WorldWideScience

Sample records for resin-bonded fiber-reinforced composite

  1. Penggunaan Fiber Reinforced Composite Sebagai Resin Bonded Prosthesis Pada Gigi Anterior

    OpenAIRE

    Pintadi, Hastoro

    2007-01-01

    Resin bonded prosthesis is a fixed bridge which replace a space where one or two teeth have been lost or extracted, by using acid etched technique and resin bonding. The main goals in selecting a Resin bonded prosthesis were to preserve tooth structure, maintain esthetics and lower patient fees while providing restorations that had the potential for long-term service. This case report discuss about fiber reinforced composite used as a main material for resin bondedprosthesis to replace incivu...

  2. Influence of retainer design on two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses: An in vitro and finite element analysis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, F.; de Jager, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strenght of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Conclusion: A dual-wing retainer is the optimal design for replacement of a single

  3. [Influence of retainer design on fixation strength of resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed cantilever dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrikas, O A; Voroshilin, Iu G; Petrikas, I V

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed partial dentures (FPD) have become an accepted part of the restorative dentist's armamentarium. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass FRC-FPDs. Four retainer designs were tested: a dual wing, a dual wing + horizontal groove, a dual wing + occlusal rest and a step-box. Of each design on 7 human mandibular molars, FRC-FPDs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin Revolution (Kerr) impregnated glass fibers (GlasSpan, GlasSpan) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Charisma, Kulzer). Revolution (Kerr) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FPDs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. T (Student's)-test was used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FPDs (step-box: 172±11 N) compared to wing-retained FPDs (poptimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FPDs.

  4. Influence of retainer design on two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses: an in vitro and finite element analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keulemans, Filip; De Jager, Niek; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Feilzer, Albert J

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Four retainer designs were tested: a proximal box, a step-box, a dual wing, and a step-box-wing. Of each design on 8 human mandibular molars, FRC-FDPs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin impregnated unidirectional glass fibers (Estenia C&B EG Fiber, Kuraray) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Estenia C&B, Kuraray). Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FDPs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test were used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FDPs (proximal box: 300 +/- 65 N; step-box: 309 +/- 37 N) compared to wing-retained FDPs (p optimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FDPs.

  5. 6-mm-long implants loaded with fiber-reinforced composite resin-bonded fixed prostheses (FRCRBFDPs). A 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Fabio; Lang, Niklaus P; Ricci, Emanuele; Ferraioli, Lorenzo; Marchetti, Claudio; Botticelli, Daniele

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes and the survival rates of fiber-reinforced composite resin-bonded fixed prostheses (FRCRBFDPs) placed in the posterior area supported by two short (6 mm) implants. Twenty consecutive patients received 40 SLActive 6-mm-long implants with a diameter of 4.1 mm (n = 29) or 4.8 mm (n = 11). Insertion torques and RFA (Resonance Frequency Analysis) were measured at implant installation. The prosthetic rehabilitation was performed after 8 weeks from insertion with a screw-retained two- or three-unit fixed dental prosthesis fabricated of FRCRBFDPs. Implant survival rates and marginal bone levels were evaluated at various time intervals until 5 years after loading. Two of 20 patients lost four implants supporting two FRCRBFDPs between the second and the third year of follow-up (cumulative survival rate: 90% after 5 years). Four patients suffered a fracture of the prosthetic reconstruction, and the success rate of the rehabilitation was 70% after 5 years. A mean marginal bone loss of 0.30 ± 0.34 mm was found after 5 years of function at the remaining implants. The survival of short implants was 90% owing to two bridges losses in the maxilla. However, the success rate of FRCRBFDPs over 5 years was only at 70%. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Clinical studies of fiber-reinforced resin-bonded fixed partial dentures: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heumen, C.C.M. van; Kreulen, C.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, follow-up studies on fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures (FRC FPDs) have been described. Combining the results of these studies to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of FRC FPDs is challenging. The objective of this systematic review was to obtain survival

  7. Lignocellulosic fiber reinforced rubber composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacob John, Maya

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available polymerization reaction using Zieglar-Natta- hetergenous catalyst. The important components of NR are given in Table I. Lignocellulosic Fiber Reinforced Rubber Composites -253- Figure 1. Structure of natural rubber NR has a very uniform.... Grafting a second polymer onto the NR backbone Grafting is mostly carried out using vinyl monomers like methyl methacrylate (MMA) and styrene. The commercial available grafted copolymer of NR with poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is Heveaplus MG...

  8. Fiber reinforced polymer composites for bridge structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra CANTORIU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in construction materials technology have led to the emergence of new materials with special properties, aiming at safety, economy and functionality of bridges structures. A class of structural materials which was originally developed many years ago, but recently caught the attention of engineers involved in the construction of bridges is fiber reinforced polymer composites. This paper provides an overview of fiber reinforced polymer composites used in bridge structures including types, properties, applications and future trends. The results of this study have revealed that this class of materials presents outstanding properties such as high specific strength, high fatigue and environmental resistance, lightweight, stiffness, magnetic transparency, highly cost-effective, and quick assembly, but in the same time high initial costs, lack of data on long-term field performance, low fire resistance. Fiber reinforced polymer composites were widely used in construction of different bridge structures such as: deck and tower, I-beams, tendons, cable stands and proved to be materials for future in this field.

  9. Micromechanical failure in fiber-reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashouri Vajari, Danial

    Micromechanical failure mechanisms occurring in unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites are studied by means of the finite element method as well as experimental testing. This study highlights the effect of micro-scale features such as fiber/matrix interfacial debonding, matrix cracking......, the failure locus of the composite lamina under different loading conditions is obtained by means of computational micromechanics and compared with the predictions of Puck’s model. The results are in very good agreement with the predictions of Puck’s model under different interfiber failure modes. In order...

  10. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yolken, H

    2001-01-01

    .... The high stiffness-to-weight ratio, low electromagnetic reflectance, and the ability to embed sensors and actuators have made fiber reinforced composites an attractive alternative construction...

  11. Effect of hybrid fiber reinforcement on the cracking process in fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Eduardo B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, Joaquim A.O.

    2012-01-01

    tensile deformations in the composite, the fibers with different geometrical and mechanical properties restrain the propagation and further development of cracking at different scales from the micro- to the macro-scale. The optimized design of the fiber reinforcing systems requires the objective......The simultaneous use of different types of fibers as reinforcement in cementitious matrix composites is typically motivated by the underlying principle of a multi-scale nature of the cracking processes in fiber reinforced cementitious composites. It has been hypothesized that while undergoing...... assessment of the contribution of each type of fiber to the overall tensile response. Possible synergistic effects resulting from particular combinations of fibers need to be clearly identified. In the present study, the evaluation of the response of different fiber reinforced cementitious composite...

  12. On the simulation of kink bands in fiber reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.D.; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard; Jensen, H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Simulations of kink band formation in fiber reinforced composites are carried out using the commercial finite element program ABAQUS. A smeared-out, plane constitutive model for fiber reinforced materials is implemented as a user subroutine, and effects of fiber misalignment on elastic and plastic...

  13. On the Simulation of Kink Bands in Fiber Reinforced Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim Dalsten; Mikkelsen, Lars P.; Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2007-01-01

    Simulations of kink band formation in fiber reinforced composites are carried out using the commercial finite element program ABAQUS. A smeared-out, plane constitutive model for fiber reinforced materials is implemented as a user subroutine, and effects of fiber misalignment on elastic and plastic...

  14. Drastic Improvements in Bonding of Fiber Reinforced Multifunctional Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Achievement of a dramatic increase in the bond strength in the adhesive and composite/adhesive interfaces of existing fiber reinforced composite material joints and...

  15. Natural fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taj, S.; Khan, S.; Munawar, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Natural fibers have been used to reinforce materials for over 3,000 years. More recently they have been employed in combination with plastics. Many types of natural fi fibers have been investigated for use in plastics including Flax, hemp, jute, straw, wood fiber, rice husks, wheat, barley, oats, rye, cane (sugar and bamboo), grass reeds, kenaf, ramie, oil palm empty fruit bunch, sisal, coir, water hyacinth, pennywort, kapok, paper-mulberry, raphia, banana fiber, pineapple leaf fiber and papyrus. Natural fibers have the advantage that they are renewable resources and have marketing appeal. The Asian markets have been using natural fibers for many years e.g., jute is a common reinforcement in India. Natural fibers are increasingly used in automotive and packaging materials. Pakistan is an agricultural country and it is the main stay of Pakistan's economy. Thousands of tons of different crops are produced but most of their wastes do not have any useful utilization. Agricultural wastes include wheat husk, rice husk, and their straw, hemp fiber and shells of various dry fruits. These agricultural wastes can be used to prepare fiber reinforced polymer composites for commercial use. This report examines the different types of fibers available and the current status of research. Many references to the latest work on properties, processing and application have been cited in this review. (author)

  16. Micromechanical modeling of strength and damage of fiber reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishnaevsky, L. Jr.; Broendsted, P.

    2007-03-15

    The report for the first year of the EU UpWind project includes three parts: overview of concepts and methods of modelling of mechanical behavior, deformation and damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites, development of computational tools for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical models of fiber reinforced composites, and micromechanical modelling of damage in FRC, and phenomenological analysis of the effect of frequency of cyclic loading on the lifetime and damage evolution in materials. (au)

  17. Fiber-reinforced composites in fixed partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallittu P

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC prostheses offer the advantages of good esthetics, minimal invasive treatment, and an ability to bond to the abutment teeth, thereby compensating for less-than-optimal abutment tooth retention and resistance form. These prostheses are composed of two types of composite materials: fiber composites to build the framework and hybrid or microfill particulate composites to create the external veneer surface. This review concentrates on the use of fiber reinforcement in the fabrication of laboratory or chairside-made composite-fixed partial dentures of conventional preparation. Other applications of FRC in dentistry are briefly mentioned. The possibilities fiber reinforcement technology offers must be emphasized to the dental community. Rather than limiting discussion to whether FRC prostheses will replace metal-ceramic or full-ceramic prostheses, attention should be focused on the additional treatment options brought by the use of fibers. However, more clinical experience is needed.

  18. Radiation processing for carbon fiber-reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Udagawa, Akira; Morita, Yousuke

    2001-01-01

    The present work is an attempt to evaluate the performance of the fiber composites with crosslinked polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as a polymer matrix by radiation. The uni-directional carbon fiber-reinforced composites were fabricated with PTFE fine powder impregnation method and then crosslinked by electron beams irradiation under selective conditions. The carbon fiber-reinforced crosslinked PTFE composites show good mechanical properties compared with crosslinked PTFE. The radiation resistance of crosslinked PTFE composites is improved more than that of crosslinked resin without fiber. (author)

  19. High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites 6 HPFRCC 6

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhardt, Hans; Naaman, A

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites (HPFRCC) represent a class of cement composites whose stress-strain response in tension undergoes strain hardening behaviour accompanied by multiple cracking, leading to a high strain prior to failure. The primary objective of this International Workshop was to provide a compendium of up-to-date information on the most recent developments and research advances in the field of High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites. Approximately 65 contributions from leading world experts are assembled in these proceedings and provide an authoritative perspective on the subject. Special topics include fresh and hardening state properties; self-compacting mixtures; mechanical behavior under compressive, tensile, and shear loading; structural applications; impact, earthquake and fire resistance; durability issues; ultra-high performance fiber reinforced concrete; and textile reinforced concrete. Target readers: graduate students, researchers, fiber producers, desi...

  20. Micromechanical modeling of strength and damage of fiber reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, P.

    The report for the first year of the EU UpWind project includes three parts: overview of concepts and methods of modelling of mechanical behavior, deformation and damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites, development of computational tools for the automatic generation of 3D micromecha......The report for the first year of the EU UpWind project includes three parts: overview of concepts and methods of modelling of mechanical behavior, deformation and damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites, development of computational tools for the automatic generation of 3D...

  1. Hybrid fiber reinforcement and crack formation in Cementitious Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, E.B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, J.A.O.

    2011-01-01

    reinforcement systems. The research described in this paper shows that the multi-scale conception of cracking and the use of hybrid fiber reinforcements do not necessarily result in an improved tensile behavior of the composite. Particular material design requirements may nevertheless justify the use of hybrid......- to the macroscale. In this study, the performance of different fiber reinforced cementitious composites is assessed in terms of their tensile stress-crack opening behavior. The results obtained from this investigation allow a direct quantitative comparison of the behavior obtained from the different fiber...

  2. Coir fiber reinforced polypropylene composite panel for automotive interior applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Songklod Jarusombuti; Vallayuth Fueangvivat; Piyawade Bauchongkol; Robert H. White

    2011-01-01

    In this study, physical, mechanical, and flammability properties of coconut fiber reinforced polypropylene (PP) composite panels were evaluated. Four levels of the coir fiber content (40, 50, 60, and 70 % based on the composition by weight) were mixed with the PP powder and a coupling agent, 3 wt % maleic anhydride grafted PP (MAPP) powder. The water resistance and the...

  3. Fiber-reinforced Composite for Chairside Replacement of Anterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... option for replacing missing teeth. However, further and long-term clinical investigation will be required to provide additional information on the survival of directly-bonded anterior fixed prosthesis made with FRC systems. Keywords: Case report, composite resin, fiber-reinforced composite. Libyan Journal of Medicine Vol.

  4. Fiber-reinforced composites in fixed partial dentures | Garoushi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to whether FRC prostheses will replace metal-ceramic or full-ceramic prostheses, attention should be focused on the additional treatment options brought by the use of fibers. However, more clinical experience is needed. Keywords: fiber-reinforced composite, fixed partial dentures, particulate resin composite, framework

  5. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Prosthesis to Restore Missing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fiber-reinforced composite inlay-onlay FPD was used for a single posterior tooth replacement in a patient refusing implant for psychological reasons. The FRC-FPD was made of pre-impregnated E-glass fibers (everStick, StickTeck, Turku, Finland) embedded in a resin matrix (Stick Resin, StickTeck, Turku, Finland).

  6. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Prosthesis to Restore Missing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The unidirectional glass fibers were used to make a framework structure with high volume design placed in the pontic (edentulous) region. To reproduce the morphology of natural teeth, the framework structure was then veneered with Gradia (GC, Tokyo, Japan). Keywords: Fiber-reinforced composite; FRC; Posterior ...

  7. CODIFICATION OF FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITE PIPING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawls, G.

    2012-10-10

    The goal of the overall project is to successfully adapt spoolable FRP currently used in the oil industry for use in hydrogen pipelines. The use of FRP materials for hydrogen service will rely on the demonstrated compatibility of these materials for pipeline service environments and operating conditions. The ability of the polymer piping to withstand degradation while in service, and development of the tools and data required for life management are imperative for successful implementation of these materials for hydrogen pipeline. The information and data provided in this report provides the technical basis for the codification for fiber reinforced piping (FRP) for hydrogen service. The DOE has invested in the evaluation of FRP for the delivery for gaseous hydrogen to support the development of a hydrogen infrastructure. The codification plan calls for detailed investigation of the following areas: System design and applicable codes and standards; Service degradation of FRP; Flaw tolerance and flaw detection; Integrity management plan; Leak detection and operational controls evaluation; Repair evaluation. The FRP codification process started with commercially available products that had extensive use in the oil and gas industry. These products have been evaluated to assure that sufficient structural integrity is available for a gaseous hydrogen environment.

  8. Fiber-reinforced bioactive and bioabsorbable hybrid composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huttunen, Mikko; Godinho, Pedro; Kellomaeki, Minna [Tampere University of Technology, Institute of Biomaterials, Hermiankatu 12, PO Box 589, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland); Toermaelae, Pertti [Bioretec Ltd, Hermiankatu 22, PO Box 135, FI-33721 Tampere (Finland)], E-mail: mikko.huttunen@tut.fi

    2008-09-01

    Bioabsorbable polymeric bone fracture fixation devices have been developed and used clinically in recent decades to replace metallic implants. An advantage of bioabsorbable polymeric devices is that these materials degrade in the body and the degradation products exit via metabolic routes. Additionally, the strength properties of the bioabsorbable polymeric devices decrease as the device degrades, which promotes bone regeneration (according to Wolff's law) as the remodeling bone tissue is progressively loaded. The most extensively studied bioabsorbable polymers are poly-{alpha}-hydroxy acids. The major limitation of the first generation of bioabsorbable materials and devices was their relatively low mechanical properties and brittle behavior. Therefore, several reinforcing techniques have been used to improve the mechanical properties. These include polymer chain orientation techniques and the use of fiber reinforcements. The latest innovation for bioactive and fiber-reinforced bioabsorbable composites is to use both bioactive and bioresorbable ceramic and bioabsorbable polymeric fiber reinforcement in the same composite structure. This solution of using bioactive and fiber-reinforced bioabsorbable hybrid composites is examined in this study.

  9. Multi-scale simulation of viscoelastic fiber-reinforced composites

    OpenAIRE

    Staub, S.; Andrä, H.; Kabel, M.; Zangmeister, T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an effective algorithm to simulate the anisotropic viscoelastic wbehavior of a fiber-reinforced composite including the influence of the local geometric properties, like fiber-orientation and volume fraction. The considered composites consist of a viscoelastic matrix which is reinforced by elastic fibers. The viscoelastic composite behavior results anisotropic due to the local anisotropic fiber-orientations. The influence of the local time-dependent viscoelastic properties...

  10. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  11. Elastic constants and internal friction of fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, H.M.

    1982-01-01

    We review recent experimental studies at NBS on the anisotropic elastic constants and internal friction of fiber-reinforced composites. Materials that were studied include: boron-aluminum, boron-epoxy, graphite-epoxy, glass-epoxy, and aramid-epoxy. In all cases, elastic-constant direction dependence could be described by relationships developed for single crystals of homogeneous materials. Elastic stiffness and internal friction were found to vary inversely

  12. Natural fiber reinforced composites with moringa and vnyl ester matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Sundara, Babu Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    In this research work an attempt is carried out for producing a Natural Plant Based fiber Reinforced Composites using the Moringa Resins and Vinyl Ester by utilizing the wastage of natural plant based fiber as Reinforcement material and Matrix material as Natural Resin and Vinyl Ester. The objective of the work is Utilization of Natural Plant Based Bio- degardable wastage into an alternative materials in the industrial applications by analyzing, Various Manufacturing and testing. Initially th...

  13. Experimental study on mix proportion of fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yi; Zhao, Renda; Liao, Ping; Li, Fuhai; Yuan, Yuan; Zhou, Shuang

    2017-10-01

    To study the mechanical property of fiber reinforced cementations composites influenced by the fiber length, quartz sand diameter, matrix of water cement ratio, volume fraction of fiber and magnesium acrylate solution. Several 40×40×160 mm standard test specimens, "8" specimens and long "8" specimens and 21 groups of fiber concrete specimens were fabricated. The flexural, compressive and uniaxial tensile strength were tested by using the bending resistance, compression resistance and electronic universal testing machine. The results show that flexural and compressive strength of fiber reinforced cementations composites increases along with the increase of quartz sand diameter, with the growth of the PVA fiber length increases; When the water-binder ratio is 0.25 and powder-binder ratio is 0.3, the PVA fiber content is 1.5% of the mass of cementations materials, there is a phenomenon of strain hardening; The addition of magnesium acrylate solution reduces the tensile strength of PVA fiber reinforced cementations composites, the tensile strength of the specimens in the curing age of 7d is decreased by about 21% and the specimens in curing age of 28d is decreased by more than 50%.

  14. Carbon fiber reinforcements for sheet molding composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Soydan; Paulauskas, Felix L.

    2017-11-14

    A method of processing a carbon fiber tow includes the steps of providing a carbon fiber tow made of a plurality of carbon filaments, depositing a sizing composition at spaced-apart sizing sites along a length of the tow, leaving unsized interstitial regions of the tow, and cross-cutting the tow into a plurality of segments. Each segment includes at least a portion of one of the sizing sites and at least a portion of at least one of the unsized regions of the tow, the unsized region including and end portion of the segment.

  15. MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND ANALYSIS OF RANDOMLY DISTRIBUTED SHORT BANANA FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Misra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Short banana fiber reinforced composites have been prepared in laboratory to determine mechanical properties. It has been observed that as soon as the percentage of the banana fiber increases slightly there is a tremendous increase in ultimate tensile strength, % of strain and young modulus of elasticity. Reinforcement of banana fibers in epoxy resin increases stiffness and decreases damping properties of the composites. Therefore, 2.468% banana fiber reinforced composite plate stabilizes early as compared to 7.7135 % banana fiber reinforced composite plate but less stiff as compared to 7.7135 % banana fiber reinforced composite plate

  16. Electron beam curing of aramid fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, C.B.; Singh, A.; Lopata, V.J.; Boyer, G.D.; Kremers, W.; Mason, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    High strength- and stiffness-to-weight ratios have allowed fiber-reinforced composites to be used for many applications, including aircraft and aerospace products, sporting goods and automotive components. Electron beam (EB) processing involves using electrons to initiate polymerization and/or crosslinking reactions in suitable polymer substrates to enhance specific physical and chemical properties. The advantages of using EB processing rather than thermal curing techniques for composites, include reduced internal stresses, a result of curing at ambient temperature, greatly reduced curing times, and better control of energy absorption. The penetration limit for a 10-MeV electron beam is about 4 cm for one-sided treatment of unit-density material, making EB processing suitable for many applications. The penetration limit is inversely proportional to the density of the material. This paper reports on the authors' research program to study EB-curable aramid fiber-reinforced composites. The program objective is to design and manufacture EB-curable composites that meet mechanical and physical property specifications for selected applications. The suitability of standard fabrication methods, such as filament winding and hand lay-up, to EB processing is also discussed

  17. Fiber-reinforced composites materials, manufacturing, and design

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, P K

    2007-01-01

    The newly expanded and revised edition of Fiber-Reinforced Composites: Materials, Manufacturing, and Design presents the most up-to-date resource available on state-of-the-art composite materials. This book is unique in that it not only offers a current analysis of mechanics and properties, but also examines the latest advances in test methods, applications, manufacturing processes, and design aspects involving composites. This third edition presents thorough coverage of newly developed materials including nanocomposites. It also adds more emphasis on underlying theories, practical methods, and problem-solving skills employed in real-world applications of composite materials. Each chapter contains new examples drawn from diverse applications and additional problems to reinforce the practical relevance of key concepts. New in The Third Edition: Contains new sections on material substitution, cost analysis, nano- and natural fibers, fiber architecture, and carbon-carbon composites Provides a new chapter on poly...

  18. Fracture morphology of carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Srinivasa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP composites have been extensively used in fabrication of primary structures for aerospace, automobile and other engineering applications. With continuous and widespread use of these composites in several advanced technology, the frequency of failures is likely to increase. Therefore, to establish the reasons for failures, the fracture modes should be understood thoroughly and unambiguously. In this paper, CFRP composite have been tested in tension, compression and flexural loadings; and microscopic study with the aid of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM has been performed on failed (fractured composite surfaces to identify the principle features of failure. Efforts have been made in correlating the fracture surface characteristics to the failure mode. The micro-mechanics analysis of failure serves as a useful guide in selecting constituent materials and designing composites from the failure behavior point of view. Also, the local failure initiation results obtained here has been reliably extended to global failure prediction.

  19. Preparasi Minimal pada Pembuatan Gigi Tiruan Cekat dengan Fiber Reinforced Composite (FRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Ayat Santiko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dalam praktek sering kali dokter gigi dihadapkan pada pasien yang kehilangan gigi anterior dan ingin segera dibuatkan gigi tiruan karena alasan estetik. Gigi tiruan yang dibuat bisa berupa gigi tiruan sebagian lepasan (GTSL atau gigi tiruan cekat (GTC. Pada GTSL, adanya plat pada palatum menyebabkan rasa tidak nyaman, selain itu pasien setiap kali harus buka pasang gigi tiruan kembali sehingga cukup merepotkan. Oleh karena itu pada umumnya pasien ingin dibuatkan GTC dan hal ini memang sesuai dengan indikasi GTC. Hal yang menjadi pertimbangan pada pembuatan GTC adalah pengasahan permukaan gigi secara keseluruhan bila akan dibuat desain full crown. Pada perkembangan desain GTC ada desain yang disebut resin bonded bridge atau adhesive bridge yaitu GTC yang dibuat pada gigi abutment yang dipreparasi minimal pada bagian palatal saja dan dilekatkan secara mikromekanikal antara retainer sayap logam dan gigi yang telah dipreparasi. Pasien wan ita usia 22 tahun datang ke klinik Prostodonsia RSGM Prof Soedomo UGM karena kehilangan gigi insisif sentral kiri atas. Pada kasus ini dilakukan pembuatan GTC dengan bahan fiber reinforced composite (FRC. Pembuatan bridge dengan bahan FRC dapat dilakukan secara langsung dan tidak langsung. Pada makalah ini akan dibahas pembuatan bridge FRC secara tidak langsung yaitu dengan menggunakan gigi artlfisial komposit. Hasil menunjukkan estetis yang baik, kontrol setelah 2 bulan tidak ada perubahan warna dan pasien merasa puas dengan penampilannya, jaringan gingiva di sekitarnya normal.

  20. Micromechanisms of damage in unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, Povl

    2009-01-01

    strength of a composite at the pre-critical load, while the fibers with randomly distributed strengths lead to the higher strength of the composite at post-critical loads. In the case of randomly distributed fiber strengths, the damage growth in fibers seems to be almost independent from the crack length...... in the numerical experiments. The effect of the statistical variability of fiber strengths, viscosity of the polymer matrix as well as the interaction between the damage processes in matrix, fibers and interface are investigated numerically. It is demonstrated that fibers with constant strength ensure higher......Numerical micromechanical investigations of the mechanical behavior and damage evolution of glass fiber reinforced composites are presented. A program code for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical unit cell models of composites with damageable elements is developed, and used...

  1. Chairside fabricated fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufyan Garoushi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The advances in the materials and techniques for adhesive dentistry have allowed the development of non-invasive or minimally invasive approaches for replacing a missing tooth in those clinical situations when conservation of adjacent teeth is needed. Good mechanical and cosmetic/aesthetic properties of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC, with good bonding properties with composite resin cement and veneering composite are needed in FRC devices. Some recent studies have shown that adhesives of composite resins and luting cements allow diffusion of the adhesives to the FRC framework of the bridges. By this so-called interdiffusion bonding is formed [1]. FRC bridges can be made in dental laboratories or chairside. This article describes a clinical case of chairside (directly made FRC Bridge, which was used according to the principles of minimal invasive approach. Treatment was performed by Professor Vallittu from the University of Turku, Finland.

  2. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  3. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  4. Evaluation of opacity in polyethylene fiber reinforced composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasani Tabatabaie M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: The main objective of this study was to determine the effect of polyethylene fibers and veneering composites in fiber-reinforced resin systems on the opacity (contrast ratio. "nMaterials and Methods: The specimens were divided into four groups. Two groups were used as the control groups, with no reinforcement. The fibers of polyethylene (Fibre-Braid with special basement composites were used as the reinforced framework materials. Filtek Z250 and GRADIA (shade A2 were used as veneering materials. The total thickness of samples was 3 mm with 13 mm diameter. Specimens were prepared in disk shaped metal mold. The composite materials were light-cured according to their manufacturers' instructions. The contrast ratio (CR of each specimen was determined on black and white backgrounds using reflection spectrophotometer. Reflectance was measured at intervals of 10 nm between 400 nm and 750 nm. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. "nResults: When contrast ratio were compared among the different types of materials statistically significant differences were observed in both veneering composites (P<0.05. The Z250 resin composite had the lowest CR. It was shown that CR tended to decrease as the wavelength of incident light increased from 400 nm to 750 nm. On the other hand, the most differences in CR between groups were found in longer wavelengths. "nConclusion: It was found that polyethylene fibers reduced the amount of the translucency in FRC samples. The results of this study indicate that light reflectance characteristics, including the wavelength dependence, play an important role for the CR of a fiber-reinforced composite.

  5. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization......This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows...... to maintain the kinematics of the two material phases independent from the assumed constitutive models, so that stress-deformation relationships, can be expressed in the framework of hyper-elasticity and hyper-elastoplasticity for the fiber and the matrix materials respectively. The bending stiffness...

  6. Resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitznagel, Frank A; Horvath, Sebastian D; Guess, Petra C; Blatz, Markus B

    2014-01-01

    Resin bonding is essential for clinical longevity of indirect restorations. Especially in light of the increasing popularity of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-fabricated indirect restorations, there is a need to assess optimal bonding protocols for new ceramic/polymer materials and indirect composites. The aim of this article was to review and assess the current scientific evidence on the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials. An electronic PubMed database search was conducted from 1966 to September 2013 for in vitro studies pertaining the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials. The search revealed 198 titles. Full-text screening was carried out for 43 studies, yielding 18 relevant articles that complied with inclusion criteria. No relevant studies could be identified regarding new ceramic/polymer materials. Most common surface treatments are aluminum-oxide air-abrasion, silane treatment, and hydrofluoric acid-etching for indirect composite restoration. Self-adhesive cements achieve lower bond strengths in comparison with etch-and-rinse systems. Thermocycling has a greater impact on bonding behavior than water storage. Air-particle abrasion and additional silane treatment should be applied to enhance the resin bond to laboratory-processed composites. However, there is an urgent need for in vitro studies that evaluate the bond strength to new ceramic/polymer materials. This article reviews the available dental literature on resin bond of laboratory composites and gives scientifically based guidance for their successful placement. Furthermore, this review demonstrated that future research for new ceramic/polymer materials is required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Neutron stress measurement of W-fiber reinforced Cu composite

    CERN Document Server

    Nishida, M; Ikeuchi, Y; Minakawa, N

    2003-01-01

    Stress measurement methods using neutron and X-ray diffraction were examined by comparing the surface stresses with internal stresses in the continuous tungsten-fiber reinforced copper-matrix composite. Surface stresses were measured by X-ray stress measurement with the sin sup 2 psi method. Furthermore, the sin sup 2 psi method and the most common triaxal measurement method using Hooke's equation were employed for internal stress measurement by neutron diffraction. On the other hand, microstress distributions developed by the difference in the thermal expansion coefficients between these two phases were calculated by FEM. The weighted average strains and stresses were compared with the experimental results. The FEM results agreed with the experimental results qualitatively and confirmed the importance of the triaxial stress analysis in the neutron stress measurement. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Neutron stress measurement of W-fiber reinforced Cu composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, M.; Hanabusa, T.; Ikeuchi, Y.; Minakawa, N.

    2003-01-01

    Stress measurement methods using neutron and X-ray diffraction were examined by comparing the surface stresses with internal stresses in the continuous tungsten-fiber reinforced copper-matrix composite. Surface stresses were measured by X-ray stress measurement with the sin 2 ψ method. Furthermore, the sin 2 ψ method and the most common triaxal measurement method using Hooke's equation were employed for internal stress measurement by neutron diffraction. On the other hand, microstress distributions developed by the difference in the thermal expansion coefficients between these two phases were calculated by FEM. The weighted average strains and stresses were compared with the experimental results. The FEM results agreed with the experimental results qualitatively and confirmed the importance of the triaxial stress analysis in the neutron stress measurement. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Problems encountered with conventional fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landel, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    Preparational, computational, and operational problems associated with fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) are reviewed. Initial preparation of FRCs is shown to involve consideration of the type of prepreg, the setting time, cure conditions and cycles, and cure temperatures. The effects of the choice of bonding agents, the fiber transfer length, and individual fiber responses to bonding agents are noted to have an impact on fiber strength, moisture uptake, and fatigue resistance. The deformation prior to failure and the failure region are modeled through models of mini-, micro- and macro mechanics formulations employing a stiffness matrix, failure criterion, or fracture mechanics. The detection, evaluation, and repair of defects comprises the operational domain, and it is stressed that no good repair techniques exist for FRCs.

  10. Placement protocol for an anterior fiber-reinforced composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbrook, D S

    1997-01-01

    The new classification of metal-free restorative materials provides the clinician with a durable, flexible, and aesthetic laboratory-fabricated alternative to conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) full-coverage crowns, inlay and onlay restorations, and single pontic bridges. With exceptional physical and optical characteristics, restorations fabricated utilizing the new ceramic optimized polymer (Ceromer) (Targis, Ivoclar Williams, Amherst, NY) and fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) framework (Vectris, Ivoclar Williams, Amherst, NY) materials can also be utilized predictably in the anterior segment. The success of metal-free restorations can be achieved by following conventional prosthodontic principles for preparation, cementation, and finishing. This article demonstrates the appropriate treatment protocol in order to achieve aesthetically acceptable and durable anterior results utilizing a metal-free restorative system for "Maryland-like" bridge restorations.

  11. In vitro evaluation of failure loads of nonmetal cantilevered resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, A.; Feilzer, A.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in vitro the influence of fiber reinforcement on the failure loads of resin composite beams, simulating cantilevered two-unit resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses, and compare the results with similarly obtained failure loads of ZrO2 and CoCr beams of a comparable design.

  12. Energy Absorption Capacity in Natural Fiber Reinforcement Composites Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Alba, Elías; Díaz, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    The study of natural fiber reinforcement composite structures has focused the attention of the automobile industry due to the new regulation in relation to the recyclability and the reusability of the materials preserving and/or improving the mechanical characteristics. The influence of different parameters on the material behavior of natural fiber reinforced plastic structures has been investigated, showing the potential for transport application in energy absorbing structures. Two different woven fabrics (twill and hopsack) made of flax fibers as well as a non-woven mat made of a mixture of hemp and kenaf fibers were employed as reinforcing materials. These reinforcing textiles were impregnated with both HD-PE (high-density polyethylen) and PLA (polylactic acid) matrix, using a continuous compression molding press. The impregnated semi-finished laminates (so-called organic sheets) were thermoformed in a second step to half-tubes that were assembled through vibration-welding process to cylindric crash absorbers. The specimens were loaded by compression to determine the specific energy absorption capacity. Quasi-static test results were compared to dynamic test data obtained on a catapult arrangement. The differences on the specific energies absorption (SEA) as a function of different parameters, such as the wall thickness, the weave material type, the reinforced textiles, and the matrix used, depending on the velocity rate application were quantified. In the case of quasi-static analysis it is observed a 20% increment in the SEA value when wove Hopsack fabric reinforcement is employed. No velocity rate influence from the material was observed on the SEA evaluation at higher speeds used to perform the experiments. The influence of the weave configuration (Hopsack) seems to be more stable against buckling effects at low loading rates with 10% higher SEA values. An increase of SEA level of up to 72% for PLA matrix was observed when compared with HD-PE matrix. PMID

  13. Energy Absorption Capacity in Natural Fiber Reinforcement Composites Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Alba, Elías; Schmeer, Sebastian; Díaz, Francisco

    2018-03-13

    The study of natural fiber reinforcement composite structures has focused the attention of the automobile industry due to the new regulation in relation to the recyclability and the reusability of the materials preserving and/or improving the mechanical characteristics. The influence of different parameters on the material behavior of natural fiber reinforced plastic structures has been investigated, showing the potential for transport application in energy absorbing structures. Two different woven fabrics (twill and hopsack) made of flax fibers as well as a non-woven mat made of a mixture of hemp and kenaf fibers were employed as reinforcing materials. These reinforcing textiles were impregnated with both HD-PE (high-density polyethylen) and PLA (polylactic acid) matrix, using a continuous compression molding press. The impregnated semi-finished laminates (so-called organic sheets) were thermoformed in a second step to half-tubes that were assembled through vibration-welding process to cylindric crash absorbers. The specimens were loaded by compression to determine the specific energy absorption capacity. Quasi-static test results were compared to dynamic test data obtained on a catapult arrangement. The differences on the specific energies absorption (SEA) as a function of different parameters, such as the wall thickness, the weave material type, the reinforced textiles, and the matrix used, depending on the velocity rate application were quantified. In the case of quasi-static analysis it is observed a 20% increment in the SEA value when wove Hopsack fabric reinforcement is employed. No velocity rate influence from the material was observed on the SEA evaluation at higher speeds used to perform the experiments. The influence of the weave configuration (Hopsack) seems to be more stable against buckling effects at low loading rates with 10% higher SEA values. An increase of SEA level of up to 72% for PLA matrix was observed when compared with HD-PE matrix.

  14. Energy Absorption Capacity in Natural Fiber Reinforcement Composites Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías López-Alba

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of natural fiber reinforcement composite structures has focused the attention of the automobile industry due to the new regulation in relation to the recyclability and the reusability of the materials preserving and/or improving the mechanical characteristics. The influence of different parameters on the material behavior of natural fiber reinforced plastic structures has been investigated, showing the potential for transport application in energy absorbing structures. Two different woven fabrics (twill and hopsack made of flax fibers as well as a non-woven mat made of a mixture of hemp and kenaf fibers were employed as reinforcing materials. These reinforcing textiles were impregnated with both HD-PE (high-density polyethylen and PLA (polylactic acid matrix, using a continuous compression molding press. The impregnated semi-finished laminates (so-called organic sheets were thermoformed in a second step to half-tubes that were assembled through vibration-welding process to cylindric crash absorbers. The specimens were loaded by compression to determine the specific energy absorption capacity. Quasi-static test results were compared to dynamic test data obtained on a catapult arrangement. The differences on the specific energies absorption (SEA as a function of different parameters, such as the wall thickness, the weave material type, the reinforced textiles, and the matrix used, depending on the velocity rate application were quantified. In the case of quasi-static analysis it is observed a 20% increment in the SEA value when wove Hopsack fabric reinforcement is employed. No velocity rate influence from the material was observed on the SEA evaluation at higher speeds used to perform the experiments. The influence of the weave configuration (Hopsack seems to be more stable against buckling effects at low loading rates with 10% higher SEA values. An increase of SEA level of up to 72% for PLA matrix was observed when compared with HD

  15. Flax fiber reinforced PLA composites: studies on types of PLA and different methods of fabrication

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available in the last decade. It is well known that natural fiber reinforced PLA composites can be prepared by solution casting cum compression molding and injection molding methods. The authors have prepared flax fiber reinforced PLA (procured from Cereplast Ltd...

  16. New generation fiber reinforced polymer composites incorporating carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Eslam

    The last five decades observed an increasing use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites as alternative construction materials for aerospace and infrastructure. The high specific strength of FRP attracted its use as non-corrosive reinforcement. However, FRP materials were characterized with a relatively low ductility and low shear strength compared with steel reinforcement. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced in the last decade as a material with minimal defect that is capable of increasing the mechanical properties of polymer matrices. This dissertation reports experimental investigations on the use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce a new generation of FRP composites. The experiments showed significant improvements in the flexure properties of the nanocomposite when functionalized MWCNTs were used. In addition, MWCNTs were used to produce FRP composites in order to examine static, dynamic, and creep behavior. The MWCNTs improved the off-axis tension, off-axis flexure, FRP lap shear joint responses. In addition, they reduced the creep of FRP-concrete interface, enhanced the fracture toughness, and altered the impact resistance significantly. In general, the MWCNTs are found to affect the behaviour of the FRP composites when matrix failure dominates the behaviour. The improvement in the mechanical response with the addition of low contents of MWCNTs would benefit many industrial and military applications such as strengthening structures using FRP composites, composite pipelines, aircrafts, and armoured vehicles.

  17. Fiber reinforced silicon-containing arylacetylene resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A silicon-containing arylacetylene resin (SAR, a poly(dimethylsilyleneethynylene phenyleneethynylene (PMSEPE, was synthesized. The PMSEPE is a solid resin at ambient temperature with a softening temperature about 60°C and soluble in some solvents like tetrahydrofuran. The melt viscosity of the PMSEPE resin is less than 1 Pa•s. The resin could cure at the temperature of lower than 200°C. Fiber reinforced PMSEPE composites were prepared from prepregs which were made by the impregnation of fibers in PMSEPE resin solution. The composites exhibit good mechanical properties at room temperature and 250°C. The observation on fracture surfaces of the composites reinforced by glass fibers and carbon fibers demonstrates that the adhesion between the fibers and resin is good. The results from an oxyacetylene flame test show that the composites have good ablation performance and XRD analyses indicate that SiC forms in the residues during the ablation of the composites.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Using Composite Binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Fediuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the creation of high-density impermeable concrete. The effect of the “cement, fly ash, and limestone” composite binders obtained by joint grinding with superplasticizer in the varioplanetary mill on the process of structure formation was studied. Compaction of structure on micro- and nanoscale levels was characterized by different techniques: X-ray diffraction, DTA-TGA, and electron microscopy. Results showed that the grinding of active mineral supplements allows crystallization centers to be created by ash particles as a result of the binding of Ca(OH2 during hardening alite, which intensifies the clinker minerals hydration process; the presence of fine grains limestone also leads to the hydrocarboaluminates calcium formation. The relation between cement stone neoplasms composition as well as fibrous concrete porosity and permeability of composite at nanoscale level for use of composite binders with polydispersed mineral supplements was revealed. The results are of potential importance in developing the wide range of fine-grained fiber-reinforced concrete with a compressive strength more than 100 MPa, with low permeability under actual operating conditions.

  19. Load-bearing capacity of fiber reinforced fixed composite bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göncü Başaran, Emine; Ayna, Emrah; Üçtaşli, Sadullah; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reinforcing effect of differently oriented fibers on the load-bearing capacity of three-unit fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Forty-eight composite FDPs were fabricated. Specimens were divided into eight groups (n = 6/group; codes 1-8). Groups 1 and 5 were plain restorative composites (Grandio and Z100) without fiber reinforcement, groups 2 and 6 were reinforced with a continuous unidirectional fiber substructure, groups 3 and 7 were reinforced with a continuous bidirectional fiber and groups 4 and 8 were reinforced with a continuous bidirectional fiber substructure and continuous unidirectional fiber. FDPs were polymerized incrementally with a handheld light curing unit for 40 s and statically loaded until final fracture. Kruskal-Wallis analysis revealed that all groups had significantly different load-bearing capacities. Group 4 showed the highest mean load-bearing capacity and Group 7 the lowest. The results of this study suggest that continuous unidirectional fiber increased the mechanical properties of composite FDPs and bidirectional reinforcement slowed crack propagation on abutments.

  20. Drastic Improvements in Bonding of Fiber Reinforced Multifunctional Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Achievement of a dramatic increase in the bond strength in the composite/adhesive interfaces of existing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite material joints and...

  1. Microhardness of resin composite materials light-cured through fiber reinforced composite.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Ray, N.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare polymerization efficiency of resin composite basing materials when light-cured through resin composite and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) by testing microhardness. METHODS: Simulated indirect restorations were prepared by application of resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) or FRC

  2. STUDY THE CREEP OF TUBULAR SHAPED FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najat J. Saleh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Inpresent work tubular –shaped fiber reinforced composites were manufactured byusing two types of resins ( Epoxy and unsaturated polyester and separatelyreinforced with glass, carbon and kevlar-49 fibers (filament and woven roving,hybrid reinforcement composites of these fibers were also prepared. The fiberswere wet wound on a mandrel using a purposely designed winding machine,developed by modifying an ordinary lathe, in winding angle of 55° for filament. A creep test was made of either the fulltube or specimens taken from it. Creep was found to increase upon reinforcementin accordance to the rule of mixture and mainly decided by the type of singleor hybridized fibers. The creep behavior, showed that the observed strain tendsto appear much faster at higher temperature as compared with that exhibited atroom temperate. The creep rate also found to be depending on fiber type, matrixtype, and the fiber /matrix bonding. The creep energy calculated fromexperimental observations was found to exhibit highest value for hybridizedreinforcement.

  3. Anomaly detection of microstructural defects in continuous fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Stephen; Simmons, J. P.; Przybyla, Craig; Hardie, Russell

    2015-03-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with continuous fiber reinforcements have the potential to enable the next generation of high speed hypersonic vehicles and/or significant improvements in gas turbine engine performance due to their exhibited toughness when subjected to high mechanical loads at extreme temperatures (2200F+). Reinforced fiber composites (RFC) provide increased fracture toughness, crack growth resistance, and strength, though little is known about how stochastic variation and imperfections in the material effect material properties. In this work, tools are developed for quantifying anomalies within the microstructure at several scales. The detection and characterization of anomalous microstructure is a critical step in linking production techniques to properties, as well as in accurate material simulation and property prediction for the integrated computation materials engineering (ICME) of RFC based components. It is desired to find statistical outliers for any number of material characteristics such as fibers, fiber coatings, and pores. Here, fiber orientation, or `velocity', and `velocity' gradient are developed and examined for anomalous behavior. Categorizing anomalous behavior in the CMC is approached by multivariate Gaussian mixture modeling. A Gaussian mixture is employed to estimate the probability density function (PDF) of the features in question, and anomalies are classified by their likelihood of belonging to the statistical normal behavior for that feature.

  4. Abrasive waterjet machining of fiber reinforced composites: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalla, D. K.; Dhanasekaran, P. S.; Zhang, B.; Asmatulu, R.

    2012-04-01

    Machining of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites is a major secondary manufacturing activity in the aircraft and automotive industries. Traditional machining of these composites is difficult due to the high abrasiveness nature of their reinforcing constituents. Almost all the traditional machining processes involve in the dissipation of heat into the workpiece which can be resulted in damage to workpiece and rapid wear of the cutting tool. This serious issue has been overcome by water jetting technologies. Abrasive waterjet machining (AWJM) is a nontraditional method and one of the best options for machining FRPs. This paper presents a review of the ongoing research and development in AWJM of FRPs, with a critical review of the physics of the machining process, surface characterization, modeling and the newer application to the basic research. Variable cutting parameters, limitations and safety aspects of AWJM and the noise related issues due to high flow rate of water jet will be addressed. Further challenges and scope of the future development in AWJM are also presented in detail.

  5. Improvement of the piezoelectric properties of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites by poling treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S M; Hwang, H Y

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a new non-destructive method has been proposed for damage monitoring of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials using the piezoelectric characteristics of a polymeric matrix. Several studies of the piezoelectric properties of unidirectional glass fiber epoxy composites and damage monitoring of double-cantilever beams have supported the claim that the piezoelectric method is feasible and powerful enough to monitor the damage of glass fiber epoxy composites. Generally, conventional piezoelectric materials have higher piezoelectric characteristics through poling treatment. In this work, we investigated the change of the piezoelectric properties of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites before and after poling treatment. The piezoelectric constants (d 33 ) of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites increased by more than 400%. Also, x-ray diffraction tests revealed that poling treatment changed the degree of crystallinity of the epoxy matrix, and this led to the improvement of the piezoelectric characteristics of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites. (paper)

  6. In Vitro Study of Transverse Strength of Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Hashemi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Reinforcement with fiber is an effective method for considerable improvement in flexural properties of indirect composite resin restorations. The aim of this in-vitrostudy was to compare the transverse strength of composite resin bars reinforced with preimpregnated and non-impregnated fibers.Materials and Methods: Thirty six bar type composite resin specimens (3×2×25 mmwere constructed in three groups. The first group was the control group (C without any fiber reinforcement. The specimens in the second group (P were reinforced with preimpregnatedfibers and the third group (N with non-impregnated fibers. These specimens were tested by the three-point bending method to measure primary transverse strength.Data were statistically analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey's tests.Results: There was a significant difference among the mean primary transverse strength in the three groups (P<0.001. The post-hoc (Tukey test showed that there was a significant difference between the pre-impregnated and control groups in their primary transversestrength (P<0.001. Regarding deflection, there was also a significant difference among the three groups (P=0.001. There were significant differences among the mean deflection of the control group and two other groups (PC&N<.001 and PC&P=.004, but there was no significant difference between the non- and pre-impregnated groups (PN&P=.813.Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that reinforcement with fiber considerably increased the transverse strength of composite resin specimens, but impregnationof the fiber used implemented no significant difference in the transverse strength of composite resin samples.

  7. Low Cost Resin for Self-Healing High Temperature Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Over the past few decades, the manufacturing processes and our knowledge base for predicting the bulk mechanical response of fiber reinforced composite materials has...

  8. Instrumented impact testing of kenaf fiber reinforced polypropylene composites: effects of temperature and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig Merrill Clemons; Anand R. Sanadi

    2007-01-01

    An instrumented Izod test was used to investigate the effects of fiber content, coupling agent, and temperature on the impact performance of kenaf fiber reinforced polypropylene (PP). Composites containing 0-60% (by weight) kenaf fiber and 0 or 2% maleated polypropylene (MAPP) and PP/wood flour composites were tested at room temperature and between -50 °C and +...

  9. Primary Manufacturing Processes for Fiber Reinforced Composites: History, Development & Future Research Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapan Bhatt, Alpa; Gohil, Piyush P.; Chaudhary, Vijaykumar

    2018-03-01

    Composite Materials are becoming more popular gradually replacing traditional material with extra strength, lighter weight and superior property. The world is exploring use of fiber reinforced composites in all application which includes air, land and water transport, construction industry, toys, instrumentation, medicine and the list is endless. Based on application and reinforcement used, there are many ways to manufactures parts with fiber reinforced composites. In this paper various manufacturing processes have been discussed at length, to make fiber reinforced composites components. The authors have endeavored to include all the processes available recently in composite industry. Paper first highlights history of fiber reinforced composites manufacturing, and then the comparison of different manufacturing process to build composites have been discussed, to give clear understanding on, which process should be selected, based on reinforcement, matrix and application. All though, there are several advantages to use such fiber reinforcement composites, still industries have not grown at par and there is a lot of scope to improve these industries. At last, where India stands today, what are the challenges in market has been highlighted and future market and research trend of exploring such composite industries have been discussed. This work is carried out as a part of research project sanctioned by GUJCOST, Gandhinagar.

  10. Mechanical and abrasive wear characterization of bidirectional and chopped E-glass fiber reinforced composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddhartha,; Gupta, Kuldeep

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Bi-directional and chopped E-glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites are fabricated. ► Three body abrasive wear behavior of fabricated composites has been assessed. ► Results are validated against existing microscopic models of Lancaster and Wang. ► Tensile strength of bi-directional E-glass fiber reinforced composites increases. ► Chopped glass fiber composites are found better in abrasive wear situations. -- Abstract: Bi-directional and chopped E-glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites are fabricated in five different (15, 20, 25, 30 and 35) wt% in an epoxy resin matrix. The mechanical characterization of these composites is performed. The three body abrasive wear behavior of fabricated composites has been assessed under different operating conditions. Abrasive wear characteristics of these composites are successfully analysed using Taguchi’s experimental design scheme and analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results obtained from these experiments are also validated against existing microscopic models of Ratner-Lancaster and Wang. It is observed that quite good linear relationships is held between specific wear rate and reciprocal of ultimate strength and strain at tensile fracture of these composites which is an indicative that the experimental results are in fair agreement with these existing models. Out of all composites fabricated it is found that tensile strength of bi-directional E-glass fiber reinforced composites increases because of interface strength enhancement. Chopped glass fiber reinforced composites are observed to perform better than bi-directional glass fiber reinforced composites under abrasive wear situations. The morphology of worn composite specimens has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to understand about dominant wear mechanisms.

  11. Effect of Sisal Fiber Surface Treatment on Properties of Sisal Fiber Reinforced Polylactide Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoqian Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of composites are strongly influenced by the quality of the fiber/matrix interface. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of polylactide (PLA composites as a function of modification of sisal fiber with two different macromolecular coupling agents. Sisal fiber reinforced polylactide composites were prepared by injection molding, and the properties of composites were studied by static/dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. The results from mechanical testing revealed that surface-treated sisal fiber reinforced composite offered superior mechanical properties compared to untreated fiber reinforced polylactide composite, which indicated that better adhesion between sisal fiber and PLA matrix was achieved. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM investigations also showed that surface modifications improved the adhesion of the sisal fiber/polylactide matrix.

  12. In vitro evaluation of failure loads of nonmetal cantilevered resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dalen, Andy; Feilzer, Albert J; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate in vitro the influence of fiber reinforcement on the failure loads of resin composite beams, simulating cantilevered two-unit resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses, and compare the results with similarly obtained failure loads of ZrO2 and CoCr beams of a comparable design. Peel tests were performed using resin composite, fiber-reinforced resin composite, and zirconia beams, simulating two-unit cantilevered resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses, luted with Panavia F2.0 onto flat-ground buccal surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors. The recorded failure loads were compared with those of CoCr beams of a similar size and design from earlier research. Finite element analysis revealed the stress concentrations within the cement layers at failure. The failure loads (N) of the peel tests, depending on the beam type and including the type of failure, were statistically analyzed. The highest failure values were obtained with the fiber-reinforced resin composite beams, which were luted with the exposed fibers directly on the bovine enamel. Finite element analysis showed that peak stress locations depend on the beam type and facilitate the explanation of the different failure modes. Fiber-reinforcement of simulated two-unit cantilevered resin composite resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses does not necessarily lead to higher failure loads. This study identified significant differences in peel failure loads between identical specimens, depending on whether or not the fiber reinforcement was exposed on the luting surface. Further research needs to be carried out regarding the combination of resin composite and fiber reinforcement.

  13. Performance of carbon fiber reinforced rubber composite armour against shaped charge jet penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Lian-yong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber is reinforced with carbon fiber; the protective performances of the carbonfiber reinforced rubber composite armour to shaped charge jet have been studied based on the depth of penetration experiments. The craters on the witness blocks, the nature rubber based composite plates’ deformation and the Scanning Electron Microscopy for the hybrid fiber reinforced rubber plate also is analyzed. The results showed that the composite armour can affect the stability of the jet and made part of the jet fracture. The carbon fiber reinforced rubber composite armour has good defence ablity especially when the nature rubber plate hybrid 15% volume percentage carbonfiber and the obliquity angle is 68°. The hybrid fiber reinforced rubber composite armour can be used as a new kind of light protective armour.

  14. Effects of moisture on glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alzamora Guzman, Vladimir Joel; Brøndsted, Povl

    2015-01-01

    performance of wind turbine blades over their lifetime. Here, environmental moisture conditions were simulated by immersing glass fiber-reinforced polymer specimens in salt water for a period of up to 8 years. The mechanical properties of specimens were analyzed before and after immersion to evaluate...... the degradation mechanisms. Single-fiber tensile testing was also performed at different moisture conditions. The water-diffusion mechanism was studied to quantify the diffusion coefficients as a function of salt concentration, sample geometry, and fiber direction. Three degradation mechanisms were observed...

  15. Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites and Methods of Making Same Without the Use of Oven or Autoclave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Stienecker, Rick D. (Inventor); Nickerson, David M. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Method embodiments for producing a fiber-reinforced epoxy composite comprise providing a mold defining a shape for a composite, applying a fiber reinforcement over the mold, covering the mold and fiber reinforcement thereon in a vacuum enclosure, performing a vacuum on the vacuum enclosure to produce a pressure gradient, insulating at least a portion of the vacuum enclosure with thermal insulation, infusing the fiber reinforcement with a reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent under vacuum conditions, wherein the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent generates exothermic heat, and producing the fiber-reinforced epoxy composite having a glass transition temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. by curing the fiber reinforcement infused with the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent by utilizing the exothermically generated heat, wherein the curing is conducted inside the thermally insulated vacuum enclosure without utilization of an external heat source or an external radiation source.

  16. Numerical simulation of progressive debonding in fiber reinforced composite under transverse loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kushch, V.; Shmegera, S.V.; Brøndsted, Povl

    2011-01-01

    The finite element model of progressive debonding in fiber reinforced composite is developed based on the cohesive-zone model of interface. An interface crack nucleation, onset and growth have been studied in detail for a single fiber and comparison is made with the linear fracture mechanics model....... Then, the effect on debonding progress of local stress redistribution due to interaction between the fibers was studied in the framework of two-inclusion model. Simulation of progressive debonding in fiber reinforced composite using the many-fiber models of composite has been performed. It has been...

  17. Evaluation of test methods used to characterize fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of fiber reinforced cementitious composites in terms of their behavior under tensile and flexural loading. Flexural testing and subsequent derivation of the tensile stress-deformation response from the flexural test data are preferred in the assessment...... of the tensile properties of Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites (FRCC) over the direct measurement of the tensile behavior because of the more convenient test setup and ease of specimen preparation. Three and four-point bending tests and round determinate panel test were carried out to evaluate the flexural...

  18. Micro-mechanical Analysis of Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites using Cohesive Crack Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Lars; Stang, Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the mechanism appearing during fiber debonding in fiber reinforced cementitious composite. The investigation is performed on the micro scale by use of a Finite Element Model. The model is 3 dimensional and the fictitious crack model and a mixed mode stress formulation...... are implemented. It is shown that the cohesive law for a unidirectional fiber reinforced cementitious composite can be found through superposition of the cohesive law for mortar and the fiber bridging curve. A comparison between the numerical and an analytical model for fiber pull-out is performed....

  19. Influence of the curing cycles on the fatigue performance of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüther, Jonas; Brøndsted, Povl

    2016-01-01

    During the manufacturing process of fiber reinforced polymers the curing reaction of the resin results in shrinkage of the resin and introduces internal stresses in the composites. When curing at higher temperatures in order to shorten up the processing time, higher curing stresses and thermal...... stresses are built up and frozen, as residual stresses occur. In the present work, a glass fiber reinforced epoxy composite laminate with an unidirectional architecture based on non-crimp fabrics with backing fibers is investigated. Three different curing cycles (time-temperature cycles) are used, leading...

  20. Microstructural changes and residual properties of fiber reinforced cement composites exposed to elevated temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Keppert, M.; Vejmelková, E.; Švarcová, Silvie; Bezdička, Petr; Černý, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2012), s. 77-89 ISSN 1425-8129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : fiber reinforced cementcomposites * high temperatures * mineralodical composition * microstructure * residual strength * apparent moisture diffusivity Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.385, year: 2012

  1. Three dimensional finite element analysis of layered fiber-reinforced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed for a biaxially loaded composite laminate (with a centered hole) consisting of several fiber-reinforced composite layers each with a specified fiber orientation. The detailed stress distribution around the hole was determined. Also, the locations of initial damage zones due to different failure mechanisms were indicated.

  2. Matrix damage helaing in fiber reinforced composite materials containing embedded active and passive wires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, T.C.; Warnet, L.L.; Akkerman, R.; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Brinkman, E.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced composite materials are susceptible to matrix cracking and delamination upon impact. Active and passive wires can be embedded within the composite material to support the healing behavior. Upon a local heating stimulus the wires, oriented mostly in the out-of-plane

  3. Mechanical properties of ramie fiber reinforced epoxy lamina composite for socket prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tresna Soemardi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation into the application of natural fiber composite especially ramie fiber reinforced epoxy lamina composite for socket prosthesis. The research focuses on the tensile and shear strength from ramie fiber reinforced epoxy lamina composite which will be applied as alternative material for socket prosthesis. The research based on American Society for Testing Material (ASTM standard D 3039/D 3039M for tensile strength and ASTM D 4255/D 4255M-83 for shear strength. The ramie fiber applied is a fiber continue 100 % Ne14'S with Epoxy Resin Bakelite EPR 174 as matrix and Epoxy Hardener V-140 as hardener. The sample composite test made by hand lay up method. Multiaxial characteristic from ramie fiber reinforced epoxy composite will be compared with ISO standard for plastic/polymer for health application and refers strength of material application at Prosthetics and Orthotics. The analysis was completed with the mode of the failure and the failure criterion observation by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Based on results of the research could be concluded that ramie fiber reinforced epoxy composite could be developed further as the alternative material for socket prosthesis on Vf 40-50%. Results of the research will be discussed in more detail in this paper.

