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Sample records for resin solution formaldehyde

  1. and phenol–formaldehyde resin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    formaldehyde resin (PFR) modified with tetraethylorthosilicate are investigated in detail. The chemical synthesis of PFR, its modification with nanometer- sized SiO2 particles created by sol–gel method and subsequent coating, enables a preparation of ...

  2. Removal of p-nitrophenol by a water-compatible hypercrosslinked resin functionalized with formaldehyde carbonyl groups and XAD-4 in aqueous solution: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianhan; Yan, Cheng; Huang, Kelong

    2009-04-01

    Chloromethylated styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers were post-crosslinked through Fredel-Crafts alkylation reaction and a water-compatible hypercrosslinked resin HJ-1 was developed successfully. It can be wetted directly by water and can be used without any wetting process. It was applied to remove p-nitrophenol in aqueous solution in comparison with the commercial Amberlite XAD-4 resin. Their adsorption behaviors for p-nitrophenol were conducted and it was found the adsorption dynamics obeyed the pseudo-second-order rate equation and the intra-particle diffusion was the rate-limiting step. The adsorption isotherms can be correlated to Freundlich isotherm and the adsorption capacity onto HJ-1 resin was much larger than XAD-4. The maximum adsorption capacity of p-nitrophenol for HJ-1 resin was measured to be 179.4 mg/g with the equilibrium concentration at 178.9 mg/l and the maximum removal percentage was predicted to be 98.3%. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters were calculated and the adsorption was mainly driven by enthalpy change. The micropore structure, the size matching between the pore diameter of HJ-1 resin and the molecular size of p-nitrophenol, and polarity matching between the formaldehyde carbonyl groups of HJ-1 resin and p-nitrophenol bring the larger adsorption capacity and higher adsorption affinity.

  3. Melamine-modified urea formaldehyde resin for bonding particleboards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse; Feng Fu; Hui Pan

    2008-01-01

    For the development of a cost-effective melamine-modified urea formaldehyde resin (MUF), the study evaluated the effects of reaction pH and melamine content on resin properties and bond performance of the MUF resin adhesive systems. Eight resins, each with three replicates, were prepared in a factorial experiment that included two formulation variables: two reaction...

  4. Reduction of the formaldehyde content in leathers treated with formaldehyde resins by means of plant polyphenols

    OpenAIRE

    Marsal Monge, Agustín; Manich Bou, Albert M.; Cuadros Domènech, Sara; Font Vallès, Joaquim

    2017-01-01

    Formaldehyde has applications in many industrial processes, including synthesis of resins and syntans to be used in the retanning process of leather. When resins are employed, they can hydrolyse, releasing formaldehyde. Due to the carcinogenicity of formaldehyde, its presence in leather should be avoided or kept below allowable limits. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of polyphenols contained in vegetable compounds (mimosa, quebracho and tara) in the reduction of the forma...

  5. Synthesis and thermal degradation studies of melamine formaldehyde resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Sami; Bustam, M A; Nadeem, M; Naz, M Y; Tan, W L; Shariff, A M

    2014-01-01

    Melamine formaldehyde (MF) resins have been synthesized at different reaction temperature and pH values. Different molar ratios of melamine and formaldehyde were used to synthesize the corresponding resins. The prepared resin samples were characterized by using molecular weight determination viscometry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The maximum percentage of solid content (69.7%) was obtained at pH 8.5 and 75°C temperature. The molecular weight of MF resin was increased with an increase of melamine monomer concentration. The highest residual weight 14.125 wt.% was obtained with sample 10.

  6. Synthesis and Thermal Degradation Studies of Melamine Formaldehyde Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Ullah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Melamine formaldehyde (MF resins have been synthesized at different reaction temperature and pH values. Different molar ratios of melamine and formaldehyde were used to synthesize the corresponding resins. The prepared resin samples were characterized by using molecular weight determination viscometry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The maximum percentage of solid content (69.7% was obtained at pH 8.5 and 75°C temperature. The molecular weight of MF resin was increased with an increase of melamine monomer concentration. The highest residual weight 14.125 wt.% was obtained with sample 10.

  7. An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Collins, Robert T [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    A small column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removal of cesium from caustic, supernatant, and dissolved salt solutions stored or generated from high-level tank wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and Savannah River Sites. In both instances, deployment of SCIX systems, either in-tank or near-tank, is a means of expediting waste pretreatment and dispositioning with minimal or no new infrastructure requirements. Conceptually, the treatment approach can utilize a range of ion exchange media. Previously, both crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, nonelutable sorbent, and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), an organic, elutable resin, have been considered for cesium removal from tank waste. More recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, an elutable ion exchange medium, for the subject application. Results of testing indicate hydraulic limitations of the SuperLig{reg_sign} resin, specifically a high pressure drop through packed ion exchange columns. This limitation is likely the result of swelling and shrinkage of the irregularly shaped (granular) resin during repeated conversions between sodium and hydrogen forms as the resin is first loaded then eluted. It is anticipated that a similar flow limitation would exist in columns packed with conventional, granular RF resin. However, use of spherical RF resin is a likely means of mitigating processing limitations due to excessive pressure drop. Although size changes occur as the spherical resin is cycled through loading and elution operations, the geometry of the resin is expected to effectively mitigate the close packing that leads to high pressure drops across ion exchange columns. Multiple evaluations have been performed to determine the feasibility of using spherical RF resin and to obtain data necessary for design of an SCIX process. The work performed consisted of examination of radiation effects on resin performance

  8. Effect of different catalysts on urea-formaldehyde resin synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi-Ning Sun; Chung-Yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2014-01-01

    Four catalysts (H2SO4, HCl, H3PO4, and NaOH/NH4OH) were studied in the preparation of melamine modified urea– formaldehyde (UFM) resins. 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of the UFM resins at different synthesis stages revealed the...

  9. Development of melamine modified urea formaldehyde resins based o nstrong acidic pH catalyzed urea formaldehyde polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse

    2009-01-01

    To upgrade the performance of urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin bonded particleboards, melamine modified urea-formaldehyde (MUF) resins based on strong acidic pH catalyzed UF polymers were investigated. The study was conducted in a series of two experiments: 1) formulation of MUF resins based on a UF polymer catalyzed with strong acidic pH and 2) determination of the...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Ddd... - Free Formaldehyde Analysis of Insulation Resins by the Hydroxylamine Hydrochloride Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... N sodium hydroxide solution. 4.2Hydroxylamine hydrochloride solution, 100 grams per liter, pH... Insulation Resins by the Hydroxylamine Hydrochloride Method A Appendix A to Subpart DDD of Part 63 Protection... Part 63—Free Formaldehyde Analysis of Insulation Resins by the Hydroxylamine Hydrochloride Method 1...

  11. 21 CFR 177.1460 - Melamine-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1460 Melamine... melamine is made to react with not more than 3 moles of formaldehyde in water solution. (b) The resins may... polymerization reaction control agent. Phthalic acid anhydride Do. Zinc stearate For use as lubricant. (c) The...

  12. 21 CFR 177.1900 - Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1900 Urea... urea is made to react with not more than 2 moles of formaldehyde in water solution. (b) The resins may... polymerization-control agent. Tetrachlorophthalic acid anhydride Do. Zinc stearate For use as lubricant. (c) The...

  13. Photochemical decomposition of Formaldehyde in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido Z, G.

    1995-01-01

    In this work was studied the effect of ultraviolet radiation produced by a mercury low pressure lamp in solutions of formaldehyde. These solutions were exposed to ultraviolet rays at different times. In some of these series of solutions was added a photosensibilizer in order to obtain a high photodecomposition of formaldehyde. The techniques used for determine the products of the decomposition were the following: 1. In order to measure the residual formaldehyde and glioxal, the Hantzsch and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine methods were used. 2. pH's measurements of the solutions, before and after exposition. 3. Paper's chromatography for determine presence of formed acids. 4. Acid-base tritiations for measure total acidification. We observed that when the time of exposition to UV rays was increased, a high photodecomposition of formaldehyde was formed and, besides, a greater quantity of another products. Of the reagents used like photosensibilizers, with the ruthenium reagent, the best results were obtained. (Author)

  14. Urea-formaldehyde resins: production, application, and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuryawan, A.; Risnasari, I.; Sucipto, T.; Heri Iswanto, A.; Rosmala Dewi, R.

    2017-07-01

    Urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin, one of the most important formaldehyde resin adhesives, is a polymeric condensation product of formaldehyde with urea, and being widely used for the manufacture of wood-based composite panels, such as plywood, particleboard, and fiberboard. In spite of its benefits such as fast curing, good performance in the panels (colorless), and lower cost; formaldehyde emission (FE) originated from either UF resin itself or composite products bonded by UF resins is considered a critical drawback as it affects human health particularly in indoor environment. In order to reduce the FE, lowering formaldehyde/urea (F/U) mole ratio in the synthesis of the UF resin was done. In this study, synthesis of UF resins was carried out following the conventional alkaline-acid two-step reaction with a second addition of urea, resulting in F/U mole ratio around 1.0, namely 0.95; 1.05, and 1.15. The UF resins produced were used as binder for particleboard making. The board was manufactured in the laboratory using shaving type particle of Gmelina wood, 8% UF resin based on oven dry particle, and 1% NH4Cl (20%wt) as hardener for the resin. The target of the thickness was 10 mm and the dimension was 25 cm x 25 cm. The resulted particleboard then was evaluated the physical and the mechanical properties by Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) A 5908 (2003). Further, the resulted particleboard also was used for the mice cage’s wall in order to mimic the real living environment. After four weeks exposure in the cages, the mice then were evaluated their mucous organs as well as their blood. The experiment results were as follows: 1) It was possible to synthesis UF resins with low F/U mole ratio; 2) However, the particleboard bonded UF resins with low F/U mole ratio showed poor properties, particularly on the thickness swelling and modulus of elasticity; 3) There was no significant differences among the mucous organs of the mice after a month exposure FE originated from

  15. Hardness evaluation of cured urea-formaldehyde resins with different formaldehyde/urea mole ratios using nanoindentation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byung-Dae Park; Charles R. Frihart; Yan Yu; Adya P. Singh

    2013-01-01

    To understand the influence of formaldehyde/urea (F/U) mole ratio on the properties of urea–formaldehyde (UF) resins, this study investigated hardness of cured UF resins with different F/U mole ratios using a nanoindentation method. The traditional Brinell hardness (HB) method was also used...

  16. Preconcentration of Cu (II) from seawater using a novel and stable phenol-formaldehyde resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, D; Starvin, Maria; Biju, V M

    2010-01-01

    Preconcentration of Cu (II) from seawater using a novel phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) resin was investigated. 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-4-azo-3-hydroxybenzene-formaldehyde resin (DAHBF) was prepared by condensing 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-4-azo-3-hydroxybenzene with formaldehyde (1:2 mole ratio) in the presence of oxalic acid as catalyst. Polychelates were obtained when the DAHBF was treated with the aqueous solution of Cu (II) ions. The polymeric resin and polymer-metal complexes were characterized with thermal analysis and spectral studies. The IR spectra of polychelates suggest that the metal was coordinated through the oxygen atoms of the dihydroxybenzene moiety. The TGA data revealed the thermal stability of the resin and the polychelates. X-ray diffraction study revealed the incorporation of the metal ion significantly enhanced the degree of crystallinity. The sorption properties of the chelate forming resin towards divalent metal ion [Cu(II)] was studied as a function of pH, preconcentration time, metal concentration, amount of resin, aqueous phase volume and presence of electrolyte. This procedure was validated for recovery of copper from seawater samples. The method has adequate accuracy and it can be used for determination of copper in sea water samples.

  17. Chemical derivation to enhance the chemical/oxidative stability of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubler, T.L.; Shaw, W.J.; Brown, G.N.; Linehan, J.C.; Franz, J.A.; Hart, T.R.; Hogan, M.O.

    1996-09-01

    Tank wastes at Hanford and SRS contain highly alkaline supernate solutions of conc. Na, K nitrates with large amounts of 137 Cs. It is desirable to remove and concentrate the highly radioactive fraction for vitrification. One candidate ion exchange material for removing the radiocesium is R-F resin. This report summarizes studies into synthesis and characterization of 4-derivatized R-F resins prepared in pursuit of more chemically/oxidatively robust resin. 85% 4-fluororesorcinol/15% phenol formaldehyde resin appears to have good stability in alkaline solution, although there may be some nucleophilic displacement reaction during synthesis; further studies are needed

  18. Concentrating cesium-137 from seawater using resorcinol-formaldehyde resin for radioecological monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorin, Andrei; Tokar, Eduard; Tutov, Mikhail; Avramenko, Valentin [Institute of Chemistry FEBRAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Far Eastern Federal Univ., Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Palamarchuk, Marina; Marinin, Dmitry [Institute of Chemistry FEBRAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-01

    A method of preconcentrating cesium-137 from seawater using a resorcinol-formaldehyde resin, which enables one to optimize the ecological monitoring procedure, has been suggested. Studies of sorption of cesium-137 from seawater by resorcinol-formaldehyde resin have been performed, and it has been demonstrated that the cation exchanger is characterized by high selectivity with respect to cesium-137. It was found that the selectivity depended on the temperature of resin solidification and the seawater pH value. The maximal value of the cesium-137 distribution coefficient is equal to 4.1-4.5 x 10{sup 3} cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}. Under dynamic conditions, the ion-exchange resin capacity is 310-910 bed volumes depending on the seawater pH, whereas the efficiency of cesium removal exceeds 95%. The removal of more than 95% of cesium-137 has been attained using 1-3 M solutions of nitric acid: here, the eluate volume was 8-8.4 bed volumes. Application of 3 M solution of nitric acid results in resin degradation with the release of gaseous products.

  19. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The...′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to which may have been added certain optional adjuvant substances...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9480 - Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9480 Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted... chemical substance identified generically as resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin (PMN...

  1. "Greener" hybrid adhesives composed of urea formaldehyde resin and cottonseed meal for wood based composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urea formaldehyde (UF) resins are one of the most widely used adhesives in wood based composites. The major concerns of the resin utilization are free formaldehyde release and poor water resistance. As a renewable raw materials, water washed conttonseed meal can be used in wood bonding. To produce “...

  2. Characterization of novolac type liquefied wood/phenol/formaldehyde (LWPF) resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui Pan; Todd F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse

    2009-01-01

    Novolac type liquefied wood/phenol/formaldehyde (LWPF) resins were synthesized from liquefied wood and formaldehyde. The average molecular weight of the LWPF resin made from the liquefied wood reacted in an atmospheric three neck flask increased with increasing P/W ratio. However, it decreased with increasing phenol/wood ratio when using a sealed Parr reactor. On...

  3. Melamine-bridged alkyl resorcinol modified urea - formaldehyde resin for bonding hardwood plywood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse; Mitsuo Higuchi

    2010-01-01

    A powdery product was obtained by the reaction of methylolated melamine with alkyl resorcinols to form melamine-bridged alkyl resorcinols (MARs). The effects of the addition of this powder on the bonding strength and formaldehyde emission of urea–formaldehyde (UF) resins were investigated. Three types of UF resins with a formaldehyde/urea molar ratio of 1.3 synthesized...

  4. PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D

    2007-01-09

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12-inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24-inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead

  5. PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D

    2006-11-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12 inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24 inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead

  6. PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, D

    2007-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12-inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24-inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead

  7. Volatile organic compound and formaldehyde emissions from Populus davidiana wood treated with low molecular weight urea-formaldehyde resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Xian; Shen, Jun; Lei, Cheng-Shuai; Feng, Qi

    2014-09-01

    Populus davidiana wood was usually impregnated with low molecular weight thermosetting resins to improve its physical and mechanical properties. However, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and formaldehyde emitted from treated wood have lead to poor indoor air quality (IAQ). The trends of VOC and formaldehyde emissions as a function of the weight percent gain (WPG) factor were mainly investigated in this work. Aldehydes and alkanes were the predominant compositions indentified in the VOC emissions, although low amount of ketones, terpenes and alcohols were also found. With the increase in WPG, VOC and formaldehyde concentrations improved. However, their concentration began to decrease when WPG was over 44.06% (VOC) and 36.35% (formaldehyde), respectively. The modulus of elasticity (MOE) of untreated and treated wood at different WPG levels was detected. It showed that treatment of wood with UF resin significantly improved the mechanical properties. Therefore, it is probably helpful to comprehensively analyze correlations among environmental performance, mechanical performance and processing costs.

  8. Preparation and Analytical Properties of 4-Hydroxybenzaldehyde, Biuret and Formaldehyde Terpolymer Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Bunian A. Shareef; Ibrahim F. Waheed; Kariem K. Jalaot

    2014-01-01

    The chelating resin was synthesized by polycondensation reaction of 4-hydroxy benzaldehyde, formaldehyde and biuret under alkaline condition. The prepared resin was characterized by IR spectroscopy and 1HNMR spectroscopy. The resin sample was cured isothermally at 1200C.The DSC scans was measured for the prepared resin. The analytical evaluation of the prepared resin toward the studied ions (Hg2+, Ni2+ and Pb2+) using the batch method. It was employed to study selectivity of metal ion...

  9. PRODUCTION OF HIGH DENSITY PARTICLEBOARD USING MELAMINE-UREA-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setsuo Iwakiri

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was developed aiming to evaluate the effects of board density and melamine-urea-formaldehyde resin onthe properties of particleboard for semi-structural applications. The boards were manufactured with nominal density of 0.65 g/cm³and 0.90 g/cm³ using urea-formaldehyde resin as control and melamine-urea-formaldehyde. The results showed a better dimensionallystability and mechanical properties of the boards manufactured with higher density and MUF resin content. The fine furnish usedfor external layer of particleboard in the industrial process, could be used for high density homogeneous board to semi-strucuturaluses, such as flooring applications.

  10. An outbreak of contact dermatitis from toluenesulfonamide formaldehyde resin in a nail hardener

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, F. S.; de Groot, A. C.; Weyland, J. W.; Bos, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    8 cases of contact dermatitis from toluenesulfonamide formaldehyde resin in a nail hardener are presented. Most patients had used nail lacquers containing this resin for many years without trouble, but became sensitized to the resin shortly after the introduction of this particular nail hardener. A

  11. Preparation and Characterization of Novolak Phenol Formaldehyde Resin from Liquefied Brown-Rotted Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai-Yun Li; Chung-Yun Hse; Te-Fu Qin

    2012-01-01

    The brown-rotted wood was liquefied in phenol with phosphoric acid as catalyst and the resulting liquefied products were condensed with formaldehyde to yield novolak liquefied wood-based phenol formaldehyde resin (LWPF). The results showed that brown-rotted wood could be more easily liquefied than sound wood in phenol. The residue content of liquefied wood decreased...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart Nnn... - Free Formaldehyde Analysis of Insulation Resins by Hydroxylamine Hydrochloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... with a high FF content. 2. Principle 2.1a. The basis for this method is the titration of the...—Free Formaldehyde Analysis of Insulation Resins by Hydroxylamine Hydrochloride 1. Scope This method was... method. The sample should contain approximately 0.3 grams free formaldehyde to ensure complete reaction...

  13. Cesium Isotherm Testing with Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin at High Sodium Concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fiskum, Sandra K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smoot, Margaret R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rinehart, Donald E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing a Low-Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) to provide low-activity waste (LAW) directly to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low-Activity Waste Facility for immobilization. The pretreatment that will be conducted on tank waste supernate at the LAWPS facility entails filtration to remove entrained solids and cesium (Cs) ion exchange to remove Cs from the product sent to the WTP. Currently, spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin (Microbeads AS, Skedsmokorset, Norway) is the Cs ion exchange resin of choice. Most work on Cs ion exchange efficacy in Hanford tank waste has been conducted at nominally 5 M sodium (Na). WRPS is examining the possibility of processing supernatant at high Na concentrations—up to 8 M Na—to maximize processing efficiency through the LAWPS. Minimal Cs ion exchange work has been conducted at 6 M and 8 M Na concentrations..

  14. Effect of Temperature on Electrical Conductivity of Guaiacol-Guanidine Hydrochloride-Formaldehyde Copolymer Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukade, S. D.; Bawankar, S. V.

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to report temperature dependence of electrical conductivity on Guaiacol-guanidine hydrochloride-formaldehyde copolymer resin. By using a microwave irradiation technique, various ratios of copolymer resin were synthesized from the reacting monomers, i.e., guaiacol, guanidine hydrochloride and formaldehyde. The characterization of the copolymer resins has been fulfilled by spectral methods viz. ultraviolet visible (UV visible), infrared and proton nuclear magnetic spectroscopy (1H-NMR). The solid state direct current electrical conductivity of synthesized copolymer resins has been measured as a function of temperature. The electrical conductivity values of all the copolymers have been found in the range of a semiconductor.

  15. Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Ion-Exchange Resin - Effects of Oxygen Uptake and Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Paul Allen

    2009-01-01

    An ion-exchange process, using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site in Washington State. The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS)in South Carolina. Testing at ORNL will determine the impact of radiation exposure and oxygen uptake by the RF resin on the hydraulic permeability of the resin. Samples of the resin will be removed periodically to measure physical properties (bead size and compressibility) and cesium capacity. The proposed full-scale treatment system at Hanford, the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), will use an ion-exchange column containing nominally 680 gal of resin, which will treat 30 gpm of waste solution. The ion-exchange column is designed for a typical pressure drop of 6 psig, with a maximum of 9.7 psig. The lab-scale column is 3-in. clear PVC pipe and is prototypic of the proposed Hanford column. The fluid velocity in the lab-scale test will be much higher than for the full-scale column, in order to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in that column (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity will produce similar forces on the resin in the lab-scale column as would be expected at the bottom of the full-scale column. The chemical changes in the resin caused by radiation exposure and oxygen uptake are expected to cause physical changes in the resin that could reduce the bed porosity and reduce the hydraulic permeability of the resin bed. These changes will be monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and by measuring the physical properties of samples of the resin. The test loop with the lab-scale column is currently being fabricated, and operation will start by late May. Testing will be completed by the

  16. Contact allergic dermatitis from melamine formaldehyde resins in a patient with a negative patch-test reaction to formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Gavin, Juan; Loureiro Martinez, Manuel; Fernandez-Redondo, Virginia; Seoane, Maria-José; Toribio, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    Melamine paper is a basic material used in the furniture industry for home and office interiors. Contact allergic dermatitis from melamine formaldehyde resins (MFRs) should be considered in patients who work on melamine paper impregnation lines. We report a case of a 28-year-old female plywood worker who developed eczema on the dorsal side of her hands and wrists after 2 years of working on the melamine paper impregnation line. She had a relevant positive patch-test reaction to MFR, with a negative reaction to formaldehyde. Contact dermatitis due to MFR is not common, and it is usually related to products that are not fully cured or to close contact with intermediate products on the assembly line. Formaldehyde release from MFR can explain most of the positive responses. To our knowledge, this is the first report of MFR contact allergic dermatitis in a worker on a melamine paper impregnation line.

  17. Formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information on formaldehyde and the regulation of formaldehyde emissions from composite wood products under the Formaldehyde Standards for Composite Wood Products Act in the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

  18. Fixing of various simulated radioactive wastes in urea-formaldehyde resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Dahai; Wei Peng

    1986-01-01

    This paper outlines the results of the fixing of a variety of simulated radioactive wastes in the urea-formaldehyde resin. The radioactive waste materials fixed include spent ion exchange resin, concentrates of NaNO 3 -NaBO 2 as well as NaBO 2 and sludge. The performance of the fixed products has been improved by means of selecting the synthetic conditions of resin, a suitable hardener and an inorganic additive

  19. Chelation Ion Exchange Properties of 2, 4-Dihydroxyacetophenone-Biuret-Formaldehyde Terpolymer Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiokumar S. Rahangdale

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The terpolymer resin 2, 4-HABF has been synthesized by the condensation of 2, 4-dihydroxyacetophenone (2, 4-HA and biuret (B with formaldehyde (F in 1:1:2 molar ratios in presence of 2 M hydrochloric acid as catalyst. UV-Visible, IR and proton NMR spectral studies have been carried out to elucidate the structure of the resin. A terpolymer (2, 4-HABF proved to be a selective chelating ion exchange polymer for certain metals. Chelating ion-exchange properties of this polymer were studied for Fe3+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Co2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Pb2+ ions. A batch equilibrium method was employed in the study of the selectivity of metal ion uptake involving the measurement of the distribution of a given metal ion between the polymer sample and a solution containing the metal ion. The study was carried out over a wide pH range and in media of various ionic strengths. The polymer showed highest selectivity for Fe3+, Cu2+ ions than for Ni2+, Co2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, and Pb2+ ions. Study of distribution ratio as a formation of pH indicates that the amount of metal ion taken by resin is increases with the increasing pH of the medium.

  20. Evaluations of Mechanisms for Pu Uptake and Retention within Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Levitskaia, Tatiana G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fiskum, Sandra K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-15

    The unexpected uptake and retention of plutonium (Pu) onto columns containing spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin during ion exchange testing of Cs (Cs) removal from alkaline tank waste was observed in experiments at both the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). These observations have raised concern regarding the criticality safety of the Cs removal unit operation within the low-activity waste pretreatment system (LAWPS). Accordingly, studies have been initiated at Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), who manages the operations of the Hanford Site tank farms, including the LAWPS, PNNL, and elsewhere to investigate these findings. As part of these efforts, PNNL has prepared the present report to summarize the laboratory testing observations, evaluate these phenomena in light of published and unpublished technical information, and outline future laboratory testing, as deemed appropriate based on the literature studies, with the goal to elucidate the mechanisms for the observed Pu uptake and retention.

  1. RELATION BETWEEN MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE OF PHENOL FORMALDEHYDE RESIN FOR GAS SEPARATION MEMBRANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MONIKA ŠUPOVÁ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper has been to characterize the relation between the pyrolysis temperature of phenol-formaldehyde resin, the development of a porous structure, and the mechanical properties for the application of semipermeable membranes for gas separation. No previous study has dealt with this problem in its entirety. Phenol-formaldehyde resin showed an increasing trend toward micropore porosity in the temperature range from 500 till 1000°C, together with closure of mesopores and macropores. Samples cured and pyrolyzed at 1000°C pronounced hysteresis of desorption branch. The ultimate bending strength was measured using a four-point arrangement that is more suitable for measuring of brittle materials. The chevron notch technique was used for determination the fracture toughness. The results for mechanical properties indicated that phenol-formaldehyde resin pyrolyzates behaved similarly to ceramic materials. The data obtained for the material can be used for calculating the technical design of gas separation membranes.

  2. Electrospinning formaldehyde cross-linked zein solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to develop zein fibers with improved physical properties and solvent resistance, formaldehyde was used as the cross-linking reagent before spinning. The cross-linking reaction was carried out in either acetic acid or ethanolic-HCl where the amount of cross-linking reagent was between 1 and...

  3. Lawps ion exchange column gravity drain of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Herman, D. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Restivo, M. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-01-28

    Experiments at several different scales were performed to understand the removal of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange resin using a gravity drain system with a valve located above the resin screen in the ion exchange column (IXC). This is being considered as part of the design for the Low Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) to be constructed at the DOE Hanford Site.

  4. Alternative to latent catalysts for curing UF resins used in the production of low formaldehyde emission wood-based panels

    OpenAIRE

    Nuno Costa; Joao Pereira; Jorge Manuel Santos Silva Martins; João Ferra; Paulo Cruz; Fernao Magalhaes; Adelio Mendes; Luísa Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies alternative catalysts to ammonium sulfate for curing urea-formaldehyde (UF) resins. When using a latent catalyst like ammonium sulfate, hexamine is formed as by-product of curing reaction. It is believed that hexamine hydrolysis may contribute to formaldehyde release during the life-time of wood-based panels produced with UF resins. Orthophosphoric acid, on the other hand, catalyzes resin cure without by-product formation and was compared to ammonium sulfate. The pot-life o...

  5. Investigation of physical, mechanical properties and formaldehyde emission of medium density fiberboard manufactured from urea formaldehyde resin reinforced with nanocrystalline cellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khanjanzadeh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the physico-mechanical properties and formaldehyde emission of medium density fiberboard (MDF made from modified urea formaldehyde resin. In this study, nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 percent based on the dry weight of resin was applied to modify urea formaldehyde resin. The results of mechanical properties indicated that MOR and IB of the MDF panels significantly increased as the NCC incorporated into the UF adhesive up to 1%wt. However, further increment in the NCC content (1.5 and 2 wt% decreased the MOR and IB of the panels. Water absorption and thickness swelling after 2 h were significantly increased when the NCC content increased from 1% to 2%, but no significant differences were observed between the panels after 24 h. Also, the formaldehyde emission significantly decreased with increasing the amount of nanocrystalline cellulose.

  6. Bra-associated allergic contact dermatitis: p-tert-butylphenol formaldehyde resin as the culprit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herro, Elise M; Friedlander, Sheila F; Jacob, Sharon E

    2012-01-01

    P-tert-butylphenol formaldehyde resin (PTBPFR) is recognized as a significant source of allergic contact dermatitis in adults and children in association with athletic gear, shoes, and neoprene. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of allergic contact dermatitis with PTBPFR associated with padded foam bras. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Characteristics of urea-formaldehyde resins as related to glue bond quality of southern pine particleboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. -Y. Hse

    1974-01-01

    Forty-five urea resins were formulated and replicated by factorial arrangement of three variables: molar ratio of formaldehyde to urea (1.5, 1.7, 1.9, 2.1, and 2.3), reactant concentration (35, 42.5, and 50%), and reaction temperature (75°, 85°, and 95°C).

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Bio-Oil Phenol Formaldehyde Resin Used to Fabricate Phenolic Based Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Yong; Hou, Xiaopeng; Wang, Wenliang; Chang, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, bio-oil from the fast pyrolysis of renewable biomass was used as the raw material to synthesize bio-oil phenol formaldehyde (BPF) resin—a desirable resin for fabricating phenolic-based material. During the synthesis process, paraformaldehyde was used to achieve the requirement of high solid content and low viscosity. The properties of BPF resins were tested. Results indicated that BPF resin with the bio-oil addition of 20% had good performance on oxygen index and bending streng...

  9. HPLC Characterization of Phenol-Formaldehyde Resole Resin Used in Fabrication of Shuttle Booster Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Philip R.

    1999-01-01

    A reverse phase High Performance Liquid Chromatographic method was developed to rapidly fingerprint a phenol-formaldehyde resole resin similar to Durite(R) SC-1008. This resin is used in the fabrication of carbon-carbon composite materials from which Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster nozzles are manufactured. A knowledge of resin chemistry is essential to successful composite processing and performance. The results indicate that a high quality separation of over 35 peaks in 25 minutes were obtained using a 15 cm Phenomenex LUNA C8 bonded reverse phase column, a three-way water-acetonitrile-methanol nonlinear gradient, and LTV detection at 280 nm.

  10. Designing of cardanol based polyol and its curing kinetics with melamine formaldehyde resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgude, Dinesh Bapurao; Sabnis, Anagha Shyamsunder; Ghosh, Swapan Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Commercially used industrial baking enamels consist of alkyd or polyester resin with melamine formaldehyde. These resins are mainly derived from fossil resources. Considering growing environmental legislation regarding use of petroleum based raw materials, utilization of renewable resources to synthesize various chemistries can be the only obvious option as far as academia and industries are concerns. The present work deals with exploration of one of the natural resources (Cardanol) for polyol synthesis, its characterization (FTIR and NMR) and its curing behavior with melamine formaldehyde resin by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The optimized formulations from DSC study were further evaluated for general coating properties to study the suitability of developed polyol for industrial coating application. The experimental studies revealed that melamine content in the curing mixtures and thereby developed crosslinking density played an important role in deciding the coatings properties.

  11. Phenol-Formaldehyde Resin-Based Carbons for CO2 Separation at Sub-Atmospheric Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Álvarez-Gutiérrez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The challenge of developing effective separation and purification technologies that leave much smaller energy footprints is greater for carbon dioxide (CO2 than for other gases. In addition to its involvement in climate change, CO2 is present as an impurity in biogas and bio-hydrogen (biological production by dark fermentation, in post-combustion processes (flue gas, CO2-N2 and many other gas streams. Selected phenol-formaldehyde resin-based activated carbons prepared in our laboratory have been evaluated under static conditions (adsorption isotherms as potential adsorbents for CO2 separation at sub-atmospheric pressures, i.e., in post-combustion processes or from biogas and bio-hydrogen streams. CO2, H2, N2, and CH4 adsorption isotherms at 25 °C and up to 100 kPa were obtained using a volumetric equipment and were correlated by applying the Sips model. Adsorption equilibrium was then predicted for multicomponent gas mixtures by extending the multicomponent Sips model and the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST in conjunction with the Sips model. The CO2 uptakes of the resin-derived carbons from CO2-CH4, CO2-H2, and CO2-N2 at atmospheric pressure were greater than those of the reference commercial carbon (Calgon BPL. The performance of the resin-derived carbons in terms of equilibrium of adsorption seems therefore relevant to CO2 separation in post-combustion (flue gas, CO2-N2 and in hydrogen fermentation (CO2-H2, CO2-CH4.

  12. Tunable, functional carbon spheres derived from rapid synthesis of resorcinol-formaldehyde resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Vilas G; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2014-07-09

    In this article, the rapid synthesis of colloidal, spherical polymer resins via enhanced copolymerization and polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde is presented. The ultrasound-mediated technique assembles perfectly spherical resins in less than 5 min due to generated active species and free radicals produced in an aqueous ammonia-ethanol-water solvent. In this report, numerous controlled experiments account for and support the important role of high intensity ultrasounds in the rapid cluster formation, condensation, and gelation process of resorcinol with formaldehyde in the presence of ammonia catalyst. After a controlled heat treatment process, amorphous carbon spheres are obtained from these spherical polymer resins. The effect of temperature (up to 1100 °C) on the structural evolution of these carbon spheres is meticulously studied which is lacking in the previous literature. The resorcinol-formaldehyde resins carbonized at 600 and 900 °C demonstrate BET surface areas of 592.4 m(2)/g and 952.5 m(2)/g with specific capacitances of 17.5, and 33.5 F/g (scan rate of 5 mV/s), respectively.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Bio-Oil Phenol Formaldehyde Resin Used to Fabricate Phenolic Based Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Hou, Xiaopeng; Wang, Wenliang; Chang, Jianmin

    2017-06-18

    In this study, bio-oil from the fast pyrolysis of renewable biomass was used as the raw material to synthesize bio-oil phenol formaldehyde (BPF) resin-a desirable resin for fabricating phenolic-based material. During the synthesis process, paraformaldehyde was used to achieve the requirement of high solid content and low viscosity. The properties of BPF resins were tested. Results indicated that BPF resin with the bio-oil addition of 20% had good performance on oxygen index and bending strength, indicating that adding bio-oil could modify the fire resistance and brittleness of PF resin. The thermal curing behavior and heat resistance of BPF resins were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Results showed that adding bio-oil had an impact on curing characteristics and thermal degradation process of PF resin, but the influence was insignificant when the addition was relatively low. The chemical structure and surface characteristics of BPF resins were determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The analysis demonstrated that adding bio-oil in the amount of 20% was able to improve the crosslinking degree and form more hydrocarbon chains in PF resin.

  14. Multicenter Patch Testing With a Resol Resin Based on Phenol and Formaldehyde Within the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksson, M.; Ale, I.; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2015-01-01

    .2%) reacted to PFR-2. Of those 28 individuals, one had a positive reaction to formaldehyde and 2 to p-tertiary-butylphenol-formaldehyde resin. Simultaneous allergic reactions were noted to colophonium in 3, to Myroxylon pereirae in 5, and to fragrance mix I in 8. Conclusions The contact allergy frequency...

  15. Synthesis, Characterization and Applications of New Nonmetallic Photocatalysts -- Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin and Boron Carbon Oxynitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ting

    This thesis describes the synthesis, characterization and applications of two kinds of nonmetallic photocatalysts: resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) resin and boron carbon oxynitride (BCNO). Part I: Catalyst-free hydrothermal method was developed to synthesize RF resin. It started with a solution containing only resorcinol and formaldehyde. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) spectrometer and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. The particle size (diameter: 100nm-4microm) of RF the spheres was controlled by changing the concentration of the reactants. With increasing particle size, visible light absorption of the product was also increased. These RF spheres could degrade Rhodamine B and generate OH radicals under visible light irradiation. Besides, highly concentrated starting reactants would form large macroporous gel instead of individual particles. This kind of gel could be easily shaped to dishes and tubes, which could be used in filtration and degradation of air pollutants. Part II: The BCNO was prepared by heating a mixture of boric acid, melamine and PEG in atmosphere. The optical properties of the products were measured by UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy with integrating sphere. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated that all BCNO compounds had the turbostratic boron nitride (t-BN) structure. Meanwhile, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) were used to determine the chemical composition of the catalyst. The BCNO could be identified as t-BN with N atoms partly substituted by O and C atoms. The degree of substitution affected its photocatalytic properties. Perdew--Burke--Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange model was introduced to simulate the density of state (DOS) of BCNO using these supercells. Simulation results indicated that C and O substitution induced occupied impurity states in the gap region which modified the band

  16. Synthesis, Characterization and Glass - Reinforced Composites of Thiourea - Formaldehyde - Phenol Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanuprasad Dahyalal Patel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available N,N'-Dimethylol thiourea-formaldehyde (DMTUF resin having the methylol group (CH2OH has been prepared and characterized. The condensation of DMTUF resin with Phenol (P was carried out in the presence of alcoholic alkali catalyst at varying ratios of DMTUF: P, namely 1:1, 1:1.5 and 1:2. The resultant DMTUFP resin was characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectral studies, number average molecular weight ( M¯n estimated by non-aqueous conductometric titration, and thermo gravimetry. The curing study of DMTUFP resin with hexamethylene tetramine (HMTA was monitored by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and kinetic parameters were evaluated. Glass-reinforced composites based on the DMTUFP-HMTA system have also been prepared and characterized.

  17. Decontamination of spent ion-exchangers contaminated with cesium radionuclides using resorcinol-formaldehyde resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamarchuk, Marina; Egorin, Andrey; Tokar, Eduard; Tutov, Mikhail; Marinin, Dmitry; Avramenko, Valentin

    2017-01-05

    The origin of the emergence of radioactive contamination not removable in the process of acid-base regeneration of ion-exchange resins used in treatment of technological media and liquid radioactive waste streams has been determined. It has been shown that a majority of cesium radionuclides not removable by regeneration are bound to inorganic deposits on the surface and inside the ion-exchange resin beads. The nature of the above inorganic inclusions has been investigated by means of the methods of electron microscopy, IR spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The method of decontamination of spent ion-exchange resins and zeolites contaminated with cesium radionuclides employing selective resorcinol-formaldehyde resins has been suggested. Good prospects of such an approach in deep decontamination of spent ion exchangers have been demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Bio-Oil Phenol Formaldehyde Resin Used to Fabricate Phenolic Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Cui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, bio-oil from the fast pyrolysis of renewable biomass was used as the raw material to synthesize bio-oil phenol formaldehyde (BPF resin—a desirable resin for fabricating phenolic-based material. During the synthesis process, paraformaldehyde was used to achieve the requirement of high solid content and low viscosity. The properties of BPF resins were tested. Results indicated that BPF resin with the bio-oil addition of 20% had good performance on oxygen index and bending strength, indicating that adding bio-oil could modify the fire resistance and brittleness of PF resin. The thermal curing behavior and heat resistance of BPF resins were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. Results showed that adding bio-oil had an impact on curing characteristics and thermal degradation process of PF resin, but the influence was insignificant when the addition was relatively low. The chemical structure and surface characteristics of BPF resins were determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The analysis demonstrated that adding bio-oil in the amount of 20% was able to improve the crosslinking degree and form more hydrocarbon chains in PF resin.

  19. Modeling and Optimization of Phenol Formaldehyde Resin Sand Mould System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chate G. R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical bonded resin sand mould system has high dimensional accuracy, surface finish and sand mould properties compared to green sand mould system. The mould cavity prepared under chemical bonded sand mould system must produce sufficient permeability and hardness to withstand sand drop while pouring molten metal through ladle. The demand for improved values of permeability and mould hardness depends on systematic study and analysis of influencing variables namely grain fineness number, setting time, percent of resin and hardener. Try-error experiment methods and analysis were considered impractical in actual foundry practice due to the associated cost. Experimental matrices of central composite design allow conducting minimum experiments that provide complete insight of the process. Statistical significance of influencing variables and their interaction were determined to control the process. Analysis of variance (ANOVA test was conducted to validate the model statistically. Mathematical equation was derived separately for mould hardness and permeability, which are expressed as a non-linear function of input variables based on the collected experimental input-output data. The developed model prediction accuracy for practical usefulness was tested with 10 random experimental conditions. The decision variables for higher mould hardness and permeability were determined using desirability function approach. The prediction results were found to be consistent with experimental values.

  20. Preparation and Characterization of UV-Curable Cyclohexanone-Formaldehyde Resin and Its Cured Film Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available UV-curable cyclohexanone-formaldehyde (UVCF resin was prepared with cyclohexanone-formaldehyde (CF resin, isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI, and pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA as base substance, bridging agent, and functional monomer, respectively. The structure of UVCF was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR, and gel permeation chromatography (GPC. The viscosity and photopolymerization behavior of the UV-curable formulations were studied. The thermal stability and mechanical properties of the cured films were also investigated. The results showed that UVCF resin was successfully prepared, the number of average molecular weight was about 2010, and its molecular weight distribution index was 2.8. With the increase of UVCF resin content, the viscosity of the UV-curable formulations increased. After exposure to UV irradiation for 230 s, the photopolymerization conversion of the UV-curable formulations was above 80%. Moreover, when the UVCF content was 60%, the formulations had high photopolymerization rate, and the cured UVCF films showed good thermal stability and mechanical properties.

  1. Thermal removal of nitrogen species from wood waste containing urea formaldehyde and melamine formaldehyde resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girods, P. [LERMAB, Nancy-Universite, UMR 1093, INRA, ENGREF, UHP, ENSTIB 27, rue du Merle Blanc, BP 1041, 88 051 Epinal (France)], E-mail: pierre.girods@yahoo.fr; Dufour, A.; Rogaume, Y.; Rogaume, C.; Zoulalian, A. [LERMAB, Nancy-Universite, UMR 1093, INRA, ENGREF, UHP, ENSTIB 27, rue du Merle Blanc, BP 1041, 88 051 Epinal (France)

    2008-11-30

    The removal of nitrogen from wood board waste through a low temperature pyrolysis (523-573 K) is investigated with two analytical methods. The kinetic study of the thermal behaviour of wood board and of its components (wood, UF and MF resins) shows the feasibility of removing thermally nitrogen from wood board waste. Indeed, the range of temperatures associated with the degradation of wood is different from the one obtained for the degradation of UF and MF resin. Isothermal conditions enable the determination of a kinetic model for degradation of wood board and of its components and demonstrate that the thermal behaviour of wood board is not the reflection of the sum of its components' behaviour. FTIR analysis of gas products confirms the feasibility removing nitrogen thermally and enables the evaluation of the optimum treatment conditions (temperature/duration). Elementary analysis of the treated samples and study of their low heating value (LHV) enable to quantify the efficiency of the thermal treatment in terms of nitrogen removal and of energy recovery. Results show that around 70% of the initial nitrogen can be removed from the waste, and that the temperature of treatment (between 523 K and 573 K) does not influence the efficiency in terms of nitrogen removal. Nevertheless, the ratio Residual energy/Initial energy (between 76% and 90%) is improved with the lowest temperature of treatment.

  2. Synthesis, Chacterization, and Thermal Study of Terpolymeric Resin Derived from m-cresol, Hexamine and Formaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Khedkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Terpolymeric resin was prepared from m-cresol (0.1M, hexamine (0.05M and formaldehyde (0.2M by acid catalyzed polycondensation method using 1M HCl in temperature range of 122-130°C.The resin was abbreviated as m-CHF-I. The molecular weight of terpolymer was determined by non-aqueous conductometric titration technique. The structure of resin was determined by its elemental analysis, UV-VIS, IR, and NMR data. The thermokinetic parameters were determined using Freeman-Carroll (FC and Sharp Wentworth (SW method in temperature range (410-485°C.The values of activation energies (Ea, entropy (∆S, and free energies (∆G were in good agreement . The order of degradation reaction determined by FC method was confirmed by SW method.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and thermal analysis of urea–formaldehyde/nanoSiO2 resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roumeli, E.; Papadopoulou, E.; Pavlidou, E.; Vourlias, G.; Bikiaris, D.; Paraskevopoulos, K.M.; Chrissafis, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► UF/nanosilica resins have been produced using the minimum cost method. ► The new resins had good dispersion and enhanced properties. ► Nanosilica interacts with polymer chains as was proved by FTIR and DSC. ► Nanosilica does not affect the resin's thermal stability but enhances its mechanical properties. - Abstract: In the present work urea–formaldehyde resins (UF) containing different amounts of SiO 2 nanoparticles were synthesized and studied in depth. All the hybrids were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD), while the dispersion of nanoparticles was studied with scanning electron microscopy with associated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM/EDS). It was found that even though silanol groups of SiO 2 can interact with UF resin and form hydrogen bonds, aggregates of SiO 2 nanoparticles can still be formed in UF resin. Their size increases as SiO 2 content is increased. The curing reactions were examined with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and it was revealed that curing temperature of UF resin is slightly affected by the addition of nanoparticles. Furthermore, the activation energy of the curing reactions, for every hybrid, was calculated using the Kissinger's method, which implied the existence of interactions between the nanoparticles and the polymer chain. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that SiO 2 nanoparticles do not have an effect in the thermal stability of the resin. From the application of the prepared UF/SiO 2 resins in wood panels it was found that the mechanical properties of the panels, like the internal bond and the modulus of rapture, are enhanced with increasing nanoSiO 2 concentration.

  4. Ion Exchange Modeling Of Cesium Removal From Hanford Waste Using Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hamm, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2007-06-27

    This report discusses the expected performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline Hanford radioactive waste. Predictions of full scale column performance in a carousel mode are made for the Hot Commissioning, Envelope B, and Subsequent Operations waste compositions under nominal operating conditions and for perturbations from the nominal. Only the loading phase of the process cycle is addressed in this report. Pertinent bench-scale column tests, kinetic experiments, and batch equilibrium experiments are used to estimate model parameters and to benchmark the ion-exchange model. The methodology and application presented in this report reflect the expected behavior of spherical RF resin manufactured at the intermediate-scale (i.e., approximately 100 gallon batch size; batch 5E-370/641). It is generally believed that scale-up to production-scale in resin manufacturing will result in similarly behaving resin batches whose chemical selectivity is unaffected while total capacity per gram of resin may vary some. As such, the full-scale facility predictions provided within this report should provide reasonable estimates of production-scale column performance.

  5. Fire Safety Tests for Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Peterson, Reid A.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2012-07-30

    A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping, which may be overly bounding based on the fire performance data from the manufacturer of the ion exchange resin selected for use at the WTP. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), following the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedures, through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). For some tests, the ASTM standard procedures were not entirely appropriate or practical for the SRF resin material, so the procedures were modified and deviations from the ASTM standard procedures were noted. This report summarizes the results of fire safety tests performed and reported by SwRI. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. All as-received SwRI reports are attached to this report in the Appendix. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each ASTM standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the SRF resin.

  6. NMR studies of proton exchange kinetics in aqueous formaldehyde solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivlin, Michal; Eliav, Uzi; Navon, Gil

    2014-05-01

    Aqueous solutions of formaldehyde, formalin, are commonly used for tissue fixation and preservation. Treatment with formalin is known to shorten the tissue transverse relaxation time T2. Part of this shortening is due to the effect of formalin on the water T2. In the present work we show that the shortening of water T2 is a result of proton exchange between water and the major constituent of aqueous solutions of formaldehyde, methylene glycol. We report the observation of the signal of the hydroxyl protons of methylene glycol at 2ppm to high frequency of the water signal that can be seen at low temperatures and at pH range of 6.0±1.5 and, at conditions where it cannot be observed by the single pulse experiment, it can be detected indirectly through the water signal by the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment. The above finding made it possible to obtain the exchange rate between the hydroxyl protons of the methylene glycol and water in aqueous formaldehyde solutions, either using the dispersion of the spin-lattice relaxation rate in the rotating frame (1/T1ρ) or, at the slow exchange regime, from the line width hydroxyl protons of methylene glycol. The exchange rate was ∼10(4)s(-1) at pH 7.4 and 37°C, the activation energy, 50.2kJ/mol and its pH dependence at 1.1°C was fitted to: k (s(-1))=520+6.5×10(7)[H(+)]+3.0×10(9)[OH(-)]. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Using cellulose nanofiber as filler of urea formaldehyde resin in plywood manufacture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    samira barzali

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, physical and mechanical properties of poplar (Populus nigra plywood made by urea-formaldehyde resin along with nano fiber cellulose were studied. For this reason, the nanofiber cellulose as filler at five levels 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7% based on oven dry weight of resin were used. Physical and mechanical properties of the samples, including water absorption and thickness swelling after 2 and 24 hours immersion in water, bending strength and modulus of elasticity (parallel and perpendicular to surface grain and bonding shear strength were measured. The results showed that increasing the amount of nano fiber cellulose improved the dimentional stability of the boards. Also increasing the amount of nano fiber cellulose increases the bending strength and modulus of elasticity parallel to surface grain. On the other hand, increasing the amount of nano fiber cellulose increases the bonding shear strength but no significant differences observed between the different treatments.

  8. Decontamination of spent ion-exchangers contaminated with cesium radionuclides using resorcinol-formaldehyde resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palamarchuk, Marina, E-mail: marina_p@ich.dvo.ru; Egorin, Andrey; Tokar, Eduard; Tutov, Mikhail; Marinin, Dmitry; Avramenko, Valentin

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Cesium radionuclides not removable by regeneration are bound to silicate deposits. • Application of RFR substantially increases cesium desorption from an ion-exchanger. • The radwaste volume was reduced at least 2-fold for zeolites and 10-fold for SIER. • The distribution coefficient values for RFR were high (K{sub d} > 10{sup 4}) after 6 regenerations. • The volume of secondary waste formed after regeneration of RFR was reduced 600-fold. - Abstract: The origin of the emergence of radioactive contamination not removable in the process of acid-base regeneration of ion-exchange resins used in treatment of technological media and liquid radioactive waste streams has been determined. It has been shown that a majority of cesium radionuclides not removable by regeneration are bound to inorganic deposits on the surface and inside the ion-exchange resin beads. The nature of the above inorganic inclusions has been investigated by means of the methods of electron microscopy, IR spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The method of decontamination of spent ion-exchange resins and zeolites contaminated with cesium radionuclides employing selective resorcinol-formaldehyde resins has been suggested. Good prospects of such an approach in deep decontamination of spent ion exchangers have been demonstrated.

  9. Decontamination of spent ion-exchangers contaminated with cesium radionuclides using resorcinol-formaldehyde resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palamarchuk, Marina; Egorin, Andrey; Tokar, Eduard; Tutov, Mikhail; Marinin, Dmitry; Avramenko, Valentin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Cesium radionuclides not removable by regeneration are bound to silicate deposits. • Application of RFR substantially increases cesium desorption from an ion-exchanger. • The radwaste volume was reduced at least 2-fold for zeolites and 10-fold for SIER. • The distribution coefficient values for RFR were high (K d > 10 4 ) after 6 regenerations. • The volume of secondary waste formed after regeneration of RFR was reduced 600-fold. - Abstract: The origin of the emergence of radioactive contamination not removable in the process of acid-base regeneration of ion-exchange resins used in treatment of technological media and liquid radioactive waste streams has been determined. It has been shown that a majority of cesium radionuclides not removable by regeneration are bound to inorganic deposits on the surface and inside the ion-exchange resin beads. The nature of the above inorganic inclusions has been investigated by means of the methods of electron microscopy, IR spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The method of decontamination of spent ion-exchange resins and zeolites contaminated with cesium radionuclides employing selective resorcinol-formaldehyde resins has been suggested. Good prospects of such an approach in deep decontamination of spent ion exchangers have been demonstrated.

  10. Synthesis of a magnetic composite resin and its cobalt removal characteristics in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Kyun; Lee, Kun Jai

    2001-01-01

    A series of stepwise procedures to prepare a new organic-inorganic composite magnetic resin with phenolsulphonic-formaldehyde and freshly formed iron ferrite was established, based upon wet-and-neutralization method for synthesizing iron ferrite and pearl-polymerization method for synthesizing rigid bead-type composite resin. The ion exchange and sorption characteristics of the composite resin prepared by the above method at various conditions were experimentally disclosed. The composite resin prepared shows stably high removal efficiency to Co(II) species in aqueous solution in a wide range of solution pH. The overall isotherm is qualitatively explained by the generalized adsorption isotherm concept proposed by McKinley. The standard enthalpy change derived from van't Hoff equation conforms to the typical range for chemisorption or ion exchange. The selectivity of the PSF-F (phenolsulphonic formaldehyde-iron ferrite) composite resin to Co(II) species and other competing chemicals (i.e. Na 2 EDTA, Ca(II) and Na) was compared. It is anticipated that the composite resin can also be used for column-operation with process-control by applying external magnetic field, since the rigid bead-type composite resin shows magnetic-susceptibility due to its paramagnetic inorganic constituent (i.e. iron ferrite). (author)

  11. Properties of resorcinol-tannin-formaldehyde copolymer resins prepared from the bark extracts of Taiwan acacia and China fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Jau; Lan, Wei-Chuan

    2006-01-01

    Resorcinol-tannin-formaldehyde copolymer resins (RTF) were prepared by using the bark extracts of Taiwan acacia (Acacia confusa) and China fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) to substitute part of the resorcinol. From the results, the content of reactive phenolic materials in Taiwan acacia and China fir bark extracts were 51.6% and 46.5%, respectively. Aromatic compounds were the main components in the bark extracts showed by FT-IR analysis. The conventional synthesis condition used for RF resin was certainly not suitable for the RTF copolymer resin. It should be formed the novolak RF prepolymer by reacting the resorcinol with formaldehyde at the first stage, and then the bark extracts added and underwent the copolymerization reaction under acidic condition at the second-stage. The RTF copolymer resins prepared had cold-setting capability. They had higher viscosity, shorter gel time as compared with the RF resin. The RTF copolymer resins could be carried out the gluing application immediately after the hardener was added and had bonding strength the same as RF resin. But the RTF copolymer resins had worse stability and shorter shelf life than RF resin.

  12. Multicenter Patch Testing With a Resol Resin Based on Phenol and Formaldehyde Within the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Marléne; Ale, Iris; Andersen, Klaus; Diepgen, Thomas; Elsner, Peter; Goossens, An; Goh, Chee-Leok; Jerajani, Hemangi; Maibach, Howard; Matsunaga, Kayoko; McFadden, John; Nixon, Rosemary; Sasseville, Denis; Bruze, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Contact allergy to phenol-formaldehyde resins (PFRs) based on phenol and formaldehyde is not detected by a p-tertiary-butylphenol-formaldehyde resin included in most baseline patch test series. The aims of this study were to investigate the contact allergy rate to PFR-2 in an international population and to investigate associated simultaneous allergic reactions. Thirteen centers representing the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group included PFR-2 into their patch test baseline series during a period of 6 months in 2012. Of 2259 patients tested, 28 (1.2%) reacted to PFR-2. Of those 28 individuals, one had a positive reaction to formaldehyde and 2 to p-tertiary-butylphenol-formaldehyde resin. Simultaneous allergic reactions were noted to colophonium in 3, to Myroxylon pereirae in 5, and to fragrance mix I in 8. The contact allergy frequency in the tested population (1.2%) merits its inclusion into the international baseline series and possibly also into other baseline series after appropriate investigations. Significantly, overrepresented simultaneous allergic reactions were noted for M. pereirae and fragrance mix I.

