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Sample records for resin quantitative electron

  1. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000?). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the res...

  2. Epoxy Resins in Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Henry

    1960-01-01

    A method of embedding biological specimens in araldite 502 (Ciba) has been developed for materials available in the United States. Araldite-embedded tissues are suitable for electron microscopy, but the cutting qualities of the resin necessitates more than routine attention during microtomy. The rather high viscosity of araldite 502 also seems to be an unnecessary handicap. The less viscous epoxy epon 812 (Shell) produces specimens with improved cutting qualities, and has several features—low shrinkage and absence of specimen damage during cure, minimal compression of sections, relative absence of electron beam-induced section damage, etc.—which recommends it as a routine embedding material. The hardness of the cured resin can be easily adjusted by several methods to suit the materials embedded in it. Several problems and advantages of working with sections of epoxy resins are also discussed. PMID:13822825

  3. Electron-beam curing of epoxy resins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron-beam (e-beam) induced polymerization of epoxy resins proceeds via cationic mechanism in presence of suitable photoinitiator. Despite good thermal properties and significant processing advantages, epoxy-based composites manufactured using e-beam curing suffer from low compressive strength, poor ...

  4. Quantitative Electron Nanodiffraction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, John [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-01-30

    This Final report summarizes progress under this award for the final reporting period 2002 - 2013 in our development of quantitive electron nanodiffraction to materials problems, especially devoted to atomistic processes in semiconductors and electronic oxides such as the new artificial oxide multilayers, where our microdiffraction is complemented with energy-loss spectroscopy (ELNES) and aberration-corrected STEM imaging (9). The method has also been used to map out the chemical bonds in the important GaN semiconductor (1) used for solid state lighting, and to understand the effects of stacking sequence variations and interfaces in digital oxide superlattices (8). Other projects include the development of a laser-beam Zernike phase plate for cryo-electron microscopy (5) (based on the Kapitza-Dirac effect), work on reconstruction of molecular images using the scattering from many identical molecules lying in random orientations (4), a review article on space-group determination for the International Tables on Crystallography (10), the observation of energy-loss spectra with millivolt energy resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution from individual point defects in an alkali halide, a review article for the Centenary of X-ray Diffration (17) and the development of a new method of electron-beam lithography (12). We briefly summarize here the work on GaN, on oxide superlattice ELNES, and on lithography by STEM.

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Radionuclide for the Used Resin of the Primary Purification System in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mun; Kim, Myong Seop; Park, Se Il; Kim, Tae Whan; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Young Chil

    2005-01-01

    In HANARO, a 30 MW research reactor, the ion exchange resin has been used for the purification of the primary coolant system. The resin used in the primary coolant purification system is replaced with new one once every 3 months during 30 MW reactor operation. The extracted resin from the primary coolant purification system is temporarily stored in a shielding treatment of the reactor hall for radiation cooling. After the radiation level of resin decreases enough to be handled for the waste disposal, it is put into the waste drum, and delivered to the waste facility in KAERI. Recently, in this procedure, the quantitative analysis of radionuclide which is contained in resin is required to have more quantitative data for the disposal. Therefore, in this work, a preliminary study was performed to find a sampling method for the representation of the characteristics of radionuclide in the spent resin

  6. Mechanisms of Interactions of Energetic Electrons with Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Coulter, D. R.; Tsay, F. D.; Moacanin, J.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of deactivation of energy of excitation in a resin system was investigated on optical excitation as well as excitation by high energy electrons. This mechanism involves formation of excited state complexes, known as exciplexes which have a considerable charge transfer character. This mechanism will be used to develop a degradation model for epoxy matrix materials deployed in a space environment.

  7. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  8. Positron lifetime study of electron-irradiated epoxy resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suevegh, K.; Vertes, A.; Wojnarovits, L.; Foeldiak, G.; Liszkai, L.; Kajcsos, Zs.

    1990-01-01

    Two bisphenol-A type epoxy resins were irradiated by electron beam and studied afterwards by positron lifetime spectroscopy. An interesting result is that despite of the considerable amount of free-radicals, no inhibition of positronium formation was observed in the two epoxies. Nevertheless, several serious differences were detected between the studied polymers. The results suggest that the radiation-resistant properties of epoxies depend strongly on the amount of the curing agent. (author) 8 refs.; 2 figs

  9. Research on blend system of epoxy resin cured by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Gang; Zhong Weihong; Zhang Zuoguang; Mao Shuli

    2000-01-01

    Electron beam curing of various blends of epoxy resin was studied. Radiation effect of epoxy resin systems of 828, 648 and 207, and their blends was compared. The effect of resin compounding ratio and radiation dose on blends of epoxy resin 828 and 648 systems was analyzed. The performance of the blend with different ratio of epoxy resin 207 and 648 was also studied. The results of study show that radiation effect of epoxy resin is associated with its chemical constitution, steric effect, and crystallinity. The mixing of various epoxy resin can improve radiation curing effect of system, reduce required radiation dose, and enhance performance of radiation product

  10. Quantitative analysis of PMR-15 polyimide resin by HPLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Lauver, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of individual components and of total solids of 50 wt pct PMR-15 resin solutions was determined using reverse-phase HPLC to within + or - 8 percent accuracy. Acid impurities, the major source of impurities in 3,3', 4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDE), were eliminated by recrystallizing the BTDE prior to esterification. Triester formation was not a problem because of the high rate of esterification of the anhydride relative to that of the carboxylic acid. Aging of PMR-15 resin solutions resulted in gradual formation of the mononadimide and bisnadimide of 4,4'-methylenedianiline, with the BTDE concentration remaining constant. Similar chemical reactions occurred at a reduced rate in dried films of PMR-15 resin.

  11. Study of Electron Beam Curing Process Using Epoxy Resin System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishitsuji, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    The competition among industries in the current globalization system has required a systematic cost reduction without affecting the quality of the final product. This fact has encouraged the use of new technologies application on productive process, especially on polymeric composites, to assure the competitiveness. The possibility of producing a new type of carbon fiber reinforced composite by radiation process with excellent thermal and mechanical properties, has been researched since 90's and it can be a potential application in aerospace, marine and automobile industries. The polymeric composites cured by thermal process (furnace or autoclave) are an example of long curing cycles, which requires time and energy consumption. Electron beam curing technology allows the process at room temperature and reduces curing time; consequently, it becomes the main difference of this technology over thermal curing process. The aim of this work was to study electron beam curable epoxy formulation for filament winding process, as well as to investigate the electron beam curing process parameters using a DC 1500/25 - Job 188 Dynamitron model linear accelerator as radiation source, with 0.5 to 1.5 MeV, 0.1 to 25 mA and 60 to 120 cm scanning electron beam. The resin system consists of commercial epoxy resin (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A - DGEBA) and cationic initiator (diaryliodonium hexafluoantimonate) and the polymerization carried out at room temperature with controlled dose rate. Thermal post cure took part of the process to improve the degree of cure and glass transition temperature (Tg) similar to thermal curable resin properties

  12. Electron radiation curing of particle boards and fiber building boards impregnated with artificial resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaudy, R.; Proksch, E. (Oesterreichisches Forschungszentrum Seibersdorf GmbH Inst. fuer Chemie)

    1980-06-01

    The hardening of wood particle boards and fiber building boards impregnated with artificial resins using a technical electron accelerator was examined. Suitable resin-monomer mixtures were selected by in-vitro-tests. A styrene-free unsaturated polyester resin and acrylic-modified melamine resins turned out be suitable, whereas other unsaturated polyesters and activators used for curing by gamma irradiation did not fit. The hardened boards showed markedly inceased hardness and reduced swelling, but only moderate weather resistance.

  13. Study of electron beam curing process using epoxy resin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitsuji, Delmo A.; Marinucci, Gerson; Evora, Maria C.; de Andrade e Silva, Leonardo G.

    2007-12-01

    Polymeric matrix composite (PMC) has been used in engineering applications instead of metal in the last few years, due to its corrosion resistance and excellent relation between tensile strength/density and elastic modulus/density. However, PMC materials cured by thermal process require high temperature and are time-consuming. The electron beam (EB) curing technology allows its use at room temperature and reduced curing times, and this is one of the main advantages over thermal technology. The aim of this work is to investigate electron beam curable epoxy formulations to use in filament winding processes to produce composite material with similar or better properties than thermal curable composites. The study has been made with commercial epoxy resins and cationic initiators. The epoxy resin samples were irradiated for few minutes with total dose of 150 kGy. The glass transition temperatures ( Tg) were determined by dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) and the result was 137 °C. The thermal process was carried out in a furnace following three steps: 4 h at 90 °C, increasing temperature from 90 °C to 130 °C during 4 h and 12 h at 130 °C. The total process time was 20 h. The Tg of this sample was 102 °C.

  14. Study of electron beam curing process using epoxy resin system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishitsuji, Delmo A. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha - CTMSP, Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Marinucci, Gerson [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242 Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Evora, Maria C. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados - IEAv/CTA, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Andrade Silva, Leonardo G de e [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242 Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil)], E-mail: lgasilva@ipen.br

    2007-12-15

    Polymeric matrix composite (PMC) has been used in engineering applications instead of metal in the last few years, due to its corrosion resistance and excellent relation between tensile strength/density and elastic modulus/density. However, PMC materials cured by thermal process require high temperature and are time-consuming. The electron beam (EB) curing technology allows its use at room temperature and reduced curing times, and this is one of the main advantages over thermal technology. The aim of this work is to investigate electron beam curable epoxy formulations to use in filament winding processes to produce composite material with similar or better properties than thermal curable composites. The study has been made with commercial epoxy resins and cationic initiators. The epoxy resin samples were irradiated for few minutes with total dose of 150 kGy. The glass transition temperatures (T{sub g}) were determined by dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) and the result was 137 deg. C. The thermal process was carried out in a furnace following three steps: 4 h at 90 deg. C, increasing temperature from 90 deg. C to 130 deg. C during 4 h and 12 h at 130 deg. C. The total process time was 20 h. The T{sub g} of this sample was 102 deg. C.

  15. Electron beam radiation of resin luting agents - a cytotoxic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabin, S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the cytotoxicity of three resin luting agents rely x luting cement, rely x luting 2 cement, and clearfil SA luting agent on human dental pulp cells before and after electron beam irradiation. Growth and maintenance of cell cultures of human pulp cells was done in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM). The test samples were divided into two categories based on radiation exposure, irradiated category and non-radiated category. Samples in Irradiated category were exposed to electron beam radiation after dose standardisation (Microtron, Electron Beam Accelerator, Microtron Centre, Mangalore University). The dose of radiation used was 200 Gy. Two subgroups of radiated category were made. In 1st sub-group (containing 18 samples), all the 3 luting cements will be placed in sterile packets and irradiated without mixing the two components. In 2nd sub-group (containing 18 samples), all the 3 luting cements will be mixed separately, placed in sterile packets and exposed to electron-beam radiations. Samples in non radiated category were also made 2 groups. In 1st sub-group (containing 18 samples), all the 3 luting cements will be placed in sterile teflon moulds and kept in a humid chamber at 37℃ without mixing the two components. In 2nd sub-group (containing 18 samples), all the 3 the luting cements will be mixed separately, placed in sterile teflon moulds and kept in a humid chamber at 37℃. All the samples were subjected to MTT assay and spectrophotometric analysis and their cytotoxicity was assessed. (author)

  16. High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Havens, Stephen J.; Dorsey, George F.; Moulton, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

  17. Quantitative transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L J; D'Alfonso, A J; Forbes, B D; Findlay, S D; LeBeau, J M; Stemmer, S

    2012-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) it is possible to operate the microscope in bright-field mode under conditions which, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, are equivalent to those in conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). The results of such an experiment will be presented which are in excellent quantitative agreement with theory for specimens up to 25 nm thick. This is at variance with the large contrast mismatch (typically between two and five) noted in equivalent CTEM experiments. The implications of this will be discussed.

  18. An in vitro quantitative antibacterial analysis of amalgam and composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyth, Nurit; Domb, Abraham J; Weiss, Ervin I

    2007-03-01

    Antibacterial properties of restorative dental materials such as amalgam and composite resins may improve the restorative treatment outcome. This study evaluates the antibacterial properties of three composite resins: Z250, Tetric Ceram, P60 and a dental amalgam in vitro. Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces viscosus served as test microorganisms. Three quantitative microtiter spectrophotometric assays were used to evaluate the effect of the restorative materials on: (i) early-stage biofilm using a direct contact test (DCT); (ii) planktonic bacterial growth; (iii) bacterial growth in the materials' elute. For comparison purposes, agar diffusion test (ADT) was also performed. The effect of the composite resins on bacterial growth was minimal and limited to a few days only. One-week-aged composites promoted growth of S. mutans and A. viscosus. The antibacterial properties in direct contact were more potent than in planktonic bacterial growth. Amalgam showed complete inhibition of both bacteria in all phases, and the effect lasted for at least 1 week. The materials' elute had no effect on both bacterial growth with the exception of complete inhibition of S. mutans in amalgam. The later results correlated with the ADT. The present findings demonstrate potent and lasting antibacterial properties of amalgam, which are lacking in composite resins. This may explain the clinical observation of biofilm accumulated more on composites compared to amalgams. It follows that the assessment of antibacterial properties of poorly-soluble materials has to employ more than one assay.

  19. Evaluation of Degradation in Nanofilled Adhesive Resins Using Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Young Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate degradation in commercial dental nanofilled adhesive resins using quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF. Three adhesives were selected: D/E resin (DR, Single Bond Plus (SB, and G-Bond (GB. The adhesives were mixed with porphyrin for the QLF analysis. Specimens were prepared by dispensing blended adhesives into a flexible mold and polymerizing. Then, the QLF analysis of the specimens was done and the porphyrin values (Simple Plaque Score and ΔR were measured. After thermocycling of the specimens (5000 cycles, 5 to 55°C for the degradation, the specimens were assayed by QLF again. The porphyrin values were analyzed using paired t-test at a 95% confidence level. A significant reduction in SPS was observed in all groups after thermocycling. The ΔR significantly decreased after thermocycling except area ΔR30 of SB group. Overall, porphyrin values decreased after thermocycling which indicates that the degradation of the adhesive resins may be measured by the change of porphyrin value. The QLF method could be used to evaluate the degradation of adhesive resin.

  20. Surface flashover performance of epoxy resin microcomposites improved by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yin; Min, Daomin; Li, Shengtao; Li, Zhen; Xie, Dongri; Wang, Xuan; Lin, Shengjun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Epoxy resin microcomposites were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV. • Surface flashover voltage increase with the increase of electron beam energy. • Both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. • Deposition energy in epoxy resin microcomposites increases with electron beam energy, and surface trap properties are determined by deposition energy. • The influence of surface conductivity and trap distribution on flashover voltage is discussed. - Abstract: The influencing mechanism of electron beam irradiation on surface flashover of epoxy resin/Al 2 O 3 microcomposite was investigated. Epoxy resin/Al 2 O 3 microcomposite samples with a diameter of 50 mm and a thickness of 1 mm were prepared. The samples were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV and a beam current of 5 μA for 5 min. Surface potential decay, surface conduction, and surface flashover properties of untreated and irradiated samples were measured. Both the decay rate of surface potential and surface conductivity decrease with an increase in the energy of electron beam. Meanwhile, surface flashover voltage increase. It was found that both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. The increase in the energy and density of deep surface traps enhance the ability to capture primary emitted electrons. In addition, the decrease in surface conductivity blocks electron emission at the cathode triple junction. Therefore, electron avalanche at the interface between gas and an insulating material would be suppressed, eventually improving surface flashover voltage of epoxy resin microcomposites.

  1. Emulsification of resin modified by simultaneous graft polymerization with electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Fumio; Sasaki, Takashi; Hagiwara, Miyuki

    1983-01-01

    Emulsification of the epoxy resins, onto which hydrophilic groups were introduced by simultaneous co-graft polymerization with electron beam irradiation, were studied. Resins modified with use of ionic monomers such as methacrylic acid (MAc), diethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DE), tetramethylammonium methacrylate (TMAMA), or methacryloyloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (QDM) formed latexes, when they were dissolved into small amounts of solvents followed by the addition of water. A higher composition of hydrophilic monomer in the resin-monomer mixture gave a latex with a smaller particle size and higher storage stability. TMAMA and QDM, both of which were incompatible with epoxy resin, were very effective in decreasing the particle size and increasing stability of a latex. It was also ascertained that an alkyd resin were able to emulsified similarly by grafting of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and MAc. (author)

  2. Clinical and scanning electron microscopic assessments of porcelain and ceromer resin veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Pankaj; Prakash, Hari; Shah, Nassem

    2003-01-01

    Recently available Ceromer resin materials are promising for fabrication of esthetic anterior laminates and provices an alternative, cost effective treament modality to porcelain laminates for discolored anterior anterior teeth. It was proposed to study the esthetic quality and surface finish of veneers fbricated from ceromer resin and compare it with the standard porcelain veneers, both clinically as well as by scanning electron microscope (SEM) at baseline and at 12 months. If found comparable, ceromer resin veneer could provide an alternative to porcelain veneers which is an expensive technique for a developing country like India. Seventy-two veneers, 36 porcelain and 36 ceromer were placed in 12 subjects who were studied at 0, 6 and 12 months for clinical acceptability, and at 0 and 12 months for SEM assessment. The restorations were luted with Opal luting composite and Scotchbond multipurpose system; polyvinyl siloxane was used as the impression material. The clinical assessment was made using modified United Public Health Services criteria, whereas the SEM assessment was made by quantitative analysis of the marginal fit and surface characteristics of the two veneering materials. Ceromer exhibited good anatomical form during the study period, but depicted changes in color, surface appearance, marginal adaptation, increased marginal discoloration, and tissue response. Inability to achieve a good finish with high gloss was a major drawback of the ceromer. Porcelain exhibited better esthetics, marginal adaptation, finish qualities, and tissue response. The SEM showed good to excellent marginal fit at baselinne in ceromer and porcelain veneers, but loss of luting resin at the margins was evident in both the materials after 12 months, leading to visible gaps in a number of veneer restorations. Ceromer veneers exhibited poor surface characteristics in several restorations, which further degraded in an oral conditions over 12 months. Veneering is an effective mode of

  3. Quantitative biological measurement in Transmission Electron Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantell, Judith M; Verkade, Paul; Arkill, Kenton P

    2012-01-01

    It has been known for some time that biological sections shrink in the transmission electron microscope from exposure to the electron beam. This phenomenon is especially important in Electron Tomography (ET). The effect on shrinkage of parameters such as embedding medium or sample type is less well understood. In addition anisotropic area shrinkage has largely been ignored. The intention of this study is to explore the shrinkage on a number of samples ranging in thickness from 200 nm to 500 nm. A protocol was developed to determine the shrinkage in area and thickness using the gold fiducials used in electron tomography. In brief: Using low dose philosophy on the section, a focus area was used prior to a separate virgin study area for a series of known exposures on a tilted sample. The shrinkage was determined by measurements on the gold beads from both sides of the section as determined by a confirmatory tomogram. It was found that the shrinkage in area (approximately to 90-95% of the original) and the thickness (approximately 65% of the original at most) agreed with pervious authors, but that a lmost all the shrinkage was in the first minute and that although the direction of the in-plane shrinkage (in x and y) was sometimes uneven the end result was consistent. It was observed, in general, that thinner samples showed more percentage shrinkage than thicker ones. In conclusion, if direct quantitative measurements are required then the protocol described should be used for all areas studied.

  4. Quantitative biological measurement in Transmission Electron Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantell, Judith M.; Verkade, Paul; Arkill, Kenton P.

    2012-07-01

    It has been known for some time that biological sections shrink in the transmission electron microscope from exposure to the electron beam. This phenomenon is especially important in Electron Tomography (ET). The effect on shrinkage of parameters such as embedding medium or sample type is less well understood. In addition anisotropic area shrinkage has largely been ignored. The intention of this study is to explore the shrinkage on a number of samples ranging in thickness from 200 nm to 500 nm. A protocol was developed to determine the shrinkage in area and thickness using the gold fiducials used in electron tomography. In brief: Using low dose philosophy on the section, a focus area was used prior to a separate virgin study area for a series of known exposures on a tilted sample. The shrinkage was determined by measurements on the gold beads from both sides of the section as determined by a confirmatory tomogram. It was found that the shrinkage in area (approximately to 90-95% of the original) and the thickness (approximately 65% of the original at most) agreed with pervious authors, but that a lmost all the shrinkage was in the first minute and that although the direction of the in-plane shrinkage (in x and y) was sometimes uneven the end result was consistent. It was observed, in general, that thinner samples showed more percentage shrinkage than thicker ones. In conclusion, if direct quantitative measurements are required then the protocol described should be used for all areas studied.

  5. A novel calorimetry technique for monitoring electron beam curing of polymer resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.H.; Johnston, A.; Petrescue, L.; Hojjati, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a calorimetry-based technique for monitoring of the curing of electron beam (EB) curable resins, including design of the calorimeter hardware and the development of an analytical model for calculating resin cure rates and radiation dose. Factors affecting the performance of the calorimeter were investigated. Experimental trials monitoring the curing of epoxy resin were conducted under single pass and multiple passes of EB irradiation. Results show that the developed calorimeter is a simple, inexpensive and reasonably accurate technique for monitoring the EB curing of cationic epoxies

  6. Clinical and scanning electron microscopic assessments of porcelain and ceromer resin veneers.

    OpenAIRE

    Dhawan P; Prakash H; Shah N

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recently available Ceromer resin materials are promising for fabrication of esthetic anterior laminates and provices an alternative, cost effective treament modality to porcelain laminates for discolored anterior anterior teeth. It was proposed to study the esthetic quality and surface finish of veneers fbricated from ceromer resin and compare it with the standard porcelain veneers, both clinically as well as by scanning electron microscope (SEM) at baseline and at 12 months. If foun...

  7. Dynamic mechanical studies on epoxy resins cured by electron beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Gang; Zhang Zuoguang; Liang Zhiyong; Chen Changqi

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical analyses on electron beam (EB)-cured epoxy resins were made in the paper. Through the studies on variation rules of gel fraction, tan δ and storage modulus for varied samples, the important effects of EB radiation dosage, initiator dosage, chemical structure, molecular weight and distribution, and heat treatment on curing reaction and properties of epoxy resin systems have been obtained. Under low radiation doses, the gel fraction, glass transition temperature (Tg) and high temperature modulus of cured epoxy resin increase with increasing radiation dose and initiator dosage. The crosslinking density of epoxy resin decreases slightly with increasing molecular weight. When radiation doses increase, the molecular weight has a little influence on the increasing of curing level and an optimal dosage of initiator appears. The experimental results indicate that the radiation reactivity of epoxy resins is directly associated with their chemical structures. Under the same radiation dose, the reaction extent in sample with high polydispersity is higher than that in low polydispersity sample, but the degree of homogeneity in crosslinking structure is lower. When the EB-cured epoxy resin is heated, the crosslinking density is enhanced. If the temperature of heating treatment exceeds the thermal-initiating temperature of initiator, the local thermal-crosslinking network can be formed in resin system

  8. Characterization of epoxy resin containing nano clay prepared by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Seok; Lee, Seung Jun; Lim, Youn Mook; Jeong, Sung In; Gwon, Hui Jeong; Shin, Young Min; Kang, Phil Hyun; Nho, Young Chan

    2015-01-01

    Epoxy resin is widely used as aerospace, automobile, construction and electronics due to their good mechanical and electrical properties and environmental advantages. However, the inherent flammability of epoxy resin has limited its application in some field where good flame retardancy is required. Nano clay can enhance the properties of polymers such as flames retardancy and thermal stability. In this study, we have investigated the nanoclay filled epoxy composite, which has good flame retardancy while maintaining high mechanical properties. The cured epoxy resins were obtained using an electron beam curing process. The nano clays were dispersed in epoxy acrylate solution and mechanically stirred. The prepared mixtures were irradiated using an electron beam accelerator. The composites were characterized by gel content and thermal/ mechanical properties. Moreover, the flammability of the composite was evaluated by limited oxygen index (LOI). The flame retardancy of nano clay filled epoxy composite was evidently improved

  9. Surface flashover performance of epoxy resin microcomposites improved by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yin; Min, Daomin [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Li, Shengtao, E-mail: stli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Li, Zhen; Xie, Dongri [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, Xuan [Key Laboratory of Engineering Dielectric and its Application, Ministry of Education, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China); Lin, Shengjun [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Pinggao Group Company Ltd., State Grid High Voltage Switchgear Insulation Materials Laboratory, Pingdingshan 467001 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Epoxy resin microcomposites were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV. • Surface flashover voltage increase with the increase of electron beam energy. • Both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. • Deposition energy in epoxy resin microcomposites increases with electron beam energy, and surface trap properties are determined by deposition energy. • The influence of surface conductivity and trap distribution on flashover voltage is discussed. - Abstract: The influencing mechanism of electron beam irradiation on surface flashover of epoxy resin/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} microcomposite was investigated. Epoxy resin/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} microcomposite samples with a diameter of 50 mm and a thickness of 1 mm were prepared. The samples were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV and a beam current of 5 μA for 5 min. Surface potential decay, surface conduction, and surface flashover properties of untreated and irradiated samples were measured. Both the decay rate of surface potential and surface conductivity decrease with an increase in the energy of electron beam. Meanwhile, surface flashover voltage increase. It was found that both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. The increase in the energy and density of deep surface traps enhance the ability to capture primary emitted electrons. In addition, the decrease in surface conductivity blocks electron emission at the cathode triple junction. Therefore, electron avalanche at the interface between gas and an insulating material would be suppressed, eventually improving surface flashover voltage of epoxy resin microcomposites.

  10. [The evaluation of acrylic resins for the study of nondecalcified human teeth with the light and electronic microscopes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, F; Martignoni, M; Scala, C; Cocchia, D

    1995-04-01

    Resin embedding of human teeth for light and transmission electron microscopic studies becomes difficult without previous decalcification. The limited and slow infiltration of the resin into hard tissues may cause problems during preparation and observation of the samples. Moreover the type of resin that is used may affect the morphologic preservation of both tissues and cellular elements. Recently there has been an increasing number of studies on the application of acrylic resins in light and electron microscopy, in order to overcome problems encountered with the use of epoxy resins still utilized in morphologic studies. We compared different acrylic resins (Technovit 7200 VLC, LR White, LR Gold, Bioacryl) in order to understand which one was more suitable for undecalcified human dental tissues under light and transmission electron microscope. Evaluation of such resins was performed using the following criteria: ease of cutting with ultramicrotome, soft and hard tissues infiltration, uptake of tissue stains for both light and electron microscopy, morphologic preservation and stability under electron beam. This study, carried out on the pulp area comprising predentin and dentin, showed excellent quality of Bioacryl and LR Gold, the two resins presenting, by far, the best results among all the different types tested. The optimal morphologic preservation obtained with such resins is indicated for light and electron microscopic studies, allowing their application in different fields of dental research.

  11. Immunogold Staining of London Resin (LR) White Sections for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skepper, Jeremy N; Powell, Janet M

    2008-06-01

    INTRODUCTIONIn post-embedding methods of immunogold staining, the cells or tissues are fixed chemically or cryoimmobilized, dehydrated, and embedded in epoxy or acrylic resins. Thin sections (50-70 nm in thickness) are cut using an ultramicrotome with a diamond knife, using a water bath to collect the sections as they slide off the knife. The sections are stretched with solvent vapor or a heat source and collected onto either bare or plastic-coated nickel grids. The sections are then stained immunochemically with primary antibodies raised against antigens exposed on the surface of the sections. The primary antibodies are visualized by staining immunochemically with secondary antibodies raised against the species and isotype of the primary antibodies, conjugated to colloidal gold particles. The immunochemically stained sections are then contrast stained with salts of uranium (uranyl acetate) and lead (lead citrate) to reveal the ultrastructure of the cells, and are finally viewed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). LR White was introduced as a low-toxicity alternative to epoxy resins, which frequently contained carcinogens. Unlike the simplest acrylic resins, in which monomers are polymerized to form long chains, the LR resins contain aromatic cross-linkers to improve the stability of the sections under the electron beam. LR White and Gold both have very low viscosity and readily penetrate, even into dense tissue. In this protocol, aldehyde-fixed tissue is dehydrated in ethanol, impregnated in LR White resin and polymerized under vacuum or in a nitrogen atmosphere before sectioning and immunogold staining.

  12. A multicentre comparison of quantitative (90)Y PET/CT for dosimetric purposes after radioembolization with resin microspheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willowson, Kathy P; Tapner, Michael; Bailey, Dale L

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate and compare the quantitative accuracy of (90)Y imaging across different generation PET/CT scanners, for the purpose of dosimetry after radioembolization with resin microspheres. METHODS: A strict experimental and imaging protocol was followed by 47 international sites using...

  13. Influences of molecular weight on curing effect of epoxy resin irradiated by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Gang; Liang Ji; Li Dan; Zhang Zuoguang; Chen Huijuan

    2004-01-01

    The influences of molecular weight on electron beam (EB) curing in epoxy resins were studied. The rate of radiation reaction in epoxy resin systems decreases with the increasing molecular weight. Under the low radiation dose, the curing thickness and curing degree is small for samples with high molecular weight. The effect of molecular weight decreases with the increasing radiation dose. The glass transition temperature (Tg) and the storage modulus (E') are under the control of curing degree in samples, and the molecular weight will play a role on the samples with similar curing degree. After heat treatment, the Tg and E' of epoxy resins cured by radiation will increase. The molecular weight is directly associated with effect of heat treatment

  14. Cure Behavior and Thermal Properties of Diepoxidized Cardanol Resin Cured by Electron Beam Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Donghwan; Cheon, Jinsil

    2013-01-01

    Thermal curing of epoxy resin requires high temperature, time-consuming process and the volatilization of hardener. It has known that electron beam curing of epoxy resin is a fast process and occurs at low or room temperature that help reduce residual mechanical stresses in thermosetting polymers. Diepoxidized cardanol (DEC) can be synthesized by an enzymatic method from cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), that constitutes nearly one-third of the total nut weight. A large amount of CNSL can be formed as a byproduct of the mechanical processes used to render the cashew kerneledible and its total production approaches one million tons annually, which can be bio-degradable and replace the industrial thermosetting plastics. It is expected that DEC may be cured as in an epoxy resin, which was constituted on two epoxide group and long alkyl chain, and two-types of onium salts (cationic initiator) were used as a photo-initiator. The experimental variables of this study are type and concentration of photo-initiators and electron beam dosage. In this study, the effects of initiator type and concentration on the cure behavior and the thermal properties of DEC resin processed by using electron beam technology were studied using FT-IR, TGA, TMA, DSC, and DMA. Figure 1 is the FT-IR results, showing the change of chemical structure of pure DEC and electron beam cured DEC. The characteristic absorption peak of epoxide group appeared at 850cm -1 . The shape and the height were reduced when the sample was irradiated with electron beam. From this result, the epoxide groups is DEC were opened by electron beam and cured. After then, electron beam cured DEC was investigated the effect of forming 3-dimensional network

  15. Possible formation of interpenetrating polym networks (IPN) by electron beam irradiation of acrylated epoxy resin blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sheikhyl, M.

    1994-01-01

    Over the last decade, high energy electron beam radiation has been successfully used by a number of laboratories to initiate the polymerization of acrylated epoxides. Unlike the radiation-induced cationic polymerization of epoxides, the polymerization of acrylated epoxides by ionizing radiation propagates by carbon-centered free radicals through the unsaturated end groups. In this work, two part epoxy-based resin matrices were cured by a two-step process; (1) In the first step, an electron beam pre-cure of the matrix was used to produce form stability; then (2) a thermal cycle was employed to complete the cure. The ultimate objective of this work is to provide a controlled epoxy polymerization reaction through the blending of fully unsaturated epoxy with an unmodified epoxy. Such a blended resin contains a component which, when exposed to ionizing radiation, will create a three dimensional structure within the unmodified epoxy resin. Thus, upon thermal curing of the unmodified epoxy resin component within the radiation cured network, an interpenetrating network (IPN) can be formed

  16. Quantitative Electron Tomography of Rubber Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staniewicz, Lech; Midgley, Paul; Vaudey, Thomas; Degrandcourt, Christophe; Couty, Marc; Gaboriaud, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Rubber composite materials have many applications, one example being tyre manufacture. The presence of a filler material in the composite (such as carbon black or silica) causes its mechanical properties to differ in several ways when compared to pure rubber such as viscoelastic behaviour (the Payne effect), increased tensile strength and improved wear resistance. To fully understand these properties, it is necessary to characterise how the filler material is organised on the nanoscale. Using composite materials representative of those found in tyres, this work illustrates the use of electron tomography and machine learning methods as tools to describe the percolation behaviour of the filler; in this case, we focus on the largest proportion of particles absorbed into one single object as a function of particle spacing

  17. Quantitative Electron Tomography of Rubber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniewicz, Lech; Vaudey, Thomas; Degrandcourt, Christophe; Couty, Marc; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Midgley, Paul

    2014-06-01

    Rubber composite materials have many applications, one example being tyre manufacture. The presence of a filler material in the composite (such as carbon black or silica) causes its mechanical properties to differ in several ways when compared to pure rubber such as viscoelastic behaviour (the Payne effect), increased tensile strength and improved wear resistance. To fully understand these properties, it is necessary to characterise how the filler material is organised on the nanoscale. Using composite materials representative of those found in tyres, this work illustrates the use of electron tomography and machine learning methods as tools to describe the percolation behaviour of the filler; in this case, we focus on the largest proportion of particles absorbed into one single object as a function of particle spacing.

  18. Quantitative characterization of electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruskin, Rachel S; Yu, Zhiheng; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2013-12-01

    A new generation of direct electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) promises significant improvement over previous detectors in terms of their modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). However, the performance of these new detectors needs to be carefully monitored in order to optimize imaging conditions and check for degradation over time. We have developed an easy-to-use software tool, FindDQE, to measure MTF and DQE of electron detectors using images of a microscope's built-in beam stop. Using this software, we have determined the DQE curves of four direct electron detectors currently available: the Gatan K2 Summit, the FEI Falcon I and II, and the Direct Electron DE-12, under a variety of total dose and dose rate conditions. We have additionally measured the curves for the Gatan US4000 and TVIPS TemCam-F416 scintillator-based cameras. We compare the results from our new method with published curves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of resin-dentin interfacial morphology of two ethanol-based universal adhesives: A scanning electron microscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Awad, Mohamed Moustafa

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the resin-dentin interfacial morphology created by two universal adhesives using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: The occlusal surfaces of ten (n = 5) molars were reduced to expose a flat surface of dentin. Two universal adhesives, Scotchbond Universal Adhesive and Tetric N-Bond Universal, were independently applied to air-dried dentin. Light-cured resin-based composite restorative materials were used to incrementa...

  20. Recent Developments in Halogen Free Flame Retardants for Epoxy Resins for Electrical and Electronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotomalala, Muriel; Wagner, Sebastian; Döring, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    The recent implementation of new environmental legislations led to a change in the manufacturing of composites that has repercussions on printed wiring boards (PWB). This in turn led to alternate processing methods (e.g., lead-free soldering), which affected the required physical and chemical properties of the additives used to impart flame retardancy. This review will discuss the latest advancements in phosphorus containing flame retardants for electrical and electronic (EE) applications and compare them with commercially available ones. The mechanism of degradation and flame retardancy of phosphorus flame retardants in epoxy resins will also be discussed. PMID:28883331

  1. Recent Developments in Halogen Free Flame Retardants for Epoxy Resins for Electrical and Electronic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotomalala, Muriel; Wagner, Sebastian; Döring, Manfred

    2010-08-11

    The recent implementation of new environmental legislations led to a change in the manufacturing of composites that has repercussions on printed wiring boards (PWB). This in turn led to alternate processing methods (e.g., lead-free soldering), which affected the required physical and chemical properties of the additives used to impart flame retardancy. This review will discuss the latest advancements in phosphorus containing flame retardants for electrical and electronic (EE) applications and compare them with commercially available ones. The mechanism of degradation and flame retardancy of phosphorus flame retardants in epoxy resins will also be discussed.

  2. Recent Developments in Halogen Free Flame Retardants for Epoxy Resins for Electrical and Electronic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Döring

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent implementation of new environmental legislations led to a change in the manufacturing of composites that has repercussions on printed wiring boards (PWB. This in turn led to alternate processing methods (e.g., lead-free soldering, which affected the required physical and chemical properties of the additives used to impart flame retardancy. This review will discuss the latest advancements in phosphorus containing flame retardants for electrical and electronic (EE applications and compare them with commercially available ones. The mechanism of degradation and flame retardancy of phosphorus flame retardants in epoxy resins will also be discussed.

  3. Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The quantitative determination of low-Z elements (using full Monte Carlo simulations, from the electron impact to the X-ray detection) in individual particles has improved the applicability of single-particle analysis, especially in atmospheric environmental aerosol research; many environmentally important atmospheric ...

  4. Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA) technique us- ing an energy-dispersive X-ray detector with an ultra-thin window, designated as low-Z particle. EPMA, has been developed. The low-Z particle EPMA allows the quantitative determination of concentrations of low-Z elements such ...

  5. Dynamic Mechanical Properties and Thermal Effect of an Epoxy Resin Composite, Encapsulation's Element of a New Electronic Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rmili, W.; Deffarges, M. P.; Chalon, F.; Ma, Z.; Leroy, R.

    2013-11-01

    Epoxy resin is used in many industrial applications principally in the microelectronic field to protect integrated circuits. However, these components are subject to various environments such as moisture and thermal fluctuations during packaging. Consequently, mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the resin can be affected. For an epoxy resin composite designed for a future application, an evaluation of the relevant properties was carried out using a dynamic mechanical analyzer and a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) instrument. The surface morphology was investigated using scanning electron microscopy to examine the impact of post-cured treatment through evolution of the rigidity and of the glass transition temperature. Subsequently, a temperature classification was proposed to define the temperature limit for safe use of the material. Finally, temperature degradation was observed and confirmed by TGA tests. Results from all of these analyses bring understanding to the phenomenon of thermal degradation and its influence on the stability of the epoxy resin composite.

  6. An electronic nose for quantitative determination of gas concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Grzegorz; Kalinowski, Paweł; Woźniak, Łukasz

    2016-11-01

    The practical application of human nose for fragrance recognition is severely limited by the fact that our sense of smell is subjective and gets tired easily. Consequently, there is considerable need for an instrument that can be a substitution of the human sense of smell. Electronic nose devices from the mid 1980s are used in growing number of applications. They comprise an array of several electrochemical gas sensors with partial specificity and a pattern recognition algorithms. Most of such systems, however, is only used for qualitative measurements. In this article usage of such system in quantitative determination of gas concentration is demonstrated. Electronic nose consist of a sensor array with eight commercially available Taguchi type gas sensor. Performance of three different pattern recognition algorithms is compared, namely artificial neural network, partial least squares regression and support vector machine regression. The electronic nose is used for ammonia and nitrogen dioxide concentration determination.

  7. Synthesis of non-ionic and ionic resins for BEP intaglio inks curing by electron-beam radiation. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, B.J.; Dickens, B.

    1992-01-01

    The inks currently used to print US postage stamps on web presses are dried by heat evaporation of solvents. Emission of solvents into the atmosphere is governed by Local and Federal Government Regulations. Reduction of these emissions to acceptable levels can be accomplished by either of two methods available to the BEP. The work was part of a continuing effort to produce resins for use in formulation of intaglio inks for the printing of postage stamps and security documents. The inks are to be cured by exposure to an electron beam. The uncured inks are cleaned from the roller and wiping blade by washing the wiping blade with neutral water or with caustic water. Laboratory scale work on the urethane/polyethylene oxide/methacrylate resins has now been concluded and information on the synthesis has been provided to BEP for patenting and scaleup. Some effort on nonionic resins continued into FY88

  8. Quantitative analysis of peel-off degree for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Janghoon; Lee, Jongsu; Sung, Ki-Hak; Shin, Kee-Hyun; Kang, Hyunkyoo

    2018-02-01

    We suggest a facile methodology of peel-off degree evaluation by image processing on printed electronics. The quantification of peeled and printed areas was performed using open source programs. To verify the accuracy of methods, we manually removed areas from the printed circuit that was measured, resulting in 96.3% accuracy. The sintered patterns showed a decreasing tendency in accordance with the increase in the energy density of an infrared lamp, and the peel-off degree increased. Thus, the comparison between both results was presented. Finally, the correlation between performance characteristics was determined by quantitative analysis.

  9. Attosecond-Resolved Electron Dynamics in Many-Electron Atoms: Quantitative Theory and Comparison with Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleanthes Anthony Nicolaides

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A variety of processes originating from the interaction of atomic or molecular N-electron states with strong and/or hypershort radiation pulses can be understood quantitatively only by first determining with good accuracy the solutions of the many-electron time-dependent Schrödinger equation (METDSE that describe the corresponding physics. The METDSE is solvable nonperturbatively via the state-specific expansion approach (SSEA. SSEA solutions have been used, or can be used, for quantitative explanation and numerically reliable predictions of quantities that have been measured or are measurable in modern laser-driven experiments that can track, with hypershort (attosecond time resolution, the effects of electron rearrangements in atoms and molecules. The calculations take into account in a transparent way the interplay between the phenomena and the electronic structures of the physically significant states in discrete and multichannel continuous spectra, including multiply- and inner-hole–excited resonance states. The discussion focuses on novel topics of time-resolved many-electron physics and includes a comparison of our predictions to recent quantitative measurements of attosecond-resolved generation of the profile of the doubly excited resonance state of helium during photoionization and of the relative time delay in photoemission of the (2s,2p electrons of neon.

  10. Quantitative analysis of complexes in electron irradiated CZ silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, N.; Ohyama, H.; Goto, Y.; Sugiyama, T.

    2007-01-01

    Complexes in helium or electron irradiated silicon are quantitatively analyzed by highly sensitive and accurate infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy. Carbon concentration (1x10 15 -1x10 17 cm -3 ) and helium dose (5x10 12 -5x10 13 cm -2 ) or electron dose (1x10 15 -1x10 17 cm -2 ) are changed by two orders of magnitude in relatively low regime compared to the previous works. It is demonstrated that the carbon-related complex in low carbon concentration silicon of commercial grade with low electron dose can be detected clearly. Concentration of these complexes is estimated. It is clarified that the complex configuration and thermal behavior in low carbon and low dose samples is simple and almost confined within the individual complex family compared to those in high concentration and high dose samples. Well-established complex behavior in electron-irradiated sample is compared to that in He-irradiated samples, obtained by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) or cathodoluminescence (CL), which had close relation to the Si power device performance

  11. Quantitative Determination of Spring Water Quality Parameters via Electronic Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noèlia Carbó

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of a voltammetric electronic tongue for the quantitative analysis of quality parameters in spring water is proposed here. The electronic voltammetric tongue consisted of a set of four noble electrodes (iridium, rhodium, platinum, and gold housed inside a stainless steel cylinder. These noble metals have a high durability and are not demanding for maintenance, features required for the development of future automated equipment. A pulse voltammetry study was conducted in 83 spring water samples to determine concentrations of nitrate (range: 6.9–115 mg/L, sulfate (32–472 mg/L, fluoride (0.08–0.26 mg/L, chloride (17–190 mg/L, and sodium (11–94 mg/L as well as pH (7.3–7.8. These parameters were also determined by routine analytical methods in spring water samples. A partial least squares (PLS analysis was run to obtain a model to predict these parameter. Orthogonal signal correction (OSC was applied in the preprocessing step. Calibration (67% and validation (33% sets were selected randomly. The electronic tongue showed good predictive power to determine the concentrations of nitrate, sulfate, chloride, and sodium as well as pH and displayed a lower R2 and slope in the validation set for fluoride. Nitrate and fluoride concentrations were estimated with errors lower than 15%, whereas chloride, sulfate, and sodium concentrations as well as pH were estimated with errors below 10%.

  12. Accurate virus quantitation using a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) detector in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancett, Candace D; Fetterer, David P; Koistinen, Keith A; Morazzani, Elaine M; Monninger, Mitchell K; Piper, Ashley E; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Kearney, Brian J; Norris, Sarah L; Rossi, Cynthia A; Glass, Pamela J; Sun, Mei G

    2017-10-01

    A method for accurate quantitation of virus particles has long been sought, but a perfect method still eludes the scientific community. Electron Microscopy (EM) quantitation is a valuable technique because it provides direct morphology information and counts of all viral particles, whether or not they are infectious. In the past, EM negative stain quantitation methods have been cited as inaccurate, non-reproducible, and with detection limits that were too high to be useful. To improve accuracy and reproducibility, we have developed a method termed Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy - Virus Quantitation (STEM-VQ), which simplifies sample preparation and uses a high throughput STEM detector in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with commercially available software. In this paper, we demonstrate STEM-VQ with an alphavirus stock preparation to present the method's accuracy and reproducibility, including a comparison of STEM-VQ to viral plaque assay and the ViroCyt Virus Counter. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Scanning electron microscopy evaluation of the interaction pattern between dentin and resin after cavity preparation using Er:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schein, Marcelo Thome

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the interaction pattern formed between dentin and resin on cavities prepared with an erbium laser (Er:YAG). The morphological aspect of the irradiated dentin after acid etching was also observed. Ten dentin disks were obtained from fresh extracted third molars. Each disk received two cavities, one prepared with a conventional high-speed drill, while the other cavity was obtained by the use of an Er:YAG laser (KaVo KEY Laser, KaVo Co.). The laser treatment was performed with 250 mJ/pulse, 4 Hz, non contact mode, focused beam, and a fine water mist was used. Five disks were prepared for morphological analysis of the acid etched dentin. The other five disks had their cavities restored with Single Bond (3M) followed by Z100 resin (3M). The specimens were observed under scanning electron microscopy after dentin-resin interface demineralization and deproteinization. It was observed that the morphological characteristics of the acid-etched irradiated dentin were not favorable to the diffusion of monomers through the collagen network. The dentin resin interfacial aspect of irradiated dentin, after acid etching, showed thin tags and scarce hybridization zones, which agreed with the morphology of the irradiated and acid-etched dentin substrate observed. (author)

  14. Quantitative characterization of solid epoxy resins using comprehensive two dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julka, Samir; Cortes, Hernan; Harfmann, Robert; Bell, Bruce; Schweizer-Theobaldt, Andreas; Pursch, Matthias; Mondello, Luigi; Maynard, Shawn; West, David

    2009-06-01

    A comprehensive multidimensional liquid chromatography system coupled to Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (LCxLC-ESI-MS) was developed for detailed characterization and quantitation of solid epoxy resin components. The two orthogonal modes of separation selected were size exclusion chromatography (SEC) in the first dimension and liquid chromatography at critical conditions (LCCC) in the second dimension. Different components present in the solid epoxy resins were separated and quantitated for the first time based on the functional groups and molecular weight heterogeneity. Coupling LCxLC separations with mass spectrometry enabled the identification of components resolved in the two-dimensional space. Several different functional group families of compounds were separated and identified, including epoxy-epoxy and epoxy-alpha-glycol functional oligomers, and their individual molecular weight ranges were determined. Repeatability obtained ranged from 0.5% for the main product to 21% for oligomers at the 0.4% concentration level.

  15. Influence of light transmission through fiber posts: Quantitative analysis, microhardness, and on bond strength of a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Fernando Dos Santos Alves Morgan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Light transmission (LT into deeper areas of the dentin root is limited. Aim: The aim of this study is to perform a quantitative investigation of the radial transmission of light (LT through different fiber posts and its influence on the Knoop hardness number (KHN and bond strength (BS of a dual-cure self-adhesive resin cement at 3 different depths. Materials and Methods: Four types of fiber posts (2 translucent and 2 conventional were used. LT and KHN analyses were performed in a specially designed matrix, which allowed measurements at 3 different depths. LT was measured using a volt-ampere meter while KHN tests were performed in a microhardness tester. For BS analysis, endodontically treated bovine roots were divided into 4 groups, each group receiving one type of post. After cementation, cross sections of the root were tested for resistance to displacement using a universal testing machine. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed by using this ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results: For LT, translucent posts showed significantly higher values at all depths compared to the conventional ones. For all posts, LT decreased at the deeper depths. The KHN results showed no statistical differences among the different posts, regardless of depth. For BS, a translucent post showed the highest values, and comparative analyses between the different depths of posts also showed statistically significant differences while comparisons among the different depths of the same post showed no differences. Conclusions: LT depended on the type of post and on depth. The type of post did not significantly influence the cement KHN. A translucent post showed higher BS in pooled data.

  16. Critical parameters for electron beam curing of cationic epoxies and property comparison of electron beam cured cationic epoxies versus thermal cured resins and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janke, C.J.; Norris, R.E.; Yarborough, K.; Lopata, V.J.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of composites is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process offering the following advantages compared to conventional thermal curing: substantially reduced manufacturing costs and curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvements in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance electron beam curing of composites. The CRADA has successfully developed hundreds of new toughened and untoughened resins, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility. Several patent applications have been filed for this work. Composites made from these easily processable, low shrinkage material match the performance of thermal cured composites and exhibit: low void contents comparable to autoclave cured composites (less than 1%); superb low water absorption values in the same range as cyanate esters (less than 1%); glass transition temperatures rivaling those of polyimides (greater than 390 C); mechanical properties comparable to high performance, autoclave cured composites; and excellent property retention after cryogenic and thermal cycling. These materials have been used to manufacture many composite parts using various fabrication processes including hand lay-up, tow placement, filament winding, resin transfer molding and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding

  17. Resins for combined light and electron microscopy: a half century of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, G R; Hobot, J A

    1999-08-01

    The last fifty years have seen enormous improvements in the way biological specimens are prepared for microscopy. The Fifties produced the essential groundwork upon which many of our current methodologies are based. Acrylic resin embedding was introduced in 1949, with subsequent publications seeking improvements to resin formulations, embedding protocols, and modes of polymerisation. Procedures for progressive lowering of temperature processing, cryosubstitution, freeze-drying and polymerisation by ultra-violet light at low temperatures, all had their genesis in this decade of great innovation. The Sixties marked the period when the acrylics were eclipsed by the more stable and reliable epoxy resins, and much of our present-day understanding of ultrastructure was elucidated. The Seventies carried on this work with advances in technical developments concerned mainly with freezing methodologies. The beginning of the Eighties saw a resurrection of the acrylic resins, with new formulations of these resins giving reliable and stable embeddings. The low temperature and freezing methodologies pioneered in the Fifties, backed up by recent improvements to low temperature technologies, were used to further our understanding of ultrastructure and breathe new life into the science of immunocytochemistry. The remainder of the Eighties and Nineties has seen the ever increasing application of these various microscopical techniques to a wide range of biological studies. The flexibility offered by the acrylic resins in choosing between different processing, embedding and polymerisation methods has provided the impetus for detailed studies to bring to the attention of microscopists the underlying trends governing specimen preparation. Therefore, looking forward to the new Millennium, this has allowed for a more reasoned choice in organising a strategy to deal with a variety of microscopical requirements and for planning an appropriate protocol.

  18. The recycling of comminuted glass-fiber-reinforced resin from electronic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Huabo; Jia, Weifeng; Li, Jinhui

    2010-05-01

    The reuse of comminuted glass-fiber-reinforced resin with various granularities gathered from printed circuit manufacturing residues was investigated. As fillers, these residues were converted into polymeric composite board by an extrusion and injection process using polypropylene as a bonding agent. The mechanical properties of the reproduced composite board were examined by considering the effects of mass fraction and glass-fiber distribution. Interfacial-layer micrograph analysis of the composite material fracture surface was used to study the fiber reinforcement mechanism. Results showed that using comminuted glass-fiber-reinforced resin as a filler material greatly enhanced the performance properties of the composite board. Although the length and diameter of filler varied, these variations had no appreciable effect on the mechanical properties of the processed board. Maximum values of 48.30 MPa for flexural strength, 31.34 MPa for tensile strength, and 31.34 J/m for impact strength were achieved from a composite board containing mass fractions of 30, 10, and 20% glass-fiber-reinforced resin waste, respectively. It was found that the maximum amount of recyclate that could be added to a composite board was 30% of weight. Beyond these percentages, the materials blend became unmanageable and the mixture less amenable to impregnation with fiber. Presented studies indicated that comminuted glass-fiber-reinforced resin waste-filled polypropylene composites are promising candidates for structural applications where high stiffness and fracture resistance are required.

  19. Comparative study of the use of non-ionizing and ionizing radiation in the cure of epoxy resin: microwave versus electron electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.kersting@usp.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Wiebeck, Helio, E-mail: hwiebeck@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica; Marinucci, Gerson; Silva, Leonardo G.A. e, E-mail: marinuci@ipen.br, E-mail: gasilva@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Several processes for curing epoxy resins were developed over the years. Two methods are discussed in this paper, in order to present the main advantages and disadvantages of using microwave radiation (non-ionizing radiation) and electron beam radiation (ionizing radiation). The microwave radiation is a non-ionizing radiation, with great power of penetration and transfer of heat in microwave absorbing materials, or materials with microwave absorbing fillers. The frequency usually used in research and development is 2.45 GHz, the same available in commercial equipment. The microwave effect provides increase on the collision velocity between the reactant which, combined with energy absorbed by the reaction system, accelerates the curing reaction. None modifications in the epoxy system are required to use microwave heating for the curing process.On the other hand, the electron beam is a form of ionizing radiation in which the high energy electrons have the ability to interact with the irradiated material and produce ions, free radicals, and molecules in excited state, which can be used to initiate and propagate a polymerization. Specific initiators are necessary for an effective cure of the resin. In this study, a DGEBA epoxy resin with initiators based on anhydride and amine was used under the same conditions indicated by the manufacturer. The curing of the catalyzed system was performed in a domestic microwave oven adapted for laboratory use. The degradation and glass transition temperatures were evaluated by thermal analysis techniques. For comparative purposes, it was used data available in the literature for electron beam irradiation. (author)

  20. Comparative study of the use of non-ionizing and ionizing radiation in the cure of epoxy resin: microwave versus electron electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersting, Daniel; Wiebeck, Helio

    2013-01-01

    Several processes for curing epoxy resins were developed over the years. Two methods are discussed in this paper, in order to present the main advantages and disadvantages of using microwave radiation (non-ionizing radiation) and electron beam radiation (ionizing radiation). The microwave radiation is a non-ionizing radiation, with great power of penetration and transfer of heat in microwave absorbing materials, or materials with microwave absorbing fillers. The frequency usually used in research and development is 2.45 GHz, the same available in commercial equipment. The microwave effect provides increase on the collision velocity between the reactant which, combined with energy absorbed by the reaction system, accelerates the curing reaction. None modifications in the epoxy system are required to use microwave heating for the curing process.On the other hand, the electron beam is a form of ionizing radiation in which the high energy electrons have the ability to interact with the irradiated material and produce ions, free radicals, and molecules in excited state, which can be used to initiate and propagate a polymerization. Specific initiators are necessary for an effective cure of the resin. In this study, a DGEBA epoxy resin with initiators based on anhydride and amine was used under the same conditions indicated by the manufacturer. The curing of the catalyzed system was performed in a domestic microwave oven adapted for laboratory use. The degradation and glass transition temperatures were evaluated by thermal analysis techniques. For comparative purposes, it was used data available in the literature for electron beam irradiation. (author)

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Electron Beam Damage in Organic Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Leijten, Zino J. W. A.; Keizer, Arthur D. A.; de With, Gijsbertus; Friedrich, Heiner

    2017-01-01

    In transmission electron microscopy (TEM) the interaction of an electron beam with polymers such as P3HT:PCBM photovoltaic nanocomposites results in electron beam damage, which is the most important factor limiting acquisition of structural or chemical data at high spatial resolution. Beam effects can vary depending on parameters such as electron dose rate, temperature during imaging, and the presence of water and oxygen in the sample. Furthermore, beam damage will occur at different length s...

  2. Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, YuPo J [Naperville, IL; Henry, Michael P [Batavia, IL; Snyder, Seth W [Lincolnwood, IL

    2008-11-18

    An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

  3. Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, YuPo J [Naperville, IL; Henry, Michael P [Batavia, IL; Snyder, Seth W [Lincolnwood, IL

    2011-07-12

    An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

  4. Scanning electron microscopic study of teeth restored with fiber posts and composite resin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Sridhara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to compare and evaluate the thickness of resin dentin interface zones (RDIZ obtained by luting carbon fiber post to intra-radicular dentin, either with All-Bond 2 bonding agent and C and B composite cement or Panavia F dentin-bonding system and Panavia F resin cement. Materials and Methods: Twenty single rooted mandibular premolars of similar sizes were prepared for the carbon fiber post after biomechanical preparation and obturation. They were divided into two groups, Group 1 and 2 of 10 samples each. Carbon fiber posts used for Group 1 samples were luted using All-Bond 2 and C and B cement. For Group 2 carbon fiber posts were luted using Panavia F dentin-bonding system and Panavia F resin cement. All the 20 samples were sectioned longitudinally and marked at three points on the length of the tooth from the dentin-core interface to the apex at 2 mm, 5 mm, and 8 mm to get coronal, middle, and apical areas, respectively. The formation and thickness (width of the RDIZ at the marked areas was evaluated by scanning electron microscope using ×1000 magnification. The results were statistical analyzed. Results: Irrespective of the adhesive systems used all specimens showed a RDIZ formation. Microscopic examination of Group 1 showed significantly higher percentage of RDIZ (P < 0.05 than Group 2. RDIZ morphology was easily detectable at coronal and middle areas of all specimens. Conclusion: All-Bond 2 showed denser and wider RDIZ compared with the Panavia F.