  4. Single Tooth Replacement Using InCeram Resin Bonded Fixed Partial Denture: A Clinical Report.

    OpenAIRE

    Elnaz Moslehifard; Farzaneh Farid

    2014-01-01

    This clinical report describes a treatment option for replacement of a missing mandibular anterior tooth using InCeram resin bonded fixed partial denture (RBFPD). The conventional approach for replacing mandibular incisors dictates the placement of either a conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) bridge, Maryland bridge, or fiber-reinforced composite veneer bridge and several appearance-related disadvantages have been reported in the use of a prosthesis that incorporates a metal substruct...

  5. Adhesive Properties of Bonded Orthodontic Retainers to Enamel : Stainless Steel Wire vs Fiber-reinforced Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foek, Dave Lie Sam; Krebs, Eliza; Sandham, John; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to compare the bond strength of a stainless steel orthodontic wire vs various fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) used as orthodontic retainers on enamel, analyze the failure types after debonding, and investigate the influence of different application

  6. In vitro fracture resistance of fiber reinforced cusp-replacing composite restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Tezvergil, A.; Kuijs, R.H.; Lassila, L.V.; Kreulen, C.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Vallittu, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the fracture resistance and failure mode of fiber reinforced composite (FRC) cusp-replacing restorations in premolars. METHODS: Forty-five extracted sound upper premolars were randomly divided into three groups. Identical MOD cavities with simulated buccal cusp fracture and

  7. Damage Precursor Investigation of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials Under Fatigue Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    capability, needs Maintenance Action Damage Detection by NDE and/or in-situ sensors (Ultrasonic, Thermography , Acoustic Emission, etc.) Incipient... Damage Prognosis for Materials and Structures in Complex Systems, AFOSR Discovery Challenge Thrust (DCT) Workshop on Prognosis of Aircraft and Space... Damage Precursor Investigation of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials Under Fatigue Loads by Asha J. Hall, Raymond E. Brennan IV, Anindya

  8. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  9. Natural tooth pontic with splinting of periodontally weakened teeth using fiber-reinforced composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Srinidhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of missing anterior teeth due to periodontal reasons is challenging due to the poor support of abutment teeth. This prevents the use of fixed partial dentures (FPDs. Fiber-reinforced splinting provides a viable alternative to the dentist while choosing a treatment plan in replacing missing anterior teeth in periodontally compromised patients as opposed to conventional modalities like FPDs or removable partial dentures. Replacing missing teeth using either patient′s own tooth or a denture tooth as pontic can be done by splinting adjacent teeth with fiber reinforced composite. The splinting has an additional advantage of stabilizing adjacent mobile teeth. This case report details the case selection, procedure with follow-up of a case where the natural extracted tooth of the patient was used as pontic to replace a missing anterior tooth. The splinting was done with fiber reinforced composite resin. Fiber-reinforced composite resin splinting of patient′s extracted natural tooth is economical, fast, and easy to use chairside technique with the added benefit of periodontal stabilization.

  10. Effect of Fiber Layers on the Fracture Resistance of Fiber Reinforced Composite Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Fazel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this in vitro study was to introduce the fiber reinforced composite bridges and evaluate the most suitable site and position for placement of fibers in order to get maximum strength. Methods: The study included 20 second premolars and 20 second molars selected for fabricating twenty fiber reinforced composite bridges. Twenty specimens were selected for one fiber layer and the remaining teeth for two fiber layers. In the first group, fibers were placed in the inferior third and in the second group, fibers were placed in both the middle and inferior third region. After tooth preparation, the restorations were fabricated, thermocycled and then loaded with universal testing machine in the middle of the pontics with crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Data was analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Independent sample t test and Kaplan-Meier test. Mode of failure was evaluated using stereomicroscope. Results: Mean fracture resistance for the first and second groups was 1416±467N and 1349±397N, respectively. No significant differences were observed between the groups (P>0.05.In the first group, 5 specimens had delamintation and 5 specimens had detachment between fibers and resin composite. In the second group, there were 4 and 6 delaminations and detachments, respectively. There was no fracture within the fiber. Conclusion: In the fiber reinforced fixed partial dentures, fibers reinforce the tensile side of the connectors but placement of additional fibers at other sites does not increase the fracture resistance of the restoration.

  11. Short Jute Fiber Reinforced Polypropylene Composites: Effect of Nonhalogenated Fire Retardants

    OpenAIRE

    Chestee, Sk. Sharfuddin; Poddar, Pinku; Sheel, Tushar Kumar; Mamunur Rashid, Md.; Khan, Ruhul A.; Chowdhury, A. M. Sarwaruddin

    2017-01-01

    Short jute fiber reinforced polypropylene (PP) composites were prepared using a single screw extrusion moulding. Jute fiber content in the composites is optimized with the extent of mechanical properties, and composites with 20% jute show higher mechanical properties. Dissimilar concentrations of several fire retardants (FRs), such as magnesium oxide (MO), aluminum oxide (AO), and phosphoric acid (PA), were used in the composites. The addition of MO, AO, and PA improved the fire retardancy pr...

  12. An emerging alternative to thermal curing: Electron curing of fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.; Saunders, C.B.; Lopata, V.J.; Kremers, W.; Chung, M.

    1995-01-01

    Electron curing of fiber-reinforced composites to produce materials with good mechanical properties has been demonstrated by the authors' work, and by Aerospatiale. The attractions of this technology are the technical and processing advantages offered over thermal curing, and the projected cost benefits. Though the work so far has focused on the higher value composites for the aircraft and aerospace industries, the technology can also be used to produce composites for the higher volume industries, such as transportation and automotive

  13. Performance of carbon fiber reinforced rubber composite armour against shaped charge jet penetration

    OpenAIRE

    Yue Lian-yong; Li Wei; Zu Xu-dong; Huang Zheng-xiang; Gao Zhen-yu

    2016-01-01

    Natural rubber is reinforced with carbon fiber; the protective performances of the carbonfiber reinforced rubber composite armour to shaped charge jet have been studied based on the depth of penetration experiments. The craters on the witness blocks, the nature rubber based composite plates’ deformation and the Scanning Electron Microscopy for the hybrid fiber reinforced rubber plate also is analyzed. The results showed that the composite armour can affect the stability of the jet and made pa...

  14. Analysis of the Behaviour of Composite Steel and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Petkevičius

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available There was a pending influence of steel fiber on the strength and stiffness of composite steel–concrete slabs under statical short–time load. Steel profiled sheeting and steel fiber reinforced concrete were used for specimens. Four composite slabs were made. Experimental investigations into the behaviour and influence of steel fiber reinforced concrete in composite slabs were conducted. Transverse, longitudinal, shear deformation and deflection of the slab were measured. The results indicated that the use of steel fiber in composite slabs was effective: strength was 20–24 % higher and the meanings of deflections under the action of the bending moment were 0,6MR (where MR is the bending moment at failure of the slabs and were 16–18 % lower for slabs with usual concrete. Article in Lithuanian

  15. Application of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al alloy matrix composite on piston for internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Shenqing

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and properties of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite and it’s application on the piston for internal combustion engines are presented. Alumina or aluminosilicate fibers reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite has more excellent synthetical properties at elevated temperature than the matrix alloys. A partially reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite piston produced by squeeze casting technique has a firm interface between reinforced and unreinforced areas, low reject rate and good technical tolerance. As a new kind of piston material, it has been used for mass production of about 400,000 pieces of automobile engines piston. China has become one of a few countries in which aluminum alloy matrix composite materials have been used in automobile industry and attained industrialization.

  16. Studying Impact Damage on Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Aircraft Composite Panels with Sonicir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Xinyue; Zhang, Ding; He, Qi; Song, Yuyang; Lubowicki, Anthony; Newaz, Golam.; Favro, Lawrence D.; Thomas, Robert L.

    2011-06-01

    Composites are becoming more important materials in commercial aircraft structures such as the fuselage and wings with the new B787 Dreamliner from Boeing which has the target to utilize 50% by weight of composite materials. Carbon-fiber reinforced composites are the material of choice in aircraft structures. This is due to their light weight and high strength (high strength-to-weight ratio), high specific stiffness, tailorability of properties, design flexibility etc. Especially, by reducing the aircraft's body weight by using such lighter structures, the cost of fuel can be greatly reduced with the high jet fuel price for commercial airlines. However, these composites are prone to impact damage and the damage may occur without any observable sign on the surface, yet resulting in delaminations and disbonds that may occur well within the layers. We are studying the impact problem with carbon-fiber reinforced composite panels and developing SonicIR for this application as a fast and wide-area NDE technology. In this paper, we present our results in studying composite structures including carbon-fiber reinforced composite materials, and preliminary quantitative studies on delamination type defect depth identification in the panels.

  17. Studying impact damage on carbon-fiber reinforced aircraft composite panels with sonicir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Xiaoyan; Zhang Ding; He Qi; Song Yuyang; Lubowicki, Anthony; Zhao Xinyue; Newaz, Golam.; Favro, Lawrence D.; Thomas, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Composites are becoming more important materials in commercial aircraft structures such as the fuselage and wings with the new B787 Dreamliner from Boeing which has the target to utilize 50% by weight of composite materials. Carbon-fiber reinforced composites are the material of choice in aircraft structures. This is due to their light weight and high strength (high strength-to-weight ratio), high specific stiffness, tailorability of properties, design flexibility etc. Especially, by reducing the aircraft's body weight by using such lighter structures, the cost of fuel can be greatly reduced with the high jet fuel price for commercial airlines. However, these composites are prone to impact damage and the damage may occur without any observable sign on the surface, yet resulting in delaminations and disbonds that may occur well within the layers. We are studying the impact problem with carbon-fiber reinforced composite panels and developing SonicIR for this application as a fast and wide-area NDE technology. In this paper, we present our results in studying composite structures including carbon-fiber reinforced composite materials, and preliminary quantitative studies on delamination type defect depth identification in the panels.

  18. Young modulus and internal friction of a fiber-reinforced composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, H.M.; Lei, M.; Austin, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    By a kilohertz-frequency resonance method we determined the Young modulus and internal friction of a uniaxially fiber-reinforced composite. The composite comprised glass fibers in an epoxy-resin matrix. We studied three fiber contents: 0, 41, and 49 vol %. The Young modulus fit a linear rule of mixture. The internal friction fit a classical free-damped-oscillator model where one assumes a linear rule of mixture for three quantities: mass, force constant, and mechanical-resistance constant

  19. Smart damping of laminated fuzzy fiber reinforced composite shells using 1–3 piezoelectric composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundalwal, S I; Suresh Kumar, R; Ray, M C

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) of smart laminated continuous fuzzy fiber reinforced composite (FFRC) shells. The distinct constructional feature of a novel FFRC is that the uniformly spaced short carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are radially grown on the circumferential surfaces of the continuous carbon fiber reinforcements. The constraining layer of the ACLD treatment is considered to be made of vertically/obliquely reinforced 1–3 piezoelectric composite materials. A finite element (FE) model is developed for the laminated FFRC shells integrated with the two patches of the ACLD treatment to investigate the damping characteristics of the laminated FFRC shells. The effect of variation of the orientation angle of the piezoelectric fibers on the damping characteristics of the laminated FFRC shells has been studied when the piezoelectric fibers are coplanar with either of the two mutually orthogonal vertical planes of the piezoelectric composite layer. It is revealed that radial growth of CNTs on the circumferential surfaces of the carbon fibers enhances the attenuation of the amplitude of vibrations and the natural frequencies of the laminated FFRC shells over those of laminated base composite shells without CNTs. (paper)

  20. Fatigue resistance and stiffness of glass fiber-reinforced urethane dimethacrylate composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narva, Katja K; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2004-02-01

    Retentive properties of cast metal clasps decrease over time because of metal fatigue. Novel fiber-reinforced composite materials are purported to have increased fatigue resistance compared with metals and may offer a solution to the problem of metal fatigue. The aim of this study was to investigate the fatigue resistance and stiffness of E-glass fiber-reinforced composite. Twelve cylindrical fiber-reinforced composite test cylinders (2 mm in diameter and 60 mm in length) were made from light-polymerized urethane dimethacrylate monomer with unidirectional, single-stranded, polymer preimpregnated E-glass fiber reinforcement. Six cylinders were stored in dry conditions and 6 in distilled water for 30 days before testing. Fatigue resistance was measured by a constant-deflection fatigue test with 1 mm of deflection across a specimen span of 11 mm for a maximum of 150,000 loading cycles. The resistance of the cylinder against deflection was measured (N) and the mean values of the force were compared by 1-way analysis of variance (alpha = .05). The flexural modulus (GPa) was calculated for the dry and water-stored cylinders for the first loading cycle. Scanning electron microscopy was used to assess the distribution of the fibers, and the volume percent of fibers and polymer were assessed by combustion analysis. The test cylinders did not fracture due to fatigue following 150,000 loading cycles. Flexural modulus at the first loading cycle was 18.9 (+/- 2.9) GPa and 17.5 (+/- 1.7) GPa for the dry and water-stored cylinders, respectively. The mean force required to cause the first 1-mm deflection was 33.5 (+/- 5.2) N and 37.7 (+/- 3.6) N for the dry and water stored cylinders, respectively; however, the differences were not significant. After 150,000 cycles the mean force to cause 1-mm deflection was significantly reduced to 23.4 (+/- 8.5) N and 13.1 (+/- 3.5) N, respectively (P fiber- and polymer-rich areas within the specimens and indicated that individual fibers were

  1. Seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures and process for their manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A metallic outer sleeve is provided which is capable of enveloping a hollow metallic inner member having continuous reinforcing fibers attached to the distal end thereof. The inner member is then introduced into outer sleeve until inner member is completely enveloped by outer sleeve. A liquid matrix member is then injected into space between inner member and outer sleeve. A pressurized heat transfer medium is flowed through the inside of inner member, thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. The novelty of this invention resides in the development of a efficient method of producing seamless metal clad fiber reinforced organic matrix composite structures.

  2. Self-healing in single and multiple fiber(s reinforced polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woldesenbet E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available You Polymer composites have been attractive medium to introduce the autonomic healing concept into modern day engineering materials. To date, there has been significant research in self-healing polymeric materials including several studies specifically in fiber reinforced polymers. Even though several methods have been suggested in autonomic healing materials, the concept of repair by bleeding of enclosed functional agents has garnered wide attention by the scientific community. A self-healing fiber reinforced polymer composite has been developed. Tensile tests are carried out on specimens that are fabricated by using the following components: hollow and solid glass fibers, healing agent, catalysts, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and a polymer resin matrix. The test results have demonstrated that single fiber polymer composites and multiple fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites with healing agents and catalysts have provided 90.7% and 76.55% restoration of the original tensile strength, respectively. Incorporation of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the healing medium of the single fiber polymer composite has provided additional efficiency. Healing is found to be localized, allowing multiple healing in the presence of several cracks.

  3. Short fiber-reinforced composite restorations: A review of the current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Gargoum, Ausama; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo

    2018-02-25

    A newly-recommended method for restoring large cavities is the biomimetic approach of using short fiber-reinforced composite (SFRC) as dentine-replacing material. The aim of the current review was to present an overview of SFRC and to give the clinician a detailed understanding of this new material and treatment strategy based on available-literature review. A thorough literature search was done up to December 2017. The range of relevant publications was surveyed using PubMed and Google Scholar. From the search results, articles related to our search terms were only considered. The search terms used were "short fiber-reinforced composite", "everX posterior", and "fiber-reinforced composite restorations". Of the assessed articles selected (N = 70), most were laboratory-based research with various test specimen designs prepared according to the ISO standard or with extracted teeth; only four articles were clinical reports. A common finding was that by combining the SFRC as a bulk base with conventional composite, the load-bearing capacity and failure mode of the material combination were improved, as compared to plain conventional composite restoration. In the reviewed studies, the biomimetic restoration technique of using SFRC showed promising characteristics, and therefore, might be recommended as an alternative treatment option for large cavities. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Evaluation of standardized test methods to characterize fiber reinforced cement composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of standardized test methods to characterize fiber reinforced cementitious composites in terms of their behavior under flexural loading and its relation to their tensile stress-deformation response. Flexural testing and derivation of the tensile stress......-deformation response are preferred in standardized testing of Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites (FRCC) over the direct assessment of the tensile behavior because of the more convenient test setup and ease of specimen preparation. Four-point bending tests were carried out to evaluate the flexural response of FRCC...... and their results are compared to data obtained from direct tensile testing. The details of the formation of cracking are an important underlying assumption in the standardized evaluation procedures as well as in the established correlation models between flexural and tensile behavior. This detail has been...

  5. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines and the like formed of continuous carbon fibers throughout the valve's stem and head is disclosed. The valve includes braided carbon fiber material over axially aligned unidirectional carbon fibers forming a valve stem; the braided and unidirectional carbon fibers being broomed out at one end of the valve stem forming the shape of the valve head; the valve-shaped structure being densified and rigidized with a matrix of carbon containing discontinuous carbon fibers: and the finished valve being treated to resist oxidation. Also disclosed is a carbon matrix plug containing continuous and discontinuous carbon fibers and forming a net-shape valve head acting as a mandrel over which the unidirectional and braided carbon fibers are formed according to textile processes. Also disclosed are various preform valves and processes for making finished and preform carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valves.

  6. Manufacturing Energy Intensity and Opportunity Analysis for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites and Other Lightweight Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liddell, Heather; Brueske, Sabine; Carpenter, Alberta; Cresko, Joseph

    2016-09-22

    With their high strength-to-weight ratios, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are important materials for lightweighting in structural applications; however, manufacturing challenges such as low process throughput and poor quality control can lead to high costs and variable performance, limiting their use in commercial applications. One of the most significant challenges for advanced composite materials is their high manufacturing energy intensity. This study explored the energy intensities of two lightweight FRP composite materials (glass- and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers), with three lightweight metals (aluminum, magnesium, and titanium) and structural steel (as a reference material) included for comparison. Energy consumption for current typical and state-of-the-art manufacturing processes were estimated for each material, deconstructing manufacturing process energy use by sub-process and manufacturing pathway in order to better understand the most energy intensive steps. Energy saving opportunities were identified and quantified for each production step based on a review of applied R&D technologies currently under development in order to estimate the practical minimum energy intensity. Results demonstrate that while carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites have the highest current manufacturing energy intensity of all materials considered, the large differences between current typical and state-of-the-art energy intensity levels (the 'current opportunity') and between state-of-the-art and practical minimum energy intensity levels (the 'R&D opportunity') suggest that large-scale energy savings are within reach.

  7. Analysis of glass fiber reinforced cement composites and their thermal and hydric material parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poděbradská, J.; Černý, R.; Drchalová, J.; Rovnaníková, P.; Šesták, Jaroslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 77, - (2004), s. 85-97 ISSN 1388-6150 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/03/1350; GA ČR GA103/04/0139; GA ČR GA401/02/0579 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : glass fiber reinforced cement composites -hydric properties * mercury porosimetry * scanning electron microscopy * thermal analysis * thermal properties Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.478, year: 2004

  8. A Damage-Dependent Finite Element Analysis for Fiber-Reinforced Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Timothy W.; Harris, Charles E.

    1998-01-01

    A progressive damage methodology has been developed to predict damage growth and residual strength of fiber-reinforced composite structure with through penetrations such as a slit. The methodology consists of a damage-dependent constitutive relationship based on continuum damage mechanics. Damage is modeled using volume averaged strain-like quantities known as internal state variables and is represented in the equilibrium equations as damage induced force vectors instead of the usual degradation and modification of the global stiffness matrix.

  9. A fiber-reinforced composite prosthesis restoring a lateral midfacial defect: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurunmäki, Hemmo; Kantola, Rosita; Hatamleh, Muhanad M; Watts, David C; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2008-11-01

    This clinical report describes the use of a glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) substructure to reinforce the silicone elastomer of a large facial prosthesis. The FRC substructure was shaped into a framework and embedded into the silicone elastomer to form a reinforced facial prosthesis. The prosthesis is designed to overcome the disadvantages associated with traditionally fabricated prostheses; namely, delamination of the silicone of the acrylic base, poor marginal adaptation over time, and poor simulation of facial expressions.

  10. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide ...

  11. Strength and thermal stability of fiber reinforced plastic composites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flexural tests and dimensional stability (water absorption and thickness swelling) of the rattan composites were determined. The results obtained revealed that the rattan composites possessed adequate strength and had low water absorption and thickness swelling rates. The water absorption of the composites was ...

  12. Studies on Properties of Short Fiber Reinforced Natural Rubber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.R. Ghoreishy

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber/fiber composites were prepared in a laboratory mixer using new and waste short nylon fiber by a one-step mixing process. Fiber loading and bonding agent effects on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the composites were studied. The cure characteristics of composites were investigated by using rheometer. Cure and scorching times of the composites decreased while maximum torques increased with increasing fiber loading. The mechanical properties of the composites improved with increasing the short fibers. The adhesion between the fiber and the rubber was enhanced by the addition of a dry bonding system consisting of resorcinol, hexamethylene tetramine and hydrated silica (HRH.

  13. Design and analysis of a novel latch system implementing fiber-reinforced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara Arreola, Francisco Javier

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite materials have increased in the last four decades in high technology applications due to their exceptional mechanical properties and low weight. In the automotive industry carbon fiber have become popular exclusively in luxury cars because of its high cost. However, Carbon-glass hybrid composites offer an effective alternative to designers to implement fiber-reinforced composites into several conventional applications without a considerable price increase maintaining most of their mechanical properties. A door latch system is a complex mechanism that is under high loading conditions during car accidents such as side impacts and rollovers. Therefore, the Department of Transportation in The United States developed a series of tests that every door latch system comply in order to be installed in a vehicle. The implementation of fiber-reinforced composite materials in a door latch system was studied by analyzing the material behavior during the FMVSS No. 206 transverse test using computational efforts and experimental testing. Firstly, a computational model of the current forkbolt and detent structure was developed. Several efforts were conducted in order to create an effective and time efficient model. Two simplified models were implemented with two different contact interaction approaches. 9 composite materials were studied in forkbolt and 5 in detent including woven carbon fiber, unidirectional carbon fiber, woven carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites and unidirectional carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites. The computational model results showed that woven fiber-reinforced composite materials were stiffer than the unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite materials. For instance, a forkbolt made of woven carbon fibers was 20% stiffer than a forkbolt made of unidirectional fibers symmetrically stacked in 0° and 90° alternating directions. Furthermore, Hybrid composite materials behaved as expected in forkbolt noticing a decline

  14. DETERMINATION OF EFFECTIVE PROPERTIES OF FIBER-REINFORCED COMPOSITE LAMINATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Skrzat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The determination of effective mechanical properties of multi-layer composite is presented in this paper. Computations based on finite element method predicting properties of inhomogeneous materials require solving huge tasks. More effective is Mori-Tanaka approach, typical for micromechanics problems. For regularly distributed fibers closed-forms for effective composite material properties are possible to derive. The results of homogenization are used in strength analysis of the composite pressure vessel.

  15. Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Smart Soft Composite Actuators According to Material Composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Min-Woo; Kim, Hyung-Il; Song, Sung-Hyuk; Ahn, Sung-Hoon [Seoul Nat’l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Fiber-reinforced polymer composites, which are made by combining a continuous fiber that acts as reinforcement and a homogeneous polymeric material that acts as a host, are engineering materials with high strength and stiffness and a lightweight structure. In this study, a shape memory alloy(SMA) reinforced composite actuator is presented. This actuator is used to generate large deformations in single lightweight structures and can be used in applications requiring a high degree of adaptability to various external conditions. The proposed actuator consists of numerous individual laminas of the glass-fiber fabric that are embedded in a polymeric matrix. To characterize its deformation behavior, the composition of the actuator was changed by changing the matrix material and the number of the glass-fiber fabric layers. In addition, current of various magnitudes were applied to each actuator to study the effect of the heating of SMA wires on applying current.

  16. Processing of thermo-structural carbon-fiber reinforced carbon composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Pardini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the processes used to obtain thermostructural Carbon/Carbon composites. The processing of these materials begins with the definition of the architecture of the carbon fiber reinforcement, in the form of stacked plies or in the form of fabrics or multidirectional reinforcement. Incorporating fiber reinforcement into the carbon matrix, by filling the voids and interstices, leads to the densification of the material and a continuous increase in density. There are two principal processing routes for obtaining these materials: liquid phase processing and gas phase processing. In both cases, thermal processes lead to the formation of a carbon matrix with specific properties related to their precursor. These processes also differ in terms of yield. With liquid phase impregnation the yield is around 45 per cent, while gas phase processing yields around 15 per cent.

  17. Fracture mechanics in fiber reinforced composite materials, taking as examples B/A1 and CRFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, P. W. M.

    1982-01-01

    The validity of linear elastic fracture mechanics and other fracture criteria was investigated with laminates of boron fiber reinforced aluminum (R/A1) and of carbon fiber reinforced epoxide (CFRP). Cracks are assessed by fracture strength Kc or Kmax (critical or maximum value of the stress intensity factor). The Whitney and Nuismer point stress criterion and average stress criterion often show that Kmax of fiber composite materials increases with increasing crack length; however, for R/A1 and CFRP the curve showing fracture strength as a function of crack length is only applicable in a small domain. For R/A1, the reason is clearly the extension of the plastic zone (or the damage zone n the case of CFRP) which cannot be described with a stress intensity factor.

  18. Hybrid welding of carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy based composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lionetto, Francesca; De Nicolas Morillas, M.; Pappadà, Silvio; Buccoliero, Giuseppe; Fernandez Villegas, I.; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2018-01-01

    The approach for joining thermosetting matrix composites (TSCs) proposed in this study is based on the use of a low melting co-cured thermoplastic film, added as a last ply in the stacking sequence of the composite laminate. During curing, the thermoplastic film partially penetrates in the first

  19. MECHANICAL AND THERMO–MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BI-DIRECTIONAL AND SHORT CARBON FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. AGARWAL

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper based on bidirectional and short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites reports the effect of fiber loading on physical, mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties respectively. The five different fiber loading, i.e., 10wt. %, 20wt. %, 30wt. %, 40wt. % and 50wt. % were taken for evaluating the above said properties. The physical and mechanical properties, i.e., hardness, tensile strength, flexural strength, inter-laminar shear strength and impact strength are determined to represent the behaviour of composite structures with that of fiber loading. Thermo-mechanical properties of the material are measured with the help of Dynamic Mechanical Analyser to measure the damping capacity of the material that is used to reduce the vibrations. The effect of storage modulus, loss modulus and tan delta with temperature are determined. Finally, Cole–Cole analysis is performed on both bidirectional and short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites to distinguish the material properties of either homogeneous or heterogeneous materials. The results show that with the increase in fiber loading the mechanical properties of bidirectional carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites increases as compared to short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites except in case of hardness, short carbon fiber reinforced composites shows better results. Similarly, as far as Loss modulus, storage modulus is concerned bidirectional carbon fiber shows better damping behaviour than short carbon fiber reinforced composites.

  20. Electron beam irradiation effects on carbon fiber reinforced PEEK composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Hagiwara, Miyuki; Odajima, Tosikazu; Sakai, Hideo; Nakakura, Toshiyuki; Masutani, Masahiro.

    1987-03-01

    Carbon fiber(CF) reinforced composites, using polyarylether-sulfone (PES) or polyarylether-ether-ketone (PEEK) as matrix material, were prepared and their electron beam irradiation effects were studied on the basis of changes in mechanical and dynamic viscoelastic properties and observation of fracture surfaces. The flexural strength of PES-CF composite decreased to 70 % of the initial strength after the irradiation of 3 MGy and 40 % after 15 MGy. The change in the profile of stress-strain (S-S) curves and fractographic observation by electron microscopy indicated that this composite irradiated with over 3 MGy was fractured by delamination caused by to the degradation of matrix polymer. The mechanical properties of PEEK-CF composite were scarcely decreased even after irradiated up to 180 MGy and this composite showed very high radiation resistance. The change in the profile of S-S curves and fractographic observation showed that this composite fractured due to destruction of fiber in the dose range less than 180 MGy, indicating that PEEK was excellent matrix material used in high radiation field. PEEK-PES-CF composite which was composed of the carbon fibers coated with PES solution showed less radiation resistance compared with PEEK-CF composite; the flexural strength decreased to 85 % of the initial value after the irradiation with 90 MGy. It was revealed from the changes in the profile of S-S curve that the specimen irradiated over 120 MGy was fractured due to not only fiber destruction but delamination. Deterioration mechanism of PEEK-PES-CF composite was studied by dynamic viscoelastic measurements in connection with the damage on matrix-fiber interface. It was suggested that the deterioration in mechanical properties of this composite was caused by the degradation of PES that coated on the surface of the carbon fibers. (author)

  1. Interfacial fracture of dentin adhesively bonded to quartz-fiber reinforced composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Renata M. [Department of Dental Materials and Pronsthodontics at Sao Jose dos Campos Dental Shool, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo 12245-820 (Brazil); Rahbar, Nima, E-mail: nrahbar@umassd.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 02720 (United States); Soboyejo, Wole [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2011-05-10

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of interfacial failure in a multilayered structure consisting of a dentin/resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced composite (FRC). Slices of dentin close to the pulp chamber were sandwiched by two half-circle discs made of a quartz-fiber reinforced composite, bonded with bonding agent (All-bond 2, BISCO, Schaumburg) and resin cement (Duo-link, BISCO, Schaumburg) to make Brazil-nut sandwich specimens for interfacial toughness testing. Interfacial fracture toughness (strain energy release rate, G) was measured as a function of mode mixity by changing loading angles from 0 deg. to 15 deg. The interfacial fracture surfaces were then examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) to determine the failure modes when loading angles changed. A computational model was also developed to calculate the driving forces, stress intensity factors and mode mixities. Interfacial toughness increased from {approx} 1.5 to 3.2 J/m{sup 2} when the loading angle increases from {approx} 0 to 15 deg. The hybridized dentin/cement interface appeared to be tougher than the resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced epoxy. The Brazil-nut sandwich specimen was a suitable method to investigate the mechanical integrity of dentin/cement/FRC interfaces.

  2. Interfacial fracture of dentin adhesively bonded to quartz-fiber reinforced composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Renata M.; Rahbar, Nima; Soboyejo, Wole

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of interfacial failure in a multilayered structure consisting of a dentin/resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced composite (FRC). Slices of dentin close to the pulp chamber were sandwiched by two half-circle discs made of a quartz-fiber reinforced composite, bonded with bonding agent (All-bond 2, BISCO, Schaumburg) and resin cement (Duo-link, BISCO, Schaumburg) to make Brazil-nut sandwich specimens for interfacial toughness testing. Interfacial fracture toughness (strain energy release rate, G) was measured as a function of mode mixity by changing loading angles from 0 deg. to 15 deg. The interfacial fracture surfaces were then examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) to determine the failure modes when loading angles changed. A computational model was also developed to calculate the driving forces, stress intensity factors and mode mixities. Interfacial toughness increased from ∼ 1.5 to 3.2 J/m 2 when the loading angle increases from ∼ 0 to 15 deg. The hybridized dentin/cement interface appeared to be tougher than the resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced epoxy. The Brazil-nut sandwich specimen was a suitable method to investigate the mechanical integrity of dentin/cement/FRC interfaces.

  3. SERIAL SECTIONS THROUGH A CONTINUOUS FIBER-REINFORCED POLYMER COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Bizet

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of a unidirectional glass-fiber composite material is described seeking especially for the influence of the stitching perpendicular to the reinforcement. Serial cuts are performed through the composite and the microstructure is quantified using global parameters and linear morphological analysis. A key result is that the stitching induces variations in fibers spacing within the yarns and in the matrix volume between the yarns. This can affect noticeably the flow of the resin during the manufacturing process and also the mechanical properties of the composite.

  4. Shear testing of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1989-01-01

    This paper outlines the elements of a combined experimental/analytical methodology for accurate shear characterization of unidirectional composites in the linear and nonlinear range, with particular attention devoted to metal matrix composites. It is illustrated that consistent results can be obtained for a large class of composites from two commonly employed shear test methods currently in use by composites researchers when the influence of various factors that affect the determination of the actual shear response is properly analyzed. These factors include the effects of material anisotropy, specimen geometry, manner of load introduction, and test fixture design on the stress and deformation fields in the test section of off-axis and Iosipescu specimens. Common errors associated with the measurement of deformation fields and calculation of stress fields are discussed and quantified. Particular problems in the determination of the shear response of unidirectional boron/aluminum using the Iosipescu test are illustrated and discussed.

  5. Cellulose fiber reinforced nylon 6 or nylon 66 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaolin

    Cellulose fiber was used to reinforce higher melting temperature engineering thermoplastics, such as nylon 6 and nylon 66. The continuous extrusion - direct compression molding processing and extrusion-injection molding were chosen to make cellulose fiber/nylon 6 or 66 composites. Tensile, flexural and Izod impact tests were used to demonstrate the mechanical properties of the composites. The continuous extrusion-compression molding processing can decrease the thermal degradation of cellulose fiber, but fiber doesn't disperse well with this procedure. Injection molding gave samples with better fiber dispersion and less void content, and thus gave better mechanical properties than compression molding. Low temperature compounding was used to extrude cellulose fiber/nylon composites. Plasticizer and a ceramic powder were used to decrease the processing temperature. Low temperature extrusion gave better mechanical properties than high temperature extrusion. The tensile modulus of nylon 6 composite with 30% fiber can reach 5GPa; with a tensile strength of 68MPa; a flexural modulus of 4GPa, and a flexural strength of 100MPa. The tensile modulus of nylon 66 composites with 30% fiber can reach 5GPa; with a flexural modulus of 5GPa; a tensile strength of 70MPa; and a flexural strength of 147MPa. The effect of thermal degradation on fiber properties was estimated. The Halpin-Tsai model and the Cox model were used to estimate the composite modulus. The Kelly-Tyson model was used to estimate the composite strength. The result indicates that the change of fiber properties determines the final properties of composites. Fiber length has a minor affect on both modulus and strength as long as the fiber length is above the critical length.

  6. Nano-Fiber Reinforced Enhancements in Composite Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    Nano-fibers are used to reinforce polymer matrices to enhance the matrix dependent properties that are subsequently used in conventional structural composites. A quasi isotropic configuration is used in arranging like nano-fibers through the thickness to ascertain equiaxial enhanced matrix behavior. The nano-fiber volume ratios are used to obtain the enhanced matrix strength properties for 0.01,0.03, and 0.05 nano-fiber volume rates. These enhanced nano-fiber matrices are used with conventional fiber volume ratios of 0.3 and 0.5 to obtain the composite properties. Results show that nano-fiber enhanced matrices of higher than 0.3 nano-fiber volume ratio are degrading the composite properties.

  7. Short fiber reinforced composite: a new alternative for direct onlay restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Mangoush, Enas; Vallittu, Mangoush; Lassila, Lippo

    2013-01-01

    To determine the static load-bearing capacity of direct composite onlay restorations made of novel filling composite resin system which combines short fiber-reinforced composite resin (FC) and conventional particulate filler composite resin (PFC). Three groups of onlay restorations were fabricated (n = 8/group); Group A: made from conventional particulate filler composite resin (Z250, 3M-ESPE, USA, control), Group B: made from short fiber-reinforced composite resin (EverX posterior, StickTeck Ltd, member of GC group, Turku, Finland) as substructure with 1 mm surface layer of PFC, Group C: made from FC composite resin. The specimens were incrementally polymerized with a hand-light curing unit for 80 s before they were statically loaded with two different sizes (3 & 6 mm) of steel ball until fracture. Failure modes were visually examined. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (p = 0.05). ANOVA revealed that onlay restorations made from FC composite resin had statistically significantly higher load-bearing capacity (1733 N) ( p composite resin (1081 N). Onlays made of FC composite resin with a surface layer of PFC gave force values of 1405 N which was statistically higher than control group ( p composite resin as substructure and surface layer of conventional composite resin displayed promising performance in high load bearing areas.

  8. Crushing characteristics of continuous fiber-reinforced composite tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Gary L.; Jones, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Composite tubes can be reinforced with continuous fibers. When such tubes are subjected to crushing loads, the response is complex and depends on interaction between the different mechanisms that control the crushing process. The modes of crushing and their controlling mechanisms are described. Also, the resulting crushing process and its efficiency are addressed.

  9. Interfacial contributions in lignocellulosic fiber-reinforced polyurethane composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy G. Rials; Michael P. Wolcott; John M. Nassar

    2001-01-01

    Whereas lignocellulosic fibers have received considerable attention as a rein- forcing agent in thermoplastic composites, their applicability to reactive polymer systems remains of considerable interest. The hydroxyl-rich nature of natural lignocellulosic fibers suggests that they are particularly useful in thermosetting systems such as polyurethanes. To further this...

  10. Liquid composite molding-processing and characterization of fiber-reinforced composites modified with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, R.; Khalid, U.; Kuttner, C.; Kothmann, M.; Dijkstra, D. J.; Fery, A.; Altstädt, V.

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand in fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) necessitates economic processing of high quality, like the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. FRPs exhibit excellent in-plane properties but weaknesses in off-plane direction. The addition of nanofillers into the resinous matrix phase embodies a promising approach due to benefits of the nano-scaled size of the filler, especially its high surface and interface areas. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are preferable candidates for resin modification in regard of their excellent mechanical properties and high aspect ratios. However, especially the high aspect ratios give rise to withholding or filtering by fibrous fabrics during the impregnation process, i.e. length dependent withholding of tubes (short tubes pass through the fabric, while long tubes are restrained) and a decrease in the local CNT content in the laminate along the flow path can occur. In this study, hybrid composites containing endless glass fiber reinforcement and surface functionalized CNTs dispersed in the matrix phase were produced by VARTM. New methodologies for the quantification of the filtering of CNTs were developed and applied to test laminates. As a first step, a method to analyze the CNT length distribution before and after injection was established for thermosetting composites to characterize length dependent withholding of nanotubes. The used glass fiber fabric showed no perceptible length dependent retaining of CNTs. Afterward, the resulting test laminates were examined by Raman spectroscopy and compared to reference samples of known CNT content. This Raman based technique was developed further to assess the quality of the impregnation process and to quantitatively follow the local CNT content along the injection flow in cured composites. A local decline in CNT content of approx. 20% was observed. These methodologies allow for the quality control of the filler content and size-distribution in CNT based hybrid

  11. Mechanical Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Using Composite Binders

    OpenAIRE

    Fediuk, Roman; Smoliakov, Aleksey; Muraviov, Aleksandr

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the creation of high-density impermeable concrete. The effect of the “cement, fly ash, and limestone” composite binders obtained by joint grinding with superplasticizer in the varioplanetary mill on the process of structure formation was studied. Compaction of structure on micro- and nanoscale levels was characterized by different techniques: X-ray diffraction, DTA-TGA, and electron microscopy. Results showed that the grinding of active mineral supplements allows cryst...

  12. Mechanics and Durability of Fiber Reinforced Porous Ceramic Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xinyu

    2001-01-01

    Porous ceramics and porous ceramic composites are emerging functional materials that have found numerous industrial applications, especially in energy conversion processes. They are characterized by random microstructure and high porosity. Examples are ceramic candle filters used in coal-fired power plants, gas-fired infrared burners, anode and cathode materials of solid oxide fuel cells, etc. In this research, both experimental and theoretical work have been conducted t...

  13. Surface analysis of graphite fiber reinforced polyimide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messick, D. L.; Progar, D. J.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Several techniques have been used to establish the effect of different surface pretreatments on graphite-polyimide composites. Composites were prepared from Celion 6000 graphite fibers and the polyimide LARC-160. Pretreatments included mechanical abrasion, chemical etching and light irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used in the analysis. Contact angle of five different liquids of varying surface tensions were measured on the composites. SEM results showed polymer-rich peaks and polymer-poor valleys conforming to the pattern of the release cloth used durng fabrication. Mechanically treated and light irradiated samples showed varying degrees of polymer peak removal, with some degradation down to the graphite fibers. Minimal changes in surface topography were observed on concentrations of surface fluorine even after pretreatment. The light irradiation pretreatment was most effective at reducing surface fluorine concentrations whereas chemical pretreatment was the least effective. Critical surface tensions correlated directly with the surface fluorine to carbon ratios as calculated from XPS.

  14. Fiber-Reinforced Reactive Nano-Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene/ matrix interface based on the fabrication of a reactive nano-epoxy matrix with lower surface energy has been improved. Enhanced mechanical properties versus pure epoxy on a three-point bend test include: strength (25 percent), modulus (20 percent), and toughness (30 percent). Increased thermal properties include higher Tg (glass transition temperature) and stable CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion). Improved processability for manufacturing composites includes faster wetting rates on macro-fiber surfaces, lower viscosity, better resin infusion rates, and improved rheological properties. Improved interfacial adhesion properties with Spectra fibers by pullout tests include initial debonding force of 35 percent, a maximum pullout force of 25 percent, and energy to debond at 65 percent. Improved mechanical properties of Spectra fiber composites (tensile) aging resistance properties include hygrothermal effects. With this innovation, high-performance composites have been created, including carbon fibers/nano-epoxy, glass fibers/nano-epoxy, aramid fibers/ nano-epoxy, and ultra-high-molecularweight polyethylene fiber (UHMWPE).

  15. Flexural properties untreated and treated kenaf fiber reinforced polypropylene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husin, Muhammad Muslimin; Mustapa, Mohammad Sukri; Wahab, Md Saidin; Arifin, Ahmad Mubarak Tajul; Masirin, Mohd Idrus Mohd; Jais, Farhana Hazwanee

    2017-05-01

    Today natural fiber polymer composites are being extensively used as alternatives in producing furniture to fulfill society demand instead of saving cost and environmentally friendly. The objective of this search is to investigate the untreated fine and rough kenaf fiber (KF) as well as treated KF reinforced with polypropylene (PP) on the flexural strength. Flexural strengths of pure PP, 10%, and 20% of untreated fine and rough KF by weight to PP have been recorded. In addition, flexural strengths of treated KF soaked with 5% and 10% of Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) have also been recorded. KF reinforced PP (PP/KF) untreated and treated composites were melt blended and then injection molded to observe their flexural strengths by measuring their threshold. Three point bending test was apply to determine the flexural stress of the composites. The result show treated fine KF produce better flexural performance at 20% PP/KF. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) is used to observe the morphological surface PP/KF. Overall 5% NaOH with 20% PP/KF (Fine KF) show good interfacial bonding PP/KF and best result with flexural stress value 30.25MPa.

  16. Statistical modelling of compression and fatigue damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, Povl

    2009-01-01

    A statistical computational model of strength and damage of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites under compressive and cyclic compressive loading is presented in this paper. The model is developed on the basis of the Budiansky–Fleck fiber kinking condition, continuum damage mechanics...... concept and the Monte-Carlo method. The effects of fiber misalignment variability, fiber clustering, load sharing rules on the damage in composite are studied numerically. It is demonstrated that the clustering of fibers has a negative effect of the damage resistance of a composite. Further, the static...

  17. Impacts of Temperature Disparity on Surface Modification of Short Jute Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Reshmi; Choudhury, P. L.; Pandey, K. M.

    2017-08-01

    Chase for manufacturing composite materials without negotiating on the physio-mechanical performance has been prevailing since long. Short jute fiber-reinforced epoxy based composites are prepared and their mechanical properties have been analyzed. The fibers are peroxide-silane treated under varying conditions of temperature from low to high. Results display that the jute composites set at higher temperature values indicate higher values of mechanical properties compared to those synthesized under lower temperature range. The same can be cited for liquid retaining capacity.

  18. Porosity characterization of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, C.; Marrow, T. J.; Reinhard, C.; Li, B.; Zhang, C.; Wang, S.

    2016-03-01

    The pore structure and porosity of a continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite has been characterized using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Segmentation of the reconstructed tomograph images reveals different types of pores within the composite, the inter-fiber bundle open pores displaying a "node-bond" geometry, and the intra-fiber bundle isolated micropores showing a piping shape. The 3D morphology of the pores is resolved and each pore is labeled. The quantitative filtering of the pores measures a total porosity 8.9% for the composite, amid which there is about 7.1~ 9.3% closed micropores.

  19. Microwave detection of delaminations between fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite and hardened cement paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D.; Kazemi, M.; Marler, K.; Zoughi, R.; Myers, J.; Nanni, A.

    2002-05-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are increasingly being used for the rehabilitation of concrete structures. Detection and characterization of delaminations between an FRP composite and a concrete surface are of paramount importance. Consequently, the development of a one sided, non-contact, real time and rapid nondestructive testing (NDT) technique for this purpose is of great interest. Near-field microwave NDT techniques, using open-ended rectangular waveguide probes, have shown great potential for detecting delaminations in layered composite structures such as these. The results of some theoretical and experimental investigations on a specially prepared cement paste specimen are presented here.

  20. Impact test on natural fiber reinforced polymer composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Chandramohan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, natural fibers like Sisal (Agave sisalana, Banana (Musa sepientum & Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa , Sisal and banana (hybrid , Roselle and banana (hybrid and Roselle and sisal (hybrid are fabricated with bio epoxy resin using molding method. In this work, impact strength of Sisal and banana (hybrid, Roselle and banana (hybridand Roselle and sisal (hybrid composite at dry and wet conditions were studied. Impact test were conducted izod impact testing machine. In this work micro structure of the specimens are scanned by the Scanning Electron Microscope.

  1. Precision hole punching on composite fiber reinforced polymer panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, A. B.; Zain, M. S. M.; Chan, H. Y.; Samad, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Structural materials, such as composite panels, can only be assembled, and in most cases through the use of fasteners, which are fitted into the drilled holes. However, drilling is costly and time consuming, thus affecting productivity. This research aims to develop an alternative method to drilling. In this paper, the precision of the holes was measured and the effects of the die clearance to the areas around the holes were evaluated. Measurement and evaluation were performed based on the profile of the holes constructed using Alicona IFM, a 3D surface measurement technique. Results showed that punching is a potential alternative to drilling but still requires improvements.

  2. Buckling of Fiber Reinforced Composite Plates with Nanofiber Reinforced Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2010-01-01

    Anisotropic composite plates were evaluated with nanofiber reinforced matrices (NFRM). The nanofiber reinforcement volumes ratio in the matrix was 0.01. The plate dimensions were 20 by 10 by 1.0 in. (508 by 254 by 25.4 mm). Seven different loading condition cases were evaluated: three for uniaxial loading, three for pairs of combined loading, and one with three combined loadings. The anisotropy arose from the unidirectional plates having been at 30 from the structural axis. The anisotropy had a full 6 by 6 rigidities matrix which were satisfied and solved by a Galerkin buckling algorithm. The buckling results showed that the NFRM plates buckled at about twice those with conventional matrix.

  3. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Lippo V.J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. Materials and Methods. Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37°C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results. Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). Conclusions. Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion than

  4. Electrospun carbon nanofibers for improved electrical conductivity of fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarifi, Ibrahim M.; Alharbi, Abdulaziz; Khan, Waseem S.; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2015-04-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was dissolved in dimethylformamide (DMF), and then electrospun to generate nanofibers using various electrospinning conditions, such as pump speeds, DC voltages and tip-to-collector distances. The produced nanofibers were oxidized at 270 °C for 1 hr, and then carbonized at 850 °C in an argon gas for additional 1 hr. The resultant carbonized PAN nanofibers were placed on top of the pre-preg carbon fiber composites as top layers prior to the vacuum oven curing following the pre-preg composite curing procedures. The major purpose of this study is to determine if the carbonized nanofibers on the fiber reinforced composites can detect the structural defects on the composite, which may be useful for the structural health monitoring (SHM) of the composites. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that the electrospun PAN fibers were well integrated on the pre-preg composites. Electrical conductivity studies under various tensile loads revealed that nanoscale carbon fibers on the fiber reinforced composites detected small changes of loads by changing the resistance values. Electrically conductive composite manufacturing can have huge benefits over the conventional composites primarily used for the military and civilian aircraft and wind turbine blades.

  5. Thermomechanical behavior of fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xin; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong; Du, Shanyi

    2007-07-01

    Carbon fiber fabric reinforced shape memory polymer composite (SMPC) is studied in this paper. The shape memory polymer (SMP) is a thermoset styrene-based resin. In order to discuss the basic thermomechanical properties of SMPC, the investigation is conducted with the following methods: dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA), three-point bending test, shape recovery tests and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results indicate that SMPC exhibits a higher glass transition temperature (T g) and a higher storage modulus than pure SMP. SMPC shows high bending modulus before the glass transition in SMP, while exhibits low bending modulus within the range of glass transition in SMP. Moreover, shape recovery velocity and ratio rise remarkably with the increase of shape recovery temperature, while they increase in a weak trend with the increase of pre-deformation temperature. In addition, electrically conductive SMPC shows favorable recovery performances during the thermomechanical cycles. In the end, under the bending deformation, all the buckled fibers in inner surface break at the same time, which make it regular for the fracture section of buckled fiber tow. However, the cross sections of these buckled fibers are relatively rough and located in 45°C direction along fiber. By contrast, the tensile fibers in outer surface break unorderly, which make it irregular for the fracture section of tensile fiber tow. But the cross sections of these tensile fibers are relatively smooth and vertical to fiber.

  6. Fatigue behavior and modeling of short fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavian, Seyyedvahid

    This study investigates uniaxial fatigue behavior of two short glass fiber polymer composites including 30 wt% short glass fiber polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) and 35 wt% short glass fiber polyamide-6 (PA6) under a number of load and environmental conditions. The main objectives are to evaluate the behavior of these materials under monotonic and cyclic loadings and present fatigue life prediction methodologies to reduce their development expenses and time. The considered environmental effects include those of low and elevated temperatures as well as moisture (or water absorption) effect. Fatigue behavior is also explored under the action of nonzero mean stress (or R ratio) as well as various cyclic loading frequencies. Material anisotropy and geometrical discontinuity effects (i.e. stress concentration) are also considered in this study. Microscopic failure analysis is also performed, when necessary, to identify failure mechanisms. Tensile tests were performed in various mold flow directions and with two thicknesses at a range of temperatures and strain rates. A shell-core morphology resulting from orientation distribution of fibers influenced the degree of anisotropy. Tensile strength and elastic modulus nonlinearly decreased with specimen angle and Tsai-Hill criterion was found to correlate variation of these properties with the fiber orientation. Kinetics of water absorption was studied and found to follow the Fick's law. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature with specimens in the longitudinal and transverse directions and with various degrees of water absorption. Mathematical relations were developed to represent tensile properties as a function of water content. Mathematical relationships were developed to represent the stress-strain response, as well as tensile properties in terms of strain rate and temperature. Time-temperature superposition principle was also employed to superimpose the effect of temperature and strain rate on tensile strength

  7. Mechanical Behavior of Hybrid Glass/Steel Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K. McBride

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available While conventional fiber-reinforced polymer composites offer high strength and stiffness, they lack ductility and the ability to absorb energy before failure. This work investigates hybrid fiber composites for structural applications comprised of polymer, steel fiber, and glass fibers to address this shortcoming. Varying volume fractions of thin, ductile steel fibers were introduced into glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites. Non-hybrid and hybrid composite specimens were prepared and subjected to monolithic and half-cyclic tensile testing to obtain stress-strain relationships, hysteresis behavior, and insight into failure mechanisms. Open-hole testing was used to assess the vulnerability of the composites to stress concentration. Incorporating steel fibers into glass/epoxy composites offered a significant improvement in energy absorption prior to failure and material re-centering capabilities. It was found that a lower percentage of steel fibers (8.2% in the hybrid composite outperformed those with higher percentages (15.7% and 22.8% in terms of energy absorption and re-centering, as the glass reinforcement distributed the plasticity over a larger area. A bilinear hysteresis model was developed to predict cyclic behavior of the hybrid composite.

  8. Mechanical and thermal properties of date palm leaf fiber reinforced recycled poly (ethylene terephthalate) composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehghani, Alireza; Madadi Ardekani, Sara; Al-Maadeed, Mariam A.; Hassan, Azman; Wahit, Mat Uzir

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel natural fiber reinforced recycled poly (ethylene terephthalate) composite was prepared. • Mechanical performance and thermal behavior of the composites were investigated. • Composites with improved toughness and strength were achieved. - Abstract: Development of a recycled poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PETr) reinforced with surface treated date palm leaf fiber (DPLF) composites with enhanced mechanical properties have been studied. Surface modified date palm leaf fiber reinforced PETr composites were prepared using twin-screw extruder followed by injection molding and the influence of the DPLF content on the mechanical and thermal behavior of the PETr matrix was evaluated. Upon the addition of fibers, remarkable enhancements in the mechanical properties of the composites were observed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images taken from DPLF fibers showed significant enhancements in the fiber’s surface topography after the surface treatment process. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that the addition of DPLF to PETr matrix increased the composites toughness. The crystallization behavior of the samples, analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) indicated an increase in the onset crystallization temperature and showed a higher degree of crystallinity of the composites as compared to PETr, demonstrating that DPLF particles could act as nucleating agents. The results point to the composite’s potential in wider indoor applications

  9. Method of controlling a resin curing process. [for fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Charles Neal (Inventor); Scott, Robert O. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to an analytical technique for controlling the curing process of fiber-reinforced composite materials that are formed using thermosetting resins. The technique is the percent gel method and involves development of a time-to-gel equation as a function of temperature. From this equation a rate-of-gel equation is then determined, and a percent gel is calculated which is the product of rate-of-gel times time. Percent gel accounting is used to control the proper pressure application point in an autoclave cure process to achieve desired properties in a production composite part.

  10. Effect of Different Fillers on Adhesive Wear Properties of Glass Fiber Reinforced Polyester Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Feyzullahoğlu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric composites are used for different aims as substitute of traditional materials such as metals; due to their improved strength at small specific weight. The fiber reinforced polymer (FRP composite material consists of polymeric matrix and reinforcing material. Polymeric materials are commonly reinforced with synthetic fibers such as glass and carbon. The glass fiber reinforced polyester (GFRP composites are used with different filler materials. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different filler materials on adhesive wear behavior of GFRP. In this experimental study; polymetilmetacrilat (PMMA, Glass beads (GB and Glass sand (GS were used as filling material in GFRP composite samples. The adhesive wear behaviors of samples were carried out using ball on disc type tribometer. The friction force and coefficient of friction were measured during the test. The volume loss and wear rate values of samples were calculated according to test results. Barcol hardness values of samples were measured. The densities of samples were measured. Results show that the wear resistance of GB filled GFRP composite samples was much more than non-filled and PMMA filled GFRP composite samples.

  11. Low Cost Fabrication of Silicon Carbide Based Ceramics and Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Levine, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    A low cost processing technique called reaction forming for the fabrication of near-net and complex shaped components of silicon carbide based ceramics and composites is presented. This process consists of the production of a microporous carbon preform and subsequent infiltration with liquid silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. The microporous preforms are made by the pyrolysis of a polymerized resin mixture with very good control of pore volume and pore size thereby yielding materials with tailorable microstructure and composition. Mechanical properties (elastic modulus, flexural strength, and fracture toughness) of reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics are presented. This processing approach is suitable for various kinds of reinforcements such as whiskers, particulates, fibers (tows, weaves, and filaments), and 3-D architectures. This approach has also been used to fabricate continuous silicon carbide fiber reinforced ceramic composites (CFCC's) with silicon carbide based matrices. Strong and tough composites with tailorable matrix microstructure and composition have been obtained. Microstructure and thermomechanical properties of a silicon carbide (SCS-6) fiber reinforced reaction-formed silicon carbide matrix composites are discussed.

  12. Influence of fiber orientation on the inherent acoustic nonlinearity in carbon fiber reinforced composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel J; Dayal, Vinay

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the study of non-classical nonlinear response of fiber-reinforced composites. Nonlinear elastic wave methods such as nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS) and nonlinear wave modulation spectroscopy have been used earlier to detect damages in several materials. It was observed that applying these techniques to composites materials becomes difficult due to the significant inherent baseline nonlinearity. Understanding the non-classical nonlinear nature of the composites plays a vital role in implementing nonlinear acoustic techniques for material characterization as well as qualitative nondestructive testing of composites. Since fiber reinforced composites are orthotropic in nature, the baseline response variation with fiber orientation is very important. This work explores the nature of the inherent nonlinearity by performing nonlinear resonant spectroscopy (NRS) in intact unidirectional carbon/epoxy samples with different fiber orientations with respect to major axis of the sample. Factors such as frequency shifts, modal damping ratio, and higher harmonics were analyzed to explore the non-classical nonlinear nature of these materials. Conclusions were drawn based on the experimental observations.

  13. Multifunctional fiber reinforced polymer composites using carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Behnam; Jakubinek, Michael B.; Martinez-Rubi, Yadienka; Rahmat, Meysam; Djokic, Drazen; Laqua, Kurtis; Park, Daesun; Kim, Keun-Su; Simard, Benoit; Yousefpour, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has made several nano-based materials available with the potential to address limitations of conventional fiber reinforced polymer composites, particularly in reference to multifunctional structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the most prevalent case and offer amazing properties at the individual nanotube level. There are already a few high-profile examples of the use of CNTs in space structures to provide added electrical conductivity for static dissipation and electromagnetic shielding. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), which are structurally analogous to CNTs, also present a range of attractive properties. Like the more widely explored CNTs, individual BNNTs display remarkable mechanical properties and high thermal conductivity but with contrasting functional attributes including substantially higher thermal stability, high electrical insulation, polarizability, high neutron absorption and transparency to visible light. This presents the potential of employing either or both BNNTs and CNTs to achieve a range of lightweight, functional composites for space structures. Here we present the case for application of BNNTs, in addition to CNTs, in space structures and describe recent advances in BNNT production at the National Research Council Canada (NRC) that have, for the first time, provided sufficiently large quantities to enable commercialization of high-quality BNNTs and accelerate development of chemistry, composites and applications based on BNNTs. Early demonstrations showing the fabrication and limited structural testing of polymer matrix composites, including glass fiber-reinforced composite panels containing BNNTs will be discussed.

