafficking its disruption could influence Golgi homeostasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed Scyl1 knock down in cultured cells using previously established methods and observed an alteration in Golgi morphology. Both the surface area and volume of the Golgi is increased in Scyl1-depleted cells, but the continuity and polarity of the organelle is unperturbed. At the ultrastructural level we observe a decrease in the orderly structure of the Golgi with an increase in cisternal luminal width, while the number of Golgi cisternae remains unchanged. The golgin family of proteins forms a detergent resistant network that controls Golgi homeostasis. Disruption of this protein network by knock down of the golgin p115 disrupts the Golgi localization of Scyl1. Moreover, we find that Scyl1 interacts with 58K/formiminotransferase cyclodeaminase (FTCD, a protein that is tightly associated with the cis face of the Golgi. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results place Scyl1 at an interface between the golgin network and COPI trafficking and demonstrate that Scyl1 is required for the maintenance of Golgi morphology. Coupled with the observation from others that Scyl1 is the gene product responsible for the neurodegenerative mouse model mdf, our results additionally implicate the regulation of COPI trafficking and Golgi homeostasis in neurodegeneration.

  11. Nanoscale Morphology Control in Functional Polymer Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joachim; Loos; Svetlana; Chevtchenko

    2007-01-01

    1 Results In high-performance organic solar cells,the photoactive layer consists of a blend of an electron donor and an electron acceptor constituent,a so-called bulk heterojunction.The requirements to morphology of the efficient photoactive layer are nanoscale phase separation,which provides large interface area for exciton dissociation,and at the same time continuous pathways for transport of free charge carriers to the appropriate electrodes.In this context,the research is now focused on a better und...

  12. Morphological neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, G.X.; Sussner, P. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The theory of artificial neural networks has been successfully applied to a wide variety of pattern recognition problems. In this theory, the first step in computing the next state of a neuron or in performing the next layer neural network computation involves the linear operation of multiplying neural values by their synaptic strengths and adding the results. Thresholding usually follows the linear operation in order to provide for nonlinearity of the network. In this paper we introduce a novel class of neural networks, called morphological neural networks, in which the operations of multiplication and addition are replaced by addition and maximum (or minimum), respectively. By taking the maximum (or minimum) of sums instead of the sum of products, morphological network computation is nonlinear before thresholding. As a consequence, the properties of morphological neural networks are drastically different than those of traditional neural network models. In this paper we consider some of these differences and provide some particular examples of morphological neural network.

  13. MORPHOLOGICAL REPRESENTATION AND SEMANTIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The morphological representation assigned to a complex word must provide the formal structure .... This brings us to the cases where, on Williams's (1981a:258) analysis, the compositional notion ...... Die en moda Ii tei t . Kaaps tad: Ba 1 kema.

  14. Morphological associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, G X; Sussner, P; Diza-de-Leon, J L

    1998-01-01

    The theory of artificial neural networks has been successfully applied to a wide variety of pattern recognition problems. In this theory, the first step in computing the next state of a neuron or in performing the next layer neural network computation involves the linear operation of multiplying neural values by their synaptic strengths and adding the results. A nonlinear activation function usually follows the linear operation in order to provide for nonlinearity of the network and set the next state of the neuron. In this paper we introduce a novel class of artificial neural networks, called morphological neural networks, in which the operations of multiplication and addition are replaced by addition and maximum (or minimum), respectively. By taking the maximum (or minimum) of sums instead of the sum of products, morphological network computation is nonlinear before possible application of a nonlinear activation function. As a consequence, the properties of morphological neural networks are drastically different than those of traditional neural network models. The main emphasis of the research presented here is on morphological associative memories. We examine the computing and storage capabilities of morphological associative memories and discuss differences between morphological models and traditional semilinear models such as the Hopfield net.

  15. Embodiment and Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Andreas Lindegaard; Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2008-01-01

    in motor isomorphism when comparing the media-supported embodied actions with unmediated actions, e.g. that discrepancy between player motor actions and visual representation may hamper ownership. It also argues that the present interfaces tend to be more supportive of the player’s active agency than...... as other game system configurations. The article argues that playing video games may provide experiences of extended embodiment where players may experience ownership of both actions and virtual bodies related to the represented game world. The article shows how ownership may be related to differences...... of the player as patient, i.e. being the object of another agent’s actions.  Keywords: Video games, embodiment, interface, agency, action, control, cognition  ...

  16. Popeye Project: ROV interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scates, C.R. [Shell Oil Inc., New Orleans, LA (United States); Hickok, D.D. [Dvaerner FSSL Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Hernandez, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    The Popeye Project in the Gulf of Mexico helped advance the technology and standardization of ROV interfaces for deepwater subsea production systems. Some of the many successful ROV operations during installation and completion were {open_quotes}first-of-it`s-kind{close_quotes} activities-enabled by many technical advances. The use and reliance upon ROV systems for support of deepwater drilling and installation operations significantly increased in the past 10 years. Shell Offshore Inc.`s (SOI) confidence in this increased capability was an important factor in many of the design decisions which characterized the innovative system. Technology advancements, which depended on effective ROV intervention, were implemented with no significant difficulties. These advancements, in particular the flying leads and seabed position methods, are available to the industry for other deepwater subsea systems. In addition, several Popeye ROV interfaces have helped advance the subsea standardization initiative; e.g., hot stabs, torque-tool end effectors, and paint color.

  17. An Approach to Interface Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan; Hald, Bjarne

    1995-01-01

    may contain the re-use of existing modules). The interface synthesis approach describes the basic transformations needed to transform the server interface description into an interface description on the client side of the communication medium. The synthesis approach is illustrated through a point......Presents a novel interface synthesis approach based on a one-sided interface description. Whereas most other approaches consider interface synthesis as optimizing a channel to existing client/server modules, we consider the interface synthesis as part of the client/server module synthesis (which......-to-point communication, but is applicable to synthesis of a multiple client/server environment. The interface description is based on a formalization of communication events....

  18. Mass and charge transport in IPMC actuators with fractal interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Longfei; Wu, Yucheng; Zhu, Zicai; Li, Heng

    2016-04-01

    Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite (IPMC) actuators have been attracting a growing interest in extensive applications, which consequently raises the demands on the accuracy of its theoretical modeling. For the last few years, rough landscape of the interface between the electrode and the ionic membrane of IPMC has been well-documented as one of the key elements to ensure a satisfied performance. However, in most of the available work, the interface morphology of IPMC was simplified with structural idealization, which lead to perplexity in the physical interpretation on its interface mechanism. In this paper, the quasi-random rough interface of IPMC was described with fractal dimension and scaling parameters. And the electro-chemical field was modeled by Poisson equation and a properly simplified Nernst-Planck equation set. Then, by simulation with Finite Element Method, a comprehensive analysis on he inner mass and charge transportation in IPMC actuators with different fractal interfaces was provided, which may be further adopted to instruct the performance-oriented interface design for ionic electro-active actuators. The results also verified that rough interface can impact the electrical and mechanical response of IPMC, not only from the respect of the real surface increase, but also from mass distribution difference caused by the complexity of the micro profile.

  19. Papers on Morphology. The Ohio State University Working Papers in Linguistics #29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicky, Arnold M., Ed.; Wallace, Rex E., Ed.

    A collection of papers on morphology in relation to other grammar components and on the morphology-syntax interface includes: "Locative Plural Forms in Classical Sanskrit" (Belinda Brodie); "On Explaining Morpheme Structure" (Donald G. Churma); "Lexical Relatedness, Head of a Word and the Misanalysis of Latin" (Brian D. Joseph and Rex E. Wallace);…

  20. SNE Industrial Fieldbus Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Angel; Raines, Matthew; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Mata, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) have very limited diagnostic and no prognostic capabilities, while current smart sensor designs do not have the capability to communicate over Fieldbus networks. The aim is to interface smart sensors with PLCs so that health and status information, such as failure mode identification and measurement tolerance, can be communicated via an industrial Fieldbus such as ControlNet. The SNE Industrial Fieldbus Interface (SIFI) is an embedded device that acts as a communication module in a networked smart sensor. The purpose is to enable a smart sensor to communicate health and status information to other devices, such as PLCs, via an industrial Fieldbus networking protocol. The SNE (Smart Network Element) is attached to a commercial off-the-shelf Any bus-S interface module through the SIFI. Numerous Anybus-S modules are available, each one designed to interface with a specific Fieldbus. Development of the SIFI focused on communications using the ControlNet protocol, but any of the Anybus-S modules can be used. The SIFI communicates with the Any-bus module via a data buffer and mailbox system on the Anybus module, and supplies power to the module. The Anybus module transmits and receives data on the Fieldbus using the proper protocol. The SIFI is intended to be connected to other existing SNE modules in order to monitor the health and status of a transducer. The SIFI can also monitor aspects of its own health using an onboard watchdog timer and voltage monitors. The SIFI also has the hardware to drive a touchscreen LCD (liquid crystal display) unit for manual configuration and status monitoring.

  1. At the Knowledge Interface:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Kristine; Buono, Anthony; Poulfelt, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    researchers. The paper addresses this challenge in terms of moving across this interface, developing the abilities and proficiency for co-creating research that meets the needs of academics and practitioners. The competency drivers behind strengthening research-practice impact are examined within the context......-produced research projects. Based on this analysis, the implications for research-oriented consulting and our interventions with a view to developing co-created academic- and practice-oriented impact are discussed...

  2. Microsystem Interfaces for Space

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Microsystem interfaces to the macroscopic surroundings and within the microsystems themselves are formidable challenges that this thesis makes an effort to overcome, specifically for enabling a spacecraft based entirely on microsystems. The NanoSpace-1 nanospacecraft is a full-fledged satellite design with mass below 10 kg. The high performance with respect to mass is enabled by a massive implementation of microsystem technology – the entire spacecraft structure is built from square silicon p...

  3. Noise at the Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The notion of noise occupies a contested territory, in which it is framed as pollution and detritus even as it makes its opposite a possibility - noise is always defined in opposition to something else, even if this ‘other’ is not quite clear. This paper explores noise in the context of ‘the inte...... interface’ asking what its affordances as an idea may contribute to our understanding of interface. I draw historically on information theory in particular to initiate this exploration....

  4. Standard interface file handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A.; Huria, H.C. (Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States))

    1992-10-01

    This handbook documents many of the standard interface file formats that have been adopted by the US Department of Energy to facilitate communications between and portability of, various large reactor physics and radiation transport software packages. The emphasis is on those files needed for use of the VENTURE/PC diffusion-depletion code system. File structures, contents and some practical advice on use of the various files are provided.

  5. Virtual button interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jake S.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch.

  6. PINE -- Electronic mail interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, G. R.

    The PINE mail interface is a user-friendly mail utility for Unix systems. It has been adopted by Starlink as the recommended mail utility because of its ease of use compared with the mail utilities supplied as standard with the Unix operating system. PINE is intended to be intuitive and "to be learned by exploration rather than reading manuals". Here however are a few brief notes to get you started.

  7. The THOSE remote interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klawon, Kevin; Gold, Josh; Bachman, Kristen

    2013-05-01

    The DIA, in conjunction with the Army Research Lab (ARL), wants to create an Unmanned Ground Sensor (UGS) controller that is (a) interoperable across all controller platforms, (b) capable of easily adding new sensors, radios, and processes and (c) backward compatible with existing UGS systems. To achieve this, a Terra Harvest controller was created that used Java JRE 1.6 and an Open Services Gateway initiative (OSGi) platform, named Terra Harvest Open Software Environment (THOSE). OSGi is an extensible framework that provides a modularized environment for deploying functionality in "bundles". These bundles can publish, discover, and share services available from other external bundles or bundles provided by the controller core. With the addition of a web GUI used for interacting with THOSE, a natural step was then to create a common remote interface that allows 3rd party real-time interaction with the controller. This paper provides an overview of the THOSE system and its components as well as a description of the architectural structure of the remote interface, highlighting the interactions occurring between the controller and the remote interface and its role in providing a positive user experience for managing UGSS functions.

  8. Assessing Electromyographic Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Armando Pires Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic apppliances are increasingly a part of our everyday lives. In particular, mobile devices, with their reduced dimensions with power rivaling desktop computers, have substantially augmented our communication abilities offering instant availability, anywhere, to everyone. These devices have become essential for human communication but also include a more comprehensive tool set to support productivity and leisure applications.However, the many applications commonly available are not adapted to people with special needs. Rather, most popular devices are targeted at teenagers or young adults with excellent eyesight and coordination. What is worse, most of the commonly used assistive control interfaces are not available in a mobile environment where user's position, accommodation and capacities can vary even widely.To try and address people with special needs new approaches and techniques are sorely needed. This paper presents a control interface to allow tetraplegic users to interact with electronic devices. Our method uses myographic information (Electromyography or EMG collected from residually controlled body areas. User evaluations validate electromyography as a daily wearable interface. In particular our results show that EMG can be used even in mobility contexts.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy at electrified interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Wieckowski, Andrzej; Braunschweig, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Reviews the latest theory, techniques, and applications Surface vibrational spectroscopy techniques probe the structure and composition of interfaces at the molecular level. Their versatility, coupled with their non-destructive nature, enables in-situ measurements of operating devices and the monitoring of interface-controlled processes under reactive conditions. Vibrational Spectroscopy at Electrified Interfaces explores new and emerging applications of Raman, infrared, and non-linear optical spectroscopy for the study of charged interfaces. The book draws from hu

  10. Why Mineral Interfaces Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnis, Andrew; Putnis, Christine V.

    2015-04-01

    While it is obvious that reactions between a mineral and an aqueous solution take place at the mineral-fluid interface it is only relatively recently that high spatial resolution studies have demonstrated how the local structure of the mineral surface and the chemical composition of the fluid at the interface control both the short-range and the long-range consequences of mineral-fluid interaction. Long-range consequences of fluid-mineral interaction control element cycles in the earth, the formation of ore-deposits, the chemical composition of the oceans through weathering of rocks and hence climate changes. Although weathering is clearly related to mineral dissolution, to what extent do experimentally measured dissolution rates of minerals help to understand weathering, especially weathering mechanisms? This question is related to the short-range, local reactions that take place when a mineral, that is not stable in the fluid, begins to dissolve. In this case the fluid composition at the interface will become supersaturated with respect to a different phase or phases. This may be a different composition of the same mineral e.g. a Ca-rich feldspar dissolving in a Na-rich solution results in a fluid at the interface which may be supersaturated with respect to an Na-rich feldspar. Alternatively, the interfacial fluid could be supersaturated with respect to a different mineral e.g. an Na-rich zeolite, depending on the temperature. Numerous experiments have shown that the precipitation of a more stable phase at the mineral-fluid interface results in a coupling between the dissolution and the precipitation, and the replacement of one mineral by another. This process separates the short-range mechanisms which depend only on the composition of the interfacial solution, and the long-range consequences that depend on the composition of the residual fluid released from the reacting parent mineral. Typically such residual fluids may carry metal ions tens to hundreds of

  11. Characteristics of seismoelectric interface responses at dipping boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, B.; Kemna, A.

    2012-04-01

    When crossing an interface between two layers with different petrophysical properties, a seismic wave generates a time-varying charge separation which acts as a dipole radiating electromagnetic energy independently of the seismic wave. If we consider a monochromatic seismic source located above a horizontal interface between such media, the seismic wave traverses the interface and causes relative displacement of ions at the matrix-fluid interface in the pore space. The resulting electric field is due to the streaming current imbalance at the interface. This is equivalent to the case of an electrical dipole oscillating in phase with the seismic wave along such boundary. As a consequence, electromagnetic disturbances are radiated away from the dipole source and can be recorded at various receiver lines. This seismic-to-electromagnetic field conversion at petrophysical boundaries in the 1st Fresnel zone is the so-called seismoelectric interface response. Conceptual field models and theoretical modelling indicate that the interface response should be a multipole electrical source. Higher-order terms will diminish more rapidly with distance and therefore will leave the dipole term to dominate. Thus, a seismoelectric interface response emanating from a horizontal boundary in a homogeneous half-space is expected to exhibit symmetry and amplitude characteristics similar to those of a vertical electric dipole (VED) centred on the interface directly below the shot point. However, no general theoretical predictions concerning the characteristics, the shape and the morphology of the VED induced by seismic waves at dipping interfaces can be found in the literature. To gain insight into the spatio-temporal occurrence and evolution of the seismoelectric interface response for dipping interfaces we run several numerical simulations using different petrophysical parameter set-ups. For the modelling, we make use of a simplified time-domain formulation of the coupled physical problem

  12. Morphological bidirectional associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, G X.; Diaz-de-Leon, J L.; Sussner, P

    1999-07-01

    The theory of artificial neural networks has been successfully applied to a wide variety of pattern recognition problems. In this theory, the first step in computing the next state of a neuron or in performing the next layer neural network computation involves the linear operation of multiplying neural values by their synaptic strengths and adding the results. Thresholding usually follows the linear operation in order to provide for nonlinearity of the network. In this paper we discuss a novel class of artificial neural networks, called morphological neural networks, in which the operations of multiplication and addition are replaced by addition and maximum (or minimum), respectively. By taking the maximum (or minimum) of sums instead of the sum of products, morphological network computation is nonlinear before thresholding. As a consequence, the properties of morphological neural networks are drastically different from those of traditional neural network models. The main emphasis of the research presented here is on morphological bidirectional associative memories (MBAMs). In particular, we establish a mathematical theory for MBAMs and provide conditions that guarantee perfect bidirectional recall for corrupted patterns. Some examples that illustrate performance differences between the morphological model and the traditional semilinear model are also given.

  13. Single-interface Casimir torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Tiago A.; Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2016-10-01

    A different type of Casimir-type interaction is theoretically predicted: a single-interface torque at a junction of an anisotropic material and a vacuum or another material system. The torque acts to reorient the polarizable microscopic units of the involved materials near the interface, and thus to change the internal structure of the materials. The single-interface torque depends on the zero-point energy of the interface localized and extended modes. Our theory demonstrates that the single-interface torque is essential to understand the Casimir physics of material systems with anisotropic elements and may influence the orientation of the director of nematic liquid crystals.

  14. Conceptual Framework for Aquatic Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, J.; Krause, S.

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic interfaces are generally characterized by steep gradients of physical, chemical and biological properties due to the contrast between the two adjacent environments. Innovative measurement techniques are required to study the spatially heterogeneous and temporally variable processes. Especially the different spatial and temporal scales are a large challenge. Due to the steep biogeochemical gradients and the intensive structural and compositional heterogeneity, enhanced biogeochemical processing rates are inherent to aquatic interfaces. Nevertheless, the effective turnover depends strongly on the residence time distribution along the flow paths and in sections with particular biogeochemical milieus and reaction kinetics. Thus, identification and characterization of the highly complex flow patterns in and across aquatic interfaces are crucial to understand biogeochemical processing along exchange flow paths and to quantify transport across aquatic interfaces. Hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes are closely coupled at aquatic interfaces. However, interface processing rates are not only enhanced compared to the adjacent compartments that they connect; also completely different reactions might occur if certain thresholds are exceeded or the biogeochemical milieu differs significantly from the adjacent environments. Single events, temporal variability and spatial heterogeneity might increase overall processing rates of aquatic interfaces and thus, should not be neglected when studying aquatic interfaces. Aquatic interfaces are key zones relevant for the ecological state of the entire ecosystem and thus, understanding interface functioning and controls is paramount for ecosystem management. The overall aim of this contribution is a general conceptual framework for aquatic interfaces that is applicable to a wide range of systems, scales and processes.

  15. Transport processes at fluidic interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Reusken, Arnold

    2017-01-01

    There are several physico-chemical processes that determine the behavior of multiphase fluid systems – e.g., the fluid dynamics in the different phases and the dynamics of the interface(s), mass transport between the fluids, adsorption effects at the interface, and transport of surfactants on the interface – and result in heterogeneous interface properties. In general, these processes are strongly coupled and local properties of the interface play a crucial role. A thorough understanding of the behavior of such complex flow problems must be based on physically sound mathematical models, which especially account for the local processes at the interface. This book presents recent findings on the rigorous derivation and mathematical analysis of such models and on the development of numerical methods for direct numerical simulations. Validation results are based on specifically designed experiments using high-resolution experimental techniques. A special feature of this book is its focus on an interdisciplina...

  16. Matched Interface and Boundary Method for Elasticity Interface Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Elasticity theory is an important component of continuum mechanics and has had widely spread applications in science and engineering. Material interfaces are ubiquity in nature and man-made devices, and often give rise to discontinuous coefficients in the governing elasticity equations. In this work, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method is developed to address elasticity interface problems. Linear elasticity theory for both isotropic homogeneous and inhomogeneous media is employed. In our approach, Lamé’s parameters can have jumps across the interface and are allowed to be position dependent in modeling isotropic inhomogeneous material. Both strong discontinuity, i.e., discontinuous solution, and weak discontinuity, namely, discontinuous derivatives of the solution, are considered in the present study. In the proposed method, fictitious values are utilized so that the standard central finite different schemes can be employed regardless of the interface. Interface jump conditions are enforced on the interface, which in turn, accurately determines fictitious values. We design new MIB schemes to account for complex interface geometries. In particular, the cross derivatives in the elasticity equations are difficult to handle for complex interface geometries. We propose secondary fictitious values and construct geometry based interpolation schemes to overcome this difficulty. Numerous analytical examples are used to validate the accuracy, convergence and robustness of the present MIB method for elasticity interface problems with both small and large curvatures, strong and weak discontinuities, and constant and variable coefficients. Numerical tests indicate second order accuracy in both L∞ and L2 norms. PMID:25914439

  17. Bubble and drop interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miller

    2011-01-01

    The book aims at describing the most important experimental methods for characterizing liquid interfaces, such as drop profile analysis, bubble pressure and drop volume tensiometry, capillary pressure technique, and oscillating drops and bubbles. Besides the details of experimental set ups, also the underlying theoretical basis is presented in detail. In addition, a number of applications based on drops and bubbles is discussed, such as rising bubbles and the very complex process of flotation. Also wetting, characterized by the dynamics of advancing contact angles is discussed critically. Spec

  18. Brain-computer interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A computer-implemented method of providing an interface between a user and a processing unit, the method comprising : presenting one or more stimuli to a user, each stimulus varying at a respective stimulation frequency, each stimulation frequency being associated with a respective user......-selectable input; receiving at least one signal indicative of brain activity of the user; and determining, from the received signal, which of the one or more stimuli the user attends to and selecting the user-selectable input associated with the stimulation frequency of the determined stimuli as being a user...

  19. Interfacing with the Night

    OpenAIRE

    McLean, Alex; Parkinson, Adam

    2014-01-01

    In  this  paper,  the  authors  consider  the  interfaces  between academia and dance music. Dance music and club culture are, we argue, important to computer music and the live performance of electronic music, but there are many different difficulties encountered when trying to present electronic dance music within academic contexts. The authors draw upon their experiences as promoters, performers, researchers and audience members to discuss these difficulties and how and why we might negoti...

  20. MAN – MACHINE INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Bhuvaneswari

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Agents trained by learning techniques provide a powerful approximation of state spaces in games that aretoo large for naive approaches. In the study Genetic Algorithms and Manual Interface was implementedand used to train agents for the board game LUDO. The state space of LUDO is generalized to a small setand encoded to suit the different techniques. The impact of variables and tactics applied in training aredetermined. Agents based on the techniques performed satisfactory against a baseline finite agent, and aGenetic Algorithm based agent performed satisfactory against competitors from the course. Better statespace representations will improve the success of learning based agents.

  1. Engineering graded tissue interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer E; Burns, Kellie L; Le Doux, Joseph M; Guldberg, Robert E; García, Andrés J

    2008-08-26

    Interfacial zones between tissues provide specialized, transitional junctions central to normal tissue function. Regenerative medicine strategies focused on multiple cell types and/or bi/tri-layered scaffolds do not provide continuously graded interfaces, severely limiting the integration and biological performance of engineered tissue substitutes. Inspired by the bone-soft tissue interface, we describe a biomaterial-mediated gene transfer strategy for spatially regulated genetic modification and differentiation of primary dermal fibroblasts within tissue-engineered constructs. We demonstrate that zonal organization of osteoblastic and fibroblastic cellular phenotypes can be engineered by a simple, one-step seeding of fibroblasts onto scaffolds containing a spatial distribution of retrovirus encoding the osteogenic transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1. Gradients of immobilized retrovirus, achieved via deposition of controlled poly(L-lysine) densities, resulted in spatial patterns of transcription factor expression, osteoblastic differentiation, and mineralized matrix deposition. Notably, this graded distribution of mineral deposition and mechanical properties was maintained when implanted in vivo in an ectopic site. Development of this facile and robust strategy is significant toward the regeneration of continuous interfacial zones that mimic the cellular and microstructural characteristics of native tissue.

  2. Mercury Shopping Cart Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Mercury Shopping Cart Interface (MSCI) is a reusable component of the Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) program described in another article. MSCI is a means of encapsulating the logic and information needed to describe an orderable item consistent with Mercury Shopping Cart service protocol. Designed to be used with Web-browser software, MSCI generates Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) pages on which ordering information can be entered. MSCI comprises two types of Practical Extraction and Report Language (PERL) modules: template modules and shopping-cart logic modules. Template modules generate HTML pages for entering the required ordering details and enable submission of the order via a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) post. Shopping cart modules encapsulate the logic and data needed to describe an individual orderable item to the Mercury Shopping Cart service. These modules evaluate information entered by the user to determine whether it is sufficient for the Shopping Cart service to process the order. Once an order has been passed from MSCI to a deployed Mercury Shopping Cart server, there is no further interaction with the user.

  3. Laparoscopic simulation interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Louis B.

    2006-04-04

    A method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth and low noise mechanical input and output for computer systems. A gimbal mechanism provides two revolute degrees of freedom to an object about two axes of rotation. A linear axis member is coupled to the gimbal mechanism at the intersection of the two axes of rotation. The linear axis member is capable of being translated along a third axis to provide a third degree of freedom. The user object is coupled to the linear axis member and is thus translatable along the third axis so that the object can be moved along all three degrees of freedom. Transducers associated with the provided degrees of freedom include sensors and actuators and provide an electromechanical interface between the object and a digital processing system. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between the transducers and the object. The linear axis member can also be rotated about its lengthwise axis to provide a fourth degree of freedom, and, optionally, a floating gimbal mechanism is coupled to the linear axis member to provide fifth and sixth degrees of freedom to an object. Transducer sensors are associated with the fourth, fifth, and sixth degrees of freedom. The interface is well suited for simulations of medical procedures and simulations in which an object such as a stylus or a joystick is moved and manipulated by the user.