  5. Structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggs, Kelvin; Wang, Xiao-Qian

    2010-03-01

    Nanocomposites of cured epoxy resin reinforced by single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibit a plethora of interesting behaviors at the molecular level. We have employed a combination of force-field-based molecular mechanics and first-principles calculations to study the corresponding binding and charge-transfer behavior. The simulation study of various nanotube species and curing agent configurations provides insight into the optimal structures in lieu of interfacial stability. An analysis of charge distributions of the epoxy functionalized semiconducting and metallic tubes reveals distinct level hybridizations. The implications of these results for understanding dispersion mechanism and future nano reinforced composite developments are discussed.

  6. Electronic imaging systems for quantitative electrophoresis of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is one of the most powerful and widely used methods for the separation of DNA. During the last decade, instruments have been developed that accurately quantitate in digital form the distribution of materials in a gel or on a blot prepared from a gel. In this paper, I review the various physical properties that can be used to quantitate the distribution of DNA on gels or blots and the instrumentation that has been developed to perform these tasks. The emphasis here is on DNA, but much of what is said also applies to RNA, proteins and other molecules. 36 refs

  7. Quantitative voltage contrast method for electron irradiated insulators in SEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belhaj, M [UR MMA INSAT Centre Urbain Nord, BP 676-1080, Tunis (Tunisia); Jbara, O [LASSI/GRESPI, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Fakhfakh, S [LaMaCop, Faculte des sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra Km 3, BP 802, CP 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)], E-mail: mohamed.belhaj@free.fr

    2008-09-07

    A surface potential mapping method for electron irradiated insulators in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) is proposed. This method, based on the use of a highly compact electrostatic toroidal spectrometer specially adapted to SEM applications, is able to monitor the spatial variation of surface potentials of strongly negatively charged materials. The capabilities of this method are tested on a made-up heterogeneous sample. First results prove that the method is particularly appropriate for the reconstitution of the surface potential distribution.

  8. Quantitative voltage contrast method for electron irradiated insulators in SEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belhaj, M; Jbara, O; Fakhfakh, S

    2008-01-01

    A surface potential mapping method for electron irradiated insulators in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) is proposed. This method, based on the use of a highly compact electrostatic toroidal spectrometer specially adapted to SEM applications, is able to monitor the spatial variation of surface potentials of strongly negatively charged materials. The capabilities of this method are tested on a made-up heterogeneous sample. First results prove that the method is particularly appropriate for the reconstitution of the surface potential distribution

  9. Quantitative determination of metallic load distribution in ion exchange resin used in the online purification system by ICP-OES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Satinath; Tripathy, M.K.; Aher, V.T.; Gandhi, S.T.; Suresh, G.; Udamle, N.; Kumar, Rakesh; Dhole, Kajal; Sharma, R.S.; Varde, P.V.

    2016-01-01

    Online purification system is essentially used in the close recirculating type coolant system for the cleaning of the impurities to ensure the reasonably minimum corrosive condition for the structural materials and also to improve the heat transfer efficacy. A sample of exhausted strong acid cation exchange resin (SAC) was investigated from the online purification system of the secondary coolant system of the research reactor after four years of regenerative use to understand the metallic load distribution and its further usability. It was evident from the component analysis that the iron was prominently occupying the resin matrix or pores as precipitates and also as major metallic foulant whereas copper and nickel were preferentially occupying the exchangeable sites

  10. Improving Short Term Instability for Quantitative Analyses with Portable Electronic Noses

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Macías Macías; J. Enrique Agudo; Antonio García Manso; Carlos Javier García Orellana; Horacio Manuel González Velasco; Ramón Gallardo Caballero

    2014-01-01

    One of the main problems when working with electronic noses is the lack of reproducibility or repeatability of the sensor response, so that, if this problem is not properly considered, electronic noses can be useless, especially for quantitative analyses. On the other hand, irreproducibility is increased with portable and low cost electronic noses where laboratory equipment like gas zero generators cannot be used. In this work, we study the reproducibility of two portable electronic noses, th...

  11. Quantitative methods for the analysis of electron microscope images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skands, Peter Ulrik Vallø

    1996-01-01

    in a number work cases. These mainly falls in the three categories: (i) Description of coarse scale measures to quantify surface structure or texture (topography); (ii) Characterization of fracture surfaces in steels (fractography); (iii) Grain boundary segmentation in sintered ceramics. The theoretical...... foundation of the thesis fall in the areas of: 1) Mathematical Morphology; 2) Distance transforms and applications; and 3) Fractal geometry. Image analysis opens in general the possibility of a quantitative and statistical well founded measurement of digital microscope images. Herein lies also the conditions...

  12. Quantitative electron probe microanalysis of borides in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karduck, P.; Schuerhoff, H.J.; Burchard, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    A procedure for the quantitative analysis of borides in aluminium was introduced. For this purpose the optimal apparative boundary conditions for the EPMA of boron were worked out. With these conditions a satisfactory peak to background ratio of 57 could be achieved for B-Kα-radiation. By application of this method the following conclusion should be drawn concerning the kind of nuclei during grain refinement of aluminium with titanium and boron: For grain refinement of aluminium with titanium and boron in the hypoperitectic region of the binary system Al-Ti TiB 2 -particles in clusters provide the high efficiency of refinement. This entails that the TiB 2 -particles already present in the master alloy remain inert in the melt. Hence, the good efficiency of refinement in this region cannot be attributed to the presence of particles like Al 3 Ti, AlB 2 or (Al, Ti) B 2 . (Author)

  13. Electron Beam Induced Mass Loss Dependence on Stained Thin Epon Resin Sections

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skoupý, Radim; Nebesářová, Jana; Krzyžánek, Vladislav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, S3 (2016), s. 926-927 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-20012S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : TEM * STEM * EFTEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering; JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering (BC-A) Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  14. Quantitative convergent beam electron diffraction measurements of bonding in alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.W.S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The QCBED technique of measuring accurate structure factors has been made practical by advances in energy filtering, computing and in the accurate measurement of intensity. Originally attempted in 1965 by the late Peter Goodman (CSIRO, Melbourne) while working with Gunter Lehmpfuhl (Fritz Haber Institut, Berlin), QCBED has been successfully developed and tested in the last decade on simple structures such as Si and MgO. Our work on Alumina is a step up in complexity and has shown that extinction in X-ray diffraction is not correctable to the precision required. In combination with accurate X-ray diffraction, QCBED promises to revolutionize the accuracy of bonding charge density measurements, experimental results which are of significance in the development of Density Functional Theory used in predictive chemistry. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  15. Quantitative determination of elastic and inelastic attenuation coefficients by off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, F.; Wolf, D.; Pschera, P.; Lubk, A.

    2016-12-15

    Off-axis electron holography is a well-established transmission electron microscopy technique, typically employed to investigate electric and magnetic fields in and around nanoscale materials, which modify the phase of the reconstructed electron wave function. Here, we elaborate on a detailed analysis of the two characteristic intensity terms that are completing the electron hologram, the conventional image intensity and the interference fringe intensity. We show how both are related to elastic and inelastic scattering absorption at the sample and how they may be separated to analyze the chemical composition of the sample. Since scattering absorption is aperture dependent, a quantitative determination of the corresponding attenuation coefficients (reciprocal mean free path lengths) requires the use of holographic image modi with well-defined objective aperture stops in the back-focal plane of the objective lens. The proposed method extends quantitative electron holography to a correlated three-in-one characterization of electric and magnetic fields, Z-contrast and dielectric losses in materials. - Highlights: • Quantitative determination of attenuation coefficients by electron holography. • Separation of elastic and inelastic attenuation coefficients (mean free path length). • Quantitative determination of the objective aperture semi-angle influence. • Compilation of elastic and inelastic attenuation from different materials.

  16. A voltammetric electronic tongue for the quantitative analysis of quality parameters in wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Bisbal, María Carmen; Loeff, Edwin; Olivas, Estela; Carbó Mestre, Noèlia; García Castillo, F. Javier; López Carrero, Javier; Tornos, Isabel; Tejadillos, Francisco José; Berlanga, José Guillermo; Martínez Máñez, Ramón; Alcañiz, Miguel; Soto, Juan

    2017-01-01

    The use of a voltammetric electronic tongue for the quantitative analysis of quality parameters in influent wastewater from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) that treats domestic and industrial wastewater is proposed. The electronic voltammetric tongue consists of a set of four noble electrodes (iridium, rhodium, platinum and gold) housed inside a stainless steel cylinder. These noble metals have high durability and are low maintenance-demanding, as required for developing futur...

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Liquid Crystalline Polyurethane/Al2O3/Epoxy Resin Composites for Electronic Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaorong Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid crystalline polyurethane (LCPU/Al2O3/epoxy resin composites were prepared by using LCPU as modifier. The mechanical properties, thermal stability, and electrical properties of the LCPU/Al2O3/epoxy resin composites were investigated systematically. The thermal oxidation analysis indicated that LCPU/Al2O3/epoxy resin composites can sustain higher thermal decomposition temperature. Meanwhile, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE was also found to decrease with addition of LCPU and nano-Al2O3.

  18. Prospects for quantitative and time-resolved double and continuous exposure off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migunov, Vadim, E-mail: v.migunov@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Dwyer, Christian [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Boothroyd, Chris B. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Pozzi, Giulio [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, viale B. Pichat 6/2, Bologna 40127 (Italy); Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    The technique of double exposure electron holography, which is based on the superposition of two off-axis electron holograms, was originally introduced before the availability of digital image processing to allow differences between electron-optical phases encoded in two electron holograms to be visualised directly without the need for holographic reconstruction. Here, we review the original method and show how it can now be extended to permit quantitative studies of phase shifts that oscillate in time. We begin with a description of the theory of off-axis electron hologram formation for a time-dependent electron wave that results from the excitation of a specimen using an external stimulus with a square, sinusoidal, triangular or other temporal dependence. We refer to the more general method as continuous exposure electron holography, present preliminary experimental measurements and discuss how the technique can be used to image electrostatic potentials and magnetic fields during high frequency switching experiments. - Highlights: • Double and continuous exposure electron holography are described in detail. • The ability to perform quantitative studies of phase shifts that are oscillating in time is illustrated. • Theoretical considerations related to noise are presented. • Future high frequency electromagnetic switching experiments are proposed.

  19. A Quantitative Exploration of the Relationship between Patient Health and Electronic Personal Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Denise Williams

    2009-01-01

    The use of electronic personal health records is becoming increasingly more popular as healthcare providers, healthcare and government leaders, and patients are seeking ways to improve healthcare quality and to decrease costs (Abrahamsen, 2007). This quantitative, descriptive correlational study examined the relationship between the degree of…

  20. Electron beam induced cationic polymerization of epoxy resins. Dependence of Tg on conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrand, H.; Cazaux, F.; Coqueret, X.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The high-energy radiation curing of monomer blends polymerizing by a free radical or by a cationic mechanism receives increasing attention in the perspective of high performance composite materials. In the present work, we have focused our attention on epoxy formulations as models of the matrices polymerizing by a cationic mechanism that could be used in fiber-reinforced composites for aerospace applications. We have examined the progress of the electron beam (EB) induced polymerization of diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) in the presence of a diaryliodonium salt (DAIS) by FTIR spectroscopy and by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMA). The obtained results allow to draw the gradual increase of the temperature for the network thermomechanical transition (T a , associated with the glass transition temperature T g ) over a broad range of conversion (p) and reveal a peculiar behavior at high conversion. In this domain (p > 0.90), the material's T g is shown to decrease when conversion approaches unity. Moreover, the post-irradiation thermal treatment of the materials, that generally yields effective 'dark curing', appears to induce a decrease of T g , with an amplitude correlated with the amount of DAIS in the formulation. Owing to the particular nature of the propagating centers in cationic polymerisation, the thermal relaxation of ionic clusters trapped in the glassy matrix can be reasonably invoked as a possible cause for this behavior

  1. Three-dimensional Quantitative Porosity Characterization of Syringe- versus Hand-mixed Set Epoxy Resin Root Canal Sealer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Deus, Gustavo; Scelza, Miriam Z; Neelakantan, Prasanna; Sharma, Subash; Neves, Aline de Almeida; Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the porosity characteristics of AH Plus Jet(tm) syringe-mix and the conventional hand-mixed AH Plus root canal sealers by three-dimensional quantitative high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Seven test specimens were prepared from each tested sealer by a single operator following the manufacturer's instructions and poured into pre-lubricated plastic split-ring moulds. Set sealer test specimens were scanned using a micro-CT device and the shadow images were reconstructed into cross-sectional slices. The evaluated parameters were (i) total pore count, (ii) total pore volume and mean pore volume, (iii) total porosity (% of pore volume in relation to total sealer volume) and (iv) mean pore distance to the sealer lateral external surface. In both groups, most pores were localized within the external sealer perimeter (0.05 mm from the external surface). Hand-mixed AH Plus specimens showed statistically significant higher mean total pore count, total pore volume and total porosity (p=0.001) than the syringe-mixed specimens. However, mean pore sizes in AH Plus syringe-mixed specimens were significantly higher (p=0.046) than the AH Plus hand-mixed counterparts. Hand-mixed AH Plus was associated with higher total mean pore count, volume and total porosity compared to syringe mixed AH Plus.

  2. Quantitative electron tomography: the effect of the three-dimensional point spread function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Hamed; Van den Broek, Wouter; Bals, Sara

    2013-12-01

    The intensity levels in a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, obtained by electron tomography, can be influenced by several experimental imperfections. Such artifacts will hamper a quantitative interpretation of the results. In this paper, we will correct for artificial intensity variations by determining the 3D point spread function (PSF) of a tomographic reconstruction based on high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The large tails of the PSF cause an underestimation of the intensity of smaller particles, which in turn hampers an accurate radius estimate. Here, the error introduced by the PSF is quantified and corrected a posteriori. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of surface roughness and dimorphism on the adhesion of Candida albicans to the surface of resins: scanning electron microscope analyses of mode and number of adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayahara, Mitsuori; Kataoka, Ryuta; Arimoto, Takafumi; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Yamaguchi, Nobuaki; Watanabe, Yuki; Yamasaki, Yoshizumi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Candida albicans is a common oral fungus but can cause serious conditions such as Candida stomatitis. We investigated C. albicans adhesion to the surface of denture-base resins at two growth phases. Fungal suspensions of logarithmic (9 h) and stationary phase (24 h) C. albicans (JCM2085) were used. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed that yeast and mycelial forms were predominant in 9-h and 24-h cultures, respectively. Resin strips were polished to three surface roughness levels (Ra 3.2 μm, Ra 0.48 μm and Ra 0.06 μm) and were then immersed in C. albicans suspensions for both phases. The SEM images were taken at five sites on each strip. Adhesion of mycelial-form C. albicans on rough surfaces (Ra = 3.2) was 2.2 times higher than on smooth surfaces (Ra = 0.06; 7030 vs 3580 adhesions/mm(2), P < 0.01). The hyphae of these mycelial forms fully penetrated the surface cracks. Fewer adhesions occurred for yeast-form C. albicans, regardless of surface type (440-620 adhesions/mm(2), P = n.s.). Adhesion of yeast-form C. albicans was indifferent to surface roughness. In contrast, mycelial adhesion increased with surface roughness of the resin because mycelia infiltrated the minute protuberances on rough surfaces. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Qualitative histologic evaluation of the tissue reaction to the polyurethane resin (ricinus communis - based biopolymer implantation assessed by light and scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Campos Belmonte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The tissue reaction of bone tissue accessed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM images after polyurethane resin implantation is presented in this study. Twenty four male rabbits were used, divided into two groups of 12 animals each (experimental group and control group in which full-thickness cranial defect was surgically created. At 30 and 90 days post operation 6 animals of each group were euthanized and bone samples were removed for analysis. The microscopic results indicated no inflammatory foreign body reaction, a perfect union between the polymer and surgical bone bed surface, lack of bone resorption and presence of a thin layer of osteogenic material covering the polymer surface in contact with the surgical bone bed. The SEM images demonstrate the porosity of the resin, with diameters from 120 to 500 µm. This important feature of this polymer is associated with its osteoconductivity, allowing the bone growth inside it, improving the integration between the material and bone tissue. These results confirm that polyurethane resin derived from Ricinuscommunis is an excellent bone substitute for use in repair surgery for great bone losses.

  5. Characterization at Atomic Resolution of Carbon Nanotube/Resin Interface in Nanocomposites by Mapping sp 2-Bonding States Using Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi-Feng; Park, Jin G; Koo, Ana; Trayner, Sarah; Hao, Ayou; Downes, Rebekah; Liang, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Functionalization is critical for improving mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/polymer nanocomposites. A fundamental understanding of the role of the CNT/polymer interface and bonding structure is key to improving functionalization procedures for higher mechanical performance. In this study, we investigated the effects of chemical functionalization on the nanocomposite interface at atomic resolution to provide direct and quantifiable information of the interactions and interface formation between CNT surfaces and adjacent resin molecules. We observed and compared electronic structures and their changes at the interfaces of nonfunctionalized and functionalized CNT/polymer nanocomposite samples via scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectrum imaging techniques. The results show that the state of sp 2 bonding and its distribution at the CNT/resin interface can be clearly visualized through EELS mapping. We found that the functionalized CNT/polymer samples exhibited a lower fraction of sp 2 bonding and a lower π*/σ* ratio compared with the nonfunctionalized cases. A good correlation between near-edge fine structures and low-loss plasmon energies was observed.

  6. Evaluation of adhesion of reline resins to the thermoplastic denture base resin for non-metal clasp denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hye; Choe, Han Cheol; Son, Mee Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the tensile and transverse bond strength of chairside reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II, Mild Rebaron LC) to a thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) used for non metal clasp denture. The results were compared with those of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20) and a thermoplastic polyamide resin (Biotone). The failure sites were examined by scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the mode of failure. As results, the bond strength of reline resins to a thermoplastic acrylic resin was similar to the value of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin. However, thermoplastic polyamide resin showed the lowest value. The results of this study indicated that a thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasps denture allows chairside reline and repair. It was also found that the light-polymerized reline resin had better bond strength than the autopolymerizing reline resin in relining for a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin and a thermoplastic acrylic resin.

  7. Multifunctional skin-like electronics for quantitative, clinical monitoring of cutaneous wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Falgout, Leo; Lee, Woosik; Jung, Sung-Young; Poon, Emily; Lee, Jung Woo; Na, Ilyoun; Geisler, Amelia; Sadhwani, Divya; Zhang, Yihui; Su, Yewang; Wang, Xiaoqi; Liu, Zhuangjian; Xia, Jing; Cheng, Huanyu; Webb, R Chad; Bonifas, Andrew P; Won, Philip; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Jang, Kyung-In; Song, Young Min; Nardone, Beatrice; Nodzenski, Michael; Fan, Jonathan A; Huang, Yonggang; West, Dennis P; Paller, Amy S; Alam, Murad; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Rogers, John A

    2014-10-01

    Non-invasive, biomedical devices have the potential to provide important, quantitative data for the assessment of skin diseases and wound healing. Traditional methods either rely on qualitative visual and tactile judgments of a professional and/or data obtained using instrumentation with forms that do not readily allow intimate integration with sensitive skin near a wound site. Here, an electronic sensor platform that can softly and reversibly laminate perilesionally at wounds to provide highly accurate, quantitative data of relevance to the management of surgical wound healing is reported. Clinical studies on patients using thermal sensors and actuators in fractal layouts provide precise time-dependent mapping of temperature and thermal conductivity of the skin near the wounds. Analytical and simulation results establish the fundamentals of the sensing modalities, the mechanics of the system, and strategies for optimized design. The use of this type of "epidermal" electronics system in a realistic clinical setting with human subjects establishes a set of practical procedures in disinfection, reuse, and protocols for quantitative measurement. The results have the potential to address important unmet needs in chronic wound management. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A qualitative analysis to compare the effects of surface machining of conventional denture base resin and two soft liners: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Santoshi V; Taruna, M; Chittaranjan, B; Reddy, Sushendhar M; Reddy, Kranti Kiran E; Kulkarni, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    The denture base acrylic resins require adjustments for various reasons. During this process there is an alteration in the surface characteristics of the denture base. Rough surfaces promote the bacterial adhesion and plaque accumulation; therefore it is important to know the character of the surface left by instrumentation on denture base materials. This study evaluated the surface characteristics of the machined surfaces of heat-cured acrylic denture base resin, GC supersoft and Permasoft softliners. Thirty 15×15×1.5mm acrylic resin specimens were fabricated with each of three acrylic resins: Lucitone 199 denture base resin (Group I), GC supersoft (Group II) and Permasoft (Group III) softliners. They were further divided into three sub Groups A, B and C, in which Sub Group A was control group that is smooth produced against the glass. Sub Group B was produced by machining with the tungsten carbide bur and Sub group C is machined with the stone bur. Each surface was evaluated by a Scanning electron microscope and data were analyzed by analysis of variance followed by Tukey's HSD test. Stone bur produced smoother surface (Ra 3.6681μm± 0.254) on Lucitone199 than the tungsten carbide bur (Ra 5.3881μm ± 0.3373). Carbide bur produced a smoother surface on the GC super soft (Ra 1.617097μm ± 0.191767) and Permasoft softliners (Ra 2.237419μm ± 0.354259). Whereas stone bur produced rougher surface on GC supersoft(Ra 2.6μm) and Permasoft (Ra 4.184839μm ± 0.409869) softliners. The present study shows each type of rotary instrument produces its own characteristic surface on each type of denture base materials and that care is needed when selecting the most appropriate instrument to adjust denture base materials. These results can have a significant clinical implication. While using Lucitone 199 stone bur can be used for chair side adjustments. Tungsten carbide bur can be used for GC supersoft and Permasoft softliners to achieve smoother surface.

  9. Physical aspects of quantitative particles analysis by X-ray fluorescence and electron microprobe techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowicz, A.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present both physical fundamentals and recent advances in quantitative particles analysis by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and electron microprobe (EPXMA) techniques. A method of correction for the particle-size effect in XRF analysis is described and theoretically evaluated. New atomic number- and absorption correction procedures in EPXMA of individual particles are proposed. The applicability of these two correction methods is evaluated for a wide range of elemental composition, X-ray energy and sample thickness. Also, a theoretical model for composition and thickness dependence of Bremsstrahlung background generated in multielement bulk specimens as well as thin films and particles are presented and experimantally evaluated. Finally, the limitations and further possible improvements in quantitative particles analysis by XFR and EPXMA are discussed. 109 refs. (author)

  10. Quantitative in situ magnetization reversal studies in Lorentz microscopy and electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, L A; Magén, C; Snoeck, E; Gatel, C; Marín, L; Serrano-Ramón, L; Prieto, J L; Muñoz, M; Algarabel, P A; Morellon, L; De Teresa, J M; Ibarra, M R

    2013-11-01

    A generalized procedure for the in situ application of magnetic fields by means of the excitation of the objective lens for magnetic imaging experiments in Lorentz microscopy and electron holography is quantitatively described. A protocol for applying magnetic fields with arbitrary in-plane magnitude and orientation is presented, and a freeware script for Digital Micrograph(™) is provided to assist the operation of the microscope. Moreover, a method to accurately reconstruct hysteresis loops is detailed. We show that the out-of-plane component of the magnetic field cannot be always neglected when performing quantitative measurements of the local magnetization. Several examples are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and functionality of the methods. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Towards quantitative scanning electron microscopy: Applications to nano-scale analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gomati, M.M., E-mail: mmg@ohm.york.ac.uk [Department of Electronics, University of York (United Kingdom); Walker, C.G.H.; Zha, X. [Department of Electronics, University of York (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-21

    Although the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) has been in existence for many decades, it cannot be yet regarded as a true quantitative instrument-certainly when applied at the nanoscale. This is due to the presence of carbonaceous deposits at the surface and a poor understanding of the emission of secondary electrons from materials. In this paper, a short review is given of some of the progress made in the efforts to improve quantification in the SEM at York. We present results which strongly suggest that the currently accepted theory, which explains why there is a correlation between the secondary electron yield and the work function of a metal, is incorrect. In addition, we show that the backscattering coefficient from materials can be strongly influenced by surface layers at low primary electron energy. Finally, we present Auger electron spectra, which have been acquired at high speed at high vacuum (10{sup -7} mbar) and thus represent a new way to determine the composition of nanostructures in the SEM.

  12. Quantitative analysis of biological fluids by electron probe and X ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girod, Chantal

    1986-01-01

    In order to know the kidney normal operation and to have an insight on cellular transport mechanisms and hormonal regulations at the nephron level, a technique based on the use of an electron probe has been developed for the elemental analysis of micro-volumes of biological fluids. This academic document reports applications of this technique on animals on which such fluids have been sampled at different levels of the nephron. As these samples are available in too small volumes to be dosed by conventional methods, they have been quantitatively analysed by using an electronic probe based analyser in order to determine concentrations of all elements with an atomic number greater than that of carbon. After a presentation of the implemented method and hardware, the author thus describes how an analysis is performed, and reports and discusses an example (analysis conditions, data acquisition, data processing, minimum detectable concentration, reasons for measurement scattering)

  13. Quantitative electron tomography: The effect of the three-dimensional point spread function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidari, Hamed [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Van den Broek, Wouter [Institut für Experimentelle Physik, Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Bals, Sara, E-mail: sara.bals@ua.ac.be [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2013-12-15

    The intensity levels in a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, obtained by electron tomography, can be influenced by several experimental imperfections. Such artifacts will hamper a quantitative interpretation of the results. In this paper, we will correct for artificial intensity variations by determining the 3D point spread function (PSF) of a tomographic reconstruction based on high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The large tails of the PSF cause an underestimation of the intensity of smaller particles, which in turn hampers an accurate radius estimate. Here, the error introduced by the PSF is quantified and corrected a posteriori. - Highlights: • Intensity variations in 3D reconstructions hamper quantification of tomography data. • These variations are corrected based on the point spread function. • The approach can be considered as an optimized route to 3D quantification.

  14. Quantitative atomic resolution mapping using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Aert, S.; Verbeeck, J.; Erni, R.; Bals, S.; Luysberg, M.; Dyck, D. Van; Tendeloo, G. Van

    2009-01-01

    A model-based method is proposed to relatively quantify the chemical composition of atomic columns using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. The method is based on a quantification of the total intensity of the scattered electrons for the individual atomic columns using statistical parameter estimation theory. In order to apply this theory, a model is required describing the image contrast of the HAADF STEM images. Therefore, a simple, effective incoherent model has been assumed which takes the probe intensity profile into account. The scattered intensities can then be estimated by fitting this model to an experimental HAADF STEM image. These estimates are used as a performance measure to distinguish between different atomic column types and to identify the nature of unknown columns with good accuracy and precision using statistical hypothesis testing. The reliability of the method is supported by means of simulated HAADF STEM images as well as a combination of experimental images and electron energy-loss spectra. It is experimentally shown that statistically meaningful information on the composition of individual columns can be obtained even if the difference in averaged atomic number Z is only 3. Using this method, quantitative mapping at atomic resolution using HAADF STEM images only has become possible without the need of simultaneously recorded electron energy loss spectra.

  15. Improving short term instability for quantitative analyses with portable electronic noses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Miguel Macías; Agudo, J Enrique; Manso, Antonio García; Orellana, Carlos Javier García; Velasco, Horacio Manuel González; Caballero, Ramón Gallardo

    2014-06-13

    One of the main problems when working with electronic noses is the lack of reproducibility or repeatability of the sensor response, so that, if this problem is not properly considered, electronic noses can be useless, especially for quantitative analyses. On the other hand, irreproducibility is increased with portable and low cost electronic noses where laboratory equipment like gas zero generators cannot be used. In this work, we study the reproducibility of two portable electronic noses, the PEN3 (commercial) and CAPINose (a proprietary design) by using synthetic wine samples. We show that in both cases short term instability associated to the sensors' response to the same sample and under the same conditions represents a major problem and we propose an internal normalization technique that, in both cases, reduces the variability of the sensors' response. Finally, we show that the normalization proposed seems to be more effective in the CAPINose case, reducing, for example, the variability associated to the TGS2602 sensor from 12.19% to 2.2%.

  16. Improving Short Term Instability for Quantitative Analyses with Portable Electronic Noses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Macías Macías

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems when working with electronic noses is the lack of reproducibility or repeatability of the sensor response, so that, if this problem is not properly considered, electronic noses can be useless, especially for quantitative analyses. On the other hand, irreproducibility is increased with portable and low cost electronic noses where laboratory equipment like gas zero generators cannot be used. In this work, we study the reproducibility of two portable electronic noses, the PEN3 (commercial and CAPINose (a proprietary design by using synthetic wine samples. We show that in both cases short term instability associated to the sensors’ response to the same sample and under the same conditions represents a major problem and we propose an internal normalization technique that, in both cases, reduces the variability of the sensors’ response. Finally, we show that the normalization proposed seems to be more effective in the CAPINose case, reducing, for example, the variability associated to the TGS2602 sensor from 12.19% to 2.2%.

  17. Weak-beam scanning transmission electron microscopy for quantitative dislocation density measurement in steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kenta; Shimodaira, Masaki; Toyama, Takeshi; Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Milan, Konstantinovic J; Gerard, Robert; Nagai, Yasuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate dislocations induced by neutron irradiation, we developed a weak-beam scanning transmission electron microscopy (WB-STEM) system by installing a novel beam selector, an annular detector, a high-speed CCD camera and an imaging filter in the camera chamber of a spherical aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The capabilities of the WB-STEM with respect to wide-view imaging, real-time diffraction monitoring and multi-contrast imaging are demonstrated using typical reactor pressure vessel steel that had been used in an European nuclear reactor for 30 years as a surveillance test piece with a fluence of 1.09 × 1020 neutrons cm-2. The quantitatively measured size distribution (average loop size = 3.6 ± 2.1 nm), number density of the dislocation loops (3.6 × 1022 m-3) and dislocation density (7.8 × 1013 m m-3) were carefully compared with the values obtained via conventional weak-beam transmission electron microscopy studies. In addition, cluster analysis using atom probe tomography (APT) further demonstrated the potential of the WB-STEM for correlative electron tomography/APT experiments. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. An electronic portfolio for quantitative assessment of surgical skills in undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Gómez, Serafín; Ostos, Elisa María Cabot; Solano, Juan Manuel Maza; Salado, Tomás Francisco Herrero

    2013-05-06

    We evaluated a newly designed electronic portfolio (e-Portfolio) that provided quantitative evaluation of surgical skills. Medical students at the University of Seville used the e-Portfolio on a voluntary basis for evaluation of their performance in undergraduate surgical subjects. Our new web-based e-Portfolio was designed to evaluate surgical practical knowledge and skills targets. Students recorded each activity on a form, attached evidence, and added their reflections. Students self-assessed their practical knowledge using qualitative criteria (yes/no), and graded their skills according to complexity (basic/advanced) and participation (observer/assistant/independent). A numerical value was assigned to each activity, and the values of all activities were summated to obtain the total score. The application automatically displayed quantitative feedback. We performed qualitative evaluation of the perceived usefulness of the e-Portfolio and quantitative evaluation of the targets achieved. Thirty-seven of 112 students (33%) used the e-Portfolio, of which 87% reported that they understood the methodology of the portfolio. All students reported an improved understanding of their learning objectives resulting from the numerical visualization of progress, all students reported that the quantitative feedback encouraged their learning, and 79% of students felt that their teachers were more available because they were using the e-Portfolio. Only 51.3% of students reported that the reflective aspects of learning were useful. Individual students achieved a maximum of 65% of the total targets and 87% of the skills targets. The mean total score was 345 ± 38 points. For basic skills, 92% of students achieved the maximum score for participation as an independent operator, and all achieved the maximum scores for participation as an observer and assistant. For complex skills, 62% of students achieved the maximum score for participation as an independent operator, and 98% achieved

  19. Contribution of stimulations for the optimization of quantitative electron probe micro analysis of heterogeneous catalysts; Apport de la simulation dans l'optimisation de l'analyse quantitative par microsonde electronique de catalyseurs heterogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorbier, L.

    2001-11-01

    Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) is frequently used to measure the local concentration of active elements in heterogeneous catalysts. However, when classical procedures are used, a significant deficit is observed both in local total concentration and mean total concentrations. A Monte Carlo program simulating measured intensities (characteristic lines and continuous background) has been written using PENELOPE routines. We have included in this program models taking into account the different physical phenomena likely to lead to the observed signal loss (insulating properties, roughness, porosity, energy loss at interfaces). Simulation results have shown that an important roughness (Ra>200 nm) was the only parameter apt to lead to a significant total signal loss. This led us to inquire into another origin to explain the signal loss observed on meso-porous samples. Measurements conducted on a meso-porous alumina confirmed that measuring aluminum, oxygen and carbon leads to a correct total of concentrations. Signal loss is thus explained by the contamination of the sample during its preparation, the components of the embedding resin diffusing into the porosity and reacting with the reactive surface of the catalyst support. In the case of macroporous catalysts, local roughness effect is very important. The simulations have shown the efficiency of the Peak to Background method to correct these local roughness effects. Measurements conducted on reforming and hydro-treating catalysts have led to a correct total concentration and confirmed the contribution of the Peak to Background method to achieve local quantitative measurement. (author)

  20. Quantitative measurement of lightning-induced electron precipitation using VLF remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, William Bolton

    This dissertation examines the detection of lightning-induced energetic electron precipitation via subionospheric Very Low Frequency (VLF) remote sensing. The primary measurement tool used is a distributed set of VLF observing sites, the Holographic Array for Ionospheric/Lightning Research (HAIL), located along the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains in the Central United States. Measurements of the VLF signal perturbations indicate that 90% of the precipitation occurs over a region ˜8 degrees in latitudinal extent, with the peak of the precipitation poleward displaced ˜7 degrees from the causative discharge. A comparison of the VLF signal perturbations recorded on the HAIL array with a comprehensive model of LEP events allows for the quantitative measurement of electron precipitation and ionospheric density enhancement with unprecedented quantitative detail. The model consists of three major components: a test-particle model of gyroresonant whistler-induced electron precipitation; a Monte Carlo simulation of energy deposition into the ionosphere; and a model of VLF subionospheric signal propagation. For the two representative LEP events studied, the model calculates peak VLF amplitude and phase perturbations within a factor of three of those observed, well within the expected variability of radiation belt flux levels. The modeled precipitated energy flux (E>45 keV) peaks at ˜1 x 10-2 [ergs s-1 cm -2], resulting in a peak loss of ˜0.001% from a single flux tube at L˜2.2, consistent with previous satellite measurements of LEP events. Metrics quantifying the ionospheric density enhancement (N ILDE) and the electron precipitation (Gamma) are strongly correlated with the VLF signal perturbations calculated by the model. A conversion ratio Psi relates VLF signal amplitude perturbations (DeltaA) to the time-integrated precipitation (100-300 keV) along the VLF path (Psi=Gamma / DeltaA). The total precipitation (100-300 keV) induced by one of the representative LEP

  1. Quantitative drug design studies. II. Development and application of new electronic substituent parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, T

    1980-11-01

    New electronic substituent parameters for quantitative drug design were developed from the standpoint of the frontier orbital theory using the extended Hückel method. Each substituent was characterized by three constants (E, Re, I), which were derived from the SOMO (solely occupied molecular orbital) energy and the coefficient of the SOMO hybrid orbital responsible for bonding to the parent moiety. These correspond to the SOMO-SOMO energy difference (E), the resistivity of the path (Re), and the flow intensity (I) respectively, when the frontier electron flow occurs between the standard parent and the substituent. They can be regarded as major factors governing the electronic inductive-field effect of the substituent. As the result of analyses of various kinds of biological data, they were found to be excellent and widely applicable parameters to the structure-activity problems. In this paper, the new frontier substituent constant values for 150 kinds of substituents and 58 kinds of equations to which the new constants were successfully applied are presented.

  2. Fabrication and Characterization of a Conformal Skin-like Electronic System for Quantitative, Cutaneous Wound Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woosik; Kwon, Ohjin; Lee, Dong Sup; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the development of electronic technologies and biomedical devices offer opportunities for non-invasive, quantitative assessment of cutaneous wound healing on the skin. Existing methods, however, still rely on visual inspections through various microscopic tools and devices that normally include high-cost, sophisticated systems and require well trained personnel for operation and data analysis. Here, we describe methods and protocols to fabricate a conformal, skin-like electronics system that enables conformal lamination to the skin surface near the wound tissues, which provides recording of high fidelity electrical signals such as skin temperature and thermal conductivity. The methods of device fabrication provide details of step-by-step preparation of the microelectronic system that is completely enclosed with elastomeric silicone materials to offer electrical isolation. The experimental study presents multifunctional, biocompatible, waterproof, reusable, and flexible/stretchable characteristics of the device for clinical applications. Protocols of clinical testing provide an overview and sequential process of cleaning, testing setup, system operation, and data acquisition with the skin-like electronics, gently mounted on hypersensitive, cutaneous wound and contralateral tissues on patients. PMID:26381652

  3. Validities of three multislice algorithms for quantitative low-energy transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, W.Q.; Chen, J.H., E-mail: jhchen123@hnu.edu.cn

    2013-11-15

    Three different types of multislice algorithms, namely the conventional multislice (CMS) algorithm, the propagator-corrected multislice (PCMS) algorithm and the fully-corrected multislice (FCMS) algorithm, have been evaluated in comparison with respect to the accelerating voltages in transmission electron microscopy. Detailed numerical calculations have been performed to test their validities. The results show that the three algorithms are equivalent for accelerating voltage above 100 kV. However, below 100 kV, the CMS algorithm will introduce significant errors, not only for higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) reflections but also for zero-order Laue zone (ZOLZ) reflections. The differences between the PCMS and FCMS algorithms are negligible and mainly appear in HOLZ reflections. Nonetheless, when the accelerating voltage is further lowered to 20 kV or below, the PCMS algorithm will also yield results deviating from the FCMS results. The present study demonstrates that the propagation of the electron wave from one slice to the next slice is actually cross-correlated with the crystal potential in a complex manner, such that when the accelerating voltage is lowered to 10 kV, the accuracy of the algorithms is dependent of the scattering power of the specimen. - Highlights: • Three multislice algorithms for low-energy transmission electron microscopy are evaluated. • The propagator-corrected algorithm is a good alternative for voltages down to 20 kV. • Below 20 kV, a fully-corrected algorithm has to be employed for quantitative simulations.

  4. Quantitative three-dimensional modeling of zeotile through discrete electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bals, Sara; Batenburg, K Joost; Liang, Duoduo; Lebedev, Oleg; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Aerts, Alexander; Martens, Johan A; Kirschhock, Christine E A

    2009-04-08

    Discrete electron tomography is a new approach for three-dimensional reconstruction of nanoscale objects. The technique exploits prior knowledge of the object to be reconstructed, which results in an improvement of the quality of the reconstructions. Through the combination of conventional transmission electron microscopy and discrete electron tomography with a model-based approach, quantitative structure determination becomes possible. In the present work, this approach is used to unravel the building scheme of Zeotile-4, a silica material with two levels of structural order. The layer sequence of slab-shaped building units could be identified. Successive layers were found to be related by a rotation of 120 degrees, resulting in a hexagonal space group. The Zeotile-4 material is a demonstration of the concept of successive structuring of silica at two levels. At the first level, the colloid chemical properties of Silicalite-1 precursors are exploited to create building units with a slablike geometry. At the second level, the slablike units are tiled using a triblock copolymer to serve as a mesoscale structuring agent.

  5. QUANTITATIVE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE - ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP OF ANTIMALARIAL COMPOUND OF ARTEMISININ DERIVATIVES USING PRINCIPAL COMPONENT REGRESSION APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Robert Martin Werfette

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of quantitative structure - activity relationship (QSAR for a series of antimalarial compound artemisinin derivatives has been done using principal component regression. The descriptors for QSAR study were representation of electronic structure i.e. atomic net charges of the artemisinin skeleton calculated by AM1 semi-empirical method. The antimalarial activity of the compound was expressed in log 1/IC50 which is an experimental data. The main purpose of the principal component analysis approach is to transform a large data set of atomic net charges to simplify into a data set which known as latent variables. The best QSAR equation to analyze of log 1/IC50 can be obtained from the regression method as a linear function of several latent variables i.e. x1, x2, x3, x4 and x5. The best QSAR model is expressed in the following equation,  (;;   Keywords: QSAR, antimalarial, artemisinin, principal component regression

  6. Quantitative analysis of sharp-force trauma: an application of scanning electron microscopy in forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelink, E J; Wiersema, J M; Demaree, R S

    2001-11-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has occasionally been used by anthropologists and forensic scientists to look at morphological characteristics that certain implements leave on bone. However, few studies have addressed techniques or protocols for assessing quantitative differences between tool marks on bone made by different bladed implements. In this study, the statistical variation in cut mark width was examined between control and test samples on bone using a scalpel blade, paring knife, and kitchen utility knife. Statistically significant differences (p marks made by the same knife under control and test conditions for all three knife types used in the study. When the control sample and test samples were examined individually for differences in mean variation between knife types, significant differences were also found (p mark width were found, caution should be used in trying to classify individual cut marks as being inflicted by a particular implement, due to the overlap in cut mark width that exists between different knife types. When combined, both quantitative and qualitative analyses of cut marks should prove to be more useful in trying to identify a suspect weapon. Furthermore, the application of SEM can be particularly useful for assessing many of these features.

  7. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  8. Investigating fold structures of 2D materials by quantitative transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Zengming; Liu, Wei; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-04-01

    We report an approach developed for deriving 3D structural information of 2D membrane folds based on the recently-established quantitative transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Systematic multislice simulations reveal that the membrane folding leads to sufficiently strong electron scattering which enables a precise determination of bending radius. The image contrast depends also on the folding angles of 2D materials due to the variation of projection potentials, which however exerts much smaller effect compared with the bending radii. DFT calculations show that folded edges are typically characteristic of (fractional) nanotubes with the same curvature retained after energy optimization. Owing to the exclusion of Stobbs factor issue, numerical simulations were directly used in comparison with the experimental measurements on an absolute contrast scale, which results in a successful determination of bending radius of folded monolayer MoS 2 films. The method should be applicable to characterizing all 2D membranes with 3D folding features. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative characterization of the composition, thickness and orientation of thin films in the analytical electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.B.; Watanabe, M.; Papworth, A.J.; Li, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Compositional variations in thin films can introduce lattice-parameter changes and thus create stresses, in addition to the more usual stresses introduced by substrate-film mismatch, differential thermal expansion, etc. Analytical electron microscopy comprising X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometry within a probe-forming field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is one of the most powerful methods of composition measurement on the nanometer scale, essential for thin-film analysis. Recently, with the development of improved X-ray collection efficiencies and quantitative computation methods it has proved possible to map out composition variations in thin films with a spatial resolution approaching 1-2 nm. Because the absorption of X-rays is dependent on the film thickness, concurrent composition and film thickness determination is another advantage of X-ray microanalysis, thus correlating thickness and composition variations, either of which may contribute to stresses in the film. Specific phenomena such as segregation to interfaces and boundaries in the film are ideally suited to analysis by X-ray mapping. This approach also permits multiple boundaries to be examined, giving some statistical certainty to the analysis particularly in nano-crystalline materials with grain sizes greater than the film thickness. Boundary segregation is strongly affected by crystallographic misorientation and it is now possible to map out the orientation between many different grains in the (S)TEM

  10. Quantitative electron microscopy and spectroscopy of MgB2 wires and tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birajdar, B; Peranio, N; Eibl, O

    2008-01-01

    In MgB 2 the correlation of microstructure with superconducting properties, in particular the critical current density, requires powerful analytical tools. Critical current densities and electrical resistivities of different MgB 2 superconductors differ by orders of magnitudes and the current limiting mechanisms have not been fully understood. Granularity of MgB 2 is one significant reason for reduced critical current densities and is introduced intrinsically by the anisotropy of B c2 but also extrinsically by the microstructure of the material. B c2 enhancement by doping is another important challenge for chemical analysis and, at present, doping levels are not well controlled on the sub-μm scale. In this paper the quantitative electron microscopy and spectroscopy methods essential for the microstructural analysis of MgB 2 are described. By quantitative electron microscopy and spectroscopy we mean a combined SEM and TEM analysis that covers various length scales from μm to nm. Contamination-free sample preparation, chemical mapping including B, and advanced chemical quantification using x-ray microanalysis were essential elements of the applied methodology. The methodology was applied to in situ and ex situ MgB 2 wires and tapes with and without SiC additives. Quantitative B analysis by EDX spectroscopy was applied quantitatively in the SEM and TEM, which is a major achievement. Although MgB 2 is a binary system, the thermodynamics of phase formation is complex, and the complexity is dramatically increased if additives like SiC are used. The small, sub-μm grain sizes of the matrix and secondary phases require TEM methods. However, granularity on the μm scale was also identified and underlines the importance of the combined SEM and TEM studies. Significant differences in the microstructure were observed for in situ and ex situ samples. This holds particularly if SiC was added and yielded Mg 2 Si for in situ samples annealed at 600-650 deg. C and Mg-Si-O phases

  11. Sorption of Cr(VI) ions on two Lewatit-anion exchange resins and their quantitative determination using UV-visible spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan, E; Cetin, S

    2009-04-15

    The sorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions with macroporous resins which contain quarternary amine groups (Lewatit MP 64 and Lewatit MP 500) was studied at varying Cr(VI) concentration, adsorbent dose, pH, contact time and temperature. Batch shaking sorption experiments were carried out to evaluate the performance of Lewatit MP 64 and Lewatit MP 500 anion exchange resins in the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. The concentration of Cr(VI) in aqueous solution was determined by UV-visible spectrophotometer. The ion exchange process, which is dependent on pH, showed maximum removal of Cr(VI) in the pH range 3-7 for an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 1x10(-3) M. The optimum pH for Cr(VI) adsorption was found as 5.0 for Lewatit MP 64 and 6.0 for Lewatit MP 500. The maximum Cr(VI) adsorption at pH 5.0 is 0.40 and 0.41 mmol/g resin for Lewatit MP 64 and Lewatit MP 500 anion exchangers, respectively. The maximum chromium sorption occurred at approximately 60 min for Lewatit MP 64 and 75 min for Lewatit MP 500. The suitability of the Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models was also investigated for each chromium-sorbent system. The uptake of Cr(VI) by the anion exchange resins was reversible and so it has good potential for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. Both ion exchangers had high bonding constants but Lewatit MP 500 showed stronger binding. The rise in the temperature caused a slight decrease in the value of the equilibrium constant (K(c)) for the sorption of Cr(VI) ion.

  12. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  13. A quantitative comparison of lightning-induced electron precipitation and VLF signal perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, W. B.; Inan, U. S.

    2007-12-01

    VLF signal perturbations recorded on the Holographic Array for Ionospheric/Lightning Research (HAIL) are quantitatively related to a comprehensive model of lightning-induced electron precipitation (LEP) events. The model consists of three major components: a test-particle model of gyroresonant whistler-induced electron precipitation, a Monte Carlo simulation of energy deposition into the ionosphere, and a model of VLF subionospheric signal propagation. For the two representative LEP events studied, the model calculates peak VLF amplitude perturbations within a factor of three of those observed, well within the expected variability of radiation belt flux levels. The phase response of the observed VLF signal to precipitation varied dramatically over the course of the two nights and this variability in phase response is not properly reproduced by the model. The model calculates a peak in the precipitation that is poleward displaced ~6° from the causative lightning flash, consistent with observations. The modeled precipitated energy flux (E > 45 keV) peaks at ~1 × 10-2 (ergs s-1 cm-2), resulting in a peak loss of ~0.001% from a single flux tube at L ~ 2.2, consistent with previous satellite measurements of LEP events. The precipitation calculated by the model is highly dependent on the near-loss-cone trapped radiation belt flux levels assumed, and hence our main objective is not to compare the model calculations and the VLF signal observations on an absolute basis but is rather to develop metrics with which we can characterize the VLF signal perturbations recorded on HAIL in terms of the associated precipitation flux. Metrics quantifying the ionospheric density enhancement (N ILDE) and the electron precipitation (Γ) along a VLF signal path are strongly correlated with the VLF signal perturbations calculated by the model. A conversion ratio Ψ, relating VLF signal amplitude perturbations (ΔA) to the time-integrated precipitation (100-300 keV) along the VLF path (

  14. QUANTITATIVE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE - ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS ANALYSIS ANTIMUTAGENIC BENZALACETONE DERIVATIVES BY PRINCIPAL COMPONENT REGRESSION APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliana Yuliana

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative Electronic Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR analysis of a series of benzalacetones has been investigated based on semi empirical PM3 calculation data using Principal Components Regression (PCR. Investigation has been done based on antimutagen activity from benzalacetone compounds (presented by log 1/IC50 and was studied as linear correlation with latent variables (Tx resulted from transformation of atomic net charges using Principal Component Analysis (PCA. QSAR equation was determinated based on distribution of selected components and then was analysed with PCR. The result was described by the following QSAR equation : log 1/IC50 = 6.555 + (2.177.T1 + (2.284.T2 + (1.933.T3 The equation was significant on the 95% level with statistical parameters : n = 28 r = 0.766  SE  = 0.245  Fcalculation/Ftable = 3.780 and gave the PRESS result 0.002. It means that there were only a relatively few deviations between the experimental and theoretical data of antimutagenic activity.          New types of benzalacetone derivative compounds were designed  and their theoretical activity were predicted based on the best QSAR equation. It was found that compounds number 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 35, 36, 37, 38, 40, 41, 42, 44, 47, 48, 49 and 50  have  a relatively high antimutagenic activity.   Keywords: QSAR; antimutagenic activity; benzalaceton; atomic net charge

  15. In vitro quantitative evaluation of marginal microleakage in class II restorations confected with a glass ionomer cement and two composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIJELLA Maria Fernanda Borro

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated, in vitro, marginal microleakage in class II restorations confected with the glass ionomer cement Vitremer and with the composite resins Ariston pHc and P-60. The aims of the study were to assess the effect of thermocycling on those materials and to evaluate two methods utilized in the analysis of dye penetration. Sixty premolars divided in three groups were utilized; the teeth had proximal cavities whose cervical walls were located 1 mm below the cementoenamel junction. Half of the test specimens from each group underwent thermocycling; the other half remained in deionized water, at 37ºC. The specimens were immersed, for 24 hours, in a basic 0.5% fuchsin solution at 37ºC. For the analysis of microleakage, the specimens were sectioned in a mesio-distal direction, and the observation was carried out with the software Imagetools. The results were evaluated through the 2-way ANOVA and through the Tukey?s test. All groups presented marginal microleakage. The smallest values were obtained with Vitremer, followed by those obtained with the composite resins P-60 and Ariston pHc. There was no statistically significant difference caused by thermocycling, and the method of maximum infiltration was the best for detecting the extension of microleakage.

  16. Quantitative characterization of nanoparticles in blood by transmission electron microscopy with a window-type microchip nanopipet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Lin-Ai; Kang, Yu-Ting; Chen, Yu-Ching; Wang, Yu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Jing; Wu, Yu-Ting; Liu, Kuo-Liang; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Ko, Yu-Feng; Chen, Ching-Ya; Huang, Nai-Chun; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsieh, Yong-Fen; Yew, Tri-Rung; Yang, Chung-Shi

    2012-08-07

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a unique and powerful tool for observation of nanoparticles. However, due to the uneven spatial distribution of particles conventionally dried on copper grids, TEM is rarely employed to evaluate the spatial distribution of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. Here, we present a microchip nanopipet with a narrow chamber width for sorting nanoparticles from blood and preventing the aggregation of the particles during the drying process, enabling quantitative analysis of their aggregation/agglomeration states and the particle concentration in aqueous solutions. This microchip is adaptable to all commercial TEM holders. Such a nanopipet proves to be a simple and convenient sampling device for TEM image-based quantitative characterization.

  17. A novel malonamide grafted polystyrene-divinyl benzene resin for extraction, pre-concentration and separation of actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, S A; Mohapatra, P K; Manchanda, V K

    2009-01-30

    A new chelating polymeric extraction chromatographic resin was prepared by chemical anchoring of N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-dibutyl malonamide (DMDBMA) with chloromethylated Merrifield resin((R)). The grafted resin exhibited stronger binding for hexavalent and tetravalent actinides such as U(VI), Th(IV) and Pu(IV) over trivalent actinides, viz. Am(III) and Pu(III). Batch studies on solid phase extraction performed over a wide range of acid solution (0.01-6M HNO(3)) revealed that ternary mixer of uranium, americium and plutonium or thorium, americium and plutonium could be separated from each other at 1M HNO(3). Desorption of U(VI), Pu(IV) and Am(III) from the loaded resin was efficiently carried out using 0.1M alpha-HIBA, 0.25M oxalic acid and 0.01M EDTA, respectively. Quantitative pre-concentration of actinide ions such as Th(IV) and U(VI) was possible from 3M HNO(3) solution. The practical utility of the grafted resin was evaluated by uranium sorption measurements in several successive cycles. The sorption efficiency of the resin with respect to uranyl ion remained unchanged even after 30 days of continuous use. The surface morphology of the resin was monitored with the help of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique.

  18. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    OpenAIRE

    Desmond Ng; Jimmy C. M. Hsiao; Keith C. T. Tong; Harry Kim; Yanjie Mai; Keith H. S. Chan

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin ...

  19. Resin Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    to see plastic deformation of the surface. 8.1.4.3 Density: Density using the Archimedes principle (ASTM D 792). 8.1.4.4 Density as a Function of...the cure and postcure, quickly cool the sample to 0 °C or lower the temperature to quench the reaction, and then ramp the temperature at 5 °C/min to...prepared by pouring 10 g of resin into a 30-mL screw-cap scintillation vial and adding appropriate amounts of initiator, catalyst, and inhibitor

  20. Quantitative low-energy electron diffraction analysis of the GaN(000-1) (1×1) reconstruction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romanyuk, Olexandr; Jiříček, Petr; Paskova, T.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 606, 7-8 (2012), s. 740-743 ISSN 0039-6028 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP204/10/P028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : gallium nitride * semiconductor surfaces * quantitative low-energy electron diffraction * LEED Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.838, year: 2012

  1. The recovery of gold from the aqua regia leachate of electronic parts using a core–shell type anion exchange resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cyganowski

    2017-09-01

    The investigated resins revealed great selectivity towards gold. Despite the fact that the obtained solutions contained only 1.5% (CPU or 0.1% (PIN of Au, its removal reached 86% and the logarithms of partition coefficients indicate that affinity of the applied resins to gold is almost ten times greater than the very competitive nickel present in the obtained solutions. Finally, the gold-containing core–shell polymers were effectively eluted, recovering 100% of the taken from the solutions gold.

  2. Paramagnetic epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Vazquez Barreiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrates that macrocycles can be used as crosslinking agents for curing epoxy resins, provided that they have appropriate organic functionalities. As macrocycles can complex metal ions in their structure, this curing reaction allows for the introduction of that metal ion into the resin network. As a result, some characteristic physical properties of the metallomacrocycle could be transferred to the new material. The bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE, n = 0 and hemin (a protoporphyrin IX containing the Fe(III ion, and an additional chloride ligand have been chosen. The new material has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Fe(III remains in the high-spin state during the curing process and, consequently, the final material exhibits the magnetic characteristics of hemin. The loss of the chlorine atom ligand during the cure of the resin allows that Fe(III can act as Lewis acid, catalyzing the crosslinking reactions. At high BADGE n = 0/hemin ratios, the formation of ether and ester bonds occurs simultaneously during the process.