  13. Synthesis, structural characterization, and performance evaluation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) ion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.; Bryan, S.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Brown, G.N.; Bray, L.A.; Linehan, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    The 177 underground storage tanks at the DOE's Hanford Site contain an estimated 180 million tons of high-level radioactive wastes. It is desirable to remove and concentrate the highly radioactive fraction of the tank wastes for vitrification. Resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin, an organic ion-exchange resin with high selectivity and capacity for the cesium ion, which is a candidate ion-exchange material for use in remediation of tank wastes. The report includes information on the structure/function analysis of R-F resin and the synthetic factors that affect performance of the resin. CS-100, a commercially available phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) resin, and currently the baseline ion-exchanger for removal of cesium ion at Hanford, is compared with the R-F resin. The primary structural unit of the R-F resin was determined to consist of a 1,2,3,4-tetrasubstituted resorcinol ring unit while CS-100, was composed mainly of a 1,2,4-trisubstituted ring. CS-100 shows the presence of phenoxy-ether groups, and this may account for the much lower decontamination factor of CS-100 for cesium ion. Curing temperatures for the R-F resin were found to be optimal at 105--130C. At lower temperatures, insufficient curing, hence crosslinking, of the polymer resin occurs and selectivity for cesium drops. Curing at elevated temperatures leads to chemical degradation. Optimal particle size for R-F resin is in the range of 20--50 mesh-sized particles. R-F resin undergoes chemical degradation or oxidation which destroys ion-exchange sites. The ion-exchange sites (hydroxyl groups) are converted to quinones and ketones. CS-100, though it has much lower performance for cesium ion-exchange, is significantly more chemically stable than R-F resin. To gamma radiation, CS-100 is more radiolytically stable than R-F resin

  14. Synthesis, structural characterization, and performance evaluation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) ion-exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.; Bryan, S.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Brown, G.N.; Bray, L.A.; Linehan, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    The 177 underground storage tanks at the DOE`s Hanford Site contain an estimated 180 million tons of high-level radioactive wastes. It is desirable to remove and concentrate the highly radioactive fraction of the tank wastes for vitrification. Resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin, an organic ion-exchange resin with high selectivity and capacity for the cesium ion, which is a candidate ion-exchange material for use in remediation of tank wastes. The report includes information on the structure/function analysis of R-F resin and the synthetic factors that affect performance of the resin. CS-100, a commercially available phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) resin, and currently the baseline ion-exchanger for removal of cesium ion at Hanford, is compared with the R-F resin. The primary structural unit of the R-F resin was determined to consist of a 1,2,3,4-tetrasubstituted resorcinol ring unit while CS-100, was composed mainly of a 1,2,4-trisubstituted ring. CS-100 shows the presence of phenoxy-ether groups, and this may account for the much lower decontamination factor of CS-100 for cesium ion. Curing temperatures for the R-F resin were found to be optimal at 105--130C. At lower temperatures, insufficient curing, hence crosslinking, of the polymer resin occurs and selectivity for cesium drops. Curing at elevated temperatures leads to chemical degradation. Optimal particle size for R-F resin is in the range of 20--50 mesh-sized particles. R-F resin undergoes chemical degradation or oxidation which destroys ion-exchange sites. The ion-exchange sites (hydroxyl groups) are converted to quinones and ketones. CS-100, though it has much lower performance for cesium ion-exchange, is significantly more chemically stable than R-F resin. To gamma radiation, CS-100 is more radiolytically stable than R-F resin.

  15. Preparation of a ribonucleic acid-(polyamidoamine)-(zirconia-urea-formaldehyde resin) high-performance liquid affinity chromatographic stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, S; Yu, S; Zhao, C

    2001-07-01

    A preparative method for a high-performance liquid affinity chromatographic (HPLAC) stationary phase is described. The 3- to 5-microm nonporous composite spherical microparticles of zirconia and urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin are synthesized through the reaction of zirconyl chloride with hexamethylene tetra-amine and urea, and then it is used as the matrix of the HPLAC stationary phase of which the diameter and structure are determined by scanning electron microscopy. In a methanol medium, the polyamidoamine (PAMAM) starburst dentritic spacer arms are linked with the imido-groups on the surface of the matrix by the Michael addition reaction with methyl acrylate and the amination reaction with ethylene diamine. After repeating these steps in triplets, amine-terminated dentritic spacer arms with a generation of 3 are obtained. The topological structure of the spacer arms is examined by solid-state 13C NMR. The Br-substituted ribonucleic acid (RNA) ligand is obtained by the reaction of liquid bromine with RNA and bonded to the dendritic spacer arms of the matrix in a solution of NaOH (pH 9-11). The binding capacity of RNA is measured by UV spectrophotometry. A new type of stationary phase--RNA-(PAMAM)-(zirconia-UF resin--for HPLAC, which possesses starburst dendritic spacer arms, is synthesized and used for the separation of biological macromolecules.

  16. Ion Exchange Study of Some New Copolymer Resins Derived from 8-Hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic Acid, Biuret and Formaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Dhakite

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Copolymer resins (8-HQSABF were synthesized by the condensation of 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic acid and biuret with formaldehyde in the presence of hydrochloric acid as catalyst, proved to be selective chelation ion exchange copolymer resins for certain metals. Chelation ion exchange properties to these polymers were studied for Cu2+, Cd2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ ions. A batch equilibrium method was employed in the study of the selectivity of the distribution of a given metal ions between the polymer sample and a solution containing the metal ion. The study was carried out over a wide pH range and in a media of various ions strengths. The polymer showed a higher selectivity for Cu2+ ions than for Cd2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ ions. Hence on the basis of above studies these copolymer may be used as semiconductors, surface coating, ion-exchangers, materials for rechargeable battery cell in various electronic industries, plastic materials, elastomers and in boiler plants

  17. Preparation of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes with different morphologies from melamine-formaldehyde resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yi; Zhang, Bingqing; Shi, Jingying; Yang, Qihua

    2015-04-08

    We report a facile method for the synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) from melamine-formaldehyde (MR) resin using FeCl3 or supported FeCl3 as catalysts. The growth of NCNTs follows a decomposition-reconstruction mechanism, in which the polymer precursor would totally gasify during pyrolysis process and then transformed into carbon nanotubes. The morphology of the NCNTs could be adjusted via applying different catalyst supports and three kinds of carbon nanotubes with outer-diameter of 20-200 nm and morphologies of either bamboo-like or hollow interiors were obtained. Nitrogen atoms in the materials were mainly in the form of pyridinic and quaternary form while the formation of iron species strongly depended on the interaction between iron precursor and organic carbon/nitrogen sources. All MR resin derived NCNTs are efficient toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). NCNTs prepared using FeCl3 as catalyst showed the highest ORR activity with half-wave potentials of -0.17 V, which is comparable with commercial Pt/C. This is probably because of a close contact between MR resin and iron precursor could enhance the iron-ligand coordination strength and thus steadily improve the performance of the catalyst.

  18. Effect of phenol formaldehyde resin as vulcanizing agent on flow behavior of HDPE/PB blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moayad N. Khalaf

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastic elastomer (TPE based on High density polyethylene (HDPE/polybutadiene (HDPE/PB = 70/30 parts blends containing 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 wt.% of dimethylol phenolic resin as a vulcanizing agent in the presence of SnCl2 as catalyst was prepared. The dimethylol phenolic resin was prepared in our laboratory. The blends were compounded in mixer-60 attached to a Haake rheochord meter-90. The rheological properties were measured at temperatures 140, 160, 180 and 200 °C. The linearity of the flow curve appeared for 5% of the vulcanizing agent. The shear stress and shear viscosity have increased upon increasing the shear rate over a range of loading levels of vulcanizing agent of 1%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 10%. This may be attributed to the increased vulcanization between polyethylene and the rubber blend. The flow behavior index of the system shows a pseudo plastic nature behavior (since n < 1. The consistency index (K increased with the increase in the phenol formaldehyde resin content and the temperature. Hence, the increase in the value of the consistency index (K of the polymer melts refers to more viscous materials prepared. The activation energy for the TPE blends fluctuated indicating that there is phase separation; where each polymer behaved separately. This study showed that HDPE/PB blends are characterized with good rheological properties, which can be recommended to be processed with the injection molding technique.

  19. Gas Generation Testing of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colburn, Heather A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bryan, Samuel A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Camaioni, Donald M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mahoney, Lenna A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Adami, Susan R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2018-01-19

    This report describes gas generation testing of the spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin that was conducted to support the technology maturation of the LAWPS facility. The current safety basis for the LAWPS facility is based primarily on two studies that had limited or inconclusive data sets. The two studies indicated a 40% increase in hydrogen generation rate of water (as predicted by the Hu model) with sRF resin over water alone. However, the previous studies did not test the range of conditions (process fluids and temperatures) that are expected in the LAWPS facility. Additionally, the previous studies did not obtain replicate test results or comparable liquid-only control samples. All of the testing described in this report, conducted with water, 0.45M nitric acid, and waste simulants with and without sRF resin, returned hydrogen generation rates that are within the current safety basis for the facility of 1.4 times the Hu model output for water.

  20. Effect of nanosilica on characteristics of carbonizates of phenol-formaldehyde resin - Fe(acac)3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gun'ko, V. M.; Bogatyrov, V. M.; Oranska, O. I.; Galaburda, M. V.; Polshin, E. V.; Urubkov, I. V.; Leboda, R.; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J.; Charmas, B.

    2013-01-01

    A series of carbon-iron-silica (CIS) composites (carbonizates) were prepared by carbonization of phenol-formaldehyde resin - Fe(III) acetylacetonate mixtures with addition of different amount of nanosilica A380 and compared with a composite prepared without silica (CFe composite). The characteristics of the composites differ because two type iron silicates were formed at a surface of silica nanoparticles and affected structure of carbon-iron phases. The textural characteristics of the CIS composites show a decrease in meso- and macroporosity and an increase in nanoporosity because new nanoparticles are formed in voids between silica nanoparticles. The CFe particles, including graphite-like structures, metallic iron nanoparticles and Fe3C, are larger than the CIS particles, which also include iron silicates, amorphous and crystalline silica. The presence of metallic α-Fe nanoparticles can provide the magnetic properties of the composites.

  1. A Microfluidic Chip Using Phenol Formaldehyde Resin for Uniform-Sized Polycaprolactone and Chitosan Microparticle Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Chen Hsieh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study develops a new solvent-compatible microfluidic chip based on phenol formaldehyde resin (PFR. In addition to its solvent-resistant characteristics, this microfluidic platform also features easy fabrication, organization, decomposition for cleaning, and reusability compared with conventional chips. Both solvent-dependent (e.g., polycaprolactone and nonsolvent-dependent (e.g., chitosan microparticles were successfully prepared. The size of emulsion droplets could be easily adjusted by tuning the flow rates of the dispersed/continuous phases. After evaporation, polycaprolactone microparticles ranging from 29.3 to 62.7 μm and chitosan microparticles ranging from 215.5 to 566.3 μm were obtained with a 10% relative standard deviation in size. The proposed PFR microfluidic platform has the advantages of active control of the particle size with a narrow size distribution as well as a simple and low cost process with a high throughput.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of resorcinol-formaldehyde resin chars doped by zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gun'ko, Vladimir M.; Bogatyrov, Viktor M.; Oranska, Olena I.; Urubkov, Iliya V.; Leboda, Roman; Charmas, Barbara; Skubiszewska-Zięba, Jadwiga

    2014-06-01

    Polycondensation polymerization of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) mixtures in water with addition of different amounts of zinc acetate and then carbonization of dried gels are studied to prepare ZnO doped chars. Zinc acetate as a catalyst of resorcinol-formaldehyde polycondensation affects structural features of the RF resin (RFR) and, therefore, the texture of chars prepared from Zn-doped RFR. The ZnO doped chars are characterized using thermogravimetry, low temperature nitrogen adsorption/desorption, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). At a relatively high content of zinc acetate (1 mol per 10-40 mol of resorcinol) in the reaction mixture, the formation of crystallites of ZnO (zincite) occurs in a shape of straight nanorods of 20-130 nm in diameter and 1-3 μm in length. At a small content of zinc acetate (1 mol per 100-500 mol of resorcinol), ZnO in composites is XRD amorphous and does not form individual particles. The ZnO doped chars are pure nanoporous at a minimal ZnO content and nano-mesoporous or nano-meso-macroporous at a higher ZnO content.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of resorcinol–formaldehyde resin chars doped by zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gun’ko, Vladimir M., E-mail: vlad_gunko@ukr.net [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 General Naumov Street, 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Bogatyrov, Viktor M.; Oranska, Olena I. [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 General Naumov Street, 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Urubkov, Iliya V. [Kurdyumov Institute of Metal Physics, 36 Vernadsky Boulevard, 03142 Kyiv (Ukraine); Leboda, Roman; Charmas, Barbara; Skubiszewska-Zięba, Jadwiga [Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, 20031 Lublin (Poland)

    2014-06-01

    Polycondensation polymerization of resorcinol–formaldehyde (RF) mixtures in water with addition of different amounts of zinc acetate and then carbonization of dried gels are studied to prepare ZnO doped chars. Zinc acetate as a catalyst of resorcinol–formaldehyde polycondensation affects structural features of the RF resin (RFR) and, therefore, the texture of chars prepared from Zn-doped RFR. The ZnO doped chars are characterized using thermogravimetry, low temperature nitrogen adsorption/desorption, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). At a relatively high content of zinc acetate (1 mol per 10–40 mol of resorcinol) in the reaction mixture, the formation of crystallites of ZnO (zincite) occurs in a shape of straight nanorods of 20–130 nm in diameter and 1–3 μm in length. At a small content of zinc acetate (1 mol per 100–500 mol of resorcinol), ZnO in composites is XRD amorphous and does not form individual particles. The ZnO doped chars are pure nanoporous at a minimal ZnO content and nano-mesoporous or nano-meso-macroporous at a higher ZnO content.

  4. Precisely controlled resorcinol-formaldehyde resin coating for fabricating core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Shengjie; Zang, Jun; Xu, Chaofa; Zheng, Ming-Sen; Dong, Quan-Feng; Sun, Daohua; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2013-08-07

    This work provides a facile one-step sol-gel route to synthesize high-quality resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin coated nanocomposites that can be further used to fabricate desired carbon nanostructures. Colloidal particles with different morphologies and sizes can be coated with high-quality RF resin shells by the proposed cationic surfactant assisted RF resin coating strategy. The as-synthesized RF resin coated nanocomposites are ideal candidates for selective synthesis of core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures. Based on the carboxylic functional RF resin coating, graphitic carbon nanostructures can also be synthesized by employing the graphitization catalyst. The as-synthesized carbon nanostructures show the advantageous performances in several applications. Hollow carbon spheres are potential electrode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries. Hollow graphitic spheres are promising catalyst supports for oxygen reduction reaction. And yolk-shell structured Au@HCS nanoreactors with ultrathin shells exhibit high catalytic activity and recyclability in confined catalysis.

  5. Resorcinol-formaldehyde reactions in dilute solution observed by carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfred W. Christiansen

    2000-01-01

    A recently discovered coupling agent, hydroxymethylated resorcinol (HMR), based on resorcinol-formaldehyde, can greatly enhance wood-to-epoxy resin bond durability in exterior applications. However, for HMR to be most effective, it needs to be prepared a few hours before it is applied to the...

  6. PEMBUATAN AYAKAN MOLEKULER BERBASIS KARBON UNTUK PEMISAHAN N2/O2 DARI PIROLISIS RESIN PHENOL FORMALDEHYDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Prasetyo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Proses pemisahan campuran gas dengan menggunakan carbon molecular sieve (CMS atau ayakan molekuler berbasis karbon merupakan teknologi proses pemisahan yang mulai banyak diterapkan di dalam industri kimia. Dalam penelitian ini, CMS untuk pemisahan N2 dari udara dibuat dari pirolisis bahan polimer sintetis yaitu resin phenol formaldehyde (PF. Prekursor yang berupa resin tersebut dipanaskan dalam retort pada suhu 400-950oC selama 0,5-3 jam yang disertai dengan pengaliran gas N2 ke dalam retort dengan laju 100 mL/jam. Dengan proses pirolisis, atom-atom non-karbon penyusun bahan polimer akan terurai dan menguap sehingga hanya menyisakan arang karbon dengan struktur kerangka atom karbon yang sesuai dengan struktur kerangka dasar rantai polimer. Kemudian karbon hasil prolisis tersebut dipanaskan lebih lanjut pada suhu 750-950oC sambil dialiri gas CO2 selama 1 jam. Pada kondisi ini karbon akan mengalami proses gasifikasi parsial sehingga terbentuk karbon dengan porositas tinggi. Melalui rekayasa proses polimerisasi dan karbonisasi dihasilkan material karbon berpori yang mayoritas porinya adalah mikropori dengan ukuran pori efektif < 2 nm yang dapat dikategorikan sebagai CMS yang dapat dipergunakan untuk memisahkan campuran gas N2-O2.  Pada penelitian ini dihasilkan CMS dengan selektifitas kinetis DN2/DO2 sekitar 3.

  7. Synthesis and Structure Characterization of Phenol-Urea-Formaldehyde Resins in the Presence of Magnesium Oxide as Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Bin Fan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to provide a useful approach of polymer synthesis for accelerating the fast cure of phenol-urea-formaldehyde (PUF resin as wood adhesive by optimizing its structure and composition. The PUF resins containing high contents of very reactive groups such as para-methylol groups were synthesized by reacting methylolurea, phenol, and formaldehyde in the presence of magnesium oxide (MgO as catalyst. The effects of synthesis parameters including F/(P + U, OH/P, and MgO/P mole ratios on the structure, composition, curing characteristics, and their relationships of PUF resins were investigated. The results indicated that MgO seemed to be an efficacious catalyst for PUF resin synthesis and promote its faster cure. The increase in the F/(P + U mole ratio or/and OH/P mole ratio appeared to be beneficial for the formation of para-methylol groups and cocondensed methylene linkages between phenolic methylol groups and urea units, and for the removal of unreacted urea. In case of Catalyst/P mole ratio, an appropriate dosage of added metal-ion was very important for synthesizing the high-content reactive groups of PUF resins, otherwise leading to the reverse effects.

  8. How mole ratio of UF resin affects formaldehyde emission and other properties : a literature critique

    Science.gov (United States)

    George E. Myers

    1984-01-01

    A critical review was made of the literature concerned with how the formaldehyde to urea mole ratio (F/U) affects formaldehyde emission from particleboard and plywood bonded with urea-formaldehyde (UF) adhesives, and how this ratio affects certain other adhesive and board properties. It is difficult to quantify the dependence of various properties on mole ratio or...

  9. On-Chip Facile Preparation of Monodisperse Resorcinol Formaldehyde (RF Resin Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmei Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Monodisperse resorcinol formaldehyde resin (RF microspheres are an important polymeric material because of their rich surface functional group and uniform structural characteristics and have been increasingly applied as an electrode material, catalyst support, absorbent, and carbon microsphere precursor. The polymerization conditions, such as the gelation/solidification temperature and the residence time, can largely influence the physical properties and the formation of the 3D polymeric network of the RF microspheres as well as the carbon microspheres. However, few studies have reported on the complexity of the gelation and solidification processes of resol. In this work, we developed a new RF microsphere preparation device that contains three units: a droplet generation unit, a curing unit, and a collection unit. In this system, we controlled the gelation and solidification processes of the resol and observed its curing behavior, which helped us to uncover the curing mechanism of resol. Finally, we obtained the optimized polymerization parameters, obtaining uniform RF microspheres with a variation coefficient of 4.94%. The prepared porous RF microspheres presented a high absorption ability, reaching ~90% at 10 min. Thus, our method demonstrated the practicality of on-chip monodisperse microspheres synthesis. The product was useful in drug delivery and adsorbing large poisonous molecules.

  10. NMR studies of the equilibria and reaction rates in aqueous solutions of formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivlin, Michal; Eliav, Uzi; Navon, Gil

    2015-03-26

    Formaldehyde has an important role in the chemical industry and in biological sciences. In dilute aqueous solutions of formaldehyde only traces of the molecular formaldehyde are present and the predominant species are methylene glycol and in lower concentrations, dimethylene glycol. The chemical equilibria and reaction rates of the hydration of formaldehyde in H2O and D2O solutions at low concentrations were studied by (1)H and (13)C NMR at various conditions of pH (1.8-7.8) and temperature (278-333 K). These measurements became possible by direct detection of formaldehyde (13)C and (1)H peaks. The equilibrium and rate constants of the dimerization reaction of methylene glycol were also measured. The rate constants for both the hydration and the dimerization reactions were measured by a new version of the conventional selective inversion transfer method. This study, together with previous published work, completes the description of dynamics and equilibria of all the processes occurring in dilute aqueous formaldehyde solutions.

  11. Mesoporous carbon adsorbents from melamine-formaldehyde resin using nanocasting technique for CO2 adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Chitrakshi; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K

    2015-06-01

    Mesoporous carbon adsorbents, having high nitrogen content, were synthesized via nanocasting technique with melamine-formaldehyde resin as precursor and mesoporous silica as template. A series of adsorbents were prepared by varying the carbonization temperature from 400 to 700°C. Adsorbents were characterized thoroughly by nitrogen sorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), elemental (CHN) analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Boehm titration. Carbonization temperature controlled the properties of the synthesized adsorbents ranging from surface area to their nitrogen content, which play major role in their application as adsorbents for CO2 capture. The nanostructure of these materials was confirmed by XRD and TEM. Their nitrogen content decreased with an increase in carbonization temperature while other properties like surface area, pore volume, thermal stability and surface basicity increased with the carbonization temperature. These materials were evaluated for CO2 adsorption by fixed-bed column adsorption experiments. Adsorbent synthesized at 700°C was found to have the highest surface area and surface basicity along with maximum CO2 adsorption capacity among the synthesized adsorbents. Breakthrough time and CO2 equilibrium adsorption capacity were investigated from the breakthrough curves and were found to decrease with increase in adsorption temperature. Adsorption process for carbon adsorbent-CO2 system was found to be reversible with stable adsorption capacity over four consecutive adsorption-desorption cycles. From three isotherm models used to analyze the equilibrium data, Temkin isotherm model presented a nearly perfect fit implying the heterogeneous adsorbent surface. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Development of Self Fire Retardant Melamine-Animal Glue Formaldehyde (MGF) Resin for the Manufacture of BWR Ply Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatua, Pijus Kanti; Dubey, Rajib Kumar; Roymahapatra, Gourisankar; Mishra, Anjan; Shahoo, Shadhu Charan; Kalawate, Aparna

    2017-10-01

    Wood is one of the most sustainable, naturally growing materials that consist mainly of combustible organic carbon compounds. Since plywood are widely used nowadays especially in buildings, furniture and cabinets. Too often the fire behavior of ply-board may be viewed as a drawback. Amino-plastic based thermosetting resin adhesives are the important and most widely used in the plywood panel industries. The fire retardant property of wood panel products by adding animal glue as an additive in the form of MGF resin and used as substitute of melamine for manufacture of plywood. Environment concerns and higher cost of petroleum based resins have resulted in the development of technologies to replace melamine partially by biomaterials for the manufacturing of resin adhesive. Natural bio-based materials such as tannin, CNSL (cardanol), lignin, soya etc. are used as partial substitution of melamine. This article presents the development of melamine-animal glue formaldehyde resin as plywood binder. About 30 % melamine was substituted by animal glue and optimized. The different physico-mechanical and fire retardant property properties tested as per IS: 1734-1983 and IS: 5509-2000 respectively are quite satisfactory. The production of adhesive from melamine with compatible natural proteinous material is cost effective, eco-friendly and enhance the fire retardant property.

  13. Preliminary flowsheet: Ion exchange for separation of cesium from Hanford tank waste using resorcinol-formaldehyde resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penwell, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    This preliminary flowsheet document describes an ion exchange process which uses resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin to remove cesium from Hanford tank waste. The flowsheet describes one possible equipment configuration, and contains mass balances based on that configuration with feeds of Neutralized Current Acid Waste, and Double Shell Slurry Feed. The flowsheet also discusses process alternatives, unresolved issues, and development needs associated with the ion exchange process. It is expected that this flowsheet will evolve as open issues are resolved and progress is made on development needs. This is part of the Tank Waste Remediation Program at Hanford. 26 refs, 6 figs, 25 tabs

  14. Separation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) using melamine-formaldehyde resin and determination of both species in water by FAAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirata, B. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Letters, Istanbul Technical University (Turkey); Tor, I. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Istanbul University (Turkey); Filik, H. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Istanbul University (Turkey); Afsar, H. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)

    1996-11-01

    A method is described for the determination of Cr(VI) and total chromium by FAAS. Cr(VI) is separated from Cr(III) by adsorption on melamine-formaldehyde resin. After elution of Cr(VI) with 0.1 mol/l NaAc solution, it is analysed by FAAS. Total chromium is determined by FAAS after conversion of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) by oxidation with hydrogen peroxide, total Cr(VI) is concentrated as above. If the total concentration of chromium is sufficient, the determination can be directly made by FAAS. Cr(III) can then be calculated by subtracting Cr(VI) from the total Cr. This method was successfully applied to the determination of chromium in lake water. (orig.). With 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. The synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by catalytic pyrolysis of the phenol-formaldehyde resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatin, Ioan; Morozan, Adina; Dumitru, Anca; Ciupina, V.; Prodan, G.; Niewolski, J.; Figiel, H.

    2007-03-01

    A series of carbon nanomaterials, particularly multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT), are obtained as products from catalytic pyrolysis of the cross-linked phenol-formaldehyde resins with different ferrocene under inert atmosphere. The morphology and structure of the samples were evaluated by TEM and XRD techniques. CNTs morphology is dependent on the iron nanoparticles and their forms (Fe, Fe 3C) resulted from ferrocene decomposition. The amount of nanotubes increases with iron content released from ferrocene catalyst during the pyrolysis process. Fe 3C nanoparticles drive the nucleation and the growth of carbon nanotubes during the pyrolysis process. Long (up to microns) well-defined MWNTs with small defects, ropes and disordered carbon are representatives in the pyrolyzed resins composition.

  16. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Hhhh... - Method for Determining Free-Formaldehyde in Urea-Formaldehyde Resins by Sodium Sulfite (Iced...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (class A). 3.2.5One 10-mL pipette (class A). 3.2.6One 50-mL graduated cylinder (class A). 3.2.7A pH meter... mL of 1 M sodium sulfite into a stirred 250-mL beaker. 3.5.1.2Using a standardized pH meter, measure... of Formaldehyde Standard Solution. The pH should rise sharply to about 12. 3.5.1.4Using the pH meter...

  17. The fabrication of porous N-doped carbon from widely available urea formaldehyde resin for carbon dioxide adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Du, Zhenyu; Song, Hao; Wang, Chuangye; Subhan, Fazle; Xing, Wei; Yan, Zifeng

    2014-02-15

    N-doped carbon material constitutes abundant of micropores and basic nitrogen species that have potential implementation for CO2 capture. In this paper, porous carbon material with high nitrogen content was simply fabricated by carbonizing low cost and widely available urea formaldehyde resin, and then followed by KOH activation. CO2 capture experiment showed high adsorption capacity of 3.21 mmol g(-1) at 25 °C under 1 atm for UFCA-2-600. XRD, SEM, XPS and FT-IR analysis confirmed that a graphitic-like structure was retained even after high temperature carbonization and strong base activation. Textural property analysis revealed that narrow micropores, especially below 0.8 nm, were effective for CO2 adsorption by physical adsorption mechanism. Chemical evolved investigation revealed that graphitic-like embedded basic nitrogen groups are generated from bridged and terminal amines of urea formaldehyde resin from thermal carbonization and KOH activation treatment, which is responsible for the enrichment of CO2 capacity by chemical adsorption mechanism. The relationship between CO2 adsorption capacity and pore size or basic N species was also studied, which turned out that both of them played crucial role by physical and chemical adsorption mechanism, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Reaction catalysts of urea-formaldehyde resin, as related to strength properties of southern pine particleboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. -Y. Hse

    1974-01-01

    Twelve resins were formulated with factorial combinations of three alkaline catalysts (i.e., somdium hydroxide, hexamethylenetetramine, and triethanolamine) and four acidic catalysts (i.e., acetic acid, hydrochloric acid, ammonium chloride, and phosphoric acid). The resins were replicated.

  19. Gold Loading on Ion Exchange Resins in Non-Ammoniacal Resin-Solution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Muslim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The loading of gold using strong base anion exchange resin in non-ammoniac resin-solution (NARS systems has been studied. The loading of gold onto ion exchange resins is affected by polythionate concentration, and trithionate can be used as the baseline in the system. The results also show that resin capacity on gold loading increases due to the increase in the equilibrium thiosulfate concentration in the NARS system. Gold loading performances show the need of optimization the equilibrium concentrations of thiosulfate in the NARS system. Keywords: equilibrium, gold loading, resin capacity, thiosulfate, trithionate

  20. Ab initio molecular dynamics study of the reaction of water with formaldehyde in sulfuric acid solution.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprik, M.; Meijer, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics methods have been used to study the reaction mechanism of acidcatalyzed addition of water to formaldehyde in a model system of an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid. Using the method of constraints we find that an H

  1. Precisely controlled resorcinol-formaldehyde resin coating for fabricating core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Shengjie; Zang, Jun; Xu, Chaofa; Zheng, Ming-Sen; Dong, Quan-Feng; Sun, Daohua; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2013-07-01

    This work provides a facile one-step sol-gel route to synthesize high-quality resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin coated nanocomposites that can be further used to fabricate desired carbon nanostructures. Colloidal particles with different morphologies and sizes can be coated with high-quality RF resin shells by the proposed cationic surfactant assisted RF resin coating strategy. The as-synthesized RF resin coated nanocomposites are ideal candidates for selective synthesis of core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures. Based on the carboxylic functional RF resin coating, graphitic carbon nanostructures can also be synthesized by employing the graphitization catalyst. The as-synthesized carbon nanostructures show the advantageous performances in several applications. Hollow carbon spheres are potential electrode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries. Hollow graphitic spheres are promising catalyst supports for oxygen reduction reaction. And yolk-shell structured Au@HCS nanoreactors with ultrathin shells exhibit high catalytic activity and recyclability in confined catalysis.This work provides a facile one-step sol-gel route to synthesize high-quality resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin coated nanocomposites that can be further used to fabricate desired carbon nanostructures. Colloidal particles with different morphologies and sizes can be coated with high-quality RF resin shells by the proposed cationic surfactant assisted RF resin coating strategy. The as-synthesized RF resin coated nanocomposites are ideal candidates for selective synthesis of core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures. Based on the carboxylic functional RF resin coating, graphitic carbon nanostructures can also be synthesized by employing the graphitization catalyst. The as-synthesized carbon nanostructures show the advantageous performances in several applications. Hollow carbon spheres are potential electrode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries. Hollow graphitic

  2. Uranium extraction from sulfuric acid solution using anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheta, M. E.; Abdel Aal, M. M.; Kandil, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Uranium is currently recovered from sulfuric acid leach liquor using anion exchange resin as Amberlite IRA 402 (CT). This technology is based on fact that, uranium exists as anionic complexes. This takes place by controlling the pH of the solution, agitation time, temperature and resin to solution ratio (R/S). In this work, batch stirrer tank used for uranium extraction from sulfate medium and after extraction, elution process was done using 1M NaCl solution. After extraction and elution process, the resin was separated from the system and uranium was determined in the solution. (Author)

  3. Dual protection of wood surface treated with melamine-modified urea-formaldehyde resin mixed with ammonium polyphosphate against both fire and decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing-xia Ma; Grant T. Kirker; Ming-liang Jiang; Yu-zhang Wu

    2016-01-01

    Surface coatings of melamine-modified urea-formaldehyde resins (MUFs) containing ammonium polyphosphate (APP) have been shown to significantly improve the fire retardancy of wood by prolonging the ignition time and reducing the heat release rate, total heat released, and mass loss rate. Dual protection of wood against both decay and fire has been proposed for remedial...

  4. [Modified Mechanism of Cell Walls from Chinese Fir Treated with Low-Molecular-Weight Phenol Formaldehyde Resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-hui; Fei, Ben-hua; Zhao, Rong-jun

    2015-12-01

    Study on the modified mechanism of wood cell walls, it is very important for improving treatment reagents, optimizing treatment technology, and enhancing wood density, mechanical properties, dimensional stability, and so on. Samples of plantation Chinese fir were treated gradually with synthesized water-soluble low-molecular-weight phenol formaldehyde (PF) resins under vacuum and pressure. The correlated physical and chemical properties of the treated and untreated reference samples were determined by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer(NMR) (Using method of Cross Polarization/Magic Angle Spinning for continuous testing) with high precision and resolution. The results showed that, after treated with water-soluble low-molecular-weight PF resin, the average values of crystallinity from the treated samples were decreased obviously, and the average reduction rate was 12.67%, 11.91% and 6.26%, respectively. Comparing water-soluble, low-molecular-weight PF resin modified Chinese fir with untreated reference samples, no new chemical shifts and characteristic peaks of functional groups from esters, ethers, etc. were present by using FTIR and ¹³C NMR spectrum. It was considered that there was no distinct chemical reaction between the water-soluble low-molecular-weight PF resin and Chinese Fir cell walls. But water-soluble low-molecular-weight PF resin could enter into the structure relatively loose, large size spaces, relatively area large amorphous regions in cell walls of Chinese fir tracheids, and form physical filling, which resulting in the decreasing of relative crystallinity. This study has important reference value for the development of new wood modification reagents and the optimization of wood modification process. The findings also provide important theoretical foundation for further proving the modification mechanisms of wood cell walls and enriching the modified theories of

  5. Methanol-enhanced removal and metabolic conversion of formaldehyde by a black soybean from formaldehyde solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hao; Xiong, Yun; Li, Kun-Zhi; Chen, Li-Mei

    2017-02-01

    Methanol regulation of some biochemical and physiological characteristics in plants has been documented in several references. This study showed that the pretreatment of methanol with an appropriate concentration could stimulate the HCHO uptake by black soybean (BS) plants. The process of methanol-stimulated HCHO uptake by BS plants was optimized using the Central Composite Design and response surface methodology for the three variables, methanol concentration, HCHO concentration, and treatment time. Under optimized conditions, the best stimulation effect of methanol on HCHO uptake was obtained. 13 C-NMR analysis indicated that the H 13 CHO metabolism produced H 13 COOH, [2- 13 C]Gly, and [3- 13 C]Ser in BS plant roots. Methanol pretreatment enhanced the metabolic conversion of H 13 CHO in BS plant roots, which consequently increased HCHO uptake by BS plants. Therefore, methanol pretreatment might be used to increase HCHO uptake by plants in the phytoremediation of HCHO-polluted solutions.

  6. Synthesis and cure kinetics of liquefied wood/phenol/formaldehyde resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui Pan; Todd F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse

    2008-01-01

    Wood liquefaction was conducted at a 2/1 phenol/wood ratio in two different reactors: (1) an atmospheric three-necked flask reactor and (2) a sealed Parr reactor. The liquefied wood mixture (liquefied wood, unreacted phenol, and wood residue) was further condensed with formaldehyde under acidic conditions to synthesize two novolac-type liquefied wood/phenol/...

  7. Selective Removal of Toxic Metals like Copper and Arsenic from Drinking Water Using Phenol-Formaldehyde Type Chelating Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Mohanty

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of different toxic metals has increased beyond environmentally and ecologically permissible levels due to the increase in industrial activity. More than 100 million people of Bangladesh and West Bengal in India are affected by drinking ground water contaminated with arsenic and some parts of India is also affected by poisoning effect of copper, cadmium and fluoride. Different methods have been evolved to reduce the arsenic concentration in drinking water to a maximum permissible level of 10 μg/L where as various methods are also available to separate copper from drinking water. Of the proven methods available today, removal of arsenic by polymeric ion exchangers has been most effective. While chelating ion exchange resins having specific chelating groups attached to a polymer have found extensive use in sorption and pre concentration of Cu2+ ions. Both the methods are coupled here to separate and preconcentrate toxic metal cation Cu2+ and metal anion arsenate(AsO4– at the same time. We have prepared a series of low-cost polymeric resins, which are very efficient in removing copper ion from drinking water and after coordinating with copper ion they act as polymeric ligand exchanger, which are efficiently removing arsenate from drinking water. For this purpose Schiff bases were prepared by condensing o-phenylenediamine with o-, m-, and p-hydroxybenzaldehydes. Condensing these phenolic Schiff bases with formaldehyde afforded the chelating resins in high yields. These resins are loaded with Cu2+, Ni2+ 2+, and Fe3+ ions. The resins and the polychelates are highly insoluble in water. In powdered form the metal ion-loaded resins are found to very efficiently remove arsenate ion from water at neutral pH. Resins loaded with optimum amount of Cu2+ ion is more effective in removing arsenate ions compared to those with Fe3+ ion, apparently because Cu2+ is a stronger Lewis acid than Fe3+. Various parameters influencing the removal of the

  8. Hydrophilic Molecularly Imprinted Resorcinol-Formaldehyde-Melamine Resin Prepared in Water with Excellent Molecular Recognition in Aqueous Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Tianwei; Yan, Hongyuan; Cao, Jiankun; Liang, Shiru

    2015-11-03

    Hydrophilic molecularly imprinted resorcinol-formaldehyde-melamine resin (MIRFM) is synthesized in water and shows excellent molecular recognition in aqueous matrices. The double functional monomers resorcinol and melamine, and the cross-linker formaldehyde, are all hydrophilic, and then the hydrophilic groups (such as hydroxyls, imino groups, and ether linkages) can be introduced into MIRFM, which make the material compatible with aqueous samples. The general principle is demonstrated by the synthesis of MIRFM using sulfanilamide as a dummy template for the selective recognition to sulfonamides (SAs) in milk samples. Resorcinol and melamine can interact with the template mainly by hydrogen bonding and π-π interaction, which makes MIRFM and the analytes have strong affinity. Besides, melamine can improve the rigidity of MIRFM and accelerate the polymerization process, so there is no need to add base or acid as a catalyst, which guarantees the success of molecular imprinting. MIRFM shows higher recovery and improved purification effect for SAs, in comparison to silica, HLB, C18, and SCX. Because of its excellent hydrophilicity and specificity, MIRFM is promising to be applied in biological, environmental, and clinical fields.

  9. EPR Spectroscopy Investigation of Cu2+ Ions Adsorbed in Tannin-Formaldehyde Resins of Mimosa (Acacia mearnsii Bark Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo H. Herbst

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical environment of Cu2+ ions adsorbed in tannin-formaldehyde resins of Acacia mearnsii bark extracts, prepared from polybutene, is investigated by EPR spectroscopy at 300 K. The spectrum is simulated considering two isolated axial Cu(II species (Species 1: A∥=16.50(5 mT, A⊥=1.20(10 mT, g∥=2.28(1, and g⊥=2.08(1; Species 2: A∥=15.00(5 mT, A⊥=1.50(10 mT, g∥=2.32(1, and g⊥=2.05(2, superposed to a broad line (giso=2.14(1; linewidth = 30.0(5 mT assigned to Cu(II aggregates. Measurements at 77 K did not improve spectral resolution. Heating at 413 K changes the hyperfine parameters of Species 2 (A∥=14.20(5 mT, A⊥=1.20(10 mT, g∥=2.33(1, and g⊥=2.07(2 and slightly modifies the parameters of the broad line (giso=2.11(2; linewidth = 40.00(50 mT but does not change Species 1, assigned to Cu(II species immobilized into resin pores in cathecolate-type coordination sites. Species 2 is assigned to Cu(II species immobilized at the outer resin surface. Upon extended heating, a reversible formation of semiquinone-type paramagnetic radicals (giso=2.0037(1 is observed, assigned to the partial collapse of the resin polymeric network.

  10. Furfuralcohol Co-Polymerized Urea Formaldehyde Resin-derived N-Doped Microporous Carbon for CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Yang, Yi; Du, Zhenyu; Xing, Wei; Komarneni, Sridhar; Zhang, Zhongdong; Gao, Xionghou; Yan, Zifeng

    2015-12-01

    Carbon-based adsorbent is considered to be one of the most promising adsorbents for CO2 capture form flue gases. In this study, a series of N-doped microporous carbon materials were synthesized from low cost and widely available urea formaldehyde resin co-polymerized with furfuralcohol. These N-doped microporous carbons showed tunable surface area in the range of 416-2273 m(2) g(-1) with narrow pore size distribution within less than 1 nm and a high density of the basic N functional groups (2.93-13.92 %). Compared with the carbon obtained from urea resin, the addition of furfuralcohol apparently changed the surface chemical composition and pore size distribution, especially ultramicropores as can be deduced from the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and pore size distribution measurements and led to remarkable improvement on CO2 adsorption capacity. At 1 atm, N-doped carbons activated at 600 °C with KOH/UFFC weight ratio of 2 (UFFA-2-600) showed the highest CO2 uptake of 3.76 and 1.57 mmol g(-1) at 25 and 75 °C, respectively.

  11. Molar-mass distribution of urea–formaldehyde resins of different degrees of polymerisation by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVANA GAVRILOVIĆ-GRMUŠA

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes some results obtained in an investigation of urea–formaldehyde (UF resins of different degrees of polymerisation by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS. MALDI-TOF MS proved to be an appropriate technique for analyzing these types of polymers, bearing in mind that the results of the analysis correspond with previous physical and chemical measurements. This technique enables a relatively swift determination of the degree of polymerrisation through the monitoring of key changes in the structure of a polymer. Thus, in the analysis of UF resins, it may be possible to monitor a decrease in the intensity of the monohydroxymethyl urea (MMU signal, which corresponds to an increase of the mass spectra values in the mass range of higher homologues, above 1000 g mol-1. A noticeable difference concerns the signal intensities in the higher mass ranges (up to 1400 g mol-1, which corresponds to more branched and longer homologues of the polymers. Especially, a significantly more intensive signal of MMU was registered. The average molecular weight (MW of the examined samples was between 936 and 1324 g mol-1, with a maximal deviation of 20 %, depending on the ratios of the reactants.

  12. Thermal degradation and evolved gas analysis: A polymeric blend of urea formaldehyde (UF and epoxy (DGEBA resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tansir Ahamad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A polymeric blend has been prepared using urea formaldehyde (UF and epoxy (DGEBA resin in 1:1 mass ratio. The thermal degradation of UF/epoxy resin blend (UFE was investigated by using thermogravimetric analyses (TGA, coupled with FTIR and MS. The results of TGA revealed that the pyrolysis process can be divided into three stages: drying process, fast thermal decomposition and cracking of the sample. There were no solid products except ash content for UFE during combustion at high temperature. The total mass loss during pyrolysis at 775 °C is found to be 97.32%, while 54.14% of the original mass was lost in the second stage between 225 °C and 400 °C. It is observed that the activation energy of the second stage degradation during combustion (6.23 × 10−4 J mol−1 is more than that of pyrolysis (5.89 × 10−4 J mol−1. The emissions of CO2, CO, H2O, HCN, HNCO, and NH3 are identified during thermal degradation of UFE.

  13. Adhesion properties of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR/Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR L-based adhesives in the presence of phenol formaldehyde resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion properties, i. e. viscosity, tack and peel strength of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR/Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR L-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied using phenol formaldehyde resin as the tackifying resin. Toluene was used as the solvent throughout the experiment. SBR composition in SBR/SMR L blend used was 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100%. Three different resin loadings, i. e. 40, 80 and 120 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr were used in the adhesive formulation. The viscosity of adhesive was determined by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength of paper/polyethylene terephthalate (PET film were measured using a Lloyd Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results indicate that the viscosity of adhesive decreases with increasing % SBR whereas loop tack passes through a maximum value at 20% SBR for all resin loadings. Except for the control sample (without resin, the peel strength shows a maximum value at 60% SBR for the three modes of peel tests. For a fixed % SBR, adhesive sample containing 40 phr phenol formaldehyde resin always exhibits the highest loop tack and peel strength, an observation which is associated to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate.

  14. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON CHROMIUM(VI REMOVAL FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION USING ACTIVATED CARBON RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE XEROGELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eghe A. Oyedoh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of chromium(VI metal ion in aqueous solutions by activated carbon resorcinol formaldehyde xerogels (ACRF was investigated. The results showed that pore structure, surface area and the adsorbent surface chemistry are important factors in the control of the adsorption of chromium(VI metal ions. The isotherm parameters were obtained from plots of the isotherms and from the application of Langmuir and Freundlich Isotherms. Based on regression analysis, the Langmuir isotherm model was the best fit. The maximum adsorption capacity of ACRF for chromium (VI was 241.9 mg/g. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model was the best fit to the experimental data for the adsorption of chromium metal ions by activated carbon resorcinol formaldehyde xerogels. The thermodynamics of Cr(VI ions adsorption onto ACRF was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  15. Highly stable microwave susceptible agents via encapsulation of Ti-mineral superfine powders in urea-formaldehyde resin microcapsules for tumor hyperthermia therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Dan; Mao, Jingsong; Liu, Tianlong; Fu, Changhui; Tan, Longfei; Ren, Xiangling; Shi, Haitang; Su, Hongying; Ren, Jun; Meng, Xianwei

    2016-05-01

    In this study, Ti-mineral superfine powders (Ti-MSP) encapsulated in urea-formaldehyde resin microcapsules (Ti-MSP@UF-MC) were successfully prepared via a one-step microemulsion method for the first time. Because of the strong confinement effects, the Ti-MSP@UF-MC possessed perfect microwave heating effects. The temperature was 9.3 °C higher than that of the saline solution, superior to UF-MC (no significant microwave heating effect, 0 °C) and Ti-MSP (5.1 °C). The Ti-MSP@UF-MC showed low toxicity and good biocompatibility via a series of studies, including a hemolysis study and the MTT assay in vitro and in vivo. When the concentration was below 1000 μg mL-1, the hemolysis rate was lower than 5% (hemolysis study). When the concentration was below 400 μg mL-1, the cell activity was higher than 80% (MTT assay). Moreover, the Ti-MSP@UF-MC exhibited an ideal CT imaging effect in vivo owing to the large molecular weight of Ti-MSP. The Ti-MSP@UF-MC showed a favorable microwave therapy effect in vivo. Using mice bearing H22 tumor cells as an animal model, the tumor suppression rate could reach 100%.

  16. Electrical Properties of Partial Carbonized Nanoporous Resin Based on Resorcinol-Formaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imededdine NAJEH

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic xerogel compounds were prepared by sol-gel method from resorcinol- formaldehyde mixtures in acetone using picric acid as catalyst. The electrical properties of the obtained nanoporous carbon structures were explored by changing the pyrolysis temperature. In this study the electrical conductivity σ can be expressed as σ =/σ0exp(-Eσ/kT, where Eσ depends on the carbonized temperature. The dc and ac conductivities of the obtained amorphous carbon have been investigated from 80 to 300 °C and in the frequency range between 40 and 106 Hz for samples pyrolysed at different temperatures in the insulator-metal transition range. The temperature dependence of samples pyrolysed at low temperatures (Tp=600–675 °C follows a Mott law, whereas samples pyrolysed at high temperature (Tp=1000 °C show an Arrhenius dependence.

  17. Synthesis and structural features of resorcinol–formaldehyde resin chars containing nickel nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galaburda, M.V., E-mail: mashagayeva@yandex.ua [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 General Naumov Str., Kyiv 03164 (Ukraine); Bogatyrov, V.M. [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 General Naumov Str., Kyiv 03164 (Ukraine); Skubiszewska-Zięba, J. [Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Maria Curie-Sklodowska Sq.3, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Oranska, O.I. [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 General Naumov Str., Kyiv 03164 (Ukraine); Sternik, D. [Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Maria Curie-Sklodowska Sq.3, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Gun’ko, V.M. [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 General Naumov Str., Kyiv 03164 (Ukraine)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Facile synthesis of the Ni-doped carbon sorbents via carbonization of resorcinol–formaldehyde polymers/nickel(II) acetate mixtures in the inert atmosphere. • Effects of Ni content, as well as water volume and temperature treatment on the morphology and texture of the chars. • Ni/C composites are characterized by a core–shell structure with well-crystallized graphitic shells. • Ni content influences the structure of the carbon. • Nickel-doped carbon nanocomposites were used as a magnetically separable adsorbent. - Abstract: A series of meso- and microporous carbons containing magnetic Ni nanoparticles (Ni/C) with a variety of Ni loadings were synthesized by a simple one-pot procedure through carbonization of resorcinol–formaldehyde polymers containing various amounts of nickel(II) acetate. Such composite materials were characterized by N{sub 2} sorption, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission electron microscope (TEM). The XRD patterns reveal peaks corresponding to face centered cubic nickel with the average size of crystallites of 17–18 nm. SEM and TEM results reveal that the formation of the nanoparticles took place mainly in the carbon spheres (1–2 μm in size) and on the outer surface as well. The as-prepared composites are characterized by a core–shell structure with well-crystallized graphitic shells about 8–15 nm in thickness. The Raman spectra show that Ni content influences the structure of the carbon. It was also shown that the morphology (particle shape and sizes) and porosity (pore volume and pore size distribution) of the chars are strongly dependent on water and nickel contents in the blends. One of the applications of Ni/C was demonstrated as a magnetically separable adsorbent.

  18. Simple synthesis of porous melamine-formaldehyde resins by low temperature solvothermal method and its CO2 adsorption properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A simple and environmentally-friendly approach for the preparation of porous melamine-formaldehyde resins (PMFRs was developed by using low-boiling-point solvents, such as water, as pore-forming agent. With using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and low-boiling solvents cosolvent method, PMFRs with a high specific surface area and well-defined pore structure can be synthesized at a low reaction temperature of 140 °C for a short reaction duration in 20 hours, which can replace the conventional methods that use dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO as reaction medium and require 3 days at 170 °C to achieve similar surface area. When loaded with polyethylenimine (PEI, the PMFR-PEI-30% showed good CO2 adsorption performance with a capacity of up to 2.89 mmol/g at 30 °C. These results bring new perspectives for the development of lowcost and environmentally-friendly synthetic methods for porous materials, which can boost their widespread applications.

  19. Resin impregnation of cellulose nanofibril films facilitated by water swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan Qing; Ronald Sabo; Zhiyong Cai; Yiqiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    Flexible composite films were produced by impregnating aqueous phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin into water-swollen cellulose nanofibril (CNF) films. CNF films were prepared using a pressurized filtration method in combination with freeze drying. The freeze-dried films were swollen with water then impregnated with PF resin by soaking in aqueous resin solutions of varying...

  20. Synthesis and structural features of resorcinol⿿formaldehyde resin chars containing nickel nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaburda, M. V.; Bogatyrov, V. M.; Skubiszewska-ZiĿba, J.; Oranska, O. I.; Sternik, D.; Gun⿿ko, V. M.

    2016-01-01

    A series of meso- and microporous carbons containing magnetic Ni nanoparticles (Ni/C) with a variety of Ni loadings were synthesized by a simple one-pot procedure through carbonization of resorcinol⿿formaldehyde polymers containing various amounts of nickel(II) acetate. Such composite materials were characterized by N2 sorption, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission electron microscope (TEM). The XRD patterns reveal peaks corresponding to face centered cubic nickel with the average size of crystallites of 17⿿18 nm. SEM and TEM results reveal that the formation of the nanoparticles took place mainly in the carbon spheres (1⿿2 μm in size) and on the outer surface as well. The as-prepared composites are characterized by a core⿿shell structure with well-crystallized graphitic shells about 8⿿15 nm in thickness. The Raman spectra show that Ni content influences the structure of the carbon. It was also shown that the morphology (particle shape and sizes) and porosity (pore volume and pore size distribution) of the chars are strongly dependent on water and nickel contents in the blends. One of the applications of Ni/C was demonstrated as a magnetically separable adsorbent.

  1. Investigation on the effect of mixed rapeseed stalk residues with wood particles, and mixing of melamine and urea formaldehyde resin on properties of manufactured particleboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Kord

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the possibility of using the rapeseed stalk mixed with industrial wood particles for manufacturing particleboard with target density of 0.7 gr/cm3 was considered. Variable factors such as mixing ratios of rapeseed stalk with industrial wood particles at five mixing levels of (0-100, 25-75, 50-50, 75-25 and 100-0 percent, mixing ratios of melamine resin with urea formaldehyde at three levels of 0-100, 15-85 and 30-70 percent, and kind of board at two levels of homogenate and layer were considered. 10 percent resin based on oven dried weight of particles, 2 percent catalyzer based on oven dried weight of resin, press temperature and time with 170 OC and 7 minute, press pressure and rate with 30 Kg/cm3 and 4.5 mm/min were fixed. Then, the boards were manufactured and the physical and mechanical properties including modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, internal bonding, water absorption and thickness swelling were measured according to EN standard. Results indicated that the modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, water absorption and thickness swelling of boards increased with increase rapeseed stalk loading; however, the internal bonding decreased. Also, the use of melamine urea formaldehyde resin caused to improve the mechanical strength and dimensional stability in the samples.

  2. Adsorption characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from non-aqueous media using activated carbon derived from phenol formaldehyde resin: kinetics and thermodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shahawi, M S; Bashammakh, A S; Alwael, H; Alsibaai, A A; Dowaidar, A M

    2017-02-01

    Porous carbons were prepared by carbonization and activation of phenol formaldehyde resin by gasification with CO 2 at 900 °C. Prepared activated carbon from phenol formaldehyde was characterized by measuring thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), pH, surface area, porosity, and pore size distribution. The specific surface area (SSA) of these carbons ranges from 562 to 1904 m 2 /g, while their point of zero charge (pHPZC) varies from 2.6 to 8.8. The ability of the prepared activated carbon by gasification with CO 2 at 900 °C from phenol formaldehyde resin (PFAC) to remove a series of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), e.g., naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and fluoranthene, from mixtures of organic solvents with different polarities and chemical structures was tested. The adsorption capacity increases with the increasing the SSA and pHPZC of the carbons, confirming the roles of dispersive interactions. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption of phenanthrene as a model compound of PAH on PFAC in the organic solvent were studied. The adsorption capacity became notably greater with an increase in contact time and initial phenanthrene concentration.

  3. Effect of molecular structure of aniline-formaldehyde copolymers on corrosion inhibition of mild steel in hydrochloric acid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Nie, Mengyan; Wang, Xiutong; Zhu, Yukun; Shi, Fuhua; Yu, Jianqiang; Hou, Baorong

    2015-05-30

    Aniline-formaldehyde copolymers with different molecular structures have been prepared and investigated for the purpose of corrosion control of mild steel in hydrochloric acid. The copolymers were synthesized by a condensation polymerization process with different ratios of aniline to formaldehyde in acidic precursor solutions. The corrosion inhibition efficiency of as-synthesized copolymers for Q235 mild steel was investigated in 1.0 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid solution by weight loss measurement, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, respectively. All the results demonstrate that as-prepared aniline-formaldehyde copolymers are efficient mixed-type corrosion inhibitors for mild steels in hydrochloric acid. The corrosion inhibition mechanism is discussed in terms of the role of molecular structure on adsorption of the copolymers onto the steel surface in acid solution. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. A Literature Review - Problem Definition Studies on Selected Toxic Chemicals. Volume 6. Occupational Health and Safety and Environmental Aspects of Urea-Formaldehyde Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-04-01

    COMPLETLNG FORMA 1REOTNUMBER jZ.GOVT ACCESSION NO. PraS TAOGSE . ie ture vieu-Problen DC- rinition - -00dCOVEon - T ected -Toxic Cýhei a s fllme6ý1ý are...or the lack of food supply in the Hygromull-rich mixture- 74 I-- X. EFFECTS ON PLAINUS Completely polymerized urea-formaldehyde resins are not toxic in...aquatic microflora into sinple compounds which are taken up by aquatic plants and animals and eventually enter into the food chain 50-55). NO reports on

  5. Effect of staining solutions on discoloration of resin nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Kil; Kim, Tae-Hyong; Ko, Ching-Chang; García-Godoy, Franklin; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2010-02-01

    To examine the effect of staining solutions on the discoloration of resin nanocomposites. Three resin nanocomposites (Ceram X, Grandio, and Filtek Z350) were light cured for 40 seconds at a light intensity of 1000 mW/cm2. The color of the specimens was measured in %R (reflectance) mode before and after immersing the specimens in four different test solutions [distilled water (DW), coffee (CF), 50% ethanol (50ET) and brewed green tea (GT)] for 7 hours/day over a 3-week period. The color difference (deltaE*) was obtained based on the CIEL*a*b* color coordinate values. The specimens immersed in DW, 50ET and GT showed a slight increase in L* value. However, the samples immersed in CF showed a decrease in the L* value and an increase in the b* value. CF induced a significant color change (deltaE*: 3.1-5.6) in most specimens but the other solutions induced only a slight color change. Overall, coffee caused unacceptable color changes to the resin nanocomposites.

  6. Influence of colorant solutions in properties of indirect resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; De Paula, Adrielle Mendes; Bonatto, Liliane da Rocha; Da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Vechiato Filho, Aljomar José; Moreno, Amália; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the influence of colorant solutions on color stability and surface roughness of indirect resin composites submitted to prior immersion in mouthwashes. Five brands of indirect resin composites were assessed: Adoro, Resilab, Cristobal, Sinfony and Epricord. The specimens were immersed in five different solutions (n = 10): four mouthwashes (Listerine, Oral-B, Plax, Periogard) and artificial saliva (control). 60 hours after immersion in mouthwashes, the specimens were exposed to coffee solution. Shade stability and surface roughness were tested by a spectrophotometer and by a profilometer, respectively. A three-way repeated-measures ANOVA was performed. Differences between the values were compared by the Tukey-Kramer test (P color change. Greater color change was observed after immersion in coffee, except for Cristobal. The color change was even higher for specimens previously immersed in mouthwashes. The Epricord resin showed the lowest roughness value and the Cristobal showed the highest value, regardless of the period. The highest roughness change occurred after immersion in Listerine.

  7. Effect of disinfectant solutions on a denture base acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cristiane F; Vanderlei, Aleska D; Marocho, Susana M Salazar; Pereira, Sarina M B; Nogueira, Lafayette; Paes-Júnior, Tarcisio J Arruda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hardness, roughness and mass loss of an acrylic denture base resin after in vitro exposure to four disinfectant solutions. Forty specimens (Clássico, Brazil) were prepared and randomly assigned to 4 groups n = 10) according to the disinfectant solution: G1: control, stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C; G2: 1% sodium hypochlorite; G3: 2% glutaraldehyde; G4: 4% chlorhexidine. G2 to G4 were immersed for 60 minutes in the disinfectant solution. Measurements were carried out both before and after immersion in the solution. The surface was analyzed with a surface roughness tester (Surfcorder SE 1700 KOZAKALAB), a microdurometer FM-700 (Future Tech) and a scanning electron microscope (DSM 962-ZEISS). Loss of mass was determined with a digital weighing scale. After disinfection procedures, values were analyzed statistically. The acrylic denture base resin may be vulnerable to surface changes after in vitro immersion in the disinfectant solutions studied.