  4. Laparoscopic simulation interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Louis B.

    2006-04-04

    A method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth and low noise mechanical input and output for computer systems. A gimbal mechanism provides two revolute degrees of freedom to an object about two axes of rotation. A linear axis member is coupled to the gimbal mechanism at the intersection of the two axes of rotation. The linear axis member is capable of being translated along a third axis to provide a third degree of freedom. The user object is coupled to the linear axis member and is thus translatable along the third axis so that the object can be moved along all three degrees of freedom. Transducers associated with the provided degrees of freedom include sensors and actuators and provide an electromechanical interface between the object and a digital processing system. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between the transducers and the object. The linear axis member can also be rotated about its lengthwise axis to provide a fourth degree of freedom, and, optionally, a floating gimbal mechanism is coupled to the linear axis member to provide fifth and sixth degrees of freedom to an object. Transducer sensors are associated with the fourth, fifth, and sixth degrees of freedom. The interface is well suited for simulations of medical procedures and simulations in which an object such as a stylus or a joystick is moved and manipulated by the user.

  5. Flexible DCP interface. [environmental sensor and signal conditioning interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemasu, E. T.; Schimmelpfenning, H.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A user of an ERTS data collection system (DCS) must supply the sensors and signal-conditioning interface. The electronic interface must be compatible with the NASA-furnished data collection platform. A universal signal-conditioning system for use with a wide range of environmental sensors is described. The interface is environmentally and electronically compatible with the DCP and has operated satisfactorily for a complete winter wheat growing season in Kansas.

  6. Needlelike morphology of aspartame

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuppen, H.M.; Eerd, A.R.T. van; Meekes, H.L.M.

    2004-01-01

    The needlelike morphology of aspartame form II-A is studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Growth simulations for all F faces show merely three faces with a nucleation barrier for growth: two side faces and one top face. Calculations of the energies involved in the growth for a few representat

  7. Morphology at the Rijksherbarium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heel, van W.A.

    1979-01-01

    In the following the role of morphology, anatomy and palynology in systematics at the Rijksherbarium will be discussed, as far as flowering plants are concerned. It will be demonstrated that most of the research in this field is rooted in the interest of individual workers, and that no planning was

  8. Aspects of Mathematical Morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.; Raedt, H. De; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we review the basic concepts of integral-geometry-based morphological image analysis. This approach yields an objective, numerical characterization of two- and three-dimensional patterns in terms of geometrical and topological descriptors called Minkowski functionals. We review its mat

  9. Vocabulary— Teaching Through Morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A large vocabulary is crucial to learners of English, but how to teach vocabulary effectively is equally important to a teacher of English. This article tries to emphasize the importance of part of speech in vocabulary teaching by analyzing the characteristics of English words from the aspect of morphology.

  10. Long term morphological modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Sten Esbjørn; Deigaard, Rolf; Taaning, Martin

    2010-01-01

    in the surf zone. Two parameterization schemes are tested for two different morphological phenomena: 1) Shoreline changes due to the presence of coastal structures and 2) alongshore migration of a nearshore nourishment and a bar by-passing a harbour. In the case of the shoreline evolution calculations...

  11. Dynamic Foot Morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Barisch-Fritz, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Background: The foot has to fulfil important and complex functions which are, in most regions of the world, supported by shoes. The interface of feet and footwear has often been considered with respect to comfort and function but also to negative effects of shoes. One main contribution to the improvement of footwear fit is provided by matching the shape of the shoe to the shape of the foot. However, current approaches for implementation only include static information. There is still a lack o...

  12. Overestimating hybrid layer quality in polished adhesive/dentin interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Spencer, Paulette

    2004-03-15

    The most popular techniques for determining the quality of the hybrid layer (HL) have relied on morphologic characterization of the polished adhesive/dentin (a/d) interfaces before and after acid-bleach chemical treatment. Using these techniques, the existence of smooth, acid-resistant layers has been consistently reported for most adhesive systems. The purpose of this study was to determine whether popular specimen preparation techniques that include polishing and acid-bleach treatment modify the a/d interface, mask the complexity of the HL, and lead to inaccurate assessment of the quality of the HL. To understand the impact of specimen preparation techniques on the morphology of the resin-dentin interface, polished and unpolished specimens from the same tooth were closely compared after different acid-bleach chemical treatment procedures. Two one-bottle adhesives, that is, 3M Single Bond and Pulpdent UNO, exhibiting distinct differences in hydrophilic/hydrophobic composition, were used in this investigation. Using specimens from the same tooth, the effect of chemical treatments on the morphology of the resin-dentin interdiffusion zone and the differences in the morphology of polished and unpolished specimens after these same treatments were studied with scanning electron microscopy. It was shown that conventional specimen preparation techniques that include polishing and acid-bleach treatment can adversely affect and even obscure the structural detail of the a/d interface in specimens that possess a porous HL. The results indicated that the Pulpdent UNO/dentin interface had better quality than the 3M Single Bond/dentin interface. The difference in the quality of HL can be attributed to factors such as compositional differences that impact the adhesive interaction with water, that is present within the substrate during wet bonding. The inability of the conventional acid-bleach procedure to reveal the differences in the scanning electron microscopy interfacial

  13. Proceedings Foundations for Interface Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Legay, Axel; 10.4204/EPTCS.46

    2011-01-01

    FIT stands for Foundations of Interface Technologies. Component-based design is widely considered as a major approach to developing systems in a time and cost effective way. Central in this approach is the notion of an interface. Interfaces summarize the externally visible properties of a component and are seen as a key to achieving component interoperability and to predict global system behavior based on the component behavior. To capture the intricacy of complex software products, rich interfaces have been proposed. These interfaces do not only specify syntactic properties, such as the signatures of methods and operations, but also take into account behavioral and extra-functional properties, such as quality of service, security and dependability. Rich interfaces have been proposed for describing, e.g., the legal sequences of messages or method calls accepted by components, or the resource and timing constraints in embedded software. The development of a rigorous framework for the specification and analysis...

  14. Intelligent interface design and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Intelligent interface concepts and systematic approaches to assessing their functionality are discussed. Four general features of intelligent interfaces are described: interaction efficiency, subtask automation, context sensitivity, and use of an appropriate design metaphor. Three evaluation methods are discussed: Functional Analysis, Part-Task Evaluation, and Operational Testing. Design and evaluation concepts are illustrated with examples from a prototype expert system interface for environmental control and life support systems for manned space platforms.

  15. A note on charged interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Huaqiang [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Yu, M Y [Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr-University, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    A condition associated with the plasma boundary or other charged interface is reviewed. It is pointed out that in comparing theories and simulations of such interfaces, in order to avoid conflicting results it should be ascertained that the systems under consideration are thermodynamically equivalent. For the plasma-wall interface in equilibrium, the rate of change of the surface-charge density with respect to the surface potential must be positive.

  16. Porphyrins at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auwärter, Willi; Écija, David; Klappenberger, Florian; Barth, Johannes V.

    2015-02-01

    Porphyrins and other tetrapyrrole macrocycles possess an impressive variety of functional properties that have been exploited in natural and artificial systems. Different metal centres incorporated within the tetradentate ligand are key for achieving and regulating vital processes, including reversible axial ligation of adducts, electron transfer, light-harvesting and catalytic transformations. Tailored substituents optimize their performance, dictating their arrangement in specific environments and mediating the assembly of molecular nanoarchitectures. Here we review the current understanding of these species at well-defined interfaces, disclosing exquisite insights into their structural and chemical properties, and also discussing methods by which to manipulate their intramolecular and organizational features. The distinct characteristics arising from the interfacial confinement offer intriguing prospects for molecular science and advanced materials. We assess the role of surface interactions with respect to electronic and physicochemical characteristics, and describe in situ metallation pathways, molecular magnetism, rotation and switching. The engineering of nanostructures, organized layers, interfacial hybrid and bio-inspired systems is also addressed.

  17. Nanoparticles at liquid interfaces: Rotational dynamics and angular locking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavi, Sepideh; Kretzschmar, Ilona [Department of Chemical Engineering, City College of City University of New York, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Koplik, Joel [Department of Physics and The Benjamin Levich Institute for Physico-chemical Hydrodynamics, City College of City University of New York, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Colosqui, Carlos E., E-mail: carlos.colosqui@stonybrook.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    2014-01-07

    Nanoparticles with different surface morphologies that straddle the interface between two immiscible liquids are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. The methodology employed allows us to compute the interfacial free energy at different angular orientations of the nanoparticle. Due to their atomistic nature, the studied nanoparticles present both microscale and macroscale geometrical features and cannot be accurately modeled as a perfectly smooth body (e.g., spheres and cylinders). Under certain physical conditions, microscale features can produce free energy barriers that are much larger than the thermal energy of the surrounding media. The presence of these energy barriers can effectively “lock” the particle at specific angular orientations with respect to the liquid-liquid interface. This work provides new insights on the rotational dynamics of Brownian particles at liquid interfaces and suggests possible strategies to exploit the effects of microscale features with given geometric characteristics.

  18. Nanoparticles at liquid interfaces: rotational dynamics and angular locking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Sepideh; Kretzschmar, Ilona; Koplik, Joel; Colosqui, Carlos E

    2014-01-07

    Nanoparticles with different surface morphologies that straddle the interface between two immiscible liquids are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. The methodology employed allows us to compute the interfacial free energy at different angular orientations of the nanoparticle. Due to their atomistic nature, the studied nanoparticles present both microscale and macroscale geometrical features and cannot be accurately modeled as a perfectly smooth body (e.g., spheres and cylinders). Under certain physical conditions, microscale features can produce free energy barriers that are much larger than the thermal energy of the surrounding media. The presence of these energy barriers can effectively "lock" the particle at specific angular orientations with respect to the liquid-liquid interface. This work provides new insights on the rotational dynamics of Brownian particles at liquid interfaces and suggests possible strategies to exploit the effects of microscale features with given geometric characteristics.

  19. Interface-assisted molecular spintronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raman, Karthik V. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Molecular spintronics, a field that utilizes the spin state of organic molecules to develop magneto-electronic devices, has shown an enormous scientific activity for more than a decade. But, in the last couple of years, new insights in understanding the fundamental phenomena of molecular interaction on magnetic surfaces, forming a hybrid interface, are presenting a new pathway for developing the subfield of interface-assisted molecular spintronics. The recent exploration of such hybrid interfaces involving carbon based aromatic molecules shows a significant excitement and promise over the previously studied single molecular magnets. In the above new scenario, hybridization of the molecular orbitals with the spin-polarized bands of the surface creates new interface states with unique electronic and magnetic character. This study opens up a molecular-genome initiative in designing new handles to functionalize the spin dependent electronic properties of the hybrid interface to construct spin-functional tailor-made devices. Through this article, we review this subject by presenting a fundamental understanding of the interface spin-chemistry and spin-physics by taking support of advanced computational and spectroscopy tools to investigate molecular spin responses with demonstration of new interface phenomena. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy is favorably considered to be an important tool to investigate these hybrid interfaces with intra-molecular spatial resolution. Finally, by addressing some of the recent findings, we propose novel device schemes towards building interface tailored molecular spintronic devices for applications in sensor, memory, and quantum computing.

  20. Capillary flows with forming interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Shikhmurzaev, Yulii D

    2007-01-01

    PREFACEINTRODUCTION Free-surface flows in nature and industryScope of the bookFUNDAMENTALS OF FLUID MECHANICS Main concepts Governing equations Elements of thermodynamics Classical boundary conditions Physically meaningful solutions and paradoxes of modelingMOVING CONTACT LINES: AN OVERVIEW Essence of the problem Experimental observations Molecular dynamics simulations Review of theoriesThe key to the moving contact-line problemBOUNDARY CONDITIONS ON FORMING INTERFACES Modeling of interfacesConservation lawsLiquid-gas and liquid-solid interfacesLiquid-liquid interfaces SummaryOpen questions an

  1. Playful user interfaces: interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton

    2014-01-01

    This book is about user interfaces to applications that can be considered as ‘playful’. The interfaces to such applications should be ‘playful’ as well. The application should be fun, and interacting with such an application should, of course, be fun as well. Maybe more. Why not expect that the inte

  2. Characteristics of S/L Interface Evolution during High Rate Directional Solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The present paper aims to the characterization of high rate direction solidification on Al-Mn and Al-Cu alloys. It is indicated that the relevant cooling rate of high rate directional solidification is defined within 100~103 K/s that is located in the region between near-equilibrium slow growth rate and rapid solidification rate beyond equilibrium condition, and at the meantime there occurred a series of turning effect of interface stability and morphologies.With the increase of growth velocity the interface with planar front evolved to cells and dendrites at the stage of near-equilibrium and with further increase of growth rate they transformed reversely from dendrites to cell structure and then to absolute stability of planar interface. An explanation based on effective constitutional supercooling about the evolution of interface morphologies with the change of growth rate was proposed.

  3. Modeling soft interface dominated systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamorgese, A.; Mauri, R.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    The two main continuum frameworks used for modeling the dynamics of soft multiphase systems are the Gibbs dividing surface model, and the diffuse interface model. In the former the interface is modeled as a two dimensional surface, and excess properties such as a surface density, or surface energy

  4. Playful Interfaces: Introduction and History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton; Nijholt, Anton

    2014-01-01

    In this short survey we have some historical notes about human-computer interface development with an emphasis on interface technology that has allowed us to design playful interactions with applications. The applications do not necessarily have to be entertainment applications. We can have playful

  5. GRAPHIC INTERFACES FOR ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion PANA,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Using effective the method of calculating Fitness for Service requires the achievement of graphical interfaces. This paper presents an example of such interfaces, made with Visual Basic program and used in the evaluation of pipelines in a research contract [4

  6. Interface Input/Output Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Nyman, Ulrik; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Building on the theory of interface automata by de Alfaro and Henzinger we design an interface language for Lynch’s I/O, a popular formalism used in the development of distributed asynchronous systems, not addressed by previous interface research. We introduce an explicit separation of assumptions...... from guarantees not yet seen in other behavioral interface theories. Moreover we derive the composition operator systematically and formally, guaranteeing that the resulting compositions are always the weakest in the sense of assumptions, and the strongest in the sense of guarantees. We also present...... a method for solving systems of relativized behavioral inequalities as used in our setup and draw a formal correspondence between our work and interface automata....

  7. Power User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) is a system of middleware, written for expert users in the Earth-science community, PUI enables expedited ordering of data granules on the basis of specific granule-identifying information that the users already know or can assemble. PUI also enables expert users to perform quick searches for orderablegranule information for use in preparing orders. PUI 5.0 is available in two versions (note: PUI 6.0 has command-line mode only): a Web-based application program and a UNIX command-line- mode client program. Both versions include modules that perform data-granule-ordering functions in conjunction with external systems. The Web-based version works with Earth Observing System Clearing House (ECHO) metadata catalog and order-entry services and with an open-source order-service broker server component, called the Mercury Shopping Cart, that is provided separately by Oak Ridge National Laboratory through the Department of Energy. The command-line version works with the ECHO metadata and order-entry process service. Both versions of PUI ultimately use ECHO to process an order to be sent to a data provider. Ordered data are provided through means outside the PUI software system.

  8. Next Generation Search Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roby, W.; Wu, X.; Ly, L.; Goldina, T.

    2015-09-01

    Astronomers are constantly looking for easier ways to access multiple data sets. While much effort is spent on VO, little thought is given to the types of User Interfaces we need to effectively search this sort of data. For instance, an astronomer might need to search Spitzer, WISE, and 2MASS catalogs and images then see the results presented together in one UI. Moving seamlessly between data sets is key to presenting integrated results. Results need to be viewed using first class, web based, integrated FITS viewers, XY Plots, and advanced table display tools. These components should be able to handle very large datasets. To make a powerful Web based UI that can manage and present multiple searches to the user requires taking advantage of many HTML5 features. AJAX is used to start searches and present results. Push notifications (Server Sent Events) monitor background jobs. Canvas is required for advanced result displays. Lesser known CSS3 technologies makes it all flow seamlessly together. At IPAC, we have been developing our Firefly toolkit for several years. We are now using it to solve this multiple data set, multiple queries, and integrated presentation problem to create a powerful research experience. Firefly was created in IRSA, the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive (http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu). Firefly is the core for applications serving many project archives, including Spitzer, Planck, WISE, PTF, LSST and others. It is also used in IRSA's new Finder Chart and catalog and image displays.

  9. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  10. Nanomaterials at Liquid/Liquid Interfaces-A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, V; Sangaranarayanan, M V

    2015-09-01

    The charge transfer processes occurring at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions are of considerable importance in diverse fields of chemistry and biology. The introduction to nanoparticles and analysis of nanostructures in diverse branches of science and engineering are provided. The chemical and electrochemical techniques pertaining to the synthesis of metal nanoparticles, polymeric nanostructures and metal-polymer nanocomposites at liquid/liquid interfaces are surveyed. The unique features pertaining to the chemical synthesis of metal nanoparticles while employing diverse electrolytes and solvents are outlined. The advantages of various electrochemical synthetic protocols such as four-electrode assembly, thin film electrode, Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy and Solid/liquid/liquid interfaces for the study of nanoparticles at liquid/liquid interfaces are emphasized. The crucial role played by the liquid/liquid interfaces in altering the morphological patterns of metal nanoparticles, conducting polymers and metal-polymer nanocomposites is indicated. A few typical novel applications of these nanomaterials in fabrication of biosensors, electrochemical supercapacitors, and electrocatalysts have been outlined.

  11. Experimental impact crater morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, A.; Poelchau, M. H.; Hoerth, T.; Schaefer, F.; Thoma, K.; Deutsch, A.; Kenkmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    The research group MEMIN (Multidisciplinary Experimental and Impact Modelling Research Network) is conducting impact experiments into porous sandstones, examining, among other parameters, the influence of target pore-space saturation with water, and projectile velocity, density and mass, on the cratering process. The high-velocity (2.5-7.8 km/s) impact experiments were carried out at the two-stage light-gas gun facilities of the Fraunhofer Institute EMI (Germany) using steel, iron meteorite (Campo del Cielo IAB), and aluminium projectiles with Seeberg Sandstone as targets. The primary objectives of this study within MEMIN are to provide detailed morphometric data of the experimental craters, and to identify trends and characteristics specific to a given impact parameter. Generally, all craters, regardless of impact conditions, have an inner depression within a highly fragile, white-coloured centre, an outer spallation (i.e. tensile failure) zone, and areas of arrested spallation (i.e. spall fragments that were not completely dislodged from the target) at the crater rim. Within this general morphological framework, distinct trends and differences in crater dimensions and morphological characteristics are identified. With increasing impact velocity, the volume of craters in dry targets increases by a factor of ~4 when doubling velocity. At identical impact conditions (steel projectiles, ~5km/s), craters in dry and wet sandstone targets differ significantly in that "wet" craters are up to 76% larger in volume, have depth-diameter ratios generally below 0.19 (whereas dry craters are almost consistently above this value) at significantly larger diameters, and their spallation zone morphologies show very different characteristics. In dry craters, the spall zone surfaces dip evenly at 10-20° towards the crater centre. In wet craters, on the other hand, they consist of slightly convex slopes of 10-35° adjacent to the inner depression, and of sub-horizontal tensile

  12. Morphologic aspects of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongratz, D E; Späth, M

    1998-01-01

    The most common morphological finding in muscle biopsies in longstanding fibromyalgia is type II fiber atrophy. This can be found in many other conditions such as disuse atrophy, affections of the corticospinal tracts, steroid atrophy, and other different neuromuscular disorders. An increase in lipid droplets and a slight proliferation of mitochondria in type I muscle fibers are correlated with the duration of fibromyalgia. In some cases we could find some ragged red fibers (RRF) which histochemically show a pronounced accumulation of lipids and mitochondria and single fiber defects of cytochrome-c-oxidase. In some fibromyalgia patients with RRF, we could find deletions of the mitochondrial genoma.

  13. Interface roughening and pinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Stéphane; Hansen, Alex

    1994-04-01

    We study a simple model for thé pinning of an interface by impurities with random strengths, and thé depinning due to thé applied pressure, in a quasi-static propagation lirait. The model is very close to thé so called "Robin Hood" model introduced by Zaitsev. It is designed to describe e.g. thé invasion of a wetting fluid (imbibition) in a heterogeneous porous medium containing a second immiscible fluid. The relation between this model and other previously proposed approaches is discussed. The front of thé invaded domain is shown to develop a self-affine structure with an increase of thé roughness as a power-law of thé injected volume. The value of thé apparent roughness exponent can be favorably compared to some experimental measurements although we argue that thé true roughness exponent is out of reach of commonly used methods. We show that thé distribution f(d, Δ t) of distances d between discrete local invasions at a time interval Δ t can be described by a scaling law f(d, Δ t) = d^{-1}\\varphi(d/sqrt{Δ t}). This form can be obtained from thé identification of a hierarchical structure of "bursts" in thé pressure signal. Those "bursts" are quahtatively similar to those observed in quasistatic drainage, (i.e. invasion percolation), although characterized by différent scaling indices. Nous étudions un modèle simple pour analyser l'accrochage d'une interface sur des impuretés et le décrochage sous l'effet d'une pression appliquée, dans une limite quasi-statique. Ce modèle est très voisin du modèle "Robin Hood" introduit par Zaitsev. Il s'applique en particulier à l'invasion d'un fluide mouillant (imbibition) dans un milieu poreux hétérogène contenant un fluide immiscible. Nous discutons les relations entre ce modèle et d'autres approches proposées pour décrire ce phénomène. Le front d'invasion acquiert une structure auto-affine, avec un développement de la rugosité selon une loi de puissance du volume injecté. La valeur de l

  14. Nanoparticle Assemblies at Fluid Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Thomas P. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering

    2015-03-10

    A systematic study of the structure and dynamics of nanoparticles (NP) and NP-surfactants was performed. The ligands attached to both the NPs and NP-surfactants dictate the manner in which the nanoscopic materials assemble at fluid interfaces. Studies have shown that a single layer of the nanoscpic materials form at the interface to reduce the interactions between the two immiscible fluids. The shape of the NP is, also, important, where for spherical particles, a disordered, liquid-like monolayer forms, and, for nanorods, ordered domains at the interface is found and, if the monolayers are compressed, the orientation of the nanorods with respect to the interface can change. By associating end-functionalized polymers to the NPs assembled at the interface, NP-surfactants are formed that increase the energetic gain in segregating each NP at the interface which allows the NP-surfactants to jam at the interface when compressed. This has opened the possibility of structuring the two liquids by freezing in shape changes of the liquids.

  15. Morphology of Proeutectoid Ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jiaqing; Hillert, Mats; Borgenstam, Annika

    2017-03-01

    The morphology of grain boundary nucleated ferrite particles in iron alloys with 0.3 mass pct carbon has been classified according to the presence of facets. Several kinds of particles extend into both grains of austenite and have facets to both. It is proposed that they all belong to a continuous series of shapes. Ferrite plates can nucleate directly on the grain boundary but can also develop from edges on many kinds of particles. Feathery structures of parallel plates on both sides of a grain boundary can thus form. In sections, parallel to their main growth direction, plates have been seen to extend the whole way from the nucleation site at the grain boundary and to the growth front. This happens in the whole temperature range studied from 973 K to 673 K (700 °C to 400 °C). The plates thus grow continuously and not by subunits stopping at limited length and continuing the growth by new ones nucleating. Sometimes, the plates have ridges and in oblique sections they could be mistaken for the start of new plates. No morphological signs were observed indicating a transition between Widmanstätten ferrite and bainitic ferrite. It is proposed that there is only one kind of acicular ferrite.

  16. Effect of CNT Modification on Morphology and Interface of CNT/Fluoro Elastomer (FE) Nanocomposite%碳纳米管表面处理对碳纳米管/氟橡胶复合材料形貌及界面作用的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐涛; 杨静晖; 魏忠; 傅强

    2011-01-01

    Based on the results of MWCNT modification, and combined with the design principle of polymer composites, the carbon nanotube (CNT)/fluoro-elastomer (FE) nanocomposites are prepared by using solution casting method, meanwhile, the different kind of multi walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) including pristine, acid treated, carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) plasma treated was considered by comparing the dispersion and interface between the filler and polymer matrix. The results show that the MWCNT grafted with F function after CF4 plasma treated can be dispersed uniformly in the FE matrix, and the compatibility of two materials is improved. Moreover, the unstable F atom of MWCNT by absorption can grafted to the FE in the process of preparation, which is good to form the chemical interface between MWCNT and FE.%采用溶液浇注法制备了碳蚋米管(CNTs)/氟橡胶纳米复合材料,并对不同表面状态的碳纳米管(原始碳纳米管,酸处理碳蚋米管、CF等离子体处理碳纳米管)在复合材料中的分散以及碳蚋米管与氟橡胶的界面作用进行了研究.研究结果表明,经CF等离子体处理后的碳纳米管在氟橡胶中的分散性明显优于混酸处理碳纳米管,激光显微拉曼分析结果表明,在与氟橡胶共混后,部分表面吸附所产生的不稳定的F原子从氟化碳纳米管表面离开,与氟橡胶发生界面化学接枝反应,说明CF等离子体处理能明显提高碳纳米管与氟橡胶的相容性.

  17. Playful user interfaces interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The book is about user interfaces to applications that have been designed for social and physical interaction. The interfaces are ‘playful’, that is, users feel challenged to engage in social and physical interaction because that will be fun. The topics that will be present in this book are interactive playgrounds, urban games using mobiles, sensor-equipped environments for playing, child-computer interaction, tangible game interfaces, interactive tabletop technology and applications, full-body interaction, exertion games, persuasion, engagement, evaluation, and user experience. Readers of the book will not only get a survey of state-of-the-art research in these areas, but the chapters in this book will also provide a vision of the future where playful interfaces will be ubiquitous, that is, present and integrated in home, office, recreational, sports and urban environments, emphasizing that in the future in these environments game elements will be integrated and welcomed.

  18. Through the Interface - a human activity approach to user interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne

    In providing a theoretical framework for understanding human- computer interaction as well as design of user interfaces, this book combines elements of anthropology, psychology, cognitive science, software engineering, and computer science. The framework examines the everyday work practices...

  19. Superconducting interfaces between insulating oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyren, N; Thiel, S; Caviglia, A D; Kourkoutis, L Fitting; Hammerl, G; Richter, C; Schneider, C W; Kopp, T; Rüetschi, A-S; Jaccard, D; Gabay, M; Muller, D A; Triscone, J-M; Mannhart, J

    2007-08-31

    At interfaces between complex oxides, electronic systems with unusual electronic properties can be generated. We report on superconductivity in the electron gas formed at the interface between two insulating dielectric perovskite oxides, LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. The behavior of the electron gas is that of a two-dimensional superconductor, confined to a thin sheet at the interface. The superconducting transition temperature of congruent with 200 millikelvin provides a strict upper limit to the thickness of the superconducting layer of congruent with 10 nanometers.