  3. Quantitative tests of a steady state theory of solar wind electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, W. C.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Gosling, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison is made of IMP 6, 7 and 8 electron data with the predictions of a solar wind electron steady state theory in which the control of transport by the macroscopic interplanetary electric and magnetic fields, as well as elastic Coulomb collisions with solar wind protons and thermal electrons, is assumed. While a ratio of forward to backward phase density for field-aligned extrathermal electrons of 6:1 is predicted, electron distribution measurements within the high speed solar wind show this ratio to be typically about an order of magnitude larger. A set of solar wind bulk speed anticorrelations predicted by the theory on the basis of a larger set of assumptions cannot be found in the IMP electron data set, so that improved agreement may require such modifications of the theory's assumptions as the inclusion of inelastic Coulomb and/or wave electron collisions.

  4. SEM and elemental analysis of composite resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoda, H.; Yamada, T.; Inokoshi, S.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four chemically cured, 21 light-cured anterior, three light-cured anterior/posterior, and 18 light-cured posterior composite resins were examined using scanning electron microscopy, and the elemental composition of their filler particles was analyzed with an energy dispersive electron probe microanalyzer. According to the results obtained, the composite resins were divided into five groups (traditional, microfilled type, submicrofilled type, hybrid type, and semihybrid), with two additional hypothetical categories (microfilled and hybrid). Characteristics of each type were described with clinical indications for selective guidance of respective composite resins for clinical use

  5. Immobilization of spent resin with epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gultom, O.; Suryanto; Sayogo; Ramdan

    1997-01-01

    immobilization of spent resin using epoxy resin has been conducted. The spent resin was mixtured with epoxy resin in variation of concentration, i.e., 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 weight percent of spent resin. The mixture were pour into the plastic tube, with a diameter of 40 mm and height of 40 mm. The density, compressive strength and leaching rate were respectively measured by quanta chrome, paul weber apparatus and gamma spectrometer. The results showed that the increasing of waste concentration would be decreased the compressive strength, and increased density by immobilized waste. The leaching rate of 137 Cs from waste product was not detected in experiment (author)

  6. Quantitative Assessment of MeV Electron Acceleration in Non-Linear Interactions with VLF Chorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Omura, Y.; Baker, D. N.

    2016-12-01

    For occurrences of apparent rapid acceleration of radiation belt electrons to MeV energies at L 4, we examine the energy gained by seed electrons in non-linear (NL) interactions with VLF chorus rising tones. For the 17-18 March 2013 storm, observations of outer zone radiation belt electron populations were made with the magEIS and REPT instruments on Van Allen Probes A & B. These reveal that MeV electron fluxes at L=4.2 increased 10-fold in 30 min at the times of 30 - 100 keV electron injections during "substorm" dipolarizations. Simultaneous enhancements of VLF chorus were observed with the EMFISIS wave instruments. Three-axis burst mode observations of wave electric and magnetic fields have been used to investigate electron interactions with individual chorus rising tones on a sub millisecond time scale. Wave amplitudes at 2500 Hz were 1 nT (|B|) and 30 mV/m (|E|). Frequency - time characteristics of the observed chorus elements closely match those predicted by NL electron-chorus interaction modeling [Omura et al., 2015, J. Geophys. Res. Space Phys., 120, doi:10.1002/2015JA021563]. For seed electrons with initial energies 50 keV to 8 MeV, subpacket wave analysis was used to quantify resonant electron energy gain both by relativistic turning acceleration and by ultrarelativistic acceleration through nonlinear trapping by the chorus waves. Electrons with 1-2 MeV initial energy can experience a 300 keV total energy gain in NL interactions with a single 200 msec rising tone. Maximum energy gain from interaction with a single 10 msec subpacket was 100 keV for a 2 MeV seed electron. Examining a number of chorus elements at different locations during the rapid local acceleration of the radiation belt during this event, we conclude that seed electrons (100s keV - 5 MeV) can be accelerated by 50 keV - 500 keV in resonant NL interactions with a single VLF rising tone on a time scale of 10-100 msec.

  7. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; van Es, Peter; Petersen, Wilhelmina; van Leeuwen, Ton; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Otto, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  8. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, L.; van Es, P.; Petersen, W.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Terstappen, L. W. M. M.; Otto, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  9. Quantitative Test of the Evolution of Geant4 Electron Backscattering Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Basaglia, Tullio; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Sung Hun; Pia, Maria Grazia; Saracco, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Evolutions of Geant4 code have affected the simulation of electron backscattering with respect to previously published results. Their effects are quantified by analyzing the compatibility of the simulated electron backscattering fraction with a large collection of experimental data for a wide set of physics configuration options available in Geant4. Special emphasis is placed on two electron scattering implementations first released in Geant4 version 10.2: the Goudsmit-Saunderson multiple scattering model and a single Coulomb scattering model based on Mott cross section calculation. The new Goudsmit-Saunderson multiple scattering model appears to perform equally or less accurately than the model implemented in previous Geant4 versions, depending on the electron energy. The new Coulomb scattering model was flawed from a physics point of view, but computationally fast in Geant4 version 10.2; the physics correction released in Geant4 version 10.2p01 severely degrades its computational performance. Evolutions in ...

  10. Comparative evaluation of the length of resin tags, viscosity and microleakage of pit and fissure sealants - an in vitro scanning electron microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A R Prabhakar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : In this era of preventive dentistry, many techniques are available for prevention of caries, such as plaque control, use of systemic and local fluorides and pit and fissure sealants. The rationale of pit and fissure sealants is that, when they are applied into the caries prone fissures, they penetrate and seal them from the oral environment. This study aims to correlate the relationship between the viscosity of the sealant, resin tag length and microleakage. Materials and Methods : 30 third molars were selected for study. The teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group E: Embrace wetbond, H: Helioseal, G: Guardian seal. Teeth were cleaned with pumice prophylaxis and pretreated with acid etching and bonding agent. The respective pit and fissure sealants were applied. Teeth were placed in 1% methylene blue dye and sectioned mesio-distally into two halves. These were used to assess the microleakage using stereomicroscope and resin tag length using SEM. Viscosity was assessed using Brooke′s field viscometer. Results : Viscosity was lowest for Embrace wetbond and highest for Guardian seal. Microleakage scores were highest with Guardian seal and lowest with Embrace wetbond. Resin tag lengths were longer with Embrace wetbond as compared to other groups. There is a definite negative correlation between viscosity, resin tag length and microleakage. Lower the viscosity, the longer were the resin tags and the microleakage decreased. Embrace wetbond pit and fissure sealant had lowest viscosity, longest resin tag length and lowest microleakage scores. Conclusion : Embrace wetbond appears to be compatible with residual moisture and ideal for use in children, where isolation is a problem.

  11. Analysis of electron beam damage of exfoliated MoS{sub 2} sheets and quantitative HAADF-STEM imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Alejandra [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Raya, Andres M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales en Ingeniería Metalúrgica y Química Inorgánica, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz (Spain); Mariscal, Marcelo M. [INFIQC-CONICET, Departamento de Matemática y Física, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, XUA5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Esparza, Rodrigo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Herrera, Miriam; Molina, Sergio I. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales en Ingeniería Metalúrgica y Química Inorgánica, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz (Spain); Scavello, Giovanni; Galindo, Pedro L. [Departamento de Ingeniería Informática, CASEM, Universidad de Cádiz, Campus Río San Pedro, Puerto Real, 11510 Cádiz (Spain); Jose-Yacaman, Miguel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Ponce, Arturo, E-mail: arturo.ponce@utsa.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    In this work we examined MoS{sub 2} sheets by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) at three different energies: 80, 120 and 200 kV. Structural damage of the MoS{sub 2} sheets has been controlled at 80 kV according a theoretical calculation based on the inelastic scattering of the electrons involved in the interaction electron–matter. The threshold energy for the MoS{sub 2} material has been found and experimentally verified in the microscope. At energies higher than the energy threshold we show surface and edge defects produced by the electron beam irradiation. Quantitative analysis at atomic level in the images obtained at 80 kV has been performed using the experimental images and via STEM simulations using SICSTEM software to determine the exact number of MoS{sub 2} layers. - Highlights: • MoS{sub 2} sheets were exfoliated by using hydrogen gas flow to separate the MoS{sub 2} layers. • The optimum energy to avoid structural damage was calculated. • Cs-corrected STEM imaging was used to obtain atomic resolution images. • Three energies were used in STEM imaging: 80, 120 and 200 kV. • A quantitative method for determining the number of layers has been applied.

  12. Quantitative Assessment of CRAND Contribution to the Inner Belt Electron Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, K.; Li, X.; Selesnick, R.; Schiller, Q. A.; Zhao, H.; Baker, D. N.; Temerin, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Following the direct identification and measurements of Cosmic Ray Albedo Neutron Decay (CRAND) produced electrons near the inner edge of the inner belt by Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE)1, we extend the study by addressing more comprehensive questions: (1) what is the relative CRAND contribution to the inner belt compared with electrons injected from further out? (2) How does this relative contribution vary with geomagnetic activity and electron energy? (3) What is the solar cycle dependence of CRAND electrons? In order to answer the above questions, extended data of relativistic electrons in the inner belt are needed for a much longer time period and also finer energy resolution is required. Therefore, we will show results regarding the above questions based on data including other low Earth orbit measurements in addition to CSSWE, such as SAMPEX/PET, DEMETER/IDP, and PROBA-V/EPT. [1] Li, Xinlin, Richard Selesnick, Quintin Schiller, Kun Zhang, Hong Zhao, Daniel Baker, and Michael Temerin (2017), Direct detection of albedo neutron decay electrons at the inner edge of the radiation belt and determination of neutron density in near-Earth space, Nature, under review.

  13. Electron-Molecule Col1isions: Quantitative Approaches, and the Legacy of Aaron Temkin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, B.I.

    2007-01-01

    This article, on electron-molecule collisions, is dedicated to the legacy of my good friend and sometime collaborator, Aaron Temkin on his retirement from the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center after many years of work at the highest intellectual level in the theoretical treatment of electron-atom and electron-molecule scattering. Aaron's contributions to the manner in which we think about electron-molecule collisions is clear to all of us who have worked in this field. I doubt that the great progress that has occurred in the computational treatment of such complex collision problems could have happened without these contributions. For a brief historical account, see the discussion of Temkin's contribution to electron-molecule scattering in the first article of this volume by Dr. A. K. Bhatia. In this article, I will concentrate on the application of the so called, non-adiabatic R-matrix theory, to vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment, although I will also present some results applying the Linear Algebraic and Kohn-Variational methods to vibrational excitation. As a starting point for almost all computationally effective approaches to electron-molecule collisions, is the fixed nuclei approximation. That is, one recognizes, just as one does with molecular bound states, that there is a separation of electronic(fast) and nuclear(s1ow) degrees of freedom. This separation makes it possible to "freeze" the nuclei in space, calculate the collision parameters for the frozen molecule and then, somehow to add back the vibrations and rotations. The manner in which this is done, depends on the details of the collision problem. It is the work of Aaron and a number of other researchers that has provided the guidance necessary to resolve these issues.

  14. Quantitative comparison of electron temperature fluctuations to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, C., E-mail: csung@physics.ucla.edu [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Howard, N. T. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Mikkelsen, D. R.; Churchill, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Holland, C. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Theiler, C. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, SPC, Lausanne 1015 (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    Long wavelength turbulent electron temperature fluctuations (k{sub y}ρ{sub s} < 0.3) are measured in the outer core region (r/a > 0.8) of Ohmic L-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod [E. S. Marmar et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104014 (2009)] with a correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic. The relative amplitude and frequency spectrum of the fluctuations are compared quantitatively with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] in two different confinement regimes: linear Ohmic confinement (LOC) regime and saturated Ohmic confinement (SOC) regime. When comparing experiment with nonlinear simulations, it is found that local, electrostatic ion-scale simulations (k{sub y}ρ{sub s} ≲ 1.7) performed at r/a ∼ 0.85 reproduce the experimental ion heat flux levels, electron temperature fluctuation levels, and frequency spectra within experimental error bars. In contrast, the electron heat flux is robustly under-predicted and cannot be recovered by using scans of the simulation inputs within error bars or by using global simulations. If both the ion heat flux and the measured temperature fluctuations are attributed predominantly to long-wavelength turbulence, then under-prediction of electron heat flux strongly suggests that electron scale turbulence is important for transport in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges. In addition, no evidence is found from linear or nonlinear simulations for a clear transition from trapped electron mode to ion temperature gradient turbulence across the LOC/SOC transition, and also there is no evidence in these Ohmic L-mode plasmas of the “Transport Shortfall” [C. Holland et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 052301 (2009)].

  15. Quantitative Measurements of Electronically Excited CH Concentration in Normal Gravity and Microgravity Coflow Laminar Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giassi, D.; Cao, S.; Stocker, D. P.; Takahashi, F.; Bennett, B. A. V.; Smooke, M. D.; Long, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    With the conclusion of the SLICE campaign aboard the ISS in 2012, a large amount of data was made available for the analysis of the effect of microgravity on laminar coflow diffusion flames. Previous work focused on the study of sooty flames in microgravity as well as the ability of numerical models to predict its formation in a simplified buoyancy-free environment. The current work shifts the investigation to soot-free flames, putting an emphasis on the chemiluminescence emission from electronically excited CH (CH*). This radical species is of significant interest in combustion studies: it has been shown that the electronically excited CH spatial distribution is indicative of the flame front position and, given the relatively simple diagnostic involved with its measurement, several works have been done trying to understand the ability of electronically excited CH chemiluminescence to predict the total and local flame heat release rate. In this work, a subset of the SLICE nitrogen-diluted methane flames has been considered, and the effect of fuel and coflow velocity on electronically excited CH concentration is discussed and compared with both normal gravity results and numerical simulations. Experimentally, the spectral characterization of the DSLR color camera used to acquire the flame images allowed the signal collected by the blue channel to be considered representative of the electronically excited CH emission centered around 431 nm. Due to the axisymmetric flame structure, an Abel deconvolution of the line-of-sight chemiluminescence was used to obtain the radial intensity profile and, thanks to an absolute light intensity calibration, a quantification of the electronically excited CH concentration was possible. Results show that, in microgravity, the maximum flame electronically excited CH concentration increases with the coflow velocity, but it is weakly dependent on the fuel velocity; normal gravity flames, if not lifted, tend to follow the same trend

  16. Quantitative analysis of bidirectional electron fluxes within coronal mass ejections at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. L.; Gosling, J. T.; Mccomas, D. J.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    The solar wind electron heat flux is carried primarily by suprathermal electrons beamed antisunward along the interplanetary magnetic field. However, analysis of electron observations at 1 AU has shown that counterstreaming electron beams, suggesting closed magnetic structures, prevail within coronal mass ejections (CMEs). These structures might be magnetic 'tongues', magnetically detached plasmoids, or complex flux ropes. Here we show results of analysis of ISEE-3 observations within 39 CMEs, including the asymmetry between the two beams, its control by magnetic field orientation, and the variation of the electron distributions as CMEs convect past the spacecraft. We find that some CMEs are strongly asymmetric, with the antisunward beam generally dominant, while others contain nearly symmetric beams. The beam asymmetries, and the magnetic field orientations, exhibit characteristic trends as CMEs pass over the spacecraft. We present an example of a distinctive 'strahl-on-strahl' distribution, suggesting continued magnetic connection to the corona, in which a narrow antisunward beam is superimposed on a broader beam. Our results favor continuing magnetic connection to the Sun in a tongue or flux rope geometry rather than a fully detached plasmoid.

  17. Surface morphology changes of acrylic resins during finishing and polishing phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucio Serra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The finishing and polishing phases are essential to improve smoothness and shining on the surface of acrylic resins used to make removable orthodontic appliances. A good surface finishing reduces roughness, which facilitates hygiene, prevents staining and provides greater comfort to the patients. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to analyze the changes on surface morphology of acrylic resins during finishing and polishing phases. METHODS: Thirty discs (10 mm in diameter and 5 mm in length were made with acrylic resin and randomly divided into ten groups. The control group did not receive any treatment while the other groups received gradual finishing and polishing. The last group received the entire finishing and polishing procedures. Surface morphology was qualitatively analyzed through scanning electron microscopy and quantitatively analyzed through a laser profilometer test. RESULTS: The acrylic resin surfaces without treatment showed bubbles which were not observed in the subsequent phases. Wearing out with multilaminated burs, finishing with wood sandpaper and finishing with water sandpaper resulted in surfaces with decreasing irregularities. The surfaces that were polished with pumice and with low abrasive liquids showed high superficial smoothness. CONCLUSION: Highly smooth acrylic resin surfaces can be obtained after mechanical finishing and polishing performed with multilaminated burs, wood sandpaper, water sandpaper, pumice and low abrasive liquids.

  18. Analysis of abused drugs by selected ion monitoring: quantitative comparison of electron impact and chemical ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foltz, R.L.; Knowlton, D.A.; Lin, D.C.K.; Fentiman, A.F. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison was made of the relative sensitivities of electron impact and chemical ionization when used for selected ion monitoring analysis of commonly abused drugs. For most of the drugs examined chemical ionization using ammonia as the reactant gas gave the largest single m/e ion current response per unit weight of sample. However, if maximum sensitivity is desired it is important to evaluate electron impact and chemical ionization with respect to both maximum response and degree of interference from background and endogenous materials

  19. Public Library Websites as Electronic Branches: A Multi-Country Quantitative Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Diane L.; Evans, Nina

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: This paper describes the findings of a study of 1517 public library Websites in Australia, Canada, and the United States over a period of four years. These Websites are referred to as 'electronic branches' of the libraries, thereby extending the definition of physical library branches into the digital realm. The purpose of the…

  20. Quantitative analysis of structural inhomogeneity in nanomaterials using transmission electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klinger, Miloslav; Polívka, Leoš; Jäger, Aleš; Tyunina, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 49, Jun (2016), 762-770 ISSN 1600-5767 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP108/12/G043; GA ČR GA15-15123S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : transmission electron microscopy * structural inhomogeneity * lattice parameters * image processing Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.495, year: 2016

  1. Towards quantitative electrostatic potential mapping of working semiconductor devices using off-axis electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdi, Sadegh; Kasama, Takeshi; Beleggia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    holography to characterize an electrically-biased Si p-. n junction by measuring its electrostatic potential, electric field and charge density distributions under working conditions. A comparison between experimental electron holographic phase images and images obtained using three-dimensional electrostatic...

  2. Quantitative modeling of electron spectroscopy intensities for supported nanoparticles: The hemispherical cap model for non-normal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, James C.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2015-02-01

    Nanoparticles of one element or compound dispersed across the surface of another substrate element or compound form the basis for many materials of great technological importance, such as heterogeneous catalysts, fuel cells and other electrocatalysts, photocatalysts, chemical sensors and biomaterials. They also form during film growth by deposition in many fabrication processes. The average size and number density of such nanoparticles are often very important, and these can be estimated with electron microscopy or scanning tunneling microscopy. However, this is very time consuming and often unavailable with sufficient resolution when the particle size is ~ 1 nm. Because the probe depth of electron spectroscopies like X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) or Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) is ~ 1 nm, these provide quantitative information on both the total amount of adsorbed material when it is in the form of such small nanoparticles, and the particle thickness. For electron spectroscopy conducted with electron detection normal to the surface, Diebold et al. (1993) derived analytical relationships between the signal intensities for the adsorbate and substrate and the particles' average size and number density, under the assumption that all the particles have hemispherical shape and the same radius. In this paper, we report a simple angle- and particle-size-dependent correction factor that can be applied to these analytical expressions so that they can also be extended to measurements made at other detection angles away from the surface normal. This correction factor is computed using numerical integration and presented for use in future modeling. This correction factor is large (> 2) for angles beyond 60°, so comparing model predictions to measurements at both 0° and ≥ 60° will also provide a new means for testing the model's assumptions (hemispherical shape and fixed size particles). The ability to compare the hemispherical cap model at several angles

  3. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Ng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  4. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Keith H. S.; Mai, Yanjie; Kim, Harry; Tong, Keith C. T.; Ng, Desmond; Hsiao, Jimmy C. M.

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  5. Quantitating morphological changes in biological samples during scanning electron microscopy sample preparation with correlative super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Huang, Tao; Jorgens, Danielle M; Nickerson, Andrew; Lin, Li-Jung; Pelz, Joshua; Gray, Joe W; López, Claudia S; Nan, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    Sample preparation is critical to biological electron microscopy (EM), and there have been continuous efforts on optimizing the procedures to best preserve structures of interest in the sample. However, a quantitative characterization of the morphological changes associated with each step in EM sample preparation is currently lacking. Using correlative EM and superresolution microscopy (SRM), we have examined the effects of different drying methods as well as osmium tetroxide (OsO4) post-fixation on cell morphology during scanning electron microscopy (SEM) sample preparation. Here, SRM images of the sample acquired under hydrated conditions were used as a baseline for evaluating morphological changes as the sample went through SEM sample processing. We found that both chemical drying and critical point drying lead to a mild cellular boundary retraction of ~60 nm. Post-fixation by OsO4 causes at least 40 nm additional boundary retraction. We also found that coating coverslips with adhesion molecules such as fibronectin prior to cell plating helps reduce cell distortion from OsO4 post-fixation. These quantitative measurements offer useful information for identifying causes of cell distortions in SEM sample preparation and improving current procedures.

  6. Quantitative characterization of agglomerates and aggregates of pyrogenic and precipitated amorphous silica nanomaterials by transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Temmerman, Pieter-Jan; Van Doren, Elke; Verleysen, Eveline; Van der Stede, Yves; Francisco, Michel Abi Daoud; Mast, Jan

    2012-06-18

    The interaction of a nanomaterial (NM) with a biological system depends not only on the size of its primary particles but also on the size, shape and surface topology of its aggregates and agglomerates. A method based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to visualize the NM and on image analysis, to measure detected features quantitatively, was assessed for its capacity to characterize the aggregates and agglomerates of precipitated and pyrogenic synthetic amorphous silicon dioxide (SAS), or silica, NM. Bright field (BF) TEM combined with systematic random imaging and semi-automatic image analysis allows measuring the properties of SAS NM quantitatively. Automation allows measuring multiple and arithmetically complex parameters simultaneously on high numbers of detected particles. This reduces operator-induced bias and assures a statistically relevant number of measurements, avoiding the tedious repetitive task of manual measurements. Access to multiple parameters further allows selecting the optimal parameter in function of a specific purpose.Using principle component analysis (PCA), twenty-three measured parameters were classified into three classes containing measures for size, shape and surface topology of the NM. The presented method allows a detailed quantitative characterization of NM, like dispersions of precipitated and pyrogenic SAS based on the number-based distributions of their mean diameter, sphericity and shape factor.

  7. Quantitative characterization of agglomerates and aggregates of pyrogenic and precipitated amorphous silica nanomaterials by transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Temmerman Pieter-Jan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction of a nanomaterial (NM with a biological system depends not only on the size of its primary particles but also on the size, shape and surface topology of its aggregates and agglomerates. A method based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM, to visualize the NM and on image analysis, to measure detected features quantitatively, was assessed for its capacity to characterize the aggregates and agglomerates of precipitated and pyrogenic synthetic amorphous silicon dioxide (SAS, or silica, NM. Results Bright field (BF TEM combined with systematic random imaging and semi-automatic image analysis allows measuring the properties of SAS NM quantitatively. Automation allows measuring multiple and arithmetically complex parameters simultaneously on high numbers of detected particles. This reduces operator-induced bias and assures a statistically relevant number of measurements, avoiding the tedious repetitive task of manual measurements. Access to multiple parameters further allows selecting the optimal parameter in function of a specific purpose. Using principle component analysis (PCA, twenty-three measured parameters were classified into three classes containing measures for size, shape and surface topology of the NM. Conclusion The presented method allows a detailed quantitative characterization of NM, like dispersions of precipitated and pyrogenic SAS based on the number-based distributions of their mean diameter, sphericity and shape factor.

  8. Quantitative analysis of different volatile organic compounds using an improved electronic nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daqi; Ji, Jiuming; Gong, Jiayu; Cai, Chaoqian

    2012-10-01

    This paper sets up an improved electronic nose with an automatic sampling mode, large volumetric vapors and constant temperature for headspace vapors and gas sensor array. In order to facilitate the fast recovery and good repeatability of gas sensors, the steps taken include (A) short-time contact with odors measured; (B) long-time purification using environmental air; (C) exact calibration using clean air before sampling. We employ multiple single-output perceptrons to discriminate and quantify multiple kinds of odors. This task is first regarded as multiple two-class discrimination problems and then multiple quantification problems, and accomplished by multiple single-output perceptrons followed by multiple single-output perceptrons. The experimental results for measuring and quantifying 12 kinds of volatile organic compounds with changing concentrations show that the type of electronic nose with a hierarchical perceptron model has a simple structure, easy operation, good repeatability and good discrimination and quantification performance.

  9. Quantitative analysis of different volatile organic compounds using an improved electronic nose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Daqi; Ji, Jiuming; Gong, Jiayu; Cai, Chaoqian

    2012-01-01

    This paper sets up an improved electronic nose with an automatic sampling mode, large volumetric vapors and constant temperature for headspace vapors and gas sensor array. In order to facilitate the fast recovery and good repeatability of gas sensors, the steps taken include (A) short-time contact with odors measured; (B) long-time purification using environmental air; (C) exact calibration using clean air before sampling. We employ multiple single-output perceptrons to discriminate and quantify multiple kinds of odors. This task is first regarded as multiple two-class discrimination problems and then multiple quantification problems, and accomplished by multiple single-output perceptrons followed by multiple single-output perceptrons. The experimental results for measuring and quantifying 12 kinds of volatile organic compounds with changing concentrations show that the type of electronic nose with a hierarchical perceptron model has a simple structure, easy operation, good repeatability and good discrimination and quantification performance. (paper)

  10. Electronic cigarette, effective or harmful for quitting smoking and respiratory health: A quantitative review papers

    OpenAIRE

    Heydari, Gholamreza; Ahmady, Arezoo Ebn; Chamyani, Fahimeh; Masjedi, Mohammadreza; Fadaizadeh, Lida

    2017-01-01

    Background: In recent years, electronic cigarettes (ECs) have been heavily advertised as an alternative smoking device as well as a possible cessation method. We aimed to review all published scientific literature pertaining to ECs and to present a simple conclusion about their effects for quitting smoking and respiratory health. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study with a search of PubMed, limited to English publications upto September 2014. The total number of papers which had ECs in i...

  11. A methodology for finding the optimal iteration number of the SIRT algorithm for quantitative Electron Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okariz, Ana, E-mail: ana.okariz@ehu.es [eMERG, Fisika Aplikatua I Saila, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, Rafael Moreno “Pitxitxi” Pasealekua 3, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Guraya, Teresa [eMERG, Departamento de Ingeniería Minera y Metalúrgica y Ciencia de los Materiales, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, Rafael Moreno “Pitxitxi” Pasealekua 3, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Iturrondobeitia, Maider [eMERG, Departamento de Expresión Gráfica y Proyectos de Ingeniería, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, Rafael Moreno “Pitxitxi” Pasealekua 3, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Ibarretxe, Julen [eMERG, Fisika Aplikatua I Saila, Faculty of Engineering,University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, Rafael Moreno “Pitxitxi” Pasealekua 2, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2017-02-15

    The SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm is commonly used in Electron Tomography to calculate the original volume of the sample from noisy images, but the results provided by this iterative procedure are strongly dependent on the specific implementation of the algorithm, as well as on the number of iterations employed for the reconstruction. In this work, a methodology for selecting the iteration number of the SIRT reconstruction that provides the most accurate segmentation is proposed. The methodology is based on the statistical analysis of the intensity profiles at the edge of the objects in the reconstructed volume. A phantom which resembles a a carbon black aggregate has been created to validate the methodology and the SIRT implementations of two free software packages (TOMOJ and TOMO3D) have been used. - Highlights: • The non uniformity of the resolution in electron tomography reconstructions has been demonstrated. • An overall resolution for the evaluation of the quality of electron tomography reconstructions has been defined. • Parameters for estimating an overall resolution across the reconstructed volume have been proposed. • The overall resolution of the reconstructions of a phantom has been estimated from the probability density functions. • It has been proven that reconstructions with the best overall resolutions have provided the most accurate segmentations.

  12. Ab initio structure determination and quantitative disorder analysis on nanoparticles by electron diffraction tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Yaşar; Barton, Bastian; Marler, Bernd; Neder, Reinhard B; Kolb, Ute

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscaled porous materials such as zeolites have attracted substantial attention in industry due to their catalytic activity, and their performance in sorption and separation processes. In order to understand the properties of such materials, current research focuses increasingly on the determination of structural features beyond the averaged crystal structure. Small particle sizes, various types of disorder and intergrown structures render the description of structures at atomic level by standard crystallographic methods difficult. This paper reports the characterization of a strongly disordered zeolite structure, using a combination of electron exit-wave reconstruction, automated diffraction tomography (ADT), crystal disorder modelling and electron diffraction simulations. Zeolite beta was chosen for a proof-of-principle study of the techniques, because it consists of two different intergrown polymorphs that are built from identical layer types but with different stacking sequences. Imaging of the projected inner Coulomb potential of zeolite beta crystals shows the intergrowth of the polymorphs BEA and BEB. The structures of BEA as well as BEB could be extracted from one single ADT data set using direct methods. A ratio for BEA/BEB = 48:52 was determined by comparison of the reconstructed reciprocal space based on ADT data with simulated electron diffraction data for virtual nanocrystals, built with different ratios of BEA/BEB. In this way, it is demonstrated that this smart interplay of the above-mentioned techniques allows the elaboration of the real structures of functional materials in detail - even if they possess a severely disordered structure.

  13. Electrons, Photons, and Force: Quantitative Single-Molecule Measurements from Physics to Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule measurement techniques have illuminated unprecedented details of chemical behavior, including observations of the motion of a single molecule on a surface, and even the vibration of a single bond within a molecule. Such measurements are critical to our understanding of entities ranging from single atoms to the most complex protein assemblies. We provide an overview of the strikingly diverse classes of measurements that can be used to quantify single-molecule properties, including those of single macromolecules and single molecular assemblies, and discuss the quantitative insights they provide. Examples are drawn from across the single-molecule literature, ranging from ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy studies of adsorbate diffusion on surfaces to fluorescence studies of protein conformational changes in solution. PMID:21338175

  14. On the quantitative prediction of bunch lengthening in high energy electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiland, T.

    1981-12-01

    The longitudinal current dependent electromagnetic interaction between a bunch of charged particles and accelerator components can be described by a Green's Function in time domain or by an impedance in frequency domain. The aim of this paper is to describe a procedure which yields an approximate Green's Function for cylindrically symmetric objects. Once this Green's Function is quantitatively known the equation of motion for the particles can be solved easily by a turn-by-turn tracking code on a computer. Thus it is possible to predict the bunch length and width as a function of charge per bunch for future accelerators and storage rings based on pure geometrical data of the accelerator components. Results are presented for PETRA and LEP. A comparison between measurements at PETRA and computations shows an excellent agreement. (orig.)

  15. Influence of the silica fillers on the ageing of epoxy resins under irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benard, F.

    2004-01-01

    Various studies were carried out on the ageing of epoxy resins under irradiations. In all cases, pure polymers were studied. The aim of our work managed by the CEA and the CNRS consists on studying the part of fillers and particularly the part of silica on ageing process under electron beam irradiations. Because of their wide use in industrial applications and especially in nuclear environment, the DGEBA-TETA resins (Diglycidylether of Bisphenol A - Triethylenetetramine) were chosen. Those epoxy resins are difficult to analyse because of their insolubility. Some pure and nano-metric silica filled chemical models which chemical structure very close to the one the DGEBA/TETA resin were synthesized and analysed with classical methods in organic chemistry. A major phenomenon of rupture of the C-O and C-N chemical bonds with creation of phenolic extremities, methylketone extremities, of primary and tertiary amines and notably enamine functions were revealed by the analyses. The quantitative 1 H and 13 C NMR analyses revealed the screen effect due to the silica and the reactions between the chemical species created by the irradiations and the silica surface. Thermic and thermodynamic analyses of the different epoxy resins in function of the irradiation dose and of the kind of silica showed the decrease of the glass transition temperature, of the relaxation temperature and of the crosslink density confirming the major phenomenon of bond ruptures during irradiations. With silica, the decrease of the crosslink density is slowed. This phenomenon can be explained with interactions between the nano-metric silica surface and the epoxy resin offsetting the effect of the chain rupture on the resin mechanical properties. The 13 C solid state NMR analyses confirmed the choice of the chemical models and permitted to detect the chemical species created by the irradiations. The analyse of the polarization transfers with 13 C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy revealed the stiffening of the nano

  16. Towards quantitative off-axis electron holographic mapping of the electric field around the tip of a sharp biased metallic needle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Kasama, Takeshi; Larson, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    We apply off-axis electron holography and Lorentz microscopy in the transmission electron microscope to map the electric field generated by a sharp biased metallic tip. A combination of experimental data and modelling provides quantitative information about the potential and the field around the ...

  17. Quantitative Global Estimates of Lightning-Induced Electron Precipitation from the Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    Pitch-angle scattering by radio waves in the VLF ( 3-30kHz) band is thought to be a major loss mechanism for energetic radiation-belt electrons. Resonant interactions with Whistler-mode VLF waves can alter the reflection altitude of trapped electrons 100keV - 1MeV; when a particle reflects at a low enough altitude, it can be removed from the magnetosphere through collisions with ionospheric constituents. Terrestrial lightning provides a natural and constantly-occurring source of VLF waves. Here we present a three-dimensional forward model of lightning-induced electron precipitation (LEP) due to resonant pitch-angle scattering from a single lightning stroke. Previous efforts (Lauben 1998, Bortnik 2006) have used two-dimensional raytracing combined with analytical expressions of pitch-angle scattering to forward model precipitation from a single stroke as a function of input and output latitude. However, these models are limited in geospatial accuracy by their use of ideal plasmasphere and magnetic field models. We relax several model assumptions by incorporating a realistic plasmasphere parameterized by Kp, to better capture the spatial dependence of LEP. We then combine our end-to-end model of the LEP process with terrestrial lightning activity data from the GLD360 sensor network to construct a real-time geospatial model of LEP-driven energy deposition into the ionosphere. We explore global and seasonal statistics, provide precipitation estimates for maximally-and-minimally-filled conditions, and compute timescales on which a populated flux tube could be depleted by LEP alone.

  18. Challenges for Electronic invoicing systems: A quantitative study of Vietnamese SMEs

    OpenAIRE

    Ngo, Hoang

    2013-01-01

    Alongside the traditional paper invoice, there is another type of invoice that has been around for over a decade but is less popular and less known to firms – the electronic invoice. Today, the e-invoice has gained the attention of many countries in, for example the EU, and Latin America, owing to its major cost saving and increased productivity benefits. In Vietnam, there have been regulations on e-invoices but firms do no show much interest in the system. So far, there have not been any stu...

  19. Damage evolution in a filled epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depoorter, Nicolas; Coutellier, Daniel; Muzic, Markus; Berg-Pollack, Antje; Cai Ye; Zimmermann, Andre

    2006-01-01

    A method is proposed for studying damage evolution in a filled epoxy resin submitted to low-cycle fatigue loading. Transmission electron microscopy analysis was performed, which indicates a damage mechanism that corresponds well to the decreasing slope of the stress-strain hysteresis observed in strain-controlled fatigue experiments. Also, the suggested damage model appears to be suitable for the simulation of strain-controlled cyclic tests and fits the damage evolution of the filled epoxy resin fairly well [de

  20. Validities of three multislice algorithms for quantitative low-energy transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, W Q; Chen, J H

    2013-11-01

    Three different types of multislice algorithms, namely the conventional multislice (CMS) algorithm, the propagator-corrected multislice (PCMS) algorithm and the fully-corrected multislice (FCMS) algorithm, have been evaluated in comparison with respect to the accelerating voltages in transmission electron microscopy. Detailed numerical calculations have been performed to test their validities. The results show that the three algorithms are equivalent for accelerating voltage above 100kV. However, below 100 kV, the CMS algorithm will introduce significant errors, not only for higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) reflections but also for zero-order Laue zone (ZOLZ) reflections. The differences between the PCMS and FCMS algorithms are negligible and mainly appear in HOLZ reflections. Nonetheless, when the accelerating voltage is further lowered to 20 kV or below, the PCMS algorithm will also yield results deviating from the FCMS results. The present study demonstrates that the propagation of the electron wave from one slice to the next slice is actually cross-correlated with the crystal potential in a complex manner, such that when the accelerating voltage is lowered to 10 kV, the accuracy of the algorithms is dependent of the scattering power of the specimen. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Robust theoretical modelling of core ionisation edges for quantitative electron energy loss spectroscopy of B- and N-doped graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, T P; Seabourne, C R; Kepaptsoglou, D M; Susi, T; Nicholls, R J; Brydson, R M D; Scott, A J; Ramasse, Q M

    2017-06-07

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is a powerful tool for understanding the chemical structure of materials down to the atomic level, but challenges remain in accurately and quantitatively modelling the response. We compare comprehensive theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 1s core-level EEL K-edge spectra of pure, B-doped and N-doped graphene with and without a core-hole to previously published atomic-resolution experimental electron microscopy data. The ground state approximation is found in this specific system to perform consistently better than the frozen core-hole approximation. The impact of including or excluding a core-hole on the resultant theoretical band structures, densities of states, electron densities and EEL spectra were all thoroughly examined and compared. It is concluded that the frozen core-hole approximation exaggerates the effects of the core-hole in graphene and should be discarded in favour of the ground state approximation. These results are interpreted as an indicator of the overriding need for theorists to embrace many-body effects in the pursuit of accuracy in theoretical spectroscopy instead of a system-tailored approach whose approximations are selected empirically.

  2. Quantitative electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis of antioxidative properties using the acetaldehyde/xanthine oxidase system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souchard, J.-P.; Nepveu, F.

    1998-05-01

    We present a method for the quantitative ESR analysis of the antioxidant properties of drugs using the acetaldhehyde/xanthine oxidase (AC/XOD) superoxide generating system and 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as spin trap. In stoichiometric conditions (AC/XOD, 60 mM/0.018 U), the resulting paramagnetic DMPO adduct disappeared with superoxide dismutase and remained when catalase or DMSO were used. That adduct was dependent only on superoxide and resulted from the trapping of a carboxyl radical by DMPO (aN = 15.2 G, aH = 18.9 G). Similar results were obtained using 4-pyridyl-l-oxide-N-t-butyl nitrone (POBN) as spin trap. The ESR signal of the DMPO-CO2- adduct was very stable and allowed quantitative analysis of the antioxidative activity of redox molecules from an IC{50} value representing the concentration causing 50% inhibition of its intensity. Among the tested compounds, manganese(II), complexes were the most effective, 25 times as active as ascorbic acid or (+)catechin and 500-fold more antioxidative than Trolox^R. Nous présentons une méthode d'analyse quantitative de l'activité antioxydante de composés d'intérêt pharmaceutique basée sur le système acétaldéhyde/xanthine oxydase (AC/XOD), l'utilisation de la RPE et du piégeage de spin avec le 5,5-diméthyl-l-pyrroline-N-oxyde (DMPO). Dans les conditions stoechiométriques {AC/XOD, 60 mM/0,018 U/ml}, l'adduit radicalaire résultant de ce système disparaît en présence de superoxyde dismutase et persiste en présence de catalase ou de DMSO. Cet adduit ne dépend que de la présence de l'anion superoxyde et provient du piégeage d'un radical carboxyle CO2- sur le DMPO (aN = 15.2 G, aH = 18.9 G). Des résultats similaires ont été obtenus avec le piégeur de spin 4-pyridyl-l-oxyde-N-t-butyl nitrone (POBN). Le signal RPE de l'adduit DMPO-CO2- est très stable et permet la quantification de l'activité antioxydante de pharmacophores redox par la détermination de la CI{50}, concentration qui

  3. Resin-Powder Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standfield, Clarence E.

    1994-01-01

    Resin-powder dispenser used at NASA's Langley Research Center for processing of composite-material prepregs. Dispenser evenly distributes powder (resin polymer and other matrix materials in powder form) onto wet uncured prepregs. Provides versatility in distribution of solid resin in prepreg operation. Used wherever there is requirement for even, continuous distribution of small amount of powder.

  4. Quantitative conversion spectroscopy of the ultrasoft isomeric transition of uranium-235 and the electronic structure of uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panov, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    Combined measurements of conversion electron spectra and the decay constant (76.5 eV, (1/2) + →(7/2) - ) of the E3-isomeric transition of the uranium-235 nucleus have been performed with collection of the isomer atoms on an indium surface. The conversion spectra are interpreted as corresponding to a mixture of two different oxides A and B of uranium, one of which (A) is similar to UO 2 , and the other (B) consists of a uranium-oxygen cluster based on the linear uranyl group O-U-O. From a set of mixed experimental spectra conversion spectra have been found corresponding to the chemical states A and B of the isomer atoms, and the variation of the absolute intensities of the conversion lines has been quantitatively investigated for them by varying the chemical composition of the isomer atoms and the ratio between the intensities of various conversion lines of the B spectrum. Experimental ratios between the intensities of the conversion lines are compared with the expected ratios in accordance with the distribution of the 6p electron density in the uranyl group. It is concluded that the experimental data agree with the calculation and that abrupt violations of proportionality of the partial probabilities of conversion of the electron density near the nucleus are absent. In accordance with the hypothesis of proportionality of the partial probabilities of conversion, an experimental estimate is given of the degree of localization of the deep-lying uranium 6p 1/2 shell during formation of the chemical bond in the uranyl group: around 70% of the 6p 1/2 electron density remains in the quasi-atomic uranium shell and around 30% is transferred to hybrid molecular orbitals

  5. A combined quantitative mass spectrometry and electron microscopy analysis of ribosomal 30S subunit assembly in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashital, Dipali G; Greeman, Candacia A; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Williamson, James R

    2014-10-14

    Ribosome assembly is a complex process involving the folding and processing of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), concomitant binding of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), and participation of numerous accessory cofactors. Here, we use a quantitative mass spectrometry/electron microscopy hybrid approach to determine the r-protein composition and conformation of 30S ribosome assembly intermediates in Escherichia coli. The relative timing of assembly of the 3' domain and the formation of the central pseudoknot (PK) structure depends on the presence of the assembly factor RimP. The central PK is unstable in the absence of RimP, resulting in the accumulation of intermediates in which the 3'-domain is unanchored and the 5'-domain is depleted for r-proteins S5 and S12 that contact the central PK. Our results reveal the importance of the cofactor RimP in central PK formation, and introduce a broadly applicable method for characterizing macromolecular assembly in cells.

  6. Adhesion-related glycocalyx study: quantitative approach with imaging-spectrum in the energy filtering transmission electron microscope (EFTEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, M; Desplat-Jego, S; Vacher, B; Ponsonnet, L; Fraterno, M; Bongrand, P; Martin, J M; Foa, C

    1998-06-05

    Large polysaccharide molecules composing the glycocalyx have been shown to prevent cell adhesion. However, this process was not observed microscopically. Terbium labeling, combined with a new quantitative imaging method based on electron energy loss spectroscopy, allowed specific glycocalyx staining with excellent contrast. Image analysis enabled us to compare glycocalyx structure in free membrane areas and contacts between monocytic cells and bound erythrocytes. Apparent glycocalyx thickness, in contact areas, was half of the sum of glycocalyx thicknesses in free areas without label density increase. Ultrastructural immunogold localization of CD43 molecules, a major component of glycocalyx, was also demonstrated to be excluded from contact areas during adhesion. Thus, both approaches strongly suggest that some glycocalyx elements must exit from contact to allow binding of adhesion molecules.

  7. Improving quantitative gas chromatography-electron ionization mass spectrometry results using a modified ion source: demonstration for a pharmaceutical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Autry, Ward; Wolfs, Kris; Hoogmartens, Jos; Adams, Erwin; Van Schepdael, Ann

    2011-07-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is a well established analytical technique. However, mass spectrometers with electron ionization sources may suffer from signal drifts, hereby negatively influencing quantitative performance. To demonstrate this phenomenon for a real application, a static headspace-gas chromatography method in combination with electron ionization-quadrupole mass spectrometry was optimized for the determination of residual dichloromethane in coronary stent coatings. Validating the method, the quantitative performance of an original stainless steel ion source was compared to that of a modified ion source. Ion source modification included the application of a gold coating on the repeller and exit plate. Several validation aspects such as limit of detection, limit of quantification, linearity and precision were evaluated using both ion sources. It was found that, as expected, the stainless steel ion source suffered from signal drift. As a consequence, non-linearity and high RSD values for repeated analyses were obtained. An additional experiment was performed to check whether an internal standard compound would lead to better results. It was found that the signal drift patterns of the analyte and internal standard were different, consequently leading to high RSD values for the response factor. With the modified ion source however, a more stable signal was observed resulting in acceptable linearity and precision. Moreover, it was also found that sensitivity improved compared to the stainless steel ion source. Finally, the optimized method with the modified ion source was applied to determine residual dichloromethane in the coating of coronary stents. The solvent was detected but found to be below the limit of quantification. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sensor fusion of electron paramagnetic resonance and magnetorelaxometry data for quantitative magnetic nanoparticle imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coene, A; Leliaert, J; Crevecoeur, G; Dupré, L

    2017-01-01

    Magnetorelaxometry (MRX) imaging and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) are two non-invasive techniques capable of recovering the magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) distribution. Both techniques solve an ill-posed inverse problem in order to find the spatial MNP distribution. A lot of research has been done on increasing the stability of these inverse problems with the main objective to improve the quality of MNP imaging. In this paper a proof of concept is presented in which the sensor data of both techniques is fused into EPR–MRX, with the intention to stabilize the inverse problem. First, both techniques are compared by reconstructing several phantoms with different sizes for various noise levels and calculating stability, sensitivity and reconstruction quality parameters for these cases. This study reveals that both techniques are sensitive to different information from the MNP distributions and generate complementary measurement data. As such, their merging might stabilize the inverse problem. In a next step we investigated how both techniques need to be combined to reduce their respective drawbacks, such as a high number of required measurements and reduced stability, and to improve MNP reconstructions. We were able to stabilize both techniques, increase reconstruction quality by an average of 5% and reduce measurement times by 88%. These improvements could make EPR–MRX a valuable and accurate technique in a clinical environment. (paper)

  9. Electronic cigarette, effective or harmful for quitting smoking and respiratory health: A quantitative review papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Heydari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, electronic cigarettes (ECs have been heavily advertised as an alternative smoking device as well as a possible cessation method. We aimed to review all published scientific literature pertaining to ECs and to present a simple conclusion about their effects for quitting smoking and respiratory health. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study with a search of PubMed, limited to English publications upto September 2014. The total number of papers which had ECs in its title and their conclusions positive or negative regarding ECs effects were computed. The number of negative papers was subtracted from the number of positive ones to make a score. Results: Of the 149 articles, 137 (91.9% were accessible, of which 68 did not have inclusion criteria. In the 69 remaining articles, 24 studies supported ECs and 45 considered these to be harmful. Finally, based on this evidence, the score of ECs (computed result with positive minus negative was −21. Conclusion: Evidence to suggest that ECs may be effective and advisable for quitting smoking or a safe alternative for smoking is lacking and may instead harm the respiratory system. However, further studies are needed.

  10. Quantitative nanoscale visualization of heterogeneous electron transfer rates in 2D carbon nanotube networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güell, Aleix G.; Ebejer, Neil; Snowden, Michael E.; McKelvey, Kim; Macpherson, Julie V.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted considerable interest for electrochemical, electrocatalytic, and sensing applications, yet there remains uncertainty concerning the intrinsic electrochemical (EC) activity. In this study, we use scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) to determine local heterogeneous electron transfer (HET) kinetics in a random 2D network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on an Si/SiO2 substrate. The high spatial resolution of SECCM, which employs a mobile nanoscale EC cell as a probe for imaging, enables us to sample the responses of individual portions of a wide range of SWNTs within this complex arrangement. Using two redox processes, the oxidation of ferrocenylmethyl trimethylammonium and the reduction of ruthenium (III) hexaamine, we have obtained conclusive evidence for the high intrinsic EC activity of the sidewalls of the large majority of SWNTs in networks. Moreover, we show that the ends of SWNTs and the points where two SWNTs cross do not show appreciably different HET kinetics relative to the sidewall. Using finite element method modeling, we deduce standard rate constants for the two redox couples and demonstrate that HET based solely on characteristic defects in the SWNT side wall is highly unlikely. This is further confirmed by the analysis of individual line profiles taken as the SECCM probe scans over an SWNT. More generally, the studies herein demonstrate SECCM to be a powerful and versatile method for activity mapping of complex electrode materials under conditions of high mass transport, where kinetic assignments can be made with confidence. PMID:22635266

  11. Electronic cigarette, effective or harmful for quitting smoking and respiratory health: A quantitative review papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Gholamreza; Ahmady, Arezoo Ebn; Chamyani, Fahimeh; Masjedi, Mohammadreza; Fadaizadeh, Lida

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, electronic cigarettes (ECs) have been heavily advertised as an alternative smoking device as well as a possible cessation method. We aimed to review all published scientific literature pertaining to ECs and to present a simple conclusion about their effects for quitting smoking and respiratory health. This was a cross-sectional study with a search of PubMed, limited to English publications upto September 2014. The total number of papers which had ECs in its title and their conclusions positive or negative regarding ECs effects were computed. The number of negative papers was subtracted from the number of positive ones to make a score. Of the 149 articles, 137 (91.9%) were accessible, of which 68 did not have inclusion criteria. In the 69 remaining articles, 24 studies supported ECs and 45 considered these to be harmful. Finally, based on this evidence, the score of ECs (computed result with positive minus negative) was -21. Evidence to suggest that ECs may be effective and advisable for quitting smoking or a safe alternative for smoking is lacking and may instead harm the respiratory system. However, further studies are needed.

  12. How patients use access to their electronic GP record--a quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavnani, Vanita; Fisher, Brian; Winfield, Marlene; Seed, Paul

    2011-04-01

    Record access is likely to become an integral part of routine care in the UK. While existing research suggests that record access improves self-care and improves relationships between patients and clinicians, little is known about how patients make use of their ability to access their records or the impact that this has on health behaviour. To explore patients' use of access to their electronic GP record and the impact of that process on their health behaviour. Self-administered postal questionnaire mailed from three general practice surgeries to patients registered to use PAERS record access system. Data were analysed using SPSS. Content analysis was used to analyse free-text responses. Two hundred and thirty-one of 610 patients responded. Frequent users of Record Access were those in poor health. Record access was used to look at test results and to read letters from those involved in health care. Forty-two per cent reported a positive impact on following medication advice and 64% a positive impact on following lifestyle advice. Just over half the sample felt accessing records prior to appointments saved time and wanted to share records with other health care providers. Approximately a third reported difficulties with understanding their records. Record access appears to have a number of positive outcomes and very few negative ones, although further work is needed to confirm this. It is used by patients to help practices improve efficiency and to improve compliance. It has the potential to promote and reinforce collaborative relationships between clinicians and patients.

  13. Quantitative determination of copper in a glass matrix using double pulse laser induced breakdown and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Ahmed A I; Morsy, Mohamed A

    2016-07-01

    A series of lithium-lead-borate glasses of a variable copper oxide loading were quantitatively analyzed in this work using two distinct spectroscopic techniques, namely double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). DP-LIBS results measured upon a combined nanosecond lasers irradiation running at 266nm and 1064nm pulses of a collinear configuration directed to the surface of borate glass samples with a known composition. This arrangement was employed to predict the electron's temperature (Te) and density (Ne) of the excited plasma from the recorded spectra. The intensity of elements' responses using this scheme is higher than that of single-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (SP-LIBS) setup under the same experimental conditions. On the other hand, the EPR data shows typical Cu (II) EPR-signals in the borate glass system that is networked at a distorted tetragonal Borate-arrangement. The signal intensity of the Cu (II) peak at g⊥=2.0596 has been used to quantify the Cu-content accurately in the glass matrix. Both techniques produced linear calibration curves of Cu-metals in glasses with excellent linear regression coefficient (R(2)) values. This study establishes a good correlation between DP-LIBS analysis of glass and the results obtained using EPR spectroscopy. The proposed protocols prove the great advantage of DP-LIBS system for the detection of a trace copper on the surface of glasses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A high-speed scintillation-based electronic portal imaging device to quantitatively characterize IMRT delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranade, Manisha K.; Lynch, Bart D.; Li, Jonathan G.; Dempsey, James F.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) employing a fast scintillator and a high-speed camera. The device is designed to accurately and independently characterize the fluence delivered by a linear accelerator during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with either step-and-shoot or dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) delivery. Our aim is to accurately obtain the beam shape and fluence of all segments delivered during IMRT, in order to study the nature of discrepancies between the plan and the delivered doses. A commercial high-speed camera was combined with a terbium-doped gadolinium-oxy-sulfide (Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb) scintillator to form an EPID for the unaliased capture of two-dimensional fluence distributions of each beam in an IMRT delivery. The high speed EPID was synchronized to the accelerator pulse-forming network and gated to capture every possible pulse emitted from the accelerator, with an approximate frame rate of 360 frames-per-second (fps). A 62-segment beam from a head-and-neck IMRT treatment plan requiring 68 s to deliver was recorded with our high speed EPID producing approximately 6 Gbytes of imaging data. The EPID data were compared with the MLC instruction files and the MLC controller log files. The frames were binned to provide a frame rate of 72 fps with a signal-to-noise ratio that was sufficient to resolve leaf positions and segment fluence. The fractional fluence from the log files and EPID data agreed well. An ambiguity in the motion of the MLC during beam on was resolved. The log files reported leaf motions at the end of 33 of the 42 segments, while the EPID observed leaf motions in only 7 of the 42 segments. The static IMRT segment shapes observed by the high speed EPID were in good agreement with the shapes reported in the log files. The leaf motions observed during beam-on for step-and-shoot delivery were not temporally resolved by the log files

  15. Generation of domestic waste electrical and electronic equipment on Fernando de Noronha Island: qualitative and quantitative aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Dhiego Raphael Rodrigues; de Oliveira, José Diego; Selva, Vanice Fragoso; Silva, Maisa Mendonça; Santos, Simone Machado

    2017-08-01

    The accelerated growth trajectory of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is a matter of concern for governments worldwide. In developing countries, the problem is more complex because municipal waste management is still a challenge for municipalities. Fernando de Noronha Island, an environmentally protected area, has a transfer station for solid waste before it is sent to the final destination abroad, which is different waste management model to most urban areas. In order to check the specifics of management of WEEE, this study aimed to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the generation of this type of waste on the main island of Fernando de Noronha, taking into consideration aspects related to consumption habits and handling of waste. During the in situ research, a questionnaire was applied to a sample of 83 households. The results provide a picture of the generation of WEEE for a period of 1 year, when a production of 1.3 tons of WEEE was estimated. Relationships between education level and monthly income and between education level and number of plasma/LCD TVs and washing machines were confirmed. Another important result is that only two socioeconomic variables (monthly income and education level) are related to two recycling behavior variables. In addition, the population and government treat WEEE as ordinary waste, ignoring its contaminant potential. Despite the existence of relevant legislation concerning the treatment and disposal of WEEE, additional efforts will be required by the government in order to properly manage this type of waste on the island.

  16. Tracheomalacia before and after aortosternopexy: dynamic and quantitative assessment by electron-beam computed tomography with clinical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, S.C.S.; Kimura, K.; Smith, W.L.; Sato, Y.

    1995-01-01

    To correlate the dynamics of tracheal collapse with clinical upper airway obstruction before and after aortosternopexy, seven boys and three girls (mean age, 10 months) underwent dynamic evaluation of the trachea by electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT). The site, extent, and severity of collapse were correlated with symptomatology and details of operative procedure. When >50% area collapse was used as the criterion for tracheomalacia, segmental involvement occurred above the aortic arch in all patients, extending to the aortic arch level in only four. Tracheomalacia involved two or fewer 8-mm levels in seven patients and more than two levels in three. Eight patients underwent one aortosternopexy procedure, resulting in clinical improvement in six and correlating well with EBCT findings. Of the remaining two patients who had single aortosternopexy and did not show clinical and radiographic improvement, one required operative repair of a vascular ring and the other continued to have recurrent respiratory tract infections. On the basis of EBCT findings, two patients required additional innominate arteriopexies: One improved, and the other remained symptomatic, requiring tracheostomy. EBCT is a noninvasive modality that allows preoperative diagnosis of tracheomalacia. More importantly, the operative decision and technique are guided by an objective and quantitative assessment of tracheal collapse. (orig.)