  8. Solid phase microextraction method development for measuring Henry's Law constants of formaldehyde in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) has been of special concern as an indoor air pollutant because of its existence in a wide range of products and its adverse health effects. The air-water partitioning behavior of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as formaldehyde is an important process th...

  9. Novel halogen-free flame retardant thermoset from a hybrid hexakis (methoxymethyl melamine/phosphorus-containing epoxy resin cured with phenol formaldehyde novolac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the curing behaviours, thermal properties and flame-resistance of a novel halogen-free epoxy hybrid thermoset, prepared by the curing reaction of hexakis (methoxymethyl melamine (HMMM, a phosphorouscontaining epoxy resin (EPN-D with 9, 10-dihydro-9-oxa-10-phosphaphenanthrene 10-oxide (DOPO group and phenol formaldehyde novolac (n-PF. The resultant thermosets showed high glass-transition temperatures (Tg, 123–147°C as determined by thermal mechanical analysis (TMA, excellent thermal stability with high 5 wt% decomposition temperatures (Td,5% ≥308°C and high char yields (Yc ≥39.4 wt% from the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. All the cured EPND/ HMMM/n-PF hybrid resins achieved the UL 94 V-0 grade with high limited oxygen indices (LOI > 45.7. It is found that phosphorous and nitrogen elements in the cured EPN-D/HMMM/n-PF hybrid resins had a positive synergistic effect on the improvement of the flame retardancy.

  10. Color test for selective detection of secondary amines on resin and in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Ulrik; Mirsharghi, Sahar

    2014-01-01

    Resins for solid-phase synthesis give orange to red-brown resin beads selectively when secondary amines are present on the resin when treated with a solution of acetaldehyde and an Fmoc-amino acid in NMP. The method shows good specificity and gives colorless beads when exposed to a variety of other...

  11. Lignin-based Phenol-Formaldehyde Resins from Purified CO2 Precipitated Kraft lignin (PCO2KL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao Chen; Charles R. Frihart; Zhiyong Cai; Linda F. Lorenz; Nicole M. Stark

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the potential for using purified CO2-precipitated Kraft lignin (PCO2KL) with phenol-formaldehyde (PF) for application as an adhesive in plywood production, two lignin replacement procedures were examined to assess lignin’s effect on bond quality. Methylolation and oxidation with hydrogen peroxide (H

  12. The transverse strength of acrylic resin after Coleus amboinicus, Lour extract solution immersion

    OpenAIRE

    Rianti, Devi

    2006-01-01

    A laboratoric experimental study was conducted on the transverse strength of acrylic resin after Coleus amboinicus, Lour extract solution immersion. The aim of this study is to know the difference of acrylic resin transverse strengths caused by immersion time variations in a concentrate solution. The study was carried out on unpolished acrylic resin plates with 65 × 10 × 2,5 mm dimension; solution with 15% Coleus amboinicus, Lour extract, and 30, 60, 90 days immersion times to measure the tra...

  13. Problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam for residential insulation. Part I. The effects of temperature and humidity on formaldehyde release from urea-formaldehyde foam insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, K.R.; Pierson, D.A.; Brennan, S.T.; Frank, C.W.; Hahne, R.A.

    1979-09-01

    The study is concerned primarily with those properties related to formaldehyde and its application as an ingredient in urea-formaldehyde resins. In particular the effects of temperature and humidity on urea-formaldehyde foam are discussed.

  14. Poly(melamine-formaldehyde) microcapsules filled with epoxy resin: effect of M/F ratio on the shell wall stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shilpi; Choudhary, Veena

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we systematically investigated the effects of process parameters such as melamine to formaldehyde (M/F) ratio taken in the initial feed on the yield percent, core content, solvent wash stability, morphology, mean particle size distribution and thermal stability of the microcapsules. Epoxy loaded poly(melamine-formaldehyde) (PMF) microcapsules were prepared by in situ polymerization using emulsion technique. Capsules core content and solvent wash stability increased as the formaldehyde content increased. Structural (FTIR and 1H-NMR), morphological (optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)) and thermal (thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry) characterization was done to investigate the effects of M/F ratio on the synthesized microcapsules. The analysis of core material by FTIR and 1H-NMR spectra confirmed the presence of epoxy as the core material. OM and SEM micrographs showed that the prepared capsules were almost spherical with a perfect periphery, but showed the tendency to agglomerate as the ratio of M/F decreased. The mean particle size of epoxy filled PMF microcapsules decreased (from 87.1 µm to 67 µm) as the ratio of M/F increased. Thermal analysis showed that the microcapsules were thermally stable up to 373 °C. Thermal stability of microcapsules increased as the ratio of M/F increased. Such microcapsules are expected to find applications in the preparation of polymeric self-healing composites for aerospace industry.

  15. Facile synthesis of allyl resinate monomer in an aqueous solution ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    as oligomer products such as inks and coatings. Com- pared with the oligomer from fossil resources such as acrylic resins and styrene resins, we believe the intro- duction of the resin structure into polymer products can provide specific mechanical properties, such as hardness and flexibility. GC analysis of each component ...

  16. Structural features of resorcinol–formaldehyde resin chars and interfacial behavior of water co-adsorbed with low-molecular weight organics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gun’ko, Vladimir M., E-mail: vlad_gunko@ukr.net [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 General Naumov Street, 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Bogatyrov, Viktor M.; Turov, Vladimir V. [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 General Naumov Street, 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Leboda, Roman; Skubiszewska-Zięba, Jadwiga [Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, 20031 Lublin (Poland); Urubkov, Iliya V. [Kurdyumov Institute of Metal Physics, 36 Vernadsky Boulevard, 03142 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2013-10-15

    Products of resorcinol–formaldehyde resin carbonization (chars) are characterized by different morphology (particle shape and sizes) and texture (specific surface area, pore volume and pore size distribution) depending on water content during resin polymerization. At a low amount of water (C{sub w} = 37.8 wt.%) during synthesis resulting in strongly cross-linked polymers, carbonization gives nonporous particles. An increase in the water content to 62.7 wt.% results in a nano/mesoporous char, but if C{sub w} = 73.3 wt.%, a char is purely nanoporous. Despite these textural differences, the Raman spectra of all the chars are similar because of the similarity in the structure of their carbon sheets with a significant contribution of sp{sup 3} C atoms. However, the difference in the spatial organization of the carbon sheet stacks in the particles results in the significant differences in the textural and morphological characteristics and in the adsorption properties of chars with respect to water, methane, benzene, hydrogen, methylene chloride, and dimethylsulfoxide.

  17. Comparison of XAD macroporous resins for the concentration of fulvic acid from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    Five macroreticular, nonlonlc AmberlHe XAD resins were evaluated for concentration and Isolation of fulvlc acid from aqueous solution. The capacity of each resin for fulvlc acid was measured by both batch and column techniques. Elution efficiencies were determined by desorptlon with 0.1 N NaOH. Highest recoveries were obtained with the acrylic ester resins which proved to be most efficient for both adsorption and elution of fulvlc acid. Compared to the acrylic ester resins, usefulness of the styrene dvlnybenzene resins to remove fulvlc acid is limited because of slow diffusion-controlled adsorption and formation of charge-transfer complexes, which hinders elution. ?? 1979 American Chemical Society.

  18. Fluorinated antimony(v) derivatives: strong Lewis acidic properties and application to the complexation of formaldehyde in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofan, Daniel; Gabbaï, François P

    2016-11-01

    As part of our ongoing studies of water tolerant Lewis acids, we have synthesized and investigated the properties of Sb(C 6 F 5 ) 3 (O 2 C 6 Cl 4 ), a fluorinated stiborane whose Lewis acidity approaches that of B(C 6 F 5 ) 3 . While chloroform solutions of this Lewis acid can be kept open to air or exposed to water for extended periods of time, this new Lewis acid reacts with P t Bu 3 and paraformaldehyde to form the corresponding formaldehyde adduct t Bu 3 P-CH 2 -O-Sb(C 6 F 5 ) 3 (O 2 C 6 Cl 4 ). To test if this reactivity can also be observed with systems that combine the phosphine and the stiborane within the same molecule, we have also prepared o -C 6 H 4 (PPh 2 )(SbAr 2 (O 2 C 6 Cl 4 )) (Ar = Ph, C 6 F 5 ). These yellow compounds, which possess an intramolecular P→Sb interaction, are remarkably inert to water but do, nonetheless, react with and accomodate formaldehyde into the P/Sb pocket. In the case of the fluorinated derivative o -C 6 H 4 (PPh 2 )(Sb(C 6 F 5 ) 2 (O 2 C 6 Cl 4 )), formaldehyde complexation, which occurs in water/dichloromethane biphasic mixtures, is accompanied by a colourimetric turn-off response thus highlighting the potential that this chemistry holds in the domain of molecular sensing.

  19. Microwave Cure of Phenol-Formaldehyde Adhesive

    OpenAIRE

    高谷, 政広; 田平, 英敏; 岡本, 忠

    2006-01-01

    [Synopsis] Phenol-formaldehyde resin has been used as a versatile material for adhesives and coatings of a wide range of adherends because of its excellent performance in water- resistance, strength against abrasion, and so on. However, it has a drawback of slow rate of cure and relevant emission of formaldehyde gas after bonding. We studied the curing performance under irradiation of microwave for the purpose of looking for a way of accelerating the cure rate of phenol formaldehyde resin. Th...

  20. Standard formaldehyde source for chamber testing of material emissions: model development, experimental evaluation, and impacts of environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenjuan; Howard-Reed, Cynthia; Persily, Andrew; Zhang, Yinping

    2013-07-16

    Formaldehyde, which is recognized as a harmful indoor air pollutant for human health, is emitted mainly from urea-formaldehyde resin in wood products. Chamber tests are used to evaluate formaldehyde emission rates from these products. However, there is no available formaldehyde standard reference emission source to assess the performance of chamber testing systems. In this work, a LIFE (liquid-inner tube diffusion-film-emission) formaldehyde reference is described. The formaldehyde source consists of a polytetrafluoroethene (PTFE) tube that holds a formaldehyde-water solution with a concentration of 16 g formaldehyde per 100 mL water, with a thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film cover. Formaldehyde emission parameters for the PDMS film (diffusion coefficient and partition coefficient) were determined experimentally, thereby enabling the prediction of the formaldehyde emissions from the source for use as a reference value in a chamber. Chamber tests were conducted in a 51 L stainless steel ventilated chamber. The impacts of temperature and relative humidity on the emissions were investigated. Results show the LIFE's chamber test results match those predicted by a mass transfer model. As a result, this formaldehyde source may be used to generate a reference concentration in product emission testing chambers, thereby providing a powerful tool to evaluate the performance of the chamber testing systems.

  1. Analyses of cocondensation of melamine and urea through carbon 13 enriched formaldehyde with carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita Bunchiro; Chung-Yun Hse

    1995-01-01

    The urea-formaldehyde (UF) resins, melamine-formaldehyde (MF) resins, and melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF) cocondensed resins were synthesized using the labeling method with 13C enriched formaldehyde unde neutral conditions and their 13C-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectra were analyzed. The remarkable down-field...

  2. Analysis on cocondensation of melamine and urea through carbon 13 enriched formaldehyde with carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunichiro Tomita; Chung-Yun Hse

    1995-01-01

    The urea-formaldehyde (UF) resins, melamine-formaldehyde (MF) resins, and melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF) cocondensed resins were synthesized using the labeling method of 13C enriched formaldehyde udner neutral conditions and their 13C-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectra were analyzed. The remarkable down-field shifts...

  3. The transverse strength of acrylic resin after Coleus amboinicus, Lour extract solution immersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Rianti

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A laboratoric experimental study was conducted on the transverse strength of acrylic resin after Coleus amboinicus, Lour extract solution immersion. The aim of this study is to know the difference of acrylic resin transverse strengths caused by immersion time variations in a concentrate solution. The study was carried out on unpolished acrylic resin plates with 65 × 10 × 2,5 mm dimension; solution with 15% Coleus amboinicus, Lour extract, and 30, 60, 90 days immersion times to measure the transverse strength and sterilized aquadest was used as control. Acrylic resin plates transverse strength was measured using Autograph AG-10 TE. The data was analyzed using One-Way Anova and LSD with 5% degree of significance. The result showed that longer immersion time will decrease the transverse strength of the acrylic resin plates. After 90 days immersion time, the transverse strength decrease is still above the recommended standard transverse strength.

  4. Saturated salt solution: a further step to a formaldehyde-free embalming method for veterinary gross anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardero, M; Yllera, M M; Costa-E-Silva, A; Oliveira, M J; Ferreira, P G

    2017-08-01

    In the field of veterinary anatomy, most of the specimens used in practical sessions are perfused with fixatives. Thus, they can be used for a longer time , reducing the number of animals for educational purposes. Formalin is the most commonly used fixative, consisting of a 37% formaldehyde solution. However, formaldehyde is a powerful irritant of the eyes and airways and is considered carcinogenic, causing nasopharyngeal cancer in exposed workers and professionals. In the present study, we explored an alternative method to avoid the use of formaldehyde in specimens used for gross anatomy practical sessions. We propose an inexpensive, non-toxic fixative that is available worldwide, such as sea salt. This method consists of a continuous perfusion of saturated salt solution for a period of 6-8 h, enabling drainage of the solution to avoid a weight increase of the specimen, and allowing salt to be retained in the tissue. The method is based on recirculation of the saturated salt solution instead of maceration. Perfused specimens retained their natural consistency and joint mobility, with no blood, resembling a piece of meat from the slaughterhouse. They could be used immediately without a maceration period, or stored in the fridge until use and then kept in a bath of saturated salt solution for future conservation. In the case of the former, no refrigeration was needed. The specimens did not have an irritating or offensive smell, and could be used for long sessions (several hours per day) and stored for long periods. However, the blood vessels used for perfusion determine the results: a less invasive approach (through common carotid arteries) gave good preservation of the musculoskeletal system, whereas more invasive access to cannulate the abdominal aorta and vena cava caudalis was required to achieve better preservation of the viscera. In conclusion, we propose that perfusion followed by immersion in a saturated salt solution is a good alternative method for the

  5. Formaldehyde-releasers: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Contact allergy to formaldehyde and inventory of formaldehyde-releasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Groot, Anton C; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann; Lensen, Gerda

    2009-01-01

    This is one of series of review articles on formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasers (others: formaldehyde in cosmetics, in clothes and in metalworking fluids and miscellaneous). Thirty-five chemicals were identified as being formaldehyde-releasers. Although a further seven are listed in the liter......This is one of series of review articles on formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasers (others: formaldehyde in cosmetics, in clothes and in metalworking fluids and miscellaneous). Thirty-five chemicals were identified as being formaldehyde-releasers. Although a further seven are listed...... of sensitization, relevance of positive patch test reactions, clinical pattern of allergic contact dermatitis from formaldehyde, prognosis, threshold for elicitation of allergic contact dermatitis, analytical tests to determine formaldehyde in products and frequency of exposure to formaldehyde and releasers....... The frequency of contact allergy to formaldehyde is consistently higher in the USA (8-9%) than in Europe (2-3%). Patch testing with formaldehyde is problematic; the currently used 1% solution may result in both false-positive and false-negative (up to 40%) reactions. Determining the relevance of patch test...

  6. Microencapsulation of butyl stearate with melamine-formaldehyde resin: Effect of decreasing the pH value on the composition and thermal stability of microcapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krajnc

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was to investigate how different decreasing of pH regimes during microencapsulation process with melamine-formaldehyde (MF resin affects the composition, morphology and thermal stability of microcapsules containing a phase-change material (PCM. Technical butyl stearate was used as PCM. Microencapsulation was carried out at 70°C. For all experiments the starting pH value was 6.0. After one hour of microencapsulation at the starting pH value, the pH value was lowered to final pH value (5.5; 5.0; 4.5 in a stepwise or linear way. The properties of microcapsules were monitored during and after the microencapsulation process. The results showed that pH value decreasing regime was critical for the morphology and stability of microcapsules. During microencapsulations with a stepwise decrease of pH value we observed faster increase of the amount of MF resin in the microencapsulation product compared to the microencapsulations with a linear pH value decrease. However, faster deposition in the case of microencapsulations with stepwise decrease of pH value did not result in thicker MF shells. The shell thickness increased much faster when the pH value was decreased in a linear way or in several smaller steps. It was shown that for the best thermal stability of microcapsules, the pH value during microencapsulation had to be lowered in a linear way or in smaller steps to 5.0 or lower.

  7. In Situ Carbon Coated LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Cathode Material Prepared by Prepolymer of Melamine Formaldehyde Resin Assisted Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon coated spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 were prepared by spray-drying using prepolymer of melamine formaldehyde resin (PMF as carbon source of carbon coating layer. The PMF carbon coated LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 was characterized by XRD, SEM, and other electrochemical measurements. The as-prepared lithium nickel manganese oxide has the cubic face-centered spinel structure with a space group of Fd3m. It showed good electrochemical performance as a cathode material for lithium ion battery. After 100 discharge and charge cycles at 0.5 C rate, the specific discharge capacity of carbon coated LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 was 130 mAh·g−1, and the corresponding capacity retention was 98.8%. The 100th cycle specific discharge capacity at 10 C rate of carbon coated LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 was 105.4 mAh·g−1, and even the corresponding capacity retention was 95.2%.

  8. Increase of porosity by combining semi-carbonization and KOH activation of formaldehyde resins to prepare high surface area carbons for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimböckel, Ruben; Kraas, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Frank; Fröba, Michael

    2018-01-01

    A series of porous carbon samples were prepared by combining a semi-carbonization process of acidic polymerized phenol-formaldehyde resins and a following chemical activation with KOH used in different ratios to increase specific surface area, micropore content and pore sizes of the carbons which is favourable for supercapacitor applications. Samples were characterized by nitrogen physisorption, powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the amount of KOH, combined with the semi-carbonization step had a remarkable effect on the specific surface area (up to SBET: 3595 m2 g-1 and SDFT: 2551 m2 g-1), pore volume (0.60-2.62 cm3 g-1) and pore sizes (up to 3.5 nm). The carbons were tested as electrode materials for electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLC) in a two electrode setup with tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile as electrolyte. The prepared carbon material with the largest surface area, pore volume and pore sizes exhibits a high specific capacitance of 145.1 F g-1 at a current density of 1 A g-1. With a high specific energy of 31 W h kg-1 at a power density of 33028 W kg-1 and a short time relaxation constant of 0.29 s, the carbon showed high power capability as an EDLC electrode material.

  9. Adsorption of CO2 on KOH activated, N-enriched carbon derived from urea formaldehyde resin: kinetics, isotherm and thermodynamic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Deepak; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K.

    2018-05-01

    High surface area nitrogen enriched carbon adsorbents were prepared from a low cost and widely available urea-formaldehyde resin using a standard chemical activation with KOH and characterized using different characterization techniques for their porous structure and surface functional groups. Maximum surface area and total pore volume of 4547 m2 g-1 and 4.50 cm3 g-1 were found by controlling the activation conditions. Nitrogen content of this sample was found to be 5.62%. Adsorption of CO2 uptake for the prepared carbon adsorbents was studied using a dynamic fixed bed adsorption system at different adsorption temperatures (30-100 °C) and at different CO2 concentrations (5-12.5%), relevant from the flue gas point application. Maximum CO2 uptake of 1.40 mmol g-1 for UFA-3-700 at 30 °C under 12.5% CO2 flow was obtained. Complete regenerability of the adsorbents over multiple adsorption-desorption cycles was obtained. Fractional order kinetic model provided best description over all adsorption temperatures and CO2 concentrations. Heterogeneity of the adsorbent surface was confirmed from Temkin adsorption isotherm model fit and isosteric heat of adsorption values. Negative value of ΔG° and ΔH° confirms spontaneous, feasible nature and exothermic nature of adsorption process. Overall, very high surface area of carbon adsorbent makes this adsorbent a new promising carbon material for CO2 capture from power plant flue gas and for other relevant applications.

  10. Test plan for demonstrating plutonium extraction from 10-L solutions using EIChrom extraction chromatographic resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.

    1994-01-01

    Corrosive plutonium solutions stored in 10-L containers at the Plutonium Finishing Plant must be treated to convert the plutonium to a safe, solid form for storage and to remove the americium so that radiation exposure can be reduced. Extraction chromatographic resins will be tested for separating plutonium from these solutions in the laboratory. Separation parameters will be developed during the testing for large scale processing of the 10-L solutions and solutions of similar composition. Use of chromatographic resins will allow plutonium separation with minimum of chemical addition to the feed and without the need for plutonium valence adjustment. The separated plutonium will be calcined to plutonium oxide by direct solution calcination

  11. Development of production methods of volume source by the resinous solution which has hardening

    CERN Document Server

    Motoki, R

    2002-01-01

    Volume sources is used for standard sources by radioactive measurement using Ge semiconductor detector of environmental sample, e.g. water, soil and etc. that require large volume. The commercial volume source used in measurement of the water sample is made of agar-agar, and that used in measurement of the soil sample is made of alumina powder. When the plastic receptacles of this two kinds of volume sources were damaged, the leakage contents cause contamination. Moreover, if hermetically sealing performance of volume source made of agar-agar fell, volume decrease due to an evaporation off moisture gives an error to radioactive measurement. Therefore, we developed the two type methods using unsaturated polyester resin, vinilester resin, their hardening agent and acrylicresin. The first type is due to dispersing the hydrochloric acid solution included the radioisotopes uniformly in each resin and hardening the resin. The second is due to dispersing the alumina powder absorbed the radioisotopes in each resin an...

  12. Comparative Enactment of Formaldehyde-free and Formaldehyde-based Cross-linkers on Cotton Woven Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawshin Farzana

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The performances of formaldehyde-based and non-formaldehyde cross-linkers on pretreated cotton woven fabric were assessed and compared in this research. Fixapret CL was considered as the formaldehyde-based resin and Fixapret NF as the formaldehyde-free resin. Dry cross-linking method was adopted for the application of cross-linkers. Different properties of resin treated fabrics investigated and compared were as follows: DP (durable press rating, wrinkle recovery, stiff ness, tensile strength, tear strength, shrinkage, skewness, hydrophobicity, whiteness and yellowness index. Marginally low performances in smoothness appearance and dimensional stability on fabric were exhibited with formaldehyde-free cross-linkers although indicating lower amount of the strength loss percentage. The formaldehyde-based compounds imparted more yellowing tendency to the treated fabric. The formaldehyde-free resins may be a good choice of replacements considering the overall eff ectiveness on fabric

  13. Effect of repeated immersion solution cycles on the color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Maurício Batista da Silva; Emílio José Tabaré Rodríguez Acosta; Matheus Jacobina; Luciana de Rezende Pinto; Vinícius Carvalho Porto

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chemical solutions have been widely used for disinfection of dentures, but their effect on color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins after repeated procedures is still unclear. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate whether repeated cycles of chemical disinfectants affected the color stability of two denture tooth acrylic resins. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty disc-shaped specimens (40 mm x 3 mm) were fabricated from two different brands (Artiplus and Trilux) of denture ...

  14. Effect of different solutions on color stability of acrylic resin-based dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Nóbrega, Adhara Smith; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Andreotti, Agda Marobo; Moreno, Amália

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of thermocycling and immersion in mouthwash or beverage solutions on the color stability of four different acrylic resin-based dentures (Onda Cryl, OC; QC20, QC; Classico, CL; and Lucitone, LU). The factors evaluated were type of acrylic resin, immersion time, and solution (mouthwash or beverage). A total of 224 denture samples were fabricated. For each type of resin, eight samples were immersed in mouthwashes (Plax-Colgate, PC; Listerine, LI; and Oral-B, OB), beverages (coffee, CP; cola, C; and wine, W), and artificial saliva (AS; control). The color change (DE) was evaluated before (baseline) and after thermocycling (T1), and after immersion in solution for 1 h (T2), 3 h (T3), 24 h (T4), 48 h (T5), and 96 h (T6). The CIE Lab system was used to determine the color changes. The thermocycling test was performed for 5000 cycles. Data were submitted to three-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test (pacrylic resin. Similarly, when the samples were immersed in each beverage, all studied factors influenced the color change values. In general, regardless of the solution, LU exhibited the greatest DE values in the period from T1 to T5; and QC presented the greatest DE values at T6. Thus, thermocycling and immersion in the various solutions influenced the color stability of acrylic resins and QC showed the greatest color alteration.

  15. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies for sorption of Ni (II from aqueous solution using formaldehyde treated waste tea leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Shah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The sorption characteristic of Ni (II from aqueous solution using formaldehyde treated waste tea leaves as a low cost sorbent has been studied. The effect of pH, contact time, sorbent dose, initial metal ion concentration and temperature were investigated in batch experiments. The equilibrium data were fitted into four most common isotherm models; Freundlich, Langmuir, Tempkin and Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R. The Langmuir model described the sorption isotherm best with maximum monolayer sorption capacity of 120.50 mg g−1. Four kinetic models, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intraparticle diffusion and Elovich were employed to explain the sorption mechanism. The kinetics of sorption data showed that the pseudo-second-order model is the best with correlation coefficient of 0.9946. The spontaneous and exothermic nature of the sorption process was revealed from thermodynamic investigations. The effect of some common alkali and alkaline earth metal ions were also studied which showed that the presence of these ions have no effect on the sorption of Ni (II. The results showed that waste tea leaves have the potential to be used as a low cost sorbent for the removal of Ni (II from aqueous solutions.

  16. Analysis of cocondensation of melamine and urea through carbon 13 enriched formaldehyde with C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunichiro Tomita; Chung-Yun Hse

    1995-01-01

    The urea-formaldehyde (UF) resins, melamine-formaldehyde (MF) resins, and melamine-ureaformaldehyde (MUF) cocondensed resins were synthesized using the labeling method with 13C enriched formaldehyde under neutral conditions and their 13C-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectra were analyzed. The remarkable down-field...

  17. Simultaneous separation and detection of actinides in acidic solutions using an extractive scintillating resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roane, J E; DeVol, T A

    2002-11-01

    An extractive scintillating resin was evaluated for the simultaneous separation and detection of actinides in acidic solutions. The transuranic extractive scintillating (TRU-ES) resin is composed of an inert macroporous polystyrene core impregnated with organic fluors (diphenyloxazole and 1,4-bis-(4-methyl-5-phenyl-2-oxazolyl)benzene) and an extractant (octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide in tributyl phosphate). The TRU-ES resin was packed into FEP Teflon tubing to produce a flow cell (0.2-mL free column volume), which is placed into a scintillation detection system to obtain pulse height spectra and time series data during loading and elution of actinides onto/from the resin. The alpha-particle absolute detection efficiencies ranged from 77% to 96.5%, depending on the alpha energy and quench. In addition to the on-line analyses, off-line analyses of the effluent can be conducted using conventional detection methods. The TRU-ES resin was applied to the quantification of a mixed radionuclide solution and two actual waste samples. The on-line characterization of the mixed radionuclide solution was within 10% of the reported activities whereas the agreement with the waste samples was not as good due to sorption onto the sample container walls and the oxidation state of plutonium. Agreement between the on-line and off-line analyses was within 35% of one another for both waste samples.

  18. Effect of repeated immersion solution cycles on the color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    da SILVA, Paulo Maurício Batista; ACOSTA, Emílio José Tabaré Rodríguez; JACOBINA, Matheus; PINTO, Luciana de Rezende; PORTO, Vinícius Carvalho

    2011-01-01

    Objective Chemical solutions have been widely used for disinfection of dentures, but their effect on color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins after repeated procedures is still unclear. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate whether repeated cycles of chemical disinfectants affected the color stability of two denture tooth acrylic resins. Material and Methods Sixty disc-shaped specimens (40 mm x 3 mm) were fabricated from two different brands (Artiplus and Trilux) of denture tooth acrylic resin. The specimens from each brand (n=30) were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=5) and immersed in the following solutions: distilled water (control group) and 5 disinfecting solutions (1% sodium hypochlorite, 2% sodium hypochlorite, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 2% glutaraldehyde, and 4% chlorhexidine gluconate). Tooth color measurements were made by spectrophotometry. Before disinfection, the initial color of each tooth was recorded. Further color measurements were determined after subjecting the specimens to 7, 21, 30, 45, 60, and 90 immersion cycles in each tested solution. Color differences (ΔE*) were determined using the CIE L*a*b* color system. Data were analyzed using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey tests. The significance level was set at 5%. Results There were statistically significant differences in ΔE* among the 5 disinfectants and water during the 90 cycles of immersion for both denture tooth acrylic resins. Distilled water promoted the greatest color change in both denture tooth acrylic resins, nevertheless none of tested disinfectants promoted ΔE* values higher than 1.0 on these acrylic materials during the 90 cycles of disinfection. Conclusions Repeated immersion cycles in disinfecting solutions alter ∆E* values, however these values do not compromise the color of the tested denture tooth acrylic resins because they are imperceptible to the human eye. PMID:22230997

  19. Effect of repeated immersion solution cycles on the color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Maurício Batista da Silva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chemical solutions have been widely used for disinfection of dentures, but their effect on color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins after repeated procedures is still unclear. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate whether repeated cycles of chemical disinfectants affected the color stability of two denture tooth acrylic resins. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty disc-shaped specimens (40 mm x 3 mm were fabricated from two different brands (Artiplus and Trilux of denture tooth acrylic resin. The specimens from each brand (n=30 were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=5 and immersed in the following solutions: distilled water (control group and 5 disinfecting solutions (1% sodium hypochlorite, 2% sodium hypochlorite, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 2% glutaraldehyde, and 4% chlorhexidine gluconate. Tooth color measurements were made by spectrophotometry. Before disinfection, the initial color of each tooth was recorded. Further color measurements were determined after subjecting the specimens to 7, 21, 30, 45, 60, and 90 immersion cycles in each tested solution. Color differences (ΔE* were determined using the CIE L*a*b* color system. Data were analyzed using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by Tukey tests. The significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: There were statistically significant differences in ΔE* among the 5 disinfectants and water during the 90 cycles of immersion for both denture tooth acrylic resins. Distilled water promoted the greatest color change in both denture tooth acrylic resins, nevertheless none of tested disinfectants promoted ΔE* values higher than 1.0 on these acrylic materials during the 90 cycles of disinfection. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated immersion cycles in disinfecting solutions alter ΔE* values, however these values do not compromise the color of the tested denture tooth acrylic resins because they are imperceptible to the human eye.

  20. Effect of repeated immersion solution cycles on the color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Paulo Maurício Batista da; Acosta, Emílio José Tabaré Rodríguez; Jacobina, Matheus; Pinto, Luciana de Rezende; Porto, Vinícius Carvalho

    2011-01-01

    Chemical solutions have been widely used for disinfection of dentures, but their effect on color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins after repeated procedures is still unclear. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate whether repeated cycles of chemical disinfectants affected the color stability of two denture tooth acrylic resins. Sixty disc-shaped specimens (40 mm x 3 mm) were fabricated from two different brands (Artiplus and Trilux) of denture tooth acrylic resin. The specimens from each brand (n=30) were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=5) and immersed in the following solutions: distilled water (control group) and 5 disinfecting solutions (1% sodium hypochlorite, 2% sodium hypochlorite, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 2% glutaraldehyde, and 4% chlorhexidine gluconate). Tooth color measurements were made by spectrophotometry. Before disinfection, the initial color of each tooth was recorded. Further color measurements were determined after subjecting the specimens to 7, 21, 30, 45, 60, and 90 immersion cycles in each tested solution. Color differences (ΔE*) were determined using the CIE L*a*b* color system. Data were analyzed using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey tests. The significance level was set at 5%. There were statistically significant differences in ΔE* among the 5 disinfectants and water during the 90 cycles of immersion for both denture tooth acrylic resins. Distilled water promoted the greatest color change in both denture tooth acrylic resins, nevertheless none of tested disinfectants promoted ΔE* values higher than 1.0 on these acrylic materials during the 90 cycles of disinfection. Repeated immersion cycles in disinfecting solutions alter ΔE* values, however these values do not compromise the color of the tested denture tooth acrylic resins because they are imperceptible to the human eye.

  1. The influence of plutonium concentration and solution flow rate on the effective capacity of macroporous anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Gallegos, T.D.

    1987-07-01

    The principal aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility is anion exchange in nitric acid. Previous studies with gel-type anion exchange resin have shown an inverse relationship between plutonium concentration in the feed solution and the optimum flow rate for this process. Because gel-type resin has been replaced with macroporous resin at Los Alamos, the relationship between plutonium concentration and solution flow rate was reexamined with the selected Lewatit MP-500-FK resin using solutions of plutonium in nitric acid and in nitric acid with high levels of added nitrate salts. Our results with this resin differ significantly from previous data obtained with gel-type resin. Flow-rate variation from 10 to 80 liters per hour had essentially no effect on the measured quantities of plutonium sorbed by the macroporous resin. However, the effect of plutonium concentration in the feed solutions was pronounced, as feed solutions that contained the highest concentrations of plutonium also produced the highest resin loadings. The most notable effect of high concentrations of dissolved nitrate salts in these solutions was an increased resin capacity for plutonium at low flow rates. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Influence of the vacuum resin process, on the ballistic behaviour of lightweight armouring solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, M.; Boussu, F.; Coutellier, D.; Vallee, D.

    2012-08-01

    The armour of vehicles against conventional threats is mainly composed with steel or aluminium panels. Efficient heavy solutions exist, but the involved industries require new lightweight structures. Moreover, unconventional threats as IEDs (Improvised Explosive Devices) may cause severe damages on these structural and protective panel solutions. Thus, combination of aluminium or steel plates with textile composite structures used as a backing, leads to the mass reduction and better performance under delamination behaviour against these new threats. This paper is a part of a study dealing with the impact behaviour of three warp interlocks weaving structures under Fragment Simulating Projectile (FSP) impact. During this research, several parameters has being studied as the influence of the yarns insertions [1-4], the degradation of the yarns during the weaving process [5-7], and the influence of the resin rate on the ballistic behaviour. The resin rate inside composite materials is dependant on the final application. In ballistic protection, we need to control the resin rate in order to have a deformable structure in order to absorb the maximum of energy. However, with the warp interlocks weaving structure, the yarns insertions induce empty spaces between the yarns where the resin takes place without being evacuated. The resin rate inside the warp interlocks structures is in the most of cases less than 50%, which lead to have brittle and hard material during the impact. Contrary to interlocks structures, the existing protection based on prepreg structure have a high fibres ratio around 88% of weight. That leads to have the best ballistic properties during the impact and good deformability of the structure. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the influence of the resin rate on the ballistic results of the composites materials. For that, we have chosen two kinds of warp interlocks fabrics which were infused with epoxy resin following two processes. The first is a

  3. Influence of the vacuum resin process, on the ballistic behaviour of lightweight armouring solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutellier D.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The armour of vehicles against conventional threats is mainly composed with steel or aluminium panels. Efficient heavy solutions exist, but the involved industries require new lightweight structures. Moreover, unconventional threats as IEDs (Improvised Explosive Devices may cause severe damages on these structural and protective panel solutions. Thus, combination of aluminium or steel plates with textile composite structures used as a backing, leads to the mass reduction and better performance under delamination behaviour against these new threats. This paper is a part of a study dealing with the impact behaviour of three warp interlocks weaving structures under Fragment Simulating Projectile (FSP impact. During this research, several parameters has being studied as the influence of the yarns insertions [1–4], the degradation of the yarns during the weaving process [5–7], and the influence of the resin rate on the ballistic behaviour. The resin rate inside composite materials is dependant on the final application. In ballistic protection, we need to control the resin rate in order to have a deformable structure in order to absorb the maximum of energy. However, with the warp interlocks weaving structure, the yarns insertions induce empty spaces between the yarns where the resin takes place without being evacuated. The resin rate inside the warp interlocks structures is in the most of cases less than 50%, which lead to have brittle and hard material during the impact. Contrary to interlocks structures, the existing protection based on prepreg structure have a high fibres ratio around 88% of weight. That leads to have the best ballistic properties during the impact and good deformability of the structure. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the influence of the resin rate on the ballistic results of the composites materials. For that, we have chosen two kinds of warp interlocks fabrics which were infused with epoxy resin following two

  4. Chromium (VI removal from aqueous solutions using a polyethylenimine - epichlorohydrin resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarri Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a synthesized polyethylenimine - epichlorohydrin resin to remove Cr(VI from aqueous solutions was investigated in absence (initial pH 2 to 7 and presence of background electrolytes (NaNO3 and Na2SO4 solutions of initial pH 3 and 6. The determined Cr-uptake was significantly higher than the one reported for the majority of other sorbents. The photo-metrically determined uptake data were modeled by the Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson, Langmuir-Freundlich, and Toth equations. The modeling results did not point out any preference to one specific model in terms of the goodness-of-fit and the prediction of maximum sorption capacity. The Cr-sorption kinetics was investigated at 15, 25, 35 and 45 oC using 51Cr-labeled solutions and γ-ray spectroscopy. The Cr-sorption was very fast at all studied temperatures and well reproduced by the pseudo-second order kinetics equation. Rate constant and activation energy values were calculated using the experimental data. The Cr-loaded resin was also examined by XRD, XPS, XAFS and SEM/EDS. The XPS and XAFS investigations indicated a partial reduction of Cr(VI to Cr(III. The environmental compatibility of the Cr-loaded resin was examined using the EPA-TCLP method. The Cr-binding by the resin was very stable and regeneration attempts by HCl solutions of pH 3 were rather unsuccessful.

  5. Formaldehyde - An Assessment of its Health Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    formaldehyde mutagenesis has not been resolved. Formaldehyde may cause mutations by reacting directly with DNA ; by forming mutagenic products on...reaction with amino groups on simple amines, amino acids, nucleic acids, or proteins; or by oxidizing to peroxides that can react directly with DNA or...species of grasshoppers , formaldehyde caused chromosomal damage (Manna and Parida, 1967). Germinating barley seeds soaked in formaldehyde solutions did not

  6. Study on uranium adsorption ability of tannix resin from solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Thi Kim Dung; Le Quang Thai; Nguyen Lanh; Le Ngoc Thuy

    2004-01-01

    During past years, generated liquid waste from uranium ore processing has been treated by co-precipitation method in ITRRE. In this liquid waste treatment process, mixing liquid waste and lime, decantation, filtration of precipitate were implemented. The treated fluid has underlimited toxic concentration and ensures for moving into environment. Residue was dried and packed into drums as low level radioactive waste. Next to the advantages of this method such as simplest technology, cheapest cost, easy operation. Some amount of secondary radioactive waste as noncombustible materials must be stored with complicated technologies a highly cost. We have been researching a new liquid waste treatment system replaceable precipitation system. In the new process, insoluble tannin is utilized as adsorbent of uranium liquid waste. Advantage of insoluble tannin is expected to be possible to reduce its volume incineration as well as its adsorption ability. Those are the reasons why tannix resin is used this research subject. In this subject, we have studied adsorption capacity of uranium in Tannix, relation of adsorption rate and pH, the change of adsorption ability of column system, the pyrolysis curve of dried Tannix (author)

  7. Effect of different solutions on color stability of acrylic resin-based dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Coelho Goiato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of thermocycling and immersion in mouthwash or beverage solutions on the color stability of four different acrylic resin-based dentures (Onda Cryl, OC; QC20, QC; Classico, CL; and Lucitone, LU. The factors evaluated were type of acrylic resin, immersion time, and solution (mouthwash or beverage. A total of 224 denture samples were fabricated. For each type of resin, eight samples were immersed in mouthwashes (Plax-Colgate, PC; Listerine, LI; and Oral-B, OB, beverages (coffee, CP; cola, C; and wine, W, and artificial saliva (AS; control. The color change (DE was evaluated before (baseline and after thermocycling (T1, and after immersion in solution for 1 h (T2, 3 h (T3, 24 h (T4, 48 h (T5, and 96 h (T6. The CIE Lab system was used to determine the color changes. The thermocycling test was performed for 5000 cycles. Data were submitted to three-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test (p < 0.05. When the samples were immersed in each mouthwash, all assessed factors, associated or not, significantly influenced the color change values, except there was no association between the mouthwash and acrylic resin. Similarly, when the samples were immersed in each beverage, all studied factors influenced the color change values. In general, regardless of the solution, LU exhibited the greatest DE values in the period from T1 to T5; and QC presented the greatest DE values at T6. Thus, thermocycling and immersion in the various solutions influenced the color stability of acrylic resins and QC showed the greatest color alteration.

  8. Adsorption of uranium ions by crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemal Oezeroglu; Niluefer Metin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the crosslinked polyester resin containing acrylic acid functional groups was used for the adsorption of uranium ions from aqueous solutions. For this purpose, the crosslinked polyester resin of unsaturated polyester in styrene monomer (Polipol 353, Poliya) and acrylic acid as weight percentage at 80 and 20%, respectively was synthesized by using methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKp, Butanox M60, Azo Nobel)-cobalt octoate initiator system. The adsorption of uranium ions on the sample (0.05 g copolymer and 5 mL of U(VI) solution were mixed) of the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid was carried out in a batch reactor. The effects of adsorption parameters of the contact time, temperature, pH of solution and initial uranium(VI) concentration for U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid were investigated. The adsorption data obtained from experimental results depending on the initial U(VI) concentration were analyzed by the Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity and free energy change were determined by using D-R isotherm. The obtained experimental adsorption data depending on temperature were evaluated to calculate the thermodynamic parameters of enthalpy (ΔH o ), entropy (ΔS o ) and free energy change (ΔG o ) for the U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions. The obtained adsorption data depending on contact time were analyzed by using adsorption models such as the modified Freundlich, Elovich, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. (author)

  9. Adsorption behaviors of trivalent actinides and lanthanides on pyridine resin in lithium chloride aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsuya Suzuki

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of trivalent actinides and lanthanides on pyridine resin in lithium chloride aqueous solution were investigated. The adsorbed amounts of lanthanides and the degree of mutual separation of lanthanides increased with an increase in the concentration of lithium chloride in aqueous solution. The group separation of the trivalent actinides and lanthanides was observed. This separation phenomenon is similar in a hydrochloric acid solution. However, the adsorption behavior of lanthanides in lithium chloride is different from their behavior in a hydrochloric acid solution. This fact shows that the adsorption mechanisms of lanthanides in a lithium chloride aqueous solution and in a hydrochloric acid solution are different; the adsorption mechanisms are attributed to the ion exchange in a hydrochloric acid solution, and to the complex formation with pyridine group in a lithium chloride solution. (author)

  10. Selectivity of cesium from fission radionuclides using resorcinol-formaldehyde and zirconyl-molybdopyrophosphate as ion-exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shady, S A

    2009-08-15

    Two ion-exchangers, the first is organic in nature and the other is inorganic named as resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) and zirconyl-molybdopyrophosphate (ZMPP) were synthesized and applied to decontaminate some fission radionuclides from radioactive waste streams. The distribution coefficients of the studied radionuclides for the two ion-exchanges at varying pH conditions are evaluated and the data showed that the selectivity sequence of resorcinol-formaldehyde for the studied cations is Cs(+)>Co(2+)>Eu(3+)>Zn(2+) which is the same sequence of zirconyl-molybdopyrophosphate while as the X-ray diffraction characterization showed that resorcinol-formaldehyde resin is an amorphous material but zirconyl-molybdopyrophosphate is a semicrystalline one and both of resorcinol-formaldehyde and zirconyl-molybdopyrophosphate are considered as promising materials specially for the decontamination of cesium from radioactive waste solutions.

  11. Sulfonation of polyvinylidene difluoride resin and its application in extraction of restriction enzymes from DNA digestion solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Dong, Chunxia; Huang, Xu; Zhao, Jindong

    2003-11-01

    Sulfonation of polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) resin was achieved by incubation of the resin with sulfuric acid at a moderately high temperature. The sulfonated PVDF (SPVDF) resin was studied for its ability to extract restriction enzymes from DNA digestion solutions. The SPVDF resin was effective in adsorbing restriction enzymes such as EcoRI and BamHI and the extraction procedure was easy and simple to perform. The adsorption depended upon the amount of the resin added. We found that 1 mg of the SPVDF resin could completely remove all restriction enzyme activity routinely used in DNA digestion within 2 min after its addition. Treatment of a digestion solution with the SPVDF resin did not change the reaction solution and the same digestion buffer could be used for another digestion of the same DNA with other enzymes. We also found that, in comparison with normal PVDF, the SPVDF resin adsorbed less DNA, resulting in less loss of DNA in the extraction step. The potential application of the SPVDF resin in other procedures of molecular cloning and enzyme purification is discussed.

  12. Composite Properties of Polyimide Resins Made From "Salt-Like" Solution Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Weiser, Erik S.; SaintClair, Terry L.; Echigo, Yoshiaki; Kaneshiro, Hisayasu

    1997-01-01

    Recent work in high temperature materials at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC (trademark)) have led to the development of new polyimide resin systems with very attractive properties. The majority of the work done with these resin systems has concentrated on determining engineering mechanical properties of composites prepared from a poly(amide acid) precursor. Three NASA Langley-developed polyimide matrix resins, LaRC (trademark) -IA, LaRC (trademark) -IAX, and LaRC (trademark) -8515, were produced via a salt-like process developed by Unitika Ltd. The 'salt-like' solutions (sixty-five percent solids in NMP) were prepregged onto Hexcel IM7 carbon fiber using the NASA LaRC Multipurpose Tape Machine. Process parameters were determined and composite panels fabricated. Mechanical properties are presented for these three intermediate modulus carbon fiber/polyimide matrix composites and compared to existing data on the same polyimide resin systems and IM7 carbon fiber manufactured via poly(amide acid) solutions (thirty-five percent solids in NMP). This work studies the effects of varying the synthetic route on the processing and mechanical properties of polyimide composites.

  13. Chromium (VI removal from aqueous solutions by purolite base anion-exchange resins with gel structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balan Catalin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of Cr (VI from aqueous solution using two strong base anionic resins with gel structure, Purolite A-400 (styrene-divinylbenzene matrix and Purolite A-850 (acrylic matrix was investigated in batch technique. The sorption efficiency was determined as a function of phases contact time, solution pH, resin dose, temperature and initial Cr (VI concentration. The percentage of Cr (VI removed reaches maximum values (up to 99 % in the pH range 4 - 5.3 under a resin dose of 6 g/L and of Cr (VI concentration up to 100 mg/L. An increase in temperature has a positive effect on the Cr (VI sorption process. The equilibrium sorption data were fitted with the Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models, using both linear and nonlinear regression method. The Langmuir model very well verifies the experimental data and gives the maximum sorption capacity of 120.55 mg Cr (VI/g and 95.82 mg Cr (VI/g for A-400 and A-850 resins, respectively. The thermodynamic study and mean free energy of sorption values calculated using Dubinin-Radushkevich equation indicated the sorption is a chemical endothermic process. The kinetic data were well described by pseudo-second order kinetic equation and the sorption process is controlled by external (film diffusion and intraparticle diffusion.

  14. Removal of Pb2+ from aqueous solutions by a high-efficiency resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hao; Ren, Yongzheng; Sun, Xueliang; Xu, Yadi; Li, Xuemei; Zhang, Tiancheng; Kang, Jianxiong; Liu, Dongqi

    2013-01-01

    The removal of Pb 2+ from aqueous solution by 732 cation-exchange resin in sodium type (732-CR) has been studied in batch experiments at varying pH (2.0–8.0), Pb 2+ concentration (50–200 mg/L), contact time (5–300 min), temperature (288–308 K) and resin dose (0.125–0.75 g/L). The experimental data show that the ion-exchange process was dependent on pH and temperature, the optimal exchange capacity was found at pH 4.0, and higher temperature was beneficial to lead sorption. Kinetic data indicate that the ion-exchange process followed a pseudo-first order model. The equilibrium exchange capacity could be reached at approximately 4 h, and the maximum sorption capacity of Pb 2+ at pH 4.0 was 396.8 mg/g resin. The equilibrium data were evaluated with Langmuir and Freundlich model, and were best fitted with Langmuir model. The thermodynamic parameters for removal of Pb 2+ indicate that the reaction was spontaneous and endothermic. Additionally, column tests were conducted by using both synthetic solution and effluents from lead battery industry. The regeneration of resin was performed for two sorption-regeneration cycles by 1 M NaOH, and the results show that effective regeneration was achieved by this method.

  15. Improved Understanding of the Reaction of Zein with Glyoxal or Formaldehyde and Electrospinning of the Resulting Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    When glyoxal or formaldehyde were allowed to react with zein (corn protein) the resulting electrospun fibers had been shown to have improved solvent resistance and physical properties. These reagents formed a cross-linked network with the zein protein. It was found that the properties of the as-sp...

  16. Processing of indium (III solutions via ion exchange with Lewatit K-2621 resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Díaz-Pavón, Adrián

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The processing of indium(III-hydrochloric acid solutions by the cationic ion exchange Lewatit K-2621 resin has been investigated. The influence of several variables such as the hydrochloric acid and metal concentrations in the aqueous solution and the variation of the amount of resin added has been studied. Moreover, a kinetic study performed in the uptake of indium(III by Lewatit K-2621, shows that either the film-diffusion and the particle-diffusion models fit the ion exchange process onto the resin, depending upon the initial metal concentration in the aqueous solution. The loaded resin could be eluted by HCl solutions at 20 °C.Se ha investigado el tratamiento de disoluciones de ácido clorhídrico conteniendo indio(III mediante la resina de cambio catiónico Lewatit K-2621. Las variables ensayadas han sido las concentraciones de ácido y de metal en la disolución acuosa y la cantidad de resina empleada en el tratamiento de dichas disoluciones. Asimismo, se ha llevado a cabo un estudio cinético del proceso de intercambio catiónico entre el indio(III y la resina Lewatit K-2621. Este estudio muestra que el proceso de intercambio responde a un mecanismo de difusión en la disolución o en la partícula de resina dependiendo de la concentración inicial del metal en el medio acuoso. El metal cargado en la resina puede ser eluido con disoluciones de ácido clorhídrico a 20 °C.

  17. The effect of disinfectant solutions on the hardness of acrylic resin denture teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavarina, A C; Vergani, C E; Machado, A L; Giampaolo, E T; Teraoka, M T

    2003-07-01

    This investigation studied the effects of disinfectant solutions on the hardness of acrylic resin denture teeth. The occlusal surfaces of 64 resin denture teeth were ground flat with abrasives up to 400-grit silicon carbide paper. Measurements were made after polishing and after the specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 48 h. The specimens were then divided into four groups and immersed in chemical disinfectants (4% chlorhexidine; 1% sodium hypochlorite and sodium perborate) for 10 min. The disinfection methods were performed twice to simulate clinical conditions and hardness measurements were made. Specimens tested as controls were immersed in water during the same disinfection time. Eight specimens were produced for each group. After desinfection procedures, testing of hardness was also performed after the samples were stored at 37 degrees C for 7, 30, 60, 90 and 120 days. Data were analysed using two-way analysis of variance (anova) and Tukey's test at 95% confidence level. According to the results, no significant differences were found between materials and immersion solutions (P > 0.05). However, a continuous decrease in hardness was noticed after ageing (P < 0.05). It was conclude that the surfaces of both acrylic resin denture teeth softened upon immersion in water regardless the disinfecting solution.

  18. Design of Ion-Exchange Resins Through EDTA and DTPA Modified Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    Catechol, resorcinol, and their admixtures with EDTA and DTPA moieties were converted into polymeric resins by alkaline polycondensation with formaldehyde. The resins were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, ion-exchange capacity, and distribution coefficient (D for heavy metal and radionuclide such as Cs and Sr. 137Cs and 90Sr constitutes a major source of heat in nuclear waste streams and in regards to recent nuclear event their remediation in complex solution – sea water - represent an important issue.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and anti-microbial activity of phenylurea-formaldehyde resin (PUF) and its polymer metal complexes (PUF-Mn(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.

    2012-10-01

    Phenylurea-formaldehyde polymer (PUF) was synthesized via polycondensation of phenylurea and formaldehyde in basic medium, its polymer-metal complexes [PUF-M(II)] were prepared with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) ions. PUF and PUF-M(II) were characterized with magnetic moment measurements, elemental and spectral (UV-visible, FTIR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and ESR) analysis. The thermal behaviors of all the synthesized polymers were carried out using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The thermal data revealed that all of the PUF-M(II) showed higher thermal stabilities than the PUF and also ascribed that the PUF-Cu(II) showed better thermal stability than the other PUF-M(II). The kinetic parameters such as activation energy, pre-exponential factor etc., were evaluated for these polymer metal complexes using Coats-Redfern equation. In addition, the antimicrobial activity of the synthesized polymers was tested against several microorganisms using agar well diffusion methods. Among all of the PUF-M(II), the antimicrobial activity of the PUF-Cu(II) showed the highest zone of inhibition because of its higher stability constant and may be used in biomedical applications.

  20. Adsorption of 4-chlorophenol from aqueous solutions by xad-4 resin: Isotherm, kinetic, and thermodynamic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilgili, M. Sinan

    2006-01-01

    Removal of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) from synthetic aqueous solutions through adsorption on Amberlite XAD-4 resin, a non-ionic macroreticular resins, under batch equilibrium experimental conditions at 298, 308 and 318 K was investigated. It is necessary to propose a suitable model to a better understanding on the mechanism of 4-CP adsorption. For this purpose, Langmiur, Freundlich, Toth, and Redlich-Peterson (RP) isotherm models were compared. The two and three parameters in the adopted adsorption isotherm models were determined by the help of MATLAB package program. It was determined that best fitted adsorption isotherm models were obtained to be in the order: Redlich-Peterson > Langmuir > Toth > Freundlich isotherms. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided the best correlation to the experimental results. Results of the intra-particle diffusion model show that the pore diffusion is not the only rate limiting step. The lower correlation of the data to the Bangham's equation also represents that the diffusion of the adsorbate into pores of the sorbent is not the only rate-controlling step. The thermodynamic constants of adsorption phenomena; ΔG o , ΔH o , and ΔS o were found as -4.17 (at 298 K) kJ/mol, -42.01 kJ/mol, and -0.127 kJ/(mol K), respectively. The results showed that adsorption of 4-CP on Amberlite XAD-4, a nonionic polymeric resin was exothermic and spontaneous

  1. Formaldehyde condensation products of model phenols for conifer bark tannins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Hemingway; Gerald W. McGraw

    1978-01-01

    Gel permeation chromatography of the condensation products of phenols and formaldehyde proved effective in understanding the reactions of condensed tannins with formaldehyde. Rates of condensation of phloroglucinols, resorcinols, catechols, (+)catechins, and (-)epicatechin were examined to determine if methylol-tannins from southern pine bark could be prepared as resin...

  2. Non-destructive evaluation by terahertz spectroscopy for penetration of acid solutions into epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kusano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy resins are used as high-performance thermosetting linings to protect substrates under corrosive environments. However, in a severe corrosive chemical solution, such protective layers may degrade with long time due to penetrations of solvent and solute molecules into resin network. In this regard, the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS is a promising tool for non-destructive evaluation of the penetrant amounts due to high transparency of such plastic materials and high sensitivity to the molecular vibrations in terahertz spectral range. In this work, the complex refractive indexes n and κ of epoxy specimens were measured after immersion into sulfuric acid solutions and compared with penetrated mass fractions of water and acid ions. It was found that n and κ depended linearly with water and sulfuric acid mass fraction in specimens, and κ of sulfuric acid immersed specimens was lager at higher frequency. While the calculated Δκ agreed well with THz-TDS measurement by THz-TDS, the calculated Δn was higher than the measurement. The difference may be attributed to the water and sulfuric states in the specimen.

  3. Stability of the neurotensin receptor NTS1 free in detergent solution and immobilized to affinity resin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim F White

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Purification of recombinant membrane receptors is commonly achieved by use of an affinity tag followed by an additional chromatography step if required. This second step may exploit specific receptor properties such as ligand binding. However, the effects of multiple purification steps on protein yield and integrity are often poorly documented. We have previously reported a robust two-step purification procedure for the recombinant rat neurotensin receptor NTS1 to give milligram quantities of functional receptor protein. First, histidine-tagged receptors are enriched by immobilized metal affinity chromatography using Ni-NTA resin. Second, remaining contaminants in the Ni-NTA column eluate are removed by use of a subsequent neurotensin column yielding pure NTS1. Whilst the neurotensin column eluate contained functional receptor protein, we observed in the neurotensin column flow-through misfolded NTS1.To investigate the origin of the misfolded receptors, we estimated the amount of functional and misfolded NTS1 at each purification step by radio-ligand binding, densitometry of Coomassie stained SDS-gels, and protein content determination. First, we observed that correctly folded NTS1 suffers damage by exposure to detergent and various buffer compositions as seen by the loss of [(3H]neurotensin binding over time. Second, exposure to the neurotensin affinity resin generated additional misfolded receptor protein.Our data point towards two ways by which misfolded NTS1 may be generated: Damage by exposure to buffer components and by close contact of the receptor to the neurotensin affinity resin. Because NTS1 in detergent solution is stabilized by neurotensin, we speculate that the occurrence of aggregated receptor after contact with the neurotensin resin is the consequence of perturbations in the detergent belt surrounding the NTS1 transmembrane core. Both effects reduce the yield of functional receptor protein.