  14. The Vibration Based Fatigue Damage Assessment of Steel and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete (SFRC Composite Girder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The steel-concrete composite girder has been usually applied in the bridge and building structures, mostly consisting of concrete slab, steel girder, and shear connector. The current fatigue damage assessment for the composite girder is largely based on the strain values and concrete crack features, which is time consuming and not stable. Hence the vibration-based fatigue damage assessment has been considered in this study. In detail, a steel-steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC composite girder was tested. The steel fiber reinforced concrete is usually considered for dealing with the concrete cracks in engineering practice. The composite girder was 3.3m long and 0.45m high. The fatigue load and impact excitation were applied on the specimen sequentially. According to the test results, the concrete crack development and global stiffness degradation during the fatigue test were relatively slow due to the favourable performance of SFRC in tension. But on the other hand, the vibration features varied significantly during the fatigue damage development. Generally, it confirmed the feasibility of executing fatigue damage assessment of composite bridge based on vibration method.

  15. Considerations regarding the volume fraction influence on the wear behavior of the fiber reinforced composite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliman, R.

    2017-08-01

    This paper contains an analysis of the factors that have an influence on the tribological characteristics of the composite material sintered with metal matrix reinforced with carbon fibers. These composites are used generally if it’s needed the wear resistant materials, whereas these composites have high specific strength in conjunction with a good corrosion resistance at low densities and some self-lubricating properties. Through the knowledge of the better tribological properties of the materials and their behavior to wear, can be generated by dry and the wet friction. Thus, where necessary the use of high temperature resistant material with low friction between the elements, carbon fiber composite materials are very suitable because they have: mechanical strength and good ductility, melting temperature on the higher values, higher electrical and thermal conductivity, lower wear speed and lower friction forces. For this purpose, this paper also contains an experimental program based on the evidence of formaldehyde resin made from fiber reinforced Cu-carbon with the aim to specifically determine the volume of fibers fraction for the consolidation of the composite material. In order to determine the friction coefficient and the wear rates of the various fiber reinforced polymer mixtures of carbon have been used special devices with needle-type with steel disc. These tests were conducted in the atmosphere at the room temperature without external lubrication study taking into consideration the sliding different speeds with constant loading task.

  16. Immediate tooth replacement using fiber-reinforced composite and natural tooth pontic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermanshah, Hamid; Motevasselian, Fariba

    2010-01-01

    The loss and replacement of anterior maxillary teeth poses several challenges. In patients refusing implant surgery, when minimal tooth reduction is desired, a fiber-reinforced composite fixed-partial denture may be used as a conservative alternative to a conventional fixed-partial denture for replacement of a single missing tooth. This article describes a clinical technique and six-year follow-up. The patient presented with a missing maxillary central incisor due to localized juvenile periodontitis. The abutment teeth were clinically stable. The advantage of supragingival margins and minimal tooth structure removal made the bonded bridge with a natural tooth pontic a viable procedure for this compromised restorative situation.

  17. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Prosthesis to Restore Missing Posterior Teeth: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Vallittu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A fiber-reinforced composite inlay-onlay FPD was used for a single posterior tooth replacement in a patient refusing implant for psychological reasons. The FRC-FPD was made of pre-impregnated E-glass fibers (everStick, StickTeck, Turku, Finland embedded in a resin matrix (Stick Resin, StickTeck, Turku, Finland. The unidirectional glass fibers were used to make a framework structure with high volume design placed in the pontic (edentulous region. To reproduce the morphology of natural teeth, the framework structure was then veneered with Gradia (GC, Tokyo, Japan.

  18. Adapting fiber-reinforced composite root canal posts for use in noncircular-shaped canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Nicola Maria; Butti, Andrea; Plotino, Gianluca; Somma, Francesco

    2006-10-01

    Post placement in oval-shaped root canals implies the sacrifice of sound dental tissue to adapt the canal shape to fit the post, which can result in one of several significant complications. A semidirect, single-visit, chairside procedure is proposed, which permits the use of an almost anatomically shaped post, starting from a preformed fiber-reinforced composite root canal post of the largest size commercially available. The utilization of this post capitalizes on the advantages of both the fiber post and the anatomical post in oval- and ribbon-shaped canals to provide restoration of endodontically treated teeth.

  19. Fiber reinforced composite loop space maintainer: An alternative to the conventional band and loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2012-04-01

    The stainless steel band and loop appliance is the most commonly used fixed space maintainer in pediatric dentistry. But there are several disadvantages with this appliance such as the need for a cast or a working model, decalcification of the abutment tooth, loosening because of breakage or dissolution of the luting agent, tendency to get embedded in the soft tissue and the possibility of metal allergy. The purpose of this article is to present a simple, laboratory design of a "Fiber Reinforced Composite" (FRC) loop space maintainer and discuss the advantages over the traditional band and loop space maintainers.

  20. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Rotary Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G.Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or wrap-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary sleeve and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  1. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composites Rotary Valves for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary, sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or warp-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties, do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary, sleeve, and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  2. Fiber-reinforced plastic composites. Possibilities and limitations of applications as machine-construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophey, Lothar

    1988-01-01

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite structural materials in engineering applications is discussed in a survey of currently available technology and future prospects. The ongoing rapid growth in the use of these materials is described, and the criteria to be applied in selecting base materials, lamination schemes, fasteners, and processing methods are examined in detail and illustrated with graphs, diagrams, flow charts, and drawings. A description of a sample application (comparing the properties of steel, CFRP, SiC-reinforced Al, CFRP/steel, and CFRP/Al automobile piston rods) is included.

  3. Structure and properties of short fiber reinforced polymer composite and hybrid composite fabricated by injection molding process

    OpenAIRE

    UAWONGSUWAN, PUTINUN

    2015-01-01

    Short fiber reinforced polymer composites have found extensive applications in many fields due to their low cost, easy processing and superior mechanical properties over the neat thermoplastics. For interpreting the mechanical properties of composite by several variable parameters, additional measurements are required when changes occur in the composite system variables. Thus, experiments may be time consuming and cost prohibitive. Therefore, theoretical models of determining composite proper...

  4. Physicochemical properties of discontinuous S2-glass fiber reinforced resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiting; Qin, Wei; Garoushi, Sufyan; He, Jingwei; Lin, Zhengmei; Liu, Fang; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2018-01-30

    The objective of this study was to investigate several physicochemical properties of an experimental discontinuous S2-glass fiber-reinforced resin composite. The experimental composite was prepared by mixing 10 wt% of discontinuous S2-glass fibers with 27.5 wt% of resin matrix and 62.5 wt% of particulate fillers. Flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), fracture toughness (FT), work of fracture (WOF), double bond conversion (DC), Vickers hardness, volume shrinkage (VS) and fiber length distribution were determined. These were compared with two commercial resin composites. The experimental composite showed the highest FS, WOF and FT compared with two control composites. The DC of the experimental composite was comparable with controls. No significant difference was observed in VS between the three tested composites. The use of discontinuous glass fiber fillers with polymer matrix and particulate fillers yielded improved physical properties and substantial improvement was associated with the use of S2-glass fiber.

  5. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard C

    2011-05-03

    Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P < 10 -4 , and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P < 10 -8 . Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential.

  6. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P<10−4, and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P<10−8. Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential.

  7. Micromechanical Modeling of Fiber-Reinforced Composites with Statistically Equivalent Random Fiber Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhi Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the random fiber distribution of a fiber-reinforced composite is of great importance for studying the progressive failure behavior of the material on the micro scale. In this paper, we develop a new algorithm for generating random representative volume elements (RVEs with statistical equivalent fiber distribution against the actual material microstructure. The realistic statistical data is utilized as inputs of the new method, which is archived through implementation of the probability equations. Extensive statistical analysis is conducted to examine the capability of the proposed method and to compare it with existing methods. It is found that the proposed method presents a good match with experimental results in all aspects including the nearest neighbor distance, nearest neighbor orientation, Ripley’s K function, and the radial distribution function. Finite element analysis is presented to predict the effective elastic properties of a carbon/epoxy composite, to validate the generated random representative volume elements, and to provide insights of the effect of fiber distribution on the elastic properties. The present algorithm is shown to be highly accurate and can be used to generate statistically equivalent RVEs for not only fiber-reinforced composites but also other materials such as foam materials and particle-reinforced composites.

  8. The effect of exfoliated graphite on carbon fiber reinforced composites for cryogenic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Adam Michael

    It is desirable to lighten cryogenic fuel tanks through the use of composites for the development of a reusable single stage launch vehicle. Conventional composites fall victim to microcracking due to the cyclic loading and temperature change experienced during launch and re-entry conditions. Also, the strength of a composite is generally limited by the properties of the matrix. The introduction of the nanoplatelet, exfoliated graphite or graphene, to the matrix shows promise of increasing both the microcracking resistivity and the mechanical characteristics. Several carbon fiber composite plates were manufactured with varying concentrations of graphene and tested under both room and cryogenic conditions to characterize graphene's effect on the composite. Results from tensile and fracture testing indicate that the ideal concentration of graphene in our carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites for cryogenic applications is 0.08% mass graphene.

  9. Short Jute Fiber Reinforced Polypropylene Composites: Effect of Nonhalogenated Fire Retardants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sk. Sharfuddin Chestee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Short jute fiber reinforced polypropylene (PP composites were prepared using a single screw extrusion moulding. Jute fiber content in the composites is optimized with the extent of mechanical properties, and composites with 20% jute show higher mechanical properties. Dissimilar concentrations of several fire retardants (FRs, such as magnesium oxide (MO, aluminum oxide (AO, and phosphoric acid (PA, were used in the composites. The addition of MO, AO, and PA improved the fire retardancy properties (ignition time, flame height, and total firing time of the composites. Ignition time for 30% MO, flame height for 30% PA, and total firing time for 20% MO content composites showed good results which were 8 sec, 1 inch, and 268 sec, respectively. Mechanical properties (tensile strength, tensile modulus, bending strength, bending modulus, and elongation at break, degradation properties (soil test, weathering test, and percentage of weight loss, and water uptake were studied.

  10. A Review on Natural Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layth Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers are getting attention from researchers and academician to utilize in polymer composites due to their ecofriendly nature and sustainability. The aim of this review article is to provide a comprehensive review of the foremost appropriate as well as widely used natural fiber reinforced polymer composites (NFPCs and their applications. In addition, it presents summary of various surface treatments applied to natural fibers and their effect on NFPCs properties. The properties of NFPCs vary with fiber type and fiber source as well as fiber structure. The effects of various chemical treatments on the mechanical and thermal properties of natural fibers reinforcements thermosetting and thermoplastics composites were studied. A number of drawbacks of NFPCs like higher water absorption, inferior fire resistance, and lower mechanical properties limited its applications. Impacts of chemical treatment on the water absorption, tribology, viscoelastic behavior, relaxation behavior, energy absorption flames retardancy, and biodegradability properties of NFPCs were also highlighted. The applications of NFPCs in automobile and construction industry and other applications are demonstrated. It concluded that chemical treatment of the natural fiber improved adhesion between the fiber surface and the polymer matrix which ultimately enhanced physicomechanical and thermochemical properties of the NFPCs.

  11. Finite element analysis of drilling in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadnis, V. A.; Roy, A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2012-08-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite (CFRP) laminates are attractive for many applications in the aerospace industry especially as aircraft structural components due to their superior properties. Usually drilling is an important final machining process for components made of composite laminates. In drilling of CFRP, it is an imperative task to determine the maximum critical thrust forces that trigger inter-laminar and intra-laminar damage modes owing to highly anisotropic fibrous media; and negotiate integrity of composite structures. In this paper, a 3D finite element (FE) model of drilling in CFRP composite laminate is developed, which accurately takes into account the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with the accurate geometrical considerations. A user defined material model is developed to account for accurate though thickness response of composite laminates. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis, for a set of machining parameters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results from literature.

  12. Dynamic mechanical analysis and crystalline analysis of hemp fiber reinforced cellulose filled epoxy composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Palanivel

    Full Text Available Abstract The Dynamic mechanical behavior of chemically treated and untreated hemp fiber reinforced composites was investigated. The morphology of the composites was studied to understand the interaction between the filler and polymer. A series of dynamic mechanical tests were performed by varying the fiber loading and test frequencies over a range of testing temperatures. It was found that the storage modulus (E’ recorded above the glass transition temperature (Tg decrease with increasing temperature. The loss modulus (E” and damping peaks (Tan δ values were found to be reduced with increasing matrix loading and temperature. Morphological changes and crystallinity of Composites were investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM and XRD techniques. The composites with Alkali and Benzoyl treated fibers has attributed enhanced DMA Results. In case of XRD studies, the composites with treated fibers with higher filler content show enhanced crystallinity.

  13. Dynamic mechanical analysis and crystalline analysis of hemp fiber reinforced cellulose filled epoxy composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palanivel, Anand; Duruvasalu, Rajesh; Iyyanar, Saranraj; Velumayil, Ramesh, E-mail: p.anand@ymail.com [Mechanical Engineering, Vel Tech Dr RR. & Dr. SR University, Avadi, Chennai, Tamilnadu (India); Veerabathiran, Anbumalar [Mechanical Engineering, Velammal College of Engineering & Technology, Madurai, TN (India)

    2017-07-01

    The Dynamic mechanical behavior of chemically treated and untreated hemp fiber reinforced composites was investigated. The morphology of the composites was studied to understand the interaction between the filler and polymer. A series of dynamic mechanical tests were performed by varying the fiber loading and test frequencies over a range of testing temperatures. It was found that the storage modulus (E') recorded above the glass transition temperature (Tg) decrease with increasing temperature. The loss modulus (E”) and damping peaks (Tan δ) values were found to be reduced with increasing matrix loading and temperature. Morphological changes and crystallinity of Composites were investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and XRD techniques. The composites with Alkali and Benzoyl treated fibers has attributed enhanced DMA Results. In case of XRD studies, the composites with treated fibers with higher filler content show enhanced crystallinity. (author)

  14. Studies on mechanical, thermal and dynamic mechanical properties of untreated (raw) and treated coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh Kumar, S.M.; Duraibabu, D.; Subramanian, K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • UTCSE and TCSE composites have been fabricated by compression molding technique. • The prepared specimens were characterized by FTIR, DMA, TGA and SEM techniques. • TCSE composite showed higher mechanical properties compared to UTCSE composite. • DMA showed that TCSE composite exhibited higher storage modulus than UTCSE composite. • TCSE composite showed higher thermal stability than UTCSE composite. - Abstract: The untreated (raw) coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy (UTCSE) composite and treated coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy (TCSE) composite have been fabricated using hand layup followed by compression molding technique. The prepared specimens were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The prepared specimens are cut as per ASTM Standards to measure tensile, flexural and impact strengths by using universal testing machine and izod impact tester respectively. The treated coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy composite (TCSE) posses higher mechanical strength and thermal stability compared to untreated (raw) coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy composite (UTCSE). In the SEM fracture analysis, TCSE composite showed better fiber–matrix bonding and absence of voids compared to UTCSE composite

  15. Relationship of margin design for fiber-reinforced composite crowns to compressive fracture resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, Abdulhamaid A; Ayad, Mohamed F; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

    2011-07-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite restorations provide excellent esthetics; however, little is known regarding the influence of margin design on marginal fit and fracture resistance for this type of crown. This study evaluated the effect of variations in tooth-preparation design on the marginal fit and compressive fracture resistance of fiber-reinforced composite crowns. Three metal dies with a total convergence of 5° and different margin designs (0.5-mm light chamfer, 1.0-mm deep chamfer, and 1.0-mm shoulder) were prepared. Sixty standardized crowns (FibreKor) were made on duplicated base metal alloy dies (n = 20 for each margin design). Marginal fit was stereoscopically evaluated by measuring the distances between each of the four pairs of indentations on the crowns and on the dies. The specimens were then subjected to a compressive fracture-loading test using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple-range test (α = 0.05). Analysis of marginal fit and fracture resistance disclosed a statistically significant difference for tooth-preparation design (p crowns was adversely affected by tooth-preparation design. The marginal gaps were greater for the shoulder margin specimens than in the light or deep chamfer margin specimens; however, the fracture strength of the chamfer margin specimens was greater than that of the shoulder margin specimens. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. Simulation and Failure Analysis of Car Bumper Made of Pineapple Leaf Fiber Reinforced Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbintarso, E. S.; Muslim, M.; Rusianto, T.

    2018-02-01

    The bumper car made of the Pineapple Leaf Fiber Reinforced Composite (PLFRC) is possible to be produced with the advantage of easy to get, and cheap. Pineapple leaf fiber has chosen as a natural fiber, which the maximum of the strength of 368 MPa. The objective of this study was to determine the maximum capability of front car bumpers using Pineapple Leaf Fiber Reinforced Composite materials through the process of simulating stress analysis with Solidworks 2014 software. The aim also to know the distribution of loads that occur on the front car bumper and predict the critical point position on the design of the bumper. The result will use to develop the alternative lightweight, cheap and environmentally friendly materials in general and the development of the use of pineapple fiber for automotive purposes in particular. Simulations and failure analysis have been conducted and showed an increased impact speed in line with increased displacement, strain, and stress that occur on the surface of the bumper. The bumper can withstand collisions at a speed of less than 70 kph.

  17. Chemical recycling of carbon fibers reinforced epoxy resin composites in oxygen in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Yongping; Wang, Zhi; Feng, Liqun

    2010-01-01

    The carbon fibers in carbon fibers reinforced epoxy resin composites were recovered in oxygen in supercritical water at 30 ± 1 MPa and 440 ± 10 o C. The microstructure of the recovered carbon fibers was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atom force microscopy (AFM). The results revealed that the clean carbon fibers were recovered and had higher tensile strength relative to the virgin carbon fibers when the decomposition rate was above 85 wt.%, although the recovered carbon fibers have clean surface, the epoxy resin on the surface of the recovered carbon fibers was readily observed. As the decomposition rate increased to above 96 wt.%, no epoxy resin was observed on the surface of the carbon fibers and the oxidation of the recovered carbon fibers was readily measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The carbon fibers were ideally recovered and have original strength when the decomposition rates were between 94 and 97 wt.%. This study clearly showed the oxygen in supercritical water is a promising way for recycling the carbon fibers in carbon fibers reinforced resin composites.

  18. Modeling of Stress Development During Thermal Damage Healing in Fiber-reinforced Composite Materials Containing Embedded Shape Memory Alloy Wires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Warnet, Laurent; Akkerman, Remko; de Boer, Andries

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite materials are susceptible to damage development through matrix cracking and delamination. This article concerns the use of shape memory alloy (SMA) wires embedded in a composite material to support healing of damage through a local heat treatment. The composite material

  19. Shear Bond Strength between Fiber-Reinforced Composite and Veneering Resin Composites with Various Adhesive Resin Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the shear bond strength of different laboratory resin composites bonded to a fiber-reinforced composite substrate with some intermediate adhesive resins. Mounted test specimens of a bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate (StickNet) were randomly assigned to three equal groups. Three types of commercially available veneering resin composites - BelleGlass®, Sinfony®, and GC Gradia® were bonded to these specimens using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group were stored for 24 hours; the remaining were stored for 30 days. There were 10 specimens in the test group (n). The shear bond strengths were calculated and expressed in MPa. Data were analyzed statistically, and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Shear bond values of those composites are influenced by the different bonding resins and different indirect composites. There was a significant difference in the shear bond strengths using different types of adhesive resins (p = 0.02) and using different veneering composites (p veneering composite to bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate is influenced by the brand of the adhesive resin and veneering composite. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  20. Bending Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composites Retainers Bonded with Spot-Composite Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, Paola; Tessera, Paola; Lassila, Lippo

    2017-01-01

    Orthodontic and periodontal splints are prepared with round or flat metallic wires. As these devices cannot be used in patients with allergy to metals or with aesthetic demands, fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retainers have been introduced. Stiffness of FRC materials could reduce physiologic tooth movement. In order to lower rigidity of conventional FRC retainers, a modified construction technique that provided a partial (spot) composite coverage of the fiber has been tested and compared with metallic splints and full-bonded FRCs. Flat (Bond-a-Braid, Reliance Orthodontic Products) and round (Penta-one 0155, Masel Orthodontics) stainless steel splints, conventional FRC splints, and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers (Everstick Ortho, StickTech) were investigated. The strength to bend the retainers at 0.1 mm deflection and at maximum load was measured with a modified Frasaco model. No significant differences were reported among load values of stainless steel wires and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers at 0.1 mm deflection. Higher strength values were recoded for conventional full-bonded FRCs. At maximum load no significant differences were reported between metallic splints (flat and round) and experimental spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were reported between spot- and full-bonded FRC splints. These results encourage further tests in order to evaluate clinical applications of experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers. PMID:29130047

  1. Bending Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composites Retainers Bonded with Spot-Composite Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Gandini, Paola; Tessera, Paola; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo; Scribante, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Orthodontic and periodontal splints are prepared with round or flat metallic wires. As these devices cannot be used in patients with allergy to metals or with aesthetic demands, fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retainers have been introduced. Stiffness of FRC materials could reduce physiologic tooth movement. In order to lower rigidity of conventional FRC retainers, a modified construction technique that provided a partial (spot) composite coverage of the fiber has been tested and compared with metallic splints and full-bonded FRCs. Flat (Bond-a-Braid, Reliance Orthodontic Products) and round (Penta-one 0155, Masel Orthodontics) stainless steel splints, conventional FRC splints, and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers (Everstick Ortho, StickTech) were investigated. The strength to bend the retainers at 0.1 mm deflection and at maximum load was measured with a modified Frasaco model. No significant differences were reported among load values of stainless steel wires and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers at 0.1 mm deflection. Higher strength values were recoded for conventional full-bonded FRCs. At maximum load no significant differences were reported between metallic splints (flat and round) and experimental spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were reported between spot- and full-bonded FRC splints. These results encourage further tests in order to evaluate clinical applications of experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers.

  2. Bending Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composites Retainers Bonded with Spot-Composite Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francesca Sfondrini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic and periodontal splints are prepared with round or flat metallic wires. As these devices cannot be used in patients with allergy to metals or with aesthetic demands, fiber-reinforced composite (FRC retainers have been introduced. Stiffness of FRC materials could reduce physiologic tooth movement. In order to lower rigidity of conventional FRC retainers, a modified construction technique that provided a partial (spot composite coverage of the fiber has been tested and compared with metallic splints and full-bonded FRCs. Flat (Bond-a-Braid, Reliance Orthodontic Products and round (Penta-one 0155, Masel Orthodontics stainless steel splints, conventional FRC splints, and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers (Everstick Ortho, StickTech were investigated. The strength to bend the retainers at 0.1 mm deflection and at maximum load was measured with a modified Frasaco model. No significant differences were reported among load values of stainless steel wires and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers at 0.1 mm deflection. Higher strength values were recoded for conventional full-bonded FRCs. At maximum load no significant differences were reported between metallic splints (flat and round and experimental spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were reported between spot- and full-bonded FRC splints. These results encourage further tests in order to evaluate clinical applications of experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers.

  3. [Recent development of research on the biotribology of carbon fiber reinforced poly ether ether ketone composites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Pan, Yusong

    2014-12-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced poly ether ether ketone (CF/PEEK) composite possesses excellent biocompatible, biomechanical and bioribological properties. It is one of the most promising implant materials for artificial joint. Many factors influence the bioribological properties of CF/PEEK composites. In this paper, the authors reviewed on the biotribology research progress of CF/PEEK composites. The influences of various factors such as lubricant, reinforcement surface modification, functional particles, friction counterpart and friction motion modes on the bio-tribological properties of CF/PEEK composites are discussed. Based on the recent research, the authors suggest that the further research should be focused on the synergistic effect of multiple factors on the wear and lubrication mechanism of CF/PEEK.

  4. Study of wear mechanism of chopped fiber reinforced epoxy composite filled with graphite and bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Nitinchand; Prasad, Krishna

    2018-04-01

    The combined effect of graphite and sintered bronze with a short glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites was investigated in this work. A pin on disc wear test was carried out to study the wear behaviour and mechanism of the composites. The objective of this work is to develop an alternate friction resistance material for the application of sliding bearing. It was observed that the addition of sintered bronze improved mechanical and thermal stability of the composites as bronze has low contact resistance with graphite and has high thermal conductivity. It was observed from the test results that increased volume percentage of graphite and presence of bronze are play significant role in wear mechanism of the composites. It was observed from the scanning electronic microscopes (SEM) that the abrasive and adhesive wear mechanism was prominent in this study. It was also evident from the result that the frictional force remains stable irrespective of the applied normal load.

  5. Multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement for advanced epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekyarova, E; Thostenson, E T; Yu, A; Kim, H; Gao, J; Tang, J; Hahn, H T; Chou, T-W; Itkis, M E; Haddon, R C

    2007-03-27

    We report an approach to the development of advanced structural composites based on engineered multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement. Electrophoresis was utilized for the selective deposition of multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on woven carbon fabric. The CNT-coated carbon fabric panels were subsequently infiltrated with epoxy resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to fabricate multiscale hybrid composites in which the nanotubes were completely integrated into the fiber bundles and reinforced the matrix-rich regions. The carbon nanotube/carbon fabric/epoxy composites showed approximately 30% enhancement of the interlaminar shear strength as compared to that of carbon fiber/epoxy composites without carbon nanotubes and demonstrate significantly improved out-of-plane electrical conductivity.

  6. Solid Particle Erosion of Date Palm Leaf Fiber Reinforced Polyvinyl Alcohol Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti R. Mohanty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particle erosion behavior of short date palm leaf (DPL fiber reinforced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA composite has been studied using silica sand particles (200 ± 50 μm as an erodent at different impingement angles (15–90° and impact velocities (48–109 m/s. The influence of fiber content (wt% of DPL fiber on erosion rate of PVA/DPL composite has also been investigated. The neat PVA shows maximum erosion rate at 30° impingement angle whereas PVA/DPL composites exhibit maximum erosion rate at 45° impingement angle irrespective of fiber loading showing semiductile behavior. The erosion efficiency of PVA and its composites varies from 0.735 to 16.289% for different impact velocities studied. The eroded surfaces were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM to understand the erosion mechanism.

  7. Affordable Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites Win 1995 R and D 100 Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Affordable fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (AFReCC) with high strength and toughness, good thermal conductivity, thermal shock resistance, and oxidation resistance are needed for high-temperature structural applications. AFReCC materials will have various applications in advanced high-efficiency and high-performance engines: that is, the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), space propulsion components, and land-based systems. For example, silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites show promise for meeting the criteria of high strength, thermal conductivity, and toughness required for the HSCT combustor liner. AFReCC received R&D Magazine's prestigious R&D 100 Award in 1995. The fabrication process for these composites has three steps. In the first step, fiber preforms are made and chemical vapor infiltration is used to apply the desired interface coating on the fibers. This step also rigidizes the preform. The second step consists of resin infiltration, which after pyrolysis, yields an interconnected network of porous carbon as the matrix. In the final step of the process, the carbon-containing preform is infiltrated with molten silicon or silicon alloys in a furnace. This converts the carbon to silicon carbide leaving as little as 5 percent residual free silicon or refractory disilicide phase. This process is suitable for any type of small-diameter fiber (e.g., carbon, alumina, or silicon carbide) woven into a two- or three-dimensional architecture. This processing approach leads to dense composites where matrix microstructure and composition can be tailored for optimum properties. It has much lower processing cost (less than 50 percent) in comparison to other approaches to fabricating silicon-carbide-based composites. The photograph shows the various AFReCC components. Thermomechanical and thermochemical characterization of these composites under the hostile environments that will be encountered in engine applications is underway.

  8. Standard Guide for Identification of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composite Materials in Databases

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This guide establishes essential and desirable data elements for fiber-reinforced composite materials for two purposes: to establish the material identification component of data-reporting requirements for test reporting and to provide information for the design of material property databases. 1.1.1 This guide is the first part of a two-part modular approach. The first part serves to identify the material and the second part serves to describe testing procedures and variables and to record results. 1.1.2 For mechanical testing, the related document is Guide E 1434. The interaction of this guide with Guide E 1434 is emphasized by the common numbering of data elements. Data Elements A1 through G13 are included in this guide, and numbering of data elements in Guide E 1434 begins with H1 for the next data element block. This guide is most commonly used in combination with a guide for reporting the test procedures and results such as Guide E 1434. 1.2 These guidelines are specific to fiber-reinforced polyme...

  9. High-strength fiber-reinforced plastic reinforcement of wood and wood composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tingley, D.A.; Eng, P. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Research and development underway since 1982 has led to the development of a method of reinforcing wood and wood composite structural products (WWC) using high-strength fiber-reinforced plastic. This method allows the use of less wood fiber and lower grade wood fiber for a given load capacity. The first WWC in which reinforcement has been marketed is glulam beams. Marketed under the trade name FiRP{trademark} Reinforced glulam, the product has gained code approval and is now being used in the construction of buildings and bridges in the United States, Japan and other countries. The high-strength fiber-reinforced plastic (FiRP{trademark} Reinforced panel (RP)) has specific characteristics that are required to provide for proper use in WWC`s. This paper discusses these characteristics and the testing requirements to develop code approved allowable design values for carbon, aramid and fiberglass RP`s for such uses. Specific issues such as in-service characteristics, i.e. long term creep tests and tension-tension fatigue tests, are discussed.

  10. Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites for Earth-to-orbit rocket engine turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeyer, Jerry W.; Schnittgrund, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites (FRCMC) are emerging materials systems that offer potential for use in liquid rocket engines. Advantages of these materials in rocket engine turbomachinery include performance gain due to higher turbine inlet temperature, reduced launch costs, reduced maintenance with associated cost benefits, and reduced weight. This program was initiated to assess the state of FRCMC development and to propose a plan for their implementation into liquid rocket engine turbomachinery. A complete range of FRCMC materials was investigated relative to their development status and feasibility for use in the hot gas path of earth-to-orbit rocket engine turbomachinery. Of the candidate systems, carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) offers the greatest near-term potential. Critical hot gas path components were identified, and the first stage inlet nozzle and turbine rotor of the fuel turbopump for the liquid oxygen/hydrogen Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) were selected for conceptual design and analysis. The critical issues associated with the use of FRCMC were identified. Turbine blades were designed, analyzed and fabricated. The Technology Development Plan, completed as Task 5 of this program, provides a course of action for resolution of these issues.

  11. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Using Reflective Terahertz Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Terahertz (THz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS imaging is considered a nondestructive evaluation method for composite materials used for examining various defects of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP composites and fire-retardant coatings in the reflective imaging modality. We demonstrate that hidden defects simulated by Teflon artificial inserts are imaged clearly in the perpendicular polarization mode. The THz TDS technique is also used to measure the thickness of thin fire-retardant coatings on CFRP composites with a typical accuracy of about 10 micrometers. In addition, coating debonding is successfully imaged based on the time-delay difference of the time-domain waveforms between closely adhered and debonded sample locations.

  12. An integrated computational framework for simulating the failure response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Hossein; Liang, Bowen; Soghrati, Soheil

    2017-12-01

    A new computational framework is introduced for the automated finite element (FE) modeling of fiber reinforced composites and simulating their micromechanical behavior. The proposed methodology relies on a new microstructure reconstruction algorithm that implements the centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) to generate an initial uniform distribution of fibers with desired volume fraction and size distribution in a repeating unit cell of the composite. The genetic algorithm (GA) is then employed to optimize locations of fibers such that they replicate the target spatial arrangement. We also use a non-iterative mesh generation algorithm, named conforming to interface structured adaptive mesh refinement (CISAMR), to create FE models of the CFRPC. The CVT-GA-CISAMR framework is then employed to investigate the appropriate size of the composite's representative volume element. We also study the strength and failure mechanisms in the CFRPC subject to varying uniaxial and mixed-mode loadings.

  13. Multi-response parametric optimization in drilling of bamboo/Kevlar fiber reinforced sandwich composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Thingujam Jackson; Samanta, Sutanu

    2016-09-01

    In the present work an attempt was made towards parametric optimization of drilling bamboo/Kevlar K29 fiber reinforced sandwich composite to minimize the delamination occurred during the drilling process and also to maximize the tensile strength of the drilled composite. The spindle speed and the feed rate of the drilling operation are taken as the input parameters. The influence of these parameters on delamination and tensile strength of the drilled composite studied and analysed using Taguchi GRA and ANOVA technique. The results show that both the response parameters i.e. delamination and tensile strength are more influenced by feed rate than spindle speed. The percentage contribution of feed rate and spindle speed on response parameters are 13.88% and 81.74% respectively.

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Using Reflective Terahertz Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Wei; Cui, Hong-Liang; Shi, Changcheng; Han, Xiaohui; Ma, Yuting; Chen, Jiandong; Chang, Tianying; Wei, Dongshan; Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) imaging is considered a nondestructive evaluation method for composite materials used for examining various defects of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites and fire-retardant coatings in the reflective imaging modality. We demonstrate that hidden defects simulated by Teflon artificial inserts are imaged clearly in the perpendicular polarization mode. The THz TDS technique is also used to measure the thickness of thin fire-retardant coatings on CFRP composites with a typical accuracy of about 10 micrometers. In addition, coating debonding is successfully imaged based on the time-delay difference of the time-domain waveforms between closely adhered and debonded sample locations. PMID:27314352

  15. Nondestructive evaluation of defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Andrew C. Y.; Goh, Henry K. H.; Lin, Karen K.; Liew, W. H.

    2017-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites are increasingly used in aerospace applications due to its superior mechanical properties and reduced weight. Adhesive bonding is commonly used to join the composite parts since it is capable of joining incompatible or dissimilar components. However, insufficient adhesive or contamination in the adhesive bonds might occur and pose as threats to the integrity of the plane during service. It is thus important to look for suitable nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques to detect and characterize the sub-surface defects within the CFRP composites. Some of the common NDT techniques include ultrasonic techniques and thermography. In this work, we report the use of the abovementioned techniques for improved interpretation of the results.

  16. Mechanical interaction of Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC) reinforced with Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) rebar in tensile loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lárusson, Lárus Helgi; Fischer, Gregor; Jönsson, Jeppe

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a preliminary study of the composite interaction of Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC), reinforced with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) rebar. The main topic of this paper will focus on the interaction of the two materials (ECC and GFRP) during axial loading...... distribution which in terms results in less mechanical deterioration during loading....

  17. Natural fiber reinforced polystyrene composites: Effect of fiber loading, fiber dimensions and surface modification on mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singha, A.S.; Rana, Raj K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Preparation of Agave fiber reinforced polystyrene composites. ► Effect of fiber content, fiber dimensions and surface treatment on the mechanical properties of composites. ► Composites with 20% by weight fiber content exhibited optimum mechanical properties. ► Composites reinforced with MMA grafted fibers exhibited better mechanical strength as compared to raw fibers. ► SEM of fractured surfaces of samples showed better interface in particle reinforced composites. -- Abstract: Natural fibers have been found to be excellent reinforcing materials for preparing polymer matrix based composites. In the present study both raw and surface modified Agave fiber reinforced polystyrene matrix based composites were prepared in order to explore the effect of reinforcement on the mechanical properties of the matrix. The surface modification of Agave fiber was carried out by graft copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) onto it in the presence of ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) as initiator. For preparing these composites different fiber contents of both raw and grafted fibers (10–30% by weight) have been used. It has been found that 20% fiber content gives optimum mechanical properties. The effect of different fiber dimensions (particle, short and long fibers) on the mechanical properties of the composites has also been investigated. It has been found that particle reinforcement gives better mechanical properties than short and long fiber reinforcement. The composites thus prepared have been characterized by Fourier transform infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and TGA/DTA techniques. Further the surface modified fiber reinforced composites have been found to be thermally more stable than that of raw fiber reinforced composites.

  18. Interfacial studies on the O3 modified carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide 6 composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, O 3 modification method was used for the surface treatment of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fiber. The surface characteristics of carbon fibers were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The interfacial properties of carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide 6 (CF/PA6) composites were investigated by means of the single fiber pull-out tests. As a result, it was found that IFSS values of the composites with O 3 treated carbon fiber are increased by 60% compared to that without treatment. XPS results show that O 3 treatment increases the amount of carboxyl groups on carbon fiber surface, thus the interfacial adhesion between carbon fiber and PA6 matrix is effectively promoted

  19. Measurement and analysis of thrust force in drilling sisal-glass fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, M.; Gopinath, A.

    2017-05-01

    Drilling of composite materials is difficult when compared to the conventional materials because of its in-homogeneous nature. The force developed during drilling play a major role in the surface quality of the hole and minimizing the damages around the surface. This paper focuses the effect of drilling parameters on thrust force in drilling of sisal-glass fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates. The quadratic response models are developed by using response surface methodology (RSM) to predict the influence of cutting parameters on thrust force. The adequacy of the models is checked by using the analysis of variance (ANOVA). A scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis is carried out to analyze the quality of the drilled surface. From the results, it is found that, the feed rate is the most influencing parameter followed by spindle speed and the drill diameter is the least influencing parameter on the thrust force.

  20. Esthetic rehabilitation of single anterior edentulous space using fiber-reinforced composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Kim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A fiber-reinforced composite (FRC fixed prosthesis is an innovative alternative to a traditional metal restoration, as it is a conservative treatment method. This case report demonstrates a detailed procedure for restoring a missing anterior tooth with an FRC. A 44-year-old woman visited our department with an avulsed tooth that had fallen out on the previous day and was completely dry. This tooth was replanted, but it failed after one year. A semi-direct technique was used to fabricate a FRC fixed partial prosthesis for its replacement. The FRC framework and the pontic were fabricated using a duplicated cast model and nanofilled composite resin. Later on, interproximal contact, tooth shape, and shade were adjusted at chairside. This technique not only enables the clinician to replace a missing tooth immediately after extraction for minimizing esthetic problems, but it also decreases both tooth reduction and cost.

  1. Statistics of Microstructure, Peak Stress and Interface Damage in Fiber Reinforced Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kushch, Volodymyr I.; Shmegera, Sergii V.; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2009-01-01

    to simulate both the uniform and clustered random fiber arrangements. By averaging over a number of numerical tests, the empirical probability functions have been obtained for the nearest neighbor distance and the peak interface stress. It is shown that the considered statistical parameters are rather...... sensitive to the fiber arrangement, particularly cluster formation. An explicit correspondence between them has been established and an analytical formula linking the microstructure and peak stress statistics in FRCs has been suggested. Application of the statistical theory of extreme values to the local......This paper addresses an effect of the fiber arrangement and interactions on the peak interface stress statistics in a fiber reinforced composite material (FRC). The method we apply combines the multipole expansion technique with the representative unit cell model of composite bulk, which is able...

  2. Reactive processing of textile-natural fiber reinforced anionic polyamide-6 composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Ze; Chen, Peng; Liu, Zhengying; Feng, Jianmin; Yang, Mingbo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays natural fiber, used in reinforced composites, is widely concerned. However, no natural fiber reinforced reactive thermoplastic polymer grades had been prepared so far. Through our studies, it was demonstrated that there was a severe retardation and discoloration occurred in the reactive processing between anionic polyamide-6 (APA-6) and natural fiber, which result in incomplete polymerization when put together. In order to solve the problem, two methods were adopted in this paper, which are fiber pretreatment and usage of a new-style initiator called caprolactam magnesium bromide. The former is to remove sizing agent and impurities on the surface of fiber, and the latter is to weaken the side reactions between APA-6 and natural fiber by the nature of its lower reactivity and weaker alkaline. In cooperation with both methods, the severe retardation and discoloration had been improved significantly, so that the polymerization of APA-6 in natural fiber was occurred smoothly. Following textile-natural fiber reinforced APA-6 composites with an average thickness of 2.5 mm and a fiber volume content of 50% was prepared by vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). The soxhlet extraction, dilute solution viscometry and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) measurements respectively suggested the degree of conversion, viscosity-average molar mass and crystallization of composites was up to 94%, 11.3×104 and 50%. Remarkable improvement of mechanical properties were achieved through dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), tensile and three-point bending test. Favorable interfacial adhesion and wettability were revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. Therefore, all of the above good performance make this new-style and environmentally friendly composites have broad application prospects

  3. Reactive processing of textile-natural fiber reinforced anionic polyamide-6 composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Ze; Chen, Peng; Liu, Zhengying; Feng, Jianmin; Yang, Mingbo [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China)

    2015-05-22

    Nowadays natural fiber, used in reinforced composites, is widely concerned. However, no natural fiber reinforced reactive thermoplastic polymer grades had been prepared so far. Through our studies, it was demonstrated that there was a severe retardation and discoloration occurred in the reactive processing between anionic polyamide-6 (APA-6) and natural fiber, which result in incomplete polymerization when put together. In order to solve the problem, two methods were adopted in this paper, which are fiber pretreatment and usage of a new-style initiator called caprolactam magnesium bromide. The former is to remove sizing agent and impurities on the surface of fiber, and the latter is to weaken the side reactions between APA-6 and natural fiber by the nature of its lower reactivity and weaker alkaline. In cooperation with both methods, the severe retardation and discoloration had been improved significantly, so that the polymerization of APA-6 in natural fiber was occurred smoothly. Following textile-natural fiber reinforced APA-6 composites with an average thickness of 2.5 mm and a fiber volume content of 50% was prepared by vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). The soxhlet extraction, dilute solution viscometry and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) measurements respectively suggested the degree of conversion, viscosity-average molar mass and crystallization of composites was up to 94%, 11.3×104 and 50%. Remarkable improvement of mechanical properties were achieved through dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), tensile and three-point bending test. Favorable interfacial adhesion and wettability were revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. Therefore, all of the above good performance make this new-style and environmentally friendly composites have broad application prospects.

  4. Fracture strength of direct surface-retained fixed partial dentures : Effect of fiber reinforcement versus the use of particulate filler composites only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumbuloglu, Ovul; Ozcan, Mutlu; User, Atilla

    This study compared the fracture strengths and analyzed the failure types of direct, surface-retained, anterior fixed-partial-dentures (FPD), reinforced with four types of fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) versus non-fiber-reinforced FPDs made of three particulate filler composites (PFC). To this

  5. Effects of Interface Modification on Mechanical Behavior of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    1997-01-01

    Unidirectional celsian matrix composites having approx. 42 volume percent of uncoated or BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers were tested in three-point bend at room temperature. The uncoated fiber-reinforced composites showed catastrophic failure with strength of 210 +/- 35 MPa and a flat fracture surface. In contrast, composites reinforced with BN/SiC-coated fibers exhibited graceful failure with extensive fiber pullout. Values of first matrix cracking stress and strain were 435 +/- 35 MPa and 0.27 +/- 0.01 %, respectively, with ultimate strength as high as 960 MPa. The elastic Young's modulus of the uncoated and BN/SiC-coated fiber-reinforced composites were measured as 184 q 4 GPa and 165 +/- 5 GPa, respectively. Fiber push-through tests and microscopic examination indicated no chemical reaction at the uncoated or coated fiber-matrix interface. The low strength of the uncoated fiber-reinforced composite is probably due to degradation of the fibers from mechanical surface damage during processing. Because both the coated and uncoated fiber reinforced composites exhibited weak interfaces, the beneficial effect of the BN-SiC dual layer is primarily the protection of fibers from mechanical damage during processing.

  6. Teeth restored using fiber-reinforced posts: in vitro fracture tests and finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitter, M; Rammelsberg, P; Lenz, J; Scheuber, S; Schweizerhof, K; Rues, S

    2010-09-01

    In dentistry the restoration of decayed teeth is challenging and makes great demands on both the dentist and the materials. Hence, fiber-reinforced posts have been introduced. The effects of different variables on the ultimate load on teeth restored using fiber-reinforced posts is controversial, maybe because the results are mostly based on non-standardized in vitro tests and, therefore, give inhomogeneous results. This study combines the advantages of in vitro tests and finite element analysis (FEA) to clarify the effects of ferrule height, post length and cementation technique used for restoration. Sixty-four single rooted premolars were decoronated (ferrule height 1 or 2 mm), endodontically treated and restored using fiber posts (length 2 or 7 mm), composite fillings and metal crowns (resin bonded or cemented). After thermocycling and chewing simulation the samples were loaded until fracture, recording first damage events. Using UNIANOVA to analyze recorded fracture loads, ferrule height and cementation technique were found to be significant, i.e. increased ferrule height and resin bonding of the crown resulted in higher fracture loads. Post length had no significant effect. All conventionally cemented crowns with a 1-mm ferrule height failed during artificial ageing, in contrast to resin-bonded crowns (75% survival rate). FEA confirmed these results and provided information about stress and force distribution within the restoration. Based on the findings of in vitro tests and computations we concluded that crowns, especially those with a small ferrule height, should be resin bonded. Finally, centrally positioned fiber-reinforced posts did not contribute to load transfer as long as the bond between the tooth and composite core was intact. 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Method for Monitoring Water Content in Epoxy Resins and Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey E. Krauklis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring water content and predicting the water-induced drop in strength of fiber-reinforced composites are of great importance for the oil and gas and marine industries. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic methods are broadly available and often used for process and quality control in industrial applications. A benefit of using such spectroscopic methods over the conventional gravimetric analysis is the possibility to deduce the mass of an absolutely dry material and subsequently the true water content, which is an important indicator of water content-dependent properties. The objective of this study is to develop an efficient and detailed method for estimating the water content in epoxy resins and fiber-reinforced composites. In this study, Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR spectroscopy was applied to measure the water content of amine-epoxy neat resin. The method was developed and successfully extended to glass fiber-reinforced composite materials. Based on extensive measurements of neat resin and composite samples of varying water content and thickness, regression was performed, and the quantitative absorbance dependence on water content in the material was established. The mass of an absolutely dry resin was identified, and the true water content was obtained. The method was related to the Beer–Lambert law and explained in such terms. A detailed spectroscopic method for measuring water content in resins and fiber-reinforced composites was developed and described.

  8. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Method for Monitoring Water Content in Epoxy Resins and Fiber-Reinforced Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauklis, Andrey E; Gagani, Abedin I; Echtermeyer, Andreas T

    2018-04-11

    Monitoring water content and predicting the water-induced drop in strength of fiber-reinforced composites are of great importance for the oil and gas and marine industries. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods are broadly available and often used for process and quality control in industrial applications. A benefit of using such spectroscopic methods over the conventional gravimetric analysis is the possibility to deduce the mass of an absolutely dry material and subsequently the true water content, which is an important indicator of water content-dependent properties. The objective of this study is to develop an efficient and detailed method for estimating the water content in epoxy resins and fiber-reinforced composites. In this study, Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy was applied to measure the water content of amine-epoxy neat resin. The method was developed and successfully extended to glass fiber-reinforced composite materials. Based on extensive measurements of neat resin and composite samples of varying water content and thickness, regression was performed, and the quantitative absorbance dependence on water content in the material was established. The mass of an absolutely dry resin was identified, and the true water content was obtained. The method was related to the Beer-Lambert law and explained in such terms. A detailed spectroscopic method for measuring water content in resins and fiber-reinforced composites was developed and described.

  9. Electrical impedance spectroscopy for measuring the impedance response of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer composite laminates

    KAUST Repository

    Almuhammadi, Khaled

    2017-02-16

    Techniques that monitor the change in the electrical properties of materials are promising for both non-destructive testing and structural health monitoring of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRPs). However, achieving reliable monitoring using these techniques requires an in-depth understanding of the impedance response of these materials when subjected to an alternating electrical excitation, information that is only partially available in the literature. In this work, we investigate the electrical impedance spectroscopy response at various frequencies of laminates chosen to be representative of classical layups employed in composite structures. We clarify the relationship between the frequency of the electrical current, the conductivity of the surface ply and the probing depth for different CFRP configurations for more efficient electrical signal-based inspections. We also investigate the effect of the amplitude of the input signal.

  10. Ultrasonic measurement of elastic constants in fiber-reinforced polymer composites under influence of absorbed moisture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.A.; Toftegaard, H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an attempt to quantify hygral aging in fiber-reinforced polymer composites by the elastic constants C-11 and C-33. Quantitative ultrasonic measurements of the elastic constants for three different unidirectional as well as three different cross-ply specimens were compared. The......, and typically moisture expansion coefficients are reported. Moreover, as the ultrasonic pulse form changed in the anisotropic materials, different broadband methods were used to calculate the elastic constants. (C) 2000 Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved........ The specimens were manufactured with different moisture resistant surfaces and immersed in water for 24 h. By calculating the elastic constants, it was taken into account that hygral aging was accompanied by absorption of moisture in the polymer matrix. Moisture changed the laminate dimensions significantly...

  11. Accounting for Fiber Bending Effects in Homogenization of Long Fiber Reinforced Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2015-01-01

    The present work deals with homogenized finite-element models of long fiber reinforced composite materials in the context of studying compressive failure modes such as the formation of kink bands and fiber micro-buckling. Compared to finite-element models with an explicit discretization...... are in good agreement. In cases where the fiber bending stiffness is significant,the homogenized finite-element model exhibits size-scale dependent material behavior, as predicted by the model with explicitly discretized individual fibers....... of the material micro-structure including individual fibers, homogenized models are computationally more efficient and hence more suitable for modeling of larger and complex structure. Nevertheless, the formulation of homogenized models is more complicated, especially if the bending stiffness of the reinforcing...

  12. Load-Bearing Capacity of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Abutments and One-Piece Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etxeberria, Marina; Abdulmajeed, Aous A; Escuin, Tomas; Vinas, Miguel; Lassila, Lippo V J; Närhi, Timo O

    2015-06-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) can potentially help in a physiologic stress transmission due to its excellent biomechanical matching with living tissues. Novel one-piece FRC implants and abutments with two different fiber orientations were loaded until failure to assess the load-bearing capacity, fracture patterns, and precision of fit. The one-piece FRC implants showed significantly higher load-bearing capacity compared to FRC abutments regardless of the fiber orientation (p < 0.001). For FRC abutments, bidirectional abutments showed significantly higher loads compared to unidirectional abutments (p < 0.001). The type of structure and fiber orientation are strong determinant factors of the load-bearing capacity of FRC implants and abutments.

  13. Segmenting delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite CT using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Daniel; Winfree, William P.; Burke, Eric; Ji, Shuiwang

    2016-02-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) utilizes a variety of techniques to inspect various materials for defects without causing changes to the material. X-ray computed tomography (CT) produces large volumes of three dimensional image data. Using the task of identifying delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite CT, this work shows that it is possible to automate the analysis of these large volumes of CT data using a machine learning model known as a convolutional neural network (CNN). Further, tests on simulated data sets show that with a robust set of experimental data, it may be possible to go beyond just identification and instead accurately characterize the size and shape of the delaminations with CNNs.

  14. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo

  15. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard C

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO 2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC) solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo properties, electrical

  16. Osseointegration of fiber-reinforced composite implants: histological and ultrastructural observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballo, A M; Cekic-Nagas, I; Ergun, G; Lassila, L; Palmquist, A; Borchardt, P; Lausmaa, J; Thomsen, P; Vallittu, P K; Närhi, T O

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone tissue response to fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) in comparison with titanium (Ti) implants after 12 weeks of implantation in cancellous bone using histomorphometric and ultrastructural analysis. Thirty grit-blasted cylindrical FRC implants with BisGMA-TEGDMA polymer matrix were fabricated and divided into three groups: (1) 60s light-cured FRC (FRC-L group), (2) 24h polymerized FRC (FRC group), and (3) bioactive glass FRC (FRC-BAG group). Titanium implants were used as a control group. The surface analyses were performed with scanning electron microscopy and 3D SEM. The bone-implant contact (BIC) and bone area (BA) were determined using histomorphometry and SEM. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on Focused Ion Beam prepared samples of the intact bone-implant interface. The FRC, FRC-BAG and Ti implants were integrated into host bone. In contrast, FRC-L implants had a consistent fibrous capsule around the circumference of the entire implant separating the implant from direct bone contact. The highest values of BIC were obtained with FRC-BAG (58±11%) and Ti implants (54±13%), followed by FRC implants (48±10%), but no significant differences in BIC or BA were observed (p=0.07, p=0.06, respectively). TEM images showed a direct contact between nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite of bone and both FRC and FRC-BAG surfaces. Fiber-reinforced composite implants are capable of establishing a close bone contact comparable with the osseointegration of titanium implants having similar surface roughness. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Five-year survival of 3-unit fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures in the posterior area.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heumen, C.C.M. van; Tanner, J.; Dijken, J.W.V. van; Pikaar, R.; Lassila, L.V.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Vallittu, P.K.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of three-unit posterior fixed partial dentures (FPDs) made of fiber-reinforced resin composite (FRC), and to identify design factors influencing the survival rate. METHODS: 77 patients (52 females, 25 males)

  18. Fracture strength and bending of all-ceramic and fiber-reinforced composites in inlay-retained fixed partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Saridag

    2012-06-01

    Conclusions: Zirconia-based ceramic inlay-retained fixed partial dentures demonstrated the highest fracture strength. The fiber-reinforced composite inlay-retained fixed partial dentures demonstrated higher bending values than did the all-ceramic inlay-retained fixed partial dentures.

  19. Fracture behavior of structurally compromised non-vital maxillary premolars restored using experimental fiber reinforced composite crowns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkinga, W.A.; Kreulen, C.M.; Bell-Ronnlof, A.M. Le; Lassila, L.V.; Vallittu, P.K.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the fracture behavior of direct resin composite crowns with or without experimental fiber reinforcement. METHODS: Clinical crowns of single-rooted maxillary premolars were cut off at the cemento-enamel junction. Canals were prepared with Gates Glidden drills up to size 4. No

  20. Marginal Adaptation and Microleakeage of Directly and Indirectly Made Fiber Reinforced Composite Inlays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovul, Kumbuloglu; Arzu, Tezvergil-Mutluay; Ahmet, Saracoglu; Lippo VJ, Lassila; Pekka K, Vallittu

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated in vitro microleakage of inlays made by direct or indirect techique with or without fiber reinforced composite (FRC) substructure. Materials and Methods: Standardized mesio-occlusal cavities were prepared and restored using direct-technique with composite resin only or FRC-composite resin, and indirect technique with laboratory composite only or FRC-laboratory composite resin. After thermocycling, teeth were immersed in basic fuchsin dye, sectioned and examined under a stereo-microscope (x40). Results: No differences of cement thickness and dye penetration were found in gingival area (p>0.05), whereas microleakage revealed statistical differences between groups (p=0.02) in occlusal area, where FRC-groups had lower microleakage than composite restorations. Thickness of cement layer did not show significant difference between groups with indirect technique (p>0.05). Conclusion: The present study suggests that insertion of FRC substructure to the inlay cavity by direct composite filling technique does not increase the marginal leakage compared to that of cementing indirectly made restotorations by composite resin luting cement. Clinical Significance: On the basis of the results of this in vitro study, the use of direct FRC technique might be an effective way to decrease the marginal leakage. PMID:21566717

  1. Curaua fiber reinforced high-density polyethylene composites: effect of impact modifier and fiber loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Albano de Morais

    Full Text Available Abstract Short fibers are used in thermoplastic composites to increase their tensile and flexural resistance; however, it often decreases impact resistance. Composites with short vegetal fibers are not an exception to this behavior. The purpose of this work is to produce a vegetal fiber reinforced composite with improved tensile and impact resistance in relation to the polymer matrix. We used poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate, EVA, to recover the impact resistance of high density polyethylene, HDPE, reinforced with Curauá fibers, CF. Blends and composites were processed in a corotating twin screw extruder. The pure polymers, blends and composites were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, tensile mechanical properties and Izod impact resistance. EVA used as impact modifier in the HDPE matrix exhibited a co-continuous phase and in the composites the fibers were homogeneously dispersed. The best combination of mechanical properties, tensile, flexural and impact, were obtained for the formulations of composites with 20 wt. % of CF and 20 to 40 wt. % of EVA. The composite prepared with 20 wt. % EVA and containing 30 wt. % of CF showed impact resistance comparable to pure HDPE and improved tensile and flexural mechanical properties.

  2. Mechanical properties of fiber reinforced restorative composite with two distinguished fiber length distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Lippo; Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Säilynoja, Eija

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reinforcing effect of discontinuous glass fiber fillers with different length scales on fracture toughness and flexural properties of dental composite. Experimental fiber reinforced composite (Exp-FRC) was prepared by mixing 27wt% of discontinuous E-glass fibers having two different length scales (micrometer and millimeter) with various weight ratios (1:1, 2:1, 1:0 respectively) to the 23wt% of dimethacrylate based resin matrix and then 50wt% of silane treated silica filler were added gradually using high speed mixing machine. As control, commercial FRC and conventional posterior composites were used (everX Posterior, Alert, and Filtek Superme). Fracture toughness, work of fracture, flexural strength, and flexural modulus were determined for each composite material following ISO standards. The specimens (n=6) were dry stored (37°C for 2 days) before they were tested. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the microstructure of the experimental FRC composites. The results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA followed by post-hoc Tukey׳s test. Level of significance was set at 0.05. ANOVA revealed that experimental composites reinforced with different fiber length scales (hybrid Exp-FRC) had statistically significantly higher mechanical performance of fracture toughness (4.7MPam(1/2)) and flexural strength (155MPa) (plength scales of discontinues fiber fillers (hybrid) with polymer matrix yielded improved mechanical performance compared to commercial FRC and conventional posterior composites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Red Mud and Copper Slag Particles on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Bamboo-Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Sandhyarani Biswas; Amar Patnaik; Ritesh Kaundal

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, a series of bamboo-fiber-reinforced epoxy composites are fabricated by using red mud and copper slag particles as filler materials. A filler plays an important role in determining the properties and behavior of particulate composites. The effects of these two fillers on the mechanical properties of bamboo-epoxy composites are investigated. Comparative analysis shows that with the incorporation of these fillers, the tensile strength of the composites increases significantl...

  4. Vibration and Damping Analysis of Composite Fiber Reinforced Wind Blade with Viscoelastic Damping Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Hong Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials are increasingly used in wind blade because of their superior mechanical properties such as high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratio. This paper presents vibration and damping analysis of fiberreinforced composite wind turbine blade with viscoelastic damping treatment. The finite element method based on full layerwise displacement theory was employed to analyze the damping, natural frequency, and modal loss factor of composite shell structure. The lamination angle was considered in mathematical modeling. The curved geometry, transverse shear, and normal strains were exactly considered in present layerwise shell model, which can depict the zig-zag in-plane and out-of-plane displacements. The frequency response functions of curved composite shell structure and wind blade were calculated. The results show that the damping ratio of viscoelastic layer is found to be very sensitive to determination of magnitude of composite structures. The frequency response functions with variety of thickness of damping layer were investigated. Moreover, the natural frequency, modal loss factor, and mode shapes of composite fiber reinforced wind blade with viscoelastic damping control were calculated.