  17. Mechanistic understanding of fouling of protein A chromatography resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Mili; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-08-12

    This paper aims to provide a thorough understanding of how fouling of Protein A resin takes place. Binding and mass transport properties of widely used agarose-based Protein A resin, MabSelect SuRe™, have been examined to understand the mechanism of resin fouling. There could be various factors that impact resin fouling. These include product/impurity build-up due to components in the feed material and ligand degradation due to the use of harsh buffers. To unravel their contributions, cycling studies were performed with and without product loading. The results presented in this paper provide a lucid understanding of the causative factors that limit Protein A chromatographic resin lifetime. The capacity fall for protein A resin at the end of 100th cycle due to use of feed material was found to be five times greater than that without using feed material. Compared to the fresh resin, the cycled resin samples shows 24% reduction in particle porosity and 51% reduction in pore mass transfer coefficient. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to qualitatively monitor accumulation of foulants on the cycled resin. Fouled resin sample contained a dense residue in the interior and exterior of resin particle both as a film at the bead surface and as granules. The surface activation energy increased five times in the case of fouled resin sample. The major event in fouling was identified as the non-specific adsorption of the feed material components on resin, signaling that pore diffusion is the rate limiting step. It is anticipated that these findings will assist in development of a more robust and economical downstream manufacturing process for monoclonal antibody purification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Flame retardant materials based on BDM/DBA resin and organic-inorganic additives

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    2,2’-diallyl bisphenol A (DBA) modified bismaleimide resins (BDM) are widely used as polymer matrix of high-performance composites in the field of aerospace, transportation, machinery, and electronics. This kind of resin has excellent properties, including good thermal stability, good processing performance, high mechanical strength, excellent dielectric properties, etc. However, as for most organic resins, the flame retardancy of the BMI resins is not so good. In order to expand the use of t...

  19. Biphenyl liquid crystalline epoxy resin as a low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Chang, Yuan-Ling; Chen, Min-Huey; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-11-01

    Low-shrinkage resin-based photocurable liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite has been investigated with regard to its application as a dental restoration material. The nanocomposite consists of an organic matrix and an inorganic reinforcing filler. The organic matrix is made of liquid crystalline biphenyl epoxy resin (BP), an epoxy resin consisting of cyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ECH), the photoinitiator 4-octylphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and the photosensitizer champhorquinone. The inorganic filler is silica nanoparticles (∼70-100 nm). The nanoparticles were modified by an epoxy silane of γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to be compatible with the organic matrix and to chemically bond with the organic matrix after photo curing. By incorporating the BP liquid crystalline (LC) epoxy resin into conventional ECH epoxy resin, the nanocomposite has improved hardness, flexural modulus, water absorption and coefficient of thermal expansion. Although the incorporation of silica filler may dilute the reinforcing effect of crystalline BP, a high silica filler content (∼42 vol.%) was found to increase the physical and chemical properties of the nanocomposite due to the formation of unique microstructures. The microstructure of nanoparticle embedded layers was observed in the nanocomposite using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This unique microstructure indicates that the crystalline BP and nanoparticles support each other and result in outstanding mechanical properties. The crystalline BP in the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite was partially melted during exothermic photopolymerization, and the resin expanded via an order-to-disorder transition. Thus, the post-gelation shrinkage of the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite is greatly reduced, ∼50.6% less than in commercialized methacrylate resin-based composites. This LC epoxy nanocomposite demonstrates good physical and chemical properties and good biocompatibility

  20. Reduction of polyester resin shrinkage by means of epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak, M.; Brzostowski, A.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt was made to decrease the shrinkage of unsaturated polyester resin, taking place during radiation-induced curing, by the addition of epoxy resin. In order to combine chemically both resins, the epoxy component was modified with cinnamic and acrylic acids. A composition of 90 parts of polyester resin, 10 parts of epoxy resin modified with cinnamic acid, and 150 parts of a silica filler showed a volume shrinkage of 1.2%. (author)

  1. Statistical failure analysis of adhesive resin cement bonded dental ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaou; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantitatively examine the effect of adhesive resin cement on the probability of crack initiation from the internal surface of ceramic dental restorations. The possible crack bridging mechanism and residual stress effect of the resin cement on the ceramic surface are examined. Based on the fracture-mechanics-based failure probability model, we predict the failure probability of glass-ceramic disks bonded to simulated dentin subjected to indentation loads. The theoretical predictions match experimental data suggesting that both resin bridging and shrinkage plays an important role and need to be considered for accurate prognostics to occur. PMID:18670583

  2. Influences of carbon nanofillers on mechanical performance of epoxy resin polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shraddha; Srivastava, V. K.; Prakash, Rajiv

    2015-03-01

    The influence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) on epoxy resin was investigated to compare their mechanical properties. MWCNT/epoxy resin and GnP/epoxy resin composites were compared with each other for their tensile strength, compressive strength, Charpy Impact and Izod impact energy with the variation of weight percentage ratio of nanofiller ranging from 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0, respectively. The result shows that GnP/epoxy resin composite gave better tensile and compressive strength compared to MWCNT/epoxy resin composite whereas Izod impact energy, Charpy impact energy and dynamic fracture toughness of MWCNT/epoxy resin composite resulted in better impact resistance than the GnP/epoxy resin composite. Thermal stability and microstructural properties of composites were measured using Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  3. Surface roughness average and scanning electron microscopic observations of resin luting agents Alteração de rugosidade superficial e observações em microscopia eletrônica de varredura de cimentos resinosos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Francisco Lia Mondelli

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the surface roughness changes of three current resin cements after tooth brushing simulation, as well as discuss its relation with scanning electron microscopic observations. The materials employed were Enforce Sure Cure (Dentsply, Rely X (3M-ESPE and Variolink II (Vivadent. They were subjected to brushing abrasion (100,000 strokes for each specimen and the surface roughness alterations (before and after strokes were detected. For each roughness test condition, specimens were coated with gold-palladium and observed on a DSM 900 Zeiss scanning electron microscope. Roughness changes values (Ra were statistically increased after brushing strokes. Based on the microscopic observations and roughness changes analysis, all cements studied became rougher after brushing strokes.O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar a alteração de rugosidade superficial de três cimentos resinosos após submetê-los a ciclos de escovação simulada e analisar qualitativamente a sua superfície através de observações microscópicas. Os materiais empregados neste estudo foram Enforce Sure Cure (Dentsply, Rely X (3M-ESPE e Variolink II (Vivadent. Estes foram submetidos à ciclos de escovação simulada (100.000 ciclos para cada espécime e a alteração de sua rugosidade superficial (antes e após escovação foi avaliada. Para cada material e condição de rugosidade, espécimes foram selecionados, metalizados e observados em microscopia eletrônica de varredura (DSM 900 Zeiss. Baseado nas observações microscópicas e nos valores de alteração de rugosidade, todos os materiais apresentaram aumento de rugosidade aritmética (Ra após ciclos de escovação simulada.

  4. The measurement of polymerization shrinkage of composite resins with ESPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Yang, Guo Biao

    2008-09-01

    In the current study, we used the method of electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) to measure polymerization shrinkage of composite resins. Standardized cavities were prepared and placed into the ESPI apparatus before the cavities were filled with composites (n=2) .The ESPI apparatus was constructed to measure the out-of-plane displacement of the resins surface during the polymerization. Experiments demonstrated that the ESPI technique was a viable method to measure the deformation of composite resins. It was responsive and sensitive to dimensional changes. We found that cavity shape, size and C- factor influenced the date of resins shrinkage. And the tooth deformation in response to polymerization of resins was measured by the ESPI too. We concluded that ESPI was a feasible method for assessing resins deformation induced by its polymerization shrinkage when it was bonded in tooth cavities. And the results were greatly influenced by the dimensions of cavities , or interface adhesive and so on. It could also measure the tooth deformation induced by shrinkage of bonded composite resins. We found that resins polymerization shrinkage date may overestimate shrinkage-induced tooth deformation.

  5. Scanning electron microscopy evaluation of the interaction pattern between dentin and resin after cavity preparation using Er:YAG laser; Avaliacao, atraves de microscopia eletronica de varredura, do padrao de interacao dentina-resina em cavidades preparadas com laser de Er:YAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schein, Marcelo Thome

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the interaction pattern formed between dentin and resin on cavities prepared with an erbium laser (Er:YAG). The morphological aspect of the irradiated dentin after acid etching was also observed. Ten dentin disks were obtained from fresh extracted third molars. Each disk received two cavities, one prepared with a conventional high-speed drill, while the other cavity was obtained by the use of an Er:YAG laser (KaVo KEY Laser, KaVo Co.). The laser treatment was performed with 250 mJ/pulse, 4 Hz, non contact mode, focused beam, and a fine water mist was used. Five disks were prepared for morphological analysis of the acid etched dentin. The other five disks had their cavities restored with Single Bond (3M) followed by Z100 resin (3M). The specimens were observed under scanning electron microscopy after dentin-resin interface demineralization and deproteinization. It was observed that the morphological characteristics of the acid-etched irradiated dentin were not favorable to the diffusion of monomers through the collagen network. The dentin resin interfacial aspect of irradiated dentin, after acid etching, showed thin tags and scarce hybridization zones, which agreed with the morphology of the irradiated and acid-etched dentin substrate observed. (author)

  6. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  7. Quantitative explanation of some electron temperature profiles measured in situ in the high latitude ionospheric E-region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, K.; Oyama, Koh-ichiro; Hirao, Kunio

    1983-01-01

    E region electron temperature profiles obtained with a rocket experiment in the Antarctica are compared to theoretical electron temperatures calculated from a model. The main heat source in this model is the heating of the electron gas by unstable plasma waves. Very good agreement between both temperatures is obtained between 105 and 115 km altitude, where this heating mechanism is effective. The agreement is also good below this altitude range, after a refinement of the data analysis procedure for the measured temperatures. Several important consequences of the good agreement are pointed out. (author)

  8. Use of near infrared correlation spectroscopy for quantitation of surface iron, absorbed water and stored electronic energy in a suite of Mars soil analog materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Lelia M.; Banin, Amos; Carle, Glenn; Orenberg, James; Scattergood, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A number of questions concerning the surface mineralogy and the history of water on Mars remain unresolved using the Viking analyses and Earth-based telescopic data. Identification and quantitation of iron-bearing clays on Mars would elucidate these outstanding issues. Near infrared correlation analysis, a method typically applied to qualitative and quantitative analysis of individual constituents of multicomponent mixtures, is adapted here to selection of distinctive features of a small, highly homologous series of Fe/Ca-exchanged montmorillonites and several kalinites. Independently determined measures of surface iron, relative humidity and stored electronic energy were used as constituent data for linear regression of the constituent vs. reflectance data throughout the spectral region 0.68 to 2.5 micrometers. High correlations were found in appropriate regions for all three constituents, though that with stored energy is still considered tenuous. Quantitation was improved using 1st and 2nd derivative spectra. High resolution data over a broad spectral range would be required to quantitatively identify iron-bearing clays by remotely sensed reflectance.

  9. Moessbauer Study of Discoloration of Synthetic Resin Covered Electric Switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmann, E.; Muzsay, I.; Homonnay, Z.; Vertes, A.

    2002-01-01

    57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry were used to investigate brown discoloration and sediments formed on the surface of synthetic resin product covered electronic switches. The Moessbauer measurement revealed that alloyed steels and iron-containing corrosion products are associated with the discolored layers. Iron, and iron corrosion products were shown by both MS and XRD in the sediments formed eventually during the finishing of the synthetic resin products after machining and washing with water solution.

  10. Composition of asphaltenes and resins of west Siberian petroleums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, I.V.; Babicheva, T.A.; Bodak, A.N.; Nemirovskaya, G.B.; Mashigorov, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    ESR and X-ray diffraction analysis was used to examine asphaltene and resin samples of West Siberia. Experiments were carried out to simulate the effect of catagenesis on resin and asphaltene composition. Processes of thermocatalytic transformations of crude oil in the deposit were found to have no marked effect on asphaltene and resin composition. Transformation of the organic input at sedimentation was assumed to be the main factor determining the qualitative and quantitative composition of crude oil resins and asphaltenes of West Siberia. Petroleums formed from organic matter, accumulating under reducing conditions, contain more asphaltenes and resins, they include much tetravalent vanadium and the asphaltenes have abundant paramagnetic centres. Petroleums formed from oxidized organic matter contain very little asphaltene low concentrations of paramagnetic centers, and little tetravalent vanadium. Resins of these petroleums are rich in oxygen. High levels of asphalt-resin matter in petroleums is related to the presence in the initial organic progenitors of polyunsaturated fatty acids and various nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds.

  11. Contact allergy to epoxy resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil

    2012-01-01

    to epoxy resin remained stable over the study period. Of the patients with an epoxy resin-positive patch test, 71% returned a questionnaire; 95 patients had worked with epoxy resin in the occupational setting, and, of these, one-third did not use protective gloves and only 50.5% (48) had participated...

  12. Spatial distribution of volatile compounds in epoxy resins for composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grayson, M.A.; Wolf, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    Precision abrasion mass spectrometry (PAMS) was used to determine the quantitative distribution profile of water in three epoxy resin systems: tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM) cured with dicyandiamide (DICY), diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) cured with DICY, and TGDDM cured with diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS). The first two resin systems also contain an epoxy cresol novolac. Specimens of the three resins were exposed to a humid environment for 4 to 2000 hours. The water distribution was determined immediately following environmental exposure. Distribution profiles of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and dichloromethane were also measured in the specimens. A brief description of the PAMS apparatus and a discussion of the distribution profiles of the sorbed gases in the three epoxy resin systems as a function of exposure time are given

  13. Reducing the V2O3(0001) surface through electron bombardment – a quantitative structure determination with I/V-LEED

    OpenAIRE

    Feiten, F.; Kuhlenbeck, H.; Freund, H.

    2016-01-01

    The (0001) surface of vanadium sesquioxide, V2O3, is terminated by vanadyl groups under standard ultra high vacuum preparation conditions. Reduction with electrons results in a chemically highly active surface with a well-defined LEED pattern indicating a high degree of order. In this work we report the first quantitative structure determination of a reduced V2O3(0001) surface. We identify two distinct surface phases by STM, one well ordered and one less well ordered. I/V-LEED shows the order...

  14. Quantitative measurement of the vibrational amplitude and phase in photorefractive time-average interferometry: A comparison with electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohleder, Henrik; Petersen, Paul Michael; Marrakchi, A.

    1994-01-01

    and amplitude of the vibrating structure are demonstrated in photorefractive time average interferometry. The photorefractive interferometer is compared with the performance of a commercial electronic speckle pattern interferometer (ESPI). It is shown that the dynamic photorefractive holographic interferometer......Time-average interferometry is dealt with using four-wave mixing in photorefractive Bi12SiO20. By introducing a proper sinusoidal phase shift in the forward pump beam it is possible to measure the amplitude and phase everywhere on a vibrating object. Quantitative measurements of the phase...

  15. Enhancement of adhesion between resin coating materials and resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Tomoaki; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Weerasinghe, Dinesh S; Harada, Naoko; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2007-07-01

    Resin coating technique is a unique method that improves the dentin bond strength of resin cements in indirect restorations. However, the weak link of a specimen bonded using the resin coating technique was reported to be the bonded interface between the resin coating material and resin cement. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to enhance the bonding performance between a resin coating material and a resin cement. Two light-cured flowable composites, Protect Liner F and Clearfil Flow FX, were used as coating materials, and two dual-cure composite materials, Panavia F 2.0 and Clearfil DC Core Automix, were used as resin cements. The ultimate tensile strength of each material and the microtensile bond strengths of the bonded specimens of resin coating material and resin cement were measured using a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Three-way ANOVA (p=0.05) revealed that the highest microtensile bond strength was obtained using a combination of Clearfil Flow FX and Clearfil DC Core Automix, and when the surface of the coating material was treated with ED Primer II. It was strongly suggested that materials with a higher ultimate tensile strength, when used in both resin coating and cementation, could enhance the bond strength between the two.

  16. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  17. Resistivity of thin gold films on mica induced by electron-surface scattering: Application of quantitative scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Marcelo E.; Gonzalez-Fuentes, Claudio A.; Henriquez, Ricardo; Kremer, German; Moraga, Luis; Oyarzun, Simón; Suarez, Marco Antonio; Flores, Marcos; Munoz, Raul C.

    2012-01-01

    We report a comparison between the resistivity measured on thin gold films deposited on mica, with predictions based upon classical theories of size effects (Drude's, Sondheimer's and Calecki's), as well as predictions based upon quantum theories of electron-surface scattering (the modified theory of Sheng, Xing and Wang, the theory of Tesanovic, Jaric and Maekawa, and that of Trivedi and Aschroft). From topographic images of the surface recorded with a Scanning Tunneling Microscope, we determined the rms roughness amplitude, δ and the lateral correlation length, ξ corresponding to a Gaussian representation of the average height-height autocorrelation function, describing the roughness of each sample in the scale of length set by the Fermi wave length. Using (δ, ξ) as input data, we present a rigorous comparison between resistivity data and predictions based upon the theory of Calecki as well as quantum theoretical predictions without adjustable parameters. The resistivity was measured on gold films of different thickness evaporated onto mica substrates, between 4 K and 300 K. The resistivity data covers the range 0.1 < x(T) < 6.8, for 4 K < T < 300 K, where x(T) is the ratio between film thickness and electron mean free path in the bulk at temperature T. We experimentally identify electron-surface and electron-phonon scattering as the microscopic electron scattering mechanisms giving rise to the macroscopic resistivity. The different theories are all capable of estimating the thin film resistivity to an accuracy better than 10%; however the mean free path and the resistivity characterizing the bulk turn out to depend on film thickness. Surprisingly, only the Sondheimer theory and its quantum version, the modified theory of Sheng, Xing and Wang, predict and increase in resistivity induced by size effects that seems consistent with published galvanomagnetic phenomena also arising from electron-surface scattering measured at low temperatures.

  18. Evaluation of resins for use in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Santos, Ana Maria M.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Prostate cancer can be treated with interstitial brachytherapy in initial stage of the disease in which tiny radioactive seeds with cylindrical geometry are used. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation, a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. Among the materials that have potential for innovation in the construction of seeds, biocompatible resins appear as an important option. In this paper, we present some characterization results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) performed on two types of resins in which curing temperatures for each one were varied as also the results of coatings with these resins under titanium substrates. Interactions of these resins in contact with the simulated body fluid were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  19. Evaluation of resins for use in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Santos, Ana Maria M., E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b, E-mail: amms@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Prostate cancer can be treated with interstitial brachytherapy in initial stage of the disease in which tiny radioactive seeds with cylindrical geometry are used. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation, a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. Among the materials that have potential for innovation in the construction of seeds, biocompatible resins appear as an important option. In this paper, we present some characterization results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) performed on two types of resins in which curing temperatures for each one were varied as also the results of coatings with these resins under titanium substrates. Interactions of these resins in contact with the simulated body fluid were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  20. Verification of surface polarity of O-face ZnO(0 0 0 1{sup Macron }) by quantitative modeling analysis of Auger electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, C.W., E-mail: cwsu@mail.ncyu.edu.tw [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiayi University, 300 Syuefu Rd., Chiayi 60004, Taiwan (China); Huang, M.S.; Tsai, T.H.; Chang, S.C. [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiayi University, 300 Syuefu Rd., Chiayi 60004, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantitative Auger intensity ratios to predict macroscopic surface type to Zn-face or O-face can be obtained using hard sphere model and considering electron mean free paths. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculation of electron signals from 6-layer depth is the best condition in estimating Auger intensity ratios. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ratio deviated from the estimation reference after surface treated by annealing or sputtering is classified to Zn-rich or O-rich surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A Zn-rich surface may exist on an O-face surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface type of a composite material can be quickly obtained by quantitative analysis of Auger intensity ratio. - Abstract: Is crystalline ZnO(0 0 0 1{sup Macron }) O-face surface believed to be enriched by Zn atoms? This study may get the answer. We proposed a simplified model to simulate surface concentration ratio on (0 0 0 1{sup Macron })-O or (0 0 0 1)-Zn surface based on the hard-sphere model. The simulation ratio was performed by integrating electron signals from the assumed Auger emission, in which the electron mean free path and relative atomic layer arrangements inside the different polarity ZnO crystal surface were considered as relevant parameters. After counting more than 100 experimental observations of Zn/O ratios, the high frequency peak ratio was found at around 0.428, which was near the value predicted by the proposed model using the IMFP database. The ratio larger than the peak value corresponds to that observed in the annealed samples. A downward trend of the ratio evaluated on the post-sputtering sample indicates the possibility of a Zn-enriched phase appearing on the annealed O-face surface. This phenomenon can further elucidate the O-deficiency debate on most ZnO materials.

  1. A critical evaluation of quantitative and qualitative analysis by means of energy-dispersive X-ray measurement in a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, F.

    1978-12-01

    The bombardment of solids in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) by means of energetic electrons results in the generation and emission of various signals that carry information about the characteristics of the target. Those signals which are related to the present context, e.g. the secondary and backscattered electrons as well as the characteristic and continuous X-radiation, are discussed. The brief description of the SEM and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometer is followed by a discussion of various obstacles affecting the reliability of X-ray intensity measurements and data reduction procedures. The observed relative X-ray intensities from pure elements were determined as a function of the atomic number. These functional dependence curves, which were established under standard conditions, served as reliable reference data for the purpose of quantitative corrections. The performance limits of a typical SEM-EDX analytical system were assessed by analysing quantitatively various types of standard reference materials and inhomogeneous samples. A brief discussion of the X-ray source is given in order to estimate whether the recorded X-ray intensities are representative of the electron bombarded areas. This is of importance when microanalyses are performed on inclusions or near phase boundaries. The use of oxide glasses which are suitable to evaluate and interrelative SEM-EDX systems is discussed. The analysis of metal alloys, which developed exaggerated surface topography when sputtered in an ion microprobe mass analyser or glow discharge lamp, is presented as a typical example for the investigation of rough-surface samples [af

  2. Quantitative determination of vortex core dimensions in head‑to‑head domain walls using off‑axis electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junginger, F; Klaui, M; Backes, D

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a complete three-dimensional characterization of vortex core spin structures, which is important for future magnetic data storage based on vortex cores in disks and in wires. Using electron holography to examine vortices in patterned Permalloy devices we have quantitativ...

  3. Electron density study of urea using TDS-corrected X-ray diffraction data: quantitative comparison of experimental theoretical results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zavodnik, Valery; Stash, Adam; Tsirelson, Vladimir; Feil, D.; de Vries, R.Y.; Feil, Dirk

    1999-01-01

    The electron-density distribution in urea, CO(NH2)2, was studied by high-precision single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis at 148 (1) K. An experimental correction for TDS was applied to the X-ray intensities. Rmerge(F2) = 0.015. The displacement parameters agree quite well with results from

  4. An Incommensurately Modulated Structure of eta '-Phase of Cu3+xSi Determined by Quantitative Electron Diffraction Tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, L.; Klementová, Mariana; Dřínek, V.; Jarošová, M.; Petříček, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 8 (2011), s. 3743-3751 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : copper silicide * incommensurate structure * electron diffraction tomography * ab inition structure solution * superspace Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.601, year: 2011

  5. Phosphorus-containing imide resins - Modification by elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A.; Varma, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    The syntheses and general features of addition-type maleimide resins based on bis(m-aminophenyl)phosphine oxide and tris(m-aminophenyl)phosphine oxide have been reported previously. These resins have been used to fabricate graphite cloth laminates having excellent flame resistance. These composites did not burn even in pure oxygen. However, these resins were somewhat brittle. This paper reports the modification of these phosphorus-containing resins by an amine-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (ATBN) and a perfluoroalkylene diaromatic amine elastomer (3F). An approximately two-fold increase in short beam shear strength and flexural strength was observed at 7 percent ATBN concentration. The tensile, flexural, and shear strengths were reduced when 18 percent ATBN was used. Anaerobic char yields of the resins at 800 C and the limiting oxygen indexes of the laminates decreased with increasing ATBN concentration. The perfluorodiamine (3F) was used with both imide resins at 6.4 percent concentration. The shear strength was doubled in the case of the bisimide with no loss of flammability characteristics. The modified trisimide laminate also had improved properties over the unmodified one. The dynamic mechanical analysis of a four-ply laminate indicated a glass transition temperature above 300 C. Scanning electron micrographs of the ATBN modified imide resins were also recorded.

  6. Analytical method to estimate resin cement diffusion into dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Ferraz, Larissa Cristina; Ubaldini, Adriana Lemos Mori; de Oliveira, Bruna Medeiros Bertol; Neto, Antonio Medina; Sato, Fracielle; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2016-05-01

    This study analyzed the diffusion of two resin luting agents (resin cements) into dentin, with the aim of presenting an analytical method for estimating the thickness of the diffusion zone. Class V cavities were prepared in the buccal and lingual surfaces of molars (n=9). Indirect composite inlays were luted into the cavities with either a self-adhesive or a self-etch resin cement. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and the cement-dentin interface was analyzed by using micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and scanning electron microscopy. Evolution of peak intensities of the Raman bands, collected from the functional groups corresponding to the resin monomer (C-O-C, 1113 cm-1) present in the cements, and the mineral content (P-O, 961 cm-1) in dentin were sigmoid shaped functions. A Boltzmann function (BF) was then fitted to the peaks encountered at 1113 cm-1 to estimate the resin cement diffusion into dentin. The BF identified a resin cement-dentin diffusion zone of 1.8±0.4 μm for the self-adhesive cement and 2.5±0.3 μm for the self-etch cement. This analysis allowed the authors to estimate the diffusion of the resin cements into the dentin. Fitting the MRS data to the BF contributed to and is relevant for future studies of the adhesive interface.

  7. Diametral tensile strength of four composite resin core materials with and without centered fiber dowels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Cornel H; Ji, Donatta Y-J; Rizkalla, Amin S; Santos, Gildo C

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the diametral tensile strength of composite resin core materials with and without fiber dowels. Eight groups were established (n = 20), four with composite resins and four with fiber dowels. Samples were tested using a universal testing machine and evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. One-way ANOVA and a Tukey B-rank order test (P = 0.05) indicated that the tensile values of two of the four composite resins decreased significantly when their matching fiber dowels were introduced.

  8. Abrasive wear and surface roughness of contemporary dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-min; Zhang, Hongyu; Choe, Hyo-Sun; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Hong, Guang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear and surface roughness of 20 currently available commercial dental composite resins, including nanofilled, supra-nanofilled, nanohybrid and microhybrid composite resins. The volume loss, maximum vertical loss, surface roughness (R(a)) and surface morphology [Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)] were determined after wear. The inorganic filler content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The result showed that the volume loss and vertical loss varied among the materials. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) of wear volume loss and filler content (wt%) was 0.283. SEM micrographs revealed nanofilled composites displayed a relatively uniform wear surfaces with nanoclusters protrusion, while the performance of nanohybrid composites varied. The abrasive wear resistance of contemporary dental composite resins is material-dependent and cannot be deduced from its category, filler loading and composite matrix; The abrasive wear resistance of some flowable composites is comparable to the universal/posterior composite resins.

  9. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  10. Bismaleimide Copolymer Matrix Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, John A.; Heimbuch, Alvin H.; Hsu, Ming-Ta S.; Chen, Timothy S.

    1987-01-01

    Graphite composites, prepared from 1:1 copolymer of two new bismaleimides based on N,N'-m-phenylene-bis(m-amino-benzamide) structure have mechanical properties superior to those prepared from other bismaleimide-type resins. New heat-resistant composites replace metal in some structural applications. Monomers used to form copolymers with superior mechanical properties prepared by reaction of MMAB with maleic or citraconic anhydride.

  11. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  12. Quantitative structure-retention relationship studies using immobilized artificial membrane chromatography I: amended linear solvation energy relationships with the introduction of a molecular electronic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Sun, Jin; Cui, Shengmiao; He, Zhonggui

    2006-11-03

    Linear solvation energy relationships (LSERs) amended by the introduction of a molecular electronic factor were employed to establish quantitative structure-retention relationships using immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatography, in particular ionizable solutes. The chromatographic indices, log k(IAM), were determined by HPLC on an IAM.PC.DD2 column for 53 structurally diverse compounds, including neutral, acidic and basic compounds. Unlike neutral compounds, the IAM chromatographic retention of ionizable compounds was affected by their molecular charge state. When the mean net charge per molecule (delta) was introduced into the amended LSER as the sixth variable, the LSER regression coefficient was significantly improved for the test set including ionizable solutes. The delta coefficients of acidic and basic compounds were quite different indicating that the molecular electronic factor had a markedly different impact on the retention of acidic and basic compounds on IAM column. Ionization of acidic compounds containing a carboxylic group tended to impair their retention on IAM, while the ionization of basic compounds did not have such a marked effect. In addition, the extra-interaction with the polar head of phospholipids might cause a certain change in the retention of basic compounds. A comparison of calculated and experimental retention indices suggested that the semi-empirical LSER amended by the addition of a molecular electronic factor was able to reproduce adequately the experimental retention factors of the structurally diverse solutes investigated.

  13. Quantitative measurement of mean inner potential and specimen thickness from high-resolution off-axis electron holograms of ultra-thin layered WSe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, Florian, E-mail: f.winkler@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute 5 (PGI-5), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Tavabi, Amir H. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute 5 (PGI-5), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Barthel, Juri [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Gemeinschaftslabor für Elektronenmikroskopie (GFE), RWTH Aachen University, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Duchamp, Martial [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute 5 (PGI-5), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Yucelen, Emrah [FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, Eindhoven 5600 KA (Netherlands); Borghardt, Sven; Kardynal, Beata E. [Peter Grünberg Institute 9 (PGI-9), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); and others

    2017-07-15

    The phase and amplitude of the electron wavefunction that has passed through ultra-thin flakes of WSe{sub 2} is measured from high-resolution off-axis electron holograms. Both the experimental measurements and corresponding computer simulations are used to show that, as a result of dynamical diffraction, the spatially averaged phase does not increase linearly with specimen thickness close to an [001] zone axis orientation even when the specimen has a thickness of only a few layers. It is then not possible to infer the local specimen thickness of the WSe{sub 2} from either the phase or the amplitude alone. Instead, we show that the combined analysis of phase and amplitude from experimental measurements and simulations allows an accurate determination of the local specimen thickness. The relationship between phase and projected potential is shown to be approximately linear for extremely thin specimens that are tilted by several degrees in certain directions from the [001] zone axis. A knowledge of the specimen thickness then allows the electrostatic potential to be determined from the measured phase. By using this combined approach, we determine a value for the mean inner potential of WSe{sub 2} of 18.9±0.8 V, which is 12% lower than the value calculated from neutral atom scattering factors. - Highlights: • Quantitative analysis of high resolution electron holograms of WSe{sub 2}. • Local specimen thickness determination and estimation of tilt angle. • Mean inner potential evaluation of WSe2 avoiding dynamical diffraction.

  14. Chelating ion exchange with macroreticular hydroxamic acid resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis, reactions, and analytical applications of hydroxamic acids, including chelating resins with this functional group, are reviewed. A procedure for attaching N-phenyl hydroxamic acid groups to Amberlite XAD-4 is described. The extraction of 20 metal ions from 2M hydrochloric acid by this resin is discussed. Conditions for the quantitative extraction and back-extraction of 9 ions are reported. The results are compared with work on solvent extraction with N-phenylbenzohydroxamic acid. Procedures for attaching N-methyl and N-substituted hydroxamic acid groups to Amberlite XAD-4 are described. The N-phenyl, N-methyl, and N-unsubstituted hydroxamic acid resins are compared with respect to metal-ion complexation. The scope of applications for hydroxamic acid resins is investigated by studying the extraction of 19 metal ions as a function of pH. The resins are especially suitable for the extraction of zirconium(IV), titanium(IV), and uranium(IV) from strongly acidic solution. Aluminum(III) is separated from calcium and phosphate by extraction at pH 4. The use of the resins for the purification of reagents, concentration of trace constituents, and chromatographic separation is demonstrated

  15. Chelating ion exchange with macroreticular hydroxamic acid resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis, reactions, and analytical applications of hydroxamic acids, including chelating resins with this functional group, are reviewed. A procedure for attaching N-phenyl hydroxamic acid groups to Amberlite XAD-4 is described. The extraction of 20 metal ions from 2 M hydrochloric acid by this resin is discussed. Conditions for the quantitative extraction and back-extraction of 9 ions are reported. Results are compared with work on solvent extraction with N-phenylbenzohydroxamic acid. Procedures for attaching N-methyl and N-unsubstituted hydroxamic acid groups to Amberlite XAD-4 are described. The N-phenyl, N-methyl, and N-unsubstituted hydroxamic acid resins are compared with respect to metal-ion complexation. The scope of applications for hydroxamic acid resins is investigated by studying the extraction of 19 metal ions as a function of pH. The resins are especially suitable for the extraction of zirconium(IV), titanium(IV), and uranium(IV) from strongly acidic solution. Aluminum(III) is separated from calcium and phosphate by extraction at pH 4. The use of the resins for the purification of reagents, concentration of trace constituents, and chromatographic separation is demonstrated

  16. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Natalia Carolina Camargos; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  17. Electronic spin resonance quantitative analysis of Mn(II) complexes anti oxidative activity using phosphate or organic buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchard, J.P.; Massol, M.; Nepveu, F. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France)

    1996-01-01

    Superoxide anion is implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases including ischaemia, atherosclerosis and inflammation when molecular or enzymatic antioxidant systems cannot regulate its formation. In order to investigate superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimics, a method using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) has been developed to quantify anti-oxidative activities of Mn(II) compounds. The acetaldehyde / xanthine oxidase system produced superoxide anion and the 5,5-dimethyl-I-pyroline-N-oxide (DMPO) was used as spin trap. The complexing properties of the usual phosphate buffer towards Mn{sup 2+} being not negligible comparatively to those of the studied ligands, activities of free ligands and Mn(II) complexes have been compared according to the buffer, phosphate or organic. (Authors). 7 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.,.

  18. Biokompatibilitas Gelas Ionomer Modifikasi Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Rotua Lestari M

    2008-01-01

    Saat ini banyak berkembang material baru dalam dunia kedokteran gigi diantaranya adalah Gelas ionomer modifikasi resin yang dikembangkan untuk mengatasi kekurangan-kekurangan dari gelas ionomer konvensional. Adanya penambahan monomer resin daIam bentuk 2-hydroxyethylmetacylate (HEMA) telah meningkatkan kekuatan dari bahan ini. Gelas ionomer modifikasi resin mempunyai sifat-sifat fisis dan mekanis yang lebih baik dibandingkan dengan gelas ionomer konvensional. Gelas ionomer modifikasi ...

  19. Refinement of the crystal structural parameters of La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 using quantitative convergent-beam electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Fang; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Aihua

    2005-07-01

    Crystal structural parameters (seven positional parameters and four isotropic Debye-Waller factors) of La(2/3)Ca(1/3)MnO(3) have been refined using the quantitative convergent-beam electron diffraction (QCBED) method. Using intensity information of many higher-order Laue-zone reflections simultaneously is essential to refine structural parameters accurately. The effective global optimization algorithm was used to avoid the problems of input values and local minima. The fittings of the differential coefficients of one-dimensional experimental intensities and theoretical ones calculated by the dynamical diffraction theory were carried out with the normalized Euclidean distance criterion. Thus, all of these improve the accuracy and reliability of the analysis. The calculated results with the refined parameters agree with the experiments. The refined parameters also agree with the Rietveld refinement results of neutron diffraction.

  20. Quantitative characterization of virus-like particles by asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation, electrospray differential mobility analysis, and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Leonard F; Lipin, Daniel I; Tsai, De-Hao; Zachariah, Michael R; Lua, Linda H L; Tarlov, Michael J; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2009-02-15

    Here we characterize virus-like particles (VLPs) by three very distinct, orthogonal, and quantitative techniques: electrospray differential mobility analysis (ES-DMA), asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation with multi-angle light scattering detection (AFFFF-MALS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). VLPs are biomolecular particles assembled from viral proteins with applications ranging from synthetic vaccines to vectors for delivery of gene and drug therapies. VLPs may have polydispersed, multimodal size distributions, where the size distribution can be altered by subtle changes in the production process. These three techniques detect subtle size differences in VLPs derived from the non-enveloped murine polyomavirus (MPV) following: (i) functionalization of the surface of VLPs with an influenza viral peptide fragment; (ii) packaging of foreign protein internally within the VLPs; and (iii) packaging of genomic DNA internally within the VLPs. These results demonstrate that ES-DMA and AFFFF-MALS are able to quantitatively determine VLP size distributions with greater rapidity and statistical significance than TEM, providing useful technologies for product development and process analytics.

  1. Quantitative investigation of precipitate growth during ageing of Al-(Mg,Si) alloys by energy-filtered electron diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollgarten, M.; Chang, C. S. T.; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard

    2011-01-01

    Besides other application fields, light-weight Al-(Mg, Si) (6XXX series) alloys are of substantial importance in automotive industries where they are used for the production of car body panels. The material gains its strength by precipitation of metastable Mg-Si-based phases. Though the general...... precipitation sequence of these phases is well studied [1,2], there remains an effect which is not fully understood up to now. Strengthening upon annealing, e.g. during paint baking of car body sheets, strongly depends on the storage duration at room temperature of the semi-finished parts [3,4]. It is commonly...... LIBRA 200 operated at 200 kV using the in-column omega filter for zero-loss filtered electron diffraction. Recording was on imaging plates (made by Fuji company) which were read out in a scanner of type Ditabis Micron. Scanning resolution was about 7·10-3 nm-1/pixel. Suitable parts of the recorded...

  2. Quantitative description of short-range order and its influence on the electronic structure in Ag-Pd alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, M.; Marmodoro, A.; Ernst, A.; Hergert, W.; Dahl, J.; Lång, J.; Laukkanen, P.; Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Kokko, K.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the effect of short-range order (SRO) on the electronic structure in alloys from the theoretical point of view using density of states (DOS) data. In particular, the interaction between the atoms at different lattice sites is affected by chemical disorder, which in turn is reflected in the fine structure of the DOS and, hence, in the outcome of spectroscopic measurements. We aim at quantifying the degree of potential SRO with a proper parameter. The theoretical modeling is done with the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green’s function method. Therein, the extended multi-sublattice non-local coherent potential approximation is used to include SRO. As a model system, we use the binary solid solution Ag c Pd1-c at three representative concentrations c  =  0.25, 0.5 and 0.75. The degree of SRO is varied from local ordering to local segregation through an intermediate completely uncorrelated state. We observe some pronounced features, which change over the whole energy range of the valence bands as a function of SRO in the alloy. These spectral variations should be traceable in modern photoemission experiments.

  3. Quantitative analysis for in situ sintering of 3% yttria-stablized zirconia in the transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Hasti; Holland, Troy B; van Benthem, Klaus

    2015-05-01

    Studying particle-agglomerate systems compared to two-particle systems elucidates different stages of sintering by monitoring both pores and particles. We report on in situ sintering of 3% yttria-stablized zirconia particle agglomerates in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Real-time TEM observations indicate neck formation and growth, particle coalescence and pore closure. A MATLAB-based image processing tool was developed to calculate the projected area of the agglomerate with and without internal pores during in situ sintering. We demonstrate the first densification curves generated from sequentially acquired TEM images. The in situ sintering onset temperature was then determined to be at 960 °C. Densification curves illustrated that the agglomerate projected area which excludes the internal observed pores also shrinks during in situ sintering. To overcome the common projection problem for TEM analyses, agglomerate mass-thickness maps were obtained from low energy-loss analysis combined with STEM imaging. The decrease in the projected area was directly related to the increase in mass-thickness of the agglomerate, likely caused by hidden pores existing in the direction of the beam. Access to shrinkage curves through in situ TEM analysis provides a new avenue to investigate fundamental mechanisms of sintering through directly correlating microstructural changes during consolidation with mesoscale densification behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative analysis of nanoscale intranuclear structural alterations in hippocampal cells in chronic alcoholism via transmission electron microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Peeyush; Shukla, Pradeep K.; Ghimire, Hemendra M.; Almabadi, Huda M.; Tripathi, Vibha; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Rao, Radhakrishna; Pradhan, Prabhakar

    2017-04-01

    Chronic alcoholism is known to alter the morphology of the hippocampus, an important region of cognitive function in the brain. Therefore, to understand the effect of chronic alcoholism on hippocampal neural cells, we employed a mouse model of chronic alcoholism and quantified intranuclear nanoscale structural alterations in these cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of hippocampal neurons were obtained, and the degree of structural alteration in terms of mass density fluctuation was determined using the light-localization properties of optical media generated from TEM imaging. The results, which were obtained at length scales ranging from ~30 to 200 nm, show that 10-12 week-old mice fed a Lieber-DeCarli liquid (alcoholic) diet had a higher degree of structural alteration than control mice fed a normal diet without alcohol. The degree of structural alteration became significantly distinguishable at a sample length of ~100 nm, which is the typical length scale of the building blocks of cells, such as DNA, RNA, proteins and lipids. Interestingly, different degrees of structural alteration at such length scales suggest possible structural rearrangement of chromatin inside the nuclei in chronic alcoholism.

  5. Measurements of volatile compound contents in resins using a moisture analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Masanori; Nagano, Futami; Endo, Kazuhiko; Ohno, Hiroki

    2010-02-01

    The contents of volatile adhesive compounds, such as water, solvents, and residual unpolymerized monomers, affect the integrity and durability of adhesive bonding. However, there is no method available that can be used to rapidly assess the residual solvent or water contents of adhesive resins. This study examined the effectiveness of a digital moisture analyzer to measure the volatile compound contents of resins. Five self-etching adhesives and seven experimental light-cured resins prepared with different contents (0, 10, and 20% by weight) of water or solvents (acetone and ethanol) were examined in this study. The resins were prepared using different methods (with and without air blast or light-curing) to simulate the clinical conditions of adhesive application. Resin weight changes (% of weight loss) were determined as the residual volatile compound contents, using the moisture analyzer. After the measurements, the resin films were examined using a scanning electron microscope. The weight changes of the resins were found to depend on the amount of water or solvents evaporating from the resin. Water and solvents were evaporated by air blast or light-curing, but some of the water and solvents remained in the cured resin. The moisture analyzer is easy to operate and is a useful instrument for using to measure the residual volatile compound contents of adhesive resin.

  6. Effects of Prepolymerized Particle Size and Polymerization Kinetics on Volumetric Shrinkage of Dental Modeling Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Yub Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental modeling resins have been developed for use in areas where highly precise resin structures are needed. The manufacturers claim that these polymethyl methacrylate/methyl methacrylate (PMMA/MMA resins show little or no shrinkage after polymerization. This study examined the polymerization shrinkage of five dental modeling resins as well as one temporary PMMA/MMA resin (control. The morphology and the particle size of the prepolymerized PMMA powders were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction particle size analysis, respectively. Linear polymerization shrinkage strains of the resins were monitored for 20 minutes using a custom-made linometer, and the final values (at 20 minutes were converted into volumetric shrinkages. The final volumetric shrinkage values for the modeling resins were statistically similar (P>0.05 or significantly larger (P<0.05 than that of the control resin and were related to the polymerization kinetics (P<0.05 rather than the PMMA bead size (P=0.335. Therefore, the optimal control of the polymerization kinetics seems to be more important for producing high-precision resin structures rather than the use of dental modeling resins.

  7. Environmental SEM and dye penetration observation on resin-tooth interface using different light curing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takako; Morigami, Makoto; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was the effects of different light curing methods on marginal sealing and resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall using the dye penetration test and environmental scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. Cylindrical cavities were prepared on cervical regions. The teeth were restored with Clearfil Liner Bond 2 V adhesive and filled with Clearfil Photo Bright or Palfique Estelite resin composites. These resins were cured with a conventional light-curing method or a slow-start curing method. After thermal cycling, the specimens were subjected to the dye penetration test to evaluate marginal sealing and adaptation of the resin composites to the cavity walls. These resin-tooth interfaces were then observed using environmental SEM. The light-cured resin composite, which exhibited increased contrast ratios during polymerization, suggests high compensation for polymerization stress using the slow-start curing method. There was a high correlation between dye penetration test and environmental SEM observation.

  8. The Readability of Electronic Cigarette Health Information and Advice: A Quantitative Analysis of Web-Based Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Albert; Zhu, Shu-Hong; Conway, Mike

    2017-01-06

    The popularity and use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) has increased across all demographic groups in recent years. However, little is currently known about the readability of health information and advice aimed at the general public regarding the use of e-cigarettes. The objective of our study was to examine the readability of publicly available health information as well as advice on e-cigarettes. We compared information and advice available from US government agencies, nongovernment organizations, English speaking government agencies outside the United States, and for-profit entities. A systematic search for health information and advice on e-cigarettes was conducted using search engines. We manually verified search results and converted to plain text for analysis. We then assessed readability of the collected documents using 4 readability metrics followed by pairwise comparisons of groups with adjustment for multiple comparisons. A total of 54 documents were collected for this study. All 4 readability metrics indicate that all information and advice on e-cigarette use is written at a level higher than that recommended for the general public by National Institutes of Health (NIH) communication guidelines. However, health information and advice written by for-profit entities, many of which were promoting e-cigarettes, were significantly easier to read. A substantial proportion of potential and current e-cigarette users are likely to have difficulty in fully comprehending Web-based health information regarding e-cigarettes, potentially hindering effective health-seeking behaviors. To comply with NIH communication guidelines, government entities and nongovernment organizations would benefit from improving the readability of e-cigarettes information and advice. ©Albert Park, Shu-Hong Zhu, Mike Conway. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 06.01.2017.

  9. Formulation of eb-curable epoxy resin : some important parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlan bin Haji Mohd; Hosoi, Fumio; Sasaki, Takashi

    1989-01-01

    The works on the electron-beam curing of surface coatings using epoxy acrylic-based resins were discussed. The works covered among other things the effect of molecular weights of the resins on the physical properties of coatings and their physical and chemical characterizations. The emphasis was given to formulating the resins applicable to surface coatings. Curings were done on a low-energy electron beam accelerator operating at 250 kV. A number of parameters deemed important to formulations, such as the molecular weights of the oligomers and monomers, monomer ratios, and HEA additions were explored. It was found that one could modify the physical properties of the coatings by changing or adjusting those parameters. (author)

  10. Marginal adaptation of composite resins under two adhesive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dačić, Stefan; Veselinović, Aleksandar M; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolić, Marija; Cenić, Milica; Dačić-Simonović, Dragica

    2016-11-01

    In the present research, different adhesive techniques were used to set up fillings with composite resins. After the application of etch and rinse or self etch adhesive technique, marginal adaptation of composite fillings was estimated by the length of margins without gaps, and by the microretention of resin in enamel and dentin. The study material consisted of 40 extracted teeth. Twenty Class V cavities were treated with 35% phosphorous acid and restored after rinsing by Adper Single Bond 2 and Filtek Ultimate-ASB/FU 3M ESPE composite system. The remaining 20 cavities were restored by Adper Easy One-AEO/FU 3M ESPE composite system. Marginal adaptation of composite fillings was examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The etch and rinse adhesive technique showed a significantly higher percentage of margin length without gaps (in enamel: 92.5%, in dentin: 57.3%), compared with the self-etch technique with lower percentage of margin length without gaps, in enamel 70.4% (p resin tugs in interprismatic spaces of enamel, while the dentin microretention was composed of adhesive and hybrid layers with resin tugs in dentin canals. In the second technique, resin tugs were rarely seen and a microgap was dominant along the border of restoration margins. The SEM analysis showed a better marginal adaptation of composite resin to enamel and dentin with better microretention when the etch and rinse adhesive procedure was applied. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Reducing the V2O3(0001) surface through electron bombardment--a quantitative structure determination with I/V-LEED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiten, Felix E; Kuhlenbeck, Helmut; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-28

    The (0001) surface of vanadium sesquioxide, V2O3, is terminated by vanadyl groups under standard ultra high vacuum preparation conditions. Reduction with electrons results in a chemically highly active surface with a well-defined LEED pattern indicating a high degree of order. In this work we report the first quantitative structure determination of a reduced V2O3(0001) surface. We identify two distinct surface phases by STM, one well ordered and one less well ordered. I/V-LEED shows the ordered phase to be terminated by a single vanadium atom per surface unit cell on a quasi-hexagonal oxygen layer with three atoms per two-dimensional unit cell. Furthermore we compare the method of surface reduction via electron bombardment with the deposition of V onto a vanadyl terminated film. The latter procedure was previously proposed to result in a structure with three surface vanadium atoms in the 2D unit cell and we confirm this with simulated STM images.

  12. Properties of the Carboxylate ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, Bert; Dario, Maarten; Boren, Hans; Torstenfelt, Boerje; Puigdomenech, Ignasi; Johansson, Claes

    2002-09-01

    Weakly acidic, carboxylic resin has been selected, together with strong base anion resins, for water purification at the Forsmark 1 and 2 reactors. For the strong (but not the weak) ion exchange resin the Nuclear Power Inspectorate has given permission to dispose the spent resins in the SFR 1 (the Final Repository for Radioactive Operational Waste). This report gives a review of the carboxylic resins and comes to the conclusion that the resins are very stable and that there should not exist any risks for increased leaching of radionuclides from SFR 1 if these resins are disposed (compared to the strong resins)

  13. Microstructure aspects of radiation-cured networks: Cationically polymerized aromatic epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowandy, Christelle; Ranoux, Guillaume; Walo, Marta; Vissouvanadin, Bertrand; Teyssedre, Gilbert; Laurent, Christian; Berquand, Alexandre; Molinari, Michaël; Coqueret, Xavier

    2018-02-01

    The thermo-mechanical properties and nanostructural features of epoxy aromatic resins cationically cured by UV-visible or electron beam radiation have been studied by FT-NIR spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), dielectric spectroscopy (DS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The influence of formulation (nature and content of onium salt) and of curing parameters (doses, thermal treatment) on the thermophysical have been investigated. The presence of several relaxation domains observed by DMA and DS analysis confirms the presence of heterogeneities in the cured materials. Network formation is described by the percolation of glassy nanoclusters which are evidenced by AFM analyses. AFM probing by quantitative nanomechanical measurements confirms the gradual build-up of the local Young's modulus in good agreement with the macroscopic value.

  14. Effect of sealant agents on the color stability and surface roughness of nanohybrid composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Doğu Ömür; Şahin, Onur; Koroglu, Aysegül; Yilmaz, Burak

    2016-07-01

    The effect of sealant agents on the surface roughness and color stability of nanohybrid composite resins is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of sealant agents on the surface roughness and color stability of 4 nanohybrid composite resin materials. Forty disks (10×2 mm) were fabricated for each nanohybrid composite resin material (Z-550, Tetric EvoCeram, Clearfill Majesty, Ice) (N=160) and divided into 4 surface treatment groups: 1 conventional polishing (control) and 3 different sealant agent (Palaseal, Optiglaze, BisCover) coupling groups (n=10). The specimens were thermocycled, and surface roughness (Ra) values were obtained with a profilometer. Scanning electron microscope images were also recorded. CIELab color parameters of each specimen were measured with a spectrophotometer before and after 7 days of storage in a coffee solution. Color differences were calculated by the CIEDE 2000 (ΔE00) formula. The data were statistically analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and by the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The surface treatment technique significantly affected the Ra values of the composite resins tested (Pcomposite resin material was also significant for ΔE00 values (Pcomposite resin groups, significant decreases in Ra were observed only for the Palaseal agent coupled composite resin groups (except Ice) compared with the control groups (Pcomposite resin group, except for BisCover applied Clearfill Majesty (Pcomposite resin groups, significant differences were observed between the color change seen with BisCover and other sealants for Clearfill Majesty composite resin (Pcomposite resins except for Ice produced smoother surfaces. All surface sealant agents provided less discoloration of nanohybrid composite resins after coffee staining compared with conventional polishing except for BisCover applied Clearfill Majesty composite resin. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  15. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of

  16. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J. Brock [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  17. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of removable partial dentures, the acrylic resin removable partial denture has 3 favourable aspects: the economic aspect, its aesthetic quality and the ease with which it can be extended and adjusted. Disadvantages are an increased risk of caries developing, gingivitis, periodontal disease, denture stomatitis, alveolar bone reduction, tooth migration, triggering of the gag reflex and damage to the acrylic resin base. Present-day indications are ofa temporary or palliative nature or are motivated by economic factors. Special varieties of the acrylic resin removable partial denture are the spoon denture, the flexible denture fabricated of non-rigid acrylic resin, and the two-piece sectional denture. Furthermore, acrylic resin removable partial dentures can be supplied with clasps or reinforced by fibers or metal wires.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Bio-Oil Phenol Formaldehyde Resin Used to Fabricate Phenolic Based Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Hou, Xiaopeng; Wang, Wenliang; Chang, Jianmin

    2017-06-18

    In this study, bio-oil from the fast pyrolysis of renewable biomass was used as the raw material to synthesize bio-oil phenol formaldehyde (BPF) resin-a desirable resin for fabricating phenolic-based material. During the synthesis process, paraformaldehyde was used to achieve the requirement of high solid content and low viscosity. The properties of BPF resins were tested. Results indicated that BPF resin with the bio-oil addition of 20% had good performance on oxygen index and bending strength, indicating that adding bio-oil could modify the fire resistance and brittleness of PF resin. The thermal curing behavior and heat resistance of BPF resins were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Results showed that adding bio-oil had an impact on curing characteristics and thermal degradation process of PF resin, but the influence was insignificant when the addition was relatively low. The chemical structure and surface characteristics of BPF resins were determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The analysis demonstrated that adding bio-oil in the amount of 20% was able to improve the crosslinking degree and form more hydrocarbon chains in PF resin.

  19. Chromatography resin support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobos, James G.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

  20. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin applicator. 872.3140 Section 872.3140 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application of...

  1. Fluorinated epoxy resins with high glass transition temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Easily processed liquid resins of low dielectric constants and high glass transition temperatures are useful for the manufacture of certain composite electronic boards. That combination of properties is difficult to acquire when dielectric constants are below 2.5, glass transition temperatures are above 200 C and processability is of conventional practicality. A recently issued patent (US 4,981,941 of 1 Jan. 1991) teaches practical materials and is the culmination of 23 years of research and effort and 15 patents owned by the Navy in the field of fluorinated resins of several classes. In addition to high fluorine content, practical utility was emphasized.

  2. Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.

    1998-01-01

    Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

  3. Modeling and mechanical performance of carbon nanotube/epoxy resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Vijay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The MWCNT fillers are uniformly dispersed in the epoxy resin, which improved the mechanical properties of epoxy resin. ► Modified Halpin–Tsai model is useful to calculate the Young’s modulus of MWCNT/epoxy resin composite. ► The experimental moduli are within the variation of 27% with the theoretical values. -- Abstract: The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) addition on mechanical properties of epoxy resin was investigated to obtain the tensile strength, compressive strength and Young’s modulus from load versus displacement graphs. The result shows that the tensile strength, compressive strength and Young’s modulus of epoxy resin were increased with the addition of MWCNT fillers. The significant improvements in tensile strength, compressive strength and Young’s modulus were obtained due to the excellent dispersion of MWCNT fillers in the epoxy resin. The dispersion of MWCNT fillers in epoxy resin was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Also, Halpin–Tsai model was modified by considering the average diameter of internal/external of multi-walled nanotube and orientation factor (α) to calculate the Young’s modulus of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/epoxy resin composite. There was a good correlation between the experimentally obtained Young’s modulus and modified Halpin–Tsai model.

  4. Quantitative X-ray Elemental Imaging in Plant Materials at the Subcellular Level with a Transmission Electron Microscope: Applications and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoliang Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX is a technique for determining the distribution of elements in various materials. Here, we report a protocol for high-spatial-resolution X-ray elemental imaging and quantification in plant tissues at subcellular levels with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM. Calibration standards were established by producing agar blocks loaded with increasing KCl or NaCl concentrations. TEM-EDX images showed that the salts were evenly distributed in the agar matrix, but tended to aggregate at high concentrations. The mean intensities of K+, Cl−, and Na+ derived from elemental images were linearly correlated to the concentrations of these elements in the agar, over the entire concentration range tested (R > 0.916. We applied this method to plant root tissues. X-ray images were acquired at an actual resolution of 50 nm ´ 50 nm to 100 nm ´ 100 nm. We found that cell walls exhibited higher elemental concentrations than vacuoles. Plants exposed to salt stress showed dramatic accumulation of Na+ and Cl− in the transport tissues, and reached levels similar to those applied in the external solution (300 mM. The advantage of TEM-EDX mapping was the high-spatial-resolution achieved for imaging elemental distributions in a particular area with simultaneous quantitative analyses of multiple target elements.

  5. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  6. and phenol–formaldehyde resin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    formaldehyde resin (PFR) modified with tetraethylorthosilicate are investigated in detail. The chemical synthesis of PFR, its modification with nanometer- sized SiO2 particles created by sol–gel method and subsequent coating, enables a preparation of ...