  4. Color stability of resin used for caries infiltration after exposure to different staining solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Ab; Caneppele, Tmf; Luz, M; Pucci, Cr; Torres, Crg

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE : The aim of this study was to investigate the staining behavior of demineralized enamel infiltrated by low-viscosity resin. METHODS AND MATERIALS : Bovine enamel/dentin cylindrical samples (3 × 2 mm) were assigned into four groups (n=45) according to the enamel treatment: sound enamel (control), demineralization + artificial saliva, demineralization + daily application of 0.05% NaF, demineralization + resin infiltration (Icon, DMG). Artificial white spot lesions were produced in groups with demineralization. After the treatments, color was assessed by spectrophotometry, using the CIE L*a*b* system. The specimens (n=15) were then immersed in deionized water, red wine, or coffee for 10 minutes daily for eight days. Color was measured again, and the specimens were repolished with sandpaper discs. The final color was assessed. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (α=0.05). A paired t-test was used for comparison between staining and repolishing conditions. RESULTS : There were significant differences for surface treatment and dye after staining and repolishing. Immersion in wine and coffee resulted in significantly increased color alteration (ΔE) compared with water (p=0.001). The resin-infiltrated group exhibited the highest staining values (p=0.001). The repolishing procedures resulted in significantly decreased color change. The exposure of specimens to colored solutions resulted in significant color alteration. The demineralized enamel treated with resin infiltration showed significantly higher staining than all other tested groups; however, the repolishing of the specimens minimized the staining effect.

  5. Influence of aging solutions on wear resistance and hardness of selected resin-based dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chladek, Grzegorz; Basa, Katarzyna; Żmudzki, Jarosław; Malara, Piotr; Nowak, Agnieszka J; Kasperski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different plasticizing aging solutions on wear resistance and hardness of selected universal resin-based dental composites. Three light cured (one nanofilled, two microhybride) and one hybride chemical cured composites were aged at 37 °C for 48 h in distillated water, ethyl alcohol solution or Listerine mouthwash. After aging the microhardness tests were carried out and then tribological tests were performed in the presence of aging solution at 37 °C. During wear testing coefficients of friction were determined. The maximal vertical loss in micrometers was determined with profilometer. Aging in all liquids resulted in a significant decrease in hardness of the test materials, with the largest values obtained successively in ethanol solution, mouthwash and water. The effect of the liquid was dependent on the particular material, but not the type of material (interpreted as the size of filler used). Introduction of mouthwash instead of water or ethanol solution resulted in a significant reduction in the coefficient of friction. The lowest wear resistance was registered after aging in ethanol and for the chemical cured hybrid composite, but the vertical loss was strongly material dependent. The effect of different aging solution, including commercial mouthrinse, on hardness and wear was material dependent, and cannot be deduced from their category or filler loading. There is no simple correlation between hardness of resin-based dental composites and their wear resistance, but softening of particular composites materials during aging leads to the reduction of its wear resistance.

  6. Influência da composição da resina tanino-uréia-formaldeído nas propriedades físicas e macânicas de chapas aglomeradas Influence of the composition of tannin-urea-formaldehyde resins in the in the physical and mechanicals properties of particleboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Gomes Gonçalves

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Na fabricação de aglomerados à base de madeira são utilizados adesivos sintéticos como melamina-formaldeído (MF, fenol-formaldeído (FF, uréia-formaldeído (UF, entre outros. Devido ao alto custo desses adesivos, pesquisas que visam a introdução de alterações nas suas formulações são importantes para a redução de custos no sistema produtivo. Desta forma, este trabalho teve como objetivo estudar a influência da adição de diferentes níveis de tanino de Acacia mearnsii em uma resina comercial à base de uréia-formaldeído nas propriedades físicas e mecânicas de chapas aglomeradas. As chapas aglomeradas foram confeccionadas com madeira de Eucalyptus urophylla. Foram avaliadas quatro composições de adesivo: T1 - 100% de resina UF (testemunha; (T2 90% de resina UF + 10% de tanino 50%; (T3 85% de resina UF + 15% de tanino 50% e (T4 70% de resina UF + 30% de tanino 50%. Através dos ensaios, conclui-se que é possível adicionar tanino à resina uréia-formaldeído sem com isso prejudicar as propriedades físicas e mecânicas das chapas.In the production of the wood base particleboards, synthetic adhesives are used as melamina-formaldehyde (MF, phenol-formaldehyde (FF, urea-formaldehyde (UF, among others. Due to the high cost of these adhesives, researches that a seek the introduction of alterations in their formulations are important for the reduction of costs in the productive system. This work had as objective verify the influence of the several levels of Acacia mearnsii tannin in a commercial resin of urea-formaldehyde an the physical and mechanical properties of the particleboard. The particleboard was produced with Eucalyptus urophylla wood. They were four treatments: T1 - 100% of resin UF (control; (T2 90% of the resin UF + 10% of the tannin 50%; (T3 85% of the resin UF + 15% of the tannin 50% and (T4 70% of the resin UF + 30% of the tannin 50%. The results showed that it is possible to add tannin to the resin urea-formaldehyde

  7. Activated Carbon by Co-pyrolysis and Steam Activation from Particle Board and Melamine Formaldehyde Resin: Production, Adsorption Properties and Techno Economic Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny Vanreppelen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the top strategic objectives and research areas in Europe is recovering wood from processing and end of life products. However, there are still several "contaminated" wood products that are not or only partly reused/recycled. Particle board waste which is contaminated with aminoplasts is one of these products. In addition, a considerable amount of aminoplast waste resinis produced for the production of particle board that cannot be re-used or recycled. The chemical properties of these wastes (high nitrogen content of 5.9 wt% and 54.1 wt% for particle board and melamine formaldehyde respectively make them ideal precursors for the production of nitrogenised activated carbon. The profitability of the produced activated carbon is investigated by calculating the net present value, the minimum selling price and performing a Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis. Encouraging results for a profitable production are obtained even though the current assumptions start from a rather pessimistic scenario.

  8. Melamine–Glyoxal–Glutaraldehyde Wood Panel Adhesives without Formaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuedong Xi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available (MGG’ resin adhesives for bonding wood panels were prepared by a single step procedure, namely reacting melamine with glyoxal and simultaneously with a much smaller proportion of glutaraldehyde. No formaldehyde was used. The inherent slow hardening of this resin was overcome by the addition of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone hydrogen sulphate ionic liquid as the adhesive hardener in the glue mix. The plywood strength results obtained were comparable with those obtained with melamine–formaldehyde resins pressed under the same conditions. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight (MALDI ToF and Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR analysis allowed the identification of the main oligomer species obtained and of the different types of linkages formed, as well as to indicate the multifaceted role of the ionic liquid. These resins are proposed as a suitable substitute for equivalent formaldehyde-based resins.

  9. Effect of five staining solutions on the colour stability of two acrylics and three composite resins based provisional restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, Sebnem Begüm; Koçak, Ayşe; Aktepe, Esra

    2006-09-01

    The effect of coffee, tea, coca-cola, orange-juice and red wine on the colour stability of acrylic and composite based provisional materials were evaluated. Two acrylic resins and three composite resins were studied. 48 standardized specimens for each provisional material were prepared. Each group was divided into 6 subgroups. Specimens from each group were immersed in staining solutions at room temperature for 30 days. Red wine and tea caused the most significant colour changes and orange juice showed the least significant colour changes. deltaE of all of the provisional restorations materials was changed after the immersion in all of the staining solutions during the experimental process.

  10. A review of the effects of formaldehyde release from endodontic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassiadis, B; George, G A; Abbott, P V; Wash, L J

    2015-09-01

    Formaldehyde is present in most living cells and the environment. In dentistry, patients may be exposed to formaldehyde through the use of several endodontic materials (e.g. AH 26) and during formocresol pulpotomies. This review outlines how the human body reacts to formaldehyde exposure, how recent data has relooked at the issue of carcinogenicity and leukaemia associated with formaldehyde, and whether it is possible to quantify the amount of formaldehyde produced by endodontic cements. The review analyses the way formaldehyde is produced from epoxy resins and addresses the question of whether the amount of formaldehyde from endodontic cements is large enough to override the body's ability to deal with its own endogenous levels of formaldehyde and should the amount of formaldehyde produced be a concern. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Adsorptive removal of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions using collagen-tannin resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Xia; Huang Xin [Department of Biomass Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Liao Xuepin, E-mail: xpliao@scu.edu.cn [Department of Biomass Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Technology of Leather Manufacture, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Shi Bi, E-mail: shibi@scu.edu.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Technology of Leather Manufacture, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2011-02-28

    The collagen-tannin resin (CTR), as a novel adsorbent, was prepared via a reaction of collagen with black wattle tannin and aldehyde, and its adsorption properties to Cu(II) were systematically investigated, including pH effect, adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics, and column adsorption. The adsorption capacity of Cu(II) on CTR was pH-dependent, and it increased with the increase of solution pH. The adsorption isotherms were well described by Langmuir isotherm model with correlating constant (R{sup 2}) higher than 0.99. The adsorption capacity determined at 303 K was high up to 0.26 mmol/g, which was close to the value (0.266 mmol/g) estimated from Langmuir equation. The adsorption capacity was increased with the increase of temperature, and thermodynamic calculations suggested that the adsorption of Cu(II) on CTR is an endothermic process. The adsorption kinetics were well fitted by the pseudo-second-order rate model. Further column studies suggested that CTR was effective for the removal of Cu(II) from solutions, and more than 99% of Cu(II) was desorbed from column using 0.1 mol/L HNO{sub 3} solution. The CTR column can be reused to adsorb Cu(II) without any loss of adsorption capacity.

  12. Comparative study of sorption and solubility of heat-cure and self-cure acrylic resins in different solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Rajesh; Kotian, Ravindra; Madhyastha, Prashanthi; Srikant, N

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the sorption and solubility of heat-cure and self-cure acrylic resins in different solutions. One heat-cure acrylic resin (Trevalon) and one self-cure acrylic resin (Rapid Repair) were studied. Five groups of square-shaped specimens (20 mm × 20 mm × 2 mm) were prepared for each acrylic resin and then immersed in five solutions: distilled water, artificial saliva, denture cleansing solution, distilled water, and denture cleaning solution for 12 h alternatively, artificial saliva and denture cleaning solution for 12 h alternatively at 37 ± 2°C, and tested sorption and solubility by weight gain/loss method, respectively, after 1, 6, and 11 weeks. The data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance followed by post hoc Tukey's test. Water sorption mean values varied from 17.5 ± 0.88 to 27.25 ± 1.04 μg/mm 3 for heat cure and from 12.75 ± 0.55 to 19.75 ± 1.04 μg/mm 3 for self-cure in the different solutions after different interval periods of 1, 6, and 11 weeks. These values were statistically significant (Psolubility mean values varied from 0.25 ± 0.55 to 1.5 ± 0.55 μg/mm 3 for heat cure and from 1.5 ± 0.55 to 6.5 ± 0.55 μg/mm 3 for self-cure in the different solutions after different interval periods of 1, 6, and 11 weeks. These values were statistically not significant (P > 0.05). There was no linear correlation between sorption and solubility values. Overall, analysis of results showed the maximum sorption value in denture cleansing solution followed by alternative soaking in distilled water and artificial saliva. Least sorption was observed with artificial saliva followed by distilled water. Both heat-cure and self-cure acrylic resins showed varying water sorption and solubility. The results of both water sorption and solubility showed compliance with the International Standards Organization specification. No correlation was found between water sorption and solubility. Artificial saliva solution is a

  13. Lead and copper removal from aqueous solutions using carbon foam derived from phenol resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Gu; Jeon, Jun-Woo; Hwang, Min-Jin; Ahn, Kyu-Hong; Park, Chanhyuk; Choi, Jae-Woo; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2015-07-01

    Phenolic resin-based carbon foam was prepared as an adsorbent for removing heavy metals from aqueous solutions. The surface of the produced carbon foam had a well-developed open cell structure and the specific surface area according to the BET model was 458.59m(2)g(-1). Batch experiments showed that removal ratio increased in the order of copper (19.83%), zinc (34.35%), cadmium (59.82%), and lead (73.99%) in mixed solutions with the same initial concentration (50mgL(-1)). The results indicated that the Sips isotherm model was the most suitable for describing the experimental data of lead and copper. The maximum adsorption capacity of lead and copper determined to Sips model were 491mgg(-1) and 247mgg(-1). The obtained pore diffusion coefficients for lead and copper were found to be 1.02×10(-6) and 2.42×10(-7)m(2)s(-1), respectively. Post-sorption characteristics indicated that surface precipitation was the primary mechanism of lead and copper removal by the carbon foam, while the functional groups on the surface of the foam did not affect metal adsorption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Separation of Technetium in Nitric Acid Solution With an Extractant Impregnated Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jei Kwon Moon; Eil Hee Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Byung Chul Lee

    2006-01-01

    An extractant impregnated resin (EIR) was prepared by impregnation of Aliquat 336 into Amberlite XAD-4 for separation of technetium from rhodium in nitric acid solution. The prepared EIR showed high preference for rhenium (chemical analogue of technetium) over rhodium. The adsorption isotherms for rhenium were described well by Langmuir equation in both the single and multi-component systems. Maximum adsorption capacities obtained by modelling the isotherms of rhenium were 2.01 meq g -1 and 1.97 meq g -1 for the single and the multi-component systems, respectively. Column tests were also performed to confirm the separation efficiency of rhenium using a jacketed glass column (diam. 11 x L 150). The EIR column showed successful separation of rhenium with the breakthrough volume of about 122 BV for the breakthrough concentration of 0.08. Also the breakthrough data were modelled successfully by assuming a homogeneous diffusion model in the particle phase. The diffusivities obtained from the modelling were in the order of 10 -7 cm 2 min -1 for a rhenium. The rhenium adsorbed on the bed could be eluted with a high purity by using a nitric acid solution. (authors)

  15. Denaturation and electrophoresis of RNA with formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, Donald C

    2015-02-02

    Electrophoretic size fractionation can be used to denature and separate large mRNA molecules (0.5-10 kb) on formaldehyde-containing agarose gels. Formaldehyde contains a carbonyl group that reacts to form Schiff bases with the imino or amino groups of guanine, adenine, and cytosine. These covalent adducts prevent normal base pairing and maintain the RNA in a denatured state. Because these adducts are unstable, formaldehyde must be present in the gel to maintain the RNA in the denatured state. This protocol describes the preparation of an agarose gel with formaldehyde and its setup in a horizontal electrophoresis apparatus. RNA samples are prepared and denatured in a solution of formamide and formaldehyde and, with 0.5- to 10-kb size markers, subjected to electrophoresis through the gel. Following electrophoresis, the gel is stained to visualize RNA markers or rRNA using one of several different types of stains. © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Formaldehyde exposure and patterns of concomitant contact allergy to formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundov, Michael D; Johansen, Jeanne D; Carlsen, Berit C

    2010-01-01

    Formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasers are widely used in consumer products and may often cause contact allergy.......Formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasers are widely used in consumer products and may often cause contact allergy....

  17. Fast kinetic and efficient removal of As(V) from aqueous solution using anion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donia, Ahmed M.; Atia, Asem A.; Mabrouk, Dalia H.

    2011-01-01

    Glycidyl methacrylate/methelenebisacrylamide resin with immobilized tetraethylenepentamine ligand was prepared. This pentamine containing resin was transformed to two anion exchange resins through treatment by glycidyl trimethylammonium chloride to give (RI) or hydrochloric acid giving (RII). The resins were used to adsorb As(V) at different experimental conditions using batch and column methods. Kinetics and thermodynamic properties as well as the mechanism of interaction between As(V) and resin active sites were discussed. The maximum adsorption capacities of As(V) on RI and RII were found to be 1.83 and 1.12 mmol/g, respectively. The regeneration and the durability of the loaded resin towards the successive reuse were also investigated.

  18. Adsorption of uranium(VI) from sulphate solutions using Amberlite IRA-402 resin: Equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solgy, Mostafa; Taghizadeh, Majid; Ghoddocynejad, Davood

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Adsorption of uranium from sulphate solutions by an anion exchange resin. • The effects of pH, contact time and adsorbent dosage were investigated. • The adsorption equilibrium is well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. • The adsorption kinetics can be predicted by the pseudo second-order model. • The adsorption is a physical, spontaneous and endothermic process. - Abstract: In the present study, adsorption of uranium from sulphate solutions was evaluated using Amberlite IRA-402 resin. The variation of adsorption process was investigated in batch sorption mode. The parameters studied were pH, contact time and adsorbent dosage. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were used in order to present a mathematical description of the equilibrium data at three different temperatures (25 °C, 35 °C and 45 °C). The final results confirmed that the equilibrium data tend to follow Freundlich isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity of Amberlite IRA-402 for uranium(VI) was evaluated to be 213 mg/g for the Langmuir model at 25 °C. The adsorption of uranium on the mentioned anion exchange resin was found to follow the pseudo-second order kinetic model, indicating that chemical adsorption was the rate limiting-step. The values of thermodynamic parameters proved that adsorption process of uranium onto Amberlite IRA-402 resin could be considered endothermic (ΔH > 0) and spontaneous (ΔG < 0)

  19. A thermodynamic and kinetic study of trace iron removal from aqueous cobalt sulfate solutions using Monophos resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangxin; Zhao, Yunchao; Yang, Bin; Song, Yongfa

    2018-01-01

    High purity cobalt has many important applications, such as magnetic recording media, magnetic recording heads, optoelectronic devices, magnetic sensors, and integrated circuits, etc. To produce 5N or higher purity cobalt in an electro-refining process, one of the challenges is to effectively reduce the Fe content of aqueous cobalt salt solution before electrolysis. This paper describes thermodynamic and kinetic investigations of the Fe adsorption process of a new sulfonated monophosphonic resin with the trade mark Monophos. Five cobalt sulfate solutions of different Co concentrations were prepared. Fe ions were removed from the solutions by ion exchange method using Monophos resin. Chemical analysis was carried out using a Perkin Elmer ICP-OES. The initial Fe concentrations of about 0.9-2.0 mg/L can be reduced to about 0.3-0.8 mg/L, which is equivalent to an Fe removal rate of 60-67%. The Langmuir isothermal adsorption model applies well to the Fe removal process. A second-order type based on McKay equation fits better with experimental data than other kinetic models. The kinetic curve can be divided into two sections. For t 30 min. Monophos resin is effective for the removal of trace Fe from cobalt sulfate solution. This ion exchange process obeys the Langmuir isothermal adsorption model and the McKay equation of second-order kinetics.

  20. Adsorptive recovery of UO2(2+) from aqueous solutions using collagen-tannin resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xia; Huang, Xin; Liao, Xue-pin; Shi, Bi

    2010-07-15

    Collagen-tannin resin (CTR), as a novel adsorbent, was prepared via reaction of collagen with black wattle tannin and aldehyde, and its adsorption properties to UO(2)(2+) were investigated in detail, including pH effect, adsorption kinetics, adsorption equilibrium and column adsorption kinetics. The adsorption of UO(2)(2+) on CTR was pH-dependent, and the optimal pH range was 5.0-6.0. CTR exhibited excellent adsorption capacity to UO(2)(2+). For instance, the adsorption capacity obtained at 303 K and pH 6.0 was as high as 0.91 mmol UO(2)(2+)/g when the initial concentration of UO(2)(2+) was 1.0 mmol/L. In kinetics studies, the adsorption equilibrium can be reached within 300 min, and the experimental data were well fitted by the pseudo-second-order rate model, and the equilibrium adsorption capacities calculated by the model were almost the same as those determined by experiments. The adsorption isotherms could be well described by the Freundlich equation with the correlation coefficients (R(2)) higher than 0.99, the adsorption behaviors of UO(2)(2+) on CTR column were investigated as well. Present study suggested that the CTR can be used for the adsorptive recovery of UO(2)(2+) from aqueous solutions. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Resin bead-thermal ionization mass spectrometry for determination of plutonium concentration in irradiated fuel dissolver solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Sumana; Shah, R.V.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Pandey, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Determination of isotopic composition (IC) and concentration of plutonium (Pu) is necessary at various stages of nuclear fuel cycle which involves analysis of complex matrices like dissolver solution of irradiated fuel, nuclear waste stream etc. Mass spectrometry, e.g. thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are commonly used for determination of IC and concentration of plutonium. However, to circumvent matrix interferences, efficient separation as well as preconcentration of Pu is required prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Purification steps employing ion-exchange resins are widely used for the separation of Pu from dissolver solution or from mixture of other actinides e.g. U, Am. However, an alternative way is to selectively preconcentrate Pu on a resin bead, followed by direct loading of the bead on the filament of thermal ionization mass spectrometer

  2. The combined effect of food-simulating solutions, brushing and staining on color stability of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tânia Mara Da; Sales, Ana Luísa Leme Simões; Pucci, Cesar Rogerio; Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of food-simulating media associated with brushing and coffee staining on color stability of different composite resins. Materials and methods: Eighty specimens were prepared for each composite: Grandio SO (Voco), Amaris (Voco), Filtek Z350XT (3M/ESPE), Filtek P90 (3M/ESPE). They were divided into four groups according to food-simulating media for 7 days: artificial saliva (control), heptane, citric acid and ethanol. The composite surface was submitted to 10,950 brushing cycles (200 g load) in an automatic toothbrushing machine. The specimens were darkened with coffee solution at 37 °C for 24 h. After each treatment, color measurements were assessed by spectrophotometry, using CIE L*a*b* system. The overall color change (Δ E ) was determined for each specimen at baseline ( C 1) and after the treatments (food-simulating media immersion/ C 2, brushing/ C 3 and dye solution/ C 4). Data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's tests ( p Grandio (3.75) bc , P90 (3.36) c . According to food-simulating media: heptane (4.41) a , citric acid (4.24) a , ethanol (4.02) ab , artificial saliva (3.76) b . For the treatments: dye solution (4.53) a , brushing (4.26) a , after food-simulating media (3.52) b . Conclusions: The composite resin Filtek Z350XT showed significantly higher staining than all other composite resin tested. The immersion in heptane and citric acid produced the highest color alteration than other food-simulating media. The exposure of samples to brushing protocols and darkening in coffee solution resulted in significant color alteration of the composite resins.

  3. Selective Adsorption of Ag+ on a New Cyanuric-Thiosemicarbazide Chelating Resin with High Capacity from Acid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Lin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A new cyanuric-thiosemicarbazid (TSC-CC chelating resin was synthesized and employed to selectively adsorb Ag+ from acid solutions. The effects of acid concentration, initial concentration of Ag+, contact time and coexisting ions were investigated. The optimal acid concentration was 0.5 mol/L. The adsorption capacity of Ag+ reached 872.63 mg/g at acid concentration of 0.5 mol/L. The adsorption isotherm was fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model and the kinetic data preferably followed the pseudo-second order model. The chelating resin showed a good selectivity for the Ag+ adsorption from acid solutions. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS were used to study the adsorption mechanism. The chelating and ionic interaction was mainly adsorption mechanism. The adsorbent presents a great potential in selective recovery Ag+ from acid solutions due to the advantage of high adsorption capacity and adapting strongly acidic condition. The recyclability indicated that the (TSC-CC resin had a good stability and can be recycled as a promising agent for removal of Ag+.

  4. Effectiveness of various methods of formaldehyde neutralization using monoethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskey, Andrew; Gest, Thomas R

    2015-05-01

    Formaldehyde is the most commonly used fixative chemical for the preservation of human cadavers used for educational purposes in the United States. Formaldehyde is also a known carcinogenic agent whose exposure level is regulated by guidelines of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Various methods for formaldehyde neutralization exist, yet many donations programs do not take any steps to neutralize the formaldehyde in embalmed donor bodies. The effectiveness of monoethanolamine (MEA) in neutralizing formaldehyde is well documented when used as a final injection during embalming. The purpose of this study is to report the effectiveness of several post-embalming techniques of formaldehyde neutralization. Twenty-four donor bodies were assigned to four experimental groups of six. For the three experimental groups, the techniques tested involve delivery of a 20:1 dilution of deionized water:MEA via recannulization and gravity flow infusion, compartment injection, and alternate wetting solution containing four percent MEA. Our results indicated that spray bottle delivery was not effective in neutralization of formaldehyde compared to the control group, but that formaldehyde levels decreased when recannulization or compartment injection were used. The most effective method of formaldehyde neutralization was compartment injection of MEA solution (P embalming, compartment injection of MEA solution is an effective method of formaldehyde neutralization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Formaldehyde: a candidate toxic air contaminant. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frye, B.; Parker, T.

    1988-03-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a gas widely used in adhesives and resins, textiles, embalming fluids, fungicides, air fresheners, and cosmetics. It is directly emitted into the ambient outdoor air from vehicular and stationary sources, and is also produced in the atmosphere from other substances by photochemical smog processes. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has determined that there is sufficient evidence for carcinogenicity of formaldehyde to animals, and limited evidence for carcinogenicity to humans. EPA classifies formaldehyde as a probable human carcinogen with a one in a million risk concentration of 0.08 ppb.

  6. Nitrogen-Enriched Fe3O4@Carbon Nanospheres Derived from Fe3O4@3-Aminophenol/Formaldehyde Resin Nanospheres Based on a Facile Hydrothermal Strategy: Towards a Robust Catalyst Scaffold for Platinum Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kesong; Guo, Wanchun; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Xu, Zhaopeng; Jiao, Jiao; Jia, Yin; Li, Ruifei; Wang, Haiyan

    2015-12-01

    Robust nitrogen-enriched Fe3O4@carbon nanospheres have been fabricated as a catalyst scaffold for Pt nanoparticles. In this work, core-shell Fe3O4@3-aminophenol/formaldehyde (APF) nanocomposites were first synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method, and subsequently carbonized to Fe3O4@N-Carbon nanospheres for in situ growth of Pt nanocrystals. Abundant amine groups were distributed uniformly onto Fe3O4@N-Carbon nanospheres, which not only improved the dispersity and stability of the Pt nanocrystals, but also endowed the Pt-based catalysts with good compatibility in organic solvents. The dense three-dimensional cross-linked carbon shell protects the Fe3O4 cores against damage from harsh chemical environments, even in aqueous HCl (up to 1.0 M) or NaOH (up to 1.0 M) solutions under ultrasonication for 24 hours, which indicates that it can be used as a robust catalyst scaffold. In the reduction of nitrobenzene compounds, the Fe3O4@N-Carbon@Pt nanocatalysts show outstanding catalytic activity, stability, and recoverability. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Sorption of Uranium Ions from Their Aqueous Solution by Resins Containing Nanomagnetite Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud O. Abd El-Magied

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic amine resins composed of nanomagnetite (Fe3O4 core and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA/N,N′-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA shell were prepared by suspension polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate with N,N′-methylenebisacrylamide in the presence of nanomagnetite particles and immobilized with different amine ligands. These resins showed good magnetic properties and could be easily retrieved from their suspensions using an external magnetic field. Adsorption behaviors of uranium ions on the prepared resins were studied. Maximum sorption capacities of uranium ions on R-1 and R-2 were found to be 92 and 158 mg/g. Uranium was extracted successfully from three granite samples collected from Gabal Gattar pluton, North Eastern Desert, Egypt. The studied resins showed good durability and regeneration using HNO3.

  8. Comparison of physical and mechanical properties of microwave-polymerized acrylic resin after disinfection in sodium hypochlorite solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; Davi, Letícia Resende; Peracini, Amanda; Soares, Rafael Bellini; Lovato, Cláudia Helena da Silva; Souza, Raphael Freitas de

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the color stability, surface roughness and flexural strength of a microwave-polymerized acrylic resin after immersion in sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), simulating 20 min of disinfection daily during 180 days. Forty disk-shaped (15 x 4 mm) and 40 rectangular (65 x 10 x 3 mm) specimens were prepared with a microwave-polymerized acrylic resin (Onda-Cryl). Specimens were immersed in either 0.5% NaOCl, 1% NaOCl, Clorox/Calgon and distilled water (control). Color measurements were determined by a portable colorimeter. Three parallel lines, separated by 1.0 mm, were registered on each specimen before and after immersion procedures to analyze the surface roughness. The flexural strength was measured using a 3-point bending test in a universal testing machine with a 50 kgf load cell and a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). There was no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) among the solutions for color, surface roughness and flexural strength. It may be concluded that immersion in NaOCl solutions simulating short-term daily use during 180 days did not influence the color stability, surface roughness and flexural strength of a microwave-polymerized acrylic resin.

  9. Adsorption of beta-naphthalenesulfonic acid/sulfuric acid from their solution by weakly basic resin: equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-Hai; Si, Peng-Fei

    2005-01-01

    Experiments for single and bisolute competitive adsorption were carried out to investigate the adsorption behavior of beta-naphthalenesulfonic acid (NSA) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) from their solution at 25 degrees C onto weakly basic resin D301R. Adsorption affinity of sulfuric acid on D301R was found to be much higher than that of NSA. The data of single-solute adsorption were fitted to the Langmuir model and the Freundlich adsorption model. The ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) coupled with the single-solute adsorption models were used to predict the bisolute competitive adsorption equilibria. The IAST coupled with the Langmuir and the Freundlich model for sulfuric acid and NSA, respectively, yields the favorable representation of the bisolute competitive adsorption behavior.

  10. (core) and phenol–formaldehyde resin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    materials is that magnetic properties and electrical resis- tivity are isotropic in the bulk, whereas they may be ... agent. The enhancement of the oxidation resistance of car- bonyl iron by polyaniline coating and its ..... in FePFRT1−3 composite essentially affect electric, magnetic and mechanical properties. The morphology of ...

  11. Towards reinforcement solutions for urban fibre/fabric waste using bio-based biodegradable resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Pramod; Hermes, Alina; Bapeer, Solaf; Luiken, Anton; Bouwhuis, Gerrit; Brinks, Ger

    2017-10-01

    The main research question is how to systematically define and characterize urban textile waste and how to effectively utilise it to produce reinforcement(s) with selected bio-based biodegradable resin(s). Several composite samples have been produced utilising predominantly natural and predominantly synthetic fibres by combining loose fibres with PLA, nonwoven fabric with PLA, woven fabric with PLA, two-layer composite & four-layer composite samples. Physio-chemical characterisations according to the established standards have been conducted. The present work is a step toward the circular economy and closing the loop in textile value chain.

  12. Formaldehyde in Our Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojanlatva, Ansa; Weeks, Charlie A.

    During the energy crisis of the early 1970s, there was a drive to conserve energy in every segment of society. Citizens were encouraged to insulate their homes and tighten them up to avoid loss of energy. One of the products to emerge from this crisis was urea formaldehyde foam insulation. (Urea formaldehyde is a well-known agent for preserving…

  13. The formaldehyde dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salthammer, Tunga

    2015-06-01

    The IARC's 2004 classification of formaldehyde as a human carcinogen has led to intensive discussion on scientific and regulatory levels. In June 2014, the European Union followed and classified formaldehyde as a cause of cancer. This automatically triggers consequences in terms of emission minimization and the health-related assessment of building and consumer products. On the other hand, authorities are demanding and authorizing technologies and products which can release significant quantities of formaldehyde into the atmosphere. In the outdoor environment, this particularly applies to combusting fuels. The formation of formaldehyde through photochemical smog has also been a recognized problem for years. Indoors there are various processes which can contribute to increased formaldehyde concentrations. Overall, legislation faces a dilemma: primary sources are often over-regulated while a lack of consideration of secondary sources negates the regulations' effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of submersion denture base acrylic resin in a betel leaf ekstract solution against growth Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Izham

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Denture base is a protesa which replace some or all of the lost original teeth and surrounding tissues. The Pupose of making protesa is for restore the function, appearance, comfort and impaired health result lost teeth. One part of the denture base is base plate. Microorganisms are often found in the oral cavity is Candida albicans (C.albicans approximately 40% in the oral cavity.C.albicans can penetrate the acrylic resin that can infect the soft tissue and is the cause of denture stomatitis therefore the disinfection of denture base is a important factor that must be done. In general betel leaves contant up to 4.2% essential oil compounds and phenyl propanoid and tannin. These compounds is a antimicroba and antifungal which can inhibit the growth of several type of bacteria among others Escherichia coli, Salmonella sp, Staphylococcus aurens, Klebstella, Pasteurella and can turn off the C.albicans. The purpose of the research is to determine how the effect of submersion denture base acrylic resin in a betel leaf ekstract solution against growth C.albicans.Type of research is an experimental laboratory with a longitudinal design (follow-up study. The sampling method used is total sampling. The results showed that the number of C.albicans colonies n denture base acrylic resin which soaked betel leaf extract solution that the dilution 10-1  with consentration 2.5% total colony count is 2 and the results 2.0 x 101 CFU/ml, on a control solution that the dilution 10-2 total colony 355 and the result 3.55 x 104 CFU/ml, that the dilution  10-3 total colony 62 and the result 6.2 x 104 CFU/ml.

  15. Influence of staining solutions and whitening procedures on discoloration of hybrid composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Lassila, Lippo; Hatem, Marwa; Shembesh, Muneim; Baady, Lugane; Salim, Ziad; Vallittu, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the color stability and water uptake of two hybrid composite resins polymerized in two different conditions after exposure to commonly consumed beverages. In addition, the effect of repolishing and bleaching on the stained composite was evaluated. Eighty specimens (12 mm × 12 mm × 3 mm) were made from two hybrid composite resins of shade A2. Forty specimens of each composite were divided into two groups (n = 20 per each) according to the curing method used (hand light cure HLC or oven light cure OLC). Then each group (HLC or OLC) was sub-divided randomly into four sub-groups (n = 5), which were immersed for 60 days in different beverages (distal water, coffee, tea and pepsi) and incubated at 37°C. Water uptake was measured during this time and followed by measurement of color difference (ΔE) by using a spectrophotometer. After complete staining, repolishing (grit 4000 FEPA at 300 rpm under water) and bleaching (40% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel) were conducted. The repolished and bleached specimens were submitted to new color measurements. Color value of the specimens immersed in tea displayed the highest statistically significant (p composite resins, both the bleaching and repolishing were able to reduce the ΔE value. All beverages used affected the color stability of tested composite resins. The effect of beverages on color change of composites depends on type of beverage and water uptake value of resins used. A superior whitening effect was obtained with repolishing technique compared to bleaching.

  16. The combined effect of food-simulating solutions, brushing and staining on color stability of composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tânia Mara Da; Sales, Ana Luísa Leme Simões; Pucci, Cesar Rogerio; Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study evaluated the effect of food-simulating media associated with brushing and coffee staining on color stability of different composite resins. Materials and methods: Eighty specimens were prepared for each composite: Grandio SO (Voco), Amaris (Voco), Filtek Z350XT (3M/ESPE), Filtek P90 (3M/ESPE). They were divided into four groups according to food-simulating media for 7 days: artificial saliva (control), heptane, citric acid and ethanol. The composite surface was submitted to 10,950 brushing cycles (200 g load) in an automatic toothbrushing machine. The specimens were darkened with coffee solution at 37 °C for 24 h. After each treatment, color measurements were assessed by spectrophotometry, using CIE L*a*b* system. The overall color change (ΔE) was determined for each specimen at baseline (C1) and after the treatments (food-simulating media immersion/C2, brushing/C3 and dye solution/C4). Data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey’s tests (p composites (p = .001), time (p = .001) and chemical degradation (p = .002). The mean of ΔE for composites were: Z350XT (5.39)a, Amaris (3.89)b, Grandio (3.75)bc, P90 (3.36)c. According to food-simulating media: heptane (4.41)a, citric acid (4.24)a, ethanol (4.02)ab, artificial saliva (3.76)b. For the treatments: dye solution (4.53)a, brushing (4.26)a, after food-simulating media (3.52)b. Conclusions: The composite resin Filtek Z350XT showed significantly higher staining than all other composite resin tested. The immersion in heptane and citric acid produced the highest color alteration than other food-simulating media. The exposure of samples to brushing protocols and darkening in coffee solution resulted in significant color alteration of the composite resins. PMID:28642926

  17. Roughness comparison of heat cured type of acrylic resin in disinfectant solution immersion (Immersion in a solution of alkaline peroxide and 75% Celery extract (Apium graveolens L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Puspitasari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Acrylic resin denture base has the properties absorbing that affecting physical and mechanical properties. One of the physical properties of acrylic resin is surface roughness. The aim of the study was to find out the roughness effect on heat cured acrylic that was immersed in alkaline peroxide and 75% celery (Apium graveoens L extract as a disinfectant solution. The study was a true experimental and posttest with control group designed with a rectangular shape size 65 x 10 x 3.3 mm based on the ISO standard 1567, six samples were used for alkaline peroxide, celery extract 75% and aquadest group for 5 and 15 days. A Surface Roughness Tester was used for the surface roughness changes observation. The statistical test used One-way ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni. The results of this study showed the value of roughness on 5 days for alkaline peroxide (1.51 µm is greater than celery extract (0.36µm and aquadest (0.30 µm. The soaking for 15 days in alkaline peroxide (1.52 µm is greater than 75% celery extracts (0.38 µm and aquadest (0.34 µm. Alkaline peroxide caused higher roughness value of heat cured acrylic resin than 75% celery extract.

  18. Radiation thermal transformations of formaldehyde in alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetrov, V.S.; Korolev, V.M.; Koroleva, G.N.; Likholap, V.F.; Khomich, F.G.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of acid and reactor gamma radiation on the interaction of formaldehyde and methanol has been studied. The radiation-thermal investigations were carried out in the range of temperatures from 150 to 230 deg C. A dose rate of n,γ-radiation amounted to 2.4x10 17 eV (gxs). From the data obtained it is concluded that the 0.01-0.1 M formic acid addition and irradiation of the methanol-formaldehyde mixture result in a substantial increase in formaldehyde consumption, the acid addition increasing the rate of formaldehyde consumption in about two times; the n,γ-radiation effect is much powerful. The rate of methylal formation increases in the presence of acid and at the temperature rise; its maximum is formed in the range of 180-190 deg C. The methyl formiate formation increases with the acid addition and temperature rise. It is concluded that radiolytic protons can accelerate methylal formation from methanol-formaldehyde solutions. The temperature rise results in the concentration increase in a free form of formaldehyde and the formation of methylal and methyl formiate

  19. Effect of modification with nitrocellulose and phenol formaldehyde ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-05-16

    May 16, 2006 ... Processability characteristics and physico-mechanical properties of natural rubber modified with cashew nut shell liquid and cashew nut shell liquid formaldehyde resin. Eur. Poly. J. 38: 163-168. Waldie JM (1983), Oil and Colour Chemists' Association of Association of Australia. Surface Coatings, Vol.1: ...

  20. The microcapsule-type formaldehyde scavenger: the preparation and the application in urea-formaldehyde adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongyun; Qiu, Teng; Guo, Longhai; Ye, Jun; Li, Xiaoyu

    2015-08-15

    The limitation and regulation of formaldehyde emissions (FE) now shows great importance in wood-based materials such as plywood and particle board manufactured for building and furnishing materials. The widely used formaldehyde-based adhesives are one of the main sources of FE from the wood products. In this work, a new kind of long-term effective formaldehyde scavenger in the microcapsule form was prepared by using an intra-liquid desiccation method. The characterizations of the capsule (UC) were performed including the morphologies, the yields, the loading efficiency as well as its sustained-release of urea in aqueous conditions. The prepared UC could be integrated in urea-formaldehyde resins by simply physical blending, and the mixtures were available to be applied as the adhesives for the manufacture of plywood. The bonding strength (BS) and the FE of the bonded plywood in both short (3h) and long (12 week) period were evaluated in detail. It was found that the FE profile of the plywood behaved following a duple exponential law within 12 week. The addition of UC in the adhesive can effectively depress the FE of the plywood not only in a short period after preparation but also in a long-term period during its practical application. The slow released urea would continuously suppress the emission of toxic formaldehyde in a sustained manner without obviously deteriorating on the BS of the adhesives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Formaldehyde-releasers : relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Contact allergy to formaldehyde and inventory of formaldehyde-releasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Anton C.; Flyvholm, Mari-ann; Lensen, Gerda; Menne, Torkil; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan

    2009-01-01

    This is one of series of review articles on formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasers (others: formaldehyde in cosmetics, in clothes and in metalworking fluids and miscellaneous). Thirty-five chemicals were identified as being formaldehyde-releasers. Although a further seven are listed in the

  2. Structure and distribution of cross-links in boron-modified phenol-formaldehyde resins designed for soft magnetic composites: a multiple-quantum 11B-11B MAS NMR correlation spectroscopy study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kobera, Libor; Czernek, Jiří; Strečková, M.; Urbanová, Martina; Abbrent, Sabina; Brus, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 14 (2015), s. 4874-4881 ISSN 0024-9297 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14010 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) COST Action MP1202 HINT Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : phenol-formaldehyde polymers * boron crosslinks * soft magnetic composites Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.554, year: 2015

  3. Evaluation of ion exchange resins for iron control in copper electro-winning solutions; Evaluacion de resinas de intercambio ionico para el control de hierro en soluciones de electro-obtencion de cobre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parada, F.; Dreisinger, D.; Wilkomirsky, I.

    2010-07-01

    Two commercial resins were evaluated for the extraction of iron from a copper electrowinning solution. Both resins efficiently extract iron. The Mono phosphonic resin has a greater charge capacity than the Diphonix resin and the Diphonix resin shows faster kinetics. Experimental results of the interrupted test and tests with different particle size of resins have demonstrated that extraction kinetics is controlled by diffusion into the particle in both resins. A good agreement with Fick's model for diffusion inside the particles confirms the proposed mechanism. Finally, temperature favors the process kinetics and its effect on the diffusion coefficient follows Arrhenius law, obtaining a value of 4,89 kcal/mol for the Mono phosphonic resin and 4,94 kcal/mol for the Diphenox resin. The aforementioned values are close to typical values for the proposed diffusional control which are 6 to 10 kcal/mol. (Author)

  4. Occupational contact allergy to formaldehyde and formaldehyde releasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Kuuliala, O; Suuronen, K; Alanko, K

    2008-11-01

    Formaldehyde allergy is common and usually derives from formaldehyde-releasing biocides in cosmetic and other products. To analyse patterns of patch test reactions to formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasing compounds and the sources of sensitization. At the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, we screened the patch test files for allergic reactions to formaldehyde and 12 formaldehyde-releasing compounds. All patients with contact allergy to any of the substances were included, and their records were reviewed. Between January 2001 and May 2007, we had patch tested 81 patients with formaldehyde allergy and 18 with independent allergy to some formaldehyde releaser. Of the formaldehyde allergies, 60 were new sensitizations, 25 of which were considered to be occupational. The most common source of occupational sensitization was metalworking fluids followed by creams and related products. Exposure to formaldehyde-releasing preservatives in liquid soaps and other rinse-off products was common in both occupational and non-occupational cases. Reactions to formaldehyde-releasing compounds were seen in 79% of the formaldehyde-allergic patients. Occupational formaldehyde allergy was common and occurred in metalworkers, hairdressers, masseurs, and workers using protective creams, detergents, and liquid soaps. When compared with studies on general dermatological patients, contact allergy to formaldehyde releasers without formaldehyde allergy was rare.

  5. Distribution of 14 elements from two solutions simulating Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY (acid-dissolved sludge and acidified supernate) on four cation exchange resins and five anion exchange resins having different functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated a series of cation exchange and anion exchange resins for their ability to remove hazardous components from radioactive high-level waste (HLW). The anion exchangers were Reillex TM HPQ, a polyvinyl pyridine resin, and four strong-base polystyrene resins having trimethyl, tri ethyl, tri propyl, and tributyl amine as their respective functional groups. The cation exchange resins included Amberlyst TM 15 and Amberlyst tM XN-1010 with sulfonic acid functionality, Duolite TM C-467 with phosphonic acid functionality, and poly functional Diphonix TM with di phosphonic acid, sulfonic acid, and carboxylic acid functionalities. We measured the distributions of 14 elements on these resins from solutions simulating acid-dissolved sludge (pH 0.6) and acidified supernate (pH 3.5) from underground storage tank 102-SY at the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington, USA. To these simulants, we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y), actinides (U, Pu, and Am), and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr). For each of the 252 element/resin/solution combinations, distribution coefficients (Kds) were measured for dynamic contact periods of 30 minutes, 2 hours, and 6 hours to obtain information about sorption kinetics from these complex media. Because we measured the sorption of many different elements, the tabulated results indicate which unwanted elements are most likely to interfere with the sorption of elements of special interest. On the basis of these 756 measured Kd values, we conclude that some of the tested resins appear suitable for partitioning hazardous components from Hanford HLW. (author). 10 refs., 11 tabs

  6. Microfabricated Formaldehyde Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen C. Cheung

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is a volatile organic compound that is widely used in textiles, paper, wood composites, and household materials. Formaldehyde will continuously outgas from manufactured wood products such as furniture, with adverse health effects resulting from prolonged low-level exposure. New, microfabricated sensors for formaldehyde have been developed to meet the need for portable, low-power gas detection. This paper reviews recent work including silicon microhotplates for metal oxide-based detection, enzyme-based electrochemical sensors, and nanowire-based sensors. This paper also investigates the promise of polymer-based sensors for low-temperature, low-power operation.

  7. Formaldehyde Workshop Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the agenda for the Formaldehyde Workshop hosted by the Office of Research and Development's National Center for Environmental Assessments in cooperation with the IRIS Program. The workshop was held in April 2014

  8. Method of removing alkyl iodides or mixtures of iodine and alkyl iodides from a gas phase and an aqueous solution phase by utilizing ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Mizuuchi, Noboru; Yokoyama, Fumio.

    1967-01-01

    Alkyl iodides and mixtures of iodine and alkyl iodides are removed from a gas phase and an aquous solution phase by using solely an anion exchange resin containing a tertiary amine or together with an anion exchange resin containing quarternary ammonium compound. The resin containing the quarternary ammonium compound is employed mainly to remove iodine, and the resin containing the tertiary amine serves mainly to remove alkyl iodides. The method can be applied to collecting a majority of the methyl iodide as well as the radioactive iodine produced in the atmosphere of a reactor in case of a fuel accident. In embodiments, it is desirable to maintain the sufficient moisture content of the anion exchange resins at a sufficient moisture level so as not to reduce the migration speed of the iodine and alkyl iodides. The iodine and alkyl iodide can be produced with high efficiency and stability independently of the relative humidity of the gas phase. In examples, a solution which consists of 20.5 mg/l of iodine and 42.2mg/l of methyl iodide flew through a column of Amberite IRA-93 alone or blended with IRA-900 at a speed of 15 /hr. respectively. The resins were able to treat 400 times their equivalent in water. (Iwakiri, K.)

  9. Chromatographic analysis of the reaction of soy flour with formaldehyde and phenol for wood adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda F. Lorenz; Charles R. Frihart; James M. Wescott

    2007-01-01

    The desire to make more biobased and lower-cost bonded wood products has led to an interest in replacing some phenol and formaldehyde in wood adhesives with soybean flour. Improved knowledge of the soy protein properties is needed to relate resin chemistry to resin performance before and after wood bonding. To expose the soy protein’s functional groups, it...

  10. Effect of cleanser solutions on the color of acrylic resins associated with titanium and nickel-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena de Freitas Oliveira Paranhos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of cleanser solutions on the color of heat-polymerized acrylic resin (HPAR and on the brightness of dental alloys with 180 immersion trials. Disk-shaped specimens were made with I commercially pure titanium, II nickel-chromium-molybdenum-titanium, III nickel-chromium molybdenum, and IV nickel-chromium-molybdenum beryllium. Each cast disk was invested in the flasks, incorporating the metal disk into the HPAR. The specimens (n = 5 were then immersed in solutions containing: 0.05% sodium hypochlorite, 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate, 0.500 mg cetylpyridinium chloride, a citric acid tablet, one of two different sodium perborate/enzyme tablets, and water. The color measurements (∆E of the HPAR were determined by a colorimeter in accordance with the National Bureau of Standards. The surface brightness of the metal was visually examined for the presence of tarnish. The results (ANOVA; Tukey test-α = 0.05 show that there was a significant difference between the groups (p < 0.001 but not among the solutions (p = 0.273. The highest mean was obtained for group III (5.06, followed by group II (2.14. The lowest averages were obtained for groups I (1.33 and IV (1.35. The color changes in groups I, II and IV were slight but noticeable, and the color change was considerable for group III. The visual analysis showed that 0.05% sodium hypochlorite caused metallic brightness changes in groups II and IV. It can be concluded that the agents had the same effect on the color of the resin and that the metallic alloys are not resistant to the action of 0.05% sodium hypochlorite.

  11. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF INDUSTRIAL FORMALDEHYDE ABSORBERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WINKELMAN, JGM; SIJBRING, H; BEENACKERS, AACM; DEVRIES, ET

    1992-01-01

    The industrially important process of formaldehyde absorption in water constitutes a case of multicomponent mass transfer with multiple reactions and considerable heat effects. A stable solution algorithm is developed to simulate the performance of industrial absorbers for this process using a

  12. Application of Central Composite Design approach for removal of chromium (VI) from aqueous solution using weakly anionic resin: modeling, optimization, and study of interactive variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Shailendra; Gupta, S K; Dey, Apurba; Jha, M K; Bajpai, Vidushi; Joshi, Saurabh; Gupta, Arvind

    2012-08-15

    In this paper, response surface methodology (RSM) approach using Central Composite Design (CCD) is applied to develop mathematical model and optimize process parameters for Cr (VI) removal from aqueous streams using weakly anionic resin Amberlite IRA 96. The individual and combined effect of four process parameters, i.e. contact time, initial solution pH, initial Cr (VI) concentration and resin dose on Cr adsorption were studied. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed the relative significance of process parameters in removal process. Initial solution pH and resin dose were found to be more significant than contact time and initial Cr (VI) concentration. The second-order regression model was developed to predict the removal efficiency using Design Expert software. The optimal conditions to remove Cr from aqueous solution at constant temperature of 30°C and stirring speed of 250 rpm were found to be contact time 62.5 min, pH 1.96, initial Cr (VI) concentration 145.4 mg/L, and resin dose 8.51 g/L. At these conditions, high removal efficiency (93.26%) was achieved. FTIR and EDX analysis were conducted to interpret the functional groups involved during the Cr-resin interaction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sorption of plutonium and curium on ion exchange resins in mixed aqueous organic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidvogel, N.; Reitsamer, G.; Grass, F.

    1974-12-01

    The sorption of the sulfate and nitrate-complexes of the actinides Pu(III), Pu(IV), Pu(VI), Am(III) and Om(III) on the ion-exchange-resins Dowex 1X8 and Dowex 50 WX8 is investigated. The strong sorbability of these actinide ions in solvents with high content of alcohol is explained by the existence of anionic complexes like Pu(III) (SO 4 ) 2 - , Pu(IV) (SO 4 ) 3 2 - , Pu(VI)O 2 (SO 4 ) 2 2 - , Am(SO 4 ) 2 - respectively Am(NO 3 ) 4 - and Om(NO 3 ) 4 - . The taking of autoradiographs from the thin-layer chromatograms by the aid of a special device and the evaluation of the autoradiographs by a particular photodensitometer are described. The measurement of the radioactivity of the α-emitting nuclides Pu 239, Am 241 and Om 242 are done by liquid-scintillation spectrometry. (author)

  14. Study on Selective Removal of Impurity Iron from Leached Copper-Bearing Solution Using a Chelating Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubiao Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to selectively remove iron from copper laden solution after leaching but prior to electrowinning, equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic studies have been conducted on an a chelating resin of Rexp-501 at pH 1.0 and at various temperatures. Both Langmuir and Freundlich models were investigated, with the Langmuir model proving to be more suitable for fitting iron removal performance, with little influence from copper concentration. Compared with the pseudo first order kinetic model, the pseudo second order kinetic model fitted the dynamic adsorption process better, indicating a chemisorption mechanism. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR results indicated that C=O from carbonyl group played a key role in combining with iron and can be regenerated and reused. However, the C=O of the acylamino group combining with iron was not able to be released after oxalic acid was applied.

  15. PREPARATION, CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF ALKYL SUBSTITUTED PHENOLIC EPOXY RESIN

    OpenAIRE

    Jyoti Chaudhary*, Supriya Dadhich, Giriraj Tailor

    2017-01-01

    The present article deals with the synthesis of phenolic epoxy resin by the reaction of phenolic resin and epichlorohydrin. The synthesis of phenolic resin was carried out by using p-ethylphenol, formaldehyde and naphthol. The structures of phenolic and epoxy resins were confirmed by spectroscopic analysis. The synthesized epoxy resin showed solubility in polar solvents like DMF, dioxane, acetone, DMSO, THF, ethyl acetate, and chloroform. Thermal characterization of epoxy resin was monitored ...

  16. Preparation and Characterizations of Composite Material Based on Carbon Fiber and Two Thermoset Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Fouda Hany; Guo Lin; Elsharkawy Karim

    2017-01-01

    In the present investigation, we used two types of thermoset resins (epoxy resin and phenol formaldehyde resin) with carbon fiber (CF) to produce composite materials. CF/epoxy resin composite and CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite were fabricated and compared between their mechanical properties as compression, tension and flexural. it was found that mechanical properties of CF/epoxy composite higher than mechanical properties of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite such as flexural strength...

  17. Eerste inventarisatie alternatieven voor biociden met formaldehyde of formaldehyde releasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenbeek JJ; Janssen MPM; Scheepmaker JWA; MSP; M&V

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde is de werkzame stof in veel desinfecteer- en conserveringsmiddelen, maar deze stof is kankerverwekkend. Daarom zal formaldehyde naar verwachting per 1 januari 2016 op Europees niveau als zodanig worden geclassificeerd (carcinogeen 1B). Dit kan betekenen dat formaldehyde-houdende

  18. Effect of finishing and polishing on the color stability of a composite resin immersed in staining solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiara Justo Polli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the influence of finishing/polishing methods and staining solutions using different immersion periods on the color stability of a microhybrid composite resin. Materials and Methods: Ninety specimens were fabricated using a stainless steel mold and polyester strips. The samples were randomly divided into five groups according to the finishing and polishing performed: Control group (no surface treatment was performed, Diamond Pro group, Diamond burs group, Enhance group, and SiC paper group. After finishing and polishing, six samples from each group were immersed in coffee, red wine, or water for 30 days. The color measurements were obtained using digital photography before immersion and after 7, 15, and 30 days of immersion. The red, green, and blue values provided by the Adobe Photoshop software were converted into CIELab values. A three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test were used for statistical analysis (P ≤ 0.05. Results: The finishing and polishing methods, staining solutions, immersion times, and their interaction had statistically significant effects on the color change (P = 0.00. Coffee and red wine caused intense staining. Among the polishing methods, the highest color change value was observed in the control group (P < 0.05 and the Diamond Pro disks provided the most stain-resistant surfaces (P ≤ 0.05. Conclusion: The finishing and polishing method, staining solution, and immersion time influences the color stability. Finishing and polishing should be applied to obtain a more stain-resistant surface.

  19. Hypercrosslinked poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) resin as a specific polymeric adsorbent for purification of berberine hydrochloride from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yin; Cao, Ruofan; Wu, Xiaofei; Huang, Jianhan; Deng, Shuguang; Lu, Xiuyang

    2013-06-15

    A hypercrosslinked poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) resin (TEPA) was synthesized and characterized as a specific polymeric adsorbent for concentrating berberine hydrochloride from aqueous solutions. Three organic molecules of different sizes (2-naphthol, berberine hydrochloride, and Congo red) were used as target molecules to elucidate the molecular sieving effect of the TEPA adsorbent. Because the TEPA adsorbent has a pore structure consisting mainly of micropores and mesopores, the adsorption of 2-naphthol from aqueous solutions is very efficient due to the micropore filling effect. The adsorption of berberine hydrochloride mostly takes place in the mesopores as well as macropores, while the adsorption of Congo red mainly occurs in the macropores. The smaller adsorbate molecule (2-naphthol) reaches the adsorption equilibrium much faster than the larger ones (berberine hydrochloride and Congo red). An adsorption breakthrough experiment with an aqueous solution containing 2-naphthol and berberine hydrochloride demonstrated that the TEPA adsorbent could effectively remove 2-naphthol from berberine hydrochloride at 0-107 BV (bed volume, 1 BV=10 ml), and the berberine hydrochloride concentration was increased from 66.7% to 99.4%, suggesting that this polymeric adsorbent is promising for purifying berberine hydrochloride and similar alkaloids from herbal plant extracts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of brush type as a carrier of adhesive solutions and paper points as an adhesive-excess remover on the resin bond to root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Rodrigo O A; Lombardo, Geraldo H L; Michida, Silvia M A; Galhano, Graziela; Bottino, Marco Antônio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of the brush type as a carrier of priming adhesive solutions and the use of paper points as a remover of the excess of these solutions on the push-out bond strength of resin cement to bovine root dentin. The null hypotheses were that brush type and the use of paper points do not affect the bond strength. The canals of 80 single-root bovine roots (16 mm in length) were prepared at 12 mm using the preparation drill (FRC Postec Plus, Ivoclar). Half of each root was embedded in acrylic resin and the specimens were divided into 8 groups, considering the factors "brush type" (4 levels) and "paper point" (2 levels) (n = 10): Gr 1: small microbrush (Cavi-Tip, SDI); Gr 2: Microbrush (Dentsply); Gr 3: Endobrush (Bisco); Gr 4: conventional brush (Bisco); Gr 5: Cavi-Tip (SDI) + paper points; Gr 6: Microbrush (Dentsply) + paper points; Gr 7: Endobrush (Bisco) + paper points; Gr 8: conventional brush (Bisco) + paper points. The root dentin was treated with a multistep total-etch adhesive system (All Bond 2). The adhesive system was applied using each microbrush, with and without using paper points. One fiber post was molded with addition silicon and 80 posts were made of resin cement (Duolink). The resin posts were luted (Duolink resin cement), and the specimens were stored for 24 h in water at 37 degrees C. Each specimen was cut into 4 disk-shaped samples (1.8 mm in thickness), which were submitted to the push-out test. The brush type (p microbrush = endobrush = conventional brush) and the use of paper points (p = 0.0001) (with > without) influenced the bond strength significantly (two-way ANOVA). The null hypotheses were rejected. The smallest brush (Cavi-Tip) and the use of paper points significantly improved the resin bond to bovine root dentin.