  5. Damage analysis of fiber reinforced resin matrix composites irradiated by CW laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Hong; Hu Kaiwei; Mu Jingyang; Bai Shuxin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the damage modes of the carbon fiber and the glass fiber reinforced epoxy or bakelite resin matrix composites irradiated by CW laser under different power densities were analyzed, and the changes of the microstructure and the tensile strength of the composites were also researched. When the resin matrix composites were radiated at a power density more than 0.1 kW/cm 2 , the matrix would be decomposed and the tensile properties of the radiated samples were lost over 30% while the carbon fiber hardly damaged and the glass fiber melted. When the power density of the laser was raised to 1 kW/cm 2 , the matrix burned violently and the carbon fiber cloth began to split with some carbon fiber being fractured, therefore, the fracture strength of the radiated sample lost over 80%. The higher the power density of radiation was, the more serious the damage of the sample was. It was also found that the difference of the matrixes had little effect on the damage extent of the composites. The influence of the radiation density on the temperature of the radiated surface of the carbon/resin composite was numerically calculated by ANSYS finite element software and the calculation results coincided with the damage mode of the radiated composites. (authors)

  6. Stress-temperature-lifetime response of nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC composites in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    Time-to-failure tests were conducted in four-point flexure and in air as a function of stress levels and temperatures to study the lifetime response of various Nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC (designated as Nic/SiC) composites with a graphitic interfacial coating. The results indicated that all of the Nic/SiC composites exhibit a similar stress-dependent failure at applied stress greater than a threshold value. In this case, the lifetimes of the composites increased with decrease in both stress level and test temperature. The lifetime of the composites appeared to be relatively insensitive to the thickness of graphitic interface layer and was enhanced somewhat by the addition of oxidation inhibitors. Electron microscopy and oxidation studies indicated that the life of the Nic/SiC composites was governed by the oxidation of the graphitic interfaces and the on of glass(es) in composites due to the oxidation of the fiber and matrix, inhibitor phases

  7. A fractal image analysis methodology for heat damage inspection in carbon fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, Aswin; Crivoi, Alexandru; Prabhathan, P.; Chan, Kelvin; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2017-06-01

    The use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite materials in the aerospace industry have far improved the load carrying properties and the design flexibility of aircraft structures. A high strength to weight ratio, low thermal conductivity, and a low thermal expansion coefficient gives it an edge for applications demanding stringent loading conditions. Specifically, this paper focuses on the behavior of CFRP composites under stringent thermal loads. The properties of composites are largely affected by external thermal loads, especially when the loads are beyond the glass temperature, Tg, of the composite. Beyond this, the composites are subject to prominent changes in mechanical and thermal properties which may further lead to material decomposition. Furthermore, thermal damage formation being chaotic, a strict dimension cannot be associated with the formed damage. In this context, this paper focuses on comparing multiple speckle image analysis algorithms to effectively characterize the formed thermal damages on the CFRP specimen. This would provide us with a fast method for quantifying the extent of heat damage in carbon composites, thus reducing the required time for inspection. The image analysis methods used for the comparison include fractal dimensional analysis of the formed speckle pattern and analysis of number and size of various connecting elements in the binary image.

  8. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of posterior fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial denture Part 2: influence of fiber reinforcement on mesial and distal connectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, Nobuhisa; Shinya, Akikazu; Yokoyama, Daiichiro; Lassila, Lippo V J; Gomi, Harunori; Vallittu, Pekka K; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of connectors under two different loading conditions on displacement and stress distribution generated in isotropic hybrid composite fixed partial denture (C-FPD) and partially anisotropic fiber-reinforced hybrid composite fixed partial denture (FRC-FPD). To this end, two three-dimensional finite element (FE) models of three-unit FPD from mandibular second premolar to mandibular second molar - intended to replace the mandibular first molar - were developed. The two loading conditions employed were a vertical load of 629 N (applied to eight points on the occlusal surface) and a lateral load of 250 N (applied to three points of the pontic). The results suggested that the reinforcing fibers in FRC framework significantly improved the rigidity of the connectors against any twisting and bending moments induced by loading. Consequently, maximum principal stress and displacement generated in the connectors of FRC-FPD were significantly reduced because stresses generated by vertical and lateral loading were transferred to the reinforcing fibers.

  9. A comprehensive study of woven carbon fiber-reinforced nylon 6 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Selvum

    Liquid molding of thermoset composites has become very popular in all industry sectors, including aerospace, automotive, mass transit, and sporting goods, but the cost of materials and processing has limited the use to high-end applications. Thermoplastic composites are relatively cheap; however, the use has been limited to components with short fiber reinforcing. The high melt viscosity and short processing window precludes their use in the liquid molding of large structures and applications with continuous fiber reinforcement. The current research addresses the processing parameters, methodology, and limitations of vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) of carbon fabric-reinforced, thermoplastic polyamide 6 (PA6). The material used is casting grade PA6. The process developed for using VARTM to produce carbon fabric-reinforced PA6 composites is explained in detail. The effects of infusion temperature and flow distance on the fiber weight fraction and crystallinity of the PA6 resin are presented. The degree of conversion from monomer to polymer was determined. Microscopic studies to show the wet-out of the fibers at the filament level are also presented. Tensile, flexural, short beam shear strength (SBSS), and low-velocity impact test results are presented and compared to a equivalent thermoset matrix composite. The rubber toughened epoxy system (SC-15) was chosen for the comparative study because the system has been especially developed to overcome the brittle nature of epoxy composites. The environmental effects of moisture and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the carbon/nylon 6 composite were investigated. The samples were immersed in boiling water for 100 hr, and mechanical tests were conducted. Results showed that moisture causes plasticization of the matrix and attacks the fiber matrix interface. This leads to deterioration of the mechanical properties. The samples were also exposed to UV for up to 600 hr, and post exposure tests were conducted. The

  10. Effect of thermal-mechanical cycling on thermal expansion behavior of boron fiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Y.C.; He, S.Y.; Yang, D.Z.

    2004-01-01

    The thermal expansion behavior of boron fiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composite subjected to thermal-mechanical cycling (TMC) was studied. Experimental results showed that TMC affected greatly the thermal expansion behavior of the composite. Using a simple analysis model of internal stress in the fibers, the stress change during the thermal expansion coefficient measurements of the composite subjected to TMC was calculated. The results indicated that TMC could induce the interfacial degradation of the composite, and the more the numbers of TMC cycles, or the higher the applied stress level of TMC, the more serious the interfacial degradation of the composite became. The proposed one-dimensional analysis model was proved to be a simple and qualitative approach to probing the interfacial degradation of unidirectional fiber-reinforced metal matrix composites during TMC

  11. Development and characterization of powder metallurgically produced discontinuous tungsten fiber reinforced tungsten composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Y.; Coenen, J. W.; Riesch, J.; Sistla, S.; Almanstötter, J.; Jasper, B.; Terra, A.; Höschen, T.; Gietl, H.; Bram, M.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.; Linsmeier, Ch; Broeckmann, C.

    2017-12-01

    In future fusion reactors, tungsten is the prime candidate material for the plasma facing components. Nevertheless, tungsten is prone to develop cracks due to its intrinsic brittleness—a major concern under the extreme conditions of fusion environment. To overcome this drawback, tungsten fiber reinforced tungsten (Wf/W) composites are being developed. These composite materials rely on an extrinsic toughing principle, similar to those in ceramic matrix composite, using internal energy dissipation mechanisms, such as crack bridging and fiber pull-out, during crack propagation. This can help Wf/W to facilitate a pseudo-ductile behavior and allows an elevated damage resilience compared to pure W. For pseudo-ductility mechanisms to occur, the interface between the fiber and matrix is crucial. Recent developments in the area of powder-metallurgical Wf/W are presented. Two consolidation methods are compared. Field assisted sintering technology and hot isostatic pressing are chosen to manufacture the Wf/W composites. Initial mechanical tests and microstructural analyses are performed on the Wf/W composites with a 30% fiber volume fraction. The samples produced by both processes can give pseudo-ductile behavior at room temperature.

  12. Carbon nanotube-based structural health monitoring for fiber reinforced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Liu, Kan; Mardirossian, Aris; Heider, Dirk; Thostenson, Erik

    2017-04-01

    In fiber reinforced composite materials, the modes of damage accumulation, ranging from microlevel to macro-level (matrix cracks development, fiber breakage, fiber-matrix de-bonding, delamination, etc.), are complex and hard to be detected through conventional non-destructive evaluation methods. Therefore, in order to assure the outstanding structural performance and high durability of the composites, there has been an urgent need for the design and fabrication smart composites with self-damage sensing capabilities. In recent years, the macroscopic forms of carbon nanotube materials have been maturely investigated, which provides the opportunity for structural health monitoring based on the carbon nanotubes that are integrated in the inter-laminar areas of advanced fiber composites. Here in this research, advanced fiber composites embedded with laminated carbon nanotube layers are manufactured for damage detection due to the relevant spatial electrical property changes once damage occurs. The mechanical-electrical coupling response is recorded and analyzed during impact test. The design and manufacturing of integrating the carbon nanotubes intensely affect the detecting sensitivity and repeatability of the integrated multifunctional sensors. The ultimate goal of the reported work is to develop a novel structural health monitoring method with the capability of reporting information on the damage state in a real-time way.

  13. Fabrication and evaluation of mechanical properties of alkaline treated sisal/hemp fiber reinforced hybrid composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesha Gupta, N. S.; Akash; Sreenivasa Rao, K. V.; kumar, D. S. Arun

    2016-09-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite have acquired a dominant place in variety of applications because of higher specific strength and modulus, the plant based natural fiber are partially replacing currently used synthetic fiber as reinforcement for polymer composites. In this research work going to develop a new material which posses a strength to weight ratio that for exceed any of the present material. The hybrid composite sisal/hemp reinforced with epoxy matrix has been developed by compression moulding technique according to ASTM standards. Sodium hydroxide (NAOH) was used as alkali for treating the fibers. The amount of reinforcement was varied from 10% to 50% in steps of 10%. Prepared specimens were examined for mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength, and hardness. Hybrid composite with 40wt% sisal/hemp fiber were found to posses higher strength (tensile strength = 53.13Mpa and flexural strength = 82.07Mpa) among the fabricated hybrid composite specimens. Hardness value increases with increasing the fiber volume. Morphological examinations are carried out to analyze the interfacial characteristics, internal structure and fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope.

  14. Optimization and Static Stress Analysis of Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Composite Leaf Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luay Muhammed Ali Ismaeel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A monofiber reinforced composite leaf spring is proposed as an alternative to the typical steel one as it is characterized by high strength-to-weight ratio. Different reinforcing schemes are suggested to fabricate the leaf spring. The composite and the typical steel leaf springs are subjected to the same working conditions. A weight saving of about more than 60% can be achieved while maintaining the strength for the structures under consideration. The objective of the present study was to replace material for leaf spring. This study suggests various materials of hybrid fiber reinforced plastics (HFRP. Also the effects of shear moduli of the fibers, matrices, and the composites on the composites performance and responses are discussed. The results and behaviors of each are compared with each other and verified by comparison with analytical solution; a good convergence is found between them. The elastic properties of the hybrid composites are calculated using rules of mixtures and Halpin-Tsi equation through the software of MATLAB v-7. The problem is also analyzed by the technique of finite element analysis (FEA through the software of ANSYS v-14. An element modeling was done for every leaf with eight-node 3D brick element (SOLID185 3D 8-Node Structural Solid.

  15. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  16. The Impact Resistance of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Mehrdad Shokrieh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced composites are widely used instead of traditional materials in various technological applications. Therefore, by considering the extensive applications of these materials, a proper knowledge of their impact behavior (from low- to high-velocity as well as their static behavior is necessary. In order to study the effects of strain rates on the behavior of these materials, special testing machines are needed. Most of the research efforts in this feld are focused on application of real loading and gripping boundary conditions on the testing specimens. In this paper, a detailed review of different types of impact testing techniques and the strain rate dependence of mechanical and strength properties of polymer composite materials  are presented. In this respect, an attempt is made to present and summarize the methods of impact tests and the strain rate effects on the tensile, compressive, shear and bending properties of the fber-reinforced polymer composite materials. Moreover, a classifcation of the state-of-the-art of the testing techniques to characterize composite material properties in a wide range of strain rates are also given.

  17. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200C, beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  18. Flexural properties of polyethylene, glass and carbon fiber-reinforced resin composites for prosthetic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Yukinori; Nishigawa, Goro; Irie, Masao; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Minagi, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    High flexural properties are needed for fixed partial denture or implant prosthesis to resist susceptibility to failures caused by occlusal overload. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the effects of four different kinds of fibers on the flexural properties of fiber-reinforced composites. Polyethylene fiber, glass fiber and two types of carbon fibers were used for reinforcement. Seven groups of specimens, 2 × 2 × 25 mm, were prepared (n = 10 per group). Four groups of resin composite specimens were reinforced with polyethylene, glass or one type of carbon fiber. The remaining three groups served as controls, with each group comprising one brand of resin composite without any fiber. After 24-h water storage in 37°C distilled water, the flexural properties of each specimen were examined with static three-point flexural test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Compared to the control without any fiber, glass and carbon fibers significantly increased the flexural strength (p glass fiber (p glass fibers (p > 0.05). Fibers could, therefore, improve the flexural properties of resin composite and carbon fibers in longitudinal form yielded the better effects for reinforcement.

  19. Properties Variation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite for Marine Current Turbine in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbine blade which are generally made of composite is a core device among components of tidal current power generator that converts the flow of tidal current into a turning force. Recent years, damages of composite turbine blades have been reported due to reasons like seawater degradation, lake of strength, manufacture etc. In this paper, water absorption, tensile, bending, longitudinal transverse shearing properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CRP composite which would be applied to fabricate the marine current turbine blade has been investigated. Furthermore, the variations of properties with seawater immersion period were studied. The results indicated that the water absorption increased almost linearly at the beginning of immersion and then became stable. Tensile strength of specimen tended to decrease firstly and then recovered slightly. However, the longitudinal transverse shearing strength showed reverse variation trend comparing to tensile strength. And the bending property of specimens was depressed significantly. The properties variations in seawater shall be referenced to design and fabrication of composite marine current turbine blade.

  20. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Wang, Xin; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000 deg C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200 deg C, Beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  1. Effect of Home Bleaching on Microleakage of Fiber-reinforced and Particle-filled Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Sharafeddin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching may exert some negative effects on existing composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of home bleaching on microleakage of fiber-reinforced and particle-filled composite resins. Materials and methods. Ninety class V cavities (1.5×2×3 mm were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 90 bovine teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=15 and restored as follows: Groups 1 and 2 with Z100, groups 3 and 4 with Z250, and groups 5 and 6 with Nulite F composite resins. All the specimens were thermocycled. Groups 1, 3 and 5 were selected as control groups (without bleaching and the experimental groups 2, 4 and 6 were bleached with 22% carbamide peroxide gel. All the samples were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours and then sectioned longitudinally. Dye penetration was evaluated under a stereomicroscope (×25, at both the gingival and incisal margins. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (α=0.05. Results. Statistical analyses revealed that bleaching gel increased microleakage only at gingival margins with Z250 (P=0.007. Moreover, the control groups showed a statistically significant difference in microleakage at their gingival margins. Nulite F had the maximum microleakage while Z250 showed the minimum (P=0.006. Conclusion. Microleakage of home-bleached restorations might be related to the type of composite resin used.

  2. Modeling the Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites Under Multiple Fatigue Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-06-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple fatigue loading. The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure and the difference existed in the new and original interface debonded region. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The interface shear stress degradation model and fibers strength degradation model have been adopted to analyze the interface wear effect on the tensile strength of the composite subjected to multiple fatigue loading. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers failure model based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two - parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength corresponding to multiple fatigue peak stress levels and different cycle number have been analyzed.

  3. Fatigue damage and fracture behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced Zr-based metallic glassy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.; Zhang, Z.F.; Wang, Z.G.; Qiu, K.Q.; Zhang, H.F.; Zang, Q.S.; Hu, Z.Q.

    2006-01-01

    The fatigue life, damage and fracture behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced metallic glass Zr 41.25 Ti 13.75 Ni 10 Cu 12.5 Be 22.5 composites are investigated under cyclic push-pull loading. It is found that the fatigue life of the composite increases with increasing the volume fraction of tungsten fibers. Similar to crystalline metals, the regions of crack initiation, propagation and overload fracture can be discerned on the fracture surface of the specimen. Fatigue crack normally initiates in the metallic glass matrix at the outer surface of the composite specimen and propagates predominantly in the matrix. Different crack front profile around the tungsten fibers and fiber pullout demonstrate that fatigue crack may propagate around the fiber, leading to bridging of the crack faces by the unbroken fiber and hence improved fatigue crack-growth resistance. Locally decreased effective stiffness in the region where fiber distribution is sparse may provide preferential crack path in the composite. A proposed model was exercised to elucidate different tungsten fiber fracture morphologies in the fatigue crack propagation and overload fracture regions in the light of Poisson's ratio effect during fatigue loading

  4. Bioactive Glass Fiber Reinforced Starch-Polycaprolactone Composite for Bone Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jukola, H.; Nikkola, L.; Tukiainen, M.; Kellomaeki, M.; Ashammakhi, N.; Gomes, M. E.; Reis, R. L.; Chiellini, F.; Chiellini, E.

    2008-01-01

    For bone regeneration and repair, combinations of different materials are often needed. Biodegradable polymers are often combined with osteoconductive materials, such as bioactive glass (BaG), which can also improve the mechanical properties of the composite. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize BaG fiber-reinforced starch-poly-ε-caprolactone (SPCL) composite. Sheets of SPCL (30/70 wt%) were produced using single-screw extrusion. They were then cut and compression molded in layers with BaG fibers to form composite structures of different combinations. Thermal, mechanical, and degradation properties of the composites were studied. The actual amount of BaG in the composites was determined using combustion tests. A strong endothermic peak indicating melting at about 56 deg. C was observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. Thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA) showed that thermal decomposition of SPCL started at 325 deg. C with the decomposition of starch and continued at 400 deg. C with the degradation of polycaprolactone (PCL). Initial mechanical properties of the reinforced composites were at least 50% better than the properties of the non-reinforced composites. However, the mechanical properties of the composites after two weeks of hydrolysis were comparable to those of the non-reinforced samples. During the six weeks' hydrolysis the mass of the composites had decreased only by about 5%. The amount of glass in the composites remained the same for the six-week period of hydrolysis. In conclusion, it is possible to enhance the initial mechanical properties of SPCL by reinforcing it with BaG fibers. However, the mechanical properties of the composites are only sufficient for use as filler material and they need to be further improved to allow long-lasting bone applications

  5. Bioactive Glass Fiber Reinforced Starch-Polycaprolactone Composite for Bone Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukola, H.; Nikkola, L.; Gomes, M. E.; Chiellini, F.; Tukiainen, M.; Kellomäki, M.; Chiellini, E.; Reis, R. L.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    For bone regeneration and repair, combinations of different materials are often needed. Biodegradable polymers are often combined with osteoconductive materials, such as bioactive glass (BaG), which can also improve the mechanical properties of the composite. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize BaG fiber-reinforced starch-poly-ɛ-caprolactone (SPCL) composite. Sheets of SPCL (30/70 wt%) were produced using single-screw extrusion. They were then cut and compression molded in layers with BaG fibers to form composite structures of different combinations. Thermal, mechanical, and degradation properties of the composites were studied. The actual amount of BaG in the composites was determined using combustion tests. A strong endothermic peak indicating melting at about 56 °C was observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. Thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA) showed that thermal decomposition of SPCL started at 325 °C with the decomposition of starch and continued at 400 °C with the degradation of polycaprolactone (PCL). Initial mechanical properties of the reinforced composites were at least 50% better than the properties of the non-reinforced composites. However, the mechanical properties of the composites after two weeks of hydrolysis were comparable to those of the non-reinforced samples. During the six weeks' hydrolysis the mass of the composites had decreased only by about 5%. The amount of glass in the composites remained the same for the six-week period of hydrolysis. In conclusion, it is possible to enhance the initial mechanical properties of SPCL by reinforcing it with BaG fibers. However, the mechanical properties of the composites are only sufficient for use as filler material and they need to be further improved to allow long-lasting bone applications.

  6. Use of fiber reinforced polymer composite cable for post-tensioning application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The primary objective of this research project was to assess the feasibility of the use of innovative carbon fiber reinforced : polymer (CFRP) tendons and to develop guidelines for CFRP in post-tensioned bridge applications, including segmental : bri...

  7. Recycled Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Incorporated in Mortar for Improved Mechanical Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-11

    Glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) recycled from retired wind turbines was implemented in mortar as a volumetric replacement of sand during the two phases of this study. In Phase I, the mechanically refined GFRP particle sizes were sieved for four...

  8. Mechanical properties of neat polymer matrix materials and their unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two neat resin systems for use in carbon fiber epoxy composites were characterized. This included tensile and shear stiffness and strengths, coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion, and fracture toughness. Tests were conducted on specimens in the dry and moisture-saturated states, at temperatures of 23, 82 and 121 C. The neat resins tested were American Cyanamid 1806 and Union Carbide ERX-4901B(MPDA). Results were compared to previously tested neat resins. Four unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites were mechanically characterized. Axial and transverse tension and in-plane shear strengths and stiffness were measured, as well as transverse coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion. Tests were conducted on dry specimens only at 23 and 100 C. The materials tested were AS4/3502, AS6/5245-C, T300/BP907, and C6000/1806 unidirectional composites. Scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental test conditions.

  9. Spot-Bonding and Full-Bonding Techniques for Fiber Reinforced Composite (FRC) and Metallic Retainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, Paola; Tessera, Paola; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Lassila, Lippo; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Fiber reinforced Composite (FRC) retainers have been introduced as an aesthetic alternative to conventional metallic splints, but present high rigidity. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate bending and fracture loads of FRC splints bonded with conventional full-coverage of the FRC with a composite compared with an experimental bonding technique with a partial (spot-) resin composite cover. Stainless steel rectangular flat, stainless steel round, and FRC retainers were tested at 0.2 and 0.3 mm deflections and at a maximum load. Both at 0.2 and 0.3 mm deflections, the lowest load required to bend the retainer was recorded for spot-bonded stainless steel flat and round wires and for spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were identified among them. Higher force levels were reported for full-bonded metallic flat and round splints and the highest loads were recorded for full-bonded FRCs. At the maximum load, no significant differences were reported among spot- and full-bonded metallic splints and spot-bonded FRCs. The highest loads were reported for full bonded FRCs. The significant decrease in the rigidity of spot-bonded FRC splints if compared with full-bonded retainers suggests further tests in order to propose this technique for clinical use, as they allow physiologic tooth movement, thus presumably reducing the risk of ankylosis. PMID:28976936

  10. Physical and Mechanical Characteristics of Kevlar Fiber-Reinforced PC/ABS Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuljira Sujirote

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the composites between polycarbonate (PC and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS alloy and Kevlar fiber were prepared. The flexural and tensile properties of PC/ABS alloy and its composites were determined using a universal testing machine. The synergistic behavior of flexural modulus was observed for all regions of PC contents, while the synergism of flexural strength and tensile strength were found in some PC contents. It was found that the optimum weight ratio of PC:ABS was 60:40. In the Kevlar Fiber-reinforced PC/ABS composite system at PC:ABS of 60:40, both flexural modulus and strength were increased with matrix contents. Additionally, the flexural strength drastically increased with the matrix content and then reached the maximum value of 167 MPa at the matrix content of 33.4 wt%. The results from peel test, water contact measurement, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM reveal that the interfacial adhesion between the Kevlar fiber and the polymer matrix could be improved by increasing the PC content in the matrix.

  11. Temperature changes caused by light curing of fiber-reinforced composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilday, Nurcan Ozakar; Sagsoz, Omer; Karatas, Ozcan; Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya; Çelik, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to evaluate temperature change in fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) resin photopolymerized with a light-emitting diode (LED) light-curing unit (LCU). Materials and Methods: Forty dentine disks (1 mm thick and 8 mm diameter) were prepared from human molars. The FRC specimens (2 mm thickness and 8 mm diameter) consisted of polyethylene fiber (Construct (CT)) products or glass fiber (ever Stick (ES)) and one hybrid composite bonded to the dentin disks and polymerized with an LED LCU. Control groups were prepared using the hybrid composite. Temperature rise in dentine samples under the FRC bonded disks was measured using a K-type thermocouple, and data were recorded. Temperature change data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's test. Results: The results show that addition of fiber (one or two layers) did not change temperature rise values at any of the exposure times (P > 0.05). The CT fiber/two layer/40 s group exhibited the greatest temperature rise (5.49 ± 0.62) and the ES/one layer/10 s group the lowest rise (1.75 ± 0.32). A significant difference was observed in temperature rise measured during 10 and 20 s exposures (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Maximal temperature rise determined in all groups was not critical for pulpal health, although clinicians need to note temperature rises during polymerization. PMID:26069409

  12. Aerogel to simulate delamination and porosity defects in carbon-fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Peter; Leckey, Cara A. C.

    2018-04-01

    Representative defect standards are essential for the validation and calibration of new and existing inspection techniques. However, commonly used methods of simulating delaminations in carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites do not accurately represent the behavior of the real-world defects for several widely-used NDE techniques. For instance, it is common practice to create a delamination standard by inserting Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) in between ply layers. However, PTFE can transmit more ultrasonic energy than actual delaminations, leading to an unrealistic representation of the defect inspection. PTFE can also deform/wrinkle during the curing process and has a thermal effusivity two orders of magnitude higher than air (almost equal to that of a CFRP). It is therefore not effective in simulating a delamination for thermography. Currently there is also no standard practice for producing or representing a known porosity in composites. This paper presents a novel method of creating delamination and porosity standards using aerogel. Insertion of thin sheets of solid aerogel between ply layers during layup is shown to produce air-gap-like delaminations creating realistic ultrasonic and thermographic inspection responses. Furthermore, it is shown that depositing controlled amounts of aerogel powder can represent porosity. Micrograph data verifies the structural integrity of the aerogel through the composite curing process. This paper presents data from multiple NDE methods, including X-ray computed tomography, immersion ultrasound, and flash thermography to the effectiveness of aerogel as a delamination and porosity simulant.

  13. Spot-Bonding and Full-Bonding Techniques for Fiber Reinforced Composite (FRC and Metallic Retainers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Scribante

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced Composite (FRC retainers have been introduced as an aesthetic alternative to conventional metallic splints, but present high rigidity. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate bending and fracture loads of FRC splints bonded with conventional full-coverage of the FRC with a composite compared with an experimental bonding technique with a partial (spot- resin composite cover. Stainless steel rectangular flat, stainless steel round, and FRC retainers were tested at 0.2 and 0.3 mm deflections and at a maximum load. Both at 0.2 and 0.3 mm deflections, the lowest load required to bend the retainer was recorded for spot-bonded stainless steel flat and round wires and for spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were identified among them. Higher force levels were reported for full-bonded metallic flat and round splints and the highest loads were recorded for full-bonded FRCs. At the maximum load, no significant differences were reported among spot- and full-bonded metallic splints and spot-bonded FRCs. The highest loads were reported for full bonded FRCs. The significant decrease in the rigidity of spot-bonded FRC splints if compared with full-bonded retainers suggests further tests in order to propose this technique for clinical use, as they allow physiologic tooth movement, thus presumably reducing the risk of ankylosis.

  14. Spot-Bonding and Full-Bonding Techniques for Fiber Reinforced Composite (FRC) and Metallic Retainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribante, Andrea; Gandini, Paola; Tessera, Paola; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca

    2017-10-04

    Fiber reinforced Composite (FRC) retainers have been introduced as an aesthetic alternative to conventional metallic splints, but present high rigidity. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate bending and fracture loads of FRC splints bonded with conventional full-coverage of the FRC with a composite compared with an experimental bonding technique with a partial (spot-) resin composite cover. Stainless steel rectangular flat, stainless steel round, and FRC retainers were tested at 0.2 and 0.3 mm deflections and at a maximum load. Both at 0.2 and 0.3 mm deflections, the lowest load required to bend the retainer was recorded for spot-bonded stainless steel flat and round wires and for spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were identified among them. Higher force levels were reported for full-bonded metallic flat and round splints and the highest loads were recorded for full-bonded FRCs. At the maximum load, no significant differences were reported among spot- and full-bonded metallic splints and spot-bonded FRCs. The highest loads were reported for full bonded FRCs. The significant decrease in the rigidity of spot-bonded FRC splints if compared with full-bonded retainers suggests further tests in order to propose this technique for clinical use, as they allow physiologic tooth movement, thus presumably reducing the risk of ankylosis.

  15. Mechanical, Thermal Degradation, and Flammability Studies on Surface Modified Sisal Fiber Reinforced Recycled Polypropylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of surface treated sisal fiber on the mechanical, thermal, flammability, and morphological properties of sisal fiber (SF reinforced recycled polypropylene (RPP composites was investigated. The surface of sisal fiber was modified with different chemical reagent such as silane, glycidyl methacrylate (GMA, and O-hydroxybenzene diazonium chloride (OBDC to improve the compatibility with the matrix polymer. The experimental results revealed an improvement in the tensile strength to 11%, 20%, and 31.36% and impact strength to 78.72%, 77%, and 81% for silane, GMA, and OBDC treated sisal fiber reinforced recycled Polypropylene (RPP/SF composites, respectively, as compared to RPP. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC, and heat deflection temperature (HDT results revealed improved thermal stability as compared with RPP. The flammability behaviour of silane, GMA, and OBDC treated SF/RPP composites was studied by the horizontal burning rate by UL-94. The morphological analysis through scanning electron micrograph (SEM supports improves surface interaction between fiber surface and polymer matrix.

  16. Flexural creep of coated SiC-fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, E.Y.

    1995-01-01

    This study reports the flexural creep behavior of a fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic and associated changes in microstructure. SiC fibers were coated with a dual layer of SiC/BN to provide a weak interface that was stable at high temperatures. Flexural creep, creep-rupture, and creep-strain recovery experiments were conducted on composite material and barium-magnesium aluminosilicate matrix from 1,000 to 1,200 C. Below 1,130 C, creep rates were extremely low (∼10 -9 s -1 ), preventing accurate measurement of the stress dependence. Above 1,130 C, creep rates were in the 10 -8 s -1 range. The creep-rupture strength of the composite at 1,100 C was about 75--80% of the fast fracture strength. Creep-strain recovery experiments showed recovery of up to 90% under prolonged unloading. Experimental creep results from the composite and the matrix were compared, and microstructural observations by TEM were employed to assess the effectiveness of the fiber coatings and to determine the mechanism(s) of creep deformation and damage

  17. Enhancement of mechanical and electrical properties of continuous-fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with stacked graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naum Naveh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Impregnation of expandable graphite (EG after thermal treatment with an epoxy resin containing surface-active agents (SAAs enhanced the intercalation of epoxy monomer between EG layers and led to further exfoliation of the graphite, resulting in stacks of few graphene layers, so-called “stacked” graphene (SG. This process enabled electrical conductivity of cured epoxy/SG composites at lower percolation thresholds, and improved thermo-mechanical properties were measured with either Kevlar, carbon or glass-fiber-reinforced composites. Several compositions with SAA-modified SG led to higher dynamic moduli especially at high temperatures, reflecting the better wetting ability of the modified nanoparticles. The hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of the SAA dictates the surface energy balance. More hydrophilic SAAs promoted localization of the SG at the Kevlar/epoxy interface, and morphology seems to be driven by thermodynamics, rather than the kinetic effect of viscosity. This effect was less obvious with carbon or glass fibers, due to the lower surface energy of the carbon fibers or some incompatibility with the glass-fiber sizing. Proper choice of the surfactant and fine-tuning of the crosslink density at the interphase may provide further enhancements in thermo-mechanical behavior.

  18. The effect of Co alloying content on the kinetics of reaction zone growth in tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, A.; Tien, J. K.; Caulfield, T.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1988-01-01

    A Co-free modified superalloy similar in composition to Waspaloy is investigated in an effort to understand the effect of Co on reaction zone growth kinetics and verify the chemistry dependence of reaction zone growth in the matrix of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composites. The values of the parabolic rate constant, characterizing the kinetics of reaction zone growth, for the Waspaloy matrix and the C-free alloy as well as five other alloys from a previous study confirm the dependence of reaction zone growth kinetics on cobalt content of the matrix. The Co-free alloy composite exhibits the slowest reaction zone growth among all tungsten fiber reinforced composites studied to date.

  19. Effect of Fiber Geometry and Representative Volume Element on Elastic and Thermal Properties of Unidirectional Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Siva Bhaskara Rao Devireddy; Sandhyarani Biswas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present work is focused on the evaluation of elastic and thermal properties of unidirectional fiber-reinforced polymer composites with different volume fractions of fiber up to 0.7 using micromechanical approach. Two ways for calculating the material properties, that is, analytical and numerical approaches, were presented. In numerical approach, finite element analysis was used to evaluate the elastic modulus and thermal conductivity of composite from the constituent material prope...

  20. Experimental investigation of span length for flexural test of fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Mehndiratta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Testing and evaluation of mechanical properties for FRP (Fiber Reinforced Polymer composite parts play a significant role to qualify it for the end use. Among the mechanical properties, the flexural strength is significant and vital as it may vary with specimen depth, temperature and the test span length. The flexural strength varies for different materials with varying the test span length hence the current work aims to find an optimum span length to test flexural strength for the specimens made of Glass (7781, EC9756 and Carbon (HTA7, G801 prepreg materials. Experiments are conducted as per the ASTM Standard D 790 for flexural test by varying the span lengths to understand the behavior of the flexural strength and flexural modulus. The experimental data were compared with those obtained from the finite element program software Altair Hyper works 14.0. The results indicate that flexural modulus increases with the span length to a point and then it decreases. Thereby, an optimum span length can be obtained for testing flexural strength, which will be useful to the designers and the composite manufacturers to accomplish better standard testing procedures.

  1. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  2. Characterization of a New Fully Recycled Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Subjected to High Strain Rate Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, H.; Tamboura, S.; Fitoussi, J.; BenDaly, H.; Tcharkhtchi, A.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is the complete physicochemical characterization and strain rate effect multi-scale analysis of a new fully recycled carbon fiber reinforced composites for automotive crash application. Two composites made of 20% wt short recycled carbon fibers (CF) are obtained by injection molding. The morphology and the degree of dispersion of CF in the matrixes were examined using a new ultrasonic method and SEM. High strain tensile behavior up to 100 s-1 is investigated. In order to avoid perturbation due to inertial effect and wave propagation, the specimen geometry was optimized. The elastic properties appear to be insensitive to the strain rate. However, a high strain rate effect on the local visco-plasticity of the matrix and fiber/matrix interface visco-damageable behavior is emphasized. The predominant damage mechanisms evolve from generalized matrix local ductility at low strain rate regime to fiber/matrix interface debonding and fibers pull-out at high strain rate regime.

  3. A Constitutive Formulation for the Linear Thermoelastic Behavior of Arbitrary Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Usal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The linear thermoelastic behavior of a composite material reinforced by two independent and inextensible fiber families has been analyzed theoretically. The composite material is assumed to be anisotropic, compressible, dependent on temperature gradient, and showing linear elastic behavior. Basic principles and axioms of modern continuum mechanics and equations belonging to kinematics and deformation geometries of fibers have provided guidance and have been determining in the process of this study. The matrix material is supposed to be made of elastic material involving an artificial anisotropy due to fibers reinforcing by arbitrary distributions. As a result of thermodynamic constraints, it has been determined that the free energy function is dependent on a symmetric tensor and two vectors whereas the heat flux vector function is dependent on a symmetric tensor and three vectors. The free energy and heat flux vector functions have been represented by a power series expansion, and the type and the number of terms taken into consideration in this series expansion have determined the linearity of the medium. The linear constitutive equations of the stress and heat flux vector are substituted in the Cauchy equation of motion and in the equation of conservation of energy to obtain the field equations.

  4. Technical features and criteria in designing fiber-reinforced composite materials: from the aerospace and aeronautical field to biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Antonio; Ronca, Dante; Russo, Teresa; D'Amora, Ugo; Chierchia, Marianna; De Santis, Roberto; Nicolais, Luigi; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Polymer-based composite materials are ideal for applications where high stiffness-to-weight and strength-to-weight ratios are required. From aerospace and aeronautical field to biomedical applications, fiber-reinforced polymers have replaced metals, thus emerging as an interesting alternative. As widely reported, the mechanical behavior of the composite materials involves investigation on micro- and macro-scale, taking into consideration micromechanics, macromechanics and lamination theory. Clinical situations often require repairing connective tissues and the use of composite materials may be suitable for these applications because of the possibility to design tissue substitutes or implants with the required mechanical properties. Accordingly, this review aims at stressing the importance of fiber-reinforced composite materials to make advanced and biomimetic prostheses with tailored mechanical properties, starting from the basic principle design, technologies, and a brief overview of composites applications in several fields. Fiber-reinforced composite materials for artificial tendons, ligaments, and intervertebral discs, as well as for hip stems and mandible models will be reviewed, highlighting the possibility to mimic the mechanical properties of the soft and hard tissues that they replace.

  5. Investigating the influence of alkalization on the mechanical and water absorption properties of coconut and sponge fibers reinforced polypropylene composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okikiola Ganiu AGBABIAKA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers are products made from renewable agricultural and forestry feedstock, which can include wood, grasses, and crops, as well as wastes and residues. There are two primary ways these fibers are used: to create polymers or as reinforcement and filler. Thermoplastic polymer may be reinforced or filled using natural fibers such as coir, sponge, hemp, flax, or sisal. This paper focused on the influence of alkalization (NaOH treatment on the mechanical and water absorption properties of selected natural fibers (coconut and sponge fibers reinforced polypropylene composites. In this study, coconut and sponge fiber were extracted from its husk by soaking them in water and was dried before it was cut into 10mm length. Those fibers were chemically treated with sodium hydroxide (NaOH in a shaking water bath before it was used as reinforcement in polypropylene composite. The reinforced polypropylene composite was produced by dispersing the coconut fibers randomly in the polypropylene before it was fabricated in a compression molding machine where the composite was produced. The fiber content used were; 2%wt, 4%wt, 6%wt, 8%wt and 10%wt. Tensile and flexural properties was observed from universal testing machine while water absorption test was carried out on the samples for seven (7 days. It was observed that the influence of NaOH treatment highly enhanced the Flexural and water absorption properties of sponge fiber reinforced polypropylene composites than coconut fiber reinforced composite samples.

  6. Direct restoration of severely damaged incisors using short fiber-reinforced composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the static load-bearing capacity and the failure mode of endodontically treated maxillary incisors restored with complete crowns made of experimental composite resin (FC) with short fiber fillers, with and without root canal posts. Further aim was to evaluate the effect of fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC) on the failure mode of the restoration. The experimental composite resin (FC) was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt.% of short E-glass fibers (3mm in length) and 22.5 wt.% of semi-interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) resin with 55 wt.% of silane treated silica fillers. The clinical crowns of 30 human extracted maxillary incisors were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction. Five groups of direct complete crowns were fabricated (n=6); Group A: made from particulate filler composite resin (PFC) (Grandio Caps, VOCO, control), Group B: PFC with fiber post (everStick, StickTeck), Group C: made from PFC with everStick fiber post and FRC-substructure, Group D: made from FC, Group E: made from FC with FRC-substructure. The root canals were prepared and posts were cemented with resin cement (ParaCem Universal). All restored teeth were stored in water at room temperature for 24h before they were statically loaded with speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (p=0.05). Failure modes were visually examined. ANOVA revealed that restorations made from experimental fiber composite resin had higher load-bearing capacity (349N) (p0.05). Restorations made from short glass fiber containing composite resin with IPN-polymer matrix showed better load-bearing capacity than those made with either plain PFC or PFC reinforced with fiber post.

  7. Carbon fiber-reinforced cyanate ester/nano-ZrW2O8 composites with tailored thermal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Rogalski, Mark K; Kessler, Michael R

    2012-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are widely used in the design and fabrication of a variety of high performance aerospace components. The mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) between the high CTE polymer matrix and low CTE fiber reinforcements in such composite systems can lead to dimensional instability and deterioration of material lifetimes due to development of residual thermal stresses. The magnitude of thermally induced residual stresses in fiber-reinforced composite systems can be minimized by replacement of conventional polymer matrices with a low CTE, polymer nanocomposite matrix. Zirconium tungstate (ZrW(2)O(8)) is a unique ceramic material that exhibits isotropic negative thermal expansion and has excellent potential as a filler for development of low CTE polymer nanocomposites. In this paper, we report the fabrication and thermal characterization of novel, multiscale, macro-nano hybrid composite laminates comprising bisphenol E cyanate ester (BECy)/ZrW(2)O(8) nanocomposite matrices reinforced with unidirectional carbon fibers. The results reveal that incorporation of nanoparticles facilitates a reduction in CTE of the composite systems, which in turn results in a reduction in panel warpage and curvature after the cure because of mitigation of thermally induced residual stresses.

  8. Advancing Discontinuous Fiber-Reinforced Composites above Critical Length for Replacing Current Dental Composites and Amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard C

    2017-02-01

    Clinicians have been aware that posterior dental particulate-filled composites (PFCs) have many placement disadvantages and indeed fail clinically at an average rate faster than amalgam alloys. Secondary caries is most commonly identified as the chief failure mechanism for both dental PFCs and amalgam. In terms of a solution, fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) above critical length (L c ) can provide mechanical property safety factors with compound molding packing qualities to reduce many problems associated with dental PFCs. Discontinuous chopped fibers above the necessary L c have been incorporated into dental PFCs to make consolidated molding compounds that can be tested for comparisons with PFC controls on mechanical properties, wear resistance, void-defect occurrence and packing ability to reestablish the interproximal contact. Further, imaging characterizations can aid in providing comparisons for FRCs with other materials using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and photographs. Also, the amalgam filling material has finally been tested by appropriate ASTM flexural bending methods that eliminate shear failure associated with short span lengths in dental standards for comparison with dental PFCs to best explain increased longevity for the amalgam when compared to dental PFCs. Accurate mechanical tests also provide significant proof for superior advantages with FRCs. Mechanical properties tested included flexural strength, yield strength, modulus, resilience, work of fracture, critical strain energy release and critical stress intensity factor. FRC molding compounds with fibers above L c extensively improve all mechanical properties over PFC dental paste and over the amalgam for all mechanical properties except modulus. The dental PFC also demonstrated superior mechanical properties over the amalgam except modulus to provide a better explanation for increased PFC failure due to secondary caries. With lower PFC modulus, increased adhesive

  9. Restorasi Resin Komposit dengan Pasak Fiber Reinforced Composite untuk Perbaikan Gigi Insisivus Sentralis Maksila Pasca Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mella Synthya Dewi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Latar belakang. Trauma pada gigi dapat menyebabkan injuri pulpa dengan atau tanpa kerusakan mahkota atau akar. Pulpektomi menjadi pilihan perawatan pada fraktur mahkota yang membutuhkan restorasi kompleks. Gigi pasca perawatan saluran akar biasanya telah kehilangan struktur jaringan keras yang cukup banyak sehingga membutuhkan retensi intrakanal berupa pasak untuk mendukung restorasi akhir. Pasak Fiber Reinforced Composite (FRG memiliki flexure dan fatigue strength yang lebih besar, modulus elastisitas yang mendekati dentin, kemampuan untuk membentuk monoblok (kompleks akar-pasak dalam saluran akar, dan meningkatkan estetik jika dibandingkan dengan pasak logam. Resin komposit memiliki warna dan translusensi yang menyerupai dentin dan email sehingga mampu menghasilkan estetik yang baik pada gigi anterior. Tujuan. Melaporkan restorasi resin komposit dengan pasak FRG untuk memperbaiki gigi insisivus sentralis maksila yang mengalami fraktur mahkota kompleks pasca trauma. Kasus dan penanganan. Perempuan 20 tahun, gigi insisivus sentralis kanan dan kiri maksila mengalami Fraktur Ellis klas III akibat kecelakaan. Gigi 11 pulpitis ireversibel dan gigi 21 nekrosis pulpa. Kedua gigi malposisi. Dilakukan pulpektomi atau perawatan saluran akar multi kunjungan. Resin komposit dengan pasak FRG customized digunakan sebagai restorasi akhir. Kesimpulan. Restorasi resin komposit dengan pasak FRG customized memberikan hasil yang memuaskan secara estetik dan fungsional untuk merestorasi gigi insisivus sentralis pasca trauma dan perawatan saluran akar.

  10. Parametric Study on Dynamic Response of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woraphot Prachasaree

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of high strength and stiffness to low self-weight ratio and ease of field installation, fiber reinforced polymer (FRP composite materials are gaining popularity as the materials of choice to replace deteriorated concrete bridge decks. FRP bridge deck systems with lower damping compared to conventional bridge decks can lead to higher amplitudes of vibration causing dynamically active bridge deck leading serviceability problems. The FRP bridge models with different bridge configurations and loading patterns were simulated using finite element method. The dynamic response results under varying FRP deck system parameters were discussed and compared with standard specifications of bridge deck designs under dynamic loads. In addition, the dynamic load allowance equation as a function of natural frequency, span length, and vehicle speed was proposed in this study. The proposed dynamic load allowance related to the first flexural frequency was presented herein. The upper and lower bounds’ limits were established to provide design guidance in selecting suitable dynamic load allowance for FRP bridge systems.

  11. Optimum design for glass fiber-reinforced composite clasps using nonlinear finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Hiromi; Nishi, Yasuhiro; Tsuru, Kazunori; Nagaoka, Eiichi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design an optimum glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) clasp. Three-dimensional finite element models were constructed of FRC circumferential clasp arms and an abutment tooth. The basic clasp arm was half-oval, without a taper, 2.60 mm wide and 1.30 mm thick. Four modified clasp arms were prepared by changing the width or thickness of the basic clasp (width/thickness: 2.60 mm/0.65 mm, 2.60 mm/1.95 mm, 1.30 mm/1.30 mm, and 3.90 mm/1.30 mm). Forced displacements of 5 mm in the removal direction were applied to the nodes at the base of the clasp arm. The retentive forces and maximum tensile stresses of the five FRC clasp arms ranged from 1.00-16.30 N and from 58.9-151 MPa, respectively. Results showed that an optimum FRC clasp was a circumferential clasp with 2.60 mm width and 1.30 mm thickness, which had sufficient retentive force and low risk of tensile failure.

  12. Structural Performance of Polymer Fiber Reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites Subjected to Static and Fatigue Flexural Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A.A. Sherir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the influence of silica sand, local crushed sand and different supplementary cementing materials (SCMs to Portland cement (C ratio (SCM/C on the flexural fatigue performance of engineered cementitious composites (ECCs. ECC is a micromechanically-based designed high-performance polymer fiber reinforced concrete with high ductility which exhibits strain-hardening and micro-cracking behavior in tension and flexure. The relative high cost remains an obstacle for wider commercial use of ECC. The replacement of cement by SCMs, and the use of local sand aggregates can lower cost and enhance greenness of the ECC. The main variables of this study were: type and size of aggregates (local crushed or standard silica sand, type of SCMs (fly ash “FA” or slag, SCM/cement ratio of 1.2 or 2.2, three fatigue stress levels and number of fatigue cycles up to 1 million. The study showed that ECC mixtures produced with crushed sand (with high volume of fly ash and slag exhibited strain hardening behavior (under static loading with deformation capacities comparable with those made with silica sand. Class F-fly ash combined with crushed sand was the best choice (compared to class CI fly ash and slag in order to enhance the ECC ductility with slag–ECC mixtures producing lowest deflection capacity. FA–ECC mixtures with silica sand developed more damage under fatigue loading due to higher deflection evolution than FA–ECC mixtures with crushed sand.

  13. Fiber-reinforced composite analysis using optical coherence tomography after mechanical and thermal cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyotoku, B. B. C.; Braz, A. K. S.; Braz, R.; Gomes, A. S. L.

    2007-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are new materials which have been used for a variety of dental applications, including tooth splinting, replacement of missing teeth, treatment of dental emergencies, reinforcement of resin provisional fixed prosthodontic restorations, orthodontic retention, and other clinical applications. Different fiber types are available, but little clinical information has been disseminated. The traditional microscopy investigation, most commonly used to study this material, is a destructive technique, which requires specimen sectioning and are essentially surface measurements. On the basis of these considerations, the aim of this research is to analyze the interior of a dental sample reinforced with fiber after a mechanical and thermal cycling to emulate oral conditions using optical coherence tomography (OCT). The device we are using is a home built Fourier domain OCT working at 800 nm with 6 μm resolution. The results are compared with microscopy images to validate OCT as a working method. In long term, fractures allow bacterial invasion provoking plaque and calculus formation that can cause caries and periodontal disease. Therefore, non invasive imaging of the bridge fiber enables the possibility of periodic clinical evaluation to ensure the patient health. Furthermore, OCT images can provide a powerful method for quantitative analysis of crack propagation, and can potentially be used for in vivo assessment.

  14. The effect of stress on ultrasonic pulses in fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemann, J. H.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1983-01-01

    An acoustical-ultrasonic technique was used to demonstrate relationships existing between changes in attenuation of stress waves and tensile stress for an eight ply 0 degree graphite-epoxy fiber reinforced composite. All tests were conducted in the linear range of the material for which no mechanical or macroscopic damage was evident. Changes in attenuation were measured as a function of tensile stress in the frequency domain and in the time domain. Stress wave propagation in these specimens was dispersive, i.e., the wave speed depends on frequency. Wave speeds varied from 267 400 cm/sec to 680 000 cm/sec as the frequency of the signal was varied from 150 kHz to 1.9 MHz which strongly suggests that flexural/lamb wave modes of propagation exist. The magnitude of the attenuation changes depended strongly on tensile stress. It was further observed that the wave speeds increased slightly for all tested frequencies as the stress was increased.

  15. Flexural Properties of E Glass and TR50S Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Hybrid Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chensong; Sudarisman; Davies, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    A study on the flexural properties of E glass and TR50S carbon fiber reinforced hybrid composites is presented in this paper. Specimens were made by the hand lay-up process in an intra-ply configuration with varying degrees of glass fibers added to the surface of a carbon laminate. These specimens were then tested in the three-point bend configuration in accordance with ASTM D790-07 at three span-to-depth ratios: 16, 32, and 64. The failure modes were examined under an optical microscope. The flexural behavior was also simulated by finite element analysis, and the flexural modulus, flexural strength, and strain to failure were calculated. It is shown that although span-to-depth ratio shows an influence on the stress-strain relationship, it has no effect on the failure mode. The majority of specimens failed by either in-plane or out-of-plane local buckling followed by kinking and splitting at the compressive GFRP side and matrix cracking combined with fiber breakage at the CFRP tensile face. It is shown that positive hybrid effects exist for the flexural strengths of most of the hybrid configurations. The hybrid effect is noted to be more obvious when the hybrid ratio is small, which may be attributed to the relative position of the GFRP layer(s) with respect to the neutral plane. In contrast to this, flexural modulus seems to obey the rule of mixtures equation.

  16. Solidification microstructures in a short fiber reinforced alloy composite containing different fiber fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JING Qing-xiu

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The solidification microstructures and micro-segregation of a fiber reinforced Al-9 Cu alloy, containing different volume fractions of Al2O3 short fibers about 6 μm diameter and made by squeeze casting have been studied. The results indicate that as volume fraction of fiber Vf increases, the size of final grains becomes finer in the matrix. If λf /λ>1, the fibers have almost no influence on the solidification behavior of the matrix, so the final grains grow coarse, where λf is the average inter-fiber spacing and λ is the secondary dendrite arm spacing. While if λf /λ<1, the growth of crystals in the matrix is affected significantly by the fibers and the grain size is reduced to the value of the inter-fiber spacing. The fibers influence the average length of a solidification volume element L of the matrix and also influence the solidification time θt of the matrix. As a result of fibers influencing L and θt, the micro-segregation in the matrix is improved when the composite contains more fibers, although the level of the improvement is slight. The Clyne-Kurz model can be used to semi-quantitatively analyze the relationship between Vf and the volume fraction fe of the micro-segregation eutectic structure.

  17. Influence of Different Techniques of Laboratory Construction on the Fracture Resistance of Fiber-Reinforced Composite (FRC) Bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellakwa, Ayman E; Shortall, Adrian C; Marquis, Peter M

    2004-11-15

    The aim of the current investigation is to evaluate optimal pontic and retainer fiber positions for Polyethylene fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) restorations. In series I notch disc specimens were used to mimic loading cuspal regions of pontics. Four groups (n=15/group; codes A to D) were prepared from Artglass composite. Groups A to C were reinforced with polyethylene fibers, and group D was an unreinforced control. Fibers were positioned either around (A), beneath the notch (B), or at the disc base (C). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h before testing to failure (CHS=1mm/min) in a universal testing machine. Mean torque to failure values ranked [P C = D. In series II five groups of three unit bridges (n =5/group; codes A to E) were prepared from Artglass dental composite without (group A) or with (groups B to E) different Connect fiber reinforcement locations/techniques. Bridges were cemented using 2 bond resin cement to a standardized substructure. After storage, as per series I, bridges were loaded mid-pontic region to failure. One-way ANOVA showed no significant (P=0.08) difference between test groups. The research hypothesis was that notched disc and 3 unit bridge test techniques would discriminate equally between fiber-reinforced specimens and an unreinforced composite control was rejected.

  18. Pasak Customized Fiber Reinforced Composite Indirect pada Gigi Incisivus Lateralis Kiri Atas dengan Dinding Saluran Akar yang Tipis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Prima Dewi Ayuningtyas Subroto

    2015-06-01

    restoration of a non vital post root canal treatment tooth with thin root canal walls using indirect customized fiber-reinforced composite post. A 27-year-old female patient with over instrumentation in root canal of the upper left lateral incisor was referred to the Department of Conservative Dentistry. The radiograph examination finds that there was a very thin wall of the remaining root canal structure. The restoration was carried out in 3 visits. In the first visit, post canal impression was obtained using double impression technique. Indirect customized fiber reinforced composite post was made in the mold using composite resin Premise Indirect (Kerr reinforced with fiber band (Construct, Kerr. The formed post and core were light cured for 20 seconds, and then refined by oven polymerization for 20 minutes. In the second visit, the post was inserted and crown impression was obtained using double impression technique. In the third visit, the jacket crown was inserted. The root canal treated tooth with remaining thin post canal wall could be restored with indirect customized fiber reinforced composite.

  19. Toughening of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy polymer composites via copolymers and graphene nano-platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Markus A.

    Carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites currently play a significant role in many different industries. Due to their high cross-link density, aromatic epoxy polymers used as the matrix in composite materials are very strong and stiff however they lack toughness. This dissertation investigates three areas of the carbon fiber-reinforced composite, which have the potential to increase toughness: the carbon fiber surface; the fiber/matrix interphase; and the matrix material. Approaches to improving each area are presented which lead to enhancing the overall composite toughness without reducing other composite mechanical properties. The toughening of the base matrix material, DGEBA/mPDA, was accomplished by two methods: first, using low concentrations of aliphatic copolymers to enhance energy absorption and second by adding graphene nano-platelets (GnP) to act as crack deflection agents. 1wt% copolymer concentration was determined to substantially increase the notched Izod impact strength without reducing other static-mechanical properties. Toughening of DGEBA/mPDA using 3wt% GnP was found to be dependent on the aspect ratio of GnP and treatment of GnP with tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). GnP C750 enhanced flexural properties but not fracture toughness because the small aspect ratio cannot effectively deflect cracks. TEPA-grafting enhanced GnP/matrix bonding. Larger aspect ratio GnP M5 and M25 showed significant increases in fracture toughness due to better crack deflection but also decreased flexural strength based on limited GnP/matrix bonding. TEPA-grafting mitigated some of the flexural strength reductions for GnP M5, due to enhanced GnP/matrix adhesion. In the high-fiber volume fraction composite, the fiber/matrix bonding was enhanced with UV-ozone surface treatment by reducing a weak fiber surface boundary layer and increasing the concentration of reactive oxygen groups on the fiber surface. Further increases in Mode I fracture toughness were seen with the

  20. Clinical evaluation of fiber-reinforced composite crowns in pulp-treated primary molars: 12-month results

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadzadeh, Zahra; Parisay, Iman; Mehrabkhani, Maryam; Madani, Azam Sadat; Mazhari, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of tooth-colored fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) crowns in pulp-treated second primary mandibular teeth. Materials and Methods: This split-mouth randomized, clinical trial performed on 67 children between 3 and 6 years with two primary mandibular second molars requiring pulp treatment. After pulp therapy, the teeth were randomly assigned to stainless steel crown (SSC) or FRC crown groups. Modified United States Public ...

  1. Analytical and Numerical Modeling of Delamination Evolution in Fiber Reinforced Laminated Composites Subject to Flexural Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiawen

    Delamination is a common failure mode in composite (fiber reinforced and layered) structures subject to low-velocity impacts by foreign objects. To maximize the design capacity, it is important to have reliable tools to predict delamination evolution in laminated composites. The focus of this research is to analyze flexural responses and delamination evolution in laminated composites subject to flexural loading. Analytical solutions were derived from linear elasticity theory and structural mechanics of beam and plate configurations. Formulations and evaluations of the proposed analytical approaches were validated by comparing with results of finite element (FE) simulations in similar settings and published experiment data. Two-dimensional (2D) elasticity theory for laminated panels was extended to analyze elastodynamic responses of pristine panels and quasi-static responses of pre-delaminated panels. A highlight of the approach is exact solutions of displacement and stress fields it provides. Further investigations showed that the 2D elasticity theory is not amenable to a closed-form solution for laminates containing off-axis angle plies due to three-dimensional (3D) states of stress. Closed-form solutions of cohesive zone modeling (CZM) were developed for popular delamination toughness tests of laminated beams. A laminate was modeled as an assembly of two sub-laminates connected by a virtual deformable layer with infinitesimal thickness. Comprehensive parametric studies were performed, offering a deeper understanding of CZM. The studies were further simplified so that closed-form expressions can be obtained, serving as a quick estimation of the flexural responses and the process zone lengths. Analytical CZM solutions were extended analyze quasi-static impact tests of laminated composite plates with arbitrary stacking sequences, aiming to predict critical load, critical interfaces and extent of delamination at that interface. The Rayleigh-Ritz method was used to

  2. The effect of fiber treatment on abrasive wear properties of palm fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Muhammad Firdaus Abdul; Bakar, Mimi Azlina Abu; Kasolang, Salmiah; Ahmad, Mohamad Ali

    2017-12-01

    Oil palm industries generate at least 30 million tons of lignocellulosic biomass annually in the form of oil palm trunks (OPT), empty fruit bunches (EFB), oil palm fronds (OPF) and palm pressed fibres (PPF). The palm fiber is one of the natural fibers used as reinforcement in composite materials in order to decrease environmental issues and promotes utilization of renewable resources. This paper presents a study on the effect of alkaline treatment on wear properties of palm fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite. Abrasive wear testing was deployed to investigate the wear profile of the composite surfaces. Testing was carried out which focused on the effect of alkaline treatment to the palm fiber under different amounts of fiber loading i.e. 1 wt%, 3 wt%, 5 wt% and 7 wt%. The palm fibers were soaked into 6 % of alkaline solution or natrium hydroxide (NaOH) for 12 hours. The fiber was treated in order to remove amorphous materials such as hemicelluloses, lignins and pectins of the fiber. The wear test samples were fabricated using hand lay-up technique and cured at room temperature for 24 hours. Surface roughness of the composite material was also measured using the surface measuring instrument. Dry sliding wear test was performed at room temperature at a constant velocity of 1.4 m/s with a constant load of 10 N by using the Abrasion Test Machine. Result shows that 5 wt% and 7 wt% treated palm fiber loadings have better specific wear rate compared to lower fiber loadings. The finding of this study contributes towards material development and utilization in promoting `waste into wealth' which is in line with national aspiration.