  7. Bending characteristics of resin concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Maria Cristina Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research work the influence of composition and curing conditions in bending strength of polyester and epoxy concrete is analyzed. Various mixtures of resin and aggregates were considered in view of an optimal combination. The Taguchi methodology was applied in order to reduce the number of tests, and in order to evaluate the influence of various parameters in concrete properties. This methodology is very useful for the planning of experiments. Test results, analyzed by this methodology, shown that the most significant factors affecting bending strength properties of resin concretes are the type of resin, resin content and charge content. An optimal formulation leading to a maximum bending strength was achieved in terms of material parameters.

  8. Epoxy hydantoins as matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile strength and fracture toughness of castings of the hydantoin resins cured with methylenedianiline are significantly higher than MY 720 control castings. Water absorption of an ethyl, amyl hydantoin formulation is 2.1 percent at equilibrium and Tg's are about 160 C, approximately 15 deg below the final cure temperature. Two series of urethane and ester-extended hydantoin epoxy resins were synthesized to determine the effect of crosslink density and functional groups on properties. Castings cured with methylenedianiline or with hexahydrophthalic anhydride were made from these compounds and evaluated. The glass transition temperatures, tensile strengths and moduli, and fracture toughness values were all much lower than that of the simple hydantoin epoxy resins. Using a methylene bishydantoin epoxy with a more rigid structure gave brittle, low-energy fractures, while a more flexible, ethoxy-extended hydantoin epoxy resin gave a very low Tg.

  9. Fiber Reinforced Polyester Resins Polymerized by Microwave Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, A. M.; Calabrese, L.; Cianciafara, P.; Bonaccorsi, L.; Proverbio, E.

    2007-12-01

    Polyester resin based composite materials are widely used in the manufacture of fiberglass boats. Production time of fiberglass laminate components could be strongly reduced by using an intense energy source as well as microwaves. In this work a polyester resin was used with 2% by weight of catalyst and reinforced with chopped or woven glass fabric. Pure resin and composite samples were cured by microwaves exposition for different radiation times. A three point bending test was performed on all the cured samples by using an universal testing machine and the resulting fracture surfaces were observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results of mechanical and microscopy analyses evidenced that microwave activation lowers curing time of the composite while good mechanical properties were retained. Microwaves exposition time is crucial for mechanical performance of the composite. It was evidenced that short exposition times suffice for resin activation while long exposure times cause fast cross linking and premature matrix fracture. Furthermore high-radiation times induce bubbles growth or defects nucleation within the sample, decreasing composite performance. On the basis of such results microwave curing activation of polyester resin based composites could be proposed as a valid alternative method for faster processing of laminated materials employed for large-scale applications.

  10. Resin glycosides from Porana duclouxii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wen-Bing; Zhang, Dai-Gui; Liu, Chun-Jie; Li, Guan-Hua; Li, You-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    A new intact resin glycoside (3) and two glycosidic acids (1 and 2), all having a common trisaccharide moiety and (11S)-hydroxytetradecanoic acid or (3S,11S)-dihydroxytetradecanoic acid as the aglycone, were obtained from the roots of Porana duclouxii. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses and chemical correlations. These compounds represent the first examples of resin glycosides from the genus Porana.

  11. Karakteristik Komposit Resin Berkemampuan Mengalir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Irawan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of resin composites as posterior restoratives has markedly increased over the past decade. The patients demand for better esthetics, concerns related to possible mercury toxicity from amalgam and improvements in resin composite materials have significantly contributed the popularity of these materials. Early problems related to composites included excessive wear, less of anatomic form, post operative sensitivity, secondary caries and marginal leakage. Marginal adaptation still remains an unavoidable problem for composite restoration, especially at the gingival wall of cervical or Class II restoration. In an attempt to improve marginal sealing, many techniques and lining materials have been designed. To reduce stress generated by polymerization shrinkage, applying and curing of resin composites in layers is often recommended. Using a thick adhesive layer or low-viscosity resin may, due to its elastic properties, serve as a flexible intermediate layer and compensate for the polymerization stress created in resin composite. Flowable composites were created by retaining the same small particle size of traditional hybrid composite but reducing the filler content and allowing the increased resin to reduce the viscosity of the mixture. Flowable composites were introduced in 1996 as liners, fissure sealants and also in tunnel preparations. They have been suggested for Class I, II, III and V cavity restorations, preventive resin restorations and composite, porcelain and amalgam repairing. Their usage as a liner under high filled resins in posterior restorations has been shown to improve the adaptation of composites and effectively achieve clinically acceptable results. This article attempts to give a broad characteristics of different types of flowable composites. 

  12. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  13. Characteristics of resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Tetsurou (Nitto Denko Corp., Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan)); Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu

    1989-09-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of resin floc dispersion. The factors related to resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index in addition to the measurement of physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin. The effect of adsorption of iron oxide and polymer electrolyte and of ion exchange were determined. In addition, considered floc dispersion with adsorbing iron oxide, it was assumed that the amount and filling ratio of resin floc were related to summation and multiplication of surface electric charge respectively. An experimental expression was obtained for simulation of the change of specific settle volume of resin floc by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author).

  14. Characteristics of resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Tetsurou; Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu.

    1989-01-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of resin floc dispersion. The factors related to resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index in addition to the measurement of physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin. The effect of adsorption of iron oxide and polymer electrolyte and of ion exchange were determined. In addition, considered floc dispersion with adsorbing iron oxide, it was assumed that the amount and filling ratio of resin floc were related to summation and multiplication of surface electric charge respectively. An experimental expression was obtained for simulation of the change of specific settle volume of resin floc by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author)

  15. How is an electronic screening and brief intervention tool on alcohol use received in a student population? A qualitative and quantitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraeyman, Jessica; Van Royen, Paul; Vriesacker, Bart; De Mey, Leen; Van Hal, Guido

    2012-04-23

    A previous study among Antwerp college and university students showed that more male (10.2%-11.1%) than female (1.8%-6.2%) students are at risk for problematic alcohol use. The current literature shows promising results in terms of feasibility and effectiveness for the use of brief electronic interventions to address this health problem in college and university students. We evaluated this type of intervention and cite existing literature on the topic. To develop a website, www.eentjeteveel.be, to motivate college and university students with problematic alcohol use to reduce alcohol consumption and increase their willingness to seek help. The website contained a questionnaire (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test [AUDIT]) for students to test their alcohol use. According to their answers, the students immediately received personalized feedback (personal AUDIT score and additional information on risks associated with alcohol use) and a suggestion for further action. Afterward, students could send an email to a student counselor for questions, guidance, or advice. To obtain in-depth qualitative information on the opinions and experiences of students, we held 5 focus group discussions. The topics were publicity, experiences, impressions, and effects of the website. We analyzed the quantitative results of the online test in SPSS 15.0. More than 3500 students visited www.eentjeteveel.be; over half were men (55.0%). A total of 34 students participated in the focus group discussions. The mixture of quantitative and qualitative methods to evaluate the intervention allowed a thorough analysis and provided complementary results. The intervention was well received by the student population. However, some minor aspects should be reconsidered, such as website publicity and providing students with options that were added after intermediate evaluation. The intervention increased the motivation of students to think about their alcohol use but could not stimulate them to

  16. Somatostatin-14-like antigenic sites in fixed islet D-cells are unaltered by cysteamine: a quantitative electron microscopic immunocytochemical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Y.C.; Ravazzola, M.; Amherdt, M.; Orci, L.

    1987-01-01

    Exposure of somatostatin cells to cysteamine (CSH) produces a marked reduction in somatostatin-14-like immunoreactivity (S-14 LI) in cell extracts. In the present study we have evaluated the effects of CSH on S-14-like sites in fixed islet D-cells using immunofluorescence and quantitative electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. Monolayer cultures of rat islet cells exposed to CSH (10 mM) for 1 h and subsequently extracted in 1 M acetic acid exhibited a severe reduction in S-14 LI from 6.6 +/- 0.48 to 0.7 +/- 0.06 ng/dish. CSH-induced reduction in S-14 LI persisted when cells were fixed in Zamboni's solution for 16 h and subsequently extracted and assayed. By immunofluorescence, however, the relative numbers of somatostatin-positive cells as well as the fluorescent intensity were identical in control and CSH-treated cells. CSH did not produce any identifiable abnormality in the ultrastructural appearance of D-cells. Protein A-gold labeling of the islet cells showed a uniform distribution of gold particles in both control and CSH-treated cultures. The density of gold particles over D-cell secretory granules from CSH-exposed cultures (36.6 +/- 3.5 particles/micron2) was not different from that in control D-cell granules (42.2 +/- 5.9 particles/micron2). These data clearly indicate that despite a profound reduction by CSH of S-14 LI in tissue extracts, there is no detectable decrease in the same antigenic sites in tissue sections when assessed immunocytochemically

  17. Somatostatin-14-like antigenic sites in fixed islet D-cells are unaltered by cysteamine: a quantitative electron microscopic immunocytochemical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Y.C.; Ravazzola, M.; Amherdt, M.; Orci, L.

    1987-04-01

    Exposure of somatostatin cells to cysteamine (CSH) produces a marked reduction in somatostatin-14-like immunoreactivity (S-14 LI) in cell extracts. In the present study we have evaluated the effects of CSH on S-14-like sites in fixed islet D-cells using immunofluorescence and quantitative electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. Monolayer cultures of rat islet cells exposed to CSH (10 mM) for 1 h and subsequently extracted in 1 M acetic acid exhibited a severe reduction in S-14 LI from 6.6 +/- 0.48 to 0.7 +/- 0.06 ng/dish. CSH-induced reduction in S-14 LI persisted when cells were fixed in Zamboni's solution for 16 h and subsequently extracted and assayed. By immunofluorescence, however, the relative numbers of somatostatin-positive cells as well as the fluorescent intensity were identical in control and CSH-treated cells. CSH did not produce any identifiable abnormality in the ultrastructural appearance of D-cells. Protein A-gold labeling of the islet cells showed a uniform distribution of gold particles in both control and CSH-treated cultures. The density of gold particles over D-cell secretory granules from CSH-exposed cultures (36.6 +/- 3.5 particles/micron2) was not different from that in control D-cell granules (42.2 +/- 5.9 particles/micron2). These data clearly indicate that despite a profound reduction by CSH of S-14 LI in tissue extracts, there is no detectable decrease in the same antigenic sites in tissue sections when assessed immunocytochemically.

  18. Characterization of multiwalled carbon nanotube-polymethyl methacrylate composite resins as denture base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Russell; Tao, Junliang; Yu, Bill; Dai, Liming

    2014-04-01

    Most fractures of dentures occur during function, primarily because of the flexural fatigue of denture resins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a polymethyl methacrylate denture base material modified with multiwalled carbon nanotubes in terms of fatigue resistance, flexural strength, and resilience. Denture resin specimens were fabricated: control, 0.5 wt%, 1 wt%, and 2 wt% of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were dispersed by sonication. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine quantitative dispersions of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in polymethyl methacrylate. Raman spectroscopic analyses were used to evaluate interfacial reactions between the multiwalled carbon nanotubes and the polymethyl methacrylate matrix. Groups with and without multiwalled carbon nanotubes were subjected to a 3-point-bending test for flexural strength. Resilience was derived from a stress and/or strain curve. Fatigue resistance was conducted by a 4-point bending test. Fractured surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. One-way ANOVA and the Duncan tests were used to identify any statistical differences (α=.05). Thermogravimetric analysis verified the accurate amounts of multiwalled carbon nanotubes dispersed in the polymethyl methacrylate resin. Raman spectroscopy showed an interfacial reaction between the multiwalled carbon nanotubes and the polymethyl methacrylate matrix. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences in static and dynamic loadings among the groups. The worst mechanical properties were in the 2 wt% multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Ppolymethyl methacrylate groups showed poor fatigue resistance. The scanning electron microscopy results indicated more agglomerations in the 2% multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes-polymethyl methacrylate groups (0.5% and 1%) performed better than the control group during the static flexural test. The results indicated that 2 wt% multiwalled carbon nanotubes

  19. Subsurface degradation of resin-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Rafat; Tyas, Martin J; Burrow, Michael F

    2007-08-01

    To determine the depth of a degraded subsurface layer produced in dental composites as a result of exposure to lactic acid or NaOH, by observing the penetration of AgNO(3) solution. Specimens were prepared from four resin composites; Point 4 (Kerr), Premise (Kerr), Filtek Supreme (3M/ESPE), Ceram X (Dentsply), and two polyacid-modified resin composites; Dyract (Dentsply) and F2000 (3M/ESPE). The specimens were immersed in distilled water for 1 week, transferred to one of three aqueous media at 60 degrees C for 2 weeks; distilled water, 0.01mol/L lactic acid or 0.1N NaOH, washed and immersed in 50% (w/w) aqueous silver nitrate for 10 days at 60 degrees C and placed in a photodeveloper solution. After reduction of the silver, specimens were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned and polished, coated with carbon, and examined by backscattered mode scanning electron microscopy. The depth of silver penetration into the degraded area was measured from the SEM micrographs. Energy dispersive analysis X-ray (EDAX) was used to confirm the presence of silver. NaOH produced the greatest depth of degradation and lactic acid the least. Premise showed the greatest depth of silver penetration when subjected to NaOH, and Filtek Supreme the second with peeling of the surface and cracking, whereas F2000 and Point 4 showed the least in NaOH and lactic acid. ANOVA and Tukey's test showed that the depth of silver penetration was material and solution dependent, and the differences were significant for most of the materials (P<0.05).

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Bio-Oil Phenol Formaldehyde Resin Used to Fabricate Phenolic Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Cui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, bio-oil from the fast pyrolysis of renewable biomass was used as the raw material to synthesize bio-oil phenol formaldehyde (BPF resin—a desirable resin for fabricating phenolic-based material. During the synthesis process, paraformaldehyde was used to achieve the requirement of high solid content and low viscosity. The properties of BPF resins were tested. Results indicated that BPF resin with the bio-oil addition of 20% had good performance on oxygen index and bending strength, indicating that adding bio-oil could modify the fire resistance and brittleness of PF resin. The thermal curing behavior and heat resistance of BPF resins were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. Results showed that adding bio-oil had an impact on curing characteristics and thermal degradation process of PF resin, but the influence was insignificant when the addition was relatively low. The chemical structure and surface characteristics of BPF resins were determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The analysis demonstrated that adding bio-oil in the amount of 20% was able to improve the crosslinking degree and form more hydrocarbon chains in PF resin.

  1. Effect of adhesive resin cements on bond strength of ceramic core materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, M; Aladag, L I

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements on the shear bond strength of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin. Extracted, caries-free, human central maxillary incisor teeth were selected, and the vestibule surfaces were cut flat to obtain dentin surfaces. Ceramic core materials (IPS e.max Press and Prettau Zirconia) were luted to the dentin surfaces using three self-etch adhesive systems (Duo-Link, Panavia F 2.0, and RelyX Ultimate Clicker) and two self-adhesive resin systems (RelyX U200 Automix and Maxcem Elite). A shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope, and bonding interfaces between the adhesive resin cements and the teeth were evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The type of adhesive resin cement significantly affected the shear bond strengths of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin (P materials when the specimens were luted with self-adhesive resin cements (P resin cements exhibited better shear bond strength than the self-adhesive resin cements, except for Panavia cement in the IPS e.max Press group. However, shear bond strengths of the self-adhesive resin cements were dependent on the nature of the ceramic core materials.

  2. Handling sticky Resin by Stingless Bees: Adhesive Properties of Surface Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARKUS GASTAUER

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Many Stingless Bees (Hymenoptera: Meliponini like Tetragonisca angustula collect resin to defend their nests against intruders like ants or Robber Bees. Small portions of resin are attached to intruders bodies and extremities causing their immobilization. It has been observed that resin is removed easily from the bee's mandible but adheres strongly to the intruder's cuticle. We tested the hypothesis that resin sticks lesser to the mandibles of Stingless Bees than to the surface of intruders due to special surface structures or adhesive properties of these structures. The surface structures of the mandible of T. angustula and the trochanter of Camponotus sericeiventris were studied by scanning electron microscopy. To measure adhesion properties, selected surfaces were fixed on a fine glass pin and withdrawn from a glass tip covered with resin. The deformation of the glass pin indicates adhesion forces operating between the resin and the selective surface. The absolute value of the forces is computed from the glass pin's stiffness. It has been shown that resin sticks more to the smooth mandible of the bee than to the structured trochanter of the ant. A new hypothesis to be tested says that the bees might lubricate their mandibles with nectar or honey to reduce the resin's adhesion temporarily.

  3. Nanoparticles Decorated on Resin Particles and Their Flame Retardancy Behavior for Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour F. Attia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New nanocomposites have been developed by doping of amberlite IR120 resin with spherical TiO2 nanoparticles in the presence of maleate diphosphate. Polystyrene composites of resin, maleate diphosphate, and resin-maleate diphosphate were prepared individually. This is in addition to preparation of polymer nanocomposites of polystyrene-resin doped TiO2 nanoparticles-maleate diphosphate. The flame retardancy and thermal stability properties of these developed polymer composites were evaluated. The inclusion of resin and resin doped nanoparticles improved the fire retardant behavior of polystyrene composites and enhanced their thermal stability. Synergistic behavior between flame retardant, resin, and nanoparticles was detected. The rate of burning of the polymer nanocomposites was recorded as 10.7 mm/min achieving 77% reduction compared to pure polystyrene (46.5 mm/min. The peak heat release rate (PHRR of the new polymer composites has reduced achieving 46% reduction compared to blank polymer. The morphology and dispersion of nanoparticles on resin and in polymer nanocomposites were characterized using transmission and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The flame retardancy and thermal properties were evaluated using UL94 flame chamber, cone tests, and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively.

  4. The characteristics of epoxy resin cured by γ-ray and E-beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nho, Y.C.; Kang, Phil Hyun; Park, Jong Seok

    2004-01-01

    Epoxy resins are widely used as high-performance thermosetting resins for many industrial applications. In this study, the effect of an electron beam (E-beam) and γ-ray irradiation on the curing of epoxy resins was investigated. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A(DGEBA), diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-F(DGEBF) as epoxy resins, triarylsulfonium hexafluoroantimonate(TASHFA), and triarylsulfonium hexafluorophosphate(TASHFP) as initiators were used in this study. The chemical and mechanical characteristics of irradiated epoxy resins were compared after curing of E-beam and γ-ray irradiation up to 50 kGy in N 2 and air atmosphere. We ascertained the effect of oxygen on the radiation curing of epoxy resin. The thermal properties of cured epoxy were investigated using DMA and TGA. Mechanical properties such as flexural strength were measured. The chemical structures of cured epoxy were characterized by FT-NIR. The gel fraction and the stress at yield of epoxy resins irradiated by E-beam and γ-ray in N 2 atmosphere were also compared with those of epoxy resins irradiated by E-beam and γ-ray in air

  5. Dimensional stability and dehydration of a thermoplastic polycarbonate-based and two PMMA-based denture resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronych, G J; Sutow, E J; Sykora, O

    2003-12-01

    This study compared the dimensional stability and dehydration of a thermoplastic polycarbonate denture base resin with two conventional polymethyl methacrylate denture base resins. Maxillary complete dentures were fabricated from the three denture materials and the accuracy of fit along the posterior palatal border of the cast used in processing was measured. Measurements were conducted at five palatal locations immediately after processing and at 7 and 30 days during immersion in water (23 degrees C) and at 7 and 30 days during dehydration (23 degrees C, 65-75% relative humidity). Percentage mass loss during dehydration was determined with an electronic balance. The thermoplastic material was separately compared with each of the conventional resins using a modified Welch two-sample t-test, with a Bonferroni correction for P values. For mean palatal dimensional change, the thermoplastic resin was generally not statistically different from the conventional resins after processing and during immersion (P > or = 0.06), but was generally less than the conventional resins during dehydration (P thermoplastic resin consistently showed much smaller, statistically significant values compared with the conventional resins (P thermoplastic resin should show dimensional changes in service comparable with the conventional resins, but less dimensional change caused by dehydration.

  6. Adsorption of heavy metal ions and azo dyes by crosslinked nanochelating resins based on poly(methylmethacrylate-co-maleic anhydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghaemy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chelating resins are suitable materials for the removal of heavy metals in water treatments. A copolymer, Poly(MMA-co-MA, was synthesized by radical polymerization of maleic anhydride (MA and methyl methacrylate (MMA, characterized and transformed into multifunctional nanochelating resin beads (80–150 nm via hydrolysis, grafting and crosslink reactions. The resin beads were characterized by swelling studies, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The main purpose of this work was to determine the adsorption capacity of the prepared resins (swelling ratio ~55% towards metal ions such as Hg2+, Cd2+, Cu2+ from water at three different pH values (3, 6 and 9. Variations in pH and types of metal ions have not significantly affected the chelation capacity of these resins. The maximum chelation capacity of one of the prepared resin beads (Co-g-AP3 for Hg2+ was 63, 85.8 and 71.14 mg/g at pH 3, 6 and 9, respectively. Approximately 96% of the metal ions could be desorbed from the resin. Adsorption capacity of these resins towards three commercial synthetic azo dyes was also investigated. The maximum adsorption of dye AY42 was 91% for the resin Co-g-AP3 at room temperature. This insures the applicability of the synthesized resins for industrial applications.

  7. Resin technologies: construction and staining of resin TMA's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howat, William J; Wilson, Susan J

    2010-01-01

    The traditional formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, and therefore the tissue microarrays created from it, provide good morphology but with a compromised antigenicity when compared to frozen tissue. In contrast, while solving the issue of antigenicity, frozen tissue suffers from a lack of morphology. We have demonstrated that tissue microarrays constructed in glycol methacrylate resin, when combined with a cold acetone fixation step, have been able to combine the superior morphology of resin-embedded sections with the superior antigenicity of frozen tissue for prospectively collected material.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of resin acid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savluchinske-Feio, Sonia; Curto, Maria João Marcelo; Gigante, Bárbara; Roseiro, J Carlos

    2006-09-01

    The wide potential of resin acids as bioactive agents gave rise to a growing effort in the search for new applications of the natural forms and their derivatives. In some of these compounds, the antimicrobial activity is associated to the presence in the molecules of functional groups such as the hydroxyl, aldehyde, and ketone or to their cis or trans configurations. The resin acid family covers a spectrum of antimicrobial activities against several microorganisms, from bacteria to fungi, in which the mode of action was studied by electron microscopy. The morphological alterations are consistent with an unspecific mode of action causing inhibition of the fungal growth or damaging the fungal cells in parallel with a mechanism of resistance based on the retention of the compound by the lipid accumulation. The sterol composition of phytopathogenic fungi Botrytis cinerea and Lophodermium seditiosum treated with methyl cis-7-oxo-deisopropyldehydroabietate revealed the presence of ergosterol (M+ 396) and dihydroergosterol (M+ 398) in both cultures showing that this compound did not interfere with the ergosterol metabolic pathway of both fungi.

  9. Preparation and Property Study of Graphene Oxide Reinforced Epoxy Resin Insulation Nanocomposites with High Heat Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xinran; Liu, Yongchang; Wu, Zhixiong; Liu, Huiming; Zhang, Zhong; Huang, Rongjin; Huang, Chuanjun; Liu, Zheng; Li, Laifeng

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, graphene oxide reinforced epoxy resin nanocomposites were successfully prepared. Compared with unmodified epoxy resin, the heat conductivity of the graphene oxide reinforced epoxy resin nanocomposites had been improved while keeping the insulation performance. The tensile strength was investigated at both room temperature (300 K) and liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). And the fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the materials had excellent mechanical properties, which could be advantages for the applications as insulating layer in low temperature superconducting magnets.

  10. The Electrical Properties for Phenolic Isocyanate-Modified Bisphenol-Based Epoxy Resins Comprising Benzoate Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Yong; Chae, Il Seok; Park, Dongkyung; Suh, Hongsuk; Kang, Sang Wook

    2016-03-01

    Epoxy resin has been required to have a low dielectric constant (D(k)), low dissipation factor (Df), low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), low water absorption, high mechanical, and high adhesion properties for various applications. A series of novel phenolic isocyanate-modified bisphenol-based epoxy resins comprising benzoate group were prepared for practical electronic packaging applications. The developed epoxy resins showed highly reduced dielectric constants (D(k)-3.00 at 1 GHz) and low dissipation values (Df-0.014 at 1 GHz) as well as enhanced thermal properties.

  11. Thermoset Blends of an Epoxy Resin and Polydicyclopentadiene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohde, Brian J.; Le, Kim Mai; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Robertson, Megan L.

    2016-12-13

    The mechanical properties of two chemically distinct and complementary thermoset polymers were manipulated through development of thermoset blends. The thermoset blend system was composed of an anhydride-cured diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA)-based epoxy resin, contributing high tensile strength and modulus, and polydicyclopentadiene (PDCPD), which has a higher toughness and impact strength as compared to other thermoset polymers. Ultra-small-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis explored the morphology of concurrently cured thermoset blends, revealing a macroscopically phase separated system with a surface fractal structure across blended systems of varying composition. The epoxy resin rich and PDCPD rich phases exhibited distinct glass transitions (Tg’s): the Tg observed at higher temperature was associated with the epoxy resin rich phase and was largely unaffected by the presence of PDCPD, whereas the PDCPD rich phase Tg systematically decreased with increasing epoxy resin content due to inhibition of dicyclopentadiene ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The mechanical properties of these phase-separated blends were in reasonable agreement with predictions by the rule of mixtures for the blend tensile strength, modulus, and fracture toughness. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the tensile and fracture specimen fracture surfaces showed an increase in energy dissipation mechanisms, such as crazing, shear banding, and surface roughness, as the fraction of the more ductile component, PDPCD, increased. These results present a facile method to tune the mechanical properties of a toughened thermoset network, in which the high modulus and tensile strength of the epoxy resin can be largely retained at high epoxy resin content in the blend, while increasing the fracture toughness.

  12. Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shembish, Fatma A; Tong, Hui; Kaizer, Marina; Janal, Malvin N; Thompson, Van P; Opdam, Niek J; Zhang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava Ultimate, n=24) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress CAD, n=24) were fabricated using CAD/CAM systems. Crowns were cemented on aged dentin-like resin composite tooth replicas (Filtek Z100) with resin-based cements (RelyX Ultimate for Lava Ultimate or Multilink Automix for IPS Empress). Three step-stress profiles (aggressive, moderate and mild) were employed for the accelerated sliding-contact mouth-motion fatigue test. Twenty one crowns from each group were randomly distributed among these three profiles (1:2:4). Failure was designated as chip-off or bulk fracture. Optical and electron microscopes were used to examine the occlusal surface and subsurface damages, as well as the material microstructures. The resin composite crowns showed only minor occlusal damage during mouth-motion step-stress fatigue loading up to 1700N. Cross-sectional views revealed contact-induced cone cracks in all specimens, and flexural radial cracks in 2 crowns. Both cone and radial cracks were relatively small compared to the crown thickness. Extending these cracks to the threshold for catastrophic failure would require much higher indentation loads or more loading cycles. In contrast, all of the glass-ceramic crowns fractured, starting at loads of approximately 450N. Monolithic CAD/CAM resin composite crowns endure, with only superficial damage, fatigue loads 3-4 times higher than those causing catastrophic failure in glass-ceramic CAD crowns. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fatigue Resistance of CAD/CAM Resin Composite Molar Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shembish, Fatma A.; Tong, Hui; Kaizer, Marina; Janal, Malvin N.; Thompson, Van P.; Opdam, Niek J.; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. Methods Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava Ultimate, n = 24) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress CAD, n = 24) were fabricated using CAD/CAM systems. Crowns were cemented on aged dentin-like resin composite tooth replicas (Filtek Z100) with resin-based cements (RelyX Ultimate for Lava Ultimate or Multilink Automix for IPS Empress). Three step-stress profiles (aggressive, moderate and mild) were employed for the accelerated sliding-contact mouth-motion fatigue test. Twenty one crowns from each group were randomly distributed among these three profiles (1:2:4). Failure was designated as chip-off or bulk fracture. Optical and electronic microscopes were used to examine the occlusal surface and subsurface damages, as well as the material microstructures. Results The resin composite crowns showed only minor occlusal damage during mouth-motion step-stress fatigue loading up to 1700 N. Cross-sectional views revealed contact-induced cone cracks in all specimens, and flexural radial cracks in 2 crowns. Both cone and radial cracks were relatively small compared to the crown thickness. Extending these cracks to the threshold for catastrophic failure would require much higher indentation loads or more loading cycles. In contrast, all of the glass-ceramic crowns fractured, starting at loads of approximately 450 N. Significance Monolithic CAD/CAM resin composite crowns endure, with only superficial damage, fatigue loads 3 – 4 times higher than those causing catastrophic failure in glass-ceramic CAD crowns. PMID:26777092

  14. Process for Molding Nonreinforced (Neat) Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Void free moldings obtained for neat, condensation, thermosetting resins. Thermally and mechanically treat resin prior to molding to reduce amount of volatiles. With volatiles reduced molding temperature and pressure are applied in way to drive out remaining volatiles during molding.

  15. 21 CFR 172.280 - Terpene resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Coatings, Films and Related Substances § 172.280 Terpene resin. The food additive terpene resin may be safely used...

  16. Action of ionizing radiation on epoxy resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Voorde, M. E.

    1970-12-01

    The resistance of classical and experimental epoxy resins to irradiation was studied. The resistance to irradiation of epoxy resins of diverse compositions as well as the development of resins having a radioresistance that approaches that of certain ceramics are discussed. Sources of irradiation and the techniques of dosimetry used are described. The structures of certain epoxy resins and of hardeners are given. The preparation of these resins and their physical properties is described. The effects of radiation on epoxy resins, as well as conditions of irradiation, and suggested mechanisms for degradation of the irradiated resins are discussed. The relationship between chemical structure of the resins and their physical properties is evaluated. (115 references) (JCB)

  17. Properties of discontinuous S2-glass fiber-particulate-reinforced resin composites with two different fiber length distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiting; Garoushi, Sufyan; Lin, Zhengmei; He, Jingwei; Qin, Wei; Liu, Fang; Vallittu, Pekka Kalevi; Lassila, Lippo Veli Juhana

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the reinforcing efficiency and light curing properties of discontinuous S2-glass fiber-particulate reinforced resin composite and to examine length distribution of discontinuous S2-glass fibers after a mixing process into resin composite. Experimental S2-glass fiber-particulate reinforced resin composites were prepared by mixing 10wt% of discontinuous S2-glass fibers, which had been manually cut into two different lengths (1.5 and 3.0mm), with various weight ratios of dimethacrylate based resin matrix and silaned BaAlSiO 2 filler particulates. The resin composite made with 25wt% of UDMA/SR833s resin system and 75wt% of silaned BaAlSiO 2 filler particulates was used as control composite which had similar composition as the commonly used resin composites. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM) and work of fracture (WOF) were measured. Fractured specimens were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Double bond conversion (DC) and fiber length distribution were also studied. Reinforcement of resin composites with discontinuous S2-glass fibers can significantly increase the FS, FM and WOF of resin composites over the control. The fibers from the mixed resin composites showed great variation in final fiber length. The mean aspect ratio of experimental composites containing 62.5wt% of particulate fillers and 10wt% of 1.5 or 3.0mm cutting S2-glass fibers was 70 and 132, respectively. No difference was found in DC between resin composites containing S2-glass fibers with two different cutting lengths. Discontinuous S2-glass fibers can effectively reinforce the particulate-filled resin composite and thus may be potential to manufacture resin composites for high-stress bearing application. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Flexural properties of experimental nanofiber reinforced composite are affected by resin composition and nanofiber/resin ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidotti, Hugo A; Manso, Adriana P; Leung, Victor; do Valle, Accácio L; Ko, Frank; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the influence of different resin blends concentrations and nanofibers mass ratio on flexural properties of experimental Poliacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers reinforced composites. Poliacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers mats were produced by electrospinning and characterized by tensile testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental resin-fiber composite beams were manufactured by infiltrating PAN nanofiber mats with varied concentrations of BisGMA-TEGDMA resin blends (BisGMA/TEGDMA: 30/70, 50/50 and 70/30weight%). The mass ratio of fiber to resin varied from 0% to 8%. Beams were cured and stored in water at 37°C. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM) and work of fracture (WF) were evaluated by three-point bending test after 24h storage. The tensile properties of the PAN nanofibers indicated an anisotropic behavior being always higher when tested in a direction perpendicular to the rotation of the collector drum. Except for WF, the other flexural properties (FS and FM) were always higher as the ratio of BisGMA to TEGDMA increased in the neat resin beams. The addition of different ratios of PAN fibers did not affect FS and FM of the composite beams as compared to neat resin beams (p>0.05). However, the addition of fibers significantly increased the WF of the composite beams, and this was more evident for the blends with higher TEGDMA ratios (presin blends did not negatively affect the properties of the composite and resulted in an increase in toughness that is a desirable property for a candidate material for prosthodontics application. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Method for loading resin beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.; Rainey, R.H.; Greene, C.W.; Shockley, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved method of preparing nuclear reactor fuel by carbonizing a uranium loaded cation exchange resin provided by contacting a H+ loaded resin with a uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate, comprises providing the nitrate deficient solution by a method comprising the steps of reacting in a reaction zone maintained between about 145 to 200 0 C, a first aqueous component comprising a uranyl nitrate solution having a boiling point of at least 145 0 C with a second aqueous component to provide a gaseous phase containing HNO 3 and a reaction product comprising an aqueous uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate

  20. Uranium sorption by tannin resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares Rieumont, S.; Martinez Luzardo, J.; Torres Hernandez, J.; Lima Cazorla, D. de la Rosa.

    1998-01-01

    The sorption of uranium by immobilised Eucalyptus Saligna Sm. and Lysiloma latisiliqua L tannins was investigated. Immobilization condition were analyzed. These resins resulted suitable adsorbent for the concentration of uranium from aqueous systems. The sorption of uranium is pH dependent. At pH 5.5 maximum in sorption capacity is registered. The presence of appreciable amount of sodium chloride do not have any effect on uranium removal. Carbonate and calcium ions in concentrations similar to these that could be found in sea water and other natural water do not decrease the uranium uptake. Tannin resins can be used several times without an appreciable decay of their sorption capacity

  1. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2008-11-18

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  2. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2007-08-07

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  3. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  4. Solvent impregnated resin for isolation of U(VI) from industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karve, M.; Rajgor, R.V.

    2008-01-01

    A solid-phase extraction method based upon impregnation of Cyanex 302 (bis(2,4,4- trimethylpentyl)mono-thio-phosphinic acid) on Amberlite XAD-2 resin is proposed for isolation of U(VI) from uranmicrolite ore tailing samples and industrial effluent samples. U(VI) was sorbed from nitric acid media on the solvent-impregnated resin (SIR) and was recovered completely with 1.0 M HCl. Based upon sorption behavior of U(VI) with Cyanex 302, it was quantitatively sorbed on the SIR in a dynamic method, while the other metal ions were not sorbed by the modified resin. The preparation of impregnated resin is simple, based upon physical interaction of the extractant and solid support, has good sorption capacity for U(VI), and is also reliable for detection of traces of U(VI). (authors)

  5. Grinding efficiency of abutment tooth with both dentin and core composite resin on axial plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miho, Otoaki; Sato, Toru; Matsukubo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate grinding efficiency in abutment teeth comprising both dentin and core composite resin in the axial plane. Grinding was performed over 5 runs at two loads (0.5 or 0.25 N) and two feed rates (1 or 2 mm/sec). The grinding surface was observed with a 3-D laser microscope. Tomographic images of the grinding surfaces captured perpendicular to the feed direction were also analyzed. Using a non-ground surface as a reference, areas comprising only dentin, both dentin and core composite resin, or only core composite resin were analyzed to determine the angle of the grinding surface. Composite resins were subjected to the Vickers hardness test and scanning electron microscopy. Data were statistically analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance and multiple comparison tests. Multiple regression analysis was performed for load, feed rate, and Vickers hardness of the build-up material depending on number of runs. When grinding was performed at a constant load and feed rate, a greater grinding angle was observed in areas comprising both dentin and composite resin or only composite resin than in areas consisting of dentin alone. A correlation was found between machinability and load or feed rate in areas comprising both dentin and composite resin or composite resin alone, with a particularly high correlation being observed between machinability and load. These results suggest that great caution should be exercised in a clinical setting when the boundary between the dentin and composite resin is to be ground, as the angle of the grinding surface changes when the rotating diamond point begins grinding the composite resin.

  6. Biocompatibility of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin used as a dental luting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kaori; Saita, Makiko; Ikeda, Takayuki; Hirota, Makoto; Park, Wonhee; Lee, Masaichi Chang-Il; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2015-07-01

    The bonding and biological properties of currently used luting/cementing materials need to be improved. 4-Acryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride/methyl methacrylate-tri-n-butylborane (4-META/MMA-TBB) resin is primarily used for splinting mobile teeth or treating fractured teeth. It undergoes moisture-resistant polymerization and bonds strongly to dentin and metals. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the biological and biochemical properties META/MMA-TBB resin with those of conventional polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-MMA resin and other currently used luting materials in order to determine whether it may be a viable dental luting agent. The degree of polymerization of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, PMMA-MMA autopolymerizing resin, 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate-dimethacrylate (MDP-DMA) adhesive resin, and a glass ionomer cement was measured by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. Free radical production during setting was evaluated by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Rat dental pulp cells cultured on these materials were examined for cell viability, attachment, proliferation, and functional phenotype. The degree of polymerization of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin was 82% thirty minutes after preparation, compared to 66% for PMMA-MMA autopolymerizing resin. ESR spectroscopy revealed free radical production from 4-META/MMA-TBB resin and glass ionomer cement was equivalent 24 hours after preparation, with no spike in radical generation observed. In contrast, free radical production from PMMA-MMA and MDP-DMA adhesive resins was rapid and sustained and 10 to 20 times greater than that from 4-META/MMA-TBB. The percentage of viable dental pulp cells 24 hours after seeding was considerably higher on MDP-DMA and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin than on glass ionomer cement. Cell number, proliferation, and alkaline phosphatase activity were highest on 4-META/MMA-TBB resin and lowest on the glass ionomer cement. 4-META/MMA-TBB resin is at least as biocompatible

  7. Functionalizing a dentin bonding resin to become bioactive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauböck, Tobias T; Zehnder, Matthias; Schweizer, Thomas; Stark, Wendelin J; Attin, Thomas; Mohn, Dirk

    2014-08-01

    To investigate chemo-mechanical effects of incorporating alkaline bioactive glass nanoparticles into a light-curable dental resin matrix. An unfilled Bis-GMA/TEGDMA material was infiltrated with up to 20 wt% of ultrafine SiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5-Bi2O3 particles. The unfilled and filled resins were investigated regarding their viscosity before setting and compared to commercially available materials. Set specimens were immersed for 21 days in phosphate buffered saline at 37°C. Water uptake, pH, Knoop hardness, and degree of conversion of freshly polymerized and stored samples were investigated. Resin surfaces were viewed and mapped in a scanning electron microscope for the formation of calcium phosphate (Ca/P) precipitates. In addition, Raman spectroscopy was performed. Numeric values were statistically compared (pSiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5-Bi2O3 particles into the resin matrix. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Diterpene resin acids in conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Christopher I; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2006-11-01

    Diterpene resin acids are a significant component of conifer oleoresin, which is a viscous mixture of terpenoids present constitutively or inducibly upon herbivore or pathogen attack and comprises one form of chemical resistance to such attacks. This review focuses on the recent discoveries in the chemistry, biosynthesis, molecular biology, regulation, and biology of these compounds in conifers.

  9. Occupational exposure to epoxy resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwoert, J.; Kersting, K.

    2014-01-01

    Products based on epoxy resins as a binder have become popular in various settings, among which the construction industry and in windmill blade production, as a result of their excellent technical properties. However, due to the same properties epoxy products are a notorious cause of allergic skin

  10. Interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis of resin-dentin interface of self-adhering flowable resin composite [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M. Hamdy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The newly introduced self-adhering flowable resin-composites decrease the required time for application by incorporation of an acidic adhesive monomer, thus reducing the number of the steps, but its bonding is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis at the resin-dentin interface of a self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise-Flow versus a total-etch (Te-Econom Plus resin composite, using an etching agent (Eco-Etch gel and  bonding agent (Single Bond Universal. Methods: Sixteen freshly extracted sound human posterior teeth were used. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups: 8 specimens per type of composite. Standard-shaped class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface. One group was restored by Te-Econom Plus resin composite by total-etch technique using Eco-Etch gel, which was applied to dentine for 15 seconds, followed by rinsing, drying and bonding agent application (Single Bond Universal. The other group restored directly with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow without application of etch or bond. Curing was done for 20 seconds using a light emitting diode light curing unit. Evaluation of the resin-dentin interface was done microscopically by examination of marginal gap distance in μm using scanning electron microscope (SEM, and chemical analysis of silver particles was observed using SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry after 24 hours of specimen storage in ammoniacal silver nitrate. Results: Regarding marginal gap distance (µm and silver atomic % mean values, teeth restored with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow showed significantly higher mean values than the multi-step etch and rinse resin composite group (5.2 vs 0; 12.2 vs 8.2, respectively. Conclusions: Resin-dentin bonding using total-etch resin composite technique was more effective than self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise

  11. Interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis of resin-dentin interface of self-adhering flowable resin composite [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M. Hamdy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The newly introduced self-adhering flowable resin-composites decrease the required time for application by incorporation of an acidic adhesive monomer, thus reducing the number of steps, but its bonding is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis at the resin-dentin interface of a self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise™Flow Self-Adhering Flowable Composite, Kerr Dental, USA versus a total-etch (Te-Econom Plus resin composite, using an etching agent (Eco-Etch gel and bonding agent (Single Bond Universal. Methods: Sixteen freshly extracted sound human posterior teeth were used. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups: 8 specimens per type of composite. Standard-shaped class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface. One group was restored by Te-Econom Plus resin composite by total-etch technique using Eco-Etch gel, which was applied to dentine for 15 seconds, followed by rinsing, drying and bonding agent application (Single Bond Universal. The other group restored directly with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow without application of etch or bond. Curing was done for 20 seconds using a light emitting diode light curing unit. Evaluation of the resin-dentin interface was done microscopically by examination of marginal gap distance in μm using scanning electron microscope (SEM, and chemical analysis of silver particles was observed using SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry after 24 hours of specimen storage in ammoniacal silver nitrate. Results: Regarding marginal gap distance (µm and silver atomic % mean values, teeth restored with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow showed significantly higher mean values than the multi-step etch and rinse resin composite group (5.2 vs 0; 12.2 vs 8.2, respectively. Conclusions: Resin-dentin bonding using total-etch resin composite technique was more effective than self

  12. Feasibility and kinetics study on the direct bio-regeneration of perchlorate laden anion-exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Lippincott, Lee; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2008-11-01

    Anion exchange is one of the most promising treatment technologies for the removal of low levels of perchlorate. The spent anion-exchange resins, however, need to be disposed of or regenerated because they contain high contents of perchlorate. This study investigated the feasibility and kinetics of a direct bio-regeneration method. The method accomplished resin regeneration and biological perchlorate destruction concurrently, by directly contacting the spent resin with the perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB). The results indicated that the method was effective in regeneration of perchlorate and nitrate loaded resin and the resin could be repeatedly regenerated with the method. The regenerated resin was effective, stable, and durable in the filtration treatment of perchlorate in well water from the Saddle River area, NJ. Moreover, the method was also effective in regeneration of the spent A-530E resin, which had high perchlorate affinity and was yet very difficult for regeneration with the conventional brine desorption technique. Besides, the results further suggested that the perchlorate and nitrate desorption from the loaded resin coupling with their subsequent biological reduction could be the direct bio-regeneration mechanism. No biofilm was formed on the regenerated resin surface according to a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis.

  13. Microstructure and mechanical properties of composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis, Andréa Cândido; de Castro, Denise Tornavoi; Schiavon, Marco Antônio; da Silva, Leandro Jardel; Agnelli, José Augusto Marcondes

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of accelerated artificial aging (AAA) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the Filtek Z250, Filtek Supreme, 4 Seasons, Herculite, P60, Tetric Ceram, Charisma and Filtek Z100. composite resins. The composites were characterized by Fourier-transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermal analyses (Differential Scanning Calorimetry - DSC and Thermogravimetry - TG). The microstructure of the materials was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Surface hardness and compressive strength data of the resins were recorded and the mean values were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The results showed significant differences among the commercial brands for surface hardness (F=86.74, pcomposite resins. FTIR, DSC and TG analyses showed that resin polymerization was complete, and there were no differences between the spectra and thermal curve profiles of the materials obtained before and after AAA. TG confirmed the absence of volatile compounds and evidenced good thermal stability up to 200 °C, and similar amounts of residues were found in all resins evaluated before and after AAA. The AAA treatment did not significantly affect resin surface. Therefore, regardless of the resin brand, AAA did not influence the microstructure or the mechanical properties.

  14. Boswellia gum resin/chitosan polymer composites: Controlled delivery vehicles for aceclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Sougata; Laha, Bibek; Maiti, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of Boswellia gum resin on the properties of glutaraldehyde (GA) crosslinked chitosan polymer composites and their potential as oral delivery vehicles for a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, aceclofenac. The incorporation of resinous material caused a significant improvement in drug entrapment efficiency (∼40%) of the polymer composites. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis confirmed the formation of chitosan-gum resin composites and did not show any evidence of drug-polymer chemical interaction. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) suggested the formation of particulate polymer composites up to chitosan:gum resin mass ratio of 1:3. Only 8-17% drug was released into HCl solution (pH 1.2) in 2h. The drug release rate of polymer composites was faster in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8). The composites released ∼60-68% drug load in 7h. In same duration, the drug release rate suddenly boosted up to 92% as the concentration of gum resin in the composites was raised to 80%. The drug release mechanism deviated from non-Fickian to case-II type with increasing resin concentration in the composites. Hence, GA-treated Boswellia resin-chitosan composites could be considered as alternative vehicles for oral delivery of aceclofenac. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Simulated localized wear of resin luting cements for universal adhesive systems with different curing mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-01-29

    This study evaluated the simulated localized wear of resin luting cements for universal adhesive systems using different curing modes. Five resin luting cements for universal adhesive systems were evaluated and subsequently subjected to wear challenge in a Leinfelder-Suzuki wear simulation device. Overall, 20 specimens from each resin luting cement were photo-cured for 40 s (dual-cure group), and 20 specimens of each material were not photo-cured (chemical-cure group). Simulated localized wear was generated using a stainless steel ball-bearing antagonist in water slurry of polymethylmethacrylate beads. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations of resin luting cements and wear facets were conducted. Significant differences in simulated wear and SEM observations of wear facets were evident among the materials in the dual- and chemical-cure groups. The simulated wear and SEM observations of wear facets of G-CEM LinkForce and Panavia V5 were not influenced by the curing mode. SEM observations of resin luting cements were material dependent. In most cases, dual curing appears to ensure greater wear resistance of resin luting cements than chemical curing alone. The wear resistance of some resin luting cements appears to be material dependent and is not influenced by the curing mode.

  16. EDF specifications on nuclear grade resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascarenhas, Darren; Gressier, Frederic; Taunier, Stephane; Le-Calvar, Marc; Ranchoux, Gilles; Marteau, Herve; Labed, Veronique

    2012-09-01

    Ion exchange resins are widely used across EDF, especially within the nuclear division for the purification of water. Important applications include primary circuit, secondary circuit and effluent treatment, which require high quality nuclear grade resins to retain the dissolved species, some of which may be radioactive. There is a need for more and more efficient purification in order to decrease worker dose during maintenance but also to decrease volumes of radioactive resin waste. Resin performance is subject to several forms of degradation, including physical, chemical, thermal and radioactive, therefore appropriate resin properties have to be selected to reduce such effects. Work has been done with research institutes, manufacturers and on EDF sites to select these properties, create specifications and to continuously improve on these specifications. An interesting example of research regarding resin performance is the resin degradation under irradiation. Resins used in the CVCS circuit of EDF nuclear power plants are subject to irradiation over their lifetime. A study was carried out on the effects of total integrated doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 MGy on typically used EDF mixed bed resins in a 'mini-CVCS' apparatus to simultaneously test actual primary circuit fluid. The tests confirmed that the resins still perform efficiently after a typical CVCS radiation dose. Certain resins also need additional specifications in order to maintain the integrity of the particular circuits they are used in. Recently, EDF has updated its requirements on these high purity nuclear grade resins, produced generic doctrines for all products and materials used on site which include resins of all grades, and as a result have also updated a guide on recommended resin usage for the French fleet of reactors. An overview of the evolutions will be presented. (authors)

  17. Interactions between resin monomers and commercial composite resins with human saliva derived esterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, F; Finer, Y; Santerre, J P

    2002-04-01

    Cholesterol esterase (CE) and pseudocholinesterase (PCE) have been reported to degrade commercial and model composite resins containing bisphenylglycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) or the latter in combination with urethane modified BisGMA monomer systems. In addition, human saliva has been shown to contain esterase like activities similar to CE and PCE. Hence, it was the aim of the current study to determine to what extent human saliva could degrade two common commercial composite resins (Z250 from 3M Inc. and Spectrum TPH from L.D. Caulk) which contain the above monomer systems. Saliva samples from different volunteers were collected, processed, pooled, and freeze-dried. TEGDMA and BisGMA monomers were incubated with human saliva derived esterase activity (HSDEA) and their respective hydrolysis was monitored using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both monomers were completely hydrolyzed within 25 h by HSDEA. Photopolymerized composites were incubated with buffer or human saliva (pH 7.0 and 37 C) for 2, 8 and 16 days. The incubation solutions were analyzed using HPLC and mass spectrometry. Surface morphology characterization was carried out using scanning electron microscopy. Upon biodegradation, the Z250 composite yielded higher amounts of BisGMA and TEGDMA related products relative to the TPH composite. However, there were higher amounts of ethoxylated bis-phenol A released from the TPH material. In terms of total mass of products released, human saliva demonstrated a greater ability to degrade Z250. In summary, HSDEA has been shown to contain esterase activities that can readily catalyze the biodegradation of current commercial composite resins.

  18. Study of plutonium IV elution from macromolecular anion exchange resin by 0.5 M nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadkarni, M.N.; Mayankutty, P.C.; Pillai, N.S.; Shinde, S.S.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary studies indicated that macroreticular resins possess more or less the same capacities and absorption characteristics for thorium, uranium and plutonium from nitric acid solutions as the conventional resins. Detailed studies were, then, conducted. It was found that Pu(IV) can be loaded on the macroreticular anion exchange resin, Amberlyst A-26 from 7.2 M nitric acid in much the same way as Dowex 1x4. It was also observed that the elution of Pu(IV) from Amberlyst A-26 by 0.5 M nitric acid is much more rapid and quantitative than from Dowex 1x4. (author)

  19. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  20. Properties of halloysite nanotube-epoxy resin hybrids and the interfacial reactions in the systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Mingxian; Guo Baochun; Du Mingliang; Cai Xiaojia; Jia Demin [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2007-11-14

    A naturally occurred microtubullar silicate, halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), was co-cured with epoxy/cyanate ester resin to form organic-inorganic hybrids. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the hybrids with low HNT concentration was found to be substantially lower than that of the plain cured resin. The moduli of the hybrids in the glassy state and rubbery state were significantly higher than those for the plain cured resin. The dispersion of HNTs in the resin matrix was very uniform as revealed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. The interfacial reactions between the HNTs and cyanate ester (CE) were revealed by the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The substantially increased properties of the hybrids were attributed to the covalent bonding between the nanotubes and the matrix.

  1. Properties of halloysite nanotube epoxy resin hybrids and the interfacial reactions in the systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingxian; Guo, Baochun; Du, Mingliang; Cai, Xiaojia; Jia, Demin

    2007-11-01

    A naturally occurred microtubullar silicate, halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), was co-cured with epoxy/cyanate ester resin to form organic-inorganic hybrids. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the hybrids with low HNT concentration was found to be substantially lower than that of the plain cured resin. The moduli of the hybrids in the glassy state and rubbery state were significantly higher than those for the plain cured resin. The dispersion of HNTs in the resin matrix was very uniform as revealed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. The interfacial reactions between the HNTs and cyanate ester (CE) were revealed by the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The substantially increased properties of the hybrids were attributed to the covalent bonding between the nanotubes and the matrix.

  2. Decontamination of spent ion-exchangers contaminated with cesium radionuclides using resorcinol-formaldehyde resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamarchuk, Marina; Egorin, Andrey; Tokar, Eduard; Tutov, Mikhail; Marinin, Dmitry; Avramenko, Valentin

    2017-01-05

    The origin of the emergence of radioactive contamination not removable in the process of acid-base regeneration of ion-exchange resins used in treatment of technological media and liquid radioactive waste streams has been determined. It has been shown that a majority of cesium radionuclides not removable by regeneration are bound to inorganic deposits on the surface and inside the ion-exchange resin beads. The nature of the above inorganic inclusions has been investigated by means of the methods of electron microscopy, IR spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The method of decontamination of spent ion-exchange resins and zeolites contaminated with cesium radionuclides employing selective resorcinol-formaldehyde resins has been suggested. Good prospects of such an approach in deep decontamination of spent ion exchangers have been demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of U and Pu resin bead samples with a single stage mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.H.; Walker, R.L.; Bertram, L.K.; Carter, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    Resin bead sampling enables the shipment of nanogram U and Pu quantities for analysis. Application of this sampling technique to safeguards was investigated with a single-stage mass spectrometer. Standards gave results in good agreement with NBS certified values. External precisions of +-0.5% were obtained on isotopic ratios of approx. 0.01; precisions on quantitative measurements are +-1.0%

  4. Accurate determination of 41Ca concentrations in spent resins from the nuclear industry by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bourlès, Didier; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2013-01-01

    The radiological characterisation of nuclear waste is essential for managing storage sites. Determining the concentration of Long‐Lived RadioNuclides (LLRN) is fundamental for their long-term management. This paper focuses on the measurement of low 41 Ca concentrations in ions exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). 41 Ca concentrations were successfully measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) after the acid digestion of resin samples, followed by radioactive decontamination and isobaric suppression through successive hydroxide, carbonate, nitrate and final CaF 2 precipitations. Measured 41 Ca concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 0.03 ng/g, i.e. from 0.06 to 0.09 Bq/g. The 41 Ca/ 60 Co activity ratios obtained were remarkably reproducible and in good agreement with the current ratio used for resins management. - Highlights: • In the context of radioactive waste management, this study aimed at measuring 41 Ca in spent resins using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. • A chemical treatment procedure was developed to quantitatively recover calcium in solution and selectively extract it. • Developed firstly on synthetic matrices, the chemical treatment procedure was then successfully applied to real resin samples. • Accelerator mass spectrometry allowed measuring concentrations of 41 Ca in spent resins as low as 0.02 ng/g of dry resin. • Final results are in agreement with current data used for spent resins management

  5. Synthesis, characterization and thermal analysis of urea–formaldehyde/nanoSiO2 resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roumeli, E.; Papadopoulou, E.; Pavlidou, E.; Vourlias, G.; Bikiaris, D.; Paraskevopoulos, K.M.; Chrissafis, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► UF/nanosilica resins have been produced using the minimum cost method. ► The new resins had good dispersion and enhanced properties. ► Nanosilica interacts with polymer chains as was proved by FTIR and DSC. ► Nanosilica does not affect the resin's thermal stability but enhances its mechanical properties. - Abstract: In the present work urea–formaldehyde resins (UF) containing different amounts of SiO 2 nanoparticles were synthesized and studied in depth. All the hybrids were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD), while the dispersion of nanoparticles was studied with scanning electron microscopy with associated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM/EDS). It was found that even though silanol groups of SiO 2 can interact with UF resin and form hydrogen bonds, aggregates of SiO 2 nanoparticles can still be formed in UF resin. Their size increases as SiO 2 content is increased. The curing reactions were examined with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and it was revealed that curing temperature of UF resin is slightly affected by the addition of nanoparticles. Furthermore, the activation energy of the curing reactions, for every hybrid, was calculated using the Kissinger's method, which implied the existence of interactions between the nanoparticles and the polymer chain. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that SiO 2 nanoparticles do not have an effect in the thermal stability of the resin. From the application of the prepared UF/SiO 2 resins in wood panels it was found that the mechanical properties of the panels, like the internal bond and the modulus of rapture, are enhanced with increasing nanoSiO 2 concentration.