  1. Effect of Buffers on Aqueous Solute-Exclusion Zones around Ion-Exchange Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian-ming; Wexler, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Interaction between charged surfaces in aqueous solution is a fundamental feature of colloid science. Theoretically, surface potential falls to half its value at a distance equal to a Debye length, which is typically on the order of tens to hundreds of nanometers. This potential prevents colloids from aggregating. On the other hand, long-range surface effects have been frequently reported. Here we report additional long-range effects. We find that charged latex particles in buffer solutions are uniformly excluded from several-hundred-micron-thick shells surrounding ion-exchange beads. Exclusion is observed whether the beads are charged similarly or oppositely to the particles. Hence, electrostatic interactions between bead and microsphere do not cause particle exclusion. Rather, exclusion may be the consequence of water molecules re-orienting to produce a more ordered structure, which then excludes the particles. PMID:19185312

  2. Thermal rearrangement of novolak resins used in microlithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Ricky; Zampini, Anthony; Monaghan, Michael J.; O'Leary, Michael J.; Cardin, William J.; Eugster, Timothy J.

    1995-06-01

    Changes in phenolic-formaldehyde resin properties are described in terms of thermal exposure. At high temperature, resin molecular weight, dissolution properties and chemical composition change depending on the presence or absence of monomers. Without monomer in the resin melt at 220 degree(s)C, resin molecular weight increases with a corresponding decrease in dissolution rate. In the presence of monomer, molecular weight generally decreases. Dissolution rate may fluctuate depending on the monomer mixture. Three,five- Xylenol and 2,3,5-trimethylphenol co-monomers induced the most extreme changes in resin properties with thermal treatment. Resin degradation-recombination processes suggest a classical Friedel-Craft rearrangement mechanism.

  3. Effect of experimental Ricinus communis solution for denture cleaning on the properties of acrylic resin teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Marina Xavier; Macedo, Ana Paula; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; Silva, Cláudia Helena Lovato da

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated Knoop hardness, surface roughness and color alteration of artificial teeth for dentures after immersion in water, 1% sodium hypochlorite and an experimental solution of 2% Ricinus communis (RC). Thirty specimens of Vipi, Biolux and Trilux were analyzed. Tests of Knoop hardness, surface roughness and color alteration were conducted immediately after specimen preparation (T0) and after two immersion protocols for 15 days (ΔT(15)) and 183 days (ΔT(183)). Data variation (ΔT) were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (pproperties. Both immersion protocols caused alterations on the analyzed properties.

  4. Plant-Scale Concentration Column Designs for SHINE Target Solution Utilizing AG 1 Anion Exchange Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Dominique C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, G. F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies (SHINE) in their efforts to develop SHINE, an accelerator-driven process that will utilize a uranyl-sulfate solution for the production of fission product Mo-99. An integral part of the process is the development of a column for the separation and recovery of Mo-99, followed by a concentration column to reduce the product volume from 15-25 L to <1 L. Argonne has collected data from batch studies and breakthrough column experiments to utilize the VERSE (Versatile Reaction Separation) simulation program (Purdue University) to design plant-scale product recovery and concentration processes.

  5. Resin bead U and PU analysis of WAK input solutions: a statistical summary of experiment No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayne, C.K.; Carter, J.A.; Smith, D.H.; Walker, R.L.

    1980-06-01

    A statistical analysis of the resin bead experimental data was made to identify sources of variations among the measurements of isotopic atom ratios and elemental concentrations of plutonium and uranium. Comparisons among treatment means of the analytical laboratory and the resin bead preparation methods are tabulated using Duncan's multiple range test.

  6. Removal of tartrazine from aqueous solutions by strongly basic polystyrene anion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzkiewicz, Monika; Hubicki, Zbigniew

    2009-05-30

    The removal of tartrazine from aqueous solutions onto the strongly basic polystyrene anion exchangers of type 1 (Amberlite IRA-900) and type 2 (Amberlite IRA-910) was investigated. The experimental data obtained at 100, 200, 300 and 500 mg/dm(3) initial concentrations at 20 degrees C were applied to the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and Weber-Morris kinetic models. The calculated sorption capacities (q(e,cal)) and the rate constant of the first order adsorption (k(1)) were determined. The pseudo-second order kinetic constants (k(2)) and capacities were calculated from the plots of t/q(t) vs. t, 1/q(t) vs. 1/t, 1/t vs. 1/q(t) and q(t)/t vs. q(t) for type 1, type 2, type 3 and type 4 of the pseudo-second order expression, respectively. The influence of phase contact time, solution pH and temperature on tartrazine removal was also discussed. The FTIR spectra of pure anion exchangers and those loaded with tartrazine were recorded, too.

  7. Utilization of m-Phenylenediamine-Furfural Resin for Removal of Cu(II from Aqueous Solution-A Thermodynamic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq S. Najim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available m-Phenylenediamine was condensed with furfural in absence of catalyst at room temperature. The produced m-phenylenediamine-furfural resin was used for the removal of Cu(II from aqueous solution. The pH for the optimum removal of Cu(II was 6. The negative values of Gibbs free energy at low concentration of Cu(II (20, 30 ppm indicative of the spontaneous adsorption process, while, at higher Cu(II concentration (40,50 ppm the positive and weak values of ∆G° indicate that the process is feasible but non spontaneous. The values of ∆H° were positive indicating that the sorption process is endothermic. On the other hand, the values of activation energy (Ea were inconsistent with the values of ∆H° both are positive and lie in the range of physisorption. The entropy ∆S° of the process was positive indicative of the randomness of the Cu(II ions at the solid / liquid interface. The values of sticking probability S* were less than one which indicate a preferable adsorption process and the mechanism is physisorption.

  8. Systematic studies of tannin–formaldehyde aerogels: preparation and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral-Labat, Gisele; Szczurek, Andrzej; Fierro, Vanessa; Pizzi, Antonio; Celzard, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Gelation of tannin–formaldehyde (TF) solutions was systematically investigated by changing pH and concentration of TF resin in water. In this way we constructed the TF phase diagram, from which chemical hydrogels could be described, and also synthesized thermoreversible tannin-based hydrogels. Conditions of non-gelation were also determined. Hydrogels were dried in supercritical CO 2 , leading to a broad range of TF aerogels. The latter were investigated for volume shrinkage, total porosity, micro-, meso- and macropore volumes, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area, microscopic texture, mechanical and thermal properties. All these properties are discussed in relation to each other, leading to an accurate and self-consistent description of these bioresource-based highly porous materials. The conditions for obtaining the highest BET surface area or mesopore volume were determined and explained in relation to the preparation conditions. The highest BET surface area, 880 m 2 g −1 , is remarkably high for organic aerogels derived from a natural resource. (paper)

  9. Systematic studies of tannin-formaldehyde aerogels: preparation and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral-Labat, Gisele; Szczurek, Andrzej; Fierro, Vanessa; Pizzi, Antonio; Celzard, Alain

    2013-02-01

    Gelation of tannin-formaldehyde (TF) solutions was systematically investigated by changing pH and concentration of TF resin in water. In this way we constructed the TF phase diagram, from which chemical hydrogels could be described, and also synthesized thermoreversible tannin-based hydrogels. Conditions of non-gelation were also determined. Hydrogels were dried in supercritical CO2, leading to a broad range of TF aerogels. The latter were investigated for volume shrinkage, total porosity, micro-, meso- and macropore volumes, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, microscopic texture, mechanical and thermal properties. All these properties are discussed in relation to each other, leading to an accurate and self-consistent description of these bioresource-based highly porous materials. The conditions for obtaining the highest BET surface area or mesopore volume were determined and explained in relation to the preparation conditions. The highest BET surface area, 880 m2 g-1, is remarkably high for organic aerogels derived from a natural resource.

  10. Poly(2-FurylMethylenesulfide as a Resin to Uptake of Metal Ions from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damasceno J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization of poly (2- furyl methylenesulfide -- POLYTHIOFURFURAL -- was performed in an 0.36 mol/L aqueous solution of furfuraldehyde, saturated by bubbling hydrogen sulfide for 2 h at different temperatures. The reaction product was thoroughly washed and dried at 40 °C under vacuum. Poly (2-furyl methylenesulfyde is a yellow powder with a rather unpleasant odor. The polythiofurfural obtained [ -CH(C4H3O-S-] is a furan with thiols end groups. These are active adsorption centers for metal ions. The polythiofurfural was soluble in acetone and chloroform and its yields attained 80%. Morphological analysis by Scanning Eletronic Microscopy indicates a regular and dense surface in an interesting spacial arrangement. Preliminary isotherms adsorption studies indicate specific affinity forNi (II and Co (II and different capacity adsorption, 0.022 and 0.045 mmol per gram, respectively.

  11. 1H and 13C-NMR studies on phenol-formaldehyde prepolymers for tannin-based adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald W. McGraw; Lawerence L. Lanucci; Seiji Ohara; Richard W. Hemingway

    1989-01-01

    The number average structure and the molecular weight distribution of phenol-formaldehyde prepolymers for use in synthesis of tannin-based adhesive resins were determined with 1H and 13C-NMR spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography of acetylated resins. These methods were used to determine differences in phenol-...

  12. Infrared spectroscopic monitoring of urea addition to oriented strandboard resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi-Leung So; Thomas L. Eberhardt; Ernest Hsu; Brian K. Via; Chung Y. Hse

    2007-01-01

    One of the variables in phenol formaldehyde adhesive resin formulation is the addition of urea, which allows the resin manufacturer to manipulate both product functionality and cost. Nitrogen content can be used as a measure of the level of urea addition because most of the nitrogen present is derived from urea added at the end of the preparation process. Nitrogen...

  13. Formaldehyde in reusable protective gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontén, Ann

    2006-05-01

    Due to the clinical findings in a single patient's case, formaldehyde was suspected to be present in clinically relevant levels in reusable protective gloves. Therefore, 9 types of gloves were investigated with the semi-quantitative chromotropic acid method. It was found that 6/9 gloves emitted some formaldehyde and that 4/9 gloves emitted > or =40 microg of formaldehyde. Most of the formaldehyde was found on the inside of the gloves. To get an indication of the clinical relevance, a comparison with a protective cream declared to contain the formaldehyde-releasing agent diazolidinyl urea was performed by comparing areas of gloves with areas of cream layers with thickness 1-2 mg/cm(2). It was found that the amounts of formaldehyde emitted from the gloves might be in the same range as emitted from a layer of cream.

  14. Resin technologies: construction and staining of resin TMA's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howat, William J; Wilson, Susan J

    2010-01-01

    The traditional formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, and therefore the tissue microarrays created from it, provide good morphology but with a compromised antigenicity when compared to frozen tissue. In contrast, while solving the issue of antigenicity, frozen tissue suffers from a lack of morphology. We have demonstrated that tissue microarrays constructed in glycol methacrylate resin, when combined with a cold acetone fixation step, have been able to combine the superior morphology of resin-embedded sections with the superior antigenicity of frozen tissue for prospectively collected material.

  15. Rapid synthesis of novel flowerlike K0.46Mn2O4(H2O)1.4 hierarchical architectures and their catalytic degradation of formaldehyde in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khalid Abdelazez Mohamed; Huang, Kaixun

    2014-04-01

    Novel flower-like birnessite type manganese oxide hierarchical architectures were hydrothermally synthesized from KMnO4 solution using sodium fluorite as a reductant in sulfuric acid medium at low temperature. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopes confirm that the composition of the as-fabricated product. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SA-ED), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm reveal that the as-synthesized sample exhibits a microsized flower-like crystal with dense nanoleaves standing on their surfaces, polycrystalline, monoclinic phase structure and high BET surface area. On the basis of time-dependent experimental results, a possible mechanism for the formation of flowerlike structures is speculated. Their capability of catalytic degradation of formaldehyde solution with oxygen air bubbles were studied by using an acetylacetone calorimetric spectra, total organic carbon (TOC) method and turnover number (TON). In addition, the birnessite nanoflower is stable during the reaction and can be used repeatedly.

  16. An eco-friendly synthesis, characterization, morphology and ion exchange properties of terpolymer resin derived from p-hydroxybenzaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti B. Patle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel chelating terpolymer resin has been synthesized through the terpolymerization of p-hydroxybenzaldehyde and biuret with formaldehyde (p-HBBF in 1:1:2 mol ratio using hydrochloric acid as a reaction medium by condensation technique. The synthesized terpolymer resin was characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. On basis of the spectral studies, the structure of the terpolymer resin was proposed. The physico-chemical parameters have been evaluated for the terpolymer resin. Non-aqueous conductometric titration was used to determine the average molecular weight and polydispersity of the p-HBBF terpolymer resin and the intrinsic viscosity was also determined. The semicrystalline nature of the synthesized terpolymer was established by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Terpolymer (p-HBBF synthesized is proved to be selective chelating ion exchange terpolymer resin for certain metals. Chelating ion exchange properties of this polymer was studied for Fe3+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, Ni2+ and Pb2+ ions. A batch equilibrium method was employed in the study of the selectivity of the distribution of a given metal ions between the polymer sample and a solution containing the metal ion. The morphology of the terpolymers was studied by scanning electron microscopy, showing amorphous nature of the resins therefore can be used as a selective ion-exchanger for certain metal ions.

  17. Effects of cryogenic temperature on the mechanical and failure characteristics of melamine-urea-formaldehyde adhesive plywood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Choi, Sung-Woong; Park, Doo-Hwan; Park, Seong-Bo; Kim, Seul-Kee; Park, Kwang-Jun; Lee, Jae-Myung

    2018-04-01

    The present study investigates the applicability of melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF) resin plywood in cryogenic applications, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) carrier insulation systems. Phenolic-formaldehyde (PF) resin plywood has been extensively used as a structural material in industrial applications. However, many shortcomings of PF resin plywood have been reported, and replacement of PF resin plywood with a new material is necessary to resolve these problems. MUF resin plywood has the advantages of short fabrication time, low veneer cost, and economic feasibility compared to PF resin plywood. However, the mechanical and failure characteristics of MUF resin plywood have not yet been investigated at low temperature ranges. For this reason, adapting MUF resin plywood for cryogenic applications has been difficult, despite the many strong points of the material in engineering aspects. In this study, the effects of cryogenic temperature and thermal treatment on the mechanical characteristics of MUF resin plywood are investigated. The performance of MUF resin plywood is compared with that of PF resin plywood to verify the applicability of the material for use as a structural material in LNG insulation systems. The results demonstrate that MUF resin plywood has mechanical properties comparable with those of PF resin plywood, even at cryogenic conditions.

  18. Primary Formation Path of Formaldehyde in Hydrothermal Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Satoshi

    2018-03-01

    Formaldehyde is abundant in the universe and one of the fundamental molecules for life. Hydrothermal vents produce a substantial amount of hydrogen molecules by serpentinization and promote reductive reactions of single carbon compounds. The abundance of formaldehyde is expected to be low due to the high Gibbs free energy in hydrothermal vents. We consider two competing formation pathways of formaldehyde: (1) the reduction of CO by H2 and (2) the reduction of HCOOH by H2 to form a methanediol, followed by the dehydration of the methanediol. We performed a number of quantum chemical simulations to examine the formation of formaldehyde in the gas phase as well as in aqueous solution. The energy barrier is significantly reduced by the catalytic effect of water molecules in aqueous solution and becomes lowest when a water cluster consisted of 5 water molecules catalyzes the reduction. The energy barrier to form a methanediol by the reduction of HCOOH is lower by 17.5 kcal/mol than that to form a formaldehyde by the reduction of CO. Considering the low energy barrier to dehydrate methanediol, the primary pathway to form formaldehyde in hydrothermal vents is concluded to be the reduction of HCOOH by H2, followed by the dehydration of methanediol.

  19. Vitrification of cesium-contaminated organic ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, T.N. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    Vitrification has been declared by the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Savannah River Site currently uses a sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from a wastewater solution created from the processing of nuclear fuel. This process has several disadvantages such as the formation of a benzene waste stream. It has been proposed to replace the precipitation process with an ion exchange process using a new resorcinol-formaldehyde resin developed by Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC). Preliminary tests, however, showed that problems such as crust formation and a reduced final glass wasteform exist when the resin is placed in the melter environment. The newly developed stirred melter could be capable of overcoming these problems. This research explored the operational feasibility of using the stirred tank melter to vitrify an organic ion exchange resin. Preliminary tests included crucible studies to determine the reducing potential of the resin and the extent of oxygen consuming reactions and oxygen transfer tests to approximate the extent of oxygen transfer into the molten glass using an impeller and a combination of the impeller and an external oxygen transfer system. These preliminary studies were used as a basis for the final test which was using the stirred tank melter to vitrify nonradioactive cesium loaded organic ion exchange resin. Results from this test included a cesium mass balance, a characterization of the semi-volatile organic compounds present in the off gas as products of incomplete combustion (PIC), a qualitative analysis of other volatile metals, and observations relating to the effect the resin had on the final redox state of the glass

  20. Vitrification of cesium-contaminated organic ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, Jr., Thomas N. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Vitrification has been declared by the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Savannah River Site currently uses a sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from a wastewater solution created from the processing of nuclear fuel. This process has several disadvantages such as the formation of a benzene waste stream. It has been proposed to replace the precipitation process with an ion exchange process using a new resorcinol-formaldehyde resin developed by Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC). Preliminary tests, however, showed that problems such as crust formation and a reduced final glass wasteform exist when the resin is placed in the melter environment. The newly developed stirred melter could be capable of overcoming these problems. This research explored the operational feasibility of using the stirred tank melter to vitrify an organic ion exchange resin. Preliminary tests included crucible studies to determine the reducing potential of the resin and the extent of oxygen consuming reactions and oxygen transfer tests to approximate the extent of oxygen transfer into the molten glass using an impeller and a combination of the impeller and an external oxygen transfer system. These preliminary studies were used as a basis for the final test which was using the stirred tank melter to vitrify nonradioactive cesium loaded organic ion exchange resin. Results from this test included a cesium mass balance, a characterization of the semi-volatile organic compounds present in the off gas as products of incomplete combustion (PIC), a qualitative analysis of other volatile metals, and observations relating to the effect the resin had on the final redox state of the glass.

  1. Analysis of the effects of stirring condition of separation of thorium in the elution process of monazite partial solution by solvent impregnated resin method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prassanti, R.; Putra, D. S.; Kusuma, B. P.; Nawawi, F. W.

    2018-01-01

    Monazite is a natural mineral which contains abundant valuable element such as Radioactive Element and Rare Earth Element(REE). In this experiment, it is proven that solution of residual Thorium Sulfate from Monazite mineral process, can be seperated selectively by using extracting method of Solvent Impregnated Resin(SIR), with the elutant solution HNO3. In the earlier process, Thorium solution is conditioned at PH 1 by using H2SO4. Then REE, Thorium and Uranium elements are seperated. This seperation is conducted by using adsorption method by Amberlite XAD-16 Resin, which has been impregnated by Tributhyl Phosphate extractant. It is continued with elution process, which is aimed to obtain Thorium solution of a higher level of concentration. This elution process is conducted by using HNO3, with the elution variables of the lenght of mixing and amount concentration elutant. Based on this experiment, SIR extracting method is able to dissolve Thorium solution until 63,2%grade and a higher level of %grade about 92,40%. It can be concluded that this SIR method can extracted Thorium elements selectively, improve extracting process recovery, and determine optimum stripping condition in the 45th minutes with elutant concentration of 1,0M HNO3.

  2. Emission of formaldehyde from furniture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Vibeke; Klinke, Helene B.; Funch, Lis Winther

    The emission of formaldehyde from 20 pieces of furniture, representing a variety of types, was measured in climate chambers. Most tests show low emissions but certain scenarios of furnishing, including furniture with large surface areas in relation to room volume can emit formaldehyde resulting...

  3. Possible mechanisms for the interaction of polymeric composite resins with Cu(II) ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zahhhar, A.A.; Abdel-Aziz, H.M.; Siyam, T.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction between the active groups of polymeric composite resins such as Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid)-ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid disodium salt P(AM-AA)EDTANa 2 , Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid)- montmorillonite P(AM-AA)-montmorillonite, and Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid)-potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate P(AM-AA)-KNiHCF, with copper sulfate as a test ion has been studied. The spectroscopic studies show that the mechanism of interaction between polymeric composite resins and copper sulfate is a bond formation between the active groups of polymeric chains and copper ion. The bond formation depends on nature of polymeric chains. It was also found that the amide groups form complexes with hydrated cations, while carboxylate group interact by ion exchange mechanism through complex formation. Montmorillonite and hexacyanoferrate of the resins interact with metal ions by ion exchange mechanism

  4. Effect of a surface sealant on the color stability of composite resins after immersion in staining solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, Lauana Borges; Barreto, Luma Franciélle Cabreira; Miotti, Leonardo Lamberti; Nicoloso, Gabriel Ferreira; Durand, Leticia Brandão

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of surface sealants on the color stability of 2 different composite resins after immersion in coffee. Four groups were created (n = 10): microhybrid composite, microhybrid with surface sealant, nanofilled composite, and nanofilled composite with surface sealant. Half of the specimens of each group were immersed in distilled water and half were immersed in coffee for 48 hours. Color was measured before and after immersion. Groups with surface sealants presented less color variation when compared with the groups without surface sealants. The nanofilled resin specimens presented the greatest color variation within the groups without sealant. The surface sealant positively influenced the color stability of composite resin specimens immersed in coffee. When surface sealant was not applied, the microhybrid specimens had better color stability than the nanofilled.

  5. Porphinogen Formation from the Co-Oligomerization of Formaldehyde and Pyrrole: Free Energy Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kua, Jeremy; Loli, Helen

    2017-10-26

    We have investigated the nonoxidative stepwise co-oligomerization of formaldehyde and pyrrole to form porphinogen using density functional theory calculations that include free energy corrections. While the addition of formaldehyde to the pyrrole nitrogen is kinetically favored, thermodynamics suggest that this reaction is reversible in aqueous solution. The more thermodynamically favorable addition of formaldehyde to the ortho-carbon of pyrrole begins a stepwise process, forming dipyrromethane via an azafulvene intermediate. Subsequent additions of formaldehyde and pyrrole lead to bilanes (linear tetrapyrroles), which favorably cyclize to form porphinogen. Porphinogen is a precursor to porphin, the simplest unsubstituted porphyrin that could have played a role in primitive metabolism at the origin of life.

  6. Preparation and Characterizations of Composite Material Based on Carbon Fiber and Two Thermoset Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouda Hany

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, we used two types of thermoset resins (epoxy resin and phenol formaldehyde resin with carbon fiber (CF to produce composite materials. CF/epoxy resin composite and CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite were fabricated and compared between their mechanical properties as compression, tension and flexural. it was found that mechanical properties of CF/epoxy composite higher than mechanical properties of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite such as flexural strength of CF/epoxy resin composite increased by 30 % than flexural strength of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite, tensile strength of CF/epoxy resin composite increased by 11.4 % than flexural strength of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin and axial compression strength of CF/epoxy resin composite increased by 14.5 % than flexural strength of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin.

  7. The effect of pheno-formaldehyde finishing on the properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined the effect of catalyst concentration, curing time and temperature on a phenolformaldehyde finished direct dyed cotton. The grey cotton fabric was desized, scoured, bleached and dyed with chlorazol D, a direct dye. Sample of the dyed cotton were subjected to resin finishing using phenol: formaldehyde.

  8. Effect of resin variables on the creep behavior of high density hardwood composite panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.C. Tang; Jianhua Pu; C.Y Hse

    1993-01-01

    The flexural creep behavior of oriented strandboards (OSB) fabricated with mixed high, density hardwood flakes was investigated. Three types of adhesives, liquid phenolic-formaldehyde (LPF), melamine modified urea-formaldehyde (MUF), and LPF (face)/MUF (core) were chosen in this investigation. The resin contents (RC) used were 3.5 percent and 5.0 percent. The flakes...

  9. Adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from chloride solutions obtained by leaching chlorinated spent automotive catalysts on ion-exchange resin Diaion WA21J

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Shaobo; Pan Tonglin; Liu Xinqiang; Yuan Lei; Wang Jinchao; Zhang Yongjian; Guo Zhanchen

    2010-01-01

    It was found that Rh, Pd and Pt contained in the spent ceramic automotive catalysts could be effectively extracted by dry chlorination with chlorine. In order to concentrate Rh(III) ions contained in the chloride solutions obtained, thermodynamic and kinetics studies for adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from the chloride solutions on an anionic exchange resin Diaion WA21J were carried out. Rh, Pd, Pt, Al, Fe, Si, Zn and Pb from the chloride solution could be adsorbed on the resin. The distribution coefficients (K d ) of Rh(III) decreased with the increase in initial Rh(III) concentration or in adsorption temperature. The isothermal adsorption of Rh(III) was found to fit Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich models under the adsorption conditions. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities Q max based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms were 6.39, 6.61 and 5.81 mg/g for temperatures 18, 28 and 40 deg. C, respectively. The apparent adsorption energy of Rh was about -7.6 kJ/mol and thus Rh(III) adsorption was a physical type. The experimental data obtained could be better simulated by pseudo-first-order kinetic model and the activation energy obtained was 6.54 J/mol. The adsorption rate of Rh(III) was controlled by intraparticle diffusion in most of time of adsorption process.

  10. EFFECT OF WOOD SPECIES USED FOR CORE LAYER ON SOME PROPERTIES OF OKUME PLYWOOD PANELS BONDED WITH MELAMINE-UREA FORMALDEHYDE (MUF ADHESIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Demirkır

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study; changes in some properties of the okume plywood panels when used alder and beech veneers in their core layers were investigated. Two types of melamine-urea formaldehyde (MUF resins having different free formaldehyde contents were used for bonding plywood panels manufactured from 2 mm thick veneers at industrial conditions. The formaldehyde emission values of plywood panels bonded with MÜF having higher free formaldehyde content were found to be higher than those of the panels bonded with other resin type. The highest formaldehyde emission value was found for the panels manufactured from okume veneers in all layers while the lowest value was determined from the panels include beech veneers in the core layer. The shear and bending strength values of the panels consisted of beech veneers in the core layer were found to be higher than those of the panels consisted of okume and alder veneers in the core layers.

  11. Evaluation of the physical, mechanical properties and formaldehyde emission of particleboard manufactured from waste stone pine (Pinus pinea L.) cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuksari, Umit; Ayrilmis, Nadir; Avci, Erkan; Koc, Enus

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate some physical/mechanical properties and formaldehyde emission of particleboard containing particles of waste stone pine cone at various usage ratios using urea-formaldehyde resin. Some physical (thickness swelling, water absorption), mechanical (modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture, internal bond strength) properties and formaldehyde emission of particleboards were evaluated. The addition of cone particle improved water resistance of the panels and greatly reduced their formaldehyde emissions. However, flexural properties and internal bond strength decreased with increasing cone particle content in the panel. The cone of the stone pine can be considered as an alternative to wood material in the manufacture of particleboard used in indoor environment due to lower thickness swelling, water absorption and formaldehyde emission.

  12. Preliminary study: Formaldehyde exposure in laboratories of Sharjah university in UAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hafiz Omer

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory technicians, students, and instructors are at high risk, because they deal with chemicals including formaldehyde. Thus, this preliminary study was conducted to measure the concentration of formaldehyde in the laboratories of the University of Sharjah in UAE. Thirty-two air samples were collected and analyzed for formaldehyde using National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) method 3500. In this method, formaldehyde reacts with chromotropic acid in the presence of sulfuric acid to form a colored solution. The absorbance of the colored solution is read in spectrophotometer at wavelength 580 nm and is proportional to the quantity of the formaldehyde in the solution. For the anatomy laboratory and in the presence of the covered cadaver, the mean concentration of formaldehyde was found to be 0.100 ppm with a range of 0.095-0.105 ppm. Whereas for the other laboratories, the highest mean concentration of formaldehyde was 0.024 ppm in the general microbiology laboratory and the lowest mean concentration of formaldehyde was 0.001 ppm in the environmental health laboratory. The 8-hour (time-weighted average) concentration of formaldehyde was found to be ranging between 0.0003 ppm in environmental health laboratory and 0.026 ppm in the anatomy laboratory. The highest level of concentration of formaldehyde in the presence of the covered cadaver in anatomy laboratory exceeded the recommended ceiling standard established by USA-NIOSH which is 0.1 ppm, but below the ceiling standard established by American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists which is 0.3 ppm. Thus, it is recommended that formaldehyde levels should be measured periodically specially during the dissection in the anatomy laboratory, and local exhaust ventilation system should be installed and personal protective equipment such as safety glass and gloves should be available and be used to prevent direct skin or eye contact.

  13. Radiation hardening lacquer binding agent based on a polyester resin with at least 3.5 double links pr. 1000 molecular weight units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crimlisk, D.J.; Wright, A.; Groves, T.E.

    1976-01-01

    The binding agent is suitable for hardening by electrons with an energy of between 100,000 and 500,000eV. It consists mainly of a solution of a polyester resin with at least 3.5 double links per 1000 mol, in an olefine-unsaturated monomer. The molecular weight of the polyester is between 800 and 1100 and the ratio of the number of double links in the monomer to that in the resin (degree of unsaturation) is in the range 0.75-2.0, or more specifically, between 1 and 1.5. Cellulose acetate/butyrate (CAB) and/or a butylated melamine/formaldehyde resin may be added to improve the surface properties. Likewise from 0.1 to 0.5% polyethylene wax may be added to give a better surface finish and hardness. (JIW)

  14. Protect Against Exposure on Formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formaldehyde is an important chemical used widely by industry to manufacture building materials and numerous household products. It is also a by-product of combustion and certain other natural processes.

  15. Absorption of formaldehyde in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkelman, Jozef Gerhardus Maria

    2003-01-01

    Deze dissertatie beschrijft theoretisch en experimenteel werk aan de absorptie van formaldehyde in water. Met resultaten hiervan zijn chemisch-technische modellen ontwikkeld voor de beschrijving en optimalisatie van industriële formaldehydeabsorbeurs. Deze samenvatting geeft eerst algemene

  16. The solution curing performance of high-ortho epoxy phenolic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Mingli; Yang, Kai; Ren, Dongxue; Diao, Quan; Cao, Jian; Liu, Hongyan; Yu, Muhuo

    2017-07-01

    The high-ortho epoxy phenolic fibers (HEPFs) were prepared by the crosslinking of as-spun filaments derived from melt-spinning of the epoxy novolac resins copolymerized among epichlorohydrin (ECH), phenol and formaldehyde, and cured in a combined solution of formaldehyde and hydrochloric acid with a different heating rate. The changes in functional groups, thermal performance and mechanical properties during the different heating rates in solution curing were characterized. The results show that a peak of thermal stability and mechanical properties can be obtained with increasing heating rate, and crosslinking structure and characteristic group have changed after the solution curing. The epoxy phenolic fibers show great potential in the application of elastic flame-resistant textiles, aero-composites and precursors for activated carbon fibers used in electronic devices.

  17. Monitoring of formaldehyde in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmat, J L; Meadows, G W

    1985-10-01

    Any one of several monitoring methods, depending on requirement and circumstance, can be used to measure employee exposure to formaldehyde. Ordinarily, monitoring at DuPont is performed by sampling with impingers containing 1% aqueous sodium bisulfite or with silica gel tubes. The collected formaldehyde is measured spectrophotometrically after reaction with chromotropic acid. Results from studies on a selected number of formaldehyde monitoring methods reveal that reliable methods are available for area and personnel monitoring over both short term and long term. Accurate results are obtained from short-term monitoring (15 min at 1 L/min) with impingers of formaldehyde concentrations as low as 0.14 ppm. The current studies show that long-term monitoring (8 hr at 0.5 L/min) can be performed accurately at concentrations as low as 0.05 ppm. Accurate results also are obtained from short-term monitoring (15 min at 500 mL/min) with silica gel tubes of concentrations as low as 0.11 ppm formaldehyde; the lower limit established in the current studies for long-term monitoring (8 hr at 30 mL/min) is 0.15 ppm. Passive monitors provide the most convenient means of obtaining 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) data. The Pro-Tek Formaldehyde Badge was demonstrated to reliably monitor formaldehyde concentrations varying from 0-0.5 ppm or 0-3 ppm. All of these methods satisfy the NIOSH criterion for acceptability that all results fall within +/- 25% of the true value at the 95% confidence level. Investigation of the Lion Formaldemeter disclosed that instantaneous and accurate (+/- 5%) measurement of formaldehyde in air can be made over a concentration range of 0.3-5 ppm in the absence of other substances that are oxidizable in its fuel cell detector.

  18. Comparing and Optimizing Nitrate Adsorption from Aqueous Solution Using Fe/Pt Bimetallic Nanoparticles and Anion Exchange Resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daud, M.; Khan, Z.; Ashgar, A.; Danish, M. I.; Qazi, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    This research work was carried out for the removal of nitrate from raw water for a drinking water supply. Nitrate is a widespread ground water contaminant. Methodology employed in this study included adsorption on metal based nanoparticles and ion exchange using anionic resins. Fe/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared in the laboratory, by the reduction of their respective salts using sodium borohydride. Scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectrometry, and X-ray florescence techniques were utilized for characterization of bimetallic Fe/Pt nanoparticles. Optimum dose, ph, temperature, and contact time were determined for removal through batch tests, both for metal based nanoparticles and anionic exchange resin. Adsorption data fitted well the Langmuir isotherm and conformed to the pseudo first-order kinetic model. Results indicated 97% reduction in nitrate by 0.25 mg/L of Fe/Pt nanoparticles at ph 7 and 83% reduction in nitrate was observed using 0.50 mg/L anionic exchange resins at ph 4 and contact time of one hour. Overall, Fe/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles demonstrated greater removal efficiency due to the small particle size, extremely large surface area (627 m 2 /g), and high adsorption capacity.

  19. Input to Resin Column Structural Analysis if Autocatalytic Resin Reaction Occurs in HB-Line Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallman, D.F.

    2001-07-10

    Solutions of plutonium in nitric acid are purified and concentrated using anion resin prior to precipitation. There have been instances of resin column explosions caused by autocatalytic reactions of anion resins in nitric acid within the DOE complex

  20. Removal of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution on Amberlite IRC 748 synthetic resin by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zhihui; Qi Tao; Qu Jingkui; Wang Lina; Chu Jinglong

    2009-01-01

    Experimental measurements have been made on the batch ion exchange of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution using cation exchanger of Amberlite IRC 748 as K + form. The ion exchange behavior of two alkaline-earth metals on the resin, depending on contact time, pH, temperature and resin dosage was studied. The adsorption isotherms were described by means of the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. For Ca(II) ion, the Langmuir model represented the adsorption process better than the Freundlich model. The maximum ion exchange capacity was found to be 47.21 mg g -1 for Ca(II) and 27.70 mg g -1 for Mg(II). The kinetic data were tested using Lagergren-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. Kinetic data correlated well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating that the chemical adsorption was the rate-limiting step. Various thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy (ΔG o ), enthalpy (ΔH o ) and entropy (ΔS o ) were also calculated. These parameters showed that the ion exchange of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. The activation energy of ion-exchange (E a ) was determined as 12.34 kJ mol -1 for Ca(II) and 9.865 kJ mol -1 for Mg(II) according to the Arrhenius equation.

  1. Preparation of a novel chloromethylated polystyrene-2-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole chelating resin and its adsorption properties and mechanism for separation and recovery of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huihua; Zheng, Jianjun; Wang, Hui; Wang, Jianxin; Song, Xiaoguang; Cao, Yanmei; Fang, Lei; Feng, Yuping; Xiong, Chunhua

    2017-10-01

    With an efficient methodology, a novel chloromethylated polystyrene-g-2-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole chelating resin (MTR resin) was prepared via a one-step reaction. The structure of MTR resin was characterized by elements analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. Meanwhile, the adsorption properties of the resin for Hg(II) were investigated by batch and column experiments. The results showed that the resin possessed much better adsorption capability for Hg(II) than for other metal ions. The statically and the dynamic saturated adsorption capacities were 343.8 mg/g and 475.1 mg/g. The adsorption kinetic and equilibrium data were well fitted to the second-order model and the Langmuir isotherm model, respectively. Desorption of mercury from the resin can be achieved using 30 mL of 2 mol/L HCl-5% thiourea solution with a desorption ratio of 92.3%. Compared with other absorbents, MTR resin was greatly conserve natural resources and reduce the cost.

  2. Modified ion exchange resins - synthesis and properties. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doescher, F.; Klein, J.; Pohl, F.; Widdecke, H.

    1982-01-22

    Sulfomethylated resins are prepared by polymer analogous reactions, starting from macroporous poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) matrices. Different reaction paths are discussed and used in the synthesis. Sulfomethylation can be achieved by reaction of a chloromethylated resin with dimethyl sulfide and sodium sulfonate or alternatively by oxidation of polymer-bound thiol groups. Both methods give high conversions as shown by IR spectra and titration of the sulfonic acid groups. Poly(1-(4-hydroxysulfomethylphenyl)ethylene) (3) is obtained by reaction of poly(1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylene) (2) resin with formaldehyde/sodium sulfonate. The thermal stability, catalytic activity, and ion exchange equilibria of the sulfomethylated resin are investigated.

  3. Removal of malathion from aqueous solution using De-Acidite FF-IP resin and determination by UPLC-MS/MS: equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naushad, Mu; Alothman, Z A; Khan, M R

    2013-10-15

    In the present study, De-Acidite FF-IP resin was used to remove a highly toxic and persistent organophosphorus pesticide (malathion) from the aqueous solution. Batch experiments were performed as a function of various experimental parameters such as effect of pH (2-10), contact time (10-120 min), resin dose (0.05-0.5 g), initial malathion concentration (0.5-2.5 µg mL(-1)) and temperature (25-65°C). The concentration of malathion was determined using a sensitive, selective and rapid ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method. The uptake rate of malathion on De-Acidite FF-IP resin was rapid and equilibrium established within 40 min. Kinetics studies showed better applicability for pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium data was fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and the isotherm constants were calculated for malathion. The values of thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0)) were computed from the Van't Hoff plot of lnKC vs. 1/T which showed that the adsorption of malathion was feasible, endothermic and spontaneous. The regeneration studies were carried out which demonstrated a decrease in the recovery of malathion from 95% to 68% after five consecutive cycles. Breakthrough and exhaustive capacities of malathion were found to be 1.25 mg g(-1) and 3.5 mg g(-1), respectively. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthesis, Characterization and Mechanical Evaluation of the Phenol-Formaldehyde Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Kaith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenol: formaldehyde ratio was varied in the synthesis of phenol- formaldehyde resin and used to prepare the composites. These composites were then evaluated for their mechanical strength on the basis of tensile strength, compressive strength and wear resistance. Composite with better strength was characterized by IR, SEM, XRD, TGA/DTA and further studies were carried out for its physico-chemical and mechanical properties like viscosity, modulus of rupture (MOR, modulus of elasticity (MOE and stress at the limit of proportionality (SP etc.

  5. Novel magnetic porous carbon spheres derived from chelating resin as a heterogeneous Fenton catalyst for the removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junjun; Zhou, Lincheng; Dan, Wenfeng; Zhang, He; Shao, Yanming; Bao, Chao; Jing, Lingyun

    2015-05-15

    Porous magnetic carbon spheres (MCS) were prepared from carbonized chelating resin composites derived from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-modified macroporous polystyrene (PS-EDTA) resin, and then loaded with iron composites via ion exchange. The resulting composites were characterized for this study using X-ray diffraction, MÖssbauer spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area method, scanning electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The porous magnetic carbon spheres were then used, in the existence of H2O2 and NH2OH, with a view to remove methylene blue from the aqueous solution by catalyze a heterogeneous Fenton reaction. Results indicated excellent removal rates and removal efficiency for this catalytic system. Optimal degradation was achieved (nearly 100% within 10 min) using initial concentrations of 5 mmol H2O2 L(-1), 2.5 mmol L(-1) NH2OH and 40 mg L(-1) methylene blue. The catalyst retained its activity after six reuses, indicating strong stability and reusability. Porosity of the catalyst contributed to its high activity, suggesting its potential application for the industrial treatment of wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Preparation of cross-linked magnetic chitosan-phenylthiourea resin for adsorption of Hg(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) ions from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, M; Abdel-Latif, D A

    2012-03-30

    In this study, cross-linked magnetic chitosan-phenylthiourea (CSTU) resin were prepared and characterized by means of FTIR, (1)H NMR, SEM high-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), magnetic properties and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The prepared resin were used to investigate the adsorption properties of Hg(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) metal ions in an aqueous solution. The extent of adsorption was investigated as a function of pH and the metal ion removal reached maximum at pH 5.0. Also, the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process were estimated. These data indicated that the adsorption process is exothermic and followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Equilibrium studies showed that the data of Hg(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) adsorption followed the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacities for Hg(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) were estimated to be 135 ± 3, 120 ± 1 and 52 ± 1 mg/g, which demonstrated the high adsorption efficiency of CSTU toward the studied metal ions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Formaldehyde stress responses in bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Houqian Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is the simplest of all aldehydes and is highly cytotoxic. Its use and associated dangers from environmental exposure have been well documented. Detoxification systems for formaldehyde are found throughout the biological world and they are especially important in methylotrophic bacteria, which generate this compound as part of their metabolism of methanol. Formaldehyde metabolizing systems can be divided into those dependent upon pterin cofactors, sugar phosphates and those dependent upon glutathione. The more prevalent thiol-dependent formaldehyde detoxification system is found in many bacterial pathogens, almost all of which do not metabolize methane or methanol. This review describes the endogenous and exogenous sources of formaldehyde, its toxic effects and mechanisms of detoxification. The methods of formaldehyde sensing are also described with a focus on the formaldehyde responsive transcription factors HxlR, FrmR and NmlR. Finally, the physiological relevance of detoxification systems for formaldehyde in bacterial pathogens is discussed.

  8. Composite panels made with biofiber or office wastepaper bonded with thermoplastic and/or thermosetting resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Muehl; Andrzej M. Krzysik; Poo Chow

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate two groups of composite panels made from two types of underutilized natural fiber sources, kenaf bast fiber and office wastepaper, for their suitability in composite panels. All panels were made with 5% thermosetting phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin and 1.5% wax. Also, an additional 10% polypropylene (PP) thermoplastic resin was...

  9. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-06-11

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.0 , which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590 PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590 PTF TEF RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  10. Quantitative determination of formaldehyde by spectrophotometry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Formaldehyde is a vastly used material in industry. Nowadays, it is proven that formaldehyde is toxic and carcinogenic. Thus providing a reliable method for its quantitative determination is very important. This study proposes a UV-Vis spectrophotometric based method for determination of formaldehyde. The method is ...

  11. Effect of urea formaldehyde viscosity on urea formaldehyde and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The melting point, refractive index, density and formaldehyde emission were found to increase with increase in UF viscosity while the dry time, moisture uptake and elongation at break were found to decrease with increase in viscosity. UF viscosity below 10.82 mPa.s was found to produce UF/UP copolymer composite which ...

  12. Formaldehyde in cosmetics in patch tested dermatitis patients with and without contact allergy to formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauksson, Inese; Pontén, Ann; Isaksson, Marléne; Hamada, Haneen; Engfeldt, Malin; Bruze, Magnus

    2016-03-01

    Formaldehyde is a well-known contact sensitizer. Formaldehyde releasers are widely used preservatives in cosmetics. To survey the release of formaldehyde in cosmetics brought by patients investigated because of suspected allergic contact dermatitis, to compare it with information given by the manufacturers on the packages, and to investigate whether formaldehyde-allergic patients are potentially exposed to more cosmetics releasing formaldehyde than dermatitis patients without contact allergy to formaldehyde. Cosmetics from 10 formaldehyde-allergic and 30 non-allergic patients (controls) matched for age and sex were investigated with the chromotropic acid spot test, which is a semiquantitative method measuring the release of formaldehyde. Formaldehyde was found in 58 of 245 (23.7%) products. Twenty-six of 126 (20.6%) leave-on products released formaldehyde, and 17 of 26 (65.4%) of these were not declared to contain formaldehyde or formaldehyde releasers. Among the rinse-off products, there were 32 of 119 (26.8%) formaldehyde-releasing products, and nine of 32 (28.0%) of these were not labelled as containing formaldehyde or formaldehyde releasers. Five of 10 formaldehyde-allergic patients brought leave-on products with ≥ 40 ppm formaldehyde, as compared with 4 of 30 in the control group (p = 0.029). Cosmetic products used by formaldehyde-allergic patients that are not declared to contain formaldehyde or formaldehyde-releasing preservatives should be analysed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Nanostructured gadolinium-doped ceria microsphere synthesis from ion exchange resin: Multi-scale in-situ studies of solid solution formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caisso, Marie [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR 5635 CNRS-ENSCM-UM2, CC047, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Lebreton, Florent; Horlait, Denis [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Picart, Sébastien [CEA, DEN, DRCP/SERA/LCAR, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Martin, Philippe M.; Bès, René [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC/LLCC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Renard, Catherine; Roussel, Pascal [Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide, UMR 8012 CNRS, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Lille BP 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Neuville, Daniel R. [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris-CNRS, Géochimie and Cosmochimie, 1 rue Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Dardenne, Kathy; Rothe, Jörg [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Delahaye, Thibaud, E-mail: thibaud.delahaye@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Ayral, André [Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR 5635 CNRS-ENSCM-UM2, CC047, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2014-10-15

    In the current nano-sized material revolution, the main limitations to a large-scale deployment of nanomaterials involve health concerns related to nano-dissemination via air. Developing new chemical routes benefiting from nano-size advantages while avoiding their hazards could overcome these limitations. Addressing this need, a chemical route leading to soft nano-particle agglomerates, i.e., macroscopic precursors presenting the ability to be decomposed into nano-sized materials, was developed and applied to Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2−δ}. Using cerium/gadolinium-loaded ion exchange resin, the Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2−δ} solid solution formation as a function of temperature was studied in-situ through X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Temperatures corresponding to the organic skeleton decomposition and to the mixed oxide crystallization were identified. An optimal heat treatment, leading to nanostructured soft agglomerates, was established. Microsphere processing capabilities were evaluated and particle size distribution measurements were recorded. A very low fracture strength was calculated, and a nanometric particle size distribution (170 nm) was determined. - Graphical abstract: The elaboration of micro-spherical precursors leading to the formation of nano-oxide soft agglomerates was studied and approved through the use of ion exchange resin loaded with cerium and gadolinium. The formation of the solid solution was followed through in-situ measurements such as XAS, XRD, Raman, TGA and DSC. Key temperatures were identified for the formation of the mixed-oxide. Following this study, the microstructure and particle size of oxide microspheres formed highlight the formation of soft nano-arrangments. - Highlights: • Soft microspherical agglomerates able to be decomposed into nano-sized materials. • In situ study of cerium/gadolinium-loaded ion exchange resin conversion in oxide. • In situ multi-scale study

  14. Mechanical and Physical Properties of Low Density Kenaf Core Particleboards Bonded with Different Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad Jani Saad; Izran Kamal

    2012-01-01

    Single layer kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) core particleboards bonded with urea formaldehyde (UF), phenol formaldehyde (PF) and polymeric 4,4-methyl phenylmethane di-isocyanate (PMDI) resins were manufactured. The boards were fabricated with three different densities i.e 350 kg/m3, 450 kg/m3 and 550 kg/m3. Each type of the resin used was sprayed at three different resin loadings on the kenaf core particles. The boards produced was evaluated for its modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticit...

  15. Competitive adsorption of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) ions from aqueous solution using triphosphate-crosslinked magnetic chitosan resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limin Zhou; Yuyan Jia; Juan Peng; Zhirong Liu; Essam Al-Zaini

    2014-01-01

    The triphosphate-crosslinked magnetic chitosan resins (TPP-MCR) with a diameter range of 200-350 nm were synthesized for the adsorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions from aqueous solutions. The adsorption experiments were conducted in both mono-component systems with pure actinide solution and bi-component systems with different U/Th mass ratios. The maximum adsorption capacities in mono-component systems determined by Langmuir model were 169.5 and 146.8 mg g -1 for U(VI) and Th(IV), respectively. In bi-component systems, U(VI) and Th(IV) adsorption capacities were reduced significantly, and the combined sorption capacities were substantially lower (almost halved) compared to those obtained by the addition of sorption capacities using mono-component solutions, indicating that U(VI) and Th(IV) compete for the same sorption sites. Adsorption-desorption experiments for five cycles illustrated the feasibility of the repeated use of TPP-MCR for the adsorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. (author)

  16. Left-handed helical polymer resin nanotubes prepared by using N-palmitoyl glucosamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangang; Li, Yi; Li, Baozong; Yang, Yonggang

    2017-12-20

    Although the preparation of single-handed helical inorganic and hybrid organic-inorganic nanotubes is well developed, approaches to the formation of single-handed organopolymeric nanotubes are limited. Here, left-handed helical m-phenylenediamine-formaldehyde resin and 3-aminophenol-formaldehyde resin nanotubes were prepared by using N-palmitoyl glucosamine that can self-assemble into left-handed twisted nanoribbons in a mixture of methanol and water. In the reaction mixture, the helical pitch of the nanoribbons decreased with increasing reaction time. The resin nanotubes were obtained after removing the N-palmitoyl glucosamine template, and circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the organopolymeric nanotubes had optical activity. Carbonaceous nanotubes were then prepared by carbonization of the 3-aminophenol-formaldehyde resin nanotubes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Formaldehyde monitor for automobile exhausts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    Device makes use of microwave spectral absorption in low-Q resonant Stark cell, and indications are that ultimate sensitivity of instrument is within 100 parts per billion of formaldehyde. Microwave source is very small and requires only six-volt dc bias for operation. Coarse tuning is accomplished mechanically and fine tuning by adjusting dc-bias voltage.

  18. Induction of formaldehyde contact sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Boman, A; Vølund, A

    1985-01-01

    , and formaldehyde 1% and 0.1% was used for challenge. The incidence of contact sensitivity depended on the intradermal, but not on the topical induction dose. Statistical analyses showed a non-monotonous (non-linear) dose response relationship. The estimated maximal sensitization rate in Copenhagen was 80% after...

  19. Recovery of gold with ion exchange resin from leaching solution by acidothioureation. Ion kokan jushiho ni yoru ryusan sansei chio nyoso kinshinshutsueki kara no kin no kaishu ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahiro, Y.; Ninae, M.; Kusaka, E.; Wakamatsu, T. (Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering); Horio, Y. (Yamaha Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-12-25

    Recovery of gold with ion exchange resin from leaching solution by acidothioureation, and elution of gold from ion exchange resin with gold were studied experimentally. As the result of batch adsorption experiments of Au(TU){sub 2}{sup +} into various kinds of ion exchange resins, strong acidic cation exchange resin was most suitable, and gold was fully adsorbed into such resin in the pH range from 1.2 to 2.0 without any effects of thiourea in the leaching solution on adsorption of gold. As the result of batch elution experiments in various kinds of eluates, copper was eluted in HNO{sub 3}(1 N) + H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(1wt%) elute, both iron and zinc in NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}(0.5 M) elute, and gold in Na{sub 2}S{sub 2} O{sub 3}(0.05 M) elute resulting in the recovery of gold. As the result of column elution experiments, Amberlite 200C was most effective among some ion exchangers used for recovery of Au(CS(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}){sub 2}{sup +}. 16 refs., 15 figs.

  20. Preformed amide-containing biopolymer for improving the environmental performance of synthesized urea–formaldehyde in agro-fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaf H. Basta; Houssni El-Saied; Jerrold E. Winandy; Ronald Sabo

    2011-01-01

    Investigations have continued for production high performance agro-based composites using environmentally acceptable approaches. This study examines the role of adding amide-containing biopolymers during synthesis of urea–formaldehyde (UF) on properties of adhesive produced, especially its adhesion potential. The environmental performance of UF-resin synthesized in the...

  1. Does occupational exposure to formaldehyde cause hematotoxicity and leukemia-specific chromosome changes in cultured myeloid progenitor cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Kenneth A; Gallagher, Alexa E; Dell, Linda D; Natelson, Ethan A; Boffetta, Paolo; Gentry, P Robinan

    2017-08-01

    Several cross-sectional studies of a single population of workers exposed to formaldehyde at one of two factories using or producing formaldehyde-melamine resins in China have concluded that formaldehyde exposure induces damage to hematopoietic cells that originate in the bone marrow. Moreover, the investigators interpret observed differences between groups as evidence that formaldehyde induces myeloid leukemias, although the mechanisms for inducing these diseases are not obvious and recently published scientific findings do not support causation. Our objective was to evaluate hematological parameters and aneuploidy in relation to quantitative exposure measures of formaldehyde. We obtained the study data for the original study (Zhang et al. 2010 ) and performed linear regression analyses. Results showed that differences in white blood cell, granulocyte, platelet, and red blood cell counts are not exposure dependent. Among formaldehyde-exposed workers, no association was observed between individual average formaldehyde exposure estimates and frequency of aneuploidy, suggested by the original study authors to be indicators of myeloid leukemia risk.

  2. Recovery of propylene glycol from dilute aqueous solutions via reversible reaction with aldehydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broekhuis, R.R.; Lynn, S.; King, C.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A means is proposed for separating propylene glycol and other compounds bearing multiple hydroxyl groups by reversible chemical reaction. Glycols react with aldehydes in cyclic acetalization reactions to form substituted dioxolanes. Propylene glycol reacts with formaldehyde and acetaldehyde to form 4-methyl-1,3-dioxolane and 2,4-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane. The reaction is catalyzed homogeneously by strong mineral acids or heterogeneously by cation exchange resins in the acid form. Separation processes utilizing this reaction would include an acetalization step, several distillative separation steps and finally a hydrolysis step in which the reaction is reversed. Both reaction steps must be forced to completion by removing the reaction product simultaneously. The equilibrium and kinetics of the reaction with formaldehyde were studied experimentally in systems catalyzed by Amberlite IR-120 ion exchange resin. A number of solvents were screened for their ability to extract 2,4-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane from aqueous solution. Aromatic hydrocarbons exhibited the highest distribution into the organic phase. To achieve an effective separation of propylene glycol from aqueous solution by combined reaction with formaldehyde and distillation, formaldehyde would have to be present in excess and would be difficult and costly to separate from the aqueous solution. In reactive distillation using acetaldehyde as a reactant this is not a problem. A large flow of acetaldehyde would be necessary to recover the propylene glycol sufficiently in a distillative process. In a process combining reaction and extraction into an organic solvent this problem is avoided. Process simulation indicates the energy input of such a process is less than half of the energy required in a triple-effect evaporation process. This benefit is offset by higher capital costs and increased complexity in the reaction/extraction process.

  3. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions by a selective impregnated resin containing carminic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl [Wastewater Division, Faculty of Health, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 319, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad, E-mail: ahoseinib@yahoo.com [Wastewater Division, Faculty of Health, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 319, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Engineering, Kashmar Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 161, Kashmar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, Seyyed-Hossein [Department of Engineering, Kashmar Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 161, Kashmar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kharghani, Keivan [Water Division, Department of Engineering, Torbat-e-Hydarieh Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 121, Torbat-e-Hydarieh (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarei, Hossein [Department of Engineering, Kashmar Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 161, Kashmar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastegar, Ayoob [Wastewater Division, Faculty of Health, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 319, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Engineering, Kashmar Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 161, Kashmar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • The objective of the study is to investigate the potential application of a selective EIR for sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. • The effects of several physiochemical parameters were investigated. • The sorption kinetics and sorption isotherms were used to explain the sorption mechanism. • The thermodynamic studies showed the feasibility of sorption process. • The EIR beads showed a great potential for effective removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. - Abstract: In this work, the removal of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solutions was studied by solid–liquid extraction using an advantageous extractant-impregnated resin (EIR) prepared by loading carminic acid (CA) onto Amberlite XAD-16 resin beads. Batch sorption experiments using CA/XAD-16 beads for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions were carried out as a function of several parameters, like equilibration time, metal ion concentration, etc. The equilibrium data obtained from the sorption experiments were adjusted to the Langmuir isotherm model and the calculated maximum sorption capacities in terms of monolayer sorption were in agreement with those obtained from the experiments. The experimental data on the sorption behavior of both metal ions onto the EIR beads fitted well in both Bangham and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models, indicating that the intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step. The thermodynamic studies at different temperatures revealed the feasibility and the spontaneous nature of the sorption process for both uranium and thorium ions.