  20. Practical speech user interface design

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, James R

    2010-01-01

    Although speech is the most natural form of communication between humans, most people find using speech to communicate with machines anything but natural. Drawing from psychology, human-computer interaction, linguistics, and communication theory, Practical Speech User Interface Design provides a comprehensive yet concise survey of practical speech user interface (SUI) design. It offers practice-based and research-based guidance on how to design effective, efficient, and pleasant speech applications that people can really use. Focusing on the design of speech user interfaces for IVR application

  1. The molecule-metal interface

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Norbert; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2013-01-01

    Reviewing recent progress in the fundamental understanding of the molecule-metal interface, this useful addition to the literature focuses on experimental studies and introduces the latest analytical techniques as applied to this interface.The first part covers basic theory and initial principle studies, while the second part introduces readers to photoemission, STM, and synchrotron techniques to examine the atomic structure of the interfaces. The third part presents photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution UV photoelectron spectroscopy and electron spin resonance to study the electroni

  2. Interface gateways: defining the solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R; Zobian, M

    1994-02-01

    In summary, an interface gateway is able to quickly create and support relationships. In the healthcare environment of the 1990s, organization executives will be faced with an exponential increase in the number of provider, payor and employer alliances, affiliations and acquisitions. One of the recurring requirements in this scenario is the need to share information. Most of the data standards in existence today do not address the vast interface requirements of these organizations. However, the capabilities, flexibility and capacity of interface gateways can allow these relationships to be created and supported in a fraction of the time that conventional methods require.

  3. Designing end-user interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Heaton, N

    1988-01-01

    Designing End-User Interfaces: State of the Art Report focuses on the field of human/computer interaction (HCI) that reviews the design of end-user interfaces.This compilation is divided into two parts. Part I examines specific aspects of the problem in HCI that range from basic definitions of the problem, evaluation of how to look at the problem domain, and fundamental work aimed at introducing human factors into all aspects of the design cycle. Part II consists of six main topics-definition of the problem, psychological and social factors, principles of interface design, computer intelligenc

  4. Search-User Interface Design

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Max

    2011-01-01

    Search User Interfaces (SUIs) represent the gateway between people who have a task to complete, and the repositories of information and data stored around the world. Not surprisingly, therefore, there are many communities who have a vested interest in the way SUIs are designed. There are people who study how humans search for information, and people who study how humans use computers. There are people who study good user interface design, and people who design aesthetically pleasing user interfaces. There are also people who curate and manage valuable information resources, and people who desi

  5. Morphology of corroded surfaces: Contribution of cellular automaton modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprio, D. di, E-mail: dung.di_caprio@upmc.f [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie, Chimie des Interfaces et Modeliation pour l' Energie, Chimie Paris Tech, ENSCP, UMR 7575, 4 place Jussieu, 75 005 Paris (France); Vautrin-Ul, C., E-mail: christine.vautrin-ul@univ-evry.f [Laboratoire Analyse et Modelisation pour la Biologie et l' Environnement, UMR 8587, CNRS-CEA-Universite d' Evry Val d' Essonne, Bd F. Mitterrand 91 025 Evry (France); Stafiej, J., E-mail: accjst@ichf.edu.p [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Saunier, J. [Laboratoire Analyse et Modelisation pour la Biologie et l' Environnement, UMR 8587, CNRS-CEA-Universite d' Evry Val d' Essonne, Bd F. Mitterrand 91 025 Evry (France); Chausse, A., E-mail: annie.chausse@univ-evry.f [Laboratoire Analyse et Modelisation pour la Biologie et l' Environnement, UMR 8587, CNRS-CEA-Universite d' Evry Val d' Essonne, Bd F. Mitterrand 91 025 Evry (France); Feron, D., E-mail: damien.feron@cea.f [CEA, DEN, Service de Corrosion et du Comportement des Materiaux dans leur Environnement, PC50, F- 91 191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Badiali, J.P., E-mail: jean-pierre.badiali@upmc.f [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie, Chimie des Interfaces et Modeliation pour l' Energie, Chimie Paris Tech, ENSCP, UMR 7575, 4 place Jussieu, 75 005 Paris (France)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: Simple cellular automata model describing uniform and localised corrosion. Introduction of a localisation degree which modulate the reactivity in the pit. Great variety of corrosion front morphology. Comparison with different experimental corrosion processes. Stochastic evolution of the pit. - Abstract: A simple model describes uniform and localised corrosion. We use a mesoscopic cellular automata (CA) type approach, which has proved a powerful tool in the study of rough metal-electrolyte interfaces. The model accounts for two corrosion kinetics and their relative spatial localisation. The competition between the two forms of kinetics of corrosion is shown to reproduce several types of morphology of corrosion ranging from narrow pits or larger cavities to rough surfaces. Simulation and experimental results are compared providing insight on the relation between kinetics and morphologies of the corrosion front. We emphasize the importance of stochastic simulations in relation to CA.

  6. Freezing-Thawing Characteristics of Botanical Tissues and Influence of Water Morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hai-Ling; MA Yuan; PENG Xiao-Feng

    2004-01-01

    @@ A series of visualization experiments were conducted to investigate the transport phenomena and interface behaviour during the freezing-thawing process of typical botanical tissues. Attention was paid to the growth of ice crystals and the advance of the phase-change interface. A comparison was made to identify the freezing/thawing behaviour for different tissues under various freezing conditions. Based on the experimental observation, analyses were conducted to explore the influence of water morphology on the freezing/thawing characteristics.

  7. Dispersive transport across interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Brian; Adler, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Experiments demonstrating asymmetrical dispersive transport of a conservative tracer across interfaces between different porous materials have recently been performed. Here, this phenomenon is studied numerically on the pore scale. The flow field is derived by solving the Stokes equation. The dispersive transport is simulated by a large number of particles undergoing random walks under the simultaneous action of convection and diffusion. Two main two-dimensional configurations are studied; each consists of two segments (called coarse and fine) with the same structure, porosity, and length along the main flow, but different characteristic solid/pore sizes. One structure consists of two channels containing cavities of different sizes, and the second of square "grains" of different sizes. At time t=0, a large number of particles is injected (as a pulse) around a given cross-section. The corresponding breakthrough curves (BTCs) are registered as functions of time at six different cross sections. Calculations are made twice; in the first case (CtoF), particles are injected in the coarse side and are transported towards the fine one; in the second one (FtoC), the opposite case is studied. These calculations are performed for various Péclet numbers (Pe). Comparison of the resulting BTCs shows features that are similar to experimental observations, but with qualitative and quantitative differences. The influences of the medium, of the injection and observation planes, and of Pe are detailed and discussed. A BTC for pulse injection can be characterized by its maximum M(t_M) and the time tM at which it occurs. The observed differences for channels bounded by cavities are very small. However for the granular structures, M(t_M) is always larger for FtoC than for CtoF ; tM depends on all the parameters, namely Pe, the size ratio between the large and small grains, the injection and the observation planes. The numerical results are systematically compared with solutions of one

  8. CdTe and ZnTe metal interface formation and Fermi-level pinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahi, A. K.; Carey, G. P.; Chiang, T. T.; Lindau, I.; Spicer, W. E.

    1989-01-01

    Interfacial morphology and Fermi-level pinning behavior at the interfaces of Al, Ag, and Pt with UHV-cleaved CdTe and ZnTe are studied using X-ray photoelectron and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopies. Results are compared to metal/HgCdTe interface formation. For Al/CdTe, a case is found where significantly greater intermixing occurs in CdTe than seen on HgCdTe. The Al/ZnTe interface is also more abrupt than Al/CdTe. Band bending results for interfaces of all three metals with p-CdTe and p-ZnTe are presented and implications for metal/HgZnTe interface formation are considered.

  9. The Simple Publishing Interface (SPI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Massart, David; Totschnig, Michael; Klerkx, Joris; Duval, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Ternier, S., Massart, D., Totschnig, M., Klerkx, J., & Duval, E. (2010). The Simple Publishing Interface (SPI). D-Lib Magazine, September/October 2010, Volume 16 Number 9/10, doi:10.1045/september2010-ternier

  10. Mathematics for 2d Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bardos, Claude

    2010-01-01

    We present here a survey of recent results concerning the mathematical analysis of instabilities of the interface between two incompressible, non viscous, fluids of constant density and vorticity concentrated on the interface. This configuration includes the so-called Kelvin-Helmholtz (the two densities are equal), Rayleigh-Taylor (two different, nonzero, densities) and the water waves (one of the densities is zero) problems. After a brief review of results concerning strong and weak solutions of the Euler equation, we derive interface equations (such as the Birkhoff-Rott equation) that describe the motion of the interface. A linear analysis allows us to exhibit the main features of these equations (such as ellipticity properties); the consequences for the full, non linear, equations are then described. In particular, the solutions of the Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor problems are necessarily analytic if they are above a certain threshold of regularity (a consequence is the illposedness of the initial ...

  11. The Simple Publishing Interface (SPI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Massart, David; Totschnig, Michael; Klerkx, Joris; Duval, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Ternier, S., Massart, D., Totschnig, M., Klerkx, J., & Duval, E. (2010). The Simple Publishing Interface (SPI). D-Lib Magazine, September/October 2010, Volume 16 Number 9/10, doi:10.1045/september2010-ternier

  12. Det æstetiske interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    Afhandlingen undersøger computerspillet historisk, teoretisk og analytisk i relation til en interfaceproblematik. Computerspil ses som et fremtrædende eksempel på det æstetiske interface – et interface baseret på sanseoplevelse i stedet for pragmatisk anvendelse. Afhandlingen består af to indbyrdes...... forbundne dele – en kulturhistorisk, diakron undersøgelse af computerspillet og en teoretisk, synkron analyse af det æstetiske interface i computerspillet. Med afsæt i bl.a. en overvejelse af forholdet mellem medie-teknologi og sansning – byggende på Walter Benjamin – og en analyse af computerspillet...... interfacets performative egenskaber. Gennem analyser af spilinter-facet og det pragmatiske interface i deres anvendelsessituation og inddragelse af bl.a. den franske lingvist Émile Benveniste, redegøres der for præcist, hvordan computerspilinterfacet, gennem at lade spilleren udforske computerens fungeren...

  13. Paper Interfaces for Learning Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnard, Quentin; Verma, Himanshu; Kaplan, Frédéric; Dillenbourg, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Paper interfaces offer tremendous possibilities for geometry education in primary schools. Existing computer interfaces designed to learn geometry do not consider the integration of conventional school tools, which form the part of the curriculum. Moreover, most of computer tools are designed specifically for individual learning, some propose group activities, but most disregard classroom-level learning, thus impeding their adoption. We present an augmented reality based tabletop system with ...

  14. Interface states at semiconductor junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaritondo, G. [Institut de Physique Appliquee, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1999-05-01

    The experimental and theoretical progress in understanding the electronic structure and the related parameters of Schottky interfaces and heterojunctions is reviewed. Particular emphasis is devoted to the solution of several historical controversial points, to the impact of novel ab initio theoretical approaches, to new experimental techniques based on synchrotron light and free electron lasers, to the efforts towards controlled modifications of interface parameters and to the foreseeable future developments of this vigorously progressing and technologically crucial field. (author)

  15. User interface for personal accounting

    OpenAIRE

    Femec, Vasilij

    2008-01-01

    This diploma work describes a method for user interface development for an application Bilanca that is intended for a review of personal financial flows. It is a simple application that subtracts outcome from income and shows the current financial state. The work begins with a detailed analysis of the best possible user interface options that give the most comfortable user experience. This is followed by the implementation in a Delphi environment. The results show that even a simple applicati...

  16. Optoelectronics Interfaces for Power Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu Neamtu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The most important issue interface is galvanicseparation between the signal part and the power board.Standards in the field have increased continuouslyelectro-security requirements on the rigidity of thedielectric and insulation resistance. Recommendations forclassical solutions require the use of galvanic separationoptoelectronics devices. Interfacing with a PC or DSP -controller is a target of interposition optical signals viathe power hardware commands.

  17. Interfacing with an EVA Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Amy

    2011-01-01

    A NASA spacesuit under the EVA Technology Domain consists of a suit system; a PLSS; and a Power, Avionics, and Software (PAS) system. Ross described the basic functions, components, and interfaces of the PLSS, which consists of oxygen, ventilation, and thermal control subsystems; electronics; and interfaces. Design challenges were reviewed from a packaging perspective. Ross also discussed the development of the PLSS over the last two decades.

  18. Active matter clusters at interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eCopenhagen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development, cancerous cells during tumor formation and metastasis, colonies of bacteria in a biofilm, or even flocks of birds and schools of fish at the macro-scale. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit that moves in two dimensions by exerting a force/torque per unit area whose magnitude depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed (overdamped clusters encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds (underdamped, where inertia dominates, the clusters show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection for the low velocity clusters. We then present an extreme limit of the model in the absence of rotational damping where clusters can become stuck spiraling along the interface or move in large circular trajectories after leaving the interface. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  19. Active matter clusters at interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-03-01

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development, cancerous cells during tumor formation and metastasis, colonies of bacteria in a biofilm, or even flocks of birds and schools of fish at the macro-scale. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit that moves in two dimensions by exerting a force/torque per unit area whose magnitude depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed (overdamped) clusters encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds (underdamped), where inertia dominates, the clusters show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection for the low velocity clusters. We then present an extreme limit of the model in the absence of rotational damping where clusters can become stuck spiraling along the interface or move in large circular trajectories after leaving the interface. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  20. Hydrophobic effect at aqueous interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Conceptual basis for hydrophobic effects in bulk water and at aqueous interfaces have similar conceptual basis but often manifests itself differently. Using a wide range of computer simulations as the basis, I will review different forms of hydrophobic effects at a variety of interfaces starting from simple liquid-vapor and water-oil interfaces and progressing to water-membrane interfaces. I will start with discussing how water is organized at different interfaces, stressing both similarities and differences. The main thread is that, as in the bulk liquid, hydrophobic effects have profound influence on conformational equilibria and organization of both small molecules and macromolecules, but the result of this influence is quite different. Specifically, it will be shown that many small, but not necessarily amphiphilic molecules tend to accumulate at the interface and, and this tendency will be explained. Furthermore, I will show that many short peptides that are disordered in water spontaneously fold into well-defined structures in the interfacial environment. Biological implications of this self-organizing effect will be discussed.

  1. Spoken Dialogue Interfaces: Integrating Usability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliotopoulos, Dimitris; Stavropoulou, Pepi; Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    Usability is a fundamental requirement for natural language interfaces. Usability evaluation reflects the impact of the interface and the acceptance from the users. This work examines the potential of usability evaluation in terms of issues and methodologies for spoken dialogue interfaces along with the appropriate designer-needs analysis. It unfolds the perspective to the usability integration in the spoken language interface design lifecycle and provides a framework description for creating and testing usable content and applications for conversational interfaces. Main concerns include the problem identification of design issues for usability design and evaluation, the use of customer experience for the design of voice interfaces and dialogue, and the problems that arise from real-life deployment. Moreover it presents a real-life paradigm of a hands-on approach for applying usability methodologies in a spoken dialogue application environment to compare against a DTMF approach. Finally, the scope and interpretation of results from both the designer and the user standpoint of usability evaluation are discussed.

  2. Computational Analysis for Morphological Evolution in Pyrolysis for Micro/Nanofabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeongseok Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis is recently proposed as an efficient fabrication technique of micro/nanoscale carbon structures. In order to understand the morphological evolution in pyrolysis and design the final shape of carbon structure, this study proposes a comprehensive model that incorporates the essential mechanisms of pyrolysis based on the phase field framework. Computational analysis with the developed model provides information about the effect of interface energy and kinetic rate on the morphological evolution in pyrolysis.

  3. Magnetosheath-cusp interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Savin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We advance the achievements of Interball-1 and other contemporary missions in exploration of the magnetosheath-cusp interface. Extensive discussion of published results is accompanied by presentation of new data from a case study and a comparison of those data within the broader context of three-year magnetopause (MP crossings by Interball-1. Multi-spacecraft boundary layer studies reveal that in ∼80% of the cases the interaction of the magnetosheath (MSH flow with the high latitude MP produces a layer containing strong nonlinear turbulence, called the turbulent boundary layer (TBL. The TBL contains wave trains with flows at approximately the Alfvén speed along field lines and "diamagnetic bubbles" with small magnetic fields inside. A comparison of the multi-point measurements obtained on 29 May 1996 with a global MHD model indicates that three types of populating processes should be operative:

    • large-scale (∼few RE anti-parallel merging at sites remote from the cusp;
    • medium-scale (few thousandkm local TBL-merging of fields that are anti-parallel on average;
    • small-scale (few hundredkm bursty reconnection of fluctuating magnetic fields, representing a continuous mechanism for MSH plasma inflow into the magnetosphere, which could dominate in quasi-steady cases.

    The lowest frequency (∼1–2mHz TBL fluctuations are traced throughout the magnetosheath from the post-bow shock region up to the inner magnetopause border. The resonance of these fluctuations with dayside flux tubes might provide an effective correlative link for the entire dayside region of the solar wind interaction with the magnetopause and cusp ionosphere. The TBL disturbances are characterized by kinked, double-sloped wave power spectra and, most probably, three-wave cascading. Both elliptical polarization and nearly Alfvénic phase velocities with characteristic dispersion indicate the

  4. Interface groups and financial transfer architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Bergstra, Jan A

    2007-01-01

    Analytic execution architectures have been proposed by the same authors as a means to conceptualize the cooperation between heterogeneous collectives of components such as programs, threads, states and services. Interface groups have been proposed as a means to formalize interface information concerning analytic execution architectures. These concepts are adapted to organization architectures with a focus on financial transfers. Interface groups (and monoids) now provide a technique to combine interface elements into interfaces with the flexibility to distinguish between directions of flow dependent on entity naming. The main principle exploiting interface groups is that when composing a closed system of a collection of interacting components, the sum of their interfaces must vanish in the interface group modulo reflection. This certainly matters for financial transfer interfaces. As an example of this, we specify an interface group and within it some specific interfaces concerning the financial transfer arch...

  5. Generation of fuzzy mathematical morphologies

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Fuzzy Mathematical Morphology aims to extend the binary morphological operators to grey-level images. In order to define the basic morphological operations fuzzy erosion, dilation, opening and closing, we introduce a general method based upon fuzzy implication and inclusion grade operators, including as particular case, other ones existing in related literature In the definition of fuzzy erosion and dilation we use several fuzzy implications (Annexe A, Table of fuzzy implic...

  6. Differentiating morphology, form, and meaning: neural correlates of morphological complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, Mirjana; Marslen-Wilson, William D; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A; Davis, Matthew H; Tyler, Lorraine K

    2007-09-01

    The role of morphological structure in word recognition raises issues about the nature and structure of the language system. One major issue is whether morphological factors provide an independent principle for lexical organization and processing, or whether morphological effects can be reduced to the joint contribution of form and meaning. The independence of form, meaning, and morphological structure can be directly investigated using derivationally complex words, because derived words can share form but need not share meaning (e.g., archer-arch). We used an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm to investigate priming between pairs of words that potentially shared a stem, where this link was either semantically transparent (e.g., bravely-brave) or opaque (e.g., archer-arch). These morphologically related pairs were contrasted with identity priming (e.g., mist-mist) and priming for pairs of words that shared only form (e.g., scandal-scan) or meaning (e.g., accuse-blame). Morphologically related words produced significantly reduced activation in left frontal regions, whether the pairs were semantically transparent or opaque. The effect was not found for any of the control conditions (identity, form, or meaning). Morphological effects were observed separately from processing form and meaning and we propose that they reflect segmentation of complex derived words, a process triggered by surface morphological structure of complex words.

  7. Modification of metal/oxide interfaces by dissolution of Sb in oxide precipitates containing metal matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, BJ; Westers, AR; Vreeling, JA; van Agterveld, DTL; De Hosson, JTM; Lejcek, P; Paidar,

    1999-01-01

    The influence of dissolution of a segregating element (Sb) in a metal matrix in which oxide precipitates are present on the precipitate morphology and the interface structure is studied using HRTEM. The influence on Mn3O4 precipitates in Ag is distinct: (i) the initial precipitates, sharply facetted

  8. Polymer Crystallization at Curved Liquid/Liquid Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenda

    -assembly behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at curved liquid/liquid interface and the crystallization behavior of polymers at curved liquid/liquid interface while SWCNTs in presence. A few crystalline polymers, such as polyethylene (PE), poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA), and poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT), and water/oil systems were used to study the behavior. The formation of nano speckle structure is a crystallization-driven process due to heterogeneous nucleation and crystal growth of polymers at curved liquid/liquid interface. The second part deals with the homogeneous nucleation and crystal growth at curved liquid/liquid interface. Both PE and PLLA were used to conduct the study. For PE, 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB), water, and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) were used for the emulsion system. The emulsification system for PLLA is p-xylene, water, and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Surfactant concentration can be employed to control the droplet size, thus controlling the final crystal vesicle's size. By controlling the initial polymer concentration, crystal shells with different morphology, such as curved crystal, bowl-like crystals, and crystal vesicles (named lamellaesome) can be obtained. The formation of these unique structures was templated by the curved interface. The formation process and detailed crystal structure are analyzed based on electron diffraction data from different sized lamellaesomes. Mechanical properties of the crystal vesicles and their encapsulation abilities will be discussed. At the end of this dissertation, a summary of my work and future outlook will be given.

  9. XML Translator for Interface Descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroson, Elizabeth R.

    2009-01-01

    A computer program defines an XML schema for specifying the interface to a generic FPGA from the perspective of software that will interact with the device. This XML interface description is then translated into header files for C, Verilog, and VHDL. User interface definition input is checked via both the provided XML schema and the translator module to ensure consistency and accuracy. Currently, programming used on both sides of an interface is inconsistent. This makes it hard to find and fix errors. By using a common schema, both sides are forced to use the same structure by using the same framework and toolset. This makes for easy identification of problems, which leads to the ability to formulate a solution. The toolset contains constants that allow a programmer to use each register, and to access each field in the register. Once programming is complete, the translator is run as part of the make process, which ensures that whenever an interface is changed, all of the code that uses the header files describing it is recompiled.

  10. DIRAC: Secure web user interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casajus Ramo, A [University of Barcelona, Diagonal 647, ES-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Sapunov, M, E-mail: sapunov@in2p3.f [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, 163 Av de Luminy Case 902 13288 Marseille (France)

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally the interaction between users and the Grid is done with command line tools. However, these tools are difficult to use by non-expert users providing minimal help and generating outputs not always easy to understand especially in case of errors. Graphical User Interfaces are typically limited to providing access to the monitoring or accounting information and concentrate on some particular aspects failing to cover the full spectrum of grid control tasks. To make the Grid more user friendly more complete graphical interfaces are needed. Within the DIRAC project we have attempted to construct a Web based User Interface that provides means not only for monitoring the system behavior but also allows to steer the main user activities on the grid. Using DIRAC's web interface a user can easily track jobs and data. It provides access to job information and allows performing actions on jobs such as killing or deleting. Data managers can define and monitor file transfer activity as well as check requests set by jobs. Production managers can define and follow large data productions and react if necessary by stopping or starting them. The Web Portal is build following all the grid security standards and using modern Web 2.0 technologies which allow to achieve the user experience similar to the desktop applications. Details of the DIRAC Web Portal architecture and User Interface will be presented and discussed.

  11. The Evaluation of Interface Design on CDROMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Jennifer; Slack, Frances

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the design and evaluation of user interfaces on CD-ROM. Defines interfaces, dialogs and interaction and explores diversity in, and issues associated with, standardization in interface design for CD-ROMs. Reviews current criteria and guidelines for the evaluation of CD-ROM interfaces and proposes alternative guidelines.…

  12. Design of Interfaces for Information Seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionini, Gary; Komlodi, Anita

    1998-01-01

    Examines the current state of user interface design for information seeking. Topics include technology push and interdisciplinarity; research and development; literature trends; user-centered interface design; information seeking in electronic environments; online information retrieval system interfaces; online public access catalog interfaces;…

  13. EFFECTS OF INTERFACES ON GAMMA SHIELDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford, C.E.

    1963-06-15

    A survey is presented of studies of interface effects in gamma shielding problems. These studies are grouped into three types of approaches, viz.: sources at the interface; radiation backscattered from the interface; and radiation transmitted through the interface. A bibliography of 54 references is included. Limitations on the applicability of the results are discussed. (T.F.H.)

  14. Interface strength and degradation of adhesively bonded porous aluminum oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Abrahami, Shoshan; M. M. de Kok, John; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy

    2017-01-01

    environmental and health regulations. Replacing this traditional process in a high-demandingand high-risk industry such as aircraft construction requires an in-depth understanding of the underlying adhesion and degradationmechanisms at the oxide/resin interface resulting from alternative processes......, a minimum pore size is pivotal for the formation of a stableinterface, as reflected by the initial peel strengths. Second, the increased surface roughness of the oxide/resin interface caused byextended chemical dissolution at higher temperature and higher phosphoric acid concentration is crucial to assure...... bond durabilityunder water ingress. There is, however, an upper limit to the beneficial amount of anodic dissolution above which bonds are pronefor corrosive degradation. Morphology is, however, not the only prerequisite for good bonding and bond performance alsodepends on the oxides’ chemical...

  15. On interfaces between cell populations with different mobilities

    KAUST Repository

    Lorenzi, Tommaso

    2016-11-18

    Partial differential equations describing the dynamics of cell population densities from a fluid mechanical perspective can model the growth of avascular tumours. In this framework, we consider a system of equations that describes the interaction between a population of dividing cells and a population of non-dividing cells. The two cell populations are characterised by different mobilities. We present the results of numerical simulations displaying two-dimensional spherical waves with sharp interfaces between dividing and non-dividing cells. Furthermore, we numerically observe how different ratios between the mobilities change the morphology of the interfaces, and lead to the emergence of finger-like patterns of invasion above a threshold. Motivated by these simulations, we study the existence of one-dimensional travelling wave solutions.

  16. Morphological knowledge and literacy acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, William E; Carlisle, Joanne F; Goodwin, Amanda P

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this special issue of the Journal of Learning Disabilities is to bring to the attention of researchers and educators studies on morphology and literacy that either involve students with learning difficulties or have educational implications for teaching such students. In our introduction, we first provide background information about morphological knowledge and consider the role of morphology in literacy, focusing on findings that are relevant for instruction of students who struggle with reading and writing. Next we present an overview of the studies included in this issue, organized by current issues concerning the role of morphological knowledge in literacy. Collectively, the articles in this issue suggest that students with weaker literacy skills tend to lag behind their peers in morphological knowledge but that all students are likely to benefit from morphological instruction. Morphological interventions hold promise, especially for students who face challenges in language learning and literacy, but additional research is needed to provide a basis for informed decisions about the design of effective morphological interventions.