  3. ZnO Piezoelectric Nanowires for Use in a Self-Powered Structural Health Monitoring Device for Fiber-Reinforced Composites Uploading Attachment Instructions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this proposed research is to develop a new self-powered structural health monitoring (SHM) system for fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites by using...

  4. Tribological properties of solid lubricants filled glass fiber reinforced polyamide 6 composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Du-Xin; You, Yi-Lan; Deng, Xin; Li, Wen-Juan; Xie, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The tribological properties of GF/PA6 improved by the incorporation of PTFE. ► PTFE and UHMWPE exhibited a synergism effect on reducing friction coefficient. ► Solid lubricants enlarged the range of applied velocity for GF/PA6 composite. - Abstract: The main purpose of this paper is to further optimize the tribological properties of the glass fiber reinforced PA6 (GF/PA6,15/85 by weight) for high performance friction materials using single or combinative solid lubricants such as Polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE), ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and the combination of both of them. Various polymer blends, where GF/PA6 acts as the polymer matrix and solid lubricants as the dispersed phase were prepared by injection molding. The tribological properties of these materials and the synergism as a result of the incorporation of both PTFE and UHMWPE were investigated. The results showed that, at a load of 40 N and a velocity of 200 rpm, PTFE was effective in improving the tribological capabilities of matrix material. On the contrary, UHMWPE was not conductive to maintain the structure integrity of GF/PA6 composite and harmful to the friction and wear properties. The combination of PTFE and UHMWPE showed synergism on further reducing the friction coefficient of the composites filled with either PTFE or UHMWPE only. Effects of load and velocity on tribological behavior were also discussed. To further understand the wear mechanism, the worn surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy

  5. In vitro evaluation of veneering composites and fibers on the color of fiber-reinforced composite restorations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Hasani Tabatabaei

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Color match between fiber-reinforced composite (FRC restorations and teeth is an imperative factor in esthetic dentistry. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of veneering composites and fibers on the color change of FRC restorations.Glass and polyethylene fibers were used to reinforce a direct microhybrid composite (Z250, 3M ESPE and a microfilled composite (Gradia Indirect, GC. There were eight experimental groups (n=5 disks per group. Four groups were used as the controls (non-FRC control and the others were used as experimental groups. CIELAB parameters (L*, a* and b* of specimens were evaluated against a white background using a spectrophotometer to assess the color change. The color difference (ΔE* and color coordinates were (L*, a* and b* analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test.Both types of composite and fiber influenced the color parameters (ΔL*, Δa*. The incorporation of fibers into the composite in the experimental groups made them darker than the control groups, except in the Gradia Indirect+ glass fibers group. Δb* is affected by types of fibers only in direct fiber reinforced composite. No statistically significant differences were recognized in ΔE* among the groups (p>0.05.The findings of the present study suggest that the tested FRC restorations exhibited no difference in color in comparison with non-FRC restoration. Hence, the types of veneering composites and fibers did not influence the color change (ΔE* of FRC restorations.

  6. In Vitro Evaluation of Veneering Composites and Fibers on the Color of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoomeh; Hasani, Zahra; Ahmadi, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Color match between fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) restorations and teeth is an imperative factor in esthetic dentistry. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of veneering composites and fibers on the color change of FRC restorations. Materials and Methods: Glass and polyethylene fibers were used to reinforce a direct microhybrid composite (Z250, 3M ESPE) and a microfilled composite (Gradia Indirect, GC). There were eight experimental groups (n=5 disks per group). Four groups were used as the controls (non-FRC control) and the others were used as experimental groups. CIELAB parameters (L*, a* and b*) of specimens were evaluated against a white background using a spectrophotometer to assess the color change. The color difference (ΔE*) and color coordinates were (L*, a* and b*) analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: Both types of composite and fiber influenced the color parameters (ΔL*, Δa*). The incorporation of fibers into the composite in the experimental groups made them darker than the control groups, except in the Gradia Indirect+ glass fibers group. Δb* is affected by types of fibers only in direct fiber reinforced composite. No statistically significant differences were recognized in ΔE* among the groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that the tested FRC restorations exhibited no difference in color in comparison with non-FRC restoration. Hence, the types of veneering composites and fibers did not influence the color change (ΔE*) of FRC restorations. PMID:25584060

  7. The correlation of low-velocity impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with matrix properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Summarized are basic studies that were conducted to correlate the impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with polymer matrix properties. Three crosslinked epoxy resins and a linear polysulfone were selected as composite matrices. As a group, these resins possess a significantly large range of mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the resins and their respective composites were measured. Neat resin specimens and unidirectional and crossply composite specimens were impact tested with an instrumented dropweight tester. Impact resistances of the specimens were assesseed on the basis of loading capability, energy absorption, and extent of damage.

  8. Mechanical interaction of Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC) reinforced with Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) rebar in tensile loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lárusson, Lárus Helgi; Fischer, Gregor; Jönsson, Jeppe

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a preliminary study of the composite interaction of Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC), reinforced with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) rebar. The main topic of this paper will focus on the interaction of the two materials (ECC and GFRP) during axial loading......, particularly in post cracking phase of the concrete matrix. The experimental program carried out in this study examined composite behavior under monotonic and cyclic loading of the specimens in the elastic and inelastic deformation phases. The stiffness development of the composite during loading was evaluated...... distribution which in terms results in less mechanical deterioration during loading....

  9. Shear Performance of Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites Beam-Column Joint Using Various Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faizal Hanif

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demands of reinforcement in the joint panel are now requiring more effective system to reduce the complicated fabrication by widely used precast system. The joint panel is responsible to keep the load transfer through beam and column as a crucial part in a structural frame that ensures the main feature of the whole structure during earthquake. Since precast system might reduce the joint panel monolithic integrity and stiffness, an innovation by adding fiber into the grouting system will give a breakthrough. The loading test of precast concrete beam-column joints using FRCC (Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites in joint panel was conducted to evaluate the influences of fiber towards shear performance. The experimental factor is fiber types with same volume fraction in mortar matrix of joint panel. Two specimens with Aramid-fiber and PP-fiber by two percent of volume fraction are designed to fail by shear failure in joint panel by reversed cyclic testing method. The comparison amongst those experiment results by various parameters for the shear performance of FRCC beam-column joints using various fibers are discussed. Preceding specimens was using no fiber, PVA fiber, and steel fiber has been carried out. Through the current experimental results and the comparison with previous experiment results, it can be recognized that by using fibers in joint panel was observed qualitatively could prevent crack widening with equitable and smaller crack width, improved the shear capacity by widening the hysteretic area, increased maximum load in positive loading and negative loading, and decreased the deformation rate. Elastic modulus properties of fiber are observed to give the most impact towards shear performance.

  10. Numerical Investigation of Delamination in Drilling of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenliang; Chen, Yan; Yang, Haojun; Wang, Hua; Yao, Qiwei

    2018-03-01

    Drilling of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is a challenging task in modern manufacturing sector and machining induced delamination is one of the major problems affecting assembly precision. In this work, a new three-dimensional (3D) finite element model is developed to study the chip formation and entrance delamination in drilling of CFRP composites on the microscopic level. Fiber phase, matrix phase and equivalent homogeneous phase in the multi-phase model have different constitutive behaviors, respectively. A comparative drilling test, in which the cement carbide drill and unidirectional CFRP laminate are employed, is conducted to validate the proposedmodel in terms of the delamination and the similar changing trend is obtained. Microscopic mechanism of entrance delamination together with the chip formation process at four special fiber cutting angles (0°, 45°, 90° and 135°) is investigated. Moreover, the peeling force is also predicted. The results show that the delamination occurrence and the chip formation are both strongly dependent on the fiber cutting angle. The length of entrance delamination rises with increasing fiber cutting angles. Negligible delamination at 0° is attributed to the compression by the minor flank face. For 45° and 90°, the delamination resulted from the mode III fracture. At 135°, serious delamination which is driven by the mode I and III fractures is more inclined to occur and the peeling force reaches its maximum. Such numerical models can help understand the mechanism of hole entrance delamination further and provide guidance for the damage-free drilling of CFRP.

  11. Fracture behavior of single-structure fiber-reinforced composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Kohji; Garoushi, Sufyan K; Vallittu, Pekka K; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2016-12-01

    Objective: The applications of single-structure fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) in restorative dentistry have not been well reported. This study aimed to clarify the static mechanical properties of anterior crown restorations prepared using two types of single-structure FRC. Materials and methods : An experimental crown restoration was designed for an upper anterior incisor. The restorations were made from IPS Empress CAD for CEREC (Emp), IPS e.max ® CAD (eMx), experimental single-structure all-FRC (a-FRC), Filtek™ Supreme XTE (XTE), and commercially available single-structure short-FRC (everX Posterior™) ( n = 8 for each material) (s-FRC). The a-FRC restorations were prepared from an experimental FRC blank using a computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) device. A fracture test was performed to assess the fracture load, toughness, and failure mode. The fracture loads were vertically applied on the restorations. The surface micromorphology of the FRC restorations was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The data were analyzed by analysis of variance ( p = .05) followed by Tukey's test. Results : s-FRC showed the highest mean fracture load (1145.0 ± 89.6 N) and toughness (26.2 ± 5.8 Ncm) among all the groups tested. With regard to the micromorphology of the prosthetic surface, local crushing of the fiberglass was observed in s-FRC, whereas chopped fiberglass was observed in a-FRC. Conclusions : The restorations made of short-FRC showed a higher load-bearing capacity than those made of the experimental all-FRC blanks for CAD/CAM. The brittle-like fractures were exhibited in the recent dental esthetic materials, while local crushing fractures were shown for single-structure FRC restorations.

  12. An evaluation on shear strength of composite resin bonded to primary teeth dentin after Nd: YAG laser radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowsari A

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the differences in the composite and morphology of dentin in primary and permanent teeth, it is necessary to make improvements in bonding techniques to promote the strength of composite resins bonded to the dentinal surface, in primary teeth. The use of lower radiation, to make structural and chemical changes in dentinal surfaces has been investigated. This research was conducted to evaluate the shear strength of the composite bonded to primary teeth dentin after Nd: YAG laser radiation and acid etching for conditioning. Peripheral dentin of the buccal and lingua! surfaces of 60 extracted posterior primary teeth were exposed and polished with 600 grit with Sic paper. The teeth were divided randomly in 3 groups of 20 teeth. In group 1 etching gel, primer and adhesive of scotch bond multipurpose system (SMP, in group 2 laser at 1.6 w and 80 mj/pulse, and in group 3 laser at 2 s and 700 mj/pulse were used. Moreover, in groups 2 and 3, after laser radiation, acid etching, primer and adhesive of SMP system were applied. After necessary laboratory tests, the mean shear bond strength in MPa were 20.99±5.3 (group 1, 23.82±6.31 (group 2 and 26.58±5.59 (group 3. ANOVA, scheffe, tukey statistical tests showed that the bond strengths of group 3 were statistically higher than group 1. The frequency of dentin cohesive failures were significantly higher in groups 2 and 3, compared to group 1 that indicates a higher bond strength in these groups. Scanning electron mirographs of laser radiated surfaces, show a porous and rough surface morphology that enhances the mechanical bond of the composite.

  13. Self-sealing of thermal fatigue and mechanical damage in fiber-reinforced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Jericho L.

    Fiber reinforced composite tanks provide a promising method of storage for liquid oxygen and hydrogen for aerospace applications. The inherent thermal fatigue of these vessels leads to the formation of microcracks, which allow gas phase leakage across the tank walls. In this dissertation, self-healing functionality is imparted to a structural composite to effectively seal microcracks induced by both mechanical and thermal loading cycles. Two different microencapsulated healing chemistries are investigated in woven glass fiber/epoxy and uni-weave carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Self-healing of mechanically induced damage was first studied in a room temperature cured plain weave E-glass/epoxy composite with encapsulated dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) monomer and wax protected Grubbs' catalyst healing components. A controlled amount of microcracking was introduced through cyclic indentation of opposing surfaces of the composite. The resulting damage zone was proportional to the indentation load. Healing was assessed through the use of a pressure cell apparatus to detect nitrogen flow through the thickness direction of the damaged composite. Successful healing resulted in a perfect seal, with no measurable gas flow. The effect of DCPD microcapsule size (51 microm and 18 microm) and concentration (0--12.2 wt%) on the self-sealing ability was investigated. Composite specimens with 6.5 wt% 51 microm capsules sealed 67% of the time, compared to 13% for the control panels without healing components. A thermally stable, dual microcapsule healing chemistry comprised of silanol terminated poly(dimethyl siloxane) plus a crosslinking agent and a tin catalyst was employed to allow higher composite processing temperatures. The microcapsules were incorporated into a satin weave E-glass fiber/epoxy composite processed at 120°C to yield a glass transition temperature of 127°C. Self-sealing ability after mechanical damage was assessed for different microcapsule sizees (25 microm and 42

  14. Electrical Resistance Based Damage Modeling of Multifunctional Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert James

    In the current thesis, the 4-probe electrical resistance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites is utilized as a metric for sensing low-velocity impact damage. A robust method has been developed for recovering the directionally dependent electrical resistivities using an experimental line-type 4-probe resistance method. Next, the concept of effective conducting thickness was uniquely applied in the development of a brand new point-type 4-probe method for applications with electrically anisotropic materials. An extensive experimental study was completed to characterize the 4-probe electrical resistance of CFRP specimens using both the traditional line-type and new point-type methods. Leveraging the concept of effective conducting thickness, a novel method was developed for building 4-probe electrical finite element (FE) models in COMSOL. The electrical models were validated against experimental resistance measurements and the FE models demonstrated predictive capabilities when applied to CFRP specimens with varying thickness and layup. These new models demonstrated a significant improvement in accuracy compared to previous literature and could provide a framework for future advancements in FE modeling of electrically anisotropic materials. FE models were then developed in ABAQUS for evaluating the influence of prescribed localized damage on the 4-probe resistance. Experimental data was compiled on the impact response of various CFRP laminates, and was used in the development of quasi- static FE models for predicting presence of impact-induced delamination. The simulation-based delamination predictions were then integrated into the electrical FE models for the purpose of studying the influence of realistic damage patterns on electrical resistance. When the size of the delamination damage was moderate compared to the electrode spacing, the electrical resistance increased by less than 1% due to the delamination damage. However, for a specimen with large

  15. COMPOSITE RESIN BOND STRENGTH TO ETCHED DENTINWITH ONE SELF PRIMING ADHESIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P SAMIMI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength of composite resins to etched dentin in both dry and wet dentin surface with active and inactive application of a single-bottle adhesive resin (Single Bond, 3M Dental products. Methods. Fourthy four intact human extracted molars and premolars teeth were selected. The facial surfaces of the teeth were grounded with diamond bur to expose dentin. Then specimens were divided into four groups of 11 numbers (9 Molars and 2 Premolars. All the samples were etched with Phosphoric Acid Gel 35% and then rinsed for 10 seconds. The following stages were carried out for each group: Group I (Active-Dry: After rinsing, air drying of dentin surface for 15 seconds, active priming of adhesive resin for 15 seconds, air drying for 5 seconds, the adhesive resin layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group III (Inactive-Dry:After rinsing, air drying of dentin surface for 15 seconds, adhesive resin was applied and air dryied for 5 seconds, the adhesive layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group III (Active-Wet:After rinsing, removal of excess water of dentin surface with a cotton roll, active priming of adhesive resin for 15 seconds and air drying for 5 seconds, the adhesive layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group IV (Inactive-Wet:After rinsing, removal of excess water of dentin surface with a cotton roll, the adhesive resin was applied and air dryied for 5 seconds and then cured for 10 seconds. After adhesive resin application, composite resin (Z250, 3M Dental products was applied on prepared surface with cylindrical molds (with internal diameter of 2.8mm, & height of 5mm and light-cured for 100 seconds (5x20s. The samples were then thermocycled. They were located in 6±3c water .temperature for 10 seconds and then 15 seconds in inviromental temperature, 10s in 55±3c water temperature and then were located at room temperature for 15s. This test was repeated for 100s. All of the specimens

  16. Using x-radiometry to count resin-bonded layers in aramid ballistic cloth composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.E.; Golis, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The army paratroopers and support ground troops (PASGT) helmet is a composite consisting of nominally 19 layers thickness aramid ballistic cloth heat-bonded in a press with rolled-on phenolic resin. Inadvertent omission or poor fitting of layers during hot pressing can significantly weaken the helmet and thereby drastically impair its effectiveness under combat conditions. Currently, helmets are accepted or rejected on a lot basis using ballistic projectile penetration destructive tests on a statistically significant sample from each lot. A Phase I small business innovative research (SBIR) was performed to access the feasibility of nondestructively counting layers by through-transmission x-radiometry, a technique that would allow 100 percent testing of helmets for layer count if proved feasible. Tests were conducted on flat panels, crown panels containing gaps, and actual helmets using 14-18 keV Pu x-rays from a 30-mCi Cm-244 source, a sodium iodide scintillation counter, several collimators, and a multichannel analyzer. The infusing of resin into artificially produced lateral gaps in the crown specimen and into actual lateral gaps in the helmet during press-curing impaired the effectiveness of the radiometric method by introducing high radiometric density material into the beam path. It is concluded that radiometry should be combined with visual inspection to assure helmet integrity. Modified approaches are discussed

  17. A note on the effect of the fiber curvature on the micromechanical behavior of natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Escalante-Solis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the role of the fiber curvature on the tensile properties of short-natural-fiber reinforced composites, a photoelastic model and a finite element analysis were performed in a well characterized henequen fiber-high density polyethylene composite material. It was hypothesized that the angle of orientation of the inclusion and the principal material orientation with respect to the applied load was very important in the reinforcement mechanics. From the photoelastic and finite element analysis it was found that the stress distribution around the fiber inclusion was different on the concave side from that observed on the convex side and an efficient length of stress transfer was estimated to be approximately equal to one third the average fiber length. This approach was used to predict the short-natural-fiber reinforced composite mechanical properties using probabilistic functions modifications of the rule of mixtures models developed by Fukuda-Chow and the Fukuda-Kawata. Recognizing the inherent flexibility that curves the natural fibers during processing, the consideration of a length of one third of the average length l should improve the accuracy of the calculations of the mechanical properties using theoretical models.

  18. Finite-Element Analysis of Crack Arrest Properties of Fiber Reinforced Composites Application in Semi-Elliptical Cracked Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linyuan; Song, Shulei; Deng, Hongbo; Zhong, Kai

    2018-04-01

    In nowadays, repair method using fiber reinforced composites as the mainstream pipe repair technology, it can provide security for X100 high-grade steel energy long-distance pipelines in engineering. In this paper, analysis of cracked X100 high-grade steel pipe was conducted, simulation analysis was made on structure of pipes and crack arresters (CAs) to obtain the J-integral value in virtue of ANSYS Workbench finite element software and evaluation on crack arrest effects was done through measured elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameter J-integral and the crack arrest coefficient K, in a bid to summarize effect laws of composite CAs and size of pipes and cracks for repairing CAs. The results indicate that the K value is correlated with laying angle λ, laying length L2/D1, laying thickness T1/T2of CAs, crack depth c/T1 and crack length a/c, and calculate recommended parameters for repairing fiber reinforced composite CAs in terms of two different crack forms.

  19. Finite-Element Analysis of Crack Arrest Properties of Fiber Reinforced Composites Application in Semi-Elliptical Cracked Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linyuan; Song, Shulei; Deng, Hongbo; Zhong, Kai

    2017-07-01

    In nowadays, repair method using fiber reinforced composites as the mainstream pipe repair technology, it can provide security for X100 high-grade steel energy long-distance pipelines in engineering. In this paper, analysis of cracked X100 high-grade steel pipe was conducted, simulation analysis was made on structure of pipes and crack arresters (CAs) to obtain the J-integral value in virtue of ANSYS Workbench finite element software and evaluation on crack arrest effects was done through measured elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameter J-integral and the crack arrest coefficient K, in a bid to summarize effect laws of composite CAs and size of pipes and cracks for repairing CAs. The results indicate that the K value is correlated with laying angle λ, laying length L2/D1, laying thickness T1/T2of CAs, crack depth c/T1 and crack length a/c, and calculate recommended parameters for repairing fiber reinforced composite CAs in terms of two different crack forms.

  20. Geometrical Effect on Thermal Conductivity of Unidirectional Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite along Different In-plane Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zenong; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Li, Yanxia; Wang, Xiaolei; Gu, Yizhuo; Liu, Qianli; Tian, Jie; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2017-11-01

    This paper focuses on the anisotropic characteristics of the in-plane thermal conductivity of fiber-reinforced polymer composite based on experiment and simulation. Thermal conductivity along different in-plane orientations was measured by laser flash analysis (LFA) and steady-state heat flow method. Their heat transfer processes were simulated to reveal the geometrical effect on thermal conduction. The results show that the in-plane thermal conduction of unidirectional carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer composite is greatly influenced by the sample geometry at an in-plane orientation angle between 0° to 90°. By defining radius-to-thickness as a dimensionless shape factor for the LFA sample, the apparent thermal conductivity shows a dramatic change when the shape factor is close to the tangent of the orientation angle (tanθ). Based on finite element analysis, this phenomenon was revealed to correlate with the change of the heat transfer process. When the shape factor is larger than tanθ, the apparent thermal conductivity is consistent with the estimated value according to the theoretical model. For a sample with a shape factor smaller than tanθ, the apparent thermal conductivity shows a slow growth around a low value, which seriously deviates from the theory estimation. This phenomenon was revealed to correlate with the change of the heat transfer process from a continuous path to a zigzag path. These results will be helpful in optimizing the ply scheme of composite laminates for thermal management applications.

  1. Development of high thermal conductive SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites for fusion reactors (Thesis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Tomitsugu

    2006-07-01

    A 3 dimensional model (after cubic model) was developed to quantitatively predict the thermal conductivity of SiC fiber-reinforced SiC matrix (SiC/SiC) composites. The cubic model showed that thermal conductivity of the composites increased by decreasing the porosity and ensphering the shape of pore. The SiC/SiC composites were fabricated by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and reaction bonding (RB) processes. The thermal conductivity of the composites by RB process was higher than that by CVI process. The reason is that the porosity of the composites by RB process was lower than that by CVI process and the shape of pore in the composites by RB process was almost sphere. The thermal conductivity of the SiC/SiC composite by RB process was consistent with the estimated value by the cubic model. The cubic model also showed that the thermal conductivity of the composites increased by introducing a high thermal conductive new phase parallel to the direction of heat flow. To verify the prediction, a SiC/SiC composite with carbon nano-fiber (CNF) were fabricated by RB process. The thermal conductivity of the SiC/SiC composite with CNF was approximately 90 W/mK at room temperature. The thermal conductivity of the SiC/SiC composite was coincided with the estimated value by the cubic model. They concluded that the cubic model was useful for predicting the thermal conductivity of fiber-reinforced composites. (author)

  2. Framework design of an anterior fiber-reinforced hybrid composite fixed partial denture: a 3D finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Daiichiro; Shinya, Akikazu; Lassila, Lippo V J; Gomi, Harunori; Nakasone, Yuji; Vallittu, Pekka K; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal design of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) framework to obtain the maximum reinforcement for fixed partial dentures (FPDs) under three different loading conditions using three-dimensional finite element (FE) analysis. materials and methods: A three-unit FPD replacing the maxillary right lateral incisor was constructed using FE analysis software (ANSYS 10.0, ANSYS). A fiber framework of the pontic was designed with three variations: with the main framework curved labially (FRC1), located in the center (FRC2), or curved lingually (FRC3). Each framework was compared with a hybrid composite FPD without any fiber reinforcement (C-FPD). A lateral load was applied to the three different loading points of the pontic 0 mm, 3 mm, and 6 mm from the incisal edge, each representing loading conditions 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Localized high stress concentration was observed around the connectors under all loading conditions. In all FRC-FPD models, the FRC framework showed stress-bearing capacity for the FPD. The highest stress reduction ratio under all loading conditions was obtained using the FRC1 model. The FRC1 framework also best reduced displacement of the framework. This study suggests that the optimum design of an FRC framework is to labially curve the FRC of the main framework at the region of the pontic.

  3. Probability of failure of veneered glass fiber-reinforced composites and glass-infiltrated alumina with or without zirconia reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Kok-Heng; Chai, John

    2003-01-01

    The probability of failure under flexural load of veneered specimens of a unidirectional glass fiber-reinforced composite (FibreKor/Sculpture), a bidirectional glass fiber-reinforced composite (Vectris/Targis), a glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina/Vita alpha), and a zirconia-reinforced glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Zirconia/Vita alpha) was investigated; a metal-ceramic (PG200/Vita omega) system served as a control. Ten uniform beams of the veneered core materials were fabricated for each system and subjected to a three-point bending test. The data were analyzed using the Weibull method. The failure load of specimens at a 10% probability of failure (B10 load) was compared. The mode of failure was analyzed. The B10 load of the systems investigated was not significantly different from that of the metal-ceramic system. FibreKor possessed significantly higher B10 load than Vectris, In-Ceram Alumina, and In-Ceram Zirconia. The B10 strength loads of Vectris, In-Ceram Alumina, and In-Ceram Zirconia were not significantly different from one another. The probability of FibreKor to fracture under a flexural load was significantly lower than that of Vectris, In-Ceram Alumina, or In-Ceram Zirconia.

  4. Application of headed studs in steel fiber reinforced cementitious composite slab of steel beam-column connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Cui; Nakashima, Masayoshi

    2012-03-01

    Steel fiber reinforced cementitous composites (SFRCC) is a promising material with high strength in both compression and tension compared with normal concrete. The ductility is also greatly improved because of 6% volume portion of straight steel fibers. A steel beam-column connection with Steel fiber reinforced cementitous composites (SFRCC) slab diaphragms is proposed to overcome the damage caused by the weld. The push-out test results suggested that the application of SFRCC promises larger shear forces transferred through headed studs allocated in a small area in the slab. Finite element models were developed to simulate the behavior of headed studs. The failure mechanism of the grouped arrangement is further discussed based on a series of parametric analysis. In the proposed connection, the SFRCC slab is designed as an exterior diaphragm to transfer the beam flange load to the column face. The headed studs are densely arranged on the beam flange to connect the SFRCC slab diaphragms and steel beams. The seismic performance and failure mechanism of the SFRCC slab diaphragm beam-column connection were investigated based on the cyclic loading test. Beam hinge mechanism was achieved at the end of the SFRCC slab diaphragm by using sufficient studs and appropriate rebars in the SFRCC slab.

  5. Marginal accuracy and fracture strength of ceromer/fiber-reinforced composite crowns: effect of variations in preparation design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, LeeRa; Song, HoYong; Koak, JaiYoung; Heo, SeongJoo

    2002-10-01

    Targis/Vectris restorations provide excellent esthetics and clinical success; however, the relationship of their marginal accuracy and fracture strength to the tooth preparation design requires further investigation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of variations in tooth preparation design on the marginal accuracy before and after cementation and on the fracture strength of the ceromer/fiber reinforced composite crown. Three metal dies with varying total occlusal convergence angles (6 degrees, 10 degrees, 15 degrees) were prepared. A total of 30 (10 for each angle) Targis/Vectris crowns were fabricated. The restorations were evaluated at 48 points on the entire circumferential margin with a stereomicroscope measuring in micrometers for margin adaptation before and after cementation. The specimens then were compressively loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. Marginal adaptation was analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis test and post-hoc Dunnett test (alpha=0.05). The fracture strength was analyzed with analysis of variance and the Scheffe adjustment at the 95% significance level. Fracture surfaces of the crowns were examined with a scanning electron microscope to determine the mode of fracture. The smallest marginal gap was recorded in angled crowns with a 6-degree convergence (47 microm mean). The marginal gap of most (95.6%) of the crowns was within a clinically acceptable level (established as ceromer/fiber-reinforced composite crowns diminished their marginal gap and increased their fracture strength.

  6. Self-Healing Capability of Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites for Recovery of Watertightness and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Nishiwaki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Various types of fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRCCs were experimentally studied to evaluate their self-healing capabilities regarding their watertightness and mechanical properties. Cracks were induced in the FRCC specimens during a tensile loading test, and the specimens were then immersed in static water for self-healing. By water permeability and reloading tests, it was determined that the FRCCs containing synthetic fiber and cracks of width within a certain range (<0.1 mm exhibited good self-healing capabilities regarding their watertightness. Particularly, the high polarity of the synthetic fiber (polyvinyl alcohol (PVA series and hybrid fiber reinforcing (polyethylene (PE and steel code (SC series showed high recovery ratio. Moreover, these series also showed high potential of self-healing of mechanical properties. It was confirmed that recovery of mechanical property could be obtained only in case when crack width was sufficiently narrow, both the visible surface cracks and the very fine cracks around the bridging of the SC fibers. Recovery of the bond strength by filling of the very fine cracks around the bridging fibers enhanced the recovery of the mechanical property.

  7. Application of Ultrasound on Monitoring the Evolution of the Collagen Fiber Reinforced nHAC/CS Composites In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, fiber reinforce scaffolds have been largely applied to repair hard and soft tissues. Meanwhile, monitoring the scaffolds for long periods in vivo is recognized as a crucial issue before its wide use. As a consequence, there is a growing need for noninvasive and convenient methods to analyze the implantation remolding process in situ and in real time. In this paper, diagnostic medical ultrasound was used to monitor the in vivo bone formation and degradation process of the novel mineralized collagen fiber reinforced composite which is synthesized by chitosan (CS, nanohydroxyapatite (nHA, and collagen fiber (Col. To observe the impact of cells on bone remodeling process, the scaffolds were planted into the back of the SD rats with and without rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs. Systematic data of scaffolds in vivo was extracted from ultrasound images. Significant consistency between the data from the ultrasound and DXA could be observed P<0.05. This indicated that ultrasound may serve as a feasible alternative for noninvasive monitoring the evolution of scaffolds in situ during cell growth.

  8. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, Marta; Natale, Gabriele; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano; Griffini, Gianmarco

    2016-07-16

    Glass (GFR) and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR) dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D) printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C) thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride) as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol) as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components.

  9. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Invernizzi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Glass (GFR and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethylphenol as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components.

  10. Design aid for shear strengthening of reinforced concrete T-joints using carbon fiber reinforced plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergely, Ioan

    The research presented in the present work focuses on the shear strengthening of beam column joints using carbon fiber composites, a material considered in seismic retrofit in recent years more than any other new material. These composites, or fiber reinforced polymers, offer huge advantages over structural steel reinforced concrete or timber. A few of these advantages are the superior resistance to corrosion, high stiffness to weight and strength to weight ratios, and the ability to control the material's behavior by selecting the orientation of the fibers. The design and field application research on reinforced concrete cap beam-column joints includes analytical investigations using pushover analysis; design of carbon fiber layout, experimental tests and field applications. Several beam column joints have been tested recently with design variables as the type of composite system, fiber orientation and the width of carbon fiber sheets. The surface preparation has been found to be critical for the bond between concrete and composite material, which is the most important factor in joint shear strengthening. The final goal of this thesis is to develop design aids for retrofitting reinforced concrete beam column joints. Two bridge bents were tested on the Interstate-15 corridor. One bent was tested in the as-is condition. Carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite sheets were used to externally reinforce the second bridge bent. By applying the composite, the displacement ductility has been doubled, and the bent overall lateral load capacity has been increased as well. The finite element model (using DRAIN-2DX) was calibrated to model the actual stiffness of the supports. The results were similar to the experimental findings.

  11. Time-Dependent Stress Rupture Strength Degradation of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites at Intermediate Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    The stress rupture strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites with a boron nitride fiber coating decreases with time within the intermediate temperature range of 700 to 950 degree Celsius. Various theories have been proposed to explain the cause of the time-dependent stress rupture strength. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relative significance of the various theories for the time-dependent strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites. This is achieved through the development of a numerically based progressive failure analysis routine and through the application of the routine to simulate the composite stress rupture tests. The progressive failure routine is a time-marching routine with an iterative loop between a probability of fiber survival equation and a force equilibrium equation within each time step. Failure of the composite is assumed to initiate near a matrix crack and the progression of fiber failures occurs by global load sharing. The probability of survival equation is derived from consideration of the strength of ceramic fibers with randomly occurring and slow growing flaws as well as the mechanical interaction between the fibers and matrix near a matrix crack. The force equilibrium equation follows from the global load sharing presumption. The results of progressive failure analyses of the composite tests suggest that the relationship between time and stress-rupture strength is attributed almost entirely to the slow flaw growth within the fibers. Although other mechanisms may be present, they appear to have only a minor influence on the observed time-dependent behavior.

  12. Designing the fiber volume ratio in SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramic composites under Hertzian stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kee Sung; Jang, Kyung Soon; Park, Jae Hong; Kim, Tae Woo; Han, In Sub; Woo, Sang Kuk

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Optimum fiber volume ratios in the SiC/SiC composite layers were designed under Hertzian stress. → FEM analysis and spherical indentation experiments were undertaken. → Boron nitride-pyrocarbon double coatings on the SiC fiber were effective. → Fiber volume ratio should be designed against flexural stress. -- Abstract: Finite element method (FEM) analysis and experimental studies are undertaken on the design of the fiber volume ratio in silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced SiC composites under indentation contact stresses. Boron nitride (BN)/Pyrocarbon (PyC) are selected as the coating materials for the SiC fiber. Various SiC matrix/coating/fiber/coating/matrix structures are modeled by introducing a woven fiber layer in the SiC matrix. Especially, this study attempts to find the optimum fiber volume ratio in SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramics under Hertzian stress. The analysis is performed by changing the fiber type, fiber volume ratio, coating material, number of coating layers, and stacking sequence of the coating layers. The variation in the stress for composites in relation to the fiber volume ratio in the contact axial or radial direction is also analyzed. The same structures are fabricated experimentally by a hot process, and the mechanical behaviors regarding the load-displacement are evaluated using the Hertzian indentation method. Various SiC matrix/coating/fiber/coating/matrix structures are fabricated, and mechanical characterization is performed by changing the coating layer, according to the introduction (or omission) of the coating layer, and the number of woven fiber mats. The results show that the damage mode changes from Hertzian stress to flexural stress as the fiber volume ratio increases in composites because of the decreased matrix volume fraction, which intensifies the radial crack damage. The result significantly indicates that the optimum fiber volume ratio in SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramics should be designed for

  13. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites from acrylic polymer matrices: Interfacial adhesion and physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kishi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Acrylic polymers have high potential as matrix polymers for carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic polymers (CFRTP due to their superior mechanical properties and the fact that they can be fabricated at relatively low temperatures. We focused on improving the interfacial adhesion between carbon fibers (CFs and acrylic polymers using several functional monomers for co-polymerization with methyl methacrylate (MMA. The copolymerized acrylic matrices showed good adhesion to the CF surfaces. In particular, an acrylic copolymer with acrylamide (AAm showed high interfacial adhesive strength with CFs compared to pure PMMA, and a hydroxyethyl acrylamide (HEAA copolymer containing both amide and hydroxyl groups showed high flexural strength of the CFRTP. A 3 mol% HEAA-copolymerized CFRTP achieved a flexural strength almost twice that of pure PMMA matrix CFRTP, and equivalent to that of an epoxy matrix CFRP.

  14. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with 2 Different Fiber-reinforced Composite and 2 Conventional Composite Resin Core Buildup Materials: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Ashly Mary; Amirtharaj, L Vijay; Sanjeev, Kavitha; Mahalaxmi, Sekar

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with 2 fiber-reinforced composite resins and 2 conventional composite resin core buildup materials. Sixty noncarious unrestored human maxillary premolars were collected, endodontically treated (except group 1, negative control), and randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 10). Group 2 was the positive control. The remaining 40 prepared teeth were restored with various direct core buildup materials as follows: group 3 teeth were restored with dual-cure composite resin, group 4 with posterior composite resin, group 5 with fiber-reinforced composite resin, and group 6 with short fiber-reinforced composite resin. Fracture strength testing was performed using a universal testing machine. The results were statistically analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Tukey test. Fracture patterns for each sample were also examined under a light microscope to determine the level of fractures. The mean fracture resistance values (in newtons) were obtained as group 1 > group 6 > group 4 > group 3 > group 5 > group 2. Group 6 showed the highest mean fracture resistance value, which was significantly higher than the other experimental groups, and all the fractures occurred at the level of enamel. Within the limitations of this study, a short fiber-reinforced composite can be used as a direct core buildup material that can effectively resist heavy occlusal forces against fracture and may reinforce the remaining tooth structure in endodontically treated teeth. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of postcuring on mechanical properties of pultruded fiber-reinforced epoxy composites and the neat resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Funk, Joan G.; Collins, William D.; Gray, Stephanie L.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of postcuring on mechanical properties of pultruded fiber-reinforced epoxy-resin composites have been investigated. Composites with carbon, glass, and aramid reinforcement fibers were individually studied. The epoxy was a commercially-available resin that was especially developed for pultrusion fabrication. The pultrusions were conducted at 400 F with postcures at 400, 450, 500, and 550 F. Measurements of the flexural, shear, and interlaminar fracture-toughness properties showed that significant postcuring can occur during the pultrusion process. All three mechanical properties were degraded by the higher (500 and 550 F) temperatures; photomicrographs suggest that the degradation was caused at the fiber-resin interface for all three fiber types.

  16. A refined finite element method for bending analysis of laminated plates integrated with piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzegar, J.; Abbasi, A.

    2018-03-01

    This research presents a finite element formulation based on four-variable refined plate theory for bending analysis of cross-ply and angle-ply laminated composite plates integrated with a piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composite actuator under electromechanical loading. The four-variable refined plate theory is a simple and efficient higher-order shear deformation theory, which predicts parabolic variation of transverse shear stresses across the plate thickness and satisfies zero traction conditions on the plate free surfaces. The weak form of governing equations is derived using the principle of minimum potential energy, and a 4-node non-conforming rectangular plate element with 8 degrees of freedom per node is introduced for discretizing the domain. Several benchmark problems are solved by the developed MATLAB code and the obtained results are compared with those from exact and other numerical solutions, showing good agreement.

  17. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Jen

    Long fibers are generally preferred for reinforcing foams for performance reasons. However, uniform dispersion is difficult to achieve because they must be mixed with liquid resin prior to foam expansion. New approaches aiming to overcome such problem have been developed at USC's Composites Center. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams with long fibers (over 6 mm in length) manufactured at USC's Composites Center have achieved promising mechanical properties and demonstrated lower density relative to conventional composite foams. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were synthesized from thermosetting polymeric microspheres (amino and phenolic microspheres), as well as thermoplastic PVC heat expandable microspheres (HEMs). Carbon and/or aramid fibers were used to reinforce the syntactic foams. Basic mechanical properties, including shear, tensile, and compression, were measured in syntactic foams and fiber-reinforced syntactic foams. Microstructure and crack propagation behavior were investigated by scanning electron microscope and light microscopy. Failure mechanisms and reinforcing mechanisms of fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were also analyzed. As expected, additions of fiber reinforcements to foams enhanced both tensile and shear properties. However, only limited enhancement in compression properties was observed, and fiber reinforcement was of limited benefit in this regard. Therefore, a hybrid foam design was explored and evaluated in an attempt to enhance compression properties. HEMs were blended with glass microspheres to produce hybrid foams, and hybrid foams were subsequently reinforced with continuous aramid fibers to produce fiber-reinforced hybrid foams. Mechanical properties of these foams were evaluated. Findings indicated that the production of hybrid foams was an effective way to enhance the compressive properties of syntactic foams, while the addition of fiber reinforcements enhanced the shear and tensile performance of syntactic foams. Another approach

  18. Single Tooth Replacement Using InCeram Resin Bonded Fixed Partial Denture: A Clinical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehifard, Elnaz; Farid, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    This clinical report describes a treatment option for replacement of a missing mandibular anterior tooth using InCeram resin bonded fixed partial denture (RBFPD). The conventional approach for replacing mandibular incisors dictates the placement of either a conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) bridge, Maryland bridge, or fiber-reinforced composite veneer bridge and several appearance-related disadvantages have been reported in the use of a prosthesis that incorporates a metal substructure. The InCeram bridge is a minimally invasive restoration and eliminates undesirable incisal graying frequently observed in metal RBFPDs. This method was successfully clinically applied to overcome shortcomings of other approaches that may require a minimal invasive technique to preserve lasting sound tooth structure.

  19. Single Tooth Replacement Using InCeram Resin Bonded Fixed Partial Denture: A Clinical Report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Moslehifard

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This clinical report describes a treatment option for replacement of a missing mandibular anterior tooth using InCeram resin bonded fixed partial denture (RBFPD. The conventional approach for replacing mandibular incisors dictates the placement of either a conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM bridge, Maryland bridge, or fiber-reinforced composite veneer bridge and several appearance-related disadvantages have been reported in the use of a prosthesis that incorporates a metal substructure. The InCeram bridge is a minimally invasive restoration and eliminates undesirable incisal graying frequently observed in metal RBFPDs. This method was successfully clinically applied to overcome shortcomings of other approaches that may require a minimal invasive technique to preserve lasting sound tooth structure.

  20. Effects of Fiber Coating Composition on Mechanical Behavior of Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Elderidge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    Celsian matrix composites reinforced with Hi-Nicalon fibers, precoated with a dual layer of BN/SiC by chemical vapor deposition in two separate batches, were fabricated. Mechanical properties of the composites were measured in three-point flexure. Despite supposedly identical processing, the composite panels fabricated with fibers coated in two batches exhibited substantially different mechanical behavior. The first matrix cracking stresses (sigma(sub mc)) of the composites reinforced with fibers coated in batch 1 and batch 2 were 436 and 122 MPa, respectively. This large difference in sigma(sub mc) was attributed to differences in fiber sliding stresses(tau(sub friction)), 121.2+/-48.7 and 10.4+/-3.1 MPa, respectively, for the two composites as determined by the fiber push-in method. Such a large difference in values of tau(sub friction) for the two composites was found to be due to the difference in the compositions of the interface coatings. Scanning Auger microprobe analysis revealed the presence of carbon layers between the fiber and BN, and also between the BN and SiC coatings in the composite showing lower tau(sub friction). This resulted in lower sigma(sub mc) in agreement with the ACK theory. The ultimate strengths of the two composites, 904 and 759 MPa, depended mainly on the fiber volume fraction and were not significantly effected by tau(sub friction) values, as expected. The poor reproducibility of the fiber coating composition between the two batches was judged to be the primary source of the large differences in performance of the two composites.

  1. Effect of Different Liners on Fracture Resistance of Premolars Restored with Conventional and Short Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Doozandeh, Maryam; Ghaffaripour, Dordaneh

    2018-01-11

    To see whether applying four different liners under short fiber-reinforced composite (SFRC), everX Posterior, compared to conventional composite resin, Z250, affected their strengthening property in premolar MOD cavities. Mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities were prepared in 120 sound maxillary premolars divided into 10 groups (n = 12) in terms of two composite resin types and 4 liners or no liner. For each composite resin, in 5 groups no liner, resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), conventional flowable composite (COFL), self-adhesive flowable composite resin (SAFL), and self-adhesive resin cement (SARC) were applied prior to restoring incrementally. After water storage and thermocycling, static fracture resistance was tested. Data (in Newtons) were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). Fracture resistance was significantly affected by composite resin type (p = 0.02), but not by the liner (p > 0.05). The interaction of the two factors was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). SFRC exhibited higher fracture strength (1470 ± 200 N) compared to conventional composite resin (1350 ± 290), irrespective of the application of liners. Application of SARC and SAFL liners led to a higher number of restorable fractures for both composite resins. The four liners can be used without interfering with the higher efficacy of SFRC, compared to conventional composite resins, to improve the fracture strength of premolar MOD cavities. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. Mechanical Characterization of High-Performance Steel-Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites with Self-Healing Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Joo; Kang, Seok Hee; Ahn, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The crack self-healing behavior of high-performance steel-fiber reinforced cement composites (HPSFRCs) was investigated. High-strength deformed steel fibers were employed in a high strength mortar with very fine silica sand to decreasing the crack width by generating higher interfacial bond strength. The width of micro-cracks, strongly affected by the type of fiber and sand, clearly produced the effects on the self-healing behavior. The use of fine silica sand in HPSFRCs with high strength deformed steel fibers successfully led to rapid healing owing to very fine cracks with width less than 20 μm. The use of very fine silica sand instead of normal sand produced 17%–19% higher tensile strength and 51%–58% smaller width of micro-cracks. PMID:28788471

  3. Three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation for injection molding flow of short fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liping; Lu, Gang; Chen, Dachuan; Li, Wenjun; Lu, Chunsheng

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates the three-dimensional (3D) injection molding flow of short fiber-reinforced polymer composites using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation method. The polymer melt was modeled as a power law fluid and the fibers were considered as rigid cylindrical bodies. The filling details and fiber orientation in the injection-molding process were studied. The results indicated that the SPH method could effectively predict the order of filling, fiber accumulation, and heterogeneous distribution of fibers. The SPH simulation also showed that fibers were mainly aligned to the flow direction in the skin layer and inclined to the flow direction in the core layer. Additionally, the fiber-orientation state in the simulation was quantitatively analyzed and found to be consistent with the results calculated by conventional tensor methods.

  4. A new system for posterior restorations: a combination of ceramic optimized polymer and fiber-reinforced composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, L; Trinkner, T; Pescatore, C

    1997-01-01

    Due to the need for increased strength characteristics and enhanced aesthetic expectations of the patients, metal-free, aesthetic restorative systems for the anterior and posterior dentition are currently available. A new "space-age" restorative material has been developed that is a combination of a ceramic optimized polymer (Ceromer) (Targis/Vectris, Ivoclar Williams, Amherst, NY) and a fiber-reinforced composite framework material. The purpose of this article is to discuss the qualities that render this material particularly suitable for a variety of indications, including laboratory-fabricated restorations for the stress-bearing posterior regions. The material lends itself to diversification. Its indication for inlays, onlays, full-coverage crown restorations, and conservative single pontic inlay bridges is presented.

  5. On the Theory and Numerical Simulation of Cohesive Crack Propagation with Application to Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudraraju, Siva Shankar; Garikipati, Krishna; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of crack propagation is among the predominant modes of failure in many natural and engineering structures, often leading to severe loss of structural integrity and catastrophic failure. Thus, the ability to understand and a priori simulate the evolution of this failure mode has been one of the cornerstones of applied mechanics and structural engineering and is broadly referred to as "fracture mechanics." The work reported herein focuses on extending this understanding, in the context of through-thickness crack propagation in cohesive materials, through the development of a continuum-level multiscale numerical framework, which represents cracks as displacement discontinuities across a surface of zero measure. This report presents the relevant theory, mathematical framework, numerical modeling, and experimental investigations of through-thickness crack propagation in fiber-reinforced composites using the Variational Multiscale Cohesive Method (VMCM) developed by the authors.

  6. Impact toughness of cellulose-fiber reinforced polypropylene : influence of microstructure in laminates and injection molded composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig Clemons; Daniel Caulfield; A. Jeffrey Giacomin

    2003-01-01

    Unlike their glass reinforced counterparts, microstructure and dynamic fracture behavior of natural fiber-reinforced thermoplastics have hardly been investigated. Here, we characterize the microstructure of cellulose fiber-reinforced polypropylene and determined its effect on impact toughness. Fiber lengths were reduced by one-half when compounded in a high-intensity...

  7. Physical, Mechanical and Water Absorption Behaviour of Coir Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites Filled With Al2O3 Particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Geetanjali; Biswas, Sandhayarani

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the present work is to study the physical, mechanical and water absorption behaviour of coir fiber reinforced epoxy composites filled with Al2O3 particulates. Composites with different compositions were prepared by varying the length of the fiber and content of fiber using hand lay-up technique. The experimental investigation reveals that the properties of composite increases with the incorporation of Al2O3 particulates. It is observed that the density of composites increases with increase in fiber content, while a decrease in density is observed with increase in fiber length. The strength properties of the composites increases with the increase in fiber content up to 15 wt.% and 12mm fiber length, however further increase in fiber length and fiber content the value decreases. The maximum tensile strength of 25.71MPa, flexural strength of 29.75MPa and impact strength of 14.76kJ/m2 is obtained for composites with 12 mm fiber length and 15 wt.% of fiber content. The hardness and tensile modulus, on the other hand, increases with increase in fiber length and fiber content. The maximum hardness value of 19.52Hv and tensile modulus of 3.412GPa is obtained for composites with 15mm fiber length and 20 wt.% of fiber content. Finally, morphological analysis is also carried out using scanning electron microscope (SEM) to study the fracture behaviour of the composite samples.

  8. Effect of Red Mud and Copper Slag Particles on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Bamboo-Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhyarani Biswas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a series of bamboo-fiber-reinforced epoxy composites are fabricated by using red mud and copper slag particles as filler materials. A filler plays an important role in determining the properties and behavior of particulate composites. The effects of these two fillers on the mechanical properties of bamboo-epoxy composites are investigated. Comparative analysis shows that with the incorporation of these fillers, the tensile strength of the composites increases significantly, whereas the flexural strength and impact strength decrease with increase in filler content (red mud and copper slag fillers in the epoxy-bamboo fiber composites. The density and hardness are also affected by the type and content of filler particles. It is found that the addition of copper slag filler improves the hardness of the bamboo-epoxy composites, whereas the addition of red mud filler reduces the hardness value of bamboo-epoxy composites. The study reveals that the addition of copper slag filler in bamboo-epoxy composites shows better physical and mechanical properties as compared to the red-mud-filled composites.

  9. Microhardness of dual-polymerizing resin cements and foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keiichi; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2014-06-01

    The optimal luting material for fiber-reinforced posts to ensure the longevity of foundation restorations remains undetermined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements and 2 dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts by assessing their Knoop hardness number. Five specimens of dual-polymerizing resin cements (SA Cement Automix, G-Cem LincAce, and Panavia F2.0) and 5 specimens of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins (Clearfil DC Core Plus and Unifil Core EM) were polymerized from the top by irradiation for 40 seconds. Knoop hardness numbers were measured at depths of 0.5, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 mm at 0.5 hours and 7 days after irradiation. Data were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA, 1-way ANOVA, and the Tukey compromise post hoc test (α=.05). At both times after irradiation, the 5 resins materials showed the highest Knoop hardness numbers at the 0.5-mm depth. At 7 days after irradiation, the Knoop hardness numbers of the resin materials did not differ significantly between the 8.0-mm and 10.0-mm depths (P>.05). For all materials, the Knoop hardness numbers at 7 days after irradiation were significantly higher than those at 0.5 hours after irradiation at all depths (Presin materials were found to decrease in the following order: DC Core Plus, Unifil Core EM, Panavia F2.0, SA Cement Automix, and G-Cem LincAce (Pcomposite resins were higher than those of the 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements, notable differences were seen among the 5 materials at all depths and at both times after irradiation. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of box preparation on the strength of glass fiber-reinforced composite inlay-retained fixed partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Breuklander, Marijn H; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2005-04-01

    Nonstandardized box dimensions for inlay-retained fixed partial dentures (FPDs) may result in uneven distribution of the forces on the connector region of such restorations. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of box dimensions on the initial and final failure strength of inlay-retained fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) FPDs. Twenty-one inlay-retained FPDs were prepared using FRC (everStick) frameworks with unidirectional fiber reinforcement between mandibular first premolars and first molars. Boxes were prepared using conventional inlay burs (Cerinlay), and small and large ultrasonic tips (SONICSYS approx). Box dimensions were measured after preparation with a digital micrometer. All restorations were subjected to thermal cycling (6000 cycles, 5 degrees C-55 degrees C). Fracture testing was performed in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Acoustic emission signals were monitored during loading of the specimens. Initial and final fracture strength values (2-way ANOVA, Bonferroni post hoc tests, alpha =.05) and failure types (Fisher exact test) were statistically compared for each group. Significant differences (P =.0146 and P =.0086) were observed between the groups in the dimensions of the boxes prepared using conventional burs buccolingually (2.8-3.0 mm in molars, 3.1-4.3 mm in premolars) and the small size (2.5-2.9, 2.9-3.8 mm) or large size (2.6-3.8, 3.2-4.9 mm) ultrasonic tips for the premolars and the molars, respectively. No significant differences were found at the initial and final failures between the conventionally prepared group (842 +/- 267 N, 1161 +/- 428 N) and those prepared with either small (1088 +/- 381 N, 1320 +/- 380 N) or large ultrasonic tips (1070 +/- 280 N, 1557 +/- 321 N), respectively. The failure analysis demonstrated no significant difference in failure types but predominant delamination of the veneering resin (85%) in all experimental groups. According to acoustic emission tests, a higher energy level was

  11. Fatigue resistance, debonding force, and failure type of fiber-reinforced composite, polyethylene ribbon-reinforced, and braided stainless steel wire lingual retainers in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foek, Dave Lie Sam; Yetkiner, Enver; Ozcan, Mutlu

    Objective: To analyze the fatigue resistance, debonding force, and failure type of fiber-reinforced composite, polyethylene ribbon-reinforced, and braided stainless steel wire lingual retainers in vitro. Methods: Roots of human mandibular central incisors were covered with silicone, mimicking the

  12. The effect of a fiber reinforced cavity configuration on load bearing capacity and failure mode of endodontically treated molars restored with CAD/CAM resin composite overlay restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rocca, G.T.; Saratti, C.M.; Cattani-Lorente, M.; Feilzer, A.J.; Scherrer, S.; Krecji, I.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the fracture strength and the mode of failure of endodontically treated molars restored with CAD/CAM overlays with fiber reinforced composite build-up of the pulp chamber. Methods 40 Devitalized molars were cut over the CEJ and divided into five groups (n = 8). The pulp

  13. Field assisted sintering of refractory carbide ceramics and fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gephart, Sean

    materials. While FAST sintered materials showed higher average values, in general they also showed consistently larger variation in the scattered data and consequently larger standard deviation for the resulting material properties. In addition, dynamic impact testing (V50 test) was conducted on the resulting materials and it was determined that there was no discernable correlation between observed mechanical properties of the ceramic materials and the resulting dynamic testing. Another study was conducted on the sintering of SiC and carbon fiber reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMC) using FAST. There has been much interest recently in fabricating high strength, low porosity SiC CMC.s for high temperature structural applications, but the current methods of production, namely chemical vapor infiltration (CVI), melt infiltration (MI), and polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP), are considered time consuming and involve material related shortcomings associated with their respective methodologies. In this study, SiC CMC.s were produced using the 25 ton laboratory unit with a target sample size of 40 mm diameter and 3 mm thickness, as well as on the larger 250 ton industrial FAST system targeting a sample size of 101.6 x 101.6 x 3 mm3 to investigate issues associated with scaling. Several sintering conditions were explored including: pressure of 35-65 MPa, temperature of 1700-1900°C, and heating rates between 50-400°C/min. The SiC fibers used in this study were coated using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with boron nitride (BN) and pyrolytic carbon to act as a barrier layer and preserve the integrity of the fibers during sintering. Then the barrier coating was coated by an outer layer of SiC to enhance the bonding between the fibers and the SiC matrix. Microstructures of the sintered samples were examined by FE-SEM. Mechanical properties including flexural strength-deflection and stress-strain were characterized using 4-point bend testing. Tensile testing was

  14. Carbon and glass hierarchical fibers: Influence of carbon nanotubes on tensile, flexural and impact properties of short fiber reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmanian, S.; Thean, K.S.; Suraya, A.R.; Shazed, M.A.; Mohd Salleh, M.A.; Yusoff, H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Dense CNT were grown on carbon fiber and glass fiber by use of floating catalyst CVD method. ► CNT showed different growing mechanism on carbon and glass fiber. ► Short fiber-CNT-composites showed enhanced mechanical properties. ► CNT coating enhanced fiber–matrix interaction and acted as additional reinforcement. -- Abstract: Dense carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown uniformly on the surface of carbon fibers and glass fibers to create hierarchical fibers by use of floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition. Morphologies of the CNTs were investigated using scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Larger diameter dimension and distinct growing mechanism of nanotubes on glass fiber were revealed. Short carbon and glass fiber reinforced polypropylene composites were fabricated using the hierarchical fibers and compared with composites made using neat fibers. Tensile, flexural and impact properties of the composites were measured, which showed evident enhancement in all mechanical properties compared to neat short fiber composites. SEM micrographs of composite fracture surface demonstrated improved adhesion between CNT-coated fiber and the matrix. The enhanced mechanical properties of short fiber composites was attributed to the synergistic effects of CNTs in improving fiber–matrix interfacial properties as well as the CNTs acting as supplemental reinforcement in short fiber-composites.

  15. Oxidation effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1989-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride composites were measured after 100 hrs exposure at temperatures to 1400 C in nitrogen and oxygen environments. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The results indicate that composites heat treated in a nitrogen environment at temperatures to 1400 C showed deformation and fracture behavior equivalent to that of the as-fabricated composites. Also, the composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment beyond 400 C yielded significantly lower tensile strength values. Specifically in the temperature range from 600 to 1000 C, composites retained approx. 40 percent of their as-fabricated strength, and those heat treated in the temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C retained 70 percent. Nonetheless, for all oxygen heat treatment conditions, composite specimens displayed strain capability beyond the matrix fracture stress; a typical behavior of a tough composite.