  4. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions by a selective impregnated resin containing carminic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl; Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad; Hosseini, Seyyed-Hossein; Kharghani, Keivan; Zarei, Hossein; Rastegar, Ayoob

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The objective of the study is to investigate the potential application of a selective EIR for sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. • The effects of several physiochemical parameters were investigated. • The sorption kinetics and sorption isotherms were used to explain the sorption mechanism. • The thermodynamic studies showed the feasibility of sorption process. • The EIR beads showed a great potential for effective removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. - Abstract: In this work, the removal of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solutions was studied by solid–liquid extraction using an advantageous extractant-impregnated resin (EIR) prepared by loading carminic acid (CA) onto Amberlite XAD-16 resin beads. Batch sorption experiments using CA/XAD-16 beads for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions were carried out as a function of several parameters, like equilibration time, metal ion concentration, etc. The equilibrium data obtained from the sorption experiments were adjusted to the Langmuir isotherm model and the calculated maximum sorption capacities in terms of monolayer sorption were in agreement with those obtained from the experiments. The experimental data on the sorption behavior of both metal ions onto the EIR beads fitted well in both Bangham and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models, indicating that the intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step. The thermodynamic studies at different temperatures revealed the feasibility and the spontaneous nature of the sorption process for both uranium and thorium ions

  5. Alkyd-amino resins based on waste PET for coating applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torlakoglu, A.; Gueclue, G.

    2009-01-01

    Waste polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flakes were depolymerized by using propylene glycol (PG) in the presence of zinc acetate as catalyst. Glycolysis reaction products of waste PET obtained by using PET/glycol molar ratio 1/2. Two short oil alkyd resins of high acid values (30-40 mgKOH/g) were prepared from phthalic anhydride (PA), glycerin (G), coconut oil fatty acids (COFA) and glycolyzed products of waste PET (PET-based alkyd resins) or glycols (PG) (reference alkyd resins). These alkyd resins were blended with 30%, 40%, and 50% of a commercial urea-formaldehyde, melamine-formaldehyde and urea-formaldehyde/melamine-formaldehyde mixture (1/1 weight ratio) and heated at 140 deg. C. The physical and chemical properties such as drying time, hardness, abrasion resistance, adhesion strength, water resistance, alkaline resistance, acid resistance, gelation time, and thermal oxidative degradation resistance (with thermogravimetric analysis, TGA) of these alkyd-amino resins were investigated. The properties of the waste PET-based resins were found to be compatible with the properties of the reference resins

  6. Alkyd-amino resins based on waste PET for coating applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torlakoğlu, A; Güçlü, G

    2009-01-01

    Waste polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flakes were depolymerized by using propylene glycol (PG) in the presence of zinc acetate as catalyst. Glycolysis reaction products of waste PET obtained by using PET/glycol molar ratio 1/2. Two short oil alkyd resins of high acid values (30-40mgKOH/g) were prepared from phthalic anhydride (PA), glycerin (G), coconut oil fatty acids (COFA) and glycolyzed products of waste PET (PET-based alkyd resins) or glycols (PG) (reference alkyd resins). These alkyd resins were blended with 30%, 40%, and 50% of a commercial urea-formaldehyde, melamine-formaldehyde and urea-formaldehyde/melamine-formaldehyde mixture (1/1 weight ratio) and heated at 140 degrees C. The physical and chemical properties such as drying time, hardness, abrasion resistance, adhesion strength, water resistance, alkaline resistance, acid resistance, gelation time, and thermal oxidative degradation resistance (with thermogravimetric analysis, TGA) of these alkyd-amino resins were investigated. The properties of the waste PET-based resins were found to be compatible with the properties of the reference resins.

  7. A new airborne formaldehyde instrument: Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisco, T. F.; Bailey, S. A.; Swanson, A. K.; Wolfe, G. M., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    We present the operating principles of a new instrument designed for operation on small aircraft. The instrument uses a new non-resonant fluorescence technique to take advantage of compact industrial lasers to make a small, robust package that can measure formaldehyde at sensitivities better than 100 ppt in 1 second integration. The instrument is designed to fly on the Alphajet at NASA Ames but can be modified to fly on other small aircraft.

  8. Optimization of conditions for Cu(II) adsorption on D151 resin from aqueous solutions using response surface methodology and its mechanism study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Xiong, Chunhua; Liu, Fang; Zheng, Xuming; Jiang, Jianxiong; Zheng, Qunxiong; Yao, Caiping

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study on the removal of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions by D151 resin was carried out in a batch system. The response surface methodology (RSM)-guided optimization indicated that the optimal adsorption conditions are: temperature of 35 °C, pH of 5.38, and initial Cu(II) concentration of 0.36 mg/mL, and the predicted adsorption capacity from the model reached 328.3 mg/g. At optimum adsorption conditions, the adsorption capacity of Cu(II) was 321.6 mg/g, which obtained from real experiments what were in close agreement with the predicted value. The adsorption isotherms data fitted the Langmuir model well, and the correlation coefficient has been evaluated. The calculation data of thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔS, and ΔH) confirmed that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. The desorption study revealed that Cu(II) can be effectively eluted by 1 mol/l HCl solution, and the recovery was 100%. Moreover, the characterization was undertaken by infrared (IR) spectroscopy.

  9. A novel derivatization-free method of formaldehyde and propylene glycol determination in hydrogels by liquid chromatography with refractometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakau, Henadz; Robert, Marielle; Shingel, Kirill I

    2009-04-05

    The paper describes the development and validation of a new derivatization-free liquid chromatography method for simultaneous determination of propylene glycol and formaldehyde in the formulations containing formaldehyde-releasing preservative. Highly swollen hydrogel made of poly(ethylene glycol)-protein conjugates was taken as a model formulation for integration of the propylene glycol and the diazolydinyl urea as formaldehyde releaser. The method is shown to be simple and selective and, more importantly, allows determining an existing level of formaldehyde at the moment of analysis instead of all available formaldehyde that might be released during chemical derivatization. After liquid extraction the propylene glycol (PG) and formaldehyde (FA) amounts are determined chromatographically on a Shodex SH 1011 ligand-exchange column using 0.01 M sulfuric acid mobile phase, a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min and RI detection. The assay is validated showing good linearity, precision, and accuracy. The limits of detection of formaldehyde and propylene glycol in the analyzed solutions were estimated to be 25 ng and 87 ng, respectively. This analytical assay is considered useful for product stability studies and in developing new formaldehyde releaser-containing formulations where the concentration of formaldehyde is a presumable subject of labeling requirements. This method can also provide a rapid and convenient alternative to gas chromatography method of propylene glycol quantification.

  10. Respiratory symptoms and functional impairments induced by occupational exposure to formaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Choobineh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aimsThe main purpose of this study was to assess the acute and chronic effects of occupational exposure to low levels of formaldehyde on respiratory health.MethodsThis historical cohort study was conducted at a local melamine-formaldehyde resin producing plant. The study population consisted of seventy exposed and 24 non-exposed (referent employees. In this study, a questionnaire was used to evaluate and determined the prevalence of respiratory symptoms. Atmospheric concentrations of formaldehyde were measured at different areas of the plant. Similarly, using a spirometer, the parameters of pulmonary function were measured during exposure and a few days after exposure ceased.ResultsAtmospheric concentrations of formaldehyde marginally exceeded current permissible levels. Additionally, significant decrements in some parameters of pulmonary function, both during and after exposure were noted. However, a relative recovery in lungfunctional capacity observed following temporary cessation of exposure. Furthermore, exposed workers had higher prevalencerates of regular cough, wheezing, phlegm, shortness of breath, chest tightness and episodes of chest illness associated with cold.ConclusionThe findings of this study indicate that exposure to formaldehyde may induce respiratory symptoms, acute partially reversible and chronic irreversible functional impairments of the lungs.

  11. Henry’s Law Constant and Overall Mass Transfer Coefficient for Formaldehyde Emission from Small Water Pools under Simulated Indoor Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Henry’s law constant (HLC) and the overall mass transfer coefficient are both important parameters for modeling formaldehyde emissions from aqueous solutions. In this work, the apparent HLCs for aqueous formaldehyde solutions were determined in the concentration range from 0....

  12. ALLERGIC CONTACT DERMATITIS FROM FORMALDEHYDE EXPOSURE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Lyapina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is a ubiquitous chemical agent, a part of our outdoor and indoor working and residential environment. Healthcare workers in difficult occupations are among the most affected by formaldehyde exposure. Formaldehyde is an ingredient of some dental materials. Formaldehyde is well-known mucous membrane irritant and a primary skin sensitizing agent associated with both contact dermatitis (Type IV allergy, and immediate, anaphylactic reactions (Type I allergy. Inhalation exposure to formaldehyde was identified as a potential cause of asthma. Quite a few investigations are available concerning health issues for dental students following formaldehyde exposure. Such studies would be beneficial for early diagnosis of hypersensitivity, adequate prophylactic, risk assessment and management of their work.

  13. Maximum Potential Hydrogen Gas Retention in the sRF Resin Ion Exchange Column for the LAWPS Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wells, Beric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bottenus, Courtney LH [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schonewill, Philip P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    The Low-Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) is being developed to provide treated supernatant liquid from the Hanford tank farms directly to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. The design and development of the LAWPS is being conducted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC. A key process in LAWPS is the removal of radioactive Cs in ion exchange (IX) columns filled with spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. One accident scenario being evaluated is the loss of liquid flow through the sRF resin bed after it has been loaded with radioactive Cs and hydrogen gas is being generated by radiolysis. In normal operations, the generated hydrogen is expected to remain dissolved in the liquid and be continuously removed by liquid flow. For an accident scenario with a loss of flow, hydrogen gas can be retained within the IX column both in the sRF resin and below the bottom screen that supports the resin within the column. The purpose of this report is to summarize calculations that estimate the upper-bound volume of hydrogen gas that can be retained in the column and potentially be released to the headspace of the IX column or to process equipment connected to the IX column and, thus, pose a flammability hazard.

  14. Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

    1993-08-10

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

  15. 78 FR 51696 - Formaldehyde; Third-Party Certification Framework for the Formaldehyde Standards for Composite...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 770 RIN 2070-AJ44 Formaldehyde; Third-Party Certification Framework for the Formaldehyde Standards for Composite Wood Products; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Environmental... formaldehyde standards for composite wood products. After receiving requests for an extension, EPA extended the...

  16. 78 FR 44090 - Formaldehyde; Third-Party Certification Framework for the Formaldehyde Standards for Composite...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 770 RIN 2070-AJ44 Formaldehyde; Third-Party Certification Framework for the Formaldehyde Standards for Composite Wood Products; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Environmental... formaldehyde standards for composite wood products. This document extends the comment period from August 9...

  17. Initial inventory of alternatives to biocidal products containing formaldehyde of formaldehyde releasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenbeek JM; Janssen MPM; Scheepmaker JWA; MSP; M&V

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde is de werkzame stof in veel desinfecteer- en conserveringsmiddelen, maar deze stof is kankerverwekkend. Daarom zal formaldehyde naar verwachting per 1 januari 2016 op Europees niveau als zodanig worden geclassificeerd (carcinogeen 1B). Dit kan betekenen dat formaldehyde-houdende

  18. The evalution of the effects of different irrigating solutions and laser systems on adhesion of resin-based root canal sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrancı, L Benan; Köseoğlu, Mustafa

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different laser systems and different irrigating solutions on the adhesion of AH Plus and EndoREZ root canal sealers to human root canal dentin. Laser irradiation can be used to obtain morphological changes in dentin walls that could influence the adhesion values of endodontic sealers. One hundred canine root canals were cleaned and shaped. The specimens were assigned to four groups (n=24). In group I 5% NaOCl (control), in group II 15% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) followed by 5% NaOCl, in group III Er:YAG laser with 2940 nm wavelength, and in group IV Nd:YAG laser with 1064 nm were used as a final procedure in root canals. In each group, half of the specimens were filled with AH Plus sealer and half with EndoREZ with gutta-percha, using cold lateral compaction. Specimens were sectioned to obtain three slices from each third using a precission saw. The first slice of 1 mm thick dentin disks from each third was subjected to the pushout test (MPa). Results were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (plaser. Nd:YAG laser irradiation increased EndoREZ adhesion values significantly when compared with Er:YAG laser irradiation (plaser systems influenced the bond strength of resin-based root canal sealers.

  19. Removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solution by resin loaded magnetic β-cyclodextrin bead and graphene oxide sheet: Synthesis, adsorption mechanism and separation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Limei; Wang, Yaoguang; Gao, Liang; Hu, Lihua; Wei, Qin; Du, Bin

    2015-10-15

    Resin loaded magnetic β-cyclodextrin bead and graphene oxide sheet (MCD-GO-R) was synthesized successfully and found to be an excellent adsorbent for Hg(II) removal. The as-prepared adsorbent was characterized by SEM, FTIR, BET, magnetization curve and zeta potential analysis respectively. Good magnetic performance made MCD-GO-R simply recover from aqueous solution at low magnetic field within 30s. And also, the rich functional groups and outstanding dispersity play an important role in the adsorption process. The maximum adsorption capacity was 88.43 mg g(-1) at 323 K and pH 7.1. The as-prepared adsorbent could perform well in a wide pH range from 4.0 to 10.0. Static adsorption experimental data showed good correlation with pseudo-second-order model and Freundlich isotherm models. It was found that the contaminant adsorption was accomplished mainly via chelation or ion exchange and come to equilibrium in only 30 min. All experimental results, especially the excellent reproducibility and resistance to ion interference, suggest that MCD-GO-R has promising applications in water treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Method for loading resin beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.; Rainey, R.H.; Greene, C.W.; Shockley, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved method of preparing nuclear reactor fuel by carbonizing a uranium loaded cation exchange resin provided by contacting a H+ loaded resin with a uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate, comprises providing the nitrate deficient solution by a method comprising the steps of reacting in a reaction zone maintained between about 145 to 200 0 C, a first aqueous component comprising a uranyl nitrate solution having a boiling point of at least 145 0 C with a second aqueous component to provide a gaseous phase containing HNO 3 and a reaction product comprising an aqueous uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate

  1. Formaldehyde Emissions from Urea-Formaldehyde- and no-added-formaldehyde-Bonded particleboard as Influenced by Temperature and Relative Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; James M. Wescott; Timothy L. Chaffee; Kyle M. Gonner

    2012-01-01

    It is well documented that temperature and humidity can influence formaldehyde emissions from composite panels that are produced using urea-formaldehyde (UF)–type adhesives. This work investigates the effect of temperature and humidity on newer commercial California Air Resources Board (CARB) phase II–compliant particleboard produced with UF-type adhesives. These...

  2. Effect of an ozone-generating air-purifying device on reducing concentrations of formaldehyde in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esswein, E.J. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Boeniger, M.F. [National Institute for Occupational Safety, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Formaldehyde, an air contaminant found in many indoor air investigations, poses distinct occupational exposure hazards in certain job categories (e.g., mortuary science) but is also of concern when found or suspected in office buildings and homes. A variety of air-purifying devices (APDs) are currently available or marketed for application to reduce or remove concentrations of a variety of indoor air pollutants through the use of ozone as a chemical oxidant. An investigation was conducted to determine if concentrations of formaldehyde similar to those found in industrial hygiene evaluations of funeral homes could be reduced with the use of an ozone-generating APD. An ozone-generating APD was placed in an exposure chamber and formaldehyde-containing embalming solution was allowed to evaporate naturally, creating peak and mean chamber concentrations of 2.5 and 1.3 ppm, respectively. Continuous-reading instruments were used to sample for formaldehyde and ozone. Active sampling methods were also used to sample simultaneously for formaldehyde and a possible reactant product, formic acid. Triplicate measurements were made in each of three evaluations: formaldehyde alone, ozone alone, and formaldehyde and ozone combined. Concentrations of formaldehyde were virtually identical with and without 0.5 ppm ozone. No reduction in formaldehyde concentration was found during a 90-minute evaluation using ozone at this concentration with peak and average concentrations of approximately 2.5 and 1.3 ppm formaldehyde, respectively. The results of this investigation suggest that the use of ozone is ineffective in reducing concentrations of formaldehyde. Because ozone has demonstrated health hazards, and is a regulated air contaminant in both the occupational and ambient environment, the use of ozone as an air purification agent in indoor air does not seem warranted. 25 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Effect of disinfectants containing glutaraldehyde on bonding of a tri-n-butylborane initiated resin to dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, N; Taira, Y; Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of disinfectants on the bond strength of resin to dentine. The surface of bovine dentine was exposed to formaldehyde (FA) aqueous solutions, glutaraldehyde (GA) aqueous solutions, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate aqueous solutions (HEMA), a commercially available dentine primer (Gluma CPS desensitizer, GLUMA), isotonic sodium chloride solution (IS), and distilled water (DW), and placed in a humidor (HU) at 37 degrees C, or non-stored (baseline). All dentine surfaces were conditioned with a 10% citric acid and 3% ferric chloride solution (10-3 liquid), and then bonded to an acrylic rod with a self-curing adhesive resin (Super-Bond C&B). The mean tensile bond strengths determined 24 h after bonding were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Fisher's protected LSD test (n=5, P disinfectant pre-treatment with 5% GA or GLUMA stabilizes the bonding of tri-n-butylborane (TBB) initiated luting agent to bovine dentine conditioned with 10-3 liquid.

  4. short communication quantitative determination of formaldehyde

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ALS). Data processing by this chemometrics technique enhanced the reliability of the UV-Vis spectrophotometry for quantitative analysis of formaldehyde in real samples. KEY WORDS: Formaldehyde, Fluoral P, UV-Visible, Multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares;. Quantitative analysis. INTRODUCTION.

  5. 29 CFR 1915.1048 - Formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Formaldehyde. 1915.1048 Section 1915.1048 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Formaldehyde. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical to...

  6. 29 CFR 1926.1148 - Formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Formaldehyde. 1926.1148 Section 1926.1148 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1148 Formaldehyde...

  7. Detection of Waterborne and Airborne Formaldehyde: From Amperometric Chemosensing to a Visual Biosensor Based on Alcohol Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasi Sigawi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory prototype of a microcomputer-based analyzer was developed for quantitative determination of formaldehyde in liquid samples, based on catalytic chemosensing elements. It was shown that selectivity for the target analyte could be increased by modulating the working electrode potential. Analytical parameters of three variants of the amperometric analyzer that differed in the chemical structure/configuration of the working electrode were studied. The constructed analyzer was tested on wastewater solutions that contained formaldehyde. A simple low-cost biosensor was developed for semi-quantitative detection of airborne formaldehyde in concentrations exceeding the threshold level. This biosensor is based on a change in the color of a solution that contains a mixture of alcohol oxidase from the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, horseradish peroxidase and a chromogen, following exposure to airborne formaldehyde. The solution is enclosed within a membrane device, which is permeable to formaldehyde vapors. The most efficient and sensitive biosensor for detecting formaldehyde was the one that contained alcohol oxidase with an activity of 1.2 U·mL−1. The biosensor requires no special instrumentation and enables rapid visual detection of airborne formaldehyde at concentrations, which are hazardous to human health.

  8. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  9. Formaldehyde concentration in diagnostic patch testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trattner, A; Johansen, J D; Menné, T

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to formaldehyde is common from both consumer products and industry. The reliability of the patch test is essential for the diagnosis of formaldehyde allergy as it is difficult to suspect from the patient's history. The recommended formaldehyde patch test concentration has been reduced over......% in consecutively patch-tested patients, with respect to frequency of positive patch test reactions, strength of patch test reactions to different formaldehyde test concentrations, irritancy and relevance. The study included 3734 consecutively patch tested patients. 121 gave a positive reaction to 1% and/or 2...... gave few additional positive cases compared to D 3/4. Problems related to relevance are discussed. Based on present knowledge, a 1% patch test concentration for formaldehyde is recommended....

  10. Environment-friendly adhesives for surface bonding of wood-based flooring using natural tannin to reduce formaldehyde and TVOC emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sumin

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop environment-friendly adhesives for face fancy veneer bonding of engineered flooring using the natural tannin form bark in the wood. The natural wattle tannin adhesive were used to replace UF resin in the formaldehyde-based resin system in order to reduce formaldehyde and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from the adhesives used between plywoods and fancy veneers. PVAc was added to the natural tannin adhesive to increase viscosity of tannin adhesive for surface bonding. For tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives, 5%, 10%, 20% and 30% of PVAc to the natural tannin adhesives were added. tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives showed better bonding than the commercial natural tannin adhesive with a higher level of wood penetration. The initial adhesion strength was sufficient to be maintained within the optimum initial tack range. The standard formaldehyde emission test (desiccator method), field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) and VOC analyzer were used to determine the formaldehyde and VOC emissions from engineered flooring bonded with commercial the natural tannin adhesive and tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives. By desiccator method and FLEC, the formaldehyde emission level of each adhesive showed the similar tendency. All adhesives satisfied the E(1) grade (below 1.5 mg/L) and E(0) grade (below 0.5 mg/L) with UV coating. VOC emission results by FLEC and VOC analyzer were different with the formaldehyde emission results. TVOC emission was slightly increased as adding PVAc.

  11. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  12. Comparison of adsorption equilibrium models for the study of CL-, NO3- and SO4(2-) removal from aqueous solutions by an anion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, Julien; Dodi, Alain

    2011-06-15

    The removal of chloride, nitrate and sulfate ions from aqueous solutions by a macroporous resin is studied through the ion exchange systems OH(-)/Cl(-), OH(-)/NO(3)(-), OH(-)/SO(4)(2-), and HCO(3)(-)/Cl(-), Cl(-)/NO(3)(-), Cl(-)/SO(4)(2-). They are investigated by means of Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevitch (D-R) and Dubinin-Astakhov (D-A) single-component adsorption isotherms. The sorption parameters and the fitting of the models are determined by nonlinear regression and discussed. The Langmuir model provides a fair estimation of the sorption capacity whatever the system under study, on the contrary to Freundlich and D-R models. The adsorption energies deduced from Dubinin and Langmuir isotherms are in good agreement, and the surface parameter of the D-A isotherm appears consistent. All models agree on the order of affinity OH(-)

  13. HIGH ASPECT RATIO ION EXCHANGE RESIN BED - HYDRAULIC RESULTS FOR SPERICAL RESIN BEADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duignan, M; Charles Nash, C; Timothy Punch, T

    2007-01-01

    A principal role of the DOE Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of a large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. An in-tank ion exchange unit is being considered for cesium removal to accelerate waste processing. This unit is planned to have a relatively high bed height to diameter ratio (10:1). Complicating the design is the need to cool the ion exchange media; therefore, the ion exchange column will have a central cooling core making the flow path annular. To separate cesium from waste the media being considered is made of resorcinol formaldehyde resin deposited on spherical plastic beads and is a substitute for a previously tested resin made of crystalline silicotitanate. This spherical media not only has an advantage of being mechanically robust, but, unlike its predecessor, it is also reusable, that is, loaded cesium can be removed through elution and regeneration. Resin regeneration leads to more efficient operation and less spent resin waste, but its hydraulic performance in the planned ion exchange column was unknown. Moreover, the recycling process of this spherical resorcinol formaldehyde causes its volume to significantly shrink and swell. To determine the spherical media's hydraulic demand a linearly scaled column was designed and tested. The waste simulant used was prototypic of the wastes' viscosity and density. This paper discusses the hydraulic performance of the media that will be used to assist in the design of a full-scale unit

  14. Performance of optical biosensor using alcohol oxidase enzyme for formaldehyde detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, A. P.; Rachim, A.; Nurlely, Fauzia, V.

    2017-07-01

    The recent issue in the world is the long exposure of formaldehyde which is can increase the risk of human health, therefore, that is very important to develop a device and method that can be optimized to detect the formaldehyde elements accurately, have a long lifetime and can be fabricated and produced in large quantities. A new and simple prepared optical biosensor for detection of formaldehyde in aqueous solutions using alcohol oxidase (AOX) enzyme was successfully fabricated. The poly-n-butyl acrylic-co-N-acryloxysuccinimide (nBA-NAS) membranes containing chromoionophore ETH5294 were used for immobilization of alcohol oxidase enzyme (AOX). Biosensor response was based on the colour change of chromoionophore as a result of enzymatic oxidation of formaldehyde and correlated with the detection concentration of formaldehyde. The performance of biosensor parameters were measured through the optical absorption value using UV-Vis spectrophotometer including the repeatability, reproducibility, selectivity and lifetime. The results showed that the prepared biosensor has good repeatability (RSD = 1.9 %) and good reproducibility (RSD = 2.1 %). The biosensor was selective formaldehyde with no disturbance by methanol, ethanol, and acetaldehyde, and also stable before 49 days and decrease by 41.77 % after 49 days.

  15. Analysis of formaldehyde in the atmosphere collected by EPA TO11 method with GC-FID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Hongmao; Fryters, T.; Brassard, B. [CHEMEX, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    Formaldehyde is an important pollutant in the atmosphere. It has been known as a major promoter in the formation of ozone because it can provide an immediate source of free radicals (HO{sub 2}) needed for the formation of ozone. The monitoring of formaldehyde in the atmosphere includes using spectroscopic techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and optical adsorption spectrometry (ODAS) and solution/sorbent adsorption techniques (such as EPA TO11 and TO5 methods). EPA TO11 and TO5 methods are based on using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrozine as a derivatization reagent for collection of formaldehyde in the atmosphere and then the extracts of the derivatized formaldehyde are analyzed by the HFLC. In this paper, a GC-FID technique is reported for analyzing the extract of formaldehyde derivation collected by the EPA TO11 method. The GC method has been extensively evaluated and compared with the HFLC method. Some field formaldehyde results are also reported in this paper.

  16. Preliminary survey report: control technology for formaldehyde emissions at Hoosier Panel, New Albany, Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortimer, V.D.

    1982-12-01

    An onsite visit was made to the Hoosier Panel Company, New Albany, Indiana to observe processes and controls in the veneering of wood panels. Most of the bonding of the veneer to the core was accomplished through use of a urea/formaldehyde resin and a hot press method. Some work was done using a cold-press process in which the glue was heated with radio-frequency radiation. Banding of the core with solid-wood edges prior to veneering also used an adhesive that may contain formaldehyde. At least five different recipes were used for panel glue, all of which involve the Perkins L-100 urea/formaldehyde resin. A canopy hood was installed over each press. There were six wall fans in the plate cooling rooms. Airflow across the glue room was also aided by auxiliary fans. Routine air sampling was not performed. A safety committee inspected the site monthly. The local exhaust ventilation hoods had an insufficient flow rate to capture vapors beyond the boundary of the canopy openings. The facility offered a unique approach to caul plate cooling which also provided a large quantity of the general ventilation airflow. The author recommends that the auxiliary fans might be better positioned to contribute more effectively to controlling exposures.

  17. Preliminary survey report: control technology for formaldehyde emissions at Jasper Laminates, Jasper, Indiana, October 19, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortimer, V.D.

    1983-07-29

    An onsite visit was made to Jasper Laminates, Jasper, Indiana to observe the processes used in veneering wood panels by a heater platen press method, and methods of controlling formaldehyde emissions. The facility produced panels for pianos, organs, office furniture and other wood products, using primarily the hot press process along with some radiofrequency (RF) pressing of curved panels and small parts. The glue most often used was a urea/formaldehyde resin adhesive. The hot presses were located under one large ventilated enclosure, measuring about 20 by 150 feet. There were also eight ventilation fans in the ceiling and auxiliary fans used to provide additional cooling air for workers and for the caul plates. Therefore, the primary methods of controlling formaldehyde exposure were dispersion, using auxiliary fans, and area ventilation. No partial-shift-time weighted-average formaldehyde concentrations were measured at over 1 part per million (ppm). For two workers unloading different hot presses, short-term breathing-zone concentrations occasionally reached 2 ppm. The author concludes that this facility offers the opportunity to study large-scale area ventilation with passive make-up air supply, and the appropriate use of auxiliary fans.

  18. The Effect of Formaldehyde Fixation on RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, David L.; Fowler, Carol B.; Cunningham, Brady R.; Mason, Jeffrey T.; O'Leary, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues generally provide low yields of extractable RNA that exhibit both covalent modification of nucleic acid bases and strand cleavage. This frustrates efforts to perform retrospective analyses of gene expression using archival tissue specimens. A variety of conditions have been reported to demodify formaldehyde-fixed RNA in different model systems. We studied the reversal of formaldehyde fixation of RNA using a 50 base RNA oligonucleotide and total cellular RNA. Formaldehyde-adducted, native, and hydrolyzed RNA species were identified by their bioanalyzer electrophoretic migration patterns and RT–quantitative PCR. Demodification conditions included temperature, time, buffer, and pH. The reversal of formaldehyde-fixed RNA to native species without apparent RNA hydrolysis was most successfully performed in dilute Tris, phosphate, or similar buffers (pH 8) at 70°C for 30 minutes. Amines were not required for efficient formaldehyde demodification. Formaldehyde-fixed RNA was more labile than native RNA to treatment with heat and buffer, suggesting that antigen retrieval methods for proteins may impede RNA hybridization or RNA extraction. Taken together, the data indicate that reliable conditions may be used to remove formaldehyde adducts from RNA to improve the quality of RNA available for molecular studies. PMID:21497290

  19. Low-density carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, F.M.; Buckley, S.R.; Giles, C.L. Jr.; Haendler, B.L.; Hair, L.M.; Letts, S.A.; Overturf, G.E. III; Price, C.W.; Cook, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report documents research and development on resorcinol- formaldehyde-based foam materials conducted between 1986 and June 1990, when the effort was discontinued. The foams discussed are resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) foam, carbonized RF (CRF) foam, and two composite foams, a polystyrene/RF (PS/RF) foam and its carbonized derivative (CPR). The RF foams are synthesized by the polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde in a slightly basic solution. Their structure and density depend strongly on the concentration of the sodium carbonate catalyst. The have an interconnected bead structure similar to that of silica aerogels; bead sizes range from 30 to 130 Angstrom, and cell sizes are less than 0.1 μm. We have achieved densities of 16 to 200 mg/cm 3 . The RF foams can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form a vitreous carbon foam (CRF), which has a similar microstructure but much higher mechanical strength. The PS/RF foams are obtained by filling the 2- to 3-μm cells of PS foam (a low-density hydrocarbon foam we have developed) with RF. The resultant foams have the outstanding handling and machinability of the PS foam matrix and the small cell size of RF. Pyrolyzing PS/RF foams causes depolymerization and loss of the PS; the resulting CPR foams have a structure similar to the PS foams in which CRF both replicates and fills the PS cells

  20. Fast fluorometric flow injection analysis of formaldehyde in atmospheric water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, S.; Dasgupta, P.K.

    1987-06-01

    Formaldehyde can be determined in aqueous solution at a rate of 45 samples/h with a small sample requirement (100 ..mu..L). The fluorescence of 3,5-diacetyl-1,4-dihydrolutidine formed upon reaction of formaldehyde with ammonium acetate and 2,4-pentanedione (25 s, 95 /sup 0/C) is monitored with a filter fluorometer. The detection limit is 0.1 ..mu..M (3 ..mu..g/L) or 10 pmol of HCHO. The response is linear up to 3.3 ..mu..M (100 ..mu..g/L), the departure from linearity at 0.33 mM is 21%, but high levels are satisfactorily determined with a second-order calibration equation. Interference from S(IV) has been investigated in detail and completely eliminated by addition of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ before rendering the sample alkaline. There are no effects from commonly occurring metal ions and anions; the method is very selective to formaldehyde compared to other carbonyl compounds. A S(IV)-containing preservative has been formulated for the stabilization of low concentrations of HCHO. Results are presented for fogwater samples. 8 figures, 41 references.

  1. Effects of free formaldehyde emission reduction by ammonia fuming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Particleboards made using formaldehyde adhesives cause substantial emission of free formaldehyde over time. Free formaldehyde is harmful to the user's health and it also weakens internal bonds of particleboards in use. Emissions levels of formaldehyde lie between 0.8 to 2.2 g/m3 of indoor air in particleboards ...

  2. PERFORMANCE OF MUF RESINS FOR PARTICLEBOARDS BEFORE AND AFTER SPRAY-DRYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio PIZZI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF resins can be spray dried to obtain resins in powder form and indefinite shelf-life. Application as particleboard adhesives of such resins after redissolving them in water does yield resins of excellent performance as particleboard adhesives if the natural advancement caused by the heat in the spray-drier chamber is taken into account. CP MAS 13C NMR analysis of the spray-dried resin in powder form and thermomechanical analysis has shown some difference in behaviour in relation to MUF resins of the same level of water tolerance which have not been spray-dried. These small but significant differences can be ascribed to differences in resin structure.

  3. Hydrophobic features of EPS extracted from anaerobic granular sludge: an investigation based on DAX-8 resin fractionation and size exclusion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feishu; Bourven, Isabelle; Lens, Piet N L; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Pechaud, Yoan; Guibaud, Gilles

    2017-04-01

    The hydrophobic fractionation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from anaerobic granular sludge was performed on the DAX-8 resin (two elution pH conditions, i.e., pH 2 and pH 5 were tested). The impact of seven different EPS extraction methods on EPS hydrophobicity features was assessed. The results showed that the extraction methods and bulk solution pH influenced dramatically the biochemical composition of the EPS, and in turn, the hydrophobicity determined. Besides, EPS extracting reagents i.e., formaldehyde, ethanol, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and Tween 20 not only introduced extra carbon content in the total organic carbon (TOC) measurement but also interacted with the DAX-8 resin. By comparing the apparent molecular weight (aMW) distribution of untreated and pH-adjusted EPS samples, more complete EPS aMW information was preserved at pH 5. Thus, elution at pH 5 was preferred in this study for the qualitative analysis of EPS hydrophobic features. The hydrophobic fraction of EPS retained by the resin at pH 5 was ascribed to a wide aMW range, ranging from >440 to 0.3 kDa. Within this range, EPS molecules ranging from 175 to 31 kDa were mostly retained by the DAX-8 resin, which indicates that these EPS molecules are highly hydrophobic.

  4. Preparation and characterization of anion exchange resin decorated with magnetite nanoparticles for removal of p-toluic acid from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarpanah, Morteza; Ahmadpour, Ali; Rohani Bastami, Tahereh

    2015-02-01

    Polystyrene resin was covalently functionalized with diethanolamine and then decorated with magnetite nanoparticles by a novel and simple co-precipitation method using iron(II) sulfate as precursor. The products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. Adsorption of p-toluic acid (p-TA) onto magnetite-decorated polystyrene (MAG-PS) was studied and compared with that of diethanolamine-functionalized polystyrene and a commercial anion exchange resin. Results showed that the magnetite nanoparticles with an average size of 20.4 nm were successfully formed on the surface of polystyrene resin, and MAG-PS was exhibited high affinity for the removal of p-TA.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of formaldehyde by catalytic oxidation of methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salman, M.; Answer, J.; Zaman, W.U.

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde is studied over copper and silver catalysts. The impact of various factors catalytic poisoning, temperature, contact time on the formaldehyde yield have been investigated. An assembly using copper and silver as catalysts has been proposed to prepare formaldehyde in perspective of Pakistan in local industry. All the conditions to optimize the formaldehyde yield were also investigated. The formaldehyde produced was standardized chemically as well as spectroscopically. (author)

  6. Gas-diffusion microextraction coupled with spectrophotometry for the determination of formaldehyde in cork agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Pedro F; Ramos, Rui M; Valente, Inês M; Almeida, Paulo J; Carro, Antonia M; Lorenzo, Rosa A; Rodrigues, José A

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a simple methodology was developed for the extraction and determination of free formaldehyde content in cork agglomerate samples. For the first time, gas-diffusion microextraction was used for the extraction of volatile formaldehyde directly from samples, with simultaneous derivatization with acetylacetone (Hantzsch reaction). The absorbance of the coloured solution was read in a spectrophotometer at 412 nm. Different extraction parameters were studied and optimized (extraction temperature, sample mass, volume of acceptor solution, extraction time and concentration of derivatization reagent) by means of an asymmetric screening. The developed methodology proved to be a reliable tool for the determination of formaldehyde in cork agglomerates with the following suitable method features: low LOD (0.14 mg kg -1 ) and LOQ (0.47 mg kg -1 ), r 2  = 0.9994, and intraday and interday precision of 3.5 and 4.9%, respectively. The developed methodology was applied to the determination of formaldehyde in different cork agglomerate samples, and contents between 1.9 and 9.4 mg kg -1 were found. Furthermore, formaldehyde was also determined by the standard method EN 717-3 for comparison purposes; no significant differences between the results of both methods were observed. Graphical abstract Representation of the GDME system and its main components.

  7. Formaldehyde's Impact on Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formaldehyde is an important chemical used widely by industry to manufacture building materials and numerous household products. It is also a by-product of combustion and certain other natural processes.

  8. Compact, Ultrasensitive Formaldehyde Monitor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovative Research Phase I proposal seeks to develop an ultrasensitive, laser-based formaldehyde gas sensor system for airborne and ground-based...

  9. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-07-02

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.01, which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590-PTF-TEF-RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  10. Treatment method for stabilization of radioactive exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hideo, Oni; Takashi, Miyake; Hitoshi, Miyamoto; Toshio, Funakoshi; Yuzo, Inagaki.

    1988-01-01

    This is a method for eluting radioactive nuclides from a radioactive ion exchange resin in which it has been absorbed. First, the Cs in this resin is extracted using a neutral salt solution which contains Na + . The Cs that has been transferred to the neutral salt solution is absorbed and expelled by inorganic ion exchangers. Then the Co, Fe, Mn and Sr in said resin are eluted using an acidic solution; the Co, Fe, Mn and Sr that have been transferred to the acidic solution are separated from that solution by means of a diffusion dialysis vat. This process is a unique characteristic of this ion exchange resin treatment method. 1 fig

  11. The production of HTR-fuel kernels by microwave hardening of aqueous metal-salt-resin droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knotik, K.; Leichter, P.

    1981-04-01

    The construction and function of the microwave equipment for the hardening of free falling salt-resin-droplets, the preparation of solutions, their treatment and conditioning of the hardening process, the appearance and properties of the hardened ''green'' kernels and the transformation of ''green'' kernels of HTR-fuel kernels, i.e. sintered UO 2 -particles are described. With a suitable microwave equipment it is possible to harden aqueous droplets containing metal-salts (e.g. uranylnitrate), resorcinol and formaldehyde. The hardening occurs while the mentioned droplets are falling under gravity. These particles are suitable for the production of HTR-fuel kernels, e.g. high density UO 2 -particles. The entire process has the advantage of minimising the process specific waste. (author)

  12. Synthesis and characterization of kraft lignin-based epoxy resins

    OpenAIRE

    El Mansouri, Nour-Eddine; Yuan, Qiaolong; Huang, Farong

    2011-01-01

    Epoxidization is an interesting way to develop a new application of lignin and therefore to improve its application potential. In this work, kraft lignin-based epoxy resins were obtained by the epoxidization reaction, using the kraft lignin recovered directly from pulping liquor and modified by a methylolation reaction. The methylolated lignins were obtained by the reaction of original kraft lignin with formaldehyde and glyoxal, which is a less volatile and less toxic aldehyde. 1H-NMR spectro...

  13. Preparation and characterization of anion exchange resin decorated with magnetite nanoparticles for removal of p-toluic acid from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davarpanah, Morteza, E-mail: Davarpanah.morteza@gmail.com; Ahmadpour, Ali; Rohani Bastami, Tahereh

    2015-02-01

    Polystyrene resin was covalently functionalized with diethanolamine and then decorated with magnetite nanoparticles by a novel and simple co-precipitation method using iron(II) sulfate as precursor. The products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. Adsorption of p-toluic acid (p-TA) onto magnetite-decorated polystyrene (MAG-PS) was studied and compared with that of diethanolamine-functionalized polystyrene and a commercial anion exchange resin. Results showed that the magnetite nanoparticles with an average size of 20.4 nm were successfully formed on the surface of polystyrene resin, and MAG-PS was exhibited high affinity for the removal of p-TA. - Highlights: • .Polystyrene resin was covalently functionalized with diethanolamine. • .The functionalized adsorbents were decorated with magnetite nanoparticles (∼20 nm). • .Proposed magnetization procedure was high-efficient and relatively simple. • .Magnetic adsorbent was presented high affinity for removal of p-toluic acid.

  14. Characterization of the formaldehyde-H2O system using combined spectroscopic and mass spectrometry approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oancea, A.; Hanoune, B.; Facq, S.; Focsa, C.; Chazallon, B.

    2009-04-01

    The atmosphere is a multiphase reactor in which physical exchange processes, heterogeneous reactions and photochemical reactions take place. The oxygenated organics (formaldehyde, ethanol, acetone etc.) present at trace concentrations into the atmosphere are known to play an important role in atmospheric chemistry due for example to their contribution in the production of HOx radicals, which largely determine the lifetime of pollutants [1]. Further, it has been shown that the interaction of oxygenated organics with ice particles in the atmosphere has the potential to promote heterogeneous chemistry [2]. In the polar lower troposphere, formaldehyde (H2CO) was measured in concentrations that are much higher that those predicted by chemistry models [3]. The mechanism at the origin of the formaldehyde production remains however controversial as the incorporation / partitioning of H2CO in ice crystal has to be determined first. Incorporation of formaldehyde into ice can take place according to several different physical mechanisms like co-condensation, riming, adsorption/desorption. The partitioning of formaldehyde between the gas phase, the liquid and the solid phases is an important parameter that leads to a better understanding of the incorporation mechanisms. In our work, different experimental approaches are used to characterize the partitioning between the different phases in which the H2O-H2CO system exists. Recently, we investigated by mass spectrometry and infrared diode laser spectroscopy the vapor liquid equilibrium (VLE) of formaldehyde aqueous solutions of different concentrations at room temperature. From the data collected on the vapor pressures at atmospherically relevant formaldehyde concentrations, we derived the Henry's coefficients at 295 K [4]. In this study we present first results on the solubility of formaldehyde in ice. This allows a better characterization of the partitioning of formaldehyde vapors above supercooled droplets and/or ice at low

  15. Formaldehyde-releasers : relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Metalworking fluids and remainder. Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, A.C.; Le Coz, C.J.; Lensen, G.J.; Flyvholm, M.A.; Maibach, H.I.; Coenraads, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    This is the second part of a review article on formaldehyde-releasers used as durable press chemical finishes (DPCF) in textiles. The early finishes contained large amounts of free formaldehyde, which led to many cases of allergic contact dermatitis to clothes in the 1950s and 1960s. Currently, most

  16. 78 FR 52567 - Formaldehyde Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... (throat). Formaldehyde solutions can damage the skin and burn the eyes. The standard specifies a number of....1048). OMB Control Number: 1218-0145. Affected Public: Business or other for-profits. Number of... and dates of birth. Although all submissions are listed in the http://www.regulations.gov index, some...

  17. Phenol-formaldehyde reactivity with lignin in the wood cell wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Latewood from Pinus taeda was reacted with alkaline phenol–formaldehyde (PF) adhesive and characterised using two-dimensional 1H–13C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy so that chemical modification of the wood cell wall polymers, after PF resol curing, could be elucidated. The...

  18. Study of bismuth molybdenum oxidic catalysts for methanol oxidation to formaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhler, R.Ya.; Kurina, L.N.; Kudrina, N.V.

    1982-01-01

    Phase composition and catalytic properties of bismuth molybdenum oxidic system in reaction of methanol oxidation are studied at temperature of 280-350 deg. Increase of selectivity according to formaldehyde is connected with formation of MoO 3 solid solution in bismuth molybdate Bi 2 O 3 x3MoO 3

  19. Study of a composite from reactive blending of methylol urea resin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-03-19

    Mar 19, 2007 ... This study was designed to study some physical properties of a composite derivable from reactive blending of methylol urea resin (MUR) with natural rubber (NR). Formaldehyde emission, decreased with increase in NR concentration in the blend. Elongation at break and viscosity recorded an initial.

  20. Study of a composite from reactive blending of methylol urea resin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to study some physical properties of a composite derivable from reactive blending of methylol urea resin (MUR) with natural rubber (NR). Formaldehyde emission, decreased with increase in NR concentration in the blend. Elongation at break and viscosity recorded an initial increase but gradually ...

  1. Thermal and Ablative Properties of Ipns and Composites of High Ortho Resole Resin and Difurfurylidene Acetone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq S. NAJIM

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High ortho resole resin was prepared by condensation of phenol with excess of formaldehyde in the presence of magnesium oxide as catalyst. Reaction of furfuraldehyde with acetone in basic medium led to difurfurylidene acetone (DFA. Their interpenetrating polymer network (IPNS were obtained by the reaction of predetermined quantities of difurfurylidene acetone and high ortho resole using p-toluene sulphonic acid (PTSA as curing agent. The thermal behavior of the resins was studied using thermogravimetry (TG under ambient and nitrogen atmospheres over a temperature range of (25-1000 Cº. It was observed that the IPN of 20% DFA – 80% resole has higher thermal stability than that of resole alone and the decomposition temperature was higher by 80 Cº. This behavior was attributed to highly cross linked structure and thermally stable backbone of ploy difurfurylidene acetone due to formation of ladder structure.Impregnation of chopped fiber glass type (E with the polymeric solutions was used to prepare their composites, and the ablative properties were investigated according to ASTM E-285 –80. It was observed that the IPN of (DFA- resol perform better than the resole composite alone.

  2. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    OpenAIRE

    Desmond Ng; Jimmy C. M. Hsiao; Keith C. T. Tong; Harry Kim; Yanjie Mai; Keith H. S. Chan

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin ...

  3. Recovery of tretrachloroaurate through ion exchange with Dowex 11 resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alguacil, F.J.

    1998-01-01

    The recovery of the tretrachloroaurate complex by the anionic ion exchange resin Dowex 11 has been studied. The kinetics of gold adsorption were dependent of both gold and resin concentrations and temperature. The adsorption isotherm can be described by the expression Q=kC''n. The loaded resin could be eluted by an acidic thiourea solution at 20 degree centigree. After several adsorption-elution cycles there is not any apparent loss in the adsorption properties of the resin. (Author) 6 refs

  4. Resin Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    to see plastic deformation of the surface. 8.1.4.3 Density: Density using the Archimedes principle (ASTM D 792). 8.1.4.4 Density as a Function of...the cure and postcure, quickly cool the sample to 0 °C or lower the temperature to quench the reaction, and then ramp the temperature at 5 °C/min to...prepared by pouring 10 g of resin into a 30-mL screw-cap scintillation vial and adding appropriate amounts of initiator, catalyst, and inhibitor

  5. Modeling Formaldehyde Emission in Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disanti, M. A.; Reuter, D. C.; Bonev, B. P.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.

    Modeling fluorescent emission from monomeric formaldehyde (H2CO) forms an integral part of our overall comprehensive program of measuring the volatile composition of comets through high-resolution (RP ~ 25,000) infrared spectroscopy using CSHELL at the IRTF and NIRSPEC at Keck II. The H2CO spectra contain lines from both the nu1 (symmetric CH2 stretch) and nu5 (asymmetric CH2 stretch) bands near 3.6 microns. We have acquired high-quality spectra of twelve Oort cloud comets, and at least six of these show clear emission from H2CO. We also detected H2CO with NIRSPEC in one Jupiter Family comet, 9P/Tempel 1, during Deep Impact observations. Our H2CO model, originally developed to interpret low-resolution spectra of comets Halley and Wilson (Reuter et al. 1989 Ap J 341:1045), predicts individual line intensities (g-factors) as a function of rotational temperature for approximately 1300 lines having energies up to approximately 400 cm^-1 above the ground state. Recently, it was validated through comparison with CSHELL spectra of C/2002 T7 (LINEAR), where newly developed analyses were applied to obtain robust determinations of both the rotational temperature and abundance of H2CO (DiSanti et al. 2006 Ap J 650:470). We are currently in the process of extending the model to higher rotational energy (i.e., higher rotational quantum number) in an attempt to improve the fit to high-J lines in our spectra of C/T7 and other comets. Results will be presented, and implications discussed.Modeling fluorescent emission from monomeric formaldehyde (H2CO) forms an integral part of our overall comprehensive program of measuring the volatile composition of comets through high-resolution (RP ~ 25,000) infrared spectroscopy using CSHELL at the IRTF and NIRSPEC at Keck II. The H2CO spectra contain lines from both the nu1 (symmetric CH2 stretch) and nu5 (asymmetric CH2 stretch) bands near 3.6 microns. We have acquired high-quality spectra of twelve Oort cloud comets, and at least six of

  6. In-depth disinfection of acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, V B; Saunders, T R; Pimsler, M; Elfring, D R

    1995-09-01

    This study demonstrated that bacteria penetrate three kinds of dental acrylic resin after a short time period. Samples of acrylic resin were contaminated with a variety of bacteria and were then placed in three different disinfecting solutions as directed by the manufacturers. After the specific dilution and immersion time, cultures were made from the resin samples. The only effective disinfectant was a 0.525% solution of sodium hypochlorite at a 10-minute immersion. It disinfected not only the surfaces but also the bacteria that penetrated the surfaces to a depth of 3 mm.

  7. Immobilization of spent resin with epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gultom, O.; Suryanto; Sayogo; Ramdan

    1997-01-01

    immobilization of spent resin using epoxy resin has been conducted. The spent resin was mixtured with epoxy resin in variation of concentration, i.e., 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 weight percent of spent resin. The mixture were pour into the plastic tube, with a diameter of 40 mm and height of 40 mm. The density, compressive strength and leaching rate were respectively measured by quanta chrome, paul weber apparatus and gamma spectrometer. The results showed that the increasing of waste concentration would be decreased the compressive strength, and increased density by immobilized waste. The leaching rate of 137 Cs from waste product was not detected in experiment (author)

  8. Teratogenic effect of formaldehyde in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Al–Saraj

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty three pregnant rabbits were exposed to vapour of 10% formaldehyde (12 ppm throughout the gestation period to know its effect on newborns. The results showed no abortion or foetal mortality but there were some anomalies (23.8% among the newborns rabbits which includes: meromelia (6.8%, encephalocele (6.1%, Oligodactyly (4.1%, Umbilical hernia (3.4% and Short tail (3.4%; besides that small for date and decrease in the body weight of the newborns were also noticed. These findings suggest that formaldehyde is a teratogenic agent.

  9. Preparation and characterization of microencapsulated phase change material with low remnant formaldehyde content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Wei [Tianjin Municipal Key Lab of Fiber Modification and Functional Fibers, Institute of Functional Fibers, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); Zhang Xingxiang [Tianjin Municipal Key Lab of Fiber Modification and Functional Fibers, Institute of Functional Fibers, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China)], E-mail: zhangpolyu@yahoo.com.cn; Wang Xuechen; Niu Jianjin [Tianjin Municipal Key Lab of Fiber Modification and Functional Fibers, Institute of Functional Fibers, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China)

    2007-12-15

    Microencapsulated phase change materials (MicroPCMs) were synthesized by in situ polymerization using melamine-formaldehyde (MF) resin as shell and n-octadecane as core. The employed MF prepolymer was prepared by incorporating formaldehyde once and melamine for three times. The effects of dropping rate of MF prepolymer on the surface morphology, dispersibility and thermal stability of the microcapsules were systematically investigated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry analysis (TG). The results show that, with the dropping rate of the MF prepolymer decreasing, the flocculation phenomenon of microcapsules decreases and the globular surface becomes smoother; and the thermal stability increases regularly. The average diameter of the microcapsules is about 2.2 {mu}m and the diameter distribution is narrow. The enthalpy of the microcapsules containing 59 wt% n-octadecane is 144 J g{sup -1}. In addition, the remnant formaldehyde content of the microcapsules is 68.6 mg kg{sup -1}, which is highly attractive for the application of MicroPCMs.

  10. Reaction of formaldehyde and nitric acid in a remotely operated thermosiphon evaporator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, R.; Patton, B.D.; Haas, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    A safe, controlled method for reacting formaldehyde with excess nitric acid, while simultaneously concentrating a fissile uranium nitrate solution, was developed and is being used successfully at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a remotely operated thermosiphon evaporator. The operation was adapted from laboratory studies to semicontinuously process multikilogram batches. Thus far, experience with this system includes the successful processing of more than 260 batches (2.7 kg per batch) of solution

  11. Developing a Reference Material for Formaldehyde Emissions Testing; Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to formaldehyde has been shown to produce broad and potentially severe adverse human health effects. With ubiquitous formaldehyde sources in the indoor environment, formaldehyde concentrations in indoor air are usually higher than outdoors, ranging from 10 to 4000 μg/m3....

  12. Conversion and toxicity characteristics of formaldehyde in acetoclastic methanogenic sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Kleerebezem, R.; Lettinga, G.

    2002-01-01

    An unadapted mixed methanogenic sludge transformed formaldehyde into methanol and formate. The methanol to formate ratio obtained was 1:1. Formaldehyde conversion proceeded without any lag phase, suggesting the constitutive character of the formaldehyde conversion enzymes involved. Because the rate

  13. Production of renewable phenolic resins by thermochemical conversion of biomass: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Effendi, A.; Gerhauser, H.; Bridgwater, A.V. [Bio-Energy Research Group, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    This review covers the production and utilisation of liquids from the thermal processing of biomass and related materials to substitute for synthetic phenol and formaldehyde in phenol formaldehyde resins. These resins are primarily employed in the manufacture of wood panels such as plywood, MDF, particle-board and OSB. The most important thermal conversion methods for this purpose are fast pyrolysis and vacuum pyrolysis, pressure liquefaction and phenolysis. Many feedstocks have been tested for their suitability as sources of phenolics including hard and softwoods, bark and residual lignins. Resins have been prepared utilising either the whole liquid product, or a phenolics enriched fraction obtained after fractional condensation or further processing, such as solvent extraction. None of the phenolics production and fractionation techniques covered in this review are believed to allow substitution of 100% of the phenol content of the resin without impacting its effectiveness compared to commercial formulations based on petroleum derived phenol. This survey shows that considerable progress has been made towards reaching the goal of a price competitive renewable resin, but that further research is required to meet the twin challenges of low renewable resin cost and satisfactory quality requirements. Particular areas of concern are wood panel press times, variability of renewable resin properties, odour, lack of reactive sites compared to phenol and potential for increased emissions of volatile organic compounds. (author)

  14. Prebiotic Amino Acid Thioester Synthesis: Thiol-Dependent Amino Acid Synthesis from Formose substrates (Formaldehyde and Glycolaldehyde) and Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1998-01-01

    Formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde (substrates of the formose autocatalytic cycle) were shown to react with ammonia yielding alanine and homoserine under mild aqueous conditions in the presence of thiol catalysts. Since similar reactions carried out without ammonia yielded alpha-hydroxy acid thioesters, the thiol-dependent synthesis of alanine and homoserine is presumed to occur via amino acid thioesters-intermediates capable of forming peptides. A pH 5.2 solution of 20 mM formaldehyde, 20 mM glycolaldehyde, 20 mM ammonium chloride, 23 mM 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and 23 mM acetic acid that reacted for 35 days at 40 C yielded (based on initial formaldehyde) 1.8% alanine and 0.08% homoserine. In the absence of thiol catalyst, the synthesis of alanine and homoserine was negligible. Alanine synthesis required both formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde, but homoserine synthesis required only glycolaldehyde. At 25 days the efficiency of alanine synthesis calculated from the ratio of alanine synthesized to formaldehyde reacted was 2.1%, and the yield (based on initial formaldehyde) of triose and tetrose intermediates involved in alanine and homoserine synthesis was 0.3 and 2.1%, respectively. Alanine synthesis was also seen in similar reactions containing only 10 mM each of aldehyde substrates, ammonia, and thiol. The prebiotic significance of these reactions that use the formose reaction to generate sugar intermediates that are converted to reactive amino acid thioesters is discussed.

  15. Effects of resins on asphaltene self-association and solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarranton, H.W.; Fox, W.A.; Svrcek, W.Y. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

    2007-10-15

    This paper described a method of modelling the self-association and precipitation of asphaltenes and resins. Self-association was assessed using vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) measurements of asphaltene and resin mixtures. A modified asphaltene self-association model was used to fit and interpret data. The molar mass distribution of the asphaltene-resin aggregates was characterized. Precipitation data were obtained by measuring asphaltenes and resins in solutions of asphaltenes, resins, toluene, and heptane. The molar mass distribution was then used as an input to the regular solution model. Results of the study suggested that resins participate in asphaltene self-association. It was concluded that both asphaltenes and resins are best characterized as a combined pseudo-component with a single molar mass distribution of the aggregated species. 30 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs.