  17. Kayardild morphology, phonology and morphosyntax

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    PL7101.G39 , gyd , Gayardilt language --Morphology , Gayardilt language --Phonology Abstract Acknowledgements List of Abbreviations 1 Introduction 2 Phonetics and surface phonology 3 Word structure 4 Segmental phonology 5 Prosodic structure and intonation 6 Syntax, morphosyntax and inflection 7 Realisational morphology Appendix A Segmental phonology Appendix B Distribution of A-TAM References

  18. Differential morphology and image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragos, P

    1996-01-01

    Image processing via mathematical morphology has traditionally used geometry to intuitively understand morphological signal operators and set or lattice algebra to analyze them in the space domain. We provide a unified view and analytic tools for morphological image processing that is based on ideas from differential calculus and dynamical systems. This includes ideas on using partial differential or difference equations (PDEs) to model distance propagation or nonlinear multiscale processes in images. We briefly review some nonlinear difference equations that implement discrete distance transforms and relate them to numerical solutions of the eikonal equation of optics. We also review some nonlinear PDEs that model the evolution of multiscale morphological operators and use morphological derivatives. Among the new ideas presented, we develop some general 2-D max/min-sum difference equations that model the space dynamics of 2-D morphological systems (including the distance computations) and some nonlinear signal transforms, called slope transforms, that can analyze these systems in a transform domain in ways conceptually similar to the application of Fourier transforms to linear systems. Thus, distance transforms are shown to be bandpass slope filters. We view the analysis of the multiscale morphological PDEs and of the eikonal PDE solved via weighted distance transforms as a unified area in nonlinear image processing, which we call differential morphology, and briefly discuss its potential applications to image processing and computer vision.

  19. Tense Aspect in Verbal Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaberry, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    Analyzed the development of past tense verbal morphology in Spanish second language acquisition among native English speakers divided into three levels of proficiency. Analysis shows that learners may use a default marker of past tense during the beginning stages of development of verbal morphology, but the choice of the default may be dependent…

  20. Recent Advances to Understand Morphology Stability of Organic Photovoltaics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio Guerrero; Germa Garcia-Belmonte

    2017-01-01

    Organic photovoltaic devices are on the verge of commercialization with power conversion efficiencies exceeding 10%in laboratory cells and above 8.5%in modules. However, one of the main limitations hindering their mass scale production is the debatable inferior stability of organic photovoltaic devices in comparison to other technologies. Adequate donor/acceptor morphology of the active layer is required to provide carrier separation and transport to the electrodes. Unfortunately, the beneficial morphology for device performance is usually a kinetically frozen state which has not reached thermodynamic equilibrium. During the last 5 years, special efforts have been dedicated to isolate the effects related to morphology changes taking place within the active layer and compare to those affecting the interfaces with the external electrodes. The current review discusses some of the factors affecting the donor/acceptor morphology evolution as one of the major intrinsic degradation pathways. Special attention is paid to factors in the nano-and microscale domain. For example, phase segregation of the polymer and fullerene domains due to Ostwald ripening is a major factor in the microscale domain and is affected by the presence of additives, glass transition temperature of the polymers or use of crosslinkers in the active layer. Alternatively, the role of vertical segregation profile toward the external electrodes is key for device operation, being a clear case of nanoscale morphology evolution. For example, donor and acceptor molecules actually present at the external interfaces will determine the leakage current of the device, energy-level alignment, and interfacial recombination processes. Different techniques have been developed over the last few years to understand its relationship with the device efficiency. Of special interest are those techniques which enable in situ analysis being non-destructive as they can be used to study accelerated degradation experiments and

  1. Rate-dependent interface capture beyond the coffee-ring effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanan; Yang, Qiang; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism of droplet drying is a widely concerned fundamental issue since controlling the deposition morphology of droplet has significant influence on printing, biology pattern, self-assembling and other solution-based devices fabrication. Here we reveal a striking different kinetics-controlled deposition regime beyond the ubiquitous coffee-ring effect that suspended particles tend to kinetically accumulate at the air-liquid interface and deposit uniformly. As the interface shrinkage rate exceeds the particle average diffusion rate, particles in vertical evaporation flow will be captured by the descending surface, producing surface particle jam and forming viscous quasi-solid layer, which dramatically prevents the trapped particles from being transported to drop edge and results in uniform deposition. This simple, robust drying regime will provide a versatile strategy to control the droplet deposition morphology, and a novel direction of interface assembling for fabricating superlattices and high quality photonic crystal patterns.

  2. Interaction of L-Phenylalanine with a Phospholipid Monolayer at the Water-Air Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Elizabeth C; Perkins, Russell J; Telesford, Dana-Marie; Adams, Ellen M; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Allen, Heather C; Roeselová, Martina; Vaida, Veronica

    2015-07-23

    The interaction of L-phenylalanine with a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) monolayer at the air-water interface was explored using a combination of experimental techniques and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. By means of Langmuir trough methods and Brewster angle microscopy, L-phenylalanine was shown to significantly alter the interfacial tension and the surface domain morphology of the DPPC film. In addition, confocal microscopy was used to explore the aggregation state of L-phenylalanine in the bulk aqueous phase. Finally, MD simulations were performed to gain molecular-level information on the interactions of L-phenylalanine and DPPC at the interface. Taken together, these results show that L-phenylalanine intercalates into a DPPC film at the air-water interface, thereby affecting the surface tension, phase morphology, and ordering of the DPPC film. The results are discussed in the context of biological systems and the mechanism of diseases such as phenylketonuria.

  3. Computational Approaches to Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corker; Lebacqz, J. Victor (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Tools which make use of computational processes - mathematical, algorithmic and/or knowledge-based - to perform portions of the design, evaluation and/or construction of interfaces have become increasingly available and powerful. Nevertheless, there is little agreement as to the appropriate role for a computational tool to play in the interface design process. Current tools fall into broad classes depending on which portions, and how much, of the design process they automate. The purpose of this panel is to review and generalize about computational approaches developed to date, discuss the tasks which for which they are suited, and suggest methods to enhance their utility and acceptance. Panel participants represent a wide diversity of application domains and methodologies. This should provide for lively discussion about implementation approaches, accuracy of design decisions, acceptability of representational tradeoffs and the optimal role for a computational tool to play in the interface design process.

  4. Physics of Surfaces and Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ibach, Harald

    2006-01-01

    This graduate-level textbook covers the major developments in surface sciences of recent decades, from experimental tricks and basic techniques to the latest experimental methods and theoretical understanding. It is unique in its attempt to treat the physics of surfaces, thin films and interfaces, surface chemistry, thermodynamics, statistical physics and the physics of the solid/electrolyte interface in an integral manner, rather than in separate compartments. The Physics of Surfaces and Interfaces is designed as a handbook for the researcher as well as a study-text for graduate students in physics or chemistry with special interest in the surface sciences, material science, or the nanosciences. The experienced researcher, professional or academic teacher will appreciate the opportunity to share many insights and ideas that have grown out of the author's long experience. Readers will likewise appreciate the wide range of topics treated, each supported by extensive references. Graduate students will benefit f...

  5. PinBus Interface Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Adgerson, Jewel D.; Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Richard M.; Pratt, Robert G.

    2009-12-30

    On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL has explored and expanded upon a simple control interface that might have merit for the inexpensive communication of smart grid operational objectives (demand response, for example) to small electric end-use devices and appliances. The approach relies on bi-directional communication via the electrical voltage states of from one to eight shared interconnection pins. The name PinBus has been suggested and adopted for the proposed interface protocol. The protocol is defined through the presentation of state diagrams and the pins’ functional definitions. Both simulations and laboratory demonstrations are being conducted to demonstrate the elegance and power of the suggested approach. PinBus supports a very high degree of interoperability across its interfaces, allowing innumerable pairings of devices and communication protocols and supporting the practice of practically any smart grid use case.

  6. Multi-robot control interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Walton, Miles C [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-06

    Methods and systems for controlling a plurality of robots through a single user interface include at least one robot display window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot display window illustrating one or more conditions of a respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes at least one robot control window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot control window configured to receive one or more commands for sending to the respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes a multi-robot common window comprised of information received from each of the plurality of robots.

  7. Interfacing with the computational brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Andrew; Fetz, Eberhard E

    2011-10-01

    Neuroscience is just beginning to understand the neural computations that underlie our remarkable capacity to learn new motor tasks. Studies of natural movements have emphasized the importance of concepts such as dimensionality reduction within hierarchical levels of redundancy, optimization of behavior in the presence of sensorimotor noise and internal models for predictive control. These concepts also provide a framework for understanding the improvements in performance seen in myoelectric-controlled interface and brain-machine interface paradigms. Recent experiments reveal how volitional activity in the motor system combines with sensory feedback to shape neural representations and drives adaptation of behavior. By elucidating these mechanisms, a new generation of intelligent interfaces can be designed to exploit neural plasticity and restore function after neurological injury.

  8. Coordinating user interfaces for consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Jakob

    2001-01-01

    In the years since Jakob Nielsen's classic collection on interface consistency first appeared, much has changed, and much has stayed the same. On the one hand, there's been exponential growth in the opportunities for following or disregarding the principles of interface consistency-more computers, more applications, more users, and of course the vast expanse of the Web. On the other, there are the principles themselves, as persistent and as valuable as ever. In these contributed chapters, you'll find details on many methods for seeking and enforcing consistency, along with bottom-line analys

  9. Artful interfaces within biological materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W.C. Dunlop

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Biological materials have a wide range of mechanical properties matching their biological function. This is achieved via complex structural hierarchies, spanning many length scales, arising from the assembly of different sized building blocks during growth. The interfaces between these building blocks can increase resistance to fracture, join materials of different character, make them deform more easily and provide motility. While they represent only a tiny fraction of the overall volume, interfaces are essential for the integrity and function of the overall tissue. Understanding their construction principles, often based on specialized molecular assemblies, may change our current thinking about composite materials.

  10. Immersed interface methods. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeVeque, R.J.; Adams, L.M.; Bube, K.P.

    1996-11-01

    Cartesian grid methods encompass a wide variety of techniques used to solve partial differential equations in more than one space dimension on uniform Cartesian grids even when the underlying geometry is complex and not aligned with the grid. The authors` groups work on Immersed Interface Methods (IIM) was originally motivated by the desire to understand and improve the ``Immersed Boundary Method``, developed by Charles Peskin to solve incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in complicated geometries with moving elastic boundaries. This report briefly discusses the development of the Immersed Interface Methods and gives examples of application of the method in solving several partial differential equations.

  11. DHMI: dynamic holographic microscopy interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuefei; Zheng, Yujie; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a powerful in-vitro biological imaging tool. In this paper, we report a fully automated off-axis digital holographic microscopy system completed with a graphical user interface in the Matlab environment. The interface primarily includes Fourier domain processing, phase reconstruction, aberration compensation and autofocusing. A variety of imaging operations such as region of interest selection, de-noising mode (filtering and averaging), low frame rate imaging for immediate reconstruction and high frame rate imaging routine ( 27 fps) are implemented to facilitate ease of use.

  12. The interface at the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2011-01-01

    experimental dresses made by Philips within the field of wearable computing subscribe to the concept of ‘ideal communication’. In her article, she explains how this particular type of communication is linked to the paranormal phenomena of mind reading and telepathy, and argues that sensor-based wearable......In the development of and discourses around interfaces there has always been a strong urge to bypass representation and ‘jack’ directly in to the human brain, consciousness, perceptions and feelings. In her article ”The interface at the skin” Lone Koefoed Hansen looks at how two contemporary...

  13. Inhomogeneous interface laser mirror coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledger, A M

    1979-09-01

    Methods of improving the durability of thin-film laser mirror coatings for 10.6 microm using thorium fluoride, zinc selenide, and zinc sulfide materials have been investigated. The largest improvement in film durability was obtained by using inhomogeneous interface fabrication for all the dielectric-dielectric interfaces and by incorporating cerium fluoride protective overcoating material into the film design. Experimental results are given for enhanced reflectors, polarization-selective coatings, and buried-grating aperture-sharing coatings designed for high-power laser applications.

  14. Chemical reactions at aqueous interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecitis, Chad David

    2009-12-01

    Interfaces or phase boundaries are a unique chemical environment relative to individual gas, liquid, or solid phases. Interfacial reaction mechanisms and kinetics are often at variance with homogeneous chemistry due to mass transfer, molecular orientation, and catalytic effects. Aqueous interfaces are a common subject of environmental science and engineering research, and three environmentally relevant aqueous interfaces are investigated in this thesis: 1) fluorochemical sonochemistry (bubble-water), 2) aqueous aerosol ozonation (gas-water droplet), and 3) electrolytic hydrogen production and simultaneous organic oxidation (water-metal/semiconductor). Direct interfacial analysis under environmentally relevant conditions is difficult, since most surface-specific techniques require relatively `extreme' conditions. Thus, the experimental investigations here focus on the development of chemical reactors and analytical techniques for the completion of time/concentration-dependent measurements of reactants and their products. Kinetic modeling, estimations, and/or correlations were used to extract information on interfacially relevant processes. We found that interfacial chemistry was determined to be the rate-limiting step to a subsequent series of relatively fast homogeneous reactions, for example: 1) Pyrolytic cleavage of the ionic headgroup of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) adsorbed to cavitating bubble-water interfaces during sonolysis was the rate-determining step in transformation to their inorganic constituents carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and fluoride; 2) ozone oxidation of aqueous iodide to hypoiodous acid at the aerosol-gas interface is the rate-determining step in the oxidation of bromide and chloride to dihalogens; 3) Electrolytic oxidation of anodic titanol surface groups is rate-limiting for the overall oxidation of organics by the dichloride radical. We also found chemistry unique to the interface, for example: 1

  15. Performance Metrics for Haptic Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Samur, Evren

    2012-01-01

    Haptics technology is being used more and more in different applications, such as in computer games for increased immersion, in surgical simulators to create a realistic environment for training of surgeons, in surgical robotics due to safety issues and in mobile phones to provide feedback from user action. The existence of these applications highlights a clear need to understand performance metrics for haptic interfaces and their implications on device design, use and application. Performance Metrics for Haptic Interfaces aims at meeting this need by establishing standard practices for the ev

  16. A database for TMT interface control documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Kim; Roberts, Scott; Brighton, Allan; Rogers, John

    2016-08-01

    The TMT Software System consists of software components that interact with one another through a software infrastructure called TMT Common Software (CSW). CSW consists of software services and library code that is used by developers to create the subsystems and components that participate in the software system. CSW also defines the types of components that can be constructed and their roles. The use of common component types and shared middleware services allows standardized software interfaces for the components. A software system called the TMT Interface Database System was constructed to support the documentation of the interfaces for components based on CSW. The programmer describes a subsystem and each of its components using JSON-style text files. A command interface file describes each command a component can receive and any commands a component sends. The event interface files describe status, alarms, and events a component publishes and status and events subscribed to by a component. A web application was created to provide a user interface for the required features. Files are ingested into the software system's database. The user interface allows browsing subsystem interfaces, publishing versions of subsystem interfaces, and constructing and publishing interface control documents that consist of the intersection of two subsystem interfaces. All published subsystem interfaces and interface control documents are versioned for configuration control and follow the standard TMT change control processes. Subsystem interfaces and interface control documents can be visualized in the browser or exported as PDF files.

  17. Hyper-Morphology: Experimentations with bio-inspired design processes for adaptive spatial re-use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biloria, N.; Chang, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Hyper-Morphology is an on-going research outlining a bottom-up evolutionary design process based on autonomous cellular building components. The research interfaces critical operational traits of the natural world (Evolutionary Development Biology, Embryology and Cellular Differentiation) with

  18. Hyper-morphology: Experimentations with bio-inspired design processes for adaptive spatial re-use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    This article is a newer version of a paper originally published in the eCAADe 2013 Conference Proceedings Computation & Performance. Hyper-Morphology is an on-going research outlining a bottom-up evolutionary design process based on autonomous cellular building components. The research interfaces c

  19. Hyper-Morphology: Experimentations with bio-inspired design processes for adaptive spatial re-use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biloria, N.; Chang, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Hyper-Morphology is an on-going research outlining a bottom-up evolutionary design process based on autonomous cellular building components. The research interfaces critical operational traits of the natural world (Evolutionary Development Biology, Embryology and Cellular Differentiation) with Evolu

  20. Hyper-morphology: Experimentations with bio-inspired design processes for adaptive spatial re-use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    This article is a newer version of a paper originally published in the eCAADe 2013 Conference Proceedings Computation & Performance. Hyper-Morphology is an on-going research outlining a bottom-up evolutionary design process based on autonomous cellular building components. The research interfaces c

  1. Morphology and Efficiency : The Case of Polymer/ZnO Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, L.J.A.; Stenzel, O.; Oosterhout, S.D.; Wienk, M.M.; Schmidt, V.; Janssen, R.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of polymer solar cells critically depends on the morphology of the interface between the donor- and acceptor materials that are used to create and transport charge carriers. Solar cells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) and ZnO were fully characterized in terms of their efficiency and

  2. Hyper-Morphology: Experimentations with bio-inspired design processes for adaptive spatial re-use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biloria, N.; Chang, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Hyper-Morphology is an on-going research outlining a bottom-up evolutionary design process based on autonomous cellular building components. The research interfaces critical operational traits of the natural world (Evolutionary Development Biology, Embryology and Cellular Differentiation) with Evolu

  3. Killer whale morphology - Variation in morphology of killer whale ecotypes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — We are using elliptic Fourier analysis to determine the patterns of variation in morphology of dorsal fin shape, saddle patch shape, and eye patch shape of resident,...

  4. BASIN: Beowulf Analysis Symbolic INterface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesperini, Enrico; Goldberg, David M.; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Dura, James; Jones, Douglas

    2013-08-01

    BASIN (Beowulf Analysis Symbolic INterface) is a flexible, integrated suite of tools for multiuser parallel data analysis and visualization that allows researchers to harness the power of Beowulf PC clusters and multi-processor machines without necessarily being experts in parallel programming. It also includes general tools for data distribution and parallel operations on distributed data for developing libraries for specific tasks.

  5. Miniaturized neural interfaces and implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Boretius, Tim; Ordonez, Juan; Hassler, Christina; Henle, Christian; Meier, Wolfgang; Plachta, Dennis T. T.; Schuettler, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Neural prostheses are technical systems that interface nerves to treat the symptoms of neurological diseases and to restore sensory of motor functions of the body. Success stories have been written with the cochlear implant to restore hearing, with spinal cord stimulators to treat chronic pain as well as urge incontinence, and with deep brain stimulators in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Highly complex neural implants for novel medical applications can be miniaturized either by means of precision mechanics technologies using known and established materials for electrodes, cables, and hermetic packages or by applying microsystems technologies. Examples for both approaches will be introduced and discussed. Electrode arrays for recording of electrocorticograms during presurgical epilepsy diagnosis have been manufactured using approved materials and a marking laser to achieve an integration density that is adequate in the context of brain machine interfaces, e.g. on the motor cortex. Microtechnologies have to be used for further miniaturization to develop polymer-based flexible and light weighted electrode arrays to interface the peripheral and central nervous system. Polyimide as substrate and insulation material will be discussed as well as several application examples for nerve interfaces like cuffs, filament like electrodes and large arrays for subdural implantation.

  6. Interface design for digital courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabbers, Huib; Kester, Liesbeth; Hummel, Hans; Nadolski, Rob

    2005-01-01

    This text should be referred to as: Tabbers, H., Kester, L., Hummel, H. G. K., & Nadolski, R. J. (2003). Interface design for digital courses. In W. Jochems, J. van Merriënboer, & R. Koper (Eds). Integrated e-learning: implications for pedagogy, technology & organisation (pp. 100-111). London: Routl

  7. Interface design for digital courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabbers, H.; Kester, L.; Hummel, H.; Nadolski, R.; Jochems, W.; Merriënboer, J.; Koper, R.

    2003-01-01

    An important question in web-based education is how to deal with the design of the interface. What will the actual screen look like? Two main issues that are especially relevant for educational purposes are discussed, both from a Human-Computer Interaction and an Educational Psychology perspective.

  8. Interface design for digital courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabbers, Huib; Kester, Liesbeth; Hummel, Hans; Nadolski, Rob

    2005-01-01

    This text should be referred to as: Tabbers, H., Kester, L., Hummel, H. G. K., & Nadolski, R. J. (2003). Interface design for digital courses. In W. Jochems, J. van Merriënboer, & R. Koper (Eds). Integrated e-learning: implications for pedagogy, technology & organisation (pp. 100-111). London: Routl

  9. The steel–concrete interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angst, Ueli M.; Geiker, Mette Rica; Michel, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Although the steel–concrete interface (SCI) is widely recognized to influence the durability of reinforced concrete, a systematic overview and detailed documentation of the various aspects of the SCI are lacking. In this paper, we compiled a comprehensive list of possible local characteristics...

  10. Surface Waves on Metamaterials Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Panah, Mohammad Esmail Aryaee

    2016-01-01

    We analyze surface electromagnetic waves supported at the interface between isotropic medium and effective anisotropic material that can be realized by alternating conductive and dielectrics layers. This configuration can host various types of surface waves and therefore can serve as a rich platf...

  11. Interfacing DNA nanodevices with biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Mathias; Kjems, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    in biology and biomedicine acting as a molecular ‘nanorobot’ or smart drug interacting with the cellular machinery. In this review, we will explore and examine the perspective of DNA nanotechnology for such use. We summarize which requirements DNA nanostructures must fulfil to function in cellular...... environments and inside living organisms. In addition, we highlight recent advances in interfacing DNA nanostructures with biology....

  12. Tactile melodies in user interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, H.A.H.C. van; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2003-01-01

    The application of dynamic vibrotactile displays in user interfaces is still a rare situation. There are, however, several important advantages of using the sense of touch as an information channel, especially in relation to overloaded or unavailable visual and auditory channels. We propose here to

  13. Human-computer interface design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowser, S.E.

    1995-04-01

    Modern military forces assume that computer-based information is reliable, timely, available, usable, and shared. The importance of computer-based information is based on the assumption that {open_quotes}shared situation awareness, coupled with the ability to conduct continuous operations, will allow information age armies to observe, decide, and act faster, more correctly and more precisely than their enemies.{close_quotes} (Sullivan and Dubik 1994). Human-Computer Interface (HCI) design standardization is critical to the realization of the previously stated assumptions. Given that a key factor of a high-performance, high-reliability system is an easy-to-use, effective design of the interface between the hardware, software, and the user, it follows logically that the interface between the computer and the military user is critical to the success of the information-age military. The proliferation of computer technology has resulted in the development of an extensive variety of computer-based systems and the implementation of varying HCI styles on these systems. To accommodate the continued growth in computer-based systems, minimize HCI diversity, and improve system performance and reliability, the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) is continuing to adopt interface standards for developing computer-based systems.

  14. Robust brain-computer interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuderink, Boris

    2011-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) enables direct communication from the brain to devices, bypassing the traditional pathway of peripheral nerves and muscles. Current BCIs aimed at patients require that the user invests weeks, or even months, to learn the skill to intentionally modify their brain sign

  15. Surface Waves on Metamaterials Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Panah, Mohammad Esmail Aryaee;

    2016-01-01

    We analyze surface electromagnetic waves supported at the interface between isotropic medium and effective anisotropic material that can be realized by alternating conductive and dielectrics layers. This configuration can host various types of surface waves and therefore can serve as a rich platf...

  16. Gluing Soft Interfaces by Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhen; Dobrynin, Andrey

    Using a combination of the molecular dynamics simulations and scaling analysis we studied reinforcement of interface between two soft gel-like materials by spherical nanoparticles. Analysis of the simulations shows that the depth of penetration of a nanoparticle into a gel is determined by a balance of the elastic energy of the gel and nanoparticle deformations and the surface energy of nanoparticle/gel interface. In order to evaluate work of adhesion of the reinforced interface, the potential of mean force for separation of two gels was calculated. These simulations showed that the gel separation proceeds through formation of necks connecting nanoparticle with two gels. The shapes of the necks are controlled by a fine interplay between nanoparticle/gel surface energies and elastic energy of the neck deformation. Our simulations showed that by introducing nanoparticles at soft interfaces, the work required for separation of two gels could be 10-100 times larger than the work of adhesion between two gels without nanoparticle reinforcement. These results provide insight in understanding the mechanism of gluing soft gels and biological tissues by nano- and micro-sized particles. NSF DMR-1409710.

  17. Embodied agents in de interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, M.J.; Nijholt, A.

    2001-01-01

    Steeds meer zien we het gebruik van mensachtige, geanimeerde figuren in interfaces en andere software applicaties, niet alleen in onderzoeksprojecten maar ook in commerciële software. Een voorbeeld dat bijna iedereen wel kent (en waar velen wel wat op aan te merken hebben) is de ‘office assistant’ i

  18. Spray algorithm without interface construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kadhem Majhool, Ahmed Abed; Watkins, A. P.

    2012-05-01

    This research is aimed to create a new and robust family of convective schemes to capture the interface between the dispersed and the carrier phases in a spray without the need to build up the interface boundary. The selection of the Weighted Average Flux (WAF) scheme is due to this scheme being designed to deal with random flux scheme which is second-order accurate in space and time. The convective flux in each cell face utilizes the WAF scheme blended with Switching Technique for Advection and Capturing of Surfaces (STACS) scheme for high resolution flux limiters. In the next step, the high resolution scheme is blended with the WAF scheme to provide the sharpness and boundedness of the interface by using switching strategy. In this work, the Eulerian-Eulerian framework of non-reactive turbulent spray is set in terms of theoretical proposed methodology namely spray moments of drop size distribution, presented by Beck and Watkins [1]. The computational spray model avoids the need to segregate the local droplet number distribution into parcels of identical droplets. The proposed scheme is tested on capturing the spray edges in modelling hollow cone sprays without need to reconstruct two-phase interface. A test is made on simple comparison between TVD scheme and WAF scheme using the same flux limiter on convective flow hollow cone spray. Results show the WAF scheme gives a better prediction than TVD scheme. The only way to check the accuracy of the presented models is by evaluating the spray sheet thickness.

  19. Brush/Fin Thermal Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Timothy R.; Seaman, Christopher L.; Ellman, Brett M.

    2004-01-01

    Brush/fin thermal interfaces are being developed to increase heat-transfer efficiency and thereby enhance the thermal management of orbital replaceable units (ORUs) of electronic and other equipment aboard the International Space Station. Brush/fin thermal interfaces could also be used to increase heat-transfer efficiency in terrestrial electronic and power systems. In a typical application according to conventional practice, a replaceable heat-generating unit includes a mounting surface with black-anodized metal fins that mesh with the matching fins of a heat sink or radiator on which the unit is mounted. The fins do not contact each other, but transfer heat via radiation exchange. A brush/fin interface also includes intermeshing fins, the difference being that the gaps between the fins are filled with brushes made of carbon or other fibers. The fibers span the gap between intermeshed fins, allowing heat transfer by conduction through the fibers. The fibers are attached to the metal surfaces as velvet-like coats in the manner of the carbon fiber brush heat exchangers described in the preceding article. The fiber brushes provide both mechanical compliance and thermal contact, thereby ensuring low contact thermal resistance. A certain amount of force is required to intermesh the fins due to sliding friction of the brush s fiber tips against the fins. This force increases linearly with penetration distance, reaching 1 psi (6.9 kPa) for full 2-in. (5.1 cm) penetration for the conventional radiant fin interface. Removal forces can be greater due to fiber buckling upon reversing the sliding direction. This buckling force can be greatly reduced by biasing the fibers at an angle perpendicularly to the sliding direction. Means of containing potentially harmful carbon fiber debris, which is electrically conductive, have been developed. Small prototype brush/fin thermal interfaces have been tested and found to exhibit temperature drops about onesixth of that of conventional

  20. Technique for converting non-conforming hexahedral-to-hexahedral interfaces into conforming interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staten, Matthew L.; Shepherd, Jason F.; Ledoux, Frank; Shimada, Kenji; Merkley, Karl G.; Carbonera, Carlos

    2013-03-05

    A technique for conforming an interface between a first mesh and a second mesh is disclosed. A first interface surface in the first mesh and a second interface surface in the second mesh residing along the interface are identified. The first and second interface surfaces are initially non-conforming along the interface. Chords within the first and second interface surfaces that fall within a threshold separation distance of each other are paired. Sheets having chords that reside within the first or second interface surfaces are recursively inserted into or extracted from one or both of the first and second meshes until all remaining chords within the first interface surface are paired with corresponding chords in the second interface surface and all remaining chords within the second interface surface are paired with corresponding chords in the first interface surface.