  6. Cation immobilization in pyrolyzed simulated spent ion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luca, Vittorio, E-mail: vluca@cnea.gov.ar [Programa Nacional de Gestion de Residuos Radiactivos, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. General, Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bianchi, Hugo L. [Gerencia de Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. General, Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); ECyT, Universidad Nacional de General San Martin, Campus Miguelete, Ed. Tornavias, Martin de Irigoyen 3100, 1650 San Martin (Argentina); Conicet, Av. Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Manzini, Alberto C. [Programa Nacional de Gestion de Residuos Radiactivos, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Del Libertador 8250, CP 1429, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-05-15

    Significant quantities of spent ion exchange resins that are contaminated by an assortment of radioactive elements are produced by the nuclear industry each year. The baseline technology for the conditioning of these spent resins is encapsulation in ordinary Portland cement which has various shortcomings none the least of which is the relatively low loading of resin in the cement and the poor immobilization of highly mobile elements such as cesium. The present study was conducted with cationic resin samples (Lewatit S100) loaded with Cs{sup +}, Sr{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} in roughly equimolar proportions at levels at or below 30% of the total cation exchange capacity. Low temperature thermal treatment of the resins was conducted in inert (Ar), or reducing (CH{sub 4}) gas atmospheres, or supercritical ethanol to convert the hydrated polymeric resin beads into carbonaceous materials that contained no water. This pyrolytic treatment resulted in at least a 50% volume reduction to give mechanically robust spherical materials. Scanning electron microscope investigations of cross-sections of the beads combined with energy dispersive analysis showed that initially all elements were uniformly distributed through the resin matrix but that at higher temperatures the distribution of Cs became inhomogeneous. Although Cs was found in the entire cross-section, a significant proportion of the Cs occurred within internal rings while a proportion migrated toward the outer surfaces to form a crustal deposit. Leaching experiments conducted in water at 25 Degree-Sign C showed that the divalent contaminant elements were very difficult to leach from the beads heated in inert atmospheres in the range 200-600 Degree-Sign C. Cumulative fractional loses of the order of 0.001 were observed for these divalent elements for temperatures below 500 Degree-Sign C. Regardless of the processing temperature, the cumulative fractional loss of Cs in water at 25 Degree-Sign C reached a plateau or

  7. Cation immobilization in pyrolyzed simulated spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luca, Vittorio; Bianchi, Hugo L.; Manzini, Alberto C.

    2012-01-01

    Significant quantities of spent ion exchange resins that are contaminated by an assortment of radioactive elements are produced by the nuclear industry each year. The baseline technology for the conditioning of these spent resins is encapsulation in ordinary Portland cement which has various shortcomings none the least of which is the relatively low loading of resin in the cement and the poor immobilization of highly mobile elements such as cesium. The present study was conducted with cationic resin samples (Lewatit S100) loaded with Cs + , Sr 2+ , Co 2+ , Ni 2+ in roughly equimolar proportions at levels at or below 30% of the total cation exchange capacity. Low temperature thermal treatment of the resins was conducted in inert (Ar), or reducing (CH 4 ) gas atmospheres, or supercritical ethanol to convert the hydrated polymeric resin beads into carbonaceous materials that contained no water. This pyrolytic treatment resulted in at least a 50% volume reduction to give mechanically robust spherical materials. Scanning electron microscope investigations of cross-sections of the beads combined with energy dispersive analysis showed that initially all elements were uniformly distributed through the resin matrix but that at higher temperatures the distribution of Cs became inhomogeneous. Although Cs was found in the entire cross-section, a significant proportion of the Cs occurred within internal rings while a proportion migrated toward the outer surfaces to form a crustal deposit. Leaching experiments conducted in water at 25 °C showed that the divalent contaminant elements were very difficult to leach from the beads heated in inert atmospheres in the range 200–600 °C. Cumulative fractional loses of the order of 0.001 were observed for these divalent elements for temperatures below 500 °C. Regardless of the processing temperature, the cumulative fractional loss of Cs in water at 25 °C reached a plateau or steady-state within the first 24 h increasing only

  8. Effects of trimethylsilane plasma coating on the hydrophobicity of denture base resin and adhesion of Candida albicans on resin surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianshuang; Xu, Changqi; Hong, Liang; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Hottel, Timothy; Babu, Jegdish; Yu, Qingsong

    2017-12-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is the most common oral mucosal lesion among denture wearers. Trimethylsilane (TMS) plasma coating may inhibit the growth of Candida albicans on denture surfaces. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate whether TMS plasma coatings can effectively reduce C albicans adhesion on denture base acrylic resin surfaces. Sixty denture base acrylic resin disks with smooth and rough surfaces were prepared and were either left untreated (control group) or coated with TMS monomer (experimental group) by using plasma. Contact angles were measured immediately after TMS plasma coating. The morphology of C albicans adhesion was observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used to characterize the elemental composition of the specimen surface. An adhesion test was performed by incubating the resin disk specimens in C albicans suspensions (1×10 7 cells/mL) at 37°C for 24 hours and further measuring the optical density of the C albicans by using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay test. One-way ANOVA and 2-way ANOVA were followed by a post hoc test analysis (α=.05). The group with TMS coating exhibited a more hydrophobic surface than the control group. EDS analysis revealed successful TMS plasma coating. The difference in the mean contact angles between the uncoated group and the TMS-coated group was statistically significant (Pcoating than on the surfaces of the experimental group. In the adhesion test, the amount of C albicans adhering to the surface of denture base resin with the TMS coating was significantly less than that on the surfaces without TMS coating (Pcoating significantly reduced the adhesion of C albicans to the denture base resin and may reduce denture stomatitis. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthesis of Hydrophobic, Crosslinkable Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    Bismaleimides have also been crosslinked with radical initiators to produce brittle networks [4].If a damine is added, chain extension and radical crosslinkinq...are produced during cure.The company also produced a similar phenylene based resin, with pendant nitrile groups which could be crosslinked without the...benzenes and tetra substituted cyclopentadienones [881. g. Preparation of poly 1,4 phenylene by nickel (0> catalysed electropolymerisation 1891. Cont’d

  10. Quetol 651: Not just a low viscosity resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, E Ann

    2016-01-01

    Quetol 651, a low viscosity epoxy resin, is miscible with alcohols, acetone, and water. It is versatile and can be used as a single epoxide or mixed with other epoxides and anhydrides. The most important characteristic is that the addition of Quetol 651 to a formulation results in a lower viscosity embedding medium and allows for good detection of antigenic activity. Properly formulated and mixed resins containing Quetol 651 have excellent sectioning properties and good beam stability. The decrease in viscosity lends to lower specific gravity of the embedding medium and less interfering electron density between specimen elements resulting in better spatial resolution. New formulations and viscosity data are presented and compared to long used, embedding formulations and the extensive uses of Quetol 651 are reviewed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The Influence of Hydroxylated Carbon Nanotubes on Epoxy Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaoxia Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxylated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs/epoxy resin nanocomposites were prepared with ultrasonic dispersion and casting molding. The effect of hydroxylated MWNTs content on reactive activity of composites is discussed. Then the flexural and electrical properties were studied. Transmission electron microscope was employed to characterize the microstructure of nanocomposites. As a result, the reactive activity of nanocomposites obtained increases with the increasing content of MWNTs. When MWNTs content of the composites is 1 wt%, as compared to neat resin, the flexural strength increases from 143 Mpa to 156 MPa, the modulus increases from 3563 Mpa to 3691 MPa, and the volume and surface resistance of nanocomposites decrease by two orders of magnitude, respectively.

  12. Large area quantitative X-ray mapping of (U,Pu)O2 nuclear fuel pellets using wavelength dispersive electron probe microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremier, S.; Haas, D.; Somers, J.; Walker, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    The work presented is an example of how large area compositional mapping (≥1 mm 2 ) can be used to provide quantitative information on element distribution and specimen homogeneity. High-resolution was accomplished by producing a collage of X-ray maps acquired using classical conditions; magnification x400, spatial resolution 256x256 pixels. The individual images, each measuring roughly 250x250 μm, were converted to quantitative maps using the HIMAX reg software package and the XMAS reg matrix correction from SAMx. The quantitative gray-level large area X-ray picture was pieced together using the 'Multiple Image Alignment' function of the ANALYSIS reg image processing software. This software was also used to convert the gray-level pictures to false color images. The specimens investigated were transverse sections of MOX fuel pellets. Results are presented for the distribution of Pu by area fraction and cumulative area fraction, the size distribution of regions of high Pu concentration and average separation of these regions

  13. Ionization Energies, Electron Affinities, and Polarization Energies of Organic Molecular Crystals: Quantitative Estimations from a Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM)–Tuned Range-Separated Density Functional Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Haitao

    2016-05-16

    We propose a new methodology for the first-principles description of the electronic properties relevant for charge transport in organic molecular crystals. This methodology, which is based on the combination of a non-empirical, optimally tuned range-separated hybrid functional with the polarizable continuum model, is applied to a series of eight representative molecular semiconductor crystals. We show that it provides ionization energies, electron affinities, and transport gaps in very good agreement with experimental values as well as with the results of many-body perturbation theory within the GW approximation at a fraction of the computational costs. Hence, this approach represents an easily applicable and computationally efficient tool to estimate the gas-to-crystal-phase shifts of the frontier-orbital quasiparticle energies in organic electronic materials.

  14. A quantitative study of valence electron transfer in the skutterudite compound CoP3 by combining x-ray induced Auger and photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diplas, S; Prytz, Oe; Karlsen, O B; Watts, J F; Taftoe, J

    2007-01-01

    We use the sum of the ionization and Auger energy, the so-called Auger parameter, measured from the x-ray photoelectron spectrum, to study the valence electron distribution in the skutterudite CoP 3 . The electron transfer between Co and P was estimated using models relating changes in Auger parameter values to charge transfer. It was found that each P atom gains 0.24 e - , and considering the unit formula CoP 3 this is equivalent to a donation of 0.72 e - per Co atom. This is in agreement with a recent electron energy-loss spectroscopy study, which indicates a charge transfer of 0.77 e - /atom from Co to P

  15. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  16. Solidifying power station resins and sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, A.S.D.; Haigh, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactive ion exchange resins and sludges arise at nuclear power stations from various operations associated with effluent treatment and liquid waste management. As the result of an intensive development programme, the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) has designed a process to convert power station resins and sludges into a shielded, packaged solid monolithic form suitable for final disposal. Research and development, the generic CEGB sludge/resin conditioning plant and the CEGB Active Waste Project are described. (U.K.)

  17. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Nagem Filho, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill ...

  18. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  19. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Mondelli, José

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1) rinsing with water and drying; (G2) application of an adhesive system; (G3) rinsing and drying, abrasion wit...

  20. Determination of the effective anticandidal concentration of denture cleanser tablets on some denture base resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz Hayran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Although the effectiveness of chemical cleansing against Candida albicans biofilm has been shown, the effective concentration of denture cleanser tablets has not been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of three denture materials against Candida albicans biofilm and to determine effective concentrations of denture cleanser tablets. Material and methods The surface-roughness of Acron-hi™, QC-20™ and Deflex™ (n=45 per resin resins was standardized by using a profilometer and their contact angle or surface free energy was calculated. C. albicans biofilm was formed on all three resins and were treated with Polident 3 min™, Corega™ and Fittydent™ cleanser solutions at various concentrations and both resin-biofilm and cleanser-biofilm interest were determined by using a MTT protocol according to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing's antifungal susceptibility testing (AFST-EUCAST. Scanning electron microscopy was used to compare the efficacy of different resin materials against C. albicans biofilm. Anticandidal activity and surface free energy statistical parameters were calculated by using 3-way and 1-way ANOVA, respectively (p<0.05. Results Polident 3 min™ and Corega™ tablets significantly inhibited (p<0.05 the proliferation of C. albicans against all denture resins at 27-37 mg/mL. Scanning electron microscopy results indicated that there was no significant difference among resin specimens regarding biofilm formation on dentures. We failed to find a significant relationship between surface free energy and the anticandidal effect of resin types. However, the polarity value of the resins was statistically associated with their anticandidal activity. Conclusions The polarity of the resins, the concentrations of tablets and the chemical content of the cleanser may directly affect C. albicans biofilm formations. Polident 3 min™ and Corega™ tablets should be suggested for

  1. Improved method and apparatus for chromatographic quantitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, J.S.; Gjerde, D.T.; Schmuckler, G.

    An improved apparatus and method are described for the quantitative analysis of a solution containing a plurality of anion species by ion exchange chromatography which utilizes a single element and a single ion exchange bed which does not require periodic regeneration. The solution containing the anions is added to an anion exchange resin bed which is a low capacity macroreticular polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin containing quarternary ammonium functional groups, and is eluted therefrom with a dilute solution of a low electrical conductance organic acid salt. As each anion species is eluted from the bed, it is quantitatively sensed by conventional detection means such as a conductivity cell.

  2. Distinguishing the core from the shell in MnO(x)/MnO(y) and FeO(x)/MnO(x) core/shell nanoparticles through quantitative electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estradé, S; Yedra, Ll; López-Ortega, A; Estrader, M; Salazar-Alvarez, G; Baró, M D; Nogués, J; Peiró, F

    2012-01-01

    The structural and chemical characterization of inverted bi-magnetic MnO(x)(antiferromagnetic)/MnO(y)(ferrimagnetic) and FeO(x)(soft-ferrimagnetic)/MnO(x)(hard-ferrimagnetic) core/shell nanoparticles has been carried out by means of scanning transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis, (S)TEM-EELS. Quantitative EELS was applied to assess the local composition of the nanoparticles by evaluating the local Mn oxidation state based on the Mn L₃/L₂ peak intensity ratio and the Mn L₃ peak onset. The analysis allows to unambiguously distinguish the core from the shell and to determine the nature of the involved manganese oxides in both cases. The results evidence that the structure of the nanoparticles is, in fact, more complex than the one designed by the synthesis parameters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

  4. Microbiological study of water-softener resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, J M; Engelhard, W E; Parsons, J E

    1969-09-01

    Microbial identification using effluents backflushed from exhausted urban and rural tank resins and cleaned resins containing the sulfonated copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene (SDB) were completed, along with microbial assessment of the concentrated stock salt brine. Forty-four different bacterial and fungal genera were identified. Extensive biochemical and animal virulence tests completed on one of the six bacterial salt brine isolates indicated a pathogenic staphylococcal strain. The retention of Staphylococcus aureus, a Flavobacterium sp, and Escherichia coli B bacteriophage was demonstrated both by using the nonexhausted sodium-regenerated resin and by using the same resin exchanged with different mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. Effluent counts completed after bacterial seepage through the resins indicated the Pb(++) exchanged resin removed 55% of the bacteria; Na(+), Fe(++), and Al(+++) removed 31 to 36% and Ca(++) and Cu(++) removed about 10 to 15%. Seventy per cent or more of the bacteriophage was removed by Fe(++), Cu(++), and Al(+++), whereas the Ca(++) and Na(++) cations removed 25 to 31%. Over a 77-day period, nonsterile tap water was passed through bacterial seeded and uninoculated SDB (Na) resin columns. Effluent and resin elution counts demonstrated the growth and survival of 2 different bacteria per column. Increased bacterial retention, survival, and multiplication occurred concomitantly with accumulation of organic and inorganic materials and the Ca(++) and Mg(++) cations from the tap water. Furthermore, microbial elution from resin particles taken from column depths of 1, 8, and 16 cm indicated a bacterial diminution with increasing depths.

  5. Heat-cured Acrylic Resin versus Light-activated Resin: A Patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Although light-activated resins (Eclipse) have been reported to possess superior physical and mechanical properties compared with the heat-cured acrylic resins (Lucitone-199), a few studies have compared overdentures with a locator attachment constructed from heat-cured acrylic resins with those constructed ...

  6. FLIPPER, a combinatorial probe for correlated live imaging and electron microscopy, allows identification and quantitative analysis of various cells and organelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Jeroen; van Ham, Tjakko J.; Kalicharan, Ruby D.; Veenstra-Algra, Anneke; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Dijk, Freerk; Schnell, Ulrike; Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    Ultrastructural examination of cells and tissues by electron microscopy (EM) yields detailed information on subcellular structures. However, EM is typically restricted to small fields of view at high magnification; this makes quantifying events in multiple large-area sample sections extremely

  7. Comparison of Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNS ) Resin with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    synthetic) resin. Compressive and tensile strength tests conducted proved that composites developed with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) resin were comparable to those developed with polyester resin. In the results, CNSL has an ultimate ...

  8. 125I-EGF binding to cultured human fibroblasts: initial localization and fate of hormone determined by quantitative electron microscopic autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorden, Phillip; Carpentier, J.-L.; Cohen, Stanley; Orci, Lelio

    1978-01-01

    The potent mitogen epidermal growth factor (EGF) binds to specific receptors on human fibroblasts. In the present study we have used a quantitative EM autoradiographic approach to visualize the events involved in the binding process. When 125 I-EGF is incubated at 4 0 C for 120 min., labeled EGF primarily localizes to the plasma membrane of the fibroblast but when incubated at 37 0 C for 120 min., over 2/3 of the labeled material is internalized by the cell. The internalized radioactivity is primarily localized to lysosomes. These studies demonstrate a temperature-dependent internalization of EGF following initial binding to specific plasma membrane receptors [fr

  9. Resin composite for sealing and its use in a solar cell. Fushiyo jushi soseibutsu oyobi sore wo mochiita taiyo denchi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toma, H.; Mimura, T.; Takehara, N.

    1994-01-28

    This invention presents resin composites for sealing of a solar cell composed of a hardening resin and a thermoplastic resin which has a number average molecular weight larger than that of the hardening resin and is soluble in the hardening resin, and the invention affords a solar cell to endure a long-term stable operation and to give a good performance. The hardening resin includes unsaturated polyester resin, phenolic resin, alkyd resin, unsaturated acrylic resin, epoxy resin, polyurethane resin, melamine resin, diallyl phthalate resin, their oligomers and their modifications. The thermoplastic resin includes saturated polyester resin, phenolic resin, acrylic resin, styrene resin, epoxy resin, polyurethane resin, polyvinyl acetate resin, polyvinyl chloride resin, polyvinyl alcohol resin, polyacetal resin, their modifications and their copolymer resin. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. An eco-friendly synthesis, characterization, morphology and ion exchange properties of terpolymer resin derived from p-hydroxybenzaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti B. Patle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel chelating terpolymer resin has been synthesized through the terpolymerization of p-hydroxybenzaldehyde and biuret with formaldehyde (p-HBBF in 1:1:2 mol ratio using hydrochloric acid as a reaction medium by condensation technique. The synthesized terpolymer resin was characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. On basis of the spectral studies, the structure of the terpolymer resin was proposed. The physico-chemical parameters have been evaluated for the terpolymer resin. Non-aqueous conductometric titration was used to determine the average molecular weight and polydispersity of the p-HBBF terpolymer resin and the intrinsic viscosity was also determined. The semicrystalline nature of the synthesized terpolymer was established by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Terpolymer (p-HBBF synthesized is proved to be selective chelating ion exchange terpolymer resin for certain metals. Chelating ion exchange properties of this polymer was studied for Fe3+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, Ni2+ and Pb2+ ions. A batch equilibrium method was employed in the study of the selectivity of the distribution of a given metal ions between the polymer sample and a solution containing the metal ion. The morphology of the terpolymers was studied by scanning electron microscopy, showing amorphous nature of the resins therefore can be used as a selective ion-exchanger for certain metal ions.

  11. Curing kinetics of alkyd/melamine resin mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Jovičić Mirjana C.; Radičević Radmila Ž.

    2009-01-01

    Alkyd resins are the most popular and useful synthetic resins applied as the binder in protective coatings. Frequently they are not used alone but are modified with other synthetic resins in the manufacture of the coatings. An alkyd/melamine resin mixture is the usual composition for the preparation of coating called 'baking enamel' and it is cured through functional groups of resins at high temperatures. In this paper, curing kinetics of alkyd resins based on castor oil and dehydrated castor...

  12. Effect of resin system on the mechanical properties and water absorption of kenaf fibre reinforced laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassmann, S.; Paskaramoorthy, R.; Reid, R.G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the mechanical and water absorption properties of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) fibre reinforced laminates made of three different resin systems. The use of different resin systems is considered so that potentially complex and expensive fibre treatments are avoided. The resin systems used include a polyester, a vinyl ester and an epoxy. Laminates of 15%, 22.5% and 30% fibre volume fraction were manufactured by resin transfer moulding. The laminates were tested for strength and modulus under tensile and flexural loading. Additionally, tests were carried out on laminates to determine the impact energy, impact strength and water absorption. The results revealed that properties were affected in markedly different ways by the resin system and the fibre volume fraction. Polyester laminates showed good modulus and impact properties, epoxy laminates displayed good strength values and vinyl ester laminates exhibited good water absorption characteristics. Scanning electron microscope studies show that epoxy laminates fail by fibre fracture, polyester laminates by fibre pull-out and vinyl ester laminates by a combination of the two. A comparison between kenaf and glass laminates revealed that the specific tensile and flexural moduli of both laminates are comparable at the volume fraction of 15%. However, glass laminates have much better specific properties than the kenaf laminates at high fibre volume fractions for all three resins used.

  13. Effect of intermediate agents and pre-heating of repairing resin on composite-repair bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papacchini, Federica; Magni, Elisa; Radovic, Ivana; Mazzitelli, Claudia; Monticellia, Francesca; Goracci, Cecilia; Polimeni, Antonella; Ferrari, Marco

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the composite-to-composite microtensile bond strength and interfacial quality after using different combinations of intermediate agents and pre-curing temperatures of repairing resin. Forty-five composite discs (8x4 mm) of Gradia Direct Anterior (GC Corp), stored in a saline solution at 37 degrees C for one month, were sandblasted (50 microm aluminum oxide), cleaned (35% phosphoric acid) and randomly divided into three groups (n=15) according to the intermediate agent applied: (1) no treatment; (2) unfilled resin (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Adhesive, 3M ESPE); (3) flowable composite (Gradia LoFlo, GC Corp). Each disc was incrementally repaired (8x8 mm) with the same resin as the substrate. For each group, three subgroups (n=5) were created, depending on the pre-curing temperature of the repairing resin-4 degrees C, 23 degrees C or 37 degrees C. Two bonded specimens per group were prepared to evaluate the composite-to-composite interfacial quality via scanning electron microscope. Microtensile bond strength measurements were performed with the remaining three specimens and failure mode was examined by stereomicroscopy. Two-way ANOVA revealed that temperature (p resin in groups where intermediate agents were used. The highest bond strengths were recorded when flowable composite was used as an intermediate agent under each of the three temperature conditions. Interfacial quality improved by raising the resin temperature from 4 degrees C to 37 degrees C.

  14. Analysis of the microstructure and mechanical performance of composite resins after accelerated artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira Daltoé, M; Lepri, C Penazzo; Wiezel, J Guilherme G; Tornavoi, D Cremonezzi; Agnelli, J A Marcondes; Reis, A Cândido Dos

    2013-03-01

    Researches that assess the behavior of dental materials are important for scientific and industrial development especially when they are tested under conditions that simulate the oral environment, so this work analyzed the compressive strength and microstructure of three composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging (AAA). Three composites resins of 3M (P90, P60 and Z100) were analyzed and were obtained 16 specimens for each type (N.=48). Half of each type were subjected to UV-C system AAA and then were analyzed the surfaces of three aged specimens and three not aged of each type through the scanning electron microscope (SEM). After, eight specimens of each resin, aged and not aged, were subjected to compression test. After statistical analysis of compressive strength values, it was found that there was difference between groups (α resin specimens aged P60 presented lower values of compressive strength statistically significant when compared to the not subject to the AAA. For the other composite resins, there was no difference, regardless of aging, a fact confirmed by SEM. The results showed that the AAA influenced the compressive strength of the resin aged P60; confirmed by surface analysis by SEM, which showed greater structural disarrangement on surface material.

  15. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanical characterisation of agarose-based chromatography resins for biopharmaceutical manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nweke, Mauryn C; McCartney, R Graham; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2017-12-29

    Mechanical characterisation of agarose-based resins is an important factor in ensuring robust chromatographic performance in the manufacture of biopharmaceuticals. Pressure-flow profiles are most commonly used to characterise these properties. There are a number of drawbacks with this method, including the potential need for several re-packs to achieve the desired packing quality, the impact of wall effects on experimental set up and the quantities of chromatography media and buffers required. To address these issues, we have developed a dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) technique that characterises the mechanical properties of resins based on the viscoelasticity of a 1ml sample of slurry. This technique was conducted on seven resins with varying degrees of mechanical robustness and the results were compared to pressure-flow test results on the same resins. Results show a strong correlation between the two techniques. The most mechanically robust resin (Capto Q) had a critical velocity 3.3 times higher than the weakest (Sepharose CL-4B), whilst the DMA technique showed Capto Q to have a slurry deformation rate 8.3 times lower than Sepharose CL-4B. To ascertain whether polymer structure is indicative of mechanical strength, scanning electron microscopy images were also used to study the structural properties of each resin. Results indicate that DMA can be used as a small volume, complementary technique for the mechanical characterisation of chromatography media. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dielectric breakdown of γ-ray irradiated epoxy resin with alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruike, Mitsuo; Fujita, Shigetaka; Noto, Fumitoshi.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we report on dielectric breakdown characteristics of alumina-filled epoxy resin irradiated by γ-ray under a needle-plane electrode geometry. For that purpose, we studied relationship between breakdown voltage and filler parts, relationship between breakdown voltage and irradiation dose, and an influence of thickness of epoxy resin on breakdown voltage. In order to investigate these results, we made further experiments on Glass Transition Temperature change before and after γ-ray irradiation using a DSC method, and filler parts dependence of tan δ and ε. We also investigated surface oxidization of epoxy resin from a wave analysis of spectra measured using FT-IR difference spectrometer. We observed surfaces of epoxy resin before and after γ-ray irradiation using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The results are as follows: 1) In the case of 2 mm thick, dielectric breakdown voltage of epoxy resin increases suddenly from 5 parts to 40 parts, and decreases slowly from 40 parts to 300 parts, under both positive and negative impulse voltage. 2) Dielectric breakdown voltage of epoxy resin with 2 mm thick begins to decrease at 2 MGy under positive impulse voltage, but it begins to decrease at 5 MGy under negative impulse voltage. (author)

  18. Study of impregnating epoxy resins for high field NMR superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, G.; Luo, G.; Crowe, L.

    1996-01-01

    NMR magnet coils are usually quite long, thick, and tightly wound with thin superconducting wires. The successful vacuum/pressure impregnation of such kind of coils demands the use of epoxy resins with superior properties such as low viscosity, long pot life, and high cracking resistance etc. In order to find the most appropriate impregnating epoxy resin for the fabrication of high-field NMR magnet coils, the authors have studied several promising epoxy resins by viscosity, thermal shock, bonding/de-bonding measurements. The results of these measurements are presented. Model coils have been vacuum/pressure impregnated with selected epoxy resins and analyzed with scanning electronic microscope (SEM). It was found that among all of the studied epoxy resins the CTD-101K epoxy resin is most suitable for impregnation of coils. The test results of the model NbTi superconducting coil show that coils potted with CTD-101K do not quench until critical current of the superconductor is reached. This epoxy and the impregnation technique have been successfully applied to the first 400 MHz/89 mm actively shielded high resolution NMR magnet developed at Houston Advanced Research Center

  19. Quantitative strain mapping of InAs/InP quantum dots with 1 nm spatial resolution using dark field electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, David; Rouviere, Jean-Luc; Béché, Armand

    2011-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots are greatly influenced by their strain state. Dark field electron holography has been used to measure the strain in InAs quantum dots grown in InP with a spatial resolution of 1 nm. A strain value of 5.4%60.1% has been determined which is consi......The optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots are greatly influenced by their strain state. Dark field electron holography has been used to measure the strain in InAs quantum dots grown in InP with a spatial resolution of 1 nm. A strain value of 5.4%60.1% has been determined which...

  20. Input to Resin Column Structural Analysis if Autocatalytic Resin Reaction Occurs in HB-Line Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallman, D.F.

    2001-07-10

    Solutions of plutonium in nitric acid are purified and concentrated using anion resin prior to precipitation. There have been instances of resin column explosions caused by autocatalytic reactions of anion resins in nitric acid within the DOE complex

  1. Gold Loading on Ion Exchange Resins in Non-Ammoniacal Resin-Solution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Muslim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The loading of gold using strong base anion exchange resin in non-ammoniac resin-solution (NARS systems has been studied. The loading of gold onto ion exchange resins is affected by polythionate concentration, and trithionate can be used as the baseline in the system. The results also show that resin capacity on gold loading increases due to the increase in the equilibrium thiosulfate concentration in the NARS system. Gold loading performances show the need of optimization the equilibrium concentrations of thiosulfate in the NARS system. Keywords: equilibrium, gold loading, resin capacity, thiosulfate, trithionate

  2. An incommensurately modulated structure of eta '-phase of Cu.sub.3+x./sub.Si determined by quantitative electron diffraction tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Klementová, Mariana; Dřínek, Vladislav; Jarošová, Markéta; Petříček, Václav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 8 (2011), s. 3743-3751 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : copper silicide * incommensurate structure * electron diffraction tomography * ab inition structure solution * superspace Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.601, year: 2011

  3. Nanoscale investigation of the degradation mechanism of a historical chrome yellow paint by quantitative electron energy loss spectroscopy mapping of chromium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Haiyan; Tian, He; Verbeeck, Jo; Monico, Letizia; Janssens, Koen; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2013-10-18

    Getting the picture: The investigation of 100 year old chrome yellow paint by transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy has led to the identification of four types of core-shell particles. This nanoscale investigation has allowed a mechanism to be proposed for the darkening of some bright yellow colors in Van Gogh's paintings (e.g. in Falling leaves (Les Alyscamps), 1888). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Polyimide Resins Resist Extreme Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft and aerospace engines share a common threat: high temperature. The temperatures experienced during atmospheric reentry can reach over 2,000 F, and the temperatures in rocket engines can reach well over 5,000 F. To combat the high temperatures in aerospace applications, Dr. Ruth Pater of Langley Research Center developed RP-46, a polyimide resin capable of withstanding the most brutal temperatures. The composite material can push the service temperature to the limits of organic materials. Designed as an environmentally friendly alternative to other high-temperature resins, the RP-46 polyimide resin system was awarded a 1992 "R&D 100" award, named a "2001 NASA Technology of the Year," and later, due to its success as a spinoff technology, "2004 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year." The technology s commercial success also led to its winning the Langley s "Paul F. Holloway Technology Transfer Award" as well as "Richard T. Whitcom Aerospace Technology Transfer Award" both for 2004. RP-46 is relatively inexpensive and it can be readily processed for use as an adhesive, composite, resin molding, coating, foam, or film. Its composite materials can be used in temperatures ranging from minus 150 F to 2,300 F. No other organic materials are known to be capable of such wide range and extreme high-temperature applications. In addition to answering the call for environmentally conscious high-temperature materials, RP-46 provides a slew of additional advantages: It is extremely lightweight (less than half the weight of aluminum), chemical and moisture resistant, strong, and flexible. Pater also developed a similar technology, RP-50, using many of the same methods she used with RP-46, and very similar in composition to RP-46 in terms of its thermal capacity and chemical construction, but it has different applications, as this material is a coating as opposed to a buildable composite. A NASA license for use of this material outside of the Space Agency as well as

  5. The solidification of spent resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiao, S. J.; Tsai, C. M.; Shyu, Y. H.

    1991-01-01

    A quasi-steady apparatus was applied to measure the thermal conductivity of solids ranging in size for 0.3 to 200 L, and temperature distributions in the solids were recorded during the curing, and theoretical equation for conduction in a cylindrical form with uniform energy generation was established to define the thermal state of reaction. The heat of reaction calculated from the theoretical equation with experimental values for the maximum temperature and thermal conductivity agrees very well with the data reported. The relationships among heat of reaction and amount of curing agent, retardant, loading of spent resin, and water were established

  6. Identification of c-Type Heme-Containing Peptides Using Non-Activated Immobilized Metal Affinity Cchromatography Resin Enrichment and Higher-Energy Collisional Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Yang, Feng; Qian, Weijun; Brown, Roslyn N.; Wang, Yuexi; Merkley, Eric D.; Park, Jea H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2011-10-01

    c-type cytochromes play essential roles in many biological activities of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, including electron transfer, enzyme catalysis and induction of apoptosis. We report a novel enrichment strategy for identifying c-type heme-containing peptides that uses non-activated IMAC resin. The strategy demonstrated at least seven-fold enrichment for heme-containing peptides digested from a cytochrome c protein standard, and quantitative linear performance was also assessed for heme-containing peptide enrichment. Heme-containing peptides extracted from the periplasmic fraction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were further identified using higher-energy collisional dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The results demonstrated the applicability of this enrichment strategy to identify c-type heme-containing peptides from a highly complex biological sample, and at the same time, confirmed the periplasmic localization of heme-containing proteins during suboxic respiration activities of S. oneidensis MR-1.

  7. Comparison of Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNS Resin with Polyester Resin in Composite Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Ugoamadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural resins can compete effectively with the synthetic ones in composite development. In this research, cashew nuts were picked and processed for the extraction of the resin content. The resin (natural resin so obtained was mixed with cobalt amine (accelerator, methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (catalyst to develop two sets of composite specimens – specimens without fibres and specimens reinforced with glass fibres. This method of sample specimen development was repeated with polyester (synthetic resin. Compressive and tensile strength tests conducted proved that composites developed with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL resin were comparable to those developed with polyester resin. In the results, CNSL has an ultimate compressive strength of 55MPa compared to that of polyester resin with an ultimate strength of 68MPa. The result of tensile strength proved cashew nut shell liquid resin (with ultimate strength of 44MPa to be better than polyester resin with 39MPa as ultimate tensile strength. This means that natural resins could be a better substitute for the synthetic ones when the required quantities of fibers (reinforcements and fillers are used in the fibre-reinforced plastic composite developments.

  8. Artificial saliva effect on toxic substances release from acrylic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Milena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Acrylic-based resins are intensively used in dentistry practice as restorative or denture-base materials. The purpose of this study was to analyze the surface structure of denture base resins and the amount of released potentially toxic substances (PTS immediately upon polymerization and incubation in different types of artificial saliva. Methods. Storage of acrylic samples in two models of artificial saliva were performed in a water bath at the temperature of 37 ± 1°C. Analysis of the surface structure of samples was carried out using scanning electronic microscopy analysis immediately after polymerization and after the 30-day incubation. The amounts of PTS per day, week and month extracts were measured using high-pressure liquid chromatography. Results. Surface design and amount of PTS in acrylic materials were different and depended on the types and duration of polymerization. The surfaces of tested acrylates became flatter after immersing in solutions of artificial saliva. The degree of acrylic materials release was not dependent on the applied model of artificial saliva. Conclusion. In order to improve biological features of acrylic resin materials, it was recommended that dentures lined with soft or hard coldpolymerized acrylates should be kept at least 1 to 7 days in water before being given to a patient. So, as to reach high degree of biocompatibility preparation of prosthetic restorations from heat-polymerized acrylate was unnecessary. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 41017

  9. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Mondelli, José

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1) rinsing with water and drying; (G2) application of an adhesive system; (G3) rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4) rinsing and drying, etching, application of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin-resin interfaces with saliva significantly reduced shear strength, especially after prolonged storage (presin increments.

  10. resin as polymer-supported synthesis support

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    dichloro-5,6-dicyano- benzoqunone ... ports used most widely in SPOS are Merrifield resin .... (2 × 10 mL). The resin was dried at 50°C for one hour to give white beads. IR (KBr): 3108, 3312 cm–1. 1H-NMR (500 MHz, CDCl3): δ 7⋅13 (br s, PS), 7⋅01.

  11. [Delayed asthma bronchiale due to epoxy resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authried, Georg; Al-Asadi, Haifaa; Møller, Ulla; Sherson, David Lee

    2013-10-28

    Epoxy resin is a low molecular weight agent, which can cause both acute and delayed allergic reactions. However, it is known causing skin reactions with direct or airborne contact. Rarely it can cause airway reactions like asthma bronchiale. We describe a case of a windmill worker who developed delayed asthma bronchiale due to airborne contact with epoxy resin.

  12. Epoxidation of linseed oil-Alkyd resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motawie, A.M.; Ismail, E.A.; Mazroua, A.M.; Abd EI Aziem, M.S.; Ramadan, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Three types of different linseed oil-alkyd resin ( Alk (I), Alk (II), and Alk (III) ) were prepared with the calculated amounts of mono glycerides and adipic acid (1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 Eq.Wt) respectively via monoglyceride method. The obtained alkyd resins were epoxidized via reaction with the calculated quantities of peracetic acid, which was prepared by the reaction of acetic anhydride with H 2 O 2 . Epoxidation occurred with the ratio (1: 1, 1 :3, and 1:6 Eq. Wt) of alkyd to peracetic acid. The effect of reaction time on the epoxy group content was measured during the epoxidation process. The prepared alkyd resins were analyzed by IR and H 1 NMR. The metal coated film properties of epoxidized alkyd resins were compared with those of unmodified alkyd resins. It was observed that the coating films of epoxidized alkyd resins have better in drying properties, hardness, adhesion, impact and flexibility than those of un epoxidized alkyd resins. The flammability properties of the paper coated films for the prepared brominated epoxidized alkyd resins were found to be fire retardant

  13. Facile synthesis of hypercrosslinked resins via chloromethylation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A sort of non-polystyrene type hypercrosslinked resin was firstly synthesized through chloromethylation of simple aryl molecules (benzene, toluene, naphthalene, diphenyl), succedent continuous Friedel–Crafts alkylation polymerization and post-crosslinking reaction. The chemical and porous structures of these novel resins ...

  14. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 1: Effects of sandblasting and silanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Mami; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kawaguchi, Asuka; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of sandblasting and silanization on resin cement bond strengths to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Twenty four blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK) were divided into two resin cement groups (PANAVIA V5 [PV5] and PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX [PSA]), and further divided into four subgroups representing different surface treatment methods: no treatment (Ctl), silanization (Si), sandblasting (Sb), and Sb+Si. After resin application, microtensile bond strengths (μTBSs) were measured immediately, 1, 3 and 6 months after water storage. In addition, surfaces resulting from each of the treatment methods were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Three-way analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=370), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=103, PSA

  15. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 2: Effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Higashi, Mami; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning on resin cement bonding to CAD/CAM resin blocks. One of two resin cements, PANAVIA V5 (PV5) or PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX (PSA), were bonded to one of 24 CAD/CAM blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK). Each cement group was divided into four subgroups: no cleaning (Ctl), ultrasonic cleaning (Uc), acid cleaning (Ac) and Uc+Ac. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBSs) were measured immediately and 1, 3, and 6 months after water storage. Block surfaces after each treatment were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=40), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=696) and 'water aging' (p<0.001, F=71). The PV5 group exhibited higher µTBS values than the PSA group. Although cleaning after sandblasting was effective in removing residual alumina particles, it did not affect the long-term bonding durability with non-contaminated CAD/CAM resin blocks.

  16. Physical Properties of Synthetic Resin Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Meyer

    1939-01-01

    A study was made to determine the physical properties of synthetic resins having paper, canvas, and linen reinforcements, and of laminated wood impregnated with a resin varnish. The results show that commercial resins have moduli of elasticity that are too low for structural considerations. Nevertheless, there do exist plastics that have favorable mechanical properties and, with further development, it should be possible to produce resin products that compare favorably with the light-metal alloys. The results obtained from tests on Compound 1840, resin-impregnated wood, show that this material can stand on its own merit by virtue of a compressive strength four times that of the natural wood. This increase in compressive strength was accomplished with an increase of density to a value slightly below three times the normal value and corrected one of the most serious defects of the natural product.

  17. Electrodialytic decontamination of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nott, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    Development of a novel electrodialytic decontamination process for the selective removal of radioactive Cs from spent ion exchange resins containing large amounts of Li is described. The process involves passage of a dc electric current through a bed of the spent ion exchange resin in a specially designed electrodialytic cell. The radiocesium so removed from a volume of the spent resin is concentrated onto a much smaller volume of a Cs selective sorbent to achieve a significant radioactive waste volume reduction. Technical feasibility of the electrodialytic resin decontamination process has been demonstrated on a bench scale with a batch of simulated spent ion exchange resin and using potassium cobalt ferrocyanide as the Cs selective sorbent. A volume reduction factor between 10 and 17 has been estimated. The process appears to be economically attractive. Improvements in process economics can be expected from optimization of the process. Other possible applications of the EDRD process have been identified

  18. Embedding of reactor wastes in plastic resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    STEAG Kernenergie GmbH is so far the only firm commercially to condition radioactive bead ion exchange resins by embedding in polystyrene resins. The objective of the work reported here was to study and develop methods for immobilization of other reactor wastes in plastic resins. Comparison studies on high quality cement however showed favourable results for cement with respect to process safety and economy. For this reason STEAG interrupted its work in the field of resin embedding after about one year. The work carried out during this period is surveyed in this report, which includes a comprehensive literature study on reactor wastes and their solidification in plastic resins as well as on regulations with regard to radioactive waste disposal in the member states of the European Communities

  19. Disinfection of denture base acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J J; Cameron, S M; Runyan, D A; Craft, D W

    1999-02-01

    During repair or adjustments of acrylic resin removable complete and partial dentures, particles of the acrylic resin from the interior of the prosthesis may expose dental personnel to microbial health hazards if the prosthesis has not been thoroughly disinfected. This study investigates the efficacy of a commercially prepared microbial disinfectant (Alcide) on the external and internal surfaces of acrylic resins. Four groups of acrylic resin were incubated in an experimental model to simulate the oral environment over time. Specimens were treated in 2 groups, disinfected and not disinfected, and then further grouped by breaking and not breaking. Analysis was performed with microbial colony counts, SEM, and statistical analyses. Viable microorganisms still remain on the internal and external surfaces of treated resins. Chlorine dioxide reduces, but does not eliminate, viable microorganisms on these dental prostheses.

  20. Research of the Dispersity of the Functional Sericite/Methylphenyl- Silicone Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, B.; Zhu, C. C.; Huang, Y. D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the homogeneity and dispersity of the sericite in methylphenyl-silicone resin, the agglomerate state of the sericites was controlled effectively. The dispersive model of the sericite in methylphenyl-silicone resin was designed also. First, the modified sericite was prepared using hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide as the intercalating agent. Then, functional sericite was incorporated into methylphenyl-silicone by terminal hydroxyl. The structure and dispersive performance of the hybrid polymers was charactered by analytical instruments. Scanning electron microscopy and Transmission electron microscope, Laser scanning confocal microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis showed that functional sericite was dispersed homogeneously in methylphenyl-silicone resin matrix. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that the absorption peaks of the Si-OH band of methylphenyl-silicone resin were decreased and the Si-O-Si band was increased. This change evidently showed a significant role to enhance the reaction degree of the functional sericite in methylphenyl-silicone resin. PMID:26061002

  1. Resin composites: Modulus of elasticity and marginal quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Ana R; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian; Flury, Simon

    2014-09-01

    To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity but quite similar polymerization contraction. MOD cavities (n=30) were prepared in extracted premolars, restored and then subjected to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. Marginal quality of the restorations before and after loading was analyzed on epoxy replicas under a scanning electron microscope. The percentage of gap-free margins and occurrence of paramarginal fractures were registered. Modulus of elasticity and polymerization contraction were analyzed with parametric and margins with nonparametric ANOVA and post hoc Tukey HSD or Wilcoxon rank-sum tests, respectively. The number of paramarginal fractures was analyzed with exact Fisher tests (α=0.05). Grandio demonstrated significantly more gap-free enamel margins than Charisma and Filtek Supreme XTE, before and after loading (p0.05). No significant effect of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (pGrandio when compared to Charisma (p=0.008). The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can be improved by the selection of a resin composite with modulus of elasticity close to that of dentine, although an increase in paramarginal enamel fractures can result as a consequence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Study on thermal conductive BN/novolac resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shasha; Qi, Shuhua; Liu, Nailiang; Cao, Peng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Boron nitride (BN) particles were used to modify novolac resin. → BN particles were pretreated by γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. → The thermal conductivity trend of composite almost agrees with the predicted data from the Maxwell-Eucken model. → At BN concentration of 80 wt.%, thermal conductivity value of composite is 4.5 times that of pure novolac resin. → Combined use of the larger and smaller particles with a mass ratio of 1:2 provides the composites with the maximum thermal conductivity among the testing systems. → The composite thermal property also increases with an increase in the BN concentration. - Abstract: In this study, γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane-treated boron nitride (BN) particles were used to modify novolac resin. The effect of varying the BN concentration, particle size, and hybrid BN fillers with the binary particle size distribution on the thermal conductivity of the composites was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging showed homogeneously dispersed treated BN particles in the matrix. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity increased as the BN concentration was increased. This behavior was also observed when the filler size was increased. Experimentally obtained thermal conductivity values agree with the predicted data from the Maxwell-Eucken model well at less than 70 wt.% BN loading. A larger particle size BN-filled novolac resin exhibits a higher thermal conductivity than a smaller particle size BN-filled one. The combined use of 0.5 and 15 μm particles with a mass ratio of 2:1 achieved the maximum thermal conductivity among the testing systems. The thermal resistance properties of the composites were also studied.

  3. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of 137 Cs, 85 Sr, and 60 Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative 137 Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either 85 Sr or 60 Co. Release rates of 137 Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. 137 Cs, 85 Sr, and 60 Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement

  4. Adhesion strength improvement of epoxy resin reinforced with nanoelastomeric copolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoee, Sepideh; Hassani, Narges

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Elastomeric nanoparticle (ENP) was prepared via miniemulsion polymerization. → ENP was added to epoxy resin (ER) with different amounts. → The lap shear strength (LSS) of different ENP/ER was measured. → The fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). - Abstract: Nano-sized copoly(styrene-butylacrylate-ethylenglycoldimethacrylate) (St-BA-EGDMA) particles were added at different contents to improve the toughness of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A epoxy resin (ER) using piperidine as a curing agent. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) proved that nanoelastomer was finely dispersed in the epoxy adhesive. To compare the adhesion strength of different adherents utilizing both modified and unmodified epoxy adhesive, the lap shear strength (LSS) test was measured as a function of elastomeric nanoparticles (ENP) amount. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and FTIR were used to investigate the interface morphology and chemical composition of adherent and epoxy adhesive. The result indicated that the adhesion strength was increased dramatically by addition of nanoparticles compared with that of pure epoxy adhesive. The highest adhesion strength was obtained with 20 wt% elastomeric nanoparticles. It was found that reinforcement with nanoparticles improved the fracture toughness.

  5. Study of Dielectric Properties and Morphology of Epoxy Resin with Silicon Dioxide Microparticles and Nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hudec, Jiří; Neděla, Vilém

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, S3 (2016), s. 1896-1897 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : epoxy resin ESEM * Nanoparticles * silicon dioxide * ESEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  6. Quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Roger

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the basic tenets of quantitative research. The concepts of dependent and independent variables are addressed and the concept of measurement and its associated issues, such as error, reliability and validity, are explored. Experiments and surveys – the principal research designs in quantitative research – are described and key features explained. The importance of the double-blind randomised controlled trial is emphasised, alongside the importance of longitudinal surveys, as opposed to cross-sectional surveys. Essential features of data storage are covered, with an emphasis on safe, anonymous storage. Finally, the article explores the analysis of quantitative data, considering what may be analysed and the main uses of statistics in analysis.

  7. The Cutting of Ultrathin Sections With the Thickness Less Than 20 nm From Biological Specimens Embedded in Resin Blocks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nebesářová, Jana; Hozák, Pavel; Frank, Luděk; Štěpan, P.; Vancová, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 6 (2016), s. 512-517 ISSN 1059-910X R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:68378050 ; RVO:68081731 Keywords : low voltage electron microscopy * resin embedding * ultramicrotomy * ultrathin sectioning Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.147, year: 2016

  8. Mid-infrared reflectance of silicone resin coating on metal substrates: Effect of polymeric binders' absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wen-Dar; Ma, Chen-Chi M.

    1997-04-01

    This study examines the infrared reflectance of polymeric coatings of silicone resin, silicone modified alkyd resin, and alkyd resin on aluminum substrates. The Kubelka-Munk's two constants theory is applied to calculate the reflectance while considering the surface reflection. An integrating sphere, infrared spectroradiometer and blackbody source are utilized as the measurement systems. The extinction coefficients are determined and used to calculate the reflectances of coatings on aluminum. Coefficients in the mid-infrared region display the quantitative difference between the polymers' structure. Silicone content enhances the absorptance of the coating in the mid-IR region. The coefficients of miscible silicone resin/alkyd resin blends are determined as well. Comparing the measured and calculated reflectances reveals that the discrepancies in thinner coatings or at the IR transparent wavelength are higher and around 0.1. Such a discrepancy is owing to the polymers' non-scattering with absorption properties which affect the validity of the values involving internal reflectances considered in the model. The internal reflectance can be assigned a negligible value in the high absorption region and is also a variable depending on thickness and transparency.

  9. Quantitative composition determination at the atomic level using model-based high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G T; Rosenauer, A; De Backer, A; Verbeeck, J; Van Aert, S

    2014-02-01

    High angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM) images provide sample information which is sensitive to the chemical composition. The image intensities indeed scale with the mean atomic number Z. To some extent, chemically different atomic column types can therefore be visually distinguished. However, in order to quantify the atomic column composition with high accuracy and precision, model-based methods are necessary. Therefore, an empirical incoherent parametric imaging model can be used of which the unknown parameters are determined using statistical parameter estimation theory (Van Aert et al., 2009, [1]). In this paper, it will be shown how this method can be combined with frozen lattice multislice simulations in order to evolve from a relative toward an absolute quantification of the composition of single atomic columns with mixed atom types. Furthermore, the validity of the model assumptions are explored and discussed. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of Resin-Resin Interface in Direct Composite Restoration Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoleriu, S.; Andrian, S.; Pancu, G.; Nica, I.; Iovan, G.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resin-resin interface when a universal bonding agent was used in two different strategies in direct restoration repair. Two composite resins (a micro-filled hybrid and a nano-filled hybrid) as old restorations that have to be repair, a universal bonding agent and a micro-filled hybrid composite resin (different then that aged) as new material for repair were chosen for the study. Non-aged samples were used as control and aged samples were used as study groups. The universal bonding agent was applied in etch-and-rinse and in self-etch strategies. The interface between old and new composite resins was evaluated by SEM and the microleakage was assessed by scoring the dye penetration. Very good adaptation of the two different composite resins placed in direct contact in non-aged samples was recorded. No gaps or defects were visible and strong resin-resin contact was observed. After aging, enlargement of resin-resin junction were observed in most of the samples and a increased dye penetration was recorded irrespective of the strategy (etch-and-rinse or self-etch) used for bonding agent application.

  11. Bond strength of a chairside autopolymerizing reline resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength of a chairside autopolymerizing reline resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Four kinds of injection-molded thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, a polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and a polycarbonate) and PMMA, as a control, were tested. The eight types of surface treatment: ((1) no treatment, (2) air abrasion, (3) dichloromethane, (4) ethyl acetate, (5) 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (6) air abrasion and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (7) tribochemical silica coating, and (8) tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin) were applied to each specimen. The chairside autopolymerizing reline resins were bonded to disks of the injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. All of the specimens were immersed in water for 4 months and then thermocycled for 10,000 cycles in water between 5 and 55°C. The shear bond strengths were determined. The shear bond strengths of the two polyamides treated using air abrasion, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate and no treatment were exceedingly low. The greatest bond strength was recorded for the polyethylene terephthalate copolymer specimens treated with tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (22.5MPa). The bond strengths of the other injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins increased using 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin were the most effective surface treatments among all denture base resins tested. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Preparation of extractive resins for producing terbium-161; Preparacion de resinas extractivas para produccion de terbio-161

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Cruz B, C. C.; Monroy G, F. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: fabiola.monroy@inin.gob.mx

    2009-10-15

    This paper presents the development of a methodology for extractive resins preparation to base of HDEHP, which allows to separation of Tb from Gd generating an own technology of preparation of these resins. The study included the extractive resins preparation from 6 different supports: kieselguhr Dg, alumina, red volcanic rock, chiluca, quarry and fluorite; two treatment types of of supports and varied concentrations of HDEHP extractant (di(2-etil hexyl) orthophosphoric acid), in order to determine which resin has improved efficiency of Gd and Tb separation, and radionuclide purity of {sup 161}Tb. Resins were prepared to base of kieselguhr to determine the most appropriate silicon deposition process. Two silicon deposition treatments were realized: treatment I , by contact with silicon deposition solution (dimethyldichlorosilane / heptane 1:30) and treatment II by contact with vapors of dimethyldichlorosilane in vacuum. The extractant retention was carried out to different concentrations of HDEHP / acetone: 1:4, 1:8, 1:15, 1:20, 1:30 and 1:40. According to the results, there is not direct relation of HDEHP concentration used in extractive resins preparation to base of kieselguhr over the efficiency of Gd and Tb separation and of radionuclide purity of {sup 161}Tb. The effect of support in the efficiency of Gd and Tb separation was studied to prepare resins with the supports kieselguhr, alumina, quarry, chiluca, volcanic rock and fluorite, using the silicon deposition treatment II for the supports and a concentration of HDEHP / acetone 1:20, for extractant retention. Only resins based on kieselguhr could separate to Gd from Tb quantitatively, the resin at a concentration of HDEHP / Acetone 1:20 was the best results obtained in Gd and Tb separation, achieving a separation efficiency greater than 90% and a radionuclide purity higher than 99%. (Author)

  13. Mineralogy of fossil resins in Northern Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdasarov, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    The investigation is focused on identification and origin of fossil resins from the Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary sediments of Northern Eurasia on the basis of detailed study of their physical and chemical characteristics: morphology; size; mass; density; optical, mechanical, and thermal properties; chemical composition; etc. The composition of amorphous organic minerals with polymeric structure, fossil resins included, is studied with IR spectrometry, the EPR method, derivatography at low heating rates, XRD, chemical analysis, emission spectrometry, etc. The results of investigation summarized for the Baltic-Dnieper, North Siberian, and Far East amber-bearing provinces show some similarity of fossil resins in combination with specific features inherent to each province. Resins from the Baltic-Dnieper province should be termed as amber (succinite). Their variety is the most characteristic of Northern and Eastern Europe. Amber-like fossil resins from the North Siberian and Far East provinces are irrelevant to succinite. They usually occur as brittle resins, namely, retinite and gedanite, without jewelry value. Viscous fossil resin rumänite with an expected high economic value occurs in the Far East, on the shore of Sakhalin Island.

  14. Investigation of fossil resins and amber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Yu. Makarova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fossil resins and amber are a product of lithogenesis of resinous substances of higher plants – resinite. These components of plants, like other lipoid ingredients (suberins, coutines, sporinins, natural rubbers are resistant to microbial action, so they are well preserved in bacterial processing of organic matter in the stages of sedimento- and diagenesis, and are well diagnosed in microscopic studies. They occur in a rather wide age range of sedimentary rocks. The amber of the Baltic region of the Eocene age is most fully studied. The article presents the results of a study of the collection of fossil resins and amber from various regions of the world. Samples were studied microscopically; carbon isotope analysis, infrared spectroscopy (IR spectroscopy were performed. The most informative analysis of high-molecular polymeric compounds is IR spectroscopy. It was found that in the analyzed samples of fossil resins of different ages, aromatic compounds are not observed, most of which are first volatilized in fossilization processes. The possibility of influencing the group composition of amber and amber-like resins for sedimentation, diagenesis and catagenesis is discussed. The IR spectra of fossil and modern resin conifers are compared. Using the IR spectroscopy method, an attempt was made to identify the botanical origin of fossil resins.

  15. Quantitative analysis of an enlarged area Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) detector based on Electron Multiplying Charge Coupled Device (EMCCD) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetadri, Vasan S N; Sharma, P; Singh, V; Jain, A; Ionita, Ciprian N; Titus, A H; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2013-03-06

    Present day treatment for neurovascular pathological conditions involves the use of devices with very small features such as stents, coils, and balloons; hence, these interventional procedures demand high resolution x-ray imaging under fluoroscopic conditions to provide the capability to guide the deployment of these fine endovascular devices. To address this issue, a high resolution x-ray detector based on EMCCD technology is being developed. The EMCCD field-of-view is enlarged using a fiber-optic taper so that the detector features an effective pixel size of 37 µm giving it a Nyquist frequency of 13.5 lp/mm, which is significantly higher than that of the state of the art Flat Panel Detectors (FPD). Quantitative analysis of the detector, including gain calibration, instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) and modulation transfer function (MTF) determination, are presented in this work. The gain of the detector is a function of the detector temperature; with the detector cooled to 5° C, the highest relative gain that could be achieved was calculated to be 116 times. At this gain setting, the lowest INEE was measured to be 0.6 µR/frame. The MTF, measured using the edge method, was over 2% up to 7 cycles/ mm. To evaluate the performance of the detector under clinical conditions, an aneurysm model was placed over an anthropomorphic head phantom and a coil was guided into the aneurysm under fluoroscopic guidance using the detector. Image sequences from the procedure are presented demonstrating the high resolution of this SSXII.