  16. Mechanical properties of banana/kenaf fiber-reinforced hybrid polyester composites: Effect of woven fabric and random orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavudeen, A.; Rajini, N.; Karthikeyan, S.; Thiruchitrambalam, M.; Venkateshwaren, N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper is presents the fabrications of kenaf/banana fiber hybrid composites. • Effect of weaving pattern and random orientation on mechanical properties was studied. • Role of interfacial adhesion due to chemical modifications were analyzed with the aid of SEM. • Hybridization of kenaf and banana fibers in plain woven composites exhibits maximum mechanical strength. - Abstract: The present work deals with the effect of weaving patterns and random orientatation on the mechanical properties of banana, kenaf and banana/kenaf fiber-reinforced hybrid polyester composites. Composites were prepared using the hand lay-up method with two different weaving patterns, namely, plain and twill type. Of the two weaving patterns, the plain type showed improved tensile properties compared to the twill type in all the fabricated composites. Furthermore, the maximum increase in mechanical strength was observed in the plain woven hybrid composites rather than in randomly oriented composites. This indicates minimum stress development at the interface of composites due to the distribution of load transfer along the fiber direction. Moreover, alkali (NaOH) and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) treatments appear to provide an additional improvement in mechanical strength through enhanced interfacial bonding. Morphological studies of fractured mechanical testing samples were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to understand the de-bonding of fiber/matrix adhesion

  17. Finite element simulation of an artificial intervertebral disk using fiber reinforced laminated composite model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmohammadi, Mehrdad; Asgharzadeh Shirazi, Hadi; Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2014-10-01

    Degeneration of intervertebral disk (IVD) has been increased in recent years. The lumbar herniation can be cured using conservative and surgical procedures. Surgery is considered after failure of conservative treatment. Partial discectomy, fusion, and total disk replacement (TDR) are also common surgical treatments for degenerative disk disease. However, due to limitations and disadvantages of the current treatments, many studies have been carried out to approach the best design of mimicking natural disk. Recently, a new method of TDRs has been introduced using nature deformation of IVD by reinforced fibers of annulus fibrosis. Nonetheless, owing to limitations of experimental works on the human body, numerical studies of IVD may help to understand load transfer and biomechanical properties within the disks with reinforced fibers. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the L2-L3 disk vertebrae unit with 12 vertical fibers embedded into annulus fibrosis was constructed. The IVD was subjected to compressive force, bending moment, and axial torsion. The most important parameters of disk failures were compared to that of experimental data. The results showed that the addition of reinforced fibers into the disk invokes a significant decrease of stress in the nucleus and annulus. The findings of this study may have implications not only for developing IVDs with reinforced fibers but also for the application of fiber reinforced IVD in orthopedics surgeries as a suitable implant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of fabrication processes on mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced polymer composites for 49 meter (160 foot recreational yachts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave (Dae-Wook Kim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Polymer composite materials offer high strength and stiffness to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and total life cost reductions that appeal to the marine industry. The advantages of composite construction have led to their incorporation in U.S. yacht hull structures over 46 meters (150 feet in length. In order to construct even larger hull structures, higher quality composites with lower cost production techniques need to be developed. In this study, the effect of composite hull fabrication processes on mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP composites is presented. Fabrication techniques investigated during this study are hand lay-up (HL, vacuum infusion (VI, and hybrid (HL + VI processes. Mechanical property testing includes: tensile, compressive, and ignition loss sample analysis. Results demonstrate that the vacuum pressure implemented during composite fabrication has an effect on mechanical properties. The VI processed GFRP yields improved mechanical properties in tension/compression strengths and tensile modulus. The hybrid GFRP composites, however, failed in a sequential manor, due to dissimilar failure modes in the HL and VI processed sides. Fractography analysis was conducted to validate the mechanical property testing results.

  19. Effect of fiber loading on mechanical and morphological properties of cocoa pod husk fibers reinforced thermoplastic polyurethane composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shekeil, Y.A.; Sapuan, S.M.; Algrafi, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Increase in fiber loading increased tensile strength and modulus of the composites. • Tensile strain was decreasing with increase in fiber loading. • Flexural strength and modulus increased with increase in fiber content. • Impact strength was deteriorated with increasing fiber loading. • Morphology observations shown a good adhesion between fibers and matrix. - Abstract: In this study, cocoa (Theobroma cacao) pod husk (CPH) fiber reinforced thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) was prepared by melt compounding method using Haake Polydrive R600 internal mixer. The composites were prepared with different fiber loading: 20%, 30% and 40% (by weight), with the optimum processing parameters: 190 °C, 11 min, and 40 rpm for temperature, time and speed, respectively. Five samples were cut from the composite sheet. Mean value was taken for each composite according to ASTM standards. Effect of fiber loading on mechanical (i.e. tensile, flexural properties and impact strength) and morphological properties was studied. TPU/CPH composites showed increase in tensile strength and modulus with increase in fiber loading, while tensile strain was decreasing with increase in fiber loading. The composite also showed increase in flexural strength and modulus with increase in fiber content. Impact strength was deteriorated with increase in fiber loading. Morphology observations using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) showed fiber/matrix good adhesion

  20. Fiber reinforced engineering plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Rodney E. Jacobson; Karl D. Sears; John H. Underwood

    2001-01-01

    Although natural fiber reinforced commodity thermoplastics have a wide range of nonstructural applications in the automotive and decking industries, there have been few reports of cellulosic fiber-reinforced engineering thermoplastics. The commonly held belief has been that the only thermoplastics amenable to natural-fibre reinforcement are limited to low-melting (...

  1. Preparation, mechanical, and in vitro properties of glass fiber-reinforced polycarbonate composites for orthodontic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Inami, Toshihiro; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Nishiyama, Norihiro; Kasai, Kazutaka

    2015-05-01

    Generally, orthodontic treatment uses metallic wires made from stainless steel, cobalt-chromium-nickel alloy, β-titanium alloy, and nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) alloy. However, these wires are not esthetically pleasing and may induce allergic or toxic reactions. To correct these issues, in the present study we developed glass-fiber-reinforced plastic (GFRP) orthodontic wires made from polycarbonate and E-glass fiber by using pultrusion. After fabricating these GFRP round wires with a diameter of 0.45 mm (0.018 inch), we examined their mechanical and in vitro properties. To investigate how the glass-fiber diameter affected their physical properties, we prepared GFRP wires of varying diameters (7 and 13 µm). Both the GFRP with 13-µm fibers (GFRP-13) and GFRP with 7 µm fibers (GFRP-7) were more transparent than the metallic orthodontic wires. Flexural strengths of GFRP-13 and GFRP-7 were 690.3 ± 99.2 and 938.1 ± 95.0 MPa, respectively; flexural moduli of GFRP-13 and GFRP-7 were 25.4 ± 4.9 and 34.7 ± 7.7 GPa, respectively. These flexural properties of the GFRP wires were nearly equivalent to those of available Ni-Ti wires. GFRP-7 had better flexural properties than GFRP-13, indicating that the flexural properties of GFRP increase with decreasing fiber diameter. Using thermocycling, we found no significant change in the flexural properties of the GFRPs after 600 or 1,200 cycles. Using a cytotoxicity detection kit, we found that the glass fiber and polycarbonate components comprising the GFRP were not cytotoxic within the limitations of this study. We expect this metal-free GFRP wire composed of polycarbonate and glass fiber to be useful as an esthetically pleasing alternative to current metallic orthodontic wire. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Study on mechanical properties of fly ash impregnated glass fiber reinforced polymer composites using mixture design analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satheesh Raja, R.; Manisekar, K.; Manikandan, V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • FRP with and without fly ash filler were prepared. • Mechanical properties of composites were analyzed. • Mixture Design Method was used to model the system. • Experimental and mathematical model results were compared. - Abstract: This paper describes the mechanical behavior of fly ash impregnated E-glass fiber reinforced polymer composite (GFRP). Initially the proportion of fiber and resin were optimized from the analysis of the mechanical properties of the GFRP. It is observed that the 30 wt% of E-glass in the GFRP without filler material yields better results. Then, based on the optimized value of resin content, the varying percentage of E-glass and fly ash was added to fabricate the hybrid composites. Results obtained in this study were mathematically evaluated using Mixture Design Method. Predictions show that 10 wt% addition of fly ash with fiber improves the mechanical properties of the composites. The fly ash impregnated GFRP yields significant improvement in mechanical strength compared to the GFRP without filler material. The surface morphologies of the fractured specimens were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The chemical composition and surface morphology of the fly ash is analyzed by using Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Scanning Electron Microscope

  3. Microstructural Analysis and Wear Performance of Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced SiC Composite for Brake Pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeong-Choon, Goo; In-Sik, Cho

    2017-06-26

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/C-SiC) composite is widely used as a friction material owing to its good performance, even though it is more expensive than metallic materials. The light C/C-SiC composite is an ideal candidate for weight reduction of frictional parts. In this study, the friction and wear behavior of C/C-SiC composite was assessed using a ball-on-disk friction tester under dry reciprocating sliding conditions at different temperatures of 25, 100, and 200 °C. The disk specimens were made of C/C-SiC composite, while the mating counterpart pins were made of bearing steel. The microstructure and wear track of the specimens were characterized using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The microstructural analysis of the wear track revealed that the wear mechanism was abrasive. The friction coefficient and wear behavior of the specimens was dependent on the temperature, where the friction coefficients and wear rate increased with increasing temperature.

  4. Flame Retardancy Effects of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Membranes on Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxian Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube/graphene nanoplatelet (MWCNT/GNP hybrid membranes with lower liquid permeability and better barrier effect compared to MWCNT membranes were successfully synthesized by vacuum filtering. Their morphologies, water permeability, and pore structures were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM and nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Furthermore, MWCNT/GNP membranes were used to improve the flame retardancy of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP composites, and the influence of weight percentage of GNPs on the permeability and flame retardancy of MWCNT/GNP membranes was systematically investigated. Results show that incorporation of MWCNT/GNP membranes on CFRP composite plates can remarkably improve the flame retardancy of CFRP composites. Specifically, the incorporation of hierarchical MWCNT/GNP membrane with 7.5 wt% of GNP displays a 35% reduction in the peak heat release rate (PHRR for a CFRP composite plate with the epoxy as matrix and a 11% reduction in PHRR compared with the incorporation of MWCNT membrane only. A synergistic flame retarding mechanism is suggested to be attributed to these results, which includes controlling the pore size and penetrative network structure.

  5. Effects of Thermal and Humidity Aging on the Interfacial Adhesion of Polyketone Fiber Reinforced Natural Rubber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ki Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyketone fiber is considered as a reinforcement of the mechanical rubber goods (MRG such as tires, automobile hoses, and belts because of its high strength and modulus. In order to apply it to those purposes, the high adhesion of fiber/rubber interface and good sustainability to aging conditions are very important. In this study, polyketone fiber reinforced natural rubber composites were prepared and they were subjected to thermal and humidity aging, to assess the changes of the interfacial adhesion and material properties. Also, the effect of adhesive primer treatment, based on the resorcinol formaldehyde resin and latex (RFL, of polyketone fiber for high interfacial adhesion was evaluated. Morphological and property changes of the rubber composites were analyzed by using various instrumental analyses. As a result, the rubber composite was aged largely by thermal aging at high temperature rather than humidity aging condition. Interfacial adhesion of the polyketone/NR composites was improved by the primer treatment and its effect was maintained in aging conditions.

  6. Smart carbon nanotube/fiber and PVA fiber-reinforced composites for stress sensing and chloride ion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoheneder, Joshua

    Fiber reinforced composites (FRC) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers and carbon nanofibers (CNF) had an excellent flexural strength in excess of 18.5 MPa compared to reference samples of 15.8 MPa. It was found that the developed, depending on applied stress and exposure to chloride solutions, composites exhibit some electrical conductivity, from 4.20×10 -4 (Ω-1m-1 to 4.13×10 -4 Ω-1m-1. These dependences can be characterized by piezioresistive and chemoresistive coefficients demonstrating that the material possesses self-sensing capabilities. The sensitivity to stain and chloride solutions can be enhanced by incorporating small amounts of carbon nanofibers (CNF) or carbon nanotube (CNT) into composite structure. Conducted research has demonstrated a strong dependency of electrical properties of composite on crack formation in moist environments. The developed procedure is scalable for industrial application in concrete structures that require nondestructive stress monitoring, integrity under high service loads and stability in harsh environments.

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties of boron-fiber-reinforced titanium-matrix composites produced by pulsed current hot pressing (PCHP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Kanryu; Sugioka, Masami; Itami, Masao; Kawahara, Masakazu; Yamauchi, Isamu

    2006-01-01

    Boron-fiber-reinforced Ti-matrix composites were fabricated by a pulsed current hot pressing (PCHP) process at various holding temperatures between 973 and 1273 K at a pressure of 32 MPa for 600 s. It was found that the boron fiber and the Ti-matrix were well bonded when the PCHP process was carried out at 1073 K. When a holding temperature of the PCHP process was higher than 1173 K, a TiB 2 compound layer was formed along the interface between the boron fiber and the matrix, and crystallization of amorphous boron occurred in the vicinity of the tungsten core in the fiber. The thickness of TiB 2 layer and the amount of crystallized boron increased with increasing holding temperature. The composite produced by the PCHP process at 1073 K with 17.2 vol.% boron fiber presented a tensile yield stress of 706 MPa when deformed at room temperature. This value was about 80% of the yield stress estimated by a force-equilibrium equation of a composite taking into account the direction of fiber axis

  8. Physical-Mechanical Properties of a Fiber-Reinforced Composite Based on an ELUR-P Carbon Tape and XT-118 Binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paimushin, V. N.; Kholmogorov, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    A series of tests to identify the physical-mechanical properties of a unidirectional carbon-fiber-reinforced composite based on an ELUR-P carbon fibers and an XT-118 epoxy binder were performed. The form of the stress-strain diagrams of specimens loaded in tension in the longitudinal, transverse, and ±45° directions and in compression in the longitudinal and ±45° directions were examined. Tensile diagrams were also determined for the XT-118 binder alone. The relation between the tangential shear modulus and shear strains of the composite was highly nonlinear from the very beginning of loading and depended on the loading type. Such a nonlinear response of the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite in shear cannot be the result of plastic deformation of binder, but can be explained only by structural changes caused by the inner buckling instability of the composite at micro- and mesolevels..

  9. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber-reinforced composite posts and composite core with varying remaining coronal tooth structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananviriyaporn, Sirirat; Jitarmat, Piyabhorn; Chairat, Surachara; Ranchan, Atchariyaporn

    2012-01-01

    Endodontically treated teeth often have a varying remaining coronal tooth structure, is an important factor in the successful of post-core with crown restoration. This study compared the fracture resistance of pulpless teeth with variable amounts of remaining coronal tooth structure restored with fiber-reinforced composite posts and composite core. Fifty extracted human premolars were endodontically treated and divided into 5 groups of 10 teeth each. Four groups were prepared having axial wall heights of 4 mm around the preparation circumferences. In 3 of the groups with axial tooth structure, mesial axial tooth structure was removed, mesial and lingual axial tooth structure were removed, mesial-lingual and distal axial tooth structure were removed. For the fifth group, all axial tooth structure was removed to the level of the prepared finish line. All 50 prepared teeth were restored with fiber-reinforced composite posts (FRC Postec Plus) and composite resin cores (Multicore Flow). Testing was conducted with a universal testing machine with the application of a static load to the lingual incline plane of buccal cusp at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min at 45 degrees to the long axis of the tooth. The load at failure was recorded. The data were subjected to 1-way analysis of variance. The mean value + standard deviation for the failure load of group 1 to 5 were 237.48 +/- 81.87, 242.97 +/- 66.80, 257.67 +/- 70.42, 239.56 +/- 70.42 and 297.70 +/- 99.42 (N), respectively There were no significant differences in the fracture resistance (p structure of endodontically treated tooth had no influenced on the fracture resistance when restored with fiber-reinforced composite posts and composite core.

  10. Zinc and resin bonded NdFeB magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonowicz, M.; Kaszuwara, W.

    2002-01-01

    Zinc and resin bonded NdFeB magnets were processed. Basic magnetic parameters as well as compressive strength were evaluated versus annealing temperature and volume fraction of the bonding agent. For the zinc bonded magnets phase composition was investigated. The additional NdZn 5 phase was found in the Zn bonded magnets after annealing. Comparison of the Zn and resin bonded magnets reveals higher remanence for the former and higher coercivity for the latter. For the Zn and resin bonded magnets, 15 wt.% Zn / 370 o C and 7-10 wt.% resin were chosen as the optimal processing parameters. (author)

  11. Effect of expansive admixtures on the shrinkage and mechanical properties of high-performance fiber-reinforced cement composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Chang; Yun, Hyun-Do

    2013-01-01

    High-performance fiber-reinforced cement composites (HPFRCCs) are characterized by strain-hardening and multiple cracking during the inelastic deformation process, but they also develop high shrinkage strain. This study investigates the effects of replacing Portland cement with calcium sulfoaluminate-based expansive admixtures (CSA EXAs) to compensate for the shrinkage and associated mechanical behavior of HPFRCCs. Two types of CSA EXA (CSA-K and CSA-J), each with a different chemical composition, are used in this study. Various replacement ratios (0%, 8%, 10%, 12%, and 14% by weight of cement) of CSA EXA are considered for the design of HPFRCC mixtures reinforced with 1.5% polyethylene (PE) fibers by volume. Mechanical properties, such as shrinkage compensation, compressive strength, flexural strength, and direct tensile strength, of the HPFRCC mixtures are examined. Also, crack width and development are investigated to determine the effects of the EXAs on the performance of the HPFRCC mixtures, and a performance index is used to quantify the performance of mixture. The results indicate that replacements of 10% CSA-K (Type 1) and 8% CSA-J (Type 2) considerably enhance the mechanical properties and reduce shrinkage of HPFRCCs.

  12. Effect of Expansive Admixtures on the Shrinkage and Mechanical Properties of High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Chang Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High-performance fiber-reinforced cement composites (HPFRCCs are characterized by strain-hardening and multiple cracking during the inelastic deformation process, but they also develop high shrinkage strain. This study investigates the effects of replacing Portland cement with calcium sulfoaluminate-based expansive admixtures (CSA EXAs to compensate for the shrinkage and associated mechanical behavior of HPFRCCs. Two types of CSA EXA (CSA-K and CSA-J, each with a different chemical composition, are used in this study. Various replacement ratios (0%, 8%, 10%, 12%, and 14% by weight of cement of CSA EXA are considered for the design of HPFRCC mixtures reinforced with 1.5% polyethylene (PE fibers by volume. Mechanical properties, such as shrinkage compensation, compressive strength, flexural strength, and direct tensile strength, of the HPFRCC mixtures are examined. Also, crack width and development are investigated to determine the effects of the EXAs on the performance of the HPFRCC mixtures, and a performance index is used to quantify the performance of mixture. The results indicate that replacements of 10% CSA-K (Type 1 and 8% CSA-J (Type 2 considerably enhance the mechanical properties and reduce shrinkage of HPFRCCs.

  13. Fabrication of silicon-carbide continuous fiber reinforced carbon (SiC/C) composites using hot press process and the effects of fiber forms on the strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Tong-Shik; Okura, Akimitsu

    1988-01-01

    Silicon-carbide continuous fiber reinforced carbon (SiC/C) composites was fabricated using a simple hot press process. Three forms of SiC fiber reinforcement, that is, cloth, mat and unidirectional long fibers (UD fibers) were employed. Fine pulverized coke mixed with carbonaceous bulk mesophase (BM) was used as matrix. In this process, SiC fibers were laminated alternately with the matrix admixture in a die, and then heated to 600deg C under a pressure of 49 MPa. The results were as follows: (1) The maximum strengths of the composites were the greatest for the UD fiber reinforcements at 121.5 MPa while the cloth and mat reinforcements showed appreciably lower strengths. (2) After secondary heat treatments at 800deg C to 1500deg C, the composite reinforced with UD fibers showed excellent strengths above 106 MPa which were greater than that of an as-fabricated commercial C/C composite. The strengths of the composites reinforced with cloth and mat, however, were significantly reduced by the heat treatments. (author)

  14. Clinical evaluation of fiber-reinforced composite crowns in pulp-treated primary molars: 12-month results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Zahra; Parisay, Iman; Mehrabkhani, Maryam; Madani, Azam Sadat; Mazhari, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of tooth-colored fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) crowns in pulp-treated second primary mandibular teeth. This split-mouth randomized, clinical trial performed on 67 children between 3 and 6 years with two primary mandibular second molars requiring pulp treatment. After pulp therapy, the teeth were randomly assigned to stainless steel crown (SSC) or FRC crown groups. Modified United States Public Health Service criteria were used to evaluate marginal integrity, marginal discoloration, and secondary caries in FRC crowns at intervals of 3, 6, and 12 months. Retention rate and gingival health were also compared between the two groups. The data were analyzed using Friedman, Cochran, and McNemar's tests at a significance level of 0.05. Intact marginal integrity in FRC crowns at 3, 6, and 12 months were 93.2%, 94.8%, and 94.2%, respectively. Marginal discoloration and secondary caries were not found at any of the FRC crowns. The retention rates of the FRC crowns were 100%, 98.3%, and 89.7% at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively, whereas all the SSCs were found to be present and intact after 12 months ( P = 0.016). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in gingival health. According to the results of this study, it seems that when esthetics is a concern, in cooperative patients with good oral hygiene, FRC crowns can be considered as a valuable procedure.

  15. Monotonic and cyclic responses of impact polypropylene and continuous glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene composites at different strain rates

    KAUST Repository

    Yudhanto, Arief

    2016-03-08

    Impact copolymer polypropylene (IPP), a blend of isotactic polypropylene and ethylene-propylene rubber, and its continuous glass fiber composite form (glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene, GFIPP) are promising materials for impact-prone automotive structures. However, basic mechanical properties and corresponding damage of IPP and GFIPP at different rates, which are of keen interest in the material development stage and numerical tool validation, have not been reported. Here, we applied monotonic and cyclic tensile loads to IPP and GFIPP at different strain rates (0.001/s, 0.01/s and 0.1/s) to study the mechanical properties, failure modes and the damage parameters. We used monotonic and cyclic tests to obtain mechanical properties and define damage parameters, respectively. We also used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images to visualize the failure mode. We found that IPP generally exhibits brittle fracture (with relatively low failure strain of 2.69-3.74%) and viscoelastic-viscoplastic behavior. GFIPP [90]8 is generally insensitive to strain rate due to localized damage initiation mostly in the matrix phase leading to catastrophic transverse failure. In contrast, GFIPP [±45]s is sensitive to the strain rate as indicated by the change in shear modulus, shear strength and failure mode.

  16. Effect of length and diameter of fiber reinforced composite post (FRC on fracture resistance of remaining tooth structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdiyeh seifi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Post and core has been considered for endodontically treated tooth, especially in cases with severe damage crowns. Recently fiber reinforced composite posts (FRC post have been used in the treatment of endodontically treated teeth. Because the length and diameter of posts are effective in stress distribution, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of length and diameter of FRC post on fracture resistance. Methods: In this experimental study, 36 glass fiber posts with combination of 7mm, 9mm, and 12mm length and 1.1mm, 1.3mm and 1.5mm diameter were divided into 9 groups of 4. These posts were cemented in root canals by Panavia. Samples were tested with 45° compressive forces for the evaluation of fracture resistance. Datas were analyzed using SPSS soft ware and One- way and Two-way ANOVA analyses. Results: Fracture resistance did not increase significantly with the effect of length and diameter simultaneously (P=0.85. Samples with 12mm length and 1.5mm diameter had the greatest fracture resistance (1023/33N±239/22. The minimum fracture resistance had occurred in post with 7mm length and 1.5mm diameter (503/13N ±69/18. Fracture resistance increased significantly by increasing the length and the same diameter. Conclusion: It can be concluded that fracture resistance is affected by the length and not the diameter of FRC post.

  17. Effect of Length and Diameter of Fiber Reinforced Composite Post on Fracture Resistance of Remaining Tooth Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Ebrahimzadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Post and core has been considered for endodontically treated tooth, especially in cases with severe damage crowns. Recently fiber reinforced composite posts (FRC post have been used in the treatment of endodontically treated teeth. Because the length and diameter of posts are effective in stress distribution, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of length and diameter of FRC post on fracture resistance. Methods: In this experimental study, 36 glass fiber posts with combination of 7mm, 9mm, and 12mm length and 1.1mm, 1.3mm and 1.5mm diameter were divided into 9 groups of 4. These posts were cemented in root canals by Panavia. Samples were tested with 45° compressive forces for the evaluation of fracture resistance. Datas were analyzed using SPSS soft ware and One- way and Two-way ANOVA analyses. Results: Fracture resistance did not increase significantly with the effect of length and diameter simultaneously (P=0.85. Samples with 12mm length and 1.5mm diameter had the greatest fracture resistance (1023/33N±239/22. The minimum fracture resistance had occurred in post with 7mm length and 1.5mm diameter (503/13N ±69/18. Fracture resistance increased significantly by increasing the length and the same diameter. Conclusion: It can be concluded that fracture resistance is affected by the length and not the diameter of FRC post.

  18. Interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of joining electroless nickel plated quartz fibers reinforced silica composite to Invar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Zhao; Lixia, Zhang; Xiaoyu, Tian; Peng, He; Jicai, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Vacuum brazing of electroless nickel plated quartz fibers reinforced silica composite (QFSC) to Invar alloy using Ag-Cu eutectic alloy at various temperatures (1073-1163 K) and times (5-35 min) has been investigated. The scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction examination of the joints showed that the junction between QFSC and Invar produced reaction products like Cu 3.8 Ni, Cu (s, s), Ni (s, s) and Ag (s, s), with the structure of Invar/Cu 3.8 Ni + Ni (s, s)/Ni (s, s) + Cu 3.8 Ni + Ag (s, s) + Cu (s, s)/Cu (s, s) + Cu 3.8 Ni + Ni (s, s) + QFSC. The shear strength of joint was effected by the changes of relative amount of Cu-Ni eutectic structure (Cu 3.8 Ni + Ni (s, s)) and thickness of nickel plating film at different parameters. The shear strength of joint increased when there were proper amount of Cu-Ni eutectic structure and nickel plating film for reinforcement, and decreased while them were consumed excessively in interaction. The maximum shear strength of joint is 29 MPa, which was brazed at 1103 K for 15 min.

  19. A testing platform for durability studies of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under concurrent hygrothermo-mechanical stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Antonio; Pires, Robert; Yambao, Alyssa; La Saponara, Valeria

    2014-12-11

    The durability of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under service condition is a critical aspect to be addressed for their robust designs and condition-based maintenance. These materials are adopted in a wide range of engineering applications, from aircraft and ship structures, to bridges, wind turbine blades, biomaterials and biomedical implants. Polymers are viscoelastic materials, and their response may be highly nonlinear and thus make it challenging to predict and monitor their in-service performance. The laboratory-scale testing platform presented herein assists the investigation of the influence of concurrent mechanical loadings and environmental conditions on these materials. The platform was designed to be low-cost and user-friendly. Its chemically resistant materials make the platform adaptable to studies of chemical degradation due to in-service exposure to fluids. An example of experiment was conducted at RT on closed-cell polyurethane foam samples loaded with a weight corresponding to ~50% of their ultimate static and dry load. Results show that the testing apparatus is appropriate for these studies. Results also highlight the larger vulnerability of the polymer under concurrent loading, based on the higher mid-point displacements and lower residual failure loads. Recommendations are made for additional improvements to the testing apparatus.

  20. Deformation behavior of carbon-fiber reinforced shape-memory-polymer composites used for deployable structures (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xin; Liu, Liwu; Li, Fengfeng; Pan, Chengtong; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2017-04-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a new type of smart material, they perform large reversible deformation with a certain external stimulus (e.g., heat and electricity). The properties (e.g., stiffness, strength and other mechanically static or quasi-static load-bearing capacity) are primarily considered for conventional resin-based composite materials which are mainly used for structural materials. By contrast, the mechanical actuating performance with finite deformation is considered for the shape memory polymers and their composites which can be used for both structural materials and functional materials. For shape memory polymers and their composites, the performance of active deformation is expected to further promote the development in smart active deformation structures, such as deployable space structures and morphing wing aircraft. The shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) are also one type of High Strain Composite (HSC). The space deployable structures based on carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) show great prospects. Considering the problems that SMPCs are difficult to meet the practical applications in space deployable structures in the recent ten years, this paper aims to research the mechanics of deformation, actuation and failure of SMPCs. In the overall view of the shape memory polymer material's nonlinearity (nonlinearity and stress softening in the process of pre-deformation and recovery, relaxation in storage process, irreversible deformation), by the multiple verifications among theory, finite element and experiments, one obtains the deformation and actuation mechanism for the process of "pre-deformation, energy storage and actuation" and its non-fracture constraint domain. Then, the parameters of SMPCs will be optimized. Theoretical analysis is realized by the strain energy function, additionally considering the interaction strain energy between the fiber and the matrix. For the common resin-based or soft

  1. Fiber-reinforced composite inlay fixed partial dentures: the influence of restorative materials and abutment design on stress distribution investigated by finite element model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappelli, G; Scalise, L; Coccia, E; Procaccini, M

    2009-10-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite may be successful used to fabricate inlay fixed partial dentures. This study used a finite element model to investigate three-dimensional stress distribution in a 3-unit fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial denture, and compared three types of fiber and three abutment configurations. A finite element model of a 3-unit fixed partial denture was used to investigate stress distribution in three different fiber-reinforced composite systems (1) Ribbond Triaxial plus Sinfony; 2) EverStick plus Sinfony; 3) Vectris Pontic/Frame plus Sinfony) and in three different abutment configurations (minimal distal-occlusal and mesial-occlusal preparation; extensive distal-occlusal and mesial-occlusal preparation; mesial-occlusal-distal preparation of both abutment teeth). Maximum load of 196 N was applied at the center of the occlusal and buccal surfaces of the pontic. Stress distribution was calculated in the tooth/restoration complex and in the abutment preparation. When a vertical load was applied, no substantial differences between stress amount in the molar and in the premolar connectors was found. When a lateral load was applied, the stress was greater in the premolar connector than in the molar connector. In all designs investigated, stress was concentrated at the cervical margins of the proximal boxes adjacent to the pontic; no stress concentrated at the occlusal box preparation surface. Within the limitations of this study, the results suggest that different fiber-reinforced composite systems show similar pattern of stress distribution. Stress concentrates at the connector areas and in the prepared teeth. Peak stress is at the cervical margin of the boxes adjacent to the pontic.

  2. Part I. Corrosion studies of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites. Part II. Galvanic corrosion between continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites and 4340 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun

    Part I. The corrosion performance of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites (CF-AMCs) was investigated in both the laboratory and field environments by comparing them with their respective monolithic matrix alloys, i.e., pure Al, A1-2wt%Cu T6, and Al 6061 T6. The corrosion initiation sites were identified by monitoring the changes in the surface morphology. Corrosion current densities and pH profiles at localized corrosion sites were measured using the scanning-vibrating electrode technique and the scanning ion-selective electrode technique, respectively. The corrosion damage of the materials immersed in various electrolytes, as well as those exposed in a humidity chamber and outdoor environments, was evaluated. Potentiodynamic polarization behavior was also studied. The corrosion initiation for the composites in 3.15 wt% NaCl occurred primarily around the Fe-rich intermetallic particles, which preferentially existed around the fiber/matrix interface on the composites. The corrosion initiation sites were also caused by physical damage (e.g., localized deformation) to the composite surface. At localized corrosion sites, the buildup of acidity was enhanced by the formation of micro-crevices resulting from fibers left in relief as the matrix corroded. The composites that were tested in exposure experiments exhibited higher corrosion rates than their monolithic alloys. The composites and their monolithic alloys were subjected to pitting corrosion when anodically polarized in the 3.15 wt% NaCl, while they passivated when anodically polarized in 0.5 M Na2SO4. The experimental results indicated that the composites exhibited inferior corrosion resistance compared to their monolithic matrix alloys. Part II. Galvanic corrosion studies were conducted on CF-AMCs coupled to 4340 steel since CF-AMCs have low density and excellent mechanical properties and are being considered as potential jacketing materials for reinforcing steel gun barrels. Coupled and

  3. Effect of Coconut Fillers on Hybrid Coconut Kevlar Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Jani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This project focuses on the conversion of naturally available coconut fibers and shells into a useful composite. In addition to it, some mechanical properties of the resultant composite is determined and also the effect of coconut shell fillers on the composite is also investigated. The few portion of the composite is incorporated with synthetic Kevlar fiber, thus the coconut fiber is hybridized to enhance the mechanical properties of coconut. In this work two types of composite is fabricate, kevelar coconut fibre (kc composite and kevelarcoco nut fibre coconut shell filler (kccsf composite. Coconut fibers have low weight and considerable properties among the natural fibers, while coconut fillers have a good ductile and impact property. The natural fibers and fillers are treated with Na-OH to make it free of organic impurities. Epoxy resin is used as the polymer matrix. Two composite are produced one with fillers and the other without the fillers using compression molding method. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and water absorption tests are done with ASTM standard. It is observed that that the addition of filler materials improves the adhesiveness of the fibers leading to the increase in the above mentioned properties. The density of the composite is also low hence the strength to weight ratio is very high. The water absorption test also showed that the resultant composite had a small adhesion to water and absorption of water.

  4. Experimental Study of the Flexural and Compression Performance of an Innovative Pultruded Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Wood Composite Profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujun Qi

    Full Text Available The plate of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer or fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP profile produced via a pultrusion process is likely to undergo local buckling and cracking along the fiber direction under an external load. In this study, we constructed a pultruded glass-fiber-reinforced polymer-light wood composite (PGWC profile to explore its mechanical performance. A rectangular cross-sectional PGWC profile was fabricated with a paulownia wood core, alkali-free glass fiber filaments, and unsaturated phthalate resin. Three-point bending and short column axial compression tests were conducted. Then, the stress calculation for the PGWC profile in the bending and axial compression tests was performed using the Timoshenko beam theory and the composite component analysis method to derive the flexural and axial compression rigidity of the profile during the elastic stress stage. The flexural capacity for this type of PGWC profile is 3.3-fold the sum of the flexural capacities of the wood core and the glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP shell. The equivalent flexural rigidity is 1.5-fold the summed flexural rigidity of the wood core and GFRP shell. The maximum axial compressive bearing capacity for this type of PGWC profile can reach 1.79-fold the sum of those of the wood core and GFRP shell, and its elastic flexural rigidity is 1.2-fold the sum of their rigidities. These results indicate that in PGWC profiles, GFRP and wood materials have a positive combined effect. This study produced a pultruded composite material product with excellent mechanical performance for application in structures that require a large bearing capacity.

  5. Experimental Study of the Flexural and Compression Performance of an Innovative Pultruded Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Wood Composite Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yujun; Xiong, Wei; Liu, Weiqing; Fang, Hai; Lu, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    The plate of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer or fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) profile produced via a pultrusion process is likely to undergo local buckling and cracking along the fiber direction under an external load. In this study, we constructed a pultruded glass-fiber-reinforced polymer-light wood composite (PGWC) profile to explore its mechanical performance. A rectangular cross-sectional PGWC profile was fabricated with a paulownia wood core, alkali-free glass fiber filaments, and unsaturated phthalate resin. Three-point bending and short column axial compression tests were conducted. Then, the stress calculation for the PGWC profile in the bending and axial compression tests was performed using the Timoshenko beam theory and the composite component analysis method to derive the flexural and axial compression rigidity of the profile during the elastic stress stage. The flexural capacity for this type of PGWC profile is 3.3-fold the sum of the flexural capacities of the wood core and the glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) shell. The equivalent flexural rigidity is 1.5-fold the summed flexural rigidity of the wood core and GFRP shell. The maximum axial compressive bearing capacity for this type of PGWC profile can reach 1.79-fold the sum of those of the wood core and GFRP shell, and its elastic flexural rigidity is 1.2-fold the sum of their rigidities. These results indicate that in PGWC profiles, GFRP and wood materials have a positive combined effect. This study produced a pultruded composite material product with excellent mechanical performance for application in structures that require a large bearing capacity.

  6. Investigation on Mechanical Properties of Coir Fiber Reinforced Polymer Resin Composites Saturated with Different Filling Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallusamy, S.; Suganthini Rekha, R.; Karthikeyan, A.

    2017-08-01

    The main objective of this research article is to assess the mechanical properties and fracture analysis of bone and sea shell powders independently integrated with coir fiber polymer composites. The specimen was fabricated with coir fiber at various dimensions of coir fiber like diameter, length, content and mesh size of the powder. Tensile, compressive, flexural and impact tests were conducted in the prepared composite materials as per the techniques of ASTM standard. The fracture faces were explored with the help of SEM images. From the final results it was concluded that the sea shell powder composite provides good tensile and flexural strength than bone powder composite, while bone powder composite material gives good compressive and impact strength than sea shell powder composite material.

  7. Modal analysis of additive manufactured carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite: Experiment and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoveikin, V. A.; Druzhinin, N. V.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    Additive manufacturing is a promising process to develop the multicomponent polymer-matrix composites. The carbon-reinforced versions of such composites possess a low weight and a high specific strength. Here we present the results of studies of numerical and experimental modal analyses of a framework structure made of a composite material by both aforementioned approaches. The numerical test results and those obtained from the laser Doppler vibrometry show the good agreement for several oscillation modes.

  8. Salt-Fog Accelerated Testing of Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caceres, Arsenio

    2002-01-01

    .... These composites included glass- reinforced vinylesters, polyesters, phenolics, and an epoxy. Durability was measured mainly in terms of the loss of elastic modulus and flexural strength after exposure...

  9. A Review of Natural Fiber Reinforced Poly(Vinyl Alcohol Based Composites: Application and Opportunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon Khoon Tan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers are fine examples of renewable resources that play an important role in the composites industry, which produces superior strength comparable to synthetic fibers. Poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA composites in particular have attracted enormous interest in view of their satisfactory performance, properties and biodegradability. Their performance in many applications such as consumer, biomedical, and agriculture is well defined and promising. This paper reviews the utilization of natural fibers from macro to nanoscale as reinforcement in PVA composites. An overview on the properties, processing methods, biodegradability, and applications of these composites is presented. The advantages arising from chemical and physical modifications of fibers or composites are discussed in terms of improved properties and performance. In addition, proper arrangement of nanocellulose in composites helps to prevent agglomeration and results in a better dispersion. The limitations and challenges of the composites and future works of these bio-composites are also discussed. This review concludes that PVA composites have potential for use in numerous applications. However, issues on technological feasibility, environmental effectiveness, and economic affordability should be considered.

  10. Effect of surface treatments on tensile properties of hemp fiber reinforced polypropylene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; He, Lujv; Zhang, Libin

    2017-04-01

    Three forms of hemp fiber (untreated, treated with sodium hydroxide solution and treated with sodium hydroxide solution followed by three-aminopropyltriethoxysilane) reinforced polypropylene composites were prepared. The effects of chemical treatments on tensile properties of the composites were studied. The results show that alkali treatment followed by three-aminopropyltriethoxysilane treatment significantly improves the tensile properties. In particular, the specific tensile strengths of alkali-silane treated composites with 30% fiber content are only 4% lower than those of composites reinforced with glass fiber. Scanning electron microscopy examination shows that the improvements in tensile properties can be attributed to better bonding between the fiber and matrix.

  11. Sound Absorption Properties Of Single-Hole Hollow Polyester Fiber Reinforced Hydrogenated Carboxyl Nitrile Rubber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Hong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of single-hole hollow polyester fiber (SHHPF reinforced hydrogenated carboxyl nitrile rubber (HXNBR composites were fabricated. In this study, the sound absorption property of the HXNBR/SHHPF composite was tested in an impedance tube, the composite morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, and the tensile mechanical property was measured by strength tester. The results demonstrated that a remarkable change in sound absorption can be observed by increasing the SHHPF content from 0% to 40%. In the composite with 40% SHHPF in 1 mm thickness, the sound absorption coefficient reached 0.671 at 2,500 Hz; the effective bandwidth was 1,800-2,500 Hz for sound absorption coefficient larger than 0.2. But the sound absorption property of the composite deteriorated when the SHHPF content increased to 50% in 1 mm thickness. While with 20% SHHPF proportion, the sound absorption property was improved by increasing the thickness of composites from 1 to 5 mm. Compared with the pure HXNBR of the same thickness, the tensile mechanical property of the composite improved significantly by increasing the SHHPF proportion. As a lightweight composite with excellent sound absorption property, the HXNBR/SHHPF composite has potential practical application value in the fields of engineering.

  12. Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite Materials Systems to Enhance Reinforced Concrete Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marshall, Orange

    1998-01-01

    .... Investigations included shear rehabilitation techniques for concrete beams, in field test methods to determine the bond strength of FRP composites, and low temperature evaluation of FRP performance...

  13. Shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to preformed metal crowns for primary molars using a universal adhesive and two different surface treatments: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, S S; Kontham, U R; Kamath, A; Kontham, R

    2016-10-01

    This was to determine the shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to preformed metal crowns with a new adhesive. Buccal surfaces of the crowns were roughened by two different methods to increase retention. Typodont mandibular second primary molars (38) were divided into two groups (19 per group). Preformed metal crowns were cemented to the teeth with glass-ionomer cement. To enhance retention, buccal surfaces of the crowns in group I were roughened with cross-cut carbide burs (SS White #56); crowns in group II were sandblasted (aluminium oxide, 50 µm). Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (3 M-ESPE) was used to bond composite resin to the crowns. A universal testing machine tested the maximum shearing force withstood by the veneered composite surfaces. Sandblasted crowns demonstrated significantly higher resistance (p = 0.001) to shearing force (324.4 N) than did the crowns that were roughened with a bur (234.2 N). Chairside veneering of composite resin to pretreated crowns could be a feasible, aesthetically pleasing, and an economical option in paediatric dentistry.

  14. Mechanical and Morphological Properties of Short Nylon Fiber Reinforced Acrylonitrile-Butadiene Rubber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Mohseniyan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR composites are prepared from waste nylon 66 short fiber using a two-roll mill mixer. The effects of fiber content and bonding agent on the mechanical and morphological properties of the composites are studied. The curing characteristics of the composites have been studied by using cure rheometer. The cure and scorch time of the composites decrease while cure rate is increased when short fiber content is increased. The mechanical properties of the composites show improvement in both longitudinal and transverse directions with increase in short fiber content. The adhesion between the fiber and rubber is enhanced by using a dry bonding system consisting of resorcinol, xamethylenetetramine and hydrated silica (HRH. The swelling behavior of the composites in N,N-dimethylformamide is tested to find the effect of bonding agent on adhesion strength of the matrix and fibers. Fracture surface morphology of composites is studied by scanning electron microscopy. The restriction to swelling is higher for composites containing bonding agent, especially, in the longitudinal direction. The morphology of the fracture surface shows less fiber pull out when the bonding agent is introduced.

  15. Influence of moisture absorption on properties of fiber reinforced polyamide 6 composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raghavalu Thirumalai, Durai Prabhakaran; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Lystrup, Aage

    2011-01-01

    sensitive to moisture, and if PA6 is used as matrix material in a fiber composite, the properties of the fiber composite will depend on the moisture content of the material. At standard condition (23 °C and 50% RH) polyamide6 absorbs about 3 weight-% of water, whereas the PA6 material is dry right after...

  16. Water absorption and tensile strength degradation of Petung bamboo (Dendrocalamus asper) fiber-reinforced polymeric composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Judawisastra, H.; Sitohang, Ramona; Rosadi, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Bamboo fibers have attracted great interest and are believed to have the potential as natural fiber for reinforcing polymer composites. This research aims to study water absorption behavior and its effect to tensile strength of the composites made from petung bamboo fiber, which is one of the most

  17. Effect of the surface roughness on interfacial properties of carbon fibers reinforced epoxy resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Wei; Gu Aijuan; Liang Guozheng; Yuan Li

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the surface roughness on interfacial properties of carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy (EP) resin composite is studied. Aqueous ammonia was applied to modify the surfaces of CFs. The morphologies and chemical compositions of original CFs and treated CFs (a-CFs) were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Compared with the smooth surface of original CF, the surface of a-CF has bigger roughness; moreover, the roughness increases with the increase of the treating time. On the other hand, no obvious change in chemical composition takes place, indicating that the treating mechanism of CFs by aqueous ammonia is to physically change the morphologies rather than chemical compositions. In order to investigate the effect of surface roughness on the interfacial properties of CF/EP composites, the wettability and Interfacial Shear Strength (IFSS) were measured. Results show that with the increase of the roughness, the wettabilities of CFs against both water and ethylene glycol improves; in addition, the IFSS value of composites also increases. These attractive phenomena prove that the surface roughness of CFs can effectively overcome the poor interfacial adhesions between CFs and organic matrix, and thus make it possible to fabricate advanced composites based on CFs.

  18. Mechanical properties of unidirectional oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, C. S.; Yeo, C. W.; Sahari, B.; Salit, M. S.; Aziz, N. Abdul

    2017-06-01

    Natural fibers have proven to be an excellent reinforcement material for various polymers. In this study, OPEFB fiber with unidirectional alignment was incorporated in epoxy and an investigation on tensile and flexural characteristics of the composite has been carried out. A fiber surface modification utilizing alkaline treatment with 1 sodium hydroxide solution was used in order to increase the fiber matrix bond in the composite. The investigation was carried out for 0°, 45° and 90° fiber orientation. Result showed that the higher the angle of the fiber orientation, the higher the tensile strength and flexural strength the composite will yield.

  19. In vitro evaluation of fracture resistance of Fiber-Reinforced Composite inlay bridges in upper anterior and lower posterior teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalalian E.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Considering flexural strength of fiber-reinforced composites (FRC and also the role of conservative cavities in protecting sound tissue of abutments, the aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of these bridges by handmade samples in vitro.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 44 sound newly extracted teeth were used to make 22 fixed inlay bridges including 11 three unit anterior upper inlay bridges substituting clinical model of upper central and 11 three unit posterior lower inlay bridges substituting clinical model of lower first molar. Specimens were prepared with FRC and mounted with artificial PDL in acryl. Cases were exposed to final load by using Universal Testing Machine (Instron 1195 with the speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical analysis was performed by Kolmogorov- Smirnov, independent sample T and Kaplan-Meier tests with p<0.05 as the level of significance.Results: Based on the statistical tests, the 95% confidence interval of mean was 450-562 N in anterior and  1473- 1761 N in posterior area. Fracture strength was high in the studied groups. Fractures in both groups occurred on composite facing, and the framework remained intact. The highest percentage of fracture in posterior teeth was in the middle of pontic towards the distal connector and in the anterior teeth in the lateral connector, between central pontic and lateral abutment. Using the independent sample T  test a significant statistical difference was observed between two groups (P<0.001. The fracture resistance of anterior samples was lower than the posterior ones.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study regarding the high fracture resistance in both areas FRC inlay bridges could be recommended for upper anterior and lower posterior teeth in clinical dentistry certainly more studies are needed to ascertain this treatment option.

  20. Root canal filling: fracture strength of fiber-reinforced composite-restored roots and finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippe, Marília Pivetta; Santini, Manuela Favarin; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of root canal filling techniques on root fracture resistance and to analyze, by finite element analysis (FEA), the expansion of the endodontic sealer in two different root canal techniques. Thirty single-rooted human teeth were instrumented with rotary files to a standardized working length of 14 mm. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin using plastic cylinders as molds, and allocated into 3 groups (n=10): G(lateral) - lateral condensation; G(single-cone) - single cone; G(tagger) - Tagger's hybrid technique. The root canals were prepared to a length of 11 mm with the #3 preparation bur of a tapered glass fiber-reinforced composite post system. All roots received glass fiber posts, which were adhesively cemented and a composite resin core was built. All groups were subjected to a fracture strength test (1 mm/min, 45°). Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA with a significance level of 5%. FEA was performed using two models: one simulated lateral condensation and Tagger's hybrid technique, and the other one simulated the single-cone technique. The second model was designed with an amount of gutta-percha two times smaller and a sealer layer two times thicker than the first model. The results were analyzed using von Mises stress criteria. One-way ANOVA indicated that the root canal filling technique affected the fracture strength (p=0.004). The G(lateral) and G(tagger) produced similar fracture strength values, while G(single-cone) showed the lowest values. The FEA showed that the single-cone model generated higher stress in the root canal walls. Sealer thickness seems to influence the fracture strength of restored endodontically treated teeth.

  1. High-Strength and Optically Transparent Fiber-Reinforced Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For many applications there exists a need for mechanically strong composite materials of high optical quality and transparency equivalent to window glass. One method...

  2. Dynamic mechanical and dielectric behavior of banana–glass hybrid fiber reinforced polyester composites.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pothan, LA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid composites of glass and banana fiber (obtained from the pseudo stem of Musa sapientum) in polyester matrix, are subjected to dynamic mechanical analysis over a range of temperature and three different frequencies. The effect of temperature...

  3. Natural Mallow Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composite for Ballistic Armor Against Class III-A Ammunition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Lucio Fabio Cassiano; Holanda, Luane Isquerdo Ferreira; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Gomes, Alaelson Vieira; Lima, Édio Pereira

    2017-10-01

    Epoxy matrix composites reinforced with up to 30 vol pct of continuous and aligned natural mallow fibers were for the first time ballistic tested as personal armor against class III-A 9 mm FMJ ammunition. The ballistic efficiency of these composites was assessed by measuring the dissipated energy and residual velocity after the bullet perforation. The results were compared to those in similar tests of aramid fabric (Kevlar™) commonly used in vests for personal protections. Visual inspection and scanning electron microscopy analysis of impact-fractured samples revealed failure mechanisms associated with fiber pullout and rupture as well as epoxy cracking. As compared to Kevlar™, the mallow fiber composite displayed practically the same ballistic efficiency. However, there is a reduction in both weight and cost, which makes the mallow fiber composites a promising material for personal ballistic protection.

  4. A Review of Issues and Strategies in Non-Destructive Evaluation of Fiber Reinforced Structural Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vary, Alex

    1979-01-01

    This paper emphasizes the need for advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for quantitative assessment of the mechanical strength and integrity of fiber composites during manufacture and service and following repair operations...

  5. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of graphite fiber-reinforced copper matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.; Mcdanels, David L.

    1993-01-01

    The high specific conductivity of graphite fiber/copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites offers great potential for high heat flux structures operating at elevated temperatures. To determine the feasibility of applying Gr/Cu composites to high heat flux structures, composite plates were fabricated using unidirectional and cross-plied pitch-based P100 graphite fibers in a pure copper matrix. Thermal conductivity of the composites was measured from room temperature to 1073 K, and thermal expansion was measured from room temperature to 1050 K. The longitudinal thermal conductivity, parallel to the fiber direction, was comparable to pure copper. The transverse thermal conductivity, normal to the fiber direction, was less than that of pure copper and decreased with increasing fiber content. The longitudinal thermal expansion decreased with increasing fiber content. The transverse thermal expansion was greater than pure copper and nearly independent of fiber content.

  6. Conduction noise absorption by fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ok Hyoung; Kim, Sung-Soo; Lim, Yun-Soo

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all electronic equipment is susceptible to malfunction as a result of electromagnetic interference. In this study, glass fiber, and carbon fiber as a type reinforcement and epoxy as a matrix material were used to fabricate composite materials. In an attempt to increase the conduction noise absorption, carbon nanotubes were grown on the surface of glass fibers and carbon fibers. A microstrip line with characteristic impedance of 50 Ω in connection with network analyzer was used to measure the conduction noise absorption. In comparing a glass fiber/epoxy composite with a GF-CNT/Ep composite, it was demonstrated that the CNTs significantly influence the noise absorption property mainly due to increase in electric conductivity. In the carbon fiber composites, however, the effectiveness of CNTs on the degree of electric conductivity is negligible, resulting in a small change in reflection and transmission of an electromagnetic wave. - Research Highlights: → In this study, glass fiber and carbon fiber as a type reinforcement and epoxy as a matrix material were used to fabricate composite materials. In an attempt to increase the conduction noise absorption, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on the surface of glass fibers and carbon fibers. A microstrip line with characteristic impedance of 50 Ω in connection with network analyzer was used to measure the conduction noise absorption. → In comparing a glass fiber/epoxy composite with a GF-CNT/Ep composite, it was demonstrated that the CNTs significantly influence the noise absorption property mainly due to increase in electric conductivity. In the carbon fiber composites, however, the effectiveness of CNTs on the degree of electric conductivity is negligible, resulting in a small change in reflection and transmission of an electromagnetic wave.

  7. Optimization and Static Stress Analysis of Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Composite Leaf Spring

    OpenAIRE

    Luay Muhammed Ali Ismaeel

    2015-01-01

    A monofiber reinforced composite leaf spring is proposed as an alternative to the typical steel one as it is characterized by high strength-to-weight ratio. Different reinforcing schemes are suggested to fabricate the leaf spring. The composite and the typical steel leaf springs are subjected to the same working conditions. A weight saving of about more than 60% can be achieved while maintaining the strength for the structures under consideration. The objective of the present study was to rep...

  8. Mechanical and physical properties of wood fiber-reinforced, sulfur-based wood composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse; Ben S. Bryant

    1993-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite was made from sulfur impregnated, oven dried, wet-formed fiber mats. The fiber mats consisted of a 50/50 mixture of recycled newsprint pulp and mechanical hardwood pulp from several species made from chips in a laboratory refiner. The thickness of the composites was 0.125 inch and the specific gravity of the unimpregnated fiber mat was 0.2. The...

  9. A plant fiber reinforced polymer composite prepared by a twin-screw extruder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, G; Fuqua, M A; Ulven, C A; Zhong, W H

    2009-02-01

    Polypropylene (PP) composites reinforced using a novel plant fiber, sunflower hull sanding dust (SHSD), were prepared using a twin-screw extruder. Thermal and mechanical properties of the SHSD/PP composites were characterized and compared to an organically modified clay (organo-clay)/PP composite. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis showed that the crystallization temperature and the degree of crystallinity of PP exhibited changes with addition of SHSD and organo-clay. Mechanical properties of the PP were enhanced with the addition of SHSDs. Both the flexural strength and flexural modulus of the PP composites containing 5% (w/w) SHSD were comparable to that of the 5% (w/w) organo-clay reinforced PP. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation showed that no obvious agglomeration of SHSD existed in the PP matrix. Compared to the neat PP and organo-clay/PP, the SHSD/PP composites exhibited a relatively decreasing rate of thermal degradation with increase in temperature. Experimental results suggest that SHSD, as a sunflower processing byproduct, may find promising applications in composite materials.

  10. Experimental Investigation and Analysis of Mercerized and Citric Acid Surface Treated Bamboo Fiber Reinforced Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Jyotiraman; Baxi, R. N., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Mercerization or NaOH fiber surface treatment is one of the most popular surface treatment processes to make the natural fibers such as bamboo fibers compatible for use as reinforcing material in composites. But NaOH being a chemical is hazardous and polluting to the nature. This paper explores the possibility of use of naturally derived citric acid for bamboo fiber surface treatment and its comparison with NaOH treated Bamboo Fiber Composites. Untreated, 2.5 wt% NaOH treated and 5 wt% citric acid treated Bamboo Fiber Composites with 5 wt% fiber content were developed by Hand Lay process. Bamboo mats made of bamboo slivers were used as reinforcing material. Mechanical and physical characterization was done to compare the effects of NaOH and citric acid bamboo fiber surface treatment on mechanical and physical properties of Bamboo Fiber Composite. The experiment data reveals that the tensile and flexural strength was found to be highest for citric acid and NaOH treated Bamboo Fiber Composite respectively. Water absorption tendency was found more than the NaOH treated Bamboo Fiber Composites. SEM micrographs used to analyze the morphology of fracture surface of tensile test specimens confirm improvement in fiber-matrix interface bonding due to surface treatment of bamboo fibers.

  11. Smart Natural Fiber Reinforced Plastic (NFRP) Composites Based On Recycled Polypropylene in The Presence Kaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharty, N. S.; Ismail, H.; Diharjo, K.; Handayani, D. S.; Lestari, W. A.

    2017-07-01

    Composites contain double filler material which act as reinforcement and flame retardants of recycled polypropylene (rPP)/kaolin(Kao)/palm oil empty bunch fiber (PEBF) have been succesfully prepared. The composites were synthesized through reactively solution method, using coupling agent PP-g-AA and compatibilizer DVB. The effect of double filler [Kao/PEBF] were investigated flexural strength (FS), inflammability, and morphology. Mechanical testing result in accordance to ASTM D790, the FS of rPP/DVB/PP-g-AA/Kao+ZB/PEBF composite was 48% higher than that of rPP matrix. Moreover, flexural modulus (FM) was significantly improved by 56% as compared to that of rPP matrix. The scanning electron images (SEM) shown good dispersion of [Ka/PEBF] and good filler-matrix interaction. The inflammability testing result which is tested using ASTM D635, showed that the flame resistance of rPP/DVB/PP-g-AA/Kao+ZB/PEBF composite was improve by increasing of time to ignition (TTI) about 857% and burning rate (BR) decreasing to 66% compared to the raw material rPP matrix. In the same time, the addition of 20% (w/w) PEBF as a second filler to form rPP/DVB/PP-g-AA/Kao+ZB/PEBF composites (F5) is able to increase: the FS by 17.5%, the FM by 19%, the TTI by 7.6% and the BR by 3.7% compared to the composite without PEBF (F2).

  12. Thermal Protection of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Composites by Ceramic Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljinder Kandola

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal barrier efficiency of two types of ceramic particle, glass flakes and aluminum titanate, dispersed on the surface of carbon-fiber epoxy composites, has been evaluated using a cone calorimeter at 35 and 50 kW/m2, in addition to temperature gradients through the samples’ thicknesses, measured by inserting thermocouples on the exposed and back surfaces during the cone tests. Two techniques of dispersing ceramic particles on the surface have been employed, one where particles were dispersed on semi-cured laminate and the other where their dispersion in a phenolic resin was applied on the laminate surface, using the same method as used previously for glass fiber composites. The morphology and durability of the coatings to water absorption, peeling, impact and flexural tension were also studied and compared with those previously reported for glass-fiber epoxy composites. With both methods, uniform coatings could be achieved, which were durable to peeling or water absorption with a minimal adverse effect on the mechanical properties of composites. While all these properties were comparable to those previously observed for glass fiber composites, the ceramic particles have seen to be more effective on this less flammable, carbon fiber composite substrate.

  13. Anisotropic Dielectric Properties of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites during Microwave Curing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linglin; Li, Yingguang; Zhou, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Microwave cuing technology is a promising alternative to conventional autoclave curing technology in high efficient and energy saving processing of polymer composites. Dielectric properties of composites are key parameters related to the energy conversion efficiency during the microwave curing process. However, existing methods of dielectric measurement cannot be applied to the microwave curing process. This paper presented an offline test method to solve this problem. Firstly, a kinetics model of the polymer composites under microwave curing was established based on differential scanning calorimetry to describe the whole curing process. Then several specially designed samples of different feature cure degrees were prepared and used to reflect the dielectric properties of the composite during microwave curing. It was demonstrated to be a feasible plan for both test accuracy and efficiency through extensive experimental research. Based on this method, the anisotropic complex permittivity of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite during microwave curing was accurately determined. Statistical results indicated that both the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the composite increased at the initial curing stage, peaked at the maximum reaction rate point and decreased finally during the microwave curing process. Corresponding mechanism has also been systematically investigated in this work.