  1. MIB Galerkin method for elliptic interface problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kelin; Zhan, Meng; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Summary Material interfaces are omnipresent in the real-world structures and devices. Mathematical modeling of material interfaces often leads to elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) with discontinuous coefficients and singular sources, which are commonly called elliptic interface problems. The development of high-order numerical schemes for elliptic interface problems has become a well defined field in applied and computational mathematics and attracted much attention in the past decades. Despite of significant advances, challenges remain in the construction of high-order schemes for nonsmooth interfaces, i.e., interfaces with geometric singularities, such as tips, cusps and sharp edges. The challenge of geometric singularities is amplified when they are associated with low solution regularities, e.g., tip-geometry effects in many fields. The present work introduces a matched interface and boundary (MIB) Galerkin method for solving two-dimensional (2D) elliptic PDEs with complex interfaces, geometric singularities and low solution regularities. The Cartesian grid based triangular elements are employed to avoid the time consuming mesh generation procedure. Consequently, the interface cuts through elements. To ensure the continuity of classic basis functions across the interface, two sets of overlapping elements, called MIB elements, are defined near the interface. As a result, differentiation can be computed near the interface as if there is no interface. Interpolation functions are constructed on MIB element spaces to smoothly extend function values across the interface. A set of lowest order interface jump conditions is enforced on the interface, which in turn, determines the interpolation functions. The performance of the proposed MIB Galerkin finite element method is validated by numerical experiments with a wide range of interface geometries, geometric singularities, low regularity solutions and grid resolutions. Extensive numerical studies confirm

  2. MIB Galerkin method for elliptic interface problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kelin; Zhan, Meng; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-12-15

    Material interfaces are omnipresent in the real-world structures and devices. Mathematical modeling of material interfaces often leads to elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) with discontinuous coefficients and singular sources, which are commonly called elliptic interface problems. The development of high-order numerical schemes for elliptic interface problems has become a well defined field in applied and computational mathematics and attracted much attention in the past decades. Despite of significant advances, challenges remain in the construction of high-order schemes for nonsmooth interfaces, i.e., interfaces with geometric singularities, such as tips, cusps and sharp edges. The challenge of geometric singularities is amplified when they are associated with low solution regularities, e.g., tip-geometry effects in many fields. The present work introduces a matched interface and boundary (MIB) Galerkin method for solving two-dimensional (2D) elliptic PDEs with complex interfaces, geometric singularities and low solution regularities. The Cartesian grid based triangular elements are employed to avoid the time consuming mesh generation procedure. Consequently, the interface cuts through elements. To ensure the continuity of classic basis functions across the interface, two sets of overlapping elements, called MIB elements, are defined near the interface. As a result, differentiation can be computed near the interface as if there is no interface. Interpolation functions are constructed on MIB element spaces to smoothly extend function values across the interface. A set of lowest order interface jump conditions is enforced on the interface, which in turn, determines the interpolation functions. The performance of the proposed MIB Galerkin finite element method is validated by numerical experiments with a wide range of interface geometries, geometric singularities, low regularity solutions and grid resolutions. Extensive numerical studies confirm the

  3. Ionic Structure at Dielectric Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yufei

    The behavior of ions in liquids confined between macromolecules determines the outcome of many nanoscale assembly processes in synthetic and biological materials such as colloidal dispersions, emulsions, hydrogels, DNA, cell membranes, and proteins. Theoretically, the macromolecule-liquid boundary is often modeled as a dielectric interface and an important quantity of interest is the ionic structure in a liquid confined between two such interfaces. The knowledge gleaned from the study of ionic structure in such models can be useful in several industrial applications, such as biosensors, lithium-ion batteries double-layer supercapacitors for energy storage and seawater desalination. Electrostatics plays a critical role in the development of such functional materials. Many of the functions of these materials, result from charge and composition heterogeneities. There are great challenges in solving electrostatics problems in heterogeneous media with arbitrary shapes because electrostatic interactions remains unknown but depend on the particular density of charge distributions. Charged molecules in heterogeneous media affect the media's dielectric response and hence the interaction between the charges is unknown since it depends on the media and on the geometrical properties of the interfaces. To determine the properties of heterogeneous systems including crucial effects neglected in classical mean field models such as the hard core of the ions, the dielectric mismatch and interfaces with arbitrary shapes. The effect of hard core interactions accounts properly for short range interactions and the effect of local dielectric heterogeneities in the presence of ions and/or charged molecules for long-range interactions are both analyzed via an energy variational principle that enables to update charges and the medium's response in the same simulation time step. In particular, we compute the ionic structure in a model system of electrolyte confined by two planar dielectric

  4. In situ study of the initiation of hydrogen bubbles at the aluminium metal/oxide interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, De-Gang; Wang, Zhang-Jie; Sun, Jun; Li, Ju; Ma, Evan; Shan, Zhi-Wei

    2015-09-01

    The presence of excess hydrogen at the interface between a metal substrate and a protective oxide can cause blistering and spallation of the scale. However, it remains unclear how nanoscale bubbles manage to reach the critical size in the first place. Here, we perform in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy experiments of the aluminium metal/oxide interface under hydrogen exposure. It is found that once the interface is weakened by hydrogen segregation, surface diffusion of Al atoms initiates the formation of faceted cavities on the metal side, driven by Wulff reconstruction. The morphology and growth rate of these cavities are highly sensitive to the crystallographic orientation of the aluminium substrate. Once the cavities grow to a critical size, the internal gas pressure can become great enough to blister the oxide layer. Our findings have implications for understanding hydrogen damage of interfaces.

  5. Spin Coated Plasmonic Nanoparticle Interfaces for Photocurrent Enhancement in Thin Film Si Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Israelowitz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticle (NP arrays of noble metals strongly absorb light in the visible to infrared wavelengths through resonant interactions between the incident electromagnetic field and the metal’s free electron plasma. Such plasmonic interfaces enhance light absorption and photocurrent in solar cells. We report a cost-effective and scalable room temperature/pressure spin-coating route to fabricate broadband plasmonic interfaces consisting of silver NPs. The NP interface yields photocurrent enhancement (PE in thin film silicon devices by up to 200% which is significantly greater than previously reported values. For coatings produced from Ag nanoink containing particles with average diameter of 40 nm, an optimal NP surface coverage ϕ of 7% is observed. Scanning electron microscopy of interface morphologies revealed that for low ϕ, particles are well separated, resulting in broadband PE. At higher ϕ, formation of particle strings and clusters causes red-shifting of the PE peak and a narrower spectral response.

  6. UNIVERSAL INTERFACE TO MULTIPLE OPERATIONS SYSTEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1986-01-01

    Alternative ways to provide access to operations systems that maintain, test, and configure complex telephone networks are being explored. It is suggested that a universal interface that provides simultaneous access to multiple operations systems that execute in different hardware and software...... environments, can be provided by an architecture that is based on the separation of presentation issues from application issues and on a modular interface management system that consists of a virtual user interface, physical user interface, and interface agent. The interface functionality that is needed...

  7. UNIVERSAL INTERFACE TO MULTIPLE OPERATIONS SYSTEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1986-01-01

    Alternative ways to provide access to operations systems that maintain, test, and configure complex telephone networks are being explored. It is suggested that a universal interface that provides simultaneous access to multiple operations systems that execute in different hardware and software...... environments, can be provided by an architecture that is based on the separation of presentation issues from application issues and on a modular interface management system that consists of a virtual user interface, physical user interface, and interface agent. The interface functionality that is needed...

  8. Crystallography and Morphology of Niobium Carbide in As-Cast HP-Niobium Reformer Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Karl G.; Kral, Milo V.

    2012-06-01

    The microstructures of two as-cast heats of niobium-modified HP stainless steels were characterized. Particular attention was paid to the interdendritic niobium-rich carbides formed during solidification of these alloys. At low magnifications, these precipitates are grouped in colonies of similar lamellae. Higher magnifications revealed that the lamellae actually obtain two distinct morphologies. The type I morphology exhibits broad planar interfaces with a smooth platelike shape. Type II lamellae have undulating interfaces and an overall reticulated shape. To provide further insight into the origin of these two different morphologies, the microstructure and crystallography of each have been studied in detail using high resolution scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, various electron diffraction methods (electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), selected area diffraction (SAD), and convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED)), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  9. Morphological Transform for Image Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Pastor Sanchez Fernandez

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A new method for image compression based on morphological associative memories (MAMs is presented. We used the MAM to implement a new image transform and applied it at the transformation stage of image coding, thereby replacing such traditional methods as the discrete cosine transform or the discrete wavelet transform. Autoassociative and heteroassociative MAMs can be considered as a subclass of morphological neural networks. The morphological transform (MT presented in this paper generates heteroassociative MAMs derived from image subblocks. The MT is applied to individual blocks of the image using some transformation matrix as an input pattern. Depending on this matrix, the image takes a morphological representation, which is used to perform the data compression at the next stages. With respect to traditional methods, the main advantage offered by the MT is the processing speed, whereas the compression rate and the signal-to-noise ratio are competitive to conventional transforms.

  10. Morphological plasticity in Cladosporium sphaerospermum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dugan, F.M.; Braun, U.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2008-01-01

    A morphologically distinct isolate of Cladosporium sphaerospermum from a North American patent collection, referenced as Cladosporium lignicola in the patent, was examined. Generic affinity was confirmed by scanning electron microscopic examination of conidiogenous loci and conidial hila. Species id

  11. Quantitative morphological descriptors confirm traditionally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-09-30

    Sep 30, 2015 ... classified morphotypes of Pentadesma butyracea Sabine (clusiaceae) ... Objective: Pentadesma butyracea is a multi-purpose tree species in Africa with great morphological ...... Fruit, Vegetable, and Cereals Science and.

  12. Human Computer Interface Design Criteria. Volume 1. User Interface Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    2 entitled Human Computer Interface ( HCI )Design Criteria Volume 1: User Interlace Requirements which contains the following major changes from...MISSILE SYSTEMS CENTER Air Force Space Command 483 N. Aviation Blvd. El Segundo, CA 90245 4. This standard has been approved for use on all Space and...and efficient model of how the system works and can generalize this knowledge to other systems. According to Mayhew in Principles and Guidelines in

  13. Morphology Simulation for Ion-Assisted Deposition Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jenn-SenLin; Shin-PonJu; Jian-MingLu

    2004-01-01

    The molecular dynamics simulation is applied to investigate the lnfluence of the incident 1on energy ana mclident angular distribution upon ion-assisted deposition process. The Cu-Cu and Ar-Cu interactions are modeled using the many body tight-binding potential and the Moliere potential, respectively, and the interface width is used to characterize the surface roughness properties at both transient and final state conditions. The results show that the surface roughness of the deposition film is lower when more Ar-to-Cu ratio is used at the same incident energy and angle. For the relative low or high incident energy, the film morphologies are not sensitive to the incident angle. However, if the incident energy of the argon ions is too high, the film morphology will be worse than that without using the ion-assisted deposition.

  14. Dislocation Model and Morphology Simulation of bcc fcc Martensitic Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    By using molecular dynamics computer simulation at atomic level, the effects of single dislocation and dipole dislocations on nucleation and growth of martensitic transformation have been studied. It was found that only the location of tension or compression stress fields of the dislocations are favorable for martensite nucleation in NiAl alloy and the dislocations can move to accommodate partly the transformation strain during the nucleation and growth of martensite. Combined with the molecular dynamics simulation, a two dimensional simulation for martensite morphology based on a dislocation model bas been performed. Many factors related to martensitic transformation were considered, such as supercooling, interface energy, shear strain, normal strain and hydrostatic pressure. Different morphologies of martensites, similar to lath, lenticular, thin plate, couple-plate and lenticular couple-plate martensites observed in Fe-C and Fe-Ni-C alloys, were obtained.

  15. ACPYPE - AnteChamber PYthon Parser interfacE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa da Silva Alan W

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ACPYPE (or AnteChamber PYthon Parser interfacE is a wrapper script around the ANTECHAMBER software that simplifies the generation of small molecule topologies and parameters for a variety of molecular dynamics programmes like GROMACS, CHARMM and CNS. It is written in the Python programming language and was developed as a tool for interfacing with other Python based applications such as the CCPN software suite (for NMR data analysis and ARIA (for structure calculations from NMR data. ACPYPE is open source code, under GNU GPL v3, and is available as a stand-alone application at http://www.ccpn.ac.uk/acpype and as a web portal application at http://webapps.ccpn.ac.uk/acpype. Findings We verified the topologies generated by ACPYPE in three ways: by comparing with default AMBER topologies for standard amino acids; by generating and verifying topologies for a large set of ligands from the PDB; and by recalculating the structures for 5 protein–ligand complexes from the PDB. Conclusions ACPYPE is a tool that simplifies the automatic generation of topology and parameters in different formats for different molecular mechanics programmes, including calculation of partial charges, while being object oriented for integration with other applications.

  16. Morphological sampling of closed sets:

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Ronse; Mohamed Tajine

    2004-01-01

    We briefiy survey the standard morphological approach (Heijmans, 1994) to the sampling (or discretization) of sets. Then we summarize the main results of our metric theory of sampling (Ronse and Tajine, 2000; 2001; 2002; Tajine and Ronse, 2002), which can be used to analyse several sampling schemes, in particular the morphological one. We extend it to the sampling of closed sets (instead of compact ones), and to the case where the sampling subspace is boundedly compact (instead of boundedly f...

  17. Hypnotizability and Corpus Callosum Morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Horton, James Edward

    1999-01-01

    Hypnotizability and Corpus Callosum Morphology By James E. Horton Committee Chair: Helen J. Crawford, Ph.D. Department of Psychology (Abstract) In general, highly hypnotizable individuals ("highs") have exhibited greater abilities to focus attention and inhibit pain than low hypnotizable individuals ("lows"). Furthermore, highs appear to have faster neural processing than lows. The present study investigated differences between lows and highs in morphological volume of s...

  18. Sorting of Sperm by Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, James; Marcos, Marcos

    2016-11-01

    Many studies have proven that the percentage of morphologically normal sperm is a significant factor in determining the success of assisted reproduction. The velocity of sperm in a microchannel with shear flow subjected to an external field will be explored theoretically. The difference in response between morphologically normal and abnormal sperm will be computed from a statistical approach, to study the feasibility and effectiveness of sorting by an external field to remove abnormal sperm. The full name of this author is Marcos.

  19. Real Time Characterization of Solid/Liquid Interfaces During Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, S.; Kaukler, W. K.; Curreri, P. A.; Peters, P.

    1997-01-01

    A X-Ray Transmission Microscope (XTM) has been developed to observe in real time and in-situ solidification phenomenon at the solid/liquid interface. Recent improvements in the horizontal Bridgman furnace design provides real-time magnification (during solidification) up to 12OX. The increased magnification has enabled for the first time the XTM imaging of real-time growth of fibers and particles with diameters of 3-6 micrometers. Further, morphological transitions from planar to cellular interfaces have also been imaged. Results from recent XTM studies on Al-Bi monotectic system, Al-Au eutectic system and interaction of insoluble particles with s/I interfaces in composite materials will be presented. An important parameter during directional solidification of molten metal is the interfacial undercooling. This parameter controls the morphology and composition at the s/I interface. Conventional probes such as thermocouples, due to their large bead size, do not have sufficient resolution for measuring undercooling at the s/I interface. Further, the intrusive nature of the thermocouples also distorts the thermal field at the s/I interface. To overcome these inherent problems we have recently developed a compact furnace which utilizes a non-intrusive technique (Seebeck) to measure undercooling at the S/I interface. Recent interfacial undercooling measurements obtained for the Pb-Sn system will be presented. The Seebeck measurement furnace in the future will be integrated with the XTM to provide the most comprehensive tool for real time characterization of s/I interfaces during solidification.

  20. Morphological awareness in developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalis, Séverine; Colé, Pascale; Sopo, Delphine

    2004-06-01

    This study examines morphological awareness in developmental dyslexia. While the poor phonological awareness of dyslexic children has been related to their difficulty in handling the alphabetical principle, less is known about their morphological awareness, which also plays an important part in reading development. The aim of this study was to analyze in more detail the implications of the phonological impairments of dyslexics in dealing with larger units of language such as morphemes. First, the performance of dyslexic children in a series of morphological tasks was compared with the performance of children matched on reading-level and chronological age. In all the tasks, the dyslexic group performed below the chronological age control group, suggesting that morphological awareness cannot be developed entirely independently of reading experience and/or phonological skills. Comparisons with the reading-age control group indicated that, while the dyslexic children were poorer in the morphemic segmentation tasks, they performed normally for their reading level in the sentence completion tasks. Furthermore, they produced more derived words in the production task. This suggests that phonological impairments prevent the explicit segmentation of affixes while allowing the development of productive morphological knowledge. A second study compared dyslexic subgroups defined by their degree of phonological impairment. Our results suggest that dyslexics develop a certain type of morphological knowledge which they use as a compensatory reading strategy.

  1. Soft particles at fluid interfaces: wetting, structure, and rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Lucio

    Most of our current knowledge concerning the behavior of colloidal particles at fluid interfaces is limited to model spherical, hard and uniform objects. Introducing additional complexity, in terms of shape, composition or surface chemistry or by introducing particle softness, opens up a vast range of possibilities to address new fundamental and applied questions in soft matter systems at fluid interfaces. In this talk I will focus on the role of particle softness, taking the case of core-shell microgels as a paradigmatic example. Microgels are highly swollen and cross-linked hydrogel particles that, in parallel with their practical applications, e.g. for emulsion stabilization and surface patterning, are increasingly used as model systems to capture fundamental properties of bulk materials. Most microgel particles develop a core-shell morphology during synthesis, with a more cross-linked core surrounded by a corona of loosely linked and dangling polymer chains. I will first discuss the difference between the wetting of a hard spherical colloid and a core-shell microgel at an oil-water interface, pinpointing the interplay between adsorption at the interface and particle deformation. I will then move on to discuss the interplay between particle morphology and the microstructure and rheological properties of the interface. In particular, I will demonstrate that synchronizing the compression of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer makes it possible to transfer the 2D phase diagram of the particles onto a solid substrate, where different positions correspond to different values of the surface pressure and the specific area. Using atomic force microscopy, we analyzed the microstructure of the monolayer and discovered a phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases correspond to shell-shell or core-core inter

  2. Interface dynamos in supernova progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, E G; Thomas, J H; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason T.; Thomas, John H.

    2004-01-01

    Observational evidence for anisotropy in supernovae (SN) and their phenomenological connection to jetted sources such as gamma-ray bursts^Mhave revived considerations of the role magnetohydrodynamic outflows might play therein. Understanding the types of dynamos that might operate in supernova progenitors is therefore relevant. In contrast to previous work, here we study an ``interface dynamo'' for the conditions of a rapidly rotating neutron star surrounded by a convective envelope. Such dynamos have been studied for the Sun, naked white dwarfs,and post-AGB stars, where analogous configurations of strong shear layers surrounded by convective envelopes are present. The interface dynamo provides estimates of large-scale poloidal and toroidal fields, whose product enters the Poynting flux. Because the poloidal field is much weaker than the toroidal magnetic field, the actual average Poynting flux is lower than rough estimates which invoke the only the magnitude of the total magnetic energy. The lower value is s...

  3. IVOA Recommendation: IVOA Support Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Matthew; Grid,

    2011-01-01

    This document describes the minimum interface that a (SOAP- or REST-based) web service requires to participate in the IVOA. Note that this is not required of standard VO services developed prior to this specification, although uptake is strongly encouraged on any subsequent revision. All new standard VO services, however, must feature a VOSI-compliant interface. This document has been produced by the Grid and Web Services Working Group. It has been reviewed by IVOA Members and other interested parties, and has been endorsed by the IVOA Executive Committee as an IVOA Recommendation. It is a stable document and may be used as reference material or cited as a normative reference from another document. IVOA's role in making the Recommendation is to draw attention to the specification and to promote its widespread deployment. This enhances the functionality and interoperability inside the Astronomical Community.

  4. Soft matter at aqueous interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the science of interfaces between an aqueous phase and a solid, another liquid or a gaseous phase, starting from the basic physical chemistry all the way to state-of-the-art research developments. Both experimental and theoretical methods are treated thanks to the contributions of a distinguished list of authors who are all active researchers in their respective fields. The properties of these interfaces are crucial for a wide variety of processes, products and biological systems and functions, such as the formulation of personal care and food products, paints and coatings, microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip applications, cell membranes, and lung surfactants. Accordingly, research and expertise on the subject are spread over a broad range of academic disciplines and industrial laboratories. This book brings together knowledge from these different places with the aim of fostering education, collaborations and research progress.

  5. Low latency asynchronous interface circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, Greg

    2017-06-20

    In one form, a logic circuit includes an asynchronous logic circuit, a synchronous logic circuit, and an interface circuit coupled between the asynchronous logic circuit and the synchronous logic circuit. The asynchronous logic circuit has a plurality of asynchronous outputs for providing a corresponding plurality of asynchronous signals. The synchronous logic circuit has a plurality of synchronous inputs corresponding to the plurality of asynchronous outputs, a stretch input for receiving a stretch signal, and a clock output for providing a clock signal. The synchronous logic circuit provides the clock signal as a periodic signal but prolongs a predetermined state of the clock signal while the stretch signal is active. The asynchronous interface detects whether metastability could occur when latching any of the plurality of the asynchronous outputs of the asynchronous logic circuit using said clock signal, and activates the stretch signal while the metastability could occur.

  6. Active matter clusters at interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Copenhagen, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development, cancerous cells during tumor formation and metastasis, colonies of bacteria in a biofilm, or even flocks of birds and schools of fish at the macro-scale. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit that moves in two dimensions by exerting a force/torque per unit area whose magnitude depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed (overdamped) clusters encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds (underdamped), wher...

  7. Responsive cell-material interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhowre, Hala S; Rajput, Sunil; Russell, Noah A; Zelzer, Mischa

    2015-01-01

    Major design aspects for novel biomaterials are driven by the desire to mimic more varied and complex properties of a natural cellular environment with man-made materials. The development of stimulus responsive materials makes considerable contributions to the effort to incorporate dynamic and reversible elements into a biomaterial. This is particularly challenging for cell-material interactions that occur at an interface (biointerfaces); however, the design of responsive biointerfaces also presents opportunities in a variety of applications in biomedical research and regenerative medicine. This review will identify the requirements imposed on a responsive biointerface and use recent examples to demonstrate how some of these requirements have been met. Finally, the next steps in the development of more complex biomaterial interfaces, including multiple stimuli-responsive surfaces, surfaces of 3D objects and interactive biointerfaces will be discussed.

  8. Nonlinear rheological models for structured interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.

    2010-01-01

    The GENERIC formalism is a formulation of nonequilibrium thermodynamics ideally suited to develop nonlinear constitutive equations for the stress–deformation behavior of complex interfaces. Here we develop a GENERIC model for multiphase systems with interfaces displaying nonlinear viscoelastic stres

  9. Adapting Information Through Tangible Augmented Reality Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sinclair, Patrick; Martinez, Kirk

    2004-01-01

    Tangible augmented reality interfaces offer a hands on approach for examining objects and exploring the associated information. We describe two tangible augmented reality interfaces that can expose the adaptation of information presented to users about objects in augmented reality environments.

  10. Surfactant influence on interface roughness and magnetoresistance value in Fe/Cr multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kąc, M., E-mail: malgorzata.kac@ifj.edu.pl; Polit, A.; Dobrowolska, A.; Zabila, Y.; Krupiński, M.; Marszałek, M.

    2013-09-02

    Effect of interfacial roughness on magnetoresistance (MR) value in Fe/Cr multilayers was studied. The Fe/Cr multilayers were prepared on a MgO(100) substrate by molecular beam deposition technique and doped with Bi and In surfactants. The morphology of the layers, especially the interface structure, was studied using conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). CEMS spectra indicate an increase in the width of interfaces of modified samples; this effect is stronger for the sample doped with In. Auger electron spectroscopy shows the segregation of the surfactant to the surface. Magnetic and magnetotransport properties of the samples were studied by the magneto-optic Kerr effect and MR measurements. The observed hysteresis loops confirm in all samples antiferromagnetic arrangement of Fe layers sandwiched between Cr while the value of MR is larger for the doped samples. It was observed that roughening of the interfaces resulted in an increase of the MR effect. - Highlights: • Interface structure of Fe/Cr multilayers was studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. • Segregating surfactants increased the interface roughness of the doped samples. • All samples, regardless of interface structure, were antiferromagnetically coupled. • The roughening of interfaces resulted in an increase of the magnetoresistance value.

  11. Electronic Properties of Semiconductor Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    AD-A130 745 ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES OF SEMICONDUCTOR INTERFACES(U) /; UNIVERSIDAD AUfONOMA DE MADRID (SPAIN) DEPT DE FISICA DEL ESTADO SOLIDO F FLORES...J.Sfinchez-Dehesa 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS Departamento de Fisica del...resistance (Esaki and Chang 1974). A SL which has received a great deal of attention is GaAs- AlxGa Ix as grown by molecular -beam-epitaxy. Several

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy of water interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Quan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful and versatile tools for studying all kinds of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The technique of infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) is particularly attractive because it offers a viable way to do vibrational spectroscopy on any surfaces accessible to light with submonolayer sensitivity. In this thesis, the author applies SFG to study a number of important water interfaces. At the air/water interface, hydrophobic solid/water and liquid/water interfaces, it was found that approximately 25% of surface water molecules have one of their hydrogen pointing away from the liquid water. The large number of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds contributes significantly to the large interfacial energy of the hydrophobic surfaces. At the hydrophilic fused quartz/water interface and a fatty acid monolayer covered water surface, the structure and orientation of surface water molecules are controlled by the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the surface OH groups and the electrostatic interaction with the surface field from the ionization of surface groups. A change of pH value in the bulk water can significantly change the relative importance of the two interactions and cause a drastic change in orientation of the surface water molecules. SFG has also been applied to study the tribological response of some model lubricant films. Monolayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films were found to disorder orientationaly under mildly high pressure and recover promptly upon removal of the applied pressure.