  16. Processes for coating or sealing electronic components with synthetic varnishes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrugia, M.; Allard, M.

    1981-01-01

    A method of coating or sealing electrical or electronic components with a synthetic resin composition is described which consists of moving each component along a fixed path through a coating station at which at least one surface of the component receives a coating of synthetic resin and then moving each component through a beam of ionising radiation (ultra-violet or beta radiation) for a sufficient time to induce polymerisation of the resin. Suitable resin compositions for the process are listed. (U.K.)

  17. Quantitative characterization of interface traps in Al2O3/AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors by dynamic capacitance dispersion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Hua; Zhu, Jie-Jie; Liao, Xue-Yang; Yue, Tong; Chen, Wei-Wei; Hao, Yue

    2013-07-01

    In this letter, the interface traps of Al2O3/AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors (MOS-HEMTs) were characterized quantitatively by dynamic capacitance dispersion technique. An analysis of Al2O3/AlGaN interface states demonstrated deep traps in the range of 0.53 eV-1.16 eV below the conduction band, with trap density nearly constant and two orders of magnitude smaller than that at AlGaN surface due to the use of atomic layer deposition-grown Al2O3 insulator. As much as 2.23 × 1013 eV-1 cm-2 fast traps with time constant smaller than 0.3 μs were observed at AlGaN/GaN interface of MOS-HEMTs, which was consistent with the qualitative prediction from pulsed I-V test.

  18. Melamine-modified urea formaldehyde resin for bonding particleboards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse; Feng Fu; Hui Pan

    2008-01-01

    For the development of a cost-effective melamine-modified urea formaldehyde resin (MUF), the study evaluated the effects of reaction pH and melamine content on resin properties and bond performance of the MUF resin adhesive systems. Eight resins, each with three replicates, were prepared in a factorial experiment that included two formulation variables: two reaction...

  19. Traumatic resin ducts as indicators of bark beetle outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Justin DeRose; Matthew F. Bekker; James N. Long

    2017-01-01

    The formation of traumatic resin ducts (TRDs) represents an important induced defense in woody plants that enhances oleoresin production and flow in response to environmental perturbations. In some genera (Pinus), resin ducts are copious and conspicuous; however, in others (Picea), resin ducts are relatively rare. The occurrence and strength of resin ducts, in...

  20. A quantitative and qualitative evaluation of reports of clinical trials published in six Brazilian dental journals indexed in the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; Nasser, Mona; Fedorowicz, Zbys

    2010-01-01

    Open access publishing is becoming increasingly popular within the biomedical sciences. SciELO, the Scientific Electronic Library Online, is a digital library covering a selected collection of Brazilian scientific journals many of which provide open access to full-text articles.This library includes a number of dental journals some of which may include reports of clinical trials in English, Portuguese and/or Spanish. Thus, SciELO could play an important role as a source of evidence for dental healthcare interventions especially if it yields a sizeable number of high quality reports. The aim of this study was to identify reports of clinical trials by handsearching of dental journals that are accessible through SciELO, and to assess the overall quality of these reports. Electronic versions of six Brazilian dental Journals indexed in SciELO were handsearched at www.scielo.br in September 2008. Reports of clinical trials were identified and classified as controlled clinical trials (CCTs - prospective, experimental studies comparing 2 or more healthcare interventions in human beings) or randomized controlled trials (RCTs - a random allocation method is clearly reported), according to Cochrane eligibility criteria. CRITERIA TO ASSESS METHODOLOGICAL QUALITY INCLUDED: method of randomization, concealment of treatment allocation, blinded outcome assessment, handling of withdrawals and losses and whether an intention-to-treat analysis had been carried out. The search retrieved 33 CCTs and 43 RCTs. A majority of the reports provided no description of either the method of randomization (75.3%) or concealment of the allocation sequence (84.2%). Participants and outcome assessors were reported as blinded in only 31.2% of the reports. Withdrawals and losses were only clearly described in 6.5% of the reports and none mentioned an intention-to-treat analysis or any similar procedure. The results of this study indicate that a substantial number of reports of trials and systematic

  1. A quantitative and qualitative evaluation of reports of clinical trials published in six Brazilian dental journals indexed in the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Freitas de Souza

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Open access publishing is becoming increasingly popular within the biomedical sciences. SciELO, the Scientific Electronic Library Online, is a digital library covering a selected collection of Brazilian scientific journals many of which provide open access to full-text articles.This library includes a number of dental journals some of which may include reports of clinical trials in English, Portuguese and/or Spanish. Thus, SciELO could play an important role as a source of evidence for dental healthcare interventions especially if it yields a sizeable number of high quality reports. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify reports of clinical trials by handsearching of dental journals that are accessible through SciELO, and to assess the overall quality of these reports. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Electronic versions of six Brazilian dental Journals indexed in SciELO were handsearched at www.scielo.br in September 2008. Reports of clinical trials were identified and classified as controlled clinical trials (CCTs - prospective, experimental studies comparing 2 or more healthcare interventions in human beings or randomized controlled trials (RCTs - a random allocation method is clearly reported, according to Cochrane eligibility criteria. CRITERIA TO ASSESS METHODOLOGICAL QUALITY INCLUDED: method of randomization, concealment of treatment allocation, blinded outcome assessment, handling of withdrawals and losses and whether an intention-to-treat analysis had been carried out. RESULTS: The search retrieved 33 CCTs and 43 RCTs. A majority of the reports provided no description of either the method of randomization (75.3% or concealment of the allocation sequence (84.2%. Participants and outcome assessors were reported as blinded in only 31.2% of the reports. Withdrawals and losses were only clearly described in 6.5% of the reports and none mentioned an intention-to-treat analysis or any similar procedure. CONCLUSIONS: The results of

  2. Effect of fluoride-containing desensitizing agents on the bond strength of resin-based cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Saraç

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents containing different amounts of fluoride on the shear bond strength of a dual polymerized resin cement and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC to dentin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred human molars were mounted in acrylic resin blocks and prepared until the dentin surface was exposed. The specimens were treated with one of four desensitizing agents: Bifluorid 12, Fluoridin, Thermoline and PrepEze. The remaining 20 specimens served as untreated controls. All groups were further divided into 2 subgroups in which a dual polymerized resin cement (Bifix QM or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (AVANTO was used. The shear bond strength (MPa was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed statistically with a 2-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD test and regression analysis (α=0.05. The effect of the desensitizing agents on the dentin surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: The fluoride-containing desensitizing agents affected the bond strength of the resin-based cements to dentin (p<0.001. PrepEze showed the highest bond strength values in all groups (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Regression analysis showed a reverse relation between bond strength values of resin cements to dentin and the amount of fluoride in the desensitizing agent (p<0.05.

  3. Properties of a nanodielectric cryogenic resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL; Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Physical properties of a nanodielectric composed of in situ synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles ({le} 5 nm in diameter) and a cryogenic resin are reported. The dielectric losses were reduced by a factor of 2 in the nanocomposite, indicating that the presence of small TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles restricted the mobility of the polymer chains. Dielectric breakdown data of the nanodielectric was distributed over a narrower range than that of the unfilled resin. The nanodielectric had 1.56 times higher 1% breakdown probability than the resin, yielding 0.64 times thinner insulation thickness for the same voltage level, which is beneficial in high voltage engineering.

  4. In-depth disinfection of acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, V B; Saunders, T R; Pimsler, M; Elfring, D R

    1995-09-01

    This study demonstrated that bacteria penetrate three kinds of dental acrylic resin after a short time period. Samples of acrylic resin were contaminated with a variety of bacteria and were then placed in three different disinfecting solutions as directed by the manufacturers. After the specific dilution and immersion time, cultures were made from the resin samples. The only effective disinfectant was a 0.525% solution of sodium hypochlorite at a 10-minute immersion. It disinfected not only the surfaces but also the bacteria that penetrated the surfaces to a depth of 3 mm.

  5. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  6. Gas chromatography-electron ionization-mass spectrometry quantitation of valproic acid and gabapentin, using dried plasma spots, for therapeutic drug monitoring in in-home medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kayo; Ikawa, Kazuro; Yokoshige, Satoko; Yoshikawa, Satoshi; Morikawa, Norifumi

    2014-12-01

    A simple and sensitive gas chromatography-electron ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS) method using dried plasma spot testing cards was developed for determination of valproic acid and gabapentin concentrations in human plasma from patients receiving in-home medical care. We have proposed that a simple, easy and dry sampling method is suitable for in-home medical patients for therapeutic drug monitoring. Therefore, in the present study, we used recently developed commercially available easy handling cards: Whatman FTA DMPK-A and Bond Elut DMS. In-home medical care patients can collect plasma using these simple kits. The spots of plasma on the cards were extracted into methanol and then evaporated to dryness. The residues were trimethylsilylated using N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide. For GC-EI-MS analysis, the calibration curves on both cards were linear from 10 to 200 µg/mL for valproic acid, and from 0.5 to 10 µg/mL for gabapentin. Intra- and interday precisions in plasma were both ≤13.0% (coefficient of variation), and the accuracy was between 87.9 and 112% for both cards within the calibration curves. The limits of quantification were 10 µg/mL for valproic acid and 0.5 µg/mL for gabapentin on both cards. We believe that the present method will be useful for in-home medical care. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Quantitative in-situ scanning electron microscope pull-out experiments and molecular dynamics simulations of carbon nanotubes embedded in palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, S., E-mail: steffen.hartmann@etit.tu-chemnitz.de; Blaudeck, T.; Hermann, S.; Wunderle, B. [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Hölck, O. [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Fraunhofer IZM Berlin, Gustav-Meyer-Allee 25, 13355 Berlin (Germany); Schulz, S. E.; Gessner, T. [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Fraunhofer ENAS Chemnitz, Technologie-Campus 3, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2014-04-14

    In this paper, we present our results of experimental and numerical pull-out tests on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in palladium. We prepared simple specimens by employing standard silicon wafers, physical vapor deposition of palladium and deposition of CNTs with a simple drop coating technique. An AFM cantilever with known stiffness connected to a nanomanipulation system was utilized inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as a force sensor to determine forces acting on a CNT during the pull-out process. SEM-images of the cantilever attached to a CNT have been evaluated for subsequent displacement steps with greyscale correlation to determine the cantilever deflection. We compare the experimentally obtained pull-out forces with values of numerical investigations by means of molecular dynamics and give interpretations for deviations according to material impurities or defects and their influence on the pull-out data. We find a very good agreement of force data from simulation and experiment, which is 17 nN and in the range of 10–61 nN, respectively. Our findings contribute to the ongoing research of the mechanical characterization of CNT-metal interfaces. This is of significant interest for the design of future mechanical sensors utilizing the intrinsic piezoresistive effect of CNTs or other future devices incorporating CNT-metal interfaces.

  8. Electron density study of urea using TDS-corrected X-ray diffraction data: quantitative comparison of experimental and theoretical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavodnik; Stash; Tsirelson; de Vries R; Feil

    1999-02-01

    The electron-density distribution in urea, CO(NH(2))(2), was studied by high-precision single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis at 148 (1) K. An experimental correction for TDS was applied to the X-ray intensities. R(merge)(F(2)) = 0.015. The displacement parameters agree quite well with results from neutron diffraction. The deformation density was obtained by refinement of 145 unique low-order reflections with the Hansen & Coppens [Acta Cryst. (1978), A34, 909-921] multipole model, resulting in R = 0.008, wR = 0.011 and S = 1.09. Orbital calculations were carried out applying different potentials to account for correlation and exchange: Hartree-Fock (HF), density-functional theory/local density approximation (DFT/LDA) and density-functional theory/generalized gradient approximation (DFT/GGA). Extensive comparisons of the deformation densities and structure factors were made between the results of the various calculations and the outcome of the refinement. The agreement between the experimental and theoretical results is excellent, judged by the deformation density and the structure factors [wR(HF) = 0.023, wR(DFT) = 0.019] and fair with respect to the results of a topological analysis. Density-functional calculations seem to yield slightly better results than Hartree-Fock calculations.

  9. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the students’ perceptions to the use of 3D electronic models in problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Ming Wong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Faculty of Dentistry of the University of Hong Kong has introduced innovative blended problem-based learning (PBL with the aid of 3D electronic models (e-models to Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS curriculum. Statistical results of pre- and post-semester questionnaire surveys illustrated compatibility of e-models in PBL settings. The students’ importance ratings of two objectives “Complete assigned tasks on time” and “Active listener”, and twenty-two facilitator evaluation items including critical thinking and group problem-solving skills had increased significantly. The students’ PBL preparation behavior, attentions to problem understanding, problem analysis, and learning resource quality were also found to be related to online support of e-models and its software. Qualitative analysis of open-ended questions with visual text analytic software “Leximancer” improved validity of statistical results. Using e-model functions in treatment planning, problem analysis and giving instructions provided a method of informative communication. Therefore, it is critical for the faculty to continuously provide facilitator training and quality online e-model resources to the students.

  10. Synthesis and quantitative structure-activity relationship of hydrazones of N-amino-N'-hydroxyguanidine as electron acceptors for xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusis, Peteris; Dambrova, Maija; Andrianov, Victor; Rozhkov, Eugene; Semenikhina, Valentina; Piskunova, Irena; Ongwae, Enock; Lundstedt, Torbjörn; Kalvinsh, Ivars; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2004-06-03

    A series of new N-hydroxyguanidines were synthesized and tested for electron acceptor activity on bovine milk xanthine oxidase using xanthine as reducing substrate. Manual inspection of the structure-activity data revealed that molecules containing nitro groups ("set A") show a different structure-activity relationship pattern compared to non-nitro compounds ("set B"). Accordingly separate QSAR models were built and validated for the two sets. Substantial differences were found in properties governing acceptor activity for the models, the only common property being sterical access to the imino nitrogen atom of the hydroxyguanidinimines. For set A molecules the presence of a nitro substituent at a certain distance range from the hydroxuguanidino group was most important. In addition, the presence of a nitro group in the ortho position interacting with NH(2) of the hydroxyguanidino group, and the mutual geometry of the phenyl ring, hydroxyguanidine, and imine groups was important for this set. By contrast, for set B molecules the acceptor activity was most influenced by the geometry of methoxy groups and the size and geometry of meta and para substituents of the phenyl ring.

  11. Lock-in thermography, penetrant inspection, and scanning electron microscopy for quantitative evaluation of open micro-cracks at the tooth-restoration interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streza, M.; Hodisan, I.; Prejmerean, C.; Boue, C.; Tessier, Gilles

    2015-03-01

    The evaluation of a dental restoration in a non-invasive way is of paramount importance in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to assess the minimum detectable open crack at the cavity-restorative material interface by the lock-in thermography technique, at laser intensities which are safe for living teeth. For the analysis of the interface, 18 box-type class V standardized cavities were prepared on the facial and oral surfaces of each tooth, with coronal margins in enamel and apical margins in dentine. The preparations were restored with the Giomer Beautifil (Shofu) in combination with three different adhesive systems. Three specimens were randomly selected from each experimental group and each slice has been analysed by visible, infrared (IR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Lock-in thermography showed the most promising results in detecting both marginal and internal defects. The proposed procedure leads to a diagnosis of micro-leakages having openings of 1 µm, which is close to the diffraction limit of the IR camera. Clinical use of a thermographic camera in assessing the marginal integrity of a restoration becomes possible. The method overcomes some drawbacks of standard SEM or dye penetration testing. The results support the use of an IR camera in dentistry, for the diagnosis of micro-gaps at bio-interfaces.

  12. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  13. Process for hardening an alkyd resin composition using ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tadashi; Murata, Koichiro; Maruyama, Tsutomu.

    1969-01-01

    In an alkyd resin composition having free hydroxide radicals and containing a conjugated unsaturated fatty acid and/or oil as a component thereof, a process for hardening an alkyd resin composition comprises the steps of dissolving into a vinyl monomer, the product obtained by the semi-esterification reaction of said hydroxide radicals with acid anhydrides having polymerizable radicals and hardening by ionizing radiation to provide a coating with a high degree of cross-linking, with favorable properties such as toughness, hardness, chemical resistance and resistance to weather and with the feasibility of being applied as the ground and finish coat on metals, wood, paper, outdoor construction or the like. Any kind of ionization radiation, particularly accelerated electron beams, γ radiation can be used at 50 0 C to -5 0 C for a few seconds or minutes, permitting continuous operation. In one example, 384 parts of phthalic anhydride, 115 parts of pentaerythritol, 233 parts of trimethylol ethane, 288 parts of tung fatty acid and 49 parts of para-tertiary-butyl benzoic acid are mixed and heated with 60 parts of xylene to an acid value of 12. In addition, 271 parts of maleic anhydride and 0.6 parts of hydroquinone are admixed with the content and heated to terminate the reaction. 100 parts of a 50% stylene solution of this alkyd resin are mixed with 1 part of a 60% toluene solution of cobalt naphthenate, and then coated on a glass plate and irradiated with high energy electron beams of 300 kV with a dose of 5 Mrad for 1 sec. (Iwakiri, K.)

  14. Evaluation of inorganic particles of composite resins with nanofiller content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Hörlle, Lucas; Oshima, Hugo Mitsuo; Hirakata, Luciana Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were evaluate by energy dispersed X-ray (EDS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the inorganic particles of three nanofilled composite resins, comparing particles sizes, shape and composition, and the filler weight content by thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA). Three composite resins classified as nanofilled were selected to this study: Esthet-X; Grandio; Filtek Supreme XT. The shade was standardized (A2) for enamel (E) or dentin (D). Ten samples with 20 mg (±10 mg) of each composite resin were submitted to thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA) in order to record the filler weight content (wt%). The amount of inorganic phase ranged from 75.75 to 87 wt%, to Esthet-X (D) and Grandio (D), respectively. The filler composition was analyzed by energy dispersed X-ray (EDS), and the size and shape were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The filler average size (µm) obtained by SEM were: Esthet-X (E) 1.16; Esthet-X (D) 1.39; Filtek Supreme XT (E) 0.6 (nanocluster); Filtek Supreme XT (D) 1.14 (nanocluster); Grandio (E) 2.05 and Grandio (D) 3.1. Silica (SiO2), Ba and Al were observed through EDS. The shape of Esthet-X and Grandio fillers showed similar characteristics with high quantity of irregular inorganic particles and heterogeneous filler. However, Filtek Supreme XT showed spherical and regular particles with homogeneous distribution and sizes. Based in the analysis of nanofilled composites inorganic phase, inconsistencies of weight content, composition, shape and size can be stated between the literature and manufacturer's instructions.

  15. Shear bond strength of an autopolymerizing repair resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the shear bond strength of an autopolymerizing repair resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Four injection-molded thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, a polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and a polycarbonate) were used in this study. The specimens were divided into eight groups according to the type of surface treatment given: (1) no treatment, (2) air abrasion with alumina, (3) dichloromethane, (4) ethyl acetate, (5) 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (6) alumina and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (7) tribochemical silica coating or (8) tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Half of the specimens in groups 1, 5, 6 and 8 were thermocycled for 10,000 cycles in water between 5-55°C with a dwell time of 1 min at each temperature. The shear bond strengths were determined. The shear bond strengths to the two polyamides treated with alumina, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate and no treatment were very low. The greatest post-thermocycling bond strengths to polyamides were recorded for the specimens treated with tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (PA12: 16.4 MPa, PACM12: 17.5 MPa). The greatest post-thermocycling bond strengths to polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and polycarbonate were recorded for the treatment with alumina and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (22.7 MPa, 20.8 MPa). Polyamide was exceedingly difficult to bond to an autopolymerizing repair resin; the shear bond strength improved using tribochemical silica coating followed by the application of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Both polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and polycarbonate were originally easy to bond to an autopolymerizing repair resin. However, with 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, the bond was more secure.

  16. Magnetic ion-exchange resin treatment: Impact of water type and resin use

    OpenAIRE

    Mergen, Maxime Rodolphe Denis; Jefferson, Bruce; Parsons, Simon A.; Jarvis, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Three raw waters of fundamentally different natural organic matter (NOM) character were treated by magnetic resin using a bench-scale method designed to mimic how the resin is used in continuous operation. Increasing water hydrophobicity resulted in reduced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal with removal of 56%, 33% and 25% for waters containing 21%, 50% and 75% hydrophobic NOM, respectively. Study of consecutive resin uses showed that the NOM in the hydrophobic water ha...

  17. 5-year clinical performance of resin composite versus resin modified glass ionomer restorative system in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions.......To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions....

  18. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The...′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to which may have been added certain optional adjuvant substances...

  19. Preparation and quality assessment of high-purity ginseng total saponins by ion exchange resin combined with macroporous adsorption resin separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu-Nan; Wang, Zhong-Li; Dai, Jian-Guo; Chen, Lin; Huang, Yu-Fang

    2014-05-01

    To prepare high-purity ginseng total saponins from a water decoction of Chinese ginseng root. Total saponins were efficiently purified by dynamic anion-cation exchange following the removal of hydrophilic impurities by macroporous resin D101. For quality control, ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with a charged aerosol detector (CAD) was applied to quantify marker components. The total saponin content was estimated by a colorimetric method using a vanillin-vitriol system and CAD response. D201, which consisted of a cross-linked polystyrene matrix and -N(+)(CH3)3 functional groups, was the best of the four anion exchange resins tested. However, no significant difference in cation exchange ability was observed between D001 (strong acid) and D113 (weak acid), although they have different functional groups and matrices. After purification in combination with D101, D201, and D113, the estimated contents of total saponins were 107% and 90% according to the colorimetric method and CAD response, respectively. The total amount of representative ginsenosides Re, Rd, Rg1, and compound K was approximately 22% based on ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-CAD quantitative analysis. These findings suggest that an ion exchange resin, combined with macroporous adsorption resin separation, is a promising and feasible purification procedure for neutral natural polar components. Copyright © 2014 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Survival of resin infiltrated ceramics under influence of fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N; Elsafi, Mohamed H

    2016-04-01

    to evaluate influence of cyclic fatigue on two resin infiltrated ceramics and three all-ceramic crowns manufactured using CAD/CAM technology. CAD/CAM anatomically shaped crowns were manufactured using two resin infiltrated ceramics (Lava Ultimate and Vita Enamic), two reinforced glass ceramic milling blocks ((IPS)Empress CAD and (IPS)e.max CAD) and a veneered zirconia core ((IPS)Zir CAD). (IPS)e.max CAD and (IPS)Zir CAD were milled into 0.5mm thick anatomically shaped core structure which received standardized press-on veneer ceramic. The manufactured crowns were cemented on standardized resin dies using a resin adhesive (Panavia F2.0). Initial fracture strength of half of the specimens was calculated using one cycle load to failure in a universal testing machine. The remaining crowns were subjected to 3.7 million chewing cycles (load range 50-200N at 3s interval) in a custom made pneumatic fatigue tester. Survival statistics were calculated and Weibull modulus was measured from fitted load-cycle-failure diagrams. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to fractographically analyze fractured surfaces. Data were analyzed using two way analysis of variance and Bonferroni post hoc tests (α=0.05). Dynamic fatigue resulted in significant reduction (F=7.54, Pceramics and (IPS)Empress demonstrated the highest percent of fracture incidences under the influence of fatigue (35-45% splitting). None of the tested veneered zirconia restorations were fractured during testing, however, chipping of the veneer ceramics was observed in 6 crowns. The lowest percent of failure was observed for (IPS)e.max crowns manifested as 3 cases of minor chipping in addition to two complete fracture incidences. SEM images demonstrated the internal structure of the tested materials and detected location and size of the critical crack. The internal structure of the tested materials significantly influenced their fatigue behavior. Resin infiltrated ceramics were least influenced by fatigue while

  1. Mechanical properties of dental resin composites by co-filling diatomite and nanosized silica particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hua; Zhu Meifang; Li Yaogang; Zhang Qinghong; Wang Hongzhi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical property effects of co-filling dental resin composites with porous diatomite and nanosized silica particles (OX-50). The purification of raw diatomite by acid-leaching was conducted in a hot 5 M HCl solution at 80 deg. C for 12 h. Both diatomite and nanosized SiO 2 were silanized with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. The silanized inorganic particles were mixed into a dimethacrylate resin. Purified diatomite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and an N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherm. Silanized inorganic particles were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a thermogravimetric analysis. The mechanical properties of the composites were tested by three-point bending, compression and Vicker's microhardness. Scanning electron microscopy was used to show the cross-section morphologies of the composites. Silanization of diatomite and nanosized silica positively reinforced interactions between the resin matrix and the inorganic particles. The mechanical properties of the resin composites gradually increased with the addition of modified diatomite (m-diatomite). The fracture surfaces of the composites exhibited large fracture steps with the addition of m-diatomite. However, when the mass fraction of m-diatomite was greater than 21 wt.% with respect to modified nanosized silica (mOX-50) and constituted 70% of the resin composite by weight, the mechanical properties of the resin composites started to decline. Thus, the porous structure of diatomite appears to be a crucial factor to improve mechanical properties of resin composites.

  2. Monomer priming of denture teeth and its effects on the bond strength of composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, Leila; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Tolvanen, Mimmi; Lassila, Lippo V; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2014-08-01

    The bond strength of acrylic resin denture teeth used as pontics in fiber-reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses needs to be improved. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of various chemical surface-conditioning monomers on the ridge-lap surface of acrylic resin denture teeth by determining the strength of their bonding to a composite resin and changes in surface hardness. Acrylic resin denture teeth of 2 different brands (Artic 8 and Vitapan Cuspiform) (n=120) were tested. Four monomer systems were used as surface primers (conditioning): a flowable composite resin, methylmethacrylate 99%, composite primer, and a photopolymerizable dimethacrylate resin. Five surface-conditioning exposure times were used: no conditioning, 1, 5, 15, and 60 minutes. Surface microhardness measurements were made after the application of the monomer systems. Shear bond strength tests were subsequently performed, followed by a new surface microhardness indentation after the application of the load. The evaluation of the changes on specimen surfaces was performed with a scanning electron microscope. The differences between the shear bond strength and the surface hardness were evaluated for statistical significance by using a 3-way ANOVA. Tooth brand, monomer used, exposure time, and their 2- and 3-way interactions had a significant effect on the shear bond strength and hardness before and after testing, except for the 3-way interaction effect on hardness before testing. The chemical pretreatment of the ridge-lap surface of acrylic resin denture teeth increased the shear bond strength and influenced the surface hardness. The monomer systems caused dissolution on the denture surfaces. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of surface conditioning on the bond strength of resin composite to amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Igor R; Hafiana, Khaula; Curtis, Andrew; Barbour, Michele E; Attin, Thomas; Lynch, Christopher D; Jagger, Daryll C

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the tensile bond strength (TBS) and integrity of the amalgam-resin composite interface, using commercially available restoration repair systems. One hundred and sixty Gamma 2 amalgam specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 2 weeks and then randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning groups (n=20/group): Group 1: air abrasion, alloy primer and 'Panavia 21', Group 2: air abrasion and 'Amalgambond Plus', Group 3: air abrasion and 'All-Bond 3', Group 4: diamond bur, alloy primer and 'Panavia 21', Group 5: diamond bur and 'Amalgambond Plus', Group 6: diamond bur and 'All-Bond 3', Group 7: silica coating technique, and Group 8: non-conditioned amalgam surfaces (control group). Subsequently, resin composite material was added to the substrate surfaces and the amalgam-resin composite specimens were subjected to TBS testing. Representative samples from the test groups were subjected to scanning electron microscopy and surface profilometry. The data was analysed statistically with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's tests (α=0.05). The mean TBS of amalgam-resin composite ranged between 1.34 and 5.13MPa and varied with the degree of amalgam surface roughness and the type of conditioning technique employed. Significantly highest TBS values (5.13±0.96MPa) were obtained in Group 1 (p=0.013). Under the tested conditions, significantly greater tensile bond strength of resin composite to amalgam was achieved when the substrate surface was conditioned by air abrasion followed by the application of the Panavia 21 adhesive system. Effecting a repair of an amalgam restoration with resin composite via the use of air abrasion and application of Panavia 21 would seem to enhance the integrity of the amalgam-resin composite interface. Clinical trials involving the implementation of this technique are indicated to determine the usefulness of this technique. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All

  4. Regulation of NaF release from bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin using gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabo, Satoshi; Torii, Yasuhiro; Itota, Toshiyuki; Ishikawa, Kunio; Suzuki, Kazuomi

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of regulation of NaF release from bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin using gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (gamma-MPTS). NaF powder was treated with gamma-MPTS to form a polysiloxane layer on its surface. The morphology and the composition of the NaF powder treated with gamma-MPTS were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin containing 50 wt% NaF powder was prepared as a model resin and immersed in distilled water at 37 degrees C, and the amount of fluoride released from the resin was measured using a fluoride electrode. The mechanical strength in terms of diametral tensile strength before and after fluoride release was also measured, and statistically analyzed using one-way factorial ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD method. NaF powder was covered with hydrophobic gamma-MPTS delivered polysiloxane. A larger amount of fluoride was released at the initial stage from the resin containing NaF treated with no gamma-MPTS. However, fluoride release terminated in a relatively shorter period. In contrast, we observed a smaller amount of fluoride released for a longer period from the resin containing NaF treated with gamma-MPTS. We found that gamma-MPTS treatment is useful for the regulation of NaF release from bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin. The mechanism of slow NaF release may be the formation of a hydrophobic polysiloxane layer on the surface of NaF powder and resulting slow water diffusion to NaF powder.

  5. The strengthening of resin cemented dental ceramic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Hooi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current investigation was to advance the understanding of the mechanism of resin-strengthening conferred to dental ceramic materials by resin-based composite materials. The investigation is presented as a series of manuscripts. In the first study (Manuscript 3.1), dental porcelain disc-shaped specimens were resin-coated with three resin-based composite materials with different flexural moduli at discrete resin thicknesses. The discs were loaded to failure in a biaxial flexure t...

  6. Pengaruh Sifat-Sifat Fisik Resin Akrilik Terhadap Basis Protesa

    OpenAIRE

    Amriani Syahfitri

    2008-01-01

    Saat ini resin akrilik banyak digunakan secara umum untuk konstruksi gigi tiruan. Sebagai bahan basis prothesa, penggunaan resin akrilik terutama resin heat cured adalah yang paling sering digunakan selain bernilai estetis, juga lebih ekonomis. Pada prothesa yang ideal memerlukan suatu basis yang kuat, Syarat- syarat basis protesa tidak semuanya dapat dipenuhi oleh basis resin akrilik. Sifat-sifat fisik resin akrilik mempunyai pengaruh terhadap basis protesa. Untuk menghindari k...

  7. Effects of Different Surface Treatment Methods and MDP Monomer on Resin Cementation of Zirconia Ceramics an In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akçaboy, Cihan

    2015-01-01

    Resin cements are generally preferred for cementation of zirconia ceramics. Resin bonding of zirconia ceramics cannot be done with the same methods of traditional ceramics because zirconia is a silica-free material. In recent years, many methods have been reported in the literature to provide the resin bonding of zirconia ceramics. The purpose of this in vitro study is to evaluate effects of different surface treatments and 10-metacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) monomer on shear bond strength between zirconia and resin cement. 120 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: sandblasting, group II: sandblasting + tribochemical silica coating + silane, group III: sandblasting + Nd:YAG (neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser. One specimen from each group was evaluated under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Specimens in each group were bonded either with conventional resin cement Variolink II or with a MDP containing resin cement Panavia F2.0. Subgroups of bonded specimens were stored in distilled water (37°C) for 24 hours or 14 days. Following water storage shear bond strength test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min in a universal test machine. Then statistical analyses were performed. Highest shear bond strength values were observed in group II. No significant difference between group I and III was found when Panavia F2.0 resin cement was used. When Variolink II resin cement was used group III showed significantly higher bond strength than group I. In group I, Panavia F2.0 resin cement showed statistically higher shear bond strength than Variolink II resin cement. In group II no significant difference was found between resin cements. No significant difference was found between specimens stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours and 14 days. In group I surface irregularities with sharp edges and grooves were observed. In group II less roughened surface was observed with silica particles. In group III surface microcracks

  8. Resin Flow Analysis in the Injection Cycle of a Resin Transfer Molded Radome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golestanian, Hossein; Poursina, Mehrdad

    2007-04-01

    Resin flow analysis in the injection cycle of an RTM process was investigated. Fiberglass and carbon fiber mats were used as reinforcements with EPON 826 epoxy resin. Numerical models were developed in ANSYS finite element software to simulate resin flow behavior into a mold of conical shape. Resin flow into the woven fiber mats is modeled as flow through porous media. The injection time for fiberglass/epoxy composite is found to be 4407 seconds. Required injection time for the carbon/epoxy composite is 27022 seconds. Higher injection time for carbon/epoxy part is due to lower permeability value of the carbon fibers compared to glass fiber mat.

  9. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  10. Nanosilica Modification of Elastomer-Modified VARTM Epoxy Resins for Improved Resin and Composite Toughness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robinette, Jason; Bujanda, Andres; DeSchepper, Daniel; Dibelka, Jessica; Costanzo, Philip; Jensen, Robert; McKnight, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Recent publications have reported a synergy between rubber and silica in modified epoxy resins that results in significantly improved fracture toughness without reductions in other material properties...

  11. [Effect of thermal cycling on surface microstructure of different light-curing composite resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Da; Liu, Kai-Lei; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Wei-Sheng; Liao, Chu-Hong; Jiang, Hong

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of thermal cycling on surface microstructure of different light-curing composite resins. A nanofilled composite (Z350) and 4 microhybrid composites (P60, Z250, Spectrum, and AP-X) were fabricated from lateral to center to form cubic specimens. The lateral surfaces were abrased and polished before water storage and 40 000 thermal cycles (5/55 degrees celsius;). The mean surface roughness (Ra) were measured and compared before and after thermal cycling, and the changes of microstructure were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Significant decreases of Ra were observed in the composites, especially in Spectrum (from 0.164±0.024 µm to 0.140±0.017 µm, Presins, and fissures occurred on Z350 following the thermal cycling. Water storage and thermal cycling may produce polishing effect on composite resins and cause fissures on nanofilled composite resins.

  12. Nanostructured composites based on carbon nanotubes and epoxy resin for use as radar absorbing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Valdirene Aparecida [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Folgueras, Luiza de Castro; Candido, Geraldo Mauricio; Paula, Adriano Luiz de; Rezende, Mirabel Cerqueira, E-mail: mirabelmcr@iae.cta.br [Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Materiais; Costa, Michelle Leali [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (DMT/UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Materiais e Tecnologia

    2013-07-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multifunctional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. The combination of epoxy resin with multi walled carbon nanotubes results in a new functional material with enhanced electromagnetic properties. The objective of this work was the processing of radar absorbing materials based on formulations containing different quantities of carbon nanotubes in an epoxy resin matrix. To reach this objective the adequate concentration of CNTs in the resin matrix was determined. The processed structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, rheology, thermal and reflectivity in the frequency range of 8.2 to 12.4 GHz analyses. The microwave attenuation was up to 99.7%, using only 0.5% (w/w) of CNT, showing that these materials present advantages in performance associated with low additive concentrations (author)

  13. Relationship between ion transport and the failure behavior of epoxy resin coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Yuhua; Zhou, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •An epoxy resin-Q345 system with a sandwich structure was prepared. •Cl − ions permeated into epoxy resin coating prior to K + ions. •Free volume size and PAL increased when the coating was immersed into the solution. -- Abstract: An epoxy resin coating with a sandwich structure was prepared to investigate ion transport behavior in the coating. The macro- and micro- appearance of the coating immersed in 5 wt.% KCl solutions was observed by stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer. The electrochemical property of the coating was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and change of free volume after immersion was characterized by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. The results indicated that Cl − ions permeated into the coating prior to K + ions, the free volume size and positron annihilation lifetime of the coating increased during immersion

  14. Nanostructured composites based on carbon nanotubes and epoxy resin for use as radar absorbing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Valdirene Aparecida; Folgueras, Luiza de Castro; Candido, Geraldo Mauricio; Paula, Adriano Luiz de; Rezende, Mirabel Cerqueira; Costa, Michelle Leali

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multifunctional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. The combination of epoxy resin with multi walled carbon nanotubes results in a new functional material with enhanced electromagnetic properties. The objective of this work was the processing of radar absorbing materials based on formulations containing different quantities of carbon nanotubes in an epoxy resin matrix. To reach this objective the adequate concentration of CNTs in the resin matrix was determined. The processed structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, rheology, thermal and reflectivity in the frequency range of 8.2 to 12.4 GHz analyses. The microwave attenuation was up to 99.7%, using only 0.5% (w/w) of CNT, showing that these materials present advantages in performance associated with low additive concentrations (author)

  15. Potting procedure for electronic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, A. G.; Zimmerman, J.

    1977-01-01

    Potting process is modified to effect a match more closely between embedded electronic components, potting mediums, and thermal environment. Application of room-temperature vulcanizing silicone rubber band cured in modified thermal cycle minimizes coil-to-resin adhesion and thus lowers stresses between transformer and potting compound.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy of bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, Vincent; Niehof, Anneke; Tigchelaar-Gutter, Wikky; Beertsen, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes procedures to process mineralized tissues obtained from different sources for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Methods for fixation, resin embedding, staining of semi-thin sections and ultrathin sections are presented. In addition, attention will be paid to processing

  17. Effect of nano SiO{sub 2} particles on the morphology and mechanical properties of POSS nanocomposite dental resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yizhi; Sun, Yi, E-mail: sunyi@hit.edu.cn; Zeng, Fanlin [Harbin Institute of Technology, Department of Astronautic Science and Mechanics (China); Xie, Weili, E-mail: xwl811@126.com [Harbin Medical University, Department of Stomatology (China); Liu, Yang [Harbin Stomatology Hospital (China); Geng, Lin [Harbin Institute of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2014-12-15

    Nanocomposite dental resins composed of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocomposite matrix and 0, 0.5,1, 1.5 and 2 wt% nano SiO{sub 2} as filler were prepared by light curing method. The nanocomposite resins were characterized by performing compressive, three-point flexure, nanoindentation and nanoscratch testings as well as optical microscopy and scanning electron microscope analysis. The effects of different nano SiO{sub 2} contents were studied on compressive strength, flexural strength, hardness and resistance of composite resin. From the mechanical results, it was found that nano SiO{sub 2} effectively enhanced the mechanical properties of the composite resins at low content. With the increase of the nano SiO{sub 2} content, the mechanical properties decreased. It was attributed to the content of nano SiO{sub 2} and dispersion of nanoparticles in matrix.

  18. Effect of organoclay incorporation on dental resin morphology;Efeito da incorporacao de argila oganofilica na morfologia de resina adontologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Nadja M.S.; Reis, Romulo P.B. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Leite, Itamara F. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia de Materiais; Morais, Crislene R.S.; Silva, Suedina M.L., E-mail: suedina@dema.ufcg.edu.b [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the present work was to incorporate nanosilicates in commercial dental resins in order to prepare dental nanocomposites competitive as commercial nanoparticulates dental resins. Thus, a silicate, Cloisite 20A (C20A), was incorporated in a microhybrid dental resin (Z100) and morphological properties of the nanocomposites evaluated as a function of the incorporation method and the amount of filler employed. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD results evidence that nanocomposites have been obtained and according to SEM results, the morphology of microhybrid resin was modified when C20A nanoparticulate was incorporated improve the size distribution and reduce the agglomeration of the particles. (author)

  19. Morphological, Mechanical and Physio-chemical Performance of ortho-Cresol Epoxy Novolac Based Vinyl Ester Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaswal Shipra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vinyl ester resin (VEOCN was prepared from o-cresol epoxy resin (EOCN and methacrylic acid in the presence of triphenyl phosphine as catalyst and hydroquinone as inhibitor with acid value of ~ 7 mg of KOH per gram of solid. O-cresol based novolac resin (OCN, OCN based epoxy resin (EOCN and VEOCN were characterized by Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FT-IR, 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR. The thermal and mechanical behavior of the samples prepared at 30°C from VEOCN using styrene and methyl-methacrylate respectively as reactive diluents, in the presence of benzoyl peroxide (2 phr as initiator was studied using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and Universal Testing Machine (UTM. Chemical resistance of above VER samples was also evaluated as a function of % weight loss and with the help of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, upon immersing the VEOCN samples in different solutions for 90 days.

  20. Curing of epoxy resins with 1-DI(2-chloroethoxyphosphinyl) methyl-2,4 and -2,6-diaminobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikroyannidis, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Fire resistant compositions were prepared using 1-di(2-chloroethoxy-phosphinyl)methyl-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzene (DCEPD) as a curing agent for typical epoxy resins such as EPON 828 (Shell), XD 7342 (Dow), and My 720 (Ciba Geigy). In addition, compositions of these three epoxy resins with common curing agents such as m-phenylenediamine (MPD) or 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulphone (DDS) were studied to compare their reactions with those of DCEPD. The reactivity of the three curing agents toward the epoxy resins, measured by differential calorimetry (DSC), was of the order MPD DCEPD DDS. The relatively lower reactivity of DCEPD toward epoxy resins was attributed to electronic effects.

  1. Comparison of the Effect of Addition of Cyanoacrylate, Epoxy Resin, and Gum Arabic on Surface Hardness of Die Stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Arvind; Gupta, Ashutosh; Bagchi, Soumyojeet; Mishra, Lallan; Gautam, Abhina; Madhok, Riti

    2016-04-01

    To observe the effects of incorporating cyanoacrylate, epoxy resins, and gum arabic on the abrasion resistance of type IV gypsum die materials. Forty specimens were prepared and divided into four groups (10 specimens in each group), namely group A (control), group B (die stone mixed with cyanoacrylate), group C (die stone mixed with epoxy resin), group D (die stone mixed with gum arabic). All the specimens were subjected to abrasion testing, wear volume analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. Abrasion testing showed maximum wear in the control group and minimum wear in the gum arabic group. Intergroup differences were statistically significant (p Epoxy resins are powerful adhesives, but they attain their full efficiency when cured with heat. Cyanoacrylate and epoxy resin displayed poor physical bonding, primarily because of inhomogeneity. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. Curing of epoxy resins with 1-/di(2-chloroethoxyphosphinyl)methyl/-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikroyannidis, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Fire resistant compositions were prepared using 1-di(2-chloroethoxy-phosphinyl)methyl-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzene (DCEPD) as a curing agent for typical epoxy resins such as EPON 828 (Shell), XD 7342 (Dow), and My 720 (Ciba Geigy). In addition, compositions of these three epoxy resins with common curing agents such as m-phenylenediamine (MPD) or 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulphone (DDS) were studied to compare their reactions with those of DCEPD. The reactivity of the three curing agents toward the epoxy resins, measured by differential calorimetry (DSC), was of the order MPD DCEPD DDS. The relatively lower reactivity of DCEPD toward epoxy resins was attributed to electronic effects.

  3. Surface roughness and wear of resin cements after toothbrush abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Kiyoshi ISHIKIRIAMA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased surface roughness and wear of resin cements may cause failure of indirect restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the surface roughness change and the vertical wear of four resin cements subjected to mechanical toothbrushing abrasion. Ten rectangular specimens (15 × 5 × 4 mm were fabricated according to manufacturer instructions for each group (n = 10: Nexus 3, Kerr (NX3; RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE (ARC; RelyX U100, 3M ESPE (U100; and Variolink II, Ivoclar/Vivadent (VL2. Initial roughness (Ra, µm was obtained through 5 readings with a roughness meter. Specimens were then subjected to toothbrushing abrasion (100,000 cycles, and further evaluation was conducted for final roughness. Vertical wear (µm was quantified by 3 readings of the real profile between control and brushed surfaces. Data were subjected to analysis of variance, followed by Tukey’s test (p < 0.05. The Pearson correlation test was performed between the surface roughness change and wear (p < 0.05. The mean values of initial/final roughness (Ra, µm/wear (µm were as follows: NX3 (0.078/0.127/23.175; ARC (0.086/0.246/20.263; U100 (0.296/0.589/16.952; and VL2 (0.313/0.512/22.876. Toothbrushing abrasion increased surface roughness and wear of all resin cements tested, although no correlation was found between those variables. Vertical wear was similar among groups; however, it was considered high and may lead to gap formation in indirect restorations.

  4. Synthesis of improved phenolic and polyester resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delano, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to provide improved char residues and moisture resistance over state of the art epoxy resin composite matrices. Cyanate, epoxy novolac and vinyl ester resins were investigated. Char promoter additives were found to increase the anaerobic char yield at 800 C of epoxy novolacs and vinyl esters. Moisture resistant cyanate and vinyl ester compositions were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. A cyanate composite matrix provided state of the art composite mechanical properties before and after humidity exposure and an anaerobic char yield of 46 percent at 800 C. The outstanding moisture resistance of the matrix was not completely realized in the composite. Vinyl ester resins showed promise as candidates for improved composite matrix systems.

  5. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/aim: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. Materials and methods: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age...... 52.4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments...... up to 4mm as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using...

  6. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Chlorotrifluoroethylene-1,1-difluoroethylene-tetrafluoroethylene co-polymer resins produced by copolymerization of..., Extrusion, and Coating Materials,” which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and...

  7. Liquid Resins With Low VOC Emissions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaScala, John J; Sands, James M; Palmese, Guiseppe R

    2004-01-01

    .... The polymer properties were similar to that of commercial resins, including Tg greater than 120 C, flex strength greater than 100 MPa, modulus of approximately 3 GPa, and fracture toughness greater than 200 J/m2...

  8. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... by osmotic pressure in monochlorobenzene; or (2) 1,1′-Sulfonylbis[4-chlorobenzene] polymer with 4,4... determined by osmotic pressure in dimethylformamide. (b) The basic polysulfone resins identified in paragraph...

  9. Preparation and properties studies of UV-curable silicone modified epoxy resin composite system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhouhui; Cui, Aiyong; Zhao, Peizhong; Wei, Huakai; Hu, Fangyou

    2018-01-01

    Modified epoxy suitable for ultraviolet (UV) curing is prepared by using organic silicon toughening. The curing kinetics of the composite are studied by dielectric analysis (DEA), and the two-phase compatibility of the composite is studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The tensile properties, heat resistance, and humidity resistance of the cured product are explored by changing the composition ratio of the silicone and the epoxy resin. SEM of silicone/epoxy resin shows that the degree of cross-linking of the composites decreases with an increase of silicone resin content. Differential thermal analysis indicates that the glass transition temperature and the thermal stability of the composites decrease gradually with an increase of silicone resin content. The thermal degradation rate in the high temperature region, however, first decreases and then increases. In general, after adding just 10%-15% of the silicone resin and exposing to light for 15 min, the composite can still achieve a better curing effect. Under such conditions, the heat resistance of the cured product decreases a little. The tensile strength is kept constant so that elongation at breakage is apparently improved. The change rate after immersion in distilled water at 60°C for seven days is small, which shows excellent humidity resistance.

  10. Surface modification of titanium hydride with epoxy resin via microwave-assisted ball milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning, Rong [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Chen, Ding, E-mail: ma97chen@hotmail.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang, Qianxia [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Bian, Zhibing; Dai, Haixiong; Zhang, Chi [Jiangsu Jinling Special Paint Co., Ltd., Yangzhou 225212 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • TiH{sub 2} was modified with epoxy resin by microwave-assisted ball milling. • The epoxy ring was opened under the coupling effect of microwave and ball milling. • Microwave-assisted ball milling improved the compatibility of TiH{sub 2} with epoxy. - Abstract: Surface modification of titanium hydride with epoxy resin was carried out via microwave-assisted ball milling and the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermo-gravimetry (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). A sedimentation test was performed to investigate the compatibility of the modified nano titanium hydride with the epoxy resin. The results show that the epoxy resin molecules were grafted on the surface of nano titanium hydride particles during the microwave-assisted ball milling process, which led to the improvement of compatibility between the nanoparticles and epoxy resin. According to the FT-IR, the grafting site was likely to be located around the epoxy group due to the fact that the epoxy ring was opened. However, compared with microwave-assisted ball milling, the conventional ball milling could not realize the surface modification, indicating that the coupling effect of mechanical force and microwave played a key role during the process.

  11. [Comparison of surface roughness of nanofilled and microhybrid composite resins after curing and polishing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Lv, Da; Liu, Kailei; Zhang, Weisheng; Yao, Yao; Liao, Chuhong

    2014-05-01

    To compare the surface roughness of nanofilled dental composite resin and microhybrid composite resins after curing and polishing. A nanofilled composite (Z350) and 4 microhybrid composites (P60, Z250, Spectrum, and AP-X) were fabricated from the lateral to the medial layers to prepare 8 mm×8 mm×5 mm cubical specimens. The 4 lateral surfaces of each specimens were polished with abrasive disks (Super-Snap). Profilometer was used to test the mean surface roughness (Ra) after polishing. P60 had the lowest Ra (0.125∓0.030 µm) followed by Z250 and Spectrum. The Ra of Z350 (0.205∓0.052 µm) was greater than that of the other 3 resins, and AP-X had the roughest surfaces. Under scanning electron microscope, the polished faces of P60 resin were characterized by minor, evenly distributed particles with fewer scratches; the polished faces of Z350 presented with scratches where defects of the filling material could be seen. The nanofilled composite Z350 has smooth surface after polishing by abrasive disks, but its smoothness remains inferior to that of other micro-hybrid composite resins.

  12. Rheological properties of flowable resin composites and pit and fissure sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beun, Sébastien; Bailly, Christian; Devaux, Jacques; Leloup, Gaëtane

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the viscoelastic properties of commercially available flowable resin composites and resin-based pit and fissure sealants. The weight percentage of filler particles and the morphology of the filler particles were also investigated. Eight flowable resin composites (Admira Flow, Filtek Flow, FlowLine, Grandio Flow, Point-4 Flowable, Revolution Formula 2, Tetric Flow and X-Flow) and four pit and fissure sealants (Clinpro, Delton FS+, Estiseal F and Guardian Seal) were tested. Rheological measurements were performed using a dynamic oscillation rheometer. The filler weight content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the morphology of the particles was investigated by scanning-electron microscopy (SEM). Flowable resin composites are non-Newtonian, shear-thinning materials. As the shear rate increased, the complex viscosity decreased drastically. They all showed elasticity even at the lowest frequencies. They also all showed thixotropy. Pit and fissure sealants are non-Newtonian, very low-viscosity fluids. No correlation was found between the rheological properties and the filler weight content or the particles' shape. Huge differences are observed in the viscosity and flow characteristics of flowable resin composites that can have a potential influence on their clinical behavior during handling and thus on their clinical indications. Pit and fissure sealants show very different rheological properties from one another.

  13. Multi-Response Optimization of Resin Finishing by Using a Taguchi-Based Grey Relational Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Md Nahid; Shafiq, Faizan; Sarwar, Zahid; Jilani, Muhammad Munib; Cai, Yingjie

    2018-03-15

    In this study, the influence and optimization of the factors of a non-formaldehyde resin finishing process on cotton fabric using a Taguchi-based grey relational analysis were experimentally investigated. An L 27 orthogonal array was selected for five parameters and three levels by applying Taguchi's design of experiments. The Taguchi technique was coupled with a grey relational analysis to obtain a grey relational grade for evaluating multiple responses, i.e., crease recovery angle (CRA), tearing strength (TE), and whiteness index (WI). The optimum parameters (values) for resin finishing were the resin concentration (80 g·L -1 ), the polyethylene softener (40 g·L -1 ), the catalyst (25 g·L -1 ), the curing temperature (140 °C), and the curing time (2 min). The goodness-of-fit of the data was validated by an analysis of variance (ANOVA). The optimized sample was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) to better understand the structural details of the resin finishing process. The results showed an improved thermal stability and confirmed the presence of well deposited of resin on the optimized fabric surface.

  14. Multi-Response Optimization of Resin Finishing by Using a Taguchi-Based Grey Relational Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Nahid Pervez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the influence and optimization of the factors of a non-formaldehyde resin finishing process on cotton fabric using a Taguchi-based grey relational analysis were experimentally investigated. An L27 orthogonal array was selected for five parameters and three levels by applying Taguchi’s design of experiments. The Taguchi technique was coupled with a grey relational analysis to obtain a grey relational grade for evaluating multiple responses, i.e., crease recovery angle (CRA, tearing strength (TE, and whiteness index (WI. The optimum parameters (values for resin finishing were the resin concentration (80 g·L−1, the polyethylene softener (40 g·L−1, the catalyst (25 g·L−1, the curing temperature (140 °C, and the curing time (2 min. The goodness-of-fit of the data was validated by an analysis of variance (ANOVA. The optimized sample was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and scanning electron microscope (SEM to better understand the structural details of the resin finishing process. The results showed an improved thermal stability and confirmed the presence of well deposited of resin on the optimized fabric surface.

  15. The effect of dentin-cleaning agents on resin cement bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraç, Duygu; Bulucu, Bilinc; Saraç, Y Sinasi; Kulunk, Safak

    2008-06-01

    Provisional cement remnants on dentin affect the bond strength of resin cements to dentin. The authors investigated the effects of dentin-cleaning agents and etching systems on the bond strength of adhesive resin cement. The authors removed the provisional cement from the dentin surfaces of the specimens and then cleaned the surfaces with the dentin-cleaning agents Sikko Tim (VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany), Cavity Cleanser (Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill.) or Consepsis Scrub (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah). They used adhesive resin cement after applying the different etching adhesive systems. Then they examined the dentin surfaces by using scanning electron microscopy. The authors analyzed data by means of a two-way analysis of variance with Tukey honestly significant difference tests (alpha= .05). They found that specimens cleaned with Sikko Tim and Consepsis Scrub had higher shear bond strength values than did those in the no-treatment control group or the group cleaned with Cavity Cleanser. The specimens treated with the total-etching adhesive system had higher shear bond strength than did those treated with the self-etching adhesive systems. Sikko Tim and Consepsis Scrub were effective in removing provisional cement. Adhesive resin cement showed higher bond strength when used in conjunction with the total-etching adhesive system. The use of an effective dentin cleaner before cementation with resin cement can increase bond strength.

  16. Anterior Cantilever Resin-Bonded Fixed Dental Prostheses: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourshed, Bilal; Samran, Abdulaziz; Alfagih, Amal; Samran, Ahalm; Abdulrab, Saleem; Kern, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    This review evaluated the survival rate of single retainer anterior resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs) to determine whether the choice of material affects their clinical outcome. An electronic search of the English peer-reviewed dental literature in PubMed was conducted to identify all publications reporting on cantilever RBFDPs until May 2016. Study information extraction and methodological quality assessments were accomplished by two reviewers independently. The searched keywords were as follows: "resin-bonded, single retainer, all-ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs), all-ceramic RBFDPs, cantilever resin, RBFDPs, cantilever resin-bonded bridge, two units cantilevered, two-unit cantilevered, metal-ceramic cantilever, and metal-ceramic." Furthermore, the ''Related Articles'' feature of PubMed was used to identify further references of interest within the primary search. The bibliographies of the obtained references were used to identify pertinent secondary references. Review articles were also used to identify relevant articles. After the application of exclusion criteria, the definitive list of articles was screened to extract the qualitative data, and the results were analyzed. Overall 2588 articles were dedicated at the first review phase; however, only 311 studies were left after the elimination of duplicates and unrelated studies. Seventeen studies passed the second review phase. Five studies were excluded because they were follow-up studies of the same study cohort. Twelve studies were finally selected. The use of cantilever RBFDPs showed promising results and high survival rates. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  17. Surface modification of titanium hydride with epoxy resin via microwave-assisted ball milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Rong; Chen, Ding; Zhang, Qianxia; Bian, Zhibing; Dai, Haixiong; Zhang, Chi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • TiH 2 was modified with epoxy resin by microwave-assisted ball milling. • The epoxy ring was opened under the coupling effect of microwave and ball milling. • Microwave-assisted ball milling improved the compatibility of TiH 2 with epoxy. - Abstract: Surface modification of titanium hydride with epoxy resin was carried out via microwave-assisted ball milling and the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermo-gravimetry (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). A sedimentation test was performed to investigate the compatibility of the modified nano titanium hydride with the epoxy resin. The results show that the epoxy resin molecules were grafted on the surface of nano titanium hydride particles during the microwave-assisted ball milling process, which led to the improvement of compatibility between the nanoparticles and epoxy resin. According to the FT-IR, the grafting site was likely to be located around the epoxy group due to the fact that the epoxy ring was opened. However, compared with microwave-assisted ball milling, the conventional ball milling could not realize the surface modification, indicating that the coupling effect of mechanical force and microwave played a key role during the process

  18. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Nagem Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (a or = 0.05 was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01 and Definite (1.89±0.01 shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06, Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03, and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02 presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation.