  16. Continuous fluorescence determination of formaldehyde in air

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Motyka, Kamil; Mikuška, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 518, 1-2 (2004), s. 51-57 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4031105; GA ČR GA526/03/1182 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : fluorescence * wet denuder * formaldehyde Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.588, year: 2004

  17. Edible carbohydrates from formaldehyde in a spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The autocatalytic nature of the base catalyzed condensation of formaldehyde to formose sugars is eliminated by using as a cocatalyst, an aldose, or ketose having an alpha-hydrogen. This is more strongly complexed by base than is formaldehyde and the cocatalyst and sugar products accumulate as catalyst complexes instead of formaldehyde. Because of the presence of alpha-hydrogen atoms in cocatalysts and formose sugars, their removal by cross Cannizzaro reaction of complexed sugars does not occur, so the formose reaction behaves autocatalytically due to this accumulation. It is believed that a given catalytic formose complex is not a discrete complexed sugar, but rather, a scrambled dynamic mixture of sugars having weakened structures. The sugar complexes derive from a common salt-like formaldehyde complex, which, because of the absence of alpha-hydrogen, has a greater tendency to undergo Cannizzaro reaction, rather than formose condensation. Because of this, the Cannizzaro reaction can proceed without measurable formose condensation. The reverse is not possible.

  18. Fabrication and optimisation of optical biosensor using alcohol oxidase enzyme to evaluate detection of formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachim, A.; Sari, A. P.; Nurlely, Fauzia, V.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, a new and simple biosensor base on alcohol oxidase (AOX)-enzyme for detecting formaldehyde in aqueous solutions has been successfully fabricated. The alcohol oxidase (AOX) enzyme was immobilized on poly-n-butyl acrylic-co-N-acryloxysuccinimide (nBA-NAS) membrane containing chromoionophore. The chemical reaction between AOX and formaldehyde generates a colour change of chromoionophore detected by optical absorbance measured in UV Vis. This paper focuses on the concentration optimization of buffer phosphate solution, response time, the quantity of enzyme and the measurement of the detection range of biosensors. The result shows that the optimum concentration and pH of buffer phosphate solution is 0.05 M and pH 7, respectively. The optimum response time is 3 min, the optimum unit of enzyme for biosensor is 1 unit/sample and the detection range of biosensor is 0.264 mM with R2 = 0.9421.

  19. Identification of formaldehyde-responsive genes by suppression subtractive hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min-Ho; Kim, Young-Ae; Na, Tae-Young; Kim, Sung-Hye; Shin, Young Kee; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Shin, Ho-Sang; Lee, Mi-Ock

    2008-01-01

    Formaldehyde is frequently used in indoor household and occupational environments. Inhalation of formaldehyde invokes an inflammatory response, including a variety of allergic signs and symptoms. Therefore, formaldehyde has been considered as the most prevalent cause of sick building syndrome, which has become a major social problem, especially in developing urban areas. Further formaldehyde is classified as a genotoxicant in the respiratory tract of rats and humans. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in formaldehyde intoxication, we sought differentially regulated genes by formaldehyde exposure to Hs 680.Tr human trachea cells, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based suppression subtractive hybridization. We identified 27 different formaldehyde-inducible genes, including those coding for the major histocompatibility complex, class IA, calcyclin, glutathione S-transferase pi, mouse double minute 2 (MDM2), platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha, and which are known to be associated with cell proliferation and differentiation, immunity and inflammation, and detoxification. Induction of these genes by formaldehyde treatment was confirmed by reverse transcription PCR and western blot analysis. Further, the expression of calcyclin, glutathione S-transferase pi, PDGFRA and MDM2 were significantly induced in the tracheal epithelium of Sprague Dawley rats after formaldehyde inhalation. Our results suggest that the elevated levels of these genes may be associated with the formaldehyde-induced toxicity, and that they deserve evaluation as potential biomarkers for formaldehyde intoxication

  20. MD simulation analysis of resin filling into nano-sized pore formed on metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hodaka; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2018-01-01

    All-atom MD simulation was conducted for the filling of epoxy resin into a nano-sized pore formed on aluminum surface. The resin species examined were polyphenol mixed with polyglycidylether of o-cresol formaldehyde novolac and their oligomers formed through ring-opening reactions. The degree of oligomerization was varied from 0.5 to 2.5 nm in terms of the radius of gyration, and the radius of the cylindrical pore was fixed at 2.5 nm. It was observed that a small resin penetrates into the pore along the wall, while larger resins move rather uniformly in the pore. The maximum density in the pore achieved with pushing was then seen to be larger when the resin is smaller. It was found that when the radius of gyration of resin is larger than half the pore radius, the resin density in the pore does not reach half the bulk density of the resin. This implies that the resin-resin interaction inhibits the filling of the nano-sized pore.

  1. Separation of 134Cs and 137Cs from 125I solution for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, Ramu; Dash, Ashutosh; Banerjee, Dayamoy

    2015-01-01

    While neutron irradiation of natural Xe gas followed by wet chemical dissolution of activation products constitutes a successful paradigm for the small scale production 125 I, the concomitant production of 134 Cs and 137 Cs emerged as the primary impediment which necessitates purification of 125 I solution. This paper describes an ion-exchange chromatographic technique using Resorcinol Formaldehyde (RF) resin to purify 125 I solution from 134 Cs and 137 Cs impurities. A thorough investigation of the adsorption parameters of RF resin was carried out to arrive at the experimental conditions resulting optimum retention of 134 Cs and 137 Cs impurities. Based on the experimental findings, an optimized separation procedure was developed in which the neutron irradiated dissolved products at pH ∝ 13 was passed through a chromatography column containing RF resin where in 134 Cs and 137 Cs impurities gets adsorbed leaving behind 125 I to appear in the effluent. The overall recovery of 125 I was >90% with acceptable purity amenable for clinical applications.

  2. Synthesis of a boron modified phenolic resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecida M. Kawamoto

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic resin has long been used as matrix for composites mainly because of its flame retardant behavior and high char yield after pyrolysis, which results in a self supporting structure. The addition of ceramic powders, such as SiC and B4C, as fillers to the phenolic resin, results in better thermo-oxidative stability, but as drawbacks, it has poor homogeneity, adhesion and processing difficulties during molding of the composites. The addition of single elements, such as boron, silicon and phosphorus in the main backbone of the thermo-set resin is a new strategy to obtain special high performance resins, which results in higher mechanical properties, avoiding the drawbacks of simply adding fillers, which results in enhanced thermo-oxidative stability compared to conventional phenol-formaldehyde resins. Therefore, the product can have several applications, including the use as ablative thermal protection for thermo-structural composites. This work describes the preparation of a boron-modified phenolic resin (BPR using salicyl alcohol and boric acid. The reaction was performed in refluxing toluene for a period of four hours, which produced a very high viscosity amber resin in 90% yield.The final structure of the compound, the boric acid double, substituted at the hydroxyl group of the aromatic ring, was determined with the help of the Infrared Spectroscopy, ¹H-NMR, TGA-DSC and boron elemental analysis. The absorption band of the group B-O at 1349 cm ˉ¹ can be visualized at the FT-IR spectrum. ¹H-NMR spectra showed peaks at 4.97-5.04 ppm and 3.60-3.90 ppm assigned to belong to CH2OH groups from the alcohol. The elemental analysis was also performed for boron determination.The product has also been tested in carbon and silicon fibers composite for the use in thermal structure. The results of the tests showed composites with superior mechanical properties when compared with the conventional phenolic resin.

  3. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Ng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  4. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Keith H. S.; Mai, Yanjie; Kim, Harry; Tong, Keith C. T.; Ng, Desmond; Hsiao, Jimmy C. M.

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  5. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  6. Determination of free formaldehyde in cosmetics containing formaldehyde-releasing preservatives by reversed-phase dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and liquid chromatography with post-column derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Pablo; Chisvert, Alberto; Alonso, M José; Hernandorena, Sandra; Salvador, Amparo

    2018-03-30

    An analytical method for the determination of traces of formaldehyde in cosmetic products containing formaldehyde-releasing preservatives has been developed. The method is based on reversed-phase dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (RP-DLLME), that allows the extraction of highly polar compounds, followed by liquid chromatography-ultraviolet/visible (LC-UV/vis) determination with post-column derivatization. The variables involved in the RP-DLLME process were studied to provide the best enrichment factors. Under the selected conditions, a mixture of 500 μL of acetonitrile (disperser solvent) and 50 μL of water (extraction solvent) was rapidly injected into 5 mL of toluene sample solution. The extracts were injected into the LC-UV/vis system using phosphate buffer 6 mmol L -1 at pH 2 as mobile phase. After chromatographic separation, the eluate merged with a flow stream of pentane-2,4-dione in ammonium acetate solution as derivatizing reagent and passed throughout a post-column reactor at 85 °C in order to derivatize formaldehyde into 3,5-diacetyl-1,4-dihydrolutidine, according to Hantzsch reaction, which was finally measured spectrophotometrically at 407 nm. The method was successfully validated showing good linearity, an enrichment factor of 86 ± 2, limits of detection and quantification of 0.7 and 2.3 ng mL -1 , respectively, and good repeatability (RSD < 9.2%). Finally, the proposed analytical method was applied to the determination of formaldehyde in different commercial cosmetic samples containing formaldehyde-releasing preservatives, such as bronopol, diazolidinyl urea, imidazolidinyl urea, and DMDM hydantoin, with good relative recovery values (91-113%) thus showing that matrix effects were negligible. The good analytical features of the proposed method besides of its simplicity and affordability, make it useful to carry out the quality control of cosmetic products containing formaldehyde-releasing preservatives. Copyright

  7. Skincare products containing low concentrations of formaldehyde detected by the chromotropic acid method cannot be safely used in formaldehyde-allergic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauksson, I; Pontén, A; Gruvberger, B; Isaksson, M; Engfeldt, M; Bruze, M

    2016-02-01

    Formaldehyde is a well-known contact sensitizer. Formaldehyde releasers are widely used preservatives in skincare products. It has been found that formaldehyde at concentrations allowed by the European Cosmetics Directive can cause allergic contact dermatitis. However, we still lack information on whether formaldehyde at low concentrations affects dermatitis in formaldehyde-allergic individuals. To study the effects of low concentrations of formaldehyde on irritant contact dermatitis in formaldehyde-allergic individuals. Fifteen formaldehyde-allergic individuals and a control group of 12 individuals without contact allergy to formaldehyde and formaldehyde releasers were included in the study. The individuals performed the repeated open application test (ROAT) during 4 weeks with four different moisturizers releasing formaldehyde in concentrations that had been determined as > 40, 20-40, 2·5-10 and 0 p.p.m. by the chromotropic acid (CA) spot test. Dimethyloldimethylhydantoin was used as a formaldehyde releaser in the moisturizers. The ROAT was performed on areas of experimentally induced sodium lauryl sulfate dermatitis. The study was double blind, controlled and randomized. Nine of the 15 formaldehyde-allergic individuals had reappearance or worsening of dermatitis on the areas that were treated with moisturizers containing formaldehyde. No such reactions were observed in the control group (P formaldehyde in the formaldehyde-allergic individuals (P formaldehyde often found in skincare products by the CA method are sufficient to worsen an existing dermatitis in formaldehyde-allergic individuals. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  8. Effects of formaldehyde on the frog's mucociliary epithelium as a surrogate to evaluate air pollution effects on the respiratory epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fló-Neyret

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of alcohol as an alternative fuel to gasoline or diesel can increase emission of formaldehyde, an organic gas that is irritant to the mucous membranes. The respiratory system is the major target of air pollutants and its major defense mechanism depends on the continuous activity of the cilia and the resulting constant transportation of mucous secretion. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of formaldehyde on the ciliated epithelium through a relative large dose range around the threshold limit value adopted by the Brazilian legislation, namely 1.6 ppm (1.25 to 5 ppm. For this purpose, the isolated frog palate preparation was used as the target of toxic injury. Four groups of frog palates were exposed to diluted Ringer solution (control, N = 8 and formaldehyde diluted in Ringer solution at three different concentrations (1.25, 2.5 and 5.0 ppm, N = 10 for each group. Mucociliary clearance and ciliary beat frequency decreased significantly in contact with formaldehyde at the concentrations of 2.5 and 5.0 ppm after 60 min of exposure (P<0.05. We conclude that relatively low concentrations of formaldehyde, which is even below the Brazilian threshold limit value, are sufficient to cause short-term mucociliary impairment.

  9. Degradation of humic acid and formation of formaldehyde in PEROXONE processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.W.; Rhee, D.S. [Kangwon National University, Chunchon (Korea)

    2001-02-01

    This research was studied the action of the coupling ozone-hydrogen peroxide on aqueous humic acid. PEROXONE process is enhanced the generation of hydroxyl radicals which is effective for degradation of organic matters. Therefore the changes of UV{sub 254} and TOC were investigated through the change of concentrations, injection time of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, initial pH of aqueous humic acid and concentrations of radical scavenger as HCO{sub 3}{sup -} in the PEROXONE processes. And the GC/ECD was used to detect the formaldehyde formed by ozonation of humic acid. From the experimental results, concentrations and injection time of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and initial pH in solution in the PEROXONE processes were very important for enhancing the efficiency of degradation in humic acid. The results indicated that removal efficiency of TOC was the highest when concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was 5 mg/L, injection time of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was 5 minutes and initial pH in solution was 10.5. And presence of alkalinity in solution was reduced the efficiency of treatment. The formaldehyde were formed less PEROXONE processes than only ozone. When initial pH in solution were changed from 3.5 to 10.5, the formaldehyde were formed the highest concentration at pH 5. (author). 18 refs., 12 figs.

  10. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheth, A C; Dharmapurikar, R; Strevel, S D

    1994-01-01

    The following investigations were performed: (1) batch mode screening of eleven(11) commercially available resins and selection of three candidate resins for further evaluation in a fixed-bed setup. (2) Process variables study using three candidate resins in the fixed-bed setup and selection of the ``best`` resin for process economics development. (3) Exhaustion efficiency and solution concentration were found to be inversely related necessitating a trade-off between the resin cost versus the cost of evaporation/concentration of ensuing effluents. (4) Higher concentration of the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} form of active sites over less active CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} form of sites in the resin was believed to be the main reason for the observed increase in the equilibrium capacity of the resin at an elevated static CO{sub 2}-pressure. This Increase in capacity was found to level off around 80--120 psig range. The increase in CO{sub 2}-pressure, however, did not appear to affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics. (5) In the fixed-bed mode, the solution concentration was found to affect the equilibrium capacity of candidate resins. Their relationship was well satisfied by the Langmuir type non-linear equilibrium isotherm. Alternatively, the effect of solution concentration on overall ion-exchange kinetics varied from resin to resin. (6) Product inhibition effect on the resin was observed as an initial increase followed by a significant decrease in the resin`s equilibrium capacity for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} as the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} molar ratio in the solution was increased from 0 to 1.0. This ratio, however, did not affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics.

  11. Regeneration to OH{sup -} form of anionic Dowex 1-X8 and Dowex 2-X8 resins as a function of concentration of eluent solution; Regeneracao de resinas anionicas Dowex 1-X8 e Dowex 2-X8 a forma OH{sup -} em funcao da concentracao da solucao eluente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendassolli, Jose Albertino; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuse [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: jbendass@cena.usp.br; pcotrive@pira.cena.usp.br; Carneiro Junior, Francisco [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica]. E-mail: fcarneir@unimep.br

    1998-06-01

    The main objective of the present paper was to evaluate the regeneration process of Dowex 1-X8 and Dowex 2-X8, 100-200 mesh anionic resins, from Cl{sup -} to OH{sup -} forms. The efficiency of the regeneration process with different concentrations of the eluent sodium hydroxide solution was determined. (author)

  12. Hydrolysis of Methylal Catalyzed by Ion Exchange Resins in Aqueous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gaoyin; Dai, Fangfang; Shi, Midong; Li, Qingsong; Yu, Yingmin

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, the chemical equilibrium and kinetics of methylal (PODE1) hydrolysis catalyzed by ion-exchange resin in aqueous solutions were investigated. The study covers temperatures between 333.15 and 363.15 K at various starting compositions covering (PODE1 + MeOH)/water molar ratio ranges from 0.5 to 1.5 in a time scale. On the basis of the experimental results, a mole fraction-based model of the chemical equilibrium and a pseudohomogeneous model are proposed to fit data based on true amount of monomeric formaldehyde. It has been demonstrated that the hydrolysis of PODE1 is slightly endothermic with the enthalpy 8.19 kJ/mol and the rate determining step. Finally, a feed-forward artificial neural networks (ANN) model is developed to model the concentration change of methanol in aqueous solutions. The results showed that the predicted data from designed ANN model were in good agreement with the experimental data with the coefficient ( R 2) of 0.98. Designed ANN provides a reliable method for modeling the hydrolysis reaction of methylal (PODE1).

  13. Investigation on formaldehyde release from preservatives in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, C; Hou, J; Xie, W; Cheng, H

    2015-10-01

    To understand formaldehyde residue in cosmetics, an investigation on formaldehyde release from eight preservatives (methenamine - MA, paraformaldehyde - PF, poly(p-toluenesulfonamide-co-formaldehyde) -PTSAF, quaternium-15 - QU, imidazolidinyl urea - IU, diazolidinyl urea - DU, dimethyloldimethyl hydantoin - DMDM and bronopol - BP) under various conditions was performed. The concentration of released formaldehyde was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. The amounts of formaldehyde release were in the order of PF > DU > DMDM ≈ QU ≈ IU > MA > BP > PTSAF. The releasing amounts of formaldehyde were the highest in the presence of aqueous matrices for the releasers except QU and IU, and the releasing effect was also relative to pH. More formaldehyde was released with longer storage time and higher temperature. Furthermore, all preservatives in cosmetic matrices released fewer amounts of formaldehyde than in pure aqueous or organic matrices, and the formaldehyde-releasing amounts were also cosmetic specific. Formaldehyde release was dependent on the matrix, pH, time and mainly temperature, and the releasing effect was also cosmetic specific. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  14. An Analytical Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) Flow Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fink, Bruce

    2000-01-01

    .... The analytical solution presented here provides insight into the scaling laws governing fill times and resin inlet placement as a function of the properties of the preform, distribution media, and resin...

  15. Afgivelse af formaldehyd fra byggevarer og forbrugerprodukter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Barbara; Gunnarsen, Lars; Funch, Llis Winther

    Rapporten præsenterer resultatet af en undersøgelse af formaldehydafgivelse fra 22 mulige kilder i indeklimaet. Undersøgelsen er gennemført for om muligt at finde årsagen til de høje koncentrationer af formaldehyd i indeluften, der blev fundet i enkelte danske boliger under en foregående undersøg......Rapporten præsenterer resultatet af en undersøgelse af formaldehydafgivelse fra 22 mulige kilder i indeklimaet. Undersøgelsen er gennemført for om muligt at finde årsagen til de høje koncentrationer af formaldehyd i indeluften, der blev fundet i enkelte danske boliger under en foregående...

  16. Electro-catalytic biodiesel production from canola oil in methanolic and ethanolic solutions with low cost stainless steel and hybrid ion-exchange resin grafted electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allioux, Francois-Marie; Holland, Brendan J.; Kong, Lingxue; Dumée, Ludovic F.

    2017-07-01

    Biodiesel is a growing alternative to petroleum fuels and is produced by the catalysed transesterification of fats in presence of an alcohol base. Transesterification processes using homogeneous catalysts are considered to be amongst the most efficient methods but rely on the feedstock quality and low water content in order to avoid undesirable saponification reactions. In this work, the electro-catalytic conversion of canola oil to biodiesel in a 1% aqueous methanolic and ethanolic reaction mixture was performed without the addition of external catalyst or co-solvent. An inexpensive stainless steel electrode and a hybrid stainless steel electrode coated with an ion-exchange resin catalyst were used as cathode materials while the anode was composed of a plain carbon paper. The cell voltages were varied from 10 to 40 V and the reaction temperature maintained at 20 or 40°C. The canola oil conversion rates were found to be superior at 40°C without saponification reactions for cell voltages below 30 V. The conversion rates were as high as 87% for the hybrid electrode and 81% for the plain stainless steel electrode. This work could inspire new process development for the conversion of high water content feedstock for the production of second-generation biodiesel.

  17. Deposition of crystalline hydroxyapatite nano-particle on zirconia ceramic: a potential solution for the poor bonding characteristic of zirconia ceramics to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, Abbas; Nikzad, Sakineh; Yazdani, Arash; Atri, Faezeh; Fazel Anvari-Yazdi, Abbas

    2017-07-01

    The poor bonding strength of zirconia to different dental substrates is one of the challenging issues in restorative dentistry. Hydroxyapatite is an excellent biocompatible material with fine bonding properties. In this study, it was hypothesized that hydroxyapatite coating on zirconia would improve its bond strength. Forty-five zirconia blocks were prepared and randomly divided into three groups: hydroxyapatite coating, sandblasting, and no preparation (control). The blocks were bonded to cement and the micro-shear bond strength was measured following load application. The bond strength values were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test in 3 groups and paired comparisons were made using the Mann-Whitney U test. The failure patterns of the specimens were studied by a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope and then analyzed by the chi-square test (significance level = 0.05). Deposition of hydroxyapatite on the zirconia surface significantly improved its bond strength to the resin cement in comparison with the control specimens (p < 0.0001). Also, the bond strength was similar to the sandblasted group (p = 0.34). The sandblasted and control group only showed adhesive failure, but the hydroxyapatite coated group had mixed failures, indicating the better quality of bonding (p < 0.0001). As a final point, hydroxyapatite coating on the zirconia surface improved the bond strength quality and values.

  18. Electro-Catalytic Biodiesel Production from Canola Oil in Methanolic and Ethanolic Solutions with Low-Cost Stainless Steel and Hybrid Ion-Exchange Resin Grafted Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois-Marie Allioux

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a growing alternative to petroleum fuels and is produced by the catalyzed transesterification of fats in presence of an alcohol base. Transesterification processes using homogeneous catalysts are considered to be among the most efficient methods but rely on the feedstock quality and low water content in order to avoid undesirable saponification reactions. In this work, the electro-catalytic conversion of canola oil to biodiesel in a 1% aqueous methanolic and ethanolic reaction mixture was performed without the addition of external catalyst or cosolvent. An inexpensive stainless steel (SS electrode and a hybrid SS electrode coated with an ion-exchange resin catalyst were used as cathode materials while the anode was composed of a plain carbon paper. The cell voltages were varied from 10 to 40 V and the reaction temperature maintained at 20 or 40°C. The canola oil conversion rates were found to be superior at 40°C without saponification reactions for cell voltages below 30 V. The conversion rates were as high as 87% for the hybrid electrode and 81% for the plain SS electrode. This work could inspire new process development for the conversion of high water content feedstock for the production of second-generation biodiesel.

  19. Resin-Powder Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standfield, Clarence E.

    1994-01-01

    Resin-powder dispenser used at NASA's Langley Research Center for processing of composite-material prepregs. Dispenser evenly distributes powder (resin polymer and other matrix materials in powder form) onto wet uncured prepregs. Provides versatility in distribution of solid resin in prepreg operation. Used wherever there is requirement for even, continuous distribution of small amount of powder.

  20. A rapid liquid chromatography determination of free formaldehyde in cod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Joseph M; Andersen, Wendy C; Heise, Andrea; Turnipseed, Sherri B; Lohne, Jack; Thomas, Terri; Madson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A rapid method for the determination of free formaldehyde in cod is described. It uses a simple water extraction of formaldehyde which is then derivatised with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) to form a sensitive and specific chromophore for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) detection. Although this formaldehyde derivative has been widely used in past tissue analysis, this paper describes an improved derivatisation procedure. The formation of the DNPH formaldehyde derivative has been shortened to 2 min and a stabilising buffer has been added to the derivative to increase its stability. The average recovery of free formaldehyde in spiked cod was 63% with an RSD of 15% over the range of 25-200 mg kg(-1) (n = 48). The HPLC procedure described here was also compared to a commercial qualitative procedure - a swab test for the determination of free formaldehyde in fish. Several positive samples were compared by both methods.

  1. Problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam for residential insulation. Part II. The effects of temperature and humidity on free formaldehyde, extractable formaldehyde, formaldehyde emission, and physical characteristics of the foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schutte, W.C.; Cole, R.S.; Frank, C.W.; Long, K.R.

    1981-02-01

    Results of testing with two products of urea-formaldehyde based foams are described. Results of three products have previously been reported. Methods for detection and quantitative determination of formaldehyde, design of the experimental chambers, and the procedures are described. Samples of Product D were monitored for about 29 days and samples of Product E were monitored for 60 days in chambers and results are tabulated for formaldehyde emission. Additional tests performed on the two products are: extractable formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); free formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); comparison of free formaldehyde concentration; density (high and low temperature conditions); shrinkage (high and low temperature conditions). Control panels were constructed to simulate a wall in a home and observations were made and compared with results of the experimental products.

  2. Low-density resin impregnated ceramic article and method for making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Huy K. (Inventor); Henline, William D. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-ta S. (Inventor); Rasky, Daniel J. (Inventor); Riccitiello, Salvatore R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A low-density resin impregnated ceramic article advantageously employed as a structural ceramic ablator comprising a matrix of ceramic fibers. The fibers of the ceramic matrix are coated with an organic resin film. The organic resin can be a thermoplastic resin or a cured thermosetting resin. In one embodiment, the resin is uniformly distributed within the ceramic article. In a second embodiment, the resin is distributed so as to provide a density gradient along at least one direction of the ceramic article. The resin impregnated ceramic article is prepared by providing a matrix of ceramic fibers; immersing the matrix of ceramic fibers in a solution of a solvent and an organic resin infiltrant; and removing the solvent to form a resin film on the ceramic fibers.

  3. Formaldehyde scavengers function as novel antigen retrieval agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollert, Craig T.; Moree, Wilna J.; Gregory, Steven; Bark, Steven J.; Eriksen, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen retrieval agents improve the detection of formaldehyde-fixed proteins, but how they work is not well understood. We demonstrate that formaldehyde scavenging represents a key characteristic associated with effective antigen retrieval; under controlled temperature and pH conditions, scavenging improves the typical antigen retrieval process through reversal of formaldehyde-protein adduct formation. This approach provides a rational framework for the identification and development of more effective antigen retrieval agents. PMID:26612041

  4. BLM protein mitigates formaldehyde-induced genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Anuradha; Owen, Nichole; Juarez, Eleonora; McCullough, Amanda K

    2015-04-01

    Formaldehyde is a reactive aldehyde that has been classified as a class I human carcinogen by the International Agency for Cancer Research. There are growing concerns over the possible adverse health effects related to the occupational and environmental human exposures to formaldehyde. Although formaldehyde-induced DNA and protein adducts have been identified, the genomic instability mechanisms and the cellular tolerance pathways associated with formaldehyde exposure are not fully characterized. This study specifically examines the role of a genome stability protein, Bloom (BLM) in limiting formaldehyde-induced cellular and genetic abnormalities. Here, we show that in the absence of BLM protein, formaldehyde-treated cells exhibited increased cellular sensitivity, an immediate cell cycle arrest, and an accumulation of chromosome radial structures. In addition, live-cell imaging experiments demonstrated that formaldehyde-treated cells are dependent on BLM for timely segregation of daughter cells. Both wild-type and BLM-deficient formaldehyde-treated cells showed an accumulation of 53BP1 and γH2AX foci indicative of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, relative to wild-type cells, the BLM-deficient cells exhibited delayed repair of formaldehyde-induced DSBs. In response to formaldehyde exposure, we observed co-localization of 53BP1 and BLM foci at the DSB repair site, where ATM-dependent accumulation of formaldehyde-induced BLM foci occurred after the recruitment of 53BP1. Together, these findings highlight the significance of functional interactions among ATM, 53BP1, and BLM proteins as responders associated with the repair and tolerance mechanisms induced by formaldehyde. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. SOLUTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Hoyos Guajardo, Ph.D. Candidate, M.Sc., B.Eng.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The theory that is presented below aims to conceptualise how a group of undergraduate students tackle non-routine mathematical problems during a problem-solving course. The aim of the course is to allow students to experience mathematics as a creative process and to reflect on their own experience. During the course, students are required to produce a written ‘rubric’ of their work, i.e., to document their thoughts as they occur as well as their emotionsduring the process. These ‘rubrics’ were used as the main source of data.Students’ problem-solving processes can be explained as a three-stage process that has been called ‘solutioning’. This process is presented in the six sections below. The first three refer to a common area of concern that can be called‘generating knowledge’. In this way, generating knowledge also includes issues related to ‘key ideas’ and ‘gaining understanding’. The third and the fourth sections refer to ‘generating’ and ‘validating a solution’, respectively. Finally, once solutions are generated and validated, students usually try to improve them further before presenting them as final results. Thus, the last section deals with‘improving a solution’. Although not all students go through all of the stages, it may be said that ‘solutioning’ considers students’ main concerns as they tackle non-routine mathematical problems.

  6. PILOT STUDY OF CONTACT SENSITIZATION OF FORMALDEHYDE-RELEASERS, FORMALDEHYDE AND GLUTARALDEHYDE IN DENTAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyapina Maya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Occupational allergic contact sensitization is common in dental personnel. Some of the most common occupational allergens in dental practice are some formaldehyde-releasers, formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde. Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the rate of contact sensitization to formaldehyde, quaternium-15, imidazolidinyl urea, diazolidinyl urea, and to glutaraldehyde in students of dental medicine and dental patients. Material and methods: A total of 50 participants were included in the study: 40 students of dental medicine exposed to formaldehyde-releasers, formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde during the course of their education; 10 dental patients without occupational exposure to the latter substances served as a control group. All of them were patch-tested with the studied allergens. Results: The sensitization rate to formaldehyde was significantly higher in the group of dental patients if compared to the one of dental students (χ2=5.37; p=0.021. Positive skin patch test reactions to quaternium-15 and to imidazolidinyl urea were observed only in the group of dental students. A significantly higher rate of sensitization to diazolidinyl urea, if compared to the one to imidazolidinyl urea (χ2=5.4; p=0.02 and to quaternium-15 (χ2=6.76; p=0.009, as well as to glutaraldehyde, if compared to the one to quaternium-15 (χ2=3.96; p=0.04 for the whole studied population was established. For the whole studied population, significantly increased rate of concomitant sensitization to formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde (χ2=6.18 p=0.013, as well as to diazolidinyl urea and to glutaraldehyde was established (χ2=9.12 p=0.003. Conclusions: We consider the importance of exposure to diazolidinyl urea, quaternium-15, imidazolidinyl urea and glutaraldehyde during the course of practical education in dentistry for the onset of sensitization. The exposure to formaldehyde is ubiquitous and is difficult to distinguish the roles of

  7. Petroleum Resins: Separation, Character, and Role in Petroleum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Ivar; Speight, James

    2001-01-01

    In petroleum science, the term resin generally implies material that has been eluted from various solid adsorbents, whereas the term maltenes (or petrolenes) indicates a mixture of the resins and oils obtained as filtrates from the asphaltene precipitation. Thus, after the asphaltenes are precipi......In petroleum science, the term resin generally implies material that has been eluted from various solid adsorbents, whereas the term maltenes (or petrolenes) indicates a mixture of the resins and oils obtained as filtrates from the asphaltene precipitation. Thus, after the asphaltenes...... are precipitated, adsorbents are added to the n-pentane solutions of the resins and oils, by which process the resins are adsorbed and subsequently recovered by the use of a more polar solvent, and the oils remain in solution. The resin fraction plays an important role in the stability of petroleum and prevents...... of the fact that the resin fraction is extremely important to the stability of petroleum, there is surprisingly little work reported on the characteristics of the resins. This article summarizes the work that has been carried out in determining the character and properties of the resin constituents...

  8. Degradation of formaldehyde in anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, N.S. [Laboratorio de Processos Biologicos (LPB), Departamento de Hidraulica e Saneamento, Escola de Engenharia de Sao Carlos (EESC), Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP, Engenharia Ambiental, Bloco 4-F, Av. Joao Dagnone, 1100 Santa Angelina, 13.563-120 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Zaiat, M. [Laboratorio de Processos Biologicos (LPB), Departamento de Hidraulica e Saneamento, Escola de Engenharia de Sao Carlos (EESC), Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP, Engenharia Ambiental, Bloco 4-F, Av. Joao Dagnone, 1100 Santa Angelina, 13.563-120 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: zaiat@sc.usp.br

    2009-04-30

    The present study evaluated the degradation of formaldehyde in a bench-scale anaerobic sequencing batch reactor, which contained biomass immobilized in polyurethane foam matrices. The reactor was operated for 212 days at 35 deg. C with 8 h sequential cycles, under different affluent formaldehyde concentrations ranging from 31.6 to 1104.4 mg/L (formaldehyde loading rates from 0.08 to 2.78 kg/m{sup 3} day). The results indicate excellent reactor stability and over 99% efficiency in formaldehyde removal, with average effluent formaldehyde concentration of 3.6 {+-} 1.7 mg/L. Formaldehyde degradation rates increased from 204.9 to 698.3 mg/L h as the initial concentration of formaldehyde was increased from around 100 to around 1100 mg/L. However, accumulation of organic matter was observed in the effluent (chemical oxygen demand (COD) values above 500 mg/L) due to the presence of non-degraded organic acids, especially acetic and propionic acids. This observation poses an important question regarding the anaerobic route of formaldehyde degradation, which might differ substantially from that reported in the literature. The anaerobic degradation pathway can be associated with the formation of long-chain oligomers from formaldehyde. Such long- or short-chain polymers are probably the precursors of organic acid formation by means of acidogenic anaerobic microorganisms.

  9. Development of a formaldehyde biosensor with application to synthetic methylotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolston, Benjamin M; Roth, Timothy; Kohale, Ishwar; Liu, David R; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a prevalent environmental toxin and a key intermediate in single carbon metabolism. The ability to monitor formaldehyde concentration is, therefore, of interest for both environmental monitoring and for metabolic engineering of native and synthetic methylotrophs, but current methods suffer from low sensitivity, complex workflows, or require expensive analytical equipment. Here we develop a formaldehyde biosensor based on the FrmR repressor protein and cognate promoter of Escherichia coli. Optimization of the native repressor binding site and regulatory architecture enabled detection at levels as low as 1 µM. We then used the sensor to benchmark the in vivo activity of several NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh) variants, the rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes the first step of methanol assimilation. In order to use this biosensor to distinguish individuals in a mixed population of Mdh variants, we developed a strategy to prevent cross-talk by using glutathione as a formaldehyde sink to minimize intercellular formaldehyde diffusion. Finally, we applied this biosensor to balance expression of mdh and the formaldehyde assimilation enzymes hps and phi in an engineered E. coli strain to minimize formaldehyde build-up while also reducing the burden of heterologous expression. This biosensor offers a quick and simple method for sensitively detecting formaldehyde, and has the potential to be used as the basis for directed evolution of Mdh and dynamic formaldehyde control strategies for establishing synthetic methylotrophy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Generation of constant formaldehyde levels for inhalation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmat, J L

    1985-11-01

    Development of the described formaldehyde generator was undertaken to provide researchers engaged in inhalation studies with the capability to produce constant and controllable levels of formaldehyde in air. Depolymerization of purified paraformaldehyde under rigorously controlled conditions in a modified Freeland calibration manifold is employed. The desired formaldehyde concentration in the exposure chamber is achieved by adding an appropriate fraction of the generator effluent to the normal air supply to the chamber. Variation in generator formaldehyde concentration is less than +/- 11% over a three-day period and less than +/- 2% over short periods (36 seconds).

  11. Formaldehyde Crosslinking: A Tool for the Study of Chromatin Complexes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Elizabeth A.; Frey, Brian L.; Smith, Lloyd M.; Auble, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde has been used for decades to probe macromolecular structure and function and to trap complexes, cells, and tissues for further analysis. Formaldehyde crosslinking is routinely employed for detection and quantification of protein-DNA interactions, interactions between chromatin proteins, and interactions between distal segments of the chromatin fiber. Despite widespread use and a rich biochemical literature, important aspects of formaldehyde behavior in cells have not been well described. Here, we highlight features of formaldehyde chemistry relevant to its use in analyses of chromatin complexes, focusing on how its properties may influence studies of chromatin structure and function. PMID:26354429

  12. Formaldehyde crosslinking: a tool for the study of chromatin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Elizabeth A; Frey, Brian L; Smith, Lloyd M; Auble, David T

    2015-10-30

    Formaldehyde has been used for decades to probe macromolecular structure and function and to trap complexes, cells, and tissues for further analysis. Formaldehyde crosslinking is routinely employed for detection and quantification of protein-DNA interactions, interactions between chromatin proteins, and interactions between distal segments of the chromatin fiber. Despite widespread use and a rich biochemical literature, important aspects of formaldehyde behavior in cells have not been well described. Here, we highlight features of formaldehyde chemistry relevant to its use in analyses of chromatin complexes, focusing on how its properties may influence studies of chromatin structure and function. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Separation of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs from {sup 125}I solution for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram, Ramu; Dash, Ashutosh [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Isotope Production and Applications Div.; Banerjee, Dayamoy [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Process Development Div.

    2015-06-01

    While neutron irradiation of natural Xe gas followed by wet chemical dissolution of activation products constitutes a successful paradigm for the small scale production {sup 125}I, the concomitant production of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs emerged as the primary impediment which necessitates purification of {sup 125}I solution. This paper describes an ion-exchange chromatographic technique using Resorcinol Formaldehyde (RF) resin to purify {sup 125}I solution from {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs impurities. A thorough investigation of the adsorption parameters of RF resin was carried out to arrive at the experimental conditions resulting optimum retention of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs impurities. Based on the experimental findings, an optimized separation procedure was developed in which the neutron irradiated dissolved products at pH ∝ 13 was passed through a chromatography column containing RF resin where in {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs impurities gets adsorbed leaving behind {sup 125}I to appear in the effluent. The overall recovery of {sup 125}I was >90% with acceptable purity amenable for clinical applications.

  14. Resistance of particleboard panels made of agricultural residues and bonded with synthetic resins or PVC plastic to wood-rotting fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divino Eterno Teixeira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the resistance of three types of particleboard panel to biodeterioration, two of which bonded with synthetic resins and one bonded with PVC plastic. Composite panels were made using sugar cane straw particles as raw material which were bonded together with urea-formaldehyde (UF, tannin-formaldehyde (TANI and PVC plastic (PVC resins. Decay tests were performed following procedures outlined in the ASTM D2017-81/1994 standard, whereby sample specimens were subjected to attack by white rot fungus Trametes versicolor and brown rot fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum using pine (Pinus sp. and embaúba (Cecropia sp. as reference timber. Panels bonded with PVC resin were rated ‘resistant’ to attack by both fungi while those bonded with UF and TANI resins were rated ‘slightly resistant’ to their attack.

  15. 78 FR 51695 - Formaldehyde Emissions Standards for Composite Wood Products; Extension of Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 770 RIN 2070-AJ92 Formaldehyde Emissions Standards for Composite Wood Products..., concerning formaldehyde emissions standards for composite wood products. After receiving requests for an... CFR Part 770 Environmental protection, Formaldehyde, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Toxic...

  16. Formaldehyde and LeukemiA: Epidemiology, Potential Mechanisms and Implications for Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formaldehyde is widely used in the United States and other countries. Occupational and environmental exposures to formaldehyde may be associated with an increased risk of leukemia in exposed individuals. However, risk assessment of formaldehyde and leukemia has been challenging ...

  17. Assessment of the Harmfulness of Moulding Sands with Alkyd Resin Subjected to the High Temperature Influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtzer M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Out of moulding sands used in the foundry industry, sands with organic binders deserve a special attention. These binders are based on synthetic resins, which ensure obtaining the proper technological properties and sound castings, however, they negatively influence the environment. These resins in their initial state these resins are not very dangerous for people and for the environment, thus under an influence of high temperatures they generate very harmful products, being the result of their thermal decomposition. Depending on the kind of the applied resin, under an influence of a temperature such compounds as: furfuryl alcohol, formaldehyde, phenol, BTEX group (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, and also polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs can be formed and released.

  18. Physical and mechanical properties of bio-composites from wood particles and liquefied wood resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui Pan; Todd F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse

    2009-01-01

    Compression molded composites were made from wood particles and a liquefied wood/phenol/formaldehyde co-condensed resin. Based on our previous research, a phenol to wood (P/W) ratio of 2/1 was chosen for this study. The two experimental variables selected were: 1) liquefaction temperature (150o and 180oC) and 2) cooking method (atmospheric and sealed). Panels were...

  19. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekala, R.W.

    1988-05-26

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer ''clusters''. The covalent crosslinking of these ''clusters'' produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density less than or equal to100 mg/cc; cell size less than or equal to0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent,dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 A/degree/. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Ketahanan Bending Komposit Hybrid Serat Batang Kelapa/Serat Gelas Dengan Matrik Urea Formaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasmi Herlina Sari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The composite has its own advantages compared to other alternative techniques such material is strong, lightweight,corrosion-resistant, economical and so on. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of bending strengthfiber composite hybrid coconut trunk / fiber glass using urea formaldehyde resin.Hybrid palm trunk fiber /glass fiber composite have been made by hand lay up which volume fraction fiber hybridvariation namely 10:20, 15:15 and 20:10 (% with length fiber 2 cm. Every Tests conducted were bending testing with eachvariation performed three times repetition. Bending test specimens in accordance with standard ASTMD 790.The results of bending strength of palm trunk fiber hybrid composite / fiber-glass with random fiber direction that thehighest bending strength in the palm trunk fiber volume fraction 10% and 20% glass fiber that is 22.7 N/mm2.

  1. Preparation, Characterization, and Properties of In Situ Formed Graphene Oxide/Phenol Formaldehyde Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO has shown great potential to be used as fillers to develop polymer nanocomposites for important applications due to their special 2D geometrical structure as well as their outstanding mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. In this work, GO was incorporated into phenol formaldehyde (PF resin by in situ polymerization. The morphologies and structures of GO sheets were characterized by FTIR, XRD, and AFM methods. The structure and properties of the GO/PF nanocomposites were characterized using FTIR, XRD, DSC, and TGA methods. Effects of GO content, reactive conditions, and blending methods on the structure and properties of GO/PF nanocomposites were studied. It was found that due to the well dispersion of GO sheets in polymer matrix and the strong interfacial interaction between the GO sheets and PF matrix, the thermal stability and thermal mechanical properties of the GO/PF nanocomposites were greatly enhanced.

  2. Melamine-formaldehyde microcapsules filled sappan dye modified polypropylene composites: encapsulation and thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanyawong, Suphitcha; Siengchin, Suchart; Parameswaranpillai, Jyotishkumar; Asawapirom, Udom; Polpanich, Duangporn

    2018-01-01

    Sappan dye, a natural dye extracted from sappan wood is widely used in cosmetics, textile dyeing and as food additives. However, it was recognized that natural dyes cannot withstand high temperature. In this study, a protective coating of melamine-formaldehyde shell material was applied over the sappan dye to improve its thermal stability. The percentage of sappan dye used in the microencapsulation was 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 wt%. The color, shape, size, and thermal stability of sappan dye microcapsules were investigated. It was found that increasing amount of sappan dye content in the microcapsules decreased the particle size. Thermal analysis reveals that the melamine-formaldehyde resin served as an efficient protective shell for sappan dye. Besides, 30 wt% sappan dye microcapsules with different weight percent (1, 3 and 5 wt%) of sappan dye was used as modifier for polypropylene (PP). All the prepared composites are red in color which supports the thermal stability of the microcapsules. The changes in crystallinity and melting behavior of PP by the addition of microcapsules were studied in detail by differential scanning calorimetry. Thermogravimetric studies showed that the thermal stability of PP composites increased by the addition of microcapsules.

  3. Concentrations of formaldehyde in rain waters harvested at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Formaldehyde has been recognized as one of the most important pollutants and a carcinogen that is present in the air, water, foods, soils, fabrics, cosmetics, cigarette smoke and treated wood. Related health effects and hazards are linked to formaldehyde, depending on mode of exposure which includes: weakness, ...

  4. [Effect of formaldehyde inhalation on allergic rhinitis in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Rong; Xu, Yu

    2015-08-01

    To observe the effect of formaldehyde inhalation on the allergic rhinitis mice model. Forty-eight male BALB/C mice in six experimental group were exposure to (A) saline control; (B) Der p1; (C) formaldehyde (3.0 mg/m3); (D) Derp1 + formaldehyde (1.5 mg/m3); (E) Der p1 + formaldehyde (3.0 mg/M3); (F) Der p1+ formaldehyde (6.0 mg/m3). The concentrations of IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ in the peripheral serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA). Nasal mucosal inflammation was evaluated by HE staining. Result: Formaldehyde exposure could increase the number of allergic rhinitis mice with sneezing and rubbing nose. The levels of IL-4 and IL-10 in group B, D, E and F were higher than that ingroup A (P formaldehyde exposure allergic rhinitis groups. The study showed that formaldehyde exposure can promote Th2 cytokines and eosinophil infiltration and then aggravate the allergic rhinitis symptoms.

  5. Influence of indoor formaldehyde pollution on respiratory system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The decoration of interior spaces can lead to dangerous levels of indoor formaldehyde pollution. Exposure to indoor air pollution may be responsible for nearly 2 million deaths per year in developing countries. Objectives To assess the prevalence of indoor formaldehyde pollution caused by decoration and ...

  6. The use of new modified poly(acrylamide chelating resin with pendent benzothiazole groups containing donor atoms in the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semmedu Selvaraj Kalaivani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption studies of poly(6-(ethoxybenzothiazole acrylamide (PEBTA, for Cu(II and Zn(II metal ions removal from an aqueous solution have been investigated, as a function of solution pH, adsorbent dose, contact time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature. The chemical and structural characteristics of the adsorbent were determined by the FT-IR, 1H-NMR, TGA, SEM, and EDAX analysis. The maximum adsorption capacities of the adsorbent for Cu(II and Zn(II ions, as calculated from the Langmuir isotherm model, were 273.5 and 216.4 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption kinetic studies show that the adsorption of Cu(II and Zn(II ions onto PEBTA follows the pseudo second order kinetic model. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° were also evaluated, and it has been found that the adsorption process is feasible, spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Desorption studies were carried out using 0.3 N HCl, and it revealed that the adsorbed Cu(II and Zn(II ions can be easily removed. The adsorption–desorption process is reversible, and this indicates that PEBTA is an effective adsorbent for the removal of heavy metal ions from an aqueous medium.

  7. Unusual formaldehyde-induced hypersensitivity in two schoolgirls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammage, R.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Hanna, W.T.; Painter, P.B. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Two schoolgirls developed a syndrome resembling Henoch-Schonlein purpura while attending a recently opened school insulated with urea-formaldehyde foam (UFFI). Skin rashes and swellings were accompanied by bizarre, blue-green discoloration of the skin. Subsequent investigations by county, state and federal authorities, and low measured concentrations of formaldehyde, prompted initial conclusions that in-school formaldehyde exposures were not responsible for the girls' problems. Subsequent controlled exposures to UFFI and formaldehyde while in hospital elicited the whole cascade of symptoms. The chronology of the onset and amplification of systems make it probable that the formaldehyde exposures precipitating the girls' hypersensitivity, occurred in the school. 3 refs.

  8. Uptake behaviour of actinides employing malonamide grafted polystyrene-divinyl benzene resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, S.A.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, one resin was prepared by chemically anchoring N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-dibutyl malonamide (DMDBMA) to chloromethylated polymeric resin. An attempt has been made to investigate the solid phase extraction of trivalent (Am and Pu), tetravalent (Pu and Th) and hexavalent (U) actinides using the anchored resin from nitric acid solution

  9. Proteinaceous Resin and Hydrophilic Encapsulation: A Self-Healing-Related Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ting

    Inspired by living organisms, self-healing materials have been designed as smart materials. Their automatic healing nature is achieved through the use of capsule in which the healing agent is encapsulated. The occurrence of cracks leads to ripping of the capsule, along with crack propagation and release of the healing agent that wets the crack surface to eventually heal (bond) the crack. Such automatic repair of the crack significantly extends the service life of the material. A vast majority of existing self-healing systems have been designed for the epoxy matrix - the most common commercially used thermoset - that possesses low crack resistance. Currently, self-healing systems have not yet been introduced for fully protein-based materials, despite their great potential to replace currently used synthesis precursors for the latter and the eco-friendly nature of self-healing materials. This has been probably due to two major obstacles: poor mechanical properties of the protein-based matrix, and extreme difficulty associated with the encapsulation of hydrophilic healing agents suitable for the protein-based matrix. This study provides possible solutions towards addressing both these obstacles. To improve the inherent mechanical properties of protein-based resin, soy protein isolate (SPI) was chosen as the model in this study. Dialdehyde carboxymethyl cellulose (DCMC) was synthesized and used as the crosslinking agent to modify the SPI film. As-synthesized DCMC - a fully bio-based material - exhibited high mechanical strength, excellent thermal stability, and reduced moisture sensitivity. Good compatibility and effective crosslinking were believed to be the key reasons for such property enhancements. However, these were accompanied by poor crack resistance, where self-healing is a pertinent solution. A novel healing system for the protein matrix was designed in this work via the use of formaldehyde as a healing agent. Subsequently, the well-acknowledged challenge, e

  10. [Refinement study of macroporous resin for Huang-Lian-Jie-Du decoction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-bin; Lu, Ning; Yang, Jin-ping; Lin, Jian-qun; Lin, Jian-qiang

    2007-10-01

    To study refinement of macroporous resin to Huang-Lian-Jie-Du decoction. The content changes of berberine, geniposide and total alkaloid in the solution which went through the macroporous resin were determined by TLC or spectrophotometry. The type of resin, absorption and desorption condition were optimized. YWD-09D macroporous resin was suitable for refinement of Huang-Lian-Jie-Du decoction. The absorptive capacity of the resin was 1: 1.3. The concentration of solution was 0.4 g/ml, pH 4 and current velocity was 2 ml/min. The ratio of diameter and high of the resin column was 1:20. The desorption solution was 90% alcohol of 4BV. YWD-09D macroporous resin and its selected condition are suitable for refinement of Huang-Lian-Jie-Du decoction.

  11. Initial Measurements of Radiocarbon In Atmospheric Formaldehyde at Narragansett, RI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H.; Heikes, B. G.; Xu, L.; McNichol, A. P.; Olson, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an intermediate in the atmospheric oxidation of nearly every volatile organic compound (VOC) and is important to odd-hydrogen radicals and ozone chemistry. It is directly observed from space and its distributions are used to constrain biogenic emissions of VOCs, specifically isoprene. The relative contribution of fossil VOCs and biogenic VOCs to formaldehyde, to isoprene emission estimates and subsequently to ozone and oxidant chemistry is expected to vary seasonally and spatially due to VOC speciation, emission patterns, and reactivity. The radiocarbon, 14C, content of formaldehyde is useful in assessing the relative contributions of fossil and biogenic VOC groups to formaldehyde. We report a compound specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) method for formaldehyde based upon gaseous formaldehyde collection, derivatization to thiazolidine, preparative capillary gas chromatography separation, and AMS analysis. Ambient measurements from Narragansett, RI, made in winter and summer 2007 are presented. On 11 of 13 samples, we find 80 to >95% of the collected formaldehyde is of fossil origin and, contrary to our initial hypothesis, we see no seasonal shift in proportion. The remaining 2 samples, one each from winter and summer, are 30-40% biogenic carbon. The measurements are interpreted considering fossil-biogenic source attribution and local transport conditions and contrasted with prior measurements from Nova Scotia. Further, CSRA measurement of acetaldehyde is feasible with the method.

  12. Histone redistribution and conformational effect on chromatin induced by formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polacow, I; Cabasso, L; Li, H J

    1976-10-19

    Histone redistributions between endogenous DNA in calf thymus chromatin and exogenous DNA from Clostridium perfringens (69% A + T) or from Micrococcus luteus (30% A + T) induced by 0.6 M NaCl or by 2% formaldehyde were studied by thermal denaturation. The observed redistribution occurred on histone Hl when the exogenous DNA was (A + T)-richer than the DNA in chromatin, and when the mixture was exposed to 0.6 M NaCl or formaldehyde. When a (G + C)-richer DNA was added as the acceptor for histones, no substantial transfer of histones from chromatin DNA to exogenous DNA was found. Thus the activation energy of histone dissociation from chromatin DNA seems to be substantially lowered by 0.6 M NaCl or formaldehyde such that histones (mostly histone Hl) can be dissociated and bind the (A + T)-richer DNA and form a more stable complex. It is suggested that the formaldehyde effect on histones may be due to the loss of positive charges on lysine and arginin residues (probably more on lysine than on arginine) in histones after their rapid reaction with formaldehyde. Formaldehyde treatment of chromatin also distorts the DNA conformation, as revealed by circular dichroism (CD) studies. This structural effect occurs mainly on those base pairs bound by histones other than Hl, or within the chromatin subunit. Histone redistribution is treated as a thermodynamic phenomenon of histone binding to DNA. The validity of using formaldehyde to study chromatin structure is discussed.

  13. Study on the colorimetric properties of 2,4,6-triarylpyridine derivative compound for imaging Formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovianto, D.; Ma’ruf, F. A. R.; Fadilah, N. N.; Sugiharta, I. B. A. R.; Purwono, B.

    2017-11-01

    The derivative compound of 2,4,6-triarylpyridine was synthesized in two steps. The target compound was tested as colorimetric chemosensor against formaldehyde and the limit of detection was also determined using spectrophotometer UV-vis. The first step of the synthesis was the formation of 4-phenyl-2,6-bis(4-nitrophenyl)pyridine compound (1) from 4-nitroacetophenon and benzaldehyde. The second step of the synthesis was the formation of 4-phenyl-2,6-bis-(4-aminophenyl)pyridine (2) from reduction of the nitro group in compound 1 by HCl 37% solution and Sn metal. Compound 1 and 2 were characterized by spectrometers FTIR, 1H NMR and direct inlet-mass spectrometry. The results showed that compound 1 was synthesized with a yield of 78.3% and compound 2 with a yield of 68.9%. Compound 2 as chemosensor showed color transition from colorless to yellow in chemosensor test against formaldehyde in ethanol solvent. The limit of detection of formaldehyde was measured as 4.7×10-3 M using spectrophotometer UV-vis.

  14. 40 CFR 80.56 - Measurement methods for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurement methods for formaldehyde... Measurement methods for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. (a) Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde will be measured by....140 of this chapter for formaldehyde analysis. Diluted exhaust sample volumes must be at least 15 L...

  15. Resin Flow in Fiber Preformed by Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding with Flexible Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Shokrieh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum assisted resin transfer molding, as a sub-branch of RTM is a method of manufacturing composite specimens. Considering the industrial development of this method, different modified techniques are designed to improve its performance. Among these techniques, using a half flexible mold is regarded as an important method. In this work, dominant equations of resin flow through the mold in polar coordinates are solved analytically. Based on this approach, closed-form solutions have been presented for different parameters such as thickness variation of preformed fiber, resin pressure, resin velocity and fiber volume fraction as functions of two variables, namely, time and the distance from injection port. After verification of the approach employed in this work, the results are presented. Important parameters influencing the quality and the rate production are studied in detail.

  16. EFFECT OF ACTIVATED CHARCOAL ADDITION ON FORMALDEHYDE EMISSION OF MEDIUM DENSITY FIBERBOARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saptadi Darmawan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The manufacturing of medium density fiberboard (MDF using dry forming process for interior purpose requires extensive amount of thermo-setting urea formaldehyde (UF adhesive. Unfortunately, this adhesive brings about formaldehyde emission from the resulting MDF, which was potentially harmful to human beings. The use of activated charcoal can be effective to reduce such emission. As the relevance, this research aimed to investigate the effect of activated charcoal addition to the MDF pulp on formaldehyde emission from the MDF. The fibers for the MDF-mat forming were the pulp procured from the MDF factory, resulting from the thermo-mechanical pulping (TMP conducted on the mixed mangium wood (Acacia mangium and rubber wood (Hevea brasiliensis in 3:1 (w/w proportion, respectively.  Such mixed TMP pulping was also done in the factor y.  The bonding between TMP pulp fiber during mat forming was assisted by the use of UF adhesive.  Prior to the MDF mat forming , was added to the resulting TMP pulp-fibers activated charcoal in  various amount, 2%, 4% and 6% based on fiber mass as well as based on UF adhesive mass. The activated charcoal was prepared by carbonizing candle nut shell into charcoal followed by activation process using phosphate solution.  Meanwhile the forming of MDF mat employed air-dr y process. As the control, MDF forming with UF adhesive was performed without addition of activated charcoal. It turned out that the activated charcoal-added MDF exhibited effective reduction in formaldehyde emission and significant improvement in physical and mechanical properties, i.e. lower thickness swelling , and greater MOR , MOE and internal bond, compared to the control MDF. The use of activated charcoal at 4% based on the adhesive mass seemed to be the optimum amount.  Physical and mechanical properties of the activated charcoal added MDF could mostly meet the JIS specification.