  14. Characterization, Long-Term Behavior Evaluation and Thermomechanical Properties of Untreated and Treated Flax Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Ali

    In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in the usage of natural fiber reinforced composites in more advanced structural applications. Consequently, the need for improving their mechanical properties as well as service life and long-term behavior modeling and predictions has arisen. In a step towards further development of these materials, in this study, two newly developed biobased resins, derived from soybean oil, methacrylated epoxidized sucrose soyate and double methacrylated epoxidized sucrose soyate are combined with untreated and alkaline treated flax fiber to produce novel biocomposites. Vinyl ester reinforced with flax fiber is used as control in addition to comparing properties of biobased composites against commercial pultruded composites. Effects of alkaline treatment of flax fiber as well as addition of 1% acrylic resin to vinyl ester and the two mentioned biobased resins on mechanical properties are studied. Properties are evaluated in short-term and also, after being exposed to accelerated weathering (i.e. UV and moisture). Moreover, long-term creep of these novel biobased composites and effect of fiber and matrix treatment on viscoelastic behavior is investigated using Time-temperature superposition (TTS) principle. Based on the results of this study, the TTS provides an accelerated method for evaluation of mechanical properties of biobased composites, and satisfactory master curves are achieved by use of this principle. Also, fiber and matrix treatments were effective in increasing mechanical properties of biobased composites in short-term, and treatments delayed the creep response and slowed the process of creep in composites under study in the steady state region. Overall, results of this study reveal the successful production of biocomposites having properties that meet or exceed those of conventional pultruded members while maintaining high biocontent. Composites using treated flax fiber and newly developed resins showed less

  15. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon-Al-Cu Composite for Friction Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lihui; Luo, Ruiying; Ma, Denghao

    2018-03-31

    A carbon/carbon-Al-Cu composite reinforced with carbon fiber 2.5D-polyacrylonitrile-based preforms was fabricated using the pressureless infiltration technique. The Al-Cu alloy liquids were successfully infiltrated into the C/C composites at high temperature and under vacuum. The mechanical and metallographic properties, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) of the C/C-Al-Cu composites were analyzed. The results showed that the bending property of the C/C-Al-Cu composites was 189 MPa, whereas that of the pure carbon slide material was only 85 MPa. The compressive strength of C/C-Al-Cu was 213 MPa, whereas that of the pure carbon slide material was only 102 MPa. The resistivity of C/C-Al-Cu was only 1.94 μΩm, which was lower than that of the pure carbon slide material (29.5 μΩm). This finding can be attributed to the "network conduction" structure. Excellent wettability was observed between Al and the carbon matrix at high temperature due to the existence of Al₄C₃. The friction coefficients of the C/C, C/C-Al-Cu, and pure carbon slide composites were 0.152, 0.175, and 0.121, respectively. The wear rate of the C/C-Al-Cu composites reached a minimum value of 2.56 × 10 -7 mm³/Nm. The C/C-Al-Cu composite can be appropriately used as railway current collectors for locomotives.

  16. A Study of Failure Strength for Fiber-Reinforced Composite Laminates with Consideration of Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Ye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite laminates can exhibit the nonlinear properties due to the fiber/matrix interface debonding and matrix plastic deformation. In this paper, by incorporating the interface stress-displacement relations between fibers and matrix, as well as the viscoplastic constitutive model for describing plastic behaviors of matrix materials, a micromechanical model is used to investigate the failure strength of the composites with imperfect interface bonding. Meanwhile, the classic laminate theory, which provides the relation between micro- and macroscale responses for composite laminates, is employed. Theory results show good consistency with the experimental data under unidirectional tensile conditions at both 23°C and 650°C. On this basis, the interface debonding influences on the failure strength of the [0/90]s and [0/±45/90]s composite laminates are studied. The numerical results show that all of the unidirectional (UD laminates with imperfect interface bonding provide a sharp decrease in failure strength in the σxx-σyy plane at 23°C. However, the decreasing is restricted in some specific region. In addition, for [0/90]s and [0/±45/90]s composite laminates, the debonding interface influences on the failure envelope can be ignored when the working temperature is increased to 650°C.

  17. Mallow Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites in Multilayered Armor for Personal Ballistic Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Lucio Fábio Cassiano; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Lima, Édio Pereira; da Luz, Fernanda Santos

    2017-10-01

    Lighter and less expensive polymer composites reinforced with natural fibers have been investigated as possible components of a multilayered armor system (MAS) for personal protection against high-velocity ammunition. Their ballistic performance was consistently found comparable with that of conventional Kevlar® synthetic aramid fiber. Among the numerous existing natural fibers with the potential for reinforcing polymer composites to replace Kevlar® in MAS, mallow fiber has not been fully investigated. Thus, the objective of this work is to evaluate the ballistic performance of epoxy composites reinforced with 30 vol.% of aligned mallow fibers as a second MAS layer backing a front ceramic plate. The results using high-velocity 7.62 ammunition show a similar indentation to a Kevlar® layer with the same thickness. An impedance matching calculation supports the similar ballistic performance of mallow fiber composite and Kevlar®. Reduced MAS costs associated with the mallow fiber composite are practical advantages over Kevlar®.

  18. Drop Weight Impact Studies of Woven Fibers Reinforced Modified Polyester Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Tijani ISA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Low velocity impact tests were conducted on modified unsaturated polyester reinforced with four different woven fabrics using hand-layup method to investigate the effect of fiber type and fiber combinations. The time-load curves were analysed and scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the surface of the impacted composite laminates. The results indicated that all the composites had ductility index (DI of above two for the test conducted at impact energy of 27J with the monolithic composite of Kevlar having the highest DI. The damage modes observed were mainly matrix cracks and fiber breakages. Hybridization of the fibers in the matrix was observed to minimize these damages.

  19. The effects of corn zein protein coupling agent on mechanical properties of flax fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, Ryan John

    In the field of renewable materials, natural fiber composites demonstrate the capacity to be a viable structural material. When normalized by density, flax fiber mechanical properties are competitive with E-glass fibers. However, the hydrophilic nature of flax fibers reduces the interfacial bond strength with polymer thermosets, limiting composite mechanical properties. Corn zein protein was selected as a natural bio-based coupling agent because of its combination of hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties. Zein was deposited on the surface of flax, which was then processed into unidirectional composite. The mechanical properties of zein treated samples where measured and compared against commonly utilized synthetic treatments sodium hydroxide and silane which incorporate harsh chemicals. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, chemical analysis, and scanning electron microscopy were also used to determine analyze zein treatments. Results demonstrate the environmentally friendly zein treatment successfully increased tensile strength 8%, flexural strength 17%, and shear strength 30% compared to untreated samples.

  20. Final Report: Interphase Analysis and Control in Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon J. Kellar; William M. Cross; Lidvin Kjerengtroen

    2009-03-14

    This research program builds upon a multi-disciplinary effort in interphase analysis and control in thermoplastic matrix polymer matrix composites (PMC). The research investigates model systems deemed of interest by members of the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) as well as samples at the forefront of PMC process development (DRIFT and P4 technologies). Finally, the research investigates, based upon the fundamental understanding of the interphases created during the fabrication of thermoplastic PMCs, the role the interphase play in key bulk properties of interest to the automotive industry.

  1. Influence of chemical treatment on the tensile properties of kenaf fiber reinforced thermoplastic polyurethane composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. El-Shekeil

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of polymeric Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (pMDI chemical treatment on kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus reinforced thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU/KF was examined using two different procedures. The first consisted of treating the fibers with 4% pMDI, and the second involved 2% NaOH + 4% pMDI. The composites were characterized according to their tensile properties, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The treatment of the composite with 4% pMDI did not significantly affect its tensile properties, but the treatment with 2% NaOH + 4% pMDI significantly increased the tensile properties of the composite (i.e., 30 and 42% increases in the tensile strength and modulus, respectively. FTIR also showed that treatment with 2% NaOH + 4% pMDI led to the strongest H-bonding. Additionally, the surface morphology of specimens after tensile fracture confirmed that the composite treated with 2% NaOH + 4% pMDI had the best adhesion and wettability.

  2. Viscoelastic bending model for continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites in melt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachs, U.; Akkerman, R.

    2017-01-01

    Bending of single plies or stacks of multiple plies is an essential deformation mechanism during thermoforming of thermoplastic composites. A reliable prediction of the forming process requires an accurate description of the bending behavior. To this end, a characterization method for the bending of

  3. Interlaminar/interfiber failure of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced composites used for wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leong, Martin Klitgaard; Overgaard, Lars C. T.; M. Daniel,, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    A unidirectional glass fiber/epoxy composite was characterized under multi-axial loading by testing off-axis specimens under uniaxial tension and compression at various angles relative to the fiber direction. Iosipescu shear tests were performed with both symmetric and asymmetric specimens. Tests...

  4. Numerical investigation of friction joint between Basalt Fiber Reinforced Composites and aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costache, Andrei; Berggreen, Christian; Sivebæk, Ion Marius

    2016-01-01

    Flexible risers are used in the offshore oil industry for exporting hydrocarbons from subsea equipment to floatingproduction and storage vessels. The latest research in unbonded flexible pipes aims to reduce weight by replacing metal components with composite materials. This would result in lighter...

  5. Recent advances in electron-beam curing of carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coqueret, Xavier; Krzeminski, Mickael; Ponsaud, Philippe; Defoort, Brigitte

    2009-07-01

    Cross-linking polymerization initiated by high-energy radiation is a very attractive technique for the fabrication of high-performance composite materials. The method offers many advantages compared to conventional energy- and time-consuming thermal curing processes. Free radical and cationic poly-addition chemistries have been investigated in some details by various research groups along the previous years. A high degree of control over curing kinetics and material properties can be exerted by adjusting the composition of matrix precursors as well as by acting on process parameters. However, the comparison with state-of-the-art thermally cured composites revealed the lower transverse mechanical properties of radiation-cured composites and the higher brittleness of the radiation-cured matrix. Improving fiber-matrix adhesion and upgrading polymer network toughness are thus two major challenges in this area. We have investigated several points related to these issues, and particularly the reduction of the matrix shrinkage on curing, the wettability of carbon fibers, the design of fiber-matrix interface and the use of thermoplastic toughening agents. Significant improvements were achieved on transverse strain at break by applying original surface treatments on the fibers so as to induce covalent coupling with the matrix. A drastic enhancement of the K IC value exceeding 2 MPa m 1/2 was also obtained for acrylate-based matrices toughened with high T g thermoplastics.

  6. The mechanics of delamination in fiber-reinforced composite materials. I - Stress singularities and solution structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1983-01-01

    The fundamental mechanics of delamination in fiber composite laminates is studied. Mathematical formulation of the problem is based on laminate anisotropic elasticity theory and interlaminar fracture mechanics concepts. Stress singularities and complete solution structures associated with general composite delaminations are determined. For a fully open delamination with traction-free surfaces, oscillatory stress singularities always appear, leading to physically inadmissible field solutions. A refined model is introduced by considering a partially closed delamination with crack surfaces in finite-length contact. Stress singularities associated with a partially closed delamination having frictional crack-surface contact are determined, and are found to be different from the inverse square-root one of the frictionless-contact case. In the case of a delamination with very small area of crack closure, a simplified model having a square-root stress singularity is employed by taking the limit of the partially closed delamination. The possible presence of logarithmic-type stress singularity is examined; no logarithmic singularity of any kind is found in the composite delamination problem. Numerical examples of dominant stress singularities are shown for delaminations having crack-tip closure with different frictional coefficients between general (1) and (2) graphite-epoxy composites. Previously announced in STAR as N84-13221

  7. Damage Tolerance Enhancement of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites by Nanoreinforcement of Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Joel Stewart

    Nanocomposites are a relatively new class of materials which incorporate exotic, engineered nanoparticles to achieve superior material properties. Because of their extremely small size and well-ordered structure, many nanoparticles possess properties that exceed those offered by a wide range of other known materials, making them attractive candidates for novel materials engineering development. Their small size is also an impediment to their practical use, as they typically cannot be employed by themselves to realize those properties in large structures. Furthermore, nanoparticles typically possess strong self-affinity, rendering them difficult to disperse uniformly into a composite. However, contemporary research has shown that, if well-dispersed, nanoparticles have great capacity to improve the mechanical properties of composites, especially damage tolerance, in the form of fracture toughness, fatigue life, and impact damage mitigation. This research focuses on the development, manufacturing, and testing of hybrid micro/nanocomposites comprised of woven carbon fibers with a carbon nanotube reinforced epoxy matrix. Material processing consisted of dispersant-and-sonication based methods to disperse nanotubes into the matrix, and a vacuum-assisted wet lay-up process to prepare the hybrid composite laminates. Various damage tolerance properties of the hybrid composite were examined, including static strength, fracture toughness, fatigue life, fatigue crack growth rate, and impact damage behavior, and compared with similarly-processed reference material produced without nanoreinforcement. Significant improvements were obtained in interlaminar shear strength (15%), Mode-I fracture toughness (180%), shear fatigue life (order of magnitude), Mode-I fatigue crack growth rate (factor of 2), and effective impact damage toughness (40%). Observations by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and ultrasonic imaging showed significant differences in failure behavior

  8. Effect of implant design and bioactive glass coating on biomechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composite implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballo, Ahmed M; Akca, Eralp; Ozen, Tuncer; Moritz, Niko; Lassila, Lippo; Vallittu, Pekka; Närhi, Timo

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of implant design and bioactive glass (BAG) coating on the response of bone to fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) implants. Three different FRC implant types were manufactured for the study: non-threaded implants with a BAG coating; threaded implants with a BAG coating; and threaded implants with a grit-blasted surface. Thirty-six implants (six implants for each group per time point) were installed in the tibiae of six pigs. After an implantation period of 4 and 12 wk, the implants were retrieved and prepared for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), push-out testing, and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Micro-CT demonstrated that the screw-threads and implant structure remained undamaged during the installation. The threaded FRC/BAG implants had the highest bone volume after 12 wk of implantation. The push-out strengths of the threaded FRC/BAG implants after 4 and 12 wk (463°N and 676°N, respectively) were significantly higher than those of the threaded FRC implants (416°N and 549°N, respectively) and the nonthreaded FRC/BAG implants (219°N and 430°N, respectively). Statistically significant correlation was found between bone volume and push-out strength values. This study showed that osseointegrated FRC implants can withstand the static loading up to failure without fracture, and that the addition of BAG significantly improves the push-out strength of FRC implants. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  9. The effect of custom adaptation and span-diameter ratio on the flexural properties of fiber-reinforced composite posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Nicola M; Plotino, Gianluca; Ioppolo, Pietro; Bedini, Rossella; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Somma, Francesco

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate whether custom modification resulting in an anatomically shaped post and whether the span/diameter ratio (L/D) would affect the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composite posts. Preformed glass-fiber posts (Group 1) and modified glass-fiber posts (Group 2) and glass-fiber rods (Groups 3 and 4) (n=20) were loaded to failure in a three-point bending test to determine the maximum load (N), flexural strength (MPa) and flexural modulus (GPa). The span distance tested for Group 3 was 10.0mm, while for Group 4 was 22.0mm. Data were subjected to different statistical analysis with significance levels of P<0.05. The maximum load recorded for Groups 1 and 2 was 72.5+/-5.9N and 73.4+/-6.4N respectively, while for Groups 3 and 4 was 215.3+/-7N and 156.6+/-3.6N respectively. The flexural strength for Groups 1 and 2 was 914.6+/-53.1MPa and 1069.2+/-115.6MPa, while for Groups 3 and 4 was 685.4+/-22.2MPa and 899.6+/-46.1MPa. The flexural modulus recorded for Groups 1 and 2 was 32.6+/-3.2GPa and 33.4+/-2.2GPa respectively, while for Groups 3 and 4 was 13.7+/-0.3GPa and 34.4+/-0.3GPa respectively. The flexural properties of an anatomically custom modified fiber post were not affected by the modification procedure and the span-diameter ratio is an important parameter for the interpretation of flexural strength and flexural modulus values.

  10. Radiation resistance of the carbon fiber reinforced composite material with PEEK as the matrix resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Seguchi, Tadao; Sakai, Hideo; Nakakura, Toshiyuki; Masutani, Masahiro.

    1987-01-01

    In the fast breeder reactor etc. the structural materials are exposed to various environment, i.e., repeated high and low temperature, stress, etc. Irradiation effect (electron radiation) in the mechanical characteristic at low and high temperature has been studied in the PEEK-CF, polyarylether · ether · ketone - carbon fiber composite. Following are the results. (1) Radiation resistance of PEEK-CF is higher than that of PEEK-PES-CF, PEEK - polyethersulfone surface treated CF composite. In PEEK-PES-CF, PES is deteriorated by irradiation so the adhesive power lowers. (2) In the unirradiated PEEK-CF, its mechanical characteristic decreases beyond 140 deg C. With increase of the radiation dose, however, the characteristic rises. (3) Mechanical characteristic of PEEK-CF thus little drops by the heat treatment after the irradiation. (Mori, K.)

  11. Monitoring the Damage State of Fiber Reinforced Composites Using an FBG Network for Failure Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esat Selim Kocaman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A structural health monitoring (SHM study of biaxial glass fibre-reinforced epoxy matrix composites under a constant, high strain uniaxial fatigue loading is performed using fibre Bragg grating (FBG optical sensors embedded in composites at various locations to monitor the evolution of local strains, thereby understanding the damage mechanisms. Concurrently, the temperature changes of the samples during the fatigue test have also been monitored at the same locations. Close to fracture, significant variations in local temperatures and strains are observed, and it is shown that the variations in temperature and strain can be used to predict imminent fracture. It is noted that the latter information cannot be obtained using external strain gages, which underlines the importance of the tracking of local strains internally.

  12. Low pressure process for continuous fiber reinforced polyamic acid resin matrix composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druyun, Darleen A. (Inventor); Hou, Tan-Hung (Inventor); Kidder, Paul W. (Inventor); Reddy, Rakasi M. (Inventor); Baucom, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A low pressure processor was developed for preparing a well-consolidated polyimide composite laminate. Prepreg plies were formed from unidirectional fibers and a polyamic acid resin solution. Molding stops were placed at the sides of a matched metal die mold. The prepreg plies were cut shorter than the length of the mold in the in-plane lateral direction and were stacked between the molding stops to a height which was higher than the molding stops. The plies were then compressed to the height of the stops and heated to allow the volatiles to escape and to start the imidization reaction. After removing the stops from the mold, the heat was increased and 0 - 500 psi was applied to complete the imidization reaction. The heat and pressure were further increased to form a consolidated polyimide composite laminate.

  13. Thermographic Non-Destructive Evaluation for Natural Fiber-Reinforced Composite Laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers, including mineral and plant fibers, are increasingly used for polymer composite materials due to their low environmental impact. In this paper, thermographic non-destructive inspection techniques were used to evaluate and characterize basalt, jute/hemp and bagasse fibers composite panels. Different defects were analyzed in terms of impact damage, delaminations and resin abnormalities. Of particular interest, homogeneous particleboards of sugarcane bagasse, a new plant fiber material, were studied. Pulsed phase thermography and principal component thermography were used as the post-processing methods. In addition, ultrasonic C-scan and continuous wave terahertz imaging were also carried out on the mineral fiber laminates for comparative purposes. Finally, an analytical comparison of different methods was given.

  14. Cold spray of metal-polymer composite coatings onto carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP)

    OpenAIRE

    Bortolussi, Vincent; Borit, François; Chesnaud, Anthony; Jeandin, Michel; Faessel, Matthieu; Figliuzzi, Bruno; Willot, François; Roche, K.; Surdon, G.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The growing use of Polymer-Matrix Composite (PMC) materials within transport industry raises new security concerns, especially those due to lightning. To protect these electrically insulating materials, conductive coatings can be applied. Due to the high level of required properties, cold spray is believed to be an effective way to achieve these coatings. Recent studies showed that obstacles remained to be overcome when cold spraying metallic particles onto Carbon Fibe...

  15. PES/POSS Soluble Veils as Advanced Modifiers for Multifunctional Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Cicala

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Novel polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS-filled thermoplastic electrospun veils were used to tailor the properties of the interlaminar region of epoxy-based composites. The veils were designed to be soluble upon curing in the epoxy matrix, so that POSS could be released within the interlaminar region. Three different POSS contents, varying from 1 to 10 wt %, were tested while the percentage of coPolyethersulphone (coPES dissolved in the epoxy resin was kept to a fixed value of 10 wt %. Good quality veils could be obtained at up to 10 wt % of POSS addition, with the nanofibers’ diameters varying from 861 nm for the coPES to 428 nm upon POSS addition. The feasibility of the soluble veils to disperse POSS in the interlaminar region was proved, and the effect of POSS on phase morphology and viscoelastic properties studied. POSS was demonstrated to significantly affect the morphology and viscoelastic properties of epoxy composites, especially for the percentages 1% and 5%, which enabled the composites to avoid POSS segregates occurring. A dynamic mechanical analysis showed a significant improvement to the storage modulus, and a shift of more than 30 °C due to the POSS cages hindering the motion of the molecular chains and network junctions.

  16. Study of the time varying properties of flax fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochioiu, Constantin; Chettah, Ameur; Piezel, Benoit; Fontaine, Stéphane; Gheorghiu, Horia-Miron

    2018-02-01

    Bio materials have seen an increase of interest from the scientific community and the industry as a possible future generation of mass produced materials, some of the main arguments being their renewability, low production costs and recyclability. The current work is focused on the experimental data required for the viscoelastic characterization of a composite material. Similar work has been conducted on different types of composite materials by Tuttle and Brinson [1] who verified for a carbon epoxy laminate the possibility of long term predicament of creep. Nordin et al [2] studied paper impregnated with phenol-formaldehyde under compression. Muliana [3] conducted experiments on E-glass/vinyl ester materials. Behavior characterization was based on a model presented by Schapery [4]. The main objective of this work is to understand the mechanical behaviors of bio-laminates structures subjected to long and severe operating conditions. The studied material is a bio composite laminate consisting in long flax fibers embedded in an epoxy resin system. The laminates were obtained from pre-impregnated unidirectional fibers, which were cured though a thermo-compression cycle followed by a post curing cycle. Test specimens were cut down to sizes, with the help of an electric saw. The concerned fiber direction was 0° with sample dimensions of 250x25x2 mm. First, testing consisted in quasi static mechanical tests. Second, to characterize linear viscoelastic behavior of the bio-laminates, creep - recovery tests with multiple load levels have been performed for the chosen fiber direction.

  17. Mechanics of Unidirectional Fiber-Reinforced Composites: Buckling Modes and Failure Under Compression Along Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paimushin, V. N.; Kholmogorov, S. A.; Gazizullin, R. K.

    2018-01-01

    One-dimensional linearized problems on the possible buckling modes of an internal or peripheral layer of unidirectional multilayer composites with rectilinear fibers under compression in the fiber direction are considered. The investigations are carried out using the known Kirchhoff-Love and Timoshenko models for the layers. The binder, modeled as an elastic foundation, is described by the equations of elasticity theory, which are simplified in accordance to the model of a transversely soft layer and are integrated along the transverse coordinate considering the kinematic coupling relations for a layer and foundation layers. Exact analytical solutions of the problems formulated are found, which are used to calculate a composite made of an HSE 180 REM prepreg based on a unidirectional carbon fiber tape. The possible buckling modes of its internal and peripheral layers are identified. Calculation results are compared with experimental data obtained earlier. It is concluded that, for the composite studied, the flexural buckling of layers in the uniform axial compression of specimens along fibers is impossible — the failure mechanism is delamination with buckling of a fiber bundle according to the pure shear mode. It is realized (due to the low average transverse shear modulus) at the value of the ultimate compression stress equal to the average shear modulus. It is shown that such a shear buckling mode can be identified only on the basis of equations constructed using the Timoshenko shear model to describe the deformation process of layers.

  18. Cassava/sugar palm fiber reinforced cassava starch hybrid composites: Physical, thermal and structural properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edhirej, Ahmed; Sapuan, S M; Jawaid, Mohammad; Zahari, Nur Ismarrubie

    2017-08-01

    A hybrid composite was prepared from cassava bagasse (CB) and sugar palm fiber (SPF) using casting technique with cassava starch (CS) as matrix and fructose as a plasticizer. Different loadings of SPF (2, 4, 6 and 8% w/w of dry starch) were added to the CS/CB composite film containing 6% CB. The addition of SPF significantly influenced the physical properties. It increased the thickness while decreasing the density, water content, water solubility and water absorption. However, no significant effect was noticed on the thermal properties of the hybrid composite film. The incorporation of SPF increased the relative crystallinity up to 47%, compared to 32% of the CS film. SEM micrographs indicated that the filler was incorporated in the matrix. The film with a higher concentration of SPF (CS-CB/SPF8) showed a more heterogeneous surface. It could be concluded that the incorporation of SPF led to changes in cassava starch film properties, potentially affecting the film performances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Supersonic Retropulsion Surface Preparation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites for Adhesive Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Surface preparation is widely recognized as a key step to producing robust and predictable bonds in a precise and reproducible manner. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, can lack precision and reproducibility, which can lead to variation in surface properties and subsequent bonding performance. The use of a laser to ablate composite surface resin can provide an efficient, precise, and reproducible means of preparing composite surfaces for adhesive bonding. Advantages include elimination of physical waste (i.e., grit media and sacrificial peel ply layers that ultimately require disposal), reduction in process variability due to increased precision (e.g. increased reproducibility), and automation of surface preparation, all of which improve reliability and process control. This paper describes a Nd:YAG laser surface preparation technique for composite substrates and the mechanical performance and failure modes of bonded laminates thus prepared. Additionally, bonded specimens were aged in a hot, wet environment for approximately one year and subsequently mechanically tested. The results of a one year hygrothermal aging study will be presented.

  20. Strain redistribution around holes and notches in fiber-reinforced cross-woven brittle matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben Krogsdal; Brøndsted, Povl

    1997-01-01

    A study of the strain redistribution around holes in two different cross-woven ceramic matrix composites is presented. The strain redistribution around holes in C-f/SiCm and SiCf/SiCm has been measured experimentally under plane stress conditions. Using micro-mechanics and Continuum Damage...... Mechanics, and an identification procedure based on a uni-axial tensile test and a shear test the strain redistribution around a hole or a notch due to matrix cracking can be predicted. Damage due to fiber breakage is not included in the model. Initial matrix damage in the C-f/SiCm material has...

  1. Forming of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite tubes - Experimental and numerical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Bernhard; Garthaus, Christian; Lenz, Florian; Hornig, Andreas; Hübner, Michael; Gude, Maik

    2016-10-01

    Continuous-reinforced thermoplastic composites are of growing importance for series production of lightweight components in manifold industrial areas. Novel manufacturing technologies allow the production of hollow semi-finished products that are post formed to enhance functionality. To maximize efficiency in the development process of such components it is necessary to map the forming processes numerically using Finite Elements(FE)-methods. The aim is to perform feasibility studies at an early stage, reduce development time by virtual process optimization and to generate a detailed understanding of the post formed fiber architecture for further structural-mechanical analysis.

  2. Process for the manufacture of seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for producing seamless metal-clad composite structures includes providing a hollow, metallic inner member and an outer sleeve to surround the inner member and define an inner space therebetween. A plurality of continuous reinforcing fibers is attached to the distal end of the outside diameter of the inner member, and the inner member is then introduced, distal end first, into one end of the outer sleeve. The inner member is then moved, distal end first, into the outer sleeve until the inner member is completely enveloped by the outer sleeve. A liquid matrix material is then injected into the space containing the reinforcing fibers between the inner member and the outer sleeve. Next a pressurized heat transfer medium is passed through the inner member to cure the liquid matrix material. Finally, the wall thickness of both the inner member and the outer sleeve are reduced to desired dimensions by chemical etching, which adjusts the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to a desired value.

  3. RESIDUAL PROPERTIES OF FIBER-REINFORCED REFRACTORY COMPOSITES WITH A FIRECLAY FILLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Jogl

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to develop a composite material for industrial use that is resistant to the effect of high temperatures. The binder system based on aluminous cement was modified by adding finely-ground ceramic powder and metakaolin to reduce costs and also to reduce adverse effects on the environment due to high energy consumption for cement production. Additives were applied as a partial aluminous cement replacement in doses of 10, 20 and 30% by weight. The composites were evaluated on the basis of their mechanical properties and their bulk density after gradual temperature loading. The influence of basalt fibers and modifications to the binder system were studied at the same time. Basalt fibers were applied in doses of 0.5% and 2.0% by volume. The results confirmed the potential of the mineral additives studied here for practical applications, taking into account the residual mechanical parameters after thermal loading. The addition of ceramic powder reduced the bulk density by 5% for each 10% of cement substitution, but the residual values were very similar. The bulk density and the compressive strength were reduced when basalt fibers were applied, and the flexural strength was significantly increased in proportion to the fiber dosages. Metakaolin seems to be a more suitable additive than the ceramic powder that was applied here, because there was a significant increase in the mechanical parameters and also in the residual values of all properties that were studied.

  4. Interfacial strength development in thermoplastic resins and fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Jeremy C.; Loos, Alfred C.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental program to develop test methods to be used to characterize interfacial (autohesive) strength development in polysulfone thermoplastic resin and graphite-polysulfone prepreg during processing is reported. Two test methods were used to examine interfacial strength development in neat resin samples. These included an interfacial tension test and a compact tension (CT) fracture toughness test. The interfacial tensile test proved to be very difficult to perform with a considerable amount of data scatter. Thus, the interfacial test was discarded in favor of the fracture toughness test. Interfacial strength development was observed by measuring the refracture toughness of precracked compact tension specimens that were rehealed at a given temperature and contact time. The measured refracture toughness was correlated with temperature and contact time. Interfacial strength development in graphite-polysulfone unidirectional composites was measured using a double cantilever beam (DCB) interlaminar fracture toughness test. The critical strain energy release rate of refractured composite specimens was measured as a function of healing temperature and contact time.

  5. Fatigue resistance of randomly oriented short glass fiber reinforced polyester composite materials immersed in seawater environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeghader, Djamel; Redjel, Bachir

    2018-02-01

    Randomly oriented short fiber mat reinforced polyester composite laminates immersed in natural seawater for various periods were tested in static and cyclic fatigue loading under three-point bending conditions. Water absorption increased the weight of the specimen while the extraction of soluble compounds induces a weak weight loss. Wöhler curves carried out from repetitive fatigue tests were drawn for the different periods of immersion time. These curves, which are characterized by an important and a significant scatter in their lifetime, were modeled by straight lines. These glass-polyester laminates deteriorate in fatigue tests at a constant rate by cycle decade. This rate increases with increasing immersion time in seawater at a constant speed. A comparison between different mathematical models of endurance curves shows that Wöhler's equation gives a good representation of the average part of the curve.

  6. Study of stinging nettle (urtica dioica l.) Fibers reinforced green composite materials : a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agus Suryawan, I. G. P.; Suardana, N. P. G.; Suprapta Winaya, I. N.; Budiarsa Suyasa, I. W.; Tirta Nindhia, T. G.

    2017-05-01

    Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica L., latin) is a wild plant that grows in Indonesia, Asia, and Europe. Nettle in Bali, Indonesia is called as Lateng, Jelatang. Nettle plant has a very strong fiber and high fixed carbon. Nettle plants are covered with fine hairs, especially in the leaves and stems. When it is touched, it will release chemicals, sting and trigger inflammation that causes redness, itching, bumps and irritation to the skin. Nettle plants grow in the wild, regarded as a weed in the agricultural industry, easy to grow and snatch food from the parent plant. The main objective of this paper is to review of the potential nettle fibers and then explain about the potential of local nettle plant in Indonesia. Nettle is a plant group at the end of bast. Its plant fibers taken from the bark, as reinforcement in composite materials. Nettle fibers have three main advantages such as strong, lightweight and low environmental impact.

  7. Experimental and numerical study of the electrical anisotropy in unidirectional carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. B.; Hwang, T. K.; Kim, H. G.; Doh, Y. D.

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, unidirectional CFRP composites are considered as an electrical percolation system, which consists of electrically conductive carbon fibers and electrically nonconductive epoxy resin. Due to the contact behavior of the carbon fibers, CFRP has electrical conductivity in the width direction. Resistance measurements using the DC four-probe and the DC six-probe methods are conducted for the unidirectional CFRP specimens with different fiber volume fractions, i.e. different contact conditions. On the basis of the electrical anisotropy level obtained, the correlation between the measured anisotropy and the electrical ineffective length δec, over which a broken fiber recovers its current carrying capacity and a key parameter in electromechanical modeling of CFRP, is shown experimentally. The empirical relationship between the electrical anisotropy and δec obtained is also reviewed using a numerical calculation method based on the electric circuit theory of Kirchhoff's rule and the Monte Carlo simulation technique.

  8. Characterization of Nylon 6 Nano Fiber/E-Glass Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod Kumar, T.; Chandrasekaran, M.; Santhanam, V.; Udayakumar, N.

    2017-03-01

    In the paper thermoplastic polymer Nylon-6 is generated in the form of Nanofibers by using an electro spinning method, and concentration of a solution is 4% as a constant then, by varying the process parameters such as flow rate (0.8 ml/hr, 1ml/hr and 1.2 ml/hr) of the solution. The results indicated Nanofibers with 4% concentration and 1 ml/hr produced optimum fibers due to continuous fiber formation. Composites Plates are fabricated by using a Hand lay-up method with different volume fraction (0.5, 1, 2 % v/v) of Nanofibers ratio. Then, the optimum Nanofibers volume ratio (2 % v/v) is reinforced with E-glass fibers and epoxy resin as a matrix. In order to find Nanofibers effect, Mechanical properties like (Tensile, Flexural and Impact) is performed and evaluated.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Fiber-Reinforced Metal Matrix Composite Processing by the Liquid Route: Literature Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Eric; Arvieu, Corinne; Mantaux, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    One of the technologies used to produce metal matrix composites (MMCs) is liquid route processing. One solution is to inject a liquid metal under pressure or at constant rate through a fibrous preform. This foundry technique overcomes the problem of the wettability of ceramic fibers by liquid metal. The liquid route can also be used to produce semiproducts by coating a filament with a molten metal. These processes involve physical phenomena combined with mass and heat transfer and phase change. The phase change phenomena related to solidification and also to the melting of the metal during the process notably result in modifications to the permeability of porous media, in gaps in impregnation, in the appearance of defects (porosities), and in segregation in the final product. In this article, we provide a state-of-the-art review of numerical models and simulation developed to study these physical phenomena involved in MMC processing by the liquid route.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Fiber-Reinforced Metal Matrix Composite Processing by the Liquid Route: Literature Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Eric; Arvieu, Corinne; Mantaux, Olivier

    2018-04-01

    One of the technologies used to produce metal matrix composites (MMCs) is liquid route processing. One solution is to inject a liquid metal under pressure or at constant rate through a fibrous preform. This foundry technique overcomes the problem of the wettability of ceramic fibers by liquid metal. The liquid route can also be used to produce semiproducts by coating a filament with a molten metal. These processes involve physical phenomena combined with mass and heat transfer and phase change. The phase change phenomena related to solidification and also to the melting of the metal during the process notably result in modifications to the permeability of porous media, in gaps in impregnation, in the appearance of defects (porosities), and in segregation in the final product. In this article, we provide a state-of-the-art review of numerical models and simulation developed to study these physical phenomena involved in MMC processing by the liquid route.

  11. Buckling and Vibration of Fiber Reinforced Composite Plates With Nanofiber Reinforced Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Anisotropic composite plates were evaluated with nanofiber reinforced matrices (NFRM). The nanofiber reinforcement volumes ratio in the matrix was 0.01. The plate dimensions were 20 by 10 by 1.0 in. (508 by 254 by 25.4 mm). Seven different loading condition cases were evaluated for buckling: three for uniaxial loading, three for pairs of combined loading, and one with three combined loadings. The anisotropy arose from the unidirectional plates having been at 30 from the structural axis. The anisotropy had a full 6 by 6 rigidities matrix which were satisfied and solved by a Galerkin buckling algorithm. For vibration the same conditions were used with the applied cods about a small fraction of the buckling loads. The buckling and vibration results showed that the NFRM plates buckled at about twice those with conventional matrix.

  12. Retentive strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts with composite resin cores: Effect of remaining coronal structure and root canal dentin conditioning protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saker, Samah; Özcan, Mutlu

    2015-12-01

    The prognosis of a fixed dental prosthesis cemented to endodontically treated teeth is primarily determined by the presence of a ferrule on the tooth. Adhesion of the post in the root canal, conditioning methods for the canal and the amount of coronal structure could also be decisive on survival of reconstructions cemented on endodontically treated teeth. The purpose of this in vitro study was to test the effect of remaining coronal structure on the retention of airborne-particle abraded fiber-reinforced composite resin posts built up with composite resin cores after the treatment of root canal dentin with different conditioning protocols. One hundred and fifty extracted human teeth with single root canal space were endodontically treated and divided into 3 groups as follows: group CEJ: the teeth were sectioned at the level of cementoenamel junction (CEJ); group CEJ1: the teeth were sectioned 1 mm above the CEJ; group CEJ2: the teeth were sectioned 2 mm above the CEJ. Each group was further divided into 5 subgroups (n=10 per group) according to the root canal treatments as follows: group C: no conditioning (control); group PH: conditioning with 37% phosphoric acid gel for 15 seconds; group E: conditioning with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for 60 seconds; group CHX: conditioning with 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) for 60 seconds; group Q: conditioning with combination of 2% CHX with 17% EDTA and a surfactant solution for 60 seconds. Glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts were airborne-particle abraded and luted to the root canal dentin with a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem). The retentive force was tested by applying a tensile load parallel to the long axis of these posts at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min. Two-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD post hoc test were used to analyze the data. The highest retention (N) was obtained with the CHX-EDTA conditioned group (374.7 ±29.8) followed by 17% EDTA (367.9 ±33.3) conditioning when 2 mm remaining

  13. Macro-mechanical material model for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    CERN Document Server

    Banks-Sills, L

    1999-01-01

    The stress-strain behavior of a metal matrix composite reinforced with unidirectional, continuous and periodic fibers is investigated. Three-dimensional micro-mechanical analyses of a unit cell by means of the finite element method $9 and homogenization-localization are carried out. These calculations allow the determination of material behavior of the in-plane, as well as the fiber directions. The fibers are assumed to be elastic and the matrix elasto-plastic. $9 The matrix material is governed by a von Mises yield surface, isotropic hardening and an associated flow rule. With the aid of these analyses, the foundation to a macro-mechanical material model is presented which is employed to $9 consider an elementary problem. The model includes an anisotropic yield surface with isotropic hardening and an associated flow rule. A beam in bending containing square fibers under plane strain conditions is analyzed by means of $9 the model. Two cases are considered: one in which the fibers are symmetric with respect t...

  14. Effect of γ-irradiation on the optical and electrical properties of fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Ahmad; Elfiky, Dalia; Ramadan, Ahmed M.; Hassan, G. M.

    2017-05-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the optical and electrical properties of the reinforced fiber polymeric based materials became an important issue. Fiberglass/epoxy and Kevlar fiber/epoxy were selected as investigated samples manufactured with hand lay-up without autoclave curing technique. The selected technique is simple and low cost while being rarely used in space materials production. The electric conductivity and dielectric constant for those samples were measured with increasing the gamma radiation dose. Moreover, the absorptivity, band gap and color change were determined. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) was performed to each of the material's constituent to evaluate the change in the investigated materials due to radiation exposure dose. In this study, the change of electrical properties for both investigated materials showed a slight variation of the test parameters with respect to the gamma dose increase; this variation is placed in the insulators rang. The tested samples showed an insulator stable behavior during the test period. The change of optical properties for both composite specimens showed the maximum absorptivity at the gamma dose 750 kGy. These materials are suitable for structure materials and thermal control for orbital life less than 7 years. In addition, the transparency of epoxy matrix was degraded. However, there is no color change for either Kevlar fiber or fiberglass.

  15. Microstructural characterization of a zirconia-toughened alumina fiber reinforced niobium aluminide composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nourbakhsh, S.; Sahin, O.; Rhee, W.H.; Margolin, H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on an NbAl 3 + Nb 2 Al composite reinforced with continuous zirconia-toughened alumina, PRD-166 fibers, that was produced by pressure casing and was examined by optical and transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Exposure of the fiber to the molten metal resulted in ZrO 2 and Al; 2 O 3 grain growth, formation of a thin layer of an amorphous phase on the grain boundaries of Al 2 O 3 and transformation of ZrO 2 . Preferential Al 2 O 3 grain growth near the surface of the fiber led to the rejection of ZrO 2 from this region into the molten metal. In NbAl 3 slip occurred by the glide of a left-angle 110 right-angle superdislocations and to a lesser extent by the glide of a pair of left-angle 11 bar 1 right-angle + left-angle 3 bar 1 bar 1 right-angle dislocations on the (112) planes and a/2 left-angle 110 right-angle superpartial dislocations on the (001) plane. The operating slip system in Nb 2 Al was identified as {010 left-angle 100 right-angle. A left-angle 100 right-angle dislocations were dissociated into a/x left-angle 100 right-angle partial dislocations joined together by a stacking fault

  16. Effects of Interface Coating and Nitride Enhancing Additive on Properties of Hi-Nicalon SiC Fiber Reinforced Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishana T.; Hull, David R.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Babuder, Raymond

    2000-01-01

    Strong and tough Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites (SiC/ RBSN) have been fabricated by the fiber lay-up approach. Commercially available uncoated and PBN, PBN/Si-rich PBN, and BN/SiC coated SiC Hi-Nicalon fiber tows were used as reinforcement. The composites contained approximately 24 vol % of aligned 14 micron diameter SiC fibers in a porous RBSN matrix. Both one- and two-dimensional composites were characterized. The effects of interface coating composition, and the nitridation enhancing additive, NiO, on the room temperature physical, tensile, and interfacial shear strength properties of SiC/RBSN matrix composites were evaluated. Results indicate that for all three coated fibers, the thickness of the coatings decreased from the outer periphery to the interior of the tows, and that from 10 to 30 percent of the fibers were not covered with the interface coating. In the uncoated regions, chemical reaction between the NiO additive and the SiC fiber occurs causing degradation of tensile properties of the composites. Among the three interface coating combinations investigated, the BN/SiC coated Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced RBSN matrix composite showed the least amount of uncoated regions and reasonably uniform interface coating thickness. The matrix cracking stress in SiC/RBSN composites was predicted using a fracture mechanics based crack bridging model.

  17. Carbon nano fibers reinforced composites origami inspired mechanical metamaterials with passive and active properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshad, Mohamed Ali E.; D'Hondt, Clement; Naguib, Hani E.

    2017-10-01

    unit cell made of composite polymers containing a low percentage of CNF were also investigated in this study, in which the shape memory effect test conducted on the origami unit cell.

  18. Steel fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, S.U.

    2005-01-01

    Steel-Fiber Reinforced Concrete is constructed by adding short fibers of small cross-sectional size .to the fresh concrete. These fibers reinforce the concrete in all directions, as they are randomly oriented. The improved mechanical properties of concrete include ductility, impact-resistance, compressive, tensile and flexural strength and abrasion-resistance. These uniqlte properties of the fiber- reinforcement can be exploited to great advantage in concrete structural members containing both conventional bar-reinforcement and steel fibers. The improvements in mechanical properties of cementitious materials resulting from steel-fiber reinforcement depend on the type, geometry, volume fraction and material-properties of fibers, the matrix mix proportions and the fiber-matrix interfacial bond characteristics. Effects of steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete have been investigated in this paper through a comprehensive testing-programme, by varying the fiber volume fraction and the aspect-ratio (Lid) of fibers. Significant improvements are observed in compressive, tensile, flexural strength and impact-resistance of concrete, accompanied by marked improvement in ductility. optimum fiber-volume fraction and aspect-ratio of steel fibers is identified. Test results are analyzed in details and relevant conclusions drawn. The research is finally concluded with future research needs. (author)

  19. Multi-Objective Patch Optimization with Integrated Kinematic Draping Simulation for Continuous–Discontinuous Fiber-Reinforced Composite Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Fengler

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Discontinuous fiber-reinforced polymers (DiCoFRP in combination with local continuous fiber reinforced polymers (CoFRP provide both a high design freedom and high weight-specific mechanical properties. For the optimization of CoFRP patches on complexly shaped DiCoFRP structures, an optimization strategy is needed which considers manufacturing constraints during the optimization procedure. Therefore, a genetic algorithm is combined with a kinematic draping simulation. To determine the optimal patch position with regard to structural performance and overall material consumption, a multi-objective optimization strategy is used. The resulting Pareto front and a corresponding heat-map of the patch position are useful tools for the design engineer to choose the right amount of reinforcement. The proposed patch optimization procedure is applied to two example structures and the effect of different optimization setups is demonstrated.

  20. Bootstrap Method for Detecting Damage in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic Using a Macro Fiber Composite Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    DJANSENA, Alradix; 田中, 宏明; 工藤, 亮

    2015-01-01

    CFRP has been used in aircraft structures for decades. Although CFRP is light, its laminationis its main weakness. We have developed a new method to increase the probability of detectingdelamination in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) by narrowing the confidence interval ofthe changes in natural frequency. The changes in the natural frequency in delaminated CFRPare tiny compared with measurement errors. We use the bootstrap method, a statisticaltechnique that increases the estimation ac...

  1. Evaluation of load-deflection properties of fiber-reinforced composites and its comparison with stainless steel wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Alavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of common sized fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs to different deflections due to bending forces and comparing it with stainless steel (SS wires. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two FRC groups with 0.75 mm and 1.2 mm diameters (Everstick Ortho, Stick Tech, Finland and three SS groups with 0.016 × 0.022 inch, 0.0215 × 0.028 inch and 0.7 mm diameters (3M Uniteck, Monrovia, California, USA were tested. Each group contained 10 samples that were tested according to a three point bending test. Each group was tested at deflections of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm and the data was analyzed using the repeated measure ANOVA by SPSS software (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, IBM SPSS, Inc. in Chicago, Illinois, USA. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The highest recorded load belonged to the 1.2 mm FRC and after that 0.7 mm SS wire, 0.75 mm FRC, 0.0215 × 0.028 inch SS wire and finally 0.016 × 0.022 inch SS wire. The 0.7 mm SS wire and 0.75 mm FRC were compared as retainers and the results showed the 0.7 mm SS wire showed significantly higher load compared with 0.75 mm FRC (P < 0.05. The 1.2 mm FRC had significantly higher load compared to 0.0215 × 0.028 inch and 0.016 × 0.022 inch SS wires (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The results showed that the 1.2 mm FRC group had significantly higher load compared to SS wires and other FRC groups under the 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm deflections. Therefore, it can be suggested that FRC can be used as an esthetic replacement for SS wires for active and passive purposes in orthodontics.

  2. The effect of silanated and impregnated fiber on the tensile strength of E-glass fiber reinforced composite retainer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niswati Fathmah Rosyida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fiber reinforced composite (FRC is can be used in dentistry as an orthodontic retainer. FRC  still has a limitations because of to  a weak bonding between fibers and matrix. Purpose: This research was aimed to evaluate the effect of silane as coupling agent and fiber impregnation on the tensile strength of E-glass FRC. Methods: The samples of this research were classified into two groups each of which consisted of three subgroups, namely the impregnated fiber group (original, 1x addition of silane, 2x addition of silane and the non-impregnated fiber group (original, 1x addition of silane, 2x addition of silane. The tensile strength was measured by a universal testing machine. The averages of the tensile strength in all groups then were compared by using Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney post hoc tests. Results: The averages of the tensile strength (MPa in the impregnated fiber group can be known as follow; original impregnated fiber (26.60±0.51, 1x addition of silane (43.38±4.42, and 2x addition of silane (36.22±7.23. The averages of tensile strength (MPa in the non-impregnated fiber group can also be known as follow; original non-impregnated fiber (29.38±1.08, 1x addition of silane (29.38±1.08, 2x addition of silane (12.48±2.37. Kruskal Wallis test showed that there was a significant difference between the impregnated fiber group and the non-impregnated fiber group (p<0.05. Based on the results of post hoc test, it is also known that the addition of silane in the impregnated fiber group had a significant effect on the increasing of the tensile strength of E-glass FRC (p<0.05, while the addition of silane in the non-impregnated fiber group had a significant effect on the decreasing of the tensile strength of E-glass FRC. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the addition of silane in the non-silanated fiber group can increase the tensile strength of E-glass FRC, but the addition of silane in the silanated fiber group can

  3. Bending and Shear Behavior of Pultruded Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Beams With Closed and Open Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, Daniel Douglas

    Several advantages, such as high strength-to-weight ratio, high stiffness, superior corrosion resistance, and high fatigue and impact resistance, among others, make FRPs an attractive alternative to conventional construction materials for use in developing new structures as well as rehabilitating in-service infrastructure. As the number of infrastructure applications using FRPs grows, the need for the development of a uniform Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) approach, including design procedures and examples, has become paramount. Step-by-step design procedures and easy-to-use design formulas are necessary to assure the quality and safety of FRP structural systems by reducing the possibility of design and construction errors. Since 2008, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), in coordination with the American Composites Manufacturers Association (ACMA), has overseen the development of the Pre-Standard for Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) of Pultruded Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Structures using probability-based limit states design. The fifth chapter of the pre-standard focuses on the design of members in flexure and shear under different failure modes, where the current failure load prediction models proposed within have been shown to be highly inaccurate based on experimental data and evaluation performed by researchers at the West Virginia University Constructed Facilities Center. A new prediction model for determining the critical flexural load capacity of pultruded GFRP square and rectangular box beams is presented within. This model shows that the type of failure can be related to threshold values of the beam span-to-depth ratio (L/h) and total flange width-to-thickness ratio (bf /t), resulting in three governing modes of failure: local buckling failure in the compression flange (4 ≤ L/h combined strain failure at the web-flange junction (6 ≤ L/h ≤ 10), and bending failure in the tension flange (10 torsional buckling (LTB

  4. Effect of finish line variants on marginal accuracy and fracture strength of ceramic optimized polymer/fiber-reinforced composite crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, LeeRa; Choi, JongMi; Yi, Yang Jin; Park, Chan Jin

    2004-06-01

    Ceramic optimized polymer (Ceromer)/fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) crowns have been promoted as alternatives to conventional crowns. However, little is known regarding the ideal tooth preparation for this type of crown. This in vitro study evaluated the marginal adaptation and fracture strength of ceromer/FRC crowns with respect to the various types of finish lines. Four metal dies with different finish lines (0.9-mm chamfer, 1.2-mm chamfer, 1.2-mm rounded shoulder, and 1.2-mm shoulder) were prepared. Forty (10 for each finish line) Targis/Vectris crowns were fabricated on duplicated base metal alloy dies. The restorations were stereoscopically evaluated at 56 points along the entire circumferential margin for measuring the margin adaptation before and after cementation with a resin luting agent. The specimens were then compressively loaded to failure using a universal testing machine. The marginal adaptation (microm) was analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test and post-hoc Dunnett test (alpha=.05). The fracture load (N) was analyzed with a 1-way analysis of the variance and the Scheffe adjustment (alpha=.05). The fractured surfaces of the crowns were examined with a scanning electron microscope to determine the mode of fracture. The marginal adaptation of crowns with a shoulder finish line was significantly better than crowns with a chamfer finish line before and after cementation (P<.001). The increased marginal gap after cementation was the lowest in the 1.2-mm rounded shoulder group. The fracture strength of the crowns with the 0.9-mm chamfer and crowns with 1.2-mm chamfer was significantly greater than those of the crowns with the 1.2-mm shoulder or rounded shoulder (P=.011, P=.049, respectively). The mean fracture load of all crowns, regardless of the finish line design, was 1646 N. The fractured surface of the crown revealed adhesive failure and 3 types of cohesive failure (fracture of the Targis and Vectris, Targis fracture with a crack in the Vectris layer

  5. Effect of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polyamide-6/Polypropylene Composites for Lightweight Automotive Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huu-Duc Nguyen-Tran

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of lightweight automotive parts is an important issue for improving the efficiency of vehicles. Polymer composites have been widely applied to reduce weight and improve mechanical properties by mixing polymers with carbon fibers, glass fibers, and carbon nanotubes. Polypropylene (PP has been added to carbon fiber-reinforced nylon-6 (CF/PA6 composite to achieve further weight reduction and water resistance. However, the mechanical properties were reduced by the addition of PP. In this research, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs were added to compensate for the reduced mechanical properties experienced when adding PP. Tensile testing and bending tests were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties. A small amount of CNTs improved the mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced PA6/PP composites. For example, the density of CF/PA6 was reduced from 1.214 to 1.131 g/cm3 (6.8% by adding 30 wt % PP, and the tensile strength of 30 wt % PP composite was improved from 168 to 173 MPa (3.0% by adding 0.5 wt % CNTs with small increase of density (1.135 g/cm3. The developed composite will be widely used for lightweight automotive parts with improved mechanical properties.

  6. Effect of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polyamide-6/Polypropylene Composites for Lightweight Automotive Parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Tran, Huu-Duc; Hoang, Van-Tho; Do, Van-Ta; Chun, Doo-Man; Yum, Young-Jin

    2018-03-15

    The development of lightweight automotive parts is an important issue for improving the efficiency of vehicles. Polymer composites have been widely applied to reduce weight and improve mechanical properties by mixing polymers with carbon fibers, glass fibers, and carbon nanotubes. Polypropylene (PP) has been added to carbon fiber-reinforced nylon-6 (CF/PA6) composite to achieve further weight reduction and water resistance. However, the mechanical properties were reduced by the addition of PP. In this research, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were added to compensate for the reduced mechanical properties experienced when adding PP. Tensile testing and bending tests were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties. A small amount of CNTs improved the mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced PA6/PP composites. For example, the density of CF/PA6 was reduced from 1.214 to 1.131 g/cm³ (6.8%) by adding 30 wt % PP, and the tensile strength of 30 wt % PP composite was improved from 168 to 173 MPa (3.0%) by adding 0.5 wt % CNTs with small increase of density (1.135 g/cm³). The developed composite will be widely used for lightweight automotive parts with improved mechanical properties.

  7. Effect of acid etching duration on tensile bond strength of composite resin bonded to erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser-prepared dentine. Preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chousterman, M; Heysselaer, D; Dridi, S M; Bayet, F; Misset, B; Lamard, L; Peremans, A; Nyssen-Behets, C; Nammour, S

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of composite resin bonded to erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser-prepared dentine after different durations of acid etching. The occlusal third of 68 human third molars was removed in order to expose the dentine surface. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups: group B (control group), prepared with bur and total etch system with 15 s acid etching [37% orthophosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4))]; group L15, laser photo-ablated dentine (200 mJ) (laser irradiation conditions: pulse duration 100 micros, air-water spray, fluence 31.45 J/ cm(2), 10 Hz, non-contact hand pieces, beam spot size 0.9 mm, irradiation speed 3 mm/s, and total irradiation time 2 x 40 s); group L30, laser prepared, laser conditioned and 30 s acid etching; group L60, laser prepared, laser conditioned and 60 s acid etching; group L90, laser prepared, laser conditioned and 90 s acid etching. A plot of composite resin was bonded onto each exposed dentine and then tested for tensile bond strength. The values obtained were statistically analysed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) coupled with the Tukey-Kramer test at the 95% level. A 90 s acid etching before bonding showed the best bonding value (P < 0.05) when compared with all the other groups including the control group. There is no significance difference between other groups, nor within each group and the control group. There was a significant increase in tensile bond strength of the samples acid etched for 90 s.

  8. Effect of short glass fiber/filler particle proportion on flexural and diametral tensile strength of a novel fiber-reinforced composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; de Almeida, Letícia Nunes; Mendes, Gustavo Adolfo Martins; Kasuya, Amanda Vessoni Barbosa; Favarão, Isabella Negro; de Paula, Marcella Silva

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of glass fiber/filler particles proportion on flexural strength and diametral tensile strength of an experimental fiber-reinforced composite. Four experimental groups (N=10) were created using an experimental short fiber-reinforced composite, having as a factor under study the glass fiber (F) and filler particle (P) proportion: F22.5/P55 with 22.5 wt% of fiber and 55 wt% of filler particles; F25/P52.5 with 25 wt% of fiber and 52.5 wt% of filler particles; F27.5/P50 with 27.5 wt% of fiber and 50 wt% of filler particles; F30/P47.5 with 30 wt% of fiber and 47.5 wt% of filler particles. The experimental composite was made up by a methacrylate-based resin (50% Bis-GMA and 50% TEGDMA). Specimens were prepared for Flexural Strength (FS) (25 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm) and for Diametral Tensile Strength (DTS) (3×6 Ø mm) and tested at 0.5 mm/min in a universal testing machine. The results (in MPa) showed significance (different superscript letters mean statistical significant difference) for FS (ptensile strength of an experimental composite reinforced with glass fibers. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Shear modulus of 5 flowable composites to the EverStick Ortho fiber-reinforced composite retainer: an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchli, Lorenz; Pintus, Stefano; Steineck, Markus; Lüthy, Heinz; Wichelhaus, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Although fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) are now available for use as orthodontic retainers, little is known about their bonding properties. Our aim in this study was to investigate the adhesive properties of various composites to a commercially available FRC retainer. Five flowable composites (Grandio Flow [Voco GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany], Synergy Flow [Coltène/Whaledent AG, Genf, Switzerland], Tetric Flow [Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan Fürstentum, Liechtenstein], Tetric Flow Chroma [Ivoclar Vivadent AG], and Transbond LR [3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) were tested for their shear bond strengths to the EverStick Ortho (Stick Tech Ltd Oy, Turku, Finland) FRC retainer stick. Each group contained 15 samples and underwent 1000 aging cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. A testing machine was used to measure the shear bond strengths at the composite-FRC interface. All specimens were visually controlled for the location of the fracture line. Typical shear bond strengths were measured at 40 N or 8 MPa. No significant difference was found between the 5 composites (ANOVA, P < or = 0.05). The fracture line was consistently in the FRC retainer. All composites had similar bonding characteristics, and visual inspection consistently showed fractures in the FRC retainer. Because the point of least resistance was in the retainer, we concluded that all tested composites were equally effective.

  10. The effects of three different desensitizing agents on the shear bond strength of composite resin bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorba, Yahya Orcun; Erdemir, Ali; Ercan, Ertugrul; Eldeniz, Ayce Unverdi; Kalaycioglu, Baris; Ulker, Mustafa

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of three desensitizing agents on the shear bond strengths of four different bonding agents used to bond composite resin to dentin. A total of 160 extracted human molars were sectioned parallel to the occlusal plane under water cooling, polished and randomly divided into 4 groups of 40. Each group was treated with a different desensitizing agent (Tooth Mousse, Ultra-EZ, Cervitec Plus), except for an untreated control group. Each group was then randomly subdivided into 4 groups of 10, and a different dentin bonding agent (XP Bond, AdheSE, Adper Prompt L-pop, GBond) was applied to each group in order to bond the specimens to a resin composite (Gradia Direct) built up using a plastic apparatus. A Universal Testing Machine was used to measure the shear bond strength of each specimen. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. With the exception of the Control/AdheSE and Ultra-EZ/XP Bond groups, no statistically significant differences were found in the shear bond strength values of the groups tested. These findings suggest that the use of different desensitizing agents does not affect the shear bond strength of various adhesive systems used to bond resin composite to dentin. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Review of Japanese recommendations on design and construction of different classes of fiber reinforced concrete and application examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uchida, Yuichi; Fischer, Gregor; Hishiki, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    The development of concrete and cementitious composites with fiber reinforcement to improve the tensile load-deformation behavior has resulted in three distinct classes of materials. These include conventional Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) with tension softening response, High Performance Fiber...... Reinforced Cement Composites (HPFRCC) with strain hardening and multiple cracking behavior, and Ultra High-strength Fiber Reinforced concrete (UFC) with increased tensile strength. The recommendations on the design, production, and application of these classes of fiber reinforced concrete have been...