  19. Cycloaliphatic epoxide resins for cationic UV - cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschueren, K.; Balwant Kaur

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces the cyclo - aliphatic epoxide resins used for the various applications of radiation curing and their comparison with acrylate chemistry. Radiation curable coatings and inks are pre - dominantly based on acrylate chemistry but over the last few years, cationic chemistry has emerged successfully with the unique properties inherent with cyclo - aliphatic epoxide ring structures. Wide variety of cationic resins and diluents, the formulation techniques to achieve the desired properties greatly contributes to the advancement of UV - curing technology

  20. Two-body wear simulation influence on some direct and indirect dental resin biocomposites - A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracostea, Adriana; Morar, Nadina; Florea, Adrian; Soanca, Andrada; Badea, Mindra Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to qualitatively assess the outcomes of two in vitro aging methods, thermal-cycling and twobody wear simulation accomplished with a dual-axis chewing device, on the surface characteristics of eight direct and indirect dental resin biocomposites. Eighty mesial-occlusal-distal dental cavities were restored with four direct nanohybrid composite materials and with four nano- and micro-hybrid lab-fabricated resin composite inlays. After the restored teeth were subjected to thermal-cycling and wear simulation based on mechanical loading, the surface texture features of the restorations were separately analysed for each of the methods, on epoxy resin models using a digital camera, computer-aided-design system, optical stereo-microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. All the dental restorative resin based composites used in this investigation displayed different cyclic wear patterns after undergoing mechanical loading. After thermal-cycling, the group of resin composite inlays showed a better adaptation, a smoother and more polished occlusal surface compared with direct restorative materials. Only two of direct nanohybrid resin composites performed better after two aging methods. One nanohybrid and the other two microhybrid resin inlays did not perform as expected when they were subjected to simulated wear compared to the rest of test materials. The use of the two-body wear simulation method revealed important information about the behavior of the dental resin-based composites when multiple oral factors are involved in a lab-simulated condition. Furthermore, the macro- and micro-morphological analysis showed different abrasion patterns among the materials being tested according to the filler percentage and distribution of the particles within the resin matrix.

  1. Effect of organic solvents compared to sandblasting on the repair bond strength of nanohybrid and nanofilled composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, Rafael Torres; Vieira, Sergio; Freire, Andrea; Mazur, Rui Fernando; De Souza, Evelise Machado; Rached, Rodrigo Nunes

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the repair bond strength of nanohybrid (Empress Direct) and nanofilled (Filtek Z350 XT) composite resins. A total of 120 specimens of each material (7.5 x 4.5 x 3 mm) were prepared and polished with SiC paper. Half of the specimens were kept in water for seven days and the other half for six months; they were then divided into six groups according to the type of surface treatment: negative control (no treatment), Al2O3sandblasted, liquid acetone, acetone gel, liquid alcohol and alcohol gel. Following application of the silane coupling agent and the adhesive system, composite resin cylinders were fabricated on the specimens and light cured (20 seconds). The same composite resins were used for the repair. Additionally, ten intact specimens of each composite resin (without repair) were prepared (positive control). The specimens were then loaded to failure in the microshear mode. Three additional specimens were fabricated in each group, and the surface treatments were analyzed by atomic force microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The nanofilled composite resin showed higher cohesive strength and repair bond strength than the nanohybrid composite resin. The aging process affected the repair bond strength of the nanofilled composite resin. Al2O3sandblasting was more efficient for the nanofilled composite resin and promoted greater surface roughness in both materials. The solvents demonstrated higher efficacy for the nanohybrid composite resin. The strengths resulting from the solvents were material dependent, and Al2O3sandblasting resulted in superior repair bond strength in both materials.

  2. Synthesis of wrinkled mesoporous silica and its reinforcing effect for dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruili; Habib, Eric; Zhu, X X

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work is to explore the reinforcing effect of wrinkled mesoporous silica (WMS), which should allow micromechanical resin matrix/filler interlocking in dental resin composites, and to investigate the effect of silica morphology, loading, and compositions on their mechanical properties. WMS (average diameter of 496nm) was prepared through the self-assembly method and characterized by the use of the electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and the N 2 adsorption-desorption measurements. The mechanical properties of resin composites containing silanized WMS and nonporous smaller silica were evaluated with a universal mechanical testing machine. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy was used to study the fracture morphology of dental composites. Resin composites including silanized silica particles (average diameter of 507nm) served as the control group. Higher filler loading of silanized WMS substantially improved the mechanical properties of the neat resin matrix, over the composites loaded with regular silanized silica particles similar in size. The impregnation of smaller secondary silica particles with diameters of 90 and 190nm, denoted respectively as Si90 and Si190, increased the filler loading of the bimodal WMS filler (WMS-Si90 or WMS-Si190) to 60wt%, and the corresponding composites exhibited better mechanical properties than the control fillers made with regular silica particles. Among all composites, the optimal WMS-Si190- filled composite (mass ratio WMS:Si190=10:90, total filler loading 60wt%) exhibited the best mechanical performance including flexural strength, flexural modulus, compressive strength and Vickers microhardness. The incorporation of WMS and its mixed bimodal fillers with smaller silica particles led to the design and formulation of dental resin composites with superior mechanical properties. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cellulose whisker/epoxy resin nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liming; Weder, Christoph

    2010-04-01

    New nanocomposites composed of cellulose nanofibers or "whiskers" and an epoxy resin were prepared. Cellulose whiskers with aspect ratios of approximately 10 and approximately 84 were isolated from cotton and sea animals called tunicates, respectively. Suspensions of these whiskers in dimethylformamide were combined with an oligomeric difunctional diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A with an epoxide equivalent weight of 185-192 and a diethyl toluenediamine-based curing agent. Thin films were produced by casting these mixtures and subsequent curing. The whisker content was systematically varied between 4 and 24% v/v. Electron microscopy studies suggest that the whiskers are evenly dispersed within the epoxy matrix. Dynamic mechanical thermoanalysis revealed that the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the materials was not significantly influenced by the incorporation of the cellulose filler. Between room temperature and 150 degrees C, i.e., below T(g), the tensile storage moduli (E') of the nanocomposites increased modestly, for example from 1.6 GPa for the neat polymer to 4.9 and 3.6 GPa for nanocomposites comprising 16% v/v tunicate or cotton whiskers. The relative reinforcement was more significant at 185 degrees C (i.e., above T(g)), where E' was increased from approximately 16 MPa (neat polymer) to approximately 1.6 GPa (tunicate) or approximately 215 MPa (cotton). The mechanical properties of the new materials are well-described by the percolation model and are the result of the formation of a percolating whisker network in which stress transfer is facilitated by strong interactions between the whiskers.

  4. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scola, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

  5. Resin elasticity and the strengthening of all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, O; Marquis, P M; Fleming, G J P

    2007-06-01

    Resin luting of all-ceramic restorations results in increased performance; however, the strengthening mechanism and the role of the mechanical properties of the resin are not fully understood. The hypothesis tested is that ceramic strength enhancement is dependent on the elastic modulus of the resin. Three-point flexural moduli of a flowable, luting, and hybrid composite resin were characterized. Two hundred forty porcelain discs were air-abraded. One group acted as a control, and 3 additional groups were coated with 120 +/- 20 microm of each resin prior to bi-axial flexure testing. All resins significantly increased in mean strength, and the associated strength increase was related to the elastic modulus of the resin (R(2) = 0.9885), so the hypothesis was accepted. The combination of Poisson constraint and the creation of a resin-inter-penetrating layer sensitive to the elastic modulus of the resin may provide an explanation of the strengthening mechanism.

  6. Effect of resin coating on dentin bonding of resin cement in Class II cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shamim; Nikaido, Toru; Matin, Khairul; Ogata, Miwako; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2007-07-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of resin coating on the regional microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of a resin cement to the dentin walls of Class II cavities. Twenty mesio-occlusal cavities were prepared in human molars. In 10 cavities, a resin coating consisting of a self-etching primer bonding system, Clearfil SE Bond, and a low-viscosity microfilled resin, Protect Liner F, was applied. The other 10 teeth served as a non-coating group. After impression taking and temporization, they were kept in water for one day. Composite inlays were then cemented with a dual-cure resin cement, Panavia F 2.0, and stored in water for one day. Thereafter, MTBSs were measured. Two-way ANOVA (p=0.05) revealed that the MTBS of resin cement to dentin was influenced by resin coating, but not by regional difference. In conclusion, application of a resin coating to the dentin surface significantly improved the MTBS in indirect restorations.

  7. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Yoshio Furuse

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1 rinsing with water and drying; (G2 application of an adhesive system; (G3 rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4 rinsing and drying, etching, application of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin-resin interfaces with saliva significantly reduced shear strength, especially after prolonged storage (p<0.05. Similar values to the original bond strength were obtained after abrasion and application of adhesive (G3 or etching and application of silane and adhesive (G4. If contamination occurs, a surface treatment is required to guarantee an adequate interaction between the resin increments.

  8. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2007-01-01

    of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin...

  9. Studies on the Use of Gamma Radiation-Induced for Preparation of Some Modified Resins for the Separation of Some Metal Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo-Zahra, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    The work carried out in the present thesis is based on preparation, characterization and applications of some modified resins such as: poly(acrylamide)/poly(maleic acid) P(AAm)/P(MA) interpolymer complex (resin), poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid-amidoxime) P(AAm-AA-AO) resin and poly(hydroxamic acid) P(HA) resin. Poly(acrylamide)/poly(maleic acid) P(AAm)/P(MA) interpolymer complex (resin) was prepared by template polymerization of maleic acid (MA) monomer on poly(acrylamide) P(AAm) hydrogel as a template polymer in the presence of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (NMBA) as a crosslinker using gamma radiation-induced technique. Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid-amidoxime) P(AAm-AA-AO) resin was prepared by template polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) and acrylonitrile (AN) monomers on P(AAm) hydrogel as a template polymer in the presence of NMBA as a crosslinker using gamma radiation-induced technique. The conversion of nitrile group to amidoxime one was carried out by the treatment of the prepared resin with an alkaline solution of hydroxylamine. Poly(hydroxamic acid) P(HA) resin was prepared from the reaction of the corresponding water-soluble P(AAm) previously prepared by gamma radiation-induced with hydroxylamine hydrochloride in an alkaline medium. The functional groups on the prepared polymeric resins were confirmed by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements were performed to evaluate the properties of the prepared polymeric resins, free or complexed with metal ions such as Cu 2+ metal ions.

  10. Characteristics of diallyl phthalate resin as a fission track detector

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuruta, T

    1999-01-01

    Diallyl phthalate (DAP) resin plates were irradiated with fission fragments, and then etched in aqueous solution of KOH. Etched tracks were observed and counted by using an optical microscope. The detection efficiency of fission fragments was about 100% for both perpendicular and random incidence. DAP plates were insensitive to alpha particles and fast neutrons. These characteristics are suitable for detecting selected fission fragments, which coexist with alpha particles or fast neutrons. DAP plates are valuable for quantitative analysis of fissionable materials and neutron dosimetry. DAP and allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39) were formed into copolymers in various ratios. The copolymers showed intermediate characteristics between DAP and CR-39. The fabrication of the copolymers made it possible to control the discrimination level for detection of heavy charged particles.

  11. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    electron microscope (SEM) examination of the surface morphology in order to obtain SEM images of the failure patterns at 29--70x magnifications. Statistical analysis: Nested general linear and generalized linear model was created to look for statistical significance. Level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. No significant differences were found on the bond strength between the two types of resin cement systems (total etch and self-etch). Regarding the thermocycling effect, the bond strengths of the group of 40,000 cycles was significantly lower than the 20,000 cycle group. In addition, the bond strengths of the specimens collected from the coronal third of the root were significantly lower than the specimens from the apical third. A Fisher's Exact test was applied to evaluate the failure mode differences, and showed statistically significant differences between the groups. Conclusions . The bond strength to the root canal dentin did not vary with the type of resin cement systems (total-etch vs self-etch). The microtensile bond strength values of FRC posts were significantly affected by increasing the thermocycling, and were significantly different among the different longitudinal levels of the root canal.

  12. Bulk-filled posterior resin restorations based on stress-decreasing resin technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W.V.; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    This randomized study evaluated a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in posterior restorations and compared it intraindividually with a conventional 2-mm resin composite layering technique over a 6-yr follow-up period. Thirty-eight pairs of Class II restorations and 15 pairs of Class I...... restorations were placed in 38 adults. In all cavities a single-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V) was applied. In the first cavity of each pair, the flowable resin composite (SDR) was placed, in bulk increments of up to 4 mm. The occlusal part was completed with a layer of nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X...... mono). In the second cavity of each pair, the hybrid resin composite was placed in 2-mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified US Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then annually for a time period of 6 yr. After 6 yr, 72 Class II restorations and 26...

  13. A new technique for the synthesis of ammonium phosphomolybdate: precipitation in resin support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, H.T.

    1977-01-01

    A technique for synthesizing ammonium molybdophosphate, an inorganic ion exchanger which retains selectively cesium-137 from a mixture of fission products, employing a strong anionic resin, saturated with molybdate anions, is presented. This method enables the precipitation of ammonium molybdophosphate directly into the resinous structure by adding dihydrogen ammonium phosphate in 7,5M HNO 3 . The reactants maintened at 60 0 C for a period of four hours has been found to be the optimum condition for a maximum yield of this compound (anionic resin-ammonium molybdophosphate = R-AMP). The tests performed for characterizing this compound are: molybdenum-phosphorus ratio determination, electronic absorption spectra, infra-red absorption spectra, reflection microscopy observations, electron probe micro-analysis and X-ray powder patterns. The analysis confirmed the presence of the ammonium molybdophosphate in the resinous structure, permitting, thereby, its use as a cation exchanger. R-AMP showed a capacity of 0,48mE/g of dry material. The cesium retention studies were made using columns charged with R-AMP compound. The behavior of polivalent fission products was studied. The R-AMP column was applied to separate cesium from irradiated uranium solutions [pt

  14. Thermal rearrangement of novolak resins used in microlithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Ricky; Zampini, Anthony; Monaghan, Michael J.; O'Leary, Michael J.; Cardin, William J.; Eugster, Timothy J.

    1995-06-01

    Changes in phenolic-formaldehyde resin properties are described in terms of thermal exposure. At high temperature, resin molecular weight, dissolution properties and chemical composition change depending on the presence or absence of monomers. Without monomer in the resin melt at 220 degree(s)C, resin molecular weight increases with a corresponding decrease in dissolution rate. In the presence of monomer, molecular weight generally decreases. Dissolution rate may fluctuate depending on the monomer mixture. Three,five- Xylenol and 2,3,5-trimethylphenol co-monomers induced the most extreme changes in resin properties with thermal treatment. Resin degradation-recombination processes suggest a classical Friedel-Craft rearrangement mechanism.

  15. New bismaleimide matrix resins for graphite fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, M.-T. S.; Chen, T. S.; Parker, J. A.; Heimbuch, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Two new bismaleimide resins based on the N,N'-m-phenylene-bis(m-amino-benzamide) structure have been synthesized and characterized. The mixtures of the two resins gave better handling, processing, mechanical, and thermal properties in graphite composites than did the individual resins. The mechanical strength of the cured graphite composites prepared from the 1:1 copolymer of the two bismaleimide resins was excellent at both ambient and elevated temperatures. The physical and mechanical properties of the composites from the new bismaleimide matrix resin systems are compared with conventional composites based on epoxy and other bismaleimide systems. The copolymer system provides another method for improving bismaleimide resins.

  16. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The influences of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) on the cytotoxicity and mechanical properties of Poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based dental resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Ma, Sai; Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Yang, Yanwei; Li, Meng; Chen, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to investigate the influences of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) on cytotoxicity and mechanical properties of Poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) dental resins. Methods. Experimental PMMA resin was prepared by incorporating various concentrations of NAC (0, 0.15, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 wt.%). MTT assay was performed to investigate viability of human dental pulp cells after exposure to extract of PMMA resin with or without NAC. Cell adhesion on resin specimens was examined with scanning electron microscopy. Degree of conversion was studied with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Flexural strength, microhardness and surface roughness was evaluated using a universal testing machine, microhardness tester and optical profilometer, respectively. Results. Incorporation of NAC into PMMA resin significantly reduced its cytotoxicity and enhanced cell adhesion on its surface. NAC induced negative influences on the mechanical and physical properties of PMMA resin in a dose-dependent manner. The degree of conversion for all experimental PMMA resins reached as high as 72% after 24 h of polymerization. All the tested properties were maintained when the concentration of incorporated NAC was 0.15 wt.%. Conclusion. The addition of 0.15 wt.% NAC remarkably improved biocompatibility of PMMA resin without exerting significant negative influence on its mechanical and physical properties.

  18. Can CAD/CAM resin blocks be considered as substitute for conventional resins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Badra; Thieu, Minh Khai Le; Johnsen, Gaute Floer; Reseland, Janne Elin; Haugen, Håvard J

    2017-12-01

    Dentists are facing a myriad of new CAD/CAM product for dental filling therapies. Are the new materials any worthwhile using? Are they succeeding the standard filling materials? Here we compare for the first time the new resin-composite blocks (RCBs) with conventional materials (Filtek Z250 and Tetric EvoCeram). The material were tested for residual monomer elution by HPLC, thermogravimetric analysis (TG) was used to determine the percentage of fillers by weight, hardness was evaluated by Vickers method, morphology of fillers and distribution in the matrix were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), elemental analysis for elemental determination of the filler particles was performed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) cytotoxicity using human gingival fibroblasts and an epithelial cell line. The RBC outperformed conventional composite regarding mechanical characteristics (hardness) and monomer eluation, but showed some worrisome results regarding cytotoxicity. The cost benefit is not in favour of RBCs in comparison to conventional composites, as the cytotoxicity was found higher for RBCs. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Durability of resin-dentin bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shono, Y; Terashita, M; Shimada, J; Kozono, Y; Carvalho, R M; Russell, C M; Pashley, D H

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the durability of resin-dentin bonds could be evaluated more quickly if the bond specimen was divided into 1 x 1 x 8 mm beams incubated at 37 degrees C for a 90-day period. Extracted human third molars were prepared for bonding by removing the occlusal surface near the dento-enamel junction (superficial dentin group) or near the pulp (deep dentin group). The teeth were bonded either with MacBond, One Step or Clearfil Liner Bond 2, and then builtup to form a flat resin composite crown. After 24 hours in water, each buildup was vertically divided into slabs 1 mm thick, the top half of which was resin, with the bottom half as dentin. Each slab was then vertically sectioned at 1-mm increments to create 1 x 1 x 8-mm beams of resin-bonded dentin. They were incubated for 1 day or 90 days at 37 degrees C, followed by measurement of the tensile bond strengths. The results were analyzed by the Least-Squares Means method at the 95% confidence level. MacBond gave the highest (p durability of resin-dentin bonds.

  20. Processing of exhausted resins for Trino NPP,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuto, F.; Bitetti, G.; Maggini, F.; Scarsi, G.

    2009-01-01

    Decomposition of organic compounds contained in the spent ion exchange resins is considered effective in reducing the waste volume. A system using the wet-oxidation process has been studied for the treatment of the spent resins stored at Trino Nuclear Power Plant owned by SOGIN. Compared with various processes for treating sludge and resin, the wet-oxidation system is rather simple and the process conditions are mild. Not contaminated ion exchange resin samples similar to those ones used in Trino NPP were processed by wet-oxidation and appropriate decomposition of the organic compounds was verified. After decomposition the residue can be solidified with cement for final disposal. When compared with direct solidification without decomposition, the number of waste packages can be significantly reduced. Additional measures for conditioning secondary waste products have also been studied, and their applicability to the Trino Nuclear Power Plant was verified. Some of conditions studied were specific to the Trino Nuclear Power Plant, but it is expected that the system will provide an effective solution for resin treatment at other Italian NPPs. (authors)

  1. Ponderosa pine resin defenses and growth: metrics matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Sharon; Sala, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) cause widespread tree mortality in coniferous forests worldwide. Constitutive and induced host defenses are important factors in an individual tree's ability to survive an attack and in bottom-up regulation of bark beetle population dynamics, yet quantifying defense levels is often difficult. For example, in Pinus spp., resin flow is important for resistance to bark beetles but is extremely variable among individuals and within a season. While resin is produced and stored in resin ducts, the specific resin duct metrics that best correlate with resin flow remain unclear. The ability and timing of some pine species to produce induced resin is also not well understood. We investigated (i) the relationships between ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson & C. Lawson) resin flow and axial resin duct characteristics, tree growth and physiological variables, and (ii) if mechanical wounding induces ponderosa pine resin flow and resin ducts in the absence of bark beetles. Resin flow increased later in the growing season under moderate water stress and was highest in faster growing trees. The best predictors of resin flow were nonstandardized measures of resin ducts, resin duct size and total resin duct area, both of which increased with tree growth. However, while faster growing trees tended to produce more resin, models of resin flow using only tree growth were not statistically significant. Further, the standardized measures of resin ducts, density and duct area relative to xylem area, decreased with tree growth rate, indicating that slower growing trees invested more in resin duct defenses per unit area of radial growth, despite a tendency to produce less resin overall. We also found that mechanical wounding induced ponderosa pine defenses, but this response was slow. Resin flow increased after 28 days, and resin duct production did not increase until the following year. These slow induced responses may allow

  2. A program for quantitative electron probe microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trincavelli, J.; Castellano, G.

    1987-01-01

    A complete procedure for the intensity corrections in EPMA is described, avoiding the simplifications usually found in conventional programs. In addition to the different classical expressions, this program includes the latest models for the characteristic X-ray production distribution φ(ρz). Characteristic constants for the different chemical elements are stored in data files, allowing the evaluation using subroutines of the different mass absorption coefficients for the sample. (Author) [es

  3. Quantitative Electron Tomography for Nanostructured Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, H.

    2009-01-01

    The controlled assembly of materials on the nanoscale has been a major focus of research across many scientific disciplines. In the nanometer size range, materials characteristics can be tuned not only by composition but more importantly by size and shape of constituent phases, giving rise to

  4. In vitro study of Streptococcus mutans adhesion on composite resin coated with three surface sealants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Hye Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Although the coating of surface sealants to dental composite resin may potentially reduce bacterial adhesion, there seems to be little information regarding this issue. This preliminary in vitro study investigated the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans on the dental composite resins coated with three commercial surface sealants. Materials and Methods Composite resin (Filtek Z250 discs (8 mm in diameter, 1 mm in thickness were fabricated in a mold covered with a Mylar strip (control. In group PoGo, the surfaces were polished with PoGo. In groups PS, OG, and FP, the surfaces polished with PoGo were coated with the corresponding surface sealants (PermaSeal, PS; OptiGuard, OG; Fortify Plus, FP. The surfaces of the materials and S. mutans cells were characterized by various methods. S. mutans adhesion to the surfaces was quantitatively evaluated using flow cytometry (n = 9. Results Group OG achieved the lowest water contact angle among all groups tested (p 0.05 or significantly lower (group OG, p < 0.001 bacterial adhesion when compared with the control group. Conclusions The application of the surface sealants significantly reduced S. mutans adhesion to the composite resin polished with the PoGo.

  5. Curing depth of (polyacid-modified) composite resins determined by scraping and a penetrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koupis, Nikolaos S; Vercruysse, Chris W J; Marks, Luc A M; Martens, Luc C; Verbeeck, Ronald M H

    2004-12-01

    The present study aimed to compare the curing depth of polyacid-modified composite resins (PAM-C) and some representative composite resins as a function of shade and post-cure using a scraping method and a penetrometer. The curing depth of the PAM-C Hytac, F2000, Glasiosite, Dyract, Dyract AP, and Compoglass F and of the composite resins Durafill VS and Z100 were determined for shade A2 and A4 using a scraping method based on ISO 4049:2000 and a digital penetrometer. Samples were light-cured (800 mW/cm2 at 40 s) in bulk in split stainless steel molds. Immediately after light-curing or after a 24 h post-cure, the height of the cylinder of cured material was measured and taken as the curing depth. For both test methods, the curing depth was independent of post-cure (P > or = 0.05) but differed significantly among materials and shade (Ppenetrometer give comparable curing depths for PAM-C. The curing depth greatly varies among the materials and can be considerably smaller than that of a microfilled composite resin. Shade A2 results in significantly greater values for the curing depth compared to shade A4, the effect depending quantitatively on the formulation of the material.

  6. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milly, Hussam; Andiappan, Manoharan; Thompson, Ian; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  7. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milly, Hussam [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Andiappan, Manoharan [Unit of Dental Public Health, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Thompson, Ian [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Banerjee, Avijit, E-mail: avijit.banerjee@kcl.ac.uk [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Unit of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  8. Analytical methods for the measurement of polymerization kinetics and stresses of dental resin-based composites: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrsima Ghavami-Lahiji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resin-based composites are commonly used restorative materials in dentistry. Such tooth-colored restorations can adhere to the dental tissues. One drawback is that the polymerization shrinkage and induced stresses during the curing procedure is an inherent property of resin composite materials that might impair their performance. This review focuses on the significant developments of laboratory tools in the measurement of polymerization shrinkage and stresses of dental resin-based materials during polymerization. An electronic search of publications from January 1977 to July 2016 was made using ScienceDirect, PubMed, Medline, and Google Scholar databases. The search included only English-language articles. Only studies that performed laboratory methods to evaluate the amount of the polymerization shrinkage and/or stresses of dental resin-based materials during polymerization were selected. The results indicated that various techniques have been introduced with different mechanical/physical bases. Besides, there are factors that may contribute the differences between the various methods in measuring the amount of shrinkages and stresses of resin composites. The search for an ideal and standard apparatus for measuring shrinkage stress and volumetric polymerization shrinkage of resin-based materials in dentistry is still required. Researchers and clinicians must be aware of differences between analytical methods to make proper interpretation and indications of each technique relevant to a clinical situation.

  9. Biogenic glutamic acid-based resin: Its synthesis and application in the removal of cobalt(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamiu, Zakariyah A.; Saleh, Tawfik A.; Ali, Shaikh A., E-mail: shaikh@kfupm.edu.sa

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • A novel resin embedded with metal chelating glutamic acid was synthesized. • The biogenic amino acid residues imparted remarkable efficacy to remove Co(II). • The resin showed excellent ability to remove various metals from wastewater. - Abstract: Inexpensive biogenic glutamic acid has been utilized to synthesize a cross-linked dianionic polyelectrolyte (CDAP) containing metal chelating ligands. Cycloterpolymerization, using azoisobutyronitrile as an initiator, of N,N-diallylglutamic acid hydrochloride, sulfur dioxide and a cross-linker afforded a pH-responsive cross-linked polyzwitterionic acid (CPZA) which upon basification with NaOH was converted into CDAP. The new resin, characterized by a multitude of spectroscopic techniques as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analyses, was evaluated for the removal of Co(II) as a model case under different conditions. The adsorption capacity of 137 mg g{sup −1} does indeed make the resin as one of the most effective sorbents in recent times. The resin leverages its cheap natural source and ease of regeneration in combination with its high and fast uptake capacities to offer a great promise for wastewater treatment. The resin has demonstrated remarkable efficiency in removing toxic metal ions including arsenic from a wastewater sample.

  10. Biogenic glutamic acid-based resin: Its synthesis and application in the removal of cobalt(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamiu, Zakariyah A.; Saleh, Tawfik A.; Ali, Shaikh A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel resin embedded with metal chelating glutamic acid was synthesized. • The biogenic amino acid residues imparted remarkable efficacy to remove Co(II). • The resin showed excellent ability to remove various metals from wastewater. - Abstract: Inexpensive biogenic glutamic acid has been utilized to synthesize a cross-linked dianionic polyelectrolyte (CDAP) containing metal chelating ligands. Cycloterpolymerization, using azoisobutyronitrile as an initiator, of N,N-diallylglutamic acid hydrochloride, sulfur dioxide and a cross-linker afforded a pH-responsive cross-linked polyzwitterionic acid (CPZA) which upon basification with NaOH was converted into CDAP. The new resin, characterized by a multitude of spectroscopic techniques as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analyses, was evaluated for the removal of Co(II) as a model case under different conditions. The adsorption capacity of 137 mg g −1 does indeed make the resin as one of the most effective sorbents in recent times. The resin leverages its cheap natural source and ease of regeneration in combination with its high and fast uptake capacities to offer a great promise for wastewater treatment. The resin has demonstrated remarkable efficiency in removing toxic metal ions including arsenic from a wastewater sample.

  11. Effects of modeling liquid/resin and polishing on the color change of resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto SEDREZ-PORTO

    Full Text Available Abstract Modeling liquids/resins have been used to build up resin composite (RC restorations, although there is a lack of information regarding their effects on the color stability of the latter. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the presence of modeling liquid between layers of RC and the finishing/polishing state of the material on color change in specimens exposed to red wine staining over time. Specimens were prepared by placing four increments (±0.5 mm thick of RC (Filtek™ Z350 XT, 3M ESPE into molds; half of which were prepared by applying modeling liquid (Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose™ Adhesive, SBMP, 3M ESPE between the layers of RC, whereas the other half were prepared without SBMP (control. Light-activation was performed after application of the final RC layer using a light-emitting diode (Radii, SDI curing unit with an irradiance of 900 mW/cm2 for 20 s. Each group was divided according to the surface finishing protocol (n = 7: nothing (non-polished or polishing with Sof-Lex™/diamond paste (polished. Initial colors of the specimens were evaluated with a digital spectrophotometer and the CIEL*a*b* color system. The specimens were stored in wine (37°C for 12 months, and the color measurements were reassessed after 4, 6, and 12 months of storage. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis was performed at the end. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α = 5%. The presence of SBMP resulted in lower overall color change of the RC as compared with the control. The non-polished specimens exhibited a significantly higher color change than the polished specimens. SEM images corroborated the previous findings. In summary, the use of modeling liquid between layers of RC shows potential for application to reduce or delay the staining process of RC over time. Moreover, polishing is essential to provide increased color stability of the RC restoration.

  12. Cytocompatible antifungal acrylic resin containing silver nanoparticles for dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; Mendieta, Irasema; Nuñez-Anita, Rosa Elvira; Cajero-Juárez, Marcos; Castaño, Víctor M

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibition of Candida albicans on denture resins could play a significant role in preventing the development of denture stomatitis. The safety of a new dental material with antifungal properties was analyzed in this work. Methods Poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] discs and PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs were formulated, with the commercial acrylic resin, Nature-CrylTM, used as a control. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, dispersive Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The antifungal effect was assessed using a luminescent microbial cell viability assay. Biocompatibility tests were carried out using NIH-3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts and a Jurkat human lymphocyte cell line. Cells were cultured for 24 or 72 hours in the presence or absence of the polymer formulations and analyzed using three different tests, ie, cellular viability by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and cell proliferation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay BrdU, and genomic DNA damage (Comet assay). Finally, the samples were evaluated mechanically, and the polymer-bearing silver nanoparticles were analyzed microscopically to evaluate dispersion of the nanoparticles. Results The results show that PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs significantly reduce adherence of C. albicans and do not affect metabolism or proliferation. They also appear not to cause genotoxic damage to cells. Conclusion The present work has developed a new biocompatible antifungal PMMA denture base material. PMID:22969297

  13. Cytocompatible antifungal acrylic resin containing silver nanoparticles for dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; Mendieta, Irasema; Nuñez-Anita, Rosa Elvira; Cajero-Juárez, Marcos; Castaño, Víctor M

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of Candida albicans on denture resins could play a significant role in preventing the development of denture stomatitis. The safety of a new dental material with antifungal properties was analyzed in this work. Poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] discs and PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs were formulated, with the commercial acrylic resin, Nature-Cryl™, used as a control. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, dispersive Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The antifungal effect was assessed using a luminescent microbial cell viability assay. Biocompatibility tests were carried out using NIH-3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts and a Jurkat human lymphocyte cell line. Cells were cultured for 24 or 72 hours in the presence or absence of the polymer formulations and analyzed using three different tests, ie, cellular viability by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and cell proliferation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay BrdU, and genomic DNA damage (Comet assay). Finally, the samples were evaluated mechanically, and the polymer-bearing silver nanoparticles were analyzed microscopically to evaluate dispersion of the nanoparticles. The results show that PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs significantly reduce adherence of C. albicans and do not affect metabolism or proliferation. They also appear not to cause genotoxic damage to cells. The present work has developed a new biocompatible antifungal PMMA denture base material.

  14. Effect of disinfectant solutions on a denture base acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cristiane F; Vanderlei, Aleska D; Marocho, Susana M Salazar; Pereira, Sarina M B; Nogueira, Lafayette; Paes-Júnior, Tarcisio J Arruda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hardness, roughness and mass loss of an acrylic denture base resin after in vitro exposure to four disinfectant solutions. Forty specimens (Clássico, Brazil) were prepared and randomly assigned to 4 groups n = 10) according to the disinfectant solution: G1: control, stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C; G2: 1% sodium hypochlorite; G3: 2% glutaraldehyde; G4: 4% chlorhexidine. G2 to G4 were immersed for 60 minutes in the disinfectant solution. Measurements were carried out both before and after immersion in the solution. The surface was analyzed with a surface roughness tester (Surfcorder SE 1700 KOZAKALAB), a microdurometer FM-700 (Future Tech) and a scanning electron microscope (DSM 962-ZEISS). Loss of mass was determined with a digital weighing scale. After disinfection procedures, values were analyzed statistically. The acrylic denture base resin may be vulnerable to surface changes after in vitro immersion in the disinfectant solutions studied.

  15. Chemical speciation of individual airborne particles by the combined use of quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young-Chul; Ryu, JiYeon; Malek, Md Abdul; Jung, Hae-Jin; Ro, Chul-Un

    2010-10-01

    In our previous work, it was demonstrated that the combined use of attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FT-IR imaging and quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), named low-Z particle EPMA, had the potential for characterization of individual aerosol particles. Additionally, the speciation of individual mineral particles was performed on a single particle level by the combined use of the two techniques, demonstrating that simultaneous use of the two single particle analytical techniques is powerful for the detailed characterization of externally heterogeneous mineral particle samples and has great potential for characterization of atmospheric mineral dust aerosols. These single particle analytical techniques provide complementary information on the physicochemical characteristics of the same individual particles, such as low-Z particle EPMA on morphology and elemental concentrations and the ATR-FT-IR imaging on molecular species, crystal structures, functional groups, and physical states. In this work, this analytical methodology was applied to characterize an atmospheric aerosol sample collected in Incheon, Korea. Overall, 118 individual particles were observed to be primarily NaNO(3)-containing, Ca- and/or Mg-containing, silicate, and carbonaceous particles, although internal mixing states of the individual particles proved complicated. This work demonstrates that more detailed physiochemical properties of individual airborne particles can be obtained using this approach than when either the low-Z particle EPMA or ATR-FT-IR imaging technique is used alone.

  16. Modification of bifunctional epoxy resin using CO{sub 2} fixation process and nanoclay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoshkish, Morteza; Bouhendi, Hosein, E-mail: H.boohendi@ippi.ac.ir; Vafayan, Mehdi

    2014-10-15

    A bifunctional epoxy resin was modified by using a CO{sub 2} fixation solution process in the presence of tetra n-butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) as catalyst and the modified treated resin was treated by cloisite 30B as nano additive. The Unmodified epoxy resin (UME), CO{sub 2} fixated modified epoxy resin (CFME), and CFME/clay nano composite (CFMEN), were cured by diethylenetriamine (DETA). A cycloaliphatic compound as a reactive diluent was used to control the viscosity of high viscose CFME. The exfoliation of organoclay in UME and CFME was investigated by X-ray diffraction and activation energy was computed using the advanced integral isoconversional method. The activation energy dependency demonstrated that the mechanism of UME curing did not change in the presence of nanoclay. In contrast, the CO{sub 2} fixation results showed a significant change in the activation energy dependency. The Thermal stability parameters include the initial degradation temperature (IDT), the temperature at the maximum rate of weight loss (T{sub max}), and the decomposition activation energy (E{sub d}) were determined by thermal gravimetry analysis. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis measurements showed that the presence of organoclay in CFME increases the T{sub g} of nano composite in contrast to UME. The fracture roughness of UME, CFME and CFNE were determined by scanning electron microscope. The exfoliated UME/1%clay nanocomposite was confirmed by TEM image. - Highlights: • A new epoxy resin was synthesized using CO{sub 2} fixation reaction. • The synthesized epoxy resin was modified by an organo nano-clay. • CO{sub 2} fixation noticeably changed the curing mechanism. • CO{sub 2} fixation reaction consumes CO{sub 2} which is a harmful greenhouse gas.

  17. Preparation and characterization of ZnO-PMMA resin nanocomposites for denture bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cierech, Mariusz; Wojnarowicz, Jacek; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Bączkowski, Bohdan; Grudniak, Anna Maria; Wolska, Krystyna Izabela; Łojkowski, Witold; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to investigate the antifungal activity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) against Candida albicans. Some attempts have been made to find out the best way to introduce ZnONPs into polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin material and to determine some parameters of a newly formed composite. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were manufactured and their basic physical parameters were determined (average particle size, density, specific surface area). Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ZnONPs was determined for the Candida albicans standard strain. The average size of ZnO conglomerates in the monomer solution of PMMA resin was measured using a dynamic light scattering instrument. PMMA resin samples with incorporated ZnONPs were produced. The morphology of nanopowder and the newly formed composite was examined under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In addition, the roughness parameter of PMMA resin material was investigated before and after ZnONPs modification. Nanopowder with the average particle size of 30 nm, density of 5.24 g/cm3 and surface area of 39 m2/g was obtained. MIC was determined at the level of 0.75 mg/mL. The average size of ZnO conglomerates in the monomer solution of acrylic resin dropped by 11 times after ultrasound activation. SEM examination of a newly formed composite showed a successful introduction of ZnONPs confirmed by the energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. There were no statistically significant differences in the biomaterial roughness before and after the modification of ZnONPs. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were successfully incorporated into acrylic resin used for the production of denture bases. The presence of nanoparticles with sizes below 100 nm was confirmed. Nevertheless a newly created composite needs to be further investigated to improve its homogeneity, and to check its microbiological properties, strength and biocompatibility prior to its possible clinical use.

  18. Modification of bifunctional epoxy resin using CO2 fixation process and nanoclay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoshkish, Morteza; Bouhendi, Hosein; Vafayan, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    A bifunctional epoxy resin was modified by using a CO 2 fixation solution process in the presence of tetra n-butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) as catalyst and the modified treated resin was treated by cloisite 30B as nano additive. The Unmodified epoxy resin (UME), CO 2 fixated modified epoxy resin (CFME), and CFME/clay nano composite (CFMEN), were cured by diethylenetriamine (DETA). A cycloaliphatic compound as a reactive diluent was used to control the viscosity of high viscose CFME. The exfoliation of organoclay in UME and CFME was investigated by X-ray diffraction and activation energy was computed using the advanced integral isoconversional method. The activation energy dependency demonstrated that the mechanism of UME curing did not change in the presence of nanoclay. In contrast, the CO 2 fixation results showed a significant change in the activation energy dependency. The Thermal stability parameters include the initial degradation temperature (IDT), the temperature at the maximum rate of weight loss (T max ), and the decomposition activation energy (E d ) were determined by thermal gravimetry analysis. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis measurements showed that the presence of organoclay in CFME increases the T g of nano composite in contrast to UME. The fracture roughness of UME, CFME and CFNE were determined by scanning electron microscope. The exfoliated UME/1%clay nanocomposite was confirmed by TEM image. - Highlights: • A new epoxy resin was synthesized using CO 2 fixation reaction. • The synthesized epoxy resin was modified by an organo nano-clay. • CO 2 fixation noticeably changed the curing mechanism. • CO 2 fixation reaction consumes CO 2 which is a harmful greenhouse gas

  19. Microshear bond strength of composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates utilizing unfilled versus filled resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi-Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Najafi-Abrandabadi, Siamak; Ghasemi, Amir; Kotick, Philip G

    2014-11-01

    Failures such as marginal discoloration and composite chipping are still the problems of tooth-colored restorations on the substrate of enamel and porcelain, which some of these problems are consequently as a result of failures in the bonding layer. Using filled resin has been recently introduced to increase the bond strength of this layer. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength (μ-SBS) of composite resins to enamel incubated in periods of 24 h and 9 months and porcelain with unfilled resin and flowable composites (filled resin). In this in vitro study, two groups of 75 enamel samples with different storage times (24 h and 9 months) and a group of 75 porcelain samples were used. They were divided into 5 experimental groups of 15 samples in each. Composite cylinders in tygon tubes were bonded on the surface of acid-etched enamel and pretreated porcelain. Wave, Wave MV, Wave HV, Grandioflow and Margin Bond were used as bonding agents. The μ-SBS was measured at the speed of 1.0 mm/min. The bond strengths were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by Tukey test. P composites (filled resins) can be used instead of unfilled resins in bonding composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates.

  20. Comparative study of resin sealant and resin modified glass ionomer as pit and fissure sealant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Malek

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to compare the marginal integrity of resin modified glass ionomer cement with that of resin sealant, in vitro. Forty artificial pit and fissure cavities were prepared in occlusal surface of extracted premolar teeth by using ¼ round carbide bur. Cavities were condensed with artificial organic debris followed by cleaning with prophylaxis pumice brush and paste and then separated into two treatment groups. In Group A, 15 fissure cavities were sealed by resin sealant and in Group B, 15 fissure cavities were sealed by resin modified glass ionomer sealant. These specimens were subjected to thermo-cycling followed by dye penetration test. The remaining 5 cavities from each group were analyzed for debris score by the SEM. The results of the microleakage test showed that the efficacy of preventing microleakage of samples sealed by resin modified glass ionomer sealant was higher than the samples sealed by resin sealant. However, no significant differences were found. It can be concluded that use of resin modified glass ionomer sealant is a good alternative for sealing pits and fissures.

  1. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veridiana Resende NOVAIS

    Full Text Available Abstract Resin cements have led to great advances in dental ceramic restoration techniques because of their ability to bond to both dental structures and restorative materials. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Material and Methods Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer. The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst and light-activation mode (base paste only. For degree of conversion (DC (n=5, a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used for classifying the failure modes. Results Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. Conclusion The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick.

  2. Aging in CTBN modified epoxy resin stocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creed, K.E. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The cause of degradation in the glass transition temperature (T/sub G/) of a partially crystallized polymer was investigated. Sample epoxy resin filled capacitors were cured at 90 0 C for 24 hours, then stored at room atmospheric conditions. These showed typical degradation in T/sub G/ after storage for one month. One set of epoxy resin castings was stored at room atmosphere and another set was stored in a dry box at 0% relative humidity and 27 0 C. The samples at room atmospheric conditions showed typical degradation in T/sub G/, while the T/sub G/ for those stored in the dry box increased. Further tests were then made on epoxy resin castings at various curing temperatures and times at both room atmosphere and 0% humidity. Resulting data indicated that absorption of moisture during storage was the predominant cause of T/sub G/ degradation, with stress relaxation another, though smaller, contributing factor

  3. Resin injection in clays with high plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowamooz, Hossein

    2016-11-01

    Regarding the injection process of polyurethane resins in clays with high plasticity, this paper presents the experimental results of the pressuremeter and cone penetration tests before and after injection. A very important increase in pressure limit or in soil resistance can be observed for all the studied depths close to the injection points. An analytical analysis for cylindrical pore cavity expansion in cohesive frictional soils obeying the Mohr-Coulomb criterion was then used to reproduce the pressuremeter tests before and after injection. The model parameters were calibrated by maintaining constant the elasticity parameters as well as the friction angel before and after injection. A significant increase in cohesion was observed because of soil densification after resin expansion. The estimated undrained cohesions, derived from the parameters of the Mohr-Coulomb criterion, were also compared with the cone penetration tests. Globally, the model predictions show the efficiency of resin injection in clay soils with high plasticity.

  4. Restoration of traumatized teeth with resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2018-01-01

    For a long time, the primary choice for initial restoration of a crown-fractured front tooth has been resin composite material. The restoration can in most cases be performed immediately after injury if there is no sign of periodontal injury. The method’s adhesive character is conservative to tooth......-structure and with minimal risk of pulpal complication. In addition, it offers an aesthetic solution to the patient immediately after an injury, which may bring a little comfort in a sad situation. The resin composite build-up is often changed or repaired a couple of times, before the tooth is restored with a porcelain...... present an aesthetic problem due to exposure of un-aesthetic crown-margins. The invasive permanent crown restorations are therefore often not suc-cessful on a long-term scale. On the other hand, a conservative direct restoration of an extensively fractured incisor crown with resin composite may...

  5. Investigations of toughening mechanisms of epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, T.

    1986-01-01

    Composite material technology was applied to the solid rocket booster by the development of a carbon filament-epoxy resin case which yields a net increase of 4000 lbs. in payload in the shuttle. The question of reusability of the new composite tanks has not yet been answered and will depend on the toughness of the matrix resin. The present study was aimed at providing conditions whereby test specimens of the epoxy resin (EPON/85) and curing agents of systematically varied structures could be produced in a controlled manner. Three sets of conditions were found that might allow the isolation of the structural effects on toughness from the cure effects. The kinetic methods leading to the determination of these conditions are described.

  6. Effect of proximal box elevation with resin composite on marginal quality of resin composite inlays in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggendorf, Matthias J; Krämer, Norbert; Dippold, Christoph; Vosen, Vera E; Naumann, Michael; Jablonski-Momeni, Anahita; Frankenberger, Roland

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate marginal quality and resin-resin transition of lab made resin composite inlays in deep proximal cavities with and without 3 mm proximal box elevation (PBE) using resin composites before and after thermo-mechanical loading (TML). MOD cavities with one proximal box beneath the cementoenamel junction were prepared in 40 extracted human third molars. Proximal boxes ending in dentine were elevated 3 mm with different resin composites (G-Cem, Maxcem Elite as self-adhesive resin cements and Clearfil Majesty Posterior as restorative resin composite in one or three layers bonded with AdheSE), or left untreated. Clearfil Majesty Posterior inlays were luted with Syntac and Variolink II (n = 8). Marginal quality as well as the PBE-composite inlay interface was analyzed under an SEM using epoxy resin replicas before and after thermomechanical loading (100,000 × 50 N and 2500 thermocylces between +5 °C and +55 °C). Bonding resin composite inlays directly to dentine showed similar amounts of gap-free margins in dentine compared to PBE applied in three consecutive layers (p > 0.05). The groups with self-adhesive resin cements for PBE exhibited significantly more gaps in dentine (p < 0.05). With layered resin composite, PBE is effective in indirect resin composite bonding to deep proximal boxes. Self-adhesive resin cements are not suitable for this indication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 76 FR 8774 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade... polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury. On...

  8. Composite resin fillings and inlays: An 11-year evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, U.; Qvist, V.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical trial, composite resin, direct restorations, indirect restorations, long-term behaviour, posterior teeth......Clinical trial, composite resin, direct restorations, indirect restorations, long-term behaviour, posterior teeth...

  9. Development of 3-methoxy-4-benzyloxybenzyl alcohol (MBBA) resin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    step sequence under microwave irradiation involving the reaction of commercially available Merrifield resin with vanillin, followed by reduction with sodium borohydride. MBBA resin was treated with bromides in the presence of sodium hydride to ...

  10. Fluorinated Alkyl Ether Epoxy Resin Compositions and Applications Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Christopher J. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Gardner, John M. (Inventor); Palmieri, Frank M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Epoxy resin compositions prepared using amino terminated fluoro alkyl ethers. The epoxy resin compositions exhibit low surface adhesion properties making them useful as coatings, paints, moldings, adhesives, and fiber reinforced composites.

  11. The influence of resin flexural modulus on the magnitude of ceramic strengthening.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2012-07-01

    The aim was to determine the magnitude of ceramic resin-strengthening with resin-based materials with varying flexural moduli using a regression technique to assess the theoretical strengthening at a \\'zero\\' resin-coating thickness. The hypothesis tested was that experimentally, increasing resin flexural modulus results in increased resin-strengthening observed at a theoretical \\'zero\\' resin-coating thickness.

  12. Kinetics, thermodynamics and surface heterogeneity assessment of uranium(VI) adsorption onto cation exchange resin derived from a lignocellulosic residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anirudhan, T.S., E-mail: tsani@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum 695581 (India); Radhakrishnan, P.G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum 695581 (India)

    2009-02-15

    A new cation exchange resin (PGTFS-COOH) having a carboxylate functional group at the chain end was prepared by grafting poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate) onto tamarind fruit shell, TFS (a lignocellulosic residue) using potassium peroxydisulphate-sodium thiosulphate redox initiator, and in the presence of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as a crosslinking agent, followed by functionalisation. The adsorbent was characterized with the help of FTIR, XRD, scanning electron micrographs (SEM), and potentiometric titrations. The kinetic and isotherm data, obtained at optimum pH value 6.0 at different temperatures could be fitted with pseudo-second-order equation and Sips isotherm model, respectively. An increase in temperature induces positive effect on the adsorption process. The calculated activation energy of adsorption (E{sub a}, 18.67 kJ/mol) indicates that U(VI) adsorption was largely due to diffusion-controlled process. The values of adsorption enthalpy, Gibbs free energy, and entropy were calculated using thermodynamic function relationships. The decrease in adsorption enthalpy with increasing U(VI) uploading on the adsorbent, reflects the surface energetic heterogeneity of the adsorbent. The isosteric heat of adsorption was quantitatively correlated with the fractional loading for the U(VI) ions adsorption onto PGTFS-COOH. The results showed that the PGTFS-COOH possessed heterogeneous surface with sorption sites having different activities.

  13. Kinetics, thermodynamics and surface heterogeneity assessment of uranium(VI) adsorption onto cation exchange resin derived from a lignocellulosic residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anirudhan, T. S.; Radhakrishnan, P. G.

    2009-02-01

    A new cation exchange resin (PGTFS-COOH) having a carboxylate functional group at the chain end was prepared by grafting poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate) onto tamarind fruit shell, TFS (a lignocellulosic residue) using potassium peroxydisulphate-sodium thiosulphate redox initiator, and in the presence of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as a crosslinking agent, followed by functionalisation. The adsorbent was characterized with the help of FTIR, XRD, scanning electron micrographs (SEM), and potentiometric titrations. The kinetic and isotherm data, obtained at optimum pH value 6.0 at different temperatures could be fitted with pseudo-second-order equation and Sips isotherm model, respectively. An increase in temperature induces positive effect on the adsorption process. The calculated activation energy of adsorption ( Ea, 18.67 kJ/mol) indicates that U(VI) adsorption was largely due to diffusion-controlled process. The values of adsorption enthalpy, Gibbs free energy, and entropy were calculated using thermodynamic function relationships. The decrease in adsorption enthalpy with increasing U(VI) uploading on the adsorbent, reflects the surface energetic heterogeneity of the adsorbent. The isosteric heat of adsorption was quantitatively correlated with the fractional loading for the U(VI) ions adsorption onto PGTFS-COOH. The results showed that the PGTFS-COOH possessed heterogeneous surface with sorption sites having different activities.

  14. Design of carbon nanofiber embedded conducting epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantayat, Subhra; Sarkar, Niladri; Rout, Dibyaranjan; Swain, Sarat K.

    2017-01-01

    Acid treated carbon nanofiber (t-CNF) reinforced epoxy nanocomposites were fabricated by hand lay-up method with various wt % of t-CNF loadings. Pristine or unmodified carbon nano fibers (u-CNFs) were made compatible with epoxy matrix by means of mixed acid treatment. Fabricated nanocomposites were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Mechanical and thermal properties of the nanocomposites were measured as a function of t-CNF content. Effect of acid treated CNFs on to the mechanical properties of epoxy nanocomposites was justified by comparing the mechanical properties of epoxy/t-CNF and epoxy/u-CNF nanocomposites with same loading level. The electrical conductivity was achieved by epoxy resin with a threshold at 1 wt % of t-CNF. Substantial improvement in thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of the synthesized epoxy/t-CNF nanocomposites may be suitable for fabricating electronic devices. - Highlights: • Epoxy/t-CNF nanocomposites are characterized by XRD, FTIR, SEM, AFM and TEM. • Electrical conductivity was achieved by epoxy with a threshold at 1 wt% of t-CNF. • Tensile strength is enhanced by 40% due to dispersion of t-CNF. • Synthesized nanocomposites are suitable for fabricating electronic devises.

  15. Design of carbon nanofiber embedded conducting epoxy resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantayat, Subhra [Department of Chemistry, Veer Surendra Sai University of Technology, Burla, Sambalpur 768018, Odisha (India); School of Applied Sciences, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar 751024, Odisha (India); Sarkar, Niladri [Department of Chemistry, Veer Surendra Sai University of Technology, Burla, Sambalpur 768018, Odisha (India); Rout, Dibyaranjan [School of Applied Sciences, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar 751024, Odisha (India); Swain, Sarat K., E-mail: swainsk2@yahoo.co.in [Department of Chemistry, Veer Surendra Sai University of Technology, Burla, Sambalpur 768018, Odisha (India)

    2017-01-15

    Acid treated carbon nanofiber (t-CNF) reinforced epoxy nanocomposites were fabricated by hand lay-up method with various wt % of t-CNF loadings. Pristine or unmodified carbon nano fibers (u-CNFs) were made compatible with epoxy matrix by means of mixed acid treatment. Fabricated nanocomposites were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Mechanical and thermal properties of the nanocomposites were measured as a function of t-CNF content. Effect of acid treated CNFs on to the mechanical properties of epoxy nanocomposites was justified by comparing the mechanical properties of epoxy/t-CNF and epoxy/u-CNF nanocomposites with same loading level. The electrical conductivity was achieved by epoxy resin with a threshold at 1 wt % of t-CNF. Substantial improvement in thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of the synthesized epoxy/t-CNF nanocomposites may be suitable for fabricating electronic devices. - Highlights: • Epoxy/t-CNF nanocomposites are characterized by XRD, FTIR, SEM, AFM and TEM. • Electrical conductivity was achieved by epoxy with a threshold at 1 wt% of t-CNF. • Tensile strength is enhanced by 40% due to dispersion of t-CNF. • Synthesized nanocomposites are suitable for fabricating electronic devises.

  16. The quantitative Morse theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Loi, Ta Le; Phien, Phan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we give a proof of the quantitative Morse theorem stated by {Y. Yomdin} in \\cite{Y1}. The proof is based on the quantitative Sard theorem, the quantitative inverse function theorem and the quantitative Morse lemma.

  17. Performances and improvement of copper-hydrazine complexation deoxidising resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fenfen; Zhang Hao; Sun Haijun; Liu Xiaojie

    2012-01-01

    Copper-hydrazine complexation deoxidising resin is tested to examine its performances including effluent water quality and capacity of deoxidisation. By the means of changing the resin type and regeneration, the deoxidising capacity of the resin can be improved to 13 times more than before. At the same time, physical performances of the resin are also greatly improved while maintaining its velocity of deoxidisation and effluent quality. (authors)

  18. Recovery of tretrachloroaurate through ion exchange with Dowex 11 resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alguacil, F.J.

    1998-01-01

    The recovery of the tretrachloroaurate complex by the anionic ion exchange resin Dowex 11 has been studied. The kinetics of gold adsorption were dependent of both gold and resin concentrations and temperature. The adsorption isotherm can be described by the expression Q=kC''n. The loaded resin could be eluted by an acidic thiourea solution at 20 degree centigree. After several adsorption-elution cycles there is not any apparent loss in the adsorption properties of the resin. (Author) 6 refs

  19. Interacting Blends of Novel Unsaturated Polyester Amide Resin with Styrene

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Hasmukh S.; Panchal, Kumar K.

    2004-01-01

    Novel unsaturated poly (ester-amide) resins (UPEAs) were prepared by the reaction between an epoxy resin, namely diglycidyl ether of bisphenol–A (DGEBA) and unsaturated aliphatic bisamic acids using a base catalyst. These UPEAs were then blended with a vinyl monomer namely, Styrene (STY.) to produce a homogeneous resin syrup. The curing of these UPEAs-STY. resin blends was carried out by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as a catalyst and was monitored by using a differential scanning calorimeter ...

  20. Gamma-irradiation on cured glycidyl amino-epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ting; Wei, Chengsha; Liu, Hewen

    2010-01-01

    ITER is an international project to design and build an experimental fusion reactor based on the superconductive 'tokamak' concept. Amounts of epoxy resin are used in the superconductive tokamak device as impregnant resins, insulation breaks, etc. Resistance to ionizing radiation is a demanding performance of those epoxy resins. In this work, we study the effects of γ-irradiation on the mechanical properties and chemical structures of glycidyl amino-epoxy resins