  17. The Preparation and Characterization of Pyrolysis Bio-Oil-Resorcinol-Aldehyde Resin Cold-Set Adhesives for Wood Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyong Ren

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF resin is a kind of excellent exterior-grade wood structural adhesive, which can be conveniently cold-set for various applications. In order to decrease the production cost, pyrolysis bio-oil from renewable bioresources was used to replace resorcinol to synthesize the bio-oil-resorcinol-aldehyde (BRF resin. The effect of replacing resorcinol with bio-oil on the properties, bonding performance, and characterization of resorcinol-aldehyde resin was comparatively investigated. A higher solid content and viscosity, albeit a lower shear strength, was found when the replacement ratio of bio-oil increased. The bonding performance of BRF with 10 and 20 wt % bio-oil was close to that of the pure RF resin. However, the trends of being less cross-linked, more easily decomposed, but more porous were found when the substitution ratio of bio-oil was higher than 20 wt %. Interestingly, it was found that the wood failure values of the BRF resins with bio-oil of no more than 20 wt % were slightly higher than that of the pure RF resin. On the whole, BRF resins with 20 wt % bio-oil is recommended as a wood structural adhesive, comprehensively considering the bio-oil substitution ratio and resin properties. The results obtained here showed that pyrolysis bio-oil is a promising green raw material for the production of RF resin with lower cost.

  18. Surface modification of self-healing poly(urea-formaldehyde) microcapsules using silane-coupling agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Haiyan [Center for Composite Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)], E-mail: lhy06b@163.com; Wang Rongguo; Hu Honglin; Liu Wenbo [Center for Composite Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2008-12-30

    Poly(urea-formaldehyde) (PUF) microcapsules, which are used as self-healing component of fibre reinforced resin matrix composites, were prepared by in situ polymerization method. The surface of PUF microcapsules was modified by using 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane-coupling agent (KH550), and the interfacial interactions between PUF microcapsules and KH550 was also studied. Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) analyses showed that the silane-coupling agent molecular binds strongly to PUF microcapsules surface. Chemical bond (Si-O-C) was formed by the reaction between Si-OH and the hydroxyl group of PUF microcapsules, also there have chemical adsorption effect in the interface simultaneously because of the existence of hydrogen bond between Si-OH and the hydroxyl group of PUF microcapsules. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) observation showed that a thin layer was formed on the surface of modified PUF microcapsules. Additionally, fractured surface were observed under SEM to investigate the interfacial adhesion effect between PUF microcapsules and epoxy matrix. The result indicted that the silane-coupling agent play an important role in improving the interfacial performance between microcapsules and resin matrix.

  19. Surface modification of self-healing poly(urea-formaldehyde) microcapsules using silane-coupling agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Wang, Rongguo; Hu, Honglin; Liu, Wenbo

    2008-12-01

    Poly(urea-formaldehyde) (PUF) microcapsules, which are used as self-healing component of fibre reinforced resin matrix composites, were prepared by in situ polymerization method. The surface of PUF microcapsules was modified by using 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane-coupling agent (KH550), and the interfacial interactions between PUF microcapsules and KH550 was also studied. Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) analyses showed that the silane-coupling agent molecular binds strongly to PUF microcapsules surface. Chemical bond (Si-O-C) was formed by the reaction between Si-OH and the hydroxyl group of PUF microcapsules, also there have chemical adsorption effect in the interface simultaneously because of the existence of hydrogen bond between Si-OH and the hydroxyl group of PUF microcapsules. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) observation showed that a thin layer was formed on the surface of modified PUF microcapsules. Additionally, fractured surface were observed under SEM to investigate the interfacial adhesion effect between PUF microcapsules and epoxy matrix. The result indicted that the silane-coupling agent play an important role in improving the interfacial performance between microcapsules and resin matrix.

  20. Reduction of polyester resin shrinkage by means of epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak, M.; Brzostowski, A.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt was made to decrease the shrinkage of unsaturated polyester resin, taking place during radiation-induced curing, by the addition of epoxy resin. In order to combine chemically both resins, the epoxy component was modified with cinnamic and acrylic acids. A composition of 90 parts of polyester resin, 10 parts of epoxy resin modified with cinnamic acid, and 150 parts of a silica filler showed a volume shrinkage of 1.2%. (author)

  1. Evidence of chemical reactions between di- and poly-glycidyl ether resins and tannins isolated from Pinus radiata D. Don bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Roy; Freer, Juanita; Baeza, Jaime

    2005-01-01

    This work evaluates the feasibility of reacting tannins isolated from Pinus radiata D. Don bark with epoxide resins of the diglycidyl and polyglycidyl ether type. To this end, gel times of aqueous tannin dispersions (40% w/w) with every one of nine selected resins (5% w/w), at previously established pH values (initial equal to 3.3, 4, 7 and 10), have been determined. Products of these reactions were analyzed by FT-IR spectroscopy, and the results were compared with those obtained from tannin-p-formaldehyde and (+)-catechin-p-formaldehyde systems, at the same pH values. Their mechanical properties were evaluated, by dynamic mechanical analysis, at two pH values (3.3 and 10). In general, it was concluded that tannin-epoxide resin systems behave similarly to tannin-paraformaldehyde systems, especially at basic pH values.

  2. Formaldehyde Profiler Using Laser Induced Fluorescence Technique, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Formaldehyde (HCHO) is of great interest to atmospheric scientists in NASA and other research institutions. In this SBIR project, we propose to build an airborne or...

  3. Status of iodine in formaldehyde-preserved milk - revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, D.M.; Gibson, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an investigation into the effect of formaldehyde preservation of raw milk in view of the differences observed by Murthy (J. Dairy Sci.; 45:1066 (1962) and J. Dairy Sci.; 49:1190 (1966)) and Thomas (personal communication. (1976)) are reported. The use of the specific electrode method for iodine analysis of formaldehyde-preserved milk has also been investigated. It was found that the Thomas preservation technique for 4 litre milk samples for 131 I analysis was acceptable, and an aliquot of the formaldehyde-preserved milk can be analyzed for total iodide concentration by the electrode method. Milk samples may also be preserved for stable iodide measurement (without iodide carrier addition) by addition of formaldehyde at 0.5 M concentration. (U.K.)

  4. Formaldehyde Surface Distributions and Variability in the Mexico City Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkermann, W.; Mohr, C.; Steinbrecher, R.; Ruiz Suarez, L.

    2007-05-01

    Formaldehyde ambient air mole fractions were measured throughout the dry season in March at three different locations in the Mexico City basin. The continuously running instruments were operated at Tenago del Aire, a site located in the Chalco valley in the southern venting area of the basin, at the Intituto Mexicano del Petroleo (IMP) in the northern part of the city and about 30 km north of the city at the campus of the Universidad Tecnològica de Tecamac (UTTEC). The technique used is the Hantzsch technology with a time resolution of 2 minutes and a detection limit of 100 ppt. Daily maxima peaked at 35 ppb formaldehyde in the city and about 15 to 20 ppb at the other sites. During night formaldehyde levels dropped to about 5 ppb or less. It is evident that the observed spatial and temporal variability in near surface formaldehyde distributions is strongly affected by local and regional advection processes.

  5. Formaldehyde cross-linking and structural proteomics: Bridging the gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa, Savita; Ding, Xuan; Kast, Juergen

    2015-11-01

    Proteins are dynamic entities constantly moving and altering their structures based on their functions and interactions inside and outside the cell. Formaldehyde cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry can accurately capture interactions of these rapidly changing biomolecules while maintaining their physiological surroundings. Even with its numerous established uses in biology and compatibility with mass spectrometry, formaldehyde has not yet been applied in structural proteomics. However, formaldehyde cross-linking is moving toward analyzing tertiary structure, which conventional cross-linkers have already accomplished. The purpose of this review is to describe the potential of formaldehyde cross-linking in structural proteomics by highlighting its applications, characteristics and current status in the field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Formaldehyde Profiler Using Laser Induced Fluorescence Technique Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a key trace species that is of great interest to atmospheric scientists in NASA and other research institutions. In this SBIR project, we...

  7. IRIS Toxicological Review of Formaldehyde (Inhalation) (External Review Draft 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    UPDATE EPA is currently revising its Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) assessment of formaldehyde to address the 2011 NAS peer review recommendations. This assessment addresses both noncancer and cancer human health effects that are relevant to assessing ...

  8. Low-Power Formaldehyde Detector for Space Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trace contamination of the International Space Station (ISS) by formaldehyde -- a known carcinogen -- is a significant threat to crew health. The spacecraft maximum...

  9. Low-power formaldehyde detector for space applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trace contamination of the International Space Station (ISS) by formaldehyde?a known carcinogen? is a significant potential threat to crew health. The spacecraft...

  10. 24 CFR 3280.309 - Health Notice on formaldehyde emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... reported as a result of formaldehyde exposure. Elderly persons and young children, as well as anyone with a history of asthma, allergies, or lung problems, may be at greater risk. Research is continuing on the...

  11. Restoration of traumatized teeth with resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2018-01-01

    For a long time, the primary choice for initial restoration of a crown-fractured front tooth has been resin composite material. The restoration can in most cases be performed immediately after injury if there is no sign of periodontal injury. The method’s adhesive character is conservative to tooth......-structure and with minimal risk of pulpal complication. In addition, it offers an aesthetic solution to the patient immediately after an injury, which may bring a little comfort in a sad situation. The resin composite build-up is often changed or repaired a couple of times, before the tooth is restored with a porcelain...... present an aesthetic problem due to exposure of un-aesthetic crown-margins. The invasive permanent crown restorations are therefore often not suc-cessful on a long-term scale. On the other hand, a conservative direct restoration of an extensively fractured incisor crown with resin composite may...

  12. Effect of resin content and substrate on the emission of BTEX and carbonyls from low-VOC water-based wall paint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Chi-Chi; Cheng, Yu-Lin

    2016-02-01

    The primary aim of this work is to explore the effect of resin content and the effect of substrate on the emission of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) and carbonyls from low-VOC water-based wall paint. Four low-volatile organic compound (VOC) paints include paints A (20% acrylic), B (30% acrylic), C (20% polyvinyl acetate), and D (30% polyvinyl acetate) were painted on stainless steel specimen for the study of resin effect. Green calcium silicate, green cement, and stainless steel were painted with paints A and C for the study of substrate effect. Concentrations of the VOCs in the chamber decreased with the elapsed time. Both resin type and resin quantity in paint had effects on VOC emissions. Paints with acrylic resin emitted less BTEX and carbonyls than paints with polyvinyl acetate resin. However, the effects of resin quantity varied with VOCs. Porous substrates were observed to interact more strongly with paints than inert substrates. Both green calcium silicate and green cement substrates have strong power of adsorption of VOCs from wall paints, namely toluene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2-butanone, methacrolein, butyraldehyde, and benzaldehyde. Some compounds like toluene, formaldehyde, and butyaldehyde were desorbed very slowly from green calcium silicate and green cement substrates.

  13. Association between formaldehyde exposure and miscarriage in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjing; Zhang, Weiqiang; Zhang, Xuezhen; Dong, Taowei; Zeng, Huiqian; Fan, Qiyun

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether higher plasma formaldehyde concentration existed in women diagnosed with miscarriage and whether it contributed to higher risk of miscarriage in Chinese women.A case-control study was conducted in 118 women with a diagnosed miscarriage at the first trimester and 191 healthy women who delivered at term. Plasma levels of formaldehyde were measured by gas chromatography in conjunction with mass spectrometry after derivatization of the formaldehyde to the pentafluorophenylhydrazone and characteristics of the subjects including age, education level, occupation, family income, home decoration status, and exposure to second-hand smoke were recorded. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the relationship between miscarriage and levels of formaldehyde.Women with miscarriage were comparable to controls in terms of age, education level, occupation, family income, and home decoration status. They were, however, more likely to be exposed to second-hand smoke. Plasma levels of formaldehyde were significantly higher in women with miscarriage (0.0944 ± 0.0105 vs. 0.0239 ± 0.0032 μg/mL, P formaldehyde (odds ratio [OR]: 8.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.96-13.09) and exposure to second-hand smoke (OR: 3.60, 95% CI: 1.58-8.20) were independently and significantly associated with higher risk of miscarriage.Plasma levels of formaldehyde were significantly higher in women who were diagnosed with miscarriage than those who delivered at term and higher levels of formaldehyde was an independent risk factor for miscarriage, with higher levels being associated with higher risk of miscarriage.

  14. Proposed residential indoor air quality guidelines for formaldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, N.

    2005-07-01

    This paper proposed a set of revised residential indoor air quality guidelines for formaldehyde. In the earlier guidelines, target and action levels were set at 60 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and 120 {mu}g/. However, epidemiological studies on the effects of chronic formaldehyde exposure have consistently found respiratory and allergic effects at levels below 123 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Formaldehyde levels in home have been associated with increased risk of atopy and have also been associated with the hospitalization of children. Summaries of various epidemiological studies were presented. A summary of critical effects and the derivation of the guidelines was provided. Based on clinical studies and animal experiments, the primary effects of acute exposure to formaldehyde are the irritation of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract and the eyes. The no observable adverse effects level (NOAEL) and lowest observable adverse effects level (LOAEL) for this outcome are 615 and 1,230 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. It was noted that an association between low-level exposure to formaldehyde and the development of allergic sensitization and asthma is biologically plausible as it is consistent with observations in animals. It was concluded that short-term exposure to formaldehyde should be limited to 123{mu}g/m{sup 3}. It was recommended that long term exposure to formaldehyde be limited to 50 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Although formaldehyde is carcinogenic to humans, the cancer risk associated with lifelong exposure at the recommended levels is estimated to be negligible. 73 refs., 9 tabs.

  15. Injection Seeded Laser for Formaldehyde Differential Fluorescence Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, G.; Yakshin, M.; Prasad, C.; Hanisco, T.; Mylapore, A. R.; Hwang, I. H.; Lee, S.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the design and development of an injection seeded Nd:YVO4 laser for use in a differential fluorescence lidar for measuring atmospheric formaldehyde profiles. A high repetition rate Q-switched laser is modified to accept injection seed input to spectrally narrow and tune the output. The third harmonic output is used to excite formaldehyde (HCHO) fluorescence when tuned to a HCHO absorption line. Spectral confirmation is made with the use of a photoacoustic cell and grating spectrometer.

  16. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000?). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the res...

  17. Processing of exhausted resins for Trino NPP,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuto, F.; Bitetti, G.; Maggini, F.; Scarsi, G.

    2009-01-01

    Decomposition of organic compounds contained in the spent ion exchange resins is considered effective in reducing the waste volume. A system using the wet-oxidation process has been studied for the treatment of the spent resins stored at Trino Nuclear Power Plant owned by SOGIN. Compared with various processes for treating sludge and resin, the wet-oxidation system is rather simple and the process conditions are mild. Not contaminated ion exchange resin samples similar to those ones used in Trino NPP were processed by wet-oxidation and appropriate decomposition of the organic compounds was verified. After decomposition the residue can be solidified with cement for final disposal. When compared with direct solidification without decomposition, the number of waste packages can be significantly reduced. Additional measures for conditioning secondary waste products have also been studied, and their applicability to the Trino Nuclear Power Plant was verified. Some of conditions studied were specific to the Trino Nuclear Power Plant, but it is expected that the system will provide an effective solution for resin treatment at other Italian NPPs. (authors)

  18. Genotoxicity of formaldehyde: Molecular basis of DNA damage and mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanobu eKawanishi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is commonly used in the chemical industry and is present in the environment, such as vehicle emissions, some building materials, food and tobacco smoke. It also occurs as a natural product in most organisms, the sources of which include a number of metabolic processes. It causes various acute and chronic adverse effects in humans if they inhale its fumes. Among the chronic effects on human health, we summarize data on genotoxicity and carcinogenicity in this review, and we particularly focus on the molecular mechanisms involved in the formaldehyde mutagenesis. Formaldehyde mainly induces N-hydroxymethyl mono-adducts on guanine, adenine and cytosine, and N-methylene crosslinks between adjacent purines in DNA. These crosslinks are types of DNA damage potentially fatal for cell survival if they are not removed by the nucleotide excision repair pathway. In the previous studies, we showed evidence that formaldehyde causes intra-strand crosslinks between purines in DNA using a unique method (Matsuda et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 26, 1769-1774,1998. Using shuttle vector plasmids, we also showed that formaldehyde as well as acetaldehyde induces tandem base substitutions, mainly at 5’-GG and 5’-GA sequences, which would arise from the intra-strand crosslinks. These mutation features are different from those of other aldehydes such as crotonaldehyde, acrolein, glyoxal and methylglyoxal. These findings provide molecular clues to improve our understanding of the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of formaldehyde.

  19. Formaldehyde Levels in Traditional and Portable Classrooms: A Pilot Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Isabela C; Kowalski, Peter J; Callahan, David B; Noonan, Gary P; Moffett, Daphne B; Olson, David R; Malilay, Josephine

    2016-03-01

    The pilot study discussed in this article assessed formaldehyde levels in portable classrooms (PCs) and traditional classrooms the authors evaluated formaldehyde levels in day and overnight indoor air (TCs) and explored factors influencing indoor air quality (e.g., carbon dioxide, temperature, and relative humidity). In a cross-sectional design, samples from nine PCs renovated within three years previously and three TCs in a school district in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. Formaldehyde levels ranged from 0.0068 to 0.038 parts per million (ppm). In both types of classroom, overnight formaldehyde median levels (PCs = 0.018 ppm; TCs = 0.019 ppm) were higher than day formaldehyde median levels (PCs = 0.011 ppm; TCs = 0.016 ppm). Carbon dioxide levels measured 470-790 ppm at 7:00 a.m. and 470-1800 ppm at 4:00 p.m. Afternoon medians were higher in TCs (1,400 ppm) than in PCs (780 ppm). Consistent with previous studies, formaldehyde levels were similar among PCs and TCs. Reducing carbon dioxide levels by improving ventilation is recommended for classrooms.

  20. Aging-associated excess formaldehyde leads to spatial memory deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhiqian; Han, Chanshuai; Luo, Wenhong; Li, Hui; Luo, Hongjun; Qiang, Min; Su, Tao; Wu, Beibei; Liu, Ying; Yang, Xu; Wan, You; Cui, Dehua; He, Rongqiao

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies show that formaldehyde participates in DNA demethylation/methylation cycle. Emerging evidence identifies that neuronal activity induces global DNA demethylation and re-methylation; and DNA methylation is a critical step for memory formation. These data suggest that endogenous formaldehyde may intrinsically link learning-responsive DNA methylation status and memory formation. Here, we report that during spatial memory formation process, spatial training induces an initial global DNA demethylation and subsequent re-methylation associated with hippocampal formaldehyde elevation then decline to baseline level in Sprague Dawley rats. Scavenging this elevated formaldehyde by formaldehyde-degrading enzyme (FDH), or enhancing DNA demethylation by a DNA demethylating agent, both led to spatial memory deficits by blocking DNA re-methylation in rats. Furthermore, we found that the normal adult rats intrahippocampally injected with excess formaldehyde can imitate the aged-related spatial memory deficits and global DNA methylation decline. These findings indicate that aging-associated excess formaldheyde contributes to cognitive decline during aging. PMID:23657727

  1. Health risks from indoor formaldehyde exposures in northwest weatherized residences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Sever, L.E.

    1986-10-01

    Conflicting opinions on the potential hazards associated with formaldehyde exposure triggered a national workshop to address the toxicological questions concerning the health effects of formaldehyde. Since quantitative human data are not available to derive a dose-response curve for formaldehyde risk assessment, nonhuman data are used. In the case of formaldehyde, data from animals exposed to high concentrations are used to estimate human risk at much lower concentrations. This study presents the several steps that make up a risk assessment and examines any additional data that might alter significantly the risk estimates presented in the 1984 EIS. Rat inhalation chronic bioassay data from a study sponsored by the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology (CIIT) have been used to develop a risk equation that was subsequently used by BPA in its EIS. The CIIT data base remains the only acceptable animal data that can support the estimation of a dose-response curve. The development of mathematical models continues with a great deal of energy, and the use of different models is largely responsible for the great variability of the formaldehyde risk estimates. While one can calculate different values for carcinogenic risk associated with formaldehyde exposure than were presented earlier in the BPA EIS, they are not likely to be any better.

  2. Formaldehyde in dentistry: a review of mutagenic and carcinogenic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.B.; Chestner, S.B.

    1981-09-01

    For many years there has been controversy over the value of antimicrobial drugs for intracanal dressings in endodontics. Formocresol, a formaldehyde compound, has evolved as the preferred drug for routine endodontic procedures, as well as pediatric endodontics. The increase in the use of formaldehyde has been complicated by the introduction of paraformaldehyde pastes for filling root canals. Neither of these formulas has ever been standardized. The doses are arbitrary, and the common dose of formocresol has been shown to be many times greater than the minimum dose needed for effect. The efficacy of paraformaldehyde pastes is questionable and remains clouded by inconclusive evidence, conflicting research, inadequate terminology, and a lack of convincing statistical evidence. The clinical use and delivery of formocresol and paraformaldehyde pastes remain arbitrary and unscientific. Formaldehyde has a known toxic mutagenic and carcinogenic potential. Many investigations have been conducted to measure the risk of exposure to formaldehyde; it is clear that formaldehyde poses a carcinogenic risk in humans. There is a need to reevaluate the rationale underlying the use of formaldehyde in dentistry particularly in light of its deleterious effects.

  3. On the Ability of Formaldehyde to Act as a Tethering Catalyst in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Mohammad P.; MacDonald, Melissa J.; Beauchemin, André M.

    2017-12-01

    The low concentration issue is a fundamental challenge when it comes to prebiotic chemistry, as macromolecular systems need to be assembled via intermolecular reactions, and this is inherently difficult in dilute solutions. This is especially true when the reactions are challenging, and reactions that proceeded more rapidly could have dictated chemical evolution. Herein we establish that formaldehyde is capable of catalyzing, via temporary intramolecularity, a challenging reaction in water at low concentrations, thus providing an alternative to other approaches that can either lead to higher concentrations or higher effective molarities.

  4. Formaldehyde-releasers in cosmetics : relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy Part 1. Characterization, frequency and relevance of sensitization, and frequency of use in cosmetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Anton C.; White, Ian R.; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann; Lensen, Gerda; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan

    2010-01-01

    In this part of a series of review articles on formaldehyde-releasers and their relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy, formaldehyde-releasers in cosmetics are discussed. In this first part of the article, key data are presented including frequency of sensitization and of their use in

  5. Formaldehyde emissions from ULEF- and NAF-bonded commercial hardwood plywood as influenced by temperature and relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; James M. Wescott; Michael J. Birkeland; Kyle M. Gonner

    2010-01-01

    It is well documented in the literature that temperature and humidity can influence formaldehyde emissions from composite panels that are produced using urea-formaldehyde (UF) adhesives. This work investigates the effect of temperature and humidity on newer, ultra-low emitting formaldehyde urea formaldehyde (ULEF-UF) and no-added formaldehyde (NAF) adhesives. A...

  6. Relation between Mechanical Properties and Pyrolysis Temperature of Phenol Formaldehyde Resin for Gas Separation Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šupová, Monika; Svítilová, Jaroslava; Chlup, Zdeněk; Černý, Martin; Weishauptová, Zuzana; Suchý, Tomáš; Machovič, Vladimír; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Žaloudková, Margit

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 1 (2012), s. 40-49 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1327 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519; CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : glassy carbon * membranes * mechanical properties Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2012 http://www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/2012/pdf/2012_01_40.pdf

  7. THE PHOTODISSOCIATION OF FORMALDEHYDE IN COMETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, Paul D., E-mail: pfeldman@jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Observations of comets in the 905–1180 Å spectral band made with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer in 2001 and 2004 show unusual features in the fluorescent emissions of CO and H{sub 2}. These include emission from a non-thermal high-J rotational population of CO and solar Lyα induced fluorescence from excited vibrational levels of H{sub 2}, both of which are attributed to the photodissociation of formaldehyde. In this paper we model the large number of observed H{sub 2} lines and demonstrate the dependence of the pumping on the heliocentric velocity of the comet and the solar line profiles. We also derive the rotational and vibrational populations of H{sub 2} and show that they are consistent with the results of laboratory studies of the photodissociation of H{sub 2}CO. In addition to the principal series of H i and O i, the residual spectrum is found to consist mainly of the Rydberg series of C i multiplets from which we derive the mean carbon column abundance in the coma. Fluorescent emissions from N i and N{sub 2} are also searched for.

  8. Indoor air quality: radon and formaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The WHO Regional Office for Europe has taken a leading role at the international level in reviewing and stimulating research and action on the potential health hazards of indoor air pollutants. A subject is given on page vi. It is now much more generally recognized than even five years ago that the use of particular materials for construction of buildings or for furniture and fittings is accompanied by certain risks, especially in view of the ''tightening'' of buildings to reduce energy costs, and increased reliance on central heating and air conditioning. For the last three years, the Regional Office, with the support of the Government of the Netherlands, has been developing a set of air quality guidelines for Europe. In addition to major air pollutants such as sulfur dioxide and particulates, these guidelines cover some 25 other inorganic and organic substances, including radon and formaldehyde. In 1985, a working group reviewed the latter two substances in relation to the ongoing indoor air quality programme of the Regional Office and also as part of the air quality guidelines. In view of the importance of these substances, it was decided to issue a separate report in the Environmental Health Series. The complete air quality guidelines will be published in mid-1987. (author)

  9. Maximizing the functional lifetime of Protein A resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jennifer; Siva, Sethu; Caple, Ryan; Ghose, Sanchayita; Gronke, Rob

    2017-05-01

    Protein A chromatography is currently the industry gold-standard for monoclonal antibody and Fc-fusion protein purification. The high cost of Protein A, however, makes resin lifetime and resin reuse an important factor for process economics. Typical resin lifetime studies performed in the industry usually examine the effect of resin re-use on binding capacity, yield, and product quality without answering the fundamental question of what is causing the decrease in performance. A two part mechanistic study was conducted in an attempt to decouple the effect of the two possible factors (resin hydrolysis and/or degradation vs. resin fouling) on column performance over lifetime of the most commonly used alkali-stable Protein A resins (MabSelect SuRe and MabSelect SuRe LX). The change in binding capacity as a function of sodium hydroxide concentration (rate of hydrolysis), temperature, and stabilizing additives was examined. Additionally, resin extraction studies and product cycling studies were conducted to determine cleaning effectiveness (resin fouling) of various cleaning strategies. Sodium hydroxide-based cleaning solutions were shown to be more effective at preventing resin fouling. Conversely, cold temperature and the use of stabilizing additives in conjunction with sodium hydroxide were found to be beneficial in minimizing the rate of Protein A ligand hydrolysis. An effective and robust cleaning strategy is presented here to maximize resin lifetime and thereby the number of column cycles for future manufacturing processes. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:708-715, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  10. Improvement in char formability of phenolic resin for development of Carbon/Carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajhosseini, M.; Payami, A.; Ghaffarian, S. R.; Rezadoust, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In the processing of carbon/carbon composites using polymer resin as the matrix precursor, it is inevitable that a porous structure was formed after carbonization. As a result, densification by liquid phase impregnation followed by recarbonization is required to obtain a densified composite. Consequently, the char formability of resin is an important factor in reducing the number of densification cycles and hence the processing cost. In this study, a novel approach is adopted to improve the densification of carbon/carbon composites by using a new phenolic resin modified by pitch. For this purpose, soluble part of pitch was extracted and dispersed in resol type phenolic resin. The polymerization reaction was performed in presence of para-formaldehyde and a resol-pitch compound was obtained. The second compound was prepared by mixing novolac-furfural in 55:45 weight ratio containing 9% by weight hexamethylene tetramine. This compound was added to resol-pitch compound in 10,20,50 and 80 w %. The microstructure of carbonized resin was investigated by X-ray diffraction and char yield, and the linear and volumetric shrinkage were obtained. Results show that in 80:20 ratio of resol-pitch to novolac-furfural , the char yield would be maximized by 71% and volumetric shrinkage would be minimized at 16.4%. At the same time, XRD results indicate that the resin has a strong ability to graphitize carbon/carbon composites matrix as a necessary step for its processing

  11. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheth, A.C.; Strevel, S.D.; Dharmapurikar, R.

    1992-01-01

    Under the current grant, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) will carry out the bench scale evaluation and further development of the anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization concept to desulfurize alkali metal sulfates. This concept has been developed and patented by UTSI under US Patent No. 4,917,874. The developmental program proposed under this DOE grant includes screening of commercially available resins to select three candidate resins for further study. These three resins will undergo a series of experiments designed to test the resins' performance under different process conditions (including the use of spent MHD seed material). The best of these resins will be used in optimizing the regeneration step and in testing the effects of performance enhancers. The process schematic developed from the results will be used to estimate the related economics. During this reporting period, October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992, analysis of batch mode screening experiments was completed to select three candidate resins for process variables study in the fixed-bed set-up. This setup was modified and the experiments were carded out to evaluate effects of major process variables. The analysis of fixed-bed experiments is going on and we have also started simple batch mode experiments to identify desirable conditions for resin regeneration step. We have also started simple process engineering type calculations to determine the trade-off between the solution concentration and the resulting evaporation/concentration load.

  12. Method of heat decomposition for chemical decontaminating resin waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Akira.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To make resin wastes into non-deleterious state, discharge them into a resin waste storage tank of existent radioactive waste processing facility and store and dispose them. Constitution: In the processing of chemical decontaminating resin wastes, iron exchange resins adsorbing chemical decontaminating agents comprising a solution of citric acid, oxalic acid, formic acid and EDTA alone or as a mixture of them are heated to dry, thermally decomposed and then separated from the ion exchange resins. That is, the main ingredients of the chemical decontaminating agents are heat-decomposed when heated and dried at about 250 deg C in air and converted into non-toxic gases such as CO, CO 2 , NO, NO 2 or H 2 O. Further, since combustion or carbonization of the basic materials for the resin is not caused at such a level of temperature, the resin wastes removed with organic acid and chelating agents are transferred to an existent resin waste storage tank and stored therein. In this way, facility cost and radiation exposure can remarkably be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Exposure to formaldehyde: a challenge of occupational health significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaonga, K.

    2009-01-01

    The use of formaldehyde as the fixative for general microscopic demonstration of tissues in medical laboratory establishments is as significant as the diagnosis of the underlying ailment. Instantaneous human exposure to formaldehyde elicits symptoms that may include watery eyes, headache, inflamed throat and dyspnea. The gaseous chemical is toxic, allergenic and carcinogenic. A study to determine the incidence of human exposure to formaldehyde was carried out at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia from January to December, 2007. Anonymous questionnaires on various aspects of human exposure to formaldehyde were given to laboratory technical personnel. Exposure to formaldehyde was determined using general consideration model comprising points awarded to participants according to their responses. Five points represented the maximum level of exposure, while one point denoted the minimum encounter. There were 8 incidents of formaldehyde pollution, with five being emissions from 210-litre formalin receptacles whose stoppers were inadvertently left loose overnight, while three involved accidental breakage of Winchester bottles of formalin. A total of 115 people were exposed during the year. Fifteen (13.0 percent) participants scored one point each, while 20 (17.4 percent) participants obtained 2 points each. Thirty-five (30.4 percent) participants got 3 points each, while 30 (26.0 percent) participants received 4 points each. Twenty-five (21.7 percent) participants attained 5 points each. Human exposure to formaldehyde is an issue of occupational health concern. Participants with a score of 3 points or more need regular medical check ups in order to safeguard their health. Programs on effective management of hazardous chemicals are worth setting up.(author)

  14. Study on removing chlorin by conversion-aborption of chlorin resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yunbai; Zhao Jinfang; Tang Zhijuan; Huang Qijin; Deng Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Theon version of chlorin resin and the reclamation of acid and uranium in converting solution were investigated. The results indicated the residual chlorin can meet the requirement after converting, acid and uranium in converting solution can be reclaimed. (authors)

  15. Thermal degradation kinetics and antimicrobial studies of terpolymer resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul R. Burkanudeen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The terpolymer (ASF was synthesized by condensation of anthranilic acid and salicylic acid with formaldehyde in the presence of glacial acetic acid as a catalyst at 140 ± 2 °C for 6 h with varying proportions of reactants. The terpolymer ASF-I was characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The thermal decomposition behavior of ASF-I, II and III terpolymers was studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA in a static nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 20 °C/min. Freeman–Carroll, Sharp–Wentworth and Phadnis–Deshpande methods were used to calculate the thermal activation energy (Ea the order of reaction (n, entropy change (ΔS, free energy change (ΔF, apparent entropy (S∗ and frequency factor (Z. Phadnis–Deshpande method was used to propose the thermal degradation model for the decomposition pattern of ASF-I terpolymer resin. The order of the decomposition reaction was found to be 0.901. The thermal activation energy determined with the help of these methods was in good agreement with each other. The ASF-I, II and III resins were tested for their inhibitory action against pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The resins show potent inhibitory action against bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and fungi viz. Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium sp., Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans and Mucor sp.

  16. Mortality from lymphohematopoietic malignancies among workers in formaldehyde industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Michael; Lubin, Jay H; Stewart, Patricia A; Hayes, Richard B; Blair, Aaron

    2003-11-05

    Many U.S. factory workers are exposed to formaldehyde. Although increased risks for leukemia have been found in medical workers and other professionals exposed to formaldehyde, studies in industrial workers, who are thought to have higher exposures, have shown inconsistent associations. We extended follow-up of a cohort of industrial workers to evaluate the association between formaldehyde exposure and lymphohematopoietic cancers. The cohort consisted of 25 619 workers (865 708 person-years) employed before January 1, 1966, at one of 10 U.S. industrial plants and followed through December 31, 1994. We analyzed formaldehyde exposure (peak exposure, average exposure intensity, cumulative exposure, and duration of exposure) and mortality from lymphohematopoietic malignancies using standardized mortality ratios and relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) based on Poisson regression. Statistical tests were two-sided. Among the cohort, there were 178 deaths from lymphohematopoietic malignancies. Relative risks for leukemia (69 deaths), particularly for myeloid leukemia (30 deaths), increased with formaldehyde exposure. Compared with workers exposed to low peak levels of formaldehyde (0.1-1.9 ppm), relative risks for myeloid leukemia were 2.43 (95% CI = 0.81 to 7.25) and 3.46 (95% CI = 1.27 to 9.43) for workers exposed to peak levels of 2.0-3.9 ppm and > or = 4.0 ppm, respectively (P(trend) =.009). Compared with workers exposed to low levels of average exposure intensity of formaldehyde (0.1-0.4 ppm), workers exposed to 0.5-0.9 ppm and > or = 1.0 ppm average intensity had relative risks of 1.15 (95% CI = 0.41 to 3.23) and 2.49 (95% CI = 1.03 to 6.03), respectively (P(trend) =.088). The relative risk for leukemia was not associated with cumulative exposure but was weakly associated with duration of exposure. Relative risks for Hodgkin's disease also increased with formaldehyde exposure. Exposure to formaldehyde may cause leukemia, particularly myeloid leukemia

  17. Moessbauer Study of Discoloration of Synthetic Resin Covered Electric Switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmann, E.; Muzsay, I.; Homonnay, Z.; Vertes, A.

    2002-01-01

    57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry were used to investigate brown discoloration and sediments formed on the surface of synthetic resin product covered electronic switches. The Moessbauer measurement revealed that alloyed steels and iron-containing corrosion products are associated with the discolored layers. Iron, and iron corrosion products were shown by both MS and XRD in the sediments formed eventually during the finishing of the synthetic resin products after machining and washing with water solution.

  18. SuperLig Ion Exchange Resin Swelling and Buoyancy Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to achieve a fundamental understanding of SuperLig resin swelling and shrinking characteristics, which lead to channeling and early breakthrough during loading cycles. The density of salt solution that causes resin floating was also determined to establish a limit for operation. Specific tests performed include (a) pH dependence, (b) ionic strength dependence and (c) buoyancy effect vs. simulant composition

  19. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  20. Mammals divert endogenous genotoxic formaldehyde into one-carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Barragan, Guillermo; Wit, Niek; Meiser, Johannes; Dingler, Felix A; Pietzke, Matthias; Mulderrig, Lee; Pontel, Lucas B; Rosado, Ivan V; Brewer, Thomas F; Cordell, Rebecca L; Monks, Paul S; Chang, Christopher J; Vazquez, Alexei; Patel, Ketan J

    2017-08-31

    The folate-driven one-carbon (1C) cycle is a fundamental metabolic hub in cells that enables the synthesis of nucleotides and amino acids and epigenetic modifications. This cycle might also release formaldehyde, a potent protein and DNA crosslinking agent that organisms produce in substantial quantities. Here we show that supplementation with tetrahydrofolate, the essential cofactor of this cycle, and other oxidation-prone folate derivatives kills human, mouse and chicken cells that cannot detoxify formaldehyde or that lack DNA crosslink repair. Notably, formaldehyde is generated from oxidative decomposition of the folate backbone. Furthermore, we find that formaldehyde detoxification in human cells generates formate, and thereby promotes nucleotide synthesis. This supply of 1C units is sufficient to sustain the growth of cells that are unable to use serine, which is the predominant source of 1C units. These findings identify an unexpected source of formaldehyde and, more generally, indicate that the detoxification of this ubiquitous endogenous genotoxin creates a benign 1C unit that can sustain essential metabolism.

  1. Formaldehyde as a basis for residential ventilation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, M.H.; Hodgson, A.T.

    2002-04-28

    Traditionally, houses in the U.S. have been ventilated by passive infiltration in combination with active window opening. However in recent years, the construction quality of residential building envelopes has been improved to reduce infiltration, and the use of windows for ventilation also may have decreased due to a number of factors. Thus, there has been increased interest in engineered ventilation systems for residences. The amount of ventilation provided by an engineered system should be set to protect occupants from unhealthy or objectionable exposures to indoor pollutants, while minimizing energy costs for conditioning incoming air. Determining the correct ventilation rate is a complex task, as there are numerous pollutants of potential concern, each having poorly characterized emission rates, and poorly defined acceptable levels of exposure. One ubiquitous pollutant in residences is formaldehyde. The sources of formaldehyde in new houses are reasonably understood, and there is a large body of literature on human health effects. This report examines the use of formaldehyde as a means of determining ventilation rates and uses existing data on emission rates of formaldehyde in new houses to derive recommended levels. Based on current, widely accepted concentration guidelines for formaldehyde, the minimum and guideline ventilation rates for most new houses are 0.28 and 0.5 air changes per hour, respectively.

  2. Removal of cations using ion-binding terpolymer involving 2-amino-6-nitro-benzothiazole and thiosemicarbazide with formaldehyde by batch equilibrium technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Mohamed A Riswan; Jeyakumar, Duraisamy; Burkanudeen, Abdul R

    2013-03-15

    2-Amino-6-nitro-benzothiazole and thiosemicarbazide with formaldehyde (BTF) terpolymer was synthesized by the condensation polymerization technique. The elemental analysis and physico-chemical parameters of the terpolymer were measured. This chelation terpolymer was characterized by infrared, electronic and nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H &(13)C NMR) spectral studies. The molecular weight of the terpolymer was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Surface analysis of the terpolymer was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The thermal stability of the terpolymer was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The cation-exchange property of the terpolymer was determined by batch equilibrium method with the effect of pH, contact time and electrolytes. The reusability of the resin was also studied to estimate the effectiveness of the terpolymer resin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ion exchange resin fouling of molybdenum in recovery uranium processess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guowei; Zhao Guirong

    1990-09-01

    The relationship between anion exchange resin fouling and molybdic acid polymerization was studied. By using potentiometer titration and laser-Raman spectroscopy the relationship of molybdic acid polymerization and the pH value of solution or the molybdenum concentration was determined. It was shown that as the concentration of initial molybdenum in solution decreases from 0.2 mol/L to 0.5 mmol/L, the pH value of starting polymerization decreased from 6.5 to 4.5. The experimental results show that the fouling of 201 x 7 resin in the acidic solution is mainly caused by the adsorbing of Mo 3 O 26 4- ion and occupying the exchange radical site of the resin. Under the leaching conditions the molybdenum and phosphate existing in the leaching liquor can form 12-molybdo-phosphate ion. It also leads to resin fouling. The molybdenum on the fouled resin can synergically be desorbed by mixed desorbents containing ammonium hydroxide and ammonium sulfate. The desorbed resin can be used for uranium adsorption and the desorbed molybdenum can be recovered by ion exchange method

  4. Pengaruh Minuman Kopi terhadap Perubahan Warna pada Resin Komposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprilia Aprilia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of coffee beverage on hybrid composite resin discoloration. Material and method: This study used hybrid composite resin with A3 color, and was done by soaking composite resin plates in coffee solution for 1, 3, 5, and 7 days, corresponding to equivalent coffee usage for 6 months, 1, 1.5, and 2 years. The same measurements of reflectance were done before and after soaking into coffee solution. In the measurement, a beam from He-Ne laser is reflected by the sample to a photovoltaic cell type BOY-47, which provides a voltage signal accordig to the intensity of reflected light. Results: There was a significant difference between composite resin plates before and after soaking into coffee dilution for 1, 3, 5, and 7 days. Conclusion: Composite resin is discolored after soaking into a coffee solution, suggesting that coffee usage will have a discoloring effect on dental composite resin.

  5. Engineering and analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that uses formaldehyde as an auxiliary substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baerends, Richard J. S.; de Hulster, Erik; Geertman, Jan-Maarten A.; Daran, Jean-Marc; van Maris, Antonius J. A.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.; Pronk, Jack T.

    We demonstrated that formaldehyde can be efficiently coutilized by an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that expresses Hansenula polymorpha genes encoding formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FLD1) and formate dehydrogenase (FMD), in contrast to wild-type strains. Initial chemostat experiments

  6. FORMALDEHYDE GAS INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS, BACILLUS SUBTILIS AND GEOBACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS SPORES ON INDOOR SURFACE MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research evaluated the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface material using formaldehyde gas. Spores were dried on seven types of indoor surfaces and exposed to 1100 ppm formaldehyde gas for 10 hr. Fo...

  7. [Decolorization and purification of total leaves saponins of panax notoginseng with ion exchange resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yun-Ge; Shi, Rong-Fu

    2008-10-01

    The total leaves saponins of panax notoginseng decoloring by adsorption with exchange resins was studied and the decoloring capacity of six anions resins as adsorbent material was evaluated. The decoloring capacity of the selected resins (D296 and Dt) was compared by the dynamic adsorption decolorization experiments. Removel of coloured compounds in rew solution takes place in two serially coupled different ionic exchange columns, one packed column was D72 cation resin, another anion resin. The results showed that macroporous anion exchange resin Dt was the best resin to decolorization of the total leaves saponins of panax notoginseng. The total saponin products with higher purity and quality were obtained. The results of this work shows that the method proposed is convenient, high efficcient and steady one.

  8. Selective Detection of Formaldehyde Gas Using a Cd-Doped TiO2-SnO2 Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Ikuhara

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the microstructure and gas-sensing properties of a nonequilibrium TiO2-SnO2 solid solution prepared by the sol-gel method. In particular, we focus on the effect of Cd doping on the sensing behavior of the TiO2-SnO2 sensor. Of all volatile organic compound gases examined, the sensor with Cd doping exhibits exclusive selectivity as well as high sensitivity to formaldehyde, a main harmful indoor gas. The key gas-sensing quantities, maximum sensitivity, optimal working temperature, and response and recovery time, are found to meet the basic industrial needs. This makes the Cd-doped TiO2-SnO2 composite a promising sensor material for detecting the formaldehyde gas.

  9. Analysis of the Compounds from the BTEX Group, Emitted During Thermal Decomposition of Alkyd Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubecki M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Suitability of the given binding agent for the moulding sands preparation depends on the one hand on the estimation of technological properties of the sand and the mould made of it and the obtained casting quality and on the other hand on the assessment of this sand influence on the natural and working environment. Out of moulding sands used in the foundry industry, sands with organic binders deserve a special attention. These binders are based on synthetic resins, which ensure obtaining the proper technological properties and sound castings, however, they negatively influence the environment. If in the initial state these resins are not very dangerous for people and for the environment, thus under an influence of high temperatures they generate very harmful products, being the result of their thermal decomposition. Depending on the kind of the applied resin (phenol-formaldehyde, urea, furfuryl, urea-furfuryl, alkyd under an influence of a temperature such compounds as: furfuryl alcohol, formaldehyde, phenol, BTEX group (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, and also polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH can be formed and released.

  10. Contact allergy to epoxy resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil

    2012-01-01

    to epoxy resin remained stable over the study period. Of the patients with an epoxy resin-positive patch test, 71% returned a questionnaire; 95 patients had worked with epoxy resin in the occupational setting, and, of these, one-third did not use protective gloves and only 50.5% (48) had participated...

  11. Effect of the chemical structure of anion exchange resin on the adsorption of humic acid: behavior and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuang, Chendong; Wang, Jun; Li, Haibo; Li, Aimin; Zhou, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Polystyrenic (PS) anion-exchange resin and polyacrylic (PA) anion-exchange resin were used to investigate the effect of resin chemical structure on the adsorption of humic acid (HA). Due to the rearrangement of HA to form layers that function as barricades to further HA diffusion, PS resin exhibited 12.4 times slower kinetics for the initial adsorption rate and 8.4 times for the diffusion constant in comparison to that of the PA resin. An HA layer and a spherical cluster of HA can be observed on the surface of the PS and PA resins after adsorption, respectively. The considerable difference in HA adsorption between the PS and PA resins was due to the difference in molecule shape for interaction with different resin structures, which can essentially be explained by the hydrophobicity and various interactions of the PS resin. A given amount of HA occupies more positively charged sites and hydrophobic sites on the PS resin than were occupied by the same amount of HA on the PA resin. Increased pH resulted in an increase of HA adsorption onto the PA resin but a decrease in adsorption onto PS resin, as the non-electrostatic adsorption led to electrostatic repulsion between the HA attached to the resin and the HA dissolved in solution. These results suggest higher rates of adsorption and higher regeneration efficiency for interaction of HA with more hydrophilic anion exchange materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Low-Cost, Formaldehyde-Free and High Flame Retardancy Wood Adhesive from Inorganic Adhesives: Properties and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shicun Jin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wood composites used in indoor living environments often pose formaldehyde emission and fire hazard problems. In this study, magnesium oxychloride cement-based (MOC inorganic adhesives are presented as an effective and sustainable binder for plywood applications. The phase composition, microstructure, and thermal stability of the adhesives prepared with different ratios of MgO/MgCl2 were investigated. In addition, the dry and wet shear strength and the combustion behavior of the plywood were also examined. The results indicated that the limiting oxygen index (LOI values of the plywood bonded by the MOC adhesives were higher than those of the plywood bonded by urea-formaldehyde resin. The active MgO/MgCl2 molar ratio of 7 was the optimal ratio for the dry and wet shear strength of the plywood with values of 1.02 and 0.88 MPa, respectively, which meet the interior use panel (Type II plywood requirements. These improvements were ascribed to the increasing ratio of MgO/MgCl2 that facilitated the formation of an excellent microstructure. Meanwhile, the continuous hydration phase strengthened the interaction between the MOC adhesive and the wood. With these improved properties, MOC adhesive is expected to be widely used for industrial applications in plywood fabrication.

  13. Physiochemical characterization and antimicrobial evaluation of phenylthiourea-formaldehyde polymer (PTF) based polymeric ligand and its polymer metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.

    2013-05-01

    Phenylthiourea-formaldehyde polymer (PTF) has been synthesized via polycondensation of phenylthiourea and formaldehyde in basic medium and its corresponding metal complexes [PTF-M(II)] were prepared with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions. The synthesized polymers have been characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, UV-visible, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, ESR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Elemental analysis, electronic spectra and magnetic moment measurement indicate that PTF-Mn(II), PTF-Co(II) and PTF-Ni(II) show octahedral geometry, while PTF-Cu(II) and PTF-Zn(II) show square planar and tetrahedral geometry, respectively. The results of TGA ascribed that all the PTF-M(II) showed better heat-resistance properties than PTF resin. In vitro antimicrobial activities were performed against several bacteria and fungi using agar well diffusion method. The results of microbial activity were compared with Kanamycin and Miconazole as standard antibiotics for antibacterial and antifungal activities respectively.

  14. Preliminary survey report: control technology for formaldehyde emissions at Baker Furniture Company, Mocksville, North Carolina, September 2, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortimer, V.D.

    1983-07-28

    An on-site visit was made to the Baker Furniture Company, Mocksville, North Carolina to observe the processes and associated controls for veneering wood panels using heated platen presses. The facility manufactured furniture and produced veneered panels. For flat panels, the hot-press process was used exclusively. There was some radiofrequency (RF) laminating of small parts and frames. Less than 5,000 square feet of panels were produced per day. The veneer department consisted of 35 workers, eight assigned to the hot press operation. For most applications, a urea/formaldehyde resin was used as the adhesive. There were canopy hoods over the feed-through press and the shuttle press. General ventilation was provided mainly by open doors and an extensive local exhaust ventilation for controlling sawdust. Formaldehyde concentrations ranging from less than 1 part per million (ppm) to between 1 and 2 ppm were noted around the feed-through press in the morning. Concentrations of 1 to 3 ppm were noted at the glue mixing station, loading platform, and unloading area in the afternoon. The general airflow through the space between the press and face of the canopy appeared to carry some emission into the work place. The author notes that this facility offers the opportunity to study a canopy hood over a feed-through press, but the low production rate may preclude an accurate evaluation of control-system effectiveness.

  15. Application conditions for ester cured alkaline phenolic resin sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-he Huang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Five organic esters with different curing speeds: propylene carbonate (i.e. high-speed ester A; 1, 4-butyrolactone; glycerol triacetate (i.e. medium-speed ester B; glycerol diacetate; dibasic ester (DBE (i.e. low-speed ester C, were chosen to react with alkaline phenolic resin to analyze the application conditions of ester cured alkaline phenolic resin. The relationships between the curing performances of the resin (including pH value, gel pH value, gel time of resin solution, heat release rate of the curing reaction and tensile strength of the resin sand and the amount of added organic ester and curing temperature were investigated. The results indicated the following: (1 The optimal added amount of organic ester should be 25wt.%-30wt.% of alkaline phenolic resin and it must be above 20wt.%-50 wt.% of the organic ester hydrolysis amount. (2 High-speed ester A (propylene carbonate has a higher curing speed than 1, 4-butyrolactone, and they were both used as high-speed esters. Glycerol diacetate is not a high-speed ester in alkaline phenolic resin although it was used as a high-speed ester in ester cured sodium silicate sand; glycerol diacetate and glycerol triacetate can be used as medium-speed esters in alkaline phenolic resin. (3 High-speed ester A, medium-speed ester B (glycerol triacetate and low-speed ester C (dibasic ester, i.e., DBE should be used below 15 ìC, 35 ìC and 50 ìC, respectively. High-speed ester A or low-speed ester C should not be used alone but mixed with medium-speed ester B to improve the strength of the resin sand. (4 There should be a suitable solid content (generally 45wt.%-65wt.% of resin, alkali content (generally 10wt.%-15wt.% of resin and viscosity of alkaline phenolic resin (generally 50-300 mPa≤s in the preparation of alkaline phenolic resin. Finally, the technique conditions of alkaline phenolic resin preparation and the application principles of organic ester were discussed.

  16. A STUDY ON ADSORPTION AND DESORPTION BEHAVIORS OF 14C FROM A MIXED BED RESIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEUNG-CHUL PARK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Spent resin waste containing a high concentration of 14C radionuclide cannot be disposed of directly. A fundamental study on selective 14C stripping, especially from the IRN-150 mixed bed resin, was carried out. In single ion-exchange equilibrium isotherm experiments, the ion adsorption capacity of the fresh resin for non-radioactive HCO3− ion, as the chemical form of 14C, was evaluated as 11mg-C/g-resin. Adsorption affinity of anions to the resin was derived in order of NO3− > HCO3− ≥ H2PO4−. Thus the competitive adsorption affinity of NO3− ion in binary systems appeared far higher than that of HCO3− or H2PO4−, and the selective desorption of HCO3− from the resin was very effective. On one hand, the affinity of Co2+ and Cs+ for the resin remained relatively higher than that of other cations in the same stripping solution. Desorption of Cs+ was minimized when the summation of the metal ions in the spent resin and the other cations in solution was near saturation and the pH value was maintained above 4.5. Among the various solutions tested, from the view-point of the simple second waste process, NH4H2PO4 solution was preferable for the stripping of 14C from the spent resin.

  17. The margin of exposure to formaldehyde in alcoholic beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Jendral, Julien A; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2012-06-01

    Formaldehyde has been classified as carcinogenic to humans (WHO IARC group 1). It causes leukaemia and nasopharyngeal cancer, and was described to regularly occur in alcoholic beverages. However, its risk associated with consumption of alcohol has not been systematically studied, so this study will provide the first risk assessment of formaldehyde for consumers of alcoholic beverages.Human dietary intake of formaldehyde via alcoholic beverages in the European Union was estimated based on WHO alcohol consumption data and literature on formaldehyde contents of different beverage groups (beer, wine, spirits, and unrecorded alcohol). The risk assessment was conducted using the margin of exposure (MOE) approach with benchmark doses (BMD) for 10 % effect obtained from dose-response modelling of animal experiments.For tumours in male rats, a BMD of 30 mg kg(-1) body weight per day and a "BMD lower confidence limit" (BMDL) of 23 mg kg(-1) d(-1) were calculated from available long-term animal experiments. The average human exposure to formaldehyde from alcoholic beverages was estimated at 8·10(-5) mg kg(-1) d(-1). Comparing the human exposure with BMDL, the resulting MOE was above 200,000 for average scenarios. Even in the worst-case scenarios, the MOE was never below 10,000, which is considered to be the threshold for public health concerns.The risk assessment shows that the cancer risk from formaldehyde to the alcohol-consuming population is negligible and the priority for risk management (e.g. to reduce the contamination) is very low. The major risk in alcoholic beverages derives from ethanol and acetaldehyde.

  18. Preliminary study: Formaldehyde exposure in laboratories of Sharjah university in UAE

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Hafiz Omer

    2011-01-01

    Objectives : Laboratory technicians, students, and instructors are at high risk, because they deal with chemicals including formaldehyde. Thus, this preliminary study was conducted to measure the concentration of formaldehyde in the laboratories of the University of Sharjah in UAE. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two air samples were collected and analyzed for formaldehyde using National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) method 3500. In this method, formaldehyde reacts with c...

  19. Fixation of metallic sulfosalicylate complexes on an anionic exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahuzac, S.

    1969-06-01

    Since sulfosalicylate ions have acid-base properties, sulfosalicylate complexes have an apparent stability which varies with the ph. As a result, the fixation of sulfo-salicylates on an anionic exchange resin depends on the ph of the solution in equilibrium with the resin. This research has been aimed at studying the influence of the ph on the fixation on an anionic exchange resin (Dowex 1 x 4) of sulfosalicylate anions on the one hand, and of metallic sulfosalicylate complexes on the other hand. In the first part of this work, a determination has been made, by frontal analysis of the distribution of sulfosalicylate ions in the resin according to the total sulfosalicylate I concentration in the aqueous solution in equilibrium with the resin. The exchange constants of these ions between the resin and the solution have been calculated. In the second part, a study has been made of the fixation of anionic sulfosalicylate complexes of Fe(III), Al(III), Cr(III), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Zn(II), Mn(II), Cd(II), Fe(II) and UO 2 2+ . By measuring the partition coefficients of these different elements between the resin and the solution it has been possible to give interpretation for the modes of fixation of the metallic ions, and to calculate their exchange constant between the resin and the solution. The relationship has been established for each metallic element studied, between its partition coefficient, the ph and the total concentration of the complexing agent in solution. Such a relationship makes it possible to predict, for given conditions, the nature of the species in solution and in the resin, as well as the partition coefficient of a metallic, element. Finally, in the third part of the work, use has been made of results obtained previously, to carry out some separations (Ni 2+ - Co 2+ ; Ni 2+ - Co 2+ - Cu 2+ ; UO 2 2+ - Fe 3+ ; UO 2 2+ - Cr 3+ ; UO 2 2+ - Cu 2+ ; UO 2 2+ - Ni 2+ ; UO 2 2+ - Co 2+ ; UO 2 2+ - Mn 2+ and UO 2 2+ - Cd 2+ ), as well as the purification

  20. Enhancement of adhesion between resin coating materials and resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Tomoaki; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Weerasinghe, Dinesh S; Harada, Naoko; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2007-07-01

    Resin coating technique is a unique method that improves the dentin bond strength of resin cements in indirect restorations. However, the weak link of a specimen bonded using the resin coating technique was reported to be the bonded interface between the resin coating material and resin cement. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to enhance the bonding performance between a resin coating material and a resin cement. Two light-cured flowable composites, Protect Liner F and Clearfil Flow FX, were used as coating materials, and two dual-cure composite materials, Panavia F 2.0 and Clearfil DC Core Automix, were used as resin cements. The ultimate tensile strength of each material and the microtensile bond strengths of the bonded specimens of resin coating material and resin cement were measured using a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Three-way ANOVA (p=0.05) revealed that the highest microtensile bond strength was obtained using a combination of Clearfil Flow FX and Clearfil DC Core Automix, and when the surface of the coating material was treated with ED Primer II. It was strongly suggested that materials with a higher ultimate tensile strength, when used in both resin coating and cementation, could enhance the bond strength between the two.