  12. Modeling Strength Degradation of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites Subjected to Cyclic Loading at Elevated Temperatures in Oxidative Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbiao, Li

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, the strength degradation of non-oxide and oxide/oxide fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) subjected to cyclic loading at elevated temperatures in oxidative environments has been investigated. Considering damage mechanisms of matrix cracking, interface debonding, interface wear, interface oxidation and fibers fracture, the composite residual strength model has been established by combining the micro stress field of the damaged composites, the damage models, and the fracture criterion. The relationships between the composite residual strength, fatigue peak stress, interface debonding, fibers failure and cycle number have been established. The effects of peak stress level, initial and steady-state interface shear stress, fiber Weibull modulus and fiber strength, and testing temperature on the degradation of composite strength and fibers failure have been investigated. The evolution of residual strength versus cycle number curves of non-oxide and oxide/oxide CMCs under cyclic loading at elevated temperatures in oxidative environments have been predicted.

  13. Initial study of new bio-based epoxy in carbon fiber reinforced composite panel manufactured by vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiezal, M. R. M.; Abdan, Khalina; Azaman, M. D.; Abidin Z., Z.; Hanafee, Z. M.

    2017-09-01

    This research paper is about carbon fiber reinforced composite panels with novel bio-based epoxy derived from Malaysian crude Jatropha oil (Epoxidized Jatropha Oil) which is mixed with synthetic epoxy as matrix. Its manufacturability performances were then verified by tensile test, flexural test and burnt off test. Two composite panels (fiber carbon with 100 wt. % of synthetic epoxy and fiber carbon with 18 wt. % bio-epoxy blend with synthetic epoxy) were fabricated by vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding. Samples were cut according to respective ASTM dimensioning and were tested. It was found that the new composite panel performed well in manufacturability aspect with fiber volume fraction achieved was around 40 - 45%. Although its tensile and flexural performances are a bit lower but comparable, we could conclude that the novel bio-epoxy as matrix in fiber carbon reinforcement could be fabricated by using this process for further research.

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    68

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced alumina composites fabricated from sol. CHAOYANG FAN, QINGSONG MA* and KUANHONG ZENG. Science and Technology on Advanced Ceramic Fibers &Composites Laboratory, National University of Defense Technology,. Changsha 410073, PR ...

  15. Improvement of Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Short Natural Fiber Reinforced Recycled Polypropylene Composites through Double Step Grafting Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputra, O. A.; Rini, K. S.; Susanti, T. D.; Mustofa, R. E.; Prameswari, M. D.; Pramono, E.

    2017-07-01

    This study focused on the effect of a compatibilizer addition, maleic anhydrides (MAH) on mechanical, thermal and water absorption properties of oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) fiber reinforced recycled polypropylene (rPP) biocomposites. The double steps grafting process were conducted by incorporated MAH on both rPP and EFB to improve the surface adhesion between these materials, to result in a good mechanical properties as well as biocompatibility to nature. The chemical test was carried out using FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra-Red) spectroscopy technique to evaluated grafting process. The mechanical test was investigated and found that the addition of 10 phr MAH to both rPP and EFB improved mechanical strength of the biocomposites higher than another formulas. In this study, thermal properties of biocomposites also characterized. Water absorption (WA) analysis showed the presence of EFB fiber increased the water uptake of the material.

  16. A fiber orientation-adapted integration scheme for computing the hyperelastic Tucker average for short fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Niels; Ospald, Felix; Schneider, Matti

    2017-10-01

    In this article we introduce a fiber orientation-adapted integration scheme for Tucker's orientation averaging procedure applied to non-linear material laws, based on angular central Gaussian fiber orientation distributions. This method is stable w.r.t. fiber orientations degenerating into planar states and enables the construction of orthotropic hyperelastic energies for truly orthotropic fiber orientation states. We establish a reference scenario for fitting the Tucker average of a transversely isotropic hyperelastic energy, corresponding to a uni-directional fiber orientation, to microstructural simulations, obtained by FFT-based computational homogenization of neo-Hookean constituents. We carefully discuss ideas for accelerating the identification process, leading to a tremendous speed-up compared to a naive approach. The resulting hyperelastic material map turns out to be surprisingly accurate, simple to integrate in commercial finite element codes and fast in its execution. We demonstrate the capabilities of the extracted model by a finite element analysis of a fiber reinforced chain link.

  17. An experimental and theoretical investigation of stick-slip, steady-state and roughness dominated sliding in fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackin, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical properties of fiber reinforced composites depends strongly upon the properties of the fiber/matrix interface. Enhanced fracture resistance and strain to failure are synonymous with debonding and sliding of the reinforcement phase. Thus, the two key properties of the composite are the interfacial toughness and the post-debond sliding stress. After debonding a variety of interfacial sliding phenomena are noted, including: stick-slip, steady-state, and roughness dominated sliding. The interfacial properties, including the coefficient of friction, the radial clamping pressure, asperity amplitude, the elastic properties of the constituents, and the compliance of the test machine, each play a role in the operative sliding phenomenon. Experiments have been conducted to explore each of these phenomena. In addition, models have been developed that rationalize all of the observed behavior

  18. Influence of Thin-Film Adhesives in Pullout Tests Between Nickel-Titanium Shape Memory Alloy and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, Derek J.; Jana, Sadhan; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2018-01-01

    Strips of nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA) and carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite (PMC) were bonded together using multiple thin film adhesives and their mechanical strengths were evaluated under pullout test configuration. Tensile and lap shear tests were conducted to confirm the deformation of SMAs at room temperature and to evaluate the adhesive strength between the NiTi strips and the PMC. Optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to examine the interfacial bonding after failure. Simple equations on composite tensile elongation were used to fit the experimental data on tensile properties. ABAQUS models were generated to show the effects of enhanced bond strength and the distribution of stress in SMA and PMC. The results revealed that the addition of thin film adhesives increased the average adhesive strength between SMA and PMC while halting the room temperature shape memory effect within the pullout specimen.

  19. Effect of fiber coatings on room and elevated temperature mechanical properties of Nicalon trademark fiber reinforced Blackglas trademark ceramic matrix composites (CMCs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, E.I.; Freitag, D.W.; Littlefield, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    With the development of silicon organometallic preceramic polymers as precursors for producing oxidation resistant ceramic matrices, through the polymer pyrolysis route, the fabrication of lightweight, complex advanced aircraft and missile structures from fiber reinforced composites is increasingly becoming more feasible. Besides refinement of processing techniques, the potential for achieving this objective depends upon identifying and developing the proper debond barrier coating layer, between the fiber and the matrix, for optimization of strength, toughness, and durability properties. Blackglas trademark based CMC's reinforced with Nicalon trademark SiC fibers with different types of coatings were fabricated. Coating schemes evaluated include CVD applied single layer boron nitride (BN) composition, dual-layer coatings of BN/SiC, and triple-layer coatings of SiC BN/SiC. Results of tensile and flexural property tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of fracture surfaces, and auger electron spectroscopy (AES) microanalysis of the fiber/matrix interface have been discussed

  20. Synergistic Effects of Stress-Rupture and Cyclic Loading on Strain Response of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperature in Oxidizing Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longbiao Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the synergistic effects of stress rupture and cyclic loading on the strain response of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs at elevated temperature in air have been investigated. The stress-strain relationships considering interface wear and interface oxidation in the interface debonded region under stress rupture and cyclic loading have been developed to establish the relationship between the peak strain, the interface debonded length, the interface oxidation length and the interface slip lengths. The effects of the stress rupture time, stress levels, matrix crack spacing, fiber volume fraction and oxidation temperature on the peak strain and the interface slip lengths have been investigated. The experimental fatigue hysteresis loops, interface slip lengths, peak strain and interface oxidation length of cross-ply SiC/MAS (magnesium alumino-silicate, MAS composite under cyclic fatigue and stress rupture at 566 and 1093 °C in air have been predicted.

  1. Effect of polyester fiber reinforcement on the mechanical properties of interim fixed partial dentures

    OpenAIRE

    Gopichander, N.; Halini Kumarai, K.V.; Vasanthakumar, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different reinforcements currently available for interim fixed partial denture (FPD) materials do not provide the ideal strength for long-term use. Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to develop a more ideal provisional material for long-term use with better mechanical properties. This study evaluated the effectiveness of polyester fiber reinforcement on different interim FPD materials. Methods: Thirty resin-bonded FPDs were constructed from three provisional interim F...

  2. Effects of electron beam irradiation on mechanical properties at low and high temperature of fiber reinforced composites using PEEK as matrix material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Seguchi, Tadao; Sakai, Hideo; Odajima, Toshikazu; Nakakura, Toshiyuki; Masutani, Masahiro.

    1987-11-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced composite (PEEK-CF) using polyarylether-ether-ketone (PEEK) as a matrix material was prepared and the electron beam radiation effects on the mechanical properties at low and high temperature and the effects of annealing after irradiation were studied. Cooling down to 77 K, the flexural strength of PEEK-CF increased to about 20 % than that at room temperature. The data of flexural strength for the irradiated specimens showed some scattering, but the strength and modulus at 77 K were changed scarcely up to 120 MGy. The flexural strength and modulus in the unirradiated specimen decreased with increasing of measurement temperature, and the strength at 140 deg C, which is the just below temperature of the glass transition of PEEK, was to 70 % of the value at room temperature. For the irradiated specimens, the strength and modulus increased with dose and the values at 140 deg C for the specimen irradiated with 120 MGy were nearly the same with the unirradiated specimen measured at room temperature. The improvement of mechanical properties at high temperature by irradiation was supported by a viscoelastic measurement in which the glass transition shifted to the higher temperature by the radiation-induced crosslinking. A glass fiber reinforced PEEK composite (PEEK-GF) was prepared and its irradiation effects by electron beam was studied. Unirradiated PEEK-GF showed the same performance with that for GFRP of epoxide resin as matrix material, but by irradiation the flexual strength and modulus decreased with dose. It was revealed that this composite was destroyed by delamination because inter laminar shear strength (ILSS) decreased with dose and analysis of the profile of S-S curve showed typical delamination. Fractoglaphy by electron microscopy supported the delamination which is caused by the lowering of adhesion on interface between the fiber and matrix with increase of dose. (author)

  3. Carbon fiber reinforced PEEK Optima--a composite material biomechanical properties and wear/debris characteristics of CF-PEEK composites for orthopedic trauma implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Ely L; Rath, Ehud; Shlaifer, Amir; Chechik, Ofir; Maman, Eran; Salai, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    The advantageous properties of carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone (CF-PEEK) composites for use as orthopedic implants include similar modulus to bone and ability to withstand prolonged fatigue strain. The CF-PEEK tibial nail, dynamic compression plate, proximal humeral plate and distal radius volar plate were compared biomechanically (by four-point bending, static torsion of the nail, and bending fatigue) and for wear/debris (by amount of the debris generated at the connection between the CF-PEEK plate and titanium alloy screws) to commercially available devices. Four-point bending stress of the tibial nail and dynamic and distal radius plates yielded characteristics similar to other commercially available devices. The distal volar plate bending structural stiffness of the CF-PEEK distal volar plate was 0.542 Nm2 versus 0.376 Nm2 for the DePuy's DVR anatomic volar plate. The PHILOS proximal humeral internal locking system stainless steel plate was much stronger (6.48 Nm2) than the CF-PEEK proximal humeral plate (1.1 Nm2). Tibial nail static torsion testing showed similar properties to other tested nails (Fixion, Zimmer and Synthes). All tested CF-PEEK devices underwent one million fatigue cycles without failure. Wear test showed a lower volume of generated particles in comparison to the common implants in use today. Thus, these tested implants were similar to commercially used devices and can be recommended for use as implants in orthopedic surgery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanical Property Evaluation of Palm/Glass Sandwiched Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite in Comparison with few natural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja Dhas, J. Edwin; Pradeep, P.

    2017-10-01

    Natural fibers available plenty can be used as reinforcements in development of eco friendly polymer composites. The less utilized palm leaf stalk fibers sandwiched with artificial glass fibers was researched in this work to have a better reinforcement in preparing a green composite. The commercially available polyester resin blend with coconut shell filler in nano form was used as matrix to sandwich these composites. Naturally available Fibers of palm leaf stalk, coconut leaf stalk, raffia and oil palm were extracted and treated with potassium permanganate solution which enhances the properties. For experimentation four different plates were fabricated using these fibers adopting hand lay-up method. These sandwiched composite plates are further machined to obtain ASTM standards Specimens which are mechanically tested as per standards. Experimental results reveal that the alkali treated palm leaf stalk fiber based polymer composite shows appreciable results than the others. Hence the developed composite can be recommended for fabrication of automobile parts.

  5. Direct Observation on the Evolution of Shear Banding and Buckling in Tungsten Fiber Reinforced Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. H.; Chen, Y.; Jiang, M. Q.; Chen, X. W.; Fu, H. M.; Zhang, H. F.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of micro-damage and deformation of each phase in the composite plays a pivotal role in the clarification of deformation mechanism of composite. However, limited model and mechanical experiments were conducted to reveal the evolution of the deformation of the two phases in the tungsten fiber reinforced Zr-based bulk metallic glass composite. In this study, quasi-static compressive tests were performed on this composite. For the first time, the evolution of micro-damage and deformation of the two phases in this composite, i.e., shear banding of the metallic glass matrix and buckling deformation of the tungsten fiber, were investigated systematically by controlling the loading process at different degrees of deformation. It is found that under uniaxial compression, buckling of the tungsten fiber occurs first, while the metallic glass matrix deforms homogeneously. Upon further loading, shear bands initiate from the fiber/matrix interface and propagate in the metallic glass matrix. Finally, the composite fractures in a mixed mode, with splitting in the tungsten fiber, along with shear fracture in the metallic glass matrix. Through the analysis on the stress state in the composite and resistance to shear banding of the two phases during compressive deformation, the possible deformation mechanism of the composite is unveiled. The deformation map of the composite, which covers from elastic deformation to final fracture, is obtained as well.

  6. The effect of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, strain sensitivity and crack sensitivity of steel fiber reinforced smart cement composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teomete, Egemen

    2016-07-01

    Earthquakes, material degradations and other environmental factors necessitate structural health monitoring (SHM). Metal foil strain gages used for SHM have low durability and low sensitivity. These factors motivated researchers to work on cement based strain sensors. In this study, the effects of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivity) and crack sensitivity were determined for steel fiber reinforced cement based composite. A rapid increase of electrical resistance at 200 °C was observed due to damage occurring between cement paste, aggregates and steel fibers. The moisture—electrical resistance relationship was investigated. The specimens taken out of the cure were saturated with water and had a moisture content of 9.49%. The minimum electrical resistance was obtained at 9% moisture at which fiber-fiber and fiber-matrix contact was maximum and the water in micro voids was acting as an electrolyte, conducting electrons. The variation of compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivities) and crack sensitivity were investigated by conducting compression, split tensile and notched bending tests with different moisture contents. The highest gage factor for the compression test was obtained at optimal moisture content, at which electrical resistance was minimum. The tensile strain gage factor for split tensile test and crack sensitivity increased by decreasing moisture content. The mechanisms between moisture content, electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivity were elucidated. The relations of moisture content with electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivities have been presented for the first time in this study for steel fiber reinforced cement based composites. The results are important for the development of self sensing cement based smart materials.

  7. Round Robin Tests to Determine Fiber Content of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites by Combustion and Thermogravimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Funabashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To propose methods to determine the fiber content of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP for the International Organization for Standardization, the fiber contents of CFRP with polyamide-6 were measured using a combustion method based on ISO 14127 and a thermogravimetry method based on the modified ISO 9924-3 under a round robin test managed by the Polymer Subcommittee of the Industrial Technology Cooperative Promotion Committee in Japan. In the combustion method, the fiber contents of the CFRTP (~0.3 g were determined by the mass of carbon fiber remaining after burning (ISO 14127. The fiber contents in weight of the CFRTP with 8, 9, or 10 plies were determined to be 55.720%, 61.088%, or 65.326%, respectively, by 17 research institutes. In the thermogravimetry method, the fiber contents of the CFRTP (~10 mg were determined by the mass of carbon fiber remaining after heating it to 600°C in nitrogen gas using thermogravimetry apparatus (modified ISO 9924-3. The fiber contents of the CFRTP with 8, 9, or 10 plies were determined to be 56.908%, 61.579%, or 64.819%, respectively, by 8 research institutes. It was confirmed that thermogravimetry method was as accurate as the combustion method based on ISO 14127.

  8. A REVIEW OF THE MEASUREMENT AND DEVELOPMENT OF CRYSTALLINITY AND ITS RELATION TO PROPERTIES IN NEAT POLY(PHENYLENE SULFIDE) AND ITS FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruiell, J.E.

    2005-01-31

    This literature review paper was prepared for the Department of Energy Automotive Lightweighting Program to address materials interest expressed by the Automotive Composites Consortium and it summarizes the measurement and development of crystallinity and its relation to properties in poly(phenylene sulfide) (PPS) and its fiber reinforced composites. The objective of this effort was to broaden the understanding of low-cost, semi-crystalline thermoplastic resins and composites for use in potential future automotive applications. PPS has an excellent combination of attributes including good mechanical properties and thermal stability, high chemical resistance, low moisture absorption, good weathering resistance, high dimensional stability, low flammability, and excellent processability. Specific areas addressed in this report include: Structure of PPS; Techniques for measuring crystallinity; Crystallinity as a function of prior treatment; Crystallization kinetics and morphology; Effect of variation of crystallinity on properties of PPS and its composites; Environmental stability; Unusual effects of cooling rates and degree of crystallinity on mechanical properties of AS4/PPS composites; Recent PPS laminate data (Ten Cate Advanced Composites); and Recommendations for future research.

  9. Effect of Environment on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Calomino, Anthony; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Stress-rupture tests were conducted in air, vacuum, and steam-containing environments to identify the failure modes and degradation mechanisms of a carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite at two temperatures, 600 and 1200 C. Stress-rupture lives in air and steam containing environments (50 - 80% steam with argon) are similar for a composite stress of 69 MPa at 1200 C. Lives of specimens tested in a 20% steam/argon environment were about twice as long. For tests conducted at 600 C, composite life in 20% steam/argon was 20 times longer than life in air. Thermogravimetric analysis of the carbon fibers was conducted under similar conditions to the stress-rupture tests. The oxidation rate of the fibers in the various environments correlated with the composite stress-rupture lives. Examination of the failed specimens indicated that oxidation of the carbon fibers was the primary damage mode for specimens tested in air and steam environments at both temperatures.

  10. Cure Cycle Design Methodology for Fabricating Reactive Resin Matrix Fiber Reinforced Composites: A Protocol for Producing Void-free Quality Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    2014-01-01

    For the fabrication of resin matrix fiber reinforced composite laminates, a workable cure cycle (i.e., temperature and pressure profiles as a function of processing time) is needed and is critical for achieving void-free laminate consolidation. Design of such a cure cycle is not trivial, especially when dealing with reactive matrix resins. An empirical "trial and error" approach has been used as common practice in the composite industry. Such an approach is not only costly, but also ineffective at establishing the optimal processing conditions for a specific resin/fiber composite system. In this report, a rational "processing science" based approach is established, and a universal cure cycle design protocol is proposed. Following this protocol, a workable and optimal cure cycle can be readily and rationally designed for most reactive resin systems in a cost effective way. This design protocol has been validated through experimental studies of several reactive polyimide composites for a wide spectrum of usage that has been documented in the previous publications.

  11. Effects of Fiber Content on Mechanical Properties of CVD SiC Fiber-Reinforced Strontium Aluminosilicate Glass-Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1996-01-01

    Unidirectional CVD SiC(f)(SCS-6) fiber-reinforced strontium aluminosilicate (SAS) glass-ceramic matrix composites containing various volume fractions, approximately 16 to 40 volume %, of fibers were fabricated by hot pressing at 1400 C for 2 h under 27.6 MPa. Monoclinic celsian, SrAl2Si2O8, was the only crystalline phase formed, with complete absence of the undesired hexacelsian phase, in the matrix. Room temperature mechanical properties were measured in 3-point flexure. The matrix microcracking stress and the ultimate strength increased with increase in fiber volume fraction, reached maximum values for V(sub f) approximately equal to 0.35, and degraded at higher fiber loadings. This degradation in mechanical properties is related to the change in failure mode, from tensile at lower V(sub f) to interlaminar shear at higher fiber contents. The extent of fiber loading did not have noticeable effect on either fiber-matrix debonding stress, or frictional sliding stress at the interface. The applicability of micromechanical models in predicting the mechanical properties of the composites was also examined. The currently available theoretical models do not appear to be useful in predicting the values of the first matrix cracking stress, and the ultimate strength of the SCS-6/SAS composites.

  12. Modification of a Phenolic Resin with Epoxy- and Methacrylate-Functionalized Silica Sols to Improve the Ablation Resistance of Their Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Functionalized silica sols were obtained by the hydrolytic condensation of (γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPMS, (γ-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPMS and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS. Three different sols were obtained: MPS (derived from MPMS and TEOS, GPS-MPS (derived from GPMS, MPMS and TEOS, and GPSD (derived from GPMS, TEOS and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A, DGEBA. These silica sols were mixed with a phenolic resin (PR. Ethylenediamine was used as a hardener for epoxy-functionalized sols and benzoyl peroxide was used as an initiator of the free-radical polymerization of methacrylate-functionalized silica sols. Glass fiber-reinforced composites were obtained from the neat PR and MPS-PR, GPS-MPS-PR and GPSD-PR. The resulting composites were evaluated as ablation resistant materials in an acetylene-oxygen flame. A large increase in the ablation resistance was observed when the PR was modified by the functionalized silica sols. The ablation resistance of the composites decreased as follows: GPSD-PR > MPS-PR > GPS-MPS-PR > PR.

  13. Machinability of drilling T700/LT-03A carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite laminates using candle stick drill and multi-facet drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Dong; Qiu, Kun-Xian; Chen, Ming; Cai, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) composite laminates are widely used in aerospace and aircraft structural components due to their superior properties. However, they are regarded as difficult-to-cut materials because of bad surface quality and low productivity. Drilling is the most common hole making process for CFRP composite laminates and drilling induced delamination damage usually occurs severely at the exit side of drilling holes, which strongly deteriorate holes quality. In this work, the candle stick drill and multi-facet drill are employed to evaluate the machinability of drilling T700/LT-03A CFRP composite laminates in terms of thrust force, delamination, holes diameter and holes surface roughness. S/N ratio is used to characterize the thrust force while an ellipse-shaped delamination model is established to quantitatively analyze the delamination. The best combination of drilling parameters are determined by full consideration of S/N ratios of thrust force and the delamination. The results indicate that candle stick drill will induce the unexpected ellipse-shaped delamination even at its best drilling parameters of spindle speed of 10,000 rpm and feed rate of 0.004 mm/tooth. However, the multi-facet drill cutting at the relative lower feed rate of 0.004 mm/tooth and lower spindle speed of 6000 rpm can effectively prevent the delamination. Comprehensively, holes quality obtained by multi-facet drill is much more superior to those obtained by candle stick drill.

  14. Adhesive retention of experimental fiber-reinforced composite, orthodontic acrylic resin, and aliphatic urethane acrylate to silicone elastomer for maxillofacial prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosor, Begüm Yerci; Artunç, Celal; Şahan, Heval

    2015-07-01

    A key factor of an implant-retained facial prosthesis is the success of the bonding between the substructure and the silicone elastomer. Little has been reported on the bonding of fiber reinforced composite (FRC) to silicone elastomers. Experimental FRC could be a solution for facial prostheses supported by light-activated aliphatic urethane acrylate, orthodontic acrylic resin, or commercially available FRCs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bonding of the experimental FRC, orthodontic acrylic resin, and light-activated aliphatic urethane acrylate to a commercially available high-temperature vulcanizing silicone elastomer. Shear and 180-degree peel bond strengths of 3 different substructures (experimental FRC, orthodontic acrylic resin, light-activated aliphatic urethane acrylate) (n=15) to a high-temperature vulcanizing maxillofacial silicone elastomer (M511) with a primer (G611) were assessed after 200 hours of accelerated artificial light-aging. The specimens were tested in a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 10 mm/min. Data were collected and statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA, followed by the Bonferroni correction and the Dunnett post hoc test (α=.05). Modes of failure were visually determined and categorized as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed and were statistically analyzed with the chi-squared goodness-of-fit test (α=.05). As the mean shear bond strength values were evaluated statistically, no difference was found among the experimental FRC, aliphatic urethane acrylate, and orthodontic acrylic resin subgroups (P>.05). The mean peel bond strengths of experimental fiber reinforced composite and aliphatic urethane acrylate were not found to be statistically different (P>.05). The mean value of the orthodontic acrylic resin subgroup peel bond strength was found to be statistically lower (P.05). Shear forces predominantly exhibited cohesive failure (64.4%), whereas peel forces predominantly exhibited adhesive failure (93.3%). The

  15. Constructing Novel Fiber Reinforced Plastic (FRP Composites through a Biomimetic Approach: Connecting Glass Fiber with Nanosized Boron Nitride by Polydopamine Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XueMei Wen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A biomimetic method was developed to construct novel fiber reinforced plastic (FRP composites. By mimicking mussel adhesive proteins, a monolayer of polydopamine was coated on glass fiber (GF surface. The polydopamine-treated GF (D-GF adsorbed boron nitride (BN nanoparticles, while obtaining micronano multiscale hybrid fillers BN-D-GF. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM results showed that the strong interfacial interaction brought by the polydopamine benefits the loading amount as well as dispersion of the nano-BN on GF’s surface. The BN-D-GF was incorporated into epoxy resin to construct “FRP nanocomposites.” The morphology, dynamic mechanical and thermal characteristics of the FRP nanocomposites were analyzed. SEM morphology revealed that BN-D-GF heterogeneous dispersed in epoxy matrix. There was good adhesion between the polymer matrix and the BN-D-GF filler. The dynamic modulus and mechanical loss were studied using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. Compared with neat epoxy and untreated GF reinforced composites, BN-D-GF/epoxy and D-GF/epoxy systems showed improved mechanical properties. The thermal conductivity, Shore D hardness, and insulation properties were also enhanced.

  16. Influence of fiber content on mechanical, morphological and thermal properties of kenaf fibers reinforced poly(vinyl chloride)/thermoplastic polyurethane poly-blend composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shekeil, Y.A.; Sapuan, S.M.; Jawaid, M.; Al-Shuja’a, O.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Increasing fiber content decreased tensile strength and strain. • Tensile modulus was increasing with increase in fiber content. • SEM showed fiber/matrix poor adhesion. • Impact strength was decreasing with increase in fiber content. • Lower thermal stability with increase in fiber content was observed. - Abstract: Kenaf (Hibiscus Cannabinus) bast fiber reinforced poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC)/thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) poly-blend was prepared by melt mixing method using Haake Polydrive R600 internal mixer. The composites were prepared with different fiber content: 20%, 30% and 40% (by weight), with the processing parameters: 140 °C, 11 min, and 40 rpm for temperature, time and speed, respectively. After mixing, the composite was compressed using compressing molding machine. Mechanical properties (i.e. tensile properties, flexural properties, impact strength) were studied. Morphological properties of tensile fracture surface were studied using Scanning electron microscope (SEM). Thermal properties of the composites were studied using Thermogravimetric Analyses (TGA). PVC/TPU/KF composites have shown lower tensile strength and strain with increase in fiber content. Tensile modulus showed an increasing trend with increase in fiber content. Impact strength decreased with increase in fiber content; however, high impact strength was observed even with 40% fiber content (20.2 kJ/m 2 ). Mean while; the 20% and 30% fiber contents showed higher impact strength of 34.9, 27.9 kJ/m 2 ; respectively. SEM showed that there is poor fiber/matrix adhesion. Thermal degradation took place in three steps. In the first step, composites as well as the matrix had a similar stability. At the second step, matrix showed a slightly better stability than the composites. At the last step, composites showed a better stability than the matrix

  17. Occupational exposures to styrene vapor in a manufacturing plant for fiber-reinforced composite wind turbine blades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Duane; Garcia, Alberto; Feng, H Amy

    2011-07-01

    A utility-scale wind turbine blade manufacturing plant requested assistance from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in controlling worker exposures to styrene at a plant that produced 37 and 42 m long fiber-reinforced wind turbine blades. The plant requested NIOSH assistance because previous air sampling conducted by the company indicated concerns about peak styrene concentrations when workers entered the confined space inside of the wind turbine blade. NIOSH researchers conducted two site visits and collected personal breathing zone and area air samples while workers performed the wind turbine blade manufacturing tasks of vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM), gelcoating, glue wiping, and installing the safety platform. All samples were collected during the course of normal employee work activities and analyzed for styrene using NIOSH Method 1501. All sampling was task based since full-shift sampling from a prior Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) compliance inspection did not show any exposures to styrene above the OSHA permissible exposure limit. During the initial NIOSH site visit, 67 personal breathing zone and 18 area air samples were collected while workers performed tasks of VARTM, gelcoating, glue wipe, and installation of a safety platform. After the initial site visit, the company made changes to the glue wipe task that eliminated the need for workers to enter the confined space inside of the wind turbine blade. During the follow-up site visit, 12 personal breathing zone and 8 area air samples were collected from workers performing the modified glue wipe task. During the initial site visit, the geometric means of the personal breathing zone styrene air samples were 1.8 p.p.m. (n = 21) for workers performing the VARTM task, 68 p.p.m. (n = 5) for workers installing a safety platform, and 340 p.p.m. (n = 14) for workers performing the glue wipe task, where n is the number of workers sampled for a

  18. Performance of natural curaua fiber-reinforced polyester composites under 7.62 mm bullet impact as a stand-alone ballistic armor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio de Oliveira Braga

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A multilayered armor system (MAS is intended to personal protection against high kinetic energy ammunition. MAS layers are composed of materials such as a front ceramic and a back composite that must show both high impact resistance and low weight, usually conflicting characteristics. Synthetic fiber fabrics, such as Kevlar™ and Dyneema™, are the favorite materials to back the front ceramic, due to their high strength, high modulus and relatively low weight. Recently, composites reinforced with natural fibers have been considered as MAS second layer owing to their good performance associated with other advantages as being cheaper and environmentally friendly. Among the natural fibers, those extracted from the leaves of the Ananas erectifolius plant, known as curaua, stand out due to its exceptional high strength and high modulus. Thus, the objective of the present work is to evaluate the performance of curaua fiber-reinforced polyester composites subjected to ballistic impact of high energy 7.62 mm ammunition. Composites reinforced with 0, 10, 20 and 30 vol.% of curaua fibers were produced and stand-alone tested as armor target to evaluate the absorbed energy. Analysis of variance (Anova and Tukey's honest significant difference test (HSD made it possible to compare the results to Kevlar™ laminates. Among the tested materials, the 30 vol.% fiber composites were found to be the best alternative to Kevlar™. Keywords: Composite, Natural fiber, Curaua fiber, Ballistic test

  19. The Effects of Fiber Orientation and Adhesives on Tensile Properties of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite with Embedded Nickel-Titanium Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, Derek J.; Jana, Sadhan C.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Kannan, Manigandan; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2017-01-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA) sections were embedded within carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite (CFRPPMC) laminates and their tensile properties were evaluated with simultaneous monitoring of modal acoustic emissions. The test specimens were fabricated in three different layup configurations and two different thin film adhesives were applied to bond the SMA with the PMC. A trio of acoustic sensors were attached to the specimens during tensile testing to monitor the modal acoustic emission (AE) as the materials experienced mechanical failure. The values of ultimate tensile strengths, strains, and moduli were obtained. Cumulative AE energy of events and specimen failure location were determined. In conjunction, optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to examine the break areas of the specimens. The analysis of AE data revealed failure locations within the specimens which were validated from the microscopic images. The placement of 90 deg plies in the outer ply gave the strongest acoustic signals during break as well as the cleanest break of the samples tested. Overlapping 0 deg ply layers surrounding the SMA was found to be the best scenario to prevent failure of the specimen itself.

  20. Stress and strain analysis of the bone-implant interface: a comparison of fiber-reinforced composite and titanium implants utilizing 3-dimensional finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinya, Akikazu; Ballo, Ahmed M; Lassila, Lippo V J; Shinya, Akiyoshi; Närhi, Timo O; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2011-03-01

    This study analyzed stress and strain mediated by 2 different implant materials, titanium (Ti) and experimental fiber-reinforced composite (FRC), on the implant and on the bone tissue surrounding the implant. Three-dimensional finite element models constructed from a mandibular bone and an implant were subjected to a load of 50 N in vertical and horizontal directions. Postprocessing files allowed the calculation of stress and strain within the implant materials and stresses at the bone-to-implant interface (stress path). Maximum stress concentrations were located around the implant on the rim of the cortical bone in both implant materials; Ti and overall stresses decreased toward the Ti implant apex. In the FRC implant, a stress value of 0.6 to 2.0 MPa was detected not only on the screw threads but also on the implant surface between the threads. Clear differences were observed in the strain distribution between the materials. Based on the results, the vertical load stress range of the FRC implant was close to the stress level for optimal bone growth. Furthermore, the stress at the bone around the FRC implant was more evenly distributed than that with Ti implant.

  1. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.1 Intelligent Manufacturing of Hybrid Carbon-Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Wind Turbine Blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twomey, Janet M. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States)

    2010-04-30

    In this subtask, the manufacturability of hybrid carbon-glass fiber-reinforced composite wind turbine blades using Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) was investigated. The objective of this investigation was to study the VARTM process and its parameters to manufacture cost-effective wind turbine blades with no defects (mainly eliminate dry spots and reduce manufacturing time). A 2.5-dimensional model and a 3-dimensional model were developed to simulate mold filling and part curing under different conditions. These conditions included isothermal and non-isothermal filling, curing of the part during and after filling, and placement of injection gates at different locations. Results from this investigation reveal that the process can be simulated and also that manufacturing parameters can be optimized to eliminate dry spot formation and reduce the manufacturing time. Using computer-based models is a cost-effective way to simulate manufacturing of wind turbine blades. The approach taken herein allows the design of the wind blade manufacturing processes without physically running trial-and-error experiments that are expensive and time-consuming; especially for larger blades needed for more demanding environmental conditions. This will benefit the wind energy industry by reducing initial design and manufacturing costs which can later be passed down to consumers and consequently make the wind energy industry more competitive.

  2. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyun, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Tae-Bong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Cha, Hyun-Suk

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement. The specimens were prepared to evaluate the bond strength of epoxy resin-based fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) to dual-curing resin cement (RelyX U200). The specimens were divided into four groups (n=18) according to different surface treatments: group 1, no treatment; group 2, silanization; group 3, silanization after hydrogen peroxide etching; group 4, silanization with warm drying at 80℃ after hydrogen peroxide etching. After storage of the specimens in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours, the shear bond strength (in MPa) between the fiber post and resin cement was measured using a universal testing machine. The fractured surface of the fiber post was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis with Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). Silanization of the fiber post (Group 2) significantly increased the bond strength in comparison with the non treated control (Group 1) (Psilanization also significantly increased the bond strength (Group 3 and 4) (Psilane agent (Group 2 and 3) (P>.05). Fiber post silanization and subsequent heat treatment (80℃) with warm air blower can be beneficial in clinical post cementation. However, hydrogen peroxide etching prior to silanization was not effective in this study.

  3. Effect of location of glass fiber-reinforced composite reinforcement on the flexural properties of a maxillary complete denture in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yutaka; Yoshida, Kaneyoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2011-07-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of the location of glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) reinforcement on the flexural load at the proportional limit (FL-PL) and the flexural deflection of a maxillary acrylic resin complete denture. Material and methods. Maxillary acrylic resin complete dentures strengthened with and without FRC reinforcement were tested. The polymerized FRC was embedded in the denture base resin in the doughy state and placed (1) under the ridge lap region, (2) in the anterior region, (3) in the middle region or (4) in the anterior and posterior regions. The FL-PL and flexural deflection value at the 100-N loading point of the reinforced maxillary denture specimens were tested. Results. All of the reinforced dentures had a higher FL-PL than the denture without reinforcement but the FL-PL values of all the dentures were not significantly different from each other. The efficiency of the FRC reinforcement compared to the unreinforced denture was 1.54-1.75 times greater. All of the reinforced dentures showed significantly lower deflection compared to the unreinforced denture, but the flexural deflections of all the dentures were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions. The location of the FRC reinforcement did not affect the fracture resistance of the maxillary acrylic resin complete denture. All of the reinforced dentures had higher FL-PL and lower flexural deflection than the denture without reinforcement.

  4. Use of the Materials Genome Initiative (MGI approach in the design of improved-performance fiber-reinforced SiC/SiC ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Snipes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New materials are traditionally developed using costly and time-consuming trial-and-error experimental efforts. This is followed by an even lengthier material-certification process. Consequently, it takes 10 to 20 years before a newly-discovered material is commercially employed. An alternative approach to the development of new materials is the so-called materials-by-design approach within which a material is treated as a complex hierarchical system, and its design and optimization is carried out by employing computer-aided engineering analyses, predictive tools and available material databases. In the present work, the materials-by-design approach is utilized to design a grade of fiber-reinforced (FR SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs, the type of materials which are currently being used in stationary components, and are considered for use in rotating components, of the hot sections of gas-turbine engines. Towards that end, a number of mathematical functions and numerical models are developed which relate CMC constituents’ (fibers, fiber coating and matrix microstructure and their properties to the properties and performance of the CMC as a whole. To validate the newly-developed materials-by-design approach, comparisons are made between experimentally measured and computationally predicted selected CMC mechanical properties. Then an optimization procedure is employed to determine the chemical makeup and processing routes for the CMC constituents so that the selected mechanical properties of the CMCs are increased to a preset target level.

  5. Effect of different sintering aids on thermo-mechanical properties and oxidation of SiC fibers - Reinforced ZrB{sub 2} composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciti, D., E-mail: diletta.sciti@istec.cnr.it [ISTEC-CNR, Institute of Science and Technology for Ceramics, National Research Council, Via Granarolo 64, I-48018 Faenza (Italy); Silvestroni, L. [ISTEC-CNR, Institute of Science and Technology for Ceramics, National Research Council, Via Granarolo 64, I-48018 Faenza (Italy); Saccone, G.; Alfano, D. [CIRA, Italian Aerospace Research Center, 81043 Capua (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    Reinforced zirconium diboride composites containing 15 vol% of Hi Nicalon SiC chopped fibers were hot pressed with addition of various sintering additives, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, ZrSi{sub 2} or MoSi{sub 2}. Depending on the sintering aid, different densification temperatures were set in the range 1650-1750 Degree-Sign C. Temperature and additive strongly influenced the matrix/fiber interface, which in turn had a strong impact on the mechanical properties and the oxidation behavior at 1650 Degree-Sign C. Even the workability, performed either by conventional machining or electro discharge machining, varied depending on the sintering additive and the secondary phases formed in the system. The system containing Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} turned out to have the highest mechanical properties, but intermediate oxidation resistance; the composite containing ZrSi{sub 2} had the lowest sintering temperature, but displayed the worst oxidation resistance, and finally the composite containing MoSi{sub 2} showed intermediate mechanical properties, but the highest oxidation resistance and lowest degree of damage upon machining. Preliminary measurements of thermal shock resistance by the water quenching method were also carried out. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We produced SiC fibers reinforced ZrB{sub 2} using different sintering aids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sintering additives affected properties, oxidation and machinability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system containing Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} had the highest mechanical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composite containing MoSi{sub 2} had the highest oxidation resistance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZrB{sub 2}-SiC fibers have higher thermal shock resistance than ZrB{sub 2}-SiC particles.

  6. The effect of a fiber reinforced cavity configuration on load bearing capacity and failure mode of endodontically treated molars restored with CAD/CAM resin composite overlay restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, G T; Saratti, C M; Cattani-Lorente, M; Feilzer, A J; Scherrer, S; Krejci, I

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the fracture strength and the mode of failure of endodontically treated molars restored with CAD/CAM overlays with fiber reinforced composite build-up of the pulp chamber. 40 Devitalized molars were cut over the CEJ and divided into five groups (n=8). The pulp chamber area was filled with: group 0 (control), no resin build-up; group 1, hybrid composite build-up (G-aenial posterior, GC); group 2, as in group 1 but covered with 3 nets of bi-directional E-glass fibers (EverStickNET, Stick Tech Ltd.); group 3, a FRC resin (EverX posterior, GC); group 4, as in group 3 but covered by the bi-directional fibers. The crowns were restored with CAD-CAM composite restorations (Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE). Maximum fracture loads were recorded in Newton and data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test (p0.05). All specimens fractured in a catastrophic way, under the CEJ. The main crack evolved in the corono-apical direction. In groups 2 and 4 secondary fracture paths with apico-coronal direction were detected close to the bi-directional fibers' layer. For the restoration of endodontically treated molars, the incorporation of FRCs did not influence the load-bearing capacity of the tooth-restoration complex. The SEM analysis showed a low ability of the bi-directional fibers net in deviating the fracture but this effect was not sufficient to lead more favorable fracture patterns, over the CEJ. The use of FRCs to reinforce the "core" of devitalized molars against vertical fractures under static loads seems useless when the thickness of the CAD/CAM composite overlay restoration is high. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Permeability of fiber reinforcements for liquid composite molding: Sequential multi-scale investigations into numerical flow modeling on the micro- and meso-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchini, Timothy John Franklin

    Composites are complex material mixtures, known to have high amounts of variability, with unique properties at the micro-, meso-, and macro-scales. In the context of advanced textile composite reinforcements, micro-scale refers to aligned fibers and toughening agents in a disordered arrangement; meso-scale is the woven, braided, or stitched fabric geometry (which compacts to various volume fractions); and macro-scale is the component or sub-component being produced for a mechanical application. The Darcy-based permeability is an important parameter for modeling and understanding the flow profile and fill times for liquid composite molding. Permeability of composite materials can vary widely from the micro- to macro-scales. For example, geometric factors like compaction and ply layup affect the component permeability at the meso- and macro-scales. On the micro-scale the permeability will be affected by the packing arrangement of the fibers and fiber volume fraction. On any scale, simplifications to the geometry can be made to treat the fiber reinforcement as a porous media. Permeability has been widely studied in both experimental and analytical frameworks, but less attention has focused on the ability of numerical tools to predict the permeability of reinforced composite materials. This work aims at (1) predicting permeability at various scales of interest and (2) developing a sequential, multi-scale, numerical modeling approach on the micro- and meso-scales. First, a micro-scale modeling approach is developed, including a geometry generation tool and a fluids-based numerical permeability solver. This micro-scale model included all physical fibers and derived the empirical permeability constant directly though numerical simulation. This numerical approach was compared with literature results for perfect packing arrangements, and the results were shown to be comparable with previous work. The numerical simulations described here also extended these previous

  8. Influence of Fiber Volume Fraction on the Tensile Properties and Dynamic Characteristics of Coconut Fiber Reinforced Composite

    OpenAIRE

    Izzuddin Zaman; Al Emran Ismail; Muhamad Khairudin Awang

    2011-01-01

    The utilization of coconut fibers as reinforcement in polymer composites has been increased significantly due to their low cost and high specific mechanical properties. In this paper, the mechanical properties and dynamic characteristics of a proposed combined polymer composite which consist of a polyester matrix and coconut fibers are determined. The influence of fibers volume fraction (%) is also evaluated and composites with volumetric amounts of coconut fiber up to 15% are fabricated. In ...

  9. Interfacial Properties of Bamboo Fiber-Reinforced High-Density Polyethylene Composites by Different Methods for Adding Nano Calcium Carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuicui Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this study was to observe the effect of nano calcium carbonate (CaCO3 modification methods on bamboo fiber (BF used in BF-reinforced high-density polyethylene (HDPE composites manufactured by extrusion molding. Two methods were used to introduce the nano CaCO3 into the BF for modification; the first was blending modification (BM and the second was impregnation modification (IM. In order to determine the effects of the modification methods, the water absorption, surface free energy and interfacial properties of the unmodified composites were compared to those of the composites made from the two modification methods. The results revealed that the percentage increase in the weight of the composite treated by nano CaCO3 decreased and that of the IMBF/HDPE composite was the lowest over the seven months of time. The results obtained by the acid-base model according to the Lewis and Owens-Wendt- Rabel-Kaelble (OWRK equations indicated that the surface energy of the composites was between 40 and 50 mJ/m2. When compared to the control sample, the maximum storage modulus (E′max of the BMBF/HDPE and IMBF/HDPE composites increased 1.43- and 1.53-fold, respectively. The values of the phase-to-phase interaction parameter B and the k value of the modified composites were higher than those of the unmodified composites, while the apparent activation energy Ea and interface parameter A were lower in the modified composites. It can be concluded that nano CaCO3 had an effect on the interfacial properties of BF-reinforced HDPE composites, and the interface bonding between IMBF and HDPE was greatest among the composites.

  10. Impact Strength and Flexural Properties Enhancement of Methacrylate Silane Treated Oil Palm Mesocarp Fiber Reinforced Biodegradable Hybrid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chern Chiet Eng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber as reinforcement filler in polymer composites is an attractive approach due to being fully biodegradable and cheap. However, incompatibility between hydrophilic natural fiber and hydrophobic polymer matrix restricts the application. The current studies focus on the effects of incorporation of silane treated OPMF into polylactic acid (PLA/polycaprolactone (PCL/nanoclay/OPMF hybrid composites. The composites were prepared by melt blending technique and characterize the composites with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. FTIR spectra indicated that peak shifting occurs when silane treated OPMF was incorporated into hybrid composites. Based on mechanical properties results, incorporation of silane treated OPMF enhances the mechanical properties of unmodified OPMF hybrid composites with the enhancement of flexural and impact strength being 17.60% and 48.43%, respectively, at 10% fiber loading. TGA thermogram shows that incorporation of silane treated OPMF did not show increment in thermal properties of hybrid composites. SEM micrographs revealed that silane treated OPMF hybrid composites show good fiber/matrix adhesion as fiber is still embedded in the matrix and no cavity is present on the surface. Water absorption test shows that addition of less hydrophilic silane treated OPMF successfully reduces the water uptake of hybrid composites.

  11. Impact strength and flexural properties enhancement of methacrylate silane treated oil palm mesocarp fiber reinforced biodegradable hybrid composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Chern Chiet; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Zainuddin, Norhazlin; Ariffin, Hidayah; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2014-01-01

    Natural fiber as reinforcement filler in polymer composites is an attractive approach due to being fully biodegradable and cheap. However, incompatibility between hydrophilic natural fiber and hydrophobic polymer matrix restricts the application. The current studies focus on the effects of incorporation of silane treated OPMF into polylactic acid (PLA)/polycaprolactone (PCL)/nanoclay/OPMF hybrid composites. The composites were prepared by melt blending technique and characterize the composites with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). FTIR spectra indicated that peak shifting occurs when silane treated OPMF was incorporated into hybrid composites. Based on mechanical properties results, incorporation of silane treated OPMF enhances the mechanical properties of unmodified OPMF hybrid composites with the enhancement of flexural and impact strength being 17.60% and 48.43%, respectively, at 10% fiber loading. TGA thermogram shows that incorporation of silane treated OPMF did not show increment in thermal properties of hybrid composites. SEM micrographs revealed that silane treated OPMF hybrid composites show good fiber/matrix adhesion as fiber is still embedded in the matrix and no cavity is present on the surface. Water absorption test shows that addition of less hydrophilic silane treated OPMF successfully reduces the water uptake of hybrid composites.

  12. Finite element analysis of strength and adhesion of cast posts compared to glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts in anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejak, Beata; Młotkowski, Andrzej

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies on the strength of teeth restored with posts have not resolved the controversy as to which post systems provide the greatest strength and longevity. The purpose of this study was to compare the strength of teeth restored using cast posts with those restored using glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts and to evaluate the bond strength of the posts to dentin. The investigation was conducted by using finite element analysis, combined with the application of contact elements. Three-dimensional (3-D) models of the maxillary central incisors were generated: IT, an intact tooth; CC, a tooth with a ceramic crown; FP, a tooth restored with an FRC (glass fiber-reinforced composite resin) post; CPAu, a tooth restored with a gold alloy cast post; and CPNi, a tooth restored with an NiCr (nickel chromium alloy) cast post. Each model was subjected to vertical and oblique loads with a force of 100 N. To evaluate the strength of the restored tooth, ceramics, and composite resin, the modified von Mises failure criterion was used, the Tsai-Wu criterion for FRC, and the von Mises criterion for gold and NiCr alloy. The equivalent stresses found in the tested models were compared with the tensile strength of the respective materials. Contact stresses in the luting cement-dentin interface were calculated. The maximum mvM (modified von Mises failure criterion) stresses in the dentin of the teeth restored with FRC posts were reduced by 21%, and in those restored with cast NiCr posts, stresses were reduced by 25% when compared to the stresses in the intact tooth. The equivalent stresses in metal posts were several times higher than in FRC posts, but did not exceed the tensile strength of the materials. The highest mvM stress in the luting resin cement around the FRC post was 55% higher than in the luting resin cement around the metal post, under an oblique load. In the ceramic crown, which covered the composite resin post and core, the highest mvM stress was 30.7 MPa

  13. Tensile and thermal properties of chemically vapor-infiltrated silicon carbide composites of various high-modulus fiber reinforcements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, T.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L.L.; Hinoki, T.; Kohyama, A.

    2008-01-01

    Chemically vapor-infiltrated (CVI) silicon carbide (SiC) matrix composites are candidate structural materials for proposed nuclear fusion and advanced fission applications due to their high temperature stability under neutron irradiation. To optimize the thermal stress properties for nuclear applications, CVI-SiC matrix composites were produced with three-dimensional (3D) fiber architectures with varied Z-fiber content, using the highly-crystalline and near-stoichiometric SiC fiber Tyranno TM -SA. In addition, hybrid SiC/SiC composites incorporating carbon fibers were fabricated to improve thermal conductivity. The purpose of this work is to obtain thermal and mechanical properties data on these developmental composites. Results show that the addition of small amount (>10 %) of Tyranno TM -SA fiber remarkably increases the composite thermal conductivity parallel to the fiber longitudinal direction, in particular the through-thickness thermal conductivity in the orthogonal three-dimensional composite system due to the excellent thermal conductivity of Tyranno TM -SA fiber itself. On the other hand, tensile properties were significantly dependent on the axial fiber volume fraction; 3D SiC/SiC composites with in-plane fiber content 20 % exhibit improved axial strength. The carbon fiber was, in general, beneficial to obtain high thermal conductivity. However matrix cracks induced due to the mismatch of coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) restricted heat transfer via matrix, limiting the improvement of thermal conductivity and reducing tensile proportional limit stress. (author)

  14. Adhesion of resin materials to S2-glass unidirectional and E-glass multidirectional fiber reinforced composites: effect of polymerization sequence protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polacek, Petr; Pavelka, Vladimir; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of different polymerization sequences employed during application of bis-GMAbased particulate filler composites (PFC) or a flowable resin (FR) on fiber-reinforced composite (FRC). Unidirectional, pre-impregnated S2-glass fibers (Dentapreg) and multidirectional preimpregnated E-glass fibers (Dentapreg) (length: 40 mm; thickness: 0.5 mm) were obtained (N = 144, n = 12 per group) and embedded in translucent silicone material with the adhesion surface exposed. The resulting specimens were randomly divided into 12 groups for the following application sequences: a) FRC+PFC (photopolymerized in one step), b) FRC+FR (photopolymerized in one step), c) FRC+PFC (photopolymerized individually), d) FRC+FR (photopolymerized individually), e) FRC (photopolymerized)+intermediate adhesive resin and PFC (photopolymerized in one step), f) FRC (photopolymerized)+intermediate adhesive resin and FR (photopolymerized in one step). The sequences of unidirectional (groups a to f) were repeated for multidirectional (groups g to l) FRCs. PFCs were debonded from the FRC surfaces using the shear bond test in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). On additional specimens from each FRC type, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was performed to characterize the fiber weight content (Wf) (N = 6, n = 3 per group). After debonding, all specimens were analyzed using SEM to categorize the failure modes. The data were statistically analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). Significant effects of the FRC type (S2 or E-glass) (p resin type (PFC or FR) (p TGA revealed 55 ± 3 wt% fiber content for multidirectional and 60 ± 3 wt% for unidirectional FRCs tested. Multidirectional pre-impregnated E-glass fibers cannot be recommended in combination with the PFC and FR materials tested in this study. Application of an intermediate adhesive resin layer increases the adhesion of both PFC and FR to unidirectional FRC. FRC and FR can be polymerized in one step, but FRC and PFC

  15. Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of an unidirectional, 9 vol percent tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1993-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling via elastic-plastic finite element analyses were performed to investigate the effects that the residual stresses and the degree of matrix work hardening (i.e., cold-worked, annealed) have upon the behavior of a 9 vol percent, unidirectional W/Cu composite, undergoing tensile loading. The inclusion of the residual stress-containing state as well as the simulated matrix material conditions proved to be significant since the Cu matrix material exhibited plastic deformation, which affected the subsequent tensile response of the composite system. The stresses generated during cooldown to room temperature from the manufacturing temperature were more of a factor on the annealed-matrix composite, since they induced the softened matrix to plastically flow. This event limited the total load-carrying capacity of this matrix-dominated, ductile-ductile type material system. Plastic deformation of the hardened-matrix composite during the thermal cooldown stage was not considerable, therefore, the composite was able to sustain a higher stress before showing any appreciable matrix plasticity. The predicted room temperature, stress-strain response, and deformation stages under both material conditions represented upper and lower bounds characteristic of the composite's tensile behavior. The initial deformation stage for the hardened material condition showed negligible matrix plastic deformation while for the annealed state, its initial deformation stage showed extensive matrix plasticity. Both material conditions exhibited a final deformation stage where the fiber and matrix were straining plastically. The predicted stress-strain results were compared to the experimental, room temperature, tensile stress-strain curve generated from this particular composite system. The analyses indicated that the actual thermal-mechanical state of the composite's Cu matrix, represented by the experimental data, followed the annealed material condition.

  16. The mechanics of delamination in fiber-reinforced composite materials. Part 2: Delamination behavior and fracture mechanics parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1983-01-01

    Based on theories of laminate anisotropic elasticity and interlaminar fracture, the complete solution structure associated with a composite delamination is determined. Fracture mechanics parameters characterizing the interlaminar crack behavior are defined from asymptotic stress solutions for delaminations with different crack-tip deformation configurations. A numerical method employing singular finite elements is developed to study delaminations in fiber composites with any arbitrary combinations of lamination, material, geometric, and crack variables. The special finite elements include the exact delamination stress singularity in its formulation. The method is shown to be computationally accurate and efficient, and operationally simple. To illustrate the basic nature of composite delamination, solutions are shown for edge-delaminated (0/-0/-0/0) and (+ or - 0/+ or - 0/90/90 deg) graphite-epoxy systems under uniform axial extenstion. Three-dimensional crack-tip stress intensity factors, associated energy release rates, and delamination crack-closure are determined for each individual case. The basic mechanics and mechanisms of composite delamination are studied, and fundamental characteristics unique to recently proposed tests for interlaminar fracture toughness of fiber composite laminates are examined.

  17. The mechanics of delamination in fiber-reinforced composite materials. II - The delamination behavior and fracture mechanics parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1983-01-01

    Based on theories of laminate anisotropic elasticity and interlaminar fracture, the complete solution structure associated with a composite delamination is determined. Fracture mechanics parameters characterizing the interlaminar crack behavior are defined from asymptotic stress solutions for delaminations with different crack-tip deformation configurations. A numerical method employing singular finite elements is developed to study delaminations in fiber composites with any arbitrary combinations of lamination, material, geometric, and crack variables. The special finite elements include the exact delamination stress singularity in its formulation. The method is shown to be computationally accurate and efficient, and operationally simple. To illustrate the basic nature of composite delamination, solutions are shown for edge-delaminated (0/-0/-0/0) and (+ or - 0/+ or - 0/90/90 deg) graphite-epoxy systems under uniform axial extension. Three-dimensional crack-tip stress intensity factors, associated energy release rates, and delamination crack-closure are determined for each individual case. The basic mechanics and mechanisms of composite delamination are studied, and fundamental characteristics unique to recently proposed tests for interlaminar fracture toughness of fiber composite laminates are examined. Previously announced in STAR as N84-13222

  18. Investigation of degradation products produced by recycling the solvent during chemical degradation of fiber-reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ucar, Hülya; Simonsen, Morten Enggrob; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2017-01-01

    of solvent consumption by 88%. It was found that the recycled solvent became increasingly more concentrated with degradation products from the epoxy resin and compounds produced by acetone aldol reactions. These degradation products promoted and enhanced the degradation of the composite. Among the compounds...... produced by acetone aldol reaction, the industrially important bulk chemical mesityl oxide accounted for 68–79% of the total chromatographic peak area. Simultaneously, with the optimization of a process for converting composite waste into its constituent (fibers and resin), valuable bulk chemicals can...

  19. Some Effects of Composition on Friction and Wear of Graphite-Fiber-Reinforced Polyimide Liners in Plain Spherical Bearings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sliney, Harold

    1978-01-01

    .... These additives were not needed when the bearing liners contained adsorbed moisture. Although, at 25 deg C, MoS2 reduced the friction and wear of the base composite at unit loads above 7.0x10(exp 7) N/m2 (10,000 psi...

  20. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Quasi-Isotropic Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Automotive Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Corum, James [ORNL; Klett, Lynn B [ORNL; Davenport, Mike [ORNL; Battiste, Rick [ORNL; Simpson, Jr., William A [ORNL

    2006-04-01

    This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a quais-isotropic carbon-fiber thermoplastic composite for possible automotive structural applications. The composite consisted of a PolyPhenylene Sulfide (PPS) thermoplastic matrix (Fortron's PPS - Ticona 0214B1 powder) reinforced with 16 plies of carbon-fiber unidirectional tape, [0?/90?/+45?/-45?]2S. The carbon fiber was Hexcel AS-4C and was present in a fiber volume of 53% (60%, by weight). The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Freedom Car and Vehicle Technologies and is closely coordinated with the Advanced Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design data and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for automotive structural applications. This document is in two parts. Part 1 provides design data and correlations, while Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects of short-time, cyclic, and sustained loadings; temperature; fluid environments; and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. Guidance for design analysis, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage-tolerance design guidance are provided.