  13. Tire/runway friction interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of NASA Langley's tire/runway pavement interface studies. The National Tire Modeling Program, evaluation of new tire and landing gear designs, tire wear and friction tests, and tire hydroplaning studies are examined. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility is described along with some ground friction measuring vehicles. The major goals and scope of several joint FAA/NASA programs are identified together with current status and plans.

  14. Interface between Context and Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Cong; Wang, Daojuan; Zhang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we explores how to consider contextual factors in the development of paradigm theory by focusing on the application and development of agency theory in a cross context. Specifically, the interface between agency theory and context is established from two aspects. On one hand...... and PPC, which shows that the two forms of conflict co-exist in the Chinese context and that the primary or secondary status of either conflict is sensitive to the context....

  15. The Interface Theory of Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Donald D; Singh, Manish; Prakash, Chetan

    2015-12-01

    Perception is a product of evolution. Our perceptual systems, like our limbs and livers, have been shaped by natural selection. The effects of selection on perception can be studied using evolutionary games and genetic algorithms. To this end, we define and classify perceptual strategies and allow them to compete in evolutionary games in a variety of worlds with a variety of fitness functions. We find that veridical perceptions--strategies tuned to the true structure of the world--are routinely dominated by nonveridical strategies tuned to fitness. Veridical perceptions escape extinction only if fitness varies monotonically with truth. Thus, a perceptual strategy favored by selection is best thought of not as a window on truth but as akin to a windows interface of a PC. Just as the color and shape of an icon for a text file do not entail that the text file itself has a color or shape, so also our perceptions of space-time and objects do not entail (by the Invention of Space-Time Theorem) that objective reality has the structure of space-time and objects. An interface serves to guide useful actions, not to resemble truth. Indeed, an interface hides the truth; for someone editing a paper or photo, seeing transistors and firmware is an irrelevant hindrance. For the perceptions of H. sapiens, space-time is the desktop and physical objects are the icons. Our perceptions of space-time and objects have been shaped by natural selection to hide the truth and guide adaptive behaviors. Perception is an adaptive interface.

  16. Interface high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-12-01

    Cuprate high-temperature superconductors consist of two quasi-two-dimensional (2D) substructures: CuO2 superconducting layers and charge reservoir layers. The superconductivity is realized by charge transfer from the charge reservoir layers into the superconducting layers without chemical dopants and defects being introduced into the latter, similar to modulation-doping in the semiconductor superlattices of AlGaAs/GaAs. Inspired by this scheme, we have been searching for high-temperature superconductivity in ultra-thin films of superconductors epitaxially grown on semiconductor/oxide substrates since 2008. We have observed interface-enhanced superconductivity in both conventional and unconventional superconducting films, including single atomic layer films of Pb and In on Si substrates and single unit cell (UC) films of FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with a superconducting gap of ∼20 meV in 1UC-FeSe/STO has stimulated tremendous interest in the superconductivity community, for it opens a new avenue for both raising superconducting transition temperature and understanding the pairing mechanism of unconventional high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we review mainly the experimental progress on interface-enhanced superconductivity in the three systems mentioned above with emphasis on 1UC-FeSe/STO, studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and transport experiments. We discuss the roles of interfaces and a possible pairing mechanism inferred from these studies.

  17. User acquaintance with mobile interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrler, Frederic; Walesa, Magali; Sarrey, Evelyne; Wipfli, Rolf; Lovis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Handheld technology finds slowly its place in the healthcare world. Some clinicians already use intensively dedicated mobile applications to consult clinical references. However, handheld technology hasn't still broadly embraced to the core of the healthcare business, the hospitals. The weak penetration of handheld technology in the hospitals can be partly explained by the caution of stakeholders that must be convinced about the efficiency of these tools before going forward. In a domain where temporal constraints are increasingly strong, caregivers cannot loose time on playing with gadgets. All users are not comfortable with tactile manipulations and the lack of dedicated peripheral complicates entering data for novices. Stakeholders must be convinced that caregivers will be able to master handheld devices. In this paper, we make the assumption that the proper design of an interface may influence users' performances to record information. We are also interested to find out whether users increase their efficiency when using handheld tools repeatedly. To answer these questions, we have set up a field study to compare users' performances on three different user interfaces while recording vital signs. Some user interfaces were familiar to users, and others were totally innovative. Results showed that users' familiarity with smartphone influences their performances and that users improve their performances by repeating a task.

  18. Atomistic modeling of dislocation-interface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valone, Steven M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beyerlein, Irene J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, T. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-31

    Using atomic scale models and interface defect theory, we first classify interface structures into a few types with respect to geometrical factors, then study the interfacial shear response and further simulate the dislocation-interface interactions using molecular dynamics. The results show that the atomic scale structural characteristics of both heterophases and homophases interfaces play a crucial role in (i) their mechanical responses and (ii) the ability of incoming lattice dislocations to transmit across them.

  19. Nonlinear Spectroscopu of Nanoparticle/Aqueous Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    experiments at air/water interfaces have measured:polarity at a polystyrene sulfonate /water interface,acid-base equilibria at polystyrene nanoparticle...water interface. 2009, Abstracts, 238th ACS National Meeting, Washington, D.C. Polarity of polystyrene colloid/aqueous interface with second harmonic...electrostatic potential, the pH, and the acid-base equilibrium of the carboxyl (-COOH) functional group fixed at the surface of polystyrene carboxyl

  20. Programmable atom-photon quantum interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Christoph; Eich, Pascal; Schug, Michael; Müller, Philipp; Eschner, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We present the implementation of a programmable atom-photon quantum interface, employing a single trapped +40Ca ion and single photons. Depending on its mode of operation, the interface serves as a bidirectional atom-photon quantum-state converter, as a source of entangled atom-photon states, or as a quantum frequency converter of single photons. The interface lends itself particularly to interfacing ions with spontaneous parametric down-conversion-based single-photon or entangled-photon-pair sources.

  1. Thermoelectric and morphological effects of Peltier pulsing on directional solidification of eutectic Bi-Mn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, R. P.; Larson, D. J., Jr.; Dressler, B.

    1984-01-01

    Extensive in situ thermal measurements using Peltier Interface Demarcation (PID) during directional solidification of eutectic Bi/MnBi were carried out. Observations indicate that significant thermal transients occur throughout the sample as a result of the Peltier pulsing. The contributions of the Peltier, Thomson, and Joule heats were separated and studied as a function of pulse intensity and polarity. The Joule and the combined Peltier and Thomson thermal contributions were determined as a function of time during and after the current pulses, close to the solid/liquid interface. Variations of the Bi/MnBi particle morphology clearly reveal the interface shape, changes in interface velocity, meltback, and temporary loss of cooperative growth, as a result of the pulsing.

  2. Thermoelectric and morphological effects of peltier pulsing on directional solidification of eutectic Bi-Mn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, R. P.; Larson, D. J.; Dressler, B.

    1984-12-01

    We have carried out extensive in situ thermal measurements during Peltier Interface Demarcation (PID) during directional solidification of eutectic Bi/MnBi. We have observed that significant thermal transients occur throughout the sample as a result of the Peltier pulsing. We have separated the contributions of the Peltier, Thomson, and Joule heats, and studied them as a function of pulse intensity and polarity. The Joule and the combined Peltier and Thomson thermal contributions were determined as a function of time during and after the current pulses, close to the solid/liquid interface. Variations of the Bi/MnBi particle morphology clearly reveal the interface shape, changes in interface velocity, meltback, and temporary loss of cooperative growth, as a result of the pulsing.

  3. Characterizing the morphology of protein binding patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malod-Dognin, Noël; Bansal, Achin; Cazals, Frédéric

    2012-12-01

    Let the patch of a partner in a protein complex be the collection of atoms accounting for the interaction. To improve our understanding of the structure-function relationship, we present a patch model decoupling the topological and geometric properties. While the geometry is classically encoded by the atomic positions, the topology is recorded in a graph encoding the relative position of concentric shells partitioning the interface atoms. The topological-geometric duality provides the basis of a generic dynamic programming-based algorithm comparing patches at the shell level, which may favor topological or geometric features. On the biological side, we address four questions, using 249 cocrystallized heterodimers organized in biological families. First, we dissect the morphology of binding patches and show that Nature enjoyed the topological and geometric degrees of freedom independently while retaining a finite set of qualitatively distinct topological signatures. Second, we argue that our shell-based comparison is effective to perform atomic-level comparisons and show that topological similarity is a less stringent than geometric similarity. We also use the topological versus geometric duality to exhibit topo-rigid patches, whose topology (but not geometry) remains stable upon docking. Third, we use our comparison algorithms to infer specificity-related information amidst a database of complexes. Finally, we exhibit a descriptor outperforming its contenders to predict the binding affinities of the affinity benchmark. The softwares developed with this article are availablefrom http://team.inria.fr/abs/vorpatch_compatch/.

  4. Morphological clues to wet granular pile stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, M.; Seemann, R.; Brinkmann, M.; di Michiel, M.; Sheppard, A.; Breidenbach, B.; Herminghaus, S.

    2008-03-01

    When a granular material such as sand is mixed with a certain amount of liquid, the surface tension of the latter bestows considerable stiffness to the material, which enables, for example, sand castles to be sculpted. The geometry of the liquid interface within the granular pile is of extraordinary complexity and strongly varies with the liquid content. Surprisingly, the mechanical properties of the pile are largely independent of the amount of liquid over a wide range. We resolve this puzzle with the help of X-ray microtomography, showing that the remarkable insensitivity of the mechanical properties to the liquid content is due to the particular organization of the liquid in the pile into open structures. For spherical grains, a simple geometric rule is established, which relates the macroscopic properties to the internal liquid morphologies. We present evidence that this concept is also valid for systems with non-spherical grains. Hence, our results provide new insight towards understanding the complex physics of a large variety of wet granular systems including land slides, as well as mixing and agglomeration problems.

  5. Morphology of the Vitreoretinal Border Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Steffen

    Ophthalmology, vitreoretinal, morphology, ultrastructure, microscopy, membrana limitans interna retinae, inner limiting membrane......Ophthalmology, vitreoretinal, morphology, ultrastructure, microscopy, membrana limitans interna retinae, inner limiting membrane...

  6. Advanced Technology Development: Solid-Liquid Interface Characterization Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing the solid-liquid interface during directional solidification is key to understanding and improving material properties. The goal of this Advanced Technology Development (ATD) has been to develop hardware, which will enable real-time characterization of practical materials, such as aluminum (Al) alloys, to unprecedented levels. Required measurements include furnace and sample temperature gradients, undercooling at the growing interface, interface shape, or morphology, and furnace translation and sample growth rates (related). These and other parameters are correlated with each other and time. A major challenge was to design and develop all of the necessary hardware to measure the characteristics, nearly simultaneously, in a smaller integral furnace compatible with existing X-ray Transmission Microscopes, XTMs. Most of the desired goals have been accomplished through three generations of Seebeck furnace brassboards, several varieties of film thermocouple arrays, heaters, thermal modeling of the furnaces, and data acquisition and control (DAC) software. Presentations and publications have resulted from these activities, and proposals to use this hardware for further materials studies have been submitted as sequels to this last year of the ATD.

  7. Interface after explosion welding: Fractal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Pushkin, M. S.; Patselov, A. M.; Volkova, A. Yu.; Inozemtsev, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    The interfaces (plain, wavy) in the welding joints formed by explosion welding are investigated. Various types of fractals, namely, islands, multifractals, and a coastline, are found. The fractal dimensions of islands in the case of a plain interface and a coastline in the case of a wavy interface are calculated.

  8. Refactoring Fat Interfaces Using a Genetic Algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romano, D.; Raemaekers, S.; Pinzger, M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the violation of the Interface Segregation Principle (ISP) is critical for maintaining and evolving software systems. Fat interfaces (i.e., interfaces violating the ISP) change more frequently and degrade the quality of the components coupled to them. According to the

  9. An Automation Interface for Kappa PC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvig, Susanne C

    1999-01-01

    The reports documents an automation interface for Kappa PC. The automation interface can be used to embed Kappa applications in 32-bit Windowsapplications.The interface includes functions for initialising Kappa, for loading an application, for settingvalues, for getting values, and for stopping...

  10. An Automation Interface for Kappa PC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvig, Susanne C

    1999-01-01

    The reports documents an automation interface for Kappa PC. The automation interface can be used to embed Kappa applications in 32-bit Windowsapplications.The interface includes functions for initialising Kappa, for loading an application, for settingvalues, for getting values, and for stopping...

  11. Interface energies in ising spin glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspelmeier, T; Moore, M A; Young, A P

    2003-03-28

    The replica method has been used to calculate the interface free energy associated with the change from periodic to antiperiodic boundary conditions in finite-dimensional spin glasses. At mean-field level the interface free energy vanishes, but after allowing for fluctuation effects, a nonzero interface free energy is obtained which is significantly different from numerical expectations.

  12. Refactoring Fat Interfaces Using a Genetic Algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romano, D.; Raemaekers, S.; Pinzger, M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the violation of the Interface Segregation Principle (ISP) is critical for maintaining and evolving software systems. Fat interfaces (i.e., interfaces violating the ISP) change more frequently and degrade the quality of the components coupled to them. According to the

  13. Interfaces for instructional use of simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoog, de Robert; Jong, de Ton; Vries, de Frits

    1991-01-01

    The learner interface is the component of an instructional system that mediates between a learner and the system. Two fundamentally different approaches for interfaces can be distinguished: conversational methapor and direct manipulation metaphor. Interfaces in both metaphors can be scaled on a dime

  14. Metal/Ceramic Interfaces: Relationships between Structures, Chemistry and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-15

    Tech Art.Q-R.TA- Rsdl Strs CrR 7/17/89.10:01 AM.10/18/90I I I ABSTRACTI Metal/ceramic bonds subject to residual stress caused by thermal expansioa I...aalloy > (A120 3 made with alloys having < 67 at.% Ta at 11000C) crack predominantly within the sapphire, I KJM-Evans-16,Tech ArtoQ-RTA- Rsdl Sirs...interface paths: within the reaction product KJM.Evans-16Tech Art.Q-RTA- Rsdl Strs Crk 7/17/89.10:01 AM.10/1890 5 g I I layer, along the reaction

  15. Photo-degradation and stabilization effects in operating organic photovoltaic devices by joint photo-current and morphological monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paci, B.; Generosi, A.; Rossi Albertini, V.; Perfetti, P. [ISM-C.N.R., Area di Ricerca di Tor Vergata, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy); de Bettignies, R. [Laboratoire Composants Solaires, CEA INES-RDI, Savoie Technolac, BP 332, 50 avenue du lac Leman, 73377 Le Bourget du Lac (France); Sentein, C. [CEA Saclay, DRT-LITEN-DSEN-GENEC-L2C, F91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-15

    We report on a joint morphological/photoelectrical study of polymer-based photovoltaic (PV) cells in working conditions. The bulk heterojunction devices investigated are based on an active layer of poly(3-hexyl thiophene) blended with methano-fullerene, combining good PV performances with promising stability. The set-up adopted allowed the electrical properties of the device to be directly correlated to the modification of the electrode morphological parameters (thickness and roughness), which were obtained by in situ energy dispersive X-ray reflectometry (EDXR). The results of this joint time-dependent characterization demonstrated how the observed photo-induced oxidation process, limited to the buried electrode interface, is responsible for a fast decrease in the photo-current. The time-resolved measurements allowed to rule out the dynamics of the morphological changes and showed that the interface morphology may be stabilized by annealing treatments, with a significant improvement of the cell efficiency. (author)

  16. User Interface Development Based on Ontologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A; S; Kleshchev; M; Y; Chernyakhovskaya; V; V; Gribova

    2002-01-01

    The user interface is a central component of any mo de rn application program. It determines how well end users accept, learn, and effi ciently work with the application program. The user interface is very difficult to design, to implement, to modify. It takes approximately 70% of the time requ ired for designing an application program. All the existing tools for user interface design can be divided into two basic c ategories-Interface Builders and Model-based Interface development tools, whic h trace t...

  17. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of soft matter interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roke, Sylvie

    2009-07-13

    Soft matter consists of complex molecules that can undergo drastic structural transformations under mild changes of chemical and physical conditions. Since a wide variety of chemical, physical and biological processes occur at soft matter interfaces, they can exhibit complex behavior. This is even more so for interfaces of colloidal soft matter since the relative amount of interface material increases by orders of magnitude. Herein, we focus on new developments that enable us to obtain detailed molecular structural changes in the topmost molecular layers of soft matter interfaces composed of complex bio-molecules. In particular, the possibilities to probe interfaces of colloidal soft matter systems are discussed.

  18. Surface and interface effects in VLSI

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G

    1985-01-01

    VLSI Electronics Microstructure Science, Volume 10: Surface and Interface Effects in VLSI provides the advances made in the science of semiconductor surface and interface as they relate to electronics. This volume aims to provide a better understanding and control of surface and interface related properties. The book begins with an introductory chapter on the intimate link between interfaces and devices. The book is then divided into two parts. The first part covers the chemical and geometric structures of prototypical VLSI interfaces. Subjects detailed include, the technologically most import

  19. Interface Characteristics of Wood-hybrid Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUEFenglian; ZHAOGuangjie

    2005-01-01

    In order to understand the current interface characteristics of wood-hybrid composites, this paper starts off from the concept of composite interface and general theory of interface form, then the inner-surface and microstructure of wood and the interface characteristics of composites, such as wood- inorganic, wood-plastic and wood- metal made by electroless plating technique, are concluded and discussed in detail. Meanwhile,on the basis of that, some points of view about how to develop the wood-hybrid composites interface research in the future are also proposed.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Interface Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Cao, Deng; Leonard, Robert H.; Owens, Eli T.; Swan, Wm. Trevor, III; Ducatman, Samuel C.

    2007-03-01

    The mechanical integrity of silicon/silicon nitride interfaces is of great importance in their applications in micro electronics and solar cells. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are an excellent tool to study mechanical and structural failure of interfaces subjected to externally applied stresses and strains. When pulling the system parallel to the interface, cracks in silicon nitride and slip and pit formation in silicon are typical failure mechanisms. Hypervelocity impact perpendicular to the interface plane leads to structural transformation and delamination at the interface. Influence of system temperature, strain rate, impact velocity, and system size on type and characteristics of failure will be discussed.

  1. Fuzzy Morphological Polynomial Image Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Pan Huang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel signal representation using fuzzy mathematical morphology is developed. We take advantage of the optimum fuzzy fitting and the efficient implementation of morphological operators to extract geometric information from signals. The new representation provides results analogous to those given by the polynomial transform. Geometrical decomposition of a signal is achieved by windowing and applying sequentially fuzzy morphological opening with structuring functions. The resulting representation is made to resemble an orthogonal expansion by constraining the results of opening to equate adapted structuring functions. Properties of the geometric decomposition are considered and used to calculate the adaptation parameters. Our procedure provides an efficient and flexible representation which can be efficiently implemented in parallel. The application of the representation is illustrated in data compression and fractal dimension estimation temporal signals and images.

  2. Galaxy Morphology - Halo Gas Connections

    CERN Document Server

    Kacprzak, G G; Steidel, C C; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Steidel, Charles C.

    2005-01-01

    We studied a sample of 38 intermediate redshift MgII absorption-selected galaxies using (1) Keck/HIRES and VLT/UVES quasar spectra to measure the halo gas kinematics from MgII absorption profiles and (2) HST/WFPC-2 images to study the absorbing galaxy morphologies. We have searched for correlations between quantified gas absorption properties, and host galaxy impact parameters, inclinations, position angles, and quantified morphological parameters. We report a 3.2-sigma correlation between asymmetric perturbations in the host galaxy morphology and the MgII absorption equivalent width. We suggest that this correlation may indicate a connection between past merging and/or interaction events in MgII absorption-selected galaxies and the velocity dispersion and quantity of gas surrounding these galaxies.

  3. Bond efficacy and interface morphology of self-etching adhesives to ground enamel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdalla, A.I.; El Zohairy, A.A.; Mohsen, M.M.A.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared the microshear bond strengths to ground enamel of three one-step self-etching adhesive systems, a self-etching primer system and an etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Materials and Methods: Three self-etching adhesives, Futurabond DC (Voco), Clearfil S Tri Bond (Kuraray) an

  4. Bond efficacy and interface morphology of self-etching adhesives to ground enamel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdalla, A.I.; El Zohairy, A.A.; Mohsen, M.M.A.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared the microshear bond strengths to ground enamel of three one-step self-etching adhesive systems, a self-etching primer system and an etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Materials and Methods: Three self-etching adhesives, Futurabond DC (Voco), Clearfil S Tri Bond (Kuraray)

  5. Experiments showing dynamics of materials interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, R.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Dynamic Experimentation Div.

    1997-02-01

    The discipline of materials science and engineering often involves understanding and controlling properties of interfaces. The authors address the challenge of educating students about properties of interfaces, particularly dynamic properties and effects of unstable interfaces. A series of simple, inexpensive, hands-on activities about fluid interfaces provides students with a testbed to develop intuition about interface dynamics. The experiments highlight the essential role of initial interfacial perturbations in determining the dynamic response of the interface. The experiments produce dramatic, unexpected effects when initial perturbations are controlled and inhibited. These activities help students to develop insight about unstable interfaces that can be applied to analogous problems in materials science and engineering. The lessons examine ``Rayleigh-Taylor instability,`` an interfacial instability that occurs when a higher-density fluid is above a lower-density fluid.

  6. The conversational interface talking to smart devices

    CERN Document Server

    McTear, Michael; Griol, David

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the conversational interface, which is becoming the main mode of interaction with virtual personal assistants, smart devices, various types of wearables, and social robots. The book consists of four parts: Part I presents the background to conversational interfaces, examining past and present work on spoken language interaction with computers; Part II covers the various technologies that are required to build a conversational interface along with practical chapters and exercises using open source tools; Part III looks at interactions with smart devices, wearables, and robots, and then goes on to discusses the role of emotion and personality in the conversational interface; Part IV examines methods for evaluating conversational interfaces and discusses future directions. · Presents a comprehensive overview of the various technologies that underlie conversational user interfaces; · Combines descriptions of conversational user interface technologies with a gui...

  7. Tailoring thermal interfaces with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Indira

    Thermal interfaces are key to ensure the reliable performance of many semiconductor, energy and electronic systems. High thermal conductivity (k), low elastic modulus (E) interface materials are required to dissipate heat and relieve thermo-mechanical stresses. The aim of this thesis is to develop compliant, high k nanocomposite materials for thermal interface applications utilizing nanostructured networks. Realizing high k nanocomposites is a challenge because of difficulties in incorporating high fractions of uniformly dispersed nanofillers and countering low filler-matrix interfacial conductance, while retaining a low elastic modulus. In this thesis, it is demonstrated that these issues are obviated by using thesis reveals a critical correlation between the rheological behavior of a high k gold-nanowire-filled polydimethylsiloxane nanocomposite and its thermal contact conductance with copper. At a critical filler fraction, an abrupt increase in the nanocomposite k is accompanied by a liquid-solid transition and a multifold decrease in Gc. These concurrent changes are attributed to nanowire percolation network formation and pre-cure polymer gelation that inhibits the formation of conformal void-free interfaces. These findings will be important for designing processing sequences to realize heterointerfaces with nanowire filled high k nanocomposite materials. Another important finding of this thesis is that nanowire networks can result in mechanical softening of polymer matrices. It is demonstrated that silver nanowire fillers result in a three-fold decrease in viscoelastic storage modulus of polydimethylsiloxane composites above a low critical filler fraction of ~0.5%, contrary to theoretical predictions presaging a modulus increase. Similar fractions of silver nanocube fillers result in no such observable effects. Rheology measurements and calorimetric kinetics analyses reveal that high surface area nanowire filler percolation networks curtail macromolecular

  8. Surface rheology and interface stability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D. (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk

  9. Physics and Chemistry of Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Butt, Hans-Jurgen; Kappl, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Serving as a general introduction to surface and interface science, this book focuses on essential concepts rather than specific details, on intuitive understanding rather than learning facts. The text reflects the fact that the physics and chemistry of surfaces is a diverse field of research and shows this in its Interdisciplinary conceptual design. Once the most important techniques and methods have been introduced, readers will be able to apply simple models to their own scientific problems. Furthermore, manifold high-end technological applications from surface technology, biotechnology, or

  10. EXPRESS Pallet Payload Interface Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Alan C.

    2004-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the EXPRESS Pallet Space Station payload interface requirements is shown. The topics include: 1) External Payload Sites; 2) EXPRESS Pallet with Six Payload Envelopes; 3) EXPRESS Pallet in Payload Bay Representative Layout; 4) EXPRESS Pallet Installation SSRMS positions pallet for PAS mating on S3 truss; 5) EXPRESS Pallet Major Components; 6) EXPRESS Pallet Adapter; 7) EXPRESS Pallet Center Location Payload Envelope; 8) Envelope Restriction for EXPRESS Pallet Corner Payload Locations; 9) EXPRESS Pallet-PAS Truss Configuration; and 10) EXPRESS Pallet Payload Services and Specifications.

  11. Metawidgets in the multimodal interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattner, M.M. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States) Anderson (M.D.) Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)); Glinert, E.P.; Jorge, J.A.; Ormsby, G.R. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    We analyze two intertwined and fundamental issues concerning computer-to-human communication in the multimodal interfaces: the interplay between sound and graphics, and the role of object persistence. Our observations lead us to introduce metawidgets as abstract entities capable of manifesting themselves to users as image, as sound, or as various combinations and/or sequences of the two media. We show examples of metawidgets in action, and discuss mechanisms for choosing among alternative media for metawidget instantiation. Finally, we describe a couple of experimental microworlds we have implemented to test out some of our ideas. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Gloved Human-Machine Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Richard (Inventor); Olowin, Aaron (Inventor); Hannaford, Blake (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Certain exemplary embodiments can provide a system, machine, device, manufacture, circuit, composition of matter, and/or user interface adapted for and/or resulting from, and/or a method and/or machine-readable medium comprising machine-implementable instructions for, activities that can comprise and/or relate to: tracking movement of a gloved hand of a human; interpreting a gloved finger movement of the human; and/or in response to interpreting the gloved finger movement, providing feedback to the human.

  13. Verified OS Interface Code Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Gerwin Klein, Toby Murray 5d.  PROJECT NUMBER 5e.  TASK NUMBER 5f.  WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...llisapi.dll Verified OS Interface Code Synthesis Final Report for AFOSR AOARD Grant FA2386-14-1-4093 Gerwin Klein, Ramana Kumar, Toby Murray gerwin.klein... Murray t +61 2 8306 0550 e gerwin.klein@data61.csiro.au w trustworthy.systems DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited.

  14. User interface design and evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Debbie; Woodroffe, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Whether you are a professional new to the user-centered design field, or an experienced designer who needs to learn the fundamentals of user interface design and evaluation, this book can lead the way.What will you get from this book? Based on a course from the Open University, UK which has been taught to over a thousand professionals and students, this book presents an overview of the field. It illustrates the benefits of a user-centered approach to the design of software, computer systems, and web sites, and provides a clear and practical discussion of requirements gathering; develop

  15. Reengenharia de interfaces utilizando Wrapping.

    OpenAIRE

    Frank José Affonso

    2003-01-01

    Com a evolução tecnológica e com a crescente utilização da Internet, empresas e instituições governamentais desejam migrar seus sistemas desenvolvidos com recursos computacionais antigos (legados) para mais modernos. No entanto, essa é uma tarefa que requer investimentos elevados, podendo o processo de reengenharia ser utilizado nesses casos. Uma forma de modificar esses sistemas é por meio da reengenharia da sua interface, através do empacotamento de sua lógica (wrapping). Essa técnica prese...

  16. Children's Morphological Awareness and Reading Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, John R.; Deacon, S. Helene; Bowers, Peter N.; Izenberg, Leah; Wade-Woolley, Lesly; Parrila, Rauno

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of morphological awareness on five measures of reading in 103 children from Grades 1 to 3. Morphological awareness was assessed with a word analogy task that included a wide range of morphological transformations. Results indicated that the new measure had satisfactory reliability, and that morphological awareness was a…

  17. Computer Vision and Mathematical Morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.; Kropratsch, W.; Klette, R.; Albrecht, R.

    1996-01-01

    Mathematical morphology is a theory of set mappings, modeling binary image transformations, which are invariant under the group of Euclidean translations. This framework turns out to be too restricted for many applications, in particular for computer vision where group theoretical considerations suc

  18. Human morphology and temperature regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. S.

    For nearly a century individuals have believed that there is a link between human morphology and one's thermoregulatory response in adverse environments. Most early research was focussed on the rate of core cooling in a male adult population and the role of subcutaneous adipose tissue, surface area and the surface-area-to-mass ratio in one's ability to withstand varying degrees of cold stress. More recently research has addressed heat tolerance in various populations, exploring the role of subcutaneous adipose tissue, surface area and the surface-area-to-mass ratio in one's ability to maintain thermal equilibrium in warm and hot, dry and humid environments. Since the late 1970s an emphasis has been placed on the role of muscle and muscle perfusion in total-body thermal insulation. Yet, despite the history of research pertaining to human morphology and temperature regulation there is little consensus as to the impact of variations in human morphology on thermoregulatory responses. Individuals differing in body size, shape and composition appear to respond quantitatively differently to variations in both ambient and core temperatures but the interrelations between morphological components and temperature regulation are complex. It is the purpose of this paper to examine the literature pertaining to the impact of variations in muscularity, adipose tissue thickness and patterning, surface area and the surface-area-to-mass ratio on thermoregulation and thermal stability in response to both heat and cold stress.

  19. Structure Characterization Using Mathematical Morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luengo Hendriks, C.L.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis deals with the application of mathematical morphology to images of some kind of structure, with the intention of characterizing (or describing) that structure. The emphasis is placed on measuring properties of the real-world scene, rather than measuring properties of the digital image. T

  20. Pollen morphology of the Stemonaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, van der R.W.J.M.

    1991-01-01

    A pollen-morphological survey of all four genera of the Stemonaceae at the light and electron microscope level is presented. Stemonaceae is a eurypalynous family. Stichoneuron pollen, up to now described as monosulcate, appears to be inaperturate. Pentastemona pollen is most deviating in Stemonaceae

  1. Soot morphology in laser pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandu, Ion C.; Pasuk, I.; Morjan, Ion G.; Voicu, Ion N.; Alexandrescu, Rodica; Fleaca, Claudiu T.; Ciupina, Victor; Dumitrache, Florian V.; Soare, Iuliana; Ploscaru, Mihaela I.; Daniels, H.; Westwood, A.; Rand, B.

    2004-10-01

    Soots obtained by laser pyrolysis of different gaseous/vapor hydrocarbons were investigated. The morphology variation of carbon soot versus process parameters and nature of reactants was analyzed and discussed. The role of oxygen is essential in obtaining soot particles having considerable curved-layer content.

  2. Computer Vision and Mathematical Morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.; Kropratsch, W.; Klette, R.; Albrecht, R.

    1996-01-01

    Mathematical morphology is a theory of set mappings, modeling binary image transformations, which are invariant under the group of Euclidean translations. This framework turns out to be too restricted for many applications, in particular for computer vision where group theoretical considerations

  3. INTERFACE REACTION IN MAGNETIC MULTILAYERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.H. Yu; M.H. Li; F.W. Zhu; X.F. Cui; J.L. Jin

    2001-01-01

    Ta/NiO/NiFe/Ta multilayers were prepared by rf reactive and dc magnetron sputter-ing. The exchange coupling field (Hex) between NiO and NiFe reached 120Oe. Thecomposition and chemical states at the interface region of NiO/NiFe were studied us-ing the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and peak decomposition technique. Theresults show that there are two thermodynamically favorable reactions at NiO/NiFeinterface: NiO+Fe = Ni+FeO and 3NiO+2Fe 3Ni+Fe2 O3. The thickness of thechemical reaction as estimated by angle-resolved XPS was about 1-1.5nm. These in-terrace reaction products are magnetic defects, and we believe that the Hex and thecoereivity (He) of NiO/NiFe ave affected by these defects. Moreover, the results alsoshow that there is an "intermixing layer" at the Ta/NiO (and NiO/Ta) interface dueto a thermodynamically favorable reaction: 2Ta+5NiO=5Ni+Ta2O5. This interfacereaction has an effect on the exchange coupling as well. The thickness of the "inter-mixing layer" as estimated by XPS depth-profiles was about 8-10nm.

  4. Brain Computer Interfaces, a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Alonso, Luis Fernando; Gomez-Gil, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a hardware and software communications system that permits cerebral activity alone to control computers or external devices. The immediate goal of BCI research is to provide communications capabilities to severely disabled people who are totally paralyzed or ‘locked in’ by neurological neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain stem stroke, or spinal cord injury. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of BCIs, looking at the different steps that form a standard BCI: signal acquisition, preprocessing or signal enhancement, feature extraction, classification and the control interface. We discuss their advantages, drawbacks, and latest advances, and we survey the numerous technologies reported in the scientific literature to design each step of a BCI. First, the review examines the neuroimaging modalities used in the signal acquisition step, each of which monitors a different functional brain activity such as electrical, magnetic or metabolic activity. Second, the review discusses different electrophysiological control signals that determine user intentions, which can be detected in brain activity. Third, the review includes some techniques used in the signal enhancement step to deal with the artifacts in the control signals and improve the performance. Fourth, the review studies some mathematic algorithms used in the feature extraction and classification steps which translate the information in the control signals into commands that operate a computer or other device. Finally, the review provides an overview of various BCI applications that control a range of devices. PMID:22438708

  5. Interface-based software integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Ahmad Rais

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Enterprise architecture frameworks define the goals of enterprise architecture in order to make business processes and IT operations more effective, and to reduce the risk of future investments. These enterprise architecture frameworks offer different architecture development methods that help in building enterprise architecture. In practice, the larger organizations become, the larger their enterprise architecture and IT become. This leads to an increasingly complex system of enterprise architecture development and maintenance. Application software architecture is one type of architecture that, along with business architecture, data architecture and technology architecture, composes enterprise architecture. From the perspective of integration, enterprise architecture can be considered a system of interaction between multiple examples of application software. Therefore, effective software integration is a very important basis for the future success of the enterprise architecture in question. This article will provide interface-based integration practice in order to help simplify the process of building such a software integration system. The main goal of interface-based software integration is to solve problems that may arise with software integration requirements and developing software integration architecture.

  6. Interface-based software testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Ahmad Rais

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Software quality is determined by assessing the characteristics that specify how it should work, which are verified through testing. If it were possible to touch, see, or measure software, it would be easier to analyze and prove its quality. Unfortunately, software is an intangible asset, which makes testing complex. This is especially true when software quality is not a question of particular functions that can be tested through a graphical user interface. The primary objective of software architecture is to design quality of software through modeling and visualization. There are many methods and standards that define how to control and manage quality. However, many IT software development projects still fail due to the difficulties involved in measuring, controlling, and managing software quality. Software quality failure factors are numerous. Examples include beginning to test software too late in the development process, or failing properly to understand, or design, the software architecture and the software component structure. The goal of this article is to provide an interface-based software testing technique that better measures software quality, automates software quality testing, encourages early testing, and increases the software’s overall testability

  7. Brain computer interfaces, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Alonso, Luis Fernando; Gomez-Gil, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a hardware and software communications system that permits cerebral activity alone to control computers or external devices. The immediate goal of BCI research is to provide communications capabilities to severely disabled people who are totally paralyzed or 'locked in' by neurological neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain stem stroke, or spinal cord injury. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of BCIs, looking at the different steps that form a standard BCI: signal acquisition, preprocessing or signal enhancement, feature extraction, classification and the control interface. We discuss their advantages, drawbacks, and latest advances, and we survey the numerous technologies reported in the scientific literature to design each step of a BCI. First, the review examines the neuroimaging modalities used in the signal acquisition step, each of which monitors a different functional brain activity such as electrical, magnetic or metabolic activity. Second, the review discusses different electrophysiological control signals that determine user intentions, which can be detected in brain activity. Third, the review includes some techniques used in the signal enhancement step to deal with the artifacts in the control signals and improve the performance. Fourth, the review studies some mathematic algorithms used in the feature extraction and classification steps which translate the information in the control signals into commands that operate a computer or other device. Finally, the review provides an overview of various BCI applications that control a range of devices.

  8. Brain Computer Interfaces, a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Nicolas-Alonso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A brain-computer interface (BCI is a hardware and software communications system that permits cerebral activity alone to control computers or external devices. The immediate goal of BCI research is to provide communications capabilities to severely disabled people who are totally paralyzed or ‘locked in’ by neurological neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain stem stroke, or spinal cord injury. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of BCIs, looking at the different steps that form a standard BCI: signal acquisition, preprocessing or signal enhancement, feature extraction, classification and the control interface. We discuss their advantages, drawbacks, and latest advances, and we survey the numerous technologies reported in the scientific literature to design each step of a BCI. First, the review examines the neuroimaging modalities used in the signal acquisition step, each of which monitors a different functional brain activity such as electrical, magnetic or metabolic activity. Second, the review discusses different electrophysiological control signals that determine user intentions, which can be detected in brain activity. Third, the review includes some techniques used in the signal enhancement step to deal with the artifacts in the control signals and improve the performance. Fourth, the review studies some mathematic algorithms used in the feature extraction and classification steps which translate the information in the control signals into commands that operate a computer or other device. Finally, the review provides an overview of various BCI applications that control a range of devices.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Solidification Microstructure and Effects of Phase-field Parameters on Grain Growth Morphologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingfeng LIU; Ruixiang LIU; Liliang CHEN

    2005-01-01

    By a simple phase field model, a series of numerical simulations of solidification microstructure was performed to show a rich variety of dendritic patterns. At the same time, the relation between the morphology of grain growth and some parameters including the strength of anisotropy, dimensionless latent heat and the size of initial solid zone was studied. It is for the first time that patterns of grain growth were associated with the size of initial solid zone,which is an interesting issue. The possible reason for this may be that variation in the size of initial solid zone may bring about fluctuation of the interface energy, making the interface unstable.

  10. Micro and nanostructural characterization of surfaces and interfaces of Portland cement mortars using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, M.F.O.; Brandao, P.R.G., E-mail: matheusfob@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: pbrandao@demin.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), MG (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The characterization of Portland cement mortars is very important in the study the interfaces and surfaces that make up the system grout/ceramic block. In this sense, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive (X-ray) spectrometer are important tools in investigating the morphology and chemical aspects. However, more detailed topographic information can be necessary in the characterization process. In this work, the aim was to characterize topographically surfaces and interfaces of mortars applied onto ceramic blocks. This has been accomplished by using the atomic force microscope (AFM) - MFP-3D-SA Asylum Research. To date, the results obtained from this research show that the characterization of cementitious materials with the help of AFM has an important contribution in the investigation and differentiation of hydrated calcium silicates (CSH), calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2, ettringite and calcium carbonate by providing morphological and micro topographical data, which are extremely important and reliable for the understanding of cementitious materials. (author)

  11. Insulin Aggregation at a Dynamic Solid-Liquid-Air Triple Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frachon, Thibaut; Bruckert, Franz; Le Masne, Quentin; Monnin, Emmanuel; Weidenhaupt, Marianne

    2016-12-13

    Therapeutic proteins are privileged in drug development because of their exquisite specificity, which is due to their three-dimensional conformation in solution. During their manufacture, storage, and delivery, interactions with material surfaces and air interfaces are known to affect their stability. The growing use of automated devices for handling and injection of therapeutics increases their exposure to protocols involving intermittent wetting, during which the solid-liquid and liquid-air interfaces meet at a triple contact line, which is often dynamic. Using a microfluidic setup, we analyze the effect of a moving triple interface on insulin aggregation in real time over a hydrophobic surface. We combine thioflavin T fluorescence and reflection interference microscopy to concomitantly monitor insulin aggregation and the morphology of the liquid as it dewets the surface. We demonstrate that insulin aggregates in the region of a moving triple interface and not in regions submitted to hydrodynamic shear stress alone, induced by the moving liquid. During dewetting, liquid droplets form on the surface anchored by adsorbed proteins, and the accumulation of amyloid aggregates is observed exclusively as fluorescent rings growing eccentrically around these droplets. The fluorescent rings expand until the entire channel surface sweeped by the triple interface is covered by amyloid fibers. On the basis of our experimental results, we propose a model describing the growth mechanism of insulin amyloid fibers at a moving triple contact line, where proteins adsorbed at a hydrophobic surface are exposed to the liquid-air interface.

  12. Atlas morphology in relation to craniofacial morphology and head posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandikçioğlu, M; Skov, S; Solow, B

    1994-04-01

    The associations between dimensions of the first cervical vertebra, atlas, and a representative set of craniofacial and postural variables were studied on cephalometric radiographs of a sample of 103 adult males aged 22-30 years, recorded in the natural head position (mirror position). Atlas morphology was expressed by nine variables, linear and angular craniofacial dimensions by 27 variables, and head and cervical posture by seven variables. A pattern of low but significant correlations was found. Although the correlations were low, the study confirmed that the dimensions of the atlas vertebra reflect associations between cranio-cervical posture and craniofacial morphology. Negative correlations were found between the height of the posterior arch of atlas and the inclination of the mandible and the maxilla to the anterior cranial base. Low positive correlations between the height of the anterior arch and vertical facial dimensions reflect the general co-ordination of the vertical growth of the face and the cervical column. Moreover, the pattern of correlations between the atlanto-cranial angle and facial morphology suggests that in changes of the cranio-cervical angle, atlas follows the cervical column.

  13. Break-down of a planar liquid-solid interface during directional solidification - Influence of convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, S. N.; Chopra, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of convection on the development of morphological instability at the liquid-solid interface during directional solidification in a positive thermal gradient has been examined in Pb-10 wt pct Sn and succinonitrile-1.9 wt pct acetone. The onset of interfacial breakdown occurs at higher growth speeds in the presence of convection. The linear stability analysis due to Favier and Rouzaud which uses the 'deformable' mass flow boundary layer concept shows a good agreement with the experimentally observed behavior.

  14. Morphology Analysis and Optimization: Crucial Factor Determining the Performance of Perovskite Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjin Zeng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This review presents an overall discussion on the morphology analysis and optimization for perovskite (PVSK solar cells. Surface morphology and energy alignment have been proven to play a dominant role in determining the device performance. The effect of the key parameters such as solution condition and preparation atmosphere on the crystallization of PVSK, the characterization of surface morphology and interface distribution in the perovskite layer is discussed in detail. Furthermore, the analysis of interface energy level alignment by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy is presented to reveals the correlation between morphology and charge generation and collection within the perovskite layer, and its influence on the device performance. The techniques including architecture modification, solvent annealing, etc. were reviewed as an efficient approach to improve the morphology of PVSK. It is expected that further progress will be achieved with more efforts devoted to the insight of the mechanism of surface engineering in the field of PVSK solar cells.

  15. Effect of superhydrophobic surface morphology on evaporative deposition patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicuangco, Mercy; Dash, Susmita; Weibel, Justin A.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2014-05-01

    Prediction and active control of the spatial distribution of particulate deposits obtained from sessile droplet evaporation are vital in printing, nanostructure assembly, biotechnology, and other applications that require localized deposits. This Letter presents surface wettability-based localization of evaporation-driven particulate deposition and the effect of superhydrophobic surface morphology on the distribution of deposits. Sessile water droplets containing suspended latex particles are evaporated on non-wetting textured surfaces with varying microstructure geometry at ambient conditions. The droplets are visualized throughout the evaporation process to track the temporal evolution of contact radius and apparent contact angle. The resulting particle deposits on the substrates are quantitatively characterized. The experimental results show that superhydrophobic surfaces suppress contact-line deposition during droplet evaporation, thereby providing an effective means of localizing the deposition of suspended particles. A correlation between deposit size and surface morphology, explained in terms of the interface pressure balance at the transition between wetting states, reveals an optimum surface morphology for minimizing the deposit coverage area.

  16. The Effect of Solidification Rate on Morphological Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekerka, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    At low solidification rates, the criterion for the onset of morphological instability parallels closely the criterion of constitutional supercooling. At somewhat larger rates of solidification, however, the results of the perturbation theory of morphological instability differ significantly from the predictions of constitutional supercooling. This arises because the critical wave length for instability decreases as solidification rate increases and thus the effects of capillarity (solid-liquid surface tension) play a strong stabilizing role. This gives rise to the concept of absolute stability, according to which the system will always be stable for a sufficiently large rate of solidification. This enhanced stabilization by capillarity is present only so long as local equilibrium is maintained at the solid-liquid interface. If the interfacial temperature drops below its equilibrium value by an amount dependent on growth rate, oscillatory morphological instabilities can occur. The differences among these various stability criteria are illustrated by means of some simple two-dimensional diagrams that should supplant the conventional plots of (temperature gradient)/(growth rate) vs. alloy concentration.

  17. A human activity approach to User Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne

    1989-01-01

    How can we understand why a bank teller has different needs for a user interface than those of casual users of a machine teller, or why a graphic designer needs a different user interface than a secretary? This article presents a framework for the design of user interfaces that originates from...... the work situations in which computer-based artifacts are used: The framework deals with the role of the user interface in purposeful human work. Human activity theory is used in this analysis. The purpose of this article is to make the reader curious and hopefully open his or her eyes to a somewhat...... different way of thinking about the user interface. The article applies examples of real-life interfaces to support this process, but it does not include a systematic presentation of empirical results. I focus on the role of the computer application in use. Thus, it is necessary to consider human...

  18. Interactive displays natural human-interface technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmik, Achintya K

    2014-01-01

    One of the first books to provide an in-depth discussion of the technologies, applications and trends in the rapidly emerging field of interactive displays (touch, gesture & voice) The book will cover the technologies, applications and trends in the field of interactive displays, namely interfaces based on touch, gesture and voice and those using a combination of these technologies. The book will be split into 4 main parts with each being dedicated to a specific user interface. Part 1 ''Touch Interfaces'' will provide a review of the currently deployed touch-screen technologies and applications. It will also cover the recent developments towards achieving thinner, lightweight and cost-reduced touch screen panels in the future via integration of touch functionalities. Part 2 ''Gesture Interfaces'' will examine techniques and applications in stereoscopic 3D computer vision, structured-light 3D computer vision and time-of-flight 3D computer vision in gesture interfaces. Part 3 ''Voice Interfaces'' will revie...

  19. Interface stress in Au/Ni multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweitz, K.O.; Böttiger, J.; Chevallier, J.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of intermixing on the apparent interface stress is studied in -textured dc-magnetron sputtered Au/Ni multilayers by use of two methods commonly used for determining interface stress. The method using profilometry and in-plane x-ray diffraction does not take intermixing...... into account and yields an apparent interface stress of -8.46 +/- 0.99 J m(-2). However, observed discrepancies between model calculations and measured high-angle x-ray diffractograms indicate intermixing, and by use of the profilometry and sin(2) psi method the real interface stress value of -2.69 +/- 0.43 J...... to be inapplicable to interface stress determinations in systems exhibiting a modulation period-dependent stress-free lattice parameter. Finally, a deviation of the interface stress in the Au/Ni sample with the smallest modulation period as compared to specimens with larger bilayer lengths is observed...

  20. Engineering gestures for multimodal user interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Echtler, Florian; Kammer, Dietrich; Vanacken, Davy; Hoste, Lode; Signer, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Despite increased presence of gestural and multimodal user interfaces in research as well as daily life, development of such systems still mostly relies on programming concepts which have emerged from classic WIMP user interfaces. This workshop proposes to explore the gap between attempts to formalize and structure development for multimodal interfaces in the research community on the one hand and the lack of adoption of these formal languages and frameworks by practitioners and other researc...

  1. Flexible feature interface for multimedia sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffland, Douglas R [Livermore, CA

    2009-06-09

    A flexible feature interface for multimedia sources system that includes a single interface for the addition of features and functions to multimedia sources and for accessing those features and functions from remote hosts. The interface utilizes the export statement: export "C" D11Export void FunctionName(int argc, char ** argv,char * result, SecureSession *ctrl) or the binary equivalent of the export statement.

  2. Surfaces and interfaces of electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Brillson, Leonard J

    2012-01-01

    An advanced level textbook covering geometric, chemical, and electronic structure of electronic materials, and their applications to devices based on semiconductor surfaces, metal-semiconductor interfaces, and semiconductor heterojunctions. Starting with the fundamentals of electrical measurements on semiconductor interfaces, it then describes the importance of controlling macroscopic electrical properties by atomic-scale techniques. Subsequent chapters present the wide range of surface and interface techniques available to characterize electronic, optical, chemical, and structural propertie

  3. XML Interfaces to the Internet of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Pemberton, Steven

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractThe internet of things is predicated on tiny, cheap, lower power computers being embedded in devices everywhere. However such tiny devices by definition have very little memory and computing power available to support user interfaces or extended servers, and so the user interface needs to be distributed over the network. This paper describes techniques using standard technologies based on XML for creating remote user interfaces for the Internet of Things

  4. SQL Generation for Natural Language Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    László Kovács

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A hot issue in the area of database management is to provide a high level interface for nontechnical users. An important research direction is the application of natural language interface. The paperpresents an interface module that converts user’s query given in natural language into a corresponding SQL command. After clustering the input sentence, a pushdown automaton is used to verify the syntax. The corresponding SQL code is generated by a semantic matcher module.

  5. XML Interfaces to the Internet of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Pemberton, Steven; Foster, C.

    2015-01-01

    The internet of things is predicated on tiny, cheap, lower power computers being embedded in devices everywhere. However such tiny devices by definition have very little memory and computing power available to support user interfaces or extended servers, and so the user interface needs to be distributed over the network. This paper describes techniques using standard technologies based on XML for creating remote user interfaces for the Internet of Things

  6. Interface area transport of monodispersed spherical particulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chong H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-05

    We present an interface area transport model required in tracking of mass, momentum, and energy exchange between dispersed and background materials. The basic transport equation has been rigorously derived from the volume fraction evolution equation. Interface area changes due to mass transport and local compression/expansion are included. The model is then simplified for the case in which the dispersed phase is composed of spheres of locally uniform size. A procedure for calculating advective flux with interface reconstruction has been suggested.

  7. Recent work on material interface reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosso, S.J.; Swartz, B.K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    For the last 15 years, many Eulerian codes have relied on a series of piecewise linear interface reconstruction algorithms developed by David Youngs. In a typical Youngs` method, the material interfaces were reconstructed based upon nearly cell values of volume fractions of each material. The interfaces were locally represented by linear segments in two dimensions and by pieces of planes in three dimensions. The first step in such reconstruction was to locally approximate an interface normal. In Youngs` 3D method, a local gradient of a cell-volume-fraction function was estimated and taken to be the local interface normal. A linear interface was moved perpendicular to the now known normal until the mass behind it matched the material volume fraction for the cell in question. But for distorted or nonorthogonal meshes, the gradient normal estimate didn`t accurately match that of linear material interfaces. Moreover, curved material interfaces were also poorly represented. The authors will present some recent work in the computation of more accurate interface normals, without necessarily increasing stencil size. Their estimate of the normal is made using an iterative process that, given mass fractions for nearby cells of known but arbitrary variable density, converges in 3 or 4 passes in practice (and quadratically--like Newton`s method--in principle). The method reproduces a linear interface in both orthogonal and nonorthogonal meshes. The local linear approximation is generally 2nd-order accurate, with a 1st-order accurate normal for curved interfaces in both two and three dimensional polyhedral meshes. Recent work demonstrating the interface reconstruction for curved surfaces will /be discussed.

  8. Swimming near a deformable interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Marcelo; Powers, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    It is a known fact that swimmers behave differently near deformable soft tissues than when near a rigid surface. Motivated by this class of problems, we investigate swimming microorganisms near flexible walls. We calculate the speed of a n infinitely long swimmer near an interface between two viscous fluids. Part of the calculation of the speed is the calculation of the shape of the free boundary. The swimming speed is controlled by the competition between surface and viscous effects, where two limits are observed. When the surface tension vanishes, we get Taylor's result for a swimmer with no walls. When the surface tension is infinite, the problem is like that of a swimmer near a rigid wall.

  9. [Pathology of the vitreomacular interface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Monica; Gheorghe, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Vitreous role in the pathophysiology of retinal diseases has increased importantly over the recent years. This was possible using Optical Coherence Tomography which reviewed the way the vitreoretinal interface should be looked at and defined and classified new pathologies such as Vitreoretinal Traction Syndrome. Vitreous is not an empty space but an important anatomical structure with role in ocular physiology. With age biochemical changes occur so that vitreous starts to liquefy. Once the vitreous is liquefied (sinchisis) it collapses and passes in the retrohialoid space (sineresis). In complete PVD besides sinchisis there is a weakness of the adherence between the posterior cortex and ILM with total detachment of posterior cortex. Abnormal adhesions are associated with incomplete PVD. The definition and understanting of vitreoretinal pathology is an active and continuous process, PVD being the trigger of a lot of retinal pathologies: epiretinal membrane, macular hole, tractional macular oedema, VMTS, myopic traction maculopathy, exacerbations of exudative ARMD.

  10. Cooperative strings and glassy interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salez, Thomas; Salez, Justin; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Raphaël, Elie; Forrest, James A

    2015-07-07

    We introduce a minimal theory of glass formation based on the ideas of molecular crowding and resultant string-like cooperative rearrangement, and address the effects of free interfaces. In the bulk case, we obtain a scaling expression for the number of particles taking part in cooperative strings, and we recover the Adam-Gibbs description of glassy dynamics. Then, by including thermal dilatation, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation is derived. Moreover, the random and string-like characters of the cooperative rearrangement allow us to predict a temperature-dependent expression for the cooperative length ξ of bulk relaxation. Finally, we explore the influence of sample boundaries when the system size becomes comparable to ξ. The theory is in agreement with measurements of the glass-transition temperature of thin polymer films, and allows quantification of the temperature-dependent thickness hm of the interfacial mobile layer.

  11. Electronic Interfacing with Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James T.

    The direct interfacing of living cells with inorganic electronic materials, components or systems has led to the development of two broad categories of devices that can (1) transduce biochemical signals generated by biological components into electrical signals and (2) transduce electronically generated signals into biochemical signals. The first category of devices permits the monitoring of living cells, the second, enables control of cellular processes. This review will survey this exciting area with emphasis on the fundamental issues and obstacles faced by researchers. Devices and applications that use both prokaryotic (microbial) and eukaryotic (mammalian) cells will be covered. Individual devices described include microbial biofuel cells that produce electricity, bioelectrical reactors that enable electronic control of cellular metabolism, living cell biosensors for the detection of chemicals and devices that permit monitoring and control of mammalian physiology.

  12. Nanofluidics, from bulk to interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquet, Lydéric; Charlaix, Elisabeth

    2010-03-01

    Nanofluidics has emerged recently in the footsteps of microfluidics, following the quest for scale reduction inherent to nanotechnologies. By definition, nanofluidics explores transport phenomena of fluids at nanometer scales. Why is the nanometer scale specific? What fluid properties are probed at nanometric scales? In other words, why does 'nanofluidics' deserve its own brand name? In this critical review, we will explore the vast manifold of length scales emerging for fluid behavior at the nanoscale, as well as the associated mechanisms and corresponding applications. We will in particular explore the interplay between bulk and interface phenomena. The limit of validity of the continuum approaches will be discussed, as well as the numerous surface induced effects occurring at these scales, from hydrodynamic slippage to the various electro-kinetic phenomena originating from the couplings between hydrodynamics and electrostatics. An enlightening analogy between ion transport in nanochannels and transport in doped semi-conductors will be discussed (156 references).

  13. AFM Study on Interface of HTHP As-grown Diamond Single Crystal and Metallic Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The study for the interface of as-grown diamond and metallic film surrounding diamond is an attractive way for understanding diamond growth mechanism at high temperature and high pressure (HTHP), because it is that through the interface carbon atom groups from the molten film are transported to growing diamond surface. It is of great interest to perform atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiment, which provides a unique technique different from that of normal optical and electron microscopy studies, to observe the interface morphology. In the present paper,we report first that the morphologies obtained by AFM on the film are similar to those of corresponding diamond surface, and they are the remaining traces after the carbon groups moving from the film to growing diamond. The fine particles and a terrace structure with homogeneous average step height are respectively found on the diamond (100) and (111) surface. Diamond growth conditions show that its growth rates and the temperature gradients in the boundary layer of the molten film at HTHP result in the differences of surface morphologies on diamond planes,being rough on (100) plane and even on the (111) plane. The diamond growth on the (100) surface at HPHT could be considered as a process of unification of these diamond fine particles or of carbon atom groups recombination on the growing diamond crystal surface. Successive growth layer steps directly suggest the layer growth mechanism of the diamond (111) plane. The sources of the layer steps might be two-dimensional nuclei and dislocations.

  14. On Building a Search Interface Discovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestakov, Denis

    A huge portion of the Web known as the deep Web is accessible via search interfaces to myriads of databases on the Web. While relatively good approaches for querying the contents of web databases have been recently proposed, one cannot fully utilize them having most search interfaces unlocated. Thus, the automatic recognition of search interfaces to online databases is crucial for any application accessing the deep Web. This paper describes the architecture of the I-Crawler, a system for finding and classifying search interfaces. The I-Crawler is intentionally designed to be used in the deep web characterization surveys and for constructing directories of deep web resources.

  15. A Theoretical Framework for Ecological Interface Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicente, Kim J.; Rasmussen, Jens

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical framework for designing interfaces for complex systems is de-scribed. The framework, called ecological interface design (EID), suggests a set of principles for designing interfaces in a way that supports the funda-mental properties of human cognition. The basis of EID is the skills...... of the task require. The EID approach extends the concept of direct manipulation inter-faces by taking into account the added complications introduced by complex systems. In this paper, we describe the development of the framework, its theoretical foundations, and examples of its application to various work...

  16. Polymer surfaces, interfaces and thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamm, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Mainz (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Neutron reflectometry can be used in various ways to investigate surfaces, interfaces and thin films of polymers. Its potential comes mostly from the possibilities offered by selective deuteration, where a particular component can be made visible with respect to its activity at the interface. In addition the depth resolution is much better than with most other direct techniques, and details of the profiles may be resolved. Several examples will be discussed including the segment diffusion at the interface between two polymer films, the determination of the narrow interfaces between incompatible polymer blends and the development of order in thin diblock copolymer films. (author) 10 figs., 2 tabs., 38 refs.

  17. Interfaces usuario máquina

    OpenAIRE

    Cervelló González, Rosa; Martínez García, Domènec; Ramírez Ramey, David; Virgili Llop, Joaquim

    2009-01-01

    Esta guía nos habla de las interfaces, que son los dispositivos de contacto entre un usuario y una máquina. El diseño de las interfaces incide activamente en el proceso de comunicación interactiva; así, es necesario profundizar en los aspectos cognitivos del ser humano, para definir modelos de interfaces adaptadas a las necesidades individuales y sociales, y al mismo tiempo, preparar a la sociedad para la adaptación a las nuevas interfaces que formarán parte de su entorno. En la era de la soc...

  18. Digital interface for high-resolution displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, David J.; Gorenflo, Ronald L.

    1999-08-01

    Commercial display interfaces are currently transitioning from analog to digital. Although this transition is in the very early stages, the military needs to begin planning their own transition to digital. There are many problems with the analog interface in high-resolution display systems that are solved by changing to a digital interface. Also, display system cost can be lower with a digital interface to a high resolution display. Battelle is under contract with DARPA to develop an advanced Display Interface (ADI) to replace the analog RGB interfaces currently used in high definition workstation displays. The goal is to create a standard digital display interface for military applications that is based on emerging commercial standards. Support for military application- specific functionality is addressed, including display test and control. The main challenges to implementing a digital display interface are described, along with approaches to address the problems. Conceptual ADI architectures are described and contrasted. The current and emerging commercial standards for digital display interfaces are reviewed in detail. Finally, the tasks required to complete the ADI effort are outlined and described.

  19. NUMERICAL SIMULATION ON MULTI-FLUID INTERFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Enhancement of two-fluid mixing was numericallystudied by tracking the multi-fluid interfaces. Level set equations were used to capture the interfaces, and flow field was obtained by upwind TVD scheme to solve 2D Eulerian equations. The boundary conditions at interface of two fluids are determined by Ghost fluid method (GFM). The distributions of fluid parameters, such as pressure and density, were got at different time steps.The results show that the method presented in this paper can track the density discontinuity perfectly. Superior to previous results, the density discontinuity remains sharper. Also, the mixing of fluids can be greatly enhanced by setting disturbances along the initial fluid interfaces.``

  20. Behavior of compacted clay-concrete interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.R. SHAKIR; Jungao ZHU

    2009-01-01

    Tests of interface between compacted clay and concrete were conducted systematically using interface simple shear test apparatus. The samples, having same dry density with different water content ratio, were prepared.Two types of concrete with different surface roughness, i.e., relatively smooth and relatively rough surface rough-ness, were also prepared. The main objectives of this paper are to show the effect of water content, normal stress and rough surface on the shear stress-shear displacement relationship of clay-concrete interface. The following were concluded in this study: 1) the interface shear sliding dominates the interface shear displacement behavior for both cases of relatively rough and smooth concrete surface except when the clay water content is greater than 16% for the case of rough concrete surface where the shear failure occurs in the body of the clay sample; 2) the results of interface shear strength obtained by direct shear test were different from that of simple shear test for the case of rough concrete surface; 3) two types of interface failure mechanism may change each other with different water content ratio; 4) the interface shear strength increases with increasing water content ratio especially for the case of clay-rough concrete surface interface.

  1. Formulations of a hydromechanical interface element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Zhi Fu; Si-Hong Liu

    2011-01-01

    A hydromechanical interface element is proposed for the consideration of the hydraulic-mechanical coupling effect along the interface.The fully coupled governing equations and the relevant finite element formulations are derived in detail for the interface element.All the involved matrices are of the same form as those of a solid element,which makes the incorporation of the model into a finite element program straightforward.Three examples are then numerically simulated using the interface element.Reasonable results confirm the correctness of the proposed model and motivate its application in hydromechanical contact problems in the future.

  2. Morphological details in bloodstain particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wael, K; Lepot, L

    2015-01-01

    During the commission of crimes blood can be transferred to the clothing of the offender or on other crime related objects. Bloodstain particles are sub-millimetre sized flakes that are lost from dried bloodstains. The nature of these red particles is easily confirmed using spectroscopic methods. In casework, bloodstain particles showing highly detailed morphological features were observed. These provided a rationale for a series of experiments described in this work. It was found that the "largest" particles are shed from blood deposited on polyester and polyamide woven fabrics. No particles are lost from the stains made on absorbent fabrics and from those made on knitted fabrics. The morphological features observed in bloodstain particles can provide important information on the substrates from which they were lost. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Morphological classification of nanoceramic aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, Giovanni F.; Kang, Bongwoo; Ospina, Carolina; Sung, Changmo

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum silicate nanoaggregates grown at near-room temperature on an organic template under a variety of experimental conditions have been imaged by transmission electron microscopy. Images have been automatically classified by an algorithm based on "spectrum enhancement", multivariate statistics and supervised optimization. Spectrum enhancement consists of subtracting, in the log scale, a known function of wavenumber from the angle averaged power spectral density of the image. Enhanced spectra of each image, after polynomial interpolation, have been regarded as morphological descriptors and as such submitted to principal components analysis nested with a multiobjective parameter optimization algorithm. The latter has maximized pairwise discrimination between classes of materials. The role of the organic template and of a reaction parameter on aggregate morphology has been assessed at two magnification scales. Classification results have also been related to crystal structure data derived from selected area electron diffraction patterns.

  4. Morphological Mutations of Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hensler, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies (DGs) are extremely challenging objects in extragalactic astrophysics. They are expected to originate as the first units in Cold Dark-Matter cosmology. They are the galaxy type most sensitive to environmental influences and their division into multiple types with various properties have invoked the picture of their variant morphological transformations. Detailed observations reveal characteristics which allow to deduce the evolutionary paths and to witness how the environment has affected the evolution. Here we review peculiarities of general morphological DG types and refer to processes which can deplete gas-rich irregular DGs leading to dwarf ellipticals, while gas replenishment implies an evolutionary cycling. Finally, as the less understood DG types the Milky Way satellite dwarf spheroidal galaxies are discussed in the context of transformation.

  5. An interface energy density-based theory considering the coherent interface effect in nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yin; Chen, Shaohua; Fang, Daining

    2017-02-01

    To characterize the coherent interface effect conveniently and feasibly in nanomaterials, a continuum theory is proposed that is based on the concept of the interface free energy density, which is a dominant factor affecting the mechanical properties of the coherent interface in materials of all scales. The effect of the residual strain caused by self-relaxation and the lattice misfit of nanomaterials, as well as that due to the interface deformation induced by an external load on the interface free energy density is considered. In contrast to the existing theories, the stress discontinuity at the interface is characterized by the interface free energy density through an interface-induced traction. As a result, the interface elastic constant introduced in previous theories, which is not easy to determine precisely, is avoided in the present theory. Only the surface energy density of the bulk materials forming the interface, the relaxation parameter induced by surface relaxation, and the mismatch parameter for forming a coherent interface between the two surfaces are involved. All the related parameters are far easier to determine than the interface elastic constants. The effective bulk and shear moduli of a nanoparticle-reinforced nanocomposite are predicted using the proposed theory. Closed-form solutions are achieved, demonstrating the feasibility and convenience of the proposed model for predicting the interface effect in nanomaterials.

  6. Filament Identification through Mathematical Morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Eric W.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for detecting filamentary structure FilFinder. The algorithm uses the techniques of mathematical morphology for filament identification, presenting a complementary approach to current algorithms which use matched filtering or critical manifolds. Unlike other methods, FilFinder identifies filaments over a wide dynamic range in brightness. We apply the new algorithm to far infrared imaging data of dust emission released by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey team. Our prel...

  7. Liver morphology in morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T; Gluud, C

    1984-01-01

    methods including a computerized survey. Forty-one original articles were included, comprising information on liver morphology in 1515 morbidly obese patients. Liver biopsy was considered normal in 12 per cent of the cases. The most frequent abnormality reported was fatty change, present in 80 per cent...... of obesity, age, sex, alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus) does not point towards a single causal factor. Co-influence of additional pathogenetic factors are likely in the development of liver changes in morbid obesity....

  8. Nanoparticle self-assembly at the interface of liquid crystal droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mohammad; Roberts, Tyler F; Armas-Pérez, Julio C; Wang, Xiaoguang; Bukusoglu, Emre; Abbott, Nicholas L; de Pablo, Juan J

    2015-04-28

    Nanoparticles adsorbed at the interface of nematic liquid crystals are known to form ordered structures whose morphology depends on the orientation of the underlying nematic field. The origin of such structures is believed to result from an interplay between the liquid crystal orientation at the particles' surface, the orientation at the liquid crystal's air interface, and the bulk elasticity of the underlying liquid crystal. In this work, we consider nanoparticle assembly at the interface of nematic droplets. We present a systematic study of the free energy of nanoparticle-laden droplets in terms of experiments and a Landau-de Gennes formalism. The results of that study indicate that, even for conditions under which particles interact only weakly at flat interfaces, particles aggregate at the poles of bipolar droplets and assemble into robust, quantized arrangements that can be mapped onto hexagonal lattices. The contributions of elasticity and interfacial energy corresponding to different arrangements are used to explain the resulting morphologies, and the predictions of the model are shown to be consistent with experimental observations. The findings presented here suggest that particle-laden liquid crystal droplets could provide a unique and versatile route toward building blocks for hierarchical materials assembly.

  9. Adhesive interfaces of enamel and dentin prepared by air-abrasion at different distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra [School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto/University of Sao Paulo, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: michinelatti@gmail.com; Andreolli do Amaral, Thais Helena [School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto/University of Sao Paulo, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Borsatto, Maria Cristina [School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto/University of Sao Paulo, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka [School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto/University of Sao Paulo, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori [School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto/University of Sao Paulo, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil)

    2007-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to analyse, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces in cavities prepared by air-abrasion at different working distances. Thirty sound third human molars were selected and, on both their buccal and lingual surfaces, class V cavities were prepared by air-abrasion, at 2-, 4-, 6-, 8- and 10-mm working distances, or high-speed bur (control group). After preparation, all cavities were etched with 35% phosphoric acid gel and restored with Single Bond/Filtek Z-250. Buccal and lingual surfaces were separated and restorations sectioned in a buccolingual direction, providing two sections of each cavity, which were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that the distances of 6 and 8 mm promoted more homogeneous dentin/adhesive interfaces, with tags formation, and more uniform for enamel, which were similar to the control group. It may be concluded that the air-abrasion working distance can influence the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces, and the intermediate distances provided better adhesive interfaces.

  10. Adhesive interfaces of enamel and dentin prepared by air-abrasion at different distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra; do Amaral, Thais Helena Andreolli; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces in cavities prepared by air-abrasion at different working distances. Thirty sound third human molars were selected and, on both their buccal and lingual surfaces, class V cavities were prepared by air-abrasion, at 2-, 4-, 6-, 8- and 10-mm working distances, or high-speed bur (control group). After preparation, all cavities were etched with 35% phosphoric acid gel and restored with Single Bond/Filtek Z-250. Buccal and lingual surfaces were separated and restorations sectioned in a buccolingual direction, providing two sections of each cavity, which were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that the distances of 6 and 8 mm promoted more homogeneous dentin/adhesive interfaces, with tags formation, and more uniform for enamel, which were similar to the control group. It may be concluded that the air-abrasion working distance can influence the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces, and the intermediate distances provided better adhesive interfaces.

  11. Nanoparticle self-assembly at the interface of liquid crystal droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mohammad; Roberts, Tyler F.; Armas-Pérez, Julio C.; Wang, Xiaoguang; Bukusoglu, Emre; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles adsorbed at the interface of nematic liquid crystals are known to form ordered structures whose morphology depends on the orientation of the underlying nematic field. The origin of such structures is believed to result from an interplay between the liquid crystal orientation at the particles’ surface, the orientation at the liquid crystal’s air interface, and the bulk elasticity of the underlying liquid crystal. In this work, we consider nanoparticle assembly at the interface of nematic droplets. We present a systematic study of the free energy of nanoparticle-laden droplets in terms of experiments and a Landau–de Gennes formalism. The results of that study indicate that, even for conditions under which particles interact only weakly at flat interfaces, particles aggregate at the poles of bipolar droplets and assemble into robust, quantized arrangements that can be mapped onto hexagonal lattices. The contributions of elasticity and interfacial energy corresponding to different arrangements are used to explain the resulting morphologies, and the predictions of the model are shown to be consistent with experimental observations. The findings presented here suggest that particle-laden liquid crystal droplets could provide a unique and versatile route toward building blocks for hierarchical materials assembly. PMID:25870304

  12. Multi-scale characterization of surface blistering morphology of helium irradiated W thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.J., E-mail: jjyang@scu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Zhu, H.L. [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Wan, Q. [Institute of Structural Mechanics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Peng, M.J. [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Ran, G., E-mail: gran@xmu.edu.cn [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Tang, J.; Yang, Y.Y.; Liao, J.L.; Liu, N. [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China)

    2015-09-01

    Highlights: • Multi-scale blistering morphology of He irradiated W film was studied. • This complex morphology was first characterized by wavelet transform approach. - Abstract: Surface blistering morphologies of W thin films irradiated by 30 keV He ion beam were studied quantitatively. It was found that the blistering morphology strongly depends on He fluence. For lower He fluence, the accumulation and growth of He bubbles induce the intrinsic surface blisters with mono-modal size distribution feature. When the He fluence is higher, the film surface morphology exhibits a multi-scale property, including two kinds of surface blisters with different characteristic sizes. In addition to the intrinsic He blisters, film/substrate interface delamination also induces large-sized surface blisters. A strategy based on wavelet transform approach was proposed to distinguish and extract the multi-scale surface blistering morphologies. Then the density, the lateral size and the height of these different blisters were estimated quantitatively, and the effect of He fluence on these geometrical parameters was investigated. Our method could provide a potential tool to describe the irradiation induced surface damage morphology with a multi-scale property.

  13. Surface morphology of titanium nitride thin films synthesized by DC reactive magnetron sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ţǎlu Ştefan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the influence of temperature on the 3-D surface morphology of titanium nitride (TiN thin films synthesized by DC reactive magnetron sputtering has been analyzed. The 3-D morphology variation of TiN thin films grown on p-type Si (100 wafers was investigated at four different deposition temperatures (473 K, 573 K, 673 K, 773 K in order to evaluate the relation among the 3-D micro-textured surfaces. The 3-D surface morphology of TiN thin films was characterized by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM and fractal analysis applied to the AFM data. The 3-D surface morphology revealed the fractal geometry of TiN thin films at nanometer scale. The global scale properties of 3-D surface geometry were quantitatively estimated using the fractal dimensions D, determined by the morphological envelopes method. The fractal dimension D increased with the substrate temperature variation from 2.36 (at 473 K to 2.66 (at 673 K and then decreased to 2.33 (at 773 K. The fractal analysis in correlation with the averaged power spectral density (surface yielded better quantitative results of morphological changes in the TiN thin films caused by substrate temperature variations, which were more precise, detailed, coherent and reproducible. It can be inferred that fractal analysis can be easily applied for the investigation of morphology evolution of different film/substrate interface phases obtained using different thin-film technologies.

  14. Astragalar Morphology of Selected Giraffidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Solounias

    Full Text Available The artiodactyl astragalus has been modified to exhibit two trochleae, creating a double pullied structure allowing for significant dorso-plantar motion, and limited mediolateral motion. The astragalus structure is partly influenced by environmental substrates, and correspondingly, morphometric studies can yield paleohabitat information. The present study establishes terminology and describes detailed morphological features on giraffid astragali. Each giraffid astragalus exhibits a unique combination of anatomical characteristics. The giraffid astragalar morphologies reinforce previously established phylogenetic relationships. We find that the enlargement of the navicular head is a feature shared by all giraffids, and that the primitive giraffids possess exceptionally tall astragalar heads in relation to the total astragalar height. The sivatheres and the okapi share a reduced notch on the lateral edge of the astragalus. We find that Samotherium is more primitive in astragalar morphologies than Palaeotragus, which is reinforced by tooth characteristics and ossicone position. Diagnostic anatomical characters on the astragalus allow for giraffid species identifications and a better understanding of Giraffidae.

  15. Thermodynamics of catalytic nanoparticle morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Michael; Sharma, Renu; Lin, Pin Ann

    Metallic nanoparticles are an important class of industrial catalysts. The variability of their properties and the environment in which they act, from their chemical nature & surface modification to their dispersion and support, allows their performance to be optimized for many chemical processes useful in, e.g., energy applications and other areas. Their large surface area to volume ratio, as well as varying sizes and faceting, in particular, makes them an efficient source for catalytically active sites. These characteristics of nanoparticles - i.e., their morphology - can often display intriguing behavior as a catalytic process progresses. We develop a thermodynamic model of nanoparticle morphology, one that captures the competition of surface energy with other interactions, to predict structural changes during catalytic processes. Comparing the model to environmental transmission electron microscope images of nickel nanoparticles during carbon nanotube (and other product) growth demonstrates that nickel deformation in response to the nanotube growth is due to a favorable interaction with carbon. Moreover, this deformation is halted due to insufficient volume of the particles. We will discuss the factors that influence morphology and also how the model can be used to extract interaction strengths from experimental observations.

  16. Phase-field-crystal investigation of the morphology of a steady-state dendrite tip on the atomic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sai; Wang, Jincheng; Li, Junjie; Wang, Zhijun; Guo, Yaolin; Guo, Can; Zhou, Yaohe

    2017-06-01

    Through phase-field-crystal (PFC) simulations, we investigated, on the atomic scale, the crucial role played by interface energy anisotropy and growth driving force during the morphological evolution of a dendrite tip at low growth driving force. In the layer-by-layer growth manner, the interface energy anisotropy drives the forefront of the dendrite tip to evolve to be highly similar to the corner of the corresponding equilibrium crystal from the aspects of atom configuration and morphology, and thus affects greatly the formation and growth of a steady-state dendrite tip. Meanwhile, the driving force substantially influences the part behind the forefront of the dendrite tip, rather than the forefront itself. However, as the driving force increases enough to change the layer-by-layer growth to the multilayer growth, the morphology of the dendrite tip's forefront is completely altered. Parabolic fitting of the dendrite tip reveals that an increase in the influence of interface energy anisotropy makes dendrite tips deviate increasingly from a parabolic shape. By quantifying the deviations under various interface energy anisotropies and growth driving forces, it is suggested that a perfect parabola is an asymptotic limit for the shape of the dendrite tips. Furthermore, the atomic scale description of the dendrite tip obtained in the PFC simulation is compatible with the mesoscopic results obtained in the phase-field simulation in terms of the dendrite tip's morphology and the stability criterion constant.

  17. Phase-field-crystal investigation of the morphology of a steady-state dendrite tip on the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sai; Wang, Jincheng; Li, Junjie; Wang, Zhijun; Guo, Yaolin; Guo, Can; Zhou, Yaohe

    2017-06-01

    Through phase-field-crystal (PFC) simulations, we investigated, on the atomic scale, the crucial role played by interface energy anisotropy and growth driving force during the morphological evolution of a dendrite tip at low growth driving force. In the layer-by-layer growth manner, the interface energy anisotropy drives the forefront of the dendrite tip to evolve to be highly similar to the corner of the corresponding equilibrium crystal from the aspects of atom configuration and morphology, and thus affects greatly the formation and growth of a steady-state dendrite tip. Meanwhile, the driving force substantially influences the part behind the forefront of the dendrite tip, rather than the forefront itself. However, as the driving force increases enough to change the layer-by-layer growth to the multilayer growth, the morphology of the dendrite tip's forefront is completely altered. Parabolic fitting of the dendrite tip reveals that an increase in the influence of interface energy anisotropy makes dendrite tips deviate increasingly from a parabolic shape. By quantifying the deviations under various interface energy anisotropies and growth driving forces, it is suggested that a perfect parabola is an asymptotic limit for the shape of the dendrite tips. Furthermore, the atomic scale description of the dendrite tip obtained in the PFC simulation is compatible with the mesoscopic results obtained in the phase-field simulation in terms of the dendrite tip's morphology and the stability criterion constant.

  18. Interfacial thiol-isocyanate reactions for functional nanocarriers: a facile route towards tunable morphologies and hydrophilic payload encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuypers, Sören; Pramanik, Sumit Kumar; D'Olieslaeger, Lien; Reekmans, Gunter; Peters, Martijn; D'Haen, Jan; Vanderzande, Dirk; Junkers, Thomas; Adriaensens, Peter; Ethirajan, Anitha

    2015-11-11

    Functional nanocarriers were synthesized using an in situ inverse miniemulsion polymerization employing thiol-isocyanate reactions at the droplet interface to encapsulate hydrophilic payloads. The morphology of the nanocarriers is conveniently tunable by varying the reaction conditions and the dispersions are easily transferable to the aqueous phase.

  19. Interface engineering for efficient fullerene-free organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivanna, Ravichandran; Rajaram, Sridhar; Narayan, K. S.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the role of zinc oxide (ZnO) morphology and addition of an acceptor interlayer to achieve high efficiency fullerene-free bulk heterojunction inverted organic solar cells. Nanopatterning of the ZnO buffer layer enhances the effective light absorption in the active layer, and the insertion of a twisted perylene acceptor layer planarizes and decreases the electron extraction barrier. Along with an increase in current homogeneity, the reduced work function difference and selective transport of electrons prevent the accumulation of charges and decrease the electron-hole recombination at the interface. These factors enable an overall increase of efficiency to 4.6%, which is significant for a fullerene-free solution-processed organic solar cell.

  20. Interface engineering for efficient fullerene-free organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shivanna, Ravichandran; Narayan, K. S., E-mail: rajaram@jncasr.ac.in, E-mail: narayan@jncasr.ac.in [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India); Rajaram, Sridhar, E-mail: rajaram@jncasr.ac.in, E-mail: narayan@jncasr.ac.in [International Centre for Materials Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2015-03-23

    We demonstrate the role of zinc oxide (ZnO) morphology and addition of an acceptor interlayer to achieve high efficiency fullerene-free bulk heterojunction inverted organic solar cells. Nanopatterning of the ZnO buffer layer enhances the effective light absorption in the active layer, and the insertion of a twisted perylene acceptor layer planarizes and decreases the electron extraction barrier. Along with an increase in current homogeneity, the reduced work function difference and selective transport of electrons prevent the accumulation of charges and decrease the electron-hole recombination at the interface. These factors enable an overall increase of efficiency to 4.6%, which is significant for a fullerene-free solution-processed organic solar